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Sample records for radio satellite corporation

  1. MIDLAND RADIO CORPORATION SECURITY POLICY

    E-print Network

    MIDLAND RADIO CORPORATION SECURITY POLICY Syn-Tech III P25 Portable Radio (VHF and UHF) Syn-Tech III P25 Dash Mount Mobile Radio (VHF and UHF) Syn-Tech III P25 Trunk Mount Mobile Radio (VHF and UHF) Syn-Tech III Desk Top Radio (VHF and UHF) Revised: August 5, 2009 MIDLAND RADIO CORPORATION 5900

  2. The Aerospace Corporation 2009 Communication Satellite Systems

    E-print Network

    Low, Steven H.

    © The Aerospace Corporation 2009 Communication Satellite Systems Trends and Network Aspects Paul://www.aero.org/ Lee Center, Caltech 13 April 2009 #12;22 Communication Satellites · Brief History by Decade · Trends: ­ Communication Satellites, fifth edition, by D. Martin, P. Anderson, L. Bartamian, Aerospace / AIAA Press, 2006

  3. Satellite transmission serving radio and television

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, H.

    Satellite transmission links established as part of the Symphonie utilization program must meet certain specifications from the radio broadcaster's point of view. It is not sufficient that a transmission link exists, it also has to be readily available for reasons of expediency. In addition, a transmission link must provide the best possible signal quality. These requirements apply equally to radio and television. Intercontinental TV transmissions, for example, are only possible by satellite transmission. The transmission of radio programs to Kigali, Rwanda, radio transmitted reports from the Himalayas and TV equipments with the Ivory Coast, Iran, Egypt, China and Guadeloupe are some of the best examples of operatons of this kind within the Symphonie program.

  4. Cognitive Satellite Terrestrial Radios Sithamparanathan Kandeepan, Luca De Nardis, Maria-Gabriella Di Benedetto,

    E-print Network

    Di Benedetto, Maria-Gabriella

    Cognitive Satellite Terrestrial Radios § Sithamparanathan Kandeepan, Luca De Nardis, Maria the concept of cognitive satellite terrestrial radios (CSTR) for hybrid satellite-terrestrial systems (HSTS of the radio spectrum. The future satellite ground terminals therefore need to integrate and co

  5. Direct broadcast satellite-radio, receiver development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaisnys, A.; Bell, D.; Gevargiz, J.; Golshan, Nasser

    1993-01-01

    The status of the ongoing Direct Broadcast Satellite-Radio (DBS-R) Receiver Development Task being performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology (JPL) is reported. This work is sponsored by the Voice of America/U.S. Information Agency through an agreement with NASA. The objective of this task is to develop, build, test, and demonstrate a prototype receiver that is compatible with reception of digital audio programs broadcast via satellites. The receiver is being designed to operate under a range of reception conditions, including fixed, portable, and mobile, as well as over a sufficiently wide range of bit rates to accommodate broadcasting systems with different cost/audio quality objectives. While the requirements on the receiver are complex, the eventual goal of the design effort is to make the design compatible with low cost production as a consumer product. One solution may be a basic low cost core design suitable for a majority of reception conditions, with optional enhancements for reception in especially difficult environments. Some of the receiver design parameters were established through analysis, laboratory tests, and a prototype satellite experiment accomplished in late 1991. Many of the necessary design trades will be made during the current simulation effort, while a few of the key design options will be incorporated into the prototype for evaluation during the planned satellite field trials.

  6. Mobile radio group communications by satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Victor C. M.

    1993-05-01

    Mobile radio group communications enable a closed group of users to communicate among themselves using push-to-talk (PTT), half duplex transmissions, such that one's transmission is received by all. This paper presents new protocol designs which support group communications over mobile satellite systems. A new demand assignment multiple access (DAMA) protocol is necessitated by the inappropriateness of call-based channel assignments. Channels are assigned to individual user-groups engaged in active conversations. As members of a user-group contend for access to the assigned channel, access control by the usual manual methods is ineffective due to the very long round trip delay. A novel signaling protocol which automates access control is proposed. Carrier sensing, signal capture, and collision detection are employed to minimize access contentions. The throughput and holding time of the assigned channel are analyzed. Numerical results show that the access control protocol improves the capacity of the assigned channel by up to 65 percent.

  7. Radio occultation based on BeiDou satellite navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hu; Hu, Haiying; Shen, Xue-min; Gong, Wenbin; Zhang, Yonghe

    2014-11-01

    With the development of GNSS systems, it has become a tendency that radio occultation is used to sense the Earth's atmosphere. By this means, the moisture, temperature, pressure, and total electron content can be derived. Based on the sensing results, more complicated models for atmosphere might come into being. Meteorology well benefits from this technology. As scheduled, the BD satellite navigation system will have a worldwide coverage by the end of 2020. Radio occultation studies in China have been highlighted in the recent decade. More and more feasibilities reports have been published in either domestic or international journals. Herein, some scenarios are proposed to assess the coverage of radio occultation based on two different phases of BD satellite navigation system. Phase one for BD is composed of GEO,IGSO and several MEO satellites. Phase two for BD consists mostly of 24 MEO satellites, some GEO and IGSO satellites. The characteristics of radio occultation based on these two phases are presented respectively.

  8. Satellite emission radio interferometric earth surveying series - GPS geodetic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.

    1979-01-01

    A concept called SERIES (satellite emissions radio interferometric earth surveying) which makes use of GPS (global positioning system) radio transmissions without any satellite modifications, is described. Through the use of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) and its calibration methods, 0.5 to 3 cm three dimensional baseline accuracy can be achieved over distances of 2 to 200 km respectively, with only 2 hours of on-site data acquisition. Attention is given to such areas as: the radio flux equivalent of GPS transmissions, synthesized delay precision, transmission and frequency subsystem requirements, tropospheric and ionospheric errors. Applications covered include geodesy and seismic tectonics.

  9. Wave propagation and earth satellite radio emission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, K. C.; Liu, C. H.; Flaherty, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    Radio propagation studies of the ionosphere using satellite radio beacons are described. The ionosphere is known as a dispersive, inhomogeneous, irregular and sometimes even nonlinear medium. After traversing through the ionosphere the radio signal bears signatures of these characteristics. A study of these signatures will be helpful in two areas: (1) It will assist in learning the behavior of the medium, in this case the ionosphere. (2) It will provide information of the kind of signal characteristics and statistics to be expected for communication and navigational satellite systems that use the similar geometry.

  10. Direct broadcast satellite-radio, space-segment/receiver tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nasser

    1993-01-01

    The balance between receiver complexity and the required satellite equivalent isotropically radiated power (EIRP) for Direct Broadcast Satellite-Radio (DBS-R) service is addressed. In general the required receiver complexity and cost can be reduced at the expense of higher space-segment cost by allowing a higher satellite EIRP. The tradeoff outcome is sensitive to the total number of anticipated receivers in a given service area, the number of audio programs, and the required audio quality. An understanding of optimum choice of satellite EIRP for DBS-R under various service requirements is a critical issue at this time when International Radio Consultative Committee (CCIR) is soliciting input in preparation for the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) planning conference for the service.

  11. Direct broadcast satellite-radio, space-segment/receiver tradeoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golshan, Nasser

    The balance between receiver complexity and the required satellite equivalent isotropically radiated power (EIRP) for Direct Broadcast Satellite-Radio (DBS-R) service is addressed. In general the required receiver complexity and cost can be reduced at the expense of higher space-segment cost by allowing a higher satellite EIRP. The tradeoff outcome is sensitive to the total number of anticipated receivers in a given service area, the number of audio programs, and the required audio quality. An understanding of optimum choice of satellite EIRP for DBS-R under various service requirements is a critical issue at this time when International Radio Consultative Committee (CCIR) is soliciting input in preparation for the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) planning conference for the service.

  12. Fade durations in satellite-path mobile radio propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmier, Robert G.; Bostian, Charles W.

    1986-01-01

    Fades on satellite to land mobile radio links are caused by several factors, the most important of which are multipath propagation and vegetative shadowing. Designers of vehicular satellite communications systems require information about the statistics of fade durations in order to overcome or compensate for the fades. Except for a few limiting cases, only the mean fade duration can be determined analytically, and all other statistics must be obtained experimentally or via simulation. This report describes and presents results from a computer program developed at Virginia Tech to simulate satellite path propagation of a mobile station in a rural area. It generates rapidly-fading and slowly-fading signals by separate processes that yield correct cumulative signal distributions and then combines these to simulate the overall signal. This is then analyzed to yield the statistics of fade duration.

  13. Satellite observations of transient radio impulses from thunderstorms

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.E.; Kirkland, M.; Jacobson, A.; Massey, R.; Suszynsky, D.; Eack, K.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Smith, D.

    1999-06-01

    Transient radio emissions from thunderstorms detected by satellites were first reported in 1995. The nature and source of these emissions remained a mystery until the launch of the FORTE satellite in 1997. FORTE, with its more sophisticated triggering and larger memory capacity showed that these emissions were connected to major thunderstorm systems. The analysis reported here, connecting FORTE RF events with ground based lightning location data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), shows that localized regions within thunderstorms are responsible for the creation of the satellite detected rf signals. These regions are connected with the areas of strong radar returns from the NEXRAD Doppler radar system, indicating that they are from regions of intense convection. The authors will also show data from several storms detected in the extended Caribbean, in which the height profile of the source regions can be determined. Although as a single low earth orbit satellite FORTE cannot provide global coverage of thunderstorm/lightning events, follow-on satellite constellations should be able to provide detailed information on global lightning in near real-time.

  14. Satellites of radio AGN in SDSS: Insights into agn triggering and feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, Cameron; Salim, Samir E-mail: salims@indiana.edu

    2014-04-10

    We study the effects of radio jets on galaxies in their vicinity (satellites) and the role of satellites in triggering radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The study compares the aggregate properties of satellites of a sample of 7220 radio AGNs at z < 0.3 (identified by Best and Heckman from the SDSS and NVSS+FIRST surveys) to the satellites of a control sample of radio-quiet galaxies, which are matched in redshift, color, luminosity, and axis ratio, as well as by environment type: field galaxies, cluster members, and brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). Remarkably, we find that radio AGNs exhibit on average a 50% excess (17? significance) in the number of satellites within 100 kpc even though the cluster membership was controlled (e.g., radio BCGs have more satellites than radio-quiet BCGs, etc.). Satellite excess is not confirmed for high-excitation sources, which are only 2% of radio AGN. Extra satellites may be responsible for raising the probability for hot gas AGN accretion via tidal effects or may otherwise enhance the intensity or duration of the radio-emitting phase. Furthermore, we find that the incidence of radio AGNs among potential hosts (massive ellipticals) is similar for field galaxies and for non-BCG cluster members, suggesting that AGN fueling depends primarily on conditions in the host halo rather than the parent, cluster halo. Regarding feedback, we find that radio AGNs, either high or low excitation, have no detectable effect on star formation in their satellites, as neither induced star formation nor star formation quenching is present in more than ?1% of radio AGN.

  15. 47 CFR 25.214 - Technical requirements for space stations in the satellite digital audio radio service and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Technical requirements for space stations in the satellite digital...Technical requirements for space stations in the satellite digital...or more terrestrial or space radiocommunication...Commission for a radio station to use a radio...

  16. 47 CFR 25.214 - Technical requirements for space stations in the Satellite Digital Audio Radio Service and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Technical requirements for space stations in the Satellite Digital...Technical requirements for space stations in the Satellite Digital...or more terrestrial or space radiocommunication...Commission for a radio station to use a radio...

  17. 47 CFR 25.214 - Technical requirements for space stations in the satellite digital audio radio service and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Technical requirements for space stations in the satellite digital...Technical requirements for space stations in the satellite digital...or more terrestrial or space radiocommunication...Commission for a radio station to use a radio...

  18. 47 CFR 25.214 - Technical requirements for space stations in the Satellite Digital Audio Radio Service and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Technical requirements for space stations in the Satellite Digital Audio Radio Service and associated...Standards § 25.214 Technical requirements for space stations in the Satellite Digital Audio Radio Service and...

  19. 47 CFR 25.214 - Technical requirements for space stations in the satellite digital audio radio service and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Technical requirements for space stations in the satellite digital...Technical requirements for space stations in the satellite digital...or more terrestrial or space radiocommunication...Commission for a radio station to use a radio...

  20. Terrestrial Myriametric Radio Burst Observed by IMAGE and Geotail Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.; Hashimoto, KoZo; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Boardson, Scott A.; Garcia, Leonard N.; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Green, James L.; Reinisch, Bodo W.

    2013-01-01

    We report the simultaneous detection of a terrestrial myriametric radio burst (TMRB) by IMAGE and Geotail on 19 August 2001. The TMRB was confined in time (0830-1006 UT) and frequency (12-50kHz). Comparisons with all known nonthermal myriametric radiation components reveal that the TMRB might be a distinct radiation with a source that is unrelated to the previously known radiation. Considerations of beaming from spin-modulation analysis and observing satellite and source locations suggest that the TMRB may have a fan beamlike radiation pattern emitted by a discrete, dayside source located along the poleward edge of magnetospheric cusp field lines. TMRB responsiveness to IMF Bz and By orientations suggests that a possible source of the TMRB could be due to dayside magnetic reconnection instigated by northward interplanetary field condition.

  1. 78 FR 44029 - Establishment of Rules and Policies for the Digital Audio Radio Satellite Service in the 2310...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ...Rules and Policies for the Digital Audio Radio Satellite Service in the 2310-2360 MHz...collections for Satellite Digital Audio Radio Service (SDARS) terrestrial repeaters...Rules and Policies for the Digital Audio Radio Satellite Service in the 2310-2360...

  2. 76 FR 57923 - Establishment of Rules and Policies for the Satellite Digital Audio Radio Service in the 2310...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ...sections. See Satellite Digital Audio Radio Service (SDARS) Second...Title: Satellite Digital Audio Radio Service (SDARS). Form...and Policies for the Digital Audio Radio Satellite Service in the...are necessary to ensure a high quality service to the public,...

  3. Small Satellite Applications of Commercial off the Shelf Radio Frequency Integrated Circuits 

    E-print Network

    Graves, John

    2012-02-14

    -spacecraft platforms to expand civil and military mission possibilities. Per the definitions of Sweeting [1], micro-satellites and nano-satellites have masses less than 100 kg and 10 kg, respectively. A study by Futron Corporation [2] on behalf of AFRL in 2008...

  4. The Last Millimeter: Interfacing the New Public Radio Satellite System. Info. Packets No. 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pizzi, Skip

    Public radio is about to achieve a new technological level as the new Public Radio Satellite System (PRSS) is deployed. The network will dramatically improve the capacity and quality of its interconnection system, but proper interfacing at member stations will be required to realize the full benefits of the new system. The new system uses digital…

  5. 76 FR 591 - Determination of Rates and Terms for Preexisting Subscription and Satellite Digital Audio Radio...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ..., respectively. 72 FR 71795 (December 19, 2007), 73 FR 4080 (January 24, 2008). Section 804(b)(3)(B) of the... Royalty Board Determination of Rates and Terms for Preexisting Subscription and Satellite Digital Audio... subscription and satellite digital audio radio services for the digital performance of sound recordings and...

  6. The Federal Communications Commission and the Communications Satellite Corporation: A Question of Ownership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, William E.

    When NASA announced in 1960 that private enterprise would produce communication satellites, rather than the Federal government, several large corporations proposed a joint venture involving a group of international carriers and electronic manufacturers, while American Telephone and Telegraph requested sole ownership. At that time, the Federal…

  7. Study of mutual occultation phenomena of the Galilean satellites at radio wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluchino, S.; Salerno, E.; Pupillo, G.; Schillirò, F.; Kraus, A.; Mack, K.-H.

    2010-01-01

    We present preliminary results for our study of mutual phenomena of the Galilean satellites performed at radio wavelengths with the Medicina and Noto antennas of the Istituto di Radioastronomia - INAF, and with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope of the Max-Planck-Institute for Radioastronomy, Bonn. Measurements of the radio flux density variation during the mutual occultations of Io by Europa and Ganymede were carried out during the PHEMU09 campaign at 22 GHz and 43 GHz. Flux density variations observed at radio wavelengths are consistent with the typical optical patterns measured when partial occultations occur.

  8. Mobile radio alternative systems study satellite/terrestrial (hybrid) systems concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiesling, J. D.; Anderson, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The use of satellites for mobile radio service in non-urban areas of the United States in the years from 1985 to 2000 was investigated. Several satellite concepts are considered: a system with single-beam coverage of the fifty United States and Puerto Rico, and multi-beam satellites with greater capacity. All of the needed functions and services identified in the market study are provided by the satellite systems, including nationwide radio access to vehicles without knowledge of vehicle location wideband data transmission from remote sites, two way exchange of short data and control messages between vehicles and dispatch or control centers, and automatic vehicle location (surveillance). The costs of providing the services are within acceptable limits, and the desired returns to the system investors are attractive. The criteria by which the Federal Communication judges the competing demands for public radio spectrum are reviewed with comments on how the criteria might apply to the consideration of land mobile satellites. Institutional arrangements for operating a mobile satellite system are based on the present institutional arrangements in which the services are offered to the end users through wireline and radio common carriers, with direct access by large private and government users.

  9. Satellite-aided mobile radio concepts study: Concept definition of a satellite-aided mobile and personal radio communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    The satellite system requires the use of a large satellite antenna and spacecraft array power of about 12 kW or more depending on the operating frequency. Technology developments needed include large offset reflector multibeam antennas, satellite electrical power sybsystems providing greater than 12 kW of power, signal switching hardware, and linearized efficient solid state amplifiers for the satellite-aided mobile band. Presently there is no frequency assignment for this service, and it is recommended that an allocation be pursued. The satellite system appears to be within reasonable extrapolation of the state of the art. It is further recommended that the satellite-aided system spacecraft definition studies and supporting technology development be initiated.

  10. Radio detection of thunderstorm activity with an earth-orbiting satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Stone, R. G.; Caruso, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    A study was made to determine the feasibility of using artificial earth satellites to monitor thunderstorm activity. The nighttime noise-temperature measurements made with the earth-oriented vee antenna of the Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE 1) satellite in the frequency range 0.2-9.2 MHz were correlated with reported surface thunderstorm activity. Analysis shows that the minimum nighttime HF noise level (in the absence of surface thunderstorms) at an altitude of 5850 km over the United States is fixed by man-made noise. When thunderstorms are active below the satellite, the noise level is increased by about 6-12 dB. The highest level is associated with the most intense storms. It is concluded that thunderstorm regions can be detected by an orbiting satellite using HF radio techniques, but ionospheric effects must be taken into account.

  11. Prospects for Lunar Satellite Detection of Radio Pulses from Ultrahigh Energy Neutrinos Interacting with the Moon

    SciTech Connect

    Staal, O.; Bergman, J. E. S.; Thide, B.; Daldorff, L. K. S.; Ingelman, G.

    2007-02-16

    The Moon provides a huge effective detector volume for ultrahigh energy cosmic neutrinos, which generate coherent radio pulses in the lunar surface layer due to the Askaryan effect. In light of presently considered lunar missions, we propose radio measurements from a Moon-orbiting satellite. First systematic Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate the detectability of Askaryan pulses from neutrinos with energies above 10{sup 20} eV at the very low fluxes predicted in different scenarios.

  12. Workshop on Satellite Power Systems (SPS) effects on optical and radio astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, G.M.; Ekstrom, P.A.

    1980-04-01

    The impacts of the SPS on astronomy were concluded to be: increased sky brightness, reducing the effective aperture of terrestrial telescopes; microwave leakage radiation causing erroneous radioastronomical signals; direct overload of radioastronomical receivers at centimeter wavelengths; and unintentional radio emissions associated with massive amounts of microwave power or with the presence of large, warm structures in orbit causing the satellites to appear as individual stationary radio sources; finally, the fixed location of the geostationary satellite orbits would result in fixed regions of the sky being unusable for observations. (GHT)

  13. The radio astronomy explorer satellite, a low-frequency observatory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, R. R.; Alexander, J. K.; Stone, R. G.

    1971-01-01

    The RAE-1 is the first spacecraft designed exclusively for radio astronomical studies. It is a small, but relatively complex, observatory including two 229-meter antennas, several radiometer systems covering a frequency range of 0.2 to 9.2 MHz, and a variety of supporting experiments such as antenna impedance probes and TV cameras to monitor antenna shape. Since its launch in July, 1968, RAE-1 has sent back some 10 billion data bits per year on measurements of long-wavelength radio phenomena in the magnetosphere, the solar corona, and the Galaxy. In this paper we describe the design, calibration, and performance of the RAE-1 experiments in detail.

  14. 47 CFR 25.214 - Technical requirements for space stations in the satellite digital audio radio service and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the satellite digital audio radio service and associated terrestrial repeaters. 25.214 Section 25.214 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.214 Technical requirements for space stations in the satellite digital audio...

  15. 47 CFR 25.214 - Technical requirements for space stations in the Satellite Digital Audio Radio Service and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the Satellite Digital Audio Radio Service and associated terrestrial repeaters. 25.214 Section 25.214 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.214 Technical requirements for space stations in the Satellite Digital Audio...

  16. 47 CFR 25.144 - Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite digital audio radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite... (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Applications and Licenses Space Stations § 25.144 Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite digital audio radio service. (a)...

  17. 47 CFR 25.214 - Technical requirements for space stations in the satellite digital audio radio service and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the satellite digital audio radio service and associated terrestrial repeaters. 25.214 Section 25.214 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.214 Technical requirements for space stations in the satellite digital audio...

  18. 47 CFR 25.214 - Technical requirements for space stations in the Satellite Digital Audio Radio Service and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the Satellite Digital Audio Radio Service and associated terrestrial repeaters. 25.214 Section 25.214 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.214 Technical requirements for space stations in the Satellite Digital Audio...

  19. 47 CFR 25.144 - Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite digital audio radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite... (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Applications and Licenses Space Stations § 25.144 Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite digital audio radio service. (a)...

  20. 47 CFR 25.144 - Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite digital audio radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite... (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Applications and Licenses Space Stations § 25.144 Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite digital audio radio service. (a)...

  1. 47 CFR 25.144 - Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite digital audio radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite... (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Applications and Licenses Space Stations § 25.144 Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite digital audio radio service. (a)...

  2. 47 CFR 25.214 - Technical requirements for space stations in the satellite digital audio radio service and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the satellite digital audio radio service and associated terrestrial repeaters. 25.214 Section 25.214 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.214 Technical requirements for space stations in the satellite digital audio...

  3. 47 CFR 25.144 - Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite digital audio radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite... (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Applications and Licenses Space Stations § 25.144 Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite digital audio radio service. (a)...

  4. Direct broadcast satellite-radio: Portable and mobile reception trade-offs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nasser

    1991-01-01

    There has been considerable international effort in the areas of system studies, system development, and regulatory work for a Direct Broadcast Satellite Radio (DBS-R). An important milestone will be the 1992 World Radio Administrative Conference (WARC 1992) consideration of frequency allocation in the 500 - 3000 MHz range for such a service. There is an interagency agreement between Voice of America and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for a coordinated program in DBS-R. This program includes seven tasks: systems tradeoff studies, propagation measurements, satellite experiment and demonstration, receiver development, market studies, regulatory studies, and WARC preparations. The findings of ongoing work under the first task, systems tradeoff studies, are discussed. Topics covered include digital bit rate and audio quality, propagation considerations and link margin estimates for portable reception, link margin estimates for mobile reception, coverage, and satellite size and cost estimates for a regional DBS-R coverage example.

  5. Using a Satellite Swarm for building a Space-based Radio Telescope for Low Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentum, Mark; Boonstra, A. J.; Verhoeven, C. J. M.; van der Veen, A. J.; Gill, E. K. A.; Saks, N.; Falcke, H.; Klein-Wolt, M.; Rajan, R. T.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Arts, M.; van't Klooster, K.; Beliün, F.; Meijerink, A.; Monna, B.; Rotteveel, J.; Boer, M. A.; Bongers, E.; Boom, E.; van Tuijl, E.; van Staveren, A.

    In radio astronomy, as in astronomy in general, a wide range of frequencies is observed as each spectral band offers a unique window to study astrophysical phenomena. In the recent years, new observatories have been designed and built at the extreme limits of the radio spectrum. For the low frequencies several Earth-based radio telescopes are constructed at this moment. In the Netherlands, the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) is being constructed at this moment and will be operational later this year. LOFAR observes the sky between 30 and 240 MHz. Observing at even lower frequencies is very interesting, but, due to the influence of the Earth's ionosphere this is not possible from Earth. Thus, the only option to observe low frequencies is a telescope in space. In the past several studies have been conducted on a low-frequency space-based radio tele-scope. In the recent ESA project Distributed Aperture Array for Radio Astronomy in Space (DARIS), such a mission was studied in detail. The study focused on a moderate-size three-dimensional satellite constellation operating as a coherent large-aperture synthesis array. The DARIS project is presented in a separate conference contribution. In the DARIS project the focus was on technology available at this moment, with an outlook and technological development plan/roadmap to be exploited for the future. Using current-day technologies, a space-based low-frequency array would be bulky and, thus, costly. A logical next step would be to investigate possibilities to miniaturize the electronics and use very small satellites, perhaps even nano satellites with masses between 1-10 kg to build the radio tele-scope. The approach is to use a swarm of satellites to establish a virtual telescope to perform the astronomical task. This is investigated in the NWO/STW-funded OLFAR (Orbiting Low Frequency Array) project. The OLFAR radio telescope will be composed of an antenna array based on satellites deployed at a location where the Earth's interference is limited, and where the satellites can be maintained in a three-dimensional configuration with a maximum diameter of 100 km. A Moon orbit could be suitable option. Each individual satellite will consist of deployable antennas. The sky signals will be amplified using an integrated ultra-low power direct sampling receiver and digitizer. Using digital fil-tering, any subband within the LNA passband can be selected. The data will be distributed over the available nodes in space. On-board signal processing will filter the data, invoke RFI mitigation algorithms (if necessary), and finally, correlate the data in a phased array mode. If more satellites are available, they will automatically join the array. The final correlated or beam-formed data will be sent to Earth as part of the telemetry data using a radio link. As the satellites will be far away from Earth, communication to and from Earth will require diversity communication schemes, using all the individual satellites together. In this paper, the design parameters for the satellites and the swarm will be discussed and status of the OLFAR project will be reported. Details will be given about the system and the signals that are expected.

  6. Femto-Satellite system for radio-occultation study of the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savio Bradford, Brandon; Gutierrez Cabello, Jordi

    This research project proposes the use of (a swarm of) Femto-Satellites in the study of Ionospheric properties using \\underline{Radio-Occultation} techniques. It makes use of GPS signals, a computing system, tiny on-board components and a data transfer module. This project is being done as a cheaper and lightweight alternative proposal to the higher cost, already running COSMIC program and other programs which use larger satellites to perform Radio-Occultation study of the Ionosphere. Being that these femto-satellites are capable of acting as a constellation, they will be able to provide higher accuracy radio-occultation readings of the Ionosphere due to the close proximity between each satellite positioned in low earth orbit. Important parameters attempted for this system include a weight of 100 grams per satellite system and an innovative power source using solar sails. The sails also serve to provide an anti-debris system of redundancy to make sure these tiny satellites don't add to the already alarming amount of space debris, in the event of a malfunction. Ultimately, having a large amount of tiny satellites serving to study the ionosphere at closer proximities and obtain more accurate results will give the scientific community a better understanding of the constant changes in the space environment at a given altitude. This could help humanity combat adverse changes in climate, which heavily affects some regions of agriculture. This could also help advance the scientific campaign against global warming, by providing real-time readings from different regions of the ionosphere.

  7. Radio sky mapping from satellites at very low frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storey, L. R. O.

    1991-01-01

    Wave Distribution Function (WDF) analysis is a procedure for making sky maps of the sources of natural electromagnetic waves in space plasmas, given local measurements of some or all of the three magnetic and three electric field components. The work that still needs to be done on this subject includes solving basic methodological problems, translating the solution into efficient algorithms, and embodying the algorithms in computer software. One important scientific use of WDF analysis is to identify the mode of origin of plasmaspheric hiss. Some of the data from the Japanese satellite Akebono (EXOS D) are likely to be suitable for this purpose.

  8. The Influence of The Galilean Satellites on Radio Emissions From The Jovian System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Menietti, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    The Galilean satellites influence radio emissions from the Jovian system in a variety of ways. The best and most familiar example of these is the Io control of decametric radiation discovered in 1964 by Bigg. Voyager observations of broadband kilometric radiation revealed a low-latitude shadow zone cast by the Io torus at frequencies between a few tens of kHz and about 1 MHz. Voyager also discovered narrowband kilometric radio emissions emanating from the outer edge of the torus. In this paper we will discuss expansions in the suite of satellite influences based on new observations by Galileo. These include the discovery of Ganymede's magnetosphere and evidence of radio emissions generated via mode conversion from upper hybrid waves in the frequency range of about 20 - 100 kHz. There is evidence that Ganymede may control some of the hectometric or low-frequency decametric radio emissions based on occultation measurements and statistical studies of radio emission occurrence as a function of Ganymede phase. Direction-finding measurements in the vicinity of Io suggest that a portion of the hectometric emissions may be generated near the lo L-shell. A rotationally modulated attenuation band in the hectometric emission appears to be the result of scattering at or near the Io L-shell where the waves propagate nearly parallel to the magnetic field. There is even a tantalizing hint of a Europa connection to the source of narrowband kilometric radiation.

  9. The Case Against Satellites. The Network Project. Notebook Number Seven.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. Network Project.

    An analysis is presented of the dangers generated by the corporate ownership of a satellite communications technology powerful enough to centralize and control the flow of information. The first part of the report reprints the transcript of a radio documentary on satellite communications, one of a series of five MATRIX radio programs produced by…

  10. Measurement of the gravitational redshift effect with RadioAstron satellite

    E-print Network

    Birukov, A V; Litvinov, D A; Porayko, N K; Rudenko, V N

    2015-01-01

    RadioAstron satellite admits in principle a testing the gravitational redshift effect with an accuracy of better than $10^{-5}$. It would surpass the result of Gravity Probe A mission at least an order of magnitude. However, RadioAstron's communications and frequency transfer systems are not adapted for a direct application of the non relativistic Doppler and troposphere compensation scheme used in the Gravity Probe A experiment. This leads to degradation of the redshift test accuracy approximately to the level 0.01. We discuss the way to overcome this difficulty and present preliminary results based on data obtained during special observing sessions scheduled for testing the new techniques.

  11. Measurement of the gravitational redshift effect with RadioAstron satellite

    E-print Network

    A. V. Birukov; V. L. Kauts; D. A. Litvinov; N. K. Porayko; V. N. Rudenko

    2015-06-07

    RadioAstron satellite admits in principle a testing the gravitational redshift effect with an accuracy of better than $10^{-5}$. It would surpass the result of Gravity Probe A mission at least an order of magnitude. However, RadioAstron's communications and frequency transfer systems are not adapted for a direct application of the non relativistic Doppler and troposphere compensation scheme used in the Gravity Probe A experiment. This leads to degradation of the redshift test accuracy approximately to the level 0.01. We discuss the way to overcome this difficulty and present preliminary results based on data obtained during special observing sessions scheduled for testing the new techniques.

  12. Prospects for Lunar Satellite Detection of Radio Pulses from Ultrahigh Energy Neutrinos Interacting with the Moon

    E-print Network

    O. Stål; J. E. S. Bergman; B. Thidé; L. K. S. Daldorff; G. Ingelman

    2007-02-15

    The Moon provides a huge effective detector volume for ultrahigh energy cosmic neutrinos, which generate coherent radio pulses in the lunar surface layer due to the Askaryan effect. In light of presently considered lunar missions, we propose radio measurements from a Moon-orbiting satellite. First systematic Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate the detectability of Askaryan pulses from neutrinos with energies above 10^{20} eV, i.e. near and above the interesting GZK limit, at the very low fluxes predicted in different scenarios.

  13. Networked Operations of Hybrid Radio Optical Communications Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hylton, Alan; Raible, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the increasing communications needs of modern equipment in space, and to address the increasing number of objects in space, NASA is demonstrating the potential capability of optical communications for both deep space and near-Earth applications. The Integrated Radio Optical Communications (iROC) is a hybrid communications system that capitalizes on the best of both the optical and RF domains while using each technology to compensate for the other's shortcomings. Specifically, the data rates of the optical links can be higher than their RF counterparts, whereas the RF links have greater link availability. The focus of this paper is twofold: to consider the operations of one or more iROC nodes from a networking point of view, and to suggest specific areas of research to further the field. We consider the utility of Disruption Tolerant Networking (DTN) and the Virtual Mission Operation Center (VMOC) model.

  14. Broadcasting of radio programmes by satellite direct to portable/vehicle receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, J.; Fromm, H.-H.; Rosetti, C.

    1984-02-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of direct satellite broadcast of sound radio to portable receivers is evaluated, with a focus on coverage of rural areas in Africa. The need for improved coverage is indicated, and the cost of the terrestrial alternative (a network of solar-powered VHF/FM transmitters) is estimated as about one million dollars/year (spread over 10 yrs) for a country like kenya. The satellite system recommended uses the 0.5-2.0-GHz UHF band, a large satellite with a 10-m-diameter antenna and at least 100-W power (perhaps a multichannel satellite serving several countries or providing both direct-broadcast and trunk-communications functions), and portable or car receivers comprising a standard VHF/FM radio plus a UHF/VHF converter and a printed-Yagi or slot-dipole antenna. It is argued that the satellite system can be economically competitive with the terrestrial network and provide more reliable service. Allocation of orbital positions and frequencies for sond broadcasting is scheduled for consideration at the next WARC, ORB-85 in August 1985.

  15. Effect of the Es layer on the fading of satellite radio signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovezgel'Dyev, O. G.; Durdyev, R.; Karadzhaev, Iu.; Kulyev, A.

    The effect of the sporadic E layer over Ashkhabad on the polarization fading of radio signals from the Intercosmos-19 satellite at a frequency of 40 MHz is analyzed. This effect is manifested in the parameter Delta f b = f0Es - fbEs. The amplitude of fading-period fluctuations increases due to an increase in Delta f b, leading to additional maxima in the power spectra.

  16. Propagation measurements for satellite radio reception inside buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Wolfhard J.; Torrence, Geoffrey W.

    1993-01-01

    Swept CW signals (from 700 to 1800 MHz) were received inside six buildings of brick, corrugated sheet-metal, wood-frame, mobile-home, and reinforced concrete-wall construction. A transmitter antenna was mounted outdoors on top of an 18 m tower to simulate a satellite, and a linearly scanned directional receiver antenna was used to probe the spatial, spectral, and temporal variability of the signal indoors. Levels were found to have much structure in the spatial and frequency domain, but were relatively stable in time. Typically, people moving nearby produced variations of less than 0.5 dB, whereas a person blocking the transmission path produced fades of 6 to 10 dB. Severe losses (17.5 dB) were observed in the concrete-wall building, which also exhibited the longest multipath delays (over 100 ns). Losses inside a mobile home were even larger (over 20 dB) and were independent of antenna orientation. The power-frequency distortion increased with the logarithm of the bandwidth, but could be reduced by moving to a position of higher power. Only the losses showed a clear frequency dependence, but they could be mitigated by moving the antenna.

  17. Analysis of type 3 solar radio bursts observed at kilometric wavelengths from the OGO-5 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, H.

    1971-01-01

    Research was conducted to analyze the data on solar radio bursts obtained by the OGO-5 satellite. Since the wavelengths corresponding to the three lowest frequencies of observations exceeded one kilometer, the bursts detected in those channels were designated as kilometer-waves. The data search covered approximately 9200 hours between March 1968 and February 1970, and included the maximum of solar cycle No. 20. The study concentrated on 64 Type 3 solar radio events reaching frequencies equal or lower than 0.35 MHz. This selection criteria led to the choice of the most intense radio events. Measurements included: times of start, times of decay, and amplitudes of the 64 events. The consistency of the results, within the accuracy of the measurements, lends support to some of the assumptions made for the analysis, notably, the validity of the local plasma hypothesis, the constancy of the exciter particles velocity, and spiral shape of their trajectory.

  18. A software radio approach to global navigation satellite system receiver design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akos, Dennis Matthew

    1997-12-01

    The software radio has been described as the most significant evolution in receiver design since the development of the superheterodyne concept in 1918. The software radio design philosophy is to position an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) as close to the antenna as possible and then process the samples using a combination of software and a programmable microprocessor. There are a number of important advantages to be gained through full exploitation of the software radio concept. The most notable include: (1) The removal of analog signal processing components and their associated nonlinear, temperature-based, and age-based performance characteristics. (2) A single antenna/front-end configuration can be used to receive and demodulate a variety of radio frequency (RF) transmissions. (3) The software radio provides the ultimate simulation/testing environment. Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) are the latest and most complex radionavigation systems in widespread use. The United States' Global Positioning System (GPS) and, to a lesser extent, the Russian Global Orbiting Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS) are being targeted for use as next generation aviation navigation systems. As a result, it is critical that a GNSS achieve the reliability and integrity necessary for use within the aerospace system. The receiver design is a key element in achieving the high standards required. This work presents the complete development of a GNSS software radio. A GNSS receiver front end has been constructed, based on the software radio design goals, and has been evaluated against the traditional design. Trade-offs associated with each implementation are presented along with experimental results. Novel bandpass sampling front end designs have been proposed, implemented and tested for the processing of multiple GNSS transmissions. Finally, every aspect of GNSS signal processing has been implemented in software from the necessary spread spectrum acquisition algorithms to those required for a position solution. The GNSS software radio is the first of its kind and will thus bring all the assets associated with the concept into GNSS receiver research. Not only does the work describe the multiple benefits available through a GNSS software radio implementation, but it also establishes the feasibility of such through actual hardware design and experimental results.

  19. The Italian Radio Occultation experiment on-board the Indian OCEANSAT-2 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perona, G.; Rosa Team

    During the June 2007 the Indian satellite OCEANSAT-2 will be launched The Italian Space Agency ASI signed a Memorandum of Understandings with the Indian Space Research Organization ISRO in which it is agreed to put on-board the OCEANSAT-2 satellite the Italian GNSS receiver devoted to Radio Occultation ROSA - Radio Occultation Sounder of the Atmosphere In the framework of this mission this instrument can only be able to observe rising occultations the Radio Occultation antenna will be mounted on the aft-velocity direction collecting data both in Open-Loop and in Close-Loop modes These data will be downloaded to the Indian and the Italian receiving stations where they will be processed by the ROSA ground segment completely developed by Italian universities and research centres In particular this ground segment will be implemented at a first level in an integrated computing infrastructure installed in Matera and mirrored at Hyderbad in India and at a second level on a distributed software and hardware infrastructure This second infrastructure will perform the rapid and precise Orbit Determination and Prediction the bending and impact parameters profiles extraction the ionospheric correction and the stratospheric initialization the refractivity pressure temperature and humidity profile retrieval the value added services for meteorology climate and space weather applications by computing units of each research centre or university connected through a Web-based GRID computing infrastructure After a description of these two

  20. Rural land mobile radio market assessment and satellite and terrestrial system concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, S.; Provencher, C.

    1984-01-01

    The market for satellite-based mobile radio in the rural U.S. is evaluated, summarizing the results of two NASA-funded studies reported by Anderson et al. and Hornstein. The study aims are listed, and the results are presented in tables, graphs, and maps and discussed. Space systems are found to be competitive with land-based systems, providing superior service at lower subscriber charges, but having limited compatibility with urban cellular mobile-radio systems. Of the three system concepts evaluated from a technological standpoint (direct-to-mobile, mobile-translator, and hybrid), the mobile-translator concept is considered most cost effective, at least within the constraints assumed in the study.

  1. Adaptive sparse signal processing of satellite-based radio frequency (RF) recordings of lightning events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Daniela I.; Smith, David A.

    2014-05-01

    Ongoing research at Los Alamos National Laboratory studies the Earth's radio frequency (RF) background utilizing satellite-based RF observations of terrestrial lightning. Such impulsive events are dispersed through the ionosphere and appear as broadband nonlinear chirps at a receiver on-orbit. They occur in the presence of additive noise and structured clutter, making their classification challenging. The Fast On-orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite provided a rich RF lightning database. Application of modern pattern recognition techniques to this database may further lightning research in the scientific community, and potentially improve on-orbit processing and event discrimination capabilities for future satellite payloads. Conventional feature extraction techniques using analytical dictionaries, such as a short-time Fourier basis or wavelets, are not comprehensively suitable for analyzing the broadband RF pulses under consideration here. We explore an alternative approach based on non-analytical dictionaries learned directly from data, and extend two dictionary learning algorithms, K-SVD and Hebbian, for use with satellite RF data. Both algorithms allow us to learn features without relying on analytical constraints or additional knowledge about the expected signal characteristics. We then use a pursuit search over the learned dictionaries to generate sparse classification features, and discuss their performance in terms of event classification. We also use principal component analysis to analyze and compare the respective learned dictionary spaces to the real data space.

  2. Refractivity and temperature climate records from multiple radio occultation satellites consistent within 0.05%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foelsche, U.; Scherllin-Pirscher, B.; Ladstädter, F.; Steiner, A. K.; Kirchengast, G.

    2011-03-01

    Data consistency is an important prerequisite to build radio occultation (RO) climatologies based on a combined record of data from different satellites. The presence of multiple RO receiving satellites in orbit over the same time period allows for testing this consistency. We used RO data from CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload for geoscientific research), six FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites (Formosa Satellite Mission 3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate, F3C), and GRACE-A (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment). We show latitude-altitude-resolved results for an example month (October 2007) and the temporal evolution of differences in a climate record of global and monthly means from January 2007 to December 2009. Latitude- and altitude-resolved refractivity and dry temperature climatologies clearly show the influence of different sampling characteristics; monthly mean deviations from the multi-satellite mean over the altitude domain 10 km to 30 km typically reach 0.1% and 0.2 K, respectively. Nevertheless, the 3-year average deviations (shorter for CHAMP) are less than 0.03% and 0.05 K, respectively. We find no indications for instrument degradation, instationarities in the RO records, or temporal trends in sampling patterns. Based on analysis fields from ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts), we can estimate - and subtract - the sampling error from each monthly climatology. After such subtraction, refractivity deviations are found reduced to <0.05% in almost any month and dry temperature deviations to <0.05 K (<0.02% relative) for almost every satellite and month. 3-year average deviations are even reduced to <0.01% and <0.01 K (CHAMP: -0.05 K), respectively, establishing an amazing consistency of RO climatologies from different satellites. If applying the same processing scheme for all data, refractivity and dry temperature records from individual satellites with similar bending angle noise can be safely combined up to 30 km altitude (refractivity also up to 35 km) to a consistent single climate record of substantial value for climate monitoring in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere.

