Sample records for radio-isotopic neutron sources

  1. Focused pulsed neutron source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Friedman; A. Drobot; N. C. Wyeth

    1995-01-01

    A non-reactor neutron source is disclosed that allows for a pulse intense current of ions to generate neutrons that are epithermal neutrons and provide low-energy neutron energy particularly suited for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatment. The present invention provides for a neutron fluence on a tumor which can be more than 10¹² neutrons\\/cm² and is generated into a time

  2. Intense fusion neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kuteev, B. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Khripunov, V. I. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2010-04-15

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 10{sup 15}-10{sup 21} neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 10{sup 20} neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  3. Neutron sources and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.L. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rush, J.J. [ed.] [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

  4. Californium252 neutron sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yevgeni A. Karelin; Yan N. Gordeev; Valentin I. Karasev; Vyacheslav M. Radchenko; Yevgeni V. Schimbarev; Rostislav A. Kuznetsov

    1997-01-01

    The technologies of neutron sources production developed by RIAR are reviewed. To produce 252Cf-containing core, different techniques are used depending on the source type. They are: impregnation of foam-alundum billets, glass beads and cermet production (point sources), electroplating on the platinum cathode (linear sources).Neutron sources produced by RIAR are one- or two-capsule design. Capsules are made of stainless steel and

  5. Ultrashort pulsed neutron source.

    PubMed

    Pomerantz, I; McCary, E; Meadows, A R; Arefiev, A; Bernstein, A C; Chester, C; Cortez, J; Donovan, M E; Dyer, G; Gaul, E W; Hamilton, D; Kuk, D; Lestrade, A C; Wang, C; Ditmire, T; Hegelich, B M

    2014-10-31

    We report on a novel compact laser-driven neutron source with an unprecedented short pulse duration (<50??ps) and high peak flux (>10(18)??n/cm(2)/s), an order of magnitude higher than any existing source. In our experiments, high-energy electron jets are generated from thin (<3???m) plastic targets irradiated by a petawatt laser. These intense electron beams are employed to generate neutrons from a metal converter. Our method opens venues for enhancing neutron radiography contrast and for creating astrophysical conditions of heavy element synthesis in the laboratory. PMID:25396373

  6. Ultrashort Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantz, I.; McCary, E.; Meadows, A. R.; Arefiev, A.; Bernstein, A. C.; Chester, C.; Cortez, J.; Donovan, M. E.; Dyer, G.; Gaul, E. W.; Hamilton, D.; Kuk, D.; Lestrade, A. C.; Wang, C.; Ditmire, T.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2014-10-01

    We report on a novel compact laser-driven neutron source with an unprecedented short pulse duration (<50 ps ) and high peak flux (>1018 n /cm2/s ), an order of magnitude higher than any existing source. In our experiments, high-energy electron jets are generated from thin (<3 ? m ) plastic targets irradiated by a petawatt laser. These intense electron beams are employed to generate neutrons from a metal converter. Our method opens venues for enhancing neutron radiography contrast and for creating astrophysical conditions of heavy element synthesis in the laboratory.

  7. Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline Spallation Neutron Source

    E-print Network

    Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source Overview and Status 21 that can utilize the full cold neutron energy spectrum. The external facility will be appropriate for experiments that need ultra cold neutrons generated in superfluid Helium. The beamlines consist of

  8. SNS: Spallation Neutron Source

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based neutron source currently being built by the United States Department of Energy. Users can find out about upcoming workshops, conferences, and other events dealing with the accelerator, which is scheduled to be completed in 2006. By downloading a series of materials, users can learn about SNS's benefits and mechanisms. Researchers can discover SNS's mission, instrumentation, moderators, and detectors. The website provides live video of the construction site. Visitors can also learn about employment opportunities.

  9. RTGs - The powering of Ulysses. [Radio-isotope Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastal, E. F.; Campbell, R. W.

    1990-01-01

    The radio-isotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) for Ulysses' electronic supply is described noting that lack of sufficient sunlight renders usual solar cell power generation ineffective due to increased distance from sun. The history of the RTG in the U.S.A. is reviewed citing the first RTG launch in 1961 with an electrical output of 2.7 W and the improved Ulysses RTG, which provides 285 W at mission beginning and 250 W at mission end. The RTG concept is discussed including the most recent RTG technology developed by the DOE, the General Purpose Heat Source RTG (GPHS-RTG). The system relies upon heat generated by radioactive decay using radioactive plutonium-238, which is converted directly to energy using the Seebeck method.

  10. Accelerator neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. K. Wang; T. E. Blue; J. W. Blue; R. A. Gahbauer

    1987-01-01

    If boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is to be widely used to treat patients with brain tumors, then a hospital-based neutron source must be developed. Accelerator neutron sources for BNCT have been proposed as alternatives to nuclear reactor beams. The ideal neutron source for BNCT is a monoenergetic neutron beam with a neutron energy that is above thermal energies but

  11. ACCELERATOR BASED CONTINUOUS NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAPIRO,S.M.; RUGGIERO,A.G.; LUDEWIG,H.

    2003-03-25

    Until the last decade, most neutron experiments have been performed at steady-state, reactor-based sources. Recently, however, pulsed spallation sources have been shown to be very useful in a wide range of neutron studies. A major review of neutron sources in the US was conducted by a committee chaired by Nobel laureate Prof. W. Kohn: ''Neutron Sources for America's Future-BESAC Panel on Neutron Sources 1/93''. This distinguished panel concluded that steady state and pulsed sources are complementary and that the nation has need for both to maintain a balanced neutron research program. The report recommended that both a new reactor and a spallation source be built. This complementarity is recognized worldwide. The conclusion of this report is that a new continuous neutron source is needed for the second decade of the 20 year plan to replace aging US research reactors and close the US neutron gap. it is based on spallation production of neutrons using a high power continuous superconducting linac to generate protons impinging on a heavy metal target. There do not appear to be any major technical challenges to the building of such a facility since a continuous spallation source has been operating in Switzerland for several years.

  12. Neutron producing target for accelerator based neutron source for

    E-print Network

    Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

    247 Neutron producing target for accelerator based neutron source for NCT V. Belov1 , S. Fadeev1, Russia Summary Neutron producing targets for novel accelerator based neutron source [1, 2] are presented Neutron producing target is one of the main elements of proposed accelerator based facility for neutron

  13. RIKEN Radio Isotope Beam Factory: Japanese Flagship for Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    En'yo, Hideto

    2015-11-01

    Recent activities at the RIKEN Radio Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) are reported together with its history and future prospects. RIBF is the Japanese flagship for nuclear science, and at this moment is the world flagship machine.

  14. Research on fusion neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Gryaznevich, M. P. [Tokamak Solutions UK, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OXON, OX133DB (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-19

    The use of fusion devices as powerful neutron sources has been discussed for decades. Whereas the successful route to a commercial fusion power reactor demands steady state stable operation combined with the high efficiency required to make electricity production economic, the alternative approach to advancing the use of fusion is free of many of complications connected with the requirements for economic power generation and uses the already achieved knowledge of Fusion physics and developed Fusion technologies. 'Fusion for Neutrons' (F4N), has now been re-visited, inspired by recent progress achieved on comparably compact fusion devices, based on the Spherical Tokamak (ST) concept. Freed from the requirement to produce much more electricity than used to drive it, a fusion neutron source could be efficiently used for many commercial applications, and also to support the goal of producing energy by nuclear power. The possibility to use a small or medium size ST as a powerful or intense steady-state fusion neutron source (FNS) is discussed in this paper in comparison with the use of traditional high aspect ratio tokamaks. An overview of various conceptual designs of compact fusion neutron sources based on the ST concept is given and they are compared with a recently proposed Super Compact Fusion Neutron Source (SCFNS), with major radius as low as 0.5 metres but still able to produce several MW of neutrons in a steady-state regime.

  15. Spallation Neutron Source Materials Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, W. F.

    1998-04-01

    Operation of accelerator facilities such as Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), ISIS at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, the Swiss Institute Neutron Source (SINQ) at Paul Scherrer Institute, and others has provided valuable information on materials performance in high energy particle beams and high energy neutron environments. The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project is sponsoring an extensive series of tests on the effect of spallation neutron source environments to physical and mechanical properties of candidate materials such as nickel-based alloys, stainless steel alloys, aluminum alloys and solid target materials such as tungsten. Measurements of corrosion rates of these candidate materials during irradiation and while in contact with flowing coolant water are being made. The APT tests use the irradiation facility in the beam stop area of the LANSCE accelerator using 800 MeV protons as well as the neutron flux-spectrum generated as these protons interact with targets. The initial irradiations were completed in summer 1997, exposing materials to a fluence approaching 4-6 x 10^21 protons/cm^2. Sample retrieval is now underway. Mechanical properties measurements are being conducted at several laboratories. Studies on components used in service have also been initiated.

  16. Accelerator neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.K.; Blue, T.E.; Blue, J.W.; Gahbauer, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    If boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is to be widely used to treat patients with brain tumors, then a hospital-based neutron source must be developed. Accelerator neutron sources for BNCT have been proposed as alternatives to nuclear reactor beams. The ideal neutron source for BNCT is a monoenergetic neutron beam with a neutron energy that is above thermal energies but below approx. 10 keV. The optimum neutron energy is currently being studied. The purpose of this paper is to report the results of a Monte Carlo analysis of the performance of an accelerator neutron source for the treatment of brain tumors by BNCT. The proton beam is identical. Thicknesses of moderators are identified that yield neutron energy spectra which produce within a head phantom distributions of absorbed dose approaching the distributions that would be attained with the above-mentioned ideal spectra.

  17. Reactivity studies on the advanced neutron source. [Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Redmond, E.L. II; Fletcher, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    An Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) with a peak thermal neutron flux of about 8.5 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} is being designed for condensed matter physics, materials science, isotope production, and fundamental physics research. The ANS is a new reactor-based research facility being planned by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to meet the need for an intense steady-state source of neutrons. The design effort is currently in the conceptual phase. A reference reactor design has been selected in order to examine the safety, performance, and costs associated with this one design. The ANS Project has an established, documented safety philosophy, and safety-related design criteria are currently being established. The purpose of this paper is to present analyses of safety aspects of the reference reactor design that are related to core reactivity events. These analyses include control rod worth, shutdown rod worth, heavy water voiding, neutron beam tube flooding, light water ingress, and single fuel element criticality. Understanding these safety aspects will allow us to make design modifications that improve the reactor safety and achieve the safety related design criteria. 8 refs., 3 tabs.

  18. CHINA SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE DESIGN.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.

    2007-01-29

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is an accelerator-based high-power project currently in preparation under the direction of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). The complex is based on an H- linear accelerator, a rapid cycling proton synchrotron accelerating the beam to 1.6 GeV, a solid tungsten target station, and five initial instruments for spallation neutron applications. The facility will operate at 25 Hz repetition rate with a phase-I beam power of about 120 kW. The major challenge is to build a robust and reliable user's facility with upgrade potential at a fractional of ''world standard'' cost.

  19. Neutron-emission measurements at a white neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Data on the spectrum of neutrons emittcd from neutron-induced reactions are important in basic nuclear physics and in applications. Our program studies neutron emission from inelastic scattering as well as fission neutron spectra. A ''white'' neutron source (continuous in energy) allows measurements over a wide range of neutron energies all in one experiment. We use the tast neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for incident neutron energies from 0.5 MeV to 200 MeV These experiments are based on double time-of-flight techniques to determine the energies of the incident and emitted neutrons. For the fission neutron measurements, parallel-plate ionization or avalanche detectors identify fission in actinide samples and give the required fast timing pulse. For inelastic scattering, gamma-ray detectors provide the timing and energy spectroscopy. A large neutron-detector array detects the emitted neutrons. Time-of-flight techniques are used to measure the energies of both the incident and emitted neutrons. Design considerations for the array include neutron-gamma discrimination, neutron energy resolution, angular coverage, segmentation, detector efficiency calibration and data acquisition. We have made preliminary measurements of the fission neutron spectra from {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu. Neutron emission spectra from inelastic scattering on iron and nickel have also been investigated. The results obtained will be compared with evaluated data.

  20. Proposed neutron activation analysis facilities in the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, L.; Dyer, F.F.; Emery, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    A number of analytical chemistry experimental facilities are being proposed for the Advanced Neutron Source. Experimental capabilities will include gamma-ray analysis and neutron depth profiling. This paper describes the various systems proposed and some of their important characteristics.

  1. Spallation Neutron Sources Around the World

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    , powders, liquids, crystals, bio-materials, proteins, chemistry ... Neutron physics, imaging, SEE testing University Bilbao project - in a deep sleep UCANS Union for Compact Accelerator-driven Neutron Sources

  2. An Accelerator Neutron Source for BNCT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Blue; Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to develop an accelerator-based neutron source (ABNS) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Specifically, our goals were to design, and confirm by measurement, a target assembly and a moderator assembly that would fulfill the design requirements of the ABNS. These design requirements were 1) that the neutron field quality be as good as

  3. An Ultra-Short Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantz, Ishay; McCary, Eddie; Meadows, Alexander R.; Arefiev, Alexey; Bernstein, Aaron C.; Chester, Clay; Cortez, Jose; Donovan, Michael E.; Dyer, Gilliss; Gaul, Erhard W.; Hamilton, David; Kuk, Donghoon; Lestrade, Arantxa; Wang, Chunhua; Ditmire, Todd; Hegelich, Manuel B.

    2014-10-01

    We report on a novel compact laser-driven neutron source with unprecedented short pulse duration (<50 ps) and high flux (>1018 neutrons/cm2/s), an order of magnitude higher than any existing source. In our experiments, high-energy electron jets are generated from thin (<1 ?m) plastic targets irradiated by a petawatt laser. These intense electron beams are employed to generate neutrons from a metal converter. Our method opens venues for enhancing neutron radiography contrast, conducting time-resolved neutron-damage studies at their characteristic evolution time-scales and for creating astrophysical conditions of heavy element synthesis in the laboratory.

  4. Switchable radioactive neutron source device

    DOEpatents

    Boyar, Robert E. (La Grange, IL); DeVolpi, Alexander (Bolingbrook, IL); Stanford, George S. (Downers Grove, IL); Rhodes, Edgar A. (Woodridge, IL)

    1989-01-01

    This invention is a switchable neutron generating apparatus comprised of a pair of plates, the first plate having an alpha emitter section on it and the second plate having a target material portion on it which generates neutrons when its nuclei absorb an alpha particle. In operation, the alpha portion of the first plate is aligned with the neutron portion of the second plate to produce neutrons and brought out of alignment to cease production of neutrons.

  5. Neutron sources: Present practice and future potential

    SciTech Connect

    Cierjacks, S.; Smith, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    The present capability and future potential of accelerator-based monoenergetic and white neutron sources are outlined in the context of fundamental and applied neutron-nuclear research. The neutron energy range extends from thermal to 500 MeV, and the time domain from steady-state to pico-second pulsed sources. Accelerator technology is summarized, including the production of intense light-ion, heavy-ion and electron beams. Target capabilities are discussed with attention to neutron-producing efficiency and power-handling capabilities. The status of underlying neutron-producing reactions is summarized. The present and future use of neutron sources in: fundamental neutron-nuclear research, nuclear data acquisition, materials damage studies, engineering tests, and biomedical applications are discussed. Emphasis is given to current status, near-term advances well within current technology, and to long-range projections. 90 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Neutron sources: present practice and future potential

    SciTech Connect

    Cierjacks, S.; Smith, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    The present capability and future potential of accelerator-based monoenergetic and white neutron sources are outlined in the context of fundamental and applied neutron-nuclear research. The neutron energy range extends from thermal to 500+ MeV, and the time domain from steady-state to pico-second pulsed sources. Accelerator technology is summarized, including the production of intense light-ion, heavy-ion and electron beams. Target capabilities are discussed with attention to neutron-production efficiency and power-handling capabilities. The status of underlying neutron-producing reactions is summarized. The present and future use of neutron sources in: (i) fundamental neutron-nuclear research, (ii) nuclear-data acquisition, (iii) materials-damage studies, (iv) engineering test, and (v) biomedical applications are discussed. Emphasis is given to current status, near-term advances well within current technology, and to long-range projections.

  7. Spallation Neutron Source reaches megawatt power

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. William F. Brinkman

    2009-09-30

    The Department of Energy's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), already the world's most powerful facility for pulsed neutron scattering science, is now the first pulsed spallation neutron source to break the one-megawatt barrier. "Advances in the materials sciences are fundamental to the development of clean and sustainable energy technologies. In reaching this milestone of operating power, the Spallation Neutron Source is providing scientists with an unmatched resource for unlocking the secrets of materials at the molecular level," said Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science.

  8. Dose measurements around spallation neutron sources.

    PubMed

    Fragopoulou, M; Stoulos, S; Manolopoulou, M; Krivopustov, M; Zamani, M

    2008-01-01

    Neutron dose measurements and calculations around spallation sources appear to be of great importance in shielding research. Two spallation sources were irradiated by high-energy proton beams delivered by the Nuclotron accelerator (JINR), Dubna. Neutrons produced by the spallation sources were measured by using solid-state nuclear track detectors. In addition, neutron dose was calculated after polyethylene and concrete, using a phenomenological model based on empirical relations applied in high-energy physics. The study provides an analytical and experimental neutron benchmark analysis using the transmission factor and a comparison between the experimental results and calculations. PMID:18957519

  9. Nested Focusing Optics for Compact Neutron Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH) have developed novel neutron grazing incidence optics for use with small-scale portable neutron generators. The technology was developed to enable the use of commercially available neutron generators for applications requiring high flux densities, including high performance imaging and analysis. Nested grazing incidence mirror optics, with high collection efficiency, are used to produce divergent, parallel, or convergent neutron beams. Ray tracing simulations of the system (with source-object separation of 10m for 5 meV neutrons) show nearly an order of magnitude neutron flux increase on a 1-mm diameter object. The technology is a result of joint development efforts between NASA and MIT researchers seeking to maximize neutron flux from diffuse sources for imaging and testing applications.

  10. International workshop on cold neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; West, C.D. (comps.) (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)) [comps.; Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1991-08-01

    The first meeting devoted to cold neutron sources was held at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on March 5--8, 1990. Cosponsored by Los Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories, the meeting was organized as an International Workshop on Cold Neutron Sources and brought together experts in the field of cold-neutron-source design for reactors and spallation sources. Eighty-four people from seven countries attended. Because the meeting was the first of its kind in over forty years, much time was spent acquainting participants with past and planned activities at reactor and spallation facilities worldwide. As a result, the meeting had more of a conference flavor than one of a workshop. The general topics covered at the workshop included: Criteria for cold source design; neutronic predictions and performance; energy deposition and removal; engineering design, fabrication, and operation; material properties; radiation damage; instrumentation; safety; existing cold sources; and future cold sources.

  11. Neutron sources for a neutron capture therapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    Recent advances in the development of boron pharmaceuticals have reopened the possibility of using epithermal neutrons to treat brain tumors containing boron-10. This paper summarizes the approaches being used to generate the neutron sources and identifies specific areas where more research and development are needed.

  12. An accelerator neutron source for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Blue

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this proposal are twofold. One objective is to design and test (using the OSU Van de Graaff accelerator) a moderator assembly for a thermal neutron source for the treatment of superficial tumors by Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). We will identify the current of 2.5 MeV protons which is necessary to treat a patient in less than

  13. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K.; Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A.

    2013-04-01

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation & treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8109 neutrons/cm2/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with 10B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  14. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd (Japan); Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A. [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (Japan)

    2013-04-19

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation and treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 109 neutrons/cm{sup 2}/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with {sup 10}B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  15. Neutron dosimetry at SLAC: Neutron sources and instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.C.; Jenkins, T.M.; McCall, R.C.; Ipe, N.E.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes in detail the dosimetric characteristics of the five radioisotopic type neutron sources ({sup 238}PuBe, {sup 252}Cf, {sup 238}PuB, {sup 238}PuF{sub 4}, and {sup 238}PuLi) and the neutron instrumentation (moderated BF{sub 3} detector, Anderson-Braun (AB) detector, AB remmeter, Victoreen 488 Neutron Survey Meter, Beam Shut-Off Ionization Chamber, {sup 12}C plastic scintillator detector, moderated indium foil detector, and moderated and bare TLDs) that are commonly used for neutron dosimetry at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). 36 refs,. 19 figs.

  16. 10 CFR 39.55 - Tritium neutron generator target sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tritium neutron generator target sources. 39...WELL LOGGING Equipment 39.55 Tritium neutron generator target sources. (a) Use of a tritium neutron generator target source,...

  17. 10 CFR 39.55 - Tritium neutron generator target sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tritium neutron generator target sources. 39...WELL LOGGING Equipment 39.55 Tritium neutron generator target sources. (a) Use of a tritium neutron generator target source,...

  18. 10 CFR 39.55 - Tritium neutron generator target sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tritium neutron generator target sources. 39...WELL LOGGING Equipment 39.55 Tritium neutron generator target sources. (a) Use of a tritium neutron generator target source,...

  19. 10 CFR 39.55 - Tritium neutron generator target sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tritium neutron generator target sources. 39...WELL LOGGING Equipment 39.55 Tritium neutron generator target sources. (a) Use of a tritium neutron generator target source,...

  20. 10 CFR 39.55 - Tritium neutron generator target sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tritium neutron generator target sources. 39...WELL LOGGING Equipment 39.55 Tritium neutron generator target sources. (a) Use of a tritium neutron generator target source,...

  1. Unconventional neutron sources for oil well logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankle, C. M.; Dale, G. E.

    2013-09-01

    Americium-Beryllium (AmBe) radiological neutron sources have been widely used in the petroleum industry for well logging purposes. There is strong desire on the part of various governmental and regulatory bodies to find alternate sources due to the high activity and small size of AmBe sources. Other neutron sources are available, both radiological (252Cf) and electronic accelerator driven (D-D and D-T). All of these, however, have substantially different neutron energy spectra from AmBe and thus cause significantly different responses in well logging tools. We report on simulations performed using unconventional sources and techniques to attempt to better replicate the porosity and carbon/oxygen ratio responses a well logging tool would see from AmBe neutrons. The AmBe response of these two types of tools is compared to the response from 252Cf, D-D, D-T, filtered D-T, and T-T sources.

  2. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McBee, M.R.; Chance, C.M. (eds.) (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M.; Peretz, F.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the advanced neutron source: quality assurance (QA) program; reactor core development; fuel element specification; corrosion loop tests and analyses; thermal-hydraulic loop tests; reactor control concepts; critical and subcritical experiments; material data, structural tests, and analysis; cold source development; beam tube, guide, and instrument development; hot source development; neutron transport and shielding; I C research and development; facility concepts; design; and safety.

  3. An accelerator neutron source for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy)

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, T.E.

    1990-03-01

    The objectives of this proposal are twofold. One objective is to design and test (using the OSU Van de Graaff accelerator) a moderator assembly for a thermal neutron source for the treatment of superficial tumors by Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). We will identify the current of 2.5 MeV protons which is necessary to treat a patient in less than one hour. Our second objective is to design and thermally test a target for our thermal and epithermal source of neutrons for BNCT. Our work to date in fulfilling these project goals is described in this document. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Observation of Neutron Skyshine from an Accelerator Based Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Franklyn, C. B. [Radiation Science Department, Necsa, PO Box 582, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2011-12-13

    A key feature of neutron based interrogation systems is the need for adequate provision of shielding around the facility. Accelerator facilities adapted for fast neutron generation are not necessarily suitably equipped to ensure complete containment of the vast quantity of neutrons generated, typically >10{sup 11} n{center_dot}s{sup -1}. Simulating the neutron leakage from a facility is not a simple exercise since the energy and directional distribution can only be approximated. Although adequate horizontal, planar shielding provision is made for a neutron generator facility, it is sometimes the case that vertical shielding is minimized, due to structural and economic constraints. It is further justified by assuming the atmosphere above a facility functions as an adequate radiation shield. It has become apparent that multiple neutron scattering within the atmosphere can result in a measurable dose of neutrons reaching ground level some distance from a facility, an effect commonly known as skyshine. This paper describes a neutron detection system developed to monitor neutrons detected several hundred metres from a neutron source due to the effect of skyshine.

  5. Modeling the LANL Ultracold neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Takeyasu; LANL Ultracold Neutron Source Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The ultracold neutron (UCN) source at LANL uses a solid deuterium UCN converter and is driven by pulsed spallation neutrons. This UCN source has been and is being used for various science experiments. An effort to further upgrade the UCN source is currently underway. An extensive source modeling has been performed. In this talk, the method and results of the modeling of the current and the upgraded sources, the insight gained by the modeling work, and the expected performance of the upgraded source will be presented.

  6. Design calculations for the ANS (Advanced Neutron Source) cold source

    SciTech Connect

    Lillie, R.A.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The calculation procedure, based on discrete ordinates transport methods, that is being used to carry out design calculations for the Advanced Neutron Source cold source is described. Calculated results on the gain in cold neutron flux produced by a liquid deuterium cold source are compared with experimental data and with calculated data previously obtained by P. Ageron et al., at the Institute Max von Laue-Paul Langevin in Grenoble, France. Calculated results are also presented that indicated how the flux of cold neutrons vary with cold source parameters. 23 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Improved neutron sources for neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. W. Nigg; C. A. Wemple; R. Risler; J. K. Hartwell; Y. D. Harker; G. E. Laramore

    2000-01-01

    Fast neutron radiotherapy (FNT) can be combined with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The selective incremental absorbed dose in the target volume that is thus obtained may be sufficient to produce a significant improvement in tumor control probability in some cases. Potential applications include certain non-small-cell lung tumors; head and neck tumors; prostate tumors; and possibly also glioblastoma multiform, an

  8. Inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nebel, R.A.; Barnes, D.C.; Caramana, E.J.; Janssen, R.D.; Nystrom, W.D.; Tiouririne, T.N.; Trent, B.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Miley, G.H.; Javedani, J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) is one of the earliest plasma confinement concepts, having first been suggested by P.T. Farnsworth in the 1950s. The concept involves a simple apparatus of concentric spherical electrostatic grids or a combination of grids and magnetic fields. An electrostatic structure is formed from the confluence of electron or ion beams. Gridded IEC systems have demonstrated neutron yields as high as 2 {times} 10{sup 10} neutrons/sec in steady state. These systems have considerable potential as small, inexpensive, portable neutron sources for assaying applications. Neutron tomography is also a potential application. This paper discusses the IEC concept and how it can be adapted to a steady-state assaying source and an intense pulsed neutron source. Theoretical modeling and experimental results are presented.

  9. Inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.C.; Caramana, E.J.; Janssen, R.D.; Nystrom, W.D.; Tiouririne, T.N.; Trent, B.C.; Miley, G.H.; Javedani, J.

    1995-01-01

    Inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) is one of the earliest plasma confinement concepts, having first been suggested by P.T. Farnsworth in the 1950s. The concept involves a simple apparatus of concentric spherical electrostatic grids or a combination of grids and magnetic fields. An electrostatic structure is formed from the confluence of electron or ion beams. Gridded IEC systems have demonstrated neutron yields as high as 2 x 10(exp 10) neutrons/sec in steady state. These systems have considerable potential as small, inexpensive, portable neutron sources for assaying applications. Neutron tomography is also a potential application. This paper discusses the IEC concept and how it can be adapted to a steady-state assaying source and an intense pulsed neutron source. Theoretical modeling and experimental results are presented.

  10. Improved neutron sources for neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, D.W.; Wemple, C.A.; Risler, R.; Hartwell, J.K.; Harker, Y.D.; Laramore, G.E.

    2000-07-01

    Fast neutron radiotherapy (FNT) can be combined with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The selective incremental absorbed dose in the target volume that is thus obtained may be sufficient to produce a significant improvement in tumor control probability in some cases. Potential applications include certain non-small-cell lung tumors; head and neck tumors; prostate tumors; and possibly also glioblastoma multiform, an extremely refractory type of primary brain tumor. A class of modified neutron production targets has been developed to provide improved performance of the cyclotron-based clinical FNT facility at the University of Washington (UW) Medical Center for applications involving BNCT-enhanced FNT. The new targets produce neutron beams that feature essentially the same fast neutron physical depth-dose performance as the current UW system but with an increased fraction of BNCT enhancement.

  11. Characterization of a Pulse Neutron Source Yield under Field Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Barzilov, Alexander; Novikov, Ivan; Womble, Phillip C.; Hopper, Lindsay [Applied Physics Institute, Western Kentucky University 1906 College Heights Blvd MS 11077, Bowling Green Kentucky 42101-1077 (United States)

    2009-03-10

    Technique of rapid evaluation of a pulse neutron sources such as neutron generators under field conditions has been developed. The phoswich sensor and pulse-shape discrimination techniques have been used for the simultaneous measurements of fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and photons. The sensor has been calibrated using activation neutron detectors and a pulse deuterium-tritium fusion neutron source.

  12. Characterization of a Pulse Neutron Source Yield under Field Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzilov, Alexander; Novikov, Ivan; Womble, Phillip C.; Hopper, Lindsay

    2009-03-01

    Technique of rapid evaluation of a pulse neutron sources such as neutron generators under field conditions has been developed. The phoswich sensor and pulse-shape discrimination techniques have been used for the simultaneous measurements of fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and photons. The sensor has been calibrated using activation neutron detectors and a pulse deuterium-tritium fusion neutron source.

  13. Preliminary Spallation Neutron Source Corrosion Experiments

    E-print Network

    Preliminary Spallation Neutron Source Corrosion Experiments: Corrosion Rates of Engineering P. Butt Materials Corrosion & Environmental Effects Lab MST-6, Metallurgy Los Alamos National OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of this project was to demonstrate a capability to measure the corrosion

  14. Cryogenic hydrogen circulation system of neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Y. N.; Hu, Z. J.; Wu, J. H.; Li, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, P.; Wang, G. P.

    2014-01-01

    Cold neutron sources of reactors and spallation neutron sources are classic high flux neutron sources in operation all over the world. Cryogenic fluids such as supercritical or supercooled hydrogen are commonly selected as a moderator to absorb the nuclear heating from proton beams. By comparing supercritical hydrogen circulation systems and supercooled hydrogen circulation systems, the merits and drawbacks in both systems are summarized. When supercritical hydrogen circulates as the moderator, severe pressure fluctuations caused by temperature changes will occur. The pressure control system used to balance the system pressure, which consists of a heater as an active controller for thermal compensation and an accumulator as a passive volume controller, is preliminarily studied. The results may provide guidelines for design and operation of other cryogenic hydrogen system for neutron sources under construction.

  15. High Brightness Neutron Source for Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, J. T.; Piestrup, Melvin, A.; Gary, Charles, K.; Harris, Jack, L. Williams, David, J.; Jones, Glenn, E.; Vainionpaa, J. , H.; Fuller, Michael, J.; Rothbart, George, H.; Kwan, J., W.; Ludewigt, B., A.; Gough, R.., A..; Reijonen, Jani; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-12-08

    This research and development program was designed to improve nondestructive evaluation of large mechanical objects by providing both fast and thermal neutron sources for radiography. Neutron radiography permits inspection inside objects that x-rays cannot penetrate and permits imaging of corrosion and cracks in low-density materials. Discovering of fatigue cracks and corrosion in piping without the necessity of insulation removal is possible. Neutron radiography sources can provide for the nondestructive testing interests of commercial and military aircraft, public utilities and petrochemical organizations. Three neutron prototype neutron generators were designed and fabricated based on original research done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The research and development of these generators was successfully continued by LBNL and Adelphi Technology Inc. under this STTR. The original design goals of high neutron yield and generator robustness have been achieved, using new technology developed under this grant. In one prototype generator, the fast neutron yield and brightness was roughly 10 times larger than previously marketed neutron generators using the same deuterium-deuterium reaction. In another generator, we integrate a moderator with a fast neutron source, resulting in a high brightness thermal neutron generator. The moderator acts as both conventional moderator and mechanical and electrical support structure for the generator and effectively mimics a nuclear reactor. In addition to the new prototype generators, an entirely new plasma ion source for neutron production was developed. First developed by LBNL, this source uses a spiral antenna to more efficiently couple the RF radiation into the plasma, reducing the required gas pressure so that the generator head can be completely sealed, permitting the possible use of tritium gas. This also permits the generator to use the deuterium-tritium reaction to produce 14-MeV neutrons with increases of yield of two orders of magnitude. The first fast neutron radiographic images were obtained using neutron cameras and a new fast neutron generator. These early images demonstrated the feasibility of using fast neutrons for imaging and penetrating thick objects of high density and imaging. Fast neutrons can be used to image low atomic number materials (e.g. plastics, explosives, lubricants and ceramics) that are shielded by high density materials (e.g. lead, tungsten and uranium). Fast neutron radiography could be used as a means to screen weapons for flaws and chemical stability. X-ray radiography can not easily do this. Fast neutron imaging is technically difficult and, consequently, a completely undeveloped market. Two of the generators were designed to have small source size and high brightness, ideal for fast-neutron imaging. With these generators we successfully used two fast neutron cameras: one developed by us, and another developed by a collaborator, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, CSIRO. We have successfully used these cameras to obtain low resolution images of various objects such as pipe fittings filled with water and other mechanical objects. Higher resolution and contrast images are expected by decreasing the source size and increasing generator yield.

  16. Phenomenological calculations of shielding spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragopoulou, M.; Zamani, M.

    2013-06-01

    The high level of radiation generated by a spallation source requires the design of an appropriate shielding to surround the source in order to fulfill radiation protection standards. A calculation of the spallation neutron attenuation is presented for various shielding materials, using a phenomenological model, based on the Moyer model. In the first step of the calculation, the interaction length of neutrons for each neutron energy and shielding material was estimated using inelastic cross-sections. In the second step the calculation deals with the attenuation of the neutron flux applying the Moyer model, for each material and neutron energy region. The transmission factors were calculated and compared with experimental data collected from the "Gamma-2" and the "E+T" projects running in JINR (Dubna, Russia). The results of the present work were also compared to the data obtained by different Monte Carlo codes such as MORSE, MCNPX, MARS14 and LAHET.

  17. DIRECTIONAL DETECTION OF A NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    VANIER, P.E.; FORMAN, L.

    2006-10-23

    Advantages afforded by the development of new directional neutron detectors and imagers are discussed. Thermal neutrons have mean free paths in air of about 20 meters, and can be effectively imaged using coded apertures. Fission spectrum neutrons have ranges greater than 100 meters, and carry enough energy to scatter at least twice in multilayer detectors which can yield both directional and spectral information. Such strategies allow better discrimination between a localized spontaneous fission source and the low, but fluctuating, level of background neutrons generated by cosmic rays. A coded aperture thermal neutron imager will be discussed as well as a proton-recoil double-scatter fast-neutron directional detector with time-of-flight energy discrimination.

  18. (An accelerator neutron source for BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this proposal are twofold. One objective is to design and test (using the OSU Van de Graaff accelerator) a moderator assembly for a thermal neutron source for the treatment of superficial tumors by Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. We will identify the current of 2.5 MeV protons which is necessary to treat a patient in less than one hour. Our second objective is to design and thermally test a target for our thermal and epithermal source of neutrons for BNCT. Our cumulative work to date in fulfilling these project goals is described. 19 refs., 25 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Trapping Metastable Krypton Atoms for Radio-Isotope Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappala, Jake; Bailey, Kevin; Jiang, Wei; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a MOT of metastable krypton atoms achieving a loading rate of 1012 s-1 for the abundant isotope 84Kr. At the same time, the trap is capable of single atom detection of the rare isotopes 81Kr and 85Kr used for radio-isotope dating. Metastable atom production via gas discharge remains a major limit to trapping efficiency. We are exploring direct optical excitation methods to overcome this limit. This technique uses a krypton lamp to produce resonant 124 nm light and an 819 nm laser to drive the krypton from the ground state to the metastable level. These advancements would lead to a next generation ATTA instrument for 81Kr dating. Improved efficiency would open up new opportunities such as dating deep ice core samples. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DEAC02-06CH11357.

  20. Radioactive source recovery program responses to neutron source emergencies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. M. Dinehart; V. A. Hatler; D. W. Gray; A. D. Guillen

    1997-01-01

    Recovery of neutron sources containing Pu²³⁹ and Be is currently taking place at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The program was initiated in 1979 by the Department of Energy (DOE) to dismantle and recover sources owned primarily by universities and the Department of Defense. Since the inception of this program, Los Alamos has dismantled and recovered more than 1000 sources. The

  1. Thermal Neutron Activation Cross Sections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leo Seren; Herbert N. Friedlander; Solomon H. Turkel

    1947-01-01

    The activation method of measuring slow neutron cross sections is discussed, in connection with the survey made at Argonne Laboratory. A table is given listing 131 activation cross sections of 65 elements and properties of the radio isotopes produced.

  2. Neutronics of a D-Li neutron source: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, I. C.; Smith, D. L.

    1993-11-01

    The importance of having a high energy (14 MeV) neutron source for fusion materials testing is widely recognized. The availability of a test volume with easy accessibility, with a radiation environment similar to the one expected for a fusion reactor, and with dimensions large enough to accommodate several small samples or a small blanket mock-up are requirements impossible to meet with the existing reactors and irradiation facilities. A D-Li neutron source meets the above mentioned requirements and can be built today with well known technology. This paper describes some relevant topics related to beam target configuration, neutron flux spectrum, and nuclear responses for a D-Li neutron source. The target-beam configuration is analyzed for different beam cross sectional areas and trade-offs between the area of the beam and related quantities such as available volume for testing, peak fluxes, and flux or nuclear responses gradient are presented. The conclusion is that the D-Li neutron source has the necessary characteristics to be the option of choice for IFMIF.

  3. A telescope for monitoring fast neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, G.; Fontbonne, J. M.; Lecolley, F. R.; Lecolley, J. F.; Lecouey, J. L.; Marie, N.; Steckmeyer, J. C.; Billebaud, A.; Brissot, R.; Le Brun, C.; Liatard, E.

    2007-07-01

    In the framework of nuclear waste management, highly radiotoxic long-lived fission products and minor actinides are planned to be transmuted in a sub-critical reactor coupled with an intense external neutron source. The latter source would be created by a high-energy proton beam hitting a high atomic number target. Such a new system, termed an accelerator-driven system (ADS), requires on-line and robust reactivity monitoring. The ratio between the beam current delivered by the accelerator and the reactor power level, or core neutron flux, is the basis of one method which could give access to a core reactivity change. In order to test reactivity measurement technique, some experimental programs use 14-MeV neutrons originating from the interaction of a deuteron beam with a tritium target as an external neutron source. In this case, the target tritium consumption over time precludes use of the beam current for reactivity monitoring and the external neutron source intensity must be monitored directly. A range telescope has been developed for this purpose, consisting of the assembly of a hydrogenous neutron converter and three silicon stages where the recoiling protons are detected. In this article, the performances of such a telescope are presented and compared to Monte-Carlo simulations.

  4. The spallation neutron source is taking shape

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. E. Mason; R. K. Crawford; G. J. Bunick; A. E. Ekkebus; D. Belanger

    2002-01-01

    The spallation neutron source (SNS) is rapidly taking shape at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the SNS is being designed and built by six DOE laboratories: Argonne (instruments), Brookhaven (accumulator ring), Lawrence Berkeley (ion source), Los Alamos (warm linac and radio-frequency systems), Thomas Jefferson (cold linac), and Oak Ridge

  5. Neutron production enhancements for the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-04

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) was the first high energy spallation neutron source in the US dedicated to materials research. It has operated for sixteen years, and in that time has had a very prolific record concerning the development of new target and moderator systems for pulsed spallation sources. IPNS supports a very productive user program on its thirteen instruments, which are oversubscribed by more than two times, meanwhile having an excellent overall reliability of 95%. Although the proton beam power is relatively low at 7 kW, the target and moderator systems are very efficient. The typical beam power which gives an equivalent flux for long-wavelength neutrons is about 60 kW, due to the use of a uranium target and liquid and solid methane moderators, precluded at some sources due to a higher accelerator power. The development of new target and moderator systems is by no means stagnant at IPNS. They are presently considering numerous enhancements to the target and moderators that offer prospects for increasing the useful neutron production by substantial factors. Many of these enhancements could be combined, although their combined benefit has not yet been well established. Meanwhile, IPNS is embarking on a coherent program of study concerning these improvements and their possible combination and implementation. Moreover, any improvements accomplished at IPNS would immediately increase the performance of IPNS instruments.

  6. Directional measurements for sources of fission neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, R.C.; Auchampaugh, G.F.; Feldman, W.C.

    1993-11-01

    Although penetrating neutron and gamma-ray emissions arguably provide the most effective signals for locating sources of nuclear radiation, their relatively low fluxes make searching for radioactive materials a tedious process. Even assuming lightly shielded sources and detectors with large areas and high efficiencies, estimated counting times can exceed several minutes for source separations greater than ten meters. Because determining the source position requires measurements at several locations, each with its own background, the search procedure can be lengthy and difficult to automate. Although directional measurements can be helpful, conventional collimation reduces count rates and increases the detector size and weight prohibitively, especially for neutron instruments. We describe an alternative approach for locating radiation sources that is based on the concept of a polarized radiation field. In this model, the presence of a source adds a directional component to the randomly oriented background radiation. The net direction of the local field indicates the source angle, and the magnitude provides an estimate of the distance to the source. The search detector is therefore seen as a device that responds to this polarized radiation field. Our proposed instrument simply substitutes segmented detectors for conventional single-element ones, so it requires little or no collimating material or additional weight. Attenuation across the detector creates differences in the count rates for opposite segments, whose ratios can be used to calculate the orthogonal components of the polarization vector. Although this approach is applicable to different types of radiation and detectors, in this report we demonstrate its use for sources of fission neutrons by using a prototype fast-neutron detector, which also provides background-corrected energy spectra for the incident neutrons.

  7. THERMAL NEUTRON INTENSITIES IN SOILS IRRADIATED BY FAST NEUTRONS FROM POINT SOURCES. (R825549C054)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal-neutron fluences in soil are reported for selected fast-neutron sources, selected soil types, and selected irradiation geometries. Sources include 14 MeV neutrons from accelerators, neutrons from spontaneously fissioning 252Cf, and neutrons produced from alp...

  8. The Los Alamos Intense Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Nebel, R.A.; Barnes, D.C.; Bollman, R.; Eden, G.; Morrison, L.; Pickrell, M.M.; Reass, W.

    1997-10-01

    The Intense Neutron Source (INS) is an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion device presently under construction at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It is designed to produce 10{sup 11} neutrons per second steady-state using D-T fuel. Phase 1 operation of this device will be as a standard three grid IEC ion focus device. Expected performance has been predicted by scaling from a previous IEC device. Phase 2 operation of this device will utilize a new operating scheme, the Periodically Oscillating Plasma Sphere (POPS). This scheme is related to both the Spherical Reflect Diode and the Oscillating Penning Trap. With this type of operation the authors hope to improve plasma neutron production to about 10{sup 13} neutrons/second.

  9. The spallation neutron source is taking shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, T. E.; Crawford, R. K.; Bunick, G. J.; Ekkebus, A. E.; Belanger, D.

    The spallation neutron source (SNS) is rapidly taking shape at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the SNS is being designed and built by six DOE laboratories: Argonne (instruments), Brookhaven (accumulator ring), Lawrence Berkeley (ion source), Los Alamos (warm linac and radio-frequency systems), Thomas Jefferson (cold linac), and Oak Ridge (target). Concrete foundations are being poured, and steel beams are piercing the sky above the ridge where the facility is being built. Instrument approval and development is progressing well, with prototypes undergoing testing and procurements beginning for approved instruments. The SNS and High Flux Isotope Reactor User Group Executive Committee are working to ensure consistent policies between the two Oak Ridge facilities. The project has sponsored and is continuing to sponsor several neutron-science-related workshops. In addition, project staff are participating in educational programs to encourage student interest in neutron science.

  10. Spallation Neutron Sources and Accelerator-Driven Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Stuart D.

    2014-02-01

    Spallation neutron sources are the primary accelerator-driven source of intense neutrons. They require high power proton accelerators in the GeV energy range coupled to heavy metal targets for efficient neutron production. They form the basis of large scale neutron scattering facilities, and are essential elements in accelerator-driven subcritical reactors. Demanding technology has been developed which is enabling the next generation of spallation neutron sources to reach even higher neutron fluxes. This technology sets the stage for future deployment in accelerator-driven systems and neutron sources for nuclear material irradiation.

