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Sample records for radio wave absorption

  1. Synopsis of Mid-latitude Radio Wave Absorption in Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torkar, K. M.; Friedrich, M.

    1984-01-01

    Radio wave absorption data covering almost two years from Europe to Central Asia are presented. They are normalized by relating them to a reference absorption. Every day these normalized data are fitted to a mathematical function of geographical location in order to obtain a daily synopsis of radio wave absorption. A film of these absorption charts was made which is intended to reveal movements of absorption or absorption anomaly. In addition, radiance (temperature) data from the lower D-region are also plotted onto these charts.

  2. Digital measurements of LF radio wave absorption in the lower ionosphere and inferred gravity wave activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lastovicka, J.; Boska, J.; Buresova, D.

    1993-10-01

    Low frequency (LF) radio wave absorption in the lower ionosphere has been measured at Pruhonice (approximately 50 deg N) since 1957. A new digital computer-controlled measuring-recording-processing system was introduced in 1988. The A3 method of radio wave absorption measurement, the measuring equipment used for the digital measurements at 270 kHz, is briefly described. The digital nighttime LF A3 measurements allow the use of absorption data for studying and monitoring the gravity wave activity in the upper middle atmosphere in the period range 10 min-3(2) hours. The resulting gravity wave spectra are as expected even though their shapes vary. Individual period bands sometimes exhibit a similar general pattern of variability in gravity wave activity (winter 1990), while in other intervals we observe a shift of gravity wave energy from one period band to another (winter 1991). No strong, pronounced and consistent response to strong geomagnetic storms and midwinter stratospheric warming is found. An apparent seasonal variation with winter minima observed in shorter-period gravity wave activity is an artefact of the changing length of the night. There is no significant seasonal variation of gravity wave activity in the analysed data. The method is very cheap -- the results are a by-product of measurements made for ionospheric purposes.

  3. Relations among low ionosphere parameters and high frequency radio wave absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cipriano, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    Charged particle conductivities measured in the very low ionosphere at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, and Wallops Island, Virginia, are compared with atmospheric parameters and high frequency radio wave absorption measurements. Charged particle densities are derived from the conductivity data. Between 33 and 58 km, positive conductivity correlated well with neutral atmospheric temperature, with temperature coefficients as large as 4.6%/deg K. Good correlations were also found between HF radio wave absorption and negative conductivity at altitudes as low as 53 km, indicating that the day-to-day absorption variations were principally due to variations in electron loss rate.

  4. Modeling Ionospheric HF/VHF Radio-Wave Absorption due to Solar Energetic Proton Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, H. H.; Wilkinson, D. C.

    2007-12-01

    Simple, one-parameter, algorithms have been applied to the observed energetic proton flux as provided by the GOES series of satellites to yield estimates of the high latitude HF and VHF radio-wave absorption for both day and night respectively. The twilight response is obtained as a bi-linear function of the solar zenith angle at the observation positions, and the latitude dependence of the absorption region near the edge of the absorbing region (the polar caps) are estimated from extant models of geomagnetic cut-offs and their dependence on geomagnetic activity. The approximate inverse square frequency dependence of ionospheric absorption is used to translate across the HF/VHF range and predictions of the minimum duration of events are determined. Calculations of the polar cap absorption of HF radio waves have been performed for eleven larger Solar Energetic Proton (SEP) events during the period from 1992 through 2002 and the results compared to observations of 30 MHz Riometers operated by the AFGL and located at Thule, Greenland. While discrepancies between the estimated and observed absorption using these procedures occur, especially at low absorption levels, this model has operational value in view of its simplicity and its being the only extant model, to our knowledge, which treats solar-illumination, geomagnetic cutoff variation, and frequency effects, at least to first order. Specimen graphical representations of the north and south polar caps illustrate the output of the model for the peak of the 12 December 2006 solar proton event. Given sufficient interest, improvements to the methodology used here are practicable and could be expected to achieve accuracies to the order of 25% or better.

  5. Radio wave.

    PubMed

    Elkin, V

    1992-01-01

    In developing countries with high rates of poverty and illiteracy, radio is emerging as an excellent medium for delivering information on health issues, family planning, nutrition, and agricultural development. Since radio does not require wired electricity, it can reach remote rural populations. Surveys have found that between 50-75% of poor rural households in developing countries own radios, and the majority listen to educational radio at least once a week. A program that reaches the urban poor outside of Lima, Peru, has been instrumental in controlling the spread of cholera. A Bolivian station broadcasts 8 hours of literacy, health, agricultural, and cultural programming a day to an audience of more than 2 million Aymara Indians. Small village radio stations with a broadcast range of 15 miles can be established for under US$400 and can generally achieve sustainability through local fundraising events such as raffles. In many cases, listeners have become broadcasters at their local radio stations. PMID:12286181

  6. Modeling of high frequency radio wave absorption on oblique soundings during a solar X-ray flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogov, D. D.; Moskaleva, E. V.; Zaalov, N. Y.

    2015-01-01

    High frequency radio wave absorption induced by Solar Ultra-Violet (UV) and X-ray flux is investigated. The influence of the solar flare observed on 11 April 2013 on the structure of oblique sounding ionograms in the Arctic region of Russia is considered. An adjustable model of the ionosphere developed for high frequency (HF) propagation problems was employed for this purpose. The simulation algorithm has been designed to accept a large variety of ionospheric conditions. On the basis of the SWPC D-region Absorption model the absorption effects in the ionosphere at sub-auroral latitudes of the Earth were calculated. This approach does not require knowledge of the electron density and electron collision frequency profiles of the D-region ionosphere. The oblique ionograms simulated with the absorption effect and ionograms provided by Russian network of ionospheric observations deployed in Arctic region exhibit quite a good resemblance.

  7. Self-consistent Powerful Radio-wave Absorption by Artificial Ionosphere Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochetov, Andrey; Menkova, Uliya; Grach, Savely

    The numerical simulations of non-linear Schrodinger equation in inhomogeneous plasma layer with pumping and damping are carried out to investigate the influence of self-consistent incident powerful electromagnetic wave absorption in the regions of plasma turbulence excitation to reflection index dynamics. The damping of electromagnetic wave is taking into account by including in the set of equations (Kochetov A.V., Mironov V. A., Terina G.I., Strong Turbulence Effects in Artificially Disturbed Ionosphere, Adv. Space.Res. 2002,vol.29, No.9, p.1369) imaginary part of plasma dielectric permitivity in the vicinity of wave reflection point in the regions with strong electromagnetic field. The large range of damping parameters: threshold, decrement; different amplitude dependence, including hysteretic one, is studied, in particular, in correlation to (V. D. Shapiro, V. I. Shevchenko, Handbook of Plasma Physics, Eds. A. A. Galeev, R N. Sudan, Elsevier, 1984, vol.2, p.119). It is obtained for some regimes that the calculated reflection index dynamics agrees qualitatively to the experimental results (B. Thide, E. N. Sergeev, S. M. Grach,T. B. Leyser, T. D. Carrozi, Competition between Langmuir and upper hybrid turbulence in an HF pumped ionosphere, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2005, vol. 95, no.25, p. 255002). The work is supported in part by Russian Foundation for Basic Research by the grant No. 06-02-17334.

  8. Results of measurement of radio wave absorption in the ionosphere by the AI method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korinevskaya, N. A.

    1972-01-01

    Median noon absorption values for each month from 1964 through 1967, the diurnal variations of absorption on the regular world days, and the seasonal variations of absorption are given. The dependence of the absorption coefficient on sunspot number is analyzed.

  9. A study of electron density profiles in relation to ionization sources and ground-based radio wave absorption measurements, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnanalingam, S.; Kane, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    The D-region ion production functions are used to calculate the relationship between radio wave absorption and the flux level of X-rays in the 1-8A wavelength band. In order to bring this calculation into agreement with the empirically established relationship, it was found necessary to reduce by, a factor of about 5, the Meira nitric oxide densities below 90 km.

  10. Planetary radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    Three planets, the earth, Jupiter and Saturn are known to emit nonthermal radio waves which require coherent radiation processes. The characteristic features (frequency spectrum, polarization, occurrence probability, radiation pattern) are discussed. Radiation which is externally controlled by the solar wind is distinguished from internally controlled radiation which only originates from Jupiter. The efficiency of the externally controlled radiation is roughly the same at all three planets (5 x 10 to the -6th) suggesting that similar processes are active there. The maser radiation mechanism for the generation of the radio waves and general requirements for the mechanism which couples the power generator to the region where the radio waves are generated are briefly discussed.

  11. Channeling of high-power radio waves under conditions of strong anomalous absorption in the presence of an averaged electron heating source

    SciTech Connect

    Vas'kov, V. V.; Ryabova, N. A.

    2010-02-15

    Strong anomalous absorption of a high-power radio wave by small-scale plasma inhomogeneities in the Earth's ionosphere can lead to the formation of self-consistent channels (solitons) in which the wave propagates along the magnetic field, but has a soliton-like intensity distribution across the field. The structure of a cylindrical soliton as a function of the wave intensity at the soliton axis is analyzed. Averaged density perturbations leading to wave focusing were calculated using the model proposed earlier by Vas'kov and Gurevich (Geomagn. Aeron. 16, 1112 (1976)), in which an averaged electron heating source was used. It is shown that, under conditions of strong electron recombination, the radii of individual solitons do not exceed 650 m.

  12. Looking for radio waves with a simple radio wave detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto (Stray Cats), Norihiro

    2011-11-01

    I created a simple device that can detect radio waves in a classroom. In physics classes I tell students that we live in a sea of radio waves. They come from TV, radio, and cell phone signals as well as other sources. Students don't realize this because those electromagnetic waves are invisible. So, I wondered if I could come up with a way to detect the waves and help students to understand them better. Electromagnetic wave meters, which measure intensity of radio waves quantitatively, are commercially available. However, to students most of these are black boxes, and at the introductory level it is more effective to detect radio waves in a simpler way. This paper describes my device and how I have used it in my classes.

  13. The 27-day versus 13.5-day variations in the solar Lyman-alpha radiation and the radio wave absorption in the lower ionosphere over Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delamorena, B. A.; Lastovicka, Jan; Rapoport, Z. TS.; Alberca, L.

    1989-01-01

    In order to clarify the question of solar periods in absorption, the pattern was studied of the solar Lyman-alpha radiation (the principal ionizing agent of the lower ionosphere) and of the radio wave absorption at five widely spaced places in Europe. When the solar Lyman-alpha flux variability is very well developed, then it dominates in the lower ionospheric variability. The most pronounced Lyman-alpha variation on time scale day-month is the solar rotation variation (about 27 days). When the Lyman-alpha variability is developed rather poorly, as it is typical for periods dominated by the 13.5 day variability, then the lower ionospheric variability appears to be dominated by variations of meteorological origin. The conclusions hold for all five widely spaced placed in Europe.

  14. A study of electron density profiles in relation to ionization sources and ground-based radio wave absorption measurements, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnanalingam, S.; Kane, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    An extensive set of ground-based measurements of the diurnal variation of medium frequency radio wave adsorption and virtual height is analyzed in terms of current understanding of the D- and lower E-region ion production and loss process. When this is done a gross discrepancy arises, the source of which is not known.

  15. Cosmic noise 'absorption' by E region plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, N. C.; Dangelo, N.

    1980-01-01

    Riometer records and the electric field records obtained during the same period at two different locations are compared in order to investigate the effect of cosmic radio wave backscatter by E region plasma waves on the cosmic radio wave power reaching riometers. The data on the relation between absorption events of small magnitude (a few tenths of a decibel to about 1 dB) and intense ionospheric electric fields are in agreement with the idea that a number of absorption events measured by riometers result from radiation backscatter into space by E region plasma waves of the Farley-Buneman type.

  16. Whistlers, helicons, and lower hybrid waves: The physics of radio frequency wave propagation and absorption for current drive via Landau damping

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R. I.

    2015-09-15

    This introductory-level tutorial article describes the application of plasma waves in the lower hybrid range of frequencies (LHRF) for current drive in tokamaks. Wave damping mechanisms in a nearly collisionless hot magnetized plasma are briefly described, and the connections between the properties of the damping mechanisms and the optimal choices of wave properties (mode, frequency, wavelength) are explored. The two wave modes available for current drive in the LHRF are described and compared. The terms applied to these waves in different applications of plasma physics are elucidated. The character of the ray paths of these waves in the LHRF is illustrated in slab and toroidal geometries. Applications of these ideas to experiments in the DIII-D tokamak are discussed.

  17. UHF Radio Wave Attenuation Factor Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomenko, S. I.; Kostina, V. L.; Mytsenko, I. M.; Roenko, A. N.

    2007-07-01

    As is known each sea-going vessel is equipped with navigation, communication and other radio engineering facilities that serve to secure the safety of navigation and are chiefly operated at UHF-wave band. In developing these systems and calculating the energy potential for a necessary coverage range one should be well aware of the radio signal attenuation processes on a propagation path. The key parameter of this path is the (radio) wave attenuation factor V and its distance dependence V(R). A diversity of factors influencing the radio signal attenuation over the oceanic expanses, especially well pronounced and quite stable tropospheric ducts, and the lack of experimental data were the compelling reasons why the researchers of the Institute for Radiophysics and Electronics, NASU, had spent many years on comprehensive radiophysical investigations carried out in different regions of the Atlantic, Indian, Arctic and Pacific Oceans. The experimental data obtained allow creating the database of radio wave attenuation factor V.

  18. Radio wave propagation and acoustic sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singal, S. P.

    Radio wave propagation of the decimetric and centimetric waves depends to a large extent on the boundary layer meteorological conditions which give rise to severe fadings, very often due to multipath propagation. Sodar is one of the inexpensive remote sensing techniques which can be employed to probe the boundary layer structure. In the paper a historical perspective has been given of the simultaneously conducted studies on radio waves and sodar at various places. The radio meteorological information needed for propagation studies has been clearly spelt out and conditions of a ray path especially in the presence of a ducting layer have been defined as giving rise to fading or signal enhancement conditions. Finally the potential of the sodar studies to obtain information about the boundary layer phenomena has been stressed, clearly spelling out the use of acoustic sounding in radio wave propagation studies.

  19. Antenna Construction and Propagation of Radio Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on antenna construction and propagation of radio waves is designed to provide communicators with instructions in the selection and/or construction of the proper antenna(s) for use with current field radio equipment. Introductory materials include…

  20. Speckles in interstellar radio-wave scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, K. M.; Gwinn, C. R.; Reynolds, J.; King, E. A.; Jauncey, D.; Nicholson, G.; Flanagan, C.; Preston, R. A.; Jones, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    Observations of speckles in the scattering disk of the Vela pulsar are presented and speckle techniques for studying and circumventing scattering of radio waves by the turbulent interstellar plasma are discussed. The speckle pattern contains, in a hologrammatic fashion, complete information on the structure of the radio source as well as the distribution of the scattering material. Speckle observations of interstellar scattering of radio waves are difficult because of their characteristically short timescales and narrow bandwidths. Here, first observations are presented, taken at 13 cm wavelength with elements of the SHEVE VLBI network, of speckles in interstellar scattering.

  1. Information Content in Radio Waves: Student Investigations in Radio Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, K.; Scaduto, T.

    2013-12-01

    We describe an inquiry-based instructional unit on information content in radio waves, created in the summer of 2013 as part of a MIT Haystack Observatory (Westford, MA) NSF Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program. This topic is current and highly relevant, addressing science and technical aspects from radio astronomy, geodesy, and atmospheric research areas as well as Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Projects and activities range from simple classroom demonstrations and group investigations, to long term research projects incorporating data acquisition from both student-built instrumentation as well as online databases. Each of the core lessons is applied to one of the primary research centers at Haystack through an inquiry project that builds on previously developed units through the MIT Haystack RET program. In radio astronomy, students investigate the application of a simple and inexpensive software defined radio chip (RTL-SDR) for use in systems implementing a small and very small radio telescope (SRT and VSRT). Both of these systems allow students to explore fundamental principles of radio waves and interferometry as applied to radio astronomy. In ionospheric research, students track solar storms from the initial coronal mass ejection (using Solar Dynamics Observatory images) to the resulting variability in total electron density concentrations using data from the community standard Madrigal distributed database system maintained by MIT Haystack. Finally, students get to explore very long-baseline interferometry as it is used in geodetic studies by measuring crustal plate displacements over time. Alignment to NextGen standards is provided for each lesson and activity with emphasis on HS-PS4 'Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer'.

  2. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2014-02-11

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  3. Embracing the Wave: Using the Very Small Radio Telescope to Teach Students about Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fish, Vincent L.; Needles, M. M.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Doherty, M.; Minnigh, S.; Arndt, M. B.; Pratap, P.

    2010-01-01

    The Very Small Radio Telescope (VSRT) is a low-cost educational tool appropriate for laboratory demonstrations of the nature of radio waves and the principles of interferometry for use in both high school and undergraduate physics/astronomy classes. The system consists of small direct broadcast antenna dishes and other commercially available parts and can be assembled for under $500. Complete teaching units have been developed and tested by high school physics teachers to demonstrate radio wave transmission and exponential absorption though materials (Beer's law), the polarization of electromagnetic waves (Malus' law), the inverse square law, and interferometry. These units can be used to explore the properties of electromagnetic waves, including similarities and differences between radio and visible light, while challenging students' misconceptions about a wavelength regime that is important to both astronomy and everyday life. In addition, the VSRT can be used as a radio astronomical interferometer to measure the diameter of the Sun at 12 GHz. Full details, including a parts list, comprehensive assembly instructions, informational memos, teaching units, software, and conformance to national and Massachusetts educational standards, are available on the web at http://www.haystack.mit.edu/edu/undergrad/VSRT/index.html . Development of the VSRT at MIT Haystack Observatory is made possible through funding provided by the National Science Foundation.

  4. The Unified Radio and Plasma wave investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. G.; Bougeret, J. L.; Caldwell, J.; Canu, P.; De Conchy, Y.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Desch, M. D.; Fainberg, J.; Goetz, K.; Goldstein, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    The scientific objectives of the Ulysses Unified Radio and Plasma wave (URAP) experiment are twofold: (1) the determination of the direction, angular size, and polarization of radio sources for remote sensing of the heliosphere and the Jovian magnetosphere and (2) the detailed study of local wave phenomena, which determine the transport coefficients of the ambient plasma. A brief discussion of the scientific goals of the experiment is followed by a comprehensive description of the instrument. The URAP sensors consist of a 72.5 m electric field antenna in the spin plane, a 7.5-m electric field monopole along the spin axis of a pair of orthogonal search coil magnetic antennas. The various receivers, designed to encompass specific needs of the investigation, cover the frequency range from dc to 1 MHz. A relaxation sounder provides very accurate electron density measurements. Radio and plasma wave observations are shown to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the URAP instruments: radio observations include solar bursts, auroral kilometric radiation, and Jovian bursts; plasma waves include Langmuir waves, ion acousticlike noise, and whistlers.

  5. The Propagation of Radio Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budden, K. G.

    1988-08-01

    Preface; 1. The ionosphere and magnetosphere; 2. The basic equations; 3. The constitutive relations; 4. Magnetoionic theory I. Polarisation and refractive index; 5. Magnetoionic theory II. Rays and group velocity; 6. Stratified media. The booker quartic; 7. Slowly varying medium. The W.K.B. solution; 8. The Airy integral function and the Stokes phenomenon; 9. Integration by steepest descents; 10. Ray tracing in a loss-free stratified medium; 11. Reflection and transmission coefficients; 12. Ray theory results for isotropic ionosphere; 13. Ray theory results for anisotropic plasmas; 14. General ray tracing; 15. Full wave solutions for isotropic ionosphere; 16. Coupled wave eqations; 17. Coalescence of couling points; 18. Full wave methods for anisotropic stratified media; 19. Applications of full wave methods; Answers to problems; Bibliography; Index of definitions of the more important symbols; Subject and name index.

  6. HF Radio Wave Production of Artificial Ionospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Herbert

    In 1993 it was predicted that artificial ionospheres would be produced by high power HF radio waves, once HF transmitters approached a GWatt ERP. When that threshold was very recently achieved, such production was indeed detected and published at two high latitude high power HF facilities. Here we review: the first-principles logic behind that prediction, which aspects of such production are critically dependent on magnetic latitude, and which aspects of such production depend only on physical parameters independent of latitude. These distinctions follow directly from decomposition of the problem of ionization production into its components of: radio-wave propagation, wave-particle interactions, electron transport, and quantitative elastic/inelastic cross-sections. We outline this analysis to show that, within the context of early observations, the production of ionization is inevitable, and only a question of competing instability thresholds, and scale of ionization production. This illustrates complimentary aeronomy and plasma physics to advance understanding of both.

  7. SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF RADIO-SELECTED BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Brotherton, M. S.; Becker, R. H.; Gregg, M. D.; Tran, H. D.; White, R. L.; Laurent-Muehleisen, S. A.

    2010-07-15

    We report spectropolarimetry of 30 radio-selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasars with the Keck Observatory, 25 from the sample of Becker et al. Both high- and low-ionization BAL quasars are represented, with redshifts ranging from 0.5 to 2.5. The spectropolarimetric properties of radio-selected BAL quasars are very similar to those of radio-quiet BAL quasars: a sizeable fraction (20%) shows large continuum polarization (2%-10%) usually rising toward short wavelengths; emission lines are typically less polarized than the continuum; and absorption line troughs often show large polarization jumps. There are no significant correlations between polarization properties and radio properties, including those indicative of system orientation, suggesting that BAL quasars are not simply normal quasars seen from an edge-on perspective.

  8. Radio Structures of Compact Quasars with Broad Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, Magdalena; Gawroński, Marcin P.

    2010-05-01

    Broad absorption lines (BALs), seen in a small fraction of both the radio-quiet and radio-loud quasar populations, are probably caused by the outflow of gas with high velocities and are part of the accretion process. The presence of BALs is due to a geometrical effect and/or it is connected with the quasar evolution. Using the final release of FIRST survey combined with a catalog of BAL QSOs from SDSS/DR3, we have constructed a new sample of compact radio-loud BAL QSOs, which constitutes the majority of radio-loud BAL QSOs. The main goal of this project is to study the origin of BALs by analysis of the BAL QSOs radio morphology, orientation, and jet evolution using the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 1.6 GHz and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 5 and 8.4 GHz.

  9. Wave optics-based LEO-LEO radio occultation retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Høeg, Per

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the theory for performing retrieval of radio occultations that use probing frequencies in the XK and KM band. Normally, radio occultations use frequencies in the L band, and GPS satellites are used as the transmitting source, and the occultation signals are received by a GPS receiver on board a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite. The technique is based on the Doppler shift imposed, by the atmosphere, on the signal emitted from the GPS satellite. Two LEO satellites are assumed in the occultations discussed in this paper, and the retrieval is also dependent on the decrease in the signal amplitude caused by atmospheric absorption. The radio wave transmitter is placed on one of these satellites, while the receiver is placed on the other LEO satellite. One of the drawbacks of normal GPS-based radio occultations is that external information is needed to calculate some of the atmospheric products such as the correct water vapor content in the atmosphere. These limitations can be overcome when a proper selected range of high-frequency waves are used to probe the atmosphere. Probing frequencies close to the absorption line of water vapor have been included, thus allowing the retrieval of the water vapor content. Selecting the correct probing frequencies would make it possible to retrieve other information such as the content of ozone. The retrieval is performed through a number of processing steps which are based on the Full Spectrum Inversion (FSI) technique. The retrieval chain is therefore a wave optics-based retrieval chain, and it is therefore possible to process measurements that include multipath. In this paper simulated LEO to LEO radio occultations based on five different frequencies are used. The five frequencies are placed in the XK or KM frequency band. This new wave optics-based retrieval chain is used on a number of examples, and the retrieved atmospheric parameters are compared to the parameters from a global European Centre for Medium

  10. Results of refraction-angle measurement of radio waves in the Venus atmosphere on the basis of bistatic radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimzyanov, R. R.; Pavel'Ev, D. A.

    1993-08-01

    Improved measurements of refraction in the Venus atmosphere using bistatic radar data have been obtained. To describe the refraction effects, a theoretical model is developed that makes it possible to determine the parameters for calculating radio communication lines in the Venus troposphere from the height dependence of the refractive index. Expressions are obtained relating the phase path length of radio waves and the integral absorption of radio waves in the atmosphere to the parameters of the theoretical model.

  11. Radio wave scintillations at equatorial regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poularikas, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Radio waves, passing through the atmosphere, experience amplitude and phase fluctuations know as scintillations. A characterization of equatorial scintillation, which has resulted from studies of data recorded primarily in South America and equatorial Africa, is presented. Equatorial scintillation phenomena are complex because they appear to vary with time of day (pre-and postmidnight), season (equinoxes), and magnetic activity. A wider and more systematic geographical coverage is needed for both scientific and engineering purposes; therefore, it is recommended that more observations should be made at earth stations (at low-geomagnetic latitudes) to record equatorial scintillation phenomena.

  12. Unusual radio and plasma wave phenomena observed in March 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Stone, R. G.; Fainberg, J.

    1992-01-01

    During the intense solar flare activity in March 1991 a number of unusual radio emission and Langmuir wave phenomena were observed by the radio and plasma wave (URAP) experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft. These phenomena were associated with unusual conditions in the interplanetary medium (IPM) presumably resulting from intense solar activity. Some of these URAP observations cannot be explained by mechanisms usually attributed to interplanetary (IP) radio emissions and Langmuir wave activity and require other interpretations.

  13. Broad absorption line variability in radio-loud quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welling, C. A.; Miller, B. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Capellupo, D. M.; Gibson, R. R.

    2014-05-01

    We investigate C IV broad absorption line (BAL) variability within a sample of 46 radio-loud quasars (RLQs), selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)/Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters (FIRST) data to include both core-dominated (39) and lobe-dominated (7) objects. The sample consists primarily of high-ionization BAL quasars, and a substantial fraction have large BAL velocities or equivalent widths; their radio luminosities and radio-loudness values span ˜2.5 orders of magnitude. We have obtained 34 new Hobby-Eberly Telescope spectra of 28 BAL RLQs to compare to earlier SDSS data, and we also incorporate archival coverage (primarily dual-epoch SDSS) for a total set of 78 pairs of equivalent width measurements for 46 BAL RLQs, probing rest-frame time-scales of ˜80-6000 d (median 500 d). In general, only modest changes in the depths of segments of absorption troughs are observed, akin to those seen in prior studies of BAL radio-quiet quasars (RQQs). Also similar to previous findings for RQQs, the RLQs studied here are more likely to display BAL variability on longer rest-frame time-scales. However, typical values of |{Δ}EW| and |{Δ}EW|/ are ˜40 ± 20 per cent lower for BAL RLQs when compared with those of a time-scale-matched sample of BAL RQQs. Optical continuum variability is of similar amplitude in BAL RLQs and BAL RQQs; for both RLQs and RQQs, continuum variability tends to be stronger on longer time-scales. BAL variability in RLQs does not obviously depend upon their radio luminosities or radio-loudness values, but we do find tentative evidence for greater fractional BAL variability within lobe-dominated RLQs. Enhanced BAL variability within more edge-on (lobe-dominated) RLQs supports some geometrical dependence to the outflow structure.

  14. Radio wave propagation in pulsar magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, S. A.; Lyubarskii, Yu. E.

    Pulsar magnetospheres are known to contain an ultrarelativistic highly magnetized plasma which streams along the open magnetic lines. The radio emission observed from pulsars is believed to originate sufficiently deep in the open field line tube, so that the characteristics of outgoing waves can be influenced by propagation in the magnetospheric plasma. Refraction of radio waves in pulsar magnetospheres appears to be efficient. The effect not only influences the observed pulse width and its frequency dependency. It can alter the apparent spatial structure of pulsar emission region which can be derived from the observations of pulsar interstellar scintillations. Transverse ray separation versus pulse longitude calculated allowing for magnetospheric refraction appears to be in qualitative agreement with that observed. In particular, the nonmonotonic character of the curve can be attributed to nonmonotonic distribution of the plasma number density across the open field line tube which makes the rays emitted at different spatial locations deviate in the opposite directions. Proceeding from the frequency dependence of refraction some predictions are made about the frequency evolution of the apparent spatial structure of pulsar emission region. Magnetospheric refraction can also determine the profile shape giving rise to ray grouping into separate components. It will be demonstrated that the salient features of profile morphology can be explained within the frame of a primordial hollow-cone emission model taking into account refraction of rays in pulsar plasma. Then the frequency evolution of profile structure is naturally interpreted as a consequence of frequency dependence of refraction. As the waves propagate in the magnetospheric plasma their polarization also evolves essentially. In the vicinity of the emission region normal waves are linearly polarized and propagate independently, with the polarization plane following the orientation of the local magnetic field. As

  15. Effects of D region ionization on radio wave propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, T. R.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of anomalous D region ionization upon radio wave propagation are described for the main types of disturbances: sudden ionospheric disturbances, relativistic electron events, magnetic storms, auroral disturbances, polar cap events, and stratospheric warmings. Examples of radio wave characteristics for such conditions are given for the frequencies between the extremely low (3-3000 Hz) and high (3-30 MHz) frequency domains. Statistics on the disturbance effects and radio wave data are given in order to contribute towards the evaluation of possibilities for predicting the radio effects.

  16. Magnetospheric radio and plasma wave research - 1987-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.

    1991-01-01

    This review covers research performed in the area of magnetospheric plasma waves and wave-particle interactions as well as magnetospheric radio emissions. The report focuses on the near-completion of the discovery phase of radio and plasma wave phenomena in the planetary magnetospheres with the successful completion of the Voyager 2 encounters of Neptune and Uranus. Consideration is given to the advances made in detailed studies and theoretical investigations of radio and plasma wave phenomena in the terrestrial magnetosphere or in magnetospheric plasmas in general.

  17. Absorption effects in diffusing wave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento-Gomez, Erick; Morales-Cruzado, Beatriz; Castillo, Rolando

    2014-07-20

    The effect of absorption in diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) was studied using an absorption-dependent diffusive equation for describing the light propagation within a turbid liquid where dielectric microspheres have been embedded. Here, we propose an expression for the time-averaged light intensity autocorrelation function that correctly describes the time fluctuations for the scattered light, in the regime where the diffusion approximation accurately describes the light propagation. This correction was suspected previously, but it was not formally derived from a light diffusive equation. As in the case of no absorption, we obtained that time fluctuations of the scattered light can be related to the mean square displacement of the embedded particles. However, if a correction for absorption is not taken into account, the colloidal dynamics can be misinterpreted. Experimental results show that this new formulation correctly describes the time fluctuations of scattered light. This new procedure extends the applicability of DWS, and it opens the possibility of doing microrheology with this optical method in systems where absorption cannot be avoided. PMID:25090203

  18. Laser absorption waves in metallic capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Arutiunian, R. V.; Bol'Shov, L. A.; Kanevskii, M. F.; Kondrashov, V. V.

    1987-07-01

    The propagation of laser absorption waves in metallic capillaries was studied experimentally and numerically during pulsed exposure to CO2 laser radiation. The dependence of the plasma front propagation rate on the initial air pressure in the capillary is determined. In a broad range of parameters, the formation time of the optically opaque plasma layer is governed by the total laser pulse energy from the beginning of the exposure to the instant screening appears, and is weakly dependent on the pulse shape and gas pressure.