  3. Refractivity and temperature climate records from multiple radio occultation satellites consistent within 0.05%

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foelsche, U.; Scherllin-Pirscher, B.; Ladstädter, F.; Steiner, A. K.; Kirchengast, G.

    2011-09-01

    Data consistency is an important prerequisite to build radio occultation (RO) climatologies based on a combined record of data from different satellites. The presence of multiple RO receiving satellites in orbit over the same time period allows for testing this consistency. We used RO data from CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload for geoscientific research), six FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites (Formosa Satellite Mission 3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate, F3C), and GRACE-A (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment). We show latitude-altitude-resolved results for an example month (October 2007) and the temporal evolution of differences in a climate record of global and monthly means from January 2007 to December 2009. Latitude- and altitude-resolved refractivity and dry temperature climatologies clearly show the influence of different sampling characteristics; monthly mean deviations from the multi-satellite mean over the altitude domain 10 km to 30 km typically reach 0.1% and 0.2 K, respectively. Nevertheless, the 3-yr average deviations (shorter for CHAMP) are less than 0.03% and 0.05 K, respectively. We find no indications for instrument degradation, temporal inhomogeneities in the RO records, or temporal trends in sampling patterns. Based on analysis fields from ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts), we can estimate - and subtract - the sampling error from each monthly climatology. After such subtraction, refractivity deviations are found reduced to <0.05% in almost any month and dry temperature deviations to <0.05 K (<0.02% relative) for almost every satellite and month. 3-yr average deviations are even reduced to <0.01% and <0.01 K (CHAMP: -0.05 K), respectively, establishing an amazing consistency of RO climatologies from different satellites. If applying the same processing scheme for all data, refractivity and dry temperature records from individual satellites with similar bending angle noise can be safely combined up to 30 km altitude (refractivity also up to 35 km) to a consistent single climate record of substantial value for climate monitoring in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere.

  4. The evolution of satellite-monitored radio tags for large whales: One laboratory's experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mate, Bruce; Mesecar, Roderick; Lagerquist, Barbara

    2007-02-01

    Despite several centuries of whaling and directed research, there are only a few whale stocks whose year-round whereabouts are reasonably well known. For the vast majority of depleted populations, the link between seasonal feeding and breeding concentrations remains unknown. This lack of information on range, seasonal distribution, stock structure, and migration routes makes it difficult to design and implement effective conservation measures to promote recovery. The use of such information would have been valuable to develop stock-specific quotas for whaling, but now it may be even more important for recovery of depleted stocks and identifying anthropogenic threats throughout a depleted stock's range. Building upon the preliminary findings of Discovery tags and more recent photo identification studies, satellite-monitored radio tags are now providing range and seasonal distribution information for many stocks of depleted large whales. These parameters are important to better estimate population abundance, characterize habitats, identify threats to recovery, and design effective protection measures when needed. This paper traces one laboratory's experience with the development of satellite-monitored radio tag technology for large whales, including attachment mechanisms and delivery systems, in the hope that others will profit from our successes and our mistakes. Selected examples are used to demonstrate how such tags contribute to new insights about whales' habitats, migrations, behaviour, and management.

  5. Numerical arc segmentation algorithm for a radio conference: A software tool for communication satellite systems planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, W. A.; Heyward, A. O.; Ponchak, D. S.; Spence, R. L.; Zuzek, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    The Numerical Arc Segmentation Algorithm for a Radio Conference (NASARC) provides a method of generating predetermined arc segments for use in the development of an allotment planning procedure to be carried out at the 1988 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC) on the Use of the Geostationary Satellite Orbit and the Planning of Space Services Utilizing It. Through careful selection of the predetermined arc (PDA) for each administration, flexibility can be increased in terms of choice of system technical characteristics and specific orbit location while reducing the need for coordination among administrations. The NASARC software determines pairwise compatibility between all possible service areas at discrete arc locations. NASARC then exhaustively enumerates groups of administrations whose satellites can be closely located in orbit, and finds the arc segment over which each such compatible group exists. From the set of all possible compatible groupings, groups and their associated arc segments are selected using a heuristic procedure such that a PDA is identified for each administration. Various aspects of the NASARC concept and how the software accomplishes specific features of allotment planning are discussed.

  6. Voyager 2 radio science observations of the uranian system: atmosphere, rings, and satellites.

    PubMed

    Tyler, G L; Sweetnam, D N; Anderson, J D; Campbell, J K; Eshleman, V R; Hinson, D P; Levy, G S; Lindal, G F; Marouf, E A; Simpson, R A

    1986-07-01

    Voyager 2 radio occultation measurements of the Uranian atmosphere were obtained between 2 and 7 degrees south latitude. Initial atmospheric temperature profiles extend from pressures of 10 to 900 millibars over a height range of about 100 kilometers. Comparison of radio and infrared results yields mole fractions near the tropopause of 0.85 and 0.15 +/- 0.05 for molecular hydrogen and helium, respectively, if no other components are present; for this composition the tropopause is at about 52 kelvins and 110 millibars. Distinctive features in the signal intensity measurements for pressures above 900 millibars strongly favor model atmospheres that include a cloud deck of methane ice. Modeling of the intensity measurements for the cloud region and below indicates that the cloud base is near 1,300 millibars and 81 kelvins and yields an initial methane mole fraction of about 0.02 for the deep atmosphere. Scintillations in signal intensity indicate small-scale stucture throughout the stratosphere and upper troposphere. As judged from data obtained during occultation ingress, the ionosphere consists of a multilayer structure that includes two distinct layers at 2,000 and 3,500 kilometers above the 100-millibar level and an extended topside that may reach altitudes of 10,000 kilometers or more. Occultation measurements of the nine previously known rings at wavelengths of 3.6 and 13 centimeters show characteristic values of optical depth between about 0.8 and 8; the maxim value occurs in the outer region of the in ring, near its periapsis. Forward-scattered signals from this ring have properties that differ from those of any of Saturn's rings, and they are inconsistent with a discrete scattering object or local (three-dimensional) assemblies of orbiting objects. These signals suggest a new kdnd of planetary ring feature characterized by highly ordered cylindrical substructures of radial scale on the order of meters and azimuthal scale of kilometers or more. From radio data alone the mass of the Uranian system is GM(sys) = 5,794,547- 60 cubic kilometers per square second; from a combination of radio and optical navigation data the mass of Uranus alone is GM(u) = 5,793,939+/- 60 cubic kilometers per square second. From all available Voyager data, induding imaging radii, the mean uncompressed density of the five major satellites is 1.40+/- 0.07 grams per cubic centimeter; this value is consistent with a solar mix of material and apparently rules out a cometary origin of the satellites. PMID:17812893

  7. 78 FR 44029 - Establishment of Rules and Policies for the Digital Audio Radio Satellite Service in the 2310...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ....263(b) and 25.263(c) published at 78 FR 9605, February 11, 2013, are effective July 23, 2013. FOR...- 130, published at 78 FR 9605, February 11, 2013. The OMB Control Number is 3060-1153. The Commission... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 25 Establishment of Rules and Policies for the Digital Audio Radio Satellite...

  8. Unexpected Very Low Frequency (VLF) Radio Events Recorded by the Ionospheric Satellite DEMETER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrot, M.; Berthelier, J. J.; Blecki, J.; Brochot, J. Y.; Hobara, Y.; Lagoutte, D.; Lebreton, J. P.; N?mec, F.; Onishi, T.; Pinçon, J. L.; Píša, D.; Santolík, O.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Slominska, E.

    2015-05-01

    DEMETER was a low Earth orbiting microsatellite in operation between July 2004 and December 2010. Its scientific objective was the study of ionospheric perturbations in relation to seismic activity and man-made activities. Its payload was designed to measure electromagnetic waves over a large frequency range as well as ionospheric plasma parameters (electron and ion densities, fluxes of energetic charged particles). This paper will show both expected and unusual events recorded by the satellite when it was in operation. These latter events have been selected from the DEMETER database because they are rare or even have never been observed before, because they have a very high intensity, or because they are related to abnormalities of the experiments under particular plasma conditions. Some events are related to man-made radio waves emitted by VLF ground-based transmitters or power line harmonic radiation. Natural waves, such as atypical quasi-periodic emissions or uncommon whistlers, are also shown.

  9. Direct Broadcast Satellites: An Interview with Hartford Gunn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Hi Tech, 1984

    1984-01-01

    In this interview with Hartford Gunn, Vice-President of Program Development for Satellite Television Corporation (STC), the concept of direct broadcast by satellite (DBS) is explored. Allocation of radio frequencies, services provided by DBS network, home installation and purchase of dish antenna, and comparison of DBS with cable television are…

  10. Satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, J.A.; Matthews, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The present work is based on a conference: Natural Satellites, Colloquium 77 of the IAU, held at Cornell University from July 5 to 9, 1983. Attention is given to the background and origins of satellites, protosatellite swarms, the tectonics of icy satellites, the physical characteristics of satellite surfaces, and the interactions of planetary magnetospheres with icy satellite surfaces. Other topics include the surface composition of natural satellites, the cratering of planetary satellites, the moon, Io, and Europa. Consideration is also given to Ganymede and Callisto, the satellites of Saturn, small satellites, satellites of Uranus and Neptune, and the Pluto-Charon system.

  11. Comparison between GPS radio occultation electron densities and in situ satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedatella, N. M.; Yue, X.; Schreiner, W. S.

    2015-06-01

    Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) electron densities are compared with collocated in situ observations from the CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) and Communications/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellites. The comparison is restricted to observations occurring within 2° latitude and longitude and 15 min local time. The in situ observations occur at altitudes of ˜300-800 km, and the results of the present study represent the first global comparison of COSMIC electron densities at altitudes ranging from near the F region peak to the topside ionosphere. The correlation coefficient between the COSMIC and in situ observations is greater than 0.90, indicating an overall good agreement between GPS RO electron densities and CHAMP and C/NOFS satellite observations. Furthermore, when averaged over all latitudes and local times, we find a near-zero mean bias and root-mean-square difference of typically less than ±30% between the COSMIC electron densities and collocated in situ observations. The overall good agreement demonstrates that the COSMIC GPS RO observations provide an accurate measure of electron density in the topside ionosphere. The results also reveal a systematic structure to the error in the equatorial and low-latitude daytime ionosphere. This structure is related to the equatorial ionization anomaly and is consistent with the error introduced by the Abel inversion spherical symmetry assumption used to retrieve the COSMIC electron density profiles. The present study thus provides direct observational evidence of the Abel inversion error on GPS RO electron densities.

  12. Product amount and quality monitoring in agricultural fields with remote sensing satellite and radio-control helicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Kohei

    Product amount and quality monitoring in agricultural fields with remote sensing satellite and radio-control helicopter is proposed. In particular, tealeaves and rice crop quality and amoujnt monitorings are peoposed as examples. Nitrogen rich tealeaves tasts good. Therefore, quality of tealeaves can be estimated with nitrogen content which is related with near infrared reflectance of the tealeves in concern. Also, rice crop quality depends on protein content in rice grain which is related to near infrared reflectance of rice leaves. Therefore, product quality can be estimated with observation of near infrared reflectance of the leaves in concern. Near infared reflectance is provided by near infrared radiometers onboard remote sensing satellites and by near infrared cameras onboard radio-control helicopter. This monitoring system is applicable to the other agricultural plant products. Through monitoring near ingfrared reflectance, it is possible to estimate quality as well as product amount.

  13. Overview of techniques for mitigation of fading and shadowing in the direct broadcast satellite radio environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, David; Gevargiz, John; Vaisnys, Arvydas; Julian, David

    1995-01-01

    The DBS radio propagation environment is divided into three sub-environments, indoor, rural-suburban mobile and urban mobile. Indoor propagation effects are in a large part determined by construction material. Non-metallic materials afford direct, albeit attenuated penetration of the satellite signal with a minimum of multipath signal scattering. Signal penetration into structures using significant metallic materials is often indirect, through openings such as doors and windows and propagation will involve significant multipath components. Even so, delay spread in many situations is on the order of 10's of nanoseconds resulting in relatively flat fading. Thus frequency diversity techniques such as Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplex (OFDM) and Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) or equalization techniques do not realize their intended performance enhancement. Antenna diversity, directivity and placement are key mitigation techniques for the indoor environment. In the Rural-Suburban mobile environment with elevation angles greater than 20 deg, multipath components from the satellite signal are 15-20 dB below the line-of-sight signal level and often originate from nearby reflectors. Thus shadowing is the dominant signal impairment and fading effects are again found to be relatively flat for a large fading margin. Because receiver motion induces rapid variations in the signal level, temporal diversity techniques such as interleaving, channel coding and retransmission can be used to combat short intermittent fading events. Antenna diversity and directivity techniques are again useful in this environment. Finally, in the Urban mobile environment, slower vehicle speeds and blockage by buildings causes signal fades that are too long and too deep to combat with signal margin or time diversity. Land-based signal boosters are needed to fill in the coverage gaps of the satellite only broadcast scheme. On frequency boosters are suggested to conserve bandwidth yet these produce long delay multipath and create a frequency selective fading environment. Enter now OFDM, spread spectrum, equalization and other techniques that are capable of deconvolving the channel effects and effecting significant performance improvements by extracting the frequency diversity or time diversity components comprising the received signal.

  14. 76 FR 57923 - Establishment of Rules and Policies for the Satellite Digital Audio Radio Service in the 2310...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ....144(e)(3), 25.144(e)(8), 25.144(e)(9), 25.263(b) and 25.263(c), published at 75 FR 45058, August 2... (SDARS) Second Report and Order (FCC 10-82; IB Docket No. 95-91), 75 FR 45058, August 2, 2010. Synopsis... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 25 Establishment of Rules and Policies for the Satellite Digital Audio Radio...

  15. Forecasting ionospheric space weather with applications to satellite drag and radio wave communications and scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannucci, Anthony J.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Verkhoglyadova, Olga P.; Meng, Xing; Pi, Xiaoqing; Kuang, Da; Wang, Chunming; Rosen, Gary; Ridley, Aaron; Lynch, Erin; Sharma, Surja; Manchester, Ward B.; van der Holst, Bart

    2015-04-01

    The development of quantitative models that describe physical processes from the solar corona to the Earth’s upper atmosphere opens the possibility of numerical space weather prediction with a lead-time of a few days. Forecasting solar wind-driven variability in the ionosphere and thermosphere poses especially stringent tests of our scientific understanding and modeling capabilities, in particular of coupling processes to regions above and below. We will describe our work with community models to develop upper atmosphere forecasts starting with the solar wind driver. A number of phenomena are relevant, including high latitude energy deposition, its impact on global thermospheric circulation patterns and composition, and global electrodynamics. Improved scientific understanding of this sun to Earth interaction ultimately leads to practical benefits. We will focus on two ways the upper atmosphere affects life on Earth: by changing satellite orbits, and by interfering with long-range radio communications. Challenges in forecasting these impacts will be addressed, with a particular emphasis on the physical bases for the impacts, and how they connect upstream to the sun and the heliosphere.

  16. Direct broadcast satellite-radio market, legal, regulatory, and business considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sood, Des R.

    1991-01-01

    A Direct Broadcast Satellite-Radio (DBS-R) System offers the prospect of delivering high quality audio broadcasts to large audiences at costs lower than or comparable to those incurred using the current means of broadcasting. The maturation of mobile communications technologies, and advances in microelectronics and digital signal processing now make it possible to bring this technology to the marketplace. Heightened consumer interest in improved audio quality coupled with the technological and economic feasibility of meeting this demand via DBS-R make it opportune to start planning for implementation of DBS-R Systems. NASA-Lewis and the Voice of America as part of their on-going efforts to improve the quality of international audio broadcasts, have undertaken a number of tasks to more clearly define the technical, marketing, organizational, legal, and regulatory issues underlying implementation of DBS-R Systems. The results and an assessment is presented of the business considerations underlying the construction, launch, and operation of DBS-R Systems.

  17. Assimilation of global navigation satellite radio occultation observations in GRAPES: Operational implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Xue, Jishan

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the design of an observation operator for assimilation of global navigation satellite system (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) refractivity and the related operational implementation strategy in the global GRAPES variational data assimilation system. A preliminary assessment of the RO data assimilation effect is performed. The results show that the RO data are one of the most important observation types in GRAPES, as they have a significant positive impact on the analysis and forecast at all ranges, especially in the Southern Hemisphere and the global stratosphere where in-situ measurements are lacking. The GRAPES model error cannot be controlled in the Southern Hemisphere without RO data being assimilated. In addition, it is found that the RO data play a key role in the stable running of the GRAPES global assimilation and forecast system. Even in a relatively simple global data assimilation experiment, in which only the conventional and RO data are assimilated, the system is able to run for more than nine months without drift compared with NCEP analyses. The analysis skills in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres are still relatively comparable even after nine-month integration, especially in the stratosphere where the number of conventional observations decreases and RO observations with a uniform global coverage dominate gradually.

  18. An experimental investigation of the power spectrum of phase modulation induced on a satellite radio signal by the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    The power spectrum of phase modulation imposed upon satellite radio signals by the inhomogeneous F-region of the ionosphere (100 - 500 km) was studied. Tapes of the S-66 Beacon B Satellite recorded during the period 1964 - 1966 were processed to yield or record the frequency of modulation induced on the signals by ionospheric dispersion. This modulation is produced from the sweeping across the receiving station as the satellite transits of the two dimensional spatial phase pattern are produced on the ground. From this a power spectrum of structure sizes comprising the diffracting mechanism was determined using digital techniques. Fresnel oscillations were observed and analyzed along with some comments on the statistical stationarity of the shape of the power spectrum observed.

  19. Results of 17 Independent Geopositional Accuracy Assessments of Earth Satellite Corporation's GeoCover Landsat Thematic Mapper Imagery. Geopositional Accuracy Validation of Orthorectified Landsat TM Imagery: Northeast Asia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles M.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides results of an independent assessment of the geopositional accuracy of the Earth Satellite (EarthSat) Corporation's GeoCover, Orthorectified Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) imagery over Northeast Asia. This imagery was purchased through NASA's Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) Scientific Data Purchase (SDP) program.

  20. The RadioSat (sm) network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noreen, Gary K.

    1991-01-01

    The RadioSat network under development by radio Satellite Corporation will use mobile satellite (MSAT) technology to provide diverse personal communications, broadcast, and navigation services. The network will support these services simultaneously for integrated mobile radios throughout Canada and the United States. The RadioSat network takes advantage of several technological breakthroughs, all coming to fruition by the time the first MSAT satellite is launched in 1994. The most important of these breakthroughs is the enormous radiated power of each MSAT spacecraft - orders of magnitude greater than the radiated power of previous L-band spacecraft. Another important breakthrough is the development of advanced digital audio compression algorithms, enabling the transmission of broadcast quality music at moderate data rates. Finally, continuing dramatic increases in VLSI capabilities permit the production of complex, multi-function mobile satellite radios in very large quantities at prices little more than those of conventional car radios. In addition to performance breakthroughs and their economic implications to RadioSat, the design of the RadioSat network is reviewed.

  1. The RadioSat (sm) network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noreen, Gary K.

    1991-09-01

    The RadioSat network under development by radio Satellite Corporation will use mobile satellite (MSAT) technology to provide diverse personal communications, broadcast, and navigation services. The network will support these services simultaneously for integrated mobile radios throughout Canada and the United States. The RadioSat network takes advantage of several technological breakthroughs, all coming to fruition by the time the first MSAT satellite is launched in 1994. The most important of these breakthroughs is the enormous radiated power of each MSAT spacecraft - orders of magnitude greater than the radiated power of previous L-band spacecraft. Another important breakthrough is the development of advanced digital audio compression algorithms, enabling the transmission of broadcast quality music at moderate data rates. Finally, continuing dramatic increases in VLSI capabilities permit the production of complex, multi-function mobile satellite radios in very large quantities at prices little more than those of conventional car radios. In addition to performance breakthroughs and their economic implications to RadioSat, the design of the RadioSat network is reviewed.

  2. 1.6 GHz distress radio call system (DRCS) via geostationary satellite (Inmarsat-E) - Results of the preoperational demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, Walter

    1990-10-01

    The paper discusses features and operations of the spaceborne Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs) system for distress alerting, which is expected to be used on every ship by August 1, 1993. Two types of EPIRBs that were developed to date are described: the floatable EPIRB, used by vessels over 300 GRT (convention ships subjected to the IMO rules) and the hand-held EPIRB used by smaller vessels such as fishing boats or yachts. The transmitted message formats of both are fully compatible. The distress alerts are presently transmitted through the polar orbiting satellite service at 406 MHz. However, the 36th Inmarsat Council in 1990 passed a decision to the effect that the Inmarsat geostationary satellite shall provide service at 1.6 GHz.

  3. Comparative study of VLF radio wave phenomena from DE-1 and ISIS satellites received at Kashima, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ondoh, Tadanori; Nakamura, Yoshikatsu; Watanabe, Shigeaki; Aikyo, Kazuhiro

    1988-03-01

    A spectral analysis of two years of plasma-wave electric field data from the DE-1 satellite have been performed to study magnetospheric VLF radio wave phenomena. Chorus, narrow-band, ELF hiss, and whistler characteristics observed in the plasmasphere are found to be similar to those of the corresponding VLF emissions noted by the ISIS-1 and ISIS-2 satellites. In the low-density plasma of the high latitude magnetosphere, the upper limit frequency of the whistler-mode waves is found to be the electron plasma frequency. Observations of electrostatic bursts associated with narrow-band hiss around 1 kHz and those without whistler-mode waves were noted in low latitudes of the nightside outer radiation zone.

  4. Radio science with Voyager 2 at Uranus - Results on masses and densities of the planet and five principal satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. D.; Campbell, J. K.; Jacobson, R. A.; Sweetnam, D. N.; Taylor, A. H.

    1987-12-01

    The authors have analyzed radio Doppler data and star-satellite imaging data from Voyager 2 at Uranus, along with 8 years of ground-based astrometric data, and have obtained improved masses and densities for the satellites of Uranus as well as a new ratio of the mass of the Sun to the mass of the Uranian system of 22902.94±0.04. The mean density of Uranus is 1.285±0.001 g cm-3. The satellite densities are 1.25±0.33 for Miranda, 1.55±0.22 for Ariel, 1.58±0.23 for Umbriel, 1.685±0.068 for Titania, and 1.635±0.060 for Oberon. The mean uncompressed density of all five satellites is 1.48±0.06 g cm-3. This is 0.10 g cm-3 higher than the value expected for a homogeneous solar mix. In order to reconcile this difference, the authors suggest that the Uranian moons contain roughly 15% by mass of pure graphite, in addition to a normal solar component of rocks and ices. If so, at least 50% of the carbon within the nebular gases from which Uranus and its satellites condensed was in the form of graphite, the remaining being in CH4. The high thermal conductivity of graphite ensures that the Uranian moons have remained cold and undifferentiated since the time of their formation, despite heating caused by the decay of radioactive nuclides. Apparently, an alternative cometary origin for the satellites is ruled out.

  5. Advancements of Global Navigation Satellite System radio occultation retrieval in the upper stratosphere for optimal climate monitoring utility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobiet, A.; Kirchengast, G.

    2004-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System-based radio occultation (RO) measurements promise to become a valuable observational basis for climate research, numerical weather prediction, and atmospheric process studies, thanks to their unique combination of global coverage, high accuracy and vertical resolution, and long-term stability. Concerning the quality of the RO-derived atmospheric profiles, performance simulation studies and first data analysis results from the current CHAMP satellite mission are encouraging but also reveal weaknesses of present RO retrieval chains at high altitudes (above 30 km). This study aims at providing, first, understanding of these weaknesses and, second, mitigation by an advanced retrieval scheme. We first evaluated present state-of-the-art high-altitude RO retrieval algorithms. We found clear superiority for using statistical optimization involving background information over using exponential extrapolation and a sensitivity of RO retrieval products to biases in background information calling for sensible bias mitigation. Exploiting these findings, an advanced high-altitude retrieval scheme is presented, which focuses on minimizing residual retrieval biases in the upper stratosphere and thereby on optimizing the climate monitoring utility of retrieved profiles. Applied to a large ensemble of simulated occultation events, the advanced scheme proved to be effective. The scheme is currently under evaluation with real data from the CHAMP mission. It will then serve as part of a processing chain generating RO-based global climatologies of refractivity, geopotential height, temperature, and humidity based on RO data from CHAMP, SAC-C, GRACE and other future satellites carrying RO instruments.

  6. Radio science with Voyager 2 at Uranus - Results on masses and densities of the planet and five principal satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. D.; Campbell, J. K.; Jacobson, R. A.; Sweetnam, D. N.; Taylor, A. H.

    1987-01-01

    Phase-coherent Doppler data generated by the Deep Space Network with the radio communication system during the Voyager 2 encounter with Uranus in January 1986, optical navigation data generated by the Voyager Navigation Team with the Voyager 2 imaging system, and ground-based astrometric data obtained over an 8-yr period are compiled and analyzed to determine the masses and densities of Uranus and its principal satellites. The data-analysis procedures are explained in detail, and the results are presented in tables and graphs. The mean density of Uranus is found to be 1.285 + or - 0.001 g/cu cm, whereas the mean uncompressed mass of all five satellites is 1.48 + or - 0.06 g/cu cm, or 0.10 g/cu cm above the density expected for a homogeneous solar mix of rock, H2O and NH3 ice, and CH4 as clathrate hydrate. This difference is tentatively attributed to the presence of 15 mass percent of pure graphite, which would provide the thermal conductivity required to keep the satellites cold and undifferentiated.

  7. Future communications satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagwell, James W.

    1992-01-01

    The point of view of the research is made through the use of viewgraphs. It is suggested that future communications satellite applications will be made through switched point to point narrowband communications. Some characteristics of which are as follows: small/low cost terminals; single hop communications; voice compatible; full mesh networking; ISDN compatible; and possible limited use of full motion video. Some target applications are as follows: voice/data networks between plants and offices in a corporation; data base networking for commercial and science users; and cellular radio internodal voice/data networking.

  8. Detection of Transionospheric SuperDARN HF Waves by the Radio Receiver Instrument on the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, R. G.; Yau, A. W.; James, H. G.; Hussey, G. C.; McWilliams, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    The enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (ePOP) Canadian small-satellite was launched in September 2013. Included in this suite of eight scientific instruments is the Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI). The RRI has been used to measure VLF and HF radio waves from various ground and spontaneous ionospheric sources. The first dedicated ground transmission that was detected by RRI was from the Saskatoon Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar on Nov. 7, 2013 at 14 MHz. Several other passes over the Saskatoon SuperDARN radar have been recorded since then. Ground transmissions have also been observed from other radars, such as the SPEAR, HAARP, and SURA ionospheric heaters. However, the focus of this study will be on the results obtained from the SuperDARN passes. An analysis of the signal recorded by the RRI provides estimates of signal power, Doppler shift, polarization, absolute time delay, differential mode delay, and angle of arrival. By comparing these parameters to similar parameters derived from ray tracing simulations, ionospheric electron density structures may be detected and measured. Further analysis of the results from the other ground transmitters and future SuperDARN passes will be used to refine these results.

  9. Results from the northern New Mexico satellite-beacon radio interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, R.; Jacobson, A.; Massey, R.; Wu, G.

    1994-09-01

    An interferometer described in the Boston, 1992, meeting of the Beacon Satellite Symposium has been in full operation for over a year now. It consists of four autonomous stations; three are in a triangle 70 km on a side and one is in the center. The stations receive the VHF beacons from two geosynchronous satellites, GOES-2 and ATS-3. The phases of the beacons are tracked at each station by referring them to an extremely stable rubidium oscillator. The studies of the two satellites are virtually separate experiments. The received phase of the beacon is retarded by the increased Total-Electron-Content of the dense regions of waves in the ionosphere. By comparing the phase history at four spatially separated stations, the authors can determine the two-dimensional propagation vector of the waves. This array is optimal for wavelengths of 70--300 km (periods of 300--3,000 seconds). Since the measurement is of the phase of the signal rather than the difference between the O-mode and X-mode phases, and since the beacons are in the VHF rather than in the L-band of GPS beacons, the array is very sensitive. It has a noise level of 10{sup 13} electrons/m{sup 2}, or 10{sup {minus}4} of the normal daytime TEC. This has been verified by operating two stations in the same location, so that they saw the same ionosphere. The first interesting results from a year`s study is that the authors do not see the same TID`s when looking at the two satellites. One conclusion they draw is that they do not see evidence of ionospheric winds.

  10. A novel method for measuring the polarization angle of satellite radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoniadis, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    One of the most important parameters for the study of the physics of the ionosphere is the columnar electron content. This can be obtained indirectly by measuring the Faraday rotation of signals emitted from satellites. Many different types of polarimeters have been developed for this purpose. Efforts to develop a new type of polarimeter, suitable for extensive network operation, led to a novel technique for measuring the polarization angle.

  11. Recent Results From the Whistler- and Z-mode Radio Sounding From the IMAGE Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Reddy, A.; Mayank, K.; Hazra, S.; Carpenter, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Whistler mode radio sounding method [Sonwalkar et al., JGR, 2011] was applied to two case studies: (1) daytime and nighttime cases of whistler mode echoes observed on IMAGE inside the plasmasphere (L<4, altitude <5000 km), and (2) cases of whistler mode echoes observed during geomagnetic storm activity. Preliminary results indicate: (i) O+/H+ and O+/ (H+ + He+) transition heights at nighttime are a few hundred kilometers lower than that at daytime. (ii) Electron and ion densities found from whistler mode sounding are consistent with those from the past in situ and radio sounding measurements, but differ from those predicted by IRI-2012 and GCPM. (iii) Electron and ion densities undergo temporal changes as a function of geomagnetic storm activity, and each species has different recovery period. (iv) Major, moderate, and minor storms affect Ne, H+, and O+ densities in a similar manner, but affect He+ density differently-the minor storm did not affect it. By comparing the electron and ion densities measured by whistler mode radio sounding with those predicted by physics based ionospheric models (e.g. SAMI 2) it may be possible to understand how thermospheric winds influence the evolution of the ionospheric electron and ion densities during geomagnetic storms. The application of Sonwalkar et al. [2011] method to nonducted and ducted fast Z mode echoes observed on IMAGE has led to the measurement of field aligned electron density and duct width and enhancement factor from ~1000 km up to the equator. In two cases, ducts with widths of ~0.05-0.1 L and density depletions of ~5-10 % accounted for the observed properties of ducted Z mode echoes. The measurements of both electron density and ducts are consistent with past measurements. The results from the whistler and Z mode sounding will lead to new empirical models of field aligned electron and ion densities and a statistical characterization of ducts in the magnetosphere.

  12. Habitats used by black and surf scoters in eastern North America as determined by satellite radio telemetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, M.C.; Kidwell, D.M.; Wells-Berlin, A. M.; Lohnes, E.J.R.; Olsen, G.H.; Osenton, P.C.

    2005-01-01

    Satellite radio telemetry was used to determine the movements and habitats of black scoters (Melanitta nigra) and surf scoters (Melanitta perspicillata) in eastern North America. A total of 21 surf scoters were instrumented during five years (2001-05) and 32 black scoters were instrumented during three years (2002-04) with implanted PTT 100 satellite transmitters (39 g) with external antenna. Nesting habitat of black scoters was more open than surf scoters (44% vs. 11%), whereas nesting habitat for surf scoters was located in more forested areas (66% vs. 20%). Locations of black scoters in breeding areas on average were at significantly higher latitude and lower elevations than sites used by surf scoters. Satellite telemetry determined that James Bay was the major molting area for male black and surf scoters, although some males molted along the coast of Labrador-Newfoundland. Black scoters instrumented on the Restigouche River, which is a major staging area, were widely distributed along the Atlantic Coast from Cape Cod to Georgia during winter. Major wintering areas for black scoters were Cape Cod (Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket Island), Long Island, and New Jersey. In these northern marine wintering areas, black scoters were located farther from shore (4.2 km) and in deeper water (8.3 m) than black scoters in more southern estuarine areas, where distance from shore was 3.1 km and water depth was 5.2 m. Surf scoters instrumented in Chesapeake Bay in late winter showed a strong tendency to return to the Bay the following winter after they had migrated to and from breeding areas. In Chesapeake Bay, black scoters and surf scoters were located mostly in mesohaline areas that had similar water depths (5.1 m vs. 7.5 m) and distances from shore (3.0 km vs. 2.9 km). Distance from shore and depth of water increased over time during the winter for both species. Updated information from the ARGOS Systems aboard the NOAA satellites on scoter movements was made accessible on the Patuxent Website.

  13. Interplanetary baseline observations of type 3 solar radio bursts. [by Helios satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, R. R.; Fitzenreiter, R. J.; Novaco, J. C.; Fainberg, J.

    1977-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of type III radio bursts using spacecraft separated by several tenths of an AU were made using the solar orbiters HELIOS-A and -B. The burst beginning at 1922 UT on March 28, 1976, was located from the intersection of the source directions measured at each spacecraft, and from the burst arrival time differences. Wide baseline observations give the radial distance of the source at each observing frequency. Consequently, coronal electron densities and exciter velocity were determined directly, without the need to assume a density model as is done with single spacecraft observations. The separation of HELIOS-A and -B also provided the first measurements of burst directivity at low frequencies. For the March 28 burst, the intensity observed from near the source longitude (HELIOS-B) was significantly greater than from 60 W of the source (HELIOS-A).

  14. Direct conversion of light to radio frequency energy. [using photoklystrons for solar power satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, J. W.; Simons, S.

    1981-01-01

    A description is presented of the test results obtained with the latest models of the phototron. The phototron was conceived as a replacement for the high voltage solar cell-high power klystron combination for the solar power satellite concept. Physically, the phototron is a cylindrical evacuated glass tube with a photocathode, two grids, and a reflector electrode in a planar configuration. The phototron can be operated either in a biased mode where a low voltage is used to accelerate the electron beam produced by the photocathode or in an unbiased mode referred to as self-oscillation. The device is easily modulated by light input or voltage to broadcast in AM or FM. The range of operation of the present test model phototrons is from 2 to 200 MHz.

  15. User applications unique to mobile satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castiel, David

    1990-01-01

    As AMSC enters the market with its mobile satellite services, it faces a sophisticated user group that has already experimented with a wide range of communications services, including cellular radio and Ku-band satellite messaging. AMSC's challenge is to define applications unique to the capabilities of its dedicated L band satellite and consistent with the provisions outlined in its FCC license. Through a carefully researched approach to its three main markets (aeronautical, land mobile, and maritime) AMSC is discovering a wellspring of interest in corporate and general aviation, trucking companies, pipeline monitoring and control companies, maritime management firms, telecommunications companies, and government agencies. A general overview is provided of AMSC's FCC license and corporate history, and the specific applications unique to each user group is discussed.

  16. Satellite radio occultation investigations of internal gravity waves in the planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillovich, Ivan; Gubenko, Vladimir; Pavelyev, Alexander

    Internal gravity waves (IGWs) modulate the structure and circulation of the Earth’s atmosphere, producing quasi-periodic variations in the wind velocity, temperature and density. Similar effects are anticipated for the Venus and Mars since IGWs are a characteristic of stably stratified atmosphere. In this context, an original method for the determination of IGW parameters from a vertical temperature profile measurement in a planetary atmosphere has been developed [Gubenko et al., 2008, 2011, 2012]. This method does not require any additional information not contained in the profile and may be used for the analysis of profiles measured by various techniques. The criterion for the IGW identification has been formulated and argued. In the case when this criterion is satisfied, the analyzed temperature fluctuations can be considered as wave-induced. The method is based on the analysis of relative amplitudes of the wave field and on the linear IGW saturation theory in which these amplitudes are restricted by dynamical (shear) instability processes in the atmosphere. When the amplitude of an internal wave reaches the shear instability threshold, energy is assumed to be dissipated in such a way that the IGW amplitude is maintained at the instability threshold level as the wave propagates upwards. We have extended the developed technique [Gubenko et al., 2008] in order to reconstruct the complete set of wave characteristics including such important parameters as the wave kinetic and potential energy per unit mass and IGW fluxes of the energy and horizontal momentum [Gubenko et al., 2011]. We propose also an alternative method to estimate the relative amplitudes and to extract IGW parameters from an analysis of perturbations of the Brunt-Vaislala frequency squared [Gubenko et al., 2011]. An application of the developed method to the radio occultation (RO) temperature data has given the possibility to identify the IGWs in the Earth's, Martian and Venusian atmospheres and to determine the magnitudes of key wave parameters such as the intrinsic frequency, amplitudes of vertical and horizontal wind velocity perturbations, vertical and horizontal wavelengths, intrinsic vertical and horizontal phase (and group) speeds, kinetic and potential energy per unit mass, vertical fluxes of the wave energy and horizontal momentum. Vertical profiles of temperature retrieved from RO measurements of the CHAMP (Earth), Mars Global Surveyor (Mars), Magellan and Venus Express (Venus) missions are used and analyzed to identify discrete or “narrow spectral” wave events and to determine IGW characteristics in the Earth’s, Martian and Venusian atmospheres. This work was partially supported by the RFBR grant 13-02-00526-? and Program 22 of the RAS Presidium. References. Gubenko V.N., Pavelyev A.G., Andreev V.E. Determination of the intrinsic frequency and other wave parameters from a single vertical temperature or density profile measurement // J. Geophys. Res. 2008. V. 113. No.D08109, doi:10.1029/2007JD008920. Gubenko V.N., Pavelyev A.G., Salimzyanov R.R., Pavelyev A.A. Reconstruction of internal gravity wave parameters from radio occultation retrievals of vertical temperature profiles in the Earth’s atmosphere // Atmos. Meas. Tech. 2011. V. 4. No.10. P. 2153-2162, doi:10.5194/amt-4-2153-2011. Gubenko V.N., Pavelyev A.G., Salimzyanov R.R., Andreev V.E. A method for determination of internal gravity wave parameters from a vertical temperature or density profile measurement in the Earth’s atmosphere // Cosmic Res. 2012. V. 50. No.1. P. 21-31, doi: 10.1134/S0010952512010029.

  17. Second-order ionospheric effects on satellite radio occultation observations and their impact on atmospheric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergados, Panagiotis

    This dissertation describes the development of first-of-a-kind mathematical models that both quantify higher-order ionospheric effects and their impact on Global Positioning System radio occultation (GPS/RO) data products. We develop new and innovative models to: a) remove the second-order ionospheric effect from Total Electron Content (TEC) estimations; b) quantify the second-order ionospheric delay in GPS/RO signal propagation using the Faraday phenomenon; c) quantify the vertical distribution of the first- and second-order ionospheric residual effects on GPS/RO data products; and d) retrieve improved atmospheric water vapour profiles. For the first time we combine GPS/RO measurements with space-based gravity missions to characterize the response of the GPS/RO-derived atmospheric parameters to the Earth's gravity anomalies. Independently, we implement these mathematical models in a new GPS/RO processing software package to investigate, for the first time, the impact of higher-order ionospheric residual effects on ionospheric and atmospheric products. We observe that under low solar activity, the second-order ionospheric residual effect introduces: a) slowly varying positive systematic biases of ˜1-3 TECU on TEC estimations as function of occultation time; b) maximum negative systematic biases of ˜0.35 N-units on atmospheric refractivity close to the Earth's surface; c) negative systematic biases of ˜0.5 K close to the Earth's surface, which decrease with altitude and above 26 km become positive, peaking at ˜2.0 K at 50 km and d) negative systematic biases of ˜0.08 mbar on the water vapour pressure. Further studies reveal that the second-order ionospheric residual effect increases non-linearly with solar variability, oscillating between +/-3 mm (at Rz12=2) and +/-15 mm (at Rz12=114), whereas its value increases with increasing latitude. The first-order ionospheric residual effect arising from the geometrical splitting of the dual-frequency GPS radiowave signals is ˜2-3 orders of magnitude smaller than the second-order ionospheric residual effect, with the potential of increasing in magnitude at high solar activity. A series of sensitivity studies show that the LEO velocity uncertainties affect the GPS/RO bending angle accuracy more than the Doppler shift uncertainties. Finally, we find that the Earth's gravity anomalies can introduce negative systematic biases on the atmospheric temperature profiles of up to ˜0.5 K close to the Earth's surface. This dissertation demonstrates the simplicity, innovation, effectiveness and importance of our proposed mathematical models on the future of GPS/RO atmospheric remote sensing.

  18. Analysis of the Temporal Structural Function of Tropospheric Delay of Radio Waves Using Radio Measurements of the Signals from Global Navigation Satellite Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutorov, V. E.; Teptin, G. M.

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of a three-year experimental study of propagation of decimeter radio waves in the troposphere. The time analysis of the structural function of tropospheric delay of the decimeter radio waves for the three-year measurements of the GLONASS and GPS signals in a city of Kazan is given. The tropospheric contribution to the variance of the decimeter radio-wave delay is for the first time observed to significantly differ for the variations with time scales 1 to 24 h.

  19. 78 FR 1252 - CalAmp Wireless Networks Corporation (CWNC), Satellite Products Division, Including On-Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ...from Select Staffing, Oxnard, California (TA-W-80,399). The workers are engaged in the production of converter/amplifiers for satellite television. The Department's Notice was published in the Federal Register on December 13, 2011 (76 FR...

  20. Radio data transmission for SCADA

    SciTech Connect

    Frasier, W.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Enron has used such wireless systems as meteor burst radio, 952 MHz multiple address radio, VSAT and L-band satellite, cellular radio and ACSB radio. The company's experience with meteor burst radio communications is discussed in this paper. It indicates good system reliability and consequently all back-up telephone lines have been removed from sites using this system.

  1. Concept and Analysis of a Satellite for Space-Based Radio Detection of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Gorham, P.; Booth, J.; Chen, P.; Duren, R. M.; Liewer, K.; Nam, J.; Saltzberg, D.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Wissel, S.; Zairfian, P.

    2014-01-01

    We present a concept for on-orbit radio detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) that has the potential to provide collection rates of ~100 events per year for energies above 10^20 eV. The synoptic wideband orbiting radio detector (SWORD) mission's high event statistics at these energies combined with the pointing capabilities of a space-borne antenna array could enable charged particle astronomy. The detector concept is based on ANITA's successful detection UHECRs where the geosynchrotron radio signal produced by the extended air shower is reflected off the Earth's surface and detected in flight.

  2. Low Earth orbit communications satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moroney, D.; Lashbrook, D.; Mckibben, B.; Gardener, N.; Rivers, T.; Nottingham, G.; Golden, B.; Barfield, B.; Bruening, J.; Wood, D.