  11. RADIATION EFFECTS CALCULATIONS FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. K. Corzine; M. H. Barnett; Y. Zheng; D. J. Dudziak; M. S. Wechsler

    Two major projects, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) facility, recently underwent conceptual designs in the U.S. In support of these projects, calculations were performed of radiation effects in the form of production of atomic displacements, helium, hydrogen, and transmutants. In the case of the SNS, emphasis was placed on computing these radiation effects

  12. An accelerator neutron source for BNCT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tanxia B. Qu; T. E. Blue; K. Vafai; R. N. Christensen

    1991-01-01

    This is the progress report and proposed research objectives for the project entitled An Accelerator Neutron Source for BNCT.'' The progress report is for the time period from July 15, 1990 to date. The proposal is for the upcoming budget period from July 15, 1991 to July 14, 1992. The objectives of this project are to design and test the

  13. Secondary electron ion source neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Brainard, J.P.; McCollister, D.R.

    1998-04-28

    A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter is disclosed. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof. 4 figs.

  14. Secondary electron ion source neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Brainard, John P. (Albuquerque, NM); McCollister, Daryl R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof

  15. Cold moderators for pulsed neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews cold moderators in pulsed neutron sources and provides details of the performance of different cold moderator materials and configurations. Analytical forms are presented which describe wavelength spectra and emission time distributions. Several types of cooling arrangements used in pulsed source moderators are described. Choices of materials are surveyed. The author examines some of the radiation damage effects in cold moderators, including the phenomenon of burping'' in irradiated cold solid methane. 9 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. BINP accelerator based epithermal neutron source V. Aleynik a

    E-print Network

    Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

    BINP accelerator based epithermal neutron source V. Aleynik a , A. Burdakov a , V. Davydenko a , A: Boron neutron capture therapy Epithermal neutron source Accelerator a b s t r a c t Innovative facility insulation, suitable for a widespread use of BNCT in clinical practice. It is intended to generate neutrons

  17. An accelerator neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Tanxia B. (ed.); Blue, T.E.; Vafai, K.; Christensen, R.N.

    1991-02-01

    This is the progress report and proposed research objectives for the project entitled An Accelerator Neutron Source for BNCT.'' The progress report is for the time period from July 15, 1990 to date. The proposal is for the upcoming budget period from July 15, 1991 to July 14, 1992. The objectives of this project are to design and test the target assembly and the moderator assembly for accelerator based thermal and epithermal neutron sources for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. This report consists of three sections. Section 1 describes the neutronic design and testing of the thermal and epithermal neutron moderator assemblies. Section 2 describes the thermal-hydraulic design of a target assembly using a heat pipe. Section 3 describes the thermal-hydraulic design and testing of a target assembly using convective heat transfer with flowing D{sub 2}O as the method for target energy removal. Each section consists of two parts: a progress report and proposed research objectives for the upcoming year.

  18. Enrico Fermi's Discovery of Neutron-Induced Artificial Radioactivity: Neutrons and Neutron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Francesco; Leone, Matteo; Robotti, Nadia

    2006-09-01

    We reconstruct and analyze the path leading from James Chadwicks discovery of the neutron in February 1932 through Frdric Joliot and Irne Curies discovery of artificial radioactivity in January 1934 to Enrico Fermis discovery of neutron-induced artificial radioactivity in March 1934. We show, in particular, that Fermis innovative construction and use of radon-beryllium neutron sources permitted him to make his discovery.

  19. Ion source requirements for pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1995-10-01

    The neutron scattering community has endorsed the need for a high- power (1 to 5 MW) accelerator-driven source of neutrons for materials research. Properly configured, the accelerator could produce very short (sub-microsecond) bursts of cold neutrons, said time structure offering advantages over the continuous flux from a reactor for a large class of experiments. The recent cancellation of the ANS reactor project has increased the urgency to develop a comprehensive strategy based on the best technological scenarios. Studies to date have built on the experience from ISIS (the 160 KW source in the UK), and call for a high-current (approx. 100 mA peak) H{sup {minus}} source-linac combination injecting into one or more accumulator rings in which beam may be further accelerated. The 1 to 5 GeV proton beam is extracted in a single turn and brought to the target-moderator stations. The high current, high duty-factor, high brightness and high reliability required of the ion source present a very large challenge to the ion source community. A workshop held in Berkeley in October 1994, analyzed in detail the source requirements for proposed accelerator scenarios, the present performance capabilities of different H{sup {minus}} source technologies, and identified necessary R&D efforts to bridge the gap.

  20. HIGH FLUENCE NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE CHARACTERIZATION OF NUCLEAR WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose to research the basic plasma physics necessary to develop a high fluence neutron source based on the inertial electrostatically confined (IEC) plasma. An intense neutron source directly addresses the capability to characterize nuclear materials under difficult measurem...

  1. Portable, high intensity isotopic neutron source provides increased experimental accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, W. C.; Stewart, D. C.; Wahlgren, M. A.

    1968-01-01

    Small portable, high intensity isotopic neutron source combines twelve curium-americium beryllium sources. This high intensity of neutrons, with a flux which slowly decreases at a known rate, provides for increased experimental accuracy.

  2. Compact, inexpensive, epithermal neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, D. A. [Linac Systems, 2167 N. Highway 77, Waxahachie, Texas 75165 (United States)

    1999-06-10

    A new rf-focused linac structure, designed specifically to increase the acceleration efficiency and reduce the cost of linac structures in the few-MeV range, may win the role as the optimum accelerator-based epithermal neutron source for the BNCT application. This new linac structure resembles a drift tube linac (DTL) with radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) focusing incorporated into each 'drift tube,' hence the name R lowbar f F lowbar ocused D lowbar TL, or RFD. It promises superior acceleration properties, focusing properties, and CW capabilities. We have a proposal under consideration for the development of an epithermal neutron source, based on the 2.5-MeV RFD linac system with an average current of 10 mA, having the following components: an ion source, a short low-energy transport system, a short RFQ linac section, an RFD linac section, an rf power system, a high-energy beam transport system, a proton beam target, and a neutron beam moderator system. We propose to develop a solid lithium target for this application in the form of a thin lithium layer on the inner surface of a truncated aluminum cone, cooled by the heavy water moderator, where the proton beam is expanded to a diameter of 3 cm and scanned along a circular path, striking the lithium layer at the cone's half-angle of 30 degrees. We propose to develop a moderator assembly designed to transmit a large fraction of the source neutrons from the target to the patient treatment port, while shifting the neutron energies to an appropriate epithermal energy spectrum and minimizing the gamma-ray dose. The status of this proposal and these plans are presented.

  3. neutron density. The neutron density (nn) of the source was modeled by solving the simul-

    E-print Network

    West, Stuart

    neutron density. The neutron density (nn) of the source was modeled by solving the simul- taneousT is the thermal neutron velocity, l is the decay constant, Ns is the s-process abun- dance, bs is the maxwellian-averaged neutron capture cross-section, and t0 is the average neutron exposure (21). The branching decay of 186Re

  4. First neutron generation in the BINP accelerator based neutron source B. Bayanova

    E-print Network

    Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

    First neutron generation in the BINP accelerator based neutron source B. Bayanova , A. Burdakova c l e i n f o Keywords: Epithermal neutrons Lithium target Neutron capture therapy Tandem accelerator a b s t r a c t Pilot innovative facility for neutron capture therapy was built at Budker

  5. Crystal Driven Neutron Source: A New Paradigm for Miniature Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V; Morse, J; Meyer, G; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; Kerr, P; Park, H G; Rusnak, B; Sampayan, S; Schmid, G; Spadaccini, C; Wang, L

    2008-08-08

    Neutron interrogation techniques have specific advantages for detection of hidden, shielded, or buried threats over other detection modalities in that neutrons readily penetrate most materials providing backscattered gammas indicative of the elemental composition of the potential threat. Such techniques have broad application to military and homeland security needs. Present neutron sources and interrogation systems are expensive and relatively bulky, thereby making widespread use of this technique impractical. Development of a compact, high intensity crystal driven neutron source is described. The crystal driven neutron source approach has been previously demonstrated using pyroelectric crystals that generate extremely high voltages when thermal cycled [1-4]. Placement of a sharpened needle on the positively polarized surface of the pyroelectric crystal results in sufficient field intensification to field ionize background deuterium molecules in a test chamber, and subsequently accelerate the ions to energies in excess of {approx}100 keV, sufficient for either D-D or D-T fusion reactions with appropriate target materials. Further increase in ion beam current can be achieved through optimization of crystal thermal ramping, ion source and crystal accelerator configuration. The advantage of such a system is the compact size along with elimination of large, high voltage power supplies. A novel implementation discussed incorporates an independently controlled ion source in order to provide pulsed neutron operation having microsecond pulse width.

  6. Advanced Neutron Sources: Plant Design Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new, world class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. At the heart of the facility is a 350-MW{sub th}, heavy water cooled and moderated reactor. The reactor is housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides fans out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Office, laboratory, and shop facilities are included to provide a complete users facility. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory at the end of the decade. This Plant Design Requirements document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of the ANS. This document also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this Plant Design Requirements document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of the ANS.

  7. Advanced Neutron Source: Plant Design Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will be a new world-class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. The heart of the facility will be a 330-MW (fission), heavy-water cooled and heavy-water moderated reactor. The reactor will be housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides will fan out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Appropriate office, laboratory, and shop facilities will be included to provide a complete facility for users. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory early in the next decade. This PDR document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of ANS. It also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this PDR document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of ANS.

  8. The possible use of a spallation neutron source for neutron capture therapy with epithermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Grusell, E.; Conde, H.; Larsson, B.; Roennqvist, T.S.; Sornsuntisook, O.; Crawford, J.; Reist, H.; Dahl, B.; Sjoestrand, N.G.R.; Russel, G. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden))

    1990-01-01

    Spallation is induced in a heavy material by 72-MeV protons. The resulting neutrons can be characterized by an evaporation spectrum with a peak energy of less than 2 MeV. The neutrons are moderated in two steps: first in iron and then in carbon. Results from neutron fluence measurements in a perspex phantom placed close to the moderator are presented. Monte Carlo calculations of neutron fluence in a water phantom are also presented under some chosen configurations of spallation source and moderator. The calculations and measurements are in good agreement and show that, for proton currents of less than 0.5 mA, useful thermal-neutron fluences are attainable in the depth of the brain. However, the dose contribution from the unavoidable gamma background component has not been included in the present investigation.

  9. The Advanced Neutron Source liquid deuterium cold source

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A.T.

    1995-08-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will employ two cold sources to moderate neutrons to low energy (<10 meV). The cold neutrons produced are then passed through beam guides to various experiment stations. Each cold source moderator is a sphere of 410-mm internal diameter. The moderator material is liquid deuterium flowing at a rate of 1 kg/s and maintained at subcooled temperatures at all points of the circuit, to prevent boiling. Nuclear beat deposited within the liquid deuterium and its containment structure totals more than 30 kW. All of this heat is removed by the liquid deuterium, which raises its temperature by 5 K. The liquid prime mover is a cryogenic circulator that is situated in the return leg of the flow loop. This arrangement minimizes the heat added to the liquid between the heat exchanger and the moderator vessel, allowing the moderator to be operated at the minimum practical temperature. This report describes the latest thinking at the time of project termination. It also includes the status of various systems at that time and outlines anticipated directions in which the design would have progressed. In this regard, some detail differences between this report and official design documents reflect ideas that were not approved at the time of closure but are considered noteworthy.

  10. Spectrum of isotopic neutron sources inside concrete wall spherical cavities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hctor Ren Vega-Carrillo; Eduardo Manzanares-Acua; Mara Pilar Iiguez; Eduardo Gallego; Alfredo Lorente

    2007-01-01

    The neutron spectra of Cf252\\/D2O, LaBe140, Cf252, Pu238O218, AmB241, AmBe241, RaBe226 and PuBe239 isotopic neutron sources due to room-return have been determined for various source-to-detector distances in concrete spherical cavities of different radius. Changes in the amount of thermal neutrons (E?0.414eV) were analyzed to estimate, for each neutron source, the coefficient that relates the neutron source strength and room surface

  11. Unperturbed moderator brightness in pulsed neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batkov, K.; Takibayev, A.; Zanini, L.; Mezei, F.

    2013-11-01

    The unperturbed neutron brightness of a moderator can be defined from the number of neutrons leaving the surface of a moderator completely surrounded by a reflector. Without openings for beam extraction, it is the maximum brightness that can be theoretically achieved in a moderator. The unperturbed brightness of a cylindrical cold moderator filled with pure para-H2 was calculated using MCNPX; the moderator dimensions were optimised, for a fixed target and reflector geometry corresponding to the present concept for the ESS spallation source. This quantity does not depend on openings for beam extraction and therefore can be used for a first-round optimisation of a moderator, before effects due to beam openings are considered. We find that such an optimisation yields to a factor of 2 increase with respect to a conventional volume moderator, large enough to accommodate a viewed surface of 1212 cm2: the unperturbed neutron brightness is maximum for a disc-shaped moderator of 15 cm diameter, 1.4 cm height. The reasons for this increase can be related to the properties of the scattering cross-section of para-H2, to the added reflector around the exit surface in the case of a compact moderator, and to a directionality effect. This large optimisation gain in the unperturbed brightness hints towards similar potentials for the perturbed neutron brightness, in particular in conjunction with advancing the optical quality of neutron delivery from the moderator to the sample, where by Liouville theorem the brightness is conserved over the beam trajectory, except for absorption and similar type losses.

  12. Inertial electro-magnetostatic plasma neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.C.; Nebel, R.A.; Schauer, M.M.; Pickrel, M.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Two types of systems are being studied experimentally as D-T plasma neutron sources. In both concepts, spherical convergence of either electrons or ions or both is used to produce a dense central focus within which D-T fusion reactions produce 14 MeV neutrons. One concept uses nonneutral plasma confinement principles in a Penning type trap. In this approach, combined electrostatic and magnetic fields provide a vacuum potential well within which electrons are confined and focused. A small (6 mm radius) spherical machine has demonstrated a focus of 30 {micro}m radius, with a central density of up to 35 times the Brillouin density limit of a static trap. The resulting electron plasma of up to several 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} provides a multi-kV electrostatic well for confining thermonuclear ions as a neutron source. The second concept (Inertial Electrostatic Confinement, or IEC) uses a high-transparence grid to form a global well for acceleration and confinement of ions. Such a system has demonstrated steady neutron output of 2 {times} 10{sup 10} s{sup {minus}1}. The present experiment will scale this to >10{sup 11} s{sup {minus}1}. Advanced designs based on each concept have been developed recently. In these proposed approaches, a uniform-density electron sphere forms an electrostatic well for ions. Ions so trapped may be focused by spherical convergence to produce a dense core. An alternative approach produces large amplitude spherical oscillations of a confined ion cloud by a small, resonant modulation of the background electrons. In both the advanced Penning trap approach and the advanced IEC approach, the electrons are magnetically insulated from a large (up to 100 kV) applied electrostatic field. The physics of these devices is discussed, experimental design details are given, present observations are analyzed theoretically, and the performance of future advanced systems are predicted.

  13. Superfluid-helium Ultracold Neutron Sources: Concepts for the European Spallation Source?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Oliver

    Production of ultracold neutrons by conversion of cold neutrons in superfluid helium can be implemented in several ways, with the converter located either in-pile close to the core of a nuclear reactor or closely coupled to a neutron spallation source, or at the end of a neutron guide. This paper shall contribute to a discussion about source concepts for the ESS.

  14. New sources and instrumentation for neutrons in biology

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, S.C.M.; Ankner, J.; Bellissent-Funel, M.C.; Bewley, R.; Blakeley, M.P.; Coates, L.; Dahint, R.; Dalgliesh, R.; Dencher, N.; Dhont, J.; Fischer, P.; Forsyth, V.T.; Fragneto, G.; Frick, B.; Geue, T.; Gilles, R.; Gutberlet, T.; Haertlein, M.; Hau, T.; Huler, W.; Heller, W.T.; Herwig, K.; Holderer, O.; Juranyi, F.; Kampmann, R.; Knott, R.; Kohlbrecher, J.; Kreuger, S.; Langan, P.; Lechner, R.; Lynn, G.; Majkrzak, C.; May, R.; Meilleur, F.; Mo, Y.; Mortensen, K.; Myles, D.A.A.; Natali, F.; Neylon, C.; Niimura, N.; Ollivier, J.; Ostermann, A.; Peters, J.; Pieper, J.; Rhm, A.; Schwahn, D.; Shibata, K.; Soper, A.K.; Straessle, T.; Suzuki, U.-i.; Tanaka, I.; Tehei, M.; Timmins, P.; Torikai, N.; Unruh, T.; Urban, V.; Vavrin, R.; Weiss, K.; Zaccai, G.

    2008-01-01

    Neutron radiation offers significant advantages for the study of biological molecular structure and dynamics. A broad and significant effort towards instrumental and methodological development to facilitate biology experiments at neutron sources worldwide is reviewed. PMID:19132140

  15. Absolute determination of the neutron source yield using melamine as a neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciechanowski, M.; Bolewski, A., Jr.; Kreft, A.

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to absolute determination of the neutron source yield is presented. It bases on the application of melamine (C3H6N6) to neutron detection combined with Monte Carlo simulations of neutron transport. Melamine has the ability to detect neutrons via 14N(n, p)14C reaction and subsequent determination of 14C content. A cross section for this reaction is relatively high for thermal neutrons (1.827 b) and much lower for fast neutrons. A concentration of 14C nuclei created in the irradiated sample of melamine can be reliably measured with the aid of the accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The mass of melamine sufficient for this analysis is only 10 mg. Neutron detection is supported by Monte Carlo simulations of neutron transport carried out with the use of MCNP-4C code. These simulations are aimed at computing the probability of 14C creation in the melamine sample per the source neutron. The result of AMS measurements together with results of MCNP calculations enable us to determine the number of neutrons emitted from the source during the irradiation of melamine. The proposed method was applied for determining the neutron emission from a commercial 252Cf neutron source which was independently calibrated. The measured neutron emission agreed with the certified one within uncertainty limits. The relative expanded uncertainty (k=2) of the absolute neutron source yield determination was estimated at 2.6%. Apart from calibration of radionuclide neutron sources the proposed procedure could facilitate absolute yield measurements for more complex sources. Potential applications of this methodology as it is further developed include diagnostics of inertial confinement fusion and plasma-focus experiments, calibration of neutron measurement systems at tokamaks and accelerator-based neutron sources as well as characterization of neutron fields generated in large particle detectors during collisions of hadron beams.

  16. Outlook for European Spallation Neutron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Guenter S.

    1996-05-01

    Currently, European laboratories are making major efforts to advance spallation neutron sources for neutron scattering applications: ISIS, the UK-facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory has achieved its design parameters of 160 kW beam power at 60 Hz repetition rate and is serving a large clientelle. The facility is using a Tantalum target which has a life time of at least a year at full performance. Plans exist to further increase the beam current and to add a second target station.A study for an even more demanding short pulsed source, AUSRTON, with 200 kW beam power at 25 Hz repetition rate using a solid, edge cooled, W5 Re alloy target has recently been completed in Austria. In Switzerland, at the Paul Scherrer Institut, a continuous spallation source with 600kW beam power is nearing completion, with the accelerator already running at full performance. The source will initially use a heavy water cooled circaloy target, but efforts are being made to develop clad lead target elements and the final goal is a liquid metal target, avoiding the cooling water in the beam. Finally, in a joint effort between several European laboratories and Universities a true next generation source is being studied, the 5 MW- 50 Hz ESS, which will deliver 1 microsecond long proton pulses with an energy content of 100 kJ per pulse. Extensive study work is going on towards a liquid mercury target for this facility which is capable of taking this very high pulse load.

  17. A simple radio-isotopic method for the detection of bronchial inhalation during intensive care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Venot; E. Veyriras; J. C. Vandroux; E. Bournaud; H. Gastinne; C. Beck

    1984-01-01

    The high incidence of pneumopathy in intensive care units might be due to the pulmonary aspiration of gastric juice following gastro-oesophageal reflux. The paper describes a radio-isotopic method using material easy to install at the patient's bedside. This technique demonstrated aspiration of gastric juice in the lungs of 8 of 25 intensive care patients investigated. Such a method might be

  18. Using spallation neutron sources for defense research

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Sterbenz, S.M.; Weinacht, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    Advanced characterization techniques and accelerated simulation are the cornerstones of the Energy Department`s science-based program to maintain confidence in the safety, reliability, and performance of the US nuclear deterrent in an era of no nuclear testing. Neutrons and protons provided by an accelerator-based facility have an important role to play in this program, impacting several of the key stockpile stewardship and management issues identified by the Department of Defense. Many of the techniques used for defense research at a spallation source have been used for many years for the basic research community, and to a lesser extent by industrial scientists. By providing access to a broad spectrum of researchers with different backgrounds, a spallation source such as the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is able to promote synergistic interaction between defense, basic and industrial researchers. This broadens the scientific basis of the stockpile stewardship program in the short term and will provide spin-off to industrial and basic research in the longer term.

  19. Field Ion Source Development for Neutron Generators

    SciTech Connect

    B. Bargsten Johnson; P. R. Schwoebel; C. E. Holland; P. J. Resnick; K. L. Hertz; D. L. Chichester

    2012-01-01

    An ion source based on the principles of electrostatic field desorption is being developed to improve the performance of existing compact neutron generators. The ion source is an array of gated metal tips derived from field electron emitter array microfabrication technology. A comprehensive summary of development and experimental activities is presented. Many structural modifications to the arrays have been incorporated to achieve higher tip operating fields, while lowering fields at the gate electrode to prevent gate field electron emission which initiates electrical breakdown in the array. The latest focus of fabrication activities has been on rounding the gate electrode edge and surrounding the gate electrode with dielectric material. Array testing results have indicated a steady progression of increased array tip operating fields with each new design tested. The latest arrays have consistently achieved fields beyond those required for the onset of deuterium desorption ({approx}20 V/nm), and have demonstrated the desorption of deuterium at fields up to 36 V/nm. The number of ions desorbed from an array has been quantified, and field desorption of metal tip substrate material from array tips has been observed for the first time. Gas-phase field ionization studies with {approx}10,000 tip arrays have achieved deuterium ion currents of {approx}50 nA. Neutron production by field ionization has yielded {approx}10{sup 2} n/s from {approx}1 mm{sup 2} of array area using the deuterium-deuterium fusion reaction at 90 kV.

  20. Status of the intense pulsed neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.; Brown, B.S.; Kustom, R.L.; Lander, G.H.; Potts, C.W.; Schulke, A.W.; Wuestefeld, G.

    1985-01-01

    Fortunately in spite of some premature reports of its impending demise, IPNS has passed the fourth anniversary of the first delivery of protons to the targets (May 5, 1981) and is approaching the fourth anniversary of its operation as a scattering facility (August 4, 1981). On June 10, 1984, the RCS delivered its one billionth pulse to the IPNS target - the total number of protons delivered to the targets amounted then to 75 stp cm/sup 3/ of H/sub 2/ gas. Since startup IPNS has improved steadily in terms of the performance of the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron, the source and its moderators and the scattering instruments, and a substantial and productive user program has evolved. This report summarizes the current status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source at Argonne National Laboratory. We include reference to recent accelerator operating experience, neutron facility operating experience, improvements to these systems, design work on the ASPUN high-current facility, booster target design, the new solid methane moderator, characterization of the room temperature moderators, and provide some examples of recent results from several of the spectrometers.

  1. General Electric PETtrace cyclotron as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    E-print Network

    Bosko, Andrey

    2005-11-01

    This research investigates the use of a PETtrace cyclotron produced by General Electric (GE) as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The GE PETtrace was chosen for this investigation because this type of cyclotron is popular...

  2. General Electric PETtrace cyclotron as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    E-print Network

    Bosko, Andrey

    2005-11-01

    This research investigates the use of a PETtrace cyclotron produced by General Electric (GE) as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The GE PETtrace was chosen for this investigation because this type of cyclotron is popular...

  3. Novel neutron focusing mirrors for compact neutron sources

    E-print Network

    Gubarev, M.V.

    We demonstrated neutron beam focusing and neutron imaging using axisymmetric optics, based on pairs of confocal ellipsoid and hyperboloid mirrors. Such systems, known as Wolter mirrors, are commonly used in x-ray telescopes. ...

  4. Non-reactor neutron sources for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. J. Dolan; E. H. Ottewitte; E. E. Wills; W. A. Neuman; D. M. Woodall

    1989-01-01

    The focus of this study is the indentification of key feasibility issues for the use of non-reactor neutron sources for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Of the non-reactor neutron sources surveyed, the ⁷Li(p,n) reaction appears to be the most favorable for producing epithermal neutrons for BNCT, and RFQ accelerators are best for producing the desired proton beam. At a proton

  5. Materials considerations for the National Spallation Neutron Source target

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. K. Mansur; J. R. DiStefano; K. Farrell; E. H. Lee; S. J. Pawel; M. S. Wechsler

    1997-01-01

    The National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS), in which neutrons are generated by bombarding a liquid mercury target with 1 GeV protons, will place extraordinary demands on materials performance. The target structural material will operate in an aggressive environment, subject to intense fluxes of high energy protons, neutrons, and other particles, while exposed to liquid mercury and to water. Components that

  6. rf improvements for Spallation Neutron Source H- ion source.

    PubMed

    Kang, Y W; Fuja, R; Goulding, R H; Hardek, T; Lee, S-W; McCarthy, M P; Piller, M C; Shin, K; Stockli, M P; Welton, R F

    2010-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is ramping up the accelerated proton beam power to 1.4 MW and just reached 1 MW. The rf-driven multicusp ion source that originates from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been delivering approximately 38 mA H(-) beam in the linac at 60 Hz, 0.9 ms. To improve availability, a rf-driven external antenna multicusp ion source with a water-cooled ceramic aluminum nitride (AlN) plasma chamber is developed. Computer modeling and simulations have been made to analyze and optimize the rf performance of the new ion source. Operational statistics and test runs with up to 56 mA medium energy beam transport beam current identify the 2 MHz rf system as a limiting factor in the system availability and beam production. Plasma ignition system is under development by using a separate 13 MHz system. To improve the availability of the rf power system with easier maintenance, we tested a 70 kV isolation transformer for the 80 kW, 6% duty cycle 2 MHz amplifier to power the ion source from a grounded solid-state amplifier. PMID:20192394

  7. HFIR cold neutron source moderator vessel design analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.J.

    1998-04-01

    A cold neutron source capsule made of aluminum alloy is to be installed and located at the tip of one of the neutron beam tubes of the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Cold hydrogen liquid of temperature approximately 20 degree Kelvin and 15 bars pressure is designed to flow through the aluminum capsule that serves to chill and to moderate the incoming neutrons produced from the reactor core. The cold and low energy neutrons thus produced will be used as cold neutron sources for the diffraction experiments. The structural design calculation for the aluminum capsule is reported in this paper.

  8. RFQ linac-based BNCT neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, R.W. [AccSys Technology, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A preliminary study has recently been completed for the National Cancer Institute of the various radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac systems that could be used to generate the epithermal neutron flux required for BNCT clinical treatment. This study included neutron sources that utilize the Be(p,n) reaction at a proton beam energy of 4 MeV, as well as the conventional Li(p,n) reaction at a proton energy of 2.5 MeV. A range of RFQ systems were considered as candidates, from commercially available pulsed linacs capable of delivering 5 to 10 mA average current to state-of-the-art CW linacs capable of delivering 50 mA current. Because this study concluded that key experimental data will be required to make the final choice of the most cost-effective clinical system, a 2.5 MeV, 1 mA pre-clinical system was also designed as a first step in the selection process.

  9. Proton recoil spectroscopy 400 meters from a fission neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Stanka, M.B. [STECS-NE, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Neutron kerma and spectrum measurements have been made at the US Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) to 400m in an air-over-ground geometry from a fission neutron source and have been compared to Monte Carlo transport calculations. The neutron spectra measurements were made using a rotating neutron spectrometer. This spectrometer consists of four spherical proton-recoil detectors mounted on a common rotating base. Detector radius, gas composition, and pressure have been varied to allow sensitivity over a neutron range of 50 keV to 4.5 MeV. Neutron kerma was determined by using the Kerr soft-tissue kerma factors. Measured neutron kerma agreed with the calculated neutron kerma to within 5%. Comparisons with other neutron spectrometers such as NE213 and Bonner Spheres are presented and agreement between the different spectrometers is better than 20%.

  10. Thermal neutron cross-section data for the design of cold and superthermal neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernnat, W.; Emendrfer, D.; Kfer, S.; Keinert, J.; Mattes, M.; Predel, M.

    1997-02-01

    For the relevant materials used in cold and superthermal neutron sources the database for design studies was considerably improved. For D 2O at room temperature the intra and inter molecular interaction with neutrons were included using realistic structure factors S( ?). These effects are also taken into account for the cold moderators liquid H 2 and D 2 by deriving improved S( ?). The neutron interaction in solid materials and neutron filters as Al, Pb and Bi is treated exactly at low temperatures, especially for coherent neutron scattering in the tetragonal and FCC lattices. For superfluid 4He cross-section data for ultracold neutron production were derived as well as data for neutron transport considering diffusive motions and intermolecular scattering. Validation of the generated cross-sectional data was realized by comparison with differential and integral neutron scattering experiments so far available. These thermal neutron data can be used for both multigroup SN and Monte-Carlo methods solving the neutron transport equation.

  11. BNCT beam quality sensitivity to a source neutron spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, E.; Karni, Y.; Vujic, J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Ludewigt, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    It has been shown that the clinical quality of the neutron beam available for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) depends strongly on the design of the beam shaping assembly (BSA). The same study showed that a neutron source based on the {sup 7}Li(p,n) reaction, which is induced by protons accelerated to 2.5 MeV, could provide treatment beams having better depth-dose characteristics than those attainable using existing reactor sources. The neutron flux spectrum from the former source peaks closer to the optimal treatment energy and has a narrower distribution. This poses a question: Is the superior shape of the treatment flux spectrum from the accelerator-based source mainly due to its softer source spectrum-its maximum neutron energy is below 800 keV-or to nonoptimal design of the BSA for the reactor-based source?

  12. Electronic neutron sources for compensated porosity well logging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. X.; Antolak, A. J.; Leung, K.-N.

    2012-08-01

    The viability of replacing Americium-Beryllium (Am-Be) radiological neutron sources in compensated porosity nuclear well logging tools with D-T or D-D accelerator-driven neutron sources is explored. The analysis consisted of developing a model for a typical well-logging borehole configuration and computing the helium-3 detector response to varying formation porosities using three different neutron sources (Am-Be, D-D, and D-T). The results indicate that, when normalized to the same source intensity, the use of a D-D neutron source has greater sensitivity for measuring the formation porosity than either an Am-Be or D-T source. The results of the study provide operational requirements that enable compensated porosity well logging with a compact, low power D-D neutron generator, which the current state-of-the-art indicates is technically achievable.

  13. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM CURRENT MONITOR ELECTRONICS.

    SciTech Connect

    KESSELMAN,M.; DAWSON,W.C.

    2002-05-06

    This paper will discuss the present electronics design for the beam current monitor system to be used throughout the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The beam is composed of a micro-pulse structure due to the 402.5MHz RF, and is chopped into mini-pulses of 645ns duration with a 300ns gap, providing a macro-pulse of 1060 mini-pulses repeating at a 60Hz rate. Ring beam current will vary from about 15ma peak during studies, to about 50Amps peak (design to 100 amps). A digital approach to droop compensation has been implemented and initial test results presented.

  14. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM CURRENT MONITOR ELECTRONICS.

    SciTech Connect

    KESSELMAN, M.

    2001-06-18

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be constructed at ORNL is a collaboration of six laboratories. Beam current monitors for SNS will be used to monitor H-minus and H-plus beams ranging from the 15 mA (tune-up in the Front End and Linac) to over 60 A fully accumulated in the Ring. The time structure of the beams to be measured range from 645 nsec ''mini'' bunches, at the 1.05 MHz ring revolution rate, to an overall 1 mS long macro pulse. Beam current monitors (BCMs) for SNS have requirements depending upon their location within the system. The development of a general approach to satisfy requirements of various locations with common components is a major design objective. This paper will describe the development of the beam current monitors and electronics.

  15. Production, distribution and applications of californium-252 neutron sources.

    PubMed

    Martin, R C; Knauer, J B; Balo, P A

    2000-01-01

    The radioisotope 252Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6-yr half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10(11) neutrons s(-1). Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, land mines and unexploded military ordinance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 yr of experience and by US Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). DOE sells 252Cf to commercial reencapsulators domestically and internationally. Sealed 252Cf sources are also available for loan to agencies and subcontractors of the US government and to universities for educational, research and medical applications. The REDC has established the Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science to make its large inventory of 252Cf sources available to researchers for irradiations inside uncontaminated hot cells. Experiments at the CUF include a land mine detection system, neutron damage testing of solid-state detectors, irradiation of human cancer cells for boron neutron capture therapy experiments and irradiation of rice to induce genetic mutations. PMID:11003521

  16. Overview of the Target Systems for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.; Haines, J.R.; McManamy, T.J.

    1998-10-15

    The technologies that are being utilized to design and build the target systems for a state-of-the-art accelerator- based neutron source, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), are discussed. Emphasis is given to the technology issues that present the greatest challenges. The present facility configuration, ongoing analysis, and planned research and development program are also described.

  17. New opportunities in neutron capture research using advanced pulsed neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, C.D.

    1987-08-01

    The extraordinary neutron intensities available from the new spallation pulsed neutron sources open up exciting opportunities for basic and applied research in neutron nuclear physics. Prospective experiments are reviewed with particular attention to those with a strong connection to capture gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  18. Influences of Neutron Source Spectrum and Thermal Neutron Scattering Law Data on the MCNPX Simulation of a Cyclotron-Based Neutron Field for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shunsuke YONAI; Mamoru BABA; Toshiro ITOGA; Takashi NAKAMURA; Hitoshi YOKOBORI; Yoshihisa TAHARA

    2007-01-01

    In our previous study, the simulation of a cyclotron-based neutron field for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a (p,n) spallation source with the MCNPX code was validated through measurements of the neutron energy spectrum behind the moderator assembly and the thermal neutron distribution in an acrylic phantom using reaction rates of Au. These validations showed that the simulation generally

  19. Production, Distribution, and Applications of Californium-252 Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Balo, P.A.; Knauer, J.B.; Martin, R.C.

    1999-10-03

    The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6-year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10{sup 11} neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). DOE sells The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6- year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10 neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory(ORNL). DOE sells {sup 252}Cf to commercial reencapsulators domestically and internationally. Sealed {sup 252}Cf sources are also available for loan to agencies and subcontractors of the U.S. government and to universities for educational, research, and medical applications. The REDC has established the Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science to make its large inventory of {sup 252}Cf sources available to researchers for irradiations inside uncontaminated hot cells. Experiments at the CUF include a land mine detection system, neutron damage testing of solid-state detectors, irradiation of human cancer cells for boron neutron capture therapy experiments, and irradiation of rice to induce genetic mutations.

  20. A simple radio-isotopic method for the detection of bronchial inhalation during intensive care.

    PubMed

    Venot, J; Veyriras, E; Vandroux, J C; Bournaud, E; Gastinne, H; Beck, C

    1984-01-01

    The high incidence of pneumopathy in intensive care units might be due to the pulmonary aspiration of gastric juice following gastro-oesophageal reflux. The paper describes a radio-isotopic method using material easy to install at the patient's bedside. This technique demonstrated aspiration of gastric juice in the lungs of 8 of 25 intensive care patients investigated. Such a method might be useful later to demonstrate that silent bronchial aspirations of gastric juice are responsible for pulmonary complications. PMID:6489365

  1. Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

    2008-07-01

    The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

  2. An overview of the planned advanced neutron source facility

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), now in the conceptual design stage, will be a new user facility for neutron research, including neutron beam experiments, materials irradiation testing and materials analysis capabilities, and production facilities for transuranic and lighter isotopes. The neutron source is to be the world's highest flux beam reactor and is based on existing reactor technology to minimize safety issues. The preferred fuel, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, has been tested in operating reactors in the United States, Japan, and Europe. The core is cooled, moderated, and reflected by heavy water, common practice for research reactors. 3 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Fissile mass estimation by pulsed neutron source interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelashvili, I.; Dubi, C.; Ettedgui, H.; Ocherashvili, A.; Pedersen, B.; Beck, A.; Roesgen, E.; Crochmore, J. M.; Ridnik, T.; Yaar, I.

    2015-06-01

    Passive methods for detecting correlated neutrons from spontaneous fissions (e.g. multiplicity and SVM) are widely used for fissile mass estimations. These methods can be used for fissile materials that emit a significant amount of fission neutrons (like plutonium). Active interrogation, in which fissions are induced in the tested material by an external continuous source or by a pulsed neutron source, has the potential advantages of fast measurement, alongside independence of the spontaneous fissions of the tested fissile material, thus enabling uranium measurement. Until recently, using the multiplicity method, for uranium mass estimation, was possible only for active interrogation made with continues neutron source. Pulsed active neutron interrogation measurements were analyzed with techniques, e.g. differential die away analysis (DDA), which ignore or implicitly include the multiplicity effect (self-induced fission chains). Recently, both, the multiplicity and the SVM techniques, were theoretically extended for analyzing active fissile mass measurements, made by a pulsed neutron source. In this study the SVM technique for pulsed neutron source is experimentally examined, for the first time. The measurements were conducted at the PUNITA facility of the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy. First promising results, of mass estimation by the SVM technique using a pulsed neutron source, are presented.

  4. Accelerator-based epithermal neutron sources for boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas E. Blue; Jacquelyn C. Yanch

    2003-01-01

    SummaryThis paper reviews the development of low-energy light ion accelerator-based neutron sources (ABNSs) for the treatment of\\u000a brain tumors through an intact scalp and skull using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A major advantage of an ABNS for\\u000a BNCT over reactor-based neutron sources is the potential for siting within a hospital. Consequently, light-ion accelerators\\u000a that are injectors to larger machines

  5. Accelerator-based Epithermal Neutron Sources for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of Brain Tumors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas E. Blue; Jacquelyn C. Yanch

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of low-energy light ion accelerator-based neutron sources (ABNSs) for the treatment of brain tumors through an intact scalp and skull using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A major advantage of an ABNS for BNCT over reactor-based neutron sources is the potential for siting within a hospital. Consequently, light-ion accelerators that are injectors to larger machines

  6. Superthermal source of ultracold neutrons for fundamental physics experiments.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Oliver; Piegsa, Florian M; Ivanov, Sergey N

    2011-09-23

    Ultracold neutrons (UCNs) play an important role for precise measurements of the properties of the neutron and its interactions. During the past 25 years, a neutron turbine coupled to a liquid deuterium cold neutron source at a high-flux reactor has defined the state of the art for UCN production, despite a long history of efforts towards a new generation of UCN sources. This Letter reports a world-best UCN density available for users, achieved with a new source based on conversion of cold neutrons in superfluid helium. A conversion volume of 5 liters provides at least 274,000 UCN in a single accumulation run. Cyclically repeated operation of the source has been demonstrated, as well. PMID:22026860

  7. Superthermal Source of Ultracold Neutrons for Fundamental Physics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, Oliver; Piegsa, Florian M.; Ivanov, Sergey N. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France)

    2011-09-23

    Ultracold neutrons (UCNs) play an important role for precise measurements of the properties of the neutron and its interactions. During the past 25 years, a neutron turbine coupled to a liquid deuterium cold neutron source at a high-flux reactor has defined the state of the art for UCN production, despite a long history of efforts towards a new generation of UCN sources. This Letter reports a world-best UCN density available for users, achieved with a new source based on conversion of cold neutrons in superfluid helium. A conversion volume of 5 liters provides at least 274 000 UCN in a single accumulation run. Cyclically repeated operation of the source has been demonstrated, as well.

  8. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project Progress report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Thompson, P.B. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (United States). Engineering Division

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following about the Advanced Neutron Source: Project Management; Research and Development; Fuel Development; Corrosion Loop Tests and Analyses; Thermal-Hydraulic Loop Tests; Reactor Control and Shutdown Concepts; Critical and Subcritical Experiments; Material Data, Structural Tests, and Analysis; Cold-Source Development; Beam Tube, Guide, and Instrument Development; Hot-Source Development; Neutron Transport and Shielding; I & C Research and Development; Design; and Safety.

  9. Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project Progress report, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H. (ed.) (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Selby, D.L.; Harrington, R.M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Thompson, P.B. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (United States). Engineering Division)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following about the Advanced Neutron Source: Project Management; Research and Development; Fuel Development; Corrosion Loop Tests and Analyses; Thermal-Hydraulic Loop Tests; Reactor Control and Shutdown Concepts; Critical and Subcritical Experiments; Material Data, Structural Tests, and Analysis; Cold-Source Development; Beam Tube, Guide, and Instrument Development; Hot-Source Development; Neutron Transport and Shielding; I C Research and Development; Design; and Safety.

  10. Accelerator-based neutron source for the neutron-capture and fast neutron therapy at hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayanov, B. F.; Belov, V. P.; Bender, E. D.; Bokhovko, M. V.; Dimov, G. I.; Kononov, V. N.; Kononov, O. E.; Kuksanov, N. K.; Palchikov, V. E.; Pivovarov, V. A.; Salimov, R. A.; Silvestrov, G. I.; Skrinsky, A. N.; Soloviov, N. A.; Taskaev, S. Yu.

    The proton accelerator complex for neutron production in lithium target discussed, which can operate in two modes. The first provides a neutron beam kinematically collimated with good forward direction in 25 and average energy of 30 keV, directly applicable for neutron-capture therapy with high efficiency of proton beam use. The proton energy in this mode is 1.883-1.890 MeV that is near the threshold of the 7Li( p, n) 7Be reaction. In the second mode, at proton energy of 2.5 MeV, the complex-produced neutron beam with maximum energy board of 790 keV which can be used directly for fast neutron therapy and for neutron-capture therapy after moderation. The project of such a neutron source is based on the 2.5 MeV original electrostatic accelerator tandem with vacuum insulation developed at BINP which is supplied with a high-voltage rectifier. The rectifier is produced in BINP as a part of ELV-type industrial accelerator. Design features of the tandem determining its high reliability in operation with a high-current (up to 40 mA) H - ion beam are discussed. They are: the absence of ceramic accelerator columns around the beam passage region, good conditions for pumping out of charge-exchange gaseous target region, strong focusing optics and high acceleration rate minimizing the space charge effects. The possibility of stabilization of protons energy with an accuracy level of 0.1% necessary for operation in the near threshold region is considered. The design description of H - continuous ion source with a current of 40 mA is also performed. To operate with a 100 kW proton beam it is proposed to use liquid-lithium targets. A thin lithium layer on the surface of a tungsten disk cooled intensively by a liquid metal heat carrier is proposed for use in case of the vertical beam, and a flat liquid lithium jet flowing through the narrow nozzle - for the horizontal beam.

  11. A Dipole Assisted IEC Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Prajakti Joshi Shrestha

    2005-11-28

    A potential opportunity to enhance Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) fusion exists by augmenting it with a magnetic dipole configuration. The theory is that the dipole fields will enhance the plasma density in the center region of the IEC and the combined IEC and dipole confinement properties will reduce plasma losses. To demonstrate that a hybrid Dipole-IEC configuration can provide an improved neutron source vs. a stand alone IEC, a first model Dipole-IEC experiment was benchmarked against a reference IEC. A triple Langmuir probe was used to find the electron temperature and density. It was found that the magnetic field increases the electron density by a factor of 16, the electron temperature decreases in the presence of a magnetic field, the discharge voltage decreases in the presence of a magnetic field, the potential of the dipole strongly influences the densities obtained in the center. The experimental set-up and plasma diagnostics are discussed in detail, as well as the results, and the developmental issues.