  19. Making Waves: Pirate Radio and Popular Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Steve

    The history of pirate radio--radio broadcasts offered by unlicensed broadcasters as alternatives to licensed, commercial radio programming--is difficult to trace, both in America and the United Kingdom (UK) since mention of pirate broadcasts of a less-then-thrilling nature are rarely found. Also, until 1927, the U.S. government did not formally…

  20. Radio wave scattering in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1995-01-01

    Current models for the 2-3 kHz emissions observed by the Voyager spacecraft in the outer heliosphere involve 2f(p) radiation generated near the termination shock or the heliopause. Radio wave scattering by solar wind density irregularities strongly affects observed sources of f(p) and 2f(p) emission in the inner heliosphere and the characteristics of astrophysical sources. In particular, the angular size, brightness temperature, and time variability of the source are strongly affected by scattering, thereby having major implications for the inferred size, energy budget, time variability, location, and nature of the source if scattering is ignored. This paper addresses whether scattering is important for interpreting the Voyager 2-3 kHz emissions. Quantitative calculations (with and without diffraction) are performed for the angular broadening of an outer heliospheric source as a function of path length, radiation frequency relative to f(p) and the spectrum of density irregularities. The effects of scattering in both the solar wind and the heliosheath are considered. Predictions for radial gradients in the source's apparent angular size and in the source's modulation index are presented. The calculations are compared with observations and the results discussed. First estimates suggest that scattering plausibly dominates the observed source size. The observed trend in modulation index with heliocentric distance is consistent with scattering being important and the source being in the outer heliosphere. Additional arguments for scattering being important are summarized.

  1. Gravity wave detection by GPS radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Torsten; Arras, Christina; De la Torre, Alejandro; Alexander, Peter; Llamedo, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) play an important role for the general atmospheric circulation due to the related transport of energy and momentum between different regions of the atmosphere. The momentum mostly generated in the troposphere is transported to upper atmospheric levels where GWs break or dissipate and transfer their momentum to the background wind (GW drag). The deposit of GW momentum can occur in the complete altitude range from the upper troposphere-stratosphere, the mesosphere, and even in the thermosphere. A global observation of GW parameters (e.g. potential energy and vertical flux of absolute horizontal momentum) is only possible with satellite data. The radio occultation (RO) technique uses GPS signals received aboard low Earth orbiting satellites for atmospheric limb sounding. Atmospheric temperature profiles in the troposphere/stratosphere and ionospheric electron densities are derived with high vertical resolution. The GPS RO technique is sensitive to GWs with small ratios of vertical to horizontal wavelengths. In this presentation we give an overview about the derivation of GW parameters from RO temperature profiles, review some results of GW detection with RO data, and discuss the limitations of the RO technique. The focus of the presented results is (1) global GW activity in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere for different seasons, (2) influence of the topography on GW activity from the troposphere to the ionosphere in the Andean region of South America, and (3) the variation of ionospheric sporadic E layers.

  2. Plasma and radio waves from Neptune: Source mechamisms and propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. Douglas

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to conduct a comprehensive investigation of the radio wave emission observed by the planetary radio astronomy (PRA) instrument on board Voyager 2 as it flew by Neptune. The study has included data analysis, theoretical and numerical calculations, and ray tracing to determine the possible source mechanisms and locations of the radiation, including the narrowband bursty and smooth components of the Neptune radio emission.

  3. New methods for calculating short-wave radio paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, A. V.; Tsedilina, E. E.; Cherkashin, Iu. N.

    Recent research on the calculation of short-wave paths at IZMIRAN (the Soviet Institute for the Study of Terrestrial Magnetism, the Ionosphere, and the Propagation of Radio Waves) is reviewed. Particular attention is given to: (1) the development of approximate analytical methods for ray-tracing calculations and for determining the geometrical-optics characteristics of a radio signal in a horizontally irregular ionosphere; (2) investigations of the long-range and short-wave propagation of decametric waves; and (3) the development of a parabolic-equation method for considering diffraction and scattering in a medium with regular and random irregularities.

  4. Nonextensivity effect on radio-wave transmission in plasma sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, A.; Esfandiari-Kalejahi, A.; Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, new theoretical findings on the application of magnetic field in effective transmission of electromagnetic (EM) waves through a plasma sheath around a hypersonic vehicle are reported. The results are obtained by assuming the plasma sheath to consist of nonextensive electrons and thermal ions. The expressions for the electric field and effective collision frequency are derived analytically in the framework of nonextensive statistics. Examination of the reflection, transmission, and absorption coefficients regarding the strength of the ambient magnetic field shows the significance of q-nonextensive parameter effect on these entities. For small values of the magnetic field, the transmission coefficient increases to unity only in the range of - 1 < q < 1 . It is also found that the EM wave transmission through the nonextensive plasma sheath can take place using lower magnetic field strengths in the presence of superthermal electrons compared with that of Maxwellian ones. It is observed that superthermal electrons, with nonextensive parameter, q < 1, play a dominant role in overcoming the radio blackout for hypersonic flights.

  5. The ISPM unified radio and plasma wave experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. G.; Caldwell, J.; Deconchy, Y.; Deschanciaux, C.; Ebbett, R.; Epstein, G.; Groetz, K.; Harvey, C. C.; Hoang, S.; Howard, R.

    1983-01-01

    Hardware for the International Solar Polar Mission (ISPM) Unified Radio and Plasma (URAP) wave experiment is presented. The URAP determines direction and polarization of distant radio sources for remote sensing of the heliosphere, and studies local wave phenomena which determine the transport coefficients of the ambient plasma. Electric and magnetic field antennas and preamplifiers; the electromagnetic compatibility plan and grounding; radio astronomy and plasma frequency receivers; a fast Fourier transformation data processing unit waveform analyzer; dc voltage measurements; a fast envelope sampler for the solar wind, and plasmas near Jupiter; a sounder; and a power converter are described.

  6. Plasma and radio waves from Neptune: Source mechanisms and propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, H. K.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes results obtained through the support of NASA Grant NAGW-2412. The objective of this project is to conduct a comprehensive investigation of the radio wave emission observed by the planetary radio astronomy (PRA) instrument on board Voyager 2 as if flew by Neptune. This study has included data analysis, theoretical and numerical calculations, ray tracing, and modeling to determine the possible source mechanism(s) and locations of the Neptune radio emissions. We have completed four papers, which are included in the appendix. The paper 'Modeling of Whistler Ray Paths in the Magnetosphere of Neptune' investigated the propagation and dispersion of lighting-generated whistler in the magnetosphere of Neptune by using three dimensional ray tracing. The two papers 'Numerical Simulations of Bursty Radio Emissions from Planetary Magnetospheres' and 'Numerical Simulations of Bursty Planetary Radio Emissions' employed numerical simulations to investigate an alternate source mechanism of bursty radio emissions in addition to the cyclotron maser instability. We have also studied the possible generation of Z and whistler mode waves by the temperature anisotropic beam instability and the result was published in 'Electron Cyclotron Wave Generation by Relativistic Electrons.' Besides the aforementioned studies, we have also collaborated with members of the PRA team to investigate various aspects of the radio wave data. Two papers have been submitted for publication and the abstracts of these papers are also listed in the appendix.

  7. High power water load for microwave and millimeter-wave radio frequency sources

    DOEpatents

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Mizuhara, Yosuke M.; Schumacher, Richard V.; Pendleton, Rand P.

    1999-01-01

    A high power water load for microwave and millimeter wave radio frequency sources has a front wall including an input port for the application of RF power, a cylindrical dissipation cavity lined with a dissipating material having a thickness which varies with depth, and a rear wall including a rotating reflector for the reflection of wave energy inside the cylindrical cavity. The dissipation cavity includes a water jacket for removal of heat generated by the absorptive material coating the dissipation cavity, and this absorptive material has a thickness which is greater near the front wall than near the rear wall. Waves entering the cavity reflect from the rotating reflector, impinging and reflecting multiple times on the absorptive coating of the dissipation cavity, dissipating equal amounts of power on each internal reflection.

  8. Evidence for nonlinear wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Levedahl, W. K.; Lotko, W.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence is presented that nonlinear wave-wave interactions occur in type III solar radio bursts. Intense, spiky Langmuir waves are observed to be driven by electron beams associated with type III solar radio bursts in the interplanetary medium. Bursts of 30-300 Hz (in the spacecraft frame) waves are often observed coincident in time with the most intense spikes of the Langmuir waves. These low-frequency waves appear to be long-wavelength ion acoustic waves, with wavenumber approximately equal to the beam resonant Langmuir wavenumber. Three possible interpretations of these observations are considered: modulational instability, parametric decay of the parent Langmuir waves to daughter ion acoustic and Langmuir waves, and decay to daughter electromagnetic waves and ion acoustic waves.

  9. Roles Played by Electrostatic Waves in Producing Radio Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    2000-01-01

    Processes in which electromagnetic radiation is produced directly or indirectly via intermediate waves are reviewed. It is shown that strict theoretical constraints exist for electrons to produce nonthermal levels of radiation directly by the Cerenkov or cyclotron resonances. In contrast, indirect emission processes in which intermediary plasma waves are converted into radiation are often favored on general and specific grounds. Four classes of mechanisms involving the conversion of electrostatic waves into radiation are linear mode conversion, hybrid linear/nonlinear mechanisms, nonlinear wave-wave and wave-particle processes, and radiation from localized wave packets. These processes are reviewed theoretically and observational evidence summarized for their occurrence. Strong evidence exists that specific nonlinear wave processes and mode conversion can explain quantitatively phenomena involving type III solar radio bursts and ionospheric emissions. On the other hand, no convincing evidence exists that magnetospheric continuum radiation is produced by mode conversion instead of nonlinear wave processes. Further research on these processes is needed.

  10. Absorption of planar waves in a draining bathtub

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Ednilton S.; Dolan, Sam R.; Crispino, Luís C. B.

    2010-06-01

    We present an analysis of the absorption of acoustic waves by a black hole analogue in (2+1) dimensions generated by a fluid flow in a draining bathtub. We show that the low-frequency absorption length is equal to the acoustic hole circumference and that the high-frequency absorption length is 4 times the ergoregion radius. For intermediate values of the wave frequency, we compute the absorption length numerically and show that our results are in excellent agreement with the low- and high-frequency limits. We analyze the occurrence of superradiance, manifested as negative partial absorption lengths for corotating modes at low frequencies.

  11. Absorption of planar waves in a draining bathtub

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Ednilton S.; Dolan, Sam R.; Crispino, Luis C. B.

    2010-06-15

    We present an analysis of the absorption of acoustic waves by a black hole analogue in (2+1) dimensions generated by a fluid flow in a draining bathtub. We show that the low-frequency absorption length is equal to the acoustic hole circumference and that the high-frequency absorption length is 4 times the ergoregion radius. For intermediate values of the wave frequency, we compute the absorption length numerically and show that our results are in excellent agreement with the low- and high-frequency limits. We analyze the occurrence of superradiance, manifested as negative partial absorption lengths for corotating modes at low frequencies.

  12. Ionospheric wave and irregularity measurements using passive radio astronomy techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. C.; Mahoney, M. J.; Jacobson, A. R.; Knowles, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    The observation of midlatitude structures using passive radio astronomy techniques is discussed, with particular attention being given to the low-frequency radio telescope at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. The present telescope operates in the 10-125-MHz frequency range. Observations of the ionosphere at separations of a few kilometers to a few hundreds of kilometers by the lines of sight to sources are possible, allowing the determination of the amplitude, wavelength, direction of propagation, and propagation speed of ionospheric waves. Data are considered on large-scale ionospheric gradients and the two-dimensional shapes and sizes of ionospheric irregularities.

  13. Coincidently Searching for Gravitational Waves and Low Frequency Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavic, Michael; Yancey, C.; Shawhan, P. S.; Cutchin, S.; Simonetti, J. H.; Bear, B.; Tsai, J.

    2014-01-01

    The transient sky has become an important area of astrophysical study, especially with the appearance of recent fast transients, but little is known about the sources of these transients. One possible approach which can shed light on this area is multi-messenger astronomy using gravitational waves and prompt emission meter-wavelength radio to observe fast transients. This is made possible with gravitational-wave detectors such as LIGO, VIRGO, and GEO (IndIGO and KAGRA proposed or under construction) and phased-array radio-telescopes such LWA, LOFAR, LoFASM, and MWA. This talk presents a method for coincidence of gravitational wave and meter-wavelength radio observations to enable multi-messenger astronomy and discusses the optimization of gravitational-wave and radio sensitivities to attain effective combined observational sensitivities. It is shown that coincidence provides a 52.9% increase to the sensitivity distance for LIGO and a 200% increase to the SNR of radio arrays for particular cases.

  14. Trajectories of radio waves in linear layer with isometric inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golynskiy, S. M.; Khlybov, G. N.

    1984-05-01

    The trajectories of radio waves in a statistically nonhomogeneous medium such as a linear ionospheric layer are estimated, taking into account their perturbation by local inhomogeneities. Assuming that the trajectories do remain in the plane of incidence, the deviation of the most probable trajectory from its unperturbed path in accordance with Snell's law is calculated for three models of wave diffusion as a Markov process (D- diffusion). The results are useful for design and operation of radio communication lines, calculation of the maximum usable frequency, and other applications.

  15. Excitation of parametric instabilities by radio waves in the ionosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fejer, J. A.; Leer, E.

    1972-01-01

    The excitation of parametric instabilities by radio waves in a magnetoplasma is discussed. A uniform medium is assumed and linear approximations are used. Excitation by a pump wave of ordinary polarization is hardly affected by the magnetic field. Low or zero frequency ion waves and high frequency Langmuir waves are excited simultaneously. For an extraordinary pump wave, the excited high frequency electrostatic waves are in the Bernstein mode. The threshold is slightly higher and excitation can occur only within certain 'allowed' frequency bands. A new type of parametric instability in which the excited waves are electromagnetic in nature and which is more strongly affected by the inhomogeneous nature of the medium is discussed qualitatively.

  16. X-Shaped Radio Galaxies and the Gravitational Wave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall Roberts, David; Saripalli, Lakshmi; Subrahmanyan, Ravi

    2015-08-01

    Coalescence of super massive black holes (SMBH's) in galactic mergers is potentially the dominant contributor to the low frequency gravitational wave background (GWB). It was proposed by Merritt and Ekers (2002) that X-shaped radio galaxies are signposts of such coalescences, and that their abundance might be used to predict the magnitude of the gravitational wave background. In Roberts et al. (2015) we presented radio images of all 52 X-shaped radio source candidates out of the sample of 100 selected by Cheung (2007) for which archival VLA data were available. These images indicate that at most 21% of the candidates might be genuine X-shaped radio sources that were formed by a restarting of beams in a new direction following a major merger. This suggests that fewer than 1.3% of extended radio sources appear to be candidates for genuine axis reorientations, much smaller than the 7% suggested by Leahy & Parma (1992). Thus the associated gravitational wave background may be substantially smaller than previous estimates. These results can be used to normalize detailed calculations of the SMBH coalescence rate and the GWB.

  17. Radio wave propagation at frequencies exceeding MUF-F2 in the short wave band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashkaliyev, Y. F.; Bocharov, V. I.

    1972-01-01

    The results of measurements of field strength and signal/noise ratio on experimental ionospheric-scattering short wave radio links are presented. It is shown that the seasonal and diurnal variations of field strength are determined by features of solar and meteoric activity. The role of the sporadic E-layer in propagation of short radio waves at frequencies exceeding MUF-F2 is noted.

  18. Short-Wave Radio: An Aid to Language Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutcavage, Charles P.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses use of short-wave radio broadcasts as method for expanding students' appreciation of practical advantages of language learning. Suggests use of news broadcasts and gives guidelines for using broadcasts such as level of aural comprehension in class. (Author/BK)

  19. The Radio Wave Emission from Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaklini, Pedro Paulo Bonetti

    2008-10-01

    SgrA* is a compact radio source, with radius smaller than 1 AU. Its position is coincident with the dynamic center of a star cluster that orbits the 4 million solar mass supermassive black hole found in the center of the Milky Way. SgrA* is surrounded by a complex of HII regions, with complex morphology, named SgrA. The variability of the SgrA* emission was observed at different wavelengths, as radio, infrared and X-rays, with timescales that range from hours to months. Recent observations using interferometric techniques have detected a quasiperiodicity in the radio light curve from SgrA*. In our work, we present the result of 43 GHz observations obtained with the Itapetinga radiotelescope, located in Atibaia, which aimed to detect this variability and verify the existence of a periodicity. Sgr B2, an HII complex near SgrA*, was used as a calibrator to eliminate any extrinsic variability. The obtained light curve is consistent with previous results reported in the literature, confirming the increase in the amplitude of the variability with frequency. Particularly, daily variability was found that is compatible with what was reported at 7 mm using VLBI techniques. The expected 106 days periodicity was not found in our data by the Jurkevich statistic method, which instead indicated the existence of a 90 day period. However, the superposition of the 7 mm data on a 106 day look similar to what was found from the 1.3 cm observations. Considering that the observations at 7 mm do not cover all the phases in the full cycle, more observations are needed to confirm the existence of a periodicity in the light curve.

  20. Millimeter-wave Absorption Studies of Molecules in Diffuse Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Robert; Liszt, Harvey S.

    1999-10-01

    With IRAM instruments in the last few years, we have been using compact extragalactic millimeter wave radio sources as background objects to study the absorption spectrum of diffuse interstellar gas at millimeter wavelengths. The molecular content of interstellar gas has turned out to be unexpectedly rich. Simple polyatomic molecules such as HCO+, C2H are quite ubiquitous near the Galactic plane (beta < 15o), and many species are detected in some directions (CO, HCO+, H2CO, HCN, HNC, CN, C2H, C3H2, H2S, CS, HCS+, SO, SiO). Remarkable proportionality relations are found between related species such as HCO+ and OH, or CN, HCN and HNC. The high abundance of some species is still a challenge for current models of diffuse cloud chemistry. A factor of 10 increase in the sensitivity will make such studies achievable in denser clouds, where the chemistry is still more active and where abundances are nowadays only available by emission measurements, and thus subject to uncertainties due to sometimes poorly understood line formation and excitation conditions.

  1. Nonlinear absorption of Alfven wave in dissipative plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Taiurskii, A. A. Gavrikov, M. B.

    2015-10-28

    We propose a method for studying absorption of Alfven wave propagation in a homogeneous non-isothermal plasma along a constant magnetic field, and relaxation of electron and ion temperatures in the A-wave. The absorption of a A-wave by the plasma arises due to dissipative effects - magnetic and hydrodynamic viscosities of electrons and ions and their elastic interaction. The method is based on the exact solution of two-fluid electromagnetic hydrodynamics of the plasma, which for A-wave, as shown in the work, are reduced to a nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations.

  2. Lightning location with variable radio wave propagation velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongjian; Koh, Kuang Liang; Mezentsev, Andrew; Sugier, Jacqueline; Fullekrug, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Lightning discharges can be located by triangulation of their broadband electromagnetic pulses in long-baseline (~500 km) radio receiver networks. Here we apply the time of arrival difference (TOA) method to electric field recordings with a low frequency radio receiver array consisting of four stations in western Europe. The electromagnetic wave propagation velocity at low radio frequencies is an important input parameter for the TOA calculation and it is normally assumed to be equal to the speed of light. However, the radio wave propagation depends for example on the frequency, ground conductivity and the ionospheric height and small variations can cause location differences from hundreds to thousands of meters, as demonstrated in this study. The radio wave propagation from two VLF transmissions at 20.9 kHz and 23.4 kHz are compared. The results show that the apparent phase velocities are 0.6% slower and 0.5% faster than the speed of light respectively. As a result, a variable velocity is implemented in the TOA method using continuously recorded data on the 8th August 2014, when a mesoscale convective system developed over central France. The lightning locations inferred with a variable wave propagation velocity are more clustered than those using a fixed velocity. The distribution of the lightning velocities in a given geographic area fits a normal distribution that is not centred at the speed of light. As a result, representative velocities can be calculated for smaller regions to generate a velocity map over a larger area of enhanced lightning activity. These results suggest a connection with the ground elevation and/or surface conductivity that might have an impact on the observed wave propagation velocities.

  3. Tracking the CME-driven shock wave on 2012 March 5 and radio triangulation of associated radio emission

    SciTech Connect

    Magdalenić, J.; Marqué, C.; Mierla, M.; Zhukov, A. N.; Rodriguez, L.; Krupar, V.; Maksimović, M.; Cecconi, B.

    2014-08-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 2012 March 5 solar eruptive event, with an emphasis on the radio triangulation of the associated radio bursts. The main points of the study are reconstruction of the propagation of shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using radio observations and finding the relative positions of the CME, the CME-driven shock wave, and its radio signatures. For the first time, radio triangulation is applied to different types of radio bursts in the same event and performed in a detailed way using goniopolarimetric observations from STEREO/Waves and WIND/Waves spacecraft. The event on 2012 March 5 was associated with a X1.1 flare from the NOAA AR 1429 situated near the northeast limb, accompanied by a full halo CME and a radio event comprising long-lasting interplanetary type II radio bursts. The results of the three-dimensional reconstruction of the CME (using SOHO/LASCO, STEREO COR, and HI observations), and modeling with the ENLIL cone model suggest that the CME-driven shock wave arrived at 1 AU at about 12:00 UT on March 7 (as observed by SOHO/CELIAS). The results of radio triangulation show that the source of the type II radio burst was situated on the southern flank of the CME. We suggest that the interaction of the shock wave and a nearby coronal streamer resulted in the interplanetary type II radio emission.

  4. Mapping Natural and Man-made Radio Interference at the Moon: Wind Waves RAD2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Hess, R. A.; Kaiser, M. L.; Farrell, W. M.

    2009-12-01

    The lunar surface is frequently identified as a preferred site for large, low-frequency (<50-100 MHz) interferometric radio observatories. Compared to ground-based facilities limited to above 10 MHz by ionospheric absorption, the Moon has essentially no ionosphere. Observations of radio sources at frequencies below 100 kHz would be possible. Compared to a free-flying spacecraft constellation, the lunar surface provides a surface for deploying antennas, after which the antenna metrology is not an issue. Also compared to the spacecraft constellation, the moon offers a “backstop” that can block unwanted radio emissions from the sun or, for a far-side array, from man-made transmitters on Earth as well as terrestrial auroral radio emissions. We present an analysis of the Wind Waves RAD2 radio data set for the frequency range 1-14 MHz. These data, acquired from November 1994 through the present, document the radio bursts and terrestrial emissions observed by Wind along a complex trajectory that included passes very close to the Moon. Thus, we can build a statistical “map” of terrestrial radio emissions as a function of local time of the Moon relative to earth, the inclination of the moon’s orbit, and frequency. These data demonstrate that successful radio observations of cosmological sources from anywhere near Earth will be best accomplished by an observatory on the far-side of the Moon. The data also provide statistics regarding interference from solar radio emissions, including variations as a function of the solar cycle, with any observations requiring high sensitivity.

  5. Ulysses radio and plasma wave observations in the Jupiter environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. G.; Pedersen, B. M.; Harvey, C. C.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Desch, M. D.; De Villedary, C.; Fainberg, J.; Farrell, W. M.; Goetz, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment has produced new observations of the Jupiter environment, owing to the unique capabilities of the instrument and the traversal of high Jovian latitudes. Broad-band continuum radio emission from Jupiter and in situ plasma waves have proved valuable in delineating the magnetospheric boundaries. Simultaneous measurements of electric and magnetic wave fields have yielded new evidence of whistler-mode radiation within the magnetosphere. Observations of auroral-like hiss provided evidence of a Jovian cusp. The source direction and polarization capabilities of URAP have demonstrated that the outer region of the Io plasma torus supported at least five separate radio sources that reoccurred during successive rotations with a measurable corotation lag. Thermal noise measurements of the Io torus densities yielded values in the densest portion that are similar to models suggested on the basis of Voyager observations of 13 years ago. The URAP measurements also suggest complex beaming and polarization characteristics of Jovian radio components. In addition, a new class of kilometer-wavelength striated Jovian bursts has been observed.

  6. Explanation of the Normal Winter Anomaly from the Seasonal Variation of Short Wave Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velinov, P. J.; Smirnova, N. V.; Vlaskov, V. A.

    1984-01-01

    The frequency dependence of the winter anomaly (WA) of radio wave absorption indicates the altitude range where the considered seasonal variation of absorption, L, takes place: 75-95 km. In this height region considerable seasonal variations of ionic composition and effective recombination coefficient, alpha sub e, exist, which can cause seasonal variations of electron concentration, N, and absorption, L. An attempt to render a qualitative estimation of the normal WA, i.e., the increased ratio of winter over summer absorption, L sub w/L sub s, at medium latitudes 40 deg and 50 deg, for solar zenith angles CHi = 60 deg and 75 deg is made. This is compared with existing experimental data.

  7. Cassini Radio Science Observations of Density Waves in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGhee, C. A.; French, R. G.; Rappaport, N. J.; Marouf, E. A.; Dawson, R.; Stack, K.

    2006-08-01

    Saturn's ring system is an elegant celestial mechanical laboratory for studying the interactions between a host of small and large moons, and the rings themselves. Resonances between the satellites and the ring particles result in spiral density waves whose detailed characteristics can be used to determine the physical properties of the rings. Over the past year, the Cassini Radio Science Team has obtained nearly a dozen exquisite radial profiles of the structure of Saturn's rings from occultations at three radio wavelengths (0.9 cm, 3 cm, and 12 cm), at sub-km resolution, after correction for the effects of diffraction. The optical depth profiles of the rings are replete with density waves produced by Mimas, Janus, Epimetheus, Prometheus, Pandora, and even smaller moons. Using wavelet decomposition as well as direct model fitting, we have determined the surface mass density and viscosity of the ring particles from weak (linear) density waves, primarily in the A ring. These are essential ingredients for dynamical models of the rings that include the effects of self-gravity and inelastic particle collisions. Future radio science occultation experiments throughout the Cassini orbital tour of Saturn will probe the rings at a range of ring opening angles, providing both additional measurements of density waves and other ring features.

  8. Estimation of electron density profile in ionospheric D and lower E region by Rocket observation and Full wave analysis of LF and MF radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashihara, Y.; Ishisaka, K.; Okada, T.; Miyake, T.; Murayama, Y.; Nagano, I.

    Electrons in ionospheric D region are closely related to neutral dynamic meteorology and chemistry including such as hydrated ion and NOx though the electron density is very small about ten -- several thousand cc Therefore it has the possibility to find a new physical knowledge in mesosphere and lower ionosphere Radio wave propagation characteristics in ionospheric D and lower E region are affected by an electron density profile As a inverse problem the electron density profile can be estimated by radio wave propagation characteristics measured by a sounding rocket S-310-33 sounding rocket was launched at Uchinoura Space Center USC at 0 30 a m LT on January 18 2004 We observed magnetic field intensities of two radio waves transmitted from Kanoya air base 238kHz and NHK Kumamoto 2nd ch 873kHz by using radio wave receivers onboarded the rocket Both of the magnetic field intensities were absorbed suddenly at 89km altitude The propagation characteristics in the ionosphere are calculated by using Full wave method It needs the electron density profile previously to calculate the propagation characteristics by Full wave method The electron density profile is estimated by according the radio wave propagation characteristics calculated by Full wave analysis with the observed one This estimation technique is called radio wave absorption method We found the thin ionospheric layer of about 1km at the altitude of 89km The electron density in this region is 2 6 times10 3 cc The electron density compared with one at 88km it was large number

  9. Electron Transport by Radio Frequency Waves in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, A. K.; Kominis, Y.; Hizanidis, K.

    2009-11-26

    A relativistic kinetic description for momentum and spatial diffusion of electrons by radio frequency (RF) waves and non-axisymmetric magnetic field perturbations in a tokamak is formulated. The Lie perturbation technique is used to obtain a non-singular, time dependent evolution equation for resonant and non-resonant electron diffusion in momentum space and diffusion in configuration space. The kinetic equation for the electron distribution function is different from the usual quasilinear equations as it includes interactions that are non-Markovian. It is suitable for studying wave-particle interaction in present tokamaks and in ITER. A primary goal of RF waves, and, in particular, of electron cyclotron waves, in ITER is to control instabilities like the neoclassical tearing mode (NTM). Non-axisymmetric effects due to NTMs are included in the kinetic formalism.

  10. Data compression for the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kirchner, D. L.; Kurth, W. S.; Woolliscroft, L. J. C.

    1993-01-01

    The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science experiment will employ data compression to make effective use of the available data telemetry bandwidth. Some compression will be achieved by use of a lossless data compression chip and some by software in a dedicated 80C85 processor. A description of the instrument and data compression system are included in this report. Also, the selection of data compression systems and acceptability of data degradation is addressed.

  11. Effect of Radio Frequency Waves on Plasma Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, S.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of Radio Frequency waves on low frequency plasma instabilities and turbulence is studied. It is shown that the ponderomotive force can stabilize or destabilize instabilities depending on the power deposition profile and no RF induced flow generation hypothesis is required. Its possible consequence on space and fusion plasma will be discussed. Collaborations with George Vahala from William & Mary, Julio Martinell from UNAM and Atsushi Fukuyama from Kyoto University are acknowledged.

  12. Theories of radio emissions and plasma waves. [in Jupiter magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Goertz, C. K.

    1983-01-01

    The complex region of Jupiter's radio emissions at decameter wavelengths, the so-called DAM, is considered, taking into account the basic theoretical ideas which underly both the older and newer theories and models. Linear theories are examined, giving attention to direct emission mechanisms, parallel propagation, perpendicular propagation, and indirect emission mechanisms. An investigation of nonlinear theories is also conducted. Three-wave interactions are discussed along with decay instabilities, and three-wave up-conversio. Aspects of the Io and plasma torus interaction are studied, and a mechanism by which Io can accelerate electrons is reviewed.

  13. Radio observations of atmospheric gravity waves with Callisto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monstein, C.

    2013-12-01

    On December 12th 2013 NOAA reported between 08:04 and 12:08 only radio noise at 245 MHz observed in San Vito. But some European observatories of the e-Callisto network (Germany, UK and Ireland) observed very strange reverse drifting and v-type bursts which was never recognized by the author before. Private communication with P. Zucca from TCD showed that these strange structures are due to focusing effects in the ionosphere. Interestingly it is possible to observe complex ionospheric behavior with cheap and simple radio-telescopes like Callisto. People who are interested in such kind of observations to study ionospheric gravity waves should generate observing programs for frequencies below 100 MHz, ideally with an additional up-converter for frequencies from 15 MHz - 100 MHz. Callisto again proved to be a powerful tool for solar science and radio-monitoring. Below are shown recent observations from Bir castle in Ireland, Essen in Germany and Glasgow in Scotland. For comparison I added an observation from a LOFAR node from Chibolton in UK which was provided by Richard Fallows from Astron NL. And finally a plot from Nançay radio heliograph, provided by Karl-Heinz Gansel, Dingden Amateur Radio- Astronomy Observatory DARO, Germany. Although Callisto instruments are almost identical, the spectra look completely different, depending on their geographical longitude and latitude.