    1992-01-01

    A current thrust in satellite communication systems considers a low-Earth orbiting constellations of satellites for continuous global coverage. Conceptual design studies have been done at the time of this design project by LORAL Aerospace Corporation under the program name GLOBALSTAR and by Motorola under their IRIDIUM program. This design project concentrates on the spacecraft design of the GLOBALSTAR low-Earth orbiting communication system. Overview information on the program was gained through the Federal Communications Commission licensing request. The GLOBALSTAR system consists of 48 operational satellites positioned in a Walker Delta pattern providing global coverage and redundancy. The operational orbit is 1389 km (750 nmi) altitude with eight planes of six satellites each. The orbital planes are spaced 45 deg., and the spacecraft are separated by 60 deg. within the plane. A Delta 2 launch vehicle is used to carry six spacecraft for orbit establishment. Once in orbit, the spacecraft will utilize code-division multiple access (spread spectrum modulation) for digital relay, voice, and radio determination satellite services (RDSS) yielding position determination with accuracy up to 200 meters.

  3. 47 CFR 25.144 - Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite digital audio radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Applications and Licenses Space Stations § 25.144 Licensing provisions for the 2...Complete contracting for construction of first space station or begin space station construction; (2) Two years: If...

  4. 47 CFR 25.144 - Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite digital audio radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Applications and Licenses Space Stations § 25.144 Licensing provisions for the 2...Complete contracting for construction of first space station or begin space station construction; (2) Two years: If...

  5. 47 CFR 25.144 - Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite digital audio radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Applications and Licenses Space Stations § 25.144 Licensing provisions for the 2...Complete contracting for construction of first space station or begin space station construction; (2) Two years: If...

  6. 47 CFR 25.144 - Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite digital audio radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Applications and Licenses Space Stations § 25.144 Licensing provisions for the 2...Complete contracting for construction of first space station or begin space station construction; (2) Two years: If...

  7. 47 CFR 25.144 - Licensing provisions for the 2.3 GHz satellite digital audio radio service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Applications and Licenses Space Stations § 25.144 Licensing provisions for the 2...Complete contracting for construction of first space station or begin space station construction; (2) Two years: If...

  8. 75 FR 5513 - Determination of Rates and Terms for Preexisting Subscription Services and Satellite Digital...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ...Preexisting Subscription Services and Satellite Digital Audio Radio Services AGENCY...governing the rates for the preexisting satellite digital audio radio services' use of...period 2007 through 2012 for preexisting satellite digital audio radio services...

  9. Migration and wintering areas of American Bitterns (Botaurus lentiginosus) that summer in central North America as determined by satellite and radio telemetry, 1998-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huschle, Guy; Toepfer, John E.; Douglas, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty adult male American Bitterns (Botaurus lentiginosus) were marked on summer range in central North America with satellite tracking Platform Transmitter Terminals (PTTs) to document migration routes and wintering range. Nineteen complete fall migration routes were documented for 17 individuals. Of the successful migrations, 63% (n = 12) went to southern Florida, 32% (n = 6) to southern Louisiana, and 5% (n = 1) to the Gulf coast of Texas. Spring migrations for nine birds were documented, and 78% (n = 7) showed fidelity to breeding range. Two complete migrations for two individuals were documented, and they demonstrated fidelity to winter range. The longest, fastest movement documented was 2,300 km in less than 74 hr. Extensive, post-breeding dispersal was not observed in the adult male American Bitterns in this study. Six male American Bitterns were marked with PTTs on winter range in Florida and Texas. Spring migration for these birds was documented to Nebraska, North Dakota, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario. Sixty-seven American Bitterns were marked with Very High Frequency radio transmitters on summer ranges, and 16% (n = 11) were located on wintering grounds used by the satellite-tracked birds, further documenting the importance of the Everglades and the Louisiana coast as winter habitat for American Bitterns that breed in Central North America.

  10. Domestic Communication Satellites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Andrew

    1974-01-01

    A discussion of the Federal Communications Commission's new policy on domestic satellites in light of our 1) military and economic history; 2) corporate interests; 3) citizen surveillance; and 4) media control. (HB)

  11. Corporate Plan Corporate Publications

    E-print Network

    Corporate Plan 2005­2008 Corporate Publications #12;Introduction Who we are 2 What we do 2 Our health and well-being 14 Aim 4: Enhanced natural and cultural heritage 17 Aim 5: Efficiency Contents Forestry Commission Scotland Corporate Plan 2005 - 2008 1 #12;Who we are Forestry Commission

  12. Radio Science Observations of the Mars Express December 2013 Phobos Flyby and Implications for the Satellite's Gravity Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andert, T.; Paetzold, M.; Rosenblatt, P.; Lainey, V.; Pasewaldt, A.; Oberst, J.; Jaumann, R.; Thuillot, W.; Remus, S.; Gurvits, L.; Pogrebenko, S.; Bocanegra Bahamon, T.; Cimo, G.; Duev, D.; Molera Calves, G.

    2014-12-01

    On 29th December 2013, the European spacecraft Mars Express performed a very close flyby at the Martian moon Phobos dedicated to the radio science experiment MaRS. The flyby distance was 58 km, the closest ever. Almost 32 hours of continuous tracking data were collected by ESTRACK (35 m) and DSN (70 m) ground station antennas. 31 VLBI antennas worldwide also recorded the radio signal. The tracking data were interrupted by occultations of approximately 1 hour duration in each orbit revolution, when the spacecraft in Mars orbit disappeared behind the planet as seen from the ground station. Images were taken with the Super Resolution Channel (SRC) of the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) onboard Mars Express before and after the flyby in order to improve the ephemeris of Phobos. The gravity field of Phobos was estimated from a close MEX flyby in 2010 at a distance of 77 km. The derived second degree and order gravity coefficients, however, showed large errors and could not resolve the interior structure of Phobos. Hence, the close flyby in 2013 was the opportunity to estimate the gravity field of Phobos at a higher precision because of the closer flyby distance, improved Phobos ephemeris obtained from the HRSC/SRC camera, and longer observation times with the ground station antennas. We aim at measurements of the gravity coefficients C20 and C22, which are linked with the main moments of inertia of the body. By comparison with the Phobos shape model and assuming a homogeneous mass distribution these can help in interpretations of the internal structure of Phobos. The main contribution to the error budget of the gravity field is caused by the uncertainty of the Phobos ephemeris, which potentially can be improved by HRSC/SRC observations.

  13. Satellite orbit predictor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Morton l.; Garrett, James, Major

    An analog aid to determine satellite coverage of Emergency Locator Transmitters Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (ELT/EPIRB) distress incidence is discussed. The satellite orbit predictor is a graphical aid for determining the relationship between the satellite orbit, antenna coverage of the spacecraft and coverage of the Local User Terminal. The predictor allows the user to quickly visualize if a selected position will probably be detected and is composed of a base map and a satellite track overlay for each satellite.A table of equator crossings for each satellite is included.

  14. Radio occultation electron density profiles from the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites over the Brazilian region: A comparison with Digisonde data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, C. V.; Batista, I. S.; Abdu, M. A.

    2012-06-01

    This study aims to validate the electron density profiles from the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites with data from Digisondes in Brazil during the low solar activity period of the years 2006, 2007 and 2008. Data from three Brazilian Digisondes located in Cachoeira Paulista (22.7°S, 45°W), São Luís (2.5°S, 44.2°W) and Fortaleza (3.8°S, 38°W) were used in the comparisons. Only the profiles whose density peak have been obtained near the stations coordinates were chosen for the comparison. Although there is generally good agreement, some cases of discrepancies are observed. Some of these discrepancies cannot be explained simply by the differences in the position and local time of the measurements made by the satellite and the ground-based station. In such cases it is possible that local conditions, such as the presence of a trans-equatorial wind or electron density gradients, could contribute to the observed differences. Comparison of the F2 layer peak parameters, the NmF2 and hmF2, obtained from the two techniques showed that, in general, the agreement for NmF2 is pretty good and the NmF2 has a better correlation than hmF2. Cachoeira Paulista had the worst correlation for hmF2 possibly because this station is situated in the region under the influence of the equatorial ionization anomaly, a region where it is more difficult to apply the RO technique without violating the spherical symmetry condition.

  15. The Use of Satellites by Schools and Colleges, Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duff, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Provides information about and suggestions for using orbital satellite-carrying amateur radio (OSCAR) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites for instructional purposes. (JN)

  16. Atmospheric Climate Change Detection by Radio Occultation Data Using a Fingerprinting Method

    E-print Network

    Atmospheric Climate Change Detection by Radio Occultation Data Using a Fingerprinting Method Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) provides a novel record of high into practice. The Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) technique allows the re

  17. The effect of solar radio bursts on the GNSS radio occultation signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xinan; Schreiner, William S.; Kuo, Ying-Hwa; Zhao, Biqiang; Wan, Weixing; Ren, Zhipeng; Liu, Libo; Wei, Yong; Lei, Jiuhou; Solomon, Stan; Rocken, Christian

    2013-09-01

    radio burst (SRB) is the radio wave emission after a solar flare, covering a broad frequency range, originated from the Sun's atmosphere. During the SRB occurrence, some specific frequency radio wave could interfere with the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals and therefore disturb the received signals. In this study, the low Earth orbit- (LEO-) based high-resolution GNSS radio occultation (RO) signals from multiple satellites (COSMIC, CHAMP, GRACE, SAC-C, Metop-A, and TerraSAR-X) processed in University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) were first used to evaluate the effect of SRB on the RO technique. The radio solar telescope network (RSTN) observed radio flux was used to represent SRB occurrence. An extreme case during 6 December 2006 and statistical analysis during April 2006 to September 2012 were studied. The LEO RO signals show frequent loss of lock (LOL), simultaneous decrease on L1 and L2 signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) globally during daytime, small-scale perturbations of SNR, and decreased successful retrieval percentage (SRP) for both ionospheric and atmospheric occultations during SRB occurrence. A potential harmonic band interference was identified. Either decreased data volume or data quality will influence weather prediction, climate study, and space weather monitoring by using RO data during SRB time. Statistically, the SRP of ionospheric and atmospheric occultation retrieval shows ~4% and ~13% decrease, respectively, while the SNR of L1 and L2 show ~5.7% and ~11.7% decrease, respectively. A threshold value of ~1807 SFU of 1415 MHz frequency, which can result in observable GNSS SNR decrease, was derived based on our statistical analysis.

  18. CORPORATE OVERVIEW AMEREN CORPORATION

    E-print Network

    Subramanian, Venkat

    1 CORPORATE OVERVIEW #12;2 AMEREN CORPORATION · Formed January 1998 through merger: Union Electric energy company; St. Louis HQ #12;3 CORE BUSINESS · Electricity: generation, transmission (including-low-sulfur coal, Nuclear, and Landfill Methane Diversified regional energy company serving 64,000 square

  19. Radio Astronomy Radio astronomy

    E-print Network

    Metchev, Stanimir

    Radio Astronomy Jin Koda #12;Radio astronomy #12;Atmospheric Window #12;Centimeter radio astronomy Effelsberg 100m telescope (Germany) Green Bank 100m telescope (National Radio Astronomy Observatory;WestVirginia) #12;Centimeter radio astronomy HI 21cm line emission traces the distribution of atomic hydrogen. Dust

  20. Fundamentals of satellite navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiller, A. H.

    The basic operating principles and capabilities of conventional and satellite-based navigation systems for air, sea, and land vehicles are reviewed and illustrated with diagrams. Consideration is given to autonomous onboard systems; systems based on visible or radio beacons; the Transit, Cicada, Navstar-GPS, and Glonass satellite systems; the physical laws and parameters of satellite motion; the definition of time in satellite systems; and the content of the demodulated GPS data signal. The GPS and Glonass data format frames are presented graphically, and tables listing the GPS and Glonass satellites, their technical characteristics, and the (past or scheduled) launch dates are provided.

  1. Magnetospherically reflected, specularly reflected, and backscattered whistler mode radio-sounder echoes observed on the IMAGE satellite: 1. Observations and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonwalkar, V. S.; Carpenter, D. L.; Reddy, A.; Proddaturi, R.; Hazra, S.; Mayank, K.; Reinisch, B. W.

    2011-11-01

    A survey of echoes detected in 2004-2005 during pulse transmissions from the Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) instrument on the IMAGE satellite has revealed several new features of sounder generated whistler mode (WM) echoes and has indicated ways in which the echoes may be used for remote sensing of the Earth's plasma structure at altitudes <5000 km. In this paper we describe the frequency versus travel time (f - t) forms of the WM echoes as they appear on RPI plasmagrams and discuss qualitatively their raypaths and diagnostic potentials. Based on their reflection mechanism, the WM echoes can be classified as: magnetospherically reflected (MR), specularly reflected (SR), or backscattered (BS). The MR echoes are reflected at altitudes where the local lower hybrid frequency (flh) is equal to the transmitted pulse frequency f, a phenomenon familiar from both theory and passive recordings of WM wave activity. The SR echoes (previously reported in a higher frequency range) are reflected at the Earth-ionosphere boundary, either with wave vector at normal incidence or, more commonly (and unexpectedly, due to ray bending in the layered ionosphere), at oblique incidence. The BS echoes are the result of scattering from small scale size plasma density irregularities close to IMAGE. The echoes are described as discrete, multipath, and diffuse, depending upon the amount of travel-time spreading caused by the presence of field aligned density irregularities (FAIs) along echo raypaths. The WM echoes described in this paper have been observed at altitudes less than 5,000 km and at all latitudes and at most MLTs. The diagnostic potential of these phenomena for remotely studying the distribution of plasma density and composition along the geomagnetic field line B0, as well as the presence of FAIs of varying scale sizes, is enhanced by the tendency for SR and MR echoes to be observed simultaneously along with the upward propagating signals from a spatial distribution of communication VLF transmitters. We believe that our findings about WM propagation and echoing in an irregular medium have important implications for the connection between WM waves and the Earth's radiation belts. In a companion paper by Sonwalkar et al. (2011), we employ ray tracing and refractive index diagrams in quantitative support of this paper and also present two diagnostic case studies of plasma density, ion effective mass, and ion composition along B0.

  2. Satellite networks for education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. P.; Morgan, R. P.; Rosenbaum, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    Satellite based educational networking is discussed with particular attention given to the potential uses of communications satellites to help meet educational needs in the United states. Four major subject areas were covered; (1) characteristics and structure of networks, (2) definition of pressures within educational establishment that provide motivation for various types of networks, (3) examination of current educational networking status for educational radio and television, instructional television fixed services, inter- and intra-state educational communication networks, computer networks, and cable television for education, and (4) identification of possible satellite based educational telecommunication services and three alternatives for implementing educational satellite systems.

  3. Radio Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Ann

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information on radio galaxies. Topic areas addressed include: what produces the radio emission; radio telescopes; locating radio galaxies; how distances to radio galaxies are found; physics of radio galaxies; computer simulations of radio galaxies; and the evolution of radio galaxies with cosmic time. (JN)

  4. 33 CFR 401.63 - Radio procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Radio procedures. 401.63 Section 401.63 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Radio Communications § 401.63 Radio procedures....

  5. 33 CFR 401.63 - Radio procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Radio procedures. 401.63 Section 401.63 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Radio Communications § 401.63 Radio procedures....

  6. 33 CFR 401.63 - Radio procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Radio procedures. 401.63 Section 401.63 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Radio Communications § 401.63 Radio procedures....

  7. 33 CFR 401.63 - Radio procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Radio procedures. 401.63 Section 401.63 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Radio Communications § 401.63 Radio procedures....

  8. 33 CFR 401.63 - Radio procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Radio procedures. 401.63 Section 401.63 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Radio Communications § 401.63 Radio procedures....

  9. 75 FR 1621 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-12

    ...FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals...ELDON, MO, To ST. THOMAS, MO; COX RADIO, INC., Station WALR-FM, Facility...To POWHATAN, VA; HAMPTONS COMMUNITY RADIO CORPORATION, Station WEER, Facility...

  10. 77 FR 2241 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First Mesa, Kachina Village, Wickenburg, and Williams, AZ...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ...RM-11517, RM-11518; DA 11-2058] Radio Broadcasting Services; Ehrenberg, First...Williams, AZ; and Application of Univision Radio License Corporation, KHOV-FM, Wickenburg...proposal, RM-11517, filed by Rocket Radio, Inc., proposes the allotment of...

  11. Current Committee Membership Technology Broadcasting Corporation

    E-print Network

    Polz, Martin

    Current Committee Membership Technology Broadcasting Corporation Technology Broadcasting 31, 2017) Chemistry Prof. Timothy F. Jamison (August 31, 2018) Brain & Cognitive Sciences Prof. Holtzman (August 31, 2018) The Oedipus Project Mr. Edward Hyson ^ (August 31, 2016) WICN Public Radio Mr

  12. Analysis, prediction and control of radio frequency interference with respect to DSN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroot, N. F.

    1982-01-01

    Susceptibility modeling, prediction of radio frequency interference from satellites, operational radio frequency interference control, and international regulations are considered. The existing satellite interference prediction program DSIP2 is emphasized. A summary status evaluation and recommendations for future work are given.

  13. The planned Chinese broadcasting satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Zhang, Z.

    1985-12-01

    This paper outlines the necessity of establishing a broadcasting satellite system in China as the key to the realization of complete TV and radio coverage of China, and the popularization of education. It discusses in brief the composition of the planned China Broadcasting Satellite System (CBSS), its mission capacity, mode of transmission, satellite orbital position, beam configuration, PFD distribution, and in-orbit spare satellite. Particular attention is paid to the selection of the satellite frequency band.

  14. CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY AND CORPORATE COMPLIANCE

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY AND CORPORATE COMPLIANCE: A Resource for Health Care Boards AND THE AMERICAN HEALTH LAWYERS ASSOCIATION #12;ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This educational resource represents a unique collaboration between the American Health Lawyers Association and the Office of the Inspector General

  15. Satellite (IRLS) tracking of elk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buechner, H. K.

    1972-01-01

    The practicability of tracking free roaming animals in natural environments by satellite systems is reported. Satellite systems combine continuous tracking with simultaneous monitoring of physiological and environmental parameters through a combination of radio tracking and biotelemetric ground systems that lead to a better understanding of animal behavior and migration patterns.

  16. Mobile satellite service communications tests using a NASA satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Katherine H.; Koschmeder, Louis A.; Hollansworth, James E.; ONeill, Jack; Jones, Robert E.; Gibbons, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    Emerging applications of commercial mobile satellite communications include satellite delivery of compact disc (CD) quality radio to car drivers who can select their favorite programming as they drive any distance; transmission of current air traffic data to aircraft; and handheld communication of data and images from any remote corner of the world. Experiments with the enabling technologies and tests and demonstrations of these concepts are being conducted before the first satellite is launched by utilizing an existing NASA spacecraft.

  17. Corporate Change and Corporate Giving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollack, Rachel H.; Toward, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    With each merger or corporate restructuring comes the possibility that corporate giving to higher education will suffer. A combination of patience, understanding of the processes at work in corporate change, and regular contact with affected companies can help position the college or university to make the most of any outcome. (MSE)

  18. Boundary Layer Remote Sensing with Combined Active and Passive Techniques: GPS Radio Occultation and High-Resolution Stereo Imaging (WindCam) Small Satellite Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannucci, A.J.; Wu, D.L.; Teixeira, J.; Ao, C.O.; Xie, F.; Diner, D.J.; Wood, R.; Turk, Joe

    2012-01-01

    Objective: significant progress in understanding low-cloud boundary layer processes. This is the Single largest uncertainty in climate projections. Radio occultation has unique features suited to boundary layer remote sensing (1) Cloud penetrating (2) Very high vertical resolution (approximately 50m-100m) (3) Sensitivity to thermodynamic variables

  19. Satellite networks for education.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. P.; Morgan, R. P.; Rosenbaum, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of satellite-based educational networking. The characteristics and structure of networks are reviewed, and pressures within the educational establishment that are providing motivation for various types of networks are discussed. A number of studies are cited in which networking needs for educational sectors and services are defined. The current status of educational networking for educational radio and television, instructional television fixed services, inter- and intrastate educational communication networks, computer networks, cable television for education, and continuing and proposed educational experiments using NASA's Applications Technology Satellites is reviewed. Possible satellite-based educational telecommunication services and three alternatives for implementing educational satellite systems are described. Some remarks are made concerning public policy aspects of future educational satellite system development.

  20. Direct television via satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeschel, W.

    The characteristics and benefits of high altitude satellite television broadcasts are outlined. Direct broadcasts to well-defined transmission areas allow narrow angle beams of allocated frequencies, reduce atmospheric attenuation of super high frequency signals due to steep angles of penetration, and permit large areas to be covered simultaneously without topographical interference. GEO satellites in three positions could cover the globe, as Intelsat satellites do in frequency ranges of 4-6 and 11-14 GHz with 14-30 m ground-based receiving antennae. Experiments with the ATS-6 and Symphonie satellites are mentioned, as are the cost savings from using satellites instead of cable TV systems. Provisions of the World Administrative Radio Conference are reviewed, along with details of the Franco-German TV-SAT/TDF 1 project, and potential applications in China.

  1. Hindawi Publishing Corporation Journal of Sensors

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    landmarks, like mountains or stones that early men could easily recognize and remember during their travels been added. Dedicated signage and a variety of radio frequency (RF) signals, like satellite signals, WiFi

  2. The ionosphere as a focusing lens - A case study involving simultaneous type III solar radio storm measurements from the ISIS 1 and 2 and ISEE 3 satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, H. G.; Benson, R. F.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    The possibility of using terrestrial ionospheric focusing to improve the directivity of electric dipoles on space missions has been investigated by comparing simultaneous observations of a solar radio storm by the ISIS 1 and ISIS 2 spacecraft, in near earth orbit, and the ISEE 3 spacecraft located beyond the magnetosphere. To this end, a three-dimensional ray tracing in a spherically stratified ionosphere has been carried out for conditions appropriate to the observations by the ISIS spacecraft of a solar radio storm in September 1983. The procedure allows Poynting flux spectral densities measured on ISIS to be converted to spectral densities well outside the ionosphere where they can be compared directly with simultaneous observations on ISEE 3. The results demonstrate good agreement over their common observing frequency range (1-2 MHz).

  3. The ionosphere as a focusing lens - A case study involving simultaneous type III solar radio storm measurements from the ISIS 1 and 2 and ISEE 3 satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, H. G.; Benson, R. F.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1990-06-01

    The possibility of using terrestrial ionospheric focusing to improve the directivity of electric dipoles on space missions has been investigated by comparing simultaneous observations of a solar radio storm by the ISIS 1 and ISIS 2 spacecraft, in near earth orbit, and the ISEE 3 spacecraft located beyond the magnetosphere. To this end, a three-dimensional ray tracing in a spherically stratified ionosphere has been carried out for conditions appropriate to the observations by the ISIS spacecraft of a solar radio storm in September 1983. The procedure allows Poynting flux spectral densities measured on ISIS to be converted to spectral densities well outside the ionosphere where they can be compared directly with simultaneous observations on ISEE 3. The results demonstrate good agreement over their common observing frequency range (1-2 MHz).

  4. 26 CFR 1.955-5 - Definition of less developed country corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Foreign corporation A is formed on November 1, 1963, to engage in the business of manufacturing and selling radios in Brazil, a less developed country as of November 1, 1963. Corporation A uses the calendar year as a taxable year....

  5. 26 CFR 1.955-5 - Definition of less developed country corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Foreign corporation A is formed on November 1, 1963, to engage in the business of manufacturing and selling radios in Brazil, a less developed country as of November 1, 1963. Corporation A uses the calendar year as a taxable year....

  6. 26 CFR 1.955-5 - Definition of less developed country corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Foreign corporation A is formed on November 1, 1963, to engage in the business of manufacturing and selling radios in Brazil, a less developed country as of November 1, 1963. Corporation A uses the calendar year as a taxable year....

  7. 26 CFR 1.955-5 - Definition of less developed country corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Foreign corporation A is formed on November 1, 1963, to engage in the business of manufacturing and selling radios in Brazil, a less developed country as of November 1, 1963. Corporation A uses the calendar year as a taxable year....

  8. 26 CFR 1.955-5 - Definition of less developed country corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Foreign corporation A is formed on November 1, 1963, to engage in the business of manufacturing and selling radios in Brazil, a less developed country as of November 1, 1963. Corporation A uses the calendar year as a taxable year....

  9. Weather, land satellite sale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    President Ronald Reagan announced on March 8 plans to sell to private industry the nation's land and meteorological remote-sensing satellites, including the responsibility for any future ocean-observing systems. According to the plan, the private firm successful in its bid to buy the five satellites would sell back to the government the data received by the satellites. The Reagan administration says the sale will save money and will put activities appropriate for commercial ventures into the commercial sector. Response to the announcement from scientists and congressmen has been anything but dulcet; one senator, in fact, charges that the Commerce Department and the corporation most likely to purchase the satellites are engaged in a ‘sweetheart deal.’

  10. 47 CFR 80.1185 - Supplemental eligibility for mobile-satellite stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Supplemental eligibility for mobile-satellite stations. 80.1185 Section 80...Voluntary Radio Installations Mobile-Satellite Stations § 80.1185 Supplemental eligibility for mobile-satellite stations. Stations in the...

  11. Satellite Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of communication satellites: explains the principles of satellite communication, describes examples of how governments and industries are currently applying communication satellites, analyzes issues confronting satellite communication, links mathematics and science to the study of satellite communication, and applies…

  12. Broadcast satellite service: The international dimension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samara, Noah

    1991-01-01

    The dawn of the 1990's has witnessed the birth of a new satellite service - satellite sound broadcasting. This new service is characterized by digital transmission at data rates up to 256 kb/s from satellites in geostationary orbit to small, low-cost, mobile and portable receivers. The satellite sound broadcasting service is a logical step beyond navigation satellite service, such as that provided by the GPS Navstar system. The mass market appeal of satellite sound broadcasting in the area of lightsat technology and low-cost digital radios has greatly facilitated the financing of this type of space service.

  13. Radio Journalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bittner, John R.; Bittner, Denise A.

    This book, a how-to-do-it guide for the novice and the professional alike, deals with several aspects of radio journalism: producing documentaries, preparing and announcing radio news, ethics and responsibility, regulation of radio journalism, and careers. It traces the history and growth of radio news, shows its impact on the public, and…

  14. Investigation of a rift zone in the western Fimbulisen by means of airborne radio echo sounding, satellite imagery, and ice flow modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humbert, Angelika; Steinhage, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    The Fimbulisen, an ice shelf located roughly between 3°W-8°E at the coast of Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica, consists of the fast flowing extension of Jutulstraumen and slower moving parts west and east of it. The largely rifted western part of the Fimbulisen is the subject of this study, which combines observations and modelling. Airborne radio echo sounding performed by the Alfred Wegener Institute between 1996 and 2008 with a frequency of 150 MHz and pulse length of 60 ns, respectively 600 ns, is analysed in order to study the internal structure of the ice in parts of the rift zone and to estimate the ice thickness in this area precisely. High-resolution radar imagery acquired by the TerraSAR-X in 2008 and 2009 is used to evaluate principal deformation axis at characteristic locations, to detect crack modes as well as to classify zones of similar structural characteristics. These zones were incorporated in a 2D diagnostic ice flow model as sub-domains with variable stress enhancement factor and thus treated as zones of different damage related stiffness. The temperature-dependent stiffness is calculated by applying the solution of a validated 3D temperature model of the ice shelf and thus the simulations focus on the softening effect caused by cracks. Extensive parameter studies show the effect of the stress enhancement factor on the principal deformation rates and axis. Comparison with the estimated deformation pattern aims to confine the softening effect for each zone separately.

  15. Solar Power Satellite (SPS) pilot beam and communication link subsystem investigation study, phase 1. [ionospheric propagation, radio frequency interference, and microwave transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary engineering model of ionospheric interactions with the pilot beam was established and used to demonstrate that the dual frequency baseline pilot beam system might not be viable in the presence of an unstable transmission path. Alternate approaches to remove this difficulty are described. Although ionospheric fluctuations will not significantly degrade beam pointing or raise the sidelobe levels, they will reduce transmission efficiency by upwards of 25%. Mitigating strategies to substantially reduce this effect are proposed. Based on the Klystron noise spectrum, the pilot beam transmitter power was determined as a function of frequency offset from the power beam carrier frequency. The RFI from the pilot beam, on the ground and at geosynchronous orbit is shown. Noise levels on the earth's surface due to the SPS are presented as a function of frequency and the number of SPS systems. Analysis of the communication subsystem indicates that a standard telemetry line of 1.544 MB/s would satisfy both voice and data link requirements. Additional links would be required for TV and radio transmissions.

  16. Astronomy research at the Aerospace Corporation. [research projects - NASA programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulikas, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    This report reviews the astronomy research carried out at The Aerospace Corporation during 1974. The report describes the activities of the San Fernando Observatory, the research in millimeter wave radio astronomy as well as the space astronomy research.

  17. The advisability of competitive international satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhalgh, D. I.

    This analysis examines the legal, political, and economic issues raised by the applications of Orion Satellites Corporation and International Satellite, Inc., before the Federal Communications Commission. The proposals request approval for the establishment of communications satellite systems potentially competitive with the International Telecommunications Satellite Organization (INTELSAT), a consortium of 109 member nations, which currently maintains a monopoly of international communications satellite traffic. The breadth of consequences resulting from a positive FCC action warrants a close scrutiny of U.S. international foreign policy objectives.

  18. Design of the American Mobile Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittiver, Charles

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the American Mobile Satellite Corporation (AMSC) Mobile Satellite System (MSS). A summary of the mobile satellite (MSAT) design and overall performance is provided. The design and components of both the forward link and return link transponders are described in detail. The design and operation of a unique hybrid matrix amplifier that offers flexible power distribution is outlined. The conceptual design and performance of three types of land mobile antennas are described.

  19. 47 CFR 73.4091 - Direct broadcast satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Direct broadcast satellites. 73.4091 Section 73.4091 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.4091 Direct broadcast satellites. (a)...

  20. 47 CFR 73.4091 - Direct broadcast satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Direct broadcast satellites. 73.4091 Section 73.4091 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.4091 Direct broadcast satellites. (a)...

  1. 47 CFR 73.4091 - Direct broadcast satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Direct broadcast satellites. 73.4091 Section 73.4091 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.4091 Direct broadcast satellites. (a)...

  2. 47 CFR 73.4091 - Direct broadcast satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Direct broadcast satellites. 73.4091 Section 73.4091 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.4091 Direct broadcast satellites. (a)...

  3. 47 CFR 73.4091 - Direct broadcast satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Direct broadcast satellites. 73.4091 Section 73.4091 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations § 73.4091 Direct broadcast satellites. (a)...

  4. Regulation of Wire and Radio Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC.

    This bulletin reviews early federal regulation of telegraphy, telephone, and radio communications, and the development of the Radio Acts of 1912 and 1927, the Communications Act of 1934, and the Communications Satellite Act of 1962. A large portion of the discussion focuses on the regulatory power and procedures of the Federal Communications…

  5. Theories of Corporate Groups: Corporate Identity Reconceived

    E-print Network

    Harper Ho, Virginia E.

    2012-06-17

    alike have persistently failed to consider the application of these concepts to corporate groups. Beginning from theories of the firm, this Article extends the standard understandings of corporate personhood to develop alternative theories of corporate...

  6. Corporal punishment.

    PubMed

    Zolotor, Adam J

    2014-10-01

    Corporal punishment is used for discipline in most homes in the United States. It is also associated with a long list of adverse developmental, behavioral, and health-related consequences. Primary care providers, as trusted sources for parenting information, have an opportunity to engage parents in discussions about discipline as early as infancy. These discussions should focus on building parents' skills in the use of other behavioral techniques, limiting (or eliminating) the use of corporal punishment and identifying additional resources as needed. PMID:25242709

  7. Radio Days.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Neil

    1998-01-01

    Thousands of today's high school students run FM radio stations at school, carrying on a tradition that began 50 years ago. Radio helps students learn to work with others and develop a strong sense of responsibility. A sidebar gives advice on starting a high school radio station. (MLF)

  8. Use of communications. [satellite communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Progress in the field of satellite communications is reviewed, and useful services which may be provided by future satellite communications systems are considered. Recommendations are made with regard to mobile communications for use on land and at sea, position determination, mineral and energy exploration, the possibility of using electronic means to assist in main delivery, education and health-care experiments, and the use of satellite telecommunications to enhance the quality of life in rural areas by making available a full range of educational and entertainment programs. The needs of the amateur radio community are also considered.

  9. “Dialed-In or Disconnected:” Millennials’ Perceptions of Radio 

    E-print Network

    Svatek, Suzann Renee

    2015-08-12

    Commercial In-Car Radio Invention of Television Electronic Television Color Television 8 Track Tape Compact Cassette VCR Cable CD Internet AOL MP3 Yahoo Google DVR Satellite Radio Facebook Apple TV Smart Phone YouTube Twitter Streaming Radio Smart TV 3...

  10. Satellite reconnaissance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloor, G. P.

    1984-06-01

    The potential of the observation equipment in remote sensing satellites is described. United States meteorology, land use and oceanography satellites and the major US Earth observation programs are listed. Imaging satellite systems are described such as: visible light and near infrared, thermal IR window, and microwave window. It is concluded that a geometrical resolution between 10 and 40 m can be expected. In order to reduce the data flow from the satellite system the input side of the system (the object-sensor interaction) has to be known. Satellites with synthetic aperture radar are increasingly important, but satellites can never fully replace observations with aircraft and drones.

  11. Firefighters' Radios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Public Technology Inc. asked for NASA assistance to devise the original firefighter's radio. Good short-range radio communications are essential during a fire to coordinate hose lines, rescue victims, and otherwise increase efficiency. Useful firefighting tool is lower cost, more rugged short range two-way radio. Inductorless electronic circuit replaced inductances and coils in radio circuits with combination of transistors and other low-cost components. Substitution promises reduced circuit size and cost. Enhanced electrical performance made radio more durable and improved maintainability by incorporating modular construction.

  12. 75 FR 20518 - Special Conditions: Cirrus Design Corporation Model SF50 Airplane; Full Authority Digital Engine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ...September 9, 2008, Cirrus Design Corporation applied for...model SF50. The Cirrus Design Corporation model SF50...carbon and fiberglass composite materials. Like other...Known Icing. The Cirrus Design Corporation model SF50...indirect effects of lightning, radio...

  13. Engineering calculations for communications satellite systems planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, E.; Aebker, E.; Mata, F.; Reilly, C.

    1991-01-01

    The final phase of a satellite synthesis project is described. Several methods for generating satellite positionings with improved aggregate carrier to interference characteristics were studied. Two general methods for modifying required separation values are presented. Also, two methods for improving aggregate carrier to interference (C/I) performance of given satellite synthesis solutions are presented. A perturbation of the World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC) synthesis is presented.

  14. A study of satellite emergency locator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Satellite emergency locator systems were studied. The objective of the study was to determine the feasibility and hardware requirements for satellite systems capable of identifying and locating the position emergency locator transmitters and emergency position indicating radio beacons. Both geosynchronous and near-polar-orbiting satellites were considered. One of the most important aspects of the study was to minimize the cost of the hardware required.

  15. Satellite remote sensing using direct receiving system: a conceptual study for satellite marine pollution monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokumaru, Kumon

    2003-05-01

    A specially designed satellite receiving system for NOAA/AVHRR and FY-1C/MVISR started its operation in March 2002 at NPEC (Northwest Pacific Region Environmental Corporation Center, Toyama, Japan) envisaging the remote sensing application for marine pollution monitoring. While NOAA series and FY-1C/D are meteorological satellites and not marine pollution monitoring satellites, they are operational. By operating direct receiving system, we became privileged user like satellite owners and, in order to overview its feasibility, effectiveness or constraints, we implemented a conceptual analysis of overall space/ground system for satellite marine pollution monitoring.

  16. 47 CFR 5.64 - Special provisions for satellite systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special provisions for satellite systems. 5.64 Section 5.64 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL RADIO SERVICE Applications and Licenses § 5.64 Special provisions for satellite systems. (a) Construction of proposed experimental satellite facilities may...

  17. LDEF Satellite Radiation Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    This report covers work performed by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) under contract NAS8-39386 from the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center entitled LDEF Satellite Radiation Analyses. The basic objective of the study was to evaluate the accuracy of present models and computational methods for defining the ionizing radiation environment for spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) by making comparisons with radiation measurements made on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite, which was recovered after almost six years in space. The emphasis of the work here is on predictions and comparisons with LDEF measurements of induced radioactivity and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) measurements. These model/data comparisons have been used to evaluate the accuracy of current models for predicting the flux and directionality of trapped protons for LEO missions.

  18. Radio Ghosts

    E-print Network

    Torsten A. Ensslin

    1999-06-11

    We investigate the possibility that patches of old radio plasma (`radio ghosts') of former radio galaxies form a second distinct phase of the inter-galactic medium (IGM), not mixed with the thermal gas. The separation of this phase from the ambient gas and its resistance against eroding turbulent forces is given by magnetic fields, which are expected to be roughly in pressure equilibrium with the surrounding medium. Since patches of this plasma are largely invisible in the radio we use the term `radio ghost' to characterize their nature. Possibilities and difficulties of different detection strategies of ghosts are discussed. These involve radio emission, cosmic microwave background (CMB) and starlight Comptonization, and Faraday rotation. Re-activation of the electron population in shock waves of cosmological structure formation, which seems to lead to the cluster radio relic phenomena. We discuss the role radio ghosts can have: They are able to store relativistic particles for cosmological times, but are also able to release them under the influence of very strong turbulence. This might happen during a major merger event of clusters of galaxies. The released relativistic proton population could produce the observed radio halos of some cluster of galaxies via hadronic reactions with the background gas leading to the production of secondary electrons and positrons. Destroyed ghosts, mixed with the IGM can help to magnetize it. Finally, the strong field strength within ghosts should have a significant impact on the propagation of extragalactic high energy cosmic rays.

  19. College Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauls, Samuel J.

    As with commercial stations, the underlying premise of the college radio station is to serve the community, whether it be the campus community or the community at large, but in unique ways often geared to underserved niches of the population. Much of college radio's charm lies in its unpredictable nature and constant mutations. The stations give…

  20. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Schaffer, R. D.; Gorenstein, M. V.

    1981-01-01

    The activities of the Deep Space Network in support of Radio Astronomy Operations during April and May 1981 are reported. Work in progres in support of an experiment selected for use of the DSN by the Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel, Twin Quasi-Stellar Object VLBI, is reported.

  1. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars. PMID:17836594

  2. Radio Relays Improve Wireless Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Signal Hill, California-based XCOM Wireless Inc. developed radio frequency micromachine (RF MEMS) relays with a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract through NASA?s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. In order to improve satellite communication systems, XCOM produced wireless RF MEMS relays and tunable capacitors that use metal-to-metal contact and have the potential to outperform most semiconductor technologies while using less power. These relays are used in high-frequency test equipment and instrumentation, where increased speed can mean significant cost savings. Applications now also include mainstream wireless applications and greatly improved tactical radios.

  3. Engineers checkout Early Bird-Communication Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Engineers Stanley R. Peterson (left) and Ray Bowerman (right), checkout the Early Bird, the world's first communication satellite. NASA launched the satellite built by Hughes Aircraft Corporation on April 6, 1955 at 6:48pm E.S.T. from Complex 17a at Cape Kennedy, Florida. Early Bird was built for the Communications Satellite Corporation and weighed about 85 pounds after being placed in a synchronous orbit of 22,300 miles above the earth. It was positioned over the Atlantic to provide 240 two-way telephone channels or 2-way television between Europe and North America. The outer surface of Early Bird was covered with 6,000 silicon-coated solar cells, which absorbed the sun's rays to provide power to the satellite for its intricate transmitting and receiving equipment.

  4. Controlling satellite communication system unwanted emissions in congested RF spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Donald; Heymann, Roger

    2007-09-01

    The International Telecommunication Union (ITU), a United Nations (UN) agency, is the agency that, under an international treaty, sets radio spectrum usage regulations among member nations. Within the United States of America (USA), the organization that sets regulations, coordinates an application for use, and provides authorization for federal government/agency use of the radio frequency (RF) spectrum is the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA). In this regard, the NTIA defines which RF spectrum is available for federal government use in the USA, and how it is to be used. The NTIA is a component of the United States (U.S.) Department of Commerce of the federal government. The significance of ITU regulations is that ITU approval is required for U.S. federal government/agency permission to use the RF spectrum outside of U.S. boundaries. All member nations have signed a treaty to do so. U.S. federal regulations for federal use of the RF spectrum are found in the Manual of Regulations and Procedures for Federal Radio Frequency Management, and extracts of the manual are found in what is known as the Table of Frequency Allocations. Nonfederal government and private sector use of the RF spectrum within the U.S. is regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). There is a need to control "unwanted emissions" (defined to include out-of-band emissions, which are those immediately adjacent to the necessary and allocated bandwidth, plus spurious emissions) to preclude interference to all other authorized users. This paper discusses the causes, effects, and mitigation of unwanted RF emissions to systems in adjacent spectra. Digital modulations are widely used in today's satellite communications. Commercial communications sector standards are covered for the most part worldwide by Digital Video Broadcast - Satellite (DVB-S) and digital satellite news gathering (DSNG) evolutions and the second generation of DVB-S (DVB-S2) standard, developed by the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI). In the USA, the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC) has adopted Europe's DVB-S and DVB-S2 standards for satellite digital transmission. With today's digital modulations, RF spectral side lobes can extend out many times the modulating frequency on either side of the carrier at excessive power levels unless filtered. Higher-order digital modulations include quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK), 8 PSK (8-ary phase shift keying), 16 APSK (also called 12-4 APSK (amplitude phase shift keying)), and 16 QAM (quadrature amplitude modulation); they are key for higher spectrum efficiency to enable higher data rate transmissions in limited available bandwidths. Nonlinear high-power amplifiers (HPAs) can regenerate frequency spectral side lobes on input-filtered digital modulations. The paper discusses technologies and techniques for controlling these spectral side lobes, such as the use of square root raised cosine (SRRC) filtering before or during the modulation process, HPA output power back-off (OPBO), and RF filters after the HPA. Spectral mask specifications are a common method of the NTIA and ITU to define spectral occupancy power limits. They are intended to reduce interference among RF spectrum users by limiting excessive radiation at frequencies beyond the regulatory allocated bandwidth.The focus here is on the communication systems of U.S. government satellites used for space research, space operations, Earth exploration satellite services (EESS), meteorological satellite services (METSATS), and other government services. The 8025 to 8400 megahertz (MHz) X band can be used to illustrate the "unwanted emissions" issue. 8025 to 8400 MHz abuts the 8400 to 8450 MHz band allocated by the NTIA and ITU to space research for space-to-Earth transmissions such as receiving very weak Deep Space Network signals. The views and ideas expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of The Aerospace Corporation or The National Oceanic and Atmosphe

  5. Petite Amateur Navy Satellite (PANSAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakoda, D.; Hiser, J. K.

    1989-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School's (NPS) Space Systems Academic Group (SSAG) is designing and developing a small communications satellite for launch aboard the shuttle as a complex autonomous payload (CAP). The objectives of PANSAT are three-fold. First, PANSAT will provide an ideal educational tool for the officer students at NPS supporting Space Systems Engineering and Space Systems Operations with hands-on hardware development. Second, the satellite will provide digital store-and-forward communications, or packet radio, for the amateur radio community. The third objective is to provide a low-cost, space-based platform for small experiments. PANSAT will be launched from the shuttle at a nominal altitude of 200 n.m. and an inclination of at least 37 degrees. The satellite weight is 150 lbs. Since there is no attitude control, eight dipole whip antennas will be used to provide isotropic ground coverage for communications. FM digital communications will be used with up-link and down-link on a single frequency in the amateur band of 437.25 MHz. A maximum 50 kHz of bandwidth is envisioned for the satellite. The expected lifetime of the satellite is 1 1/2 to 2 years before atmospheric reentry. The PANSAT design consists of the following: communications subsystem (COMM); computer, or data processor and sequencer (DP&S); power subsystem; structure subsystem; and experiment payload.