  12. Characterization of short-pulse laser driven neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Katerina; Jung, Daniel; Guler, Nevzat; Deppert, Oliver; Devlin, Matthew; Fernandez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Geissel, M.; Haight, R. C.; Hegelich, B. M.; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, K. D.; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F. E.; Schaumann, G.; Schoenberg, K.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Tybo, J. L.; Wagner, F.; Wender, S. A.; Wurden, G. A.; Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2014-10-01

    We present a full spectral characterization of a novel laser driven neutron source, which employed the Break Out Afterburner ion acceleration mechanism. Neutrons were produced by nuclear reactions of the ions deposited on Be or Cu converters. We observed neutrons at energies up to 150 MeV. The neutron spectra were measured by five neutron time-of-flight detectors at various positions and distances from the source. The nTOF detectors observed that emission of neutrons is a superposition of an isotropic component peaking at 3.5--5 MeV resulting from nuclear reactions in the converter and a directional component at 25--70 MeV, which was a product of break-up reaction of the forward moving deuterons. Energy shifts due to geometrical effects in BOA were also observed.

  13. Radiation Field for Fission Neutron Enhanced Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Employing Fast Neutron Source Reactor YAYOI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroaki WAKABAYASHI; Kozi YOSHII; Norihiko SASUGA; Hideharu YANAGI

    1982-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of a localized tumor needs a sufficient thermal neutron flux at the tumor. A surgical operation including ennucleation of the main part of tumor is required for the case of thermal neutron beam from a thermal reactor because of the rapid decrease of the neutron flux in the tissue. Intermediate neutrons with little fast neutron

  14. Accelerator-driven neutron sources for materials research

    SciTech Connect

    Jameson, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Particle accelerators are important tools for materials research and production. Advances in high-intensity linear accelerator technology make it possible to consider enhanced neutron sources for fusion material studies or as a source of spallation neutrons. Energy variability, uniformity of target dose distribution, target bombardment from multiple directions, time-scheduled dose patterns, and other features can be provided, opening new experimental opportunities. New designs have also been used to ensure hands-on maintenance on the accelerator in these factory-type facilities. Designs suitable for proposals such as the Japanese Energy-Selective Intense Neutron Source, and the international Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility are discussed.

  15. Inertial electrostatic confinement I(IEC) neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nebel, R.A.; Barnes, D.C.; Caramana, E.J.; Janssen, R.D.; Nystrom, W.D.; Tiouririne, T.N.; Trent, B.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Miley, G.H.; Javedani, J. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) is one of the earliest plasma confinement concepts, having first been suggested by P.T. Farnsworth in the 1950s. The concept involves a simple apparatus of concentric spherical electrostatic grids or a combination of grids and magnetic fields. An electrostatic structure is formed from the confluence of electron or ion beams. Gridded IEC systems have demonstrated neutron yields as high as 2*10 [10]. neutrons/sec in steady state. These systems have considerable potential as small, inexpensive, portable neutron sources for assaying applications. Neutron tomography is also a potential application. This paper discusses the IEC concept and how it can be adapted to a steady-state assaying source and an intense pulsed neutron source. Theoretical modeling and experimental results are presented.

  16. Summary of alpha-neutron sources in GADRAS.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Dean James; Thoreson, Gregory G.; Harding, Lee T.

    2012-05-01

    A common source of neutrons for calibration and testing is alpha-neutron material, named for the alpha-neutron nuclear reaction that occurs within. This material contains a long-lived alpha-emitter and a lighter target element. When the alpha particle from the emitter is absorbed by the target, neutrons and gamma rays are released. Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) includes built-in alpha-neutron source definitions for AcC, AmB, AmBe, AmF, AmLi, CmC, and PuC. In addition, GADRAS users may create their own alpha-neutron sources by placing valid alpha-emitters and target elements in materials within their one-dimensional models (1DModel). GADRAS has the ability to use pre-built alpha-neutron sources for plotting or as trace-sources in 1D models. In addition, if any material (existing or user-defined) specified in a 1D model contains both an alpha emitter in conjunction with a target nuclide, or there is an interface between such materials, then the appropriate neutron-emission rate from the alpha-neutron reaction will be computed. The gamma-emissions from these sources are also computed, but are limited to a subset of nine target nuclides. If a user has experimental data to contribute to the alpha-neutron gamma emission database, it may be added directly or submitted to the GADRAS developers for inclusion. The gadras.exe.config file will be replaced when GADRAS updates are installed, so sending the information to the GADRAS developers is the preferred method for updating the database. This is also preferable because it enables other users to benefit from your efforts.

  17. An Intense Pulsed Neutron Source for Argonne National Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Carpenter; David L. Price

    1975-01-01

    A pulsed neutron source has been designed for materials research in slow neutron scattering and radiation effects. The facility is based in its first phase on the ZGS 500 MeV Injector Booster Accelerator, which will produce 5 ?? 1012 protons per pulse and be modified for 60 Hz operation. In its second phase a high intensity synchrotron will provide 5

  18. Non-reactor neutron sources for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy)

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, T.J.; Ottewitte, E.H.; Wills, E.E.; Neuman, W.A.; Woodall, D.M.

    1989-05-01

    The focus of this study is the indentification of key feasibility issues for the use of non-reactor neutron sources for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Of the non-reactor neutron sources surveyed, the /sup 7/Li(p,n) reaction appears to be the most favorable for producing epithermal neutrons for BNCT, and RFQ accelerators are best for producing the desired proton beam. At a proton energy of 2.5 MeV, the total neutron yield is 1.49 /times/ 10/sup /minus/4/ neutrons/proton, with a forward energy spectrum extending up to 780 keV and peaked at 500-600 keV. At I = 20 mA, the total neutron yield would be about 1.86 /times/ 10/sup 13/ neutrons/s. In comparison with a medical therapy fission reactor, the 20 mA accelerator system has a flux intensity at least 5 times lower, requiring an irradiation time at least 5 times longer, a much higher gamma intensity, which would probably require additional shielding, further reducing the neutron intensity, 30% of the neutrons above 15 keV, resulting in a higher fast neutron dose to healthy tissue, poorer spatial uniformity of the neutron beam, and greater angular divergence of the neutron beam, resulting in a rapid decrease of flux with distance from the filter. The possibility of overcoming these limitations by using more shielding and a higher beam current needs further study. RFQ accelerator technology is being developed to provide the desired proton beam parameters. The effects of neutron beam energy spectra, beam contaminants, angular divergence, spatial variation, and beam rotation around the tumor need to be studied in detail, in order to evaluate the feasibility of accelerator-produced neutrons for BNCT. 41 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Advanced Neutron Source radiological design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, J.L.

    1995-08-01

    The operation of the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) facility will present a variety of radiological protection problems. Because it is desired to design and operate the ANS according to the applicable licensing standards of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), it must be demonstrated that the ANS radiological design basis is consistent not only with state and Department of Energy (DOE) and other usual federal regulations, but also, so far as is practicable, with NRC regulations and with recommendations of such organizations as the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Also, the ANS radiological design basis is in general to be consistent with the recommendations of authoritative professional and scientific organizations, specifically the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). As regards radiological protection, the principal goals of DOE regulations and guidance are to keep occupational doses ALARA [as low as (is) reasonably achievable], given the current state of technology, costs, and operations requirements; to control and monitor contained and released radioactivity during normal operation to keep public doses and releases to the environment ALARA; and to limit doses to workers and the public during accident conditions. Meeting these general design objectives requires that principles of dose reduction and of radioactivity control by employed in the design, operation, modification, and decommissioning of the ANS. The purpose of this document is to provide basic radiological criteria for incorporating these principles into the design of the ANS. Operations, modification, and decommissioning will be covered only as they are affected by design.

  20. Fast-Neutron Source Based on Plasma-Focus Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, M.; Bienkowska, B.; Chernyshova, M.; Gribkov, V. A.; Jednorog, S.; Kalinowska, Z.; Karpinski, L.; Paduch, M.; Prokopowicz, R.; Szydlowski, A.

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes investigations of neutrons produced by small plasma focus device PF-6 operating in the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw, Poland. Main parameters of neutron radiation have been measured by scintillation probe, and by activation technique. Current derivative probe has also been applied to measure dI/dt signal. Simultaneously neutron transport calculations have been carried out by Monte Carlo method. Finally, experimental measurements and numerical calculations have allowed concluding that plasma focus devices can be useful pulse neutron sources for different applications.

  1. Neutron transmission: A powerful technique for small accelerator-based neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granada, J. R.; Santisteban, J. R.; Dawidowski, J.; Mayer, R. E.

    The determination of total cross section of a material as a function of neutron energy by means of transmission experiments is rather easy on a pulsed neutron source. The spectrometer and associated instrumentation required may be described as relatively simple, and sound statistical data are achieved even using a small, pulsed, accelerator based neutron source. Despite its simplicity, detailed scientific and technological information can be extracted from such measurements, at the cost of fairly elaborate data analysis techniques. These features make this an attractive tool for neutron-based materials research within small research groups. Different physical properties of a material manifest over the different neutron energy ranges. At our group we have focused on the determination and analysis of the total cross section for thermal and sub-thermal neutrons, which is very sensitive to the geometric arrangement and movement of the atoms, over distances ranging from the' first-neighbour scale' up to the microstructural level or' grain scale'.

  2. Neutronic Design Calculations on Moderators for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, D.B.

    1999-11-14

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory will provide an intense source of neutrons for a large variety of experiments. It consists of a high-energy (1-GeV) and high-power ({approximately}1-MW) proton accelerator, an accumulator ring, together with a target station and an experimental area. In the target itself, the proton beam will produce neutrons via the spallation process and these will be converted to low-energy (<2-eV) neutrons in moderators located close to the target. Current plans are to have two liquid-hydrogen (20-K) moderators and two room-temperature H{sub 2}O moderators. Extensive engineering design work has been conducted on the moderator vessels. For our studies we have produced realistic neutronic representations of these moderators. We report on neutronic studies conducted on these representations of the moderators using Monte Carlo simulation techniques.

  3. Fundamental neutron physics beamline at the spallation neutron source at ORNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, N.; Greene, G. L.; Allen, R. R.; Cianciolo, V.; Crawford, C.; Tito, T. M.; Huffman, P. R.; Iverson, E. B.; Mahurin, R.; Snow, W. M.

    2015-02-01

    We describe the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FnPB) facility located at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The FnPB was designed for the conduct of experiments that investigate scientific issues in nuclear physics, particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology using a pulsed slow neutron beam. We present a detailed description of the design philosophy, beamline components, and measured fluxes of the polychromatic and monochromatic beams.

  4. Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL

    E-print Network

    Fomin, N; Allen, R; Cianciolo, V; Crawford, C; Ito, T; Huffman, P R; Iverson, E B; Mahurin, R; Snow, W M

    2014-01-01

    We describe the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FnPB) facility located at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The FnPB was designed for the conduct of experiments that investigate scientific issues in nuclear physics, particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology using a pulsed slow neutron beam. We present a detailed description of the design philosophy, beamline components, and measured fluxes of the polychromatic and monochromatic beams.

  5. A shielding design for an accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. E Hawk; T. E Blue; J. E Woollard

    2004-01-01

    Research in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at The Ohio State University Nuclear Engineering Department has been primarily focused on delivering a high quality neutron field for use in BNCT using an accelerator-based neutron source (ABNS). An ABNS for BNCT is composed of a proton accelerator, a high-energy beam transport system, a 7Li target, a target heat removal system (HRS),

  6. An overview of an accelerator-based neutron spallation source

    SciTech Connect

    Lessner, E.S.

    1996-06-01

    An overview of the feasibility study of a 1-MW pulsed spallation source is presented. The machine delivers 1 MW of proton beam power to spallation targets where slow neutrons are produced. The slow neutrons can be used for isotope production, materials irradiation, and neutron scattering research. The neutron source facility is based on a rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) and consists of a 400-MeV linac, a 30-Hz RCS that accelerates the 400-MeV beam to 2 GeV, and two neutron-generating target stations. The RCS accelerates an average proton beam current of 0.5 mA, corresponding to 1.04 x 10{sup 14} protons per pulse. This intensity is about two times higher than that of existing machines. A key feature of this accelerator system design is that beam losses are minimized from injection to extraction, reducing activation to levels consistent with hands-on maintenance.

  7. Design and Demonstration of a Quasi-monoenergetic Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, T.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Norman, E. B.; Sorensen, Peter F.; Foxe, Michael P.; Bench, G.; Bernstein, A.

    2014-03-05

    The design of a neutron source capable of producing 24 and 70 keV neutron beams with narrow energy spread is presented. The source exploits near-threshold kinematics of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction while taking advantage of the interference `notches' found in the scattering cross-sections of iron. The design was implemented and characterized at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Alternative lters such as vanadium and manganese are also explored and the possibility of studying the response of di*erent materials to low-energy nuclear recoils using the resultant neutron beams is discussed.

  8. Outline of a proposal for a new neutron source: The pulsed neutron research facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Kustom, R.L.

    1992-04-01

    Accelerator-based, pulsed spallation neutron sources have been performing neutron scattering research for about fifteen years. During this time beam intensities have increased by a factor of 100 and more than 50 spectrometers are now operating on four major sources worldwide. The pulsed sources have proven to be highly effective and complementary to reactor-based sources in that there are important scientific areas for which each type of source has unique capabilities. We describe a proposal for a new pulsed neutron facility based on a Fixed Field Alternating Gradient synchrotron. The specifications for this new machine, which are now only being formulated, are for an accelerator that will produce (100 {divided_by} 200) {mu}A of time-averaged proton current at (500 {divided_by} 1000) MeV, in short pulses at 30 Hz. Appropriate target and moderator systems and an array of scattering instruments will be provided to make the facility a full-blown research installation. The neutron source, named the Pulsed Neutron Research Facility (PNRF), will be as powerful as any pulsed source now operating in the world and will also act as a test bed for the Fixed Field Alternating Gradient Synchrotron concept as a basis for more powerful sources in the future. The peak thermal neutron flux in PNRF will be about 5{center_dot}10{sup 15}n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s.

  9. Outline of a proposal for a new neutron source: The pulsed neutron research facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.S.; Carpenter, J.M.; Kustom, R.L.

    1992-04-01

    Accelerator-based, pulsed spallation neutron sources have been performing neutron scattering research for about fifteen years. During this time beam intensities have increased by a factor of 100 and more than 50 spectrometers are now operating on four major sources worldwide. The pulsed sources have proven to be highly effective and complementary to reactor-based sources in that there are important scientific areas for which each type of source has unique capabilities. We describe a proposal for a new pulsed neutron facility based on a Fixed Field Alternating Gradient synchrotron. The specifications for this new machine, which are now only being formulated, are for an accelerator that will produce (100 {divided by} 200) {mu}A of time-averaged proton current at (500 {divided by} 1000) MeV, in short pulses at 30 Hz. Appropriate target and moderator systems and an array of scattering instruments will be provided to make the facility a full-blown research installation. The neutron source, named the Pulsed Neutron Research Facility (PNRF), will be as powerful as any pulsed source now operating in the world and will also act as a test bed for the Fixed Field Alternating Gradient Synchrotron concept as a basis for more powerful sources in the future. The peak thermal neutron flux in PNRF will be about 5{center dot}10{sup 15}n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s.

  10. General Electric PETtrace cyclotron as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrey Bosko

    2005-01-01

    This research investigates the use of a PETtrace cyclotron produced by General Electric (GE) as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The GE PETtrace was chosen for this investigation because this type of cyclotron is popular among nuclear pharmacies and clinics in many countries; it is compact and reliable; it produces protons with energies high enough to

  11. An integrated design of an accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Christian Dobelbower

    1997-01-01

    An Accelerator Based Neutron Source (ABNS) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) was first proposed at The Ohio State University (OSU). Since the conception of the ABNS for BNCT, OSU has designed and optimized a moderator assembly based on in-air and in-phantom parameters. Additionally, the fabrication of the moderator assembly has commenced along with detailed analyses of the target and

  12. Optimal Neutron Source and Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    E-print Network

    Vujic, J L; Greenspan, E; Guess, S; Karni, Y; Kastenber, W E; Kim, L; Leung, K N; Regev, D; Verbeke, J M; Waldron, W L; Zhu, Y

    2003-01-01

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

  13. Optimal Neutron Source & Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    J. Vujic; E. Greenspan; W.E. Kastenber; Y. Karni; D. Regev; J.M. Verbeke, K.N. Leung; D. Chivers; S. Guess; L. Kim; W. Waldron; Y. Zhu

    2003-04-30

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

  14. Data acquisition system for the neutron scattering instruments at the intense pulsed neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.; Daly, R.T.; Haumann, J.R.; Hitterman, R.L.; Morgan, C.B.; Ostrowski, G.E.; Worlton, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a major new user-oriented facility which is now coming on line for basic research in neutron scattering and neutron radiation damage. This paper describes the data-acquisition system which will handle data acquisition and instrument control for the time-of-flight neutron-scattering instruments at IPNS. This discussion covers the scientific and operational requirements for this system, and the system architecture that was chosen to satisfy these requirements. It also provides an overview of the current system implementation including brief descriptions of the hardware and software which have been developed.

  15. A method for using neutron elastic scatter to create a variable energy neutron beam from a nearly monoenergetic neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetstone, Z. D.; Kearfott, K. J.

    2015-07-01

    This work describes preliminary investigation into the design of a compact, portable, variable energy neutron source. The proposed method uses elastic neutron scatter at specific angles to reduce the energy of deuterium-deuterium or deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutrons. The research focuses on D-T Monte Carlo simulations, both in idealized and more realistic scenarios. Systematic uncertainty of the method is also analyzed. The research showed promise, but highlighted the need for discrimination of multiply-scattered neutrons, either through a pulsed generator or associated particle imaging.

  16. Optimizing Moderator Dimensions for Neutron Scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jinkui [ORNL] [ORNL; Robertson, Lee [ORNL] [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL] [ORNL; Gallmeier, Franz X [ORNL] [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the effect of neutron moderator dimensions on the performance of neutron scattering instruments at the Spallation Neutron Source. In a recent study of the planned second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility [1,2], we have found that the dimensions of a moderator play a significant role in determining its surface brightness. A smaller moderator may be significantly brighter for a smaller viewing area [4]. One of the immediate implications of this finding is that for modern neutron scattering instrument designs, moderator dimensions and brightness have to be incorporated as an integrated optimization parameter. Here, we establish a strategy of matching neutron scattering instruments with moderators using analytical and Monte Carlo techniques. In order to simplify our treatment, we group the instruments into two broad categories, those with natural collimation and those that use neutron guide systems. We found that the cross-sections of the sample and the neutron guide, respectively, are the deciding factors for choosing the moderator. Beam divergence plays no role as long as it is within the reach of practical constraints. Namely, the required divergence is not too large for the guide or sample to be located close enough to the moderator on an actual spallation source.

  17. Inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) neutron sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A. Nebel; D. C. Barnes; E. J. Caramana; R. D. Janssen; W. D. Nystrom; T. N. Tiouririne; B. C. Trent; G. H. Miley; J. Javedani

    1995-01-01

    Inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) is one of the earliest plasma confinement concepts, having first been suggested by P.T. Farnsworth in the 1950s. The concept involves a simple apparatus of concentric spherical electrostatic grids or a combination of grids and magnetic fields. An electrostatic structure is formed from the confluence of electron or ion beams. Gridded IEC systems have demonstrated neutron

  18. High Intensity Accelerator and Neutron Source in China

    SciTech Connect

    Guan Xialing; Wei, J.; Loong Chun [Tsinghua University, 100084 Beijing (China)

    2011-06-28

    High intensity Accelerator is being studied all over world for numerous applications, which includes the waste transmutation, spallation neutron source and material irradiation facilities. The R/D activities of the technology of High intensity accelerator are also developed in China for some year, and have some good facilities around China. This paper will reports the status of some high intensity accelerators and neutron source in China, which including ADS/RFQ; CARR; CSNS; PKUNIFTY and CPHS. This paper will emphatically report the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) led by the Department of Engineering Physics of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.

  19. High output neutron tube using an occluded gas ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Walko, R.J.; Rochau, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    A neutron tube capable of generating 10/sup 10/ 14 MeV neutrons in a 1.2 ms pulse has been developed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for use in flow measurements using the Pulsed Neutron Activation technique. The tube consists of an occluded deuterium gas ion source, a single gap accelerator and a scandium tritide target. A unique feature of the tube design is its complete demountability, permitting easy replacement or modification of critical components. The ion source is a modified version of a stacked occluded washer source. However, in contrast to previous designs, this source utilizes only a single scandium deuteride washer and needs no independent trigger. Outputs of 1.2 x 10/sup 10/ neutrons per pulse from a 250 mA deuterium ion beam at 125 kV have been obtained for over 1500 consecutive operations with a standard deviation of only +- 5%. The ultimate operational lifetime is believed to be in excess of 3000 shots based on the present knowledge of ion source behavior. Recent experiments using nonmagnetic structural components in the ion source resulted in a 26% increase in output with a simultaneous 35% reduction in the source drive current. This implies that even higher outputs with greater source efficiencies may be achievable.

  20. Neutron production and thermal moderation at the PSI UCN source

    E-print Network

    H. Becker; G. Bison; B. Blau; Z. Chowdhuri; J. Eikenberg; M. Fertl; K. Kirch; B. Lauss; G. Perret; D. Reggiani; D. Ries; P. Schmidt-Wellenburg; V. Talanov; M. Wohlmuther; G. Zsigmond

    2014-08-14

    We report on gold foil activation measurements performed along a vertical channel along the tank of the ultracold neutron source at the Paul Scherrer Institute. The activities obtained at various distances from the spallation target are in very good agreement with MCNPX simulations which take into account the detailed description of the source as built.

  1. Active Neutron-Based Interrogation System with D-D Neutron Source for Detection of Special Nuclear Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Misawa, T.; Yagi, T.; Pyeon, C. H.; Kimura, M.; Masuda, K.; Ohgaki, H.

    2015-10-01

    The detection of special nuclear materials (SNM) is an important issue for nuclear security. The interrogation systems used in a sea port and an airport are developed in the world. The active neutron-based interrogation system is the one of the candidates. We are developing the active neutron-based interrogation system with a D-D fusion neutron source for the nuclear security application. The D-D neutron source is a compact discharge-type fusion neutron source called IEC (Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement fusion) device which provides 2.45 MeV neutrons. The nuclear materials emit the highenergy neutrons by fission reaction. High-energy neutrons with energies over 2.45 MeV amount to 30% of all the fission neutrons. By using the D-D neutron source, the detection of SNMs is considered to be possible with the attention of fast neutrons if there is over 2.45 MeV. Ideally, neutrons at En>2.45 MeV do not exist if there is no nuclear materials. The detection of fission neutrons over 2.45 MeV are hopeful prospect for the detection of SNM with a high S/N ratio. In the future, the experiments combined with nuclear materials and a D-D neutron source will be conducted. Furthermore, the interrogation system will be numerically investigated by using nuclear materials, a D-D neutron source, and a steel container.

  2. Considerations for an Intense Source of Ultracold Neutrons at the European Long Pulse Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendlebury, J. M.; Greene, G. L.

    While intense reactor based sources of ultra-cold neutrons have been in operation for approximately three decades, it is only in the last few years that practical sources of UCN have been realized at spallation sources. Existing and proposed spallation based UCN sources employ two distinct strategies. In the first, the UCN converter (superfluid 4He, or solid D2) is placed in the immediate vicinity of the spallation target. In the second, a converter (usually superfluid He) is placed at the output end of a cold neutron guide fed by the spallation target cold source. Both of these approaches are considered in relation to the European Long Pulse Spallation Source.

  3. Accelerator-Based Sources of Epithermal Neutrons for Bnct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisceglie, E.; Colangelo, P.; Colonna, N.; Variale, V.; Santorelli, P.

    2001-11-01

    The treatment of deep-seated tumors with BNCT requires high-intensity neutron beams in the epithermal energy region (1 eV < En < 10 keV). Therapeutic beams with optimal spectral features could be produced with high-current accelerators, through a suitable neutron-producing reaction. We report here on the results of a systematic investigation of different low-energy (p,n) and (d,n) reactions that could reveal useful for the setup of accelerator-based neutron sources for BNCT.

  4. Materials for cold neutron sources: Cryogenic and irradiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Materials for the construction of cold neutron sources must satisfy a range of demands. The cryogenic temperature and irradiation create a severe environment. Candidate materials are identified and existing cold sources are briefly surveyed to determine which materials may be used. Aluminum- and magnesium-based alloys are the preferred materials. Existing data for the effects of cryogenic temperature and near-ambient irradiation on the mechanical properties of these alloys are briefly reviewed, and the very limited information on the effects of cryogenic irradiation are outlined. Generating mechanical property data under cold source operating conditions is a daunting prospect. It is clear that the cold source material will be degraded by neutron irradiation, and so the cold source must be designed as a brittle vessel. The continued effective operation of many different cold sources at a number of reactors makes it clear that this can be accomplished. 46 refs., 8 figs., 2 tab.

  5. Spallation-driven Ultracold Neutron Sources: Concepts for a Next Generation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, A. R.; Huegle, T.; Makela, M.; Morris, C.; Muhrer, G.; Saunders, A.

    We present concepts for a next-generation, spallation-driven ultracold neutron source. Our source is based on a 40 liter volume of liquid He held at 1.6 K, with heat removed by sub-cooled He technology developed for the Large Hadron Collider's magnet systems. We report on neutronics modeling for two geometries which utilize well-vetted scattering and absorption data developed for the Lujan Center Mark-3 target, as well as promising moderator materials for the cold neutron pre-moderator for this source.

  6. Irradiation of structure material in spallation neutron sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Naberejnev, D. G.; Salvatores, M.

    2002-02-18

    In principle, intense spallation neutron sources can be used not only to irradiate materials (e.g. window materials) and to validate different target geometries/concepts, but also to irradiate structural materials (samples, pins or even full assemblies) in order to characterize their behavior under irradiation (in a fast neutron field). However, a question arises concerning the ''representativity'' of such irradiations to reproduce the conditions encountered in a typical fast reactor. The present paper documents an investigation aimed at understanding phenomena related to the representativity of an irradiation using an intense spallation source, with regards to neutron damage and Helium production. Two different designs of a spallation neutron source are considered. The first is an Intense Spallation Neutron Source (ISNS) proposed at CEA, France as a potential irradiation tool. The second is one of the current models for the TMT (Target for Material Testing) of the ADTF (Accelerator Driven Test Facility) program. In our calculations we used the MCNPX Version 2.1.5 Monte Carlo code.

  7. The new Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source - Design and Performance

    E-print Network

    Ehlers, G; Niedziela, J L; Iverson, E B

    2011-01-01

    The design and performance of the new Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed to cover essentially the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM2, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments.

  8. The new cold neutron chopper spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source: Design and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, G.; Podlesnyak, A. A.; Niedziela, J. L.; Iverson, E. B.; Sokol, P. E.

    2011-08-01

    The design and performance of the new cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct-geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed essentially to cover the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM-II, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE, and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments.

  9. High-power linac for the spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D. J. (Donald J.)

    2004-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be the world's most intense source of neutrons for fundamental science and industrial applications. In this paper, we review the physics requirements, design, construction, installation, and first commissioning results of the 1-GeV, 1.4-MW average power RF linac for SNS. The overall project is 82% complete, with most of the linac hardware manufactured and delivered to the SNS site. Commissioning of the first drift tube linac tanks was a success. Approximately 100% of the beam was transmitted at full average current while achieving the emittance goal of less than 0.3 {pi} mm-mrad.

  10. Proton Driver Linac for the Frankfurt Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesner, C.; Chau, L. P.; Dinter, H.; Droba, M.; Heilmann, M.; Joshi, N.; Maeder, D.; Metz, A.; Meusel, O.; Noll, D.; Podlech, H.; Ratzinger, U.; Reichau, H.; Schempp, A.; Schmidt, S.; Schweizer, W.; Volk, K.; Wagner, C. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Reifarth, R. [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Mueller, I.

    2010-08-04

    The Frankfurt Neutron Source at the Stern-Gerlach-Zentrum (FRANZ) will deliver high neutron fluxes in the energy range of 1 to 500 keV. The Activation Mode provides a high averaged neutron flux created by a cw proton beam of up to 5 mA, while in the Compressor Mode intense neutron pulses of 1 ns length are formed with a repetition rate of up to 250 kHz. The Compressor Mode is well-suited for energy-dependent neutron capture measurements using the Time-of-Flight method in combination with a 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} detector array. The design of the proton driver linac for both operation modes is presented. This includes the volume type ion source, the ExB chopper located in the low energy section, the RFQ-IH combination for beam acceleration and the bunch compressor. Finally, the neutron production at the lithium-7 target and the resulting energy spectrum is described.

  11. Optimization of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. E. Kononov; V. N. Kononov; M. V. Bokhovko; V. V. Korobeynikov; A. N. Soloviev; A. S. Sysoev; I. A. Gulidov; W. T. Chu; D. W. Nigg

    2004-01-01

    A modeling investigation was performed to choose moderator material and size for creating optimal epithermal neutron beams for BNCT based on a proton accelerator and the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction as a neutrons source. An optimal configuration is suggested for the beam shaping assembly made from polytetrafluoroethylene and magnesium fluorine to be placed on high current IPPE proton accelerator KG-2.5. Results of

  12. Optimization of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kononov, O.E.; Kononov, V.N.; Bokhovko, M.V.; Korobeynikov, V.V.; Soloviev, A.N.; Chu, W.T.

    2004-02-20

    A modeling investigation was performed to choose moderator material and size for creating optimal epithermal neutron beams for BNCT based on a proton accelerator and the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction as a neutrons source. An optimal configuration is suggested for the beam shaping assembly made from polytetrafluoroethylene and magnesium fluorine. Results of calculation were experimentally tested and are in good agreement with measurements.

  13. Measurements of Neutron Beta-decay Using Ultra-Cold Neutrons Produced at a Spallation Source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. R. Young; S. Hoedl; C.-Y. Liu; D. Smith; B. Filippone; T. Ito; C. Jones; R. McKeown; J. Yuan; K. Soyama; T. Bowles; T. Brun; M. Fowler; R. Hill; A. Hime; G. Hogan; S. Lamoreaux; C. Morris; A. Saunders; S. Seestrom; P. Walstrom; A. Alduschenkov; A. Kharitonov; M. Lassakov; Y. Rudnev; A. Serebrov; A. Vasilev; P. Geltenbort; T. Kitagaki; K. Asahi; M. Hino; T. Kawai; M. Utsuro; A. Garcia; M. Makela; R. B. Vogelaar

    1999-01-01

    We present an overview of our program to provide improved measurements of the neutron beta-asymmetry and other beta-decay observables using ultra-cold neutrons (UCNs) produced at LANSCE. Central to this effort is the recent development of a superthermal solid deuterium source coupled to a tungsten spallation target. Our preliminary production results indicate that ample UCN fluxes should be available for our

  14. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R. [and others

    1998-05-01

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

  15. China Spallation Neutron Source: Design, R&D, and outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jie; Chen, Hesheng; Chen, Yanwei; Chen, Yuanbo; Chi, Yunlong; Deng, Changdong; Dong, Haiyi; Dong, Lan; Fang, Shouxian; Feng, Ji; Fu, Shinian; He, Lunhua; He, Wei; Heng, Yuekun; Huang, Kaixi; Jia, Xuejun; Kang, Wen; Kong, Xiangcheng; Li, Jian; Liang, Tianjiao; Lin, Guoping; Liu, Zhenan; Ouyang, Huafu; Qin, Qing; Qu, Huamin; Shi, Caitu; Sun, Hong; Tang, Jingyu; Tao, Juzhou; Wang, Chunhong; Wang, Fangwei; Wang, Dingsheng; Wang, Qingbin; Wang, Sheng; Wei, Tao; Xi, Jiwei; Xu, Taoguang; Xu, Zhongxiong; Yin, Wen; Yin, Xuejun; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Zong; Zhang, Zonghua; Zhou, Min; Zhu, Tao

    2009-02-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is an accelerator based multidiscipline user facility planned to be constructed in Dongguan, Guangdong, China. The CSNS complex consists of an negative hydrogen linear accelerator, a rapid cycling proton synchrotron accelerating the beam to 1.6 GeV energy, a solid tungsten target station, and instruments for spallation neutron applications. The facility operates at 25 Hz repetition rate with an initial design beam power of 120 kW and is upgradeable to 500 kW. The primary challenge is to build a robust and reliable user's facility with upgrade potential at a fraction of "world standard" cost. We report the status, design, R&D, and upgrade outlook including applications using spallation neutron, muon, fast neutron, and proton, as well as related programs including medical therapy and accelerator-driven sub-critical reactor (ADS) programs for nuclear waste transmutation.

  16. Research reactor of the future: The advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Appleton, B.; West, C.

    1994-12-31

    Agents for cancer detection and treatment, stronger materials, better electronic gadgets, and other consumer and industrial products - these are assured benefits of a research reactor project proposed for Oak Ridge. Just as American companies have again assumed world leadership in producing semiconductor chips as well as cars and trucks, the United States is poised to retake the lead in neutron science by building and operating the $2.9 billion Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) research reactor by the start of the next century. In 1985, the neutron community, led by ORNL researchers, proposed a pioneering project, later called the ANS. Scheduled to begin operation in 2003, the ANS is seen not only as a replacement for the aging HFIR and HFBR but also as the best laboratory in the world for conducting neutron-based research.

  17. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, W.Y.; Jones, J.L.; Nigg, D.W.; Harker, Y.D.

    1999-05-11

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0{times}10{sup 9} neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use. 3 figs.

  18. Development of an IEC neutron source for NDE

    SciTech Connect

    Anderl, R.A,; Hartwell, J.K. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nadler, J.H. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States). Fusion Studies Lab.

    1995-12-01

    This paper concerns the development of a neutron so based on the inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) of a low density fusion plasma in a gridded, spherically-focusing device. With the motivation of using such sources for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) applications, the focus of the development is on : Small size devices, sealed operation with D{sub 2} or D{sub 2}/T{sub 2} mixtures, Power-utilization and neutron-output optimization, and integration into an assay system. In this paper, we describe an experimental system that has been established for the development and testing of IEC neutron sources, and we present preliminary results of tests conducted for 25-cm and 15-cm diameter IEC devices.

  19. Emittance characterization of the spallation neutron source H- injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, B. X.; Stockli, M. P.; Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N., Jr.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.

    2013-02-01

    The H- injector for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory consists of a RF H- ion source and a compact electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) section. Up to 5 ion sources and up to 4 LEBT assemblies are alternated for the SNS beam operations. The beam current and emittance of the H- beam exiting the LEBT were characterized on the test-stand for different sources and LEBT assemblies in order to understand and minimize their performance variations.

  20. Advanced neutron source final preconceptual reference core design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. L. Copeland; W. R. Gambill; R. M. Harrington; J. A. Johnson; F. J. Peretz; H. Reutler; J. M. Ryskamp; D. L. Selby; C. D. West; G. L. Yoder

    1989-01-01

    The preconceptual design phase of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project ended with the selection of a reference reactor core that will be used to begin conceptual design work. The new reference core consists of two involute fuel elements, of different diameters, aligned axially with a small axial gap between them. The use of different element diameters permits a separate

  1. Intense neutron source: high-voltage power supply specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, A.A.

    1980-08-01

    This report explains the need for and sets forth the electrical, mechanical and safety specifications for a high-voltage power supply to be used with the intense neutron source. It contains sufficient information for a supplier to bid on such a power supply.

  2. International workshop on plasma-based neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-12-09

    The workshop was devoted to discussion of the status and future directions of work on plasma-based neutron sources. The workshop presentations demonstrated significant progress in development of the concepts of these sources and in broadening the required data base. Two main groups of neutron source designs were presented at the workshop: tokamak-based and mirror-based. Designs of the tokamak- based devices use the extensive data base generated during decades of tokamak research. Their plasma physics performance can be predicted with a high degree of confidence. On the other hand, they are relatively large and expensive, and best suited for Volumetric Neutron Sources (VNSes) or other large scale test facilities. They also have the advantage of being on the direct path to a power- producing reactor as presently conceived, although alternatives to the tokamak are presently receiving serious consideration for a reactor. The data base for the mirror-based group of plasma sources is less developed, but they are generally more flexible and, with appropriate selection of parameters, have the potential to be developed as compact Accelerated Test Facilities (ATFs) as well as full-scale VNSes. Also discussed at the workshop were some newly proposed but potentially promising concepts, like those based on the flow-through pinch and electrostatic ion-beam sources.

  3. Neutron powder diffraction at a pulsed neutron source: a study of resolution effects

    SciTech Connect

    Faber, J. Jr.; Hitterman, R.L.

    1985-11-01

    The General Purpose Powder Diffractometer (GPPD), a high resolution ( d/d = 0.002) time-of-flight instrument, exhibits a resolution function that is almost independent of d-spacing. Some of the special properties of time-of-flight scattering data obtained at a pulsed neutron source will be discussed. A method is described that transforms wavelength dependent data, obtained at a pulsed neutron source, so that standard structural least-squares analyses can be applied. Several criteria are given to show when these techniques are useful in time-of-flight data analysis. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Thermal-hydraulic studies of the Advanced Neutron Source cold source

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.; Lucas, A.T.

    1995-08-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), in its conceptual design phase at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was to be a user-oriented neutron research facility producing the most intense steady-state flux of thermal and cold neutrons in the world. Among its many scientific applications, the production of cold neutrons was a significant research mission for the ANS. The cold neutrons come from two independent cold sources positioned near the reactor core. Contained by an aluminum alloy vessel, each cold source is a 410-mm-diam sphere of liquid deuterium that functions both as a neutron moderator and a cryogenic coolant. With nuclear heating of the containment vessel and internal baffling, steady-state operation requires close control of the liquid deuterium flow near the vessel`s inner surface. Preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses supporting the cold source design were performed with heat conduction simulations of the vessel walls and multidimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations of the liquid deuterium flow and heat transfer. This report presents the starting phase of a challenging program and describes the cold source conceptual design, the thermal-hydraulic feasibility studies of the containment vessel, and the future computational and experimental studies that were planned to verify the final design.

  5. Simulations towards optimization of a neutron/anti-neutron oscillation experiment at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Matthew; Kamyshkov, Yuri; Castellanos, Luis; Klinkby, Esben; US NNbar Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The observation of Neutron/Anti-neutron oscillation would prove the existence of Baryon Number Violation (BNV), and thus an explanation for the dominance of matter over anti-matter in the universe. The latest experiments have shown the oscillation time to be greater than 8.6 x 107 seconds, whereas current theoretical predictions suggest times on the order of 108 to 109 seconds. A neutron oscillation experiment proposed at the European Spallation Source (ESS) would provide sensitivity of more than 1000 times previous experiments performed, thus providing a result well-suited to confirm or deny current theory. A conceptual design of the proposed experiment will be presented, as well as the optimization of key experiment components using Monte-Carlo simulation methods, including the McStas neutron ray-trace simulation package. This work is supported by the Organized Research Units Program funded by The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Office of Research and Engagement.

  6. Experimental studies on neutronic performance of various cold-neutron moderators for the pulsed neutron sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshiaki Kiyanagi

    2006-01-01

    As a moderator material, solid methane is the best one from the neutronic point of view. However, solid methane has low-resisitivity to the radiation damage, and at some facilities it cannot be used due to the regulation to the explosive materials. We have been experimentally studied neutronic performances of various materials, explosive and non-explosive, to look for the materials having

  7. A prospective pulsed source of ultracold neutrons for experiments in fundamental neutron physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, Th.; Zechlau, Th.

    2013-08-01

    Since their discovery, ultracold neutrons (UCNs) have been a unique tool for the investigation of fundamental properties of the free neutron and its interactions. The succesfull installation of a new pulsed superthermal source for ultracold neutrons based on solid deuterium at the TRIGA Mainz reactor is described. In a combination of solid hydrogen acting as pre-moderator and a solid deuterium converter of around 160 cm3, this new UCN source should provide at the experimental area ? 370000 UCN to the storage volume with the reactor operated in the pulse mode. In a storage experiment, a UCN density of 18 2 UCN/cm3 was measured applying 1.5 pulses with a nominal power of 7 MJ. Assuming a linear behaviour of the UCN output as a function of reactor power this corresponds to a UCN density of 25 3 UCN/cm3 for 2 (10 MJ) pulses.

  8. Experience with position sensitive neutron detectors at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.; Haumann, J.R.; Schultz, A.J.; Felcher, G.P.; Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Montague, D.G.; Dejus, R.J.

    1990-05-07

    At the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) pulses of protons accelerated in a synchrotron produce pulses of fast neutrons via the spallation process in an enriched uranium target. After moderation, the resulting pulses of slow neutrons are directed into beams which serve a variety of neutron scattering instruments. Currently there are thirteen neutron scattering instruments in operation or under development at IPNS, and six of these use position-sensitive neutron detectors (PSDs). These PSDs are: a 30 cm {times} 30 cm, {approximately}3 mm resolution, neutron Anger camera area PSD with {sup 6}Li-glass scintillator; a 2.5 cm dia, {approximately}0.7 mm resolution, microchannel-plate area PSD with {sup 6}Li-glass scintillator; a 20 cm {times} 20 cm, {approximately}5 mm resolution, {sup 3}He proportional counter area PSD; a 40 cm {times} 40 cm, {approximately}4 mm resolution, {sup 3}He proportional counter area PSD; a flat 20 cm long, {approximately}1.6 mm resolution, {sup 3}He proportional counter linear PSD; and 160 cylindrical {sup 3}He proportional counter linear PSDs, each of which is 1.27 cm in dia 60 cm long and has {approximately}14 mm resolution. These detectors, in addition to being position-sensitive, resolve the time of the neutron capture with {approximately}1 {mu}s precision for neutron time-of-flight measurements. This paper will discuss these various PSDs with emphasis on the instrumental specifications and the reasons for the selection of the different types of PSDs, and will also discuss the observed performances of these PSDs. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Experience with position-sensitive neutron detectors at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, R. K.; Haumann, J. R.; Epperson, J. E.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Schultz, A. J.; Felcher, G. P.; Montague, D. G.; Dejus, R. J.

    1990-12-01

    At the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory, pulses of protons accelerated in a synchrotron produce pulses of fast neutrons via the spallation process in an enriched uranium target. After moderation, the resulting pulses of slow neutrons are directed into beams which serve a variety of neutron-scattering instruments. Currently there are thirteen neutron-scattering instruments in operation or under development at IPNS, and six of these use position-sensitive neutron detectors (PSDs). These PSDs are: a 30 cm 30 cm, 3 mm resolution, neutron Anger camera area PSD with 6Li-glass scintillator; a 2.5 cm diameter, 0.7 mm resolution, microchannel-plate area PSD with 6Li-glass scintillator; a 20 cm 20 cm, 5 mm resolution, 3He proportional-counter area PSD; a 40 cm 40 cm, 4 mm resolution, 3He proportional-counter area PSD; a flat 20 cm long, 1.6 mm resolution, 3He proportional-counter linear PSD; and 160 cylindrical 3He proportional-counter linear PSDs, each of which is 1.27 cm in diameter and 60 cm long and has 14 mm resolution. These detectors, in addition to being position-sensitive, resolve the time of the neutron capture with 1 ?s precision for neutron time-of-flight measurements. This paper will discuss these various PSDs with emphasis on the instrumental specifications and the reasons for the selection of the different types of PSDs, and will also discuss the observed performances of these PSDs.