  14. Inferring the distances of fast radio bursts through associated 21-cm absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalit, Ben; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-07-01

    The distances of fast radio burst (FRB) sources are currently unknown. We show that the 21-cm absorption line of hydrogen can be used to infer the redshifts of FRB sources, and determine whether they are Galactic or extragalactic. We calculate a probability of ˜10 per cent for the host galaxy of an FRB to exhibit a 21-cm absorption feature of equivalent width ≳10 km s-1. Arecibo, along with several future radio observatories, should be capable of detecting such associated 21-cm absorption signals for strong bursts of ≳several Jy peak flux densities.

  15. Absorption of acoustic waves by sunspots. II - Resonance absorption in axisymmetric fibril models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, C. S.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical calculations of acoustic waves scattered by sunspots which concentrate on the absorption at the magnetohydrodynamic Alfven resonance are extended to the case of a flux-tube embedded in a uniform atmosphere. The model is based on a flux-tubes of varying radius that are highly structured, translationally invariant, and axisymmetric. The absorbed fractional energy is determined for different flux-densities and subphotospheric locations with attention given to the effects of twist. When the flux is highly concentrated into annuli efficient absorption is possible even when the mean magnetic flux density is low. The model demonstrates low absorption at low azimuthal orders even in the presence of twist which generally increases the range of wave numbers over which efficient absorption can occur. Resonance absorption is concluded to be an efficient mechanism in monolithic sunspots, fibril sunspots, and plage fields.

  16. The propagation of radio waves: The theory of radio waves of low power in the ionosphere and magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budden, K. G.

    The effect of the ionized regions of the earth's atmosphere on radio wave propagation is comprehensively treated. After an introductory consideration of the terrestrial ionosphere and magnetosphere, wave propagation in ion plasmas, and their disturbances, attention is given to basic equations for the consideration of propagation effects, such constitutive relations as the Lorentz polarization term and the Debye length, the roles of polarization and refractive index in magnetoionic theory, rays and group velocity, the Booker quartic in stratified media, and the 'WKB' solutions. Further topics encompass the Airy integral function and the Stokes phenomenon, ray tracing in a loss-free stratified medium, ray theory and full wave solution results for an isotropic ionosphere, and full wave methods for anisotropic stratified media and their applications.

  17. Scattering of radio frequency waves by blobs in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Abhay K.; Hizanidis, Kyriakos; Kominis, Yannis

    2013-05-15

    The density fluctuations and blobs present in the edge region of magnetic fusion devices can scatter radio frequency (RF) waves through refraction, reflection, diffraction, and coupling to other plasma waves. This, in turn, affects the spectrum of the RF waves and the electromagnetic power that reaches the core of the plasma. The usual geometric optics analysis of RF scattering by density blobs accounts for only refractive effects. It is valid when the amplitude of the fluctuations is small, of the order of 10%, compared to the background density. In experiments, density fluctuations with much larger amplitudes are routinely observed, so that a more general treatment of the scattering process is needed. In this paper, a full-wave model for the scattering of RF waves by a blob is developed. The full-wave approach extends the range of validity well beyond that of geometric optics; however, it is theoretically and computationally much more challenging. The theoretical procedure, although similar to that followed for the Mie solution of Maxwell's equations, is generalized to plasmas in a magnetic field. Besides diffraction and reflection, the model includes coupling to a different plasma wave than the one imposed by the external antenna structure. In the model, it is assumed that the RF waves interact with a spherical blob. The plasma inside and around the blob is cold, homogeneous, and imbedded in a uniform magnetic field. After formulating the complete analytical theory, the effect of the blob on short wavelength electron cyclotron waves and longer wavelength lower hybrid waves is studied numerically.

  18. Interpretation of gravity wave signatures in GPS radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, P.; de la Torre, A.; Llamedo, P.

    2008-08-01

    The horizontal averaging of global positioning system radio occultation retrievals produces an amplitude attenuation and phase shift in any plane gravity wave, which may lead to significant discrepancies with respect to the original values. In addition, wavelengths cannot be straightforwardly inferred due to the observational characteristics. If the waves produce small departures from spherical symmetry in the background atmosphere and under the assumption that the refractivity kernel may be represented by a delta function, an analytical expression may be derived in order to find how the retrieved amplitudes become weakened (against the original ones). In particular, we study the range of waves that may be detected and the consequent reduction in variance calculation, which is found to be around 19%. A larger discrepancy was obtained when comparing an occultation variance with the one computed from a numerical simulation of that case. Wave amplitudes can be better resolved when the fronts are nearly horizontal or when the angle between the occultation line of sight and the horizontal component of the wave vector approaches π/2. Short horizontal scale waves have a high probability of becoming attenuated or of not being detected at all. We then find geometrical relations in terms of the relative orientation between waves and sounding, so as to appropriately interpret wavelengths extracted from the acquired data. Only inertio-gravity waves, which exhibit nearly horizontal fronts, will show small differences between detected and original vertical wavelengths. Last, we analyze the retrieval effect on wave phase and find a shift between original and detected wave that generally is nonzero and approaches π/4 for the largest horizontal wavelengths.

  19. Millimeter wave absorption spectra of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, O.P.; Hagmann, M.J.; Hill, D.W.; Partlow, L.M.; Bush, L.

    1980-01-01

    A solid-state computer-controlled system has been used to make swept-frequency measurements of absorption of biological specimens from 26.5 to 90.0 GHz. A wide range of samples was used, including solutions of DNA and RNA, and suspensions of BHK-21/C13 cells, Candida albicans, C krusei, and Escherichia coli. Sharp spectra reported by other workers were not observed. The strong absorbance of water (10--30 dB/mm) caused the absorbance of all aqueous preparations that we examined to have a water-like dependence on frequency. Reduction of incident power (to below 1.0 microW), elimination of modulation, and control of temperature to assure cell viability were not found to significantly alter the water-dominated absorbance. Frozen samples of BHK-21/C13 cells tested at dry ice and liquid nitrogen temperatures were found to have average insertion loss reduced to 0.2 dB/cm but still showed no reproducible peaks that could be attributed to absorption spectra. It is concluded that the special resonances reported by others are likely to be in error.

  20. Propagation of radio frequency waves through density filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Abhay K.; Hizanidis, Kyriakos

    2015-12-01

    In tokamak fusion plasmas, coherent fluctuations in the form of blobs or filaments are routinely observed in the scrape-off layer. In this paper we develop an analytical formalism for the scattering of radio frequency waves by filaments which are cylindrical with their major axis aligned along the toroidal magnetic field lines. Since the magnitude of the ratio of the density inside the filaments to the background density is generally of order 1, the geometric optics approximation cannot be used to describe the scattering. A full-wave model is formulated which assumes that the plasma is cold and that the plasma in the cylindrical filament has uniform density. The background plasma, in which the filament is present, is also assumed to be cold and uniform. The theoretical framework applies to the scattering of any plasma wave.

  1. Trends and Periodicities In Nighttime Lf Radio Wave Reflection Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürschner, D.; Jacobi, Ch.

    The nighttime reflection height of low-frequency (LF) radio waves at oblique inci- dence is measured at Collm Observatory using 1.8 kHz sideband phase comparisons of the sky-wave and the ground wave of a commercial 177 kHz LF transmitter. The measurements have been carried out continuously since 1983, now allowing the anal- ysis of trends and regular variations of the reflection height. In the time series is found a) a long-term negative trend and b) a solar cycle dependence, both confirming ear- lier measurements and theoretical estimations. Moreover, a significant oscillation of quasi-biennial period is visible in LF reflection heights, indicating a reaction of the midlatitude mesosphere/lower thermosphere region on the equatorial QBO.

  2. Propagation of radio frequency waves through density filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Abhay K.; Hizanidis, Kyriakos

    2015-12-10

    In tokamak fusion plasmas, coherent fluctuations in the form of blobs or filaments are routinely observed in the scrape-off layer. In this paper we develop an analytical formalism for the scattering of radio frequency waves by filaments which are cylindrical with their major axis aligned along the toroidal magnetic field lines. Since the magnitude of the ratio of the density inside the filaments to the background density is generally of order 1, the geometric optics approximation cannot be used to describe the scattering. A full-wave model is formulated which assumes that the plasma is cold and that the plasma in the cylindrical filament has uniform density. The background plasma, in which the filament is present, is also assumed to be cold and uniform. The theoretical framework applies to the scattering of any plasma wave.

  3. Resonance absorption of magnetohydrodynamic surface waves Physical discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown how the phenomenon of MHD surface wave resonance absorption can be described in simple terms, both physically and mathematically, by applying the 'thin flux tube equations' to the finite-thickness transition layer which supports the surface wave. The thin flux tubes support incompressible slow-mode waves that are driven by fluctuations in the total pressure which exist due to the presence of the surface wave. It is shown that the equations for the slow-mode waves can be reduced to a simple equation, equivalent to a driven harmonic oscillator. Certain field lines within the transition layer are equivalent to a harmonic oscillator driven at resonance, and neighboring field lines are effectively driven at resonance as long as a given condition is satisfied. Thus, a layer which secularly extracts energy from the surface wave develops. The analysis indicates that nonlinear effects may destroy the resonance which is crucial to the whole effect.

  4. Scattering of radio frequency waves by density fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, A. K.; Hizanidis, K.; Ioannidis, Z.; Tigelis, I.

    2015-11-01

    The scattering of radio frequency waves by density fluctuations in magnetized fusion plasmas is studied theoretically and computationally. For coherent fluctuations, such as filaments in the edge region, we use a full-wave model for which the theory is similar to that for Mie scattering of electromagnetic waves by dielectric objects. The filaments are considered to be cylindrical with their axes aligned along the magnetic field. The results from the theoretical model are compared with numerical simulations using COMSOL. The simulations are extended to plasma conditions that are beyond the scope of the theoretical model, e.g., multiple filaments and filaments with density gradients. For incoherent planar fluctuations, which can be either in the core of the plasma or in the edge region, our theory is based on the Kirchhoff approach in tandem with Huygen's principle. The coherent and incoherent fluctuations scatter the incident plane wave, as well as couple some of the power to different plasma waves. The scattered spectrum is affected by the size of the fluctuations, the frequency, and the direction of propagation of the incident wave.

  5. Absorption of surface acoustic waves by topological insulator thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L. L.; Xu, W.

    2014-08-11

    We present a theoretical study on the absorption of the surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by Dirac electrons in topological insulator (TI) thin films (TITFs). We find that due to momentum and energy conservation laws, the absorption of the SAWs in TITFs can only be achieved via intra-band electronic transitions. The strong absorption can be observed up to sub-terahertz frequencies. With increasing temperature, the absorption intensity increases significantly and the cut-off frequency is blue-shifted. More interestingly, we find that the absorption of the SAWs by the TITFs can be markedly enhanced by the tunable subgap in the Dirac energy spectrum of the TI surface states. Such a subgap is absent in conventional two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) and in the gapless Dirac 2DEG such as graphene. This study is pertinent to the exploration of the acoustic properties of TIs and to potential application of TIs as tunable SAW devices working at hypersonic frequencies.

  6. Discovery of millimetre-wave excess emission in radio-quiet active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, Ehud; Baldi, Ranieri D.; Laor, Ari; Horesh, Assaf; Stevens, Jamie; Tzioumis, Tasso

    2015-07-01

    The physical origin of radio emission in radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (RQ AGN) remains unclear, whether it is a downscaled version of the relativistic jets typical of radio-loud (RL) AGN, or whether it originates from the accretion disc. The correlation between 5 GHz and X-ray luminosities of RQ AGN, which follows LR = 10-5LX observed also in stellar coronae, suggests an association of both X-ray and radio sources with the accretion disc corona. Observing RQ AGN at higher (mm-wave) frequencies, where synchrotron self-absorption is diminished, and smaller regions can be probed, is key to exploring this association. Eight RQ AGN, selected based on their high X-ray brightness and variability, were observed at 95 GHz with the CARMA (Combined Array for Research in Millimetre-wave Astronomy) and ATCA (the Australia Telescope Compact Array) telescopes. All targets were detected at the 1-10 mJy level. Emission excess at 95 GHz of up to ×7 is found with respect to archival low-frequency steep spectra, suggesting a compact, optically thick core superimposed on the more extended structures that dominate at low frequencies. Though unresolved, the 95 GHz fluxes imply optically thick source sizes of 10-4-10-3 pc, or ˜10-1000 gravitational radii. The present sources lie tightly along an LR (95 GHz) = 10-4LX (2-10 keV) correlation, analogous to that of stellar coronae and RQ AGN at 5 GHz, while RL AGN are shown to have higher LR/LX ratios. The present observations argue that simultaneous mm-wave and X-ray monitoring of RQ AGN features a promising method for understanding accretion disc coronal emission.

  7. The VLBI structure of radio-loud Broad Absorption Line quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Jiang, D. R.; Gu, M.

    2016-02-01

    The nature and origin of Broad Absorption Line (BAL) quasars and their relationship to non-BAL quasars are an open question. The BAL quasars are probably normal quasars seen along a particular line of sight. Alternatively, they are young or recently refueled. The high resolution radio morphology of BAL quasars is very important to understand the radio properties of BAL quasars. We present VLBA observations at L and C bands for a sample of BAL quasars. The observations will help us to explore the VLBI radio properties, and distinguish the present models of explaining BAL phenomena.

  8. Absorption by dirty black holes: Null geodesics and scalar waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedo, Caio F. B.; Leite, Luiz C. S.; Crispino, Luís C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Black holes are a paradigm in physics nowadays and are expected to be hosted at the centers of galaxies. Supermassive galactic black holes are not isolated, and their surroundings play crucial roles in many observational features. The absorption and scattering of fields by isolated black holes have been vastly studied, allowing the understanding of many phenomenological features. However, as far as we are aware, a study of the influence of the presence of matter surrounding black holes in their planar wave scattering and absorption spectrum is still lacking in the literature. This may be important in the analysis of, for instance, the accretion of dark matter by black holes. We consider planar massless scalar waves incident upon a Schwarzschild black hole surrounded by a thin spherical shell. We use the partial-wave method to determine the absorption cross section and present a selection of numerical results. In the low-frequency regime, we show that the absorption cross section is equal to the horizon area. At the high-frequency regime, we show that the absorption cross section approaches the geodesic capture cross section.

  9. Magellan radio occultation measurements of atmospheric waves on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinson, David P.; Jenkins, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Radio occultation experiments were conducted at Venus on three consecutive orbits of the Magellan spacecraft in October 1991. Each occultation occurred over the same topography (67 deg N, 127 deg E) and at the same local time (22 hr 5 min), but the data are sensitive to zonal variations because the atmosphere rotates significantly during one orbit. Through comparisons between observations and predictions of standard wave theory, we have demonstrated that small-scale oscillations in retrieved temperature profiles as well as scintillations in received signal intensity are caused by a spectrum of vertically propagating internal gravity waves. There is a strong similarity between the intensity scintillations observed here and previous measurements, which pertain to a wide range of locations and experiment dates. This implies that the same basic phenomenon underlies all the observations and hence that gravity waves are a persistent, global feature of Venus' atmosphere. We obtained a fairly complete characterization of a gravity wave that appears above the middle cloud in temperature measurements on all three orbits. The amplitude and vertical wavelength are about 4 K and 2.5 km respectively, at 65 km. A model for radiative damping implies that the wave intrinsic frequency is approximately 2 x 10(exp 4) rad/sec, the corresponding ratio between horizontal and vertical wavelengths is approximately 100. The wave is nearly stationary relative to the surface or the Sun. Radiative attenuation limits the wave amplitude at altitudes above approximately 65 km, leading to wave drag on the mean zonal winds of about +0.4 m/sec per day (eastward). The sign, magnitude, and location of this forcing suggest a possible role in explaining the decrease with height in the zonal wind speed that is believed to occur above the cloud tops. Temperature oscillations with larger vertical wavelengths (5-10 km) were also observed on all three orbits, but we are able unable to interpret these

  10. Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Observations at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Averkamp, T. F.; Ceccni, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2005-01-01

    Results are presented from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument during the approach and first few orbits around Saturn. During the approach the intensity modulation of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) showed that the radio rotation period of Saturn has increased to 10 hr 45 min plus or minus 36 sec, about 6 min longer than measured by Voyager in 1980-81. Also, many intense impulsive radio signals called Saturn Electrostatic Discharges (SEDs) were detected from saturnian lightning, starting as far as 1.08 AU from Saturn, much farther than terrestrial lightning can be detected from Earth. Some of the SED episodes have been linked to cloud systems observed in Saturn s atmosphere by the Cassini imaging system. Within the magnetosphere plasma wave emissions have been used to construct an electron density profile through the inner region of the magnetosphere. With decreasing radial distance the electron density increases gradually to a peak of about 100 per cubic centimeter near the outer edge of the A ring, and then drops precipitously to values as low as .03 per cubic centimeter over the rings. Numerous nearly monochromatic whistler-mode emissions were observed as the spacecraft passed over the rings that are believed to be produced by meteoroid impacts on the rings. Whistlermode emissions, similar to terrestrial auroral hiss were also observed over the rings, indicating that an electrodynamic interaction, similar to auroral particle acceleration, may be occurring in or near the rings. During the Titan flybys Langmuir probe and plasma wave measurements provided observations of the density and temperature in Titan's ionosphere.

  11. Dependence of the Broad Absorption Line Quasar Fraction on Radio Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Francesco; Dai, Xinyu; Sivakoff, Gregory R.

    2008-11-01

    We find that the fraction of classical broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs) among the FIRST radio sources in the Sloan Data Release 3, is 20.5+ 7.3-5.9% at the faintest radio powers detected (L1.4 GHz ~ 1032 erg s-1), and rapidly drops to lesssim8% at L1.4 GHz ~ 3 × 1033 erg s-1. Similarly, adopting the broader absorption index (AI) definition of Trump et al., we find the fraction of radio BALQSOs to be 44+ 8.1-7.8%, reducing to 23.1+ 7.3-6.1% at high luminosities. While the high fraction at low radio power is consistent with the recent near-IR estimates by Dai et al., the lower fraction at high radio powers is intriguing and confirms previous claims based on smaller samples. The trend is independent of the redshift range, the optical and radio flux selection limits, or the exact definition of a radio match. We also find that at fixed optical magnitude, the highest bins of radio luminosity are preferentially populated by non-BALQSOs, consistent with the overall trend. We do find, however, that those quasars identified as AI-BALQSOs but not under the classical definition do not show a significant drop in their fraction as a function of radio power, further supporting independent claims that these sources, characterized by lower equivalent width, may represent an independent class from the classical BALQSOs. We find the balnicity index, a measure of the absorption trough in BALQSOs, and the mean maximum wind velocity to be roughly constant at all radio powers. We discuss several plausible physical models which may explain the observed fast drop in the fraction of the classical BALQSOs with increasing radio power, although none is entirely satisfactory. A strictly evolutionary model for the BALQSO and radio emission phases requires a strong fine-tuning to work, while a simple geometric model, although still not capable of explaining polar BALQSOs and the paucity of FRII BALQSOs, is statistically successful in matching the data if part of the apparent radio

  12. Gyrokinetic simulation on the effect of radio frequency waves on ion-temperature-gradient-driven modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imadera, K.; Kishimoto, Y.; Sen, S.; Vahala, G.

    2016-02-01

    The ion-temperature-driven modes are studied in the presence of radio frequency waves by the use of the Gyro-Kinetic simulation Code. It is shown that the radio frequency waves through the ponderomotive force can stabilise the ion-temperature-gradient instabilities and contrary to the usual belief no radio frequency wave-induced flow generation hypothesis is required. This might be a major way to create a transport barrier in the fusion energy generation.

  13. Searching for Correlated Radio Transients & Gravitational Wave Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavic, Michael; Shawhan, P. S.; Yancey, C.; Cutchin, S.; Simonetti, J. H.; Bear, B.; Tsai, J.

    2013-01-01

    We will discuss an ongoing multi-messenger search for transient radio pulses and gravitational wave bursts. This work is being conducted jointly by the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) and the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC). A variety of astrophysical sources can produce simultaneous emission of gravitational waves and coherent low-frequency electromagnetic radiation. The primary common source motivating this work is the merger of neutron star binaries for which the LWA and LSC instruments have comparable sensitivity. Additional common sources include supernovae, long timescale GRBs and cosmic string cusp events. Data taken by both instruments can be compared to search for correlated signals. Identification of correlated signals can be used to increase the sensitivity of both instruments. We will summarize the coincident observations which have already been conducted and outline plans for future work. We will describe the process being used for synthesizing these data set and present preliminary results.

  14. Hertz and the Discovery of Radio Waves and the Photoelectric Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spradley, Joseph L.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the discoveries by Hertz historically, such as photoelectric effect, radio waves, their impact on modern physics and some applications. Presents several diagrams and two chronological tables. (YP)

  15. Energy Absorption Structure of Laser Supported Detonation Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Hatai, Keigo; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2010-05-01

    In Repetitive Pulsed (RP) laser propulsion, when the high energy laser beam is focused in the thruster, Laser Supported Detonation (LSD) wave is generated. This LSD wave converts the laser energy to the enthalpy of the blast wave, which will then apply impulse to the wall of the thruster. Therefore, the energy absorption structure and sustaining condition of LSD wave are important to be understood, which was still not clear though some visualized experiments have been conducted by Ushio et al. before. In this paper, 2-wavelength Mach-Zehnder interferometry is brought to investigate the electron density distribution of LSD area. At the same time, the temperature of the laser induced plasma is measured by an emission spectroscopy experiment, and calculated based on the assumption of local thermal equilibrium. The results show that in LSD, the electron density has a peak (as high as 2×1024[m-3]) behind the shock wave. The irradiated laser can be entirely absorbed before reaching the position of this peak. As a result, a new peak is always generating in front of the old one and this propagating has the same velocity as that of the blast wave. In this way, high heating ratio is sustained right after the shock front. However, as the laser pulse energy becomes lower, the propagating peak cannot catch up with the blast wave anymore, which leads to a termination of the LSD wave. From this study, it is found that for sustaining the LSD wave, a sufficiently thin laser absorption layer is necessary.

  16. Radio Wave Propagation Handbook for Communication on and Around Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Christian; Golshan, Nasser; Kliore, Arvydas

    2002-01-01

    This handbook examines the effects of the Martian environment on radio wave propagation on Mars and in the space near the planet. The environmental effects include these from the Martian atmosphere, ionosphere, global dust storms, aerosols, clouds, and geomorphologic features. Relevant Martian environmental parameters were extracted from the measurements of Mars missions during the past 30 years, especially from Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor. The results derived from measurements and analyses have been reviewed through an extensive literature search. The updated parameters have been theoretically analyzed to study their effects on radio propagation. This handbook also provides basic information about the entire telecommunications environment on and around Mars for propagation researchers, system engineers, and link analysts. Based on these original analyses, some important recommendations have been made, including the use of the Martian ionosphere as a reflector for Mars global or trans-horizon communication between future Martian colonies, reducing dust storm scattering effects, etc. These results have extended our wave propagation knowledge to a planet other than Earth; and the tables, models, and graphics included in this handbook will benefit telecommunication system engineers and scientific researchers.

  17. First tsunami gravity wave detection in ionospheric radio occultation data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Coïsson, Pierdavide; Lognonné, Philippe; Walwer, Damian; Rolland, Lucie M.

    2015-05-09

    After the 11 March 2011 earthquake and tsunami off the coast of Tohoku, the ionospheric signature of the displacements induced in the overlying atmosphere has been observed by ground stations in various regions of the Pacific Ocean. We analyze here the data of radio occultation satellites, detecting the tsunami-driven gravity wave for the first time using a fully space-based ionospheric observation system. One satellite of the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) recorded an occultation in the region above the tsunami 2.5 h after the earthquake. The ionosphere was sounded from top to bottom, thus providing themore » vertical structure of the gravity wave excited by the tsunami propagation, observed as oscillations of the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC). The observed vertical wavelength was about 50 km, with maximum amplitude exceeding 1 total electron content unit when the occultation reached 200 km height. We compared the observations with synthetic data obtained by summation of the tsunami-coupled gravity normal modes of the Earth/Ocean/atmosphere system, which models the associated motion of the ionosphere plasma. These results provide experimental constraints on the attenuation of the gravity wave with altitude due to atmosphere viscosity, improving the understanding of the propagation of tsunami-driven gravity waves in the upper atmosphere. They demonstrate that the amplitude of the tsunami can be estimated to within 20% by the recorded ionospheric data.« less

  18. First tsunami gravity wave detection in ionospheric radio occultation data

    SciTech Connect

    Coïsson, Pierdavide; Lognonné, Philippe; Walwer, Damian; Rolland, Lucie M.

    2015-05-09

    After the 11 March 2011 earthquake and tsunami off the coast of Tohoku, the ionospheric signature of the displacements induced in the overlying atmosphere has been observed by ground stations in various regions of the Pacific Ocean. We analyze here the data of radio occultation satellites, detecting the tsunami-driven gravity wave for the first time using a fully space-based ionospheric observation system. One satellite of the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) recorded an occultation in the region above the tsunami 2.5 h after the earthquake. The ionosphere was sounded from top to bottom, thus providing the vertical structure of the gravity wave excited by the tsunami propagation, observed as oscillations of the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC). The observed vertical wavelength was about 50 km, with maximum amplitude exceeding 1 total electron content unit when the occultation reached 200 km height. We compared the observations with synthetic data obtained by summation of the tsunami-coupled gravity normal modes of the Earth/Ocean/atmosphere system, which models the associated motion of the ionosphere plasma. These results provide experimental constraints on the attenuation of the gravity wave with altitude due to atmosphere viscosity, improving the understanding of the propagation of tsunami-driven gravity waves in the upper atmosphere. They demonstrate that the amplitude of the tsunami can be estimated to within 20% by the recorded ionospheric data.

  19. Optical detection of radio waves through a nanomechanical transducer.

    PubMed

    Bagci, T; Simonsen, A; Schmid, S; Villanueva, L G; Zeuthen, E; Appel, J; Taylor, J M; Sørensen, A; Usami, K; Schliesser, A; Polzik, E S

    2014-03-01

    Low-loss transmission and sensitive recovery of weak radio-frequency and microwave signals is a ubiquitous challenge, crucial in radio astronomy, medical imaging, navigation, and classical and quantum communication. Efficient up-conversion of radio-frequency signals to an optical carrier would enable their transmission through optical fibres instead of through copper wires, drastically reducing losses, and would give access to the set of established quantum optical techniques that are routinely used in quantum-limited signal detection. Research in cavity optomechanics has shown that nanomechanical oscillators can couple strongly to either microwave or optical fields. Here we demonstrate a room-temperature optoelectromechanical transducer with both these functionalities, following a recent proposal using a high-quality nanomembrane. A voltage bias of less than 10 V is sufficient to induce strong coupling between the voltage fluctuations in a radio-frequency resonance circuit and the membrane's displacement, which is simultaneously coupled to light reflected off its surface. The radio-frequency signals are detected as an optical phase shift with quantum-limited sensitivity. The corresponding half-wave voltage is in the microvolt range, orders of magnitude less than that of standard optical modulators. The noise of the transducer--beyond the measured 800 pV Hz-1/2 Johnson noise of the resonant circuit--consists of the quantum noise of light and thermal fluctuations of the membrane, dominating the noise floor in potential applications in radio astronomy and nuclear magnetic imaging. Each of these contributions is inferred to be 60 pV Hz-1/2 when balanced by choosing an electromechanical cooperativity of ~150 with an optical power of 1 mW. The noise temperature of the membrane is divided by the cooperativity. For the highest observed cooperativity of 6,800, this leads to a projected noise temperature of 40 mK and a sensitivity limit of 5 pV Hz-1/2. Our approach to

  20. Resonance absorption of propagating fast waves in a cold plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.

    1990-01-01

    Absorption of propagating waves impinging on a surface in which the plasma and magnetic field may change is investigated by examining in depth the problem of a combination of cold plasma, uniform magnetic field and a surface density which varies linearly from zero at the left end to some finite value at the right end, beyond which the density is constant. Two cases are considered: one in which the plasma is a vacuum everywhere to the left of the surface (which may correspond to coronal conditions) and one in which the plasma density jumps to a very large value to the left of the surface (which may mimic the magnetosphere with the dense region at the left corresponding to the plasmasphere). A complete discussion of the resonance absorption of propagating fast waves for the case considered by Kiveloson and Southwood (1986) is presented, emphasizing approximate analytical results whenever possible; these results are then compared with exact numerical solutions.

  1. Solar Corona and plasma effects on Radio Frequency waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkono, C.; Rosenblatt, P.; Dehant, V. M.

    2009-12-01

    Solar corona (plasma) effects on radio signal waves for three different frequency bands S (2.3 GHz), X (8.4 GHz), and Ka (32 GHz), currently used to track probes in the solar system, have been computed using different models of the total electron content (TEC) along the propagation path between the Earth and Mars. The Earth-Mars-Sun configuration has been obtained from the planetary ephemerides DE421 (using SPICE kernels) for the period from September 2004 to September 2006. This configuration is expressed as a function of the Sun-Earth-Probe (SEP) angles (the probe being in close orbit to Mars). We used the TEC values provided by the different models proposed in the literature in order to estimate the TEC along the propagation path (STEC, for Slant TEC). From these model-dependent STEC estimates, the time delay on the wave propagation as well as the associated frequency shift with a 10 seconds sampling time have been obtained for each of the three frequency bands. For the X-band mostly used in radio science, we have obtained estimates differing by up to several orders of magnitude due to the different STEC values derived from different models of TEC. For example, if the propagation path passes near the Sun such that SEP angle is 1.55° the STEC is ranging from 4.6x1020 electron/m2 to 6.07x1016 electron/m2, which corresponds to a time delay range between 0.87 μs and 1.15x10-4 μs, respectively. For SEP angles between 2° and 8°, the range of the different time delay values reduces to 2.8x10-1 μs and becomes as small as 1.6x10-2 μs for SEP angles larger than 8° (1x10-2 μs is about the order of magnitude of the radioscience instrument precision). These results show that the correction of the solar corona effect on radio frequency waves can be reliably done on usual X-band tracking data of spacecraft for SEP angles >12°, but should be use with caution for lower SEP angles, especially lower than 2°.

  2. Waves in the Martian Atmosphere: Results from MGS Radio Occultations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F. M.; Hinson, D. P.; Tyler, G. L.

    1999-01-01

    Temperatures retrieved from Mars Global Surveyor radio occultations have been searched for evidence of waves. Emphasis has been on the initial series of occultations between 29 deg N and 64 deg S, obtained during the early martian southern summer, L(sub s) = 264 deg - 308 deg. The profiles exhibit an undulatory behavior that is suggestive of vertically propagating waves. wavelengths approximately 10 km are often dominant, but structure on smaller scales is evident. The undulatory structure is most pronounced between latitudes 29 deg N and 10 deg S, usually in regions of "interesting" topography, e.g., in the Tharsis region and near the edge of Syrtis Major. Several temperature profiles, particularly within 30 deg of the equator, exhibit lapse rates that locally become superadiabatic near the 0.4-mbar level or at higher altitudes. This implies that the waves are "breaking" and depositing horizontal momentum into the atmosphere. Such a deposition may play an important role in modulating the atmospheric winds, and characterizing the spatial and temporal distribution of these momentum transfers can provide important clues to understanding how the global circulation is maintained.