  6. Pre-Flight Testing and Performance of a Ka-Band Software Defined Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, Joseph A.; Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed a space-qualified, reprogrammable, Ka-band Software Defined Radio (SDR) to be utilized as part of an on-orbit, reconfigurable testbed. The testbed will operate on the truss of the International Space Station beginning in late 2012. Three unique SDRs comprise the testbed, and each radio is compliant to the Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture Standard. The testbed provides NASA, industry, other Government agencies, and academic partners the opportunity to develop communications, navigation, and networking applications in the laboratory and space environment, while at the same time advancing SDR technology, reducing risk, and enabling future mission capability. Designed and built by Harris Corporation, the Ka-band SDR is NASA's first space-qualified Ka-band SDR transceiver. The Harris SDR will also mark the first NASA user of the Ka-band capabilities of the Tracking Data and Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) for on-orbit operations. This paper describes the testbed's Ka-band System, including the SDR, travelling wave tube amplifier (TWTA), and antenna system. The reconfigurable aspects of the system enabled by SDR technology are discussed and the Ka-band system performance is presented as measured during extensive pre-flight testing.

  7. PetaOp/Second FPGA Signal Processing for SETI and Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Zakhor, Avideh

    PetaOp/Second FPGA Signal Processing for SETI and Radio Astronomy Aaron Parsons1 , Donald Backer1), seeks to speed the development of radio astronomy signal process- ing instrumentation by designing: aparsons@astron.berkeley.edu 2 Xilinx Corporation Currently in radio astronomy, high-performance DSP in

  8. Meteorological satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, L. J. (editor); Schnapf, A.; Diesen, B. C., III; Martin, P. S.; Schwalb, A.; Bandeen, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    An overview is presented of the meteorological satellite programs that have been evolving from 1958 to the present, and plans for the future meteorological and environmental satellite systems that are scheduled to be placed into service in the early 1980's are reviewed. The development of the TIROS family of weather satellites, including TIROS, ESSA, ITOS/NOAA, and the present TIROS-N (the third generation operational system) is summarized. The contribution of the Nimbus and ATS technology satellites to the development of the operational-orbiting and geostationary satellites is discussed. Included are descriptions of both the TIROS-N and the DMSP payloads currently under development to assure a continued and orderly growth of these systems into the 1980's.

  9. Radio Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, V. S.; Chernov, S. V.; Gwinn, C. R.; Tchekhovskoy, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Almost 50 years after radio pulsars were discovered in 1967, our understanding of these objects remains incomplete. On the one hand, within a few years it became clear that neutron star rotation gives rise to the extremely stable sequence of radio pulses, that the kinetic energy of rotation provides the reservoir of energy, and that electromagnetic fields are the braking mechanism. On the other hand, no consensus regarding the mechanism of coherent radio emission or the conversion of electromagnetic energy to particle energy yet exists. In this review, we report on three aspects of pulsar structure that have seen recent progress: the self-consistent theory of the magnetosphere of an oblique magnetic rotator; the location, geometry, and optics of radio emission; and evolution of the angle between spin and magnetic axes. These allow us to take the next step in understanding the physical nature of the pulsar activity.

  10. Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolken, P. R.; Shaffer, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Deep Space Network (DSN) 26- and 64-meter antenna stations were utilized in support of Radio Astronomy Experiment Selection Panel experiments. Within a time span of 10 days, in May 1983 (267.75 hours total), nine RAES experiments were supported. Most of these experiments involved multifacility interferometry using Mark 3 data recording terminals and as many as six non-DSN observatories. Investigations of black holes, quasars, galaxies, and radio sources are discussed.

  11. Information and Corporate Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Miriam A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper defines "corporate culture" (set of values and beliefs shared by people working in an organization which represents employees' collective judgments about future) and discusses importance of corporate culture, nature of corporate cultures in business and academia, and role of information in shaping present and future corporate cultures.…

  12. Voyager-Jupiter radio science data papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, G. S.; Wood, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    The reduction and interpretation of the radio science data from the Voyager 1 and 2 encounters of the planet Jupiter and its satellites resulted in the preparation of several papers for publication in the special Voyager-Jupiter issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research. The radio science and tracking systems of the Deep Space Network provide the data which makes this research possible. This article lists submitted papers by title, with their authors and with abstracts of their contents.

  13. Radio constraints on Galactic WIMP dark matter

    E-print Network

    Roberto A. Lineros

    2013-09-18

    Synchrotron emission from electron cosmic ray populations can be used to study both cosmic rays physics and WIMP dark matter imprints on radio skymaps. We used available radio data - from MHz to GHz - to analyze the contribution from galactic WIMP annihilations and impose constraints on WIMP observables: annihilation cross section, channel and mass. Depending on the annihilation channel we obtain as competitive bounds as those obtained in FERMI-LAT gamma ray analysis of dwarf satellite galaxies.

  14. ECS - The European Communication Satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooster, C. B.

    1981-09-01

    The evolution of the European Communication Satellite system (ECS) is traced from feasibility studies in 1970 to the development and launch in 1978 of the Orbital Test Satellite (OTS) by the European Space Agency to prove the new satellite and radio transmission technology being used on ECS. This was followed by the establishment of 'Interim EUTELSAT' in 1979 as the organization to operate ECS. The satellite, which operates at 11/14 GHz, covers all the capitals in Europe via three spot beam antennas, supplemented by a 'Eurobeam' regional coverage antenna which extends the range to cover all of Europe and the Mediterranean basin. Telephony channels are transmitted digitally using time division multiple access (TDMA) with digital speech interpolation (DSI) to optimize satellite capacity. Television transmission is by analog FM over the Eurobeam antenna to North African as well as European capitals. System implications of TDMA operation are discussed, and the EUTELSAT policy for Special Services or satellite business systems is discussed.

  15. Satellite Broadcast of Graphical Weather Data Flight Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallasch, Paul G.

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field's aviation Weather Information Communications (WINCOMM) and NASA Langley Research Center's Aviation Weather Information (AWIN) programs collaborated in a flight test and evaluation of a worldwide weather data-link capability using satellites. This successful flight testing moves NASA closer to its goal of developing advanced communications and information technologies to enable high-quality and timely dissemination of aviation weather information to all relevant users on the aviation information network. Recognized as a major contributing factor in aviation accidents and incidents, weather contributes directly or indirectly to nearly 80 percent of fatal general aviation (small private aircraft) accidents. In 1997, the Aeronautics Safety Investment Strategy Team s weather team produced a prioritized list of investment areas under weather accident prevention. Weather data dissemination is the most critical and highest ranked priority on the list. NASA's Aviation Safety Program founded the Aviation Weather Information initiative to focus efforts on significantly reducing the number of weather-related aviation fatalities. Access to accurate and timely weather data could contribute to a major reduction of weather-related incidents and accidents. However, a cost-effective solution has eluded most general aviation pilots because of the high cost of onboard weather radar equipment. Rockwell Collins, through a contract with NASA and in cooperation with WorldSpace Corporation, successfully completed ground and flight testing of a receiver and antenna in Johannesburg, South Africa. This NASA/Rockwell Collins project is an evaluation of worldwide weather data-link capability using transmissions from the Satellite Digital Audio Radio Services (S DARS) AfriStar satellite. Owned and operated by WorldSpace, AfriStar is a geostationary satellite that broadcasts commercial digital audio services to stationary and mobile platforms. S DARS satellites are the most powerful communications satellites produced to date, allowing users to receive signals using simple, low-cost patch antennas instead of more expensive, beam-steered antenna arrays. Engineers connected an inexpensive, commercially available radio receiver to a laptop computer and an antenna designed and built by Rockwell Collins, enabling them to receive WorldSpace signals from the AfriStar satellite during flight tests. WorldSpace broadcast their composite color graphical weather data files, which were multiplexed with normal audio streams, to the flat patch antenna mounted on a single-engine aircraft. The aircraft was equipped with a modified commercial S-DARS receiver, a Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) receiver, and a laptop computer with color display. Continuous data reception occurred during normal aircraft maneuvers performed throughout takeoff, cruise, and landing operations. In addition, engineers monitored receiver power levels during steep turns and banks. In most instances, the receiver was able to maintain acceptable power levels during all phases of flight and to obtain weather data with little or with the successful completion of ground and flight testing of a receiver and antenna in Johannesburg, South Africa, the team has started to prepare for experiments using highspeed aircraft in areas of the world with limited access to timely weather data. NASA plans to provide a more advanced antenna design and consultation support. This successful test of real-time aviation-related weather data is a positive step toward solving communications-specific issues associated with the dissemination of weather data directly to the cockpit.

  16. Leo satellite-based telecommunication network concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, John G.; Swan, Peter A.; Leopold, Ray J.

    1991-01-01

    Design considerations are discussed for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite based telecommunications networks. The satellites are assumed to be connected to each other via intersatellite links. They are connected to the end user either directly or through gateways to other networks. Frequency reuse, circuit switching, packet switching, call handoff, and routing for these systems are discussed by analogy with terrestrial cellular (mobile radio) telecommunication systems.

  17. Managing Mobile/Satellite Propagation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1990-01-01

    "Data Management System for Mobile Satellite Propagation" software package collection of FORTRAN programs and UNIX shell scripts designed to handle huge amounts of data resulting from mobile/satellite radio-propagation experiments. Data from experiments converted into standard and more useful forms. Software package contains program to convert binary format of data into standard ASCII format suitable for use with wide variety of computing-machine architectures. Written in either FORTRAN 77 or UNIX shell scripts.

  18. Heart Monitoring By Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The ambulance antenna shown is a specially designed system that allows satellite-relayed two-way communications between a moving emergency vehicle and a hospital emergency room. It is a key component of a demonstration program aimed at showing how emergency medical service can be provided to people in remote rural areas. Satellite communication permits immediate, hospital- guided treatment of heart attacks or other emergencies by ambulance personnel, saving vital time when the scene of the emergency is remote from the hospital. If widely adopted, the system could save tens of thousands of lives annually in the U.S. alone, medical experts say. The problem in conventional communication with rural areas is the fact that radio signals travel in line of sight. They may be blocked by tall buildings, hills and mountains, or even by the curvature of the Earth, so signal range is sharply limited. Microwave relay towers could solve the problem, but a complete network of repeater towers would be extremely expensive. The satellite provides an obstruction-free relay station in space.

  19. Analysis and Modeling of Jovian Radio Emissions Observed by Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    Our studies of Jovian radio emission have resulted in the publication of five papers in refereed journals, with three additional papers in progress. The topics of these papers include the study of narrow-band kilometric radio emission; the apparent control of radio emission by Callisto; quasi-periodic radio emission; hectometric attenuation lanes and their relationship to Io volcanic activity; and modeling of HOM attenuation lanes using ray tracing. A further study of the control of radio emission by Jovian satellites is currently in progress. Abstracts of each of these papers are contained in the Appendix. A list of the publication titles are also included.

  20. Definition phase of Grand Tour missions/radio science investigations study for outer planets missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyler, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    Scientific instrumentation for satellite communication and radio tracking systems in the outer planet exploration mission is discussed. Mission planning considers observations of planetary and satellite-masses, -atmospheres, -magnetic fields, -surfaces, -gravitational fields, solar wind composition, planetary radio emissions, and tests of general relativity in time delay and ray bending experiments.

  1. MARS IONOSPHERE STUDIES USING THE MGS RADIO SCIENCE EXPERIMENT

    E-print Network

    Withers, Paul

    MARS IONOSPHERE STUDIES USING THE MGS RADIO SCIENCE EXPERIMENT M. Mendillo and P. Withers Center of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) satellite, ionospheric science at Mars depended upon a total of 433 Radio Science (RS) experiment active at Mars since 1997, the MGS ionospheric database now includes

  2. New Technology in Radio: A Macro- and Micro- View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, James E.

    Recent developments in radio technology are reflected in increases in the number of stations available to listeners in more communities, improvements in audio technology, increased use of satellite interconnection, and extensive automation; however, too little of the impact of these continuing changes has been felt by radio management and…

  3. Radio Tagged Adult Female Walrus on Ice Floe

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Adult female walrus on ice floe photographed shortly after receiving a behavior monitoring satellite-linked radio tag from USGS researchers.  Data acquired from such radio-tags are providing insights on the distribution and behavior of Pacific walruses during a time when their summer sea ice h...

  4. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellermann, Kenneth I.; Heeschen, David; Backer, Donald C.; Cohen, Marshall H.; Davis, Michael; Depater, Imke; Deyoung, David; Dulk, George A.; Fisher, J. R.; Goss, W. Miller

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) scientific opportunities (millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelength astronomy; meter to hectometer astronomy; the Sun, stars, pulsars, interstellar masers, and extrasolar planets; the planets, asteroids, and comets; radio galaxies, quasars, and cosmology; and challenges for radio astronomy in the 1990's); (2) recommendations for new facilities (the millimeter arrays, medium scale instruments, and small-scale projects); (3) continuing activities and maintenance, upgrading of telescopes and instrumentation; (4) long range programs and technology development; and (5) social, political, and organizational considerations.

  5. Activities of Canadian Satellite Communications, Inc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-12-01

    Canadian Satellite Communications (Cancom) has as its core business the provision of television and radio signals to cable systems in Canada, with the objective of making affordable broadcast signals available to remote and/or small communities. Cancom also provides direct-to-home services to backyard receiving dishes, as well as satellite digital data business communications services, satellite business television, and satellite network services. Its business communication services range from satellite links for big-city businesses with small branch operations located far from major centers, to a mobile messaging and tracking system for the trucking industry. Revenues in 1992 totalled $48,212,000 and net income was just over $7 million. Cancom bought 10 percent interest in Leosat Corp. of Washington, DC, who are seeking approval to operate a position locator network from low-orbit satellites. Cancom has also become a partner in SovCan Star Satellite Communications Inc., which will build an international satellite system in partnership with Russia. The first satellite in this east-west business network will be placed in a Russian orbital slot over the Atlantic by 1996, and a second satellite will follow for the Pacific region. This annual report of Cancom's activities for 1992 includes financial statements and a six year financial review.

  6. Satellite multiple access systems for mobile communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    This paper considers multiple access techniques for a mobile radio system which incorporates a geosynchronous orbiting satellite repeater through which mobile terminals communicate. The communication capacities of FDMA, TDMA and CDMA systems are examined for a 4 MHz bandwidth system to serve up to 10,000 users. An FDMA system with multibeam coverage is analyzed in detail. The system includes an order-wire network for demand-access control and reassignment of satellite channels. Satellite and terminal configurations are developed to a block diagram level and system costs and implementation requirements are discussed.

  7. Passive synthesis of the antenna aperture for satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumskii, P. O.; Meshcheryakov, A. A.; Sharygin, G. S.

    2012-08-01

    The possibility of passive synthesis of the antenna aperture for satellite systems of monitoring ground-based radio radiation sources is discussed. Experimental data on the inverse passive synthesis on the Space-Earth paths are presented for reception of GPS navigation satellite radiation. The data confirm the possibility of developing the passive synthesized aperture radar and interference phase signal processing.

  8. Communications Satellite Receiver Systems for Public Schools: A Technical Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Designed to aid school districts contemplating use of some of the telecommunications services now available by satellite, this document contains information on home satellite receiving dishes (Television Receive-Only--TVROs), which can receive radio signals carrying television, sound, and data. This information includes: some factors involved in…

  9. Aeronautical mobile satellite service: Air traffic control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Dave

    1990-01-01

    Canada's history both in aviation and in satellite communications development spans several decades. The introduction of aeronautical mobile satellite communications will serve our requirements for airspace management in areas not served by line-of-sight radio and radar facilities. The ensuing improvements in air safety and operating efficiency are eagerly awaited by the aviation community.

  10. Small satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.; Dermott, S.

    1986-01-01

    Satellites smaller than Mimas (r = 195 km) are distinguished by irregular overall shapes and by rough limb topography. Material properties and impact cratering dominate the shaping of these objects. Long fragmentation histories can produce a variety of internal structures, but so far there is no direct evidence that any small satellite is an equilibrium ellipsoid made up of noncohesive gravitationally bound rubble. One many bodies that orbit close to their primary the tidal and rotational components of surface gravity strongly affect the directions of local g and thereby affect the redistribution of regolith by mass wasting. Downslope movement of regolith is extensive on Deimos, and is probably effective on many other small satellites. It is shown that in some cases observed patterns of downslope mass wasting cold produce useful constraints on the satellite's mean density. The diversity of features seen in the few high-resolution images of small satellites currently available suggests that these objects have undergone complex histories of cratering, fragmentation, and regolith evolution.

  11. A School Radio Telescope for Two Metres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Codling, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the arrangement, specifications, and operation of a setup designed for use as a student project to record radio storms, continuous level of the quiet sun, and scientific satellites operating near the amateur 2-m band. Included is an example of records of solar activity during 1968-73. (CC)

  12. Radio astronomy at Stanford

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracewell, R. N.

    2005-12-01

    Many astronomical topics were addressed by students and staff of the Stanford Radio Astronomy Institute over the course of decades, and some of the memorable milestones can be discussed here at length. These are antenna design and construction, the sunspot number series, astronomical tomography, the cosmic microwave background radiation, nulling interferometry for peering into circumstellar environments, celestial mechanics of the early Earth satellites, the extraterrestrial connection, dynamic spectra of exospheric phenomena, the versatile Hartley transform and Centaurus A. In addition to the text references, a complete list of solar publications related to the microwave spectroheliograph is appended. Further detail, and non-solar publications, are available in the annual reports published in the Astronomical Journal and Bulletin American Astronomical Society from 1961 to1980, especially the final report.

  13. Corporate sustainability assessment methodology

    E-print Network

    Pinchuk, Natallia

    2011-01-01

    Sustainability is a vague concept specifically in the context of a corporate world. There are numerous definitions for corporate sustainability and just as many ways of evaluating it. This work attempts to define, structure ...

  14. Essays on corporate bonds

    E-print Network

    Bao, Jack (Jack C.)

    2009-01-01

    This thesis consists of three empirical essays on corporate bonds, examining the role of both credit risk and liquidity. In the first chapter, I test the ability of structural models of default to price corporate bonds in ...

  15. Corporate Student Systems Corporate Information Systems

    E-print Network

    Lörinczi, József

    collection. Library Catalogue Plus (LCP) The Library catalogue plus system provides a discovery solution carrels and other Library resources. Short Stay PCs System In-house system to manage the selectedCorporate Student Systems Corporate Information Systems System Description LUSI LUSI is an in

  16. Satellite Doppler data processing using a microcomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, P. E.; Lynn, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    A microcomputer which was developed to compute ground radio beacon position locations using satellite measurements of Doppler frequency shift is described. Both the computational algorithms and the microcomputer hardware incorporating these algorithms were discussed. Results are presented where the microcomputer in conjunction with the NIMBUS-6 random access measurement system provides real time calculation of beacon latitude and longitude.

  17. Understanding Corporate Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cluff, Gary A.

    1988-01-01

    Considers concept of corporate culture and discusses several values which can be considered when assessing corporate culture, and the "compatibility scales" used to measure them. Included are discussions of employee attitudes, work atmosphere, internal communications, management style, employment opportunity, stability, business ethics, corporate

  18. The Radio JOVE Project - Shoestring Radio Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J.; Flagg, R.; Greenman, W.; Higgins, C.; Reyes, F.; Sky, J.

    2010-01-01

    Radio JOVE is an education and outreach project intended to give students and other interested individuals hands-on experience in learning radio astronomy. They can do this through building a radio telescope from a relatively inexpensive kit that includes the parts for a receiver and an antenna as well as software for a computer chart recorder emulator (Radio Skypipe) and other reference materials

  19. Nanosail-D: The Small Satellite That Could!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C.; Casas, Joseph P.; Agasid, Elwood F.; Adams, Charles L.; Laue, Greg; Kitts, Christopher; O'Brien, Sue

    2011-01-01

    Three years from its initial design review, NanoSail-D successfully deployed its sail on January 20th, 2011. It became the first solar sail vehicle to orbit the earth and the second sail ever unfurled in space. The NanoSail-D mission had two main objectives: eject a nanosatellite from a microsatellite; deploy its sail from a highly compacted volume and low mass system to validate large structure deployment and potential de-orbit technologies. These objectives were successfully achieved and the de-orbit analysis is in process. This paper presents an overview of the NanoSail-D project and insights into how potential setbacks were overcome. Many lessons have been learned during these past three years and are discussed in light of the phenomenal success and interest that this small satellite has generated. NanoSail-D was jointly designed and built by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and NASA's Ames Research Center. ManTech/NeXolve Corporation also provided key sail design support. The NanoSail-D experiment is managed by Marshall and jointly sponsored by the Army Space and Missile Defense Command, the Von Braun Center for Science and Innovation and Dynetics Inc. Ground operations support was provided by Santa Clara University, with radio beacon packets received from amateur operators around the world.

  20. Jupiter: Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, P.; Murdin, P.

    2003-04-01

    As befitting the king of the planets, JUPITER is orbited by an entourage of at least 39 natural satellites in addition to its faint rings, intense radiation belts and occasional temporary visitors from Earth and the outer solar system. Named after Zeus' lovers and other mythological companions, Jupiter's moons can be divided into four groups on the basis of their sizes and orbits (t...

  1. Satellite Telecommunications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forum, 1986

    1986-01-01

    This issue of a quarterly publication of the Council of Europe covers aspects of the history, technology, policies, and impact of telecommunications in Europe, with an emphasis on European television. The following articles are included: (1) "Man and the World of Telecommunications" (Piet Stoffelen); (2) "The European Communications Satellite

  2. Space Telecommunications Radio System STRS Cognitive Radio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briones, Janette C.; Handler, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    Radios today are evolving from awareness toward cognition. A software defined radio (SDR) provides the most capability for integrating autonomic decision making ability and allows the incremental evolution toward a cognitive radio. This cognitive radio technology will impact NASA space communications in areas such as spectrum utilization, interoperability, network operations, and radio resource management over a wide range of operating conditions. NASAs cognitive radio will build upon the infrastructure being developed by Space Telecommunication Radio System (STRS) SDR technology. This paper explores the feasibility of inserting cognitive capabilities in the NASA STRS architecture and the interfaces between the cognitive engine and the STRS radio. The STRS architecture defines methods that can inform the cognitive engine about the radio environment so that the cognitive engine can learn autonomously from experience, and take appropriate actions to adapt the radio operating characteristics and optimize performance.

  3. 78 FR 43916 - Certain Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Products and Components Thereof; Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ...,690,264. 78 FR 19311 (Mar. 29, 2013). The respondents are Federal Signal Corporation of Oakbrook... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Printing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Products and Components Thereof; Commission...

  4. Satellite sound broadcasting system, portable reception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nasser; Vaisnys, Arvydas

    1990-01-01

    Studies are underway at JPL in the emerging area of Satellite Sound Broadcast Service (SSBS) for direct reception by low cost portable, semi portable, mobile and fixed radio receivers. This paper addresses the portable reception of digital broadcasting of monophonic audio with source material band limited to 5 KHz (source audio comparable to commercial AM broadcasting). The proposed system provides transmission robustness, uniformity of performance over the coverage area and excellent frequency reuse. Propagation problems associated with indoor portable reception are considered in detail and innovative antenna concepts are suggested to mitigate these problems. It is shown that, with the marriage of proper technologies a single medium power satellite can provide substantial direct satellite audio broadcast capability to CONUS in UHF or L Bands, for high quality portable indoor reception by low cost radio receivers.

  5. Radio Quiet Protection at the Australian Square Kilometre array site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Smith, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    Radio astronomy relies on the detection of very faint signals from the universe. Many radio telescopes are now detrimentally affected by radio frequency interference (RFI), which results from a wide range of active spectrum users such as communications, aviation and satellites. This is why many new radio observatories are being sited at increasingly remote locations.The site for the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders in Australia is the Murchison Radio-Astronomy Observatory (MRO). The MRO is located more than 350km from the nearest population centre and has a large radio-quiet zone that is managed under a range of legislative agreements.In this talk I will describe the radio quiet zone, what protection it gives, how it works and how astronomers interact with the spectrum management authorities.

  6. Satellite Survivability Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, P.; Smith, J.

    The Satellite Survivability Module (SSM) is an end-to-end, physics-based, performance prediction model for directed energy engagement of orbiting spacecraft. SSM was created as an add-on module for the Satellite Tool Kit (STK). Two engagement types are currently supported: laser engagement of the focal plane array of an imaging spacecraft; and Radio Frequency (RF) engagement of spacecraft components. This paper will focus on the laser engagement scenario, the process by which it is defined, and how we use this tool to support a future laser threat detection system experiment. For a laser engagement, the user creates a spacecraft, defines its optical system, adds any protection techniques used by the optical system, introduces a laser threat, and then defines the atmosphere through which the laser will pass. SSM models the laser engagement and its impact on the spacecraft's optical system using four impact levels: degradation, saturation, damage, and destruction. Protection techniques, if employed, will mitigate engagement effects. SSM currently supports two laser protection techniques. SSM allows the user to create and implement a variety of "what if" scenarios. Satellites can be placed in a variety of orbits. Threats can be placed anywhere on the Earth or, for version 2.0, on other satellites. Satellites and threats can be mixed and matched to examine possibilities. Protection techniques for a particular spacecraft can be turned on or off individually; and can be arranged in any order to simulate more complicated protection schemes. Results can be displayed as 2-D or 3-D visualizations, or as textual reports. A new report feature available in version 2.0 will allow laser effects data to be displayed dynamically during scenario execution. In order to test SSM capabilities, the Ball team used SSM to model several engagement scenarios for our future laser threat detection system experiment. Actual test sites, along with actual laser, optics, and detector characteristics were entered into SSM to determine what effects we can expect to see, and to what extent. We concluded that SSM results are accurate when compared to actual field test results. The work is currently funded by the Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles directorate at Kirtland AFB, New Mexico, under contract number FA9453-06-C-0371.

  7. Radio Transmitter 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193 7.2 Autonomous GPS Navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193 7.2.1 GPS Navigation Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 7.2.1.1 GPS Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 7.2.1.2 GPS Satellite Constellation... . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 7.2.1.3 GPS Measurement Models . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196 7.2.1.4 GPS Positioning Accuracy . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 7.2.1.5 Coordinate Transformation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 7.2.2 Navigation Solution...

  8. A new digital land mobile satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Philip

    1990-01-01

    A description is given of the different digital services planned to be carried over existing and planned mobile satellite systems. These systems are then compared with analog services in terms of bandwidth and power efficiency. This comparison provides the rationale for the establishment of a digital land mobile satellite service (DLMSS) to use frequencies that are currently available but not yet assigned to a domestic mobile satellite system in the United States. The focus here is on the expected advantages of digital transmission techniques in accommodating additional mobile satellite systems in this portion of the spectrum, and how such techniques can fully satisfy voice, data and facsimile mobile communications requirements in a cost effective manner. A description is given of the system architecture of the DMLSS service proposed by the Geostar Messaging Corporation (GMC) and the market potential of DLMSS.

  9. Coordinated observations of PHEMU at radio wavelengths.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluchino, S.; Schillirò, F.; Salerno, E.; Pupillo, G.; Kraus, A.; Mack, K.-H.

    We present preliminary results for our study of mutual phenomena of the Galilean satellites performed at radio wavelengths with the Medicina and Noto antennas of the Istituto di Radioastronomia \\textendash{} INAF, and with the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope of the Max-Planck-Institute for Radioastronomy. Measurements of the radio flux density variation occurred during the mutual occultations of Io by Europa and Ganymede were carried out during the PHEMU09 campaign at K- and Q-band. Flux density variations observed for the first time at radio wavelengths are consistent with the typical optical patterns measured when partial occultations occurred. The flux density drops indicate a non-linear dependence with the percentage of overlapped area.

  10. Virtual Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammrs, Stephan R.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Satellite (VirtualSat) is a computer program that creates an environment that facilitates the development, verification, and validation of flight software for a single spacecraft or for multiple spacecraft flying in formation. In this environment, enhanced functionality and autonomy of navigation, guidance, and control systems of a spacecraft are provided by a virtual satellite that is, a computational model that simulates the dynamic behavior of the spacecraft. Within this environment, it is possible to execute any associated software, the development of which could benefit from knowledge of, and possible interaction (typically, exchange of data) with, the virtual satellite. Examples of associated software include programs for simulating spacecraft power and thermal- management systems. This environment is independent of the flight hardware that will eventually host the flight software, making it possible to develop the software simultaneously with, or even before, the hardware is delivered. Optionally, by use of interfaces included in VirtualSat, hardware can be used instead of simulated. The flight software, coded in the C or C++ programming language, is compilable and loadable into VirtualSat without any special modifications. Thus, VirtualSat can serve as a relatively inexpensive software test-bed for development test, integration, and post-launch maintenance of spacecraft flight software.

  11. A potential 21st century satellite communications application - Personal communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, E. K.; Douville, R.

    1990-03-01

    It has been forecast that not only will the future needs for satellite communications grow, especially in the area of broadcasting and mobile services, but also that the requirements will be diversified. For voice and data traffic, satellite communications started with the requirements of the telephone companies. Over the past few years, with the availability of Ku-band and VSAT systems, private business networks have emerged. Heading into the 21st century, satellite communications will expand into the personal services domain. This paper describes a concept for a satellite-based personal radio system. To realize the personal communications system, the portable terminals have to be inexpensive and small, similar to the present portable or handheld cellular radio-phones in size. The system aspects, such as selection of frequency band, multiple access and payload configuration will be addressed. The advanced technology required for the portable personal satellite communications system will be discussed.

  12. The Arctic Regional Communications Small SATellite (ARCSAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casas, Joseph; Kress, Martin; Sims, William; Spehn, Stephen; Jaeger, Talbot; Sanders, Devon

    2013-01-01

    Traditional satellite missions are extremely complex and expensive to design, build, test, launch and operate. Consequently many complementary operational, exploration and research satellite missions are being formulated as a growing part of the future space community capabilities using formations of small, distributed, simple to launch and inexpensive highly capable small scale satellites. The Arctic Regional Communications small SATellite (ARCSAT) initiative would launch a Mini-Satellite "Mothership" into Polar or Sun Sync low-earth-orbit (LEO). Once on orbit, the Mothership would perform orbital insertion of four internally stored independently maneuverable nanosatellites, each containing electronically steerable antennas and reconfigurable software-defined radios. Unlike the traditional geostationary larger complex satellite communication systems, this LEO communications system will be comprised of initially a five small satellite formation that can be later incrementally increased in the total number of satellites for additional data coverage. ARCSAT will provide significant enabling capabilities in the Arctic for autonomous voice and data communications relay, Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA), data-extraction from unattended sensors, and terrestrial Search & Rescue (SAR) beacon detection missions throughout the "data starved desert" of the Arctic Region.

  13. A preliminary error analysis of the gravity field recovery from a lunar Satellite-to-Satellite mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iz, Huseyin B.

    1993-01-01

    A low cost lunar Satellite-to-Satellite radio tracking mission in a low-low configuration could considerably improve the existing knowledge about the lunar gravity field. The impact of various mission parameters that may contribute to the recovery of the gravity field, such as satellite altitude, satellite separation mission duration, measurement precision and sampling interval were quantified using the Jekeli-Rapp algorithm. Preliminary results indicate that the gravity field resolution up to harmonic degree 40 to 80 is feasible depending on various mission configurations. Radio tracking data from a six-month mission with a precision of 1 mm/s every 10 s and 300 km satellite separation at 150 km altitude will permit the determination of 5 deg x 5 deg mean gravity anomalies with an error of approximately 15 mgals. Consideration of other unaccounted error sources of instrumental, operational, and environmental nature may lower this resolution.

  14. Radio Jove: Jupiter Radio Astronomy for Citizens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Charles; Thieman, J. R.; Flagg, R.; Reyes, F. J.; Sky, J.; Greenman, W.; Brown, J.; Typinski, D.; Ashcraft, T.; Mount, A.

    2014-01-01

    Radio JOVE is a hands-on educational activity that brings the radio sounds of the Sun, Jupiter, the Milky Way Galaxy, and terrestrial radio noise to students, teachers, and the general public. Participants may build a simple radio telescope kit, make scientific observations, and interact with professional radio observatories in real-time over the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov) includes science information, construction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for teachers and students. Radio Jove is continually expanding its participants with over 1800 kits sold to more than 70 countries worldwide. Recently some of our most dedicated observers have upgraded their Radio Jove antennas to semi-professional observatories. We have spectrographs and wide band antennas, some with 8 MHz bandwidth and some with dual polarization capabilities. In an effort to add to the science literature, these observers are coordinating their efforts to pursue some basic questions about Jupiter’s radio emissions (radio source locations, spectral structure, long term changes, etc.). We can compare signal and ionosphere variations using the many Radio Jove observers at different locations. Observers are also working with members of the Long Wavelength Array Station 1 (LWA1) radio telescope to coordinate observations of Jupiter; Radio Jove is planning to make coordinated observations while the Juno Mission is active beginning in 2015. The Radio Jove program is overviewed, its hardware and software are highlighted, recent sample observations are shown, and we demonstrate that we are capable of real citizen science.

  15. Domestic mobile satellite systems in North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wachira, Muya

    1990-01-01

    Telest Mobile Inc. (TMI) and the American Mobile Satellite Corporation (AMSC) are authorized to provide mobile satellite services (MSS) in Canada and the United States respectively. They are developing compatible systems and are undertaking joint specification and procurement of spacecraft and ground segment with the aim of operational systems by late 1993. Early entry (phase 1) mobile data services are offered in 1990 using space segment capacity leased from Inmarsat. Here, an overview is given of these domestic MSS with an emphasis on the TMI component of the MSAT systen.

  16. Data Mining Group VNG Corporation

    E-print Network

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    Data Mining Group VNG Corporation Data Mining Group_VNG Corporation 1 #12;Data Mining Group_VNG Corporation 2 1 ·Introduction 2 ·Edge Rank 3 ·Parameter Estimate 4 ·Conclusion #12;Data Mining Group_VNG Corporation 3 #12;Data Mining Group_VNG Corporation 4 #12; User's self activity Update status Write blogs

  17. Monitoring Radio Frequency Interference in Southwest Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The radio signals received from astronomical objects are extremely weak. Because of this, radio sources are easily shrouded by interference from devices such as satellites and cell phone towers. Radio astronomy is very susceptible to this radio frequency interference (RFI). Possibly even worse than complete veiling, weaker interfering signals can contaminate the data collected by radio telescopes, possibly leading astronomers to mistaken interpretations. To help promote student awareness of the connection between radio astronomy and RFI, an inquiry-based science curriculum was developed to allow high school students to determine RFI levels in their communities. The Quiet Skies Project_the result of a collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO)_encourages students to collect and analyze RFI data and develop conclusions as a team. Because the project focuses on electromagnetic radiation, it is appropriate for physics, physical science, chemistry, or general science classes. My class-about 50 students from 15 southwest Virginia high schools-participated in the Quiet Skies Project and were pioneers in the use of the beta version of the Quiet Skies Detector (QSD), which is used to detect RFI. Students have been involved with the project since 2005 and have collected and shared data with NRAO. In analyzing the data they have noted some trends in RFI in Southwest Virginia.

  18. Galilean satellite remote sensing by the Galileo Jupiter Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeates, C. M.; Klaasen, K. P.; Clarke, T. C.

    The derivation of a mission design strategy for the Galileo Jupiter Orbiter which best satisfies the requirements for remote sensing of the surfaces of the Galilean satellites during a 20-month orbital tour of the Jovian system is described. The celestial mechanics of a spacecraft orbiting about Jupiter and interacting with the Galilean satellites is discussed. A satellite tour strategy designed to optimize the accomplishment of remote sensing, field and particle science, and radio science objectives is developed. Finally, an assessment is made of how well these objectives can be met given the spacecraft, the capabilities of the scientific instruments, and the structure of the satellite tour.

  19. Satellite-aided land mobile communications system implementation considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leroy, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    It was proposed that a satellite-based land mobile radio system could effectively extend the terrestrial cellular mobile system into rural and remote areas. The market, technical and economic feasibility for such a system is studied. Some of the aspects of implementing an operational mobile-satellite system are discussed. In particular, two key factors in implementation are examined: (1) bandwidth requirements; and (2) frequency sharing. Bandwidth requirements are derived based on the satellite antenna requirements, modulation characteristics and numbers of subscribers. Design trade-offs for the satellite system and potential implementation scenarios are identified. Frequency sharing is examined from a power flux density and modulation viewpoint.

  20. Jovian Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Holland

    2002-07-01

    The icy Galilean satellites form an integral but poorly understood component of Jupiter's magnetospheric system. While the Pioneer and Voyager spacecraft encounters yielded evidence for the existence of a source of oxygen ions beyond Io's orbit, conclusive evidence that Europa and Ganymede possess thin oxygen atmospheres was only recently provided by HST/GHRS detections of faint far-UV airglow emissions of OI. Moreover, the OI emission on Ganymede is localized to the region of the satellite's poles, consistent with an auroral excitation source that would be expected from the internal magnetic field of Ganymede. More recently, spectrally resolved images of Ganymede obtained with STIS have confirmed this result and demonstrated the variation in location and brightness of the OI emissions with the position of Ganymede relative to Jupiter's plasmasheet. The energy and source of the exciting electrons remain unknown and there is little or no relevant in situ Galileo data that bear directly on this question and thus the determination of the molecular abundance remains highly uncertain. However, the energy can be constrained by the observation of the forbidden OI red line at 6300 Ang, but this requires observation when the satellite is in Jupiter's shadow, to avoid the emissions being swamped by the strong solar reflected light. Europa similarly shows the UV OI emissions, and recent HST/STIS observations show a complex time-dependent variation in the spatial distribution of these emissions. Europa does not have an intrinsic magnetic field, but rather the Jovian field at Europa is modified by a magnetic field induced by Europa's rotation. We will investigate Kivelson's suggested European conducting ocean by timing observations to coincide with different orientations of the induced magnetic field.

  1. 76 FR 55388 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ...The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change the community of license: CBS Radio East Inc., Station WLZL, Facility ID 72177, BPH-20110812ACL, from Annapolis, MD, to Bowie, MD; Indiana Community Radio Corporation, Station WYER, Facility ID 173401, BPED- 20110705AAO, from Carmi, IL, To Albion, IL; Mount Wilson FM Broadcasters, Inc., Station NEW, Facility ID 183343,......

  2. Corporate and Business Plan

    E-print Network

    Corporate and Business Plan 2010-2011 #12;Main addresses Forest Research Alice Holt Lodge Farnham Research's Business Plan 2010-2011 ..........................12 Table Contents Table 1 - Income This Corporate and Business Plan sets out FR's aims and strategic objectives. It describes the Key Performance

  3. Corporal Punishment Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Adah

    This handbook describes the use of corporal punishment, attitudes towards it, and alternatives to it. Topics covered include: (1) a definition of corporal punishment; (2) descriptions and examples of different types; (3) a brief history of its use in schools and society; (4) arguments in favor of its use; (5) arguments for abolition; (6)…

  4. Making the Corporate Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornforth, Suzanne; Simpson, Kristen

    1999-01-01

    Corporate sponsorship is a marketing strategy by which companies communicate about their products or services by affiliating with events or institutions valued by targeted customer groups. Increasingly, campus communicators are seeking to establish corporate sponsorships but first must resolve legal and ethical concerns. Various types of…

  5. Propagation considerations in the American Mobile Satellite system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kittiver, Charles; Sigler, Charles E., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of the American Mobile Satellite Corporation (AMSC) mobile satellite services (MSS) system with special emphasis given to the propagation issues that were considered in the design is presented. The aspects of the voice codec design that effect system performance in a shadowed environment are discussed. The strategies for overcoming Ku-Band rain fades in the uplink and downlink paths of the gateway station are presented. A land mobile propagation study that has both measurement and simulation activities is described.

  6. NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, R. T.

    1983-01-01

    NASA recently restructured its Space Communications Program to emphasize the development of high risk communication technology useable in multiple frequency bands and to support a wide range of future communication needs. As part of this restructuring, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Project will develop and experimentally verify the technology associated with multiple fixed and scanning beam systems which will enable growth in communication satellite capacities and more effective utilization of the radio frequency spectrum. The ACTS requirements and operations as well as the technology significance for future systems are described.

  7. The Radio Amateur's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakeslee, Douglas, Ed.

    The objectives of this basic reference work for the radio amateur are to present radio theory and practice in terms of application and to reflect both the fundamentals and the rapidly-advancing technology of radio communications so that the radio amateur will have a guide to what is practical, meaningful, proven, and useful. Twenty-three chapters…

  8. Cognitive Radio Chapter 12

    E-print Network

    Kranakis, Evangelos

    Part II Cognitive Radio 169 D raft #12;D raft #12;Chapter 12 The Cognitive Radio Approach This chapter introduces and explores the notion of Cognitive Radio (CR). CR can be defined as the combination layer. The hardware layer consists of a minimum number of radio frequency elements, such as an antenna

  9. Satellites in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David

    1988-01-01

    Describes the methods and materials used to obtain satellite pictures from weather satellites. Discusses possible physics lessons which can be done using this equipment including orbital mechanics, and how the satellite works. (CW)

  10. Satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheney, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Since altimetry data are not really old enough to use the term data archaeology, Mr. Cheney referred to the stewardship of these data. He noted that it is very important to document the basis for an altimetry data set as the algorithms and corrections used to arrive at the Geophysical Data Record (GDR) have been improving and are continuing to improve the precision of sea level data derived from altimetry. He noted that the GEOSAT Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) data set has recently been reprocessed by his organization in the National Ocean Service of NOAA and made available to the scientific community on CD/ROM disks by the National Oceanographic Data Center of the U.S. (NODC). The new data set contains a satellite orbit more precise by an order of magnitude together with an improved water vapor correction. A new, comprehensive GDR Handbook has also been prepared.