  10. Small plasma focus as neutron pulsed source for nuclides identification.

    PubMed

    Milanese, M; Niedbalski, J; Moroso, R; Barbaglia, M; Mayer, R; Castillo, F; Guichn, S

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we present preliminary results on the feasibility of employing a low energy (2 kJ, 31 kV) plasma focus device as a portable source of pulsed neutron beams (2.45 MeV) generated by nuclear fusion reactions D-D, for the "in situ" analysis of substances by nuclear activation. This source has the relevant advantage of being pulsed at requirement, transportable, not permanently radioactive, without radioactive waste, cheap, among others. We prove the feasibility of using this source showing several spectra of the characteristic emission line for manganese, gold, lead, and silver. PMID:24182104

  11. Small plasma focus as neutron pulsed source for nuclides identification

    SciTech Connect

    Milanese, M.; Moroso, R.; Barbaglia, M. [Centro de Investigaciones en Fsica e Ingeniera del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CONICET-UNCPBA), Pinto 399, Tandil 7000, Buenos Aires (Argentina) [Centro de Investigaciones en Fsica e Ingeniera del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CONICET-UNCPBA), Pinto 399, Tandil 7000, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CONICET-UNCPBA), Pinto 399, Tandil 7000, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Niedbalski, J. [CONICET(Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientficas y Tcnicas), Rivadavia 1917, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [CONICET(Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientficas y Tcnicas), Rivadavia 1917, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Mayer, R. [CNEA (Comisin Nacional de Energa Atmica), Av. Bustillo 9500, San Carlos de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina)] [CNEA (Comisin Nacional de Energa Atmica), Av. Bustillo 9500, San Carlos de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Castillo, F. [UNAM (Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mxico)Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Delg. Coyoacn, P.O. Box 70-543, Mxico DF (Mexico)] [UNAM (Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mxico)Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Delg. Coyoacn, P.O. Box 70-543, Mxico DF (Mexico); Guichn, S. [Universidad del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CONICET-UNCPBA), Pinto 399, Tandil 7000, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Universidad del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CONICET-UNCPBA), Pinto 399, Tandil 7000, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, we present preliminary results on the feasibility of employing a low energy (2 kJ, 31 kV) plasma focus device as a portable source of pulsed neutron beams (2.45 MeV) generated by nuclear fusion reactions D-D, for the in situ analysis of substances by nuclear activation. This source has the relevant advantage of being pulsed at requirement, transportable, not permanently radioactive, without radioactive waste, cheap, among others. We prove the feasibility of using this source showing several spectra of the characteristic emission line for manganese, gold, lead, and silver.

  12. Nuclear science research at the WNR and LANSCE neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, P.W.

    1994-06-01

    The Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) Facility and the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) use 800 MeV proton beam from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) to generate intense bursts of neutrons. Experiments using time-of-flight (TOF) energy determination can cover an energy range from thermal to about 2 MeV at LANSCE and 0.1 to 800 MeV at WNR. At present, three flight paths at LANSCE and six flight paths at WNR are used in basic and applied nuclear science research. In this paper we present a status report on WNR and LANSCE, discuss plans for the future, and describe three experiments recently completed or underway that use the unique features of these sources.

  13. White neutron source from 1 to 400 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, S.A.; Lisowski, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    A new high intensity white neutron source has recently been constructed at Los Alamos. Beams of nuetrons with a continuous energy distribution up to several hundred MeV are produced by the spallation reaction using the 800 MeV pulsed proton beam from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) linear accelerator. The neutron facility has been designed to make very efficient use of the LAMPF beam with several experiments being able to operate simultaneously. Typical running conditions involve approximately 50,000 bursts/sec and proton beam currents of 2.5 microamperes. Experiments planned for this fall include gamma-ray production, neutron induced fission, and medium energy (n,p) and (p,n) studies. 1 ref., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Spallation ultracold neutron source of superfluid helium below 1 K.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yasuhiro; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Jeong, Sun-Chan; Kawasaki, Shinsuke; Matsumiya, Ryohei; Matsuta, Kensaku; Mihara, Mototsugu; Watanabe, Yutaka

    2012-03-30

    For the production of high-density ultracold neutrons (UCNs), we placed 0.8 K superfluid helium in a cold neutron moderator. We resolved previous heat-load problems in the spallation neutron source that were particularly serious below 1 K. With a proton-beam power of 400 MeV1 ?A, a UCN production rate of 4 UCN cm(-3) s(-1) at the maximum UCN energy of E(c)=210 neV and a storage lifetime of 81 s were obtained. A cryogenic test showed that the production rate can be increased by a factor of 10 with the same storage lifetime by increasing the proton-beam power as well as (3)He pumping speed. PMID:22540705

  15. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Y. Yoon; J. L. Jones; D. W. Nigg; Y. D. Harker

    1999-01-01

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and

  16. Capabilities of a DT tokamak fusion neutron source for driving a spent nuclear fuel transmutation reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. M. Stacey

    2001-01-01

    The capabilities of a DT fusion neutron source for driving a spent nuclear fuel transmutation reactor are characterized by identifying limits on transmutation rates that would be imposed by tokamak physics and engineering limitations on fusion neutron source performance. The need for spent nuclear fuel transmutation and the need for a neutron source to drive subcritical fission transmutation reactors are

  17. Heat generation and neutron beam characteristics in a high power pulsed spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jerng, D.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Carpenter, J.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)][Korea Electric Power Corp. (KEPCO), Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-11-01

    In the course of conceptual design of a high power pulsed spallation source, a Monte Carlo model was developed for heat generation and neutronics studies. In this paper, we present two sets of results. The first set of calculations was performed with a simple target model to investigate general characteristics of power distribution and neutron production with various proton energies ranging from 0.8 to 12 GeV. The second set was performed with a realistic target model including major components of the target system to provide basic parameters for engineering design of a high power pulsed spallation source. Calculated results generally confirm that higher proton energy provides and advantage in target cooling system requirements and yet somewhat lower neutron beam intensity as a counter effect. The heat generation in the systems surrounding the target was investigated in detail and found to have important variation with position and according to proton beam energy. Calculations of the neutron currents from the moderators showed that the neutron beam intensity from moderators in the front region of the target decreased fro higher proton energy while that from moderators in the back region of the target remained almost unchanged.

  18. Post irradiation examination of the Spallation Neutron Source target vessels

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, David A [ORNL; Ferguson, Phillip D [ORNL; Mansur, Louis K [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is an accelerator-based pulsed neutron source that produces high-energy spallation neutrons by bombarding liquid mercury flowing through a stainless steel target vessel. During operation the proton beam and spallation neutrons produce radiation damage in the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel target vessel and water-cooled shroud. The beam pulses also cause rapid heating of the liquid mercury, which may produce cavitation erosion damage on the inner surface of the target vessel. The cavitation erosion rate is thought to be highly sensitive to beam power and predicted to be the primary life-limiting factor of target vessel. Though mitigation of cavitation erosion and radiation damage to the target vessel will be a critical for successful high-power operation of the SNS facility, the effects of radiation damage and cavitation erosion to target vessels in liquid metal spallation systems are not well known. Therefore preparations are being undertaken to perform post irradiation examination (PIE) of the liquid mercury target vessel and water-cooled shroud after end-of-life occurs. An overview of the planned PIE for the SNS target vessel is presented here, including proposed techniques for specimen acquisition and subsequent material properties characterization.

  19. Accelerator-driven neutron sources for fusion-materials testing

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    Several accelerator-driven neutron sources have been proposed for satisfying the requirements of a high-flux high-volume international fusion materials testing facility that could be built in the near future. This paper summarizes the features and projected performance for the three accelerator sources that are leading candidates for such a role and that are viewed by the International Energy Agency (IEA) as worthy of further evaluation. These are: (1) the d-Li source, in which 35-MeV deuteron beams are incident on flowing lithium targets, (2) the t-H{sub 2}O source, in which 21-MeV triton beams strike high-speed water jets, and (3) the Spallation source in which a 600-MeV proton beam bombards a heavy-metal target.

  20. Backscattering at a pulsed neutron source, the MUSICAL instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alefeld, B.

    1995-02-01

    In the first part the principles of the neutron backscattering method are described and some simple considerations about the energy resolution and the intensity are presented. A prototype of a backscattering instrument, the first Jlich instrument, is explained in some detail and a representative measurement is shown which was performed on the backscattering instrument IN10 at the ILL in Grenoble. In the second part a backscattering instrument designed for a pulsed neutron source is proposed. It is shown that a rather simple modification, which consists in the replacement of the Doppler drive of the conventional backscattering instrument by a multi silicon monochromator cryst al (MUSICAL) leads to a very effective instrument, benefitting from the peak flux of the pulsed source.

  1. Target Operational Experience at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie [ORNL] [ORNL; Janney, Jim G [ORNL] [ORNL; Kaminskas, Saulius [ORNL] [ORNL; McClintock, David A [ORNL] [ORNL; Rosenblad, Peter M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has operated at unprecedented power levels for a short-pulse spallation source. Target operations have been successful but not without difficulties. Three targets out of the eight used to date have ended life unexpectedly causing interruptions to the neutron science users. The first of a kind mercury target design experiences beam-pulse induced cavitation damage that is suspected in one of the target leaks. The two other targets suffered early failures due to defective welds. Diagnosing the causes of target leaks and understanding of the progression of cavitation erosion and radiation damage effects has made use of post-irradiation examination (PIE) capabilities. As a result of PIE, review of quality assurance practices and related investigations, design changes are being implemented and manufacturing oversight improved. This paper describes SNS target operating experience, including the more important observations and lessons learned.

  2. Obsidian sources characterized by neutron-activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Gordus, A A; Wright, G A; Griffin, J B

    1968-07-26

    Concentrations of elements such as manganese, scandium, lanthanum, rubidium, samarium, barium, and zirconium in obsidian samples from different flows show ranges of 1000 percent or more, whereas the variation in element content in obsidian samples from a single flow appears to be less than 40 percent. Neutron-activation analysis of these elements, as well as of sodium and iron, provides a means of identifying the geologic source of an archeological artifact of obsidian. PMID:17776740

  3. Actinide/beryllium neutron sources with reduced dispersion characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Schulte, Louis D.

    2012-08-14

    Neutron source comprising a composite, said composite comprising crystals comprising BeO and AmBe.sub.13, and an excess of beryllium, wherein the crystals have an average size of less than 2 microns; the size distribution of the crystals is less than 2 microns; and the beryllium is present in a 7-fold to a 75-fold excess by weight of the amount of AmBe.sub.13; and methods of making thereof.

  4. Inertial electrostatic confinement fusion neutron source R & D and issues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masami Ohnishi; Yasushi Yamamoto; Mitsunori Hasegawa

    1997-01-01

    An inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion is the scheme of injecting the ions and electrons toward the spherical center, trapping both species in the electrostatic self-field and giving rise to fusion reactions in the dense core. An IEC is expected to have wide application from a small neutron source to a D-³He fusion reactor. Hirsch reported 10⁹ n\\/s deuterium-tritium (D-T)

  5. Superconducting Prototype Cavities for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Ciovati; P. Kneisel; K. Davis; K. Macha; J. Mammosser

    2002-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source project includes a superconducting linac section in the energy range from 186 MeV to 1000 MeV operating at a frequency of 805 MHz at 2.1 K. For this energy range two types of cavities are needed with geometrical Beta-values of Beta=0.61 and Beta=0.81. An aggressive cavity prototyping program is being pursued at JLab, which calls for

  6. The advanced neutron source research and development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.L.

    1995-08-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is being designed as a user-oriented neutron research laboratory centered around the most intense continuous beams of thermal and subthermal neutrons in the world (an order of magnitude more intense than beams available from the most advanced existing reactors). The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of 330-MW fission power, producing an unprecedented peak thermal flux of >7 {center_dot} 10{sup 19} {center_dot} m{sup -2} {center_dot} s{sup -1}. Primarily a research facility, the ANS will accommodate more than 1000 academic, industrial, and government researchers each year. They will conduct basic research in all branches of science as well as applied research leading to better understanding of new materials, including high temperature super conductors, plastics, and thin films. Some 48 neutron beam stations will be set up in the ANS beam rooms and the neutron guide hall for neutron scattering and for fundamental and nuclear physics research. There also will be extensive facilities for materials irradiation, isotope production, and analytical chemistry. The top level work breakdown structure (WBS) for the project. As noted in this figure, one component of the project is a research and development (R&D) program (WBS 1.1). This program interfaces with all of the other project level two WBS activities. Because one of the project guidelines is to meet minimum performance goals without relying on new inventions, this R&D activity is not intended to produce new concepts to allow the project to meet minimum performance goals. Instead, the R&D program will focus on the four objectives described.

  7. The Advanced Neutron Source research and development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.L.

    1992-11-30

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is being designed as a user-oriented neutron research laboratory centered around the most intense continuous beams of thermal and subthermal neutrons in the world. The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of [approximately] 330 MW fission power, producing an unprecedented peak thermal flux of > 7 [times] 10[sup 19] M[sup [minus]2] [center dot] S[sup [minus]1]. Primarily a research facility, the ANS will accommodate more than 1000 academic, industrial, and government researchers each year. They will conduct basic research in all branches of science-as well as applied research-leading to better understanding of new materials, including high temperature super conductors, plastics, and thin films. Some 48 neutron beam stations will be set up in the ANS beam rooms and the neutron guide hall for neutron scattering and for fundamental and nuclear physics research. There also will be extensive facilities for materials irradiation, isotope production, and analytical chemistry. The R D program will focus on the four objectives: Address feasibility issues; provide analysis support; evaluate options for improvement in performance beyond minimum requirements; and provide prototype demonstrations for unique facilities. The remainder of this report presents (1) the process by which the R D activities are controlled and (2) a discussion of the individual tasks that have been identified for the R D program, including their justification, schedule and costs. The activities discussed in this report will be performed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES) through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and through subcontracts with industry, universities, and other national laboratories. It should be noted that in general a success path has been assumed for all tasks.

  8. The Advanced Neutron Source research and development plan

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.L.

    1992-11-30

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is being designed as a user-oriented neutron research laboratory centered around the most intense continuous beams of thermal and subthermal neutrons in the world. The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of {approximately} 330 MW fission power, producing an unprecedented peak thermal flux of > 7 {times} 10{sup 19} M{sup {minus}2} {center_dot} S{sup {minus}1}. Primarily a research facility, the ANS will accommodate more than 1000 academic, industrial, and government researchers each year. They will conduct basic research in all branches of science-as well as applied research-leading to better understanding of new materials, including high temperature super conductors, plastics, and thin films. Some 48 neutron beam stations will be set up in the ANS beam rooms and the neutron guide hall for neutron scattering and for fundamental and nuclear physics research. There also will be extensive facilities for materials irradiation, isotope production, and analytical chemistry. The R&D program will focus on the four objectives: Address feasibility issues; provide analysis support; evaluate options for improvement in performance beyond minimum requirements; and provide prototype demonstrations for unique facilities. The remainder of this report presents (1) the process by which the R&D activities are controlled and (2) a discussion of the individual tasks that have been identified for the R&D program, including their justification, schedule and costs. The activities discussed in this report will be performed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES) through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and through subcontracts with industry, universities, and other national laboratories. It should be noted that in general a success path has been assumed for all tasks.

  9. Elemental composition in sealed plutonium-beryllium neutron sources.

    PubMed

    Xu, N; Kuhn, K; Gallimore, D; Martinez, A; Schappert, M; Montoya, D; Lujan, E; Garduno, K; Tandon, L

    2014-10-22

    Five sealed plutonium-beryllium (PuBe) neutron sources from various manufacturers were disassembled. Destructive chemical analyses for recovered PuBe materials were conducted for disposition purposes. A dissolution method for PuBe alloys was developed for quantitative plutonium (Pu) and beryllium (Be) assay. Quantitation of Be and trace elements was performed using plasma based spectroscopic instruments, namely inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Pu assay was accomplished by an electrochemical method. Variations in trace elemental contents among the five PuBe sources are discussed. PMID:25464182

  10. Phase 1 environmental report for the Advanced Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. J. Blasing; R. A. Brown; G. F. Cada; C. Easterly; D. L. Feldman; C. W. Hagan; R. M. Harrington; R. O. Johnson; R. H. Ketelle; R. L. Kroodsma; L. N. McCold; W. J. Reich; P. A. Scofield; M. L. Socolof; R. P. Taleyarkhan; J. W. Van Dyke

    1992-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed the construction and operation of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a 330-MW(f) reactor, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support neutron scattering and nuclear physics experiments. ANS would provide a steady-state source of neutrons that are thermalized to produce sources of hot, cold, and very coal neutrons. The use of these

  11. Accelerator-based epithermal neutron sources for boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Blue, Thomas E; Yanch, Jacquelyn C

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of low-energy light ion accelerator-based neutron sources (ABNSs) for the treatment of brain tumors through an intact scalp and skull using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A major advantage of an ABNS for BNCT over reactor-based neutron sources is the potential for siting within a hospital. Consequently, light-ion accelerators that are injectors to larger machines in high-energy physics facilities are not considered. An ABNS for BNCT is composed of: (1) the accelerator hardware for producing a high current charged particle beam, (2) an appropriate neutron-producing target and target heat removal system (HRS), and (3) a moderator/reflector assembly to render the flux energy spectrum of neutrons produced in the target suitable for patient irradiation. As a consequence of the efforts of researchers throughout the world, progress has been made on the design, manufacture, and testing of these three major components. Although an ABNS facility has not yet been built that has optimally assembled these three components, the feasibility of clinically useful ABNSs has been clearly established. Both electrostatic and radio frequency linear accelerators of reasonable cost (approximately 1.5 M dollars) appear to be capable of producing charged particle beams, with combinations of accelerated particle energy (a few MeV) and beam currents (approximately 10 mA) that are suitable for a hospital-based ABNS for BNCT. The specific accelerator performance requirements depend upon the charged particle reaction by which neutrons are produced in the target and the clinical requirements for neutron field quality and intensity. The accelerator performance requirements are more demanding for beryllium than for lithium as a target. However, beryllium targets are more easily cooled. The accelerator performance requirements are also more demanding for greater neutron field quality and intensity. Target HRSs that are based on submerged-jet impingement and the use of microchannels have emerged as viable target cooling options. Neutron fields for reactor-based neutron sources provide an obvious basis of comparison for ABNS field quality. This paper compares Monte Carlo calculations of neutron field quality for an ABNS and an idealized standard reactor neutron field (ISRNF). The comparison shows that with lithium as a target, an ABNS can create a neutron field with a field quality that is significantly better (by a factor of approximately 1.2, as judged by the relative biological effectiveness (RBE)-dose that can be delivered to a tumor at a depth of 6cm) than that for the ISRNF. Also, for a beam current of 10 mA, the treatment time is calculated to be reasonable (approximately 30 min) for the boron concentrations that have been assumed. PMID:12749700

  12. The angular and spatial distributions of the thermal neutron source description of the THOR BNCT beam

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yuan-Hao Liu; Pi-En Tsai; Hong-Ming Liu; Shiang-Huei Jiang

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a way to determine the angular and spatial distributions of the thermal neutron source strength of a boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) beam. The experiments applied 1) the indirect neutron radiography, 2) the cadmium difference method, and 3) the instrumental neutron activation analysis. The measured data were processed by the spectrum deconvolution technique to resolve into a

  13. Comparison of LaBr3:Ce and NaI(Tl) Scintillators for RadioIsotope Identification Devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian D. Milbrath; Bethany J. Choate; Jim E. Fast; Walter K. Hensley; Richard T. Kouzes; John E. Schweppe

    2006-01-01

    Lanthanum halide (LaBr3:Ce) scintillators offer significantly better resolution (<3 percent at 662 kilo-electron volt [keV]) relative to sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and have recently become commercially available in sizes large enough for the hand-held radio-isotope identification device (RIID) market. There are drawbacks to lanthanum halide detectors, however. These include internal radioactivity that contributes to spectral counts and a low-energy response that

  14. Neutron-capture therapy of brain tumours: neutron sources, neutron-capture drugs, biological tests and clinical perspectives in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Burian, J; Marek, M; Mares, V; Drahota, Z

    1997-01-01

    The paper reviews neutron sources, chemical compounds and clinical perspectives of the boron neutron-capture therapy of brain tumours. Special attention is paid to the physical characteristics and biological effectiveness of the epithermal neutron beam constructed at the LVR-15 nuclear reactor at Rez near Prague. PMID:9727499

  15. Methods for lipid nanostructure investigation at neutron and synchrotron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    A lipid membrane is a main component of biological membranes. Contemporary bionanotechnologies use phospholipids and ceramides as basic components of drugs and cosmetic preparations. Phospholipids-based nanoparticles are used as drug carriers. Effective development of bionanotechnologies in Russia calls for creation of physical methods to diagnose the particle nanostructure which would be promising for application in pharmacology. Radiation with wavelengths of 1-10 is an adequate instrument for detecting the nanostructure of lipid bi- and monolayers. The review deals with methods that apply neutron scattering and synchrotron radiation for studying nanostructures of lipid membranes, phospholipid nanoparticles, and phospholipid monolayers on a water surface by techniques of diffraction, small-angle scattering, and reflectometry. The importance of the mutually complementary application of neutron and synchrotron radiation for solving urgent problems of membrane biophysics, microbiology, dermapharmacology, and bionanotechnologies is demonstrated by particular examples of studies of phospholipid membranes and ceramide-based membranes. The efficiency of development and application of new methods for solving urgent problems of biophysics is shown. The review is written on the basis of results obtained over the period of 1999-2010 at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) Laboratory of Neutron Physics in collaboration with the Pharmaceutical Departments of universities of France (Paris-Sud, Chatenay Malabry) and Germany (Martin Luther University, Halle). The experiments were performed at various European and Russian neutron and synchrotron sources.

  16. Advanced Neutron Source: Plant Design Requirements. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source will be a new world-class facility for research using hot, thermal, cold, and ultra-cold neutrons. The heart of the facility will be a 330-MW (fission), heavy-water cooled and heavy-water moderated reactor. The reactor will be housed in a central reactor building, with supporting equipment located in an adjoining reactor support building. An array of cold neutron guides will fan out into a large guide hall, housing about 30 neutron research stations. Appropriate office, laboratory, and shop facilities will be included to provide a complete facility for users. The ANS is scheduled to begin operation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory early in the next decade. This PDR document defines the plant-level requirements for the design, construction, and operation of ANS. It also defines and provides input to the individual System Design Description (SDD) documents. Together, this PDR document and the set of SDD documents will define and control the baseline configuration of ANS.

  17. Computational Benchmark Calculations Relevant to the Neutronic Design of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Gallmeier, F.X.; Glasgow, D.C.; Jerde, E.A.; Johnson, J.O.; Yugo, J.J.

    1999-11-14

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will provide an intense source of low-energy neutrons for experimental use. The low-energy neutrons are produced by the interaction of a high-energy (1.0 GeV) proton beam on a mercury (Hg) target and slowed down in liquid hydrogen or light water moderators. Computer codes and computational techniques are being benchmarked against relevant experimental data to validate and verify the tools being used to predict the performance of the SNS. The LAHET Code System (LCS), which includes LAHET, HTAPE ad HMCNP (a modified version of MCNP version 3b), have been applied to the analysis of experiments that were conducted in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In the AGS experiments, foils of various materials were placed around a mercury-filled stainless steel cylinder, which was bombarded with protons at 1.6 GeV. Neutrons created in the mercury target, activated the foils. Activities of the relevant isotopes were accurately measured and compared with calculated predictions. Measurements at BNL were provided in part by collaborating scientists from JAERI as part of the AGS Spallation Target Experiment (ASTE) collaboration. To date, calculations have shown good agreement with measurements.

  18. High-current negative-ion sources for pulsed spallation neutron sources: LBNL workshop, October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1995-09-01

    The neutron scattering community has endorsed the need for a high-power (1 to 5 MW) accelerator-driven source of neutrons for materials research. Properly configured, the accelerator could produce very short (sub-microsecond) bursts of cold neutrons, said time structure offering advantages over the continuous flux from a reactor. The recent cancellation of the ANS reactor project has increased the urgency to develop a comprehensive strategy based on the best technological scenarios. Studies to date have built on the experience from ISIS (the 160 kW source in the UK), and call for a high-current (approx. 100 mA peak) H- source-linac combination injecting into one or more accumulator rings in which beam may be further accelerated. The I to 5 GeV proton beam is extracted in a single turn and brought to the target-moderator stations. The high current, high duty-factor, high brightness and high reliability required of the ion source present a very large challenge to the ion source community. The Workshop reported on here, held in Berkeley in October 1994, analyzed in detail the source requirements for proposed accelerator scenarios, the present performance capabilities of different H- source technologies, and identified necessary R&D efforts to bridge the gap.

  19. OPTIONS FOR A STEADY-STATE COMPACT FUSION NEUTRON SOURCE M.P. Gryaznevich1

    E-print Network

    OPTIONS FOR A STEADY-STATE COMPACT FUSION NEUTRON SOURCE M.P. Gryaznevich1 , A. Sykes1 , D Kingham1 with a recently proposed Super Compact Fusion Neutron Source (SCFNS). It is shown that SCFNS with major radius, is the fusion fission hybrid reactor. By using the excess neutrons from the fusion reaction to cause a high

  20. Measurement of the thermal neutron distribution in a water phantom using a cyclotron based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroki Tanaka; Yoshinori Sakurai; Minoru Suzuki; Shinichiro Masunaga; Toshinori Mitsumoto; Satoru Yajima; Hiroshi Tsutsui; Takemi Sato; Tomoyuki Asano; Genro Kashino; Yuko Kinashi; Yong Liu; Koji Ono; A. Maruhashi

    2009-01-01

    We have been developed an epithermal neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy(BNCT), consisting of a cyclotron accelerator that can provide a ~ 1 mA, 30 MeV proton beam, a neutron production beryllium target and the moderator that can reduce the energy of fast neutrons to an effective energy range. In order to validate the simulations, we measured the depth

  1. Spallation neutron source saddle antenna H{sup -} ion source project

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Johnson, Rolland P. [Muons, Inc., Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Dudnikova, Galina [University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Stockli, Martin; Welton, Robert [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    In this project we are developing an H{sup -} source which will synthesize the most important developments in the field of negative ion sources to provide high current, high brightness, good lifetime, high reliability, and high power efficiency. We describe two planned modifications to the present spallation neutron source external antenna source in order to increase the plasma density near the output aperture: (1) replacing the present 2 MHz plasma-forming solenoid antenna with a 13 MHz saddle-type antenna and (2) replacing the permanent multicusp magnetic system with a weaker electromagnet.

  2. A Search for Point Sources of EeV Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anti?i'c, T.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Buml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Belltoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blmer, H.; Boh?ov, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buroker, L.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chirinos Diaz, J.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceio, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; del Peral, L.; del Ro, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Daz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filip?i?, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fratu, O.; Frhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garca, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gmez Berisso, M.; Gmez Vitale, P. F.; Gonalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hrandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsk, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kgl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krmer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leo, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lpez, R.; Lopez Agera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martnez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masas Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Meyhandan, R.; Mi'canovi'c, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostaf, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mller, G.; Mnchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Noka, L.; Oehlschlger, J.; Olinto, A.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pe?ala, J.; Pelayo, R.

    2012-12-01

    A thorough search of the sky exposed at the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory reveals no statistically significant excess of events in any small solid angle that would be indicative of a flux of neutral particles from a discrete source. The search covers from -90 to +15 in declination using four different energy ranges above 1 EeV (1018 eV). The method used in this search is more sensitive to neutrons than to photons. The upper limit on a neutron flux is derived for a dense grid of directions for each of the four energy ranges. These results constrain scenarios for the production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in the Galaxy.

  3. Coded source neutron imaging at the PULSTAR reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Ziyu [North Carolina State University; Mishra, Kaushal [North Carolina State University; Hawari, Ayman [North Carolina State University; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A neutron imaging facility is located on beam-tube No.5 of the 1-MW PULSTAR reactor at North Carolina State University. An investigation of high resolution imaging using the coded source imaging technique has been initiated at the facility. Coded imaging uses a mosaic of pinholes to encode an aperture, thus generating an encoded image of the object at the detector. To reconstruct the image data received by the detector, the corresponding decoding patterns are used. The optimized design of coded mask is critical for the performance of this technique and will depend on the characteristics of the imaging beam. In this work, a 34 x 38 uniformly redundant array (URA) coded aperture system is studied for application at the PULSTAR reactor neutron imaging facility. The URA pattern was fabricated on a 500 ?m gadolinium sheet. Simulations and experiments with a pinhole object have been conducted using the Gd URA and the optimized beam line.

  4. BEAM DUMP WINDOW DESIGN FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    RAPARIA,D.RANK,J.MURDOCH,G.ET AL.

    2004-03-10

    The Spallation Neutron Source accelerator systems will provide a 1 GeV, 1.44 MW proton beam to a liquid mercury target for neutron production. Beam tuning dumps are provided at the end of the linac (the Linac Dump) and in the Ring-to-Target transport line (the Extraction Dump) [1]. Thin windows are required to separate the accelerator vacuum from the poor vacuum upstream of the beam dump. There are several challenging engineering issues that have been addressed in the window design. Namely, handling of the high local power density deposited by the stripped electrons from the H-beam accelerated in the linac, and the need for low-exposure removal and replacement of an activated window. The thermal design of the linac dump window is presented, as is the design of a vacuum clamp and mechanism that allows remote removal and replacement of the window.

  5. Inertial electrostatic confinement fusion neutron source R & D and issues

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, Masami; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Hasegawa, Mitsunori [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1997-12-01

    An inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion is the scheme of injecting the ions and electrons toward the spherical center, trapping both species in the electrostatic self-field and giving rise to fusion reactions in the dense core. An IEC is expected to have wide application from a small neutron source to a D-{sup 3}He fusion reactor. Hirsch reported 10{sup 9} n/s deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron production in the device equipped with ion guns. Recently, Gu et al. measured 10{sup 6} n/s using a D{sub 2} gas discharge between the spherical wire cathode and the anode vacuum vessel, where the applied voltage is 60 kV and the current is 15 mA. We have also obtained similar neutron production at a lower voltage, {approximately}45 kV in a single-grid IEC device. Fusion reaction rates obtained by IEC experiments so far cannot be explained by a model of a simple potential well structure because the electrical potential peaked at the center prevents making a dense core. Hirsch proposed a multiwell structure called {open_quotes}poissors{close_quotes} to explain the experiments. It is generally believed that there may be some correlation between the potential well structure and the neutron production rate. The scaling of neutron production on the injected ion current is a most important aspect of the problem for the prospect of utilizing IEC for fusion energy. The potential structure and its behavior are keys to the physics in understanding the principle of an IEC.

  6. General Electric PETtrace cyclotron as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosko, Andrey

    This research investigates the use of a PETtrace cyclotron produced by General Electric (GE) as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The GE PETtrace was chosen for this investigation because this type of cyclotron is popular among nuclear pharmacies and clinics in many countries; it is compact and reliable; it produces protons with energies high enough to produce neutrons with appropriate energy and fluence rate for BNCT and it does not require significant changes in design to provide neutrons. In particular, the standard PETtrace 18O target is considered. The cyclotron efficiency may be significantly increased if unused neutrons produced during radioisotopes production could be utilized for other medical modalities such as BNCT at the same time. The resulting dose from the radiation emitted from the target is evaluated using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP at several depths in a brain phantom for different scattering geometries. Four different moderating materials of various thicknesses were considered: light water, carbon, heavy water, arid Fluental(TM). The fluence rate tally was used to calculate photon and neutron dose, by applying fluence rate-to-dose conversion factors. Fifteen different geometries were considered and a 30-cm thick heavy water moderator was chosen as the most suitable for BNCT with the GE PETtrace cyclotron. According to the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) protocol, the maximum dose to the normal brain is set to 12.5 RBEGy, which for the conditions of using a heavy water moderator, assuming a 60 muA beam current, would be reached with a treatment time of 258 min. Results showed that using a PETtrace cyclotron in this configuration provides a therapeutic ratio of about 2.4 for depths up to 4 cm inside a brain phantom. Further increase of beam current proposed by GE should significantly improve the beam quality or the treatment time and allow treating tumors at greater depths.

  7. Novel Large Area High Resolution Neutron Detector for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Jeffrey L

    2009-05-22

    Neutron scattering is a powerful technique that is critically important for materials science and structural biology applications. The knowledge gained from past developments has resulted in far-reaching advances in engineering, pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, to name a few. New facilities for neutron generation at much higher flux, such as the SNS at Oak Ridge, TN, will greatly enhance the capabilities of neutron scattering, with benefits that extend to many fields and include, for example, development of improved drug therapies and materials that are stronger, longer-lasting, and more impact-resistant. In order to fully realize this enhanced potential, however, higher neutron rates must be met with improved detection capabilities, particularly higher count rate capability in large size detectors, while maintaining practicality. We have developed a neutron detector with the technical and economic advantages to accomplish this goal. This new detector has a large sensitive area, offers 3D spatial resolution, high sensitivity and high count rate capability, and it is economical and practical to produce. The proposed detector technology is based on B-10 thin film conversion of neutrons in long straw-like gas detectors. A stack of many such detectors, each 1 meter in length, and 4 mm in diameter, has a stopping power that exceeds that of He-3 gas, contained at practical pressures within an area detector. With simple electronic readout methods, straw detector arrays can provide spatial resolution of 4 mm FWHM or better, and since an array detector of such form consists of several thousand individual elements per square meter, count rates in a 1 m^2 detector can reach 2?10^7 cps. Moreover, each individual event can be timetagged with a time resolution of less than 0.1 ?sec, allowing accurate identification of neutron energy by time of flight. Considering basic elemental cost, this novel neutron imaging detector can be commercially produced economically, probably at a small fraction of the cost of He-3 detectors. In addition to neutron scattering science, the fully developed base technology can be used as a rugged, low-cost neutron detector in area monitoring and surveying. Radiation monitors are used in a number of other settings for occupational and environmental radiation safety. Such a detector can also be used in environmental monitoring and remote nuclear power plant monitoring. For example, the Department of Energy could use it to characterize nuclear waste dumps, coordinate clean-up efforts, and assess the radioactive contaminants in the air and water. Radiation monitors can be used to monitor the age and component breakdown of nuclear warheads and to distinguish between weapons and reactor grade plutonium. The UN's International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) uses radiation monitors for treaty verification, remote monitoring, and enforcing the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons. As part of treaty verification, monitors can be used to certify the contents of containers during inspections. They could be used for portal monitoring to secure border checkpoints, sea ports, air cargo centers, public parks, sporting venues, and key government buildings. Currently, only 2% of all sea cargo shipped is inspected for radiation sources. In addition, merely the presence of radiation is detected and nothing is known about the radioactive source until further testing. The utilization of radiation monitors with neutron sensitivity and capability of operation in hostile port environments would increase the capacity and effectiveness of the radioactive scanning processes.

  8. Development of high-quality titanium--tritide targets for the rotating-target neutron source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. M. Jones; D. M. Makowiecki; S. A. Steward

    1980-01-01

    The Rotating-Target Neutron Source II (RTNS II) at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) is the most intense continuous source of 14-MeV D-T neutrons currently available and is a national center for the study of the effects of these neutrons on materials of interest to the fusion community. The 14-MeV neutrons are produced when a 400-keV deuteron beam strikes an approximately 10-..mu..m-thick

  9. Neutron interrogation to identify chemical elements with an ion-tube neutron source (INS)

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, R.A.; Dougan, A.D.; Rowland, M.R.; Wang, T.F.

    1994-04-07

    A non-destructive analysis technique using a portable, electric ion-tube neutron source (INS) and gamma ray detector has been used to identify the key constituent elements in a number of sealed munitions, and from the elemental makeup, infer the types of agent within each. The high energy (14 MeV) and pulsed character of the neutron flux from an INS provide a method of measuring, quantitatively, the oxygen, carbon, and fluorine content of materials in closed containers, as well as the other constituents that can be measured with low-energy neutron probes. The broad range of elements that can be quantitatively measured with INS-based instruments provides a capability of verifying common munition fills; it provides the greatest specificity of any portable neutron-based technique for determining the full matrix of chemical elements in completely unrestricted sample scenarios. The specific capability of quantifying the carbon and oxygen content of materials should lead to a fast screening technique which, can discriminate very quickly between high-explosive and chemical agent-filled containers.

  10. An integrated design of an accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobelbower, Michael Christian

    1997-07-01

    An Accelerator Based Neutron Source (ABNS) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) was first proposed at The Ohio State University (OSU). Since the conception of the ABNS for BNCT, OSU has designed and optimized a moderator assembly based on in-air and in-phantom parameters. Additionally, the fabrication of the moderator assembly has commenced along with detailed analyses of the target and its heat removal system. In this dissertation, an integrated design of the ABNS is presented. This integrated design includes the high energy beam transport system (HEBT), the target and heat removal system (HRS), and the moderator assembly. In the integration process, a neutronic model of the HRS was developed and incorporated into the moderator assembly model. Additionally, a preliminary design of a HEBT system was developed that is compatible with both the HRS and the facility shielding. This dissertation also includes the completion of the fabrication of the moderator assembly and its experimental verification. The completion of the moderator assembly fabrication included the refabrication of the moderator and delimiter and the fabrication of the 6Li covering on the front of the moderator assembly. The experimental verification included neutron spectrum calculations and measurements in the irradiation port, and 3He detector response calculations and measurements in-phantom downstream of the moderator assembly.

  11. Lithium target for accelerator based BNCT neutron source: Influence by the proton irradiation on lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, R.; Imahori, Y.; Nakakmura, M.; Takada, M.; Kamada, S.; Hamano, T.; Hoshi, M.; Sato, H.; Itami, J.; Abe, Y.; Fuse, M.

    2012-12-01

    The neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is in the transition stage from nuclear reactor to accelerator based neutron source. Generation of low energy neutron can be achieved by 7Li (p, n) 7Be reaction using accelerator based neutron source. Development of small-scale and safe neutron source is within reach. The melting point of lithium that is used for the target is low, and durability is questioned for an extended use at a high current proton beam. In order to test its durability, we have irradiated lithium with proton beam at the same level as the actual current density, and found no deterioration after 3 hours of continuous irradiation. As a result, it is suggested that lithium target can withstand proton irradiation at high current, confirming suitability as accelerator based neutron source for BNCT.

  12. Flat-spectrum radio sources - Cosmic conspiracy or relativistic neutrons?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovanoni, Peter M.; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    1990-01-01

    The intensity spectrum of the core of radio-loud AGN varies smoothly from 10 exp 8.5 to 10 to the 16th Hz, and is flat between 10 to the 9th and 10 to the 10th Hz, implying that a single emission mechanism is responsible. It is proposed here that energy is transported from the central source by relativistic neutrons which travel freely over a large volume and decay into relativistic protons. The protons produce secondary electrons which generate the observed radiation. The photon spectra thus produced are largely model-independent and flat.

  13. Structural thermal tests on Advanced Neutron Source reactor fuel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Yahr, G.T.

    1995-08-01

    The thin aluminum-clad fuel plates proposed for the Advanced Neutron Source reactor are stressed by the high-velocity coolant flowing on each side of the plates and by the thermal gradients in the plates. The total stress, composed of the sum of the flow stress and the thermal stress at a point, could be reduced if the thermal loads tend to relax when the stress magnitude approaches the yield stress of the material. The potential of this occurring would be very significant in assessing the structural reliability of the fuel plates and has been investigated through experiment. The results of this investigation are given in this report.

  14. Neutron source capability assessment for cumulative fission yields measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Descalle, M A; Dekin, W; Kenneally, J

    2011-04-06

    A recent analysis of high-quality cumulative fission yields data for Pu-239 published in the peer-reviewed literature showed that the quoted experimental uncertainties do not allow a clear statement on how the fission yields vary as a function of energy. [Prussin2009] To make such a statement requires a set of experiments with well 'controlled' and understood sources of experimental errors to reduce uncertainties as low as possible, ideally in the 1 to 2% range. The Inter Laboratory Working Group (ILWOG) determined that Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) would benefit from an experimental program with the stated goal to reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Following recent discussions between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), there is a renewed interest in developing a concerted experimental program to measure fission yields in a neutron energy range from thermal energy (0.025 eV) to 14 MeV with an emphasis on discrete energies from 0.5 to 4 MeV. Ideally, fission yields would be measured at single energies, however, in practice there are only 'quasi-monoenergetic' neutrons sources of finite width. This report outlines a capability assessment as of June 2011 of available neutron sources that could be used as part of a concerted experimental program to measure cumulative fission yields. In a framework of international collaborations, capabilities available in the United States, at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom and at the Commissariat Energie Atomique (CEA) in France are listed. There is a need to develop an experimental program that will reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Fission and monoenergetic neutron sources are available that could support these fission yield experiments in the US, as well as at AWE and CEA. Considerations that will impact the final choice of experimental venues are: (1) Availability during the timeframe of interest; (2) Ability to accommodate special nuclear materials; (3) Cost; (4) Availability of counting facilities; and (5) Expected experimental uncertainties.

  15. STUDY OF A 10-MW CONTINUOUS SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    RUGGIERO,A.G.LUDEWIG,H.SHAPIRO,S.

    2003-05-12

    This paper reports on the feasibility study of a proton Super-Conducting Linac as the driver for an Accelerator-based Continuous Neutron Source (ACNS) [1] to be located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Linac is to be operated in the Continuous Wave (CW) mode to produce an average 10 MW of beam power. The Linac beam energy is taken to be 1.25 GeV. The required average proton beam intensity in exit is then 8 mA.

  16. A new fuel loading design for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Gehin, J.C.; Renier, J.P.; Worley, B.A.

    1994-06-01

    A new fuel loading design has been developed for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor. In this reactor the combination of a small core volume and high power results in a very high power density. Using a direct optimization procedure the thermal-hydraulic margins for oxide temperature drop, centerline temperature and incipient boiling (and thus critical heat flux) were maximized to increase the limiting thermal power from 298 MW to 346 MW compared to the previous fuel grading, while maintaining the desired peak reflector thermal flux.

  17. A compact neutron generator using a field ionization source

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, Arun; Waldmann, Ole; Kapadia, Rehan; Takei, Kuniharu; Javey, Ali; Schenkel, Thomas

    2011-10-31

    Field ionization as a means to create ions for compact and rugged neutron sources is pursued. Arrays of carbon nano-#12;bers promise the high #12;eld-enhancement factors required for efficient field ionization. We report on the fabrication of arrays of #12;field emitters with a density up to 10{sup 6} tips/cm{sup 2} and measure their performance characteristics using electron field emission. The critical issue of uniformity is discussed, as are efforts towards coating the nano-fibers to enhance their lifetime and surface properties.

  18. Emittance studies of the Spallation Neutron Source external-antenna H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B. X.; Stockli, M. P.; Welton, R. F.; Pennisi, T. R.; Murray, S. N.; Santana, M.; Long, C. D. [Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    A new Allison-type emittance scanner has been built to characterize the ion sources and low energy beam transport systems at Spallation Neutron Source. In this work, the emittance characteristics of the H{sup -} beam produced with the external-antenna rf-driven ion source and transported through the two-lens electrostatic low energy beam transport are studied. The beam emittance dependence on beam intensity, extraction parameters, and the evolution of the emittance and twiss parameters over beam pulse duration are presented.

  19. Irradiation facility for boron neutron capture therapy application based on a rf-driven DT neutron source and a new beam shaping assembly (abstract)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Cerullo; J. Esposito; K. N. Leung

    2002-01-01

    Selecting the best neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) requires optimizing neutron beam parameters. This involves solving many complex problems. Safety issues related to the use of nuclear reactor in hospital environments, as well as lower costs have led to interest in the development of accelerator-driven neutron sources. The BNCT research programs at the Nuclear Departments of Pisa

  20. Study on High Speed Lithium Jet For Neutron Source of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tooru; Zhang, Mingguang; Mk, Michael; tefanica, Jir; Dostl, Vclav; Zhao, Wei

    The feasibility study of a liquid lithium type proton beam target was performed for the neutron source of the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). As the candidates of the liquid lithium target, a thin sheet jet and a thin film flow on a concave wall were chosen, and a lithium flow experiment was conducted to investigate the hydrodynamic stability of the targets. The surfaces of the jets and film flows with a thickness of 0.5 mm and a width of 50 mm were observed by means of photography. It has been found that a stable sheet jet and a stable film flow on a concave wall can be formed up to certain velocities by using a straight nozzle and a curved nozzle with the concave wall, respectively.