  3. Walkie-Talkie Measurements for the Speed of Radio Waves in Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dombi, Andra; Tunyagi, Arthur; Neda, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    A handheld emitter-receiver device suitable for the direct estimation of the velocity of radio waves in air is presented. The velocity of radio waves is measured using the direct time-of-flight method, without the need for any tedious and precise settings. The results for two measurement series are reported. Both sets of results give an estimate…

  4. Grating formation by a high power radio wave in near-equator ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rohtash; Sharma, A. K.; Tripathi, V. K.

    2011-11-15

    The formation of a volume grating in the near-equator regions of ionosphere due to a high power radio wave is investigated. The radio wave, launched from a ground based transmitter, forms a standing wave pattern below the critical layer, heating the electrons in a space periodic manner. The thermal conduction along the magnetic lines of force inhibits the rise in electron temperature, limiting the efficacy of heating to within a latitude of few degrees around the equator. The space periodic electron partial pressure leads to ambipolar diffusion creating a space periodic density ripple with wave vector along the vertical. Such a volume grating is effective to cause strong reflection of radio waves at a frequency one order of magnitude higher than the maximum plasma frequency in the ionosphere. Linearly mode converted plasma wave could scatter even higher frequency radio waves.

  5. Radio Wave Scattering in the Outer Heliosphere: Preliminary Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1995-01-01

    Detailed first estimates are presented of angular broadening in the outer heliosphere due to scattering of radio waves by density irregularities. The application is to the 2-3 kHz radiation observed by Voyager. Two plausible turbulence models, which account very well for scattering within 1 AU, are extrapolated beyond 10 AU. Both models predict significant angular broadening in the outer heliosphere, accounting semi- quantitatively alone for the source sizes inferred from roll modulation data. Predictions are presented for radial variations in the apparent source size if scattering is important. Comparisons with available data argue that scattering is important (and indeed is the dominant contributor to the apparent source size) and that the radiation source is located in the outer heliosphere. Other evidence that scattering is important, such as the fluctuations in apparent source direction and intensity, are also identified. The effects of scattering should be included in future analyses of the 2-3 kHz emissions.

  6. Studies of the propagation of Low Frequency (LF) radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrington, E. M.; Jones, T. B.

    1993-05-01

    Low frequency (30-300 kHz) radio waves can propagate to great distances with little attenuation in the cavity formed by the earth and the ionosphere. Because of the relatively high frequency at LF, many active propagation modes can occur between the transmitter and receiver. Changes in the ionospheric conductivity or reflection height can influence the phase and amplitude of these modes and, hence, produce mutual interference. Because of these interference effects, the propagation is less stable than at VLF and the received field strength becomes more difficult to predict. In the present investigation, the WAVEHOP program was employed in conjunction with a range of ionospheric models to estimate the receiver field strength over a number of experimental paths. The predicted values were compared with those measured in an attempt to validate the ionospheric models and the method of calculation.

  7. Annual report 1992/93, FOA 38. Radio systems and wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mildh, I. M.

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of the division of Radio Systems and Wave Propagation is to carry out research and development in the field of secure and robust radio communications for Sweden's national defense. This is the Annual Report for fiscal year 1992/93 of the Division of Radio Systems and Wave Propagation. The division is responsible for research and development of secure radio communication for information transmission. We are also responsible for wave propagation research within a frequency range from LF to SHF. We carry out applied research in fields like antijamming systems, modulation, error correcting codes, wave propagation and digital signal processing. The wave propagation research is carried out by basic research so the demands from new techniques and new radio systems for accurate propagation models can be achieved.

  8. Microwave absorption in s- and d-wave disordered superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mai Suan

    2001-10-01

    We model s- and d-wave ceramic superconductors with a three-dimensional lattice of randomly distributed 0 and π Josephson junctions with finite self-inductance. The field and temperature dependences of the microwave absoption are obtained by solving the corresponding Langevin dynamical equations. We find that at magnetic field H=0 the microwave absoption of the s-wave samples, when plotted against the field, has a minimum at any temperature. In the case of d-wave superconductors one has a peak at H=0 in the temperature region where the paramagnetic Meissner effect is observable. These results agree with experiments. The dependence of the microwave absorption on the screening strength was found to be nontrivial due to the crossover from the weak to the strong screening regime.

  9. LH wave absorption by mode conversion near ion cyclotron harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, K.; Bers, A.; Fuchs, V.

    1981-02-01

    Numerical studies of the dispersion relation near the lower-hybrid frequency in an inhomogeneous plasma (..delta.. n, ..delta.. T, ..delta.. B) show that portions of an incident lower-hybrid wave spectrum undergo successive but partial mode conversions to warm-plasma waves in the presence of ion cyclotron harmonics. Wave absorption beyond the first mode conversion occurs near an ion cyclotron harmonic where ion Landau damping is enhanced. A second-order dispersion relation numerically in good agreement with the full dispersion relation in the mode conversion region is derived using the condition par. delta D/par. delta k = 0. The mode conversion efficiency at each confluence is evaluated by solving the corresponding differential equation.

  10. Rest-frame optical properties of luminous, radio-selected broad absorption line quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runnoe, Jessie C.; Ganguly, R.; Brotherton, M. S.; DiPompeo, M. A.

    2013-08-01

    We have obtained Infrared Telescope Facility/SpeX spectra of eight moderate-redshift (z = 0.7-2.4), radio-selected (log R* ≈ 0.4-1.9) broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. The spectra cover the rest-frame optical band. We compare the optical properties of these quasars to those of canonically radio-quiet (log R* ≲ 1) BAL quasars at similar redshifts and to low-redshift quasars from the Palomar-Green catalogue. As with previous studies of BAL quasars, we find that [O III] λ5007 is weak, and optical Fe II emission is strong, a rare combination in canonically radio-loud (log R* ≳ 1) quasars. With our measurements of the optical properties, particularly the Balmer emission-line widths and the continuum luminosity, we have used empirical scaling relations to estimate black hole masses and Eddington ratios. These lie in the range (0.4-2.6) × 109 M⊙ and 0.1-0.9, respectively. Despite their comparatively extreme radio properties relative to most BAL quasars, their optical properties are quite consistent with those of radio-quiet BAL quasars and dissimilar to those of radio-loud non-BAL quasars. While BAL quasars generally appear to have low values of [O III] λ5007/Fe II an extreme of `Eigenvector 1', the Balmer line widths and Eddington ratios do not appear to significantly differ from those of unabsorbed quasars at similar redshifts and luminosities.

  11. The compact structure of radio-loud broad absorption line quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Jiang, D. R.; Wang, T. G.; Xie, F. G.

    2008-11-01

    We present the results of EVN+MERLIN very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) polarization observations of eight broad absorption line (BAL) quasars at 1.6 GHz, including four low-ionization BAL quasars (LoBALs) and four high-ionization BAL quasars (HiBALs) with either steep or flat spectra on Very Large Array (VLA) scales. Only one steep-spectrum source, J1122+3124, shows two-sided structure on the scale of 2 kpc. The other four steep-spectrum sources and three flat-spectrum sources display either an unresolved image or a core-jet structure on scales of less than 300 pc. In all cases, the marginally resolved core is the dominant radio component. Linear polarization in the cores has been detected in the range of a few to 10 per cent. Polarization, together with high brightness temperatures (from 2 × 109 to 5 × 1010K), suggests a synchrotron origin for the radio emission. There is no apparent difference in the radio morphologies or polarization between low-ionization and high-ionization BAL quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) or between flat- and steep-spectrum sources. We discuss the orientation of BAL QSOs with both flat and steep spectra, and consider a possible evolutionary scenario for BAL QSOs. In this scenario, BAL QSOs are probably a young population of radio sources that are compact steep spectrum or GHz peaked radio source analogues at the low end of radio power.

  12. Upper limits on gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Ballmer, S.; Bantilan, H.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Belczynski, K.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burmeister, O.; Busby, D.; Butler, W. E.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cantley, C. A.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Carter, K.; Casey, M. M.; Castaldi, G.; Cepeda, C.; Chalkey, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chiadini, F.; Chin, D.; Chin, E.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Clark, J.; Cochrane, P.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C. N.; Coldwell, R.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Croce, R. P.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Dalrymple, J.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Degree, M.; Demma, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; di Credico, A.; Diederichs, G.; Dietz, A.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dupuis, R. J.; Dwyer, J. G.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Finn, L. S.; Fiumara, V.; Fotopoulos, N.; Franzen, A.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Ganezer, K. S.; Garofoli, J.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L.; González, G.; Gossler, S.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, J.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hammer, D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Harstad, E.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hosken, D.; Hough, J.; Howell, E.; Hoyland, D.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D.; Innerhofer, E.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Jackrel, D.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalili, F. Ya.; Kim, C.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R. K.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lee, B.; Lei, M.; Leiner, J.; Leonhardt, V.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Lindquist, P.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Longo, M.; Lormand, M.; Lubiński, M.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Malec, M.; Mandic, V.; Marano, S.; Márka, S.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matone, L.; Matta, V.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McKenzie, K.; McNabb, J. W. C.; McWilliams, S.; Meier, T.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messaritaki, E.; Messenger, C. J.; Meyers, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mowlowry, C.; Moylan, A.; Mudge, D.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nocera, F.; Numata, K.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Parameswariah, C.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Rabeling, D.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rawlins, K.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Regimbau, T.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ribichini, L.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rogan, A. M.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Route, R.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Samidi, M.; de La Jordana, L. Sancho; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, G. H.; Sannibale, V.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Sazonov, A.; Schediwy, S.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Sidles, J. A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Somiya, K.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D. M.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, K.-X.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Takahashi, H.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarallo, M.; Taylor, R.; Taylor, R.; Thacker, J.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tyler, W.; Ugolini, D.; Ungarelli, C.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Broeck, C.; van Putten, M.; Varvella, M.; Vass, S.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.; Villar, A.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Ward, H.; Ward, R.; Watts, K.; Webber, D.; Weidner, A.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A.; Weiss, R.; Wen, S.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitbeck, D. M.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiley, S.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wilmut, I.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wise, S.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Woods, D.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Wu, W.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yan, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Yunes, N.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M.; Zur Mühlen, H.; Zweizig, J.; Kramer, M.; Lyne, A. G.

    2007-08-01

    We present upper limits on the gravitational wave emission from 78 radio pulsars based on data from the third and fourth science runs of the LIGO and GEO 600 gravitational wave detectors. The data from both runs have been combined coherently to maximize sensitivity. For the first time, pulsars within binary (or multiple) systems have been included in the search by taking into account the signal modulation due to their orbits. Our upper limits are therefore the first measured for 56 of these pulsars. For the remaining 22, our results improve on previous upper limits by up to a factor of 10. For example, our tightest upper limit on the gravitational strain is 2.6×10-25 for PSR J1603-7202, and the equatorial ellipticity of PSR J2124 3358 is less than 10-6. Furthermore, our strain upper limit for the Crab pulsar is only 2.2 times greater than the fiducial spin-down limit.

  13. A blind green bank telescope millimeter-wave survey for redshifted molecular absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Kanekar, N.; Gupta, A.; Carilli, C. L.; Stocke, J. T.; Willett, K. W.

    2014-02-10

    We present the methodology for 'blind' millimeter-wave surveys for redshifted molecular absorption in the CO/HCO{sup +} rotational lines. The frequency range 30-50 GHz appears optimal for such surveys, providing sensitivity to absorbers at z ≳ 0.85. It is critical that the survey is 'blind', i.e., based on a radio-selected sample, including sources without known redshifts. We also report results from the first large survey of this kind, using the Q-band receiver on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to search for molecular absorption toward 36 sources, 3 without known redshifts, over the frequency range 39.6-49.5 GHz. The GBT survey has a total redshift path of Δz ≈ 24, mostly at 0.81 < z < 1.91, and a sensitivity sufficient to detect equivalent H{sub 2} column densities ≳ 3 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2} in absorption at 5σ significance (using CO-to-H{sub 2} and HCO{sup +}-to-H{sub 2} conversion factors of the Milky Way). The survey yielded no confirmed detections of molecular absorption, yielding the 2σ upper limit n(z = 1.2) < 0.15 on the redshift number density of molecular gas at column densities N(H{sub 2}) ≳ 3 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2}.

  14. A Blind Green Bank Telescope Millimeter-wave Survey for Redshifted Molecular Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekar, N.; Gupta, A.; Carilli, C. L.; Stocke, J. T.; Willett, K. W.

    2014-02-01

    We present the methodology for "blind" millimeter-wave surveys for redshifted molecular absorption in the CO/HCO+ rotational lines. The frequency range 30-50 GHz appears optimal for such surveys, providing sensitivity to absorbers at z >~ 0.85. It is critical that the survey is "blind," i.e., based on a radio-selected sample, including sources without known redshifts. We also report results from the first large survey of this kind, using the Q-band receiver on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to search for molecular absorption toward 36 sources, 3 without known redshifts, over the frequency range 39.6-49.5 GHz. The GBT survey has a total redshift path of Δz ≈ 24, mostly at 0.81 < z < 1.91, and a sensitivity sufficient to detect equivalent H2 column densities >~ 3 × 1021 cm-2 in absorption at 5σ significance (using CO-to-H2 and HCO+-to-H2 conversion factors of the Milky Way). The survey yielded no confirmed detections of molecular absorption, yielding the 2σ upper limit n(z = 1.2) < 0.15 on the redshift number density of molecular gas at column densities N(H2) >~ 3 × 1021 cm-2.

  15. H I absorption measurements over the Galactic center Radio Arc region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasenby, J.; Lasenby, A. N.; Yusef-Zadeh, F.

    1989-01-01

    The compact array of the VLA was used to study H I absorption in a 100-pc region in the center of the Galaxy. An absence of gas was observed at 40-50 km/s across the Radio Arc, suggesting that the '40 km/s molecular cloud' possibly associated with Sgr A is placed behind the Arc. At +20 km/s, the observations show absorption by material which could be depolarizing much of the synchrotron emission from the Arc filaments. The kinematic structure revealed by high-resolution molecular and radio recombination line observations is confirmed by the distribution of H I gas at -10 to -60 km/s.

  16. Combined X-Ray and mm-Wave Observations of Radio Quiet Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, E.

    2016-06-01

    A connection between the X-ray and radio sources in radio quiet active galaxies (AGNs) will be demonstrated. High radio frequency, i.e., mm-wave observations are promising probes of the X-ray emitting inner regions of the accretion disks in radio quiet AGNs. An argument for simultaneous observations in X-rays and in mm waves will be made, in order to promote these as one of the future science goals of X-ray and AGN astronomy in the next decade. Preliminary results from an exploratory campaign with several space and ground based telescopes will be presented.

  17. Discovery of carbon radio recombination lines in absorption towards Cygnus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oonk, J. B. R.; van Weeren, R. J.; Salgado, F.; Morabito, L. K.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Rottgering, H. J. A.; Asgekar, A.; White, G. J.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Avruch, I. M.; Batejat, F.; Beck, R.; Bell, M. E.; van Bemmel, I.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Brentjens, M.; Broderick, J.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Ciardi, B.; Conway, J. E.; Corstanje, A.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; de Vos, M.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Engels, D.; van Enst, J.; Falcke, H.; Fallows, R. A.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Hamaker, J. P.; Hassall, T. E.; Heald, G.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hoeft, M.; Horneffer, A.; van der Horst, A.; Iacobelli, M.; Jackson, N. J.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Klijn, W.; Kohler, J.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; Maat, P.; Macario, G.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McKean, J. P.; Mevius, M.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Mol, J. D.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Munk, H.; Norden, M. J.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Reich, W.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Schoenmakers, A.; Schwarz, D.; Shulevski, A.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Sobey, C.; Stappers, B. W.; Steinmetz, M.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Veen, S. ter; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, C.; van Nieuwpoort, R.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; Vogt, C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Wise, M. W.; Wucknitz, O.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.; Zensus, A.

    2014-02-01

    We present the first detection of carbon radio recombination line absorption along the line of sight to Cygnus A. The observations were carried out with the Low Frequency Array in the 33-57 MHz range. These low-frequency radio observations provide us with a new line of sight to study the diffuse, neutral gas in our Galaxy. To our knowledge this is the first time that foreground Milky Way recombination line absorption has been observed against a bright extragalactic background source. By stacking 48 carbon α lines in the observed frequency range we detect carbon absorption with a signal-to-noise ratio of about 5. The average carbon absorption has a peak optical depth of 2 × 10-4, a line width of 10 km s-1 and a velocity of +4 km s-1 with respect to the local standard of rest. The associated gas is found to have an electron temperature Te ˜ 110 K and density ne ˜ 0.06 cm-3. These properties imply that the observed carbon α absorption likely arises in the cold neutral medium of the Orion arm of the Milky Way. Hydrogen and helium lines were not detected to a 3σ peak optical depth limit of 1.5 × 10-4 for a 4 km s-1 channel width. Radio recombination lines associated with Cygnus A itself were also searched for, but are not detected. We set a 3σ upper limit of 1.5 × 10-4 for the peak optical depth of these lines for a 4 km s-1 channel width.

  18. Multipath propagation of low-frequency radio waves inferred from high-resolution array analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Smith, Nathan; Mezentsev, Andrew; Watson, Robert; Astin, Ivan; Gaffet, Stéphane; Evans, Adrian; Rycroft, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The low-frequency radio sky shows the locations of electromagnetic radio sources with a characteristic dilution of precision. Here we report a thorough high-resolution analysis of radio waves from low-frequency (˜20-150 kHz) radio communication transmitters which are recorded with a small aperture array of radio receivers during the day. It is found that the observed dilution of precision results from the array geometry of the radio receivers, a birefringent wave propagation, and the correlated multipath propagation of low-frequency radio waves. The influence of the array geometry on the dilution of precision is reduced by taking into account the impulse response of the array. This procedure reveals for the very first time the splitting of one single radio source into two distinct source locations separated by ˜0.2°-1.9° which result from a birefringent wave propagation. The two locations are yet more clearly identified by using the polarity of the modulated wave number vectors of the radio waves. This polarity is also used to quantify the dilution of precision arising from correlated multipath propagation which is discriminated against wave number fluctuations arising from the timing accuracy of the radio receivers. It is found that ˜69% of the wave number variability is of natural origin and ˜31% originates from the timing accuracy of the receivers. The wave number variability from correlated multipath propagation results in a standard deviation ˜2-8% relative to the source location. This compact measurement of correlated multipath propagation is used to characterize the uncertainty of source locations in the radio sky. The identification of correlated multipath propagation strongly suggests the existence of very fast processes acting on time scales <1 ms in the D region ionosphere with physically meaningful effects on low-frequency radio wave propagation. This important result has implications for practical applications in that the observed multipath

  19. Low Frequency Radio-wave System for subsurface investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Kudelya, Anatoliy; Denisov, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Low frequency radio-wave methods (RWM) allow subsurface investigations in terms of lithological structure characterization, detection of filtration flows of ground water, anthropogenic and natural cavities. In this contribution, we present a RWM that exploits two coils working at frequencies of few MHz as transmitting and receiving antennas. The basic principle of this inductive method is as follows. The primary alternating electromagnetic field radiated by the transmitting coil induces eddy currents in the subsurface mainly due to the conductivity anomalies. These eddy currents generate a secondary (scattered) magnetic field which overlaps to the incident magnetic field and is detected by the receiving coil. Despite the simple operation of the system, the complexity of the electromagnetic scattering phenomenon at hand must be properly modeled to achieve adequate performance. Therefore, an advanced data processing technique, belonging to the class of the inverse scattering approaches, has been developed by the authors in a full 3D geometry. The proposed method allows to deal with data collected on a scanning surface under a dipole inductive profiling (DIP) modality, where the transmitting/receiving coils are moved simultaneously with fixed offset (multi-bistatic configuration). The hardware, called Dipole Inductive Radio-wave System (DIRS), is composed by an electronic unit and transmitting and receiving loop antennas radiating at frequencies of few MHz (2-4 MHz), which are installed on theodolite supports. The compactness of DIRS and its robustness to external electromagnetic interference offers the possibility to perform geophysical research up to the depth of some tens of meters and under several types of ground and water surfaces, vegetation, and weather conditions. The light weight and small size of system (the single antenna with support weights about 5 kg and has a diameter of 0.5m) allows two operators to perform geophysical research without disturbing the

  20. Characteristics of coronal shock waves and solar type 2 radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, G.; Classen, H.-T.

    1995-01-01

    In the solar corona shock waves generated by flares and/or coronal mass ejections can be observed by radio astronomical methods in terms of solar type 2 radio bursts. In dynamic radio spectra they appear as emission stripes slowly drifting from high to low frequencies. A sample of 25 solar type 2 radio bursts observed in the range of 40 - 170 MHz with a time resolution of 0.1 s by the new radiospectrograph of the Astrophvsikalisches Institut Potsdam in Tremsdorf is statistically investigated concerning their spectral features, i.e, drift rate, instantaneous bandwidth, and fundamental harmonic ratio. In-situ plasma wave measurements at interplanetary shocks provide the assumption that type 2 radio radiation is emitted in the vicinity of the transition region of shock waves. Thus, the instantaneous bandwidth of a solar type 2 radio burst would reflect the density jump across the associated shock wave. Comparing the inspection of the Rankine-Hugoniot relations of shock waves under coronal circumstances with those obtained from the observational study, solar type 2 radio bursts should be regarded to be generated by weak supercritical, quasi-parallel, fast magnetosonic shock waves in the corona.

  1. Stratospheric gravity wave momentum flux from radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, T.; Alexander, P.; Torre, A.

    2016-05-01

    Triples of GPS radio occultation (RO) temperature data are used to derive horizontal and vertical gravity wave (GW) parameters in the stratosphere between 20 km and 40 km from which the vertical flux of horizontal momentum is determined. Compared to previous studies using RO data, better limiting values for the sampling distance (Δd≤250 km) and the time interval (Δt≤15 min) are used. For several latitude bands the mean momentum fluxes (MFs) derived in this study are considerably larger than MF from other satellite missions based on horizontal wavelengths calculated between two adjacent temperature profiles along the satellite track. Error sources for the estimation of MF from RO data and the geometrical setup for the applied method are investigated. Another crucial issue discussed in this paper is the influence of different background separation methods to the final MF. For GW analysis a measured temperature profile is divided into a fluctuation and a background and it is assumed that the fluctuation is caused by GWs only. For the background separation, i.e., the detrending of large-scale processes from the measured temperature profile, several methods exist. In this study we compare different detrending approaches and for the first time an attempt is made to detrend RO data with ERA-Interim data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. We demonstrate that the horizontal detrending based on RO data and ERA-Interim gives more consistent results compared with a vertical detrending.

  2. Radio-wave propagation for space communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ippolito, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    The most recent information on the effects of Earth's atmosphere on space communications systems is reviewed. The design and reliable operation of satellite systems that provide the many applications in space which rely on the transmission of radio waves for communications and scientific purposes are dependent on the propagation characteristics of the transmission path. The presence of atmospheric gases, clouds, fog, precipitation, and turbulence causes uncontrolled variations in the signal characteristics. These variations can result in a reduction of the quality and reliability of the transmitted information. Models and other techniques are used in the prediction of atmospheric effects as influenced by frequency, geography, elevation angle, and type of transmission. Recent data on performance characteristics obtained from direct measurements on satellite links operating to above 30 GHz have been reviewed. Particular emphasis has been placed on the effects of precipitation on the Earth/space path, including rain attenuation, and ice particle depolarization. Other factors are sky noise, antenna gain degradation, scintillations, and bandwidth coherence. Each of the various propagation factors has an effect on design criteria for communications systems. These criteria include link reliability, power margins, noise contribution, modulation and polarization factors, channel cross talk, error rate, and bandwidth limitations.

  3. Stratospheric gravity wave momentum fluxes from radio occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Torsten; Wickert, Jens; De la Torre, Alejandro; Alexander, Peter; Llamedo, Pablo; Ramezani Ziarani, Maryam

    2016-07-01

    Triples of GPS radio occultation (RO) temperature data are used to derive horizontal and vertical gravity wave (GW) parameters in the stratosphere between 20 km and 40 km from which the vertical flux of horizontal momentum is determined. Compared to previous studies using RO data better limiting values for the sampling distance (Δd<250 km) and the time interval (Δt<15 minutes) are used. For several latitude bands the mean momentum fluxes (MF) derived in this study are considerable larger than MF from other satellite missions based on horizontal wavelengths calculated between two adjacent temperature profiles along the satellite track. Error sources for the estimation of MF from RO data and the geometrical setup for the applied method is investigated. Another crucial issue discussed in the presentation is the influence of different background separation methods to the final MF. For GW analysis a measured temperature profile is divided into a fluctuation and a background and it is assumed that the fluctuation is caused by GWs only. For the background separation, i.e. the detrending of large-scale processes from the measured temperature profile, several methods exist. In this study we compare different detrending approaches including a new attempt by detrending RO data with ERA-Interim data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. We demonstrate that the horizontal detrending based on RO data and ERA-Interim gives more consistent results compared with a vertical detrending.

  4. Jupiter: As a planet. [its physical characteristics and radio waves emitted from Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The planet Jupiter, its planetary mass and atmosphere, radio waves emitted from Jupiter, thermal radiation, internal structure of Jupiter, and the possibility of life on Jupiter are discussed. Educational study projects are included.

  5. A Coincident Search for Radio and Gravitational Waves from Binary Neutron Star Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardena, Brett

    2011-05-01

    The merger of neutron star-neutron star binary pairs may be accompanied by the prompt emission of a coherent low-frequency radio pulse. This radio transient is produced as synchrotron radiation caused by the spin and rotation of the surface charge density of a pulsar through the magnetosphere of a larger neutron star, usually referred to as a Magnetar . This type of merger event would also result in the release of a gravitational coalescence wave-form. We will discuss a coincident radio transient and gravitational wave search. This search is being conducted by two radio telescope arrays: The Long Wave Array (LWA) and the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA) in coordination with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). We will outline this ongoing coincident search and discuss some preliminary results.

  6. Put a Short-Wave Radio in Your Foreign Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oksenholt, Svein

    1977-01-01

    Advantages of the short-wave radio as a supplement to foreign language instruction as well as practical hints on wavelength, antenna, and techniques for use are provided. Selective annotated bibliography. (STS)

  7. Unusual high-redshift radio broad absorption-line quasar 1624+3758

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benn, C. R.; Carballo, R.; Holt, J.; Vigotti, M.; González-Serrano, J. I.; Mack, K.-H.; Perley, R. A.

    2005-07-01

    We present observations of the most radio-luminous broad absorption-line (BAL) quasar known, 1624+3758, at redshift z= 3.377. The quasar has several unusual properties. (1) The FeII UV191 1787-Åemission line is very prominent. (2) The BAL trough (BALnicity index 2990 km s-1) is detached by 21000 km s-1 and extends to velocity v=-29000 km s-1. There are additional intrinsic absorbers at -1900 and -2800 km s-1. (3) The radio rotation measure of the quasar, 18350 rad m-2, is the second highest known. The radio luminosity is P1.4GHz= 4.3 × 1027 W Hz-1 (H0= 50 km s-1 Mpc-1, q0= 0.5) and the radio loudness is R*= 260. The radio source is compact and the radio spectrum is GHz-peaked, consistent with it being relatively young. The width of the CIV emission line, in conjunction with the total optical luminosity, implies a black hole mass MBH~ 109Msolar, L/LEddington~ 2. The high Eddington ratio and the radio-loudness place this quasar in one corner of Boroson's two-component scheme for the classification of active galactic nuclei, implying a very high accretion rate, and this may account for some of the unusual observed properties. The v=-1900km s-1 absorber is a possible Lyman-limit system, with N(HI) = 4 × 1018 cm-2, and a covering factor of 0.7. A complex mini-BAL absorber at v=-2200 to -3400 km s-1 is detected in each of CIV, NV and OVI. The blue and red components of the CIV doublet happen to be unblended, allowing both the covering factor and optical depth to be determined as a function of velocity. Variation of the covering factor with velocity dominates the form of the mini-BAL, with the absorption being saturated (e-τ~ 0) over most of the velocity range. The velocity dependence of the covering factor and the large velocity width imply that the mini-BAL is intrinsic to the quasar. There is some evidence of line-locking between velocity components in the CIV mini-BAL, suggesting that radiation pressure plays a role in accelerating the outflow.

  8. Absorption features in the x-ray spectrum of an ordinary radio pulsar.

    PubMed

    Kargaltsev, Oleg; Durant, Martin; Misanovic, Zdenka; Pavlov, George G

    2012-08-24

    The vast majority of known nonaccreting neutron stars (NSs) are rotation-powered radio and/or γ-ray pulsars. So far, their multiwavelength spectra have all been described satisfactorily by thermal and nonthermal continuum models, with no spectral lines. Spectral features have, however, been found in a handful of exotic NSs and were thought to be a manifestation of their unique traits. Here, we report the detection of absorption features in the x-ray spectrum of an ordinary rotation-powered radio pulsar, J1740+1000. Our findings bridge the gap between the spectra of pulsars and other, more exotic, NSs, suggesting that the features are more common in the NS spectra than they have been thought so far. PMID:22923576

  9. Numerical calculations of spectral turnover and synchrotron self-absorption in CSS and GPS radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyakumar, S.

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of the turnover frequency on the linear size is presented for a sample of Giga-hertz Peaked Spectrum and Compact Steep Spectrum radio sources derived from complete samples. The dependence of the luminosity of the emission at the peak frequency with the linear size and the peak frequency is also presented for the galaxies in the sample. The luminosity of the smaller sources evolve strongly with the linear size. Optical depth effects have been included to the 3D model for the radio source of Kaiser to study the spectral turnover. Using this model, the observed trend can be explained by synchrotron self-absorption. The observed trend in the peak-frequency-linear-size plane is not affected by the luminosity evolution of the sources.

  10. Radio Wave Scintillations and Models of Interstellar Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven R.

    1998-05-01

    There are a number of well-established observational results from radio scintillations which have implications for the nature of interstellar turbulence. Among such results are evidence for anisotropy and a Kolmogorov spectrum for the density irregularities. It is probable the galactic magnetic field organizes these irregularities so that spatial gradients along the field are much less than those perpendicular to the field. Such a behavior for turbulence is predicted by theories of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in which the amplitude is small. The turbulence is then described by a theory termed reduced magnetohydrodynamics. A limiting case of reduced magnetohydrodynamics is two dimensional magnetohydrodynamics, in which the direction of the large scale magnetic field z defines the ignorable coordinate. Two dimensional magnetohydrodynamics consists of a pair of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations for the velocity stream function psi and the z component of the magnetic vector potential A_z. A number of observed features of interstellar turbulence can be identified with solutions to the equations of two dimensional magnetohydrodynamics. Examples are the development of Kolmogorov-like spectra for the velocity and magnetic field from a wide class (although not totally general) initial conditions, a natural explanation for the formation of intermittancy in turbulence, and the rapid development of small scale, large spatial wavenumber fluctuations, in contrast to the eddy cascade of hydrodynamic turbulence. The equations of two dimensional magnetohydrodynamics may serve as a simple but tractable model of interstellar plasma turbulence that may complement and be superior to the traditional model of an ensemble of magnetohydrodynamic waves.