  11. The Cassini Radio Science Observations of the Enceladus Plasma Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliore, A. J.; Nagy, A. F.; Cravens, T.; Anabtawi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Cassini Radio Science Subsystem (RSS) observations of the plasma environment of Enceladus from the radio occultation of 26 January 2006 are reported. The radio occultation technique was used to measure the electron content as a function of distance along a the orbital path of Enceladus with the radio line-of-sight passing about 45 km below the South Pole. The RSS observations, when applied to a toroidal model of a plasma cloud along the orbit of Enceladus show a significant enhancement of the electron density, extending out to distances from the satellite in excess of 88 Enceladus radii in both directions. Simple estimates show that this is consistent with a photoionization plasma source together with transport away from the satellite due to the plasma flow. In addition, the occultation data shows an electron density depletion near the plume, in agreement with other instruments, and this is possibly due to electron attachment to grains.

  12. Petite Amateur Navy Satellite (PANSAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The subsystem and structural design of the Naval Post Graduate School's Petite Amateur Navy Satellite (PANSAT) is described. The objectives of PANSAT are: (1) to provide an ideal educational tool for officer students; (2) to provide digital store-and-forward communications, or packet radio, for the amateur radio community; and (3) to provide a low-cost space-based platform for small experiments. PANSAT will be launched from the Shuttle at a nominal altitude of 200 nmi. and an inclination of at least 37 deg. Since there is no attitude control, eight dipole whip antennas will be used to provide isotropic ground coverage for communications. FM digital communications will be used with up-link and down-link on a single frequency in the amateur band of 144 to 146 MHz or 437 to 438 MHz. The satellite's communications subsystem, data processor and sequencer, power subsystem, structure subsystem, and experiment payload are described. The major experiment being considered will test the on-orbit annealing of radiation damaged solar cells.

  13. 77 FR 34788 - Surrogate Foreign Corporations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ...CFR Part 1 [TD 9591] RIN 1545-BF47 Surrogate Foreign Corporations AGENCY: Internal...a foreign corporation is treated as a surrogate foreign corporation. The final [[Page...treatment of a foreign corporation as a surrogate foreign corporation (2006...

  14. Modulate Internet Radio Into FM Using GNU Radio

    E-print Network

    Yu, Chansu

    1 Modulate Internet Radio Into FM Using GNU Radio By: Elie Salameh Outline. · Fm in gnu radio · Audio Streams in Internet Radio · Gnu & Audio Files · Sox command · Playlist ".pls" · Recording internet radio #12;2 Project description · Using gnu radio to modulate internet radio into fm. · Using usrp

  15. Coping with Radio Frequency Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. M.

    2009-01-01

    The radio spectrum is a finite resource, on which humanity makes many demands. And pressure on it is ever increasing with the development of new technology and ideas for radio services. After all, we all benefit from wifi and cell phones. Radio astronomers have a small percentage of the spectrum allocated to them at octave intervals in the metre-centimetre bands, and at important frequencies, such as that of the 21cm line of HI. Signals from other services, as well as from our own poorly-engineered equipment, sometimes contaminate our bands: these signals constitute RFI. These may totally obliterate the astronomical signal, or, in the case of CLOUDSAT, may be capable of completely destroying a receiver, which introduces us to the new possibility of 'destructive interference'. A geo-stationary satellite can block access to a piece of sky from one site. Good equipment design eliminates self-inflicted interference, while physical separation often provides adequate practical mitigation at many frequencies. However, new observatories end up being located in the West Australian desert or Antarctica. In future they may be on the back side of the Moon. But there is no Earth-bound protection via physical separation against satellite signals. Some mitigation can be achieved by frequent data dumps and the excision of RFI, or by real-time detection and blanking of the receiver, or by more sophisticated algoriths. Astronomers of necessity aim to achieve mitigation via coordination, at the local level, and by participating in spectrum management at the national and international levels. This involves them spending a lot of time in Geneva at the International Telegraphic Union protecting their access to spectrum, and access to clean spectrum from the L3 point and the far side of the Moon.

  16. Satellite observations of transionospheric pulse pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, D.N.; Munson, C.P.; Devenport, J.C.

    1995-04-15

    The BLACKBEARD payload aboard the ALEXIS satellite has been making broadband observations in the VHF band of the radio spectrum. Since November of 1993 several hundred unusual signals have been recorded. The peculiar nature of these bursts of radio noise is that they have a duration of approximately 10 {mu}sec, are typically 20 to 40 dB brighter than the average background, and occur in pairs separated by approximately 50 {mu}sec. The authors have dubbed these emissions TransIonospheric Pulse Pairs, or TIPP events. They do not know what the source of these emissions is, but the dispersion of these signals is consistent with an origin at or near the earth`s surface. The satellite field of view and time of day when TIPP events are generally detected are consistent with regions of thunderstorm activity such as south-central Africa or Indonesia. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Using a co-located GNSS radio occultation payload for microwave radiometer calibration

    E-print Network

    Davé, Pratik K. (Pratik Kamlesh)

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a new method of calibrating an orbital cross-track scanning microwave radiometer using a co-located radio occultation (RO) instrument with Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). The radiometer and ...

  18. Radio frequency interference at the geostationary orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sue, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    Growing demands on the frequency spectrum have increased the possibility of radio frequency interference (RFI). Various approaches to obtain in orbit RFI data are compared; this comparision indicates that the most practical way to obtain RFI data for a desired orbit (such as a geostationary orbit) is through the extrapolation of in orbit RFI measurements by a low orbit satellite. It is concluded that a coherent RFI program that uses both experimental data and analytical predictions provides accurate RFI data at minimal cost.

  19. Radio astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, R. D.; Mccluskey, J. T.; Gulkis, S.; Klein, M.; Kuiper, T.

    1981-01-01

    A K-band reflected-wave ruby maser was used on the 64-meter (DSS-43) antenna at the Tidbinbilla Tracking Station, near Canberra, Australia. Spectral line observations were carried out near 22 GHz for water vapor sources and near 24 GHz for ammonia sources. The water vapor observations were made in the direction of known southern OH and H2O maser sources. All of the previously detected water line sources examined were detected. In addition, two new water vapor maser sources were discovered, G301.1+1.1and G308.9+0.1. The spectrum of G301.0+1.1 is presented six ammonia sources were found: G291.3-0.7, G305.4+0.2, G322.2+0.6, G327.3-0.5, G333.6-0.2, and G268.4-0.8. Spectra of two of these sources, G291.3-0.7 (RCW 57) and G305.4+0.2, are presented. Both show clearly the presence of the quadrupole splitting satellite lines that will allow the determination of NH3 optical depths in these clouds.

  20. "SpaceCam": Legal Issues in the Use of Remote-Sensing Satellites for News Gathering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, William E.

    News media representatives foresee a growing use of remote-sensing satellites to gather data, including data that could be used to check government claims about military and other activities occurring anywhere on the planet. The satellite technology is developing rapidly, and several nations and private corporations are involved in separate…

  1. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Cown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt Warren

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  2. Essays in Corporate Finance 

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jun

    2014-06-02

    , and Paudyal (2006) apply the dynamic panel GMM estimator to examine the determinants of debt maturity structure. Wintoki, Linck, and Netter (2012) apply the dynamic GMM estimator to account for the dynamic relation between firm performance and corporate...

  3. CAREER READINESS CORPORATE ENGAGEMENT

    E-print Network

    Freshman Business Orientation · Professional image and behavior · Personal goal-setting and strategyCAREER READINESS CORPORATE ENGAGEMENT CAREER SERVICES #12;Core Business Curriculum: The Eastin Center Career Readiness Strategy is incorporated throughout the business curriculum with a particular

  4. Essays in corporate finance

    E-print Network

    Drexler, Alejandro Herman

    2009-01-01

    This thesis consists of three essays covering topics in empirical corporate finance with an emphasis on banking relationships and its effect on liquidity constraints and business growth. In particular, it investigates the ...

  5. Navy satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clair, William C.

    1992-03-01

    The history, current status, and future plans of Navy satellite communications are reviewed. Particular attention is given to Fleet Satellites; the Defense Satellite Communications System; the International Maritime Satellite; Core Command and Control (Core C2), General Purpose Communications, and Navy EHF SATCOM program; and the Copernicus architecture.

  6. Short-term GNSS satellite clock stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griggs, E.; Kursinski, E. R.; Akos, D.

    2015-08-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) clock stability is characterized via the modified Allan deviation using active hydrogen masers as the receiver frequency reference. The high stability of the maser reference allows the GNSS clock contribution to the GNSS carrier phase variance to be determined quite accurately. Satellite clock stability for four different GNSS constellations are presented, highlighting the similarities and differences between the constellations as well as satellite blocks and clock types. Impact on high-rate applications, such as GNSS radio occultation (RO), is assessed through the calculation of the maximum carrier phase error due to clock instability. White phase noise appears to dominate at subsecond time scales. However, while we derived the theoretical contribution of white phase modulation to the modified Allan deviation, our analysis of the GNSS satellite clocks was limited to 1-200 s time scales because of inconsistencies between the subsecond results from the commercial and software-defined receivers. The rubidium frequency standards on board the Global Positioning System (GPS) Block IIF, BeiDou, and Galileo satellites show improved stability results in comparison to previous GPS blocks for time scales relevant to RO. The Globalnaya Navigatsionnaya Sputnikovaya Sistema (GLONASS) satellites are the least stable of the GNSS constellations in the short term and will need high-rate corrections to produce RO results comparable to those from the other GNSS constellations.

  7. Feasibility of microminiature satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Ryouichi

    1991-07-01

    A conceptual study is conducted on technical problems and system design techniques to accomplish higher performance microminiature satellites by smaller systems. Applications of microminiature satellite technology to practical satellite mission are mentioned. Concepts of microminiature satellites, measures to miniaturize satellites, and micro-miniaturization technologies for communication and data processing, electric solar power paddle, attitude and orbit control, structure, thermal control, propulsion, and instrumentation systems are outlined. Examples of miniaturizing satellite missions such as planet exploration, low-altitude communication networks, space positioning system, low-altitude earth observation mission, clustered satellites, tethered satellites, and timely observation are described. Satellite miniaturizing technology can also be used to launch systems by lasers, and superconductive linear catapults (space escalator). It is pointed out that keys to promote satellite miniaturization are electronics, precision machining, raw material, electric power source technologies, and system design technology to integrate those technologies.

  8. Iodine Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Dankanich, John; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Iodine Satellite (iSat) spacecraft will be the first CubeSat to demonstrate high change in velocity from a primary propulsion system by using Hall thruster technology and iodine as a propellant. The mission will demonstrate CubeSat maneuverability, including plane change, altitude change and change in its closest approach to Earth to ensure atmospheric reentry in less than 90 days. The mission is planned for launch in fall 2017. Hall thruster technology is a type of electric propulsion. Electric propulsion uses electricity, typically from solar panels, to accelerate the propellant. Electric propulsion can accelerate propellant to 10 times higher velocities than traditional chemical propulsion systems, which significantly increases fuel efficiency. To enable the success of the propulsion subsystem, iSat will also demonstrate power management and thermal control capabilities well beyond the current state-of-the-art for spacecraft of its size. This technology is a viable primary propulsion system that can be used on small satellites ranging from about 22 pounds (10 kilograms) to more than 1,000 pounds (450 kilograms). iSat's fuel efficiency is ten times greater and its propulsion per volume is 100 times greater than current cold-gas systems and three times better than the same system operating on xenon. iSat's iodine propulsion system consists of a 200 watt (W) Hall thruster, a cathode, a tank to store solid iodine, a power processing unit (PPU) and the feed system to supply the iodine. This propulsion system is based on a 200 W Hall thruster developed by Busek Co. Inc., which was previously flown using xenon as the propellant. Several improvements have been made to the original system to include a compact PPU, targeting greater than 80 percent reduction in mass and volume of conventional PPU designs. The cathode technology is planned to enable heaterless cathode conditioning, significantly increasing total system efficiency. The feed system has been designed to include iodine compatible control valves with internal heaters and temperature sensors to coincide with the iodine-compatible thruster. A key advantage to using iodine as a propellant is that it may be stored in the tank as an unpressurized solid on the ground and before flight operations. During operations, the tank is heated to vaporize the propellant. Iodine vapor is then routed through custom flow control valves to control mass flow to the thruster and cathode assembly. The thruster then ionizes the vapor and accelerates it via magnetic and electrostatic fields, resulting in high specific impulse, characteristic of a highly efficient propulsion system. The iSat spacecraft is a 12-unit (12U) CubeSat with dimensions of about 8 inches x 8 inches x 12 inches (20 centimeters x 20 centimeters x 30 centimeters). The spacecraft frame will be constructed from aluminum with a finish to prevent iodine-driven corrosion. The iSat spacecraft includes full three-axis control and will leverage heat generated by spacecraft components and radiators for a passive thermal control system. After the CubeSat has successfully detached from its launch vehicle, it will deploy its solar panels, correct for tip-off and maintain attitude control before ground contact. An initial check-out period of two weeks is planned for testing all subsystems. The spacecraft will charge the power system while in sunlight, using momentum wheels and magnetic torque rods to rotate the vehicle to the required attitude.

  9. Satellite sound broadcasting system study: Mobile considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golshan, Nasser

    1990-01-01

    Discussed here is the mobile reception part of a study to investigate a satellite sound broadcast system in the UHF or L bands. Existing propagation and reception measurements are used with proper interpretation to evaluate the signaling, coding, and diversity alternatives suitable for the system. Signal attenuation in streets shadowed by buildings appear to be around 29 db, considerably higher than the 10 db adopted by CCIR. With the marriage of proper technologies, an LMSS class satellite can provide substantial direct satellite audio broadcast capability in UHF or L bands for high quality mobile and portable indoor reception by low cost radio receivers. This scheme requires terrestrial repeaters for satisfactory mobile reception in urban areas. A specialized bandwidth efficient spread spectrum signalling technique is particularly suitable for the terrestrial repeaters.

  10. NOAA polar satellite calibration: A system description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, Cecil A.

    1994-02-01

    The operational processing of polar satellite data has undergone many evolutionary changes since the launch of TIROS-N in 1978. These changes have resulted in both functional and organizational changes within NESDIS. In general, corporate knowledge of the detailed steps involved in processing satellite data has been greatly diminished. The following describes several factors contributing to our current situation: decreasing staff/budget and non-replacement of key positions, prompting centralization of many separate functions into one functional element; re-hosting of applications software from the original TIROS-N satellite processing subsystem to an IBM mainframe system (all capabilities inherent to the current system were not transferred in totality to the new system); the lack of properly documented software, procedures, and methodologies associated with detailed, step-by-step processing of satellite data, i.e. pre-launch, early orbit support, in-flight calibration, etc. In efforts to mitigate any further erosion of our knowledge base of operational satellite data processing with respect to calibration, this report is intended to document the instructional guidelines for processing of pre-launch and in-flight calibration data for instruments aboard the NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). Its purpose is to familiarize the reader--the user and managers of satellite acquired environmental data or data systems--with the basic operational technology, terminology and status of the NOAA polar satellite calibration system. Thus, a very brief description of calibration, radiometry, POES instrumentation, and procedures for prelaunch, early-orbit, in-flight, and post-launch support have been included as these subjects pertain to operational calibration.

  11. First results from an airborne GPS radio occultation system for atmospheric profiling

    E-print Network

    Larson, Kristine

    First results from an airborne GPS radio occultation system for atmospheric profiling J. S. Haase1, Indiana, USA Abstract Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) from low Earth Satellite Systems Instrument System for Multistatic and Occultation Sensing (GISMOS), has been developed

  12. Outer planet satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, P.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent findings on the outer-planet satellites are presented, with special consideration given to data on the rheologic properties of ice on icy satellites, the satellite surfaces and exogenic processes, cratering on dead cratered satellites, volcanism, and the interiors of outer-planet satellites. Particular attention is given to the state of Titan's surface and the properties of Triton, Pluto, and Charon. 210 refs.

  13. Radio occultation experiments with INAF-IRA radiotelescopes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluchino, S.; Schillirò, F.; Salerno, E.; Pupillo, G.

    The Radio Occultation research program performed at the Medicina and Noto Radioastronomical Stations of the Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (INAF) - Istituto di Radioastronomia (IRA) includes observations of spacecraft by satellite and satellite by satellite events. The Lunar Radio Occultation (LRO) part of the program consists in collecting data of the lunar Total Electron Content (TEC), at different limb longitudes and at different time, in order to study long term variation of the Moon's ionosphere. The LRO program started at Medicina in September 2006 with the observation of the European probe SMART-1 during its impact on the lunar soil. It proceeded in 2007 with the observation of the lunar occultations of Saturn and Venus, and with the observation of Mars in 2008. On this occasion the probes Cassini, Venus Express, Mars Express, Mars Reconaissance Orbiter and Mars Odissey were respectively occulted by the moon. On Dec 1st 2008 a Venus lunar occultation occurred. On that occasion we performed the first Italian-VLBI (I-VLBI) tracking experiment by detecting the carrier signals coming from the Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft with both the IRA radiotelescopes together with the Matera antenna of the Italian Space Agency. The second part of the radio occultation program includes the observation of satellite by satellite occultation events, as well as mutual occultations of Jupiter satellites. These events are referred to as mutual phenomena (PHEMU). These observations are aimed to measure the radio flux variation during the occultation and to derive surface spatial characteristics such as Io's hot spots. In this work preliminary results of the Radio Occultation program will be presented.

  14. Building and Operating Weather Satellite Ground Stations for High School Science. Teachers Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, R. Joe; Gotwald, Timothy

    Automatic Picture Transmission (APT) images are real-time weather pictures transmitted from satellites on a radio frequency in a video format. Amateur radio enthusiasts and electronic experimenters have for a number of years designed, built, and operated direct readout stations capable of receiving APT photographs. The equipment to receive weather…

  15. 78 FR 14920 - Earth Stations Aboard Aircraft Communicating With Fixed-Satellite Service Geostationary-Orbit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ...Satellite System (TDRSS). (b) In the band 14.47-14.5 GHz, operations within radio line-of- sight of the radio astronomy stations specified in 47 CFR 25.226(d)(2) are subject to coordination with the National Science Foundation in...

  16. Invisible Milky Way Satellite Uncovered With Help from NERSC

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Astronomers predict that large spiral galaxies, like our Milky Way, have hundreds of satellite galaxies orbiting around them. While a few satellites are visible, like the Magellanic Clouds, many other galaxies are too dim to see. Scientists suspect that these faint satellite galaxies are primarily comprised of mysterious "dark matter," which makes up 85 percent of all matter in the universe and so far remains undetected. Using supercomputers at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), Sukanya Chakrabarti, an assistant professor of physics at Florida Atlantic University, developed a mathematical method to uncover these "dark" satellites. When she applied this method to our own Milky Way galaxy, Chakrabarti discovered a faint satellite might be lurking on the opposite side of the galaxy from Earth, approximately 300,000 light-years from the galactic center. According to Chakrabarti, the dark satellite galaxies create disturbances in the cold atomic hydrogen gas at the edges of the spiral galaxy's disk, and these perturbations reveal the mass, distance and location of the satellite. With the help of NERSC systems, she successfully validated her method by analyzing the radio observations of the Whirlpool Galaxy, which has a visible satellite one-third of its size, and NGC 1512, which has a satellite one-hundredth its size. Her calculations correctly predicted the mass and location of both of the known satellite galaxies. http://www.lbl.gov/cs/Archive/news031411.html

  17. Energy Efficient Radio Resource

    E-print Network

    Yanikomeroglu, Halim

    Energy Efficient Radio Resource Management in a Coordinated Multi-Cell Distributed Antenna System Omer HALILOGLU Introduction System Model Performance Evaluation Conclusion References Energy Efficient Hacettepe University 5 September 2014 Omer HALILOGLU (Hacettepe University) Energy Efficient Radio Resource

  18. Resonance and Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starrett, Malin J.

    2008-01-01

    The science and technology of radio receives little attention in contemporary education. This article discusses ways to explore the basic operating principles of radio. (Contains 4 figures, 3 footnotes, and 2 notes.)

  19. Low-cost small satellites for astrophysical missions

    SciTech Connect

    Priedhorsky, W.C.

    1989-01-01

    A miniature satellite is a low-cost platform to support a small space experiment. Space astrophysics has been hindered by decades-long delays in important experiments. With miniature satellites, one hopes to reduce both experiment cost and lead time to an affordable level. Miniature satellites are not a new idea. The first scientific satellites, including Explorer I, were small and developed on a timescale of months. Important science was done by these pioneer missions. Though the easy discoveries have been made, important missions in exploration and follow-up can still be carried out from small platforms. Successful small satellite programs continue to this day. These include the OSCAR amateur radio satellite program, in which 12 small satellites, built by amateurs, have been flown over 25 years with no satellite failures (Fleeter, 1988). Two small free-flyers, GLOMAR and NUSAT, were ejected from the Shuttle in 1985. GLOMAR, a radio-relay experiment, was built in less than a year for under $1 million, and operated over a year in orbit. Small satellite projects continue to this day. Approaching launch are the Air Force STACKSAT array of 3 small satellites (P87-2), a number of other small satellites under Department of Defense auspices. The Air Force Space Test Program is developing a standard small experiment platform called STEP (Space Test Experiment Platform). NASA has started a small explorer program, beginning with SAMPEX, a solar and magnetospheric particle explorer, FAST, a fast auroral snapshot experiment, and SWAS, a submillimeter astronomy experiment. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. The advent of land mobile satellite service systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattan, Bruno

    1987-09-01

    The FCC has allocated the L-band spectrum to geostationary satellite-based mobile radio, mobile telephone, and other similar services, which will then become available for large numbers of rural and suburban users. An expedient means of increasing capacity involves the use of single channel per carrier, demand-assignment multiple access with voice and frequency reuse via multiple beams, and orbital reuse by means of multiple satellites. Attention is given to several of the operational, systematic, and technological considerations of the first generation of land mobile satellite services furnishing thin-route services throughout North America.

  1. Quad-Tree Visual-Calculus Analysis of Satellite Coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, Martin W.; Hockney, George; Kwan, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of analysis of coverage of areas of the Earth by a constellation of radio-communication or scientific-observation satellites has been developed. This method is intended to supplant an older method in which the global-coverage-analysis problem is solved from a ground-to-satellite perspective. The present method provides for rapid and efficient analysis. This method is derived from a satellite-to-ground perspective and involves a unique combination of two techniques for multiresolution representation of map features on the surface of a sphere.

  2. FORTE satellite observations of VHF radiation from lightning discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Junor, William; Suszcynsky, D. M.; Jacobson, A. R.

    2004-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory/Sandia National Laboratory FORTE satellite is described and its capabilities for global remote sensing of lightning in the radio regime are described. Some results from 7 years of successful operation are presented. A future global lightning monitoring mission, VGLASS, is described. The FORTE satellite program has provided a powerful tool for the observation and understanding of the natural RF background due to thunderstorm activity. Unfortunately, because of hardware failures, the satellite ceased operation in late summer of 2003 after 6 years of very successful operation.

  3. Tracking Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) VHF propagation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schleicher, L. A. H.; Llewellyn, S. K.; Bent, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    A study performed to investigate the use of the Bent Ionospheric Model in computing corrections to the range and range rate measurements of the TDRSS satellites is documented. Several orbital configurations between the two satellites are discussed as to their effects on total electron content along the radio path between the satellites. Problem areas in the accurate computation of total electron content and range rate corrections are also discussed. The Bent Ionospheric Model gives the electron density versus height profile as a function of latitude, longitude, height, time, season, and solar flux.

  4. 47 CFR 80.333 - Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service. 80.333...SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Safety Watch Requirements...Procedures § 80.333 Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service. The...

  5. 47 CFR 80.333 - Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service. 80.333...SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Safety Watch Requirements...Procedures § 80.333 Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service. The...

  6. A Guide to the Literature on Application of Communications Satellites to Educational Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Robert P.; Singh, Jai P.

    Because of the ability of communications satellites to distribute electronic information (radio, television, digital computer data) over wide areas with potentially attractive costs, considerable interest has been shown in using satellite technology to enhance educational programs, both in the United States and in other countries. In view of these…

  7. Extragalactic Radio Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellerman, Kenneth I.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses new problems arising from the growing observational data through radio telescope arrays, involving the origin of radio sources, apparent superluminal velocities, conversion of radio sources to relativistic particles, and the nature of compact opaque and extended transparent sources. New physics may be needed to answer these cosmological…

  8. Commercial Radio as Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothenbuhler, Eric W.

    1996-01-01

    Compares the day-to-day work routines of commercial radio with the principles of a theoretical communication model. Illuminates peculiarities of the conduct of communication by commercial radio. Discusses the application of theoretical models to the evaluation of practicing institutions. Offers assessments of commercial radio deriving from…

  9. Software Defined Radio Architecture

    E-print Network

    Kranakis, Evangelos

    ) [14]. The USRP2 bridges the analog world of electromagnetic radio waves and digital world of computersChapter 2 Software Defined Radio Architecture A SDR is a real-time system. The inputs to the system are actions performed by the radio operator and data produced by active elements present in the SDR

  10. Introduction Big Radio Data

    E-print Network

    Prodiæ, Aleksandar

    Introduction VLBI Pulsars Summary Big Radio Data Ue-Li Pen CITA, UofT, CIFAR July 3, 2014U. Pen Big Radio Data #12;Introduction VLBI Pulsars Summary Overview History VLBI Processing Future U. Pen Big signal processing U. Pen Big Radio Data #12;Introduction VLBI Pulsars Summary VLBI Current experiments

  11. Astrometric goals of the Radio Astron mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharov, Vladimir E.; Gerasimov, Igor A.; Kuimov, Konstantin V.; Rodin, Aleksander E.; Ilyasov, Yury P.

    2005-01-01

    It is planned that the RadioAstron mission will be started since March 2006. According the RadioAstron program initiated by Astro Space Center of Lebedev Physical Institute of Russian Academy of Science (supervisor N.S.Kardashev) in collaboration with other institutes of Russia a satellite carrying a 10-meter radio telescope will be launched in high elliptical orbit around the Earth. In apogee distance will be 350000 km. It is planned that VLBI observations will be conducted with large ground based radio telescopes. Main astrometric goal of the mission is the realization of new International Celestial Reference Frame on base of measurements of the coordinates of the defining sources with microarcsecond accuracy. Observations of some pulsars on the space-ground interferometers and by the timing technique will allow us to connect kinematical and dynamical systems with unprecedented accuracy. Coordinates of ground radio telescopes will be determined with respect to the geocenter. Status of work will be reported: program of observations model of the VLBI reduction procedure expected accuracies.

  12. Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-12-06

    Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation. Through smart technology, it will anticipate user needs; detect available bandwidths and frequencies then seamlessly connect vehicles, infrastructures, and consumer devices; and it will support the Department of Transportation IntelliDrive Program, helping researchers, auto manufacturers, and Federal and State officials advance the connectivity of US transportation systems for improved safety, mobility, and environmental conditions. Using cognitive radio, a commercial vehicle will know its driver, onboard freight and destination route. Drivers will save time and resources communicating with automatic toll booths and know ahead of time whether to stop at a weigh station or keep rolling. At accident scenes, cognitive radio sensors on freight and transportation modes can alert emergency personnel and measure on-site, real-time conditions such as a chemical leak. The sensors will connect freight to industry, relaying shipment conditions and new delivery schedules. For industry or military purposes, cognitive radio will enable real-time freight tracking around the globe and its sensory technology can help prevent cargo theft or tampering by alerting shipper and receiver if freight is tampered with while en route. For the average consumer, a vehicle will tailor the transportation experience to the passenger such as delivering age-appropriate movies via satellite. Cognitive radio will enhance transportation safety by continually sensing what is important to the user adapting to its environment and incoming information, and proposing solutions that improve mobility and quality of life.

  13. Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-22

    Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation. Through smart technology, it will anticipate user needs; detect available bandwidths and frequencies then seamlessly connect vehicles, infrastructures, and consumer devices; and it will support the Department of Transportation IntelliDrive Program, helping researchers, auto manufacturers, and Federal and State officials advance the connectivity of US transportation systems for improved safety, mobility, and environmental conditions. Using cognitive radio, a commercial vehicle will know its driver, onboard freight and destination route. Drivers will save time and resources communicating with automatic toll booths and know ahead of time whether to stop at a weigh station or keep rolling. At accident scenes, cognitive radio sensors on freight and transportation modes can alert emergency personnel and measure on-site, real-time conditions such as a chemical leak. The sensors will connect freight to industry, relaying shipment conditions and new delivery schedules. For industry or military purposes, cognitive radio will enable real-time freight tracking around the globe and its sensory technology can help prevent cargo theft or tampering by alerting shipper and receiver if freight is tampered with while en route. For the average consumer, a vehicle will tailor the transportation experience to the passenger such as delivering age-appropriate movies via satellite. Cognitive radio will enhance transportation safety by continually sensing what is important to the user adapting to its environment and incoming information, and proposing solutions that improve mobility and quality of life.

  14. An economic systems analysis of land mobile radio telephone services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, B. E.; Stevenson, S. M.

    1980-11-01

    This paper deals with the economic interaction of the terrestrial and satellite land-mobile radio service systems. The cellular, trunked and satellite land-mobile systems are described. Parametric equations are formulated to allow examination of necessary user thresholds and growth rates as functions of system costs. Conversely, first order allowable systems costs are found as a function of user thresholds and growth rates. Transitions between satellite and terrestrial service systems are examined. User growth rate density (user/year/km squared) is shown to be a key parameter in the analysis of systems compatibility. The concept of system design matching the price demand curves is introduced and examples are given. The role of satellite systems is critically examined and the economic conditions necessary for the introduction of satellite service are identified.

  15. An economic systems analysis of land mobile radio telephone services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leroy, B. E.; Stevenson, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    This paper deals with the economic interaction of the terrestrial and satellite land-mobile radio service systems. The cellular, trunked and satellite land-mobile systems are described. Parametric equations are formulated to allow examination of necessary user thresholds and growth rates as functions of system costs. Conversely, first order allowable systems costs are found as a function of user thresholds and growth rates. Transitions between satellite and terrestrial service systems are examined. User growth rate density (user/year/km squared) is shown to be a key parameter in the analysis of systems compatibility. The concept of system design matching the price demand curves is introduced and examples are given. The role of satellite systems is critically examined and the economic conditions necessary for the introduction of satellite service are identified.

  16. China's satellite communications discussed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhou, Z.

    1986-04-01

    In 1972, China began to enter the age of satellite comunications, and it was realized that satellites could play a large role in television transmission in China. The experimental broadcasting of satellite television programs was begun in 1978, and satisfactory results were obtained. The success of the television transmission demonstration has led to important decisions regarding development of a domestic satellite communications system. Before specialized communications satellites are launched, the decision was made to lease an international communications satellite transmitter. The responsibility of the ground stations were discussed.

  17. The Impact of Radio Interference on Future Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Daniel A.; Robertson, Gordon J.; Sault, Robert J.

    While future radio telescopes will require technological advances from the communications industry interference from sources such as satellites and mobile phones is a serious concern. In addition to the fact that the level of interference is growing constantly the increased capabilities of next generation instruments make them more prone to harmful interference. These facilities must have mechanisms to allow operation in a crowded spectrum. In this report some of the factors which may limit the effectiveness of these mechanisms are investigated. Radio astronomy is unique among other observing wavelengths in that the radiation can be fully sampled at a rate which completely specifies the electromagnetic environment. Knowledge of phases and antennae gain factors affords one the opportunity to attempt to mitigate interference from the astronomical data. At present several interference mitigation techniques have been demonstrated to be extremely effective. However the observational scales of the new facilities will push the techniques to their limits. Processes such as signal decorrelation varying antenna gain and instabilities in the primary beam will have a serious effect on some of the algorithms. In addition the sheer volume of data produced will render some techniques computationally and financially impossible.

  18. Estimating lightning current moment waveforms from satellite optical measurements

    E-print Network

    Mende, Stephen B.

    Estimating lightning current moment waveforms from satellite optical measurements Toru Adachi,1 and Duke magnetometer observed clear optical and radio signatures of 12 sprite- producing lightning events to remotely measure lightning current moment, which is critical for understanding the production of sprites

  19. Technology of newspaper transmission over ground and satellite communications channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mel'Nik, Semen Osherovich

    The design principles of a facsimile newspaper transmission system are examined with emphasis on signal-conversion processes in the transmitting and receiving devices. The design of the comunications channels is considered along with newspaper transmission over cable, radio-relay, and satellite channels. The operation of the Gazeta-2 facsimile system is described as an example.

  20. NASA-GSFC ionospheric corrections to satellite tracking data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, P. E.; Bent, R. B.; Llewellyn, S. K.; Nesterczuk, G.; Rangaswamy, S.

    1971-01-01

    An overview is presented of the development, verification, and recent implementation of the NASA-GSFC ionospheric model for satellite tracking data corrections. This model was incorporated into the Goddard Trajectory Determination System which is providing continuous trajectory computation support for the lunar orbiting Radio Astronomy Explorer-B launched on 10 June 1973.

  1. 47 CFR 5.64 - Special provisions for satellite systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special provisions for satellite systems. 5.64 Section 5.64 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL RADIO SERVICE... included in the debris mitigation disclosure. Such systems shall also indicate the anticipated...

  2. attitude control design for the solar polar orbit radio telesope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, D.; Zheng, J.

    This paper studies the attitude dynamics and control of the Solar Polar Orbit Radio Telescope SPORT The SPORT which consists of one parent satellite and eight tethered satellites runs around the Sun in a polar orbit The parent satellite locates at the mass center of the constellation and tethered satellites which are tied with the parent satellite through a non-electric rope rotate around the parent satellite It is also supposed that the parent satellite and all tethered satellites are in a plane when the constellation works begin figure htbp centerline includegraphics width 3 85in height 2 38in 75271331 6a6eb71057 doc1 eps label fig1 end figure Fig 1 the SPORT constellation Firstly this paper gives the dynamic equations of the tethered satellite and the parent satellite From the dynamic characteristic of the tethered satellite we then find that the roll axis is coupled with the yaw axis The control torque of the roll axis can control the yaw angle But the control torque of the roll axis and pitch axis provided by the tether is very small it can not meet the accuracy requirement of the yaw angle In order to improve the attitude pointing accuracy of the tethered satellite a gradient pole is set in the negative orientation of the yaw axis The gradient pole can improve not only the attitude accuracy of roll angle and pitch angle but also that of the yaw angle indirectly As to the dynamic characteristic of the parent satellite the roll axis is coupled with the pitch axis due to the spinning angular velocity At the same

  3. Galileo satellite antenna modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Dach, Rolf; Prange, Lars; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The space segment of the European satellite navigation system Galileo currently consists of six satellites. Four of them belong to the first generation of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites whereas the other two are Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. High-precision geodetic applications require detailed knowledge about the actual phase center of the satellite and receiver antenna. The deviation of this actual phase center from a well-defined reference point is described by phase center offsets (PCOs) and phase center variations (PCVs). Unfortunately, no public information is available about the Galileo satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs, neither for the IOV, nor the FOC satellites. Therefore, conventional values for the IOV satellite antenna PCOs have been adopted for the Multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The effect of the PCVs is currently neglected and no PCOs for the FOC satellites are available yet. To overcome this deficiency in GNSS observation modeling, satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs are estimated for the Galileo IOV satellites based on global GNSS tracking data of the MGEX network and additional stations of the legacy IGS network. Two completely independent solutions are computed with the Bernese and Napeos software packages. The PCO and PCV values of the individual satellites are analyzed and the availability of two different solutions allows for an accuracy assessment. The FOC satellites are built by a different manufacturer and are also equipped with another type of antenna panel compared to the IOV satellites. Signal transmission of the first FOC satellite has started in December 2014 and activation of the second satellite is expected for early 2015. Based on the available observations PCO estimates and, optionally PCVs of the FOC satellites will be presented as well. Finally, the impact of the new antenna model on the precision and accuracy of the Galileo orbit determination is analyzed.

  4. Terrestrial structured radio emissions occurring close to the equatorial regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Galopeau, Patrick H. M.; Sawas, Sami; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques

    2015-04-01

    We study the occurrence of terrestrial radio emissions observed by the electric field experiment (ICE) onboard DEMETER micro-satellite. We principally consider the ICE observations recorded in the HF frequency range between 10 kHz and 3.175 MHz. A dynamic spectrum is recorded each half-orbit with a time and frequency resolutions, respectively, in the order of 3.25 kHz and 2.048 sec. The terrestrial structured radio emission is found to occur when the satellite is approaching the equatorial region of the Earth. It appears as a structured narrow band 'continuum' with a positive or negative low frequency drift rate, less than 1 kHz/s. The bandwidth is, on average, of about 30 kHz. We derive from our investigation the beam and the probable location of the emission source. We discuss the origin of this terrestrial radio emission and its dependence, or not, on the solar and geomagnetic activities.

  5. Modems for emerging digital cellular-mobile radio system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feher, Kamilo

    1991-01-01

    Digital modem techniques for emerging digital cellular telecommunications-mobile radio system applications are described and analyzed. In particular, theoretical performance, experimental results, principles of operation, and various architectures of pi/4-QPSK (pi/4-shifted coherent or differential QPSK) modems for second-generation US digital cellular radio system applications are presented. The spectral/power efficiency and performance of the pi/4-QPSK modems (American and Japanese digital cellular emerging standards) are studied and briefly compared to GMSK (Gaussian minimum-shift keying) modems (proposed for European DECT and GSM cellular standards). Improved filtering strategies and digital pilot-aided (digital channel sounding) techniques are also considered for pi/4-QPSK and other digital modems. These techniques could significantly improve the performance of digital cellular and other digital land mobile and satellite mobile radio systems. More spectrally efficient modem trends for future cellular/mobile (land mobile) and satellite communication systems applications are also highlighted.

  6. Case study on complex sporadic E layers observed by GPS radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, X.; Schreiner, W. S.; Zeng, Z.; Kuo, Y.-H.; Xue, X.

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of sporadic E (Es) layers has been a hot scientific topic for a long time. The GNSS (global navigation satellite system)-based radio occultation (RO) has proven to be a powerful technique for detecting the global Es layers. In this paper, we focus on some cases of complex Es layers based on the RO data from multiple missions processed in UCAR/CDAAC (University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) Data Analysis and Archive Center (CDAAC)). We first show some examples of multiple Es layers occurred in one RO event. Based on the evaluations between colocated simultaneous RO events and between RO and lidar observations, it could be concluded that some of these do manifest the multiple Es layer structures. We then show a case of the occurrence of Es in a broad region during a certain time interval. The result is then validated by independent ionosondes observations. It is possible to explain these complex Es structures using the popular wind shear theory. We could map the global Es occurrence routinely in the near future, given that more RO data will be available. Further statistical studies will enhance our understanding of the Es mechanism. The understanding of Es should benefit both Es-based long-distance communication and accurate neutral RO retrievals.

  7. Statement by Harvard Corporation Committee on Shareholder Responsibility (CCSR) Regarding Stock in China Petroleum and Chemical Corporation (Sinopec Corporation)

    E-print Network

    Schrag, Daniel

    in China Petroleum and Chemical Corporation (Sinopec Corporation) March, 2006 We are announcing today by HMC in China Petroleum and Chemical Corporation (Sinopec Corporation). The Corporation, on our Operating Company Ltd., a consortium whose partners also include China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC

  8. Corporate governance and insider trading

    E-print Network

    Rozanov, Konstantin A

    2008-01-01

    I investigate the relation between corporate governance and insider trading by corporate executives. Despite the general view that trade on non-public information adversely affects capital market participants, the impact ...

  9. Expected results of Cassini Radio Science experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, J.; Rappaport, N.

    Cassini gravity radio science experiments scheduled from February 2005 to July 2008 are expected to improve our knowledge of the Saturnian system through direct measurements of gravity parameters performed in a multidisciplinary and comparative planetary science approach. In 2005, direct mass determination will be achieved for Enceladus, Hyperion, and Dione, as well as gravity field measurement of Rhea. Detection of an ocean suspected to lie within Titan is expected to happen by 2007. However, after the two first flybys scheduled in 2006, the determination of the dimensionless moment of inertia of this body will provide scientists with enough information to build detailed models to be compared with the Galilean satellites. Density determination of all major satellites will be performed through navigation passes scheduled throughout the tour. Accurate and independent determination of Saturn's high zonal harmonics up to degree 8 will provide crucial constraints on the interior of this giant planet by the end of the initial mission. Comparison of direct mass determination with values inferred from analytical theories is very important. Besides, density distribution sampling in the Saturnian system will provide new constraints on the models of evolution of Saturn's subnebula, as well as references for compared planetology with the Jovian satellites. This is particularly timely as a mission toward Jupiter is being scheduled in the frame of NASA New Frontiers program. Fresh geophysical observations of icy satellites and the finding or absence of a deep ocean within Titan will be crucial inputs for constraining numerical models of internal and external dynamics of this category of bodies. We will especially stress out the synergy between the information provided by the Radio Science Subsystems with the other instruments onboard Cassini to leverage our understanding of the phenomena responsible for the dynamics and evolution of the icy satellites.

  10. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chung-Chi; Hsu, Yau-Heiu; Lin, Na-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    The view that satellite RNAs (satRNAs) and satellite viruses are purely molecular parasites of their cognate helper viruses has changed. The molecular mechanisms underlying the synergistic and/or antagonistic interactions among satRNAs/satellite viruses, helper viruses, and host plants are beginning to be comprehended. This review aims to summarize the recent achievements in basic and practical research, with special emphasis on the involvement of RNA silencing mechanisms in the pathogenicity, population dynamics, and, possibly, the origin(s) of these subviral agents. With further research following current trends, the comprehensive understanding of satRNAs and satellite viruses could lead to new insights into the trilateral interactions among host plants, viruses, and satellites. PMID:21994595

  11. Potential markets for advanced satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, Steven; Roberts, David; Schubert, Leroy; Smith, Brian; Sogegian, Robert; Walters, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    This report identifies trends in the volume and type of traffic offered to the U.S. domestic communications infrastructure and extrapolates these trends through the year 2011. To describe how telecommunications service providers are adapting to the identified trends, this report assesses the status, plans, and capacity of the domestic communications infrastructure. Cable, satellite, and radio components of the infrastructure are examined separately. The report also assesses the following major applications making use of the infrastructure: (1) Broadband services, including Broadband Integrated Services Digital Network (BISDN), Switched Multimegabit Data Service (SMDS), and frame relay; (2) mobile services, including voice, location, and paging; (3) Very Small Aperture Terminals (VSAT), including mesh VSAT; and (4) Direct Broadcast Satellite (DBS) for audio and video. The report associates satellite implementation of specific applications with market segments appropriate to their features and capabilities. The volume and dollar value of these market segments are estimated. For the satellite applications able to address the needs of significant market segments, the report also examines the potential of each satellite-based application to capture business from alternative technologies.