  1. Detection of buried explosives using portable neutron sources with nanosecond timing.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A V; Evsenin, A V; Gorshkov, I Yu; Osetrov, O I; Vakhtin, D N

    2004-07-01

    Significant reduction of time needed to identify hidden explosives and other hazardous materials by the "neutron in, gamma out" method has been achieved by introducing timed (nanosecond) neutron sources-the so-called nanosecond neutron analysis technique. Prototype mobile device for explosives' detection based on a timed (nanosecond) isotopic (252)Cf neutron source has been created. The prototype is capable of identifying 400 g of hidden explosives in 10 min. Tests have been also made with a prototype device using timed (nanosecond) neutron source based on a portable D-T neutron generator with built-in segmented detector of accompanying alpha-particles. The presently achieved intensity of the neutron generator is 5x10(7)n/s into 4pi, with over 10(6) of these neutrons being correlated with alpha-particles detected by the built-in alpha-particle detector. Results of measurements with an anti-personnel landmine imitator are presented. PMID:15145438

  2. A portable active interrogation system using a switchable AmBe neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Matthew; Hertz, Kristin; Kunz, Christopher; Mascarenhas, Nicholas

    2005-09-01

    Active neutron interrogation is an effective technique used to locate fissionable material. This paper discusses a portable system that utilizes a AmBe neutron source. The AmBe source consists of an americium alpha source and a beryllium target that can be switched into alignment to turn the source on and out of alignment to turn the source off. This offers a battery operated backpack portable source. The detector system that has been fabricated for use with this source is a fifteen tube 3He neutron detector. The results of initial experiments with the detector and MCNP calculations are discussed.

  3. Demonstration of a solid deuterium source of ultra-cold neutrons

    E-print Network

    A. Saunders; J. M. Anaya; T. J. Bowles; B. W. Filippone; P. Geltenbort; R. E. Hill; M. Hino; S. Hoedl; G. E. Hogan; T. M. Ito; K. W. Jones; T. Kawai; K. Kirch; S. K. Lamoreaux; C. -Y. Liu; M. Makela; L. J. Marek; J. W. Martin; C. L. Morris; R. N. Mortensen; A. Pichlmaier; S. J. Seestrom; A. Serebrov; D. Smith; W. Teasdale; B. Tipton; R. B. Vogelaar; A. R. Young; J. Yuan

    2003-12-18

    Ultra-cold neutrons (UCN), neutrons with energies low enough to be confined by the Fermi potential in material bottles, are playing an increasing role in measurements of fundamental properties of the neutron. The ability to manipulate UCN with material guides and bottles, magnetic fields, and gravity can lead to experiments with lower systematic errors than have been obtained in experiments with cold neutron beams. The UCN densities provided by existing reactor sources limit these experiments. The promise of much higher densities from solid deuterium sources has led to proposed facilities coupled to both reactor and spallation neutron sources. In this paper we report on the performance of a prototype spallation neutron-driven solid deuterium source. This source produced bottled UCN densities of 145 +/-7 UCN/cm3, about three times greater than the largest bottled UCN densities previously reported. These results indicate that a production UCN source with substantially higher densities should be possible.

  4. Study on induced radioactivity of China Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing-Biao; Wang, Qing-Bin; Wu, Jing-Min; Ma, Zhong-Jian

    2011-06-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is the first High Energy Intense Proton Accelerator planned to be constructed in China during the State Eleventh Five-Year Plan period, whose induced radioactivity is very important for occupational disease hazard assessment and environmental impact assessment. Adopting the FLUKA code, the authors have constructed a cylinder-tunnel geometric model and a line-source sampling physical model, deduced proper formulas to calculate air activation, and analyzed various issues with regard to the activation of different tunnel parts. The results show that the environmental impact resulting from induced activation is negligible, whereas the residual radiation in the tunnels has a great influence on maintenance personnel, so strict measures should be adopted.

  5. 5 MW pulsed spallation neutron source, Preconceptual design study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report describes a self-consistent base line design for a 5 MW Pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (PSNS). It is intended to establish feasibility of design and as a basis for further expanded and detailed studies. It may also serve as a basis for establishing project cost (30% accuracy) in order to intercompare competing designs for a PSNS not only on the basis of technical feasibility and technical merit but also on the basis of projected total cost. The accelerator design considered here is based on the objective of a pulsed neutron source obtained by means of a pulsed proton beam with average beam power of 5 MW, in {approx} 1 {mu}sec pulses, operating at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. Two target stations are incorporated in the basic facility: one for operation at 10 Hz for long-wavelength instruments, and one operating at 50 Hz for instruments utilizing thermal neutrons. The design approach for the proton accelerator is to use a low energy linear accelerator (at 0.6 GeV), operating at 60 Hz, in tandem with two fast cycling booster synchrotrons (at 3.6 GeV), operating at 30 Hz. It is assumed here that considerations of cost and overall system reliability may favor the present design approach over the alternative approach pursued elsewhere, whereby use is made of a high energy linear accelerator in conjunction with a dc accumulation ring. With the knowledge that this alternative design is under active development, it was deliberately decided to favor here the low energy linac-fast cycling booster approach. Clearly, the present design, as developed here, must be carried to the full conceptual design stage in order to facilitate a meaningful technology and cost comparison with alternative designs.

  6. Improvements to the internal and external antenna H(-) ion sources at the Spallation Neutron Source.

    PubMed

    Welton, R F; Dudnikov, V G; Han, B X; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Pillar, C; Santana, M; Stockli, M P; Turvey, M W

    2014-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), a large scale neutron production facility, routinely operates with 30-40 mA peak current in the linac. Recent measurements have shown that our RF-driven internal antenna, Cs-enhanced, multi-cusp ion sources injects ?55 mA of H(-) beam current (?1 ms, 60 Hz) at 65-kV into a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator through a closely coupled electrostatic Low-Energy Beam Transport system. Over the last several years a decrease in RFQ transmission and issues with internal antennas has stimulated source development at the SNS both for the internal and external antenna ion sources. This report discusses progress in improving internal antenna reliability, H(-) yield improvements which resulted from modifications to the outlet aperture assembly (applicable to both internal and external antenna sources) and studies made of the long standing problem of beam persistence with the external antenna source. The current status of the external antenna ion source will also be presented. PMID:24593575

  7. Improvements to the internal and external antenna H- ion sources at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Dudnikov, V. G.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Pillar, C.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Turvey, M. W.

    2014-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), a large scale neutron production facility, routinely operates with 30-40 mA peak current in the linac. Recent measurements have shown that our RF-driven internal antenna, Cs-enhanced, multi-cusp ion sources injects 55 mA of H- beam current (1 ms, 60 Hz) at 65-kV into a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator through a closely coupled electrostatic Low-Energy Beam Transport system. Over the last several years a decrease in RFQ transmission and issues with internal antennas has stimulated source development at the SNS both for the internal and external antenna ion sources. This report discusses progress in improving internal antenna reliability, H- yield improvements which resulted from modifications to the outlet aperture assembly (applicable to both internal and external antenna sources) and studies made of the long standing problem of beam persistence with the external antenna source. The current status of the external antenna ion source will also be presented.

  8. Stellar neutron sources and s-Process in Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwar, R.; Berg, G. P. A.; Bin, L.; Couder, M.; Deboer, R.; Fang, X.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Goerres, J.; Hatanaka, K.; Ito, T.; Kadoya, T.; Long, A.; Miki, K.; Patel, D.; Tamii, A.; Wiescher, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Yosoi, M.

    2014-09-01

    Potential stellar neutron sources for the s-process in massive stars are associated with ?-capture reactions on light nuclei. The capture-reaction rates provide the reaction flow for the buildup of the neutron sources 22Ne, and 26Mg during the helium-burning phase in stars. A critical influence on these reactions is expected to come from low-energy resonances at stellar energies between 300 keV and 1500 keV. It is possible that these resonances are suspected to correspond to pronounced cluster structures near the ?-threshold. Direct measurements of capture reactions to study these cluster states are handicapped by the Coulomb barrier and limited detector resolutions. Hence, inelastic ?-scattering on these nuclei has been used as an alternative tool to probe into the level structure. Also ?-transfer technique has been used to extract ?-strength information. In reference to this, the experiments performed using the Grand Raiden Spectrometer at RCNP, Osaka will be discussed and preliminary results will be presented.

  9. Feasibility study of BNCT of skin melanoma with an accelerator-based neutron source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefano Agosteo; P. Colautti; M. G. Corrado; F. D'Errico; Sandra Monti; Marco Silari; R. Tinti; G. Tornielli

    1997-01-01

    The feasibility of an accelerator-driven thermal neuron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of skin melanoma is discussed, based on the design of an analogous source for BNCT of the explanted liver. Monte Carlo simulations were performed by introducing some variations in the moderator geometry of that source. Neutrons are generated by 7 MeV deuterons impinging on a thick

  10. Plans for a collaboratively developed distributed control system for the Spallation Neutron Source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. R. DeVan; D. P. Gurd; J. Hammonds; S. A. Lewis; J. D. Smith

    1999-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based pulsed neutron source to be built in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The facility has five major sections-a front end consisting of a 65 kev H ion source followed by a 2.5 MeV RFQ; a 1 GeV linac; a storage ring; a 1 MW spallation neutron target (upgradeable to 2 MW); the conventional facilities

  11. Neutron generators with size scalability, ease of fabrication and multiple ion source functionalities

    DOEpatents

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M

    2014-11-18

    A neutron generator is provided with a flat, rectilinear geometry and surface mounted metallizations. This construction provides scalability and ease of fabrication, and permits multiple ion source functionalities.

  12. High electric field deuterium ion sources for neutron generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichenbach, Birk

    Active interrogation systems for highly enriched uranium require improved fieldable neutron sources. The target technology for deuterium-tritium neutron generators is well understood and the most significant improvement can be achieved by improving the deuterium ion source through increased output and, in some cases, lifetime of the ion source. We are developing a new approach to a deuterium ion sources based upon the field desorption/evaporation of deuterium from the surfaces of metal tips. Electrostatic field desorption (EFD) desorbs previously adsorbed deuterium as ions under the influence of high electric fields (several V/A), without removing tip material. Single etched wire tip experiments have been performed and have shown that this is difficult but can be achieved with molybdenum and tungsten tips. Electrostatic field evaporation (EFE) evaporates ultra thin deuterated titanium films as ions. It has been shown that several 10s of atomic layers can be removed within a few nanoseconds from etched tungsten tips. In the course of these studies titanium deposition and deuteration methods were studied and new detection methods developed. Space charge effects resulting from the large ion currents were identified to be the most likely cause of some unusual ion emission characteristics. In addition, on W < 110 > oriented substrates a surprising body-centered cubic crystal structure of the titanium film was found and studied. The ion currents required for neutron generator applications can be achieved by microfabrication of metal tip arrays. Field desorption studies of microfabricated field emitter tip arrays have been conducted for the first time. Maximum fields of 3 V/A have been applied to the array tip surfaces to date, although fields of 2 V/A to 2.5 V/A are more typical. Desorption of atomic deuterium ions has been observed at fields of roughly 2 V/A at room temperature. The desorption of common surface adsorbates, such as hydrogen, carbon, water, and carbon monoxide is observed at fields exceeding 1 V/A. In vacuo heating of the arrays to temperatures of the order of 800C can be effective in removing many of the surface contaminants observed. For both the field desorption and the field evaporation approaches further improvements to array design and fabrication are required if arrays are to provide sufficient deuterium ion currents to produce 109 to 1010 n/cm2 of tip array area for the detection systems.

  13. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, R. F.; Dudnikov, V. G.; Gawne, K. R.; Han, B. X.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Roseberry, R. T.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.; Turvey, M. W.

    2012-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent 38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of 90%. H- beam pulses (1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, 60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of 0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of 99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of 75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to 100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  14. Neutron resonance transmission spectroscopy with high spatial and energy resolution at the J-PARC pulsed neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Shinohara, T.; Kai, T.; Ooi, M.; Kamiyama, T.; Kiyanagi, Y.; Shiota, Y.; McPhate, J. B.; Vallerga, J. V.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Feller, W. B.

    2014-05-01

    The sharp variation of neutron attenuation at certain energies specific to particular nuclides (the lower range being from ~1 eV up to ~1 keV), can be exploited for the remote mapping of element and/or isotope distributions, as well as temperature probing, within relatively thick samples. Intense pulsed neutron beam-lines at spallation sources combined with a high spatial, high-timing resolution neutron counting detector, provide a unique opportunity to measure neutron transmission spectra through the time-of-flight technique. We present the results of experiments where spatially resolved neutron resonances were measured, at energies up to 50 keV. These experiments were performed with the intense flux low background NOBORU neutron beamline at the J-PARC neutron source and the high timing resolution (~20 ns at epithermal neutron energies) and spatial resolution (~55 ?m) neutron counting detector using microchannel plates coupled to a Timepix electronic readout. Simultaneous element-specific imaging was carried out for several materials, at a spatial resolution of ~150 ?m. The high timing resolution of our detector combined with the low background beamline, also enabled characterization of the neutron pulse itself - specifically its pulse width, which varies with neutron energy. The results of our measurements are in good agreement with the predicted results for the double pulse structure of the J-PARC facility, which provides two 100 ns-wide proton pulses separated by 600 ns, broadened by the neutron energy moderation process. Thermal neutron radiography can be conducted simultaneously with resonance transmission spectroscopy, and can reveal the internal structure of the samples. The transmission spectra measured in our experiments demonstrate the feasibility of mapping elemental distributions using this non-destructive technique, for those elements (and in certain cases, specific isotopes), which have resonance energies below a few keV, and with lower resolution for elements with relatively high resonance energies in the 1-30 keV range.

  15. NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS APPLICATIONS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE USING AN ISOTOPIC NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Diprete, D; C Diprete, C; Raymond Sigg, R

    2006-08-14

    NAA using {sup 252}Cf is used to address important areas of applied interest at SRS. Sensitivity needs for many of the applications are not severe; analyses are accomplished using a 21 mg {sup 252}Cf NAA facility. Because NAA allows analysis of bulk samples, it offers strong advantages for samples in difficult-to-digest matrices when its sensitivity is sufficient. Following radiochemical separation with stable carrier addition, chemical yields for a number methods are determined by neutron activation of the stable carrier. In some of the cases where no suitable stable carriers exist, the source has been used to generate radioactive tracers to yield separations.

  16. Characteristics comparison between a cyclotron-based neutron source and KUR-HWNIF for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Suzuki, M.; Masunaga, S.; Kinashi, Y.; Kashino, G.; Liu, Y.; Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Maruhashi, A.; Ono, K.

    2009-06-01

    At Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), 275 clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) have been performed as of March 2006, and the effectiveness of BNCT has been revealed. In order to further develop BNCT, it is desirable to supply accelerator-based epithermal-neutron sources that can be installed near the hospital. We proposed the method of filtering and moderating fast neutrons, which are emitted from the reaction between a beryllium target and 30-MeV protons accelerated by a cyclotron accelerator, using an optimum moderator system composed of iron, lead, aluminum and calcium fluoride. At present, an epithermal-neutron source is under construction from June 2008. This system consists of a cyclotron accelerator, beam transport system, neutron-yielding target, filter, moderator and irradiation bed. In this article, an overview of this system and the properties of the treatment neutron beam optimized by the MCNPX Monte Carlo neutron transport code are presented. The distribution of biological effect weighted dose in a head phantom compared with that of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) is shown. It is confirmed that for the accelerator, the biological effect weighted dose for a deeply situated tumor in the phantom is 18% larger than that for KUR, when the limit dose of the normal brain is 10 Gy-eq. The therapeutic time of the cyclotron-based neutron sources are nearly one-quarter of that of KUR. The cyclotron-based epithermal-neutron source is a promising alternative to reactor-based neutron sources for treatments by BNCT.

  17. Intercalibration of physical neutron dosimetry for the RA-3 and MURR thermal neutron sources for BNCT small-animal research.

    PubMed

    Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Thorp, Silvia; Brockman, John; Miller, Marcelo; Nigg, David W; Hawthorne, M Frederick

    2011-12-01

    New thermal neutron irradiation facilities to perform cell and small-animal irradiations for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy research have been installed at the Missouri University Research Reactor and at the RA-3 research reactor facility in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Recognizing the importance of accurate and reproducible physical beam dosimetry as an essential tool for combination and intercomparisons of preclinical and clinical results from the different facilities, we have conducted an experimental intercalibration of the neutronic performance of the RA-3 and MURR thermal neutron sources. PMID:21330143

  18. A Project of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy System based on a Proton Linac Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyanagi, Yoshikai; Asano, Kenji; Arakawa, Akihiro; Fukuchi, Shin; Hiraga, Fujio; Kimura, Kenju; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Kubota, Michio; Kumada, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Akira; Sakae, Takeji; Saitoh, Kimiaki; Shibata, Tokushi; Yoshioka, Masakazu

    At present, the clinical trials of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) are being performed at research reactor facilities. However, an accelerator based BNCT has a merit that it can be built in a hospital. So, we just launched a development project for the BNCT based on an accelerator in order to establish and to spread the BNCT as an effective therapy in the near future. In the project, a compact proton linac installed in a hospital will be applied as a neutron source, and energy of the proton beam is planned to be less than about 10 MeV to reduce the radioactivity. The BNCT requires epithermal neutron beam with an intensity of around 1x109 (n/cm2/sec) to deliver the therapeutic dose to a deeper region in a body and to complete the irradiation within an hour. From this condition, the current of the proton beam required is estimated to be a few mA on average. Enormous heat deposition in the target is a big issue. We are aiming at total optimization of the accelerator based BNCT from the linac to the irradiation position. Here, the outline of the project is introduced and the moderator design is presented.

  19. Proposal for a New Integrated Circuit and Electronics Neutron Experiment Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Phillip D [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Government and customer specifications increasingly require assessments of the single event effects probability in electronics from atmospheric neutrons. The accelerator that best simulates this neutron spectrum is the WNR facility (Los Alamos), but it is underfunded and oversubscribed for present and future needs. A new beam-line is proposed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, as part of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS).

  20. Study on an inertial electrostatic confinement fusion as a portable neutron source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masami Ohnishi; Yasushi Yamamoto; Mitsunori Hasegawa; Kiyoshi Yoshikawa; George H. Miley

    1998-01-01

    The scaling of neutron generation versus ion current is important in evaluating the prospect of an inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) as a neutron source. In this paper, the scaling of neutron generation versus ion current, I, based on the results of both the experiments and the numerical simulations is discussed. The experiments shows the scaling of I2, while the numerical

  1. Energyangle correlation of neutrons and gamma-rays emitted from an HEU source

    E-print Network

    Harilal, S. S.

    Energyangle correlation of neutrons and gamma-rays emitted from an HEU source G. Miloshevsky n , A 2 March 2014 Keywords: Special Nuclear Materials Monte Carlo simulation Energy spectra of neutrons t Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) yield very unique fission signatures, namely correlated neutrons and gamma

  2. Feasibility analysis of a Plasma Focus neutron source for BNCT treatment of transplanted human liver

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Benzi; F. Mezzetti; F. Rocchi; M. Sumini

    2004-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy preliminary treatments on transplanted human liver have been recently conducted at Pavia University. The need of high fluences of thermal neutrons imposed the use of the available thermal channel of a TRIGA reactor properly modified for this application. We analyse the possibility of using the Plasma Focus (PF) machine as a pulsed neutron source for this

  3. The flow mechanism in the Chalk based on radio-isotope analyses of groundwater in the London Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Downing, R.A.; Pearson, F.J.; Smith, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    14C analyses of groundwaters from the Chalk of the London Basin are re-interpreted and the age of the groundwater is revised. Radio-isotope analyses are used to examine the flow mechanism in the aquifer. The evidence supports the view that a network of micro-fissures and larger intergranular pores in the matrix provides a significant part of the water pumped from Chalk wells and the major fissures distribute the water to the wells. Most of the matrix is fine-grained and contains a very old water. This diffuses into the micro-fissures and larger pores and is carried to the wells by the major fissures. ?? 1979.

  4. Comparison of LaBr 3:Ce and NAI(Tl) scintillators for radio-isotope identification devices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. D. Milbrath; B. J. Choate; J. E. Fast; W. K. Hensley; R. T. Kouzes; J. E. Schweppe

    2007-01-01

    Lanthanum bromide (LaBr3:Ce) scintillators offer significantly better resolution (<3 percent at 662keV) relative to sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) but contain internal radioactivity that contributes to spectral counts. LaBr3:Ce has recently become available commercially in sizes large enough for the hand-held radio-isotope identification device (RIID) market. To study its potential for RIIDs, a series of measurements were performed comparing a 1.51.5-in. LaBr3:Ce

  5. Present and future trends for neutron source calibrations at the National Institute of Standards and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    The neutron source calibration facility operated by the United States National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is a world-class calibration laboratory providing neutron source calibration services for radioisotopic sources with neutron emission rates ranging from 5 10 5 to 1 10 10 s -1. Calibrations are performed using the manganous sulfate bath technique with a relative expanded uncertainty of approximately 3.5% (2 ?). Recently, an improvement to the calibration procedure has been implemented whereby sources are regularly cross-calibrated against the national standard neutron source as well as one of three (international) standard sources formerly maintained by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures. This feature helps ensure that the fidelity of NIST neutron source calibrations is maintained at the highest level. In addition to the Institute's external customers, NIST's neutron source calibration facility also provides important contributions to other neutron irradiation and calibration services provided by the Institute, as well as to NIST's intramural research programs in neutron metrology, nuclear reactor pressure-vessel dosimetry, and fundamental neutron physics.

  6. The project of ultracold neutron sources at the PIK reactor with superfluid helium as a moderator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Fomin, A. K.; Onegin, M. S.; Kharitonov, A. G.; Prudnikov, D. V.; Lyamkin, V. A.; Ivanov, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    The project of ultracold neutron sources at the PIK reactor with superfluid helium as a moderator is presented. The rate of producing ultracold neutrons in superfluid helium is 100 cm-3 s-1 at neutron flux density ?(? = 9 ) = 109 cm-2 s-1 -1. At a moderator temperature of 1 K within the experimental volume of 351, the density of ultracold neutrons may be equal to 1.3 103 cm-3, which is two orders of magnitude exceeds that the currently existing ultracold neutron sources.

  7. Calculations of radiation damage in target, container and window materials for spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, M.S. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Ferguson, P.D.; Sommer, W.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Mansur, L.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Radiation damage in target, container, and window materials for spallation neutron sources is am important factor in the design of target stations for accelerator-driver transmutation technologies. Calculations are described that use the LAHET and SPECTER codes to obtain displacement and helium production rates in tungsten, 316 stainless steel, and Inconel 718, which are major target, container, and window materials, respectively. Results are compared for the three materials, based on neutron spectra for NSNS and ATW spallation neutron sources, where the neutron fluxes are normalized to give the same flux of neutrons of all energies.

  8. Materials compatibility studies for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; Pawel, S.J.; Manneschmidt, E.T.

    1998-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high power facility for producing neutrons that utilizes flowing liquid mercury inside an austenitic stainless steel container as the target for a 1.0 GeV proton beam. Type 316 SS has been selected as the container material for the mercury and consequences of exposure of 316 SS to radiation, thermal shock, thermal stress, cavitation and hot, flowing mercury are all being addressed by R and D programs. In addition, corrosion studies also include evaluation of Inconel 718 because it has been successfully used in previous spallation neutron systems as a window material. Two types of compatibility issues relative to 316 SS/mercury and Inconel 718/mercury are being examined: (1) liquid metal embrittlement (LME) and (2) temperature gradient mass transfer. Studies have shown that mercury does not easily wet type 316 SS below 275 C. In the LME experiments, attempts were made to promote wetting of the steel by mercury either by adding gallium to the mercury or coating the specimen with a tin-silver solder that the mercury easily wets. The latter proved more reliable in establishing wetting, but there was no evidence of LME in any of the constant extension rate tensile tests either at 23 or 100 C. Inconel 718 also showed no change in room temperature properties when tested in mercury or mercury-gallium. However, there was evidence that the fracture was less ductile. Preliminary evaluation of mass transfer of either type 316 SS or Inconel 718 in mercury or mercury-gallium at 350 C (maximum temperature) did not reveal significant effects. Two 5,000 h thermal convection loop tests of type 316 SS are in progress, with specimens in both hot and cold test regions, at 300 and 240 C, respectively.

  9. Experimental verification of beam characteristics for cyclotron-based epithermal neutron source (C-BENS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Tanaka; Y. Sakurai; M. Suzuki; S. Masunaga; T. Mitsumoto; K. Fujita; G. Kashino; Y. Kinashi; Y. Liu; M. Takada; K. Ono; A. Maruhashi

    2011-01-01

    A cyclotron-based epithermal neutron source has been developed for boron neutron capture therapy. This system consists of a cyclotron accelerator producing 1.1-mA proton beams with an energy of 30MeV, a beam transport system coupled with a beryllium neutron production target, and a beam-shaping assembly (BSA) with a neutron collimator. In our previous work, the BSA was optimized to obtain sufficient

  10. Design of moderator and multiplier systems for DT neutron source in BNCT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. R. Eskandari; S. Kashian

    2009-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is an outstanding way to treat Glioblastoma Multiforme. Epithermal neutrons with energy from 1eV to 10keV represent the most effective range for brain tumor therapy. In this research we have focused on 3H(d,n)4He reaction as a neutron source using Cock Craft Walton accelerator. High neutron yield with 14.1MeV energy can be generated via accelerating a

  11. Conceptual design of a high-intensity positron source for the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hulett, L.D.; Eberle, C.C.

    1994-12-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a planned new basic and applied research facility based on a powerful steady-state research reactor that provides neutrons for measurements and experiments in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The useful neutron flux will be at least five times more than is available in the world`s best existing reactor facility. Construction of the ANS provides a unique opportunity to build a positron spectroscopy facility (PSF) with very-high-intensity beams based on the radioactive decay of a positron-generating isotope. The estimated maximum beam current is 1000 to 5000 times higher than that available at the world`s best existing positron research facility. Such an improvement in beam capability, coupled with complementary detectors, will reduce experiment durations from months to less than one hour while simultaneously improving output resolution. This facility will remove the existing barriers to the routine use of positron-based analytical techniques and will be a giant step toward realization of the full potential of the application of positron spectroscopy to materials science. The ANS PSF is based on a batch cycle process using {sup 64}Cu isotope as the positron emitter and represents the status of the design at the end of last year. Recent work not included in this report, has led to a proposal for placing the laboratory space for the positron experiments outside the ANS containment; however, the design of the positron source is not changed by that relocation. Hydraulic and pneumatic flight tubes transport the source material between the reactor and the positron source where the beam is generated and conditioned. The beam is then transported through a beam pipe to one of several available detectors. The design presented here includes all systems necessary to support the positron source, but the beam pipe and detectors have not been addressed yet.

  12. OPERATION OF THE SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC AT THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I. E.; Casagrande, F.; Crofford, M.; Howell, M.; Kang, Y.; Kim, S. H.; Kursun, Z.; Ladd, P.; Stout, D.; Strong, W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Champion, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Batavia, IL, 60510 (United States)

    2008-03-16

    At the Spallation Neutron Source, the first fully operational pulsed superconducting linac has been active for about two years. During this period, stable beam operation at 4.4 K has been achieved with beam for repetition rates up to 15 Hz and 30 Hz at 2.1 K. At the lower temperature 60 Hz RF pulses have been also used. Full beam energy has been achieved at 15 Hz and short beam pulses. Most of the time the superconducting cavities are operated at somewhat lower gradients to improve reliability. A large amount of data has been collected on the pulsed behavior of cavities and SRF modules at various repetition rates and at various temperatures. This experience will be of great value in determining future optimizations of SNS as well in guiding in the design and operation of future pulsed superconducting linacs. This paper describes the details of the cryogenic system and RF properties of the SNS superconducting linac.

  13. OPERATION OF THE SUPERCONDUCTING LINAC AT THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, Isidoro E [ORNL; Casagrande, Fabio [ORNL; Champion, Mark [FNAL; Crofford, Mark T [ORNL; Howell, Matthew P [ORNL; Kang, Yoon W [ORNL; Kim, Sang-Ho [ORNL; Kursun, Zafer [ORNL; Ladd, Peter [ORNL; Stout, Daniel S [ORNL; Strong, William Herb [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    At the Spallation Neutron Source, the first fully operational pulsed superconducting linac has been active for about two years. During this period, stable beam operation at 4.4 K has been achieved with beam for repetition rates up to 15 Hz and 30 Hz at 2.1 K. At the lower temperature 60 Hz RF pulses have been also used. Full beam energy has been achieved at 15 Hz and short beam pulses. Most of the time the superconducting cavities are operated at somewhat lower gradients to improve reliability. A large amount of data has been collected on the pulsed behavior of cavities and SRF modules at various repetition rates and at various temperatures. This experience will be of great value in determining future optimizations of SNS as well in guiding in the design and operation of future pulsed superconducting linacs. This paper describes the details of the cryogenic system and RF properties of the SNS superconducting linac.

  14. Operation of the superconducting linac at the spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, Isidoro E [ORNL] [ORNL; Casagrande, Fabio [ORNL] [ORNL; Champion, Mark S [ORNL] [ORNL; Howell, Matthew P [ORNL] [ORNL; Kang, Yoon [ORNL] [ORNL; Kim, Sang-Ho [ORNL] [ORNL; Kursun, Zafer [ORNL] [ORNL; Ladd, Peter [ORNL] [ORNL; Stout, Daniel S [ORNL] [ORNL; Strong, William Herb [ORNL] [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    At the Spallation Neutron Source, the first fully operational pulsed superconducting linac has been active for about two years. During this period, stable beam operation at 4.4 K has been achieved with beam for repetition rates up to 15 Hz and 30 Hz at 2.1 K. At the lower temperature 60 Hz RF pulses have been also used. Full beam energy has been achieved at 15 Hz and short beam pulses. Most of the time the superconducting cavities are operated at somewhat lower gradients to improve reliability. A large amount of data has been collected on the pulsed behavior of cavities and SRF modules at various repetition rates and at various temperatures. This experience will be of great value in determining future optimizations of SNS as well in guiding in the design and operation of future pulsed superconducting linacs. This paper describes the details of the cryogenic system and RF properties of the SNS superconducting linac.

  15. STATUS OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE SUPERCONDUCTING RF FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, Daniel S [ORNL] [ORNL; Assadi, Saeed [ORNL] [ORNL; Campisi, Isidoro E [ORNL] [ORNL; Casagrande, Fabio [ORNL] [ORNL; Crofford, Mark T [ORNL] [ORNL; DeVan, Bill [ORNL] [ORNL; Hardek, Thomas W [ORNL] [ORNL; Henderson, Stuart D [ORNL] [ORNL; Howell, Matthew P [ORNL] [ORNL; Kang, Yoon W [ORNL] [ORNL; Geng, Xiaosong [ORNL] [ORNL; Stone Jr, William C [ORNL] [ORNL; Strong, William Herb [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Derrick C [ORNL] [ORNL; Wright, Paul Alan [ORNL] [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project was completed with only limited superconducting RF (SRF) facilities installed as part of the project. A concerted effort has been initiated to install the infrastructure and equipment necessary to maintain and repair the superconducting Linac, and to support power upgrade research and development (R&D). Installation of a Class10/100/10,000 cleanroom and outfitting of the test cave with RF, vacuum, controls, personnel protection and cryogenics systems is underway. A horizontal cryostat, which can house a helium vessel/cavity and fundamental power coupler for full power, pulsed testing, is being procured. Equipment for cryomodule assembly and disassembly is being procured. This effort, while derived from the experience of the SRF community, will provide a unique high power test capability as well as long term maintenance capabilities. This paper presents the current status and the future plans for the SNS SRF facilities.

  16. Impedance measurements of the Spallation Neutron Source extraction kicker system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, H.

    2004-10-01

    Transverse coupling impedance measurements of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam extraction system were performed and the results are here reported. The SNS beam extraction system is composed from 14 subsystems, each of which consists of a vertical kicker magnet plus a pulse forming network (PFN). Impedance bench measurements were performed on one large and one small aperture magnet, stand-alone as well as assembled with the first-article production PFN. The impedance measuring methods to cover the interesting frequency range from below 1 to 100MHz are described in considerable detail. The upper frequency range is properly covered by the conventional twin-wire method but it had to be supplemented at the low-frequency end by a direct input impedance measurement at the magnet busbar. Required modifications of the PFN to maintain the impedance budget are discussed. The total impedance estimate was finally obtained by quadratic scaling with vertical aperture from the two tested kicker subsystems.

  17. Probing neutrino magnetic moments at Spallation Neutron Source facilities

    E-print Network

    Kosmas, T S; Papoulias, D K; Tortola, M; Valle, J W F

    2015-01-01

    Majorana neutrino electromagnetic properties are studied through neutral current coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering. We focus on the potential of the recently planned COHERENT experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source to probe muon-neutrino magnetic moments. The resulting sensitivities are determined on the basis of a $\\chi^2$ analysis employing realistic nuclear structure calculations in the context of the quasi-particle random phase approximation (QRPA). We find that they can improve existing limits by half an order of magnitude. In addition, we show that these facilities allow for Standard Model precision tests in the low energy regime, with a competitive determination of the weak mixing angle. Finally, they also offer the capability to probe other electromagnetic neutrino properties, such as the neutrino charge-radius. We illustrate our results for various choices of experimental setup and target material.

  18. BEAM INSTRUMENTATION FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WITKOVER,R.L.; CAMERON,P.R.; SHEA,T.J.; CONNOLLY,R.C.; KESSELMAN,M.

    1999-03-29

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be constructed by a multi-laboratory collaboration with BNL responsible for the transfer lines and ring. [1] The 1 MW beam power necessitates careful monitoring to minimize un-controlled loss. This high beam power will influence the design of the monitors in the high energy beam transport line (HEBT) from linac to ring, in the ring, and in the ring-to-target transfer line (RTBT). The ring instrumentation must cover a 3-decade range of beam intensity during accumulation. Beam loss monitoring will be especially critical since un-controlled beam loss must be kept below 10{sup -4}. A Beam-In-Gap (BIG) monitor is being designed to assure out-of-bucket beam will not be lost in the ring.

  19. On accelerator-based neutron sources and neutron field characterization with low energy neutron spectrometer based on position sensitive 3He counter.

    PubMed

    Murata, I; Miyamaru, H; Kato, I; Mori, Y

    2009-07-01

    The development of new neutron sources for BNCT applications, based on particle accelerators is currently underway all over the world. Though nuclear reactors were used for a long time as the only neutron source available having the requested flux levels, the accelerator-based ones have recently been investigated on the other hand due to its easy-to-use and acceptable performances. However, when using an accelerator, various secondary particles would be emitted which forms a troublesome background. Moreover, the neutrons produced have usually an energy spectrum somewhat different from the requested one and thus should be largely moderated. An additional issue to be taken into account is the patient positioning, which should be close to the neutron source, in order to take advantage of a neutron flux level high enough to limit the BNCT treatment time within 1h. This implies that, inside a relatively narrow space, neutrons should be moderated, while unnecessary secondary particles should be shielded. Considering that a background-free neutron field from an accelerator-driven neutron source dedicated to BNCT application is generally difficult to be provided, the characterization of such a neutron field will have to be clearly assessed. In the present study, a low energy neutron spectrometer has been thus designed and is now being developed to measure the accelerator-based neutron source performance. The presently proposed spectrometer is based on a (3)He proportional counter, which is 50 cm long and 5 cm in diameter, with a gas pressure of 0.5 MPa. It is quite unique that the spectrometer is set up in parallel with the incident neutron beam and a reaction depth distribution is measured by it as a position sensitive detector. Recently, a prototype detector has been developed and the signal test is now underway. In this paper, the feature of the accelerator-based neutron sources is outlined and importance of neutron field characterization is discussed. And the developed new low energy neutron spectrometer for the characterization is detailed. PMID:19376716

  20. Materials for spallation neutron sources, with emphasis on SNS facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, L.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1999-09-01

    The materials requirements in a high-power spallation neutron source like the SNS are particularly demanding. Materials at the target station are of special concern; these include the containment vessel and protective shroud for the mercury target material, beam windows, support structures, moderator housings, and beam tubes. The material chosen for the mercury containment vessel is Type 316 stainless steel (316SS). This choice is based on the extensive background of experience with 316SS and on its good fabricability and availability. While much has been learned about the effect of radiation on the properties of 316SS, the preponderance of this information stems from fission reactor irradiations, where the average neutron energy is only 1 to 2 MeV and relatively few neutrons are present with energies above {approximately}10 MeV. By contrast, the energies of the spallation neutrons at the SNS extend up to the 1000-MeV energy of the incident protons. However, because of the design of the target module, irradiation creep is not expected to be a significant problem. The major concern is for radiation embrittlement. Mercury is known to be an aggressive medium, and corrosion and compatibility studies for 316SS and INCONEL 718 are included in the research and development program on SNS materials. INCONEL 718 is under consideration as a beam window material. Two issues are receiving particular attention: liquid-metal embrittlement and temperature gradient mass transfer. Constant-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted in mercury and mercury-gallium at 23 C for 316SS and INCONEL 718 and at 100 C for 316SS; in all the tests there was no evidence of liquid metal embrittlement. In addition, preliminary mass transfer tests on 3165SS or INCONEL 718 at temperatures up to 350 C reveled no significant effects. Fatigue tests in mercury have recently been initiated. As a partial simulation of SNS conditions, they provide a more severe probe for possible ductility loss associated with a liquid-metal environment.

  1. Advanced Neutron Source Cross Section Libraries (ANSL-V): ENDF\\/BV based multigroup cross-section libraries for advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. E. Ford; J. W. Arwood; N. M. Greene; D. L. Moses; L. M. Petrie; R. T. Primm; C. O. Slater; R. M. Westfall; R. Q. Wright

    1990-01-01

    Pseudo-problem-independent, multigroup cross-section libraries were generated to support Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor design studies. The ANS is a proposed reactor which would be fueled with highly enriched uranium and cooled with heavy water. The libraries, designated ANSL-V (Advanced Neutron Source Cross Section Libraries based on ENDF\\/B-V), are data bases in AMPX master format for subsequent generation of problem-dependent cross-sections

  2. The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) project: A world-class research reactor facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, P.B. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (US); Meek, W.E. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (US)

    1993-07-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a new research facility being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The facility is based on a 330 MW, heavy-water cooled and reflected reactor as the neutron source, with a thermal neutron flux of about 7.5{times}10{sup 19}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}sec{sup {minus}1}. Within the reflector region will be one hot source which will serve 2 hot neutron beam tubes, two cryogenic cold sources serving fourteen cold neutron beam tubes, two very cold beam tubes, and seven thermal neutron beam tubes. In addition there will be ten positions for materials irradiation experiments, five of them instrumented. The paper touches on the project status, safety concerns, cost estimates and scheduling, a description of the site, the reactor, and the arrangements of the facilities.

  3. Determining 252Cf source strength by absolute passive neutron correlation counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, S.; Henzlova, D.

    2013-06-01

    Physically small, lightly encapsulated, radionuclide sources containing 252Cf are widely used for a vast variety of industrial, medical, educational and research applications requiring a convenient source of neutrons. For many quantitative applications, such as detector efficiency calibrations, the absolute strength of the neutron emission is needed. In this work we show how, by using a neutron multiplicity counter the neutron emission rate can be obtained with high accuracy. This provides an independent and alternative way to create reference sources in-house for laboratories such as ours engaged in international safeguards metrology. The method makes use of the unique and well known properties of the 252Cf spontaneous fission system and applies advanced neutron correlation counting methods. We lay out the foundation of the method and demonstrate it experimentally. We show that accuracy comparable to the best methods currently used by national bodies to certify neutron source strengths is possible.

  4. Spectrum shaping assessment of accelerator-based fusion neutron sources to be used in BNCT treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerullo, N.; Esposito, J.; Daquino, G. G.

    2004-01-01

    Monte Carlo modelling of an irradiation facility, for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) application, using a set of advanced type, accelerator based, 3H(d,n) 4He (D-T) fusion neutron source device is presented. Some general issues concerning the design of a proper irradiation beam shaping assembly, based on very hard energy neutron source spectrum, are reviewed. The facility here proposed, which represents an interesting solution compared to the much more investigated Li or Be based accelerator driven neutron source could fulfil all the medical and safety requirements to be used by an hospital environment.

  5. Compact tokamaks as convenient neutron sources for fusion reactors materials testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Bombarda; B. Coppi; Z. S. Hartwig; M. Sassi; M. Zucchetti

    2011-01-01

    Radiation damage evaluations have been performed with the ACAB code for fusion-relevant materials in an Ignitor-like compact fusion device that could be used as a neutron source for materials testing. Values ranging from 1.610?26 to 2.410?25dpa per source neutron have been obtained, which translates into 16250dpa\\/y at full operating power and demonstrates the potential of this neutron-rich device for fusion

  6. Spectrum shaping assessment of accelerator-based fusion neutron sources to be used in BNCT treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Cerullo; J. Esposito; G. G. Daquino

    2004-01-01

    Monte Carlo modelling of an irradiation facility, for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) application, using a set of advanced type, accelerator based, 3H(d,n)4He (DT) fusion neutron source device is presented. Some general issues concerning the design of a proper irradiation beam shaping assembly, based on very hard energy neutron source spectrum, are reviewed. The facility here proposed, which represents an

  7. Some neutron and gamma radiation characteristics of plutonium cermet fuel for isotopic power sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, R. A.; Anderson, M. E.; Campbell, A. R.; Haas, F. X.

    1972-01-01

    Gamma and neutron measurements on various types of plutonium sources are presented in order to show the effects of O-17, O-18 F-19, Pu-236, age of the fuel, and size of the source on the gamma and neutron spectra. Analysis of the radiation measurements shows that fluorine is the main contributor to the neutron yields from present plutonium-molybdenum cermet fuel, while both fluorine and Pu-236 daughters contribute significantly to the gamma ray intensities.

  8. Startup neutron source strength evaluation of Three Mile Island Unit 1 after extended shutdown

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Luoma; J. W. Folsom; W. W. Wilkerson

    1986-01-01

    Three Mile Island Unit 1 (TMI-1) was shut down February 17, 1979, for refueling and went critical October 3, 1985 (2420 days later), without inserting any external neutron sources. The intrinsic neutron source strength was evaluated and confirmed in 1981 through analyses and supporting subcritical tests. Results showed TMI-1 could have performed a successful startup at least through 1990 without

  9. A portable neutron\\/tunable X-ray source based on inertial electrostatic confinement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    George H. Miley

    1999-01-01

    Portable neutron sources are of strong interest for uses such as industrial neutron activation analysis and various medical research applications. The inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) device under development at the University of Illionis is intended for such uses and also provides a tunable X-ray source (required reverse bias and added electron emitters). The IEC operates as an accelerator plasma-target type

  10. Phantom studies of Cd, Hg and Cl by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis using a 238Pu Be neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinyer, J.; Atanackovic, J.; Byun, S. H.; Chettle, D. R.

    2007-10-01

    Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis is a means of non-invasive monitoring for occupational exposure to toxic heavy metals such as Cd and Hg. Preliminary kidney detection limits from previous phantom studies at McMaster were 13.6 0.2 ppm for Cd (125 mL phantom) and 315 24 ppm for Hg (125 mL phantom) using the 238Pu-Be neutron source and 0.88 0.01 ppm for Cd (125 mL phantom) and 16.91 0.05 ppm for Hg (30 mL phantom) using the thermal neutron beam port at the McMaster Nuclear Reactor. The detection limits vary greatly between the two methods due to differences in experimental set-up, neutron energy spectra and a difference in dose by more than a factor of 100. The Hg detection limit from preliminary data is much higher than expected for both neutron source types. In order to explain the apparent detection limit discrepancy, measurements of Hg and Cd phantoms were performed using the 238Pu-Be neutron source. The results were compared to phantom measurements of Cl, a well-known neutron activation element.