  11. Asymmetric perfectly matched layer for the absorption of waves

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, Jean-Luc

    2002-02-10

    The Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) has become a standard for comparison in the techniques that have been developed to close the system of Maxwell equations (more generally wave equations) when simulating an open system. The original Berenger PML formulation relies on a split version of Maxwell equations with numerical electric and magnetic conductivities. They present here an extension of this formulation which introduces counterparts of the electric and magnetic conductivities affecting the term which is spatially differentiated in the equations. they phase velocity along each direction is also multiplied by an additional coefficient. They show that, under certain constraints on the additional numerical coefficients, this ''medium'' does not generate any reflection at any angle and any frequency and is then a Perfectly Matched Layer. Technically it is a super-set of Berenger's PML to which it reduces for a specific set of parameters and like it, it is anisotropic. However, unlike the PML, it introduces some asymmetry in the absorption rate and is therefore labeled an APML for Asymmetric Perfectly Matched Layer. They present here the numerical considerations that have led them to introduce such a medium as well as its theory. Several finite-different numerical implementations are derived (in one, two and three dimensions) and the performance of the APML is contrasted with that of the PML in one and two dimensions. Using plane wave analysis, they show that the APML implementations lead to higher absorption rates than the considered PML implementations. Although they have considered in this paper the finite-different discretization of Maxwell-like equations only, the APML system of equations may be used with other discretization schemes, such as finite-elements, and may be applied to other equations, for applications beyond electromagnetics.

  12. Investigating the radio-loud phase of broad absorption line quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruni, G.; González-Serrano, J. I.; Pedani, M.; Benn, C. R.; Mack, K.-H.; Holt, J.; Montenegro-Montes, F. M.; Jiménez-Luján, F.

    2014-09-01

    Context. Broad absorption lines (BALs) are present in the spectra of ~20% of quasars (QSOs); this indicates fast outflows (up to 0.2c) that intercept the observer's line of sight. These QSOs can be distinguished again into radio-loud (RL) BAL QSOs and radio-quiet (RQ) BAL QSOs. The first are very rare, even four times less common than RQ BAL QSOs. The reason for this is still unclear and leaves open questions about the nature of the BAL-producing outflows and their connection with the radio jet. Aims: We explored the spectroscopic characteristics of RL and RQ BAL QSOs with the aim to find a possible explanation for the rarity of RL BAL QSOs. Methods: We identified two samples of genuine BAL QSOs from SDSS optical spectra, one RL and one RQ, in a suitable redshift interval (2.5 < z < 3.5) that allowed us to observe the Mg ii and Hβ emission lines in the adjacent near-infrared (NIR) band. We collected NIR spectra of the two samples using the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG, Canary Islands). By using relations known in the literature, we estimated the black-hole mass, the broad-line region radius, and the Eddington ratio of our objects and compared the two samples. Results: We found no statistically significant differences from comparing the distributions of the cited physical quantities. This indicates that they have similar geometries, accretion rates, and central black-hole masses, regardless of whether the radio-emitting jet is present or not. Conclusions: These results show that the central engine of BAL QSOs has the same physical properties with and without a radio jet. The reasons for the rarity of RL BAL QSOs must reside in different environmental or evolutionary variables. Figure 3 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. X-RAYS FROM A RADIO-LOUD COMPACT BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASAR 1045+352 AND THE NATURE OF OUTFLOWS IN RADIO-LOUD BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, Magdalena; Katarzynski, Krzysztof; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Janiuk, Agnieszka

    2009-11-10

    We present new results on X-ray properties of radio-loud broad absorption line (BAL) quasars and focus on broadband spectral properties of a high-ionization BAL (HiBAL) compact steep spectrum (CSS) radio-loud quasar 1045+352. This HiBAL quasar has a very complex radio morphology indicating either strong interactions between a radio jet and the surrounding interstellar medium or a possible re-start of the jet activity. We detected 1045+352 quasar in a short 5 ksec Chandra ACIS-S observation. We applied theoretical models to explain spectral energy distribution of 1045+352 and argue that non-thermal, inverse-Compton (IC) emission from the innermost parts of the radio jet can account for a large fraction of the observed X-ray emission. In our analysis, we also consider a scenario in which the observed X-ray emission from radio-loud BAL quasars can be a sum of IC jet X-ray emission and optically thin corona X-ray emission. We compiled a sample of radio-loud BAL quasars that were observed in X-rays to date and report no correlation between their X-ray and radio luminosity. However, the radio-loud BAL quasars show a large range of X-ray luminosities and absorption columns. This is consistent with the results obtained earlier for radio-quiet BAL quasars and may indicate an orientation effect in BAL quasars or more complex dependence between X-ray emission, radio emission, and an orientation based on the radio morphology.

  14. Energetic electrons and plasma waves associated with a solar type III radio burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Potter, D. W.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.

    1981-01-01

    Detailed in situ observations from the ISEE 3 spacecraft of energetic electrons, plasma waves, and radio emission for the type II solar radio burst of February 17, 1979, are presented. The reduced, one-dimensional electron distribution function is constructed as a function of time. Since the faster electrons arrive before the slower ones, a bump on tail distribution forms which is unstable to the growth of Langmuir waves. The plasma wave growth computed from the distribution function agrees well with the observed onset of the Langmuir waves, and there is qualitative agreement between variations in the plasma wave levels and in the development of regions of positive slope in the function. The evolution of the function, however, predicts far higher plasma wave levels than those observed. The maximum levels observed are approximately equal to the threshold for nonlinear wave processes, such as oscillation two-stream instability and soliton collapse.

  15. Wave Normal and Poynting Vector Calculations using the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hospodarsky, G. B.; Averkamp, T. F.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Dougherty, M.; Inan, Umran; Wood, Troy

    2001-01-01

    Wave normal and Poynting vector measurements from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument (RPWS) are used to examine the propagation characteristics of various plasma waves during the Earth flyby on August 18, 1999. Using the five-channel waveform receiver (WFR), the wave normal vector is determined using the Means method for a lightning-induced whistler, equatorial chorus, and a series of low-frequency emissions observed while Cassini was in the magnetosheath. The Poynting vector for these emissions is also calculated from the five components measured by the WFR. The propagation characteristics of the lightning-induced whistler were found to be consistent with the whistler wave mode of propagation, with propagation antiparallel to the magnetic field (southward) at Cassini. The sferic associated with this whistler was observed by both Cassini and the Stanford VLF group at the Palmer Station in Antarctica. Analysis of the arrival direction of the sferic at the Palmer Station suggests that the lightning stroke is in the same sector as Cassini. Chorus was observed very close (within a few degrees) to the magnetic equator during the flyby. The chorus was found to propagate primarily away from the magnetic equator and was observed to change direction as Cassini crossed the magnetic equator. This suggests that the source region of the chorus is very near the magnetic equator. The low-frequency emission in the magnetosheath has many of the characteristics of lion roars. The average value of the angle between the wave normal vector and the local magnetic field was found to be 16 degrees, and the emissions ranged in frequency from 0. 19 to 0.75 f(sub ce), where f(sub ce) is the electron cyclotron frequency. The wave normal vectors of these waves were primarily in one direction for each individual burst (either parallel or antiparallel to the local field) but varied in direction throughout the magnetosheath. This suggests that the sources of the emissions are far from

  16. Characterization of Fast Ion Absorption of the High Harmonic Fast Wave in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    A.L. Rosenberg; J.E. Menard; J.R. Wilson; S. Medle; C.K. Phillips; R. Andre; D.S. Darro; R.J. Dumont; B.P. LeBlanc; M.H. Redi; T.K. Mau; E. F. Jaeger; P.M. Ryan; D.W. Swain; R.W. Harvey; J. Egedal; the NSTX Team

    2003-08-19

    Ion absorption of the high harmonic fast wave in a spherical torus is of critical importance to assessing the viability of the wave as a means of heating and driving current. Analysis of recent National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) shots has revealed that under some conditions when neutral beam and radio-frequency (RF) power are injected into the plasma simultaneously, a fast ion population with energy above the beam injection energy is sustained by the wave. In agreement with modeling, these experiments find the RF-induced fast ion tail strength and neutron rate at lower B-fields to be less enhanced, likely due to a larger beta profile, which promotes greater off-axis absorption where the fast ion population is small. Ion loss codes find the increased loss fraction with decreased B insufficient to account for the changes in tail strength, providing further evidence that this is an RF interaction effect. Though greater ion absorption is predicted with lower k(sub)||, surprisingly little variation in the tail was observed, along with a small neutron rate enhancement with higher k(sub)||. Data from the neutral particle analyzer, neutron detectors, X-ray crystal spectrometer, and Thomson scattering is presented, along with results from the TRANSP transport analysis code, ray-tracing codes HPRT and CURRAY, full-wave code and AORSA, quasi-linear code CQL3D, and ion loss codes EIGOL and CONBEAM.

  17. An analysis of bending waves in Saturn's rings using Voyager radio occultation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gresh, Donna L.; Rosen, Paul A.; Tyler, G. Leonard; Lissauer, Jack J.

    1986-01-01

    Three oscillatory features in the Voyager 1 radio occultation map of Saturn's rings have been identified as the 5:3, 7:4, and 4:2 spiral bending waves excited by the satellite Mimas. The observations are presented and the wave properties are investigated. It is found that the Mimas 7:4 wave is consistent with the linear theory of bending waves, while the Mimas 5:3 wave may not be. A detailed analysis of the Mimas 4:2 bending wave was not possible due to the large optical depth in the region in which it propagates.

  18. Ulysses observations of wave activity at interplanetary shocks and implications for type II radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Lengyel-Frey, D. |; Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R.J.; Stone, R.G.; Phillips, J.L. |

    1997-02-01

    We present the first quantitative investigation of interplanetary type II radio emission in which in situ waves measured at interplanetary shocks are used to compute radio wave intensities for comparison with type II observations. This study is based on in situ measurements of 42 in-ecliptic forward shocks as well as 10 intervals of type II emission observed by the Ulysses spacecraft between 1 AU and 5 AU. The analysis involves comparisons of statistical properties of type II bursts and in situ waves. Most of the 42 shocks are associated with the occurrence of electrostatic waves near the time of shock passage at Ulysses. These waves, which are identified as electron plasma waves and ion acoustic-like waves, are typically most intense several minutes before shock passage. This suggests that wave-wave interactions might be of importance in electromagnetic wave generation and that type II source regions are located immediately upstream of the shocks. We use the in situ wave measurements to compute type II brightness temperatures, assuming that emission at the fundamental of the electron plasma frequency is generated by the merging of electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves or the decay of electron plasma waves into ion acoustic and transverse waves. Second harmonic emission is assumed to be produced by the merging of electron plasma waves. The latter mechanism requires that a portion of the electron plasma wave distribution is backscattered, presumably by density inhomogeneities in regions of observed ion acoustic wave activity. The computed type II brightness temperatures are found to be consistent with observed values for both fundamental and second harmonic emission, assuming that strong ({approx_equal}10{sup {minus}4}V/m) electron plasma waves and ion acoustic waves are coincident and that the electron plasma waves have phase velocities less than about 10 times the electron thermal velocity. (Abstract Truncated)

  19. INCIDENCE OF Mg II ABSORPTION SYSTEMS TOWARD FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chand, Hum; Gopal-Krishna E-mail: krishna@ncra.tifr.res.in

    2012-07-20

    The conventional wisdom that the rate of incidence of Mg II absorption systems, dN/dz (excluding 'associated systems' having a velocity {beta}c relative to the active galactic nucleus (AGN) of less than {approx}5000 km s{sup -1}), is totally independent of the background AGNs has been challenged by a recent finding that dN/dz for strong Mg II absorption systems toward distant blazars is 2.2 {+-} {sup 0.8}{sub 0.6} times the value known for normal optically selected quasars (QSOs). This has led to the suggestion that a significant fraction of even the absorption systems with {beta} as high as {approx}0.1 may have been ejected by the relativistic jets in the blazars, which are expected to be pointed close to our direction. Here, we investigate this scenario using a large sample of 115 flat-spectrum radio-loud quasars (FSRQs) that also possess powerful jets, but are only weakly polarized. We show, for the first time, that dN/dz toward FSRQs is, on the whole, quite similar to that known for QSOs and that the comparative excess of strong Mg II absorption systems seen toward blazars is mainly confined to {beta} < 0.15. The excess relative to FSRQs probably results from a likely closer alignment of blazar jets with our direction; hence, any gas clouds accelerated by them are more likely to be on the line of sight to the active quasar nucleus.

  20. Approach warning system for snowplow using aerial-high-power ultrasonic wave with radio wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabu, Aoyagi; Yuta, Amagi; Hiroaki, Miura; Okeya, Ryota; Hideki, Tamura; Takehiro, Takano

    2012-05-01

    An approach warning system for a snowplow and guide was developed by using aerial-high-power ultrasonic transducer. To be robust against some serious factors in winter, ultrasonic signal and radio one were combined on the system, and the flat face side of stepped circular vibrating plate was utilized as a radiation plate. The ultrasonic wave radiated from the flat face side still had a better directivity, and the flat face had advantage to prevent bad influences from water, snow or ice. From experiment results, when double transducers were set on both sides of roof of snowplow, this system was able to be measure distance between a guide and snowplow in whole of controlled area.

  1. Wave propagation and earth satellite radio emission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, K. C.; Liu, C. H.; Flaherty, B. J.

    1974-01-01

    Radio propagation studies of the ionosphere using satellite radio beacons are described. The ionosphere is known as a dispersive, inhomogeneous, irregular and sometimes even nonlinear medium. After traversing through the ionosphere the radio signal bears signatures of these characteristics. A study of these signatures will be helpful in two areas: (1) It will assist in learning the behavior of the medium, in this case the ionosphere. (2) It will provide information of the kind of signal characteristics and statistics to be expected for communication and navigational satellite systems that use the similar geometry.

  2. Density waves in Saturn's rings probed by radio and optical occultation - Observational tests of theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, Thomas G.; Rosen, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    A parallel examination is conducted of Voyager radio and photopolarimeter occultation observations of the Saturn A ring's density waves. The radio instrument waves exhibit an average -90 deg offset from the dynamical phase. A warping height of about 100-m amplitude can qualtitatively reproduce this phase shift, while preserving the overall model wave shape. These results may be profoundly relevant for satellite-ring torque calculations in Saturn's rings, given the deposition of all of the net torque of the standard model in the first wavelength.

  3. Cassini radio and plasma wave investigation: Data compression and scientific applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolliscroft, L. J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Alleyne, H. St. C.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kirchner, D. L.; Kurth, W. S.; Thompson, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) experiment being built for the Cassini spacecraft will study a wide range of plasma and radio wave phenomena in the magnetosphere of Saturn and will also make valuable measurements during the cruise phase and at other encounters. A feature of data from wave receivers is the capability of producing vastly more data than the spacecraft telemetry link is capable of transmitting back to the Earth. Thus, techniques of on-board data compression and data reduction are important. The RPWS instrument has one processor dedicated to data compression tasks.

  4. Cassini radio and plasma wave investigation - Data compression and scientific applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolliscroft, L. J. C.; Farrell, W. M.; Alleyne, H. St. C.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kirchner, D. L.; Kurth, W. S.; Thompson, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) experiment being built for the Cassini spacecraft will study a wide range of plasma and radio wave phenomena in the magnetosphere of Saturn and will also make valuable measurements during the cruise phase and at other encounters. A feature of data from wave receivers is the capability of producing vastly more data than the spacecraft telemetry link is capable of transmitting back to the Earth. Thus, techniques of on-board data compression and data reduction are important. The RPWS instrument has one processor dedicated to data compression tasks.

  5. An assessment of full-wave effects on the propagation and absorption of lower hybrid waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John

    2008-11-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance on relatively fast tail electrons. Consequently these waves are well-suited to driving current in the plasma periphery where the electron temperature is lower, making LH current drive (LHCD) a promising technique for off--axis (r/a˜0.60) current profile control in reactor grade plasmas. Established modeling techniques use WKB expansions with non-Maxwellian self-consistent distributions. Higher order WKB expansions have shown some effects on the parallel wavenumber evolution and consequently on the damping due to diffraction [1]. A massively parallel version of the TORIC full-wave electromagnetic field solver valid in the LH range of frequencies has been developed [2] and applied to scenarios at the density and magnetic field characteristic of devices such as Alcator C-Mod and ITER [B0 5 T, ne 1x10^20 m-3]. We find that retaining full wave effects due to diffraction and focusing has a strong effect on the location of wave absorption. Diffraction occurs at caustic surfaces and in resonance cones resulting in a large upshift of the parallel wavenumber and localized power deposition. For some values of density and magnetic field when the waves are fully accessible to the center of the plasma, the full wave description predicts all power being damped at larger radii (r/a ˜ 0.7) in contrast to ray tracing which shows more central power absorption. By incorporating a Fokker-Planck code for self-consistent treatment of the electron distribution and using an synthetic hard X-ray diagnostic we compare the code predictions by both full wave and ray tracing methods with recent Alcator C-Mod experiments. We will compare full-wave and ray tracing for low and high single pass damping regimes. [0pt] [1] G. Pereverzev, Nucl. Fusion 32 1091 (1991). [0pt] [2] J. C. Wright, E. J. Valeo, C. K. Phillips and P. T. Bonoli, Comm. in Comput. Physics 4 545 (2008).

  6. Force-controlled absorption in a fully-nonlinear numerical wave tank

    SciTech Connect

    Spinneken, Johannes Christou, Marios; Swan, Chris

    2014-09-01

    An active control methodology for the absorption of water waves in a numerical wave tank is introduced. This methodology is based upon a force-feedback technique which has previously been shown to be very effective in physical wave tanks. Unlike other methods, an a-priori knowledge of the wave conditions in the tank is not required; the absorption controller being designed to automatically respond to a wide range of wave conditions. In comparison to numerical sponge layers, effective wave absorption is achieved on the boundary, thereby minimising the spatial extent of the numerical wave tank. In contrast to the imposition of radiation conditions, the scheme is inherently capable of absorbing irregular waves. Most importantly, simultaneous generation and absorption can be achieved. This is an important advance when considering inclusion of reflective bodies within the numerical wave tank. In designing the absorption controller, an infinite impulse response filter is adopted, thereby eliminating the problem of non-causality in the controller optimisation. Two alternative controllers are considered, both implemented in a fully-nonlinear wave tank based on a multiple-flux boundary element scheme. To simplify the problem under consideration, the present analysis is limited to water waves propagating in a two-dimensional domain. The paper presents an extensive numerical validation which demonstrates the success of the method for a wide range of wave conditions including regular, focused and random waves. The numerical investigation also highlights some of the limitations of the method, particularly in simultaneously generating and absorbing large amplitude or highly-nonlinear waves. The findings of the present numerical study are directly applicable to related fields where optimum absorption is sought; these include physical wavemaking, wave power absorption and a wide range of numerical wave tank schemes.

  7. Commensal searches for microhertz gravitational waves and fast radio bursts: A pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Hobbs, George; Ravi, Vikram

    2014-04-01

    In this pilot observing programme, we propose to observe at high cadence the transient gravitational-wave and radio-wave Universe. The goals of these observations are threefold: 1) To improve the timing precision of secondary pulsars in the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array (PPTA) to accelerate the detection of gravitational waves; 2) To characterise the gravitational wave universe in the hitherto unexplored microhertz frequency band; and 3) To develop methods and search for fast radio bursts (FRBs) while conducting precision time experiments. To achieve these goals, we request 120 hours of observations with the Parkes multibeam system, divided into 10 epochs comprising 12-hour LST days. This pilot project acts as a feasibility study for modifications to both the PPTA project and the International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA), the consortium coordinating timing array observations in Australia, Europe, and North America, and assess the feasibility of searching for fast radio bursts while conduction precision timing observations.

  8. Double layers and plasma-wave resistivity in extragalactic jets - Cavity formation and radio-wave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    1987-01-01

    Current driven electrostatic-wave- and electromagnetic-wave-produced resistivities do not occur in extragalactic jets for estimated values of the carried currents. Strong plasma double layers, however, may exist within self-maintained density cavities. The relativistic double-layer-emitted electron and ion beams drive plasma-wave resistivities in the low- and high-potential plasma adjacent to the double layers. The double-layer-emitted electron beams may also emit polarized radio waves via a collective bremsstrahlung process mediated by electrostatic two-stream instabilities.

  9. Double layers and plasma-wave resistivity in extragalactic jets: Cavity formation and radio-wave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    1987-01-01

    For estimated values of the currents carried by extragalactic jets, current-driven electrostatic-wave- and electromagnetic-wave-produced resistivities do not occur. Strong plasma double layers, however, may exist within self-maintained density cavities, the relativistic double-layer-emitted electron, and ion beams driving plasma-wave resistivities in the low- and high-potential plasma adjacent to the double layers. The double-layer-emitted electron beams may also emit polarized radio waves via a collective bremsstrahlung process mediated by electrostatic two-stream instabilities.

  10. Verification of nonlinear particle simulation of radio frequency waves in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Kuley, A. Lin, Z.; Bao, J.; Wei, X. S.; Xiao, Y.; Zhang, W.; Sun, G. Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-10-15

    Nonlinear simulation model for radio frequency waves in fusion plasmas has been developed and verified using fully kinetic ion and drift kinetic electron. Ion cyclotron motion in the toroidal geometry is implemented using Boris push in the Boozer coordinates. Linear dispersion relation and nonlinear particle trapping are verified for the lower hybrid wave and ion Bernstein wave (IBW). Parametric decay instability is observed where a large amplitude pump wave decays into an IBW sideband and an ion cyclotron quasimode (ICQM). The ICQM induces an ion perpendicular heating, with a heating rate proportional to the pump wave intensity.

  11. Thermoelastic Stress in a Functionally Graded Infinite Plate with Electromagnetic Wave Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hong-Yan; Wang, Xing-Zhe; Zhou, You-He

    2012-11-01

    We present an analysis of thermal and thermoelastic behaviors of a functionally graded infinite plate taking into account electromagnetic wave absorption. To treat with the inhomogeneity of functionally graded wave-absorbing (FGWA) materials, the plate is approximated by subdividing it into thin homogeneous layers to solve the governing equations together with proper boundary and connecting conditions. The results illustrate that the FGWA plate is a broadband type absorber with electromagnetic wave absorption. By choosing proper material gradation character and the thickness of the FGWA plate, it is possible to obtain a good performance of electromagnetic wave absorption and thermoelastic stress characteristics.

  12. Study of interstellar molecular clouds using formaldehyde absorption toward extragalactic radio sources

    SciTech Connect

    Araya, E. D.; Andreev, N.; Dieter-Conklin, N.; Goss, W. M.

    2014-04-01

    We present new Very Large Array 6 cm H{sub 2}CO observations toward four extragalactic radio continuum sources (B0212+735, 3C 111, NRAO 150, and BL Lac) to explore the structure of foreground Galactic clouds as revealed by absorption variability. This project adds a new epoch in the monitoring observations of the sources reported by Marscher and collaborators in the mid-1990s. Our new observations confirm the monotonic increase in H{sub 2}CO absorption strength toward NRAO 150. We do not detect significant variability of our 2009 spectra with respect to the 1994 spectra of 3C111, B0212+735, and BL Lac; however, we find significant variability of the 3C111 2009 spectrum with respect to archive observations conducted in 1991 and 1992. Our analysis supports that changes in absorption lines could be caused by chemical and/or geometrical gradients in the foreground clouds and not necessarily by small-scale (∼10 AU) high-density molecular clumps within the clouds.

  13. Advanced sine wave modulation of continuous wave laser system for atmospheric CO(2) differential absorption measurements.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Joel F; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R

    2014-02-10

    In this theoretical study, modulation techniques are developed to support the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. A continuous wave (CW) lidar system using sine waves modulated by maximum length (ML) pseudo-noise (PN) codes is described for making simultaneous online/offline differential absorption measurements. Amplitude and phase-shift keying (PSK) modulated intensity modulation (IM) carriers, in addition to a hybrid-pulse technique are investigated, which exhibit optimal autocorrelation properties. A method is presented to bandwidth limit the ML sequence based on a filter implemented in terms of Jacobi theta functions, which does not significantly degrade the resolution or introduce sidelobes as a means of reducing aliasing and IM carrier bandwidth. PMID:24663259

  14. Advanced Sine Wave Modulation of Continuous Wave Laser System for Atmospheric CO2 Differential Absorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with ITT Exelis have been experimenting with Continuous Wave (CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) as a means of performing atmospheric CO2 column measurements from space to support the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission.Because range resolving Intensity Modulated (IM) CW lidar techniques presented here rely on matched filter correlations, autocorrelation properties without side lobes or other artifacts are highly desirable since the autocorrelation function is critical for the measurements of lidar return powers, laser path lengths, and CO2 column amounts. In this paper modulation techniques are investigated that improve autocorrelation properties. The modulation techniques investigated in this paper include sine waves modulated by maximum length (ML) sequences in various hardware configurations. A CW lidar system using sine waves modulated by ML pseudo random noise codes is described, which uses a time shifting approach to separate channels and make multiple, simultaneous online/offline differential absorption measurements. Unlike the pure ML sequence, this technique is useful in hardware that is band pass filtered as the IM sine wave carrier shifts the main power band. Both amplitude and Phase Shift Keying (PSK) modulated IM carriers are investigated that exibit perfect autocorrelation properties down to one cycle per code bit. In addition, a method is presented to bandwidth limit the ML sequence based on a Gaussian filter implemented in terms of Jacobi theta functions that does not seriously degrade the resolution or introduce side lobes as a means of reducing aliasing and IM carrier bandwidth.

  15. The influence of polarization on millimeter wave propagation through rain. [radio signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostian, C. W.; Stutzman, W. L.; Wiley, P. H.; Marshall, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The measurement and analysis of the depolarization and attenuation that occur when millimeter wave radio signals propagate through rain are described. Progress was made in three major areas: the processing of recorded 1972 data, acquisition and processing of a large amount of 1973 data, and the development of a new theoretical model to predict rain cross polarization and attenuation. Each of these topics is described in detail along with radio frequency system design for cross polarization measurements.

  16. Variation of Langmuir wave polarization with electron beam speed in type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Malaspina, David M.; Cairns, Iver H.; Ergun, Robert E.

    2013-06-13

    Observations by the twin STEREO spacecraft of in-situ electric field waveforms and radio signatures associated with type III radio bursts have demonstrated that the polarization of electron beam-driven waves near the local plasma frequency depends strongly on the speed of the driving electron beam. We expand upon a previous study by including all radio bursts with in-situ waveforms observed by STEREO in 2011. The expanded data set contains five times more radio bursts (35 up from 7) and three times as many Langmuir waves (663 up from 168). While this expanded study supports the results of the original study, that faster (slower) beam electrons drive waves with strong (weak) electric fields perpendicular to the local magnetic field, the larger data set emphasizes that the observation of strong perpendicular electric fields at high electron beam speeds is probabilistic rather than definite. This property supports the interpretation of wave polarization dependence on beam speed as Langmuir/z-mode waves shifted to small wave number through interaction with turbulent solar wind density fluctuations.

  17. Influence of short gravity waves on thermal radio emission of water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilin, V. A.; Naumov, A. A.; Rayzer, V. Y.; Filonovich, S. R.; Etkin, V. S.

    1985-06-01

    An experimental study is presented of the thermal radio emission caused by short waves, accompanied by a quantitative interpretation of the data obtained. Emphasis is on an analysis of the variation in radio brightness contrast as a function of steepness of the short gravity waves, measured by means of a high-frequency radiometer operating in the lambda = 0.8 cm range. Waves were artificially generated in a small channel, wavelength 8 to 40 cm, height 0.6 to 3 cm. Due to the high sensitivity of the radiometric apparatus used, effects were recorded which were related to the influence of the profile and steepness of the short gravity waves. The possibility of using the geometrical optics approximation for quantitative interpretation of the experimental data is demonstrated. The model is based on essentially non-Gaussian statistics of slopes corresponding to quasimonochromatic waves of finite amplitude.

  18. Real-time HF Radio Absorption Maps Incorporating Riometer and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Neil; Honary, Farideh; Warrington, Mike; Stocker, Alan; Danskin, Donald

    2016-04-01

    A real-time model of HF radio propagation conditions is being developed as a service for aircraft communications at high latitudes. An essential component of this is a real-time map of the absorption of HF (3-30 MHz) radio signals in the D-region ionosphere. Empirical, climatological Polar Cap Absorption (PCA) models in common usage cannot account for day-to-day variations in ionospheric composition and are inaccurate during the large changes in recombination rate at twilight. However, parameters of such models may be optimised using an age-weighted regression to absorption measurements from riometers in Canada and Scandinavia. Such parameters include the day- and night-time sensitivity to proton flux as measured on a geostationary satellite (GOES). Modelling the twilight transition as a linear or Gauss error function over a range of solar-zenith angles (χl < χ < χu) is found to provide greater accuracy than 'Earth shadow' methods (as applied in the Sodankylä Ionospheric Chemistry (SIC) model, for example) due to a more gradual ionospheric response for χ < 90° . The fitted χl parameter is found to be most variable, with smaller values (as low as 60°) post-sunrise compared with pre-sunset. Correlation coefficients of model parameters between riometers are presented and these provide a means of appropriately weighting individual riometer contributions in an assimilative PCA model. At times outside of PCA events, the probability of absorption in the auroral zones is related to the energetic electron flux inside the precipitation loss cone, as measured on the polar-orbiting POES satellites. This varies with magnetic local time, magnetic latitude and geomagnetic activity, and its relation to the real-time solar wind - magnetospheric coupling function [Newell et al., 2007] will be presented. Reference: Newell, P. T., T. Sotirelis, K. Liou, C.-I. Meng, and F. J. Rich (2007), A nearly universal solar wind-magnetosphere coupling function inferred from 10

  19. Unprecedentedly Strong and Narrow Electromagnetic Emissions Stimulated by High-Frequency Radio Waves in the Ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Norin, L.; Leyser, T. B.; Nordblad, E.; Thide, B.; McCarrick, M.

    2009-02-13

    Experimental results of secondary electromagnetic radiation, stimulated by high-frequency radio waves irradiating the ionosphere, are reported. We have observed emission peaks, shifted in frequency up to a few tens of Hertz from radio waves transmitted at several megahertz. These emission peaks are by far the strongest spectral features of secondary radiation that have been reported. The emissions are attributed to stimulated Brillouin scattering, long predicted but hitherto never unambiguously identified in high-frequency ionospheric interaction experiments. The experiments were performed at the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP), Alaska, USA.

  20. Unprecedentedly strong and narrow electromagnetic emissions stimulated by high-frequency radio waves in the ionosphere.