  12. Impact of the 1985 space World Administrative Radio Conference on frequency/orbit planning and use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    The 1985 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC-ORB-85) was held to determine which space radio services should be planned and which planning methods should be used. The second session of this Conference (WARC-ORB-88) will meet to develop the required plans. This paper presents the results of WARC-ORB-85, assesses the impact of those decisions, and identifies the intersessional work to be conducted by administrations and the CCIR (consultative Committee on International Radio). The major decisions of WARC-ORB-85 were: (1) the restriction of additional planning to the fixed satellite service at identified frequencies; and (2) the selection of a planning method consisting of two parts: (a) an allotment plan, and (b) improved procedures. The paper also discusses WARC-ORB-85 decisions relative to the Region 2 broadcast satellite service plans at 12 GHz, feederlink planning for Regions 1 and 3 broadcast satellites at 12 GHz, and sound broadcast satellite service.

  13. Impact of the 1985 Space World Administrative Radio Conference on frequency/orbit planning and use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    The 1985 World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC-ORB-85) was held to determine which space radio services should be planned and which planning methods should be used. The second session of this Conference (WARC-ORB-88) will meet to develop the required plans. This paper presents the results of WARC-ORB-85, assesses the impact of those decisions, and identifies the intersessional work to be conducted by administrations and the CCIR (Consultative Committee on International Radio). The major decisions of WARC-ORB-85 were: (1) the restriction of additional planning to the fixed satellite service at identified frequencies; and (2) the selection of a planning method consisting of two parts (a) an allotment plan, and (b) improved procedures. The paper also discusses WARC-ORB-85 decisions relative to the Region 2 broadcast satellite service plans at 12 GHz, feederlink planning for Regions 1 and 3 broadcast satellites at 12 GHz, and sound broadcast satellite service.

  14. Two Essays in Corporate Finance 

    E-print Network

    Rutherford, Jessica Marie

    2012-02-14

    -1 TWO ESSAYS IN CORPORATE FINANCE A Dissertation by JESSICA MARIE RUTHERFORD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY... December 2010 Major Subject: Finance Two Essays in Corporate Finance Copyright 2010 Jessica Marie Rutherford TWO ESSAYS IN CORPORATE FINANCE A Dissertation by JESSICA MARIE RUTHERFORD...

  15. Constructive Engagement with the Corporation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Many of the gravest concerns that critics of corporate culture have about the consequences of academic-corporate relationships are built on little more than ill-informed speculation, fueled by a lack of direct engagement with corporations. The solution to knowledge gap--and the key to liberation from fears of "creeping corporatization"--may…

  16. Tracking Weather Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Helen E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of weather satellites in providing an exciting, cohesive framework for students learning Earth and space science and in providing a hands-on approach to technology in the classroom. Discusses the history of weather satellites and classroom satellite tracking. (JRH)

  17. Corporate Training in Museums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Causey, Adera

    2011-01-01

    Museums often court corporate audiences through special event rentals and development and promotional partnerships. But we rarely approach them as potential adult learners. In overlooking them, we miss the potential of reaching a large number of often novice museum participants who can gain from gallery learning and develop a relationship with our…

  18. Of Corporate Bondage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgeway, James

    1975-01-01

    "While it is entirely possible that the university will continue to function as an essential arm of the giant agribusiness and energy corporations, there are, nevertheless, a wealth of opportunities for it to direct its energies to more useful purposes." The author traces universities' past involvement noting alternatives in energy and agriculture…

  19. Corporate information management guidance

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Information Management (IM) Council, IM representatives from nearly all Headquarters (HQ) organizations have been meeting over the past year as the Corporate Guidance Group (CGG) to develop useful and sound corporate information management (IM) guidance. The ability of the Department`s IM community to develop such unified guidance continues to be critical to the success of future Departmental IM planning processes and the establishment of a well-coordinated IM environment between Headquarters and field organizations. This report, with 26 specific corporate IM guidance items documented and unanimously agreed to, as well as 12 items recommended for further development and 3 items deferred for future consideration, represents a highly successful effort by the IM community. The effort has proven that the diverse DOE organizations can put aside individual preferences and work together towards a common and mutually beneficial goal. In examining most areas and issues associated with information management in the Department, they have developed specific, far-reaching, and useful guidance. The IM representatives recommend that the documented guidance items provided in this report and approved by the DOE IM Council be followed by all IM organizations. The representatives also strongly recommend that the guidance process developed by the CGG be the single process for developing corporate IM guidance.

  20. Corporate Management Invades Academe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Robert M.

    Measures taken to cut costs at the expense of the faculty and the loss in academic quality are shown to be part of a well-organized plan being adopted throughout higher education. Problems have arisen from the activities of the private or semi-private corporate consulting organization in higher education. Taken as a whole, the uncritical use of…

  1. A corporate supersonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Randall; Seebass, Richard

    1996-01-01

    This talk address the market and technology for a corporate supersonic transport. It describes a candidate configuration. There seems to be a sufficient market for such an aircraft, even if restricted to supersonic operation over water. The candidate configuration's sonic boom overpressure may be small enough to allow overland operation as well.

  2. Survey: National Environmental Satellite Service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The national Environmental Satellite Service (NESS) receives data at periodic intervals from satellites of the Synchronous Meteorological Satellite/Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite series and from the Improved TIROS (Television Infrared Observational Satellite) Operational Satellite. Within the conterminous United States, direct readout and processed products are distributed to users over facsimile networks from a central processing and data distribution facility. In addition, the NESS Satellite Field Stations analyze, interpret, and distribute processed geostationary satellite products to regional weather service activities.

  3. International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite mission analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, R. A.; Griffin, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The results are presented of the mission analysis performed by Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) in support of the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. The launch window is open for three separate periods (for a total time of 7 months) during the year extending from July 20, 1977, to July 20, 1978. The synchronous orbit shadow constraint limits the launch window to approximately 88 minutes per day. Apogee boost motor fuel was computed to be 455 pounds (206 kilograms) and on-station weight was 931 pounds (422 kilograms). The target orbit is elliptical synchronous, with eccentricity 0.272 and 24 hour period.

  4. Swedish small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundahl, Kaj; Von Schéele, Fredrik

    In 1986 the first Swedish small satellite VIKING was launched on the Ariane I rocket together with the French remote sensing satellite SPOT. This paper describes the development of the Swedish Small Satellite Program. The satellites have delivered excellent scientific data at a low cost by using streamlined project organisations, competitive procurement programs and piggy-back launch opportunities. The first micro satellite Astrid-1 was launched in January 1995 and will be followed by the launch of Astrid-2 in December 1998. The capable Odin small satellite will be launched in September 1999. SSC has completed a design study for ESA's SMART-1 probe destined to the Moon — and possibly beyond. SMART-1, planned for launch in 2001, will be used for both research and as a technology demonstrator for future projects. Future projects include micro and small satellites for ESA as Earth Explorer Opportunity Missions and for the Swedish National Space Board as galactic sky surveyors and atmospheric ozone deplition observers.

  5. Satellite altitude determination uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siry, J. W.

    1971-01-01

    Satellite altitude determination uncertainties are discussed from the standpoint of the GEOS-C satellite. GEOS-C will be tracked by a number of the conventional satellite tracking systems, as well as by two advanced systems; a satellite-to-satellite tracking system and lasers capable of decimeter accuracies which are being developed in connection with the Goddard Earth and Ocean Dynamics Applications program. The discussion is organized in terms of a specific type of GEOS-C orbit which would satisfy a number of scientific objectives including the study of the gravitational field by means of both the altimeter and the satellite-to-satellite tracking system, studies of tides, and the Gulf Stream meanders.

  6. Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory began operating in 1959, and joined the NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL in 1970. It became part of the Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics in 1975. The site near Penticton, BC has a 26 m radio telescope, a seven-antenna synthesis telescope on a 600 m baseline and two telescopes dedicated to monitoring the solar radio flux at 10.7 cm. This part of the Institu...

  7. The optical communication link outage probability in satellite formation flying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnon, Shlomi; Gill, Eberhard

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, several space systems consisting of multiple satellites flying in close formation have been proposed for various purposes such as interferometric synthetic aperture radar measurement (TerraSAR-X and the TanDEM-X), detecting extra-solar earth-like planets (Terrestrial Planet Finder-TPF and Darwin), and demonstrating distributed space systems (DARPA F6 project). Another important purpose, which is the concern of this paper, is for improving radio frequency communication to mobile terrestrial and maritime subscribers. In this case, radio frequency signals from several satellites coherently combine such that the received/transmit signal strength is increased proportionally with the number of satellites in the formation. This increase in signal strength allows to enhance the communication data rate and/or to reduce energy consumption and the antenna size of terrestrial mobile users' equipment. However, a coherent combination of signals without aligning the phases of the individual communication signals interrupts the communication and outage link between the satellites and the user. The accuracy of the phase estimation is a function of the inter-satellite laser ranging system performance. This paper derives an outage probability model of a coherent combination communication system as a function of the pointing vibration and jitter statistics of an inter-satellite laser ranging system tool. The coherent combination probability model, which could be used to improve the communication to mobile subscribers in air, sea and ground is the main importance of this work.

  8. OPENENDED CONFIGURATIONS OF RADIO TELESCOPES

    E-print Network

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    telescopes, devices that use the second observability window of radio waves. Why configurations of radioOPEN­ENDED CONFIGURATIONS OF RADIO TELESCOPES: A GEOMETRICAL ANALYSIS Vladik Kreinovich, Scott A. The quality of radio astronomical images drastically depends on where we place the radio telescopes. During

  9. OPENENDED CONFIGURATIONS OF RADIO TELESCOPES

    E-print Network

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    telescopes, devices that use the second observability window of radio waves. #12; Why configurations of radioOPEN­ENDED CONFIGURATIONS OF RADIO TELESCOPES: TOWARDS OPTIMAL DESIGN VLADIK KREINOVICH, SCOTT A, Russia ABSTRACT The quality of radio astronomical images drastically depends on where we place the radio

  10. Continuum Radio Emission and Diagnostics

    E-print Network

    White, Stephen

    Continuum Radio Emission and Diagnostics The Sun is a strong radio source (one of the first objects detected by radio telescopes) and radio observations can provide information on structures throughout the solar atmosphere. Radio techniques allow high--quality im­ ages with arcsecond resolution to be achieved

  11. The Deep Space Network as an instrument for radio science research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, S. W.; Renzetti, N. A.

    1993-01-01

    Radio science experiments use radio links between spacecraft and sensor instrumentation that is implemented in the Deep Space Network. The deep space communication complexes along with the telecommunications subsystem on board the spacecraft constitute the major elements of the radio science instrumentation. Investigators examine small changes in the phase and/or amplitude of the radio signal propagating from a spacecraft to study the atmospheric and ionospheric structure of planets and satellites, planetary gravitational fields, shapes, masses, planetary rings, ephemerides of planets, solar corona, magnetic fields, cometary comae, and such aspects of the theory of general relativity as gravitational waves and gravitational redshift.

  12. 75 FR 10439 - Cognitive Radio Technologies and Software Defined Radios

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ...10-12] Cognitive Radio Technologies and Software Defined Radios AGENCY: Federal Communications...proceeding concerning the use of open source software to implement security features in software defined radios (SDRs). While, the...

  13. Radio Frequency Interference and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Sierra

    2014-01-01

    Radio frequency interference (RFI) and radio astronomy have been closely linked since the emergence of radio astronomy as a scientific discipline in the 1930s. Even before the official establishment of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, protection against contemporary and future radio noise levels was seen as crucial to ensure success of any new observatory. My talk will examine the various local, regional, national, and international efforts enacted to protect NRAO and other American radio astronomy sites from RFI.

  14. Operating frequencies for educational satellite services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    The factors affecting the choice of transmission frequencies are identified. These include international radio regulations, natural environment, man-made environment, hardware considerations, and interconnection and spectrum space considerations. An analysis is presented of international radio regulations with emphasis on 1963 EARC and 1971 WARC frequency allocations, powerflux density restrictions, and resolutions concerning introduction of broadcasting-satellite systems. Natural-environmental effects were divided into two categories: (1) those due to transionospheric propagation, and (2) those that can be credited to the earth's atmosphere and its constituents. The frequency dependence of the signal attenuation, signal distortion, and contributions to system noise temperature due to environmental effects are discussed, and comparisons were made for frequencies of interest. Man-made environmental effects were examined in terms of various sharing limitations as well as the indigenous noise contribution to the overall system noise.

  15. The first radio astronomy from space - RAE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, M. L.

    1987-01-01

    The spacecraft design, instrumentation, and performance of the Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) satellites (RAE-1 launched to earth orbit in 1968 and RAE-2 launched to lunar orbit in 1972) are reviewed and illustrated with drawings, diagrams, and graphs of typical data. Consideration is given to the three pairs of antennas, the Ryle-Vonberg and burst radiometers, and problems encountered with antenna deployment and observing patterns. Results summarized include observations of type III solar bursts, the spectral distribution of cosmic noise in broad sky regions, Jupiter at low frequencies, and auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) from the earth. The importance of avoiding the AKR bands in designing future space observatories is stressed.

  16. Industrial Analytics Corporation

    SciTech Connect

    Industrial Analytics Corporation

    2004-01-30

    The lost foam casting process is sensitive to the properties of the EPS patterns used for the casting operation. In this project Industrial Analytics Corporation (IAC) has developed a new low voltage x-ray instrument for x-ray radiography of very low mass EPS patterns. IAC has also developed a transmitted visible light method for characterizing the properties of EPS patterns. The systems developed are also applicable to other low density materials including graphite foams.

  17. SERIES - Satellite Emission Range Inferred Earth Surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.; Spitzmesser, D. J.; Buennagel, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    The Satellite Emission Range Inferred Earth Surveying (SERIES) concept is based on the utilization of NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS) radio transmissions without any satellite modifications and in a totally passive mode. The SERIES stations are equipped with lightweight 1.5 m diameter dish antennas mounted on trailers. A series baseline measurement accuracy demonstration is considered, taking into account a 100 meter baseline estimation from approximately one hour of differential Doppler data. It is planned to conduct the next phase of experiments on a 150 m baseline. Attention is given to details regarding future baseline measurement accuracy demonstrations, aspects of ionospheric calibration in connection with subdecimeter baseline accuracy requirements of geodesy, and advantages related to the use of the differential Doppler or pseudoranging mode.

  18. Propagation considerations in satellite communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brussaard, Gert; Rogers, David V.

    1990-07-01

    Radio wave propagation phenomena that affect the performance of satellite communication systems are concisely discussed to introduce some topics in propagation research related to satellite systems design and to illustrate related problems and uncertainties. The focus is on troposphere effects. A summary of relevant propagation impairments is supplied, and general classes of impairments, the physical cause of each, and the major importance of each for sattelite systems are given Some impairments in the table are critically important of each for certain systems applications. For example, attenuation due to rainfall can be substantial for significant percentages of the time on 30/20-GHz propagation paths and will be the dominant path impairment for most Ka-band systems. Appropriate literature sources are referenced for the additional details that will be required for many applications.

  19. Satellite Threat Warning and Attack Reporting

    SciTech Connect

    Hilland, D.; Phipps, G.; Jingle, C.; Newton, G.

    1997-12-31

    The Air Force Research Laboratory`s Satellite Threat Warning and Attack Reporting (STW/AR) program will provide technologies for advanced threat warning and reporting of radio frequency (RF) and laser threats. The STW/AR program objectives are: (a) develop cost- effective technologies to detect, identify, locate, characterize, and report attacks or interference against U.S. and Allied satellites. (b) demonstrate innovative, light-weight, low-power, laser and RF sensors. The program focuses on the demonstration of RF and laser sensors. The RF sensor effort includes the investigation of interferometric antenna arrays, multi-arm spiral and butler matrix antennas, wideband receivers, adaptive processors, and improved processing algorithms. The laser sensor effort includes the investigation of alternative detectors, broadband grating and optical designs, active pixel sensing, and improved processing algorithms.

  20. Radio frequency observations of lightning discharges by the forte satellite.

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, X.; Jacobson, A. R.; Light, T.; Suszcynsky, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    FORTE-observed VHF signatures for different lightning discharges are presented. For in-cloud discharges, a pulse pair is typically recorded and is named a 'transionospheric pulse pair' (TIPP). Many intense TIPPs are coherent and polarized, whereas initial and dart leaders do not show a recognizable degree of polarization. TIPPs are optically weaker than cloud-to-ground (CG) strokes, and stronger VHF TIPPs are optically darker. About 10% of CG strokes, mostly over seawater, produce extremely narrow, powerful VHF pulses at the very beginning of the return strokes. These narrow pulses are found to form an upward beam pattern.

  1. Satellite Communications with NRAO Green Bank Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, John M.; Ford, H. Alyson; Watts, Galen

    2014-11-01

    The National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Green Bank facility has several medium and large antennas that are available for satellite communications. The 100 meter Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), the largest and most sensitive antenna on site, is capable of receiving signals at frequencies as high as 86 GHz. In addition to the GBT are the fully operational 43 meter, 20 meter, and 13.7 meter antennas, and three mothballed 26 meter antennas. A transmitter could be fitted to any of these antennas for spacecraft uplinks. We discuss the characteristics of these antennas and possible operational models for future planetary science mission support.

  2. Yakov Alpert: Sputnik-1 and the first satellite ionospheric experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. D.; Sinelnikov, V. M.; Alpert, S. N.

    2015-06-01

    The world first scientific space experiment was carried out in 1957 during the flight of the First Artificial Earth Satellite (AES) - Sputnik-1. It was an ionospheric experiment performed at IZMIRAN under the direction of Prof. Ya.L. Alpert (1911-2010). The sunrise and sunset variations in the AES radio signal were recorded to determine the distribution of electron density in the topside ionosphere (above the maximum). The experiment demonstrated the capabilities of the satellite radio beacon method, which is now very important and widely used for studying the ionosphere. The paper describes the history and results of that experiment as well as the contribution of Ya.L. Alpert to ionospheric research. Ya.L. Alpert was one of the most famous and influential radiophysicists, the author of many fundamental studies and a number of classic books on the theory of propagation of electromagnetic waves, interaction of artificial bodies with ionospheric plasma, ionospheric radio scattering, and the use of satellite radio beacon methods for studying the ionosphere. We give in the paper some extracts from Ya.L. Alpert's research notes. They include the history of the publication of the results from recordings of the Sputnik-1 transmitter signals, and described the method of data analysis. The first scientific publication based on Sputnik-1 data is given in the abbreviated summary. At the end of the paper there is an outline of Ya.L. Alpert's scientific biography.

  3. Sputnik 1 and the First Satellite Ionospheric Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, Vyacheslav; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Alpert, Svetlana

    The world's first scientific space experiment was carried out in 1957 during the flight of the first Artificial Earth Satellite (AES) - Sputnik 1. It was an ionospheric experiment performed at IZMIRAN under the direction of Prof. Ya.L.Alpert (1911-2010). The sunrise and sunset variations in the AES radio signal were recorded in order to determine the distribution of electron density in the topside ionosphere (above the maximum). The experiment demonstrated the capabilities of the satellite radio beacon method, which is now very important and widely used for studying the ionosphere. Our report submitted to the COSPAR General Assembly in Russia describes the history and results of that experiment, as well as some other contributions by Ya.L.Alpert to ionospheric research. Yakov L.Alpert was one of the most famous and influential radiophysicists of his time, the author of many fundamental studies and of a number of classic books on the theory of propagation of electromagnetic waves, interaction of artificial bodies with ionospheric plasmas, ionospheric radio scattering, and the use of satellite radio beacon methods for studying the ionosphere.

  4. First LEO Satellite Constellation Based on GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svehla, D.; Rothacher, M.

    2005-12-01

    In the beginning, an overview is given covering precise orbit determination (POD) of Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) satellites using GPS. Kinematic and reduced-dynamic POD approaches and results are presented for a single LEO satellite like CHAMP and for the first LEO formation flying in the case of the two GRACE satellites. It is shown that, when forming a GPS baseline in space between the two GRACE satellites, almost all ambiguities can be resolved to their integer values, leading to highly accurate orbit differences between the GRACE satellites on the two-millimeter level. The Taiwan-US mission FORMOSAT3/COSMIC will be the first mission at LEO altitudes with 6 satellites flying in a constellation making use of onboard GPS receivers. By forming GPS baselines between these 6 LEO satellites and by fixing ambiguities, a unique GPS network in space can be formed. Based on such a LEO network, orbits of the GPS satellites can be estimated simultaneously with the orbits of the LEO satellites without using measurements from the ground GPS network. However, as our simulation study shows, the orbit of one reference LEO satellite has to be kept fixed and assumed to be estimated, e.g., using SLR measurement. By adding GPS data from the ground IGS network, the strength of the whole system is considerably increased and the impact of a LEO constellation on the determination of global IGS parameters like Earth rotation, station coordinates, troposphere zenith delays and the orbits of the GPS satellites can be demonstrated. The simulation shows that FORMOSAT3/COSMIC satellites may have great impact on the IGS processing. Because SLR measurements are standard to externally validate satellite orbits and can easily indicate systematic errors or problems with attitude or GPS antenna characteristics, such satellites should be equipped with SLR reflectors. In addition, results obtained applying higher-order ionosphere corrections may be tested using LEO POD and may externally be validated by means of SLR measurements. The quality of radio occultation results depends critically on the quality of the orbits and fast near-real time POD. A reduced-dynamic POD approach based on Fourier series is presented. In contrast to the present POD approach based on the estimation of small velocity changes, it provides orbits with continuous first and second time derivatives (velocity and acceleration). This POD approach can be applied for both, near real-time and post-processed orbit determination and has the additional advantage that, when introducing a high-quality gravity field model (e.g. from GRACE), the non-conservative accelerations (air-drag, solar radiation) can be used to determine, e.g., air-densities or residual temporal gravity field variations. The FORMOSAT3/COSMIC mission poses a special challenge for POD due to the two sideways-pointing POD antennas. The GPS measurements from both GPS antennas have to be combined and processed together, as they are affected by different system delays. This problem may be critical when forming baselines between the LEO satellites and may degrade the accuracy of orbit determination. In this case the data pre-processing is also more difficult than for a zenith pointing GPS antenna. Using simulated GPS data, this problem is addressed and the impact on POD performance is presented.

  5. PARTNeR for Teaching and Learning Radio Astronomy Basics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquerizo, Juan Ángel

    2010-10-01

    NASA has three satellite tracking stations around the world: CDSCC (Canberra, Australia), GDSCC (Goldstone, USA) and MDSCC (Madrid, Spain). One of the antennas located at MDSCC, DSS-61, is not used for satellite tracking any more and thanks to an agreement between INTA (Instituto Nacional de TA~l'cnica Aeroespacial) and NASA, it has been turned into an educational radio telescope. PARTNeR (Proyecto Académico con el RadioTelescopio de NASA en Robledo, Academic Project with the NASA Radio Telescope at Robledo) is a High School and University radio astronomy educational program that allows teachers and students to control this 34-meter radio telescope and conduct radio astronomical observations via the Internet. As radio astronomy is not a popular subject and astronomy has little presence in the High School Curriculum, teachers need specific training in those subjects to implement PARTNeR. Thus, High School teachers joining the project take a course to learn about the science of radio astronomy and how to use the antenna in their classrooms. Also, teachers are provided with some learning activities they can do with their students. These lesson plans are focused on the implementation of the project within an interdisciplinary framework. All educational resources are available on PARTNeR website. PARTNeR is an inquiry based approach to science education. Nowadays, students can join in three different observational programmes: variability studies in quasars, studies of radio-bursts in X-ray binaries (microquasars), and mapping of radio sources in the galactic plane. Nevertheless, any other project can be held after an evaluation by the scientific committee. The operational phase of the project started in the academic year 2003-04. Since then, 85 High Schools, seven Universities and six societies of amateur astronomers have been involved in the project. During the 2004-09 period, 103 High School teachers from Spain and Portugal have attended the training courses, and 105 radio astronomical remote observations have been performed with users. Until now, more than 2,000 students have been involved in radio astronomical observations.

  6. Radio Emission from Exoplanets

    E-print Network

    Samuel J. George; Ian R. Stevens

    2008-04-24

    We present results from new low frequency observations of two extrasolar planetary systems (Epsilon Eridani and HD128311) taken at 150 MHz with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). We do not detect either system, but are able to place tight upper limits on their low frequency radio emission.

  7. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1984-12-25

    Disclosed is a long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator. 5 figs.

  8. The Radio Jove Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    The Radio love Project is a hands-on education and outreach project in which students, or any other interested individuals or groups build a radio telescope from a kit, operate the radio telescope, transmit the resulting signals through the internet if desired, analyze the results, and share the results with others through archives or general discussions among the observers. Radio love is intended to provide an introduction to radio astronomy for the observer. The equipment allows the user to observe radio signals from Jupiter, the Sun, the galaxy, and Earth-based radiation both natural and man-made. The project was started through a NASA Director's Discretionary Fund grant more than ten years ago. it has continued to be carried out through the dedicated efforts of a group of mainly volunteers. Dearly 1500 kits have been distributed throughout the world. Participation can also be done without building a kit. Pre-built kits are available. Users can also monitor remote radio telescopes through the internet using free downloadable software available through the radiosky.com website. There have been many stories of prize-winning projects, inspirational results, collaborative efforts, etc. We continue to build the community of observers and are always open to new thoughts about how to inspire the observers to still greater involvement in the science and technology associated with Radio Jove.

  9. Writing for Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tupper, Marianna S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a 24-hour commercial radio station simulation class project for eighth-grade language arts. Students wrote their own scripts, chose music and were disc jockeys on their own music and talk shows, and prepared news and traffic reports. Guest speakers from actual commercial radio came in to discuss issues such as advertising, censorship,…

  10. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Henry D. (Orinda, CA); Fugitt, Jock A. (Berkeley, CA); Howard, Donald R. (Danville, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  11. Imaging the Radio Universe

    E-print Network

    Hibbard, John

    -rays, and microwaves, etc). · Sound waves are pressure waves. Require a medium (air, water, etc.) to travel through. · Sound is created by a pressure wave moving a membrane in your ear. Your brain turns the vibration of this membrane into "sound". MediumEar Sound Radio Waves are not Sound Waves #12;You do not listen to radio waves

  12. World atlas of satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansky, D. M.

    Features of the 17 services offered by planned or operational satellites in geostationary earth orbit (GEO) are described. The orbital inclinations, controlling organizations, and frequency bands employed by the 143 spacecraft in GEO as of 1979 are provided, together with the typical operational parameters of the 6/4 GHz transmitters and receivers. The spacecraft have nominal design lifetimes of 10-15 yr and employ FDM-FM, digital, SCPC, and video transmission techniques. Attention is given to the technology developments affecting GEO satellite system characteristics and the capacity of the GEO. Intersatellite service is characterized, as are frequency allocations and applications, and the space operation service involving frequency bands dedicated to the telemetry, tracking, and telecommand of spacecraft. Consideration is given to mobile satellite services, satellite broadcasting services, and satellite navigation, earth exploration, and positioning services. Finally, meteorological, standard frequency and time signal, and space research satellite services are explored, noting that the latter do not usually use GEO positions.

  13. Satellite-aided land mobile communications system implementation considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leroy, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    It was proposed that a satellite-based land mobile radio system could effectively extend the terrestrial cellular mobile system into rural and remote areas. The market, technical and economic feasibility for such a system is studied. Some of the aspects of implementing an operational mobile-satellite system are discussed. In particular, two key factors in implementation are examined: (1) bandwidth requirements; and (2) frequency sharing. Bandwidth requirements are derived based on the satellite antenna requirements, modulation characteristics and numbers of subscribers. Design trade-offs for the satellite system and potential implementation scenarios are identified. Frequency sharing is examined from a power flux density and modulation viewpoint. Previously announced in STAR as N82-25290

  14. Analyses for a Modernized GNSS Radio Occultation Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griggs, Erin R.

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) is a remote sensing technique that exploits existing navigation signals to make global, real-time observations of the Earth's atmosphere. A specialized RO receiver makes measurements of signals originating from a transmitter onboard a GNSS spacecraft near the Earth's horizon. The radio wave is altered during passage through the Earth's atmosphere. The changes in the received signals are translated to the refractivity characteristics of the intervening medium, which enable the calculation of atmospheric pressure, temperature, and humidity. Current satellite missions employing GNSS RO have provided invaluable and timely information for weather and climate applications. Existing constellations of occultation satellites, however, are aging and producing fewer quality measurements. Replacement fleets of RO satellites are imperative to sustain and improve the global coverage and operational impact achieved by the current generation of RO satellites. This dissertation describes studies that facilitate the development of next generation RO receivers and satellite constellations. Multiple research efforts were conducted that aim to improve the quantity and quality of measurements made by a future satellite-based RO collection system. These studies range in magnitude and impact, and begin with a receiver development study using ground-based occultation data. Future RO constellations and collection opportunities were simulated and autonomous occultation prediction and scheduling capabilities were implemented. Finally, a comprehensive study was conducted to characterize the stability of the GNSS atomic frequency standards. Oscillator stability for a subset of satellites in the GNSS was found to be of insufficient quality at timescales relevant to RO collections and would degrade the atmospheric profiling capabilities of an RO system utilizing these signals. Recommendations for a high-rate clock correction network are proposed, which provides significant improvement to the fractional errors in the derived refractivity, pressure, and temperature values caused by the oscillator instabilities.

  15. Satellite services system overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rysavy, G.

    1982-01-01

    The benefits of a satellite services system and the basic needs of the Space Transportation System to have improved satellite service capability are identified. Specific required servicing equipment are discussed in terms of their technology development status and their operative functions. Concepts include maneuverable television systems, extravehicular maneuvering unit, orbiter exterior lighting, satellite holding and positioning aid, fluid transfer equipment, end effectors for the remote manipulator system, teleoperator maneuvering system, and hand and power tools.

  16. Radio efficiency of pulsars

    SciTech Connect

    Szary, Andrzej; Melikidze, George I.; Gil, Janusz; Zhang, Bing; Xu, Ren-Xin E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2014-03-20

    We investigate radio emission efficiency, ?, of pulsars and report a near-linear inverse correlation between ? and the spin-down power, E-dot , as well as a near-linear correlation between ? and pulsar age, ?. This is a consequence of very weak, if any, dependences of radio luminosity, L, on pulsar period, P, and the period derivative, P-dot , in contrast to X-ray or ?-ray emission luminosities. The analysis of radio fluxes suggests that these correlations are not due to a selection effect, but are intrinsic to the pulsar radio emission physics. We have found that, although with a large variance, the radio luminosity of pulsars is ?10{sup 29} erg s{sup –1}, regardless of the position in the P-- P-dot diagram. Within such a picture, a model-independent statement can be made that the death line of radio pulsars corresponds to an upper limit in the efficiency of radio emission. If we introduce the maximum value for radio efficiency into the Monte Carlo-based population syntheses we can reproduce the observed sample using the random luminosity model. Using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test on a synthetic flux distribution reveals a high probability of reproducing the observed distribution. Our results suggest that the plasma responsible for generating radio emission is produced under similar conditions regardless of pulsar age, dipolar magnetic field strength, and spin-down rate. The magnetic fields near the pulsar surface are likely dominated by crust-anchored, magnetic anomalies, which do not significantly differ among pulsars, leading to similar conditions for generating electron-positron pairs necessary to power radio emission.

  17. 12 CFR 704.11 - Corporate Credit Union Service Organizations (Corporate CUSOs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... have led courts to “pierce the corporate veil,” such as inadequate capitalization, lack of corporate... corporate CUSO. This opinion must address factors that have led courts to “pierce the corporate veil,”...

  18. 12 CFR 704.11 - Corporate Credit Union Service Organizations (Corporate CUSOs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...corporate CUSO. This opinion must address factors that have led courts to “pierce the corporate veil,” such as inadequate...corporate CUSO. This opinion must address factors that have led courts to “pierce the corporate veil,” such as...

  19. Of Enterprise Principles & Corporate Groups: Does Corporate Law Reach Human Rights?

    E-print Network

    Harper Ho, Virginia E.

    2013-03-01

    enterprise. It argues that notwithstanding the centrality of entity-level principles within corporate law, some dimensions of corporate law in fact extend across the formal internal legal boundaries of the multinational corporation. Although corporate law...

  20. Satellite Antenna Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Through the Technology Affiliates Program at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the ACTS antenna system was transferred from experimental testing status to commercial development with KVH Industries, Inc. The ACTS design enables mobile satellite antennas to remain pointed at the satellite, regardless of the motion or vibration on which it is mounted. KVH's first product based on the ACTS design is a land-mobile satellite antenna system that will enable direct broadcast satellite television aboard moving trucks, recreational vehicles, trains, and buses. Future products could include use in broadcasting, emergency medical and military vehicles.

  1. Communication satellites in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, J. D.

    A brief history of the Canadian involvement with domestic communications satellites is presented. Canada is the first country to deploy, through Telesat Canada, a geostationary domestic satellite system. This system, ANIK-A, operates within the 6/4 GHz band, and provides both telephony and television distribution. The limitations of the 6/4 GHz band prompted the Canadian government to join NASA and ESA in the design and construction of an experimental satellite operating in the 14/12 GHz band. The resulting spacecraft (CTS/HERMES) was used in 36 different Canadian Communications experiments. The experiments included were: telemedicine; teleeducation; community communications; administration; and satellite television broadcasting.

  2. The Canadian Corporate-Academic Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, James

    2010-01-01

    As universities more aggressively embrace corporate values, corporate management practices, corporate labor-relations policies, and corporate money, faculty associations face troubling challenges. The new reality is particularly hostile to academic freedom, and people see that hostility in the actions of corporate funders and university…

  3. Corporate Support of Higher Education, 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Financial Aid to Education, New York, NY.

    This report presents some of the results of the first annual Survey of Corporate Contributions. The information included in this document relates primarily to corporate support of education. Tables cover: (1) national trends in corporate pre-tax net income and contributions; (2) corporate support of education as a percentage of total corporate

  4. Mapping the Galilean satellites of Jupiter with Voyager data.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batson, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    The four Galilean satellites of Jupiter are being mapped using image data from the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. The maps are published at several scales and in several versions. Preliminary maps at 1:25,000,000-required for mission planning and preliminary science reports-were compiled within three weeks of data acquisition and have been published. Later maps incorporate Rand Corporation photogrammetric triangulations. - from Authors

  5. Effects of implanted radio transmitters with percutaneous antennas on the behavior of Canada Geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, J.W.; Ruhl, G.A.; Pearce, J.M.; Mulcahy, D.M.; Tomeo, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    We examined whether surgically-implanted radio transmitters with percutaneous antennas affected behavior of Lesser Canada Geese (Branta canadensis parvipes) in Anchorage, Alaska. We implanted either a 26-g VHF radio transmitter or a larger VHF radio that was the same mass (35 g) and shape as a satellite transmitter in the coelom of adult females captured during molt in 2000. A control group of females was marked with leg bands. We simultaneously observed behavior of radio-marked and control females from 4-62 d following capture. We observed no differences in the proportion of time birds in different treatments allocated among grazing, resting, comfort, walking, and alert behavior. Females in different treatments spent a similar proportion of time in the water. Implantation of radio transmitters did not affect the frequency of agonistic interactions. We conclude that coelomic radio transmitters with percutaneous antennas had minimal effects on the behavior of Canada Geese.

  6. Multiple Radios for Fast Rendezvous in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-print Network

    Chu, Xiaowen

    . The existing work on rendezvous implicitly assumes that each cognitive user is equipped with one radio (i1 Multiple Radios for Fast Rendezvous in Cognitive Radio Networks Lu Yu, Hai Liu, Yiu-Wing Leung, Xiaowen Chu, and Zhiyong Lin Abstract--Rendezvous is a fundamental operation in cognitive radio networks

  7. Techniques and Technology Article Optimizing Radio Retention and Minimizing Radio

    E-print Network

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Techniques and Technology Article Optimizing Radio Retention and Minimizing Radio Impacts the duration of transmitter attachment and minimizing the impacts of radios on the behavior and demography of the study animal. We tested 4 methods of radio attachment for a breeding population of upland sandpipers

  8. Multiple Radios for Effective Rendezvous in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-print Network

    Chu, Xiaowen

    Multiple Radios for Effective Rendezvous in Cognitive Radio Networks Lu Yu1 , Hai Liu1 , Yiu in cognitive radio networks (CRNs) for establishing a communication link on a commonly-available channel is equipped with one radio (i.e., one wireless transceiver). As the cost of wireless transceivers is dropping

  9. Radio Science in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefeuvre, Francois; Mc Kinnel, Lee-Anne; Chukwuma, Victor; Amory-Mazaudier, Christine

    2010-05-01

    Radio science activities covered by URSI (International Radio Science Union) are briefly reviewed. They encompass the knowledge and study of all aspects of electromagnetic fields and waves in a wide frequency range running from micro pulsation frequencies (i.e. from ~1 mHz) to Terahertz. The topics include: electromagnetic measurements and standards, electromagnetic theory and applications, radio-communication systems and signal processing, electronics and Photonics, electromagnetic environment and interference, wave propagation and remote sensing, ionospheric radio and propagation, waves in plasmas, radio astronomy, and electromagnetics in biology and medicine. The main radio science activities conducted by the URSI national Committees of South Africa, Egypt and Nigeria, and by African radio scientists groups gathered in GIRGEA (Groupe International de Recherche en Géophysique Europe Afrique) are reviewed. The emphasis is put on the activities developed in the context of the IHY programme and of the SCINDA network for forecasting ionospheric irregularities that adversely impact communication and navigation systems in the low latitude regions.

  10. The European Satellite Users' Association as an education broadcaster on Olympus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groombridge, Brian

    1989-05-01

    The possibilities opened to educators by the offer of transmission time on the Olympus DBS (Direct Broadcast Satellite) are outlined. The need for proper organization and funding of potential education and training programs is stressed. Eurostep, a cooperative association for educators using satellites is introduced. New markets for tele-education in the fields of medical consultation, vocational and corporate training, and language teaching are described. The need for cooperation between various tele-education programs is stressed.

  11. Extragalactic Radio Jets and Intergalactic Medium 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birkinshaw, Mark

    2000-01-01

    During the mid 1990s, the ROSAT satellite provided the highest resolution X-ray imaging, with useful X-ray spectroscopy, and excellent sensitivity. ROSAT"s PSPC and HRI instruments gave us our first high-quality data on the AGN phenomenon in nearby galaxies - the central theme of this research project. Initially this project concentrated on separating the AGN-related component of the X-ray emission from thermal radiation from the surrounding atmospheres in radio galaxies. There was ample reason to believe that this separation would be possible, although earlier work had taken the view that the X-ray emission from radio galaxies is either wholly AGN-related (and hence of sub-arcsec scale), or wholly from the galaxy and cluster atmospheres (and hence of scales - 10 arcsec or more in the low-redshift radio galaxies that we chose to study). First with the PSPC, and then with the HRI, we proved that a wide range of AGN core X ray emissivities could be found, and that the generic radio galaxy produces both AGN-related and atmosphere-related X-radiation. We demonstrated that there is a close relationship between the core X-ray power and the core radio power, and found instances in which the hot atmospheres of the galaxies must be participating in cooling flows, and other cases where those atmospheres are relatively stable. In some cases, there is a clear active relationship between the extended radio emission and the X-ray atmospheres: thus in NGC 326, we interpret the distorted radio structure as evidence of buoyancy as the radio plasma rises through the cluster atmosphere. In 3C 449, we can see that the radio plasma is displacing the X-ray emitting gas. In a further case (NGC 1265), we hoped that the motion of a radio galaxy through a cluster atmosphere would be apparent though the wake that it might establish - unfortunately, other structure in the atmosphere of the Perseus cluster tends to dominate our X-ray image, and no useful limits could be placed on the strength of the wake. In the light of so-called "unified" models of AGN, it is expected that the low-power radio galaxies studied under these programmes are the unbeamed counterparts of BL Lac objects. Accordingly, we predicted that BL Lac objects, as a class, should show X-ray halos from atmospheres similar to those associated with radio galaxies. The difficulty with studying this is that BL Lac objects tend to be X-ray bright, and the halos then vanish under the wings of the point response function. We found a BL Lac with less of a dynamic range problem, mapped it with the ROSAT HRI, and duly found an atmosphere (Hardcastle et al. 1999). Unfortunately for unification models, this atmosphere is exceptionally dense, so that it must be participating in an intense cooling flow. The implications of this for unification models are far from clear, and further work is under way.

  12. Communications technology satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A description of the Communications Technology Satellite (CTS), its planned orbit, its experiments, and associated ground facilities was given. The communication experiments, to be carried out by a variety of groups in both the United States and Canada, include tele-education, tele-medicine, community interaction, data communications and broadcasting. A historical summary of communications satellite development was also included.

  13. Audio direct broadcast satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    Satellite sound broadcasting is, as the name implies, the use of satellite techniques and technology to broadcast directly from space to low-cost, consumer-quality receivers the types of sound programs commonly received in the AM and FM broadcast bands. It would be a ubiquitous service available to the general public in the home, in the car, and out in the open.

  14. Signals from Communications Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomsen, Volker

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the Doppler effect for relative motion between a source of waves and an observer and the orbital dynamics of communications satellites. Presents preliminary calculations of the satellite's altitude and linear velocity using only the concepts of the Doppler shift and the mechanics of motion in a circular path. (JRH)

  15. Satellite Teleconference Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elgin Community Coll., IL.

    The vocational education satellite teleconference project accomplished two goals: (1) identified, acquired, copied, and distributed to the Illinois Vocational Curriculum Center 100 marketing or training videotapes for staff development and classroom use; and (2) provided from 15-25 variable time (1- to 3-hour) satellite teleconferences in four…

  16. Satellite-aided mobile communications, experiments, applications and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. E.; Frey, R. L.; Lewis, J. R.; Milton, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    NASA's ATS-series of satellites were used in a series of communications and position fixing experiments with automotive vehicles, ships and aircraft. Applications of the communications were demonstrated and evaluated for public services including law enforcement, search and rescue, and medical emergency, and for commercial uses in the land and maritime transportation industries. The technical success of the experiments and the demonstrated potential value of the communications prompted a study that concluded an operational satellite-aided system would be a valuable augmentation of planned trunking or cellular type terrestrial mobile radio telephone systems.

  17. Search and rescue satellite-aided tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trudell, B.; Gutwein, J. M.; Vollmers, R.; Wammer, D.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of Sarsat is to demonstrate that satellites can greatly facilitate the monitoring, detection, and location of distress incidents alerted by Emergency Locator Transmitters (ELTs) and Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs) carried on commercial, military, and general aviation aircraft and some marine vessels. The detection and location will be accomplished by relaying, via satellite, ELT/EPIRB distress information to ground stations, which will complete the data processing and forward alert and position location data to rescue coordination services. This paper presents a Sarsat system description and a summary of Coast Guard and USAF objectives for the initial demonstration and evaluation tests of Sarsat.