  11. On accelerator-based neutron sources and neutron field characterization with low energy neutron spectrometer based on position sensitive 3He counter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Murata; H. Miyamaru; I. Kato; Y. Mori

    2009-01-01

    The development of new neutron sources for BNCT applications, based on particle accelerators is currently underway all over the world. Though nuclear reactors were used for a long time as the only neutron source available having the requested flux levels, the accelerator-based ones have recently been investigated on the other hand due to its easy-to-use and acceptable performances. However, when

  12. Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement Neutron\\/Proton Source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. H. Miley; J. Javedani; Y. Yamamoto; R. Nebel; J. Nadler; Y. Gu; A. Satsangi; P. Heck

    1994-01-01

    There is considerable demand in the scientific community for a neutron generator with an output of 106-108 neutrons\\/second (n\\/s) that can be switched on or off, emit fusion neutrons, be self-calibrating, and offer portable operation. An Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC)-based neutron generator is proposed to meet these needs. In an IEC device, ion beams are injected into a spherical vacuum

  13. Tritium ion beam for an intense neutron source, INS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emigh

    1973-01-01

    The INS facility has been proposed to provide a neutronic environment ; similar to that anticipated in a fully operational fusionpower reactor. The ; neutron generator will produce an intense flux of 14-MeV neutrons> 10 ; neutrons\\/cm sec from the collision of two intersecting beams, one of 1.1 A ; of 270-keV tritium ions and the other of a supersonic

  14. Computer simulations for rf design of a Spallation Neutron Source external antenna H- ion source.

    PubMed

    Lee, S W; Goulding, R H; Kang, Y W; Shin, K; Welton, R F

    2010-02-01

    Electromagnetic modeling of the multicusp external antenna H(-) ion source for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been performed in order to optimize high-power performance. During development of the SNS external antenna ion source, antenna failures due to high voltage and multicusp magnet holder rf heating concerns under stressful operating conditions led to rf characteristics analysis. In rf simulations, the plasma was modeled as an equivalent lossy metal by defining conductivity as sigma. Insulation designs along with material selections such as ferrite and Teflon could be included in the computer simulations to compare antenna gap potentials, surface power dissipations, and input impedance at the operating frequencies, 2 and 13.56 MHz. Further modeling and design improvements are outlined in the conclusion. PMID:20192395

  15. Computer simulations for rf design of a Spallation Neutron Source external antenna H ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung-Woo [ORNL] [ORNL; Goulding, Richard Howell [ORNL] [ORNL; Kang, Yoon W [ORNL] [ORNL; Shin, Ki [ORNL] [ORNL; Welton, Robert F [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Electromagnetic modeling of the multicusp external antenna H ion source for the Spallation Neutron Source SNS has been performed in order to optimize high-power performance. During development of the SNS external antenna ion source, antenna failures due to high voltage and multicusp magnet holder rf heating concerns under stressful operating conditions led to rf characteristics analysis. In rf simulations, the plasma was modeled as an equivalent lossy metal by defining conductivity as . Insulation designs along with material selections such as ferrite and Teflon could be included in the computer simulations to compare antenna gap potentials, surface power dissipations, and input impedance at the operating frequencies, 2 and 13.56 MHz. Further modeling and design improvements are outlined in the conclusion.

  16. Characterisation of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT versus beam energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, S.; Curzio, G.; d'Errico, F.; Nath, R.; Tinti, R.

    2002-01-01

    Neutron capture in 10B produces energetic alpha particles that have a high linear energy transfer in tissue. This results in higher cell killing and a higher relative biological effectiveness compared to photons. Using suitably designed boron compounds which preferentially localize in cancerous cells instead of healthy tissues, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has the potential of providing a higher tumor cure rate within minimal toxicity to normal tissues. This clinical approach requires a thermal neutron source, generally a nuclear reactor, with a fluence rate sufficient to deliver tumorcidal doses within a reasonable treatment time (minutes). Thermal neutrons do not penetrate deeply in tissue, therefore BNCT is limited to lesions which are either superficial or otherwise accessible. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of an accelerator-based thermal neutron source for the BNCT of skin melanomas. The source was designed via MCNP Monte Carlo simulations of the thermalization of a fast neutron beam, generated by 7 MeV deuterons impinging on a thick target of beryllium. The neutron field was characterized at several deuteron energies (3.0-6.5 MeV) in an experimental structure installed at the Van De Graaff accelerator of the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, in Italy. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluences were measured with activation techniques and fast neutron spectra were determined with superheated drop detectors (SDD). These neutron spectrometry and dosimetry studies indicated that the fast neutron dose is unacceptably high in the current design. Modifications to the current design to overcome this problem are presented.

  17. Materials Compatibility Studies for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Pawel, S.J.

    1998-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high power facility for producing neutrons that utilizes flowing liquid mercury inside an austenitic stainless steel container as the target for a 1.0 GeV proton beam. The energy deposited in the target is transported by two separate mercury flow streams: one to transport heat in the interior target region and one to cool the stainless steel container. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations have been performed to predict temperature, velocity, and pressure distributions in the target. Results have generally shown that the power deposited in the bulk mercury can be effectively transported with reasonable flow rates and the bulk mercury temperature should not exceed 160{deg}C. Assuming good thermal contact, the maximum stainless steel wall temperature should be 130 {deg}C. Type 316 SS has been selected as the container material for the mercury and consequences of exposure of 316 SS to radiation, thermal shock, thermal stress, cavitation and hot, flowing mercury are all being addressed by R&D programs. In addition, corrosion studies include evaluation of Inconel 718 because it has been successfully used in previous water cooled spallation neutron systems as a window material. With type 316 SS selected to contain the mercury target of the SNS, two types of compatibility issues have been examined: LME and temperature gradient mass transfer. Studies have shown that mercury does not easily wet type 316 SS below 275{deg}C. In the LME experiments, attempts were made to promote wetting of the steel by mercury either by adding gallium to the mercury or coating the specimen with a tin-silver solder that the mercury easily wets. The latter proved more reliable in establishing wetting, but there was no evidence of LME in any of the constant extension rate tensile tests either at 23 or 100 {deg}C. Inconel 718 also showed no change in room temperature properties when tested in mercwy or mercury-gallium. However, there was evidence that the fracture was less ductile. Preliminary evaluation of mass transfer of either type 304 SS, 316 SS, and Inconel 718 in mercury or mercury-gallium at 300-3500 C (maximum temperature) did not reveal significant effects. Two 5000 h thermal convection loop tests of type 316 SS are in progress, with specimens in both hot and cold test regions, at 300 and 240{deg}C, respectively.

  18. Multiplicity correlation between neutrons and gamma-rays emitted from SNM and non-SNM sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloshevsky, Gennady; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The challenge in detection and identification of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) is to discriminate between the time-correlated neutrons and gamma-rays emitted from SNM and those originating from non-correlated or differently-correlated environmental non-SNM sources. Time-correlated neutron and gamma-ray bursts can be generated by penetrating components of cosmic radiation. The characteristic features or attributes of correlated signatures can be revealed by analyzing the joint probability density functions (JPDFs) of various parameters of neutrons and gamma-rays. Monte Carlo simulations of SNM and cosmic-ray (non-SNM) sources of neutrons and gamma-rays are performed. For both SNM and non-SNM sources, energy-lifetime JPDF of neutrons, energy-lifetime JPDF of gamma-rays, and JPDFs of neutron-gamma-ray multiplicity are evaluated. Mean values, standard deviations, covariance and correlation are estimated. It is found that the number (multiplicity) of neutrons and gamma-rays emitted from an SNM source is moderately correlated (?0.48). The multiplicity of neutrons and gamma-rays generated by cosmic-ray showers at sea level is only weakly correlated (?-0.046). The exploitation of neutron-gamma-ray multiplicity correlation in detectors can provide a tool to discriminate non-SNM sources.

  19. A Long-Pulse Spallation Source at Los Alamos: Facility description and preliminary neutronic performance for cold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; Weinacht, D.J.; Pitcher, E.J.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1998-03-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has discussed installing a new 1-MW spallation neutron target station in an existing building at the end of its 800-MeV proton linear accelerator. Because the accelerator provides pulses of protons each about 1 msec in duration, the new source would be a Long Pulse Spallation Source (LPSS). The facility would employ vertical extraction of moderators and reflectors, and horizontal extraction of the spallation target. An LPSS uses coupled moderators rather than decoupled ones. There are potential gains of about a factor of 6 to 7 in the time-averaged neutron brightness for cold-neutron production from a coupled liquid H{sub 2} moderator compared to a decoupled one. However, these gains come at the expense of putting ``tails`` on the neutron pulses. The particulars of the neutron pulses from a moderator (e.g., energy-dependent rise times, peak intensities, pulse widths, and decay constant(s) of the tails) are crucial parameters for designing instruments and estimating their performance at an LPSS. Tungsten is the reference target material. Inconel 718 is the reference target canister and proton beam window material, with Al-6061 being the choice for the liquid H{sub 2} moderator canister and vacuum container. A 1-MW LPSS would have world-class neutronic performance. The authors describe the proposed Los Alamos LPSS facility, and show that, for cold neutrons, the calculated time-averaged neutronic performance of a liquid H{sub 2} moderator at the 1-MW LPSS is equivalent to about 1/4th the calculated neutronic performance of the best liquid D{sub 2} moderator at the Institute Laue-Langevin reactor. They show that the time-averaged moderator neutronic brightness increases as the size of the moderator gets smaller.

  20. Study of a 5 MeV electron linac based neutron source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Auditore; R. C. Barn; D. De Pasquale; A. Italiano; A. Trifiro; M. Trimarchi

    2005-01-01

    A compact neutron source, based on a 5MeV electron linac, has been designed for Neutron Radiography\\/Boron-Neutron-Capture-Therapy (BNCT) applications. Although a higher electron energy is generally needed to produce an intense neutron beam, in this paper the use of Be and BeD2 photoneutron targets will be proposed, leading to thermal neutron beams of 8.48107n\\/cm2\\/s\\/mA and 1.23108n\\/cm2\\/s\\/mA, respectively. Optimization of the parameters

  1. The Neutron Energy Spectrum Study from the Phase II Solid Methane Moderator at the LENS Neutron Source

    E-print Network

    Yunchang Shin; W. Mike Snow; Christopher M. Lavelle; David V. Baxter; Xin Tong; Haiyang Yan; Mark Leuschner

    2007-11-19

    Neutron energy spectrum measurements from a solid methane moderator were performed at the Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) to verify our neutron scattering model of solid methane. The time-of-flight method was used to measure the energy spectrum of the moderator in the energy range of 0.1$meV\\sim$ 1$eV$. Neutrons were counted with a high efficiency $^{3}{He}$ detector. The solid methane moderator was operated in phase II temperature and the energy spectra were measured at the temperatures of 20K and 4K. We have also tested our newly-developed scattering kernels for phase II solid methane by calculating the neutron spectral intensity expected from the methane moderator at the LENS neutron source using MCNP (Monte Carlo N-particle Transport Code). Within the expected accuracy of our approximate approach, our model predicts both the neutron spectral intensity and the optimal thickness of the moderator at both temperatures. The predictions are compared to the measured energy spectra. The simulations agree with the measurement data at both temperatures.

  2. Neutronic simulations for source-instrument matching at the Lujan Center

    SciTech Connect

    Court, J.D.; Ferguson, P.D.; Schoenborn, B.P.

    1998-12-31

    The neutronics design of pulsed spallation neutron sources can be difficult when considering the fact that multiple instruments view the same moderator. Typically, the moderator design is a compromise between the required resolution for one instrument and the maximum intensity desires of another instrument. At the Manuel Lujan, Jr., Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC), a recent target redesign has offered the opportunity to design a moderator for a Laue diffractometer with few other requirements. Detailed time and energy spectra were calculated for a variety of moderator decoupling options. The purpose of this summary is to document the neutronics calculations required for this source-instrument matching process.

  3. Startup of the High-Intensity Ultracold Neutron Source at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    E-print Network

    Lauss, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Ultracold neutrons (UCN) can be stored in suitable bottles and observed for several hundreds of seconds. Therefore UCN can be used to study in detail the fundamental properties of the neutron. A new user facility providing ultracold neutrons for fundamental physics research has been constructed at the Paul Scherrer Institute, the PSI UCN source. Assembly of the facility finished in December 2010 with the first production of ultracold neutrons. Operation approval was received in June 2011. We give an overview of the source and the status at startup.

  4. Startup of the High-Intensity Ultracold Neutron Source at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    E-print Network

    Bernhard Lauss

    2012-02-27

    Ultracold neutrons (UCN) can be stored in suitable bottles and observed for several hundreds of seconds. Therefore UCN can be used to study in detail the fundamental properties of the neutron. A new user facility providing ultracold neutrons for fundamental physics research has been constructed at the Paul Scherrer Institute, the PSI UCN source. Assembly of the facility finished in December 2010 with the first production of ultracold neutrons. Operation approval was received in June 2011. We give an overview of the source and the status at startup.

  5. A parameter study to determine the optimal source neutron energy in boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nievaart, V. A.; Moss, R. L.; Kloosterman, J. L.; van der Hagen, T. H. J. J.; van Dam, H.

    2004-09-01

    The values of the parameters used in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) to calculate a given dose to human tissue vary with patients due to different physical, biological and/or medical circumstances. Parameters include the tissue dimensions, the 10B concentration and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors for the different dose components associated with BNCT. Because there is still no worldwide agreement on RBE values, more often than not, average values for these parameters are used. It turns out that the RBE-problem can be circumvented by taking into account all imaginable parameter values. Approaching this quest from another angle: the outcome will also provide the parameters (and values) which influence the optimal source neutron energy. For brain tumours it turns out that the 10B concentration, the RBE factors for 10B as well as fast neutrons, together with the dose limit set for healthy tissue, affect the optimal BNCT source neutron energy. By using source neutrons of a few keV together with neutrons of a few eV, it ensures that, under all imaginable circumstances, a maximum of alpha (and lithium) particles can be delivered in the tumour.

  6. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Garty, G.; Marino, S. A.; Massey, T. N.; Randers-Pehrson, G.; Johnson, G. W.; Brenner, D. J.

    2012-03-01

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 10-20 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a proton microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. This novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components.

  7. Novel neutron sources at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanping; Garty, Guy; Marino, Stephen A.; Massey, Thomas N.; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Johnson, Gary W.; Brenner, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Since the 1960s, the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been providing researchers in biology, chemistry and physics with advanced irradiation techniques, using charged particles, photons and neutrons. We are currently developing a unique facility at RARAF, to simulate neutron spectra from an improvised nuclear device (IND), based on calculations of the neutron spectrum at 1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima atom bomb. This is significantly different from a standard fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and is dominated by neutron energies between 0.05 and 8 MeV. This facility will be based on a mixed proton/deuteron beam impinging on a thick beryllium target. A second, novel facility under development is our new neutron microbeam. The neutron microbeam will, for the first time, provide a kinematically collimated neutron beam, 1020 micron in diameter. This facility is based on a Proton Microbeam, impinging on a thin lithium target near the threshold of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. This novel neutron microbeam will enable studies of neutron damage to small targets, such as single cells, individual organs within small animals or microelectronic components. PMID:22545061

  8. ASPUN: design for an Argonne super-intense pulsed neutron source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. K. Khoe; R. L. Kustom

    1983-01-01

    Argonne pioneered the pulsed spallation neutron source with the ZING-P and IPNS-I concepts. IPNS-I is now a reliable and actively used source for pulsed spallation neutrons. The accelerator is a 500-MeV, 8 to 9 ..mu..a, 30-Hz rapid-cycling proton synchrotron. Other proton spallation sources are now in operation or in construction. These include KENS-I at the National Laboratory for High Energy

  9. Report on the international workshop on cold moderators for pulsed neutron sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J. M.

    1999-01-06

    The International Workshop on Cold Moderators for Pulsed Neutron Sources resulted from the coincidence of two forces. Our sponsors in the Materials Sciences Branch of DOE's Office of Energy Research and the community of moderator and neutron facility developers both realized that it was time. The Neutron Sources Working Group of the Megascience Forum of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development offered to contribute its support by publishing the proceedings, which with DOE and Argonne sponsorship cemented the initiative. The purposes of the workshop were: to recall and improve the theoretical groundwork of time-dependent neutron thermalization; to pose and examine the needs for and benefits of cold moderators for neutron scattering and other applications of pulsed neutron sources; to summarize experience with pulsed source, cold moderators, their performance, effectiveness, successes, problems and solutions, and the needs for operational data; to compile and evaluate new ideas for cold moderator materials and geometries; to review methods of measuring and characterizing pulsed source cold moderator performance; to appraise methods of calculating needed source characteristics and to evaluate the needs and prospects for improvements; to assess the state of knowledge of data needed for calculating the neutronic and engineering performance of cold moderators; and to outline the needs for facilities for testing various aspects of pulsed source cold moderator performance.

  10. Simulation of H- ion source extraction systems for the Spallation Neutron Source with Ion Beam Simulatora)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvas, T.; Welton, R. F.; Tarvainen, O.; Han, B. X.; Stockli, M. P.

    2012-02-01

    A three-dimensional ion optical code IBSimu, which is being developed at the University of Jyvskyl, features positive and negative ion plasma extraction models and self-consistent space charge calculation. The code has been utilized for modeling the existing extraction system of the H- ion source of the Spallation Neutron Source. Simulation results are in good agreement with experimental data. A high-current extraction system with downstream electron dumping at intermediate energy has been designed. According to the simulations it provides lower emittance compared to the baseline system at H- currents exceeding 40 mA. A magnetic low energy beam transport section consisting of two solenoids has been designed to transport the beam from the alternative electrostatic extraction systems to the radio frequency quadrupole.

  11. Control system for the Spallation Neutron Source H- source test facility Allison scannera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, C. D.; Stockli, M. P.; Gorlov, T. V.; Han, B.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.

    2010-02-01

    Spallation Neutron Source is currently in progress of a multiyear plan to ramp ion beam power to the initial design power of 1.4 MW. Key to reaching this goal is understanding and improving the operation of the H- ion source. An Allison scanner was installed on the ion source in the test facility to support this improvement. This paper will discuss the hardware and the software control system of the installed Allison scanner. The hardware for the system consists of several parts. The heart of the system is the scanner head, complete with associated bias plates, slits, and signal detector. There are two analog controlled high voltage power supplies to bias the plates in the head, and a motor with associated controller to position the head in the beam. A multifunction data acquisition card reads the signals from the signal detector, as well as supplies the analog voltage control for the power supplies. To synchronize data acquisition with the source, the same timing signal that is used to trigger the source itself is used to trigger data acquisition. Finally, there is an industrial personal computer to control the rest of the hardware. Control software was developed using National Instruments LABVIEW, and consists of two parts: a data acquisition program to control the hardware and a stand alone application for offline user data analysis.

  12. Control system for the Spallation Neutron Source H{sup -} source test facility Allison scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Long, C. D.; Stockli, M. P.; Gorlov, T. V.; Han, B.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R. [Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Spallation Neutron Source is currently in progress of a multiyear plan to ramp ion beam power to the initial design power of 1.4 MW. Key to reaching this goal is understanding and improving the operation of the H{sup -} ion source. An Allison scanner was installed on the ion source in the test facility to support this improvement. This paper will discuss the hardware and the software control system of the installed Allison scanner. The hardware for the system consists of several parts. The heart of the system is the scanner head, complete with associated bias plates, slits, and signal detector. There are two analog controlled high voltage power supplies to bias the plates in the head, and a motor with associated controller to position the head in the beam. A multifunction data acquisition card reads the signals from the signal detector, as well as supplies the analog voltage control for the power supplies. To synchronize data acquisition with the source, the same timing signal that is used to trigger the source itself is used to trigger data acquisition. Finally, there is an industrial personal computer to control the rest of the hardware. Control software was developed using National Instruments LABVIEW, and consists of two parts: a data acquisition program to control the hardware and a stand alone application for offline user data analysis.

  13. Control system for the Spallation Neutron Source H- source test facility Allison scanner.

    PubMed

    Long, C D; Stockli, M P; Gorlov, T V; Han, B; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R

    2010-02-01

    Spallation Neutron Source is currently in progress of a multiyear plan to ramp ion beam power to the initial design power of 1.4 MW. Key to reaching this goal is understanding and improving the operation of the H(-) ion source. An Allison scanner was installed on the ion source in the test facility to support this improvement. This paper will discuss the hardware and the software control system of the installed Allison scanner. The hardware for the system consists of several parts. The heart of the system is the scanner head, complete with associated bias plates, slits, and signal detector. There are two analog controlled high voltage power supplies to bias the plates in the head, and a motor with associated controller to position the head in the beam. A multifunction data acquisition card reads the signals from the signal detector, as well as supplies the analog voltage control for the power supplies. To synchronize data acquisition with the source, the same timing signal that is used to trigger the source itself is used to trigger data acquisition. Finally, there is an industrial personal computer to control the rest of the hardware. Control software was developed using National Instruments LABVIEW, and consists of two parts: a data acquisition program to control the hardware and a stand alone application for offline user data analysis. PMID:20192462

  14. Neutron beam optimization for boron neutron capture therapy using the D-D and DT high-energy neutron sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Verbeke; J. L. Vujic; K. N. Leung

    2000-01-01

    A monoenergetic neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the most suitable neutron energy for treatment of shallow and deep-seated brain tumors in the context of boron neutron capture therapy. Two figures-of-merit--the absorbed skin dose and the absorbed tumor dose at a given depth in the brain--are used to measure the neutron beam quality. Based on the results

  15. Assessment of the roles of the Advanced Neutron Source Operators

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, W.E.; Houser, M.M.; Knee, H.E.; Spelt, P.F.

    1995-03-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is unique in the extent to which human factors engineering (HFE) principles are being applied at the conceptual design stage. initial HFE accomplishments include the development of an ANS HFE program plan, operating philosophy, and functional analysis. In FY 1994, HFE activities focused on the role of the ANS control room reactor operator (RO). An operator-centered control room model was used in conjunction with information gathered from existing ANS system design descriptions and other literature to define a list of RO responsibilities. From this list, a survey instrument was developed and administered to ANS design engineers, operations management personnel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), and HFIR ROs to detail the nature of the RO position. Initial results indicated that the RO will function as a high-level system supervisor with considerable monitoring, verification, and communication responsibilities. The relatively high level of control automation has resulted in a reshaping of the RO`s traditional safety and investment protection roles.

  16. Mercury Cavitation Phenomenon in Pulsed Spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Naoe, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1195 (Japan); Kawai, Masayoshi [KEK Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken, 305-0801 (Japan)

    2008-06-24

    Innovative researches will be performed at Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility in J-PARC, in which a mercury target system will be installed as MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. Proton beams will be injected into mercury target to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. Localized impacts by micro-jets and/or shock waves which are caused by cavitation bubble collapse impose pitting damage on the vessel wall. The pitting damage which degrades the structural integrity of target vessels is a crucial issue for high power mercury targets. Micro-gas-bubbles injection into mercury may be useful to mitigate the pressure wave and the pitting damage. The visualization of cavitation-bubble and gas-bubble collapse behaviors was carried out by using a high-speed video camera. The differences between them are recognized.

  17. Advanced Neutron Source design: Burnout heat flux correlation development

    SciTech Connect

    Gambill, W.R.; Mochizuki, T.

    1988-01-01

    In the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) fuel element region, heat fluxes will be elevated. Early designs corresponded to average and estimated hot-spot fluxes of 11-12 and 21-22 MW/m/sup 2/, respectively. Design changes under consideration may lower these values to about 9 and 17 MW/m/sup 2/. In either event, the development of a satisfactory burnout heat flux correlation is an important element among the many thermal-hydraulic design issues, since the critical power ration will depend in part on its validity. Relatively little work in the area of subcooled-flow burnout has been published over the past 12 years. We have compared seven burnout correlations and modifications thereof with several sets of experimental data, of which the most relevant to the ANS core are presently those referenced. The best overall agreement between the correlations tested and these data is currently provided by a modification of Thorgerson's correlation. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  18. RESULTS OF FIRST EXPERIMENTS ON NEUTRON GENERATION IN THE VITA NEUTRON SOURCE

    E-print Network

    Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

    for registration of fast and thermal neutrons. Total yield of neutrons was defined by 7 Be activity. Simulation vacuum insulation tandem accelerator (VITA) which is designed to produce proton current up to 10 m as activation detector due to capture of epithermal neutrons by iodine also. Bubble detectors were used

  19. Advanced Neutron Source Cross Section Libraries (ANSL-V): ENDF/B-V based multigroup cross-section libraries for advanced neutron source (ANS) reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, W.E. III; Arwood, J.W.; Greene, N.M.; Moses, D.L.; Petrie, L.M.; Primm, R.T. III; Slater, C.O.; Westfall, R.M.; Wright, R.Q.

    1990-09-01

    Pseudo-problem-independent, multigroup cross-section libraries were generated to support Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor design studies. The ANS is a proposed reactor which would be fueled with highly enriched uranium and cooled with heavy water. The libraries, designated ANSL-V (Advanced Neutron Source Cross Section Libraries based on ENDF/B-V), are data bases in AMPX master format for subsequent generation of problem-dependent cross-sections for use with codes such as KENO, ANISN, XSDRNPM, VENTURE, DOT, DORT, TORT, and MORSE. Included in ANSL-V are 99-group and 39-group neutron, 39-neutron-group 44-gamma-ray-group secondary gamma-ray production (SGRP), 44-group gamma-ray interaction (GRI), and coupled, 39-neutron group 44-gamma-ray group (CNG) cross-section libraries. The neutron and SGRP libraries were generated primarily from ENDF/B-V data; the GRI library was generated from DLC-99/HUGO data, which is recognized as the ENDF/B-V photon interaction data. Modules from the AMPX and NJOY systems were used to process the multigroup data. Validity of selected data from the fine- and broad-group neutron libraries was satisfactorily tested in performance parameter calculations.

  20. Development of Measurement Methods for Detection of Special Nuclear Materials using D-D Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Yagi, Takahiro; Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Kimura, Masaharu; Masuda, Kai; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2015-10-01

    For detection of hidden special nuclear materials (SNMs), we have developed an active neutron-based interrogation system combined with a D-D fusion pulsed neutron source and a neutron detection system. In the detection scheme, we have adopted new measurement techniques simultaneously; neutron noise analysis and neutron energy spectrum analysis. The validity of neutron noise analysis method has been experimentally studied in the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA), and was applied to a cargo container inspection system by simulation.

  1. Powder diffraction in materials science using the KENS cold-neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiyama, T.; Oikawa, K. [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan). Inst. of Materials Science; Akiba, E. [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research, Tsukuba (Japan)] [and others

    1997-12-01

    Since superconductivity fever spread around the world, neutron powder diffraction has become very popular and been widely used by crystallographers, physicists, chemists, mineralogists, and materials scientists. The purpose of present paper is to show, firstly, important characteristics of time-of-flight TOF powder diffraction using cold-neutron source in the study of materials science, and, secondly, recent studies on the structure and function of batteries at the Neutron Science Laboratory (KENS) in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK).

  2. Characterization of pulsed (plasma focus) neutron source with image plate and application to neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Andola, Sanjay; Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, S. C. [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Shaikh, A. M. [Raja Ramanna Fellow, Solid State Physics Division (India)

    2013-02-05

    Plasma focus device of Mather type developed in house has been used first time for neutron radiography of different objects. The device gives (1.2{+-}0.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} neutrons per pulse produced by D-D fusion reaction with a pulse width of 50{+-}5 ns. The method involves exposing sample to be radiographed to thermalized D-D neutrons and recording the image on Fuji-film BAS-ND image plates. The thermal neutron component of the moderated beam was estimated using two image plates: a conventional IP for X-rays and gamma rays, and an IP doped with Gd for detecting neutrons.

  3. Characterization of pulsed (plasma focus) neutron source with image plate and application to neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andola, Sanjay; Niranjan, Ram; Shaikh, A. M.; Rout, R. K.; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, S. C.

    2013-02-01

    Plasma focus device of Mather type developed in house has been used first time for neutron radiography of different objects. The device gives (1.20.3) 109 neutrons per pulse produced by D-D fusion reaction with a pulse width of 505 ns. The method involves exposing sample to be radiographed to thermalized D-D neutrons and recording the image on Fuji-film BAS-ND image plates. The thermal neutron component of the moderated beam was estimated using two image plates: a conventional IP for X-rays and gamma rays, and an IP doped with Gd for detecting neutrons.

  4. Design and simulation of neutron radiography system based on 241Am-Be source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, H.; Feghhi, S. A. H.

    2012-05-01

    Neutron imaging is extended rapidly as a means of non-destructive testing (NDT) of materials. Various effective parameters on the image quality are needed to be studied for neutron radiography system with good resolution. In the present study a portable system of neutron radiography has been designed using 241Am-Be neutron source. The effective collimator parameters were calculated to obtain relatively pure, collimated and uniform neutron beam. All simulations were carried out in two stages using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. In the first stage, different collimator configurations were investigated and the appropriate design was selected based on maximum intensity and uniformity of neutron flux at the image plane in the outlet of collimator. Then, the overall system including source, collimator and sample was simulated for achieving radiographic images of standard samples. Normalized thermal neutron fluence of 2.6110-5 cm-2 per source particle with n/? ratio of 1.92105 cm-2 ?Sv-1 could be obtained at beam port of the designed collimator. Quality of images was assessed for two standard samples, using radiographic imaging capability in MCNPX. The collimated neutron beam in the designed system could be useful in a transportable exposure module for neutron radiography application.

  5. An ultracold neutron source at the NC State University PULSTAR reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobkina, E.; Wehring, B. W.; Hawari, A. I.; Young, A. R.; Huffman, P. R.; Golub, R.; Xu, Y.; Palmquist, G.

    2007-08-01

    Research and development is being completed for an ultracold neutron (UCN) source to be installed at the PULSTAR reactor on the campus of North Carolina State University (NCSU). The objective is to establish a university-based UCN facility with sufficient UCN intensity to allow world-class fundamental and applied research with UCN. To maximize the UCN yield, a solid ortho-D 2 converter will be implemented coupled to two moderators, D 2O at room temperature, to thermalize reactor neutrons, and solid CH 4, to moderate the thermal neutrons to cold-neutron energies. The source assembly will be located in a tank of D 2O in the space previously occupied by the thermal column of the PULSTAR reactor. Neutrons leaving a bare face of the reactor core enter the D 2O tank through a 4545 cm cross-sectional area void between the reactor core and the D 2O tank. Liquid He will cool the disk-shaped UCN converter to below 5 K. Independently, He gas will cool the cup-shaped CH 4 cold-neutron moderator to an optimum temperature between 20 and 40 K. The UCN will be transported from the converter to experiments by a guide with an inside diameter of 16 cm. Research areas being considered for the PULSTAR UCN source include time-reversal violation in neutron beta decay, neutron lifetime determination, support measurements for a neutron electric-dipole-moment search, and nanoscience applications.

  6. Tagging fast neutrons from an 241Am/9Be source

    E-print Network

    J. Scherzinger; J. R. M. Annand; G. Davatz; K. G. Fissum; U. Gendotti; R. Hall-Wilton; A. Rosborg; E. Hkansson; R. Jebali; K. Kanaki; M. Lundin; B. Nilsson; H. Svensson

    2015-01-03

    We report on an investigation of the fast-neutron spectrum emitted by 241Am/9Be. Well-understood shielding, coincidence, and time-of-flight measurement techniques are employed to produce a continuous, polychromatic, energy-tagged neutron beam.

  7. Research on fusion neutron sources M. P. Gryaznevich

    E-print Network

    upgrade for neutral gas analysis Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10D728 (2012) Fuel ion ratio measurements://proceedings.aip.org/about/about_the_proceedings Top downloads: http://proceedings.aip.org/dbt/most_downloaded.jsp?KEY=APCPCS Information for Authors with the high efficiency and high neutron fluxes (resulting in extremely high neutron wall loading) required

  8. Oak Ridge Reservation site evaluation report for the Advanced Neutron Source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Sigmon; A. C. Jr. Heitzman; J. Morrissey

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a research reactor that is the US Department of Energy (DOE) plans to build for initial service late in this century. The primary purpose of the ANS is to provide a useable neutron flux for scattering experiments 5 to 10 times as a high as that generated by any existing research reactor, secondary purposes

  9. INEL and ISU BNCT research using a 2 MeV RFQ-based neutron source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. D. Harker; J. F. Harmon; G. W. Irwin

    1995-01-01

    A radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) proton linear accelerator manufactured by AccSys Corp. was purchased by the U.S. Department of Energy and was installed in the Particle Beam Laboratory at Idaho State University (ISU). It is available for physics studies consistent with the INEL mission such as those related to accelerator produced neutron sources for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and

  10. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. Evans; T. E. Blue

    1995-01-01

    For several years, research has been ongoing in the Ohio State University (OSU) Nuclear Engineering Program toward the development of an accelerator-based irradiation facility (ANIF) neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The ANIF, which is planned to be built in a hospital, has been conceptually designed and analyzed. After Qu, an OSU researcher, determined that the shielding design

  11. Argonne Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Used to Solve the Molecular Structure of a Novel Organometallic Complex

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arthur J. Schultz; Raymond G. Teller; Mark A. Beno; Jack M. Williams; M. Brookhart; W. Lamanna; M. Beth Humphrey

    1983-01-01

    The single-crystal structure of Mn(CO)3(C7H11) is the first to be solved by direct methods based on time-of-flight neutron diffraction data obtained at the Argonne Intense Pulsed Neutron Source. The molecule contains an unusual three-center, two-electron manganese-hydrogen-carbon interaction.

  12. DOSE ATTENUATION BY SOILS AND CONCRETE FOR BROAD, PARALLEL-BEAM NEUTRON SOURCES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Spielberg; A. Duneer

    1958-01-01

    The theory and results of certain neutron shielding studies performed to ; supply information primly for underground bomb shelter design are presented. ; Specifically, for neutron source energies of 0.025 ev, O.5, 2.5, 7.5, 10, and 14 ; Mev, and various angles of incidence upon the ground, results are presented that ; show the total neutrcn plus secondary gamma dose

  13. Superconducting Prototype Cavities for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2001-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source project includes a superconducting linac section in the energy range from 186 MeV to 1000 MeV. For this energy range two types of cavities are needed with geometrical {beta} values of {beta} = 0.61 and {beta} = 0.81. An aggressive cavity prototyping program is being pursued at Jefferson Lab, which calls for fabricating and testing four {beta} = 0.61 cavities and two {beta} = 0.81 cavities. Both types consist of six cells made from high purity niobium and feature one HOM coupler on each beam pipe and a port for a high power coaxial input coupler. Three of the four {beta} = 0.61 cavities will be used for a cryomodule test in early 2002. At this time four medium beta cavities and one high beta cavity have been completed at JLab. The first tests on the {beta} = 0.61 and {beta} = 0.81 exceeded the design values for gradient and Q value: E{sub acc} = 10.1 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K for the {beta} = 0.61 and E{sub acc} = 12.3 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1 K for the {beta} = 0.81. One of the medium beta cavities has been equipped with an integrated helium vessel and measurements of the static Lorentz force detuning have been done and compared to the ''bare'' cavities. In addition two single cell cavities have been fabricated, equipped with welded-on HOM couplers. They are being used to evaluate the HOM couplers with respect to multipacting, fundamental mode rejection and HOM damping as far as possible in a single cell. This paper describes the cavity design with respect to electromagnetic and mechanical features, the fabrication efforts and the results obtained with the different cavities existing at the time of this workshop.

  14. Intense Pulsed Neutron Source progress report for 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Schriesheim, Alan

    1991-01-01

    The IPNS Progress Report 10th Anniversary Edition is being published in recognition of the first ten years of successful IPNS operation. To emphasize the significance of this milestone, we wanted this report to stand apart from the previous IPNS Progress Reports, and the best way to do this, we thought, was to make the design and organization of the report significantly different. In their articles, authors were asked to emphasize not only advances made since IPNS began operating but also the groundwork that was laid at its predecessor facilities - Argonne's ZING-P and ZING-P' prototype pulsed neutron sources and CP-5 reactor. Each article stands as a separate chapter in the report, since each represents a particular instrument or class of instruments, system, technique, or area of research. In some cases, contributions were similar to review articles in scientific journals, complete with extensive lists of references. Ten-year cumulative lists of members of IPNS committees and of scientists who have visited or done experiments at IPNS were assembled. A list of published and in press'' articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS during the past ten years, was compiled. And archival photographs of people and activities during the ten-year history of IPNS were located and were used liberally throughout the report. The titles of the chapters in this report are: accelerator; computer; radiation effects; powder; stress; single crystal; superconductivity; amorphous; small angle; reflection; quasielastic; inelastic; inelastic magnetic; deep inelastic; user program; the future; and publications.

  15. Design of a compact high-power neutron sourceThe EURISOL converter target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samec, K.; Milenkovi?, R. .; Dementjevs, S.; Ashrafi-Nik, M.; Kalt, A.

    2009-07-01

    The EURISOL project, a multi-lateral initiative supported by the EU, aims to develop a facility to achieve high yields of isotopes in radioactive beams and extend the variety of these isotopes towards more exotic types. The neutron source at the heart of the projected facility is designed to generate isotopes by fissioning uranium carbide (UC) targets arranged around a 4 MW neutron source. For reasons of efficiency, it is essential that the neutron source be as compact as possible, to avoid losing neutrons by absorption whilst maximising the escaping neutron flux, thus increasing the number of fissions in the UC targets. The resulting configuration presents a challenge in terms of absorbing heat deposition rates of up to 8 kW/cm3 in the neutron source; it has led to the selection of liquid metal for the target material. The current paper presents the design of a compact high-power liquid-metal neutron source comprising a specially optimised beam window concept. The design is based on two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulations for thermal hydraulics and hydraulic aspects, as well as finite-element method (FEM) for assessing thermo-mechanical stability. The resulting optimised design was validated by a dedicated hydraulic test under realistic flow conditions. A full-scale mock-up was built at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and was tested at the Institute of Physics of the University of Latvia (IPUL).

  16. Designing and testing the neutron source deployment system and calibration plan for a dark matter detector

    E-print Network

    Westerdale, Shawn (Shawn S.)

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we designed and tested a calibration and deployment system for the MiniCLEAN dark matter detector. The deployment system uses a computer controlled winch to lower a canister containing a neutron source into ...

  17. 76 FR 76327 - Installation of Radiation Alarms for Rooms Housing Neutron Sources

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ...NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION...NRC-2011-0251] Installation of Radiation Alarms for Rooms Housing...Neutron Sources AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission...require installation of radiation alarms for rooms housing...December 2011. For the Nuclear Regulatory...

  18. Conceptual design of an RFQ accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron-capture therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. P. Wangler; J. E. Stovall; T. S. Bhatia; C. K. Wang; T. E. Blue; R. A. Gahbauer

    1989-01-01

    A conceptual design of a low-energy neutron generator for treatment of brain tumors by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is presented. The concept is based on a 2.5-MeV proton beam from a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, and the neutrons are produced by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction. A liquid lithium target and modulator assembly are designed to provide a high flux of

  19. Penumbral imaging and numerical evaluation of large area source neutron imaging system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    YueLei Wu; HuaSi Hu; BoPing Zhang; LinBo Li; Da Chen; Qing Shan; Jie Zhu

    2009-01-01

    The fusion neutron penumbral imaging system Monte Carlo model was established. The transfer functions of the two discrete\\u000a units in the neutron source were obtained in two situations: Imaging in geometrical near-optical and real situation. The spatial\\u000a resolutions of the imaging system in two situations were evaluated and compared. The penumbral images of four units in the\\u000a source were obtained

  20. Geometrical effects on thermal neutron reflection of hydrogenous moderators using 241Am-Be source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. H. K. Akaho; S. A. Jonah; C. P. K Dagadu; B. T. Maakuu; P. S. Adu; S. Anim-Sampong; A. W. K. Kyere

    2001-01-01

    The variation of thermal reflection parameter with thicknesses of water and paraffin moderators was measured using an instrument consisting of 1 Ci 241AmBe isotopic neutron source and 3He neutron detector. Based on experimental data obtained from two different sourcedetectorsample geometries, analytical expressions were derived for calculation of reflection parameters for various moderator thicknesses. The measured data for the two geometries

  1. Estimation of low-level neutron dose-equivalent rate by using extrapolation method for a curie level Am-Be neutron source.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Xu, Jiayun; Zhang, Jie

    2014-10-22

    Neutron radiation protection is an important research area because of the strong radiation biological effect of neutron field. The radiation dose of neutron is closely related to the neutron energy, and the connected relationship is a complex function of energy. For the low-level neutron radiation field (e.g. the Am-Be source), the commonly used commercial neutron dosimeter cannot always reflect the low-level dose rate, which is restricted by its own sensitivity limit and measuring range. In this paper, the intensity distribution of neutron field caused by a curie level Am-Be neutron source was investigated by measuring the count rates obtained through a (3)He proportional counter at different locations around the source. The results indicate that the count rates outside of the source room are negligible compared with the count rates measured in the source room. In the source room, (3)He proportional counter and neutron dosimeter were used to measure the count rates and dose rates respectively at different distances to the source. The results indicate that both the count rates and dose rates decrease exponentially with the increasing distance, and the dose rates measured by a commercial dosimeter are in good agreement with the results calculated by the Geant4 simulation within the inherent errors recommended by ICRP and IEC. Further studies presented in this paper indicate that the low-level neutron dose equivalent rates in the source room increase exponentially with the increasing low-energy neutron count rates when the source is lifted from the shield with different radiation intensities. Based on this relationship as well as the count rates measured at larger distance to the source, the dose rates can be calculated approximately by the extrapolation method. This principle can be used to estimate the low level neutron dose values in the source room which cannot be measured directly by a commercial dosimeter. PMID:25464188

  2. Separation of beam and electrons in the spallation neutron source H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Whealton, J.H.; Raridon, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Leung, K.N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) requires an ion source producing an H{sup {minus}} beam with a peak current of 35mA at a 6.2 percent duty factor. For the design of this ion source, extracted electrons must be transported and dumped without adversely affecting the H{sup {minus}} beam optics. Two issues are considered: (1) electron containment transport and controlled removal; and (2) first-order H{sup {minus}} beam steering. For electron containment, various magnetic, geometric and electrode biasing configurations are analyzed. A kinetic description for the negative ions and electrons is employed with self-consistent fields obtained from a steady-state solution to Poisson`s equation. Guiding center electron trajectories are used when the gyroradius is sufficiently small. The magnetic fields used to control the transport of the electrons and the asymmetric sheath produced by the gyrating electrons steer the ion beam. Scenarios for correcting this steering by split acceleration and focusing electrodes will be considered in some detail.

  3. Preliminary probabilistic design accident evaluation of the cold source facilities of the advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, R.M.; Ramsey, C.T.

    1995-08-01

    Consistent with established Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) project policy for the use of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in design, a task has been established to use PRA techniques to help guide the design and safety analysis of the ANS cold sources. The work discussed in this report is the first formal output of the cold source PRA task. The major output at this stage is a list of design basis accidents, categorized into approximate frequency categories. This output is expected to focus attention on continued design work to define and optimize the design such that design basis accidents are better defined and have acceptable outcomes. Categorizing the design basis events (DBEs) into frequency categories should prove helpful because it will allow appropriate acceptance criteria to be applied. Because the design of the cold source is still proceeding, it is beyond the scope of this task to produce detailed event probability calculations or even, in some cases, detailed event sequence definitions. That work would take place as a logically planned follow-on task, to be completed as the design matures. Figure 1.1 illustrates the steps that would typically be followed in selecting design basis accidents with the help of PRA. Only those steps located above the dashed line on Fig. 1.1 are included in the scope of the present task. (Only an informal top-level failure modes and effects analysis was done.) With ANS project closeout expected in the near future, the scope of this task has been abbreviated somewhat beyond the state of available design information on the ANS cold sources, or what could be achieved in a reasonable time. This change was necessary to ensure completion before the closeout and because the in-depth analytical support necessary to define fully some of the accidents has already been curtailed.

  4. Secondary photon fields produced in accelerator-based sources for neutron generation.

    PubMed

    Agosteo, S; Cesana, A; Garlati, L; Pola, A; Terrani, M

    2005-01-01

    Neutrons can be produced with low-energy ion accelerators for many applications, such as the characterisation of neutron detectors, the irradiation of biological samples and the study of the radiation damage in electronic devices. Moreover, accelerator-based neutron sources are under development for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Thin targets are used for generating monoenergetic neutrons, while thick targets are usually employed for producing more intense neutron fields. The associated photon field produced by the target nuclei may have a strong influence on the application under study. For instance, these photons can play a fundamental role in the design of an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT. This work focuses on the measurement of the photon field associated with neutrons that are produced by 4.0-6.8 MeV protons striking both a thin 7LiF target (for generating monoenergetic neutrons) and a thick beryllium target. In both cases, very intense photon fields are generated with energy distribution extending up to several MeV. PMID:16381747

  5. Uranium target for electron accelerator based neutron source for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonchev, A. P.; Harmon, F.; Collens, T. J.; Kennedy, K.; Sabourov, A.; Harker, Y. D.; Nigg, D. W.; Jones, J. L.