    PubMed

    Norin, L; Leyser, T B; Nordblad, E; Thidé, B; McCarrick, M

    2009-02-13

    Experimental results of secondary electromagnetic radiation, stimulated by high-frequency radio waves irradiating the ionosphere, are reported. We have observed emission peaks, shifted in frequency up to a few tens of Hertz from radio waves transmitted at several megahertz. These emission peaks are by far the strongest spectral features of secondary radiation that have been reported. The emissions are attributed to stimulated Brillouin scattering, long predicted but hitherto never unambiguously identified in high-frequency ionospheric interaction experiments. The experiments were performed at the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP), Alaska, USA. PMID:19257596

  1. Application of surface acoustic wave devices to radio telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strasilla, U.

    1983-01-01

    Three experimental Surface Acoustic Wave Resonators (SAWR) are developed and evaluated. A desired center frequency is obtained by correct spacing of the Inter-Digital Transducers (IDT). Transmitting and receiving IDT's must be close for adequate coupling and a sufficient number of reflectors are required to create a high quality standing wave. A review of oscillator theory is given and current technology evaluated.

  2. Estimation of Electron Density profile Using the Propagation Characteristics of Radio Waves by S-520-29 Sounding Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itaya, K.; Ishisaka, K.; Ashihara, Y.; Abe, T.; Kumamoto, A.; Kurihara, J.

    2015-12-01

    S-520-29 sounding rocket experiment was carried out at Uchinoura Space Center (USC) at 19:10 JST on 17 August, 2014. The purpose of this sounding rocket experiments is observation of sporadic E layer that appears in the lower ionosphere at near 100km. Three methods were used in order to observe the sporadic E layer. The first method is an optical method that observe the light of metal ion emitted by the resonance scattering in sporadic E layer using the imager. The second method is observation of characteristic of radio wave propagation that the LF/MF band radio waves transmitted from the ground. The third method is measuring the electron density in the vicinity of sounding rocket using the fast Langmuir probe and the impedance probe. We analyze the propagation characteristics of radio wave in sporadic E layer appeared from the results of the second method observation. This rocket was equipped with LF/MF band radio receiver for observe the LF/MF band radio waves in rocket flight. Antenna of LF/MF band radio receiver is composed of three axis loop antenna. LF/MF band radio receiver receives three radio waves of 873kHz (JOGB), 666kHz (JOBK), 60kHz (JJY) from the ground. 873kHz and 60kHz radio waves are transmitting from north side, and 666kHz radio waves are transmitting from the east side to the trajectory of the rocket. In the sounding rocket experiment, LF/MF band radio receiver was working properly. We have completed the observation of radio wave intensity. We analyze the observation results using a Doppler shift calculations by frequency analysis. Radio waves received by the sounding rocket include the influences of Doppler shift by polarization and the direction of rocket spin and the magnetic field of the Earth. So received radio waves that are separate into characteristics waves using frequency analysis. Then we calculate the Doppler shift from the separated data. As a result, 873kHz, 666kHz radio waves are reflected by the ionosphere. 60kHz wave was able to

  3. Propagation characteristics of the ionospheric transmission window relating to long wave radio location issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossey, Paul A.; Lewis, Edward A.

    1992-11-01

    Most applications of long radio waves (ELF/VLF/LF/MF) are ground-based and exploit the fact that such signals can propagate to great distances via reflections from the lower ionosphere. It is known however that, owing to the influence of the earth's magnetic field, long wave signals can penetrate through the ionosphere as well; at times, the waves penetrate with relatively little loss, depending on ionospheric conditions and other propagation factors. This has prompted investigations of the long wave 'ionospheric transmission window' as part of efforts to assess the feasibility of deploying long wave emitters in space for terrestrial applications and/or for exploiting, in space, signals emanating from ground-based long wave transmitters. This paper outlines results of theoretical and experimental investigations of the ionospheric transmission window over the frequency range from about 100 Hz to 500 kHz, with emphasis on directional issues associated with long wave penetration of the ionosphere.

  4. Symmetrical and anti-symmetrical coherent perfect absorption for acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Pengjiang; Croënne, Charles; Tak Chu, Sai; Li, Jensen

    2014-03-24

    We investigate tunable acoustic absorption enabled by the coherent control of input waves. It relies on coherent perfect absorption originally proposed in optics. By designing appropriate acoustic metamaterial structures with resonating effective bulk modulus or density, we show that complete absorption of incident waves impinging on the metamaterial can be achieved for either symmetrical or anti-symmetrical inputs in the forward and backward directions. By adjusting the relative phase between the two incident beams, absorption can be tuned effectively from unity to zero, making coherent control useful in applications like acoustic modulators, noise controllers, transducers, and switches.

  5. Solar type III radio bursts modulated by homochromous Alfvén waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, G. Q.; Chen, L.; Wu, D. J.

    2013-12-10

    Solar type III radio bursts and their production mechanisms have been intensively studied in both theory and observation and are believed to be the most important signatures of electron acceleration in active regions. Recently, Wu et al. proposed that the electron-cyclotron maser emission (ECME) driven by an energetic electron beam could be responsible for producing type III bursts and pointed out that turbulent Alfvén waves can greatly influence the basic process of ECME via the oscillation of these electrons in the wave fields. This paper investigates effects of homochromous Alfvén waves (HAWs) on ECME driven by electron beams. Our results show that the growth rate of the O-mode wave will be significantly modulated by HAWs. We also discuss possible application to the formation of fine structures in type III bursts, such as so-called solar type IIIb radio bursts.

  6. Mode conversion and absorption of fast waves at high ion cyclotron harmonics in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Suwon; Kwak, Jong-Gu

    2014-04-15

    The propagation and absorption of high harmonic fast waves is of interest for non-inductive current drives in fusion experiments. The fast wave can be coupled with the ion Bernstein wave that propagates in the high magnetic field side of an ion cyclotron harmonic resonance layer. This coupling and the absorption are analyzed using the hot plasma dispersion relation and a wave equation that was converted from an approximate dispersion relation for the case where λ{sub i}=k{sub ⊥}{sup 2}ρ{sub i}{sup 2}/2≳1 (where k{sub ⊥} is the perpendicular wave number and ρ{sub i} is the ion Larmor radius). It is found that both reflection and conversion may occur near the harmonic resonance layer but that they decrease rapidly, giving rise to a sharp increase in the absorption as the parallel wave number increases.

  7. Detection of 21 Centimeter H I Absorption at z=0.78 in a Survey of Radio Continuum Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Jeremy; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Bower, Geoffrey C.

    2004-10-01

    We report the detection of a deep broad H I 21 cm absorption system at z=0.78 toward the radio source [HB89] 2351+456 (4C +45.51) at z=1.992. The H I absorption was identified in a blind spectral line survey conducted at the Green Bank Telescope spanning 0.63radio continuum sources. The H I column density is NHI=2.35×1019(Ts/f) cm-2, where Ts is the spin temperature and f is the continuum covering factor of the absorbing gas. For Ts/f>8.5 K, this system is by definition a damped Lyα absorption system (NHI>=2×1020 cm-2). The line is unusually broad, with an FWHM of 53 km s-1 and a full span of 163 km s-1, suggesting a physically extended H I gas structure. Radio surveys identify damped Lyα systems in a manner that bypasses many of the selection effects present in optical/UV surveys, including dust extinction and the atmospheric cutoff for z<1.65. The smooth broad profile of this H I 21 cm absorption system is similar to the z=0.89 H I absorption toward PKS 1830-211, which suggests that the absorber toward [HB89] 2351+456 is also a gravitational lens and a molecular absorption system. However, very long baseline interferometry and Hubble Space Telescope observations show little evidence for gravitational lensing, and BIMA millimeter observations show no HCO+ (1-->2) or HCN (1-->2) absorption down to τ=0.15 (3 σ) in 5 km s-1 channels. Although this radio damped Lyα selection technique would include dusty, molecule-rich systems, [HB89] 2351+456 appears to be a ``vanilla'' H I 21 cm absorber.

  8. Scintillation effects on radio wave propagation through solar corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, C. M.; Sue, M. K.; Bedrossian, A.; Sniffin, R. W.

    2002-01-01

    When RF waves pass through the solar corona and solar wind regions close to the Sun, strong scintillation effects appear at their amplitude, frequency and phase, especially in the regions very close to the Sun (less than 4 solar radius).

  9. The Density and Mass of Unshocked Ejecta in Cassiopeia A through Low Frequency Radio Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLaney, Tracey; Kassim, Namir E.; Rudnick, Lawrence; Perley, R. A.

    2014-04-01

    Characterizing the ejecta in young supernova remnants is a requisite step toward a better understanding of stellar evolution. In Cassiopeia A the density and total mass remaining in the unshocked ejecta are important parameters for modeling its explosion and subsequent evolution. Low frequency (<100 MHz) radio observations of sufficient angular resolution offer a unique probe of unshocked ejecta revealed via free-free absorption against the synchrotron emitting shell. We have used the Very Large Array plus Pie Town Link extension to probe this cool, ionized absorber at 9'' and 18.''5 resolution at 74 MHz. Together with higher frequency data we estimate an electron density of 4.2 cm-3 and a total mass of 0.39 M ⊙ with uncertainties of a factor of ~2. This is a significant improvement over the 100 cm-3 upper limit offered by infrared [S III] line ratios from the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our estimates are sensitive to a number of factors including temperature and geometry. However using reasonable values for each, our unshocked mass estimate agrees with predictions from dynamical models. We also consider the presence, or absence, of cold iron- and carbon-rich ejecta and how these affect our calculations. Finally we reconcile the intrinsic absorption from unshocked ejecta with the turnover in Cas A's integrated spectrum documented decades ago at much lower frequencies. These and other recent observations below 100 MHz confirm that spatially resolved thermal absorption, when extended to lower frequencies and higher resolution, will offer a powerful new tool for low frequency astrophysics.

  10. Radio Wave Generation by a Collision or Contact between Various Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, T.; Hanawa, R.; Saegusa, K.; Ikeda, H.

    2014-12-01

    In fracture of rock, radio wave emission was found experimentally [1]. This phenomenon could be used to detect a rock fracture during an earthquake or a volcanic activity [2]. The cause of the radio wave is expected to be micro-discharges, which are generated by an inhomogeneous potential distribution around micro-cracks. In order to better understand the phenomena and clarify the cause of radio wave emission, we carried out experiments to detect the emission in the cases of a collision or contact between various materials. We used receiving systems with great sensitivities and sufficient frequency bandwidths at 1 MHz-, 300 MHz-, 2 GHz-, and 18 GHz-bands. The specimen materials are as follows: Steel (2) Brass (3) Copper (4)Small coin (5)Celluloid. We obtained the following results: The signal was detected for the specimen of (1) to (4), but not for (5). The signal is composed of intermittent spikes which include waves with a frequency close to the center frequency of each frequency band. The power is strongest at the lower frequencies among all frequency bands. The more details will be given in the presentation. The origin of radio wave emission from the metal is supposed to be discharges between materials in these experiments. It is surprising that even a small coin can generate a significant amount of radio wave. Accordingly, it is inferred that all amount of charges are discharged through a conductive metal. On the other hand, celluloid did not generate radio wave, though the specimen was sufficiently charged by brushing. It is inferred that a quite localized charge was discharged but the remaining charges were blocked due to poor conductivity. Extending this hypothesis, large-scale contact should have occurred between broken fragments for the radio wave generation in the aforementioned rock fracture experiments. Turbulence of the fragments is a candidate for the explanation. [1] K. Maki et al., "An experimental study of microwave emission from compression

  11. Differential phase shift of partially reflected radio waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    The addition of phase difference measurements to differential absorption experiments is shown to be both feasible and desirable. The phase information can provide a more sensitive measurement of electron density above about 75 km. The differential phase shift is only weakly dependent on collision frequency in this range, and so an accurate collision frequency profile is not a prerequisite. The differential phase shift and differential absorption measurements taken together can provide both electron density and collision frequency data from about 70 to 90 km.

  12. The integrated radio continuum spectrum of M33 - Evidence for free-free absorption by cool ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israel, F. P.; Mahoney, M. J.; Howarth, N.

    1992-01-01

    We present measurements of the integrated radio continuum flux density of M33 at frequencies between 22 and 610 MHz and discuss the radio continuum spectrum of M33 between 22 MHz and 10 GHz. This spectrum has a turnover between 500 and 900 MHz, depending on the steepness of the high frequency radio spectrum of M33. Below 500 MHz the spectrum is relatively flat. We discuss possible mechanisms to explain this spectral shape and consider efficient free-free absorption of nonthermal emission by a cool (not greater than 1000 K) ionized gas to be a very likely possibility. The surface filling factor of both the nonthermal and the thermal material appears to be small (of order 0.001), which could be explained by magnetic field/density fluctuations in the M 33 interstellar medium. We briefly speculate on the possible presence of a nuclear radio source with a steep spectrum.

  13. Forecasting characteristics of propagation of decameter radio waves using the global ionosphere and plasmasphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarchuk, Sergey; Kotovich, Galina; Romanova, Elena; Tashchilin, Anatoliy

    2015-09-01

    We present the results of forecasting maximum usable frequencies (MUF) on middle-latitude paths on the basis of complex algorithm including modules of the ionosphere and plasmasphere global model (IPGM) and the model of radio wave propagation. The computation of propagation characteristics for decameter radio waves is carried out within the framework of normal wave technique. IPGM developed in ISTP SB RAS enables to compute electron concentration profiles and effective frequency of collisions using minimum number of input data and taking into account physical processes in the Earth's upper atmosphere. To estimate the efficiency of using IPGM in long-term forecast of radio wave propagation we computed MUF for radio communication in various heliogeophysical conditions. To obtain precision characteristics of MUF forecast we used experimental data of oblique sounding on Magadan-Irkutsk, Khabarovsk-Irkutsk, Norilsk-Irkutsk paths. The paths are equipped with modern ionosphere diagnostic hardware for oblique sounding by continuous chirp signal. We also compared results of MUF forecast using IPGM with computations carried out according IRI model.

  14. Dust Detection Using Radio and Plasma Wave Instruments in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Averkamp, T. F.; Kempf, S.; Hsu, S.; Srama, R.; Grün, E.; Morooka, M. W.; Sakai, S.; Wahlund, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Nanometer to micrometer sized dust particles pervade our solar system. The origins of these dust particles include asteroid collisions, cometary activity, and geothermal activity of the planetary moons, for example, the water dust cloud ejected from Saturn's moon Enceladus. Radio and plasma wave instruments have been used to detect such dust particles via voltage pulses induced by impacts on the spacecraft body and antennas. The first detection of such dust impacts occurred when Voyager 1 passed through Saturn's ring plane. Since then, dust impacts have been detected by radio and plasma wave instruments on many spacecraft, including ISEE-3, Cassini, and STEREO. In this presentation, we review the detection of dust particles in the solar system using radio and plasma wave instruments aboard various spacecraft since the Voyager era. We also show characteristics of the dust particles derived from recent observations by Cassini RPWS in Saturn's magnetosphere. The dust size distribution and density are consistent with those measured by the conventional dust detectors. A new method of measuring the electron density inside the Enceladus plume based on plasma oscillations observed after dust impacts will also be discussed. The dust measurement by radio and plasma wave instruments complements that by conventional dust detectors and provide important information about the spatial distribution of dust particles due to less pointing constraints and the larger detection area.

  15. A Simple Demonstration for Exploring the Radio Waves Generated by a Mobile Phone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Described is a simple low cost home-made device that converts the radio wave energy from a mobile phone signal into electricity for lighting an LED. No battery or complex circuitry is required. The device can form the basis of a range of interesting experiments on the physics and technology of mobile phones. (Contains 5 figures.)

  16. Radio wave emitted by an extensive air showers in 10KHz to 1MHz region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichimura, J.

    1985-01-01

    The importance of radio waves in a frequency range of less than 1MHz in an EAS shower is discussed. Estimates of radio intensities at 10KHz, 100KHz and 1MHz in EAS showers made on the basis of the Kahn-Lerche theory. Negative charge excess in a shower is the main source of low frequency radio emission, in spite of the importance of the contribution of transverse current in the geomagnetic field in a higher frequency range. An estimate is also made for radio intensity produced when the shower hits the ground. The contribution of this process seems to be important at a large distance, i.e., beyond 1km from the shower axis.

  17. Radio and Plasma Wave Observations at Saturn from Cassini's Approach and First Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Haspodarsky, G. B.; Persoon, A. M.; Averkamp, T. F.; Cecconi, B.; Lecacheux, A.; Zarka, P.; Canu, P.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.

    2005-01-01

    We report data from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument during the approach and first orbit at Saturn. During the approach, radio emissions from Saturn showed that the radio rotation period is now 10 hours 45 minutes 45 k 36 seconds, about 6 minutes longer than measured by Voyager in 1980 to 1981. In addition, many intense impulsive radio signals were detected from Saturn lightning during the approach and first orbit. Some of these have been linked to storm systems observed by the Cassini imaging instrument. Within the magnetosphere, whistler-mode auroral hiss emissions were observed near the rings, suggesting that a strong electrodynamic interaction is occurring in or near the rings.

  18. Radio and plasma wave observations at Saturn from Cassini's approach and first orbit.

    PubMed

    Gurnett, D A; Kurth, W S; Hospodarsky, G B; Persoon, A M; Averkamp, T F; Cecconi, B; Lecacheux, A; Zarka, P; Canu, P; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N; Galopeau, P; Roux, A; Harvey, C; Louarn, P; Bostrom, R; Gustafsson, G; Wahlund, J-E; Desch, M D; Farrell, W M; Kaiser, M L; Goetz, K; Kellogg, P J; Fischer, G; Ladreiter, H-P; Rucker, H; Alleyne, H; Pedersen, A

    2005-02-25

    We report data from the Cassini radio and plasma wave instrument during the approach and first orbit at Saturn. During the approach, radio emissions from Saturn showed that the radio rotation period is now 10 hours 45 minutes 45 +/- 36 seconds, about 6 minutes longer than measured by Voyager in 1980 to 1981. In addition, many intense impulsive radio signals were detected from Saturn lightning during the approach and first orbit. Some of these have been linked to storm systems observed by the Cassini imaging instrument. Within the magnetosphere, whistler-mode auroral hiss emissions were observed near the rings, suggesting that a strong electrodynamic interaction is occurring in or near the rings. PMID:15604362

  19. Radio wave propagation experiments to probe the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, P. E.

    1972-01-01

    Ionospheric bias corrections associated with radio tracking of spacecraft depend on the following measuring techniques for integrated electron content: (1) Faraday rotation measurements from an earth synchronous satellite; (2) ranging measurements at two frequencies; and (3) group and phase velocity measurements obtained from tracking data. The extraction of the integrated electron content directly from tracking data is achieved by comparison of range-rate measurements based on Doppler shift with differentiated range measurements based on tone delay. This method is most desirable because the measured corrections pertain directly to the spacecraft whose orbit is being determined and can be used in near earth as well as deep space tracking data.

  20. The effect of plasma inhomogeneities on (i) radio emission generation by non-gyrotropic electron beams and (ii) particle acceleration by Langmuir waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklauri, D.

    2014-12-01

    Extensive particle-in-cell simulations of fast electron beams injected in a background magnetised plasma with a decreasing density profile were carried out. These simulations were intended to further shed light on a newly proposed mechanism for the generation of electromagnetic waves in type III solar radio bursts [1]. Here recent progress in an alternative to the plasma emission model using Particle-In-Cell, self-consistent electromagnetic wave emission simulations of solar type III radio bursts will be presented. In particular, (i) Fourier space drift (refraction) of non-gyrotropic electron beam-generated wave packets, caused by the density gradient [1,2], (ii) parameter space investigation of numerical runs [3], (iii) concurrent generation of whistler waves [4] and a separate problem of (iv) electron acceleration by Langmuir waves in a background magnetised plasma with an increasing density profile [5] will be discussed. In all considered cases the density inhomogeneity-induced wave refraction plays a crucial role. In the case of non-gyrotropic electron beam, the wave refaction transforms the generated wave packets from standing into freely escaping EM radiation. In the case of electron acceleration by Langmuir waves, a positive density gradient in the direction of wave propagation causes a decrease in the wavenumber, and hence a higher phase velocity vph=ω/k. The k-shifted wave is then subject to absorption by a faster electron by wave-particle interaction. The overall effect is an increased number of high energy electrons in the energy spectrum. [1] D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 18, 052903 (2011) [2] H. Schmitz, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 20, 062903 (2013) [3] R. Pechhacker, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 19, 112903 (2012) [4] M. Skender, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 21, 042904 (2014) [5] R. Pechhacker, D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plasmas 21, 012903 (2014)

  1. Design, fabrication, and measurement of reflective metasurface for orbital angular momentum vortex wave in radio frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shixing; Li, Long; Shi, Guangming; Zhu, Cheng; Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Shi, Yan

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a reflective metasurface is designed, fabricated, and experimentally demonstrated to generate an orbital angular momentum (OAM) vortex wave in radio frequency domain. Theoretical formula of phase-shift distribution is deduced and used to design the metasurface producing vortex radio waves. The prototype of a practical configuration is designed, fabricated, and measured to validate the theoretical analysis at 5.8 GHz. The simulated and experimental results verify that the vortex waves with different OAM mode numbers can be flexibly generated by using sub-wavelength reflective metasurfaces. The proposed method and metasurface pave a way to generate the OAM vortex waves for radio and microwave wireless communication applications.

  2. Radio-wave emission due to hypervelocity impacts and its correlation with optical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, T.; Maki, K.; Yamori, A.

    This paper describes the most interesting phenomena of radio-wave emission due to hypervelocity impacts. A projectile of polycarbonate with 1.1 g weight was accelerated by a rail gun to 3.8 km/sec, and hit two targets which are a 2 mm thick aluminum plate upstream and a 45 mm diameter aluminum column downstream, respectively. The projectile first breaks wires to give a triggering signal to a data recorder, then penetrates the aluminum plate, and finally hit the column, The emitted radio-waves propagate through the chamber window, and are received by antennas at each frequency band. The receivers in 22 GHz- and 2 GHz-bands consist of a low noise amplifier, a mixer, a local oscillator and an IF amplifier , respectively. The receiver in 1 MHz-band is a simple RF amplifier. The outputs of all receivers are fed to a data recorder which is actually a high-speed digital oscilloscope with a large amount of memory. The radio-waves were successfully recorded in 22 GHz-band with 500 MHz bandwidth, in 2 GHz-band with 300 MHz bandwidth, and in 1MHz-band. The waveforms in 22 GHz- and 2 GHz-bands coincide well each other, and are composed of two groups of sharp impulses with a separation of about 20 micro seconds. The width of an impulse is less than 2 n sec. which is the resolution limit of the data recorder. We carried out optical observations using an ultra-high speed camera simultaneously through another window of the chamber. The time interval between scenes is 2 micro sec. We can see a faint light of the projectile before the first impact to the plate, and then a brilliant gas exploding backward from the plate and forward to the column. After hitting the column target, the brilliant gas flows to the chamber wall and is reflected back to make a mixture with dark gas in the chamber. Excellent correlation between radio-wave emission and the observed optical phenomena was obtained in the experiment. It is easily conceived that the radio-waves consist of quite a wide frequency

  3. Radio frequency wave experiments on the MST reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, C. B.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Nornberg, M. D.; Prager, S. C.; Thomas, M. A.; Uchimoto, E.; Smirnov, A. P.; Harvey, R. W.; Ram, A. K.

    1999-09-20

    Whether there is a self-consistent path from poor confinement to greatly improved confinement through current profile modification is an issue for future experiments to address if and only if near term experiments can demonstrate: (1) coupling to and the propagation of rf waves in RFP plasmas, (2) efficient current drive, and (3) control of the power deposition which will make it possible to control the current profile. In this paper, modeling results and experimental plans are presented for two rf experiments which have the potential of satisfying these three goals: high-n{sub (parallel} {sub sign)} lower hybrid (LH) waves and electron Bernstein waves (EBWs). (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Reflection of radio waves by sporadic-E layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, K. L.; Smith, L. G.

    1977-01-01

    A full-wave analysis of the reflection coefficient is developed and applied to electron-density profiles of midlatitude sporadic-E layers observed by rocket-borne probes. It is shown that partial reflection from the large electron-density gradients at the upper and lower boundaries of sporadic-E layers does not account for the partial transparency observed by ionosondes.

  5. The parsec-scale structure of radio-loud broad absorption line quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruni, G.; Dallacasa, D.; Mack, K.-H.; Montenegro-Montes, F. M.; González-Serrano, J. I.; Holt, J.; Jiménez-Luján, F.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Broad absorption line quasars (BAL QSOs) belong to a class of objects not well-understood as yet. Their UV spectra show BALs in the blue wings of the UV resonance lines, owing to ionized gas with outflow velocities up to 0.2 c. They can have radio emission that is difficult to characterize and that needs to be studied at various wavelengths and resolutions. Aims: We aim to study the pc-scale properties of their synchrotron emission and, in particular, to determine their core properties. Methods: We performed observations in the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) technique, using both the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 5 GHz, and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 5 and 8.4 GHz to map the pc-scale structure of the brightest radio-loud objects of our sample, allowing a proper morphological interpretation. Results: A variety of morphologies have been found: 9 BAL QSOs on a total of 11 observed sources have a resolved structure. Core-jet, double, and symmetric objects are present, suggesting different orientations. In some cases the sources can be young GPS or CSS. The projected linear size of the sources, also considering observations from our previous work for the same objects, can vary from tens of pc to hundreds of kpc. In some cases, a diffuse emission can be supposed from the missing flux-density with respect to previous lower resolution observations. Finally, the magnetic field strength does not significantly differ from the values found in the literature for radio sources with similar sizes. Conclusions: These results are not easily interpreted with the youth scenario for BAL QSOs, in which they are generally compact objects still expelling a dust cocoon. The variety of orientations, morphologies, and extensions found are presumably related to different possible angles for the BAL producing outflows, with respect to the jet axis. Moreover, the phenomenon could be present in various phases of the QSO evolution. Table 3 is available in

  6. Inconsistency of Ulysses Millisecond Langmuir Spikes with Wave Collapse in Type 3 Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Recent Ulysses observations of millisecond spikes superposed on broader Langmuir wave packets in type 3 radio sources are compared quantitatively with constraints from the theory of wave collapse. It is found that both the millisecond spikes and the wave packets have fields at least 10 times too small to be consistent with collapse, contrary to previous interpretations in terms of this process. Several alternative explanations are considered and it is argued that the spikes should be interpreted as either non-collapse phenomena or observational artifacts. To the extent the observations are representative, this rules out theories for type 3 bursts at approx. 1 - 4 AU that rely on collapse.

  7. Kilometric radio waves generated along auroral field lines observed by ground facilities - A theoretical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Wu, C. S.; Yoon, Peter H.

    1991-01-01

    A theory of generation of radio waves observed by ground-based facilities in the frequency range 150-700 kHz is discussed. This work is a continuation of an earlier discussion (Wu et al., 1989) in which it was proposed that the trapped electrons along the auroral field lines can lead to a cyclotron instability which amplifies the whistler waves observed at ground level. The objective of the present study is to investigate the propagation effect on the wave amplification and to examine whether the proposed mechanism is indeed viable.

  8. Radio scintillations in Venus's atmosphere: application of a theory of gravity wave generation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, S. S.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    1996-04-01

    Radio scintillations in Pioneer Venus radio occultation data are simulated assuming that the index of refraction fluctuations in Venus's atmosphere responsible for the scintillations are directly caused by gravity wave fluctuations. The gravity waves are created by a global convection layer between 50- and 55-km altitude in Venus's atmosphere and propagate vertically. The authors compare the simulated scintillations with data from Pioneer Venus. These gravity waves can explain the spectral shape and amplitude of the radio scintillations. The shape at high frequencies is controlled by wave breaking, which yields a saturated spectrum. The amplitude is subject to parameters such as the intensity of the convection, the angle between the zonal winds and the beam path, and the zonal wind profile at polar latitudes. To match the observed amplitude of the scintillations, the velocity variations of the energy-bearing eddies in the convection must be at least 2 m s-1. This value is consistent with the Venus balloon results of Sagdeev et al. (1986) and is in the middle of the range considered by Leroy and Ingersoll (1994) in their study of convectively generated gravity waves. The latter study, combined with the lower bound on velocity from the present study, then yields lower bounds on the vertical fluxes of momentum and energy in the Venus atmosphere.

  9. NONLINEAR WAVE INTERACTIONS AS EMISSION PROCESS OF TYPE II RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ganse, Urs; Kilian, Patrick; Spanier, Felix; Vainio, Rami

    2012-06-01

    The emission of fundamental and harmonic frequency radio waves of type II radio bursts are assumed to be products of three-wave interaction processes of beam-excited Langmuir waves. Using a particle-in-cell code, we have performed simulations of the assumed emission region, a coronal mass ejection foreshock with two counterstreaming electron beams. Analysis of wavemodes within the simulation shows self-consistent excitation of beam-driven modes, which yield interaction products at both fundamental and harmonic emission frequencies. Through variation of the beam strength, we have investigated the dependence of energy transfer into electrostatic and electromagnetic modes, confirming the quadratic dependence of electromagnetic emission on electron beam strength.

  10. The seasonal variation of the D region as inferred from propagation characteristics of LF radio waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishimine, T.; Ishii, T.; Echizenya, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The propagation data of JG2AS 40 kHz (Japanese Standard Frequency), Loran C 100 kHz radio waves, and meteorological data were analyzed to study the association of propagation characteristics of LF radio waves with the atmospheric circulation in the mesosphere. The monthly averaged electric fields were depicted on the complex plane for typical summer and winter months, June and November. The locus traced out by the electric field vector during daytime is nearly circular. This is because during daytime the amplitude of the sky wave remains nearly constant while its phase changes in accord with the height change of the reflection layer, and thus the electric field vector traces out a circular locus with its center at the tip of the supposed ground wave vector. The locus has a loop during the sunrise or sunset period, which seems to arise from interference of two waves reflected by two different layers. In June the amplitude of the sky wave decreases rapidly before the dawn or increases after the dusk. In November such rapid change is not observed. During nighttime, the sky wave phase changes in such a way as to suggest that the reflection height moves upwards with time before midnight or lowers after midnight in November. In June it changes similarly before midnight, but after midnight it varies erratically. These characteristics are closely related to the structure of the D region, which is clearly shown by simulating the loci traced out by electric fields.

  11. Radio frequency wave experiments on the MST reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, C.B.; Chattopadhyay, P.K.; Nornberg, M.D.; Prager, S.C.; Thomas, M.A.; Uchimoto, E.; Smirnov, A.P.; Harvey, R.W.; Ram, A.K.

    1999-04-01

    Experiments, simulations, and theory all indicate that the magnetic fluctuations responsible for the poor confinement in the reversed field pinch (RFP) can be controlled by altering the radial profile of the current density. The magnetic fluctuations in the RFP are due to resistive MHD instabilities caused by current profile peaking; thus confinement in the RFP is ultimately the result of a misalignment between inductively driven current profiles and the stable current profiles characteristic of the Taylor state. If a technique such as rf current drive can be developed to non-inductively sustain a Taylor state (a current profile linearly stable to all tearing modes), the confinement of the RFP and its potential as a reactor concept are likely to increase. Whether there is a self-consistent path from poor confinement to greatly improved confinement through current profile modification is an issue for future experiments to address if and only if near term experiments can demonstrate: (1) coupling to and the propagation of rf waves in RFP plasmas, (2) efficient current drive, and (3) control of the power deposition which will make it possible to control the current profile. In this paper, modeling results and experimental plans are presented for two rf experiments which have the potential of satisfying these three goals: high-n{sub {parallel}} lower hybrid (LH) waves and electron Bernstein waves (EBWs).