  18. AB Levitrons and their Applications to Earth's Motionless Satellites

    E-print Network

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Author offers the new and distinctly revolutionary method of levitation in artificial magnetic field. It is shown that a very big space station and small satellites may be suspended over the Earth's surface and used as motionless radio-TV translators, telecommunication boosters, absolute geographic position locators, personal and mass entertainment and as planet-observation platforms. Presented here is the theory of big AB artificial magnetic field and levitation in it is generally developed. Computation of three macro-projects: space station at altitude 100 km, TV-communication antenna at height 500 m, and multi-path magnetic highway. Key words: levitation, AB Levitrons, motionless space satellite.

  19. AB Levitrons and their Applications to Earth's Motionless Satellites

    E-print Network

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-08-18

    Author offers the new and distinctly revolutionary method of levitation in artificial magnetic field. It is shown that a very big space station and small satellites may be suspended over the Earth's surface and used as motionless radio-TV translators, telecommunication boosters, absolute geographic position locators, personal and mass entertainment and as planet-observation platforms. Presented here is the theory of big AB artificial magnetic field and levitation in it is generally developed. Computation of three macro-projects: space station at altitude 100 km, TV-communication antenna at height 500 m, and multi-path magnetic highway. Key words: levitation, AB Levitrons, motionless space satellite.

  20. Corporate Support of Education: Some Strings Attached

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malott, Robert H.

    1978-01-01

    Corporate self-interest should guide corporate giving. Managers of publicly held corporations have the right, the capability, and the obligation to establish a philosophical screen to use in determining how shareholders' money is to be donated. (Author/MLF)

  1. Corporate U. Takes the Job Training Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Discusses corporations such as Sears, Motorola, Saturn, and Intel that have created their own corporate universities to train and retrain their workers. Highlights Motorola, the largest of the corporate universities. (JOW)

  2. 77 FR 45352 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ...The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change the community of license: NORTHSTAR BROADCATING CORPORATION, Station WRSV, Facility ID 54823, BPH-20120530AFQ, From ROCKY MOUNT, NC, To ELM CITY, NC; SIERRA RADIO, INC., Station KVXX, Facility ID 31618, BPH- 20101004ACX, From QUINCY, CA, To CONCOW,...

  3. 76 FR 46294 - Radio Broadcasting Services; AM or FM Proposals To Change the Community of License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ...The following applicants filed AM or FM proposals to change the community of license: ALEX MEDIA, INC., Station NEW, Facility ID 189554, BNPH-20110602AAW, From BLANCA, CO, To AVONDALE, CO; BLACK CROW RADIO, LLC, DEBTOR-IN-POSSESSION, Station WKRO-FM, Facility ID 5464, BPH-20110609ADM, From EDGEWATER, FL, To PORT ORANGE, FL; ETHER MINING CORPORATION, Station KPSF, Facility ID 161373,......

  4. The First Wave: The Beginnings of Radio in Canadian Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, George H.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes one of the first developments and deployment of radio for distance learning and education in Canada, beginning in the early 1920s. Anticipating a recent initiative of public-private partnerships, the impetus, infrastructure, and initial programs were provided by a large corporation. Description of the system, its purpose,…

  5. Optimization of Satellite Constellation Reconfiguration

    E-print Network

    Optimization of Satellite Constellation Reconfiguration by Uriel Scialom Submitted Students #12;2 #12;Optimization of Satellite Constellation Reconfiguration by Uriel Scialom Submitted for the degree of Master of Science in Aeronautics and Astronautics Abstract Traditional satellite constellation

  6. Experimental Satellite Quantum Communications

    E-print Network

    Giuseppe Vallone; Davide Bacco; Daniele Dequal; Simone Gaiarin; Vincenza Luceri; Giuseppe Bianco; Paolo Villoresi

    2014-06-16

    Quantum Communications on planetary scale require complementary channels including ground and satellite links. The former have progressed up to commercial stage using fiber-cables, while for satellite links, the absence of terminals in orbit has impaired theirs development. However, the demonstration of the feasibility of such links is crucial for designing space payloads and to eventually enable the realization of protocols such as quantum-key-distribution (QKD) and quantum teleportation along satellite-to-ground or intersatellite links. We demonstrated the faithful transmission of qubits from space to ground by exploiting satellite corner cube retroreflectors acting as transmitter in orbit, obtaining a low error rate suitable for QKD. We also propose a two-way QKD protocol exploiting modulated retroreflectors that necessitates a minimal payload on satellite, thus facilitating the expansion of Space Quantum Communications.

  7. A satellite for Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, John D. R.

    In April 1990, an American satellite will be launched by China on the Long March 3 rocket. This satellite, called AsiaSat 1 will provide domestic telecommunications service to the countries of Asia. AsiaSat 1 is designed to provide satellite communications services to China, Thailand and Pakistan. These services will also be available for the use of neighboring countries such as Korea, Hong Kong, Burma and Nepal. As an independently financed satellite, it will provide services to each of these countries on an equal access basis and will be shared by these countries depending on their needs. The satellite's 24 C-band transponders will be leased or sold to customers in each of these countries. Transponders will be used for many purposes including back-up to national telephone networks, new private network services and the distribution of television programs.

  8. Experimental and theoretical analysis of the ionospheric impact on the amplitude and phase oscillations of GPS signals in the satellite-to-satellite and satellite-to ground communication links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelyev, A. G.; Zhang, K.; Liou, Y.; Wang, C.; Wickert, J.; Schmidt, T.; Pavelyev, A. A.; Kuleshov, Yu.

    2012-04-01

    By using the CHAllenge Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) radio occultation (RO) data, a description of different types of the ionospheric impacts on the RO signals at the altitudes 30-90 km of the RO ray perigee is given and compared with the results of measurements obtained earlier in the satellite-to-Earth communication link at frequency 1.5415 GHz. An analytical model is introduced for describing propagation of radio waves in a stratified medium consisting of sectors with spherically symmetric refractivity distribution. This model gives analytical expressions for the phase delay, eikonal, bending angle, and refractive attenuation of radio waves given and is applied to the analysis of radio wave propagation phenomena along an extended path including the atmosphere and two parts of the ionosphere. Analytical model can be used for analytical ray tracing. Analytical ray tracing can control different regimes of the GPS signal propagation (multipath, diffraction, waveguide, etc.) and can be performed in general case for the analysis of radio communication and GPS navigation in trans-ionospheric links (satellite-to-satellite, satellite-to-Earth).The model explains significant amplitude and phase variations at altitudes 30-90 km of the RO ray perigee and attributes them to inclined ionospheric layers. Based on this analytical model, an innovative technique is introduced to locate layers in the atmosphere and ionosphere. A necessary and sufficient criterion is obtained for a layer to be located at the radio occultation (RO) ray perigee. The displacement of an ionospheric or atmospheric layer from the RO ray perigee can be assessed both, qualitatively and quantitatively using this criterion. The new criterion opens a new avenue in terms of measuring the altitude and slope of the atmospheric and ionospheric layers. The new criterion provides an improved estimation of the altitude and location of the ionospheric plasma layers compared with the back-propagation radio-holographic method previously used. The work is partly supported by RFBR grant No. 10-02-01015-a.

  9. CMB quenching of high-redshift radio-loud AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Haardt, F.; Ciardi, B.; Sbarrato, T.; Gallo, E.; Tavecchio, F.; Celotti, A.

    2015-10-01

    The very existence of more than a dozen of high-redshift (z ? 4) blazars indicates that a much larger population of misaligned powerful jetted active galactic nucleus (AGN) was already in place when the Universe was ?1.5 Gyr old. Such parent population proved to be very elusive, and escaped direct detection in radio surveys so far. High-redshift blazars themselves seem to be failing in producing extended radio lobes, raising questions about the connection between such class and the vaster population of radio galaxies. We show that the interaction of the jet electrons with the intense cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation explains the lack of extended radio emission in high-redshift blazars and in their parent population, helping to explain the apparently missing misaligned counterparts of high-redshift blazars. On the other hand, the emission from the more compact and more magnetized hotspots are less affected by the enhanced CMB energy density. By modelling the spectral energy distribution of blazar lobes and hotspots, we find that most of them should be detectable by low-frequency deep radio observations, e.g. by LOw-Frequency ARray for radio astronomy and by relatively deep X-ray observations with good angular resolution, e.g. by the Chandra satellite. At high redshifts, the emission of a misaligned relativistic jet, being debeamed, is missed by current large sky area surveys. The isotropic flux produced in the hotspots can be below ˜1 mJy and the isotropic lobe radio emission is quenched by the CMB cooling. Consequently, even sources with very powerful jets can go undetected in current radio surveys, and misclassified as radio-quiet AGNs.

  10. Business Development Corporation, Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    Jasek, S.

    1995-12-31

    Business Development Corporation, Inc., is a company specializing in opportunity seeking and business development activities in the {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} post communist Central and Eastern Europe, with particular emphasis on the Republics of Poland and Slovakia. The company currently focuses its expertise on strategic investing and business development between Central Europe and the United States of America. In Poland and Slovakia, the company specializes in developing large scale energy and environmental {open_quotes}infrastructure{close_quotes} development projects on the federal, state, and local level. In addition, the company assists large state owned industries in the transformation and privatization process. Business Development Corporation has assisted and continues to assist in projects of national importance. The staff of experts advise numerous large Polish and Slovak companies, most owned or in the process of privatization, on matters of restructuring, finance, capital structure, strategic parternships or investors, mergers, acquisitions and joint ventures with U.S. based firms. The company also assists and advises on a variety of environmental and energy matters in the public and private sector.

  11. Corporate citizenship: Statoil.

    PubMed

    Fjell, Olav

    2003-01-01

    Open markets alone do not guarantee equitable and sustainable development. Income disparities are growing both within and between countries to the extent that the marginalization of the poor has become a key challenge of globalization. To meet this challenge, the global community must address the governance gap between global finance/economics and local or national politics in world affairs. This article discusses how globalization is shaping Statoil's approach to corporate citizenship. The Norwegian firm, with 17,000 workers in some 25 countries, is one of the major net sellers of crude oil and supplies Europe with natural gas. Statoil maintains that corporations can contribute to global governance by conducting business in a manner that is ethical, economically viable, environmentally sound, and socially responsible. This contribution can be achieved through development partnerships with national governments, multilateral institutions, and nongovernmental organizations. Norway's Statoil ASA is one of the world's largest net sellers of crude oil and a major supplier of natural gas to Europe. It is the leading Scandinavian retailer of petroleum and other oil products. Statoil employs approximately 17,000 workers and operates in 25 countries. PMID:17208716

  12. Dynamical Friction on Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deienno, Rogerio; Yokoyama, T.; Prado, A. F. B. A.

    2012-10-01

    Deienno et al 2011 (A&A, v.536, A57) investigated the effects of the planetary migration on the satellites of Uranus. We concluded that Uranus might have had more satellites than those observed today. However, due to the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) phenomenon, those satellites beyond Oberon were destabilized mostly by collisions involving themselves or with some regular ones. In this work we apply the same methodology for the Saturnian system. We found that the satellites with orbits inside Titan's orbit are immune to the LHB phenomenon. On the other hand, Hyperion, Iapetus, and even Titan, in some cases are strongly affected by the LHB, and depending on the value of Saturn's obliquity, Iapetus might not have resisted to the LHB event. We also found that, the final orbital elements of the surviving satellites differ from what we see today, mainly in inclination. While eccentricity and orbital semi-major axis can be easily damped by tides, for orbital inclinations, tidal effects are not so efficient. Thus, considering that eccentricity and orbital semi-major axis will still evolve by tides, to study the problem of the orbital inclination we consider that: according to our simulations, during the LHB event, collisions between planetesimals and satellites are a common event, causing in some cases destruction of satellites. So, we hypothesized that the material delivered by these catastrophic events could form a disc of particles around the remaining of satellites' orbits. This disc interacts with the remaining satellites and by dynamical friction phenomenon the orbital inclination can be damped. Some preliminary results have shown that, indeed, this tentative can be a viable way to damp conveniently the inclination of some satellites. Acknowledgement: FAPESP-CNPq

  13. Polar vortex evolution during the 2002 Antarctic major warming as observed by the Odin satellite

    E-print Network

    Strong, Kimberly

    , Ontario, Canada. 12 Stockholm Observatory, Stockholm Center for Physics, Astronomy and Biotechnology Service d'Ae´ronomie, Institut Pierre-Simon Laplace, Paris, France. 4 Department of Radio and Space University, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada. 9 Swedish Space Corporation, Solna, Sweden. 10 Centre National d

  14. Limitations imposed by ionospheric turbulence on satellite-to-satellite Doppler measurement accuracy. [of earth gravity field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossi, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    For some time the possibility has been considered to perform an accurate survey from orbit of the earth gravity field by making use of low-low, satellite-to-satellite Doppler tracking with a radio link which operates in the frequency band in the range from 50 to 100 GHz. It is, therefore, of interest to discuss the upper bound in Doppler measurement accuracy imposed by the effects of ionospheric turbulence. The present investigation is concerned with the measurement error induced by ionospheric turbulence. The assumptin is made that the so-called ionospheric refractive 'bias' can be removed with one of the multifrequency methods of the current practice.

  15. Corporate Support of Education, 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Financial Aid to Education, New York, NY.

    Results of the Council for Financial Aid to Education's 1983 survey of 503 companies providing financial support to higher education are summarized and tabulated. Attention is directed to: national trends in corporate pretax net income and contributions; effects of inflation; corporate support in relation to total voluntary support and…

  16. Corporate Support of Education, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Financial Aid to Education, New York, NY.

    Results of the Council for Financial Aid to Education's 1984 survey of 422 companies providing financial support to higher education are summarized. Attention is directed to: national trends in corporate pretax net income and contributions; inflation; corporate support in relation to total voluntary support and institutional expenditures; the…

  17. Corporate Support of Education, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Financial Aid to Education, New York, NY.

    Results of the Council for Financial Aid to Education's 1985 survey of 439 companies providing financial support to higher education are summarized. Attention is directed to: national trends in corporate pretax net income and contributions; inflation; corporate support in relation to total voluntary support and institutional expenditures; the…

  18. Corporate Overview Founded on Values

    E-print Network

    Subramanian, Venkat

    to be socially responsible and culturally aware. Founding corporate sponsor in 2003 Employees involved in local1 Corporate Overview #12;Founded on Values Established in 1946, CH2M HILL operated from its very, and stay true to our culture of integrity and honesty. Clair HillHolly Cornell Jim Howland Burke Hayes Fred

  19. Discussion Paper Corporate Governance, Bank

    E-print Network

    Hodges, Kevin

    Discussion Paper Corporate Governance, Bank Mergers and Executive Compensation December 2014 Yan Discussion Paper Series © Liu, Padgett and Varotto, December 2014 1 Corporate Governance, Bank Mergers and Executive Compensation Abstract Using a sample of US bank mergers from 1995 to 2012, we observe that the pre

  20. The Changing Shape of Corporations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, June G.

    2003-01-01

    This newsletter contains two articles dealing with the changing shape of corporations. The article "Trends in Business Culture" argues that Wal-Mart's emergence as the largest corporation in the United States reflects the larger economic shift in the U.S. economy from production of goods to provision of abstract goods such as services and…

  1. Eratosthenes via Ham Radio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koser, John F.

    1975-01-01

    A secondary geology class used Eratosthenes' method for measuring the circumference of the earth by comparing their measurements of the shadow of a vertical rod to the measurements made by another person contacted by ham radio. (MLH)

  2. Radio Sources and Scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickett, Barney

    2001-10-01

    A review is given of the interplay between studies of compact radio sources and the scattering and scintillations that occur as the signals travel through the irregular refractive index of the interstellar and interplanetary plasmas.

  3. Data Collection Satellite Application in Precision Agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durào, O.

    2002-01-01

    Agricultural Instrumentation Research Center, Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation; Space Programs Brazil launched in 1993 its first satellite partially built and entirely designed, integrated, tested and operated in the country. It was the SCD-1 satellite, a small (115 kg. and an octagonal prism with 80 cm. height and an external diameter of 100 cm.) with a payload transponder that receives data from ground platforms spread all over the country (including its sea shore). These data are then retransmitted to a receiving station at every satellite pass. Data collected and received are processed at Data Collection Mission Center for distribution via internet at most 30 min after the satellite pass. The ground platforms are called PCD's and differ in the parameters measured according to its purpose and location. Thus, they are able to measure temperature, rain level, wind direction, solar radiation, carbon monoxide as well as many others, beyond its own location. SCD- 1 had a nominal designed life of one year, but is still functioning. It is a LEO satellite with inclination of 25°. In 1998, the country launched SCD-2, with the same purpose, but in phase with SCD-1 . Other differences were a higher index of Brazilian made components and an active attitude control subsystem for the spin rate provided by the magnetic torque coils (these in accordance with a development strategy previously planned). In 1999 the country launched in cooperation with China a remote sensing satellite (mass of 1.4 ton.) called CBERS-1. This satellite is sun synchronous (98° inclination) and also carries a transponder for data collection/transmission as a secondary payload. Thus, the country has now three satellites with data collection/transmission capabilities, two in low inclination phased orbits and one in polar orbit, providing a nice coverage both geographical and temporal not only to its territory but also to other regions of the world.. At first there were not too many PCD's over Brazilian territory. There were 25 platforms when SCD-1 was launched. However this number is growing rapidly to 400 platforms, at first for measurements of water reservoir levels as well as other hydrology applications (The Brazilian Electricity Regulatory Agency - ANEEL is the customer), and for many other different applications such as meteorology, oceanography, environmental monitoring sciences, and people and animal tracking. The clear feeling is that users are discovering a satellite system whose benefits were not previously well understood when launched and being able to propose and come up with different and useful applications. A new field in the country that has a great potential to benefit from this system is agriculture. Per se, this is a very important sector of the Brazilian economy and its international trade. Combining it with space technology may justify the investment of new and low cost dedicated satellites. This paper describes a new proposal for use of the SCD-1,2,CBERS-1 satellite system for precision agriculture. New PCD's would be developed for measurements of chemical content of the soil, such as, for example, Nitrogen and others, beyond humidity and solar incidence. This can lead to a more efficient fertilization, harvesting and even the spray of chemical defensives, with the consequence of environment protection. The PCD's ground network so established, along with the information network already available, combined with the space segment of such a system may, as previously said, be able to justify the investment in low cost satellites with this sole purpose.

  4. Satellite Services Workshop, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Key issues associated with the orbital servicing of satellites are examined including servicing spacecraft and equipment, servicing operations, economics, satellite design, docking and berthing, and fluid management.

  5. Mobile satellite services for public safety, disaster mitigation and disaster medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freibaum, Jerry

    Between 1967 and 1987 nearly three million lives were lost and property damage of $25 to $100 billion resulted form natural disasters that adversely affected more than 829 million people. The social and economic impacts have been staggering and are expected to grow more serious as a result of changing demographic factors. The role that the Mobile Satellite Service can play in the International Decade is discussed. MSS was not available for disaster relief operations during the recent Loma Prieta/San Francisco earthquake. However, the results of a review of the performance of seven other communication services with respect to public sector operations during and shortly after the earthquake are described. The services surveyed were: public and private telephone, mobile radio telephone, noncellular mobile radio, broadcast media, CB radio, ham radio, and government and nongovernment satellite systems. The application of MSS to disaster medicine, particularly with respect to the Armenian earthquake is also discussed.

  6. Mobile satellite services for public safety, disaster mitigation and disaster medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freibaum, Jerry

    1990-01-01

    Between 1967 and 1987 nearly three million lives were lost and property damage of $25 to $100 billion resulted form natural disasters that adversely affected more than 829 million people. The social and economic impacts have been staggering and are expected to grow more serious as a result of changing demographic factors. The role that the Mobile Satellite Service can play in the International Decade is discussed. MSS was not available for disaster relief operations during the recent Loma Prieta/San Francisco earthquake. However, the results of a review of the performance of seven other communication services with respect to public sector operations during and shortly after the earthquake are described. The services surveyed were: public and private telephone, mobile radio telephone, noncellular mobile radio, broadcast media, CB radio, ham radio, and government and nongovernment satellite systems. The application of MSS to disaster medicine, particularly with respect to the Armenian earthquake is also discussed.

  7. Astrometry of southern radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Graeme L.; Jauncey, David L.; Harvey, Bruce R.; Savage, Ann; Gulkis, Samuel; Preston, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is presented of a number of astrometry and astrophysics programs based on radio sources from the Parkes 2.7 GHz catalogs. The programs cover the optical identification and spectroscopy of flat-spectrum Parkes sources and the determination of their milliarcsecond radio structures and positions. Work is also in progress to tie together the radio and Hipparcos positional reference frames. A parallel program of radio and optical astrometry of southern radio stars is also under way.

  8. Remote Radio Sounding Science for JIMO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Reinisch, B. W.; Song, P.; Fung, S. F.; Benson, R. F.; Taylor, W. W.; Cooper, J. F.; Garcia, L.; Gallagher, D.

    2003-01-01

    Radio sounding of the Earth's top side ionosphere and magnetosphere is a proven technique from geospace missions such as the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) and the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE). Application of this technique to the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission will provide unique remote sensing observations of the plasma and magnetic field environments, and the subsurface conductivities, of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. Spatial structures of ionospheric plasma above the moon surfaces vary in response to magnetic field perturbations from (1) magnetospheric plasma flows, (2) ionospheric currents from ionization of sputtered surface material, and (3) induced electric currents in salty subsurface oceans. Radio sounding at 3 kHz to 10 MHz can provide globally-determined electron densities necessary for the extraction of the oceanic current signals and supplements in-situ plasma and magnetic field measurements. Subsurface variations in conductivity, can be investigated by radio sounding from 10 MHz to 40 MHz allowing the determination of the presence of dense and solid-liquid phase boundaries associated with oceans and related structures in overlying ice crusts.

  9. A Tour of the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardenski, Brooke; Stephan, George R.

    1997-01-01

    Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) is located in a remote area of the Mojave Desert, 40 miles north of Barstow, California. The antenna, identified as DSS-12, is a 34-meter diameter dish, 11 times the diameter of a ten foot microwave dish used for satellite television. DSS-12 has been used by NASA to communicate with robotic space probes for more than thirty years.

  10. Observations of OH in comet Levy with the Nancay radio telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Colom, P.; Crovisier, Jacques; Gerard, E.; Bourgois, G.

    1992-01-01

    Due to extremely favorable excitation conditions, comet Levy (1990c) exhibited in August-September 1990 the strongest OH 18-cm signal ever recorded in a comet at the Nancay radio telescope. This unique opportunity was used to measure the OH satellite lines at 1612 and 1721 MHz, to perform extensive mapping of the OH radio emission and to make a sensitive evaluation of the cometary magnetic field, of the H2O outflow velocity and of the OH production rate.

  11. Density waves in Saturn's rings probed by radio and optical occultation - Observational tests of theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, Thomas G.; Rosen, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    A parallel examination is conducted of Voyager radio and photopolarimeter occultation observations of the Saturn A ring's density waves. The radio instrument waves exhibit an average -90 deg offset from the dynamical phase. A warping height of about 100-m amplitude can qualtitatively reproduce this phase shift, while preserving the overall model wave shape. These results may be profoundly relevant for satellite-ring torque calculations in Saturn's rings, given the deposition of all of the net torque of the standard model in the first wavelength.

  12. Swedish small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundahl, K.; von Scheele, F.

    2004-11-01

    In 1986 the first Swedish small satellite VIKING was launched on the Ariane 1 rocket together with the French remote sensing satellite SPOT-1. This paper describes the development of Swedish small satellites in an international framework. The satellites have delivered excellent scientific data to a low cost by using e.g. streamlined project organisations, competitive procurement programs and piggy-back launch opportunities. The first micro satellite Astrid-1 was launched in January 1995 and was followed by the launch of Astrid-2 in December 1998. The capable Odin small satellite was launched in February 2001. SSC was also contracted for ESA's SMART-1 probe destined to the Moon. SMART-1, launched in September 2003, is used for both research and as a technology demonstrator for future projects. Future proposed projects include micro and small satellites for climate research as the Atmosphere and Climate Explorer Plus (ACE+), the Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange And climate Monitor (STEAM) and PRISMA, a technology demonstrator for formation flying, new propulsion system and commercial development methods.

  13. MEMOS - Mars Environment Monitoring Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, T.; Barabash, S.; von Schéele, F.; Clacey, E.; Pokrupa, N.

    2007-08-01

    The Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF) in cooperation with the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) has conducted first studies on a Mars Environment Monitoring Satellite (MEMOS). The MEMOS microsatellite (mass < 20 kg) will accommodate four scientific instruments: solar EUV/UV monitor (SEM), solar wind monitor (SWIM), magnetometer (MAG) and radiation environment monitor (REM). The payload monitors the solar conditions at Mars and characterizes the Mars environment to support other missions and science investigations. Monitoring of the solar wind parameters (velocity, density, and field) is the key for any aeronomy and solar wind interaction mission at Mars. The solar EUV / UV (HeII 30.4 nm and HII 121.6 nm) flux monitoring is required for upper atmosphere / ionosphere studies. The radiation environment monitoring is needed to study space weather effects on the near-Mars environment as well as for the preparations for man-flights. MEMOS follows the design philosophy of a detached and autonomously flying instrument for achieving the mentioned objectives. It is intended to be carried "piggy-back" to Mars on a suitable mission. Potential missions are: ESA Mars orbiters within the NEXT or Cosmic Vision programs, NASA Mars orbiters, national / bilateral Mars missions. At Mars MEMOS is separated from its carrier (parent satellite) via the release mechanism implemented in the dual formation flight mission PRISMA. The separation will take place during the orbit insertion scenario of the parent satellite at Mars thus placing MEMOS in a highly elliptical orbit guarantying sufficient observation time in the solar wind. In orbit MEMOS will autonomously detumble and spin-up to ~1 rpm for reasons of stabilization and to fulfill instrument requirements. Such a low spin-rate is sufficient for a required inertial pointing accuracy of 2.5° because of the small external disturbance torques (< 10-7 Nm) predominant at Mars responsible for nutation and precession of the spin-axis. The advances in micropropulsion systems providing ?NmN adjustable thrust levels and reducing the dry mass to ~2 kg respectively are key factors in keeping the microsatellite stabilized and sun-pointed without stressing the mass budget. The low thrust level enables precise and active nutation damping. Moreover the system offers the possibility of implementing active orbit control or formation flight demonstrations at Mars. Attitude will be determined on-board with an accuracy < 1.0° using miniaturized Horizon Crossing Indicators, a two-axis sun sensor and in support accelerometers and gyroscopes based on MEMS-technology. TM/TC will be relayed via the parent satellite in the UHF frequency range. Therefore the Electra Lite (ELT) Proximity-1 transceiver will autonomously communicate with the parent satellite at inter-satellite ranges < 10 000 km featuring adaptive bit rates > 2 kbit/s. The transceiver also implements a coherent transponding mode for orbit determination through two-way Doppler ranging between the parent satellite and MEMOS. In addition ELT is compatible with a future Martian communication and navigation network pursued by NASA, which could be taken advantage of in the future for relaying data or performing ranging via other satellites part of the network. A system design driver for inter-satellite communication at Mars is the high demand of power. This leads to a disk-shape and thus easy to accommodate spacecraft configuration of MEMOS comprising a single sun-pointing solar array favourable in terms of power and spin stability. Multi-junction solar cells, which currently have an efficiency of ~29% under laboratory conditions are a key factor to keep MEMOS solar array area of ~1.15 m2 small compared to the worst case system power requirements of ~105 W. During eclipse periods high-efficient Li-ion batteries (6 x 20 Wh) will ensure power supply. The spacecraft and payload design will incorporate new technology developments such as autonomous navigation, MicroElectroMechanical Systems MEMS, Micro- Opto-ElectroMechanical Sys

  14. Requirements for a mobile communications satellite system. Volume 2: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstein, M.

    1983-01-01

    Three types of satellite aided mobile communications are considered for users in areas not served by (terrestrial) cellular radio systems. In system 1, mobile units are provided a direct satellite link to a gateway station, which serves as the interface to the terrestrial toll network. In system 2, a terrestrial radio link similar to those in cellular systems connects the mobile unit to a translator station; each translator relays the traffic from mobile units in its vicinity, via satellite, to the regional gateway. It is not feasible for system 2 to provide obiquitous coverage. Therefore, system 3 is introduced, in which the small percentage of users not within range of a translator are provided a direct satellite link as in system 1.

  15. Modulation/demodulation techniques for satellite communications. Part 1: Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omura, J. K.; Simon, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    Basic characteristics of digital data transmission systems described include the physical communication links, the notion of bandwidth, FCC regulations, and performance measurements such as bit rates, bit error probabilities, throughputs, and delays. The error probability performance and spectral characteristics of various modulation/demodulation techniques commonly used or proposed for use in radio and satellite communication links are summarized. Forward error correction with block or convolutional codes is also discussed along with the important coding parameter, channel cutoff rate.

  16. Overview of commercial satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beakley, G. W.

    1984-07-01

    A brief history of communications satellites is presented, taking into account the launching of Sputnik 1 in October 1957, the Explorer 1 in January of 1958, the launch of the Score as the world's first active communications satellite in December 1958, the Communications Satellite Act in 1962, and the launch of 'Early Bird' in 1964. The Intelsat satellites are considered along with maritime satellite communications, the U.S. domestic satellite systems, Alaskan satellite communications, cable television, broadcast TV stations, print media, the hotel/motel industry as a large market for satellite communications terminals, the opening of a minicable and satellite master antenna TV market for TV receive-only systems, and business telecommunications earth terminals. Attention is also given to future directions regarding satellite positions, the concept of 'video-plus', and direct broadcast satellites.

  17. Positions of Uranian satellites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiga, C. H.; Vieira Martins, R.

    1994-11-01

    Positions of Uranian satellites from 333 photographic plates obtained at the Cassegrain focus of a 1.6 m reflector are given for the oppositions of 1983 through 1988. These positions were reduced using photometric methods and compared with those calculated theoretically calculated from GUST86. The observed minus calculated residuals referred to Oberon, have standard deviations of the order of 0".04 for the four greatest Uranian satellites and 0".09 for Miranda. These residuals for the four satellites are better than the most precise found in the literature.

  18. Skeletal muscle satellite cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, E.; McCormick, K. M.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence now suggests that satellite cells constitute a class of myogenic cells that differ distinctly from other embryonic myoblasts. Satellite cells arise from somites and first appear as a distinct myoblast type well before birth. Satellite cells from different muscles cannot be functionally distinguished from one another and are able to provide nuclei to all fibers without regard to phenotype. Thus, it is difficult to ascribe any significant function to establishing or stabilizing fiber type, even during regeneration. Within a muscle, satellite cells exhibit marked heterogeneity with respect to their proliferative behavior. The satellite cell population on a fiber can be partitioned into those that function as stem cells and those which are readily available for fusion. Recent studies have shown that the cells are not simply spindle shaped, but are very diverse in their morphology and have multiple branches emanating from the poles of the cells. This finding is consistent with other studies indicating that the cells have the capacity for extensive migration within, and perhaps between, muscles. Complexity of cell shape usually reflects increased cytoplasmic volume and organelles including a well developed Golgi, and is usually associated with growing postnatal muscle or muscles undergoing some form of induced adaptive change or repair. The appearance of activated satellite cells suggests some function of the cells in the adaptive process through elaboration and secretion of a product. Significant advances have been made in determining the potential secretion products that satellite cells make. The manner in which satellite cell proliferative and fusion behavior is controlled has also been studied. There seems to be little doubt that cellcell coupling is not how satellite cells and myofibers communicate. Rather satellite cell regulation is through a number of potential growth factors that arise from a number of sources. Critical to the understanding of this form of control is to determine which of the many growth factors that can alter satellite cell behavior in vitro are at work in vivo. Little work has been done to determine what controls are at work after a regeneration response has been initiated. It seems likely that, after injury, growth factors are liberated through proteolytic activity and initiate an activation process whereby cells enter into a proliferative phase. After myofibers are formed, it also seems likely that satellite cell behavior is regulated through diffusible factors arising from the fibers rather than continuous control by circulating factors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS).

  19. Operation Argus. Satellite measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kostoff, P.C.; Stuhlinger, E.; Kampneier, H.W.; Boehm, J.

    1984-08-31

    Following a theory on the trapping of electrons from nuclear explosions by the magnetic field of the earth, DOD initiated Operation Argus in May 1958 to provide an experimental check of the theory. Nuclear devices were detonated at great altitudes, and the ensuing effects were measured by instrumented satellites, rocket probes, and land and sea observation stations in various parts of the world. This report describes the Argus Satellite Project, the broad theory of the Christofilos effect, the measurements of the background radiation, and the measurement of the effect itself. After each Argus nuclear detonation, the instrumented satellite reported a new and well-defined radiation belt that persisted before many hours.

  20. GUST86 - An analytical ephemeris of the Uranian satellites. [General Uranus Satellite Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laskar, J.; Jacobson, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    The General Uranus Satellite Theory GUST (Laskar, 1986) is used for the construction of an analytical ephemeris for the Uranian satellites. The theory is fitted against earth-based observations from 1911 to 1986, and all radio and optical data obtained during Voyager encounter with Uranus. Earth-based observations alone allow the determination of masses which are within 15 percent of the values determined by the Uranus flyby. The analysis of all the observations confirm the values of the masses obtained during the encounter (Stone and Miner, 1986) and give a complete set of dynamical parameters for the analytical theory. An analytical ephemeris, GUST86, with an estimated precision of about 100 km with respect to Uranus is obtained.

  1. Satellite-aided mobile communications limited operational test in the trucking industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. E.; Frey, R. L.; Lewis, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    An experiment with NASA's ATS-6 satellite, that demonstrates the practicality of satellite-aided land mobile communications is described. Satellite communications equipment for the experiment was designed so that it would be no more expensive, when mass produced, than conventional two-way mobile radio equipment. It embodied the operational features and convenience of present day mobile radios. Vehicle antennas 75 cm tall and 2 cm in diameter provided good commercial quality signals to and from trucks and jeeps. Operational applicability and usage data were gathered by installing the radio equipment in five long-haul tractor-trailer trucks and two Air Force search and rescue jeeps. Channel occupancy rates are reported. Air Force personnel found the satellite radio system extremely valuable in their search and rescue mission during maneuvers and actual rescue operations. Propagation data is subjectively analyzed and over 4 hours of random data is categorized and graded as to signal quality on a second by second basis. Trends in different topographic regions are reported. An overall communications reliability of 93% was observed despite low satellite elevation angles ranging from 9 to 24 degrees.

  2. Satellite Products and Services Review Board ATBD: Satellite-Derived

    E-print Network

    Miami, University of

    Satellite Products and Services Review Board ATBD: Satellite-Derived Ocean Heat Content Version 1.0 July 2012 ___________________________________ #12;NOAA /RSMAS ATBD : Satellite-Derived Ocean Heat/STAR) #12;NOAA /RSMAS ATBD : Satellite-Derived Ocean Heat Content Product Page 3 of 32 TABLE OF CONTENTS

  3. Irregularities in ionospheric plasma clouds: Their evolution and effect on radio communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesecky, J. F.; Chamberlain, J. W.; Cornwall, J. M.; Hammer, D. A.; Perkins, F. W.

    1980-09-01

    Both satellite radio communications, which travel through the Earth's ionosphere, and high frequency (HF) sky wave circuits, which use the ionosphere as a refracting medium, can be strongly affected by radio wave scintillation. High altitude nuclear explosions cause scintillation (by strongly disturbing the ionosphere) and thus severely degrade satellite radio communications over a large region. Since further atmospheric nuclear tests are banned, a thorough understanding of the physics involved in both the disturbed ionosphere and its interaction with radio waves is necessary in order to design radio communications systems which will operate satisfactorily in a nuclear environment. During the 1980 JASON Summer Study we addressed some aspects of the evolution of ionospheric irregularities following a high altitude nuclear explosion--the radio wave propagation theory being apparently well understood for the satellite link case. In particular, we have worked on irregularity evolution at late times (approx. hours) after an explosion and the impact of early time irregularity structure on late time evolution. We also raise the question of scintillation effects on HF sky wave communications.

  4. Astronomers Make First Images With Space Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-07-01

    Marking an important new milestone in radio astronomy history, scientists at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico, have made the first images using a radio telescope antenna in space. The images, more than a million times more detailed than those produced by the human eye, used the new Japanese HALCA satellite, working in conjunction with the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and Very Large Array (VLA) ground-based radio telescopes. The landmark images are the result of a long-term NRAO effort supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). "This success means that our ability to make detailed radio images of objects in the universe is no longer limited by the size of the Earth," said NRAO Director Paul Vanden Bout. "Astronomy's vision has just become much sharper." HALCA, launched on Feb. 11 by Japan's Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), is the first satellite designed for radio astronomy imaging. It is part of an international collaboration led by ISAS and backed by NRAO; Japan's National Astronomical Observatory; NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL); the Canadian Space Agency; the Australia Telescope National Facility; the European VLBI Network and the Joint Institute for Very Long Baseline Interferometry in Europe. On May 22, HALCA observed a distant active galaxy called PKS 1519-273, while the VLBA and VLA also observed it. Data from the satellite was received by a tracking station at the NRAO facility in Green Bank, West Virginia. Tape-recorded data from the satellite and from the radio telescopes on the ground were sent to NRAO's Array Operations Center (AOC) in Socorro, NM. In Socorro, astronomers and computer scientists used a special-purpose computer to digitally combine the signals from the satellite and the ground telescopes to make them all work together as a single, giant radio telescope. This dedicated machine, the VLBA Correlator, built as part of the VLBA instrument, was modified over the past four years to allow it to incorporate data from the satellite. Correlation of the observational data was completed successfully on June 12, after the exact timing of the satellite recording was established. Further computer processing produced an image of PKS 1519-273 -- the first image ever produced using a radio telescope in space. For Jim Ulvestad, the NRAO astronomer who made the first image, the success ended a long quest for this new capability. Ulvestad was involved in an experiment more than a decade ago in which a NASA communications satellite, TDRSS, was used to test the idea of doing radio astronomical imaging by combining data from space and ground radio telescopes. That experiment showed that an orbiting antenna could, in fact, work in conjunction with ground-based radio observatories, and paved the way for HALCA and a planned Russian radio astronomy satellite called RadioAstron. "This first image is an important technical milestone, and demonstrates the feasibility of a much more advanced mission, ARISE, currently being considered by NASA," Ulvestad said. The first image showed no structure in the object, even at the extremely fine level of detail achievable with HALCA; it is what astronomers call a "point source." This object also appears as a point source in all-ground-based observations. In addition, the 1986 TDRSS experiment observed the object, and, while this experiment did not produce an image, it indicated that PKS 1519-273 should be a point source. "This simple point image may not appear very impressive, but its beauty to us is that it shows our entire, complex system is functioning correctly. The system includes not only the orbiting and ground-based antennas, but also the orbit determination, tracking stations, the correlator, and the image-processing software," said Jonathan Romney, the NRAO astronomer who led the development of the VLBA correlator, and its enhancement to process data from orbiting radio telescopes. "We would b

  5. Optimization of continuum receiving systems in radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebold, U.; Gebler, K.-H.

    In connection with the new spectral ranges which have become accessible to the astronomer by means of satellite-based observations, radio continuum observations conducted with ground-based installations have obtained new significance. This conclusion is valid for objects of comparatively little extension, such as a supernova remnant, and for extended structures, such as the Milky Way Galaxy. It is pointed out, in this connection, that the demand for radio continuum surveys has considerably increased during the last few years. The present information is concerned with fundamental aspects which can provide a suitable basis for the optimization of continuum receiving systems. Attention is given to antenna and radiation temperature, optimization efforts related to system noise and amplification stability, the suppression of radar and directional radio noise, disturbances caused by the sun, and the contributions to antenna temperature provided by ground and atmosphere.

  6. Enhanced performance of the Westinghouse Series 1000 Mobile Satellite Telephone System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, Richard E.

    1995-01-01

    The Westinghouse Series 1000 Mobile Satellite Telephone System is designed for land mobile, maritime, and fixed site land applications. The product currently operates on the Optus Mobilesat system in Australia and will operate on American Mobile Satellite Corporation's (AMSC) Skycell service in the U.S. and TMI Communications' (TMIC) MSAT service in Canada. The architecture allows the same transceiver electronics to be used for diverse mobile applications. Advanced antenna designs have made land mobile satellite communications a reality. This paper details the unique high performance product and its configuration for the vehicle mounted land mobile application.

  7. Satellite Applications for Public Service: Project Summaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauffer, Sandra; And Others

    Summaries of 18 different projects involving the use of satellite communications are presented in this report, including PEACESAT Education and Communication Experiments, USP Network Satellite Communication Project, Project Satellite, Satellite Instructional Television Experiment (SITE), Appalachian Education Satellite Program, Alaska Education…

  8. Developing Radio Beam Geometry and Luminosity Models of Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, S.; Giacherio, B.; Gonthier, P.; Harding, A.

    2004-12-01

    Our recent studies of pulsar population statistics suggest that improvements of radio and gamma-ray beam geometry and luminosity models require further refinement. The polarization properties of radio profiles of gamma-ray pulsars do not suggest that short period pulsars are core dominated, as discussed by the study of Arzoumanian, Chernoff & Cordes (2002). Furthermore, the predicted radio luminosity in this model seems to be too large compared to those observed. The goal of this project is to constrain the viewing geometry for some radio pulsars, especially three-peaked pulse profiles, in order to limit the uncertainty of the magnetic inclination and impact angles. We perform fits of the pulse profile and position angle sweep of radio pulsars for the available frequencies. We assume a single core and conal beams described by Gaussians. We incorporate three different size cones with frequency dependence from the work of Mitra and Deshpande (1999). We obtain separate spectral indices for the core and cone beams and explore the trends of the ratio of core to cone peak fluxes. This ratio is observed to have some dependence with period. However, we cannot establish the suggested functional form of this ratio as indicated by the work of Arzoumanian, Chernoff & Cordes (2002). We will present our current findings and implications. We express our gratitude for the generous support of the Research Corporation (CC5813), of the National Science Foundation (REU and AST-0307365), the Michigan Space Grant Consortium and the NASA Astrophysics Theory Program.

  9. COMPASS Final Report: Lunar Relay Satellite (LRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven R.; McGuire, Melissa L.

    2012-01-01

    The Lunar Relay Satellite (LRS) COllaborative Modeling and Parametric Assessment of Space Systems (COMPASS) session was tasked to design a satellite to orbit in an elliptical lunar polar orbit to provide relay communications between lunar South Pole assets and the Earth. The design included a complete master equipment list, power requirement list, configuration design, and brief risk assessment and cost analysis. The LRS is a half-TDRSS sized box spacecraft, which provides communications and navigation relay between lunar outposts (via Lunar Communications Terminals (LCT)) or Sortie parties (with user radios) and large ground antennas on Earth. The LRS consists of a spacecraft containing all the communications and avionics equipment designed by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory s (JPL) Team X to perform the relay between lunar-based assets and the Earth. The satellite design is a standard box truss spacecraft design with a thermal control system, 1.7 m solar arrays for 1 kWe power, a 1 m diameter Ka/S band dish which provides relay communications with the LCT, and a Q-band dish for communications to/from the Earth based assets. While JPL's Team X and Goddard Space Flight Center s (GSFC) I M Design Center (IMDC) have completed two other LRS designs, this NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) COMPASS LRS design sits between them in terms of physical size and capabilities.