    2001-07-01

    Calculations of the epithermal-neutron yield of photoneutrons from a uranium-beryllium converter using a 27 MeV electron linear accelerator have been investigated. In this concept, relativistic electron beams from a 30 MeV LINAC impinge upon a small uranium sphere surrounded by a cylindrical tank of circulating heavy water (D2O) nested in a beryllium cube. The photo-fission neutron spectrum from the uranium sphere is thermalized in deuterium and beryllium, filtered and moderated in special material (AlF3/Al/LiF), and directed to the patient. The results of these calculations demonstrate that photoneutron devices could offer a promising alternative to nuclear reactors for the production of epithermal neutrons for Neutron Capture Therapy. The predicted parameter for the epithermal flux is more than 108n.cm-2.mA-1.

  6. Optimization of a moderator assembly for use in an accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woollard, Jeffrey Earl

    In this dissertation, the development and application of in-phantom neutron field optimization parameters for use in evaluating neutron fields for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is presented. These parameters are based on dose rate distributions in a head phantom and include the effects of fractionation and an energy dependent normal-tissue neutron RBE. As a step in the development of these parameters, a methodology for calculating the energy dependent normal-tissue neutron RBE, RBE(Esbn), was developed. This methodology was used to obtain reasonable estimates for the RBE of neutrons, as a function of neutron energy, for skeletal muscle and brain tissue. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis was performed to examine the robustness of the calculations of RBE(Esbn) to necessary assumptions regarding the level of cell-survival at tolerance for brain. This analysis showed that differences in the RBE-dose rate as a function of depth in an ellipsoidal head phantom, as a result of different assumptions regarding the level of cell-survival at tolerance, were negligible, thus increasing our confidence in our mathematical method. The in-phantom neutron field optimization parameters were used to evaluate the neutron fields produced by several potential moderator assemblies and to determine the optimum moderator assembly for use in our Accelerator-Based Neutron Source (ABNS) for BNCT. Based on a comparison of the calculated in-phantom neutron field optimization parameters, for a single irradiation from the superior aspect, a 10 mA proton beam current, and the specified treatment parameters, a BeO-Lisb2COsb3 moderator assembly, with a 20 cm thick BeO moderator, was found to be the optimum moderator assembly for use in the ABNS. The second best moderator assembly was a Dsb2O-Lisb2COsb3 moderator assembly with a 25 cm thick Dsb2O moderator. An optimization analysis, based on in-air optimization parameters, was also performed on the same moderator assemblies considered in the in-phantom moderator assembly optimization analysis. This analysis concluded that the moderator assemblies shown as optimum in the in-phantom moderator assembly optimization analysis, were also the optimum moderator assemblies based on the in-air parameters. This indicates that both types of parameters agree on the optimal neutron field for use in an ABNS for BNCT.

  7. Measurement of angular distribution of neutron flux for the 6 MeV race-track microtron based pulsed neutron source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. J. Patil; S. T. Chavan; S. N. Pethe; R. Krishnan; S. D. Dhole

    2010-01-01

    The 6MeV race track microtron based pulsed neutron source has been designed specifically for the elemental analysis of short lived activation products, where the low neutron flux requirement is desirable. Electrons impinges on a e? target to generate bremsstrahlung radiations, which further produces neutrons by photonuclear reaction in ?n target. The optimisation of these targets along with their spectra were

  8. Benchmark experiments for cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S Yonai; T Itoga; M Baba; T Nakamura; H Yokobori; Y Tahara

    2004-01-01

    In the previous study, we found the feasibility of a cyclotron-based BNCT using the Ta(p,n) neutrons at 90 bombarded by 50MeV protons, and the iron, AlF3, Al and 6LiF moderators by simulations using the MCNPX code. In order to validate the simulations to realize the cyclotron-based BNCT, we measured the epithermal neutron energy spectrum passing through the moderators with our

  9. Accelerator-Based Sources of Epithermal Neutrons for Bnct

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Bisceglie; P. Colangelo; N. Colonna; V. Variale; P. Santorelli

    2001-01-01

    The treatment of deep-seated tumors with BNCT requires high-intensity neutron beams in the epithermal energy region (1 eV < En < 10 keV). Therapeutic beams with optimal spectral features could be produced with high-current accelerators, through a suitable neutron-producing reaction. We report here on the results of a systematic investigation of different low-energy (p,n) and (d,n) reactions that could reveal

  10. Nanoparticles as a possible moderator for an ultracold neutron source

    E-print Network

    V. V. Nesvizhevsky; G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov

    2008-02-04

    Ultracold and very cold neutrons (UCN and VCN) interact strongly with nanoparticles due to the similarity of their wavelengths and nanoparticles sizes. We analyze the hypothesis that this interaction can provide efficient cooling of neutrons by ultracold nanoparticles at certain experimental conditions, thus increasing the density of UCN by many orders of magnitude. The present analytical and numerical description of the problem is limited to the model of independent nanoparticles at zero temperature. Constraints of application of this model are discussed.

  11. Feasibility analysis of a Plasma Focus neutron source for BNCT treatment of transplanted human liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzi, V.; Mezzetti, F.; Rocchi, F.; Sumini, M.

    2004-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy preliminary treatments on transplanted human liver have been recently conducted at Pavia University. The need of high fluences of thermal neutrons imposed the use of the available thermal channel of a TRIGA reactor properly modified for this application. We analyse the possibility of using the Plasma Focus (PF) machine as a pulsed neutron source for this medical application instead of a nuclear reactor. Thermalization of the fast (2.45 MeV for D-D reactions) neutrons produced by the PF is gained with a paraffin or polyethylene moderator which contains both the neutron source and the irradiation chamber. The design parameters of a PF optimized for such an application are discussed, as well as other considerations on the advantages that this machine can bring to this kind of cancer therapy.

  12. Characterization of a novel, short pulse laser-driven neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, D.; Falk, K.; Guler, N.; Devlin, M.; Favalli, A.; Fernandez, J. C.; Gautier, D. C.; Haight, R.; Hamilton, C. E.; Hegelich, B. M.; Johnson, R. P.; Merrill, F.; Schoenberg, K.; Shimada, T.; Taddeucci, T.; Tybo, J. L.; Wender, S. A.; Wilde, C. H.; Wurden, G. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Deppert, O. [Technische Universitt Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)] [Technische Universitt Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2013-05-15

    We present a full characterization of a short pulse laser-driven neutron source. Neutrons are produced by nuclear reactions of laser-driven ions deposited in a secondary target. The emission of neutrons is a superposition of an isotropic component into 4? and a forward directed, jet-like contribution, with energies ranging up to 80 MeV. A maximum flux of 4.4 10{sup 9} neutrons/sr has been observed and used for fast neutron radiography. On-shot characterization of the ion driver and neutron beam has been done with a variety of different diagnostics, including particle detectors, nuclear reaction, and time-of-flight methods. The results are of great value for future optimization of this novel technique and implementation in advanced applications.

  13. Study of a 5 MeV electron linac based neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auditore, L.; Barn, R. C.; De Pasquale, D.; Italiano, A.; Trifir, A.; Trimarchi, M.

    2005-02-01

    A compact neutron source, based on a 5 MeV electron linac, has been designed for Neutron Radiography/Boron-Neutron-Capture-Therapy (BNCT) applications. Although a higher electron energy is generally needed to produce an intense neutron beam, in this paper the use of Be and BeD 2 photoneutron targets will be proposed, leading to thermal neutron beams of 8.48 10 7 n/cm 2/s/mA and 1.23 10 8 n/cm 2/s/mA, respectively. Optimization of the parameters involved in neutron production (e-? conversion, moderator and reflector performances) has been studied by means of the MCNP-4C2 code.

  14. Ion Acceleration by Magnetic Pinch Instabilities- Powerful Neutron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Anna; Li, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Since the 1950s pinch discharges with deuterium gas have been known to produce large neutron bursts. During these early quests for laboratory fusion it was initially believed that the heat produced in the pinch led to sufficently high temperatures that these neutrons resulted from thermonuclear (TN) burn. However, a series of careful measurements led by Stirling Colgate was carried out to show that these neutrons did not result form TN burn. Rather, they resulted from an m = 0 sausage mode instability that accelerated the ions, causing beam-target interactions. Today, this same mechanism is used in dense plasma focus machines to generate intense neutron pulses for neutron activation experiments. One such experiment, to test the citicality of aging plutonium, is currently being planned at the Nevada Test Site. Helping to characterize the neutrons from the dense palsma focus to be used in this large experiment was the last applied physics project that Stirling work on. In this talk we will summarize the physics issues involved both in the original discovery in the 1950s and in today's experiments.

  15. New source for ultracold neutrons at the Institut Laue-Langevin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegsa, F. M.; Fertl, M.; Ivanov, S. N.; Kreuz, M.; Leung, K. K. H.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Soldner, T.; Zimmer, O.

    2014-07-01

    A new intense superthermal source for ultracold neutrons (UCN) was installed at a dedicated beam line at the Institut Laue-Langevin. Incident neutrons with a wavelength of 0.89 nm are converted to UCN in a 5-liter volume filled with superfluid He4 at a temperature of about 0.7 K. The UCN can be extracted to room temperature experiments. We present the cryogenic setup of the source, a characterization of the cold neutron beam, and UCN production measurements, where a UCN density in the production volume of at least 55 per cm3 was determined.

  16. A neutron producing target for BINP accelerator-based neutron source B. Bayanova

    E-print Network

    Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

    during thermal tests with gallium as a coolant, target damage occurred due to the high chemical activity neutrons was conceived based on a tandem accelerator with vacuum insulation, suitable for widespread use, chemical, and thermal properties of lithium metal. Pure lithium is more effective for neutron generation

  17. Dosimetry of 252Cf sources for neutron radiotherapy with and without augmentation by boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Yanch, J C; Zamenhof, R G

    1992-09-01

    Interstitial and intracavity 252Cf sources have been used to treat a number of tumor types with encouraging results. In particular these tumors include a variety of cervical, head-and-neck, and oral-cavity cancers and possible malignant gliomas. As a neutron source, 252Cf offers certain theoretical advantages over photon therapy (i.e., in treating tumors with significant hypoxic or necrotic components). With the recent availability of 10B-labeled tumor-seeking compounds, the usefulness of 252Cf may be further improved by augmenting the 252Cf dose to the tumor with an additional dose due to the fission (following thermal neutron capture) of 10B located in the tumor itself. While the high mean neutron energy permits 252Cf to deliver a high-LET, low-OER dose to the tumor on a macroscopic scale, thermalization of neutrons followed by 10B capture may augment this dose at the cellular level if adequate loading of tumor cells with 10B is possible. This paper presents results of a Monte Carlo simulation study investigating the dosimetric characteristics of linear 252Cf sources both with and without the quantitative increase in tumor dose possible with the addition of 10B. Results are displayed in the form of "along and away" tables and dose profiles in a water phantom. Comparisons of Monte Carlo results with experimental and analytical dosimetry data available in the literature are also presented. PMID:1438684

  18. Mixed-field dosimetry measurement of a target assembly for an accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. K. Reed; M. C. Dobelbower; J. E. Woollard; T. E Blue

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this work was to measure the neutron and gamma-ray absorbed dose components for a target assembly for an Accelerator-Based Neutron Source (ABNS) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), and to compare these measurements with MCNP calculations in order to verify the calculations of the in-air neutron and gamma-ray absorbed dose components. The measurements were made using the

  19. Feasibility study of BNCT of skin melanoma with an accelerator-based neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosteo, Stefano; Colautti, P.; Corrado, M. G.; d'Errico, F.; Monti, Sandra; Silari, Marco; Tinti, R.; Tornielli, G.

    1997-02-01

    The feasibility of an accelerator-driven thermal neuron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of skin melanoma is discussed, based on the design of an analogous source for BNCT of the explanted liver. Monte Carlo simulations were performed by introducing some variations in the moderator geometry of that source. Neutrons are generated by 7 MeV deuterons impinging on a thick beryllium target. The neutron moderator consists of a nuclear graphite structure containing a heavy water tank in turn enclosing the beryllium target. The moderator materials were chosen in order to minimize the production of prompt gamma rays. THe requested neutron fluence can be achieved in three hours with a deuteron current in the range of 3-8 mA.

  20. A precise method to determine the activity of a weak neutron source using a germanium detector

    E-print Network

    Duke, M J M; Krauss, C B; Mekarski, P; Sibley, L

    2015-01-01

    A standard high purity germanium detector (HPGe) was used to determine the neutron activity of a weak americium-beryllium (AmBe) neutron source. Gamma rays were created through 27Al(n,n'), 27Al(n,gamma) and 1H(n,gamma) reactions induced by the neutrons on aluminum and acrylic disks. A Monte Carlo simulation was developed to model the efficiency of the detector system. The activity of our neutron source was determined to be 305.6 +/- 4.9 n/s. The result is consistent for the different gamma rays and was verified using additional simulations and measurements of the 4483 keV gamma ray produced directly from the AmBe source.

  1. Irradiation facility for boron neutron capture therapy application based on a rf-driven D-T neutron source and a new beam shaping assembly (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerullo, N.; Esposito, J.; Leung, K. N.

    2002-02-01

    Selecting the best neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) requires optimizing neutron beam parameters. This involves solving many complex problems. Safety issues related to the use of nuclear reactor in hospital environments, as well as lower costs have led to interest in the development of accelerator-driven neutron sources. The BNCT research programs at the Nuclear Departments of Pisa and Genova Universities (DIMNP and DITEC) focus on studies of new concepts for accelerator-based DT neutron sources. Simple and compact accelerator designs using relatively low deuteron beam energy, 100 keV, have been developed which, in turn, can generate high neutron yields. New studies have been started for optimization of moderator materials for the 14.1 MeV DT neutrons. Our aim is to obtain an epithermal neutron beam for therapeutic application at the exit end, with minimal beam intensity losses, the specific goal is to achieve an epithermal neutron flux of at least of 1109 n/cm2 s at the beam port, with low gamma and fast neutron dose contamination. According to the most recent neutron BNCT beam parameters some moderating and spectrum shifter materials and geometrical configurations have thus far been tested, and neutron and gamma beam data at beam port have been computed. A possible beam shaping assembly model has been designed. This research demonstrates that a DT neutron source could be successfully implemented for BNCT application, with performance surpassing the minimum requirements stated above, using DT neutron sources with yields in the range 1013-1014 n/s. The latest Monte Carlo simulation results of an accelerator based facility which relies on a rf-driven DT fusion neutron generator will be presented.

  2. Superconducting Prototype Cavities for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati; P. Kneisel; K. Davis; K. Macha; J. Mammosser

    2002-06-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source project includes a superconducting linac section in the energy range from 186 MeV to 1000 MeV operating at a frequency of 805 MHz at 2.1 K. For this energy range two types of cavities are needed with geometrical Beta-values of Beta=0.61 and Beta=0.81. An aggressive cavity prototyping program is being pursued at JLab, which calls for fabricating and testing of four Beta=0.61 cavities and two Beta=0.81 cavities. Both types consist of six cells made from high purity niobium and feature one HOM coupler of the TESLA type on each beam pipe and a port for a high power coaxial input coupler. Three of the four Beta=0.61 cavities will be used for a cryomodule test in early 2002. At this time, four medium beta cavities and one high beta cavity have been completed and tested at JLab. In addition, the three medium beta cavities for the prototype cryomodule have been equipped with the integrated Ti-Helium vessel, successfully retested and will be assembled into a cavity string. Results from the cryo-module test should be available by the time of the conference. The tests on the Beta=0.61 cavity and the Beta=0.81 cavity exceeded the design values for gradient and Q - value: E{sub acc} =10.1 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K for Beta=0.61 and E{sub acc} = 12.3 MV/m and Q=5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K for Beta = 0.81. The medium beta cavities reached gradients between E{sub acc} = 15 MV/m and 21 MV/m. This paper will describe the test results obtained with the various cavities, some aspects of the HOM damping at cryogenic temperatures, results from microphonics and Lorentz force detuning tests and the cavity string assembly at the time of this workshop.

  3. Superconducting Prototype Cavities for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati, P. Kneisel , J. Brawley, R. Bundy, I. Campisi, K. Davis; K. Macha; D. Machie; J. Mammosser; S. Morgan; R. Sundelin; L. Turlington; K. Wilson; M. Doleans; S.H. Kim; D. Barni; C. Pagani; P. Pierini; K. Matsumoto; R. Mitchell; D. Schrage; R. Parodi; J. Sekutowicz; P. Ylae-Oijala

    2001-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source project includes a superconducting linac section in the energy range from 192 MeV to 1000 MeV, operating at a frequency of 805 MHz at 2.1 K. For this energy range two types of cavities are needed with geometrical beta - values of beta= 0.61 and beta= 0.81. An aggressive cavity prototyping program is being pursued at Jlab, which calls for fabricating and testing of four beta= 0.61 cavities and two beta= 0.81 cavities. Both types consist of six cells made from high purity niobium and feature one HOM coupler on each beam pipe and a port for a high power coaxial input coupler. Three of the four beta= 0.61 cavities will be used for a cryomodule test in early 2002. At this time four medium beta cavities and one high beta cavity have been completed at JLab. The first tests on the beta=0.61 cavity and the beta= 0.81 exceeded the design values for gradient and Q - value: E{sub acc} = 1 0.3 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K for beta= 0.61 and E{sub acc} = 12.3 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K for beta= 0.81. One of the medium beta cavities has been equipped with an integrated helium vessel and measurements of the static and dynamic Lorentz force detuning will be done and compared to the ''bare'' cavities. In addition two single cell cavities have been fabricated, equipped with welded-on HOM couplers. They are being used to evaluate the HOM couplers with respect to multipacting, fundamental mode rejection and HOM damping as far as possible in a single cell. This paper will describe the cavity design with respect to electrical and mechanical features, the fabrication efforts and the results obtained with the different cavities existing at the time of this workshop.

  4. Thermal hydraulic analysis of two-phase closed thermosyphon cooling system for new cold neutron source moderator of Breazeale research reactor at Penn State

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melaku Habte

    2008-01-01

    A cold neutron source cooling system is required for the Penn State's next generation cold neutron source facility that can accommodate a variable heat load up to about 10W with operating temperature of about 28K. An existing cold neutron source cooling system operating at the University of Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) facility failed to accommodate heat loads upwards of

  5. Proceedings of the workshop on ion source issues relevant to a pulsed spallation neutron source: Part 1: Workshop summary

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, L.; Leung, K.N.; Alonso, J. [eds.

    1994-10-01

    The workshop reviewed the ion-source requirements for high-power accelerator-driven spallation neutron facilities, and the performance of existing ion sources. Proposals for new facilities in the 1- to 5-MW range call for a widely differing set of ion-source requirements. For example, the source peak current requirements vary from 40 mA to 150 mA, while the duty factor ranges from 1% to 9%. Much of the workshop discussion centered on the state-of-the-art of negative hydrogen ion source (H{sup {minus}}) technology and the present experience with Penning and volume sources. In addition, other ion source technologies, for positive ions or CW applications were reviewed. Some of these sources have been operational at existing accelerator complexes and some are in the source-development stage on test stands.

  6. Developments in neutron beam devices and an advanced cold source for the NIST research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Robert E.; Rowe, J. Michael

    2002-01-01

    The last 5 yr has been a period of steady growth in instrument capabilities and utilization at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research. Since the installation of the liquid hydrogen cold source in 1995, all of the instruments originally planned for the Cold Neutron Research Facility have been completed and made available to users, and three new thermal neutron instruments have been installed. Currently, an advanced cold source is being fabricated that will better couple the reactor core and the existing network of neutron guides. Many improvements are also being made in neutron optics to enhance the beam characteristics of certain instruments. For example, optical filters will be installed that will increase the fluxes at the two 30-m SANS instruments by as much as two. Sets of MgF 2 biconcave lenses have been developed for SANS that have demonstrated a significant improvement in resolution over conventional pinhole collimation. The recently commissioned high-flux backscattering spectrometer incorporates a converging guide, a large spherically focusing monochromator and analyzer, and a novel phase space transform chopper, to achieve very high intensity while maintaining excellent energy resolution. Finally, a prototype low background, doubly focusing neutron monochromator is nearing completion that will be the heart of a new cold neutron spectrometer, as well as two new thermal neutron triple axis spectrometers.

  7. The development of solid methane neutron moderators at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source facility of Argonne National Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J. M.; Miller, M. E.; Scott, T. L.

    1999-03-10

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) started using solid methane moderators in 1985 because of their efficient conversion (about 3.5 times greater than was achieved with a liquid hydrogen moderator) of fast neutrons to long wavelength neutrons. However, the solid methane moderators experienced numerous failures due to pressure surges caused by a combination of (1) the release of stored energy, which occurred when methane radiolytic products recombined, and (2) the expansion of hydrogen, which built up in the solid methane during irradiation. During the ensuing years studies were made to determine how to operate the solid methane moderators without causing failure. The rate at which stored energy built up during irradiation and the temperature at which hydrogen was released during annealing were determined. Since 1993 IPNS has successfully operated the solid methane moderators (at about 30 K) by periodically annealing to the liquid state around 90 K after every roughly three days of irradiation.

  8. A Targeted Search for Point Sources of EeV Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Buml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blmer, H.; Boh?ov, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceio, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Daz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filip?i?, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Frhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; Garca, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gmez Berisso, M.; Gmez Vitale, P. F.; Gonalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hasankiadeh, Q. D.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hrandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsk, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kp, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kgl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krmer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leo, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lpez, R.; Lopez Agera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mari?, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martnez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masas Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mi?anovi?, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Mostaf, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mller, G.; Mnchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Noka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pe?ala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.

    2014-07-01

    A flux of neutrons from an astrophysical source in the Galaxy can be detected in the Pierre Auger Observatory as an excess of cosmic-ray air showers arriving from the direction of the source. To avoid the statistical penalty for making many trials, classes of objects are tested in combinations as nine "target sets," in addition to the search for a neutron flux from the Galactic center or from the Galactic plane. Within a target set, each candidate source is weighted in proportion to its electromagnetic flux, its exposure to the Auger Observatory, and its flux attenuation factor due to neutron decay. These searches do not find evidence for a neutron flux from any class of candidate sources. Tabulated results give the combined p-value for each class, with and without the weights, and also the flux upper limit for the most significant candidate source within each class. These limits on fluxes of neutrons significantly constrain models of EeV proton emission from non-transient discrete sources in the Galaxy.

  9. Neutron sources for BNCT using low-power research reactors or compact charged particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harker, Yale D.; Nigg, David W.; Mitchell, Hannah E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.; Jones, James L.

    1997-02-01

    Since 1986, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been involved in the development of epithermal neutron sources for BNCT. The INEL effort was instrumental in the implementation of an epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Recently, the INEL's effort has been directed toward developing advanced filter designs for use with low- power research reactors such as the 250W and 1MW class TRIGA reactors which are located at various sites and universities throughout the world. This work has focused on utilizing advanced filter materials that more effectively reduce fast neutron contamination in the epithermal neutron beam and at the same time optimize neutron economy. The INEL has also been involved in developing two concepts of producing neutron sources for BNCT using charged particle accelerators. The first concept involves the use of an electron accelerator/photoneutron source. The second concept involves the use of a charged particle beam in which the particle energy is just above the threshold energy of the reaction. This paper will review the progress made by INEL in modifying the WSU TRIGA reactor and conceptual development of an electron accelerator based photoneutron source for BNCT. The near threshold particle accelerator development will be discussed in a separate paper.

  10. Consideration of a ultracold neutron source in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry by taking simulated boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Gheisari, R., E-mail: gheisari@pgu.ac.ir [Physics Department, Persian Gulf University, Bushehr 75169 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nuclear Energy Research Center, Persian Gulf University, Bushehr 75169 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Firoozabadi, M. M.; Mohammadi, H. [Department of Physics, University of Birjand, Birjand 97175 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, University of Birjand, Birjand 97175 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    A new idea to calculate ultracold neutron (UCN) production by using Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the cold neutron (CN) flux and an analytical approach to calculate the UCN production from the simulated CN flux was given. A super-thermal source (UCN source) was modeled based on an arrangement of D{sub 2}O and solid D{sub 2} (sD{sub 2}). The D{sub 2}O was investigated as the neutron moderator, and sD{sub 2} as the converter. In order to determine the required parameters, a two-dimensional (2D) neutron balance equation written in Matlab was combined with the MCNPX simulation code. The 2D neutron-transport equation in cylindrical (? ? z) geometry was considered for 330 neutron energy groups in the sD{sub 2}. The 2D balance equation for UCN and CN was solved using simulated CN flux as boundary value. The UCN source dimensions were calculated for the development of the next UCN source. In the optimal condition, the UCN flux and the UCN production rate (averaged over the sD{sub 2} volume) equal to 6.79??10{sup 6} cm{sup ?2}s{sup ?1} and 2.20 10{sup 5} cm{sup ?3}s{sup ?1}, respectively.

  11. Consideration of a ultracold neutron source in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry by taking simulated boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheisari, R.; Firoozabadi, M. M.; Mohammadi, H.

    2014-01-01

    A new idea to calculate ultracold neutron (UCN) production by using Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the cold neutron (CN) flux and an analytical approach to calculate the UCN production from the simulated CN flux was given. A super-thermal source (UCN source) was modeled based on an arrangement of D2O and solid D2 (sD2). The D2O was investigated as the neutron moderator, and sD2 as the converter. In order to determine the required parameters, a two-dimensional (2D) neutron balance equation written in Matlab was combined with the MCNPX simulation code. The 2D neutron-transport equation in cylindrical (? - z) geometry was considered for 330 neutron energy groups in the sD2. The 2D balance equation for UCN and CN was solved using simulated CN flux as boundary value. The UCN source dimensions were calculated for the development of the next UCN source. In the optimal condition, the UCN flux and the UCN production rate (averaged over the sD2 volume) equal to 6.79 106 cm-2s-1 and 2.20 105 cm-3s-1, respectively.

  12. Production and characterization of a custom-made 228Th source with reduced neutron source strength for the Borexino experiment

    E-print Network

    Maneschg, W; Dressler, R; Eberhardt, K; Eichler, R; Keller, H; Lackner, R; Praast, B; Santorelli, R; Schreiner, J; Tarka, M; Wiegel, B; Zimbal, A

    2011-01-01

    A custom-made 228Th source of several MBq activity was produced for the Borexino experiment for studying the external background of the detector. The aim was to reduce the unwanted neutron emission produced via (alpha,n) reactions in ceramics used typically for commercial 228Th sources. For this purpose a ThCl4 solution was converted chemically into ThO2 and embedded into a gold foil. The paper describes the production and the characterization of the custom-made source by means of gamma-activity, dose rate and neutron source strength measurements. From gamma-spectroscopic measurements it was deduced that the activity transfer from the initial solution to the final source was >91% (at 68% C.L.) and the final activity was (5.41+-0.30) MBq. The dose rate was measured by two dosimeters yielding 12.1 mSv/h and 14.3 mSv/h in 1 cm distance. The neutron source strength of the 5.41 MBq 228Th source was determined as (6.59+-0.85)/sec.

  13. Relation of university research reactors to the advanced neutron source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. B. Hayter; T. J. McManamy; C. D. West

    1994-01-01

    For the past two decades, the Europeans have had a model enterprise for the execution and exploitation of neutron research. It is based on a single large and highly capable central facility - the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) - and a considerable number of smaller research reactors at universities and government laboratories in various countries. New experimental techniques and instruments have

  14. Modified big bang nucleosynthesis with nonstandard neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coc, Alain; Pospelov, Maxim; Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Vangioni, Elisabeth

    2014-10-01

    During big bang nucleosynthesis, any injection of extra neutrons around the time of the Be7 formation, i.e. at a temperature of order T ?50 keV, can reduce the predicted freeze-out amount of Be7+Li7 that otherwise remains in sharp contradiction with the Spite plateau value inferred from the observations of Pop II stars. However, the growing confidence in the primordial D /H determinations puts a strong constraint on any such scenario. We address this issue in detail, analyzing different temporal patterns of neutron injection, such as decay, annihilation, resonant annihilation, and oscillation between mirror and standard model world neutrons. For this latter case, we derive the realistic injection pattern taking into account thermal effects (damping and refraction) in the primordial plasma. If the extra-neutron supply is the sole nonstandard mechanism operating during the big bang nucleosynthesis, the suppression of lithium abundance below Li /H?1.910-10 always leads to the overproduction of deuterium, D /H?3.610-5, well outside the error bars suggested by recent observations.

  15. Spectra of neutrons from a beam-driven fusion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, P. R.

    2015-06-01

    Semianalytical calculations of fusion neutron spectra in case of the presence of substantial suprathermal tails in fuel nuclei velocity distributions have been implemented using two different approaches. Numerical techniques are described. Results for a variety of isotropic and anisotropic distributions of suprathermal fuel nuclei are presented. Verification of calculated fusion product spectra has been performed using several methods.

  16. Physics Analyses in the Design of the HFIR Cold Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Bucholz, J.A.

    1999-09-27

    Physics analyses have been performed to characterize the performance of the cold neutron source to be installed in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the near future. This paper provides a description of the physics models developed, and the resulting analyses that have been performed to support the design of the cold source. These analyses have provided important parametric performance information, such as cold neutron brightness down the beam tube and the various component heat loads, that have been used to develop the reference cold source concept.

  17. Progress on the Construction of the PULSTAR Solid Deuterium Ultracold Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmquist, Grant; Cottrell, Chris; Golub, Robert; Huffman, Paul; Young, Albert; Hawari, Ayman; Korobkina, Ekaterina; Wehring, Bernard

    2009-10-01

    An ultracold neutron (UCN) source utilizing solid deuterium is being constructed at the 1MW PULSTAR nuclear reactor on the campus of North Carolina State University. The final stages of assembly and commissioning are underway. The overall design, status of construction, and benchmarking measurements will be discussed. The UCN source design is based on detailed simulations including MCNP, UCN transport Monte Carlo, and CFD of the cryogenic systems. The source will be available for developing general UCN experiment technology, such as guides and detectors in support of current neutron EDM and UCNA projects. Other plans include fundamental physics measurements such as neutron beta decay and gravity measurements, as well as development of new techniques to use UCN in material and surface physics studies. The expected experimental density of UCN will be competitive with currently available sources, including those at significantly more powerful reactors. This work is supported in part by NSF grant #0314114 and funds from the DOE INIE program.

  18. First results from the NPDGamma experiment at the spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Nadia; NPDGamma Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The NPDGamma experiment aims to measure the parity-odd correlation between the neutron spin and the direction of the emitted photon in neutron-proton capture. A parity violating asymmetry (to be measured to 10-8) from this process can be directly related to the strength of the hadronic weak interaction between nucleons, specifically the ?I=1 contribution. As part of the commissioning runs on the Fundamental Neutron Physics beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at ORNL, the gamma-ray asymmetries from the parity-violating capture of cold neutrons on 35Cl and 27Al were measured, to check for systematic effects, false asymmetries, and backgrounds. Early this year, the parahydrogen target for the production run of NPDGamma was commissioned. Preliminary results for the commissioning measurements with 35Cl and 27Al will be presented as well as first results of the hydrogen run.

  19. Initial results from the NPDGamma Experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Nadia

    2013-10-01

    The NPDGamma experiment aims to measure the parity-odd correlation between the neutron spin and the direction of the emitted photon in neutron-proton capture. A parity violating asymmetry (to be measured to 10?8) from this process can be directly related to the strength of the hadronic weak interaction between nucleons, specifically the ?I = 1 contribution. As part of the commissioning runs on the Fundamental Neutron Physics beam line at the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL, the gamma-ray asymmetries from the parity-violating capture of cold neutrons on 35Cl and 27Al were measured, to check for systematic effects, false asymmetries, and backgrounds. Early in 2012, the parahydrogen target for the production run of NPDGamma was commissioned. Preliminary results for the commissioning measurements with 35Cl and 27Al will be presented. Finally, intermediate results for the hydrogen asymmetry will be shown and discussed.

  20. Proceedings of the workshop on ion source issues relevant to a pulsed spallation neutron source: Part 2 workshop presentations

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, L.; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Alonso, J. [eds.

    1994-10-01

    As part of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Pulsed Spallation Source study, this Workshop was convened to address ion-source technology`s present status with respect to the next-generation Pulsed Spallation Source in the 1-5 MW range for the neutron scattering community. Considerations of Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) parameters and designs were included in the discussions throughout the Workshop. Ion-source requirements and actually-achieved performances were assessed, resulting in a determination of research and development requirements to bridge the gap. Part 1 of these Proceedings summarizes the Workshop; Part 2 contains viewgraphs of Workshop presentations.

  1. Secondary Startup Neutron Sources as a Source of Tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Shaver, Mark W.; Lanning, Donald D.

    2010-02-01

    The hypothesis of this paper is that the Zircaloy clad fuel source is minimal and that secondary startup neutron sources are the significant contributors of the tritium in the RCS that was previously assigned to release from fuel. Currently there are large uncertainties in the attribution of tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS). The measured amount of tritium in the coolant cannot be separated out empirically into its individual sources. Therefore, to quantify individual contributors, all sources of tritium in the RCS of a PWR must be understood theoretically and verified by the sum of the individual components equaling the measured values.

  2. The Argonne ACWL, a potential accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMichael, G. E.; Yule, T. J.; Zhou, X.-L.

    1995-05-01

    THE CWDD (Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator) accelerator was designed to accelerate 80 mA cw of D - to 7.5 MeV. Most of the hardware for the first 2 MeV was installed at Argonne and major subsystems had been commissioned when program funding from the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization ended in October 1993. Renamed the Argonne Continuous Wave Linac (ACWL), we are proposing to complete it to accelerate either deuterons to 2 MeV or protons to 3 - 3.5 MeV. Equipped with a beryllium or other light-element target, it would make a potent source of neutrons (on the order of 10 13 n/s) for BNCT and/or neutron radiography. Project status and proposals for turning ACWL into a neutron source are reviewed, including the results of a computational study that was carried out to design a target/moderator to produce an epithermal neutron beam for BNCT.

  3. Leakage neutron spectra from spherical samples with a PuBe source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I ElAgib; J Csikai; J Jordanova; L Olh

    1999-01-01

    Leakage neutron spectra from a PuBe source placed in the center of a 30 cm diameter sphere filled with water, paraffin oil, SiO2 and river sand were measured using a pulse height response spectrometer (PHRS) in the 1.412.0 MeV energy range. The measured leakage neutron spectra have been compared with the calculated results obtained by the three dimensional Monte Carlo

  4. Research and Development of Compact Neutron Sources based on Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kai Masuda; Teruhisa Takamatsu; Kiyoshi Yoshikawa; Tsuyoshi Misawa; Seiji Shiroya; Yoshiyuki Takahashi; Takeshi Fujimoto; Tomoya Nakagawa; Taiju Kajiwara; Kazunobu Nagasaki

    2009-01-01

    Recent progress is described in the research and development of an inertial-electrostatic confinement fusion (IECF) device. Use of a water-cooling jacket with non-uniform thickness shows promising success for landmine detection application, such as effective channeling of neutron flux toward the target and a very stable dc yield in excess of 107 D-D neutrons\\/sec. Addition of an ion source to the

  5. Design study on an accelerator-based facility for BNCT and low energy neutron source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Makoto Sasaki; Toshiyuki Yamanaka

    2000-01-01

    We have challenged to reduce an accelerator beam power for an accelerator-based BNCT facility. The required neutron source strength at the target has been estimated so as to make the epithermal neutron flux in the patient irradiation field exceed 1.7 109 n\\/cm2s. The energy of the incident proton and the arrangement of the moderator assemblies are optimized. The beam

  6. The LICORNE Neutron Source and Measurements of Prompt ?-rays Emitted in Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. N.; Lebois, M.; Halipre, P.; Oberstedt, S.; Oberstedt, A.

    The emission of prompt gamma rays is one of the least measured and least well-understood parts of the fission process. Knowledge of prompt fission gamma spectra, mean energies and multiplicities are important for reactor gamma heating and hence linked to reactor safety. At the IPN Orsay we have developed a unique, directional, fast neutron source called LICORNE, intended initially to facilitate prompt fission gamma measurements. The ability of the IPN Orsay tandem accelerator to produce intense beams of 7Li is exploited to produce quasi mono-energetic neutrons between 0.5 - 4 MeV using the p(7Li, 7Be)n inverse reaction. The available fluxes of up to 7107 neutrons/second/steradian are comparable to existing installations, but with two added advantages: (i) The kinematic focusing produces a natural neutron beam collimation which allows placement of gamma detectors adjacent to the irradiated sample unimpeded by source neutrons. (ii) The background of scattered neutrons in the experimental hall is drastically reduced. The dedicated neutron converter was commissioned in June 2013

  7. Calibration of Time Of Flight Detectors Using Laser-driven Neutron Source

    E-print Network

    S. R. Mirfayzi; S. Kar; H. Ahmed; A. G. Krygier; A. Green; A. Alejo; R. Clarke; R. R. Freeman; J. Fuchs; D. Jung; A. Kleinschmidt; J. T. Morrison; Z. Najmudin; H. Nakamura; P. Norreys; M. Oliver; M. Roth; L. Vassura; M. Zepf; M. Borghesi

    2015-06-15

    Calibration of three scintillators (EJ232Q, BC422Q and EJ410) in a time-of-flight (TOF) arrangement using a laser drive-neutron source is presented. The three plastic scintillator detectors were calibrated with gamma insensitive bubble detector spectrometers, which were absolutely calibrated over a wide range of neutron energies ranging from sub MeV to 20 MeV. A typical set of data obtained simultaneously by the detectors are shown, measuring the neutron spectrum emitted from a petawatt laser irradiated thin foil.

  8. Development of target system for intense neutron source of p-Li reaction.

    PubMed

    Kamada, So; Takada, Masashi; Suda, Mitsuru; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Imaseki, Hitoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Fujii, Ryo; Nakamura, Masaru; Sato, Hitoshi; Higashimata, Atsushi; Arai, Seiji

    2014-06-01

    A target cooling system was developed for an intense neutron source of p-Li reaction. The system consists of target cooling devices and protection devices for lithium evaporation. A pin-structure cooling device was developed to enhance cooling power. Functional graded material was utilized for the evaporation of lithium. Test experiments were performed by using the neutron exposure accelerator system for biological effect experiments (NASBEE) at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan. The target system was confirmed to be applicable for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:24786900

  9. Neutron source images and spectra to guide neutron diagnostics specifications for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sweezy, J. E.; Wilson, D. C.; Bradley, P. A.; Grim, G. P.; Choi, C. K.; Coggeshall, J. C.; Wilde, C. H.; Forster, R. A.; Russell, R. D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2006-10-15

    Both neutron images and spectra will diagnose ignition implosions at the National Ignition Facility. From the integrated Hohlraum and capsule calculations of copper-doped beryllium capsules using {approx}1 MJ of laser energy we have postprocessed neutron spectra and both energy-gated and time integrated neutron images displaying the observable consequences of two-dimensional Hohlraum asymmetries. If low signal precludes multiple down scattered images, we suggest a 6-12 MeV gate. With asymmetries, it is noted that the neutron yield, spectra, and images vary with observation direction. The yield varies only several percent when observed at different angles. Since most asymmetries are expected about the Hohlraum axis, a perpendicular view has the highest priority. The next most informative view would be along the Hohlraum axis, but may be precluded by target chamber structures. We present images at the available port angles and discuss their utility. To facilitate detailed diagnostic simulations with real pinhole geometries or penumbral apertures, we offer a compact disk containing neutron spectra and gated images from various integrated calculations.

  10. Visibility Estimation for Neutron Resonance Absorption Radiography using a Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Tetsuya; Maekawa, Fujio; Oshita, Hidetoshi; Sato, Hirotaka; Shinohara, Takenao; Ooi, Motoki; Harada, Masahide; Uno, Shoji; Otomo, Toshiya; Kamiyama, Takashi; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki

    Neutron resonance absorption radiography is a technique to enhance neutron transmission images of specific nucleus at neutron resonance energies. Demonstration measurements by using a lithium-glass pixel type scintillator and a gas electron multiplication (GEM) neutron detector were carried out at NOBORU beam line in MLF/J-PARC for sodium, manganese, cobalt, copper, zinc, molybdenum, cadmium, indium, tantalum and gold. To discuss advantages of the resonance absorption radiography the mass attenuation coefficient at resonance energy of each element was compared to that at 25 meV. In addition a visibility index derived by a resonance peak cross section and a relative width (full width at half maximum divided by its resonance energy) was proposed to summarize visibility of the neutron resonance absorption radiography for natural elements. The values of visibility index and the resonance energy indicated that large advantages of the resonance absorption radiography were obtainable for the following elements: sodium (Na), manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), rhodium (Rh), silver (Ag), cadmium (Cd), indium (In), xenon (Xe), cesium (Cs), samarium (Sm), europium (Eu), dysprosium (Dy), erbium (Er), thulium (Tm), hafnium (Hf), tantalum (Ta), tungsten (W), rhenium (Re), iridium (Ir) and gold (Au).

  11. Upgrade of the neutron guide system at the OPAL Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, D. Martin; Kennedy, S. J.; Klose, F.

    2010-11-01

    The new research reactor at ANSTO (OPAL) is operating with seven neutron beam instruments in the user programme and three more under construction. The reactor design provides for expansion of the facility to eighteen instruments, and much of the basic infrastructure is already in place. However, an expansion of the neutron guide system is needed for further beam instruments. For this purpose, several possibilities are under consideration, such as insertion of multi-channel neutron benders in the existing cold guides or the construction of a new elliptic cold guide. In this work Monte Carlo (MC) simulations have been used to evaluate performance of these guide configurations. Results show that these configurations can be competitive with the best instruments in the world.

  12. Compact D-D Neutron Source-Driven Subcritical Multiplier and Beam-Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Francesco Ganda; Jasmina Vujic; Ehud Greenspan; Ka-Ngo Leung

    2010-12-01

    This work assesses the feasibility of using a small, safe, and inexpensive keff 0.98 subcritical fission assembly [subcritical neutron multiplier (SCM)] to amplify the treatment neutron beam intensity attainable from a compact deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion neutron source delivering [approximately]1012 n/s. The objective is to reduce the treatment time for deep-seated brain tumors to [approximately]1 h. The paper describes the optimal SCM design and two optimal beam-shaping assemblies (BSAs) - one designed to maximize the dose rate and the other designed to maximize the total dose that can be delivered to a deep-seated tumor. The neutron beam intensity amplification achieved with the optimized SCM and BSA results in an increase in the treatment dose rate by a factor of 18: from 0.56 Gy/h without the SCM to 10.1 Gy/h. The entire SCM is encased in an aluminum structure. The total amount of 20% enriched uranium required for the SCM is 8.5 kg, and the cost (not including fabrication) is estimated to be less than $60,000. The SCM power level is estimated at 400 W when driven by a 1012 n/s D-D neutron source. This translates into consumption of only [approximately]0.6% of the initially loaded 235U atoms during 50 years of continuous operation and implies that the SCM could operate continuously for the entire lifetime of the facility without refueling. Cooling the SCM does not pose a challenge; it may be accomplished by natural circulation as the maximum heat flux is only 0.034 W/cm2.

  13. Investigation of the neutron spectrum of americium-beryllium sources by Bonner sphere spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedogni, R.; Domingo, C.; Roberts, N.; Thomas, D. J.; Chiti, M.; Esposito, A.; Garcia, M. J.; Gentile, A.; Liu, Z. Z.; de-San-Pedro, M.