  12. AN INFRARED EXCESS IDENTIFIED IN RADIO-LOUD BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Runnoe, J. C.; Brotherton, M. S.; Myers, A. D.

    2013-01-10

    If broad absorption line (BAL) quasars represent a high-covering-fraction evolutionary state (even if this is not the sole factor governing the presence of BALs), it is expected that they should show an excess of mid-infrared radiation compared to normal quasars. Some previous studies have suggested that this is not the case. We perform the first analysis of the IR properties of radio-loud BAL quasars, using IR data from WISE and optical (rest-frame ultraviolet) data from SDSS, and compare the BAL quasar sample with a well-matched sample of unabsorbed quasars. We find a statistically significant excess in the mid- to near-infrared luminosities of BAL quasars, particularly at rest-frame wavelengths of 1.5 and 4 {mu}m. Our sample was previously used to show that BALs are observed along many lines of sight toward quasars, but with an overabundance of more edge-on sources, suggesting that orientation factors into the appearance of BALs. The evidence here-of a difference in IR luminosities between BAL quasars and unabsorbed quasars-can be ascribed to evolution. This suggests that a merging of the current BAL paradigms is needed to fully describe the class.

  13. Determining the solar wind speed above active regions using remote radio-wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; Bougeret, J.-L.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique has made it possible to measure the velocity of portions of the solar wind during its flow outward from the sun. This analysis utilizes spacecraft (ISEE-3) observations of radio emission generated in regions of the solar wind associated with solar active regions. By tracking the source of these radio waves over periods of days, it is possible to measure the motion of the emission regions. Evidence of solar wind acceleration during this outward flow, consistent with theoretical models, has also been obtained.

  14. Invisible Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Radio Morphologies and Five New H i 21cm Absorption Line Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ting; Stocke, John T.; Darling, Jeremy; Momjian, Emmanuel; Sharma, Soniya; Kanekar, Nissim

    2016-03-01

    This is the second paper directed toward finding new highly redshifted atomic and molecular absorption lines at radio frequencies. To this end, we selected a sample of 80 candidates for obscured radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and presented their basic optical/near-infrared (NIR) properties in Paper I. In this paper, we present both high-resolution radio continuum images for all of these sources and H i 21 cm absorption spectroscopy for a few selected sources in this sample. A-configuration 4.9 and 8.5 GHz Very Large Array continuum observations find that 52 sources are compact or have substantial compact components with size <0.″5 and flux densities >0.1 Jy at 4.9 GHz. The 36 most compact sources were then observed with the Very Long Baseline Array at 1.4 GHz. One definite and 10 candidate Compact Symmetric Objects (CSOs) are newly identified, which is a detection rate of CSOs ∼three times higher than the detection rate previously found in purely flux-limited samples. Based on possessing compact components with high flux densities, 60 of these sources are good candidates for absorption-line searches. Twenty-seven sources were observed for H i 21 cm absorption at their photometric or spectroscopic redshifts with only six detections (five definite and one tentative). However, five of these were from a small subset of six CSOs with pure galaxy optical/NIR spectra (i.e., any AGN emission is obscured) and for which accurate spectroscopic redshifts place the redshifted 21 cm line in a radio frequency intereference (RFI)-free spectral “window” (i.e., the percentage of H i 21 cm absorption-line detections could be as high as ∼90% in this sample). It is likely that the presence of ubiquitous RFI and the absence of accurate spectroscopic redshifts preclude H i detections in similar sources (only 1 detection out of the remaining 22 sources observed, 13 of which have only photometric redshifts); that is, H i absorption may well be present but is masked by

  15. Numerical investigation of fast-wave propagation and radio-frequency sheath interaction with a shaped tokamak wall

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, H.; Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2015-07-15

    Interactions between propagating fast waves and radio-frequency (RF) sheaths in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies are numerically investigated based on a cold fluid plasma model coupled with a sheath boundary condition. In this two-dimensional study, the capability of the finite element code rfSOL, which was developed in previous numerical work, is extended to analyze self-consistent RF sheath-plasma interaction problems in a tokamak with a non-circular cross-section. It is found that a large sheath voltage is generated near the edges of the limiter-shaped deformation as a result of the conversion from fast to slow waves on the sheaths. The sheath voltage associated with this conversion is particularly significant in the localized region where the contact angle between the magnetic field line and the conducting wall varies rapidly along the curved sheath surface, which is consistent with the results in previous one-dimensional theoretical work. The dependences of the RF sheaths on various parameters in plasma such as the toroidal wavenumber, edge plasma density, and the degree of the RF wave absorption in the core region are also examined in detail.

  16. Relativistic effects on cyclotron wave absorption by an energetic electron tail in the PLT tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucato, E.; Efthimion, P.; Fidone, I.

    1984-07-01

    Electron cyclotron wave absorption by mildly relativistic electrons in the low density regime of the PLT tokamak is investigated. Appreciable wave damping is found for vertical propagation at frequencies of 50, 60, and 70 GHz when the spatially constant cyclotron frequency is 89 GHz. The perpendicular temperature T/sub perpendicular/(v/sub parallel/) of the fast tail is also measured from emission of radiation in the same direction. The results obtained are in satisfactory agreement with the theory of wave emission and absorption.

  17. Selective spatial damping of propagating kink waves due to resonant absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terradas, J.; Goossens, M.; Verth, G.

    2010-12-01

    Context. There is observational evidence of propagating kink waves driven by photospheric motions. These disturbances, interpreted as kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are attenuated as they propagate upwards in the solar corona. Aims: We show that resonant absorption provides a simple explanation to the spatial damping of these waves. Methods: Kink MHD waves are studied using a cylindrical model of solar magnetic flux tubes, which includes a non-uniform layer at the tube boundary. Assuming that the frequency is real and the longitudinal wavenumber complex, the damping length and damping per wavelength produced by resonant absorption are analytically calculated in the thin tube (TT) approximation, valid for coronal waves. This assumption is relaxed in the case of chromospheric tube waves and filament thread waves. Results: The damping length of propagating kink waves due to resonant absorption is a monotonically decreasing function of frequency. For kink waves with low frequencies, the damping length is exactly inversely proportional to frequency, and we denote this as the TGV relation. When moving to high frequencies, the TGV relation continues to be an exceptionally good approximation of the actual dependency of the damping length on frequency. This dependency means that resonant absorption is selective as it favours low-frequency waves and can efficiently remove high-frequency waves from a broad band spectrum of kink waves. The efficiency of the damping due to resonant absorption depends on the properties of the equilibrium model, in particular on the width of the non-uniform layer and the steepness of the variation in the local Alfvén speed. Conclusions: Resonant absorption is an effective mechanism for the spatial damping of propagating kink waves. It is selective because the damping length is inversely proportional to frequency so that the damping becomes more severe with increasing frequency. This means that radial inhomogeneity can cause solar

  18. Heating of solar chromosphere by electromagnetic wave absorption in a plasma slab model

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiklauri, D.; Pechhacker, R.

    2011-04-15

    The heating of solar chromospheric internetwork regions by means of the absorption of electromagnetic (EM) waves that originate from the photospheric blackbody radiation is studied in the framework of a plasma slab model. The absorption is provided by the electron-neutral collisions in which electrons oscillate in the EM wave field and electron-neutral collisions damp the EM wave. Given the uncertain nature of the collision cross-section due to the plasma microturbulence, it is shown that for plausible physical parameters, the heating flux produced by the absorption of EM waves in the chromosphere is between 20% and 45% of the chromospheric radiative loss flux requirement. It is also established that there is an optimal value for the collision cross-section, 5x10{sup -18} m{sup 2}, which produces the maximal heating flux of 1990 W m{sup -2}.

  19. A carbonyl iron/carbon fiber material for electromagnetic wave absorption.

    PubMed

    Youh, Meng-Jey; Wu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Wang-Hua; Chiu, Sheng-Cheng; Huang, Chien-Fa; Yu, Hsin-Chih; Hsu, Jen-Sung; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2011-03-01

    A carbonyl iron/carbon fiber material consisting of carbon fibers grown on micrometer-sized carbonyl iron sphere, was synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using a mixture of C2H2 and H2. The hollow-core carbon fibers (outer diameter: 140 nm and inner diameter: 40 nm) were composed of well-ordered graphene layers which were almost parallel to the long axis of the fibers. A composite (2 mm thick) consisting of the carbonyl iron/carbon fibers and epoxy resin demonstrated excellent electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption. Minimum reflection losses of -36 dB (99.95% of EM wave absorption) at 7.6 GHz and -32 dB (99.92% of EM wave absorption) at 34.1 GHz were achieved. The well-dispersed and network-like carbon fibers in the resin matrix affected the dielectric loss of the EM wave while the carbonyl iron affected the magnetic loss. PMID:21449387

  20. Evaluation of Coronal Shock Wave Velocities from the II Type Radio Bursts Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanin, V. V.; Isaeva, E. A.; Kravetz, R. O.

    The work presents the results of research of connection between the coronal shock waves and the parameters of type II (mII) meter-decameter bursts in 25-180 MHz band for 66 solar proton events. The velocities of coronal shock waves for this two cases where determined. In the first case the velocities of the shock waves was evaluated according to the Newkirck model and in the second case - directly from the type II radio burst parameters. The calculated values of shock waves velocity was compared with the same velocity values that is published on NGDC site. The comparative analysis showed that precision of coronal shock waves velocity estimation which gets directly from type II radio bursts parameters was higher than the same one which used the Newkirck model. Research showed that there is exist the sufficiently strong connection between the shock wave velocity and the delay of type II burst intensity maximum on the second harmonica. Correlation coefficient between the studied parameters was equal to ≍ 0.65.

  1. Antenna Construction & Propagation of Radio Waves, 5-1. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps, Washington, DC.

    These military-developed curriculum materials consist of five individualized, self-paced chapters dealing with antenna construction and propagation of radio waves. Covered in the individual lessons are the following topics: basic electricity; antenna transmission-line fundamentals; quarter-wave antennas, half-wave antennas, and associated radio…

  2. Non-Condensable Gas Absorption by Capillary Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2013-03-01

    Oceans and atmosphere are constantly exchanging heat and mass; this has a direct consequence on the climate. While these exchanges are inherently multi-scales, in non-breaking waves the smallest scales strongly govern the transfer rates at the ocean-atmosphere interface. The present experimental study aims at characterizing and quantifying the exchanges of non-condensable gas at a sub-millimeter scale, in the presence of capillary waves. In oceans, capillaries are generated by high winds and are also present on the forward face of short gravity waves. Capillary waves are thus present over a large fraction of the ocean surface, but their effect on interphase phenomena is little known. In the experiment, 2D capillary waves are generated by the relaxation of a shear layer at the surface of a laminar water slab jet. Wave profile is measured with Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) and 2D velocity field of the water below the surface is resolved with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Special optical arrangements coupled with high speed imaging allow 0.1 mm- and 0.1 ms- resolution. These data reveal the interaction of vorticity and free surface in the formation and evolution of capillaries. The effect of the capillaries on the transfer of oxygen from the ambient air to anoxic water is measured with another PLIF system. In this diagnostic, dissolved oxygen concentration field is indirectly measured using fluorescence quenching of Pyrenebutyric Acid (PBA). The three measurements performed simultaneously -surface profile, velocity field, and oxygen concentration- give deep physical insights into oxygen transfer mechanisms under capillary waves.

  3. Generation and Upper Atmospheric Propagation of Acoustic Gravity Waves according to Numerical Modeling and Radio Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorontsov, Artem; Andreeva, Elena; Nesterov, Ivan; Padokhin, Artem; Kurbatov, Grigory

    2016-04-01

    The acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) in the upper atmosphere and ionosphere can be generated by a variety of the phenomena in the near-Earth environment and atmosphere as well as by some perturbations of the Earth's ground or ocean surface. For instance, the role of the AGW sources can be played by the earthquakes, explosions, thermal heating, seisches, tsunami waves. We present the examples of AGWs excited by the tsunami waves traveling in the ocean, by seisches, and by ionospheric heating by the high-power radio wave. In the last case, the gravity waves are caused by the pulsed modulation of the heating wave. The AGW propagation in the upper atmosphere induces the variations and irregularities in the electron density distribution of the ionosphere, whose structure can be efficiently reconstructed by the method of the ionospheric radio tomography (RT) based on the data from the global navigational satellite systems (GNSS). The input data for RT diagnostics are composed of the 150/400 MHz radio signals from the low-orbiting (LO) satellites and 1.2-1.5 GHz radio signals from the high-orbiting (HO) satellites with their orbits at ~1000 and ~20000 km above the ground, respectively. These data enable ionospheric imaging on different spatiotemporal scales with different spatiotemporal resolution and coverage, which is suitable, inter alia, for tracking the waves and wave-like features in the ionosphere. In particular, we demonstrate the maps of the ionospheric responses to the tornado at Moore (Oklahoma, USA) of May 20, 2013, which are reconstructed from the HO data. We present the examples of LORT images containing the waves and wavelike disturbances associated with various sources (e.g., auroral precipitation and high-power heating of the ionosphere). We also discuss the results of modeling the AGW generation by the surface and volumetric sources. The millihertz AGW from these sources initiate the ionospheric perturbation with a typical scale of a few hundred km at the

  4. Resonance absorption of compressible magnetohydrodynamic waves at thin 'surfaces'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Yang, G.

    1988-01-01

    The behavior of plasma and fields in the transition layer supporting MHD surface waves is analyzed, assuming that the total pressure fluctuations, delta-P(tot), can be taken to be nearly constant across this thin transition layer, with a value nearly the same as would be obtained if the MHD wave were supported by a truly discontinuous surface. Regarding therefore delta-P(tot) as known, the plasma and field equations in the transition layer were cast into a form in which delta-P(tot) appeared as a driving term. Among the two resonances that appear (the cusp resonance and the Alfven resonance) special attention is given to the Alfven resonance, which affects the velocity and magnetic field components normal to the background magnetic field. The effects of three types of viscosity on the Alfven resonance are considered, and it is shown that energy is pumped out of the surface wave into thin layers surrounding the resonant field lines.

  5. Auto- and cross-correlation analysis of the QSOs radio wave intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demin, S. A.; Panischev, O. Yu; Nefedyev, Yu A.

    2015-12-01

    We discuss here the Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy approach to studying astrophysical systems, for example the radio wave intensity of quasi-stellar object (QSO) 1641+399 and BL Lacertae (BL Lac) 0215+015 in different frequency ranges. The presented method allows to parameterize the study dynamics using a short set of characteristics. The considering sources have a significant differences in manifesting the non-stationary effects, dynamical intermittency and synchronization. The radio wave intensity dynamics of the BL Lac 0215+015 is characterized by well-defined set of natural frequencies, persistent behavior with low effects of non-stationarity and high level of frequency-phase synchronization. For dynamics of the QSO 1641+399 reverse occurs including the asymmetrical structure of cross-correlator. Our findings show that using the flicker-noise spectroscopy approach to studying astrophysical objects allows to carry out the more detail analysis of their behavior and evolution.

  6. Gravitational-wave Constraints on the Progenitors of Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callister, Thomas; Kanner, Jonah; Weinstein, Alan

    2016-07-01

    The nature of fast radio bursts (FRBs) remains enigmatic. Highly energetic radio pulses of millisecond duration, FRBs are observed with dispersion measures consistent with an extragalactic source. A variety of models have been proposed to explain their origin. One popular class of theorized FRB progenitor is the coalescence of compact binaries composed of neutron stars and/or black holes. Such coalescence events are strong gravitational-wave emitters. We demonstrate that measurements made by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave observatories can be leveraged to severely constrain the validity of FRB binary coalescence models. Existing measurements constrain the binary black hole rate to approximately 5% of the FRB rate, and results from Advanced LIGO’s O1 and O2 observing runs may place similarly strong constraints on the fraction of FRBs due to binary neutron star and neutron star–black hole progenitors.

  7. An Overview of Observations by the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation at Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kaiser, M. L.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Roux, A.; Canu, P.; Zarka, P.; Tokarev, Y.

    2001-01-01

    On August 18, 1999, the Cassini spacecraft flew by Earth at an altitude of 1186 km on its way to Saturn. Although the flyby was performed exclusively to provide the spacecraft with sufficient velocity to get to Saturn, the radio and plasma wave science (RPWS) instrument, along with several others, was operated to gain valuable calibration data and to validate the operation of a number of capabilities. In addition, an opportunity to study the terrestrial radio and plasma wave environment with a highly capable instrument on a swift fly-through of the magnetosphere was afforded by the encounter. This paper provides an overview of the RPWS observations, at Earth, including the identification of a number of magnetospheric plasma wave modes, an accurate measurement of the plasma density over a significant portion of the trajectory using the natural wave spectrum in addition to a relaxation sounder and Langmuir probe, the detection of natural and human-produced radio emissions, and the validation of the capability to measure the wave normal angle and Poynting flux of whistler-mode chorus emissions. The results include the observation of a double-banded structure at closest' approach including a band of Cerenkov emission bounded by electron plasma and upper hybrid frequencies and an electron cyclotron harmonic band just above the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency. In the near-Earth plasma sheet, evidence for electron phase space holes is observed, similar to those first reported by Geotail in the magnetotail. The wave normal analysis confirms the Polar result that chorus is generated very close to the magnetic equator and propagates to higher latitudes. The integrated power flux of auroral kilometric radiation is also used to identify a series of substorms observed during the outbound passage through the magnetotail.

  8. Detectable radio flares following gravitational waves from mergers of binary neutron stars.

    PubMed

    Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-10-01

    Mergers of neutron-star/neutron-star binaries are strong sources of gravitational waves. They can also launch subrelativistic and mildly relativistic outflows and are often assumed to be the sources of short γ-ray bursts. An electromagnetic signature that persisted for weeks to months after the event would strengthen any future claim of a detection of gravitational waves. Here we present results of calculations showing that the interaction of mildly relativistic outflows with the surrounding medium produces radio flares with peak emission at 1.4 gigahertz that persist at detectable (submillijansky) levels for weeks, out to a redshift of 0.1. Slower subrelativistic outflows produce flares detectable for years at 150 megahertz, as well as at 1.4 gigahertz, from slightly shorter distances. The radio transient RT 19870422 (ref. 11) has the properties predicted by our model, and its most probable origin is the merger of a compact neutron-star/neutron-star binary. The lack of radio detections usually associated with short γ-ray bursts does not constrain the radio transients that we discuss here (from mildly relativistic and subrelativistic outflows) because short γ-ray burst redshifts are typically >0.1 and the appropriate timescales (longer than weeks) have not been sampled. PMID:21964342

  9. Evidence for four- and three-wave interactions in solar type III radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Bergamo, M.

    2013-08-01

    The high time resolution observations obtained by the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in the source regions of solar type III radio bursts, Langmuir waves often occur as intense localized wave packets with short durations of only few ms. One of these wave packets shows that it is a three-dimensional field structure with WLneTe ~ 10-3, where WL is the peak energy density, and ne and Te are the electron density and temperature, respectively. For this wave packet, the conditions of the oscillating two-stream instability (OTSI) and supersonic collapse are satisfied within the error range of determination of main parameters. The density cavity, observed during this wave packet indicates that its depth, width and temporal coincidence are consistent with those of a caviton, generated by the ponderomotive force of the collapsing wave packet. The spectrum of each of the parallel and perpendicular components of the wave packet contains a primary peak at fpe, two secondary peaks at fpe ± fS and a low-frequency enhancement below fS, which, as indicated by the frequency and wave number resonance conditions, and the fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based tricoherence spectral peak at (fpe, fpe, fpe + fS, fpe - fS), are coupled to each other by the OTSI type of four-wave interaction (fpe is the local electron plasma frequency and fS is the frequency of ion sound waves). In addition to the primary peak at fpe, each of these spectra also contains a peak at 2fpe, which as indicated by the frequency and wave number resonance conditions, and the wavelet-based bicoherence spectral peak at (fpe, fpe), appears to correspond to the second harmonic electromagnetic waves generated as a result of coalescence of oppositely propagating sidebands excited by the OTSI. Thus, these observations for

  10. On the determination of gravity wave momentum flux from GPS radio occultation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, A.; Llamedo, P.; Schmidt, T.; de la Torre, A.; Wickert, J.

    2013-11-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) is a well-established technique for obtaining global gravity wave (GW) information. RO uses GPS signals received by low Earth-orbiting satellites for atmospheric limb sounding. Temperature profiles are derived with high vertical resolution and provide a global coverage under any weather conditions, offering the possibility of global monitoring of the vertical temperature structure and atmospheric wave parameters. The six-satellite constellation COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 delivers approximately 2000 temperature profiles daily. In this study, we use a method to obtain global distributions of horizontal gravity wave wavelengths, to be applied in the determination of the vertical flux of horizontal momentum transported by gravity waves. Here, a method for the determination of the real horizontal wavelength from three vertical profiles is applied to the COSMIC data. The horizontal and vertical wavelength, the specific potential energy (Ep), and the vertical flux of horizontal momentum (MF) are calculated and their global distribution is discussed.

  11. Experimental comparison between centimeter- and millimeter-wave ultrawideband radio channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Ingles, Maria-Teresa; Molina-Garcia-Pardo, Jose-Maria; Rodríguez, José-Víctor; Pascual-García, Juan; Juan-Llácer, Leandro

    2014-06-01

    This paper analyzes radio wave propagation phenomena at two very different frequency bands: 2-10 GHz (centimeter wave) and 57-66 GHz (millimeter wave (mm-W)). The two frequency bands have been measured using the same equipment and under similar propagation conditions, such as path loss, root-mean-square delay spread, maximum excess delay, and Rician K factor, and their respective correlations compared. Obstructed line of sight situations have also been considered by using metal and cardboard obstructions. The statistical distributions, main specular reflections, and decay factors have been found similar for the two bands. However, the measured path loss, correlation in terms of electrical distances, and the K factor are higher for the millimeter-wave frequency band. Indeed, the importance of propagation mechanism changes from one band to the other, which must be considered in the design of future mm-W systems.

  12. Phase Coupling in Langmuir Wave Packets: Evidence for Four Wave Interactions in Solar Type III Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    The four wave interaction process, known as the oscillating two stream instability (OTSI) is considered as one of the mechanisms responsible for stabilizing the electron beams associated with solar type III radio bursts. It has been reported that (1) an intense localized Langmuir wave packet associated with a type III burst contains the spectral characteristics of the OTSI: (a) a resonant peak at the local electron plasma frequency, f(sub pe), (b) a Stokes peak at a frequency slightly lower than f(sub pe), (c) anti-Stokes peak at a frequency slightly higher than f(sub pe), and (d) a low frequency enhancement below a few hundred Hz, (2) the frequencies and wave numbers of these spectral components satisfy the resonance conditions of the OTSI, and (3) the peak intensity of the wave packet is well above the thresholds for the OTSI as well as spatial collapse of envelope solitons. Here, for the first time, applying the trispectral analysis on this wave packet, we show that the tricoherence, which measures the degree of coherent four-wave coupling amongst the observed spectral components exhibits a peak. This provides an additional evidence for the OTSI and related spatial collapse of Langmuir envelope solitons in type III burst sources.

  13. Radio wave refraction caused by artificial disturbances of the ionosphere - A numerical experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, V. B.; Svistunov, K. V.

    The method of trajectory calculations is used to study short-wave propagation in the ionosphere, in the presence of large-scale inhomogeneities, due to plasma heating by means of high-power transmissions. It is shown that the refraction caused by the artificial disturbances can result in variations of the radio path distances, the occurrence of ricochet trajectories, and the focusing and defocusing of the radiation.

  14. High performance superconducting radio frequency ingot niobium technology for continuous wave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati Ciovati, Gianluigi Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2015-12-04

    Future continuous wave (CW) accelerators require the superconducting radio frequency cavities with high quality factor and medium accelerating gradients (≤20 MV/m). Ingot niobium cavities with medium purity fulfill the specifications of both accelerating gradient and high quality factor with simple processing techniques and potential reduction in cost. This contribution reviews the current superconducting radiofrequency research and development and outlines the potential benefits of using ingot niobium technology for CW applications.

  15. A Minimal Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation For a Mercury Orbiter Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.

    2001-01-01

    The primary thrust of the effort at The University of Iowa for the definition of an orbiter mission to Mercury is a minimum viable radio and plasma wave investigation. While it is simple to add sensors and capability to any payload, the challenge is to do reasonable science within limited resources; and viable missions to Mercury are especially limited in payload mass. For a wave investigation, this is a serious concern, as the sensor mass often makes up a significant fraction of the instrumentation mass.

  16. Focus Adjustment System of Laser Probe for Radio Frequency Surface and Bulk Acoustic Wave Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Kashiwa, Keisuke; Hashimoto, Ken-ya; Omori, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Masatsune; Kasai, Naoki

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we describe a focus adjustment system designed especially for a fast-mechanical-scanning laser probe for radio-frequency surface and bulk acoustic wave devices. When high spatial resolution is necessary for the observation, one needs an objective lens of large magnifying power with extremely shallow focal depth. Then, a small inclination of a measurement device may cause severe defocus resulting in blurred images. We installed the focus adjustment system in the laser probe, and showed that even with inclination, high-quality information of the wave field can be acquired without reducing the scanning speed.

  17. Search for non-thermal radio emission from Eta Carina's outer blast wave with ATCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohm, Stefan; Urquhart, James; Skilton, Joanna Lucy; Hinton, Jim; Domainko, Wilfried

    2010-10-01

    Non-thermal hard X-ray and high-energy (HE; 1 MeV < E < 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission in the direction of Eta Carina has been recently detected using the INTEGRAL, AGILE and Fermi satellites. This emission can be either interpreted in the framework of particle acceleration in the colliding wind region between the two massive stars or in the very fast moving blast wave which originates in the historical 1843 "Great Eruption". The detection of a radio shell at the location of the shock would support the latter scenario and confirm Eta Carina as prime example of a new source type, namely, an LBV star whose massive ejecta accelerates electrons to non-thermal energies. While Fermi and INTEGRAL do not provide sufficient angular resolution to resolve the blast wave, high resolution radio observations using ATCA will be able to test non-thermal radio emission from this acceleration site. The current sensitivity of ATCA is such that a relatively modest observation time of 12 hours will be sufficient to image the synchrotron emission from the blast region down to magnetic field strengths well below typical ISM values and hence prove or reject our blast-wave hypothesis for the high energy emission.

  18. Influence of tropical F region in ionosphere on propagation of short radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomiytsev, O. P.; Savchenko, P. P.

    1985-05-01

    Tropical ionospheric waveguides in the presence of stratification of the electron concentration maximum were studied. Under these conditions a specific form of vertical electron concentration profile is formed which to a great extent determines the nature and conditions of propagation of short radio waves in the low latitudes. The phase trajectories were computed for a spherically stratified ionosphere. Three approaches for description of the ionospheric waveguide were used: comparative, temporal, latitudinal. Examples of computations are given which show that in a wide spatial-temporal range in the tropical ionosphere there is an additional ionospheric waveguide in which radio waves can be propagated along ricochetting trajectories. At identical time there can be three types of phases trajectories or three types of adjacent channels, each of which is characterized by a definite working frequency and definite conditions for the propagation of radio waves in it. The computations presented give a qualitative representation of the influence of stratification of the electron concentration on the formation, dynamics and degeneration of the additional ionospheric waveguides in the tropical latitudes.

  19. Fokker-Planck description of the scattering of radio frequency waves at the plasma edge

    SciTech Connect

    Hizanidis, Kyriakos; Kominis, Yannis; Tsironis, Christos; Ram, Abhay K.

    2010-02-15

    In magnetic fusion devices, radio frequency (rf) waves in the electron cyclotron (EC) and lower hybrid (LH) range of frequencies are being commonly used to modify the plasma current profile. In ITER, EC waves are expected to stabilize the neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) by providing current in the island region [R. Aymar et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1301 (2001)]. The appearance of NTMs severely limits the plasma pressure and leads to the degradation of plasma confinement. LH waves could be used in ITER to modify the current profile closer to the edge of the plasma. These rf waves propagate from the excitation structures to the core of the plasma through an edge region, which is characterized by turbulence--in particular, density fluctuations. These fluctuations, in the form of blobs, can modify the propagation properties of the waves by refraction. In this paper, the effect on rf due to randomly distributed blobs in the edge region is studied. The waves are represented as geometric optics rays and the refractive scattering from a distribution of blobs is formulated as a Fokker-Planck equation. The scattering can have two diffusive effects--one in real space and the other in wave vector space. The scattering can modify the trajectory of rays into the plasma and it can affect the wave vector spectrum. The refraction of EC waves, for example, could make them miss the intended target region where the NTMs occur. The broadening of the wave vector spectrum could broaden the wave generated current profile. The Fokker-Planck formalism for diffusion in real space and wave vector space is used to study the effect of density blobs on EC and LH waves in an ITER type of plasma environment. For EC waves the refractive effects become important since the distance of propagation from the edge to the core in ITER is of the order of a meter. The diffusion in wave vector space is small. For LH waves the refractive effects are insignificant but the diffusion in wave vector space is

  20. Experimental observations of the spatial structure of wave-like disturbances generated in midlatitude ionosphere by high power radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunitsyn, V.; Andreeva, E.; Padokhin, A. M.; Nazarenko, M.; Frolov, V.; Komrakov, G.; Bolotin, I.

    2012-12-01

    We present the results of the experiments carried out in 2009-2012 on the Sura heating facility (Radio Physical Research Institute, N. Novgorod, Russia) on modification of the midlatitude ionosphere by powerful HF radiowaves. The experiments were conducted using O-mode radiowaves at frequencies lower than critical frequency of the ionospheric F2 layer both in daytime and nighttime ionosphere. Various schemes of the radiation of the heating wave were used including square wave modulation of the effective radiated power (ERP) at various frequencies and power stepping. Radio transmissions of the low- (Parus/Tsikada) and high-orbital (GPS/GLONASS) navigational satellites received at the mobile network of receiving sites were used for the remote sensing of the heated area of the ionosphere. The variations in the slant total electron content (TEC), which are proportional to the reduced phase of navigational signals, were studied for the satellite passes for which ionospheric penetration points crossed the disturbed area during HF heating. The variations in TEC caused by HF heating are identified in a number of examples. It is shown that the GNSS TEC spectra contain frequency components corresponding to the modulation periods of the ERP of the heating wave. The manifestations of the heating-induced variations in TEC are most prominent in the area of magnetic zenith of the pumping wave. Different behavior of TEC variations was observed during nighttime and daytime heating experiments. In daytime conditions the pump wave switched ON causes the increase of TEC while in the nighttime it causes a decrease in TEC. This can be explained by the different contribution of the processes responsible for the increase and decrease of TEC in daytime in nighttime conditions. In this work we also present the first time radiotomographic reconstructions of the spatial structure of the wave-like disturbances, generated in the ionosphere by high-power radio waves radiated by the Sura heater

  1. 21 cm absorption by compact hydrogen discs around black holes in radio-loud nuclei of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Loeb, Abraham

    2008-05-15

    The clumpy maser discs observed in some galactic nuclei mark the outskirts of the accretion disc that fuels the central black hole and provide a potential site of nuclear star formation. Unfortunately, most of the gas in maser discs is currently not being probed; large maser gains favor paths that are characterized by a small velocity gradient and require rare edge-on orientations of the disc. Here we propose a method for mapping the atomic hydrogen distribution in nuclear discs through its 21 cm absorption against the radio continuum glow around the central black hole. In NGC 4258, the 21 cm optical depth may approach unity for high angular resolution (VLBI) imaging of coherent clumps which are dominated by thermal broadening and have the column density inferred from x-ray absorption data, {approx}10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}. Spreading the 21 cm absorption over the full rotation velocity width of the material in front of the narrow radio jets gives a mean optical depth of {approx}0.1. Spectroscopic searches for the 21 cm absorption feature in other galaxies can be used to identify the large population of inclined gaseous discs which are not masing in our direction. Follow-up imaging of 21 cm silhouettes of accelerating clumps within these discs can in turn be used to measure cosmological distances.