  10. Silicon Satellites: Picosats, Nanosats, and Microsats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janson, Siegfried W.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon, the most abundant solid element in the Earth's lithosphere, is a useful material for spacecraft construction. Silicon is stronger than stainless steel, has a thermal conductivity about half that of aluminum, is transparent to much of the infrared radiation spectrum, and can form a stable oxide. These unique properties enable silicon to become most of the mass of a satellite, it can simultaneously function as structure, heat transfer system, radiation shield, optics, and semiconductor substrate. Semiconductor batch-fabrication techniques can produce low-power digital circuits, low-power analog circuits, silicon-based radio frequency circuits, and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) such as thrusters and acceleration sensors on silicon substrates. By exploiting these fabrication techniques, it is possible to produce highly-integrated satellites for a number of applications. This paper analyzes the limitations of silicon satellites due to size. Picosatellites (approximately 1 gram mass), nanosatellites (about 1 kg mass), and highly capable microsatellites (about 10 kg mass) can perform various missions with lifetimes of a few days to greater than a decade.

  11. Satellite Delivery of Aviation Weather Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Haendel, Richard

    2001-01-01

    With aviation traffic continuing to increase worldwide, reducing the aviation accident rate and aviation schedule delays is of critical importance. In the United States, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has established the Aviation Safety Program and the Aviation System Capacity Program to develop and test new technologies to increase aviation safety and system capacity. Weather is a significant contributor to aviation accidents and schedule delays. The timely dissemination of weather information to decision makers in the aviation system, particularly to pilots, is essential in reducing system delays and weather related aviation accidents. The NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating improved methods of weather information dissemination through satellite broadcasting directly to aircraft. This paper describes an on-going cooperative research program with NASA, Rockwell Collins, WorldSpace, Jeppesen and American Airlines to evaluate the use of satellite digital audio radio service (SDARS) for low cost broadcast of aviation weather information, called Satellite Weather Information Service (SWIS). The description and results of the completed SWIS Phase 1 are presented, and the description of the on-going SWIS Phase 2 is given.

  12. Astronaut Ron Parise checks timeline for monitoring Jupiter and its satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronaut Ronald A. Parise, STS-67 payload specialist and a senior scientist in the Space Observatories Department of Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC), checks a timeline for monitoring of Jupiter and its satellites. Parise is on the aft flight deck of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour.

  13. Satellite Point-to-Multipoint Services for Information Dissemination: Opportunities and Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casewell, I. E.

    1992-01-01

    Outlines the current status of satellite-delivered narrowcasting services in Europe; identifies potential applications, including electronic publishing and corporate data communications; compares various transmission technologies; and explores economic issues with the aid of a spreadsheet model for the cases of a facsimile broadcast and a weather…

  14. NASA Launches Satellite to Study Sun's Godard to Get First Green Roof

    E-print Network

    Christian, Eric

    NASA Launches Satellite to Study Sun's Atmosphere Pg 3 Godard to Get First Green Roof Pg 6 Goddard 2013 #12;N ASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph space- craft launched June 26 at 10:27 p.m. EDT by an Orbital Sciences Corporation Pegasus XL rocket. "We are thrilled to add IRIS to the suite of NASA missions

  15. Channel Estimation and Code Word Inference for Mobile Digital Satellite Broadcasting Reception

    E-print Network

    Ikeda, Shiro

    #12;Channel Estimation and Code Word Inference for Mobile Digital Satellite Broadcasting Reception Masatoshi Hamada The Japan Broadcasting Corporation (NHK) hamada@ism.ac.jp Shiro Ikeda The Institute of Statistical Mathematics shiro@ism.ac.jp October 28, 2008 Abstract This paper proposes a method of improving

  16. AUSSAT mobile satellite services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowland, Wayne L.; Wagg, Michael; Simpson, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    An overview of AUSSAT's planned mobile satellite system is given. The development program which is being undertaken to achieve the 1992 service date is described. Both business and technical aspects of the development program are addressed.

  17. Disaster warning satellite study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The Disaster Warning Satellite System is described. It will provide NOAA with an independent, mass communication system for the purpose of warning the public of impending disaster and issuing bulletins for corrective action to protect lives and property. The system consists of three major segments. The first segment is the network of state or regional offices that communicate with the central ground station; the second segment is the satellite that relays information from ground stations to home receivers; the third segment is composed of the home receivers that receive information from the satellite and provide an audio output to the public. The ground stations required in this system are linked together by two, separate, voice bandwidth communication channels on the Disaster Warning Satellites so that a communications link would be available in the event of disruption of land line service.

  18. Meteorological satellite accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, L. J.; Arking, A.; Bandeen, W. R.; Shenk, W. E.; Wexler, R.

    1974-01-01

    The various types of meteorological satellites are enumerated. Vertical sounding, parameter extraction technique, and both macroscale and mesoscale meteorological phenomena are discussed. The heat budget of the earth-atmosphere system is considered, along with ocean surface and hydrology.

  19. Aiming a Satellite Dish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zebrowski, Ernest, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Develops a pair of equations for calculating the elevation and azimuth angles for the various satellites. Uses 3-dimensional vector difference calculations. Provides a practical example, figures, and table. (YP)

  20. Cloud Investigation by Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson-Sellers, A.

    This is a picture book. The pictures are black and white images derived from meteorological satellite data. The primary source of imagery is the Advanced Tiros N (ATN) series of polar orbiter satellites, although there are a number of examples from the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) flown on Nimbus 7 and also from the Japanese Geostationary Meteorological Satellites (GMS) 1 and 2. Richard Scorer has selected the majority of his examples from the excellent archive at the University of Dundee's Satellite Laboratory, and hence most are local area coverage (i.e., 1.1- km resolution at nadir) data drawn from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR).

  1. Ionosphere/microwave beam interaction study. [satellite solar energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, L. M.; Gordon, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    A solar power satellite microwave power density of 20mw sq cm was confirmed as the level where nonlinear interactions may occur in the ionosphere, particularly at 100 km altitude. Radio wave heating at this altitude, produced at the Arecibo Observatory, yielded negative results for radio wave heating of an underdense ionosphere. Overdense heating produced striations in the ionosphere which may cause severe radio frequency interference problems under certain conditions. The effects of thermal self-focusing are shown to be limited severely geographically. The aspect sensitivity of field-aligned striations makes interference-free regions above magnetic latitude about 60 deg. A test program is proposed to simulate the interaction of the SPS beam with the ionosphere, to measure the effects of the interaction on the ionosphere and on communication and navigation systems, and to interpret the results.

  2. Digital Audio Radio Broadcast Systems Laboratory Testing Nearly Complete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Radio history continues to be made at the NASA Lewis Research Center with the completion of phase one of the digital audio radio (DAR) testing conducted by the Consumer Electronics Group of the Electronic Industries Association. This satellite, satellite/terrestrial, and terrestrial digital technology will open up new audio broadcasting opportunities both domestically and worldwide. It will significantly improve the current quality of amplitude-modulated/frequency-modulated (AM/FM) radio with a new digitally modulated radio signal and will introduce true compact-disc-quality (CD-quality) sound for the first time. Lewis is hosting the laboratory testing of seven proposed digital audio radio systems and modes. Two of the proposed systems operate in two modes each, making a total of nine systems being tested. The nine systems are divided into the following types of transmission: in-band on-channel (IBOC), in-band adjacent-channel (IBAC), and new bands. The laboratory testing was conducted by the Consumer Electronics Group of the Electronic Industries Association. Subjective assessments of the audio recordings for each of the nine systems was conducted by the Communications Research Center in Ottawa, Canada, under contract to the Electronic Industries Association. The Communications Research Center has the only CCIR-qualified (Consultative Committee for International Radio) audio testing facility in North America. The main goals of the U.S. testing process are to (1) provide technical data to the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) so that it can establish a standard for digital audio receivers and transmitters and (2) provide the receiver and transmitter industries with the proper standards upon which to build their equipment. In addition, the data will be forwarded to the International Telecommunications Union to help in the establishment of international standards for digital audio receivers and transmitters, thus allowing U.S. manufacturers to compete in the world market.

  3. Antenna system characteristics and solar radio burst observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sha; Yan, Yi-Hua; Chen, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Wei; Liu, Dong-Hao

    2015-11-01

    The Chinese Spectral Radio Heliograph (CSRH) is an advanced aperture synthesis solar radio heliograph, independently developed by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. It consists of 100 reflector antennas, which are grouped into two antenna arrays (CSRH-I and CSRH-II) for low and high frequency bands respectively. The frequency band of CSRH-I is 0.4–2 GHz and that for CSRH-II is 2–15 GHz. In the antenna and feed system, CSRH uses eleven feeds to receive signals coming from the Sun. The radiation pattern has a lower side lobe and the back lobe of the feed is well illuminated. The characteristics of gain G and antenna noise temperature T affect the quality of solar radio imaging. For CSRH, the measured G is larger than 60 dBi and T is less than 120 K. After CSRH-I was established, we successfully captured a solar radio burst between 1.2–1.6 GHz on 2010 November 12 using this instrument and this event was confirmed through observations with the Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer at 2.84 GHz and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite. In addition, an image obtained from CSRH-I clearly revealed the profile of the solar radio burst. The other observational work involved the imaging the Fengyun-2E geosynchronous satellite which is assumed to be a point source. Results indicate that the data processing method applied in this study for deleting errors in a noisy image could be used for processing images from other sources.

  4. Solar Power Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, C. C., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A satellite based energy concept is described, including the advantages of the basic concept, system characteristics, cost, and environmental considerations. An outline of a plan for the further evaluation and implementation of the system is given. It is concluded that the satellite concept is competitive with other advanced power generation systems when a variety of factors are considered, including technical feasibility, cost, safety, natural resources, environment, baseload capability, location flexibility, land use, and existing industrial base for implementation.

  5. Satellite battery testing status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, R.; Hall, S.

    1986-01-01

    Because of the large numbers of satellite cells currently being tested and anticipated at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NAVWPNSUPPCEN) Crane, Indiana, satellite cell testing is being integrated into the Battery Test Automation Project (BTAP). The BTAP, designed to meet the growing needs for battery testing at the NAVWPNSUPPCEN Crane, will consist of several Automated Test Stations (ATSs) which monitor batteries under test. Each ATS will interface with an Automation Network Controller (ANC) which will collect test data for reduction.

  6. Direct Broadcasting Satellites in Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maeda, Jiro

    The development and use of broadcasting satellites in Japan are discussed in this paper. The paper describes the medium-scale experimental broadcasting satellite, YURI, launched by NASA in 1978, and reports that experiments with YURI in the areas of basic technologies in the broadcasting satellite system, experiments on satellite control…

  7. Satellite Technologies in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portz, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    Focuses on ways of using satellite imagery obtained from the Internet, to enhance classroom learning. Discusses satellite deployment; classroom applications, including infrared imagery, high-resolution photography, and global positioning satellites; and use of satellite data for hands-on activities, including cartography, city and community…

  8. The satellites of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    Observations and the probable natures of the five known satellites of Uranus are reviewed. Photographic, photoelectric and CCD photometry of the satellites since 1961, although in agreement within experimental error, is not as mutually consistent as may be expected, and broadband JHK photometry falls in a portion of the J-H, H-K color diagram difficult to interpret. Spectrophotometry in the range 0.3-1.1 microns taken on two separate occasions is inconsistent, with only the relatively neutral reflectances of Titania and Oberon regarded as well established. Near-infrared spectrophotometry has revealed the presence of water ice or frost on the satellite surfaces, possibly in a very pure state, with spectra most similar to Ganymede. Estimations of the properties of the satellites from their surface geometric albedos, assumed mean densities and dynamics yield radii in the range 160-520 km, albedos on the order of 0.5 and densities of about 1.3 g/cu cm, similar to the icy Saturn satellites. The satellites are also believed to have formed after the event that caused the planet to tilt to its present obliquity.

  9. A utility oriented radio resource management algorithm for heterogenous network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Dong, Yan; Huang, Zailu

    2007-11-01

    A utility oriented radio resource management algorithm is proposed for broadband nongeostationary satellite network which works in the heterogeneous network environment and provides access services for various customers on the ground. Based on the game theory, the problem for optimizing the network's performance is turned into the problem for maximizing the network's long term utility in the proposed algorithm. With evaluation to the traffic condition and dimensions of Qos for the network at the moment while the access service requirements changing, the influence of this service requirement to the long term utility of the satellite network is audited and then the resource assignment decision can be made according to the rule for maximizing the satellite network's long term utility. The process directed by game theory guaranteed both that the benefit of the network and the requirements of the customers could be considered synthetically. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  10. 27 CFR 31.123 - New corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false New corporation. 31.123... Requiring Registration As A New Business § 31.123 New corporation. Where a new corporation is formed to take over and conduct the business of one or more corporations that have registered under this part, the...

  11. 27 CFR 31.123 - New corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false New corporation. 31.123... Requiring Registration As A New Business § 31.123 New corporation. Where a new corporation is formed to take over and conduct the business of one or more corporations that have registered under this part, the...

  12. 27 CFR 31.123 - New corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false New corporation. 31.123... Requiring Registration As A New Business § 31.123 New corporation. Where a new corporation is formed to take over and conduct the business of one or more corporations that have registered under this part, the...

  13. 27 CFR 31.123 - New corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false New corporation. 31.123... Requiring Registration As A New Business § 31.123 New corporation. Where a new corporation is formed to take over and conduct the business of one or more corporations that have registered under this part, the...

  14. 27 CFR 31.123 - New corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false New corporation. 31.123... Requiring Registration As A New Business § 31.123 New corporation. Where a new corporation is formed to take over and conduct the business of one or more corporations that have registered under this part, the...

  15. eRadio : empowerment through community Web radio

    E-print Network

    Gomez-Monroy, Carla, 1977-

    2004-01-01

    The eRadio project proposes to be an effective aid to increase interaction and reduce alienation among the members of dispersed communities by using a holistic approach to participatory and interactive web radio-production, ...

  16. Remote Radio Sounding Science For JIMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. L.; Reinisch, B. W.; Song, P.; Fung, S. F.; Benson, R. F.; Taylor, W. W.; Cooper, J. F.; Garcia, L.; Markus, T.; Gallagher, D.; Gogineni, P.

    2003-12-01

    Radio sounding of the Earth's topside ionosphere and magnetosphere is a proven technique from geospace missions such as the International Satellites for Ionospheric Studies (ISIS) and the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE). Application of this technique to the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) mission will provide unique remote sensing observations of the plasma and magnetic field environments, and the subsurface structures of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. Spatial structures of ionospheric plasma above the surfaces of these bodies will vary in response to magnetic field perturbations from magnetospheric plasma flows, ionospheric currents from ionization of sputtered surface material, and induced electric currents in salty subsurface oceans. Radio sounding at 3 kHz to 10 MHz will provide globally-determined electron densities necessary for the extraction of the oceanic current signals and will supplement in-situ plasma and magnetic field measurements. Long-range magnetospheric sounding, pioneered by the radio plasma imager (RPI) instrument on IMAGE, has provided electron density distributions along magnetic field lines and in radial directions on time scales of minutes. RPI has also been able to measure the entire electron plasma density distributions (in the orbit plane) of the Earth's polar cap and the plasmasphere within one pass of the spacecraft. In a similar manner, a radio sounder orbiting an icy moon would be able to measure the electron density along the magnetic field into each hemisphere and provide information on the Jovian magnetospheric background, the magnetospheric influences on the moon's ionospheres, and distortions of magnetic field line geometry from model predictions. The higher-power source available from JIMO would allow radio sounding transmissions at much higher powers than those used on ISIS or IMAGE making subsurface sounding of the Jovian icy moons possible at frequencies above the ionosphere peak plasma frequency from~5 MHz to 40 MHz. Subsurface variations in dielectric properties, can be investigated by radio sounding allowing the detection of dense and solid-liquid phase boundaries associated with oceans and related structures in overlying ice crusts.

  17. Planetary radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    Three planets, the earth, Jupiter and Saturn are known to emit nonthermal radio waves which require coherent radiation processes. The characteristic features (frequency spectrum, polarization, occurrence probability, radiation pattern) are discussed. Radiation which is externally controlled by the solar wind is distinguished from internally controlled radiation which only originates from Jupiter. The efficiency of the externally controlled radiation is roughly the same at all three planets (5 x 10 to the -6th) suggesting that similar processes are active there. The maser radiation mechanism for the generation of the radio waves and general requirements for the mechanism which couples the power generator to the region where the radio waves are generated are briefly discussed.

  18. A new phase for NASA's communications satellite program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dement, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    NASA's research in communications satellite technology is discussed, including orbit-efficient techniques and applications by the commercial sector. Attention is given to expanding the capacities of the C-band (6-4 GHz) and the Ku-band (14-11 GHz), opening the Ka-band (30/20 GHz), broadly applied 're-use' of the spectrum, and developing multibeam spacecraft antennas with on-board switching. Increasing wideband services in video, high-speed data, and voice trunking is considered, as are narrow-band systems that may be used for data collection or public safety, with possible expansion to a thin-route satellite system. In particular, communication for medical, disaster, or search-and-rescue emergencies may be met by the integration of a satellite service with land mobile communications via terrestrial radio links. Also considered is a large geostationary platform providing electrical power, thermal rejection, and orbital station-keeping for many communications payloads.

  19. An experiment to enable commercial mobile satellite service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, R. R.; Knouse, G. H.; Weber, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    A Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) is described, based on a planned cooperative U.S./Canadian program. The experiment would establish network architecture, develop system and ground-segment technology, and define the technical characteristics needed to help structure the regulatory/institutional framework needed to enable a first-generation commercial satellite service. A satellite of this type would augment terrestrial systems, both cellular and noncellular, in the thin-route/rural areas of the country where service is either unavailable or inadequate. Applications range from wide-area radio/dispatch (e.g., oil exploration and interstate trucking) to extension of the public mobile telephone service. Market estimates are provided and experiment objectives and requirements are delineated. The requirements are being developed in close coordination with the Department of Communications (DOC) of Canada and with industry and potential-user organizations. The paper closes with a development plan and milestone chart.

  20. Satellite Communications for ATM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamma, Mohammed A.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation is an overview on Satellite Communication for the Aeronautical Telecommunication Management (ATM) research. Satellite Communications are being considered by the FAA and NASA as a possible alternative to the present and future ground systems supporting Air Traffic Communications. The international Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) have in place Standards and Recommended Practices (SARPS) for the Aeronautical Mobile Satellite Services (AMSS) which is mainly derived from the pre-existing Inmarsat service that has been in service since the 1980s. The Working Group A of the Aeronautical Mobile Communication Panel of ICAO has also been investigating SARPS for what is called the Next Generation Satellite Service (NGSS) which conforms less to the Inmarsat based architecture and explores wider options in terms of satellite architectures. Several designs are being proposed by Firms such as Boeing, ESA, NASA that are geared toward full or secondary usage of satellite communications for ATM. Satellite communications for ATM can serve several purposes ranging from primary usage where ground services would play a minimal backup role, to an integrated solution where it will be used to cover services, or areas that are less likely to be supported by the proposed and existing ground infrastructure. Such Integrated roles can include usage of satellite communications for oceanic and remote land areas for example. It also can include relieving the capacity of the ground network by providing broadcast based services of Traffic Information Services messages (TIS-B), or Flight Information Services (FIS-B) which can take a significant portion of the ground system capacity. Additionally, satellite communication can play a backup role to support any needs for ground replacement, or additional needed capacity even after the new digital systems are in place. The additional bandwidth that can be provided via satellite communications can also open the door for many new applications that generally will enhance the standard services provided. All of those possibilities were investigated and comments, as well as descriptions of those analyses are put forward, as well as suggestions for future areas of study.

  1. The radio structure of radio-quiet quasars

    E-print Network

    Christian Leipski; Heino Falcke; Nicola Bennert; Susanne Huettemeister; ;

    2006-06-21

    We investigate the radio emitting structures of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei with an emphasis on radio-quiet quasars to study their connection to Seyfert galaxies. We present and analyse high-sensitivity VLA radio continuum images of 14 radio-quiet quasars and six Seyfert galaxies. Many of the low redshift radio-quiet quasars show radio structures that can be interpreted as jet-like outflows. However, the detection rate of extended radio structures on arcsecond scales among our sample decreases with increasing redshift and luminosity, most likely due to a lack of resolution. The morphologies of the detected radio emission indicate strong interactions of the jets with the surrounding medium. We also compare the radio data of seven quasars with corresponding HST images of the [OIII] emitting narrow-line region (NLR). We find that the scenario of interaction between the radio jet and the NLR gas is confirmed in two sources by structures in the NLR gas distribution as previously known for Seyfert galaxies. The extended radio structures of radio-quiet quasars at sub-arcsecond resolution are by no means different from that of Seyferts. Among the luminosities studied here, the morphological features found are similar in both types of objects while the overall size of the radio structures increases with luminosity. This supports the picture where radio-quiet quasars are the scaled-up versions of Seyfert galaxies. In addition to known luminosity relations we find a correlation of the NLR size and the radio size shared by quasars and Seyferts.

  2. Campuses Weld the Corporate Link.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Khawas, Elaine

    1985-01-01

    A 1984 survey by American Council on Education, Campus Trends, offers evidence of the extent of academe's involvement in corporate-college collaborative activities. Links including assisting students, supporting research, training employees, and joint programs are discussed. (MLW)

  3. Two Essays in Corporate Finance 

    E-print Network

    Alanis Hernandez, Emmanuel

    2015-06-25

    In this dissertation, we answer two research question in corporate finance. In the first essay, “A New Benchmark: Relative Performance Evaluation with Total Returns”, we revisit the question of relative performance evaluation ...

  4. Radio astronomy with microspacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, D.

    2001-01-01

    A dynamic constellation of microspacecraft in lunar orbit can carry out valuable radio astronomy investigations in the frequency range of 30kHz--30MHz, a range that is difficult to explore from Earth. In contrast to the radio astronomy ivestigations that have flown on individual spacecraft, the four microspacecraft together with a carrier spacecraft, which transported them to lunar orbit, form an interferometer with far superior angular resolution. Use of microspacecraft allows the entire constellation to be launched with a Taurus-class vehicle. Also distinguishing this approach is that the Moon is used as needed to shield the constellation from RF interference from the Earth and Sun.

  5. Sensors Locate Radio Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    After receiving a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center, Soneticom Inc., based in West Melbourne, Florida, created algorithms for time difference of arrival and radio interferometry, which it used in its Lynx Location System (LLS) to locate electromagnetic interference that can disrupt radio communications. Soneticom is collaborating with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to install and test the LLS at its field test center in New Jersey in preparation for deploying the LLS at commercial airports. The software collects data from each sensor in order to compute the location of the interfering emitter.

  6. Radio Emission from Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Sramek, Richard A.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Stockdale, Christopher J.; Kelley, Matthew T.

    2009-05-03

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 27 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. It is also possible to detect ionized hydrogen along the line of sight, to demonstrate binary properties of the presupernova stellar system, and to detect dumpiness of the circumstellar material.

  7. Radio Frequency Identification iny integrated circuits equipped with radio an-

    E-print Network

    Han, Richard Y.

    -called Radio Frequency Identification tags--better known as RFID--could help stamp out drug counterfeitingRadio Frequency Identification T iny integrated circuits equipped with radio an- tennas are fast,mostpopularpresscover- age of RFID tags has centered on the technology's po- tential for tracking consumers without

  8. Study for HDR cross-link for formation flight satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishinaga, Nozomu; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Takahashi, Takashi; Ogawa, Yasuo; Kubooka, Toshihiro; Umehara, Hiroaki

    2003-07-01

    In this paper we studied about optical and millimeter radio wave cross-link for formation flight communication satellite system in a geostationary orbit. In formation flight system, since the distance among the satellites becomes short compared with the conventional inter satellite comunication link, the size and the weight of the communication system can be reduced. If the high data rate cross-link among the satellites which is equal to the whole transponder bandwidth can be established, the functionally distributed communications satellite system can be constructed. Then, by exchanging a part of the satellite system without the physical contact, in other words, by exchange some old satellites and new ones, the fully reconfigurable and long lifetime (from the point of the function) satellite communication system which can follow the paradigm shift in the terrestrial communications technology can be realize. On the other hand, however, since the maximum of relative angle error among two satellites is enlarged, the tracking becomes difficult. In this study, it turns the electric power which is gotten from the shortening the distance to making beam width large. Here, we examine communication among two satellites (10Km distance) where the data rate is 1Gbps.

  9. Earth-satellite propagation above GHz: Papers from the 1972 spring URSI session on experiments utilizing the ATS-5 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, L. J. (compiler)

    1972-01-01

    Papers are reported from the Special Session on Earth-Satellite Propagation Above 10 GHz, presented at The 1972 Spring Meeting of the United States National Committee, International Union of Radio Science, April 1972, Washington, D. C. This session was devoted to propagation measurements associated with the Applications Technology Satellite (ATS-5), which provided the first operational earth-space links at frequencies above 15 GHz. A comprehensive summary is presented of the major results of the ATS-5 experiment measurements and related radiometric, radar and meteorological studies. The papers are organized around seven selected areas of interest, with the results of the various investigators combined into a single paper presented by a principal author for that area. A comprehensive report is provided on the results of the ATS-5 satellite to earth transmissions. A complete list of published reports and presentations related to the ATS-5 Millimeter Wave Experiment is included.

  10. Some Fundamental Limitations for Cognitive Radio

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    ' & $ % Some Fundamental Limitations for Cognitive Radio Anant Sahai Wireless Foundations, UCB EECS program November 1 at BWRC Cognitive Radio Workshop #12;' & $ % Outline 1. Why cognitive radios? 2 November 1 at BWRC Cognitive Radio Workshop #12;' & $ % Apparent spectrum allocations · Traditional

  11. Unbundling the corporation.

    PubMed

    Hagel, J; Singer, M

    1999-01-01

    No matter how monolithic they may seem, most companies are really engaged in three kinds of businesses. One business attracts customers. Another develops products. The third oversees operations. Although organizationally intertwined, these businesses have conflicting characteristics. It takes a big investment to find and develop a relationship with a customer, so profitability hinges on achieving economies of scope. But speed, not scope, drives the economics of product innovation. And the high fixed costs of capital-intensive infrastructure businesses require economies of scale. Scope, speed, and scale can't be optimized simultaneously, so trade-offs have to be made when the three businesses are bundled into one corporation. Historically, they have been bundled because the interaction costs--the friction--incurred by separating them were too high. But we are on the verge of a worldwide reduction in interaction costs, the authors contend, as electronic networks drive down the costs of communicating and of exchanging data. Activities that companies have always believed were central to their businesses will suddenly be offered by new, specialized competitors that won't have to make trade-offs. Ultimately, the authors predict, traditional businesses will unbundle and then rebundle into large infrastructure and customer-relationship businesses and small, nimble product innovation companies. And executives in many industries will be forced to ask the most basic question about their companies: What business are we really in? Their answer will determine their fate in an increasingly frictionless economy. PMID:10387769

  12. Corporeal reflexivity and autism.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Elinor

    2015-06-01

    Ethnographic video recordings of high functioning children with autism or Aspergers Syndrome in everyday social encounters evidence their first person perspectives. High quality visual and audio data allow detailed analysis of children's bodies and talk as loci of reflexivity. Corporeal reflexivity involves displays of awareness of one's body as an experiencing subject and a physical object accessible to the gaze of others. Gaze, demeanor, actions, and sotto voce commentaries on unfolding situations indicate a range of moment-by-moment reflexive responses to social situations. Autism is associated with neurologically based motor problems (e.g. delayed action-goal coordination, clumsiness) and highly repetitive movements to self-soothe. These behaviors can provoke derision among classmates at school. Focusing on a 9-year-old girl's encounters with peers on the playground, this study documents precisely how autistic children can become enmeshed as unwitting objects of stigma and how they reflect upon their social rejection as it transpires. Children with autism spectrum disorders in laboratory settings manifest diminished understandings of social emotions such as embarrassment, as part of a more general impairment in social perspective-taking. Video ethnography, however, takes us further, into discovering autistic children's subjective sense of vulnerability to the gaze of classmates. PMID:25939529

  13. Launch Will Create a Radio Telescope Larger than Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NASA and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory are joining with an international consortium of space agencies to support the launch of a Japanese satellite next week that will create the largest astronomical "instrument" ever built -- a radio telescope more than two-and-a-half times the diameter of the Earth that will give astronomers their sharpest view yet of the universe. The launch of the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Space Observatory Program (VSOP) satellite by Japan's Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) is scheduled for Feb. 10 at 11:50 p.m. EST (1:50 p.m. Feb. 11, Japan time.) The satellite is part of an international collaboration led by ISAS and backed by Japan's National Astronomical Observatory; NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA; the National Science Foundation's National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), Socorro, NM; the Canadian Space Agency; the Australia Telescope National Facility; the European VLBI Network and the Joint Institute for Very Long Baseline Interferometry in Europe. Very long baseline interferometry is a technique used by radio astronomers to electronically link widely separated radio telescopes together so they work as if they were a single instrument with extraordinarily sharp "vision," or resolving power. The wider the distance between telescopes, the greater the resolving power. By taking this technique into space for the first time, astronomers will approximately triple the resolving power previously available with only ground-based telescopes. The satellite system will have resolving power almost 1,000 times greater than the Hubble Space Telescope at optical wavelengths. The satellite's resolving power is equivalent to being able to see a grain of rice in Tokyo from Los Angeles. "Using space VLBI, we can probe the cores of quasars and active galaxies, believed to be powered by super massive black holes," said Dr. Robert Preston, project scientist for the U.S. Space Very Long Baseline Interferometry project at JPL. "Observations of cosmic masers -- naturally-occurring microwave radio amplifiers -- will tell us new things about the process of star formation and activity in the heart of other galaxies." "By the 1980s, radio astronomers were observing the universe with assemblages of radio telescopes whose resolving power was limited only by the size of the Earth. Now, through a magnificent international effort, we will be able to break this barrier and see fine details of celestial objects that are beyond the reach of a purely ground-based telescope array. We anticipate a rich harvest of new scientific knowledge from VSOP," said Dr. Paul Vanden Bout, Director of NRAO. In the first weeks after launch, scientists and engineers will "test the deployment of the reflecting mesh telescope in orbit, the wide-band data link from the satellite to the ground, the performance of the low noise amplifiers in orbit, and the high-precision orbit determination and attitude control necessary for VLBI observations with an orbiting telescope," according to Dr. Joel Smith, manager of the U.S. Space VLBI project at JPL. Scientific observations are expected to begin in May. The 26-foot diameter orbiting radio telescope will observe celestial radio sources in concert with a number of the world's ground-based radio telescopes. The 1,830-pound satellite will be launched from ISAS' Kagoshima Space Center, at the southern tip of Kyushu, one of Japan's main islands, and will be the first launch with ISAS' new M-5 series rocket. The satellite will go into an elliptical orbit, varying between 620 to 12,400 miles above the Earth's surface. This orbit provides a wide range of distances between the satellite and ground-based telescopes, which is important for producing a high-quality image of the radio source being observed. One orbit of the Earth will take about six hours. The satellite's observations will concentrate on some of the most distant and intriguing objects in the universe, where the extremely sharp

  14. Prism beamswitch for radio telescopes.

    PubMed

    Payne, J M; Ulich, B L

    1978-12-01

    A dielectric prism and switching mechanism have been constructed for beamswitching a Cassegrain radio telescope. Spatially extended radio sources may be mapped without significant confusion utilizing the sensitivity and stability inherent in the conventional Dicke radiometer. PMID:18699031

  15. SECURING RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION (RFID)

    E-print Network

    May 2007 SECURING RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION (RFID) SYSTEMS SECURING RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION (RFID) SYSTEMS Karen Scarfone, EditorKaren Scarfone, Editor Computer Security Division of Standards and Technology National Institute of Standards and Technology RFID is a form of automatic

  16. Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Baker, Andrew J.

    is fair game. Previous years: "Current and Future Radio Astronomy Projects" "The Search telescopes, interferometry + science: stars, planets, interstellar medium, active galactic nuclei, cosmic, or a final project with the SRT studying "radio frequency interference" #12; Visit to Green Bank

  17. Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Baker, Andrew J.

    , interferometry + science: stars, planets, interstellar medium, active galactic nuclei, cosmic microwave that you choose shortly after spring break. Any topic related to radio astronomy is fair game. Previous years: "Current and Future Radio Astronomy Projects" "The Search for Extratrrestrial Intelligence

  18. TDRS satellite application to LEO satellite data link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hu; Shen, Xue-min; Gong, Wenbin; Yu, Jinpei

    2013-10-01

    With the development of space technologies, satellite-based data link is becoming more and more popular due to its wide coverage. However, it needs tens of LEO satellites, short for Low Earth Orbiting satellites, to cover the whole Earth in real time. Therefore it requires huge investment to fulfill such an engineering. If several TDRS satellites, short for Tracking and Data Relaying Satellites, are included, the engineering investment might as well be acceptable. Herein, simulations of coverage and some particular performances are presented in three cases, i.e., a single LEO satellite plus one TDRS satellite, a single LEO satellite plus two TDRS satellite, a single LEO satellite plus three TDRS satellite. Simulations have shown that in the case of one LEO satellite and one TDRS satellite, the revisiting period is 5726s,which will shorten the revisiting period by 57%;the encounter frequency between one LEO and one TDRS is 11 times daily; the average duration for every encounter is 2128s. The performances of one LEO satellite and two TDRS satellites are presented as followings - the revisiting period is 2819s,which will shorten the revisiting period by 79%;the encounter frequency among one LEO and two TDRS is 23 times daily;the average duration for every encounter is 2049s.The performances of one LEO satellite and two TDRS satellites are presented as followings - the revisiting period is 1780s,which will shorten the revisiting period by 87%;the encounter frequency among one LEO and two TDRS is 34 times daily;the average duration for every encounter is 2067s. The above simulations have indicated TDRS satellites can greatly improve LEO satellite coverage and related performances. For china customers, the space orbits of TDRS are limited by either geographical positions or by orbital space regulation in equator. Such limitations make sparsely-distributed LEO satellites global real-time data link difficult, especially above western hemisphere. LEO satellite data link above some of the western hemisphere has to be retarded. Delayed data link are hardly acceptable for some emergency rescues. Before the constellation of tens of LEO communication satellites is deployed in space, it might be a good choice to realize LEO satellite data link via TDRS satellites for China users.

  19. Integration between terrestrial-based and satellite-based land mobile communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arcidiancono, Antonio

    1990-01-01

    A survey is given of several approaches to improving the performance and marketability of mobile satellite systems (MSS). The provision of voice/data services in the future regional European Land Mobile Satellite System (LMSS), network integration between the Digital Cellular Mobile System (GSM) and LMSS, the identification of critical areas for the implementation of integrated GSM/LMSS areas, space segment scenarios, LMSS for digital trunked private mobile radio (PMR) services, and code division multiple access (CDMA) techniques for a terrestrial/satellite system are covered.

  20. Integration between terrestrial-based and satellite-based land mobile communications systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcidiancono, Antonio

    A survey is given of several approaches to improving the performance and marketability of mobile satellite systems (MSS). The provision of voice/data services in the future regional European Land Mobile Satellite System (LMSS), network integration between the Digital Cellular Mobile System (GSM) and LMSS, the identification of critical areas for the implementation of integrated GSM/LMSS areas, space segment scenarios, LMSS for digital trunked private mobile radio (PMR) services, and code division multiple access (CDMA) techniques for a terrestrial/satellite system are covered.

  1. 77 FR 41808 - General Dynamics Itronix Corporation, a Subsidiary of General Dynamics Corporation, Including...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ... and Training Administration General Dynamics Itronix Corporation, a Subsidiary of General Dynamics... Adjustment Assistance (TAA) applicable to workers and former workers of General Dynamics Itronix Corporation, a subsidiary of General Dynamics Corporation, Sunrise, Florida. The determination was issued on...

  2. 76 FR 35024 - Precision Dynamics Corporation San Fernando, CA; Precision Dynamics Corporation, Also Known as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ...Dynamics Corporation, Also Known as the St. John Companies, Valencia, CA; Amended Certification...Dynamics Corporation, also known as The St. John Companies, operated in conjunction with...Dynamics Corporation, also known as The St. John Companies, Valencia, California...

  3. 78 FR 60375 - Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation-Corporate Family Transaction Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation--Corporate Family Transaction Exemption Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation (Rogue Valley),\\1\\ a Class III rail carrier... White City Terminal & Utility Co. (WCTU) and was indirectly controlled by Berkshire Hathaway...

  4. 78 FR 60375 - Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation-Corporate Family Transaction Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ...Docket No. FD 35768] Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation--Corporate...Transaction Exemption Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation (Rogue Valley...WCTU Railway LLC, or White City Terminal & Utility Co. (WCTU) and...

  5. 75 FR 20389 - Resinoid Engineering Corporation Hebron, OH; Resinoid Engineering Corporation Heath, OH; Amended...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ...TA-W-71,175; TA-W-71,175A] Resinoid Engineering Corporation Hebron, OH; Resinoid Engineering Corporation Heath, OH; Amended Certification...2010, applicable to workers of Resinoid Engineering Corporation, Hebron, Ohio. The...

  6. International communications via satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLucas, J. L.

    The evolution of communications satellite systems is traced in terms of technical capabilities and technological advances. The Communications Act of 1962 led to the establishment of INTELSAT on an international basis in 1964. The original 19 signatory nations has grown to over 100, and over 800 ground relay stations have been built. The INTELSAT system comprises spacecraft over the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans and handles 2/3 of the world's international electronic communications and all transoceanic television. The 1965 Early Bird satellite had a 240 two-way telephone link capacity and weighed 38 kg, while the Intelsat V satellites, of which there will be nine, have increased the capacity to 20,000 voice circuits and Intelsat VI will double the number by 1993. Increasing demand for satellite communications links is driving the design and development of space platforms for multiple missions of communications, meteorological studies, and on-board switching and data processing in excess of current multiple satellite systems.

  7. Writing the Instructional Radio Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Fossard, Esta

    This guide was developed for script writers on the Radio Language Arts Project, which was designed to develop, implement, and test the effectiveness of an instructional radio system to teach English as a second language at the primary school level in Kenya. The project was planned to produce a radio-based, English language program with…

  8. Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy course number = 01:750:343 web page = http Textbook: none. Three useful books will be placed on reserve, and an online "Essential Radio Astronomy; Lectures We'll talk about material relevant to the labs, but also about radio astronomy in general

  9. CRAF Handbook for Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Rodriguez, Luis F.

    CRAF Handbook for Radio Astronomy EUROPEAN SCIENCE FOUNDATION Committee on Radio Astronomy forum for science. The ESF Expert Committee on Radio Astronomy Frequencies, CRAF, was established Astronomy Service and other passive applications. Cover: The 76-m diameter Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank

  10. The Nicaragua Radio Mathematics Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searle, Barbara

    The Radio Mathematics Project was funded by the Agency for International Development to design, implement, and evaluate, in conjunction with personnel of a developing country, a system for teaching primary-grade mathematics by radio. In July 1974, a project in Nicaragua began with a series of radio presentations, each followed by 20 minutes of…

  11. Ham Radio is Mir Magic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Gary

    1997-01-01

    Presents a classroom activity in which students communicated with U.S. and Russian astronauts via ham radio while they were in orbit on the space station Mir. Gives suggestions for other ham radio classroom activities as well as names of organizations, publications, and grant programs that teachers can access to help in bring ham radio into their…

  12. Radio: Your Publics Are Listening!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Gary

    The purpose of this booklet is to provide school board members, administrators, teachers, and others interested in education with an understanding of radio, how it works, and how school systems can take advantage of the communications possibilities offered by radio. After providing background information on radio as a mass communications medium…

  13. Radio Interferometric Geolocation Miklos Maroti

    E-print Network

    Maróti, Miklós

    Radio Interferometric Geolocation Mikl´os Mar´oti P´eter V¨olgyesi Sebesty´en D´ora Branislav.kusy, akos.ledeczi}@vanderbilt.edu ABSTRACT We present a novel radio interference based sensor local- ization method for wireless sensor networks. The technique relies on a pair of nodes emitting radio waves

  14. Language Issues for Cognitive Radio

    E-print Network

    Kokar, Mieczyslaw M.

    INVITED P A P E R Language Issues for Cognitive Radio Computer languages that may be useful for expressing cognitive radio concepts are identified and evaluated in this tutorial paper. By Mieczyslaw M aspects of formal languages in the context of cognitive radio. A bottom up approach is taken in which

  15. Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy

    E-print Network

    Baker, Andrew J.

    choice May 5th = last day of class: I will lecture on 1­2 topics that you choose shortly after spring, but also about radio astronomy in general: + techniques: singledish telescopes, interferometry + science break. Any topic related to radio astronomy is fair game. Previous years: "Current and Future Radio

  16. Width of Radio-Loud and Radio-Quiet CMEs

    E-print Network

    G. Michalek; N. Gopalswamy; H. Xie

    2007-10-24

    In the present paper we report on the difference in angular sizes between radio-loud and radio-quiet CMEs. For this purpose we compiled these two samples of events using Wind/WAVES and SOHO/LASCO observations obtained during 1996-2005. It is shown that the radio-loud CMEs are almost two times wider than the radio-quiet CMEs (considering expanding parts of CMEs). Furthermore we show that the radio-quiet CMEs have a narrow expanding bright part with a large extended diffusive structure. These results were obtained by measuring the CME widths in three different ways.

  17. Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Torun Center for Astronomy is located at Piwnice, 15 km north of Torun, Poland. A part of the Faculty of Physics and Astronomy of the Nicolaus Copernicus University, it was created by the union of Torun Radio Astronomy Observatory (TRAO) and the Institute of Astronomy on 1 January 1997....

  18. Nobeyama Radio Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Nobeyama Radio Observatory has telescopes at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. It was established in 1982 as an observatory of Tokyo Astronomical Observatory (NATIONAL ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATORY, JAPAN since 1987), and operates the 45 m telescope, Nobeyama Millimeter Array, and Radioheliograph. High-resolution images of star forming regions and molecular clouds have revealed many aspects of...

  19. Japanese Radio Exercises. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jocelyn

    This unit focuses on Japanese radio exercises which became popular in Japan just after World War II and are still used among students and workers in companies to help raise morale and form group unity. The exercises reflect the general role of exercise in Japanese culture--to serve as a symbol of unity and cooperation among the Japanese, as well…

  20. Radio Channel Simulator (RCSM)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-01-31

    This is a simulation package for making site specific predictions of radio signal strength. The software computes received power at discrete grid points as a function of the transmitter location and propagation environment. It is intended for use with wireless network simulation packages and to support wireless network deployments.