    2014-11-01

    Americium-beryllium neutron sources are certainly the most widely used in neutron dosimetry laboratories, basically due to their long half-life and their energy distribution, which covers the energy domain of interest for many applications in ambient and personal dosimetry. Nevertheless, the spectrum of this source depends on the materials and dimension of the capsule and on the amount and physical-chemical properties of the active material, thus affecting relevant quantities such as the spectrum-averaged fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficient. A EURAMET (European Association of National Metrology Institutes) project (n. 1104) was initiated to experimentally investigate how the neutron spectrum changes for different source sizes and encapsulations with a view to providing improved data for a planned revision of the ISO 8529 Standard Series. The experimental campaign was carried out in the low scatter facility at NPL. Here three different Bonner sphere spectrometers, BSSs, were exposed to the neutron fields produced by three different neutron sources formats: one X3 capsule (1 Ci) and two X14 capsules (10 Ci and 15 Ci). The specific advantage of the BSS is the large sensitivity to low-energy neutrons (E<0.1 MeV) which is the component expected to be most affected by the capsule-to-capsule variations and the component which is least well known. This paper summarises the results of the campaign with emphasis on (1) estimating the low-energy component of the Am-Be neutron spectrum, according to the encapsulation type; (2) evaluating the coherence between the Bonner spheres data and the previous studies performed with high-resolution spectrometers but limited in energy to E>0.1 MeV; (3) understanding whether the ISO-recommended Am-Be spectrum needs to be amended, and for which source formats.

  14. SOURCES 4A: A Code for Calculating (alpha,n), Spontaneous Fission, and Delayed Neutron Sources and Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Madland, D.G.; Arthur, E.D.; Estes, G.P.; Stewart, J.E.; Bozoian, M.; Perry, R.T.; Parish, T.A.; Brown, T.H.; England, T.R.; Wilson, W.B.; Charlton, W.S.

    1999-09-01

    SOURCES 4A is a computer code that determines neutron production rates and spectra from ({alpha},n) reactions, spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron emission due to the decay of radionuclides. The code is capable of calculating ({alpha},n) source rates and spectra in four types of problems: homogeneous media (i.e., a mixture of {alpha}-emitting source material and low-Z target material), two-region interface problems (i.e., a slab of {alpha}-emitting source material in contact with a slab of low-Z target material), three-region interface problems (i.e., a thin slab of low-Z target material sandwiched between {alpha}-emitting source material and low-Z target material), and ({alpha},n) reactions induced by a monoenergetic beam of {alpha}-particles incident on a slab of target material. Spontaneous fission spectra are calculated with evaluated half-life, spontaneous fission branching, and Watt spectrum parameters for 43 actinides. The ({alpha},n) spectra are calculated using an assumed isotropic angular distribution in the center-of-mass system with a library of 89 nuclide decay {alpha}-particle spectra, 24 sets of measured and/or evaluated ({alpha},n) cross sections and product nuclide level branching fractions, and functional {alpha}-particle stopping cross sections for Z < 106. The delayed neutron spectra are taken from an evaluated library of 105 precursors. The code outputs the magnitude and spectra of the resultant neutron source. It also provides an analysis of the contributions to that source by each nuclide in the problem.

  15. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA- booster subcritical assembly Part II : pulsed neutron source.

    SciTech Connect

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Rabiti, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-22

    One of the most reliable experimental methods for measuring the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly is the Sjoestrand method applied to the reaction rate generated from a pulsed neutron source. This study developed a new analytical methodology for characterizing the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly using the Sjoestrand method, which allows comparing the analytical and experimental time dependent reaction rates and the reactivity measurements. In this methodology, the reaction rate, detector response, is calculated due to a single neutron pulse using MCNP/MCNPX computer code or any other neutron transport code that explicitly simulates the fission delayed neutrons. The calculation simulates a single neutron pulse over a long time period until the delayed neutron contribution to the reaction is vanished. The obtained reaction rate is superimposed to itself, with respect to the time, to simulate the repeated pulse operation until the asymptotic level of the reaction rate, set by the delayed neutrons, is achieved. The superimposition of the pulse to itself was calculated by a simple C computer program. A parallel version of the C program is used due to the large amount of data being processed, e.g. by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The new calculation methodology has shown an excellent agreement with the experimental results available from the YALINA-Booster facility of Belarus. The facility has been driven by a Deuterium-Deuterium or Deuterium-Tritium pulsed neutron source and the (n,p) reaction rate has been experimentally measured by a {sup 3}He detector. The MCNP calculation has utilized the weight window and delayed neutron biasing variance reduction techniques since the detector volume is small compared to the assembly volume. Finally, this methodology was used to calculate the IAEA benchmark of the YALINA-Booster experiment.

  16. Monte-Carlo calculations for the development of a BNCT neutron source at the Kyiv Research Reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. O Gritzay; O. I Kalchenko; N. A Klimova; V. F Razbudey; A. I Sanzhur; S. E Binney

    2004-01-01

    The results presented in this paper display our continuing steps toward development of a neutron source with parameters required by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at the Kyiv Research Reactor (KRR). The purpose of this work was:(1)calculation of the neutron flux which can be achieved at the greatest possible approach of a patient to the reactor core;(2)analysis of the influence

  17. Experimental studies on neutronic performance of coupled liquid-hydrogen moderator for pulsed spallation neutron sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Kiyanagi; N. Watanabe; H. Iwasa

    1992-01-01

    Optimization studies on a coupled liquid-hydrogen moderator system were performed experimentally and the results were compared with those of decoupled liquid-hydrogen and solid-methane moderators. A very large gain factor is obtained in the cold neutron region. Pulse characteristics were also studied and it was found that the pulse broadening by coupling is rather modest.

  18. SOURCES 4C : a code for calculating ([alpha],n), spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron sources and spectra.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W. B. (William B.); Perry, R. T. (Robert T.); Shores, E. F. (Erik F.); Charlton, W. S. (William S.); Parish, Theodore A.; Estes, G. P. (Guy P.); Brown, T. H. (Thomas H.); Arthur, Edward D. (Edward Dana),; Bozoian, Michael; England, T. R.; Madland, D. G.; Stewart, J. E. (James E.)

    2002-01-01

    SOURCES 4C is a computer code that determines neutron production rates and spectra from ({alpha},n) reactions, spontaneous fission, and delayed neutron emission due to radionuclide decay. The code is capable of calculating ({alpha},n) source rates and spectra in four types of problems: homogeneous media (i.e., an intimate mixture of a-emitting source material and low-Z target material), two-region interface problems (i.e., a slab of {alpha}-emitting source material in contact with a slab of low-Z target material), three-region interface problems (i.e., a thin slab of low-Z target material sandwiched between {alpha}-emitting source material and low-Z target material), and ({alpha},n) reactions induced by a monoenergetic beam of {alpha}-particles incident on a slab of target material. Spontaneous fission spectra are calculated with evaluated half-life, spontaneous fission branching, and Watt spectrum parameters for 44 actinides. The ({alpha},n) spectra are calculated using an assumed isotropic angular distribution in the center-of-mass system with a library of 107 nuclide decay {alpha}-particle spectra, 24 sets of measured and/or evaluated ({alpha},n) cross sections and product nuclide level branching fractions, and functional {alpha}-particle stopping cross sections for Z < 106. The delayed neutron spectra are taken from an evaluated library of 105 precursors. The code provides the magnitude and spectra, if desired, of the resultant neutron source in addition to an analysis of the'contributions by each nuclide in the problem. LASTCALL, a graphical user interface, is included in the code package.

  19. Studies of neutron shielding properties of ilmenite-magnetite concrete using a sup 252 Cf source

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuiyan, S.I.; Ahmed, F.U.; Mollah, A.S.; Rahman, M.A. (Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology, G.P.O. Box 3787, Dhaka 1000 (BD))

    1991-03-01

    The neutron shielding properties of ilmenite-magnetite (I-M) concrete are measured experimentally. The instantaneous relaxation length and thickness-dependent removal cross section of neutrons from a {sup 252}Cf source penetrating I-M concrete with an without a cadmium sheet are reported. An empirical formula is developed to calculate the thickness dependence of the removal cross section and the related coefficients are reported. The results illustrate the effectiveness of I-M concrete so far as its shielding properties are concerned. This material can be used to shield reactors, accelerators, X-ray installations, and radioactive sources used for commercial purposes.

  20. TRIUMF Ultracold Neutron Source J.W. Martin (Spokesperson)1

    E-print Network

    Martin, Jeff

    , NC, USA 5 California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA 6 University of Manitoba, Winnipeg of materials. Hence, they can be confined in material bottles for long periods of time. Typically, UCN have.1). With the advent of superthermal sources of UCN, a new generation of UCN sources are under development at various

  1. Calculated shielding characteristics of eight materials for neutrons and secondary photons produced by monoenergetic source neutrons with energies less than 400 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Noriyoshi; Shikata, Takashi; Fujita, Shin [Inst. of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Kosako, Toshiso [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology

    1995-10-01

    Shielding characteristics of iron, lead, ordinary concrete, heavy concrete, graphite, marble, water, and paraffin were calculated for monoenergetic source neutrons with energies < 400 MeV. The depth dependence of neutron and secondary photon transmitted dose equivalents at the exit surfaces of shields of varying thickness is exhibited for some monoenergetic source neutrons and for each material. Their shielding characteristics are compared and discussed in terms of the degradation process of neutron energy and the change of neutron spectrum in typical shielding materials. Calculations were carried out by using the one-dimensional discrete ordinates code ANISN-JR and the cross-section library DLC-87/HILO. Systematic knowledge concerning the shielding of neutrons with energies < 400 MeV was successfully obtained.

  2. The advanced neutron source--designing to meet the needs of the user community

    SciTech Connect

    Peretz, F.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is to be a multi-purpose neutron research center, constructed around a high-flux reactor now being designed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Its primary purpose is to place the United States in the forefront of neutron scattering in the twenty-first century. Other research programs include nuclear and fundamental physics, isotopes production, materials irradiation, and analytical chemistry. The Advanced Neutron Source will be a unique and invaluable research tool because of the unprecedented neutron flux available from the high intensity research reactor. But that reactor would be ineffective without world-class research facilities that allow the fullest utilization of the available neutrons. And, in turn, those research facilities will not produce new and exciting science without a broad population of users coming from all parts of the nation, and the world, placed in a simulating environment in which experiments can be effectively conducted, and in which scientific exchange is encouraged. This paper discusses the measures being taken to ensure that the design of the ANS focuses not only on the reactor, but on providing the experiment and user support facilities needed to allow its effective use. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Establishment of a simple neutron calibration field from a moderated 252Cf source . Part I. Design and calculation of the simple neutron calibration field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, A.; Iwai, S.; Nakamura, T.

    1987-02-01

    This paper describes the development and standardization of simple neutron reference calibration fields. These fields have been arranged for calibration of neutron detectors particularly used for radiation control and environmental measurements, having four different neutron spectra formed by a 252Cf source with or without moderators of iron, carbon or polyethylene. These calibration fields are independent of room-scattered neutrons, since they use only direct neutron components which are obtained by subtracting the results with shadow blocks from the results without those. The absolute energy spectra and dose equivalents of direct neutrons and room-scattered neutrons, and the effect of a shadow shield have been calculated by the one-dimensional ANISN-W, two-dimensional DOT-3.5 discrete ordinates codes and the three-dimensional MORSE-CG Monte Carlo code, for these four fields.

  4. Feasibility of an epithermal neutron source for BNCT based on RFQ accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terlizzi, R.; Colonna, N.; Bisceglie, E.; Colangelo, P.; Marrone, S.; Rain, A.; Tagliente, G.; Variale, V.

    2004-01-01

    The use of boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of deep-seated tumours, such as glioblastoma multiforme, requires neutron beams of suitable energy and intensity. The analysis of the therapeutic gain shows that a high tumour control probability with sublethal dose at healthy tissues can be achieved, in most cases, by using neutron beams of a few keV energy, with a flux of about 10 9 neutrons/cm 2 s. Therapeutic neutron beams with high-spectral purity in this energy range could be produced by accelerator-based neutron sources through a suitable neutron-producing reaction. We investigate the feasibility of a solution based on a small radio frequency quadrupole for a proton beam current of 30 mA and an energy of 2 MeV. An appropriate choice of the function parameters of the RFQ (modulation, efficiency of acceleration, phase shift, etc., ) allows one to design relatively compact accelerators, which could eventually lead to setup hospital-based BNCT facilities.

  5. A feasibility study of the Tehran research reactor as a neutron source for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kasesaz, Yaser; Khalafi, Hossein; Rahmani, Faezeh; Ezati, Arsalan; Keyvani, Mehdi; Hossnirokh, Ashkan; Shamami, Mehrdad Azizi; Monshizadeh, Mahdi

    2014-08-01

    Investigation on the use of the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) as a neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been performed by calculating and measuring energy spectrum and the spatial distribution of neutrons in all external irradiation facilities, including six beam tubes, thermal column, and the medical room. Activation methods with multiple foils and a copper wire have been used for the mentioned measurements. The results show that (1) the small diameter and long length beam tubes cannot provide sufficient neutron flux for BNCT; (2) in order to use the medical room, the TRR core should be placed in the open pool position, in this situation the distance between the core and patient position is about 400 cm, so neutron flux cannot be sufficient for BNCT; and (3) the best facility which can be adapted for BNCT application is the thermal column, if all graphite blocks can be removed. The epithermal and fast neutron flux at the beginning of this empty column are 4.1210(9) and 1.2110(9) n/cm(2)/s, respectively, which can provide an appropriate neutron beam for BNCT by designing and constructing a proper Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) structure. PMID:24742535

  6. A new imaging method using pulsed neutron sources for visualizing structural and dynamical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyanagi, Y.; Sato, H.; Kamiyama, T.; Shinohara, T.

    2012-02-01

    Neutron imaging using pulsed neutron sources coupled with a 2-dimensional position sensitive detector applicable to the time-of-flight method can give information on the crystal texture of coherently scattering materials, dynamical information of incoherently scattering materials such as hydrogen, and magnetic field information. Bragg edges appeared at cold neutron region reflect the preferred orientation, crystallite size, and lattice spacing. To deduce such information from the neutron transmission data depending on the position we have developed a data analysis code, and applied this code to data of a welded iron sample. Furthermore, as examples of more realistic materials we have investigated quenched iron rods. The quenched region was clearly demonstrated by the lattice space distribution. Furthermore, difference in the bound state of water or hydrogen in wet and dry cement pastes have been observed by analyzing the gradient of the neutron transmission cross section at the cold neutron region. The magnetic field has been also measured by using the polarized neutrons, and the strength of the field was estimated easily by analyzing the wave length dependent data.

  7. Thermophysical properties of saturated light and heavy water for advanced neutron source applications

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, A.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source is an experimental facility being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As a new nuclear fission research reactor of unprecedented flux, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor will provide the most intense steady-state beams of neutrons in the world. The high heat fluxes generated in the reactor [303 MW(t) with an average power density of 4.5 MW/L] will be accommodated by a flow of heavy water through the core at high velocities. In support of this experimental and analytical effort, a reliable, highly accurate, and uniform source of thermodynamic and transport property correlations for saturated light and heavy water were developed. In order to attain high accuracy in the correlations, the range of these correlations was limited to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source Reactor's nominal operating conditions. The temperature and corresponding saturation pressure ranges used for light water were 20--300[degrees]C and 0.0025--8.5 MPa, respectively, while those for heavy water were 50--250[degrees]C and 0.012--3.9 MPa. Deviations between the correlation predictions and data from the various sources did not exceed 1.0%. Light water vapor density was the only exception, with an error of 1.76%. The physical property package consists of analytical correlations, SAS codes, and FORTRAN subroutines incorporating these correlations, as well as an interactive, easy-to-use program entitled QuikProp.

  8. Thermophysical properties of saturated light and heavy water for Advanced Neutron Source applications

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, A.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source is an experimental facility being developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As a new nuclear fission research reactor of unprecedented flux, the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor will provide the most intense steady-state beams of neutrons in the world. The high heat fluxes generated in the reactor [303 MW(t) with an average power density of 4.5 MW/L] will be accommodated by a flow of heavy water through the core at high velocities. In support of this experimental and analytical effort, a reliable, highly accurate, and uniform source of thermodynamic and transport property correlations for saturated light and heavy water were developed. In order to attain high accuracy in the correlations, the range of these correlations was limited to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source Reactor`s nominal operating conditions. The temperature and corresponding saturation pressure ranges used for light water were 20--300{degrees}C and 0.0025--8.5 MPa, respectively, while those for heavy water were 50--250{degrees}C and 0.012--3.9 MPa. Deviations between the correlation predictions and data from the various sources did not exceed 1.0%. Light water vapor density was the only exception, with an error of 1.76%. The physical property package consists of analytical correlations, SAS codes, and FORTRAN subroutines incorporating these correlations, as well as an interactive, easy-to-use program entitled QuikProp.

  9. A dual neutron/gamma source for the Fissmat Inspection for Nuclear Detection (FIND) system.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); King, Michael; Rossi, Paolo (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); McDaniel, Floyd Del (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Morse, Daniel Henry; Antolak, Arlyn J.; Provencio, Paula Polyak (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Raber, Thomas N.

    2008-12-01

    Shielded special nuclear material (SNM) is very difficult to detect and new technologies are needed to clear alarms and verify the presence of SNM. High-energy photons and neutrons can be used to actively interrogate for heavily shielded SNM, such as highly enriched uranium (HEU), since neutrons can penetrate gamma-ray shielding and gamma-rays can penetrate neutron shielding. Both source particles then induce unique detectable signals from fission. In this LDRD, we explored a new type of interrogation source that uses low-energy proton- or deuteron-induced nuclear reactions to generate high fluxes of mono-energetic gammas or neutrons. Accelerator-based experiments, computational studies, and prototype source tests were performed to obtain a better understanding of (1) the flux requirements, (2) fission-induced signals, background, and interferences, and (3) operational performance of the source. The results of this research led to the development and testing of an axial-type gamma tube source and the design/construction of a high power coaxial-type gamma generator based on the {sup 11}B(p,{gamma}){sup 12}C nuclear reaction.

  10. Optimizing moderation of He-3 neutron detectors for shielded fission sources

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rees, Lawrence B.; Czirr, J. Bart

    2012-11-01

    Abstract: The response of 3-He neutron detectors is highly dependent on the amount of moderator incorporated into the detector system. If there is too little moderation, neutrons will not react with the 3-He. If there is too much moderation, neutrons will not reach the 3-He. In applications for portal or border monitors where 3He detectors are used to interdict illicit Importation of plutonium, the fission source is always shielded to some extent. Since the energy distribution of neutrons emitted from the source depends on the amount and type of shielding present, the optimum placement of moderating material around 3-He tubesmoreis a function of shielding. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo techniques to model the response of 3-He tubes placed in polyethylene boxes for moderation. To model the shielded fission neutron source, we use a 252-Cf source placed in the center of spheres of water of varying radius. Detector efficiency as a function of box geometry and shielding are explored. We find that increasing the amount of moderator behind and to the sides of the detector generally improves the detector response, but that benefits are limited if the thickness of the polyethylene moderator is greater than about 5-7 cm. The thickness of the moderator in front of the 3He tubes, however, is very important. For bare sources, about 5-6 cm of moderator is optimum, but as the shielding increases, the optimum thickness of this moderator decreases to 0-1 cm. A two-tube box with a moderator thickness of 5 cm in front of the first tube and a thickness of 1 cm in front of the second tube is proposed to improve the detector's sensitivity to lower-energy neutrons.less

  11. Irradiation damage of ferritic/martensitic steels: Fusion program data applied to a spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-06-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels were chosen as candidates for future fusion power plants because of their superior swelling resistance and better thermal properties than austenitic stainless steels. For the same reasons, these steels are being considered for the target structure of a spallation neutron source, where the structural materials will experience even more extreme irradiation conditions than expected in a fusion power plant first wall (i.e., high-energy neutrons that produce large amounts of displacement damage and transmutation helium). Extensive studies on the effects of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of ferritic/martensitic steels indicate that the major problem involves the effect of irradiation on fracture, as determined by a Charpy impact test. There are indications that helium can affect the impact behavior. Even more helium will be produced in a spallation neutron target material than in the first wall of a fusion power plant, making helium effects a prime concern for both applications. 39 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Application of accelerator sources for pulsed neutron logging of oil and gas wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, R. R.

    1985-05-01

    Dresser Atlas introduced the first commercial pulsed neutron oil well log in the early 1960s. This log had the capability of differentiating oil from salt water in a completed well. In the late 1970s the first continuous carbon/oxygen (C/O) log capable of differentiating oil from fresh water was introduced. The sources used in these commercial logs are radial geometry deuterium-tritium reaction devices with Cockcroft-Walton voltage multipliers providing the accelerator voltage. The commercial logging tools using these accelerators are comprised of scintillators detectors, power supplies, line drivers and receivers, and various timing and communications electronics. They are used to measure either the time decay or energy spectra of neutron-induced gamma events. The time decay information is useful in determining the neutron capture cross section, and the energy spectra is used to characterize inelastic neutron events.

  13. Technical concepts for a long-wavelength target station for the Spallation Neutron Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J. M.

    2002-12-04

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), a major new user facility for materials research funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), see the Spallation Neutron Source web site at: www.sns.gov/aboutsns/source/htm. The SNS will operate at a proton beam power of 1.4 MW delivered in short pulses at 60 Hz; this power level is an order of magnitude higher than that of the current most intense pulsed spallation neutron facility in the world, ISIS at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory in the United Kingdom: 160 kW at 50 Hz. When completed in 2006, the SNS will supply the research community with neutron beams of unprecedented intensity and a powerful, diverse instrument suite with exceptional capabilities. Together, these will enable a new generation of experimental studies of interest to chemists, condensed matter physicists, biologists, materials scientists, and engineers, in an ever-increasing range of applications. The Long-Wavelength Target Station (LWTS) complements the High-Power Target Station (HPTS) facility, which is already under construction, and will leverage the significant investment in the remainder of the complex, providing important new scientific opportunities. The fully equipped SNS will offer capabilities for neutron scattering studies of the structure and dynamics of materials with sensitivity, resolution, dynamic range, and speed that are unparalleled in the world.

  14. Principles for timing at spallation neutron sources based on developments at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R. O. (Ronald O.); Merl, R. B. (Robert B.); Rose, C. R. (Chris R.)

    2001-01-01

    Due to AC-power-grid frequency fluctuations, the designers for accelerator-based spallation-neutron facilities have worked to optimize the conflicting demands of accelerator and neutron chopper performance. For the first time, we are able to quantitatively access the tradeoffs between these two constraints and design or upgrade a facility to optimize total system performance using powerful new simulation techniques. We have modeled timing systems that integrate chopper controllers and chopper hardware and built new systems. Thus, at LANSCE, we now operate multiple chopper systems and the accelerator as simple slaves to a single master-timing-reference generator. Based on this experience we recommend that spallation neutron sources adhere to three principles. First, timing for pulsed sources should be planned starting with extraction at a fixed phase and working backwards toward the leading edge of the beam pulse. Second, accelerator triggers and storage ring extraction commands from neutron choppers offer only marginal benefits to accelerator-based spallation sources. Third, the storage-ring RF should be phase synchronized with neutron choppers to provide extraction without the one orbit timing uncertainty.

  15. Optimal Neutron Source & Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Vujic; E. Greenspan; W. E. Kastenber; Y. Karni; D. Regev; K. N. Leung J. M. Verbeke; D. Chivers; S. Guess; L. Kim; W. Waldron; Y. Zhu

    2003-01-01

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based

  16. An Ultracold Neutron Source for TRIUMF 3rd Draft #

    E-print Network

    Martin, Jeff

    II source at the ILL reactor. The TRIUMF source figures are quoted for 5 kW average power delivered with Location Technology critical energy storage time limiting density E c (neV) # s (s) # UCN (UCN/cm 3 ) TRIUMF spallation HeII 210 150 1.8 10 4 ILL Grenoble reactor HeII 250 150 1000 SNS ORNL CN beam He

  17. Research and Development of Landmine Detection System by a Compact Fusion Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi [Kyoto University (Japan); Masuda, Kai [Kyoto University (Japan); Toku, Hisayuki [Kyoto University (Japan); Nagasaki, Kazunobu [Kyoto University (Japan); Mizutani, Toshiyuki [Kyoto University (Japan); Takamatsu, Teruhisa [Kyoto University (Japan); Imoto, Masaki [Kyoto University (Japan); Yamamoto, Yasushi [Kyoto University (Japan); Ohnishi, Masami [Kansai University (Japan); Osawa, Hodaka [Kansai University (Japan); Hotta, Eiki [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Kohno, Toshiyuki [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Okino, Akitoshi [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Watanabe, Masato [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Yamauchi, Kunihito [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Yuura, Morimasa [Pulse Electronic Engineering Co., Ltd. (Japan); Shiroya, Seiji [Kyoto University (Japan); Misawa, Tsuyoshi [Kyoto University (Japan); Mori, Takamasa [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2005-05-15

    Current results are described on the research and development of an advanced anti-personnel landmine detection system by using a compact discharge-type fusion neutron source called IECF (Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement Fusion). Landmines are to be identified through backscattering of neutrons, and specific-energy capture {gamma}-rays by hydrogen and nitrogen atoms in the landmine explosives.For this purpose, improvements in the IECF were made by various methods to achieve a drastic enhancement of neutron yields of more than 10{sup 8} n/s in pulsed operation. This required R and D on the power source, as well as analysis of envisaged detection systems with multi-sensors. The results suggest promising and practical features for humanitarian landmine detection, particularly, in Afghanistan.

  18. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.F.; Blue, T.E. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-12-31

    For several years, research has been ongoing in the Ohio State University (OSU) Nuclear Engineering Program toward the development of an accelerator-based irradiation facility (ANIF) neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The ANIF, which is planned to be built in a hospital, has been conceptually designed and analyzed. After Qu, an OSU researcher, determined that the shielding design of a 6-MV X-ray treatment room was inadequate to protect personnel from an accelerator neutron source operating at 30 mA, we decided to analyze and determine the shielding requirements of a treatment room for an ANIF. We determined the amount of shielding that would be sufficient to protect facility personnel from excessive radiation exposure caused by operation of the accelerator at 30 mA.

  19. On the optimization of the isotopic neutron source method for measuring the thermal neutron absorption cross section: Advantages and disadvantages of BF 3 and 3He counters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A BOLEWSKIJR; M. Ciechanowski; A. Dydejczyk; A. Kreft

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the detector characteristics on the performance of an isotopic neutron source device for measuring thermal neutron absorption cross section (?) has been examined by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Three specific experimental arrangements, alternately with BF3 counters and 3He counters of the same sizes, have been modelled using the MCNP-4C code. Results of Monte Carlo calculations show

  20. Neutronics methods, models, and applications at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the advanced neutron source reactor three-element core design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. A. Wemple; B. G. Schnitzler; J. M. Ryskamp

    1995-01-01

    A summary of the methods and models used to perform neutronics analyses on the Advanced Neutron Source reactor three-element core design is presented. The applications of the neutral particle Monte Carlo code MCNP are detailed, as well as the expansion of the static role of MCNP to analysis of fuel cycle depletion calculations. Results to date of these applications are

  1. A portable measurement system for subcriticality measurements by the CF-source-driven neutron noise analysis method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. T. Mihalczo; G. E. Ragan; E. D. Blakeman

    1988-01-01

    A portable measurement system consisting of a personal computer used as a Fourier analyzer and three detection channels (with associated electronics that provide the signals to analog-to-digital (A\\/D) convertors) has been assembled to measure subcriticality by the ²⁵²Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method. The ²⁵²Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method for obtaining the subcritical neutron multiplication factor of a configuration of fissile

  2. Saturn Neutron Exosphere as Source for Inner and Innermost Radiation Belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John; Lipatov, Alexander; Sittler, Edward; Sturner, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Energetic proton and electron measurements by the ongoing Cassini orbiter mission are expanding our knowledge of the highest energy components of the Saturn magnetosphere in the inner radiation belt region after the initial discoveries of these belts by the Pioneer 11 and Voyager 2 missions. Saturn has a neutron exosphere that extends throughout the magnetosphere from the cosmic ray albedo neutron source at the planetary main rings and atmosphere. The neutrons emitted from these sources at energies respectively above 4 and 8 eV escape the Saturn system, while those at lower energies are gravitationally bound. The neutrons undergo beta decay in average times of about 1000 seconds to provide distributed sources of protons and electrons throughout Saturn's magnetosphere with highest injection rates close to the Saturn and ring sources. The competing radiation belt source for energetic electrons is rapid inward diffusion and acceleration of electrons from the middle magnetosphere and beyond. Minimal losses during diffusive transport across the moon orbits, e.g. of Mimas and Enceladus, and local time asymmetries in electron intensity, suggest that drift resonance effects preferentially boost the diffusion rates of electrons from both sources. Energy dependences of longitudinal gradient-curvature drift speeds relative to the icy moons are likely responsible for hemispheric differences (e.g., Mimas, Tethys) in composition and thermal properties as at least partly produced by radiolytic processes. A continuing mystery is the similar radial profiles of lower energy (<10 MeV) protons in the inner belt region. Either the source of these lower energy protons is also neutron decay, but perhaps alternatively from atmospheric albedo, or else all protons from diverse distributed sources are similarly affected by losses at the moon' orbits, e.g. because the proton diffusion rates are extremely low. Enceladus cryovolcanism, and radiolytic processing elsewhere on the icy moon and ring surfaces, are additional sources of protons via ionization and charge exchange from breakup of water molecules. But one must then account somehow for local acceleration to the observed keV-MeV energies, since moon sweeping and E-ring absorption would remove protons diffusing inward from the middle magnetosphere. Although the main rings block further inward diffusion from the inner radiation belts, the exospheric neutron-decay source, combined with much slower diffusion of protons relative to electrons, may produce an innermost radiation belt in the gap between the upper atmosphere and the D-ring. This innermost belt will first be explored in-situ during the final proximal orbits of the Cassini mission.

  3. Geometrical effects on thermal neutron reflection of hydrogenous moderators using 241Am-Be source.

    PubMed

    Akaho, E H; Jonah, S A; Dagadu, C P; Maakuu, B T; Adu, P S; Anim-Sampong, S; Kyere, A W

    2001-08-01

    The variation of thermal reflection parameter with thicknesses of water and paraffin moderators was measured using an instrument consisting of 1 Ci 241Am-Be isotopic neutron source and 3He neutron detector. Based on experimental data obtained from two different source-detector-sample geometries, analytical expressions were derived for calculation of reflection parameters for various moderator thicknesses. The measured data for the two geometries exhibit saturation curves with saturation achieved at about 8 and 16 cm when sample container was placed at top and side of the source holder, respectively. By locating the source holder along the vertical axis of the sample container, measurements showed that the reflection parameter was very sensitive with the axial location and was strongly dependent on the moderator and its thickness. PMID:11393757

  4. ALARA considerations for the whole body neutron irradiation facility source removal project at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Patrick T

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes the activities that were involved with the safe removal of fourteen PuBe sources from the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Whole Body Neutron Irradiation Facility (WBNIF). As part of a Department of Energy and BNL effort to reduce the radiological inventory, the WBNIF was identified as having no future use. In order to deactivate the facility and eliminate the need for nuclear safety management and long-term surveillance, it was decided to remove the neutron sources and dismantle the facility. In addition, the sources did not have DOT Special Form documentation so they would need to be encapsulated once removed for offsite storage or disposal. The planning and the administrative as well as engineering controls put in place enabled personnel to safely remove and encapsulate the sources while keeping exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). PMID:16404183

  5. Nonpulsation of QPOs and Galactic bulge neutron star X-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Meszaros, P.; Riffert, H.; Berthiaume, G.

    1988-02-01

    It is shown that general-relativistic (GR) light bending is extremely efficient in reducing below 1 percent the pulsed fraction of low magnetic field, small radius neutron stars. Such stars may be present in QPOs and Galactic bulge X-ray sources. 16 references.

  6. Development of manufacturing methods for 50-cm diameter neutron source targets for RTNS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, C.M.; Dini, J.W.; Ludemann, W.D.; Schumacher, B.J.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Kelley, W.K.; Harter, G.A.

    1981-06-01

    RTNS-II is an accelerator driven neutron source. It was attempted to produce a larger version of the current accelerator target but experienced problems in diffusion bonding and thermal stability of the copper alloy used for target fabrication. The causes of these problems were identified, and a new technique (electroforming) was demonstrated for fabricating targets.

  7. Preliminary fracture analysis of the core pressure boundary tube for the Advanced Neutron Source Research Reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. C. Schulz; G. T. Yahr

    1995-01-01

    The outer core pressure boundary tube (CPBT) of the Advanced neutron Source (ANS) reactor being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently specified as being composed of 6061-T6 aluminum. ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code fracture analysis rules for nuclear components are based on the use of ferritic steels; the expressions, tables, charts and equations were all developed from

  8. Rotating Neutron Stars as the Origin of the Pulsating Radio Sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Gold

    1968-01-01

    The constancy of frequency in the recently discovered pulsed radio sources can be accounted for by the rotation of a neutron star. Because of the strong magnetic fields and high rotation speeds, relativistic velocities will be set up in any plasma in the surrounding magnetosphere, leading to radiation in the pattern of a rotating beacon.

  9. A Fast Pulse, High Intensity Neutron Source Based Upon The Dense Plasma Focus

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, M.; Bures, B.; Madden, R.; Blobner, F.; Elliott, K. Wilson [Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation, 3077 Teagarden St., San Leandro, CA, 94577 (United States)

    2009-12-02

    Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation (AASC) has built a bench-top source of fast neutrons (approx10-30 ns, 2.45 MeV), that is portable and can be scaled to operate at approx100 Hz. The source is a Dense Plasma Focus driven by three different capacitor banks: a 40 J/30 kA/100 Hz driver; a 500 J/130 kA/2 Hz driver and a 3 kJ/350 kA/0.5 Hz driver. At currents of approx130 kA, this source produces approx1x10{sup 7} (DD) n/pulse. The neutron pulse widths are approx10-30 ns and may be controlled by adjusting the DPF electrode geometry and operating parameters. This paper describes the scaling of the fast neutron output with current from such a Dense Plasma Focus source. For each current and driver, different DPF head designs are required to match to the current rise-time, as the operating pressure and anode radius/shape are varied. Doping of the pure D{sub 2} gas fill with Ar or Kr was shown earlier to increase the neutron output. Results are discussed in the light of scaling laws suggested by prior literature.

  10. The Design and Performance of the Integrated Spallation Neutron Source Vacuum Control System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Tang; P. Ladd; D. Williams; J. Crandall

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) vacuum control systems have been developed within a collaboration of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Each participating lab is responsible for a different section of the machine: LBNL for the Front-End section, LANL for the warm LINAC section, TJNAF

  11. Commissioning of the Argonne Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS-I) Accelerator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antanas V. Rauchas; Franklin R. Brumwell; Gerald J. Volk

    1979-01-01

    The IPNS-I 500 MeV Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) was commissioned during March of 1977. It was originally designed as an injection energy booster for the Zero Gradient Synchrotron (ZGS), as well as a source of high intensity proton beams for neutron production. With the termination of the high intensity operation of the ZGS, the accelerator became a dedicated machine for

  12. The determination of a neutron source position in an unknown homogeneous medium: The planar case

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Dubinski; A. Talmor; O. Presler; A. Tshuva; I. Yaar; I. Orion; Z. B. Alfassi

    2005-01-01

    The possibility of localization of an unknown neutron source in various bulky homogeneous media (box) was studied. For the planar case, two 3He detectors on the opposite faces of the box were used. A constant polypropylene shield around the box and detectors was used to eliminate the varying contribution from the environment to increase count rates of the detectors and

  13. GDT-based neutron source with multiple-mirror end plugs

    SciTech Connect

    Beklemishev, A.; Anikeev, A.; Burdakov, A.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, I.; Postupaev, V.; Sinitsky, S. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-06-19

    We present a new linear trap to be built at the Budker Institute. It combines gasdynamictype central cell with sloshing ions for beam fusion and the multiple-mirror end plugs for improved axial confinement. Thus it is designed as an efficient neutron source and a testbed for future development of mirror-based fusion reactors.

  14. The Corrosion of Materials in Spallation Neutron Sources R. Scott Lillard, Darryl P. Butt

    E-print Network

    1 The Corrosion of Materials in Spallation Neutron Sources R. Scott Lillard, Darryl P. Butt Materials Corrosion and Environmental Effects Lab Materials Science and Technology Division, MST-6 Los current efforts to measure the real-time corrosion rates of Alloy 718 (718) during 800 MeV proton

  15. Leadgold eutectic: An alternative liquid target material candidate for high power spallation neutron sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marisa Medarde; Rainer Moormann; Ruggero Frison; Robert J. Pu?niak; Ekaterina Pomjakushina; Kazimierz Conder; Ernests Platacis; Yong Dai; Daniela Kiselev; Luca Zanini; Szabina Trk; Peter Zagyvai; Stephan Heinitz; Jrg Neuhausen; Dorothea Schumann; Knud Thomsen

    2011-01-01

    One of the main technical concerns of Megawatt-class spallation neutron sources is the removal of the heat deposited in the target station. A way to overcome it is to use targets consisting of flowing liquid metals, but the already tested materials mercury and leadbismuth eutectic (LBE) are not unproblematic. We show here that another eutectic alloy containing lead

  16. Design and Construction of the Ultracold Neutron Source at the NC State PULSTAR Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmquist, Grant R.

    An ultracold neutron (UCN) source using solid deuterium is being constructed at the 1MWPULSTAR nuclear reactor on the campus of North Carolina State University. The final stages of assembly and commissioning are underway. The overall design, status of construction, and benchmarking measurements are presented. The UCN source design is based on detailed simulations including MCNP, UCN transport Monte Carlo, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the cryogenic systems. The source will be useful for developing UCN technologies, including guides and detectors, and in support of current projects including measurements of neutron beta-decay asymmetry coefficients and the electric dipolemoment of the neutron. The facility will also be available for testing new techniques using UCN in material and surface physics, as well as new fundamental physics measurements such as neutron lifetime and beta decay measurements. The expected experimental density of UCN/cm3 in a storage volume will be competitive with currently available sources, including those at significantly more powerful reactors.

  17. Modeling and analysis of hydrogen detonation events in the advanced neutron source reactor containment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. P. Taleyarkhan; V. Georgevich; S. H. Kim; S. Valenti; D. B. Simpson; W. Sawruk

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes salient aspects of the modeling, analyses and evaluations for hydrogen detonation in selected regions of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) containment during hypothetical severe accident conditions. Shock wave generation and transport modeling and analyses were conducted for two stratified configurations in the dome region of the high bay. Principal tools utilized for these purposes were the CTH

  18. Coherent Scattering Investigations at the Spallation Neutron Source: a Snowmass White Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Akimov, D. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI), Russia] Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI), Russia; Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); BarbeauP., [Duke University; Barton, P. J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Bolozdynya, A. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI), Russia] Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI), Russia; Cabrera-Palmer, B. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Cavanna, F. [Yale University] Yale University; Cianciolo, Vince [ORNL] ORNL; Collar, J. [University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institute] University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institute; Cooper, R. J. [Indiana University] Indiana University; Dean, D. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Efremenko, Yuri [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Etenko, A. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI), Russia] Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI), Russia; Fields, N. [University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institute] University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institute; Foxe, M. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA] Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Figueroa-Feliciano, E. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Fomin, N. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Gallmeier, F. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Garishvili, I. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Gerling, M. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Green, M. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill] University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Greene, Geoffrey [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hatzikoutelis, A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Henning, Reyco [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill] University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Hix, R. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Hogan, D. [University of California-Berkeley] University of California-Berkeley; Hornback, D. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jovanovic, I. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA] Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Hossbach, T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Iverson, Erik B [ORNL] ORNL; Klein, S. R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Khromov, A. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI), Russia] Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI), Russia; Link, J. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Louis, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lu, W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Mauger, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Marleau, P. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Markoff, D. [North Carolina Central University, Durham] North Carolina Central University, Durham; Martin, R. D. [University of South Dakota] University of South Dakota; Mueller, Paul Edward [ORNL] ORNL; Newby, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Orrell, John L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); O'Shaughnessy, C. [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill] University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, provides an intense flux of neutrinos in the few tens-of-MeV range, with a sharply-pulsed timing structure that is beneficial for background rejection. In this white paper, we describe how the SNS source can be used for a measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CENNS), and the physics reach of different phases of such an experimental program (CSI: Coherent Scattering Investigations at the SNS).

  19. An Ultracold Neutron Source for TRIUMF 4th Draft #

    E-print Network

    Martin, Jeff

    be confined in material bottles # This document will be updated as more information becomes available. 1 #12 sources are un der development at various laboratories (see Table 1). TRIUMF would be competetive with the Location Technology critical energy storage time limiting density E c (neV) # s (s) # UCN (UCN/cm 3

  20. The determination of reactor neutron spectrum-averaged cross-sections in miniature neutron source reactor facility.

    PubMed

    Jonah, S A; Ibrahim, Y V; Akaho, E H K

    2008-10-01

    A comparator method based on the resonance integral of (197)Au(n,gamma)(198)Au reaction has been used to determine fast neutron spectrum-averaged cross-section data of some dosimetry reactions in a miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR) facility. Target materials of low- and medium-mass nuclei, which are of interest in reactor dosimetry and NAA were investigated. Irradiation was performed under Cd cover in an inner irradiation channel of the Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1) currently fueled with highly enriched uranium (HEU). Spectrum-averaged cross-section data were calculated on the basis of the epithermal neutron flux monitored by the Al-0.1%Au foil irradiated along with the target materials. Results of (n,p) reaction on (27)Al, (28)Si, (29)Si, (46)Ti, (47)Ti, (56)Fe, (58)Ni, and (n,alpha) reaction on (30)Si were found to be in good agreement with recommended data within standard deviation. However, data obtained for the (27)Al(n,alpha) (24)Na and (64)Zn (n,p) (64)Cu reactions using the Al-0.1%Au foil as the flux monitor for both the comparator approach and the conventional method are higher than recommended data from the literature by over 25%. PMID:18534860

  1. Study of boron neutron capture therapy used neutron source with protons bombarding a thick 9Be target.

    PubMed

    Yue, G; Chen, J; Song, R

    1997-06-01

    Neutron sources created by 4-, 3.5-, and 3-MeV protons striking a thick beryllium target were studied via the time-of-flight technique. Protons were accelerated by the Peking University 4.5 MV electrostatic accelerator. Two disk-shaped 9Be targets with thickness 1.5 and 3 mm were used in the measurements. The time-of-flight spectra were observed at zero degrees with respect to the incident proton beam. The analysis to these time-of-flight spectra is given. The time-of-flight spectra were converted to the energy spectra and compared to a neutron spectrum of 7Li(p, n)7 Be reaction with incident energy 2.5 MeV, which was also measured in this work. Restricted by the spectrometer itself, the threshold of the measurements is 400 keV. The results show that by using several MeV protons bombarding a thick beryllium target, reactions other than 9Be(p, n)9B produce significant contributions to the neutron yield with energy less than 1 MeV. PMID:9198018

  2. High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Paul, M.; Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I.

    2013-04-01

    A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

  3. INEL and ISU BNCT research using a 2 MeV RFQ-based neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Harker, Y.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A radio frequency quadrapole (RFQ) proton linear accelerator manufactured by AccSys Corp. was purchased by the U.S. Department of Energy and was installed in the Particle Beam Laboratory at Idaho State University (ISU). It is available for physics studies consistent with the INEL mission such as those related to accelerator produced neutron sources for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). It is an AccSys model PL-1 and is designed to produce 2 MeV protons at an average current of 150{mu}A. The overall objective of the INEL BNCT/ISU collaborative program is to evaluate neutron filter design concepts which use a 2 MeV proton accelerator with a lithium target as the neutron source. This paper will discuss the overall plan of INEL/ISU collaborative program and how it relates to other university and government laboratory studies, the methods being employed in this study and results of neutron spectra and angular distribution measurements for different lithium target configurations.

  4. High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target

    SciTech Connect

    Halfon, S. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Feinberg, G. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel)

    2013-04-19

    A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

  5. Monte Carlo Simulations of the Response of Shielded SNM to a Pulsed Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury; D.L. Chichester

    2010-08-01

    Active interrogation (AI) has been used as a technique for the detection and identification of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) for both proposed and field-tested systems. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been studying this technique for systems ranging from small systems employing portable electronic neutron generators (ENGs) 1 to larger systems employing linear accelerators as high-energy photon sources for assessment of vehicles and cargo2. In order to assess the feasibility of new systems, INL has undertaken a campaign of Monte Carlo simulations of the response of a variety of