  2. An estimation of the LF-MF high latitude communication radio lines range on surface electromagnetic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkuev, Yu. B.; Dembelov, M. G.; Angarkhaeva, L. Kh.; Naguslaeva, I. B.; Khaptanov, V. B.; Buyanova, D. G.

    2015-11-01

    The paper is devoted to estimation of the LF-MF high latitude communication radio lines range on surface electromagnetic waves (SEW). A surface impedance of sea areas of water in summer and winter time is considered. An example of calculations of the ground wave field over inhomogeneous impedance paths including stratified inhomogeneous structure "ice-sea" is given. It is shown that due to the emergence of SEW the Arctic radio lines range increases significantly.

  3. Effect exerted by a radio wave electromagnetic field on the rheological properties of water and portland-cement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azharonok, V. V.; Belous, N. Kh.; Rodtsevich, S. P.; Koshevar, V. D.; Shkadretsova, V. G.; Goncharik, S. V.; Chubrik, N. I.; Orlovich, A. I.

    2013-09-01

    We have studied the effect of the regimes of high-frequency (radio wave) electromagnetic treatment of gauging water on the process of structurization and on the technological characteristics of portland-cement systems. It has been established that the radio wave electromagnetic activation of water leads to a reduction in its surface tension, dynamic viscosity, and shear stress, as well as intensifies the formation of coagulation structures in a portlandcement slurry and aids in increasing the mobility of cement-sand mixtures.

  4. Absorption of THz electromagnetic wave in two mono-layers of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Cole B.; Shoufie Ukhtary, M.; Saito, Riichiro

    2016-05-01

    Nearly 100% absorption of an electromagnetic (EM) wave in terahertz (THz) frequency is proposed for a system consisting of two mono-layers of graphene. Here, we demonstrate that the system can almost perfectly absorb an EM wave with frequency of 2 THz, even though we have a low electron mobility of roughly 1000 cm2  Vs‑1. The absorption probability is calculated by using the transfer matrix method. We show that the two mono-layers of the graphene system is needed to obtain nearly 100% absorption when the graphene has a relatively low Fermi energy. The absorption dependence on the distance between the graphene layers is also discussed.

  5. Frequency correlation of probe waves backscattered from small scale ionospheric irregularities generated by high power HF radio waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puchkov, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    Aspect sensitive scattering of multi-frequency probe signals by artificial, magnetic field aligned density irregularities (with transverse size ∼ 1- 10 m) generated in the ionosphere by powerful radio waves is considered. Fluctuations of received signals depending on stochastic properties of the irregularities are calculated. It is shown that in the case of HF probe waves two mechanisms may contribute to the scattered signal fluctuations. The first one is due to the propagation of probe waves in the ionospheric plasma as in a randomly inhomogeneous medium. The second one lies in non-stationary stochastic behavior of irregularities which satisfy the Bragg conditions for the scattering geometry and therefore constitute centers of scattering. In the probe wave frequency band of the order of 10-100 MHz the second mechanism dominates which delivers opportunity to recover some properties of artificial irregularities from received signals. Correlation function of backscattered probe waves with close frequencies is calculated, and it is shown that detailed spatial distribution of irregularities along the scattering vector can be found experimentally from observations of this correlation function.

  6. Radial distribution of compressive waves in the solar corona revealed by Akatsuki radio occultation observations

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Mayu; Imamura, Takeshi; Ando, Hiroki; Toda, Tomoaki; Nakamura, Masato; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Shiota, Daikou; Isobe, Hiroaki; Asai, Ayumi; Häusler, Bernd; Pätzold, Martin; Nabatov, Alexander

    2014-12-10

    Radial variations of the amplitude and the energy flux of compressive waves in the solar corona were explored for the first time using a spacecraft radio occultation technique. By applying wavelet analysis to the frequency time series taken at heliocentric distances of 1.5-20.5 R{sub S} (solar radii), quasi-periodic density disturbances were detected at almost all distances. The period ranges from 100 to 2000 s. The amplitude of the fractional density fluctuation increases with distance and reaches ∼30% around 5 R{sub S} , implying that nonlinearity of the wave field is potentially important. We further estimate the wave energy flux on the assumption that the observed periodical fluctuations are manifestations of acoustic waves. The energy flux increases with distance below ∼6 R{sub S} and seems to saturate above this height, suggesting that the acoustic waves do not propagate from the low corona but are generated in the extended corona, probably through nonlinear dissipation of Alfvén waves. The compressive waves should eventually dissipate through shock generation to heat the corona.

  7. Estimated errors in a global gravity wave climatology from GPS radio occultation temperature profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre, A.; Llamedo, P.; Alexander, P.; Schmidt, T.; Wickert, J.

    2010-07-01

    In a previous paper by Schmidt et al. (2008), from CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation data, a comparison was made between a Gaussian filter applied to the "complete" temperature profile and to its "separate" tropospheric and stratospheric height intervals, for gravity wave analyses. It was found that the separate filtering method considerably reduces a wave activity artificial enhancement near the tropopause, presumably due to the isolation process of the wave component. We now propose a simple approach to estimate the uncertainty in the calculation of the mean specific wave potential energy content, due exclusively to the filtering process of vertical temperature profiles, independently of the experimental origin of the data. The approach is developed through a statistical simulation, built up from the superposition of synthetic wave perturbations. These are adjusted by a recent gravity wave (GW) climatology and temperature profiles from reanalyses. A systematic overestimation of the mean specific wave potential energy content is detected and its variability with latitude, altitude, season and averaging height interval is highlighted.

  8. Transformation and absorption of magnetosonic waves generated by solar wind in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Resonant transformation of fast magnetosonic (FMS) wave flux into Alfven and slow magnetosonic (SMS) oscillations is investigated in the one-dimensionally inhomogeneous magnetosphere. Spatial distribution of energy absorption rate of FMS oscillations penetrating into the magnetosphere from the solar wind is studied. The FMS wave energy absorption rate caused by magnetosonic resonance excitation is shown to be several orders of magnitude greater than that caused by Alfven resonance excitation at the same surface. It is connected with the spectrum of incident FMS waves. The Kolmogorov spectrum is used in numerical calculations. Magnitude of the Fourier harmonics exciting resonant Alfven oscillations is much smaller than that of the harmonics driving lower-frequency magnetosonic resonance. It is shown that resonant transformation of FMS waves into SMS oscillations can be an effective mechanism of energy transfer from the solar wind to the magnetosphere.

  9. Computational strategy for modeling radio wave propagation in lossy circular waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Ronald; Cai, D Michael

    2008-01-01

    The propagation of radio waves in lossy waveguides and tunnels has been researched extensively for many years as can be seen in the detailed book by Wait. The mathematics used to model waveguides for communications is essentially the same as that needed to model radio frequency (RF) propagation in simple tunnels. The presence or lack of conductors inside a waveguide or tunnel is a key driver in the nature of the solutions one will find for a particular application, Delogne. When there are conductors passing through a waveguide or tunnel, the simplest modes of propagation are surface-guided waves following the conductor and typically enabling long-range transmission. A tunnel containing a core conductor can act rather like a coaxial cable, propagating waves at a nearly constant speed, regardless of frequency. Conversely, a tunnel or waveguide without internal conductors is subject to very different wave patterns, resulting in a much more complex propagation analysis. Holloway et al. presented an exhaustive study of RF propagation in circular structures embedded in lossy surroundings. The work of Holloway et al. is the basis for this paper, where we discuss application of their computational techniques and present refinements gleaned from our work on similar problems.

  10. Millimeter and terahertz wave absorption in a lossy conducting layer

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, M. K.; Chiang, W. Y.; Wu, K. L.; Chu, K. R.

    2013-10-15

    Relativistic electronics research in recent years has produced powerful millimeter waves on the MW level, while also extending the frequency range into the terahertz (THz) region and beyond. These developments have opened up new horizons in applications. The current study is motivated by the associated need for high-power absorbers not readily available at such frequencies. Our focus is on effective absorber schemes which can handle high power while also possessing a structural simplicity for easy implementation. In and above the THz region, the electrical conductivity can no longer be treated as a real constant. We begin with a derivation of the field penetration depth applicable to all frequencies. Requirements to meet the intended criteria are then determined from the wave penetration and reflection properties. Design examples in the 1–1000 GHz range are illustrated, which consist of a thin lossy conducting layer on the surface of a pyramidal shaped metal base. It is shown in theory that such structures can function effectively in the millimeter and THz regions.

  11. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF ABSORPTION, LOCAL SUPPRESSION, AND EMISSIVITY REDUCTION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES IN MAGNETIC REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, D.-Y.; Yang, M.-H.; Zhao Hui; Liang Zhichao; Sun, M.-T.

    2009-11-20

    Observed acoustic power in magnetic regions is lower than the quiet Sun because of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of solar acoustic waves in magnetic regions. In the previous studies, we have developed a method to measure the coefficients of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of sunspots. In this study, we go one step further to measure the spatial distributions of three coefficients in two active regions, NOAA 9055 and 9057. The maps of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression coefficients correlate with the magnetic map, including plage regions, except the emissivity reduction coefficient of NOAA 9055 where the emissivity reduction coefficient is too weak and lost among the noise.

  12. Ion Acoustic Wave Frequencies and Onset Times During Type 3 Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Conflicting interpretations exist for the low-frequency ion acoustic (S) waves often observed by ISEE 3 in association with intense Langmuir (L) waves in the source regions of type III solar radio bursts near 1 AU. Two indirect lines of observational evidence, as well as plasma theory, suggest they are produced by the electrostatic (ES) decay L yields L(PRIME) + S. However, contrary to theoretical predictions, an existing analysis of the wave frequencies instead favors the electromagnetic (EM) decays L yields T + S, where T denotes an EM wave near the plasma frequency. This conflict is addressed here by comparing the observed wave frequencies and onset times with theoretical predictions for the ES and EM decays, calculated using the time-variable electron beam and magnetic field orientation data, rather than the nominal values used previously. Field orientation effects and beam speed variations are shown analytically to produce factor-of-three effects, greater than the difference in wave frequencies predicted for the ES and EM decays; effects of similar magnitude occur in the events analyzed here. The S-wave signals are extracted by hand from a sawtooth noise background, greatly improving the association between S waves and intense L waves. Very good agreement exists between the time-varying predictions for the ES decay and the frequencies of most (but not all) wave bursts. The waves occur only after the ES decay becomes kinematically allowed, which is consistent with the ES decay proceeding and producing most of the observed signals. Good agreement exists between the EM decay's predictions and a significant fraction of the S-wave observations while the EM decay is kinematically allowed. The wave data are not consistent, however, with the EM decay being the dominant nonlinear process. Often the observed waves are sufficiently broadband to overlap simultaneously the frequency ranges predicted for the ES and EM decays. Coupling the dominance of the ES decay with this

  13. Verification of particle simulation of radio frequency waves in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kuley, Animesh; Lin, Z.; Wang, Z. X.; Wessel, F.

    2013-10-15

    Radio frequency (RF) waves can provide heating, current and flow drive, as well as instability control for steady state operations of fusion experiments. A particle simulation model has been developed in this work to provide a first-principles tool for studying the RF nonlinear interactions with plasmas. In this model, ions are considered as fully kinetic particles using the Vlasov equation and electrons are treated as guiding centers using the drift kinetic equation. This model has been implemented in a global gyrokinetic toroidal code using real electron-to-ion mass ratio. To verify the model, linear simulations of ion plasma oscillation, ion Bernstein wave, and lower hybrid wave are carried out in cylindrical geometry and found to agree well with analytic predictions.

  14. Long-term Measurements of Nighttime LF Radio Wave Reflection Heights over Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, C.; Kürschner, D.

    2005-05-01

    The nighttime ionospheric absolute reflection height of low-frequency (LF) radio waves at oblique incidence has been measured continuously since late 1982 using 1.8kHz sideband phase comparisons between the sky wave and the ground wave of a commercial 177kHz LF transmitter. The dataset allows the analysis of long-term trends and other regular variations of the reflection height. Beside the clear signal of the 11-year solar cycle a quasi-biennial oscillation is visible in LF reflection heights, which is correlated to the equatorial stratospheric wind field. A long-term decreasing reflection height trend is found, confirming results from other measurements and theoretical estimations. The results can be interpreted as a long-term decrease of the height levels of fixed electron density in the lower E region, reflecting a long-term cooling trend of the middle atmosphere.

  15. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSORPTION, EMISSIVITY REDUCTION, AND LOCAL SUPPRESSION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES IN SUNSPOTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, D.-Y.; Liang, Z.-C.; Yang, M.-H.; Zhao Hui; Sun, M.-T.

    2009-05-01

    The power of solar acoustic waves in magnetic regions is lower relative to the quiet Sun. Absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of acoustic waves contribute to the observed power reduction in magnetic regions. We propose a model for the energy budget of acoustic waves propagating through a sunspot in terms of the coefficients of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of the sunspot. Using the property that the waves emitted along the wave path between two points have no correlation with the signal at the starting point, we can separate the effects of these three mechanisms. Applying this method to helioseismic data filtered with direction and phase-velocity filters, we measure the fraction of the contribution of each mechanism to the power deficit in the umbra of the leading sunspot of NOAA 9057. The contribution from absorption is 23.3 {+-} 1.3%, emissivity reduction 8.2 {+-} 1.4%, and local suppression 68.5 {+-} 1.5%, for a wave packet corresponding to a phase velocity of 6.98 x 10{sup -5} rad s{sup -1}.

  16. An Experiment Study of the Propagation of Radio Waves in a Scaled Model of Long-Wall Coal Mining Tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Han, G.R.; Zhang, W.M.; Zhang, Y.P.

    2009-07-01

    A long-wall coal mining tunnel is the most important working area in a coal mine. It has long been realized that radio communications can improve both productivity and safety in this dangerous area. Hence, many attempts to use radio communications in such an environment have been made. Unfortunately, no radio system has satisfactorily provided communication services there, which, we believe, is partially due to poor understanding of the propagation characteristics of radio waves in the long-wall mining tunnel. To have deeper physical insight into the propagation problem, a scaled model of the long-wall mining tunnel was built, and the propagation characteristics of UHF radio waves were measured. The experiment and the measured results are presented and discussed.

  17. Full-wave reflection of lightning long-wave radio pulses from the ionospheric D- region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Shao, X.; Holzworth, R.

    2008-12-01

    A model is developed for calculating ionospheric reflection of electromagnetic pulses emitted by lightning, with most energy in the long-wave spectral region (f = 3 - 100 kHz). The building-block of the calculation is a differential-equation full-wave solution of Maxwell's Equations for the complex reflection of individual plane waves incident from below, by the anisotropic, dissipative, diffuse dielectric profile of the lower ionosphere. This full-wave solution is then put into a summation over plane waves in an angular Direct Fourier Transform to obtain the reflection properties of curved wavefronts. This step models also the diffraction effects of long- wave ionospheric reflections observed at short or medium range (200 - 500 km). The calculation can be done with any arbitrary but smooth dielectric profile versus altitude. For an initial test, we use the classic D- region exponential profiles of electron density and collision rate given by Wait. With even these simple profiles, our model of full-wave reflection of curved wavefronts captures some of the basic attributes of observed reflected waveforms recorded with the Los Alamos Sferic Array.

  18. Involuntary human hand movements due to FM radio waves in a moving van.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, P; Savinainen, A; Hänninen, Osmo; Myllylä, R

    2011-06-01

    Finland TRACT Involuntary movements of hands in a moving van on a public road were studied to clarify the possible role of frequency modulated radio waves on driving. The signals were measured in a direct 2 km test segment of an international road during repeated drives to both directions. Test subjects (n=4) had an ability to sense radio frequency field intensity variations of the environment. They were sitting in a minivan with arm movement detectors in their hands. A potentiometer was used to register the hand movements to a computer which simultaneously collected data on the amplitude of the RF signal of the local FM tower 30 km distance at a frequency of about 100 MHz. Involuntary hand movements of the test subjects correlated with electromagnetic field, i.e. FM radio wave intensity measured. They reacted also on the place of a geomagnetic anomaly crossing the road, which was found on the basis of these recordings and confirmed by the public geological maps of the area.In conclusion, RF irradiation seems to affect the human hand reflexes of sensitive persons in a moving van along a normal public road which may have significance in traffic safety. PMID:21616774

  19. Peculiarities of long-wave radio bursts from solar flares preceding strong geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokudina, V. S.; Kuril'Chik, V. N.; Yermolaev, Yu. I.; Kudela, K.; Slivka, M.

    2009-02-01

    Radio bursts in the frequency range of 100-1500 kHz, recorded in 1997-2000 on the INTERBALL-1 satellite during the solar flares preceding the strong geomagnetic storms with D st < -100 nT, are analyzed in this paper. The observed long-wave III-type radio bursts of solar origin at frequencies of 1460 and 780 kHz were characterized by large values of the flux S f = 10-15 -10-17 W/m2 Hz and duration longer than 10 min. The rapid frequency drift of a modulated radio burst continued up to a frequency of 250 kHz, which testified that the exciting agent (a beam of energetic electrons) propagated from the Sun to the Earth. All such flares were characterized by the appearance of halo coronal mass ejections, observed by the LASCO/ SOHO, and by the presence of a southward Bz-component of the IMF, measured on the ACE and WIND spacecraft. In addition, shortly after radio bursts, the INTERBALL-1 satellite has recorded the fluxes of energetic electrons with E > 40 keV.

  20. Guided-wave approaches to spectrally selective energy absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegeman, G. I.; Burke, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Results of experiments designed to demonstrate spectrally selective absorption in dielectric waveguides on semiconductor substrates are reported. These experiments were conducted with three waveguides formed by sputtering films of PSK2 glass onto silicon-oxide layers grown on silicon substrates. The three waveguide samples were studied at 633 and 532 nm. The samples differed only in the thickness of the silicon-oxide layer, specifically 256 nm, 506 nm, and 740 nm. Agreement between theoretical predictions and measurements of propagation constants (mode angles) of the six or seven modes supported by these samples was excellent. However, the loss measurements were inconclusive because of high scattering losses in the structures fabricated (in excess of 10 dB/cm). Theoretical calculations indicated that the power distribution among all the modes supported by these structures will reach its steady state value after a propagation length of only 1 mm. Accordingly, the measured loss rates were found to be almost independent of which mode was initially excited. The excellent agreement between theory and experiment leads to the conclusion that low loss waveguides confirm the predicted loss rates.

  1. Scattering of radio frequency waves by cylindrical density filaments in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Abhay K.; Hizanidis, Kyriakos

    2016-02-01

    In tokamak fusion plasmas, coherent fluctuations in the form of blobs or filaments are routinely observed in the scrape-off layer. Radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic waves, excited by antenna structures placed near the wall of a tokamak, have to propagate through the scrape-off layer before reaching the core of the plasma. While the effect of fluctuations on the properties of RF waves has not been quantified experimentally, it is of interest to carry out a theoretical study to determine if fluctuations can affect the propagation characteristics of RF waves. Usually, the difference between the plasma density inside the filament and the background plasma density is sizable, the ratio of the density difference to the background density being of order one. Generally, this precludes the use of geometrical optics in determining the effect of fluctuations, since the relevant ratio has to be much less than one, typically, of the order of 10% or less. In this paper, a full-wave, analytical model is developed for the scattering of a RF plane wave by a cylindrical plasma filament. It is assumed that the plasma inside and outside the filament is cold and uniform and that the major axis of the filament is aligned along the toroidal magnetic field. The ratio of the density inside the filament to the density of the background plasma is not restricted. The theoretical framework applies to the scattering of any cold plasma wave. In order to satisfy the boundary conditions at the interface between the filament and the background plasma, the electromagnetic fields inside and outside the filament need to have the same k∥ , the wave vector parallel to the ambient magnetic field, as the incident plane wave. Consequently, in contrast to the scattering of a RF wave by a spherical blob [Ram et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 056110-1-056110-10 (2013)], the scattering by a field-aligned filament does not broaden the k∥ spectrum. However, the filament induces side-scattering leading to surface

  2. HF Radio Wave Propagation in the Ionosphere Observed with the ePOP RRI (Radio Receiver Instrument) -- SuperDARN Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussey, G. C.; Gillies, R. G.; Ridley, C. G.; Yau, A. W.; McWilliams, K. A.; Sofko, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) on the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (ePOP) scientific payload of the recently launched CSA (Canadian Space Agency) CASSIOPE (Cascade Demonstrator Small-Sat and Ionospheric Polar Explorer) satellite mission and the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) of HF radars have successfully executed a number of experiments since the launch of ePOP in late September, 2013. This presentation investigates the propagation delays and timing associated with HF radio waves transversing the plasma in the terrestrial ionosphere. Both the relative and absolute timing of the co-ordinated SuperDARN-RRI experiments will be presented. This knowledge is essential for interpreting HF radio wave propagation effects such as range accuracy, mode-splitting and timing, Doppler shift, and delayed 'echo' signatures, for example.

  3. Beat-type Langmuir wave emissions associated with a type III solar radio burst: Evidence of parametric decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Recent measurements from the plasma wave instrument on the Galileo spacecraft have shown that Langmuir waves observed in conjunction with a type III solar radio burst contain many beat-type waveforms, with beat frequencies ranging from about 150 to 650 Hz. Strong evidence exists that the beat pattern is produced by two closely spaced narrowband components. The most likely candidates for these two waves are a beam-generated Langmuir wave and an oppositely propagating Langmuir wave produced by parametric decay. In the parametric decay process, nonlinear interactions cause the beam-driven Langmuir wave to decay into a Langmuir wave and a low-frequency ion sound wave. Comparisons of the observed beat frequency are in good agreement with theoretical predictions for a three-wave parametric decay process. Weak low-frequency emissions are also sometimes observed at the predicted frequency of the ion sound wave.

  4. Review of radio wave for power transmission in medical applications with safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, John; Geddis, Demetris; Kim, Jaehwan; Choi, Sang H.; Yoon, Hargsoon; Song, Kyo D.

    2015-04-01

    The integration of biosensors with radio frequency (RF) wireless power transmission devices is becoming popular, but there are challenges for implantable devices in medical applications. Integration and at the same time miniaturization of medical devices in a single embodiment are not trivial. The research reported herein, seeks to review possible effects of RF signals ranging from 900 MHz to 100 GHz on the human tissues and environment. Preliminary evaluation shows that radio waves selected for test have substantial influence on human tissues based on their dielectric properties. In the advancement of RF based biosensors, it is imperative to set up necessary guidelines that specify how to use RF power safely. In this paper, the dielectric properties of various human tissues will be used for estimation of influence within the selected RF frequency ranges.

  5. Atropisomerism in bisphenols: free jet absorption millimeter wave study of 2,2$prime;-biphenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottaviani, Paolo; Maris, Assimo; Caminati, Walther

    2004-06-01

    The rotational spectrum of 2,2'-biphenol has been investigated by millimeter wave absorption free jet spectroscopy. The two sides of the phenyl rings with attached the hydroxyl group form a dihedral angle of 112.7°. Each hydroxyl group is nearly co-planar to the ring to which it belongs, and points towards the π system of the adjacent ring.

  6. Supporting Structure of the LSD Wave in an Energy Absorption Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Akihiro; Hatai, Keigo; Cho, Shinatora; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2008-04-01

    In Repetitively Pulsed (RP) Laser Propulsion, laser energy irradiated to a vehicle is converted to blast wave enthalpy during the Laser Supported Detonation (LSD) regime. Based on the measured post-LSD electron number density profiles by two-wavelength Mach Zehnder interferometer in a line-focusing optics, electron temperature and absorption coefficient were estimated assuming Local Thermal Equilibrium. A 10J/pulse CO2 laser was used. As a result, laser absorption was found completed in the layer between the shock wave and the electron density peak. Although the LSD-termination timing was not clear from the shock-front/ionization-front separation in the shadowgraph images, there observed drastic changes in the absorption layer thickness from 0.2 mm to 0.5 mm and in the peak heating rate from 12-17×1013 kW/m3 to 5×1013 kW/m3 at the termination.

  7. Characteristics of anomalous skin effect and evolution of power absorption regions in a cylindrical radio frequency inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Z. F.; Sun, B.; Huo, W. G.

    2015-06-15

    In a low-pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz), inductively coupled argon plasma generated by a normal cylindrical rf coil, electric field, current density, and absorbed power density is calculated from magnetic field measured with a phase-resolved magnetic probe. The anomalous skin effect (ASE) for the cylindrical rf coil is compared to those previously reported for the planar and re-entrant cylindrical rf coils. Physical reasons for our observed characteristics of ASE are presented. With the increasing discharge power, the size and the number of negative and positive power absorption regions evolve into several distinct patterns. For the low discharge power (at 156.9 W), there is one area of positive and one area of negative power absorption in the radial direction. For the medium discharge power (279 W–683.5 W), there are two areas of negative and two areas of positive power absorption. For the even higher discharge power (above 803.5 W), the number of areas is the same as that of the medium discharge power, but the size of the inner positive and negative power absorption areas is approximately doubled and halved, respectively, while the outer positive and negative power absorption areas slightly shrinks. The evolution of positive and negative power absorption regions is explained as a result of electron thermal diffusion and the energy conversion between rf current and electric field. The spatial decays of electric field and current density are also elucidated by linking them with the positive and negative power absorption pattern.

  8. Search for transient gravitational waves in coincidence with short-duration radio transients during 2007-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, K. N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ott, C. D.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Pereira, R.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O. E. S.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stiles, D.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Archibald, A. M.; Banaszak, S.; Berndsen, A.; Boyles, J.; Cardoso, R. F.; Chawla, P.; Cherry, A.; Dartez, L. P.; Day, D.; Epstein, C. R.; Ford, A. J.; Flanigan, J.; Garcia, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hinojosa, J.; Jenet, F. A.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Keane, E. F.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Leake, S.; Lorimer, D.; Lunsford, G.; Lynch, R. S.; Martinez, J. G.; Mata, A.; McLaughlin, M. A.; McPhee, C. A.; Penucci, T.; Ransom, S.; Roberts, M. S. E.; Rohr, M. D. W.; Stairs, I. H.; Stovall, K.; van Leeuwen, J.; Walker, A. N.; Wells, B. L.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We present an archival search for transient gravitational-wave bursts in coincidence with 27 single-pulse triggers from Green Bank Telescope pulsar surveys, using the LIGO, Virgo, and GEO interferometer network. We also discuss a check for gravitational-wave signals in coincidence with Parkes fast radio bursts using similar methods. Data analyzed in these searches were collected between 2007 and 2013. Possible sources of emission of both short-duration radio signals and transient gravitational-wave emission include starquakes on neutron stars, binary coalescence of neutron stars, and cosmic string cusps. While no evidence for gravitational-wave emission in coincidence with these radio transients was found, the current analysis serves as a prototype for similar future searches using more sensitive second-generation interferometers.

  9. Significantly high wave trains in cosmic rays and solar radio flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Rajesh Kumar; Agarwal, Rekha

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic field of the Sun disturbs the propagation of cosmic rays during their propagation through the Heliosphere, and introduces variations on time scales that range from hours to millennia. Changes in the heliosphere arising from fluctuations in the Sun's magnetic field mean that galactic cosmic rays are less able to reach the Earth when the Sun is more active so the cosmic ray flux is inversely related to solar activity. In the present work studies has been carried on the occurrence of a large number high amplitude wave train events in cosmic ray intensity and to identify a possible dependence on 10.7-cm solar radio flux (solar activity) using the hourly cosmic ray neutron monitor data for two different ground based neutron monitors. The phase for both high amplitude events as well as for all days is found to significantly deviate towards an earlier hour as compared to the corotational/azimuthal direction. The amplitude of first harmonic and 10.7-cm solar radio flux significantly deviates and reaches to its peak and phase remains in the corotational direction during the years close to solar activity maximum for these high amplitude events. The occurrence of high amplitude wave train events is dominant during solar activity minimum as well as maximum years. The amplitude as well as phase of the first harmonic of cosmic ray intensity during high amplitude events shows significant correlation with solar activity. However, the frequency of occurrence of high amplitude events shows a very nominal dependence on solar activity. Keywords: high amplitude wave trains, cosmic ray, solar activity, 10.7-cm solar radio flux, magnetic field.

  10. Radio Wave Propagation for Communication on and around Mars. Part 1; Highlights: Propagation Through Mars Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Christian; Golshan, Nasser

    1999-01-01

    We recommend to use the dayside Martian ionosphere as a reflector for global communication, because the dayside ionosphere has stable density peak and usable critic frequency. This is very crucial for the future Mars ground to around communication. The dayside ionosphere has been well modeled as a Chapman layer. We suggest to perform the Martian nightside ionospheric modeling study. Because the nightside ionosphere has very little measurements available, we propose to drop a digital ionosond instrument into the Mars surface for data collection. Even though the Martian tropospheric radio refractivity has small value, it still can cause the ray bending and multipath effects. We recommend to perform an accurate calculation on excess phase and group delays (range and time delays). Other effects, such as range rate errors, appearance angle deviation, defocusing loss on Mars, etc. are also needed to be estimated. Ice depolarization effects due to Martian clouds on radio waves is unknown yet, which is expected to be small, because lower optical depth and thinner layer of cloud: Total Martian atmospheric gaseous attenuation is expected to be less than 1 dB on microwaves band, because the Martian atmosphere has very low concentration in uncondensed H2O and O2. An accurate calculation for zenith opacity requires the information about scale heights of H2O and O2 distribution. An accurate water vapor altitude profile at Mars is not available yet. Under the normal condition, CO2 and N2 gases do not have electric or magnetic dipoles and do not absorb electromagnetic energy from the waves. However, they may generate the dipoles through a collision and interact with waves under a high density condition and absorb electromagnetic waves in the infrared and visible band. Dust storm is most dominant factor to the radio wave attenuation. Large Martian dust storm can cause at least 3 dB or higher loss to Ka band wave. For a normal dust storm, the attenuation is about 1 dB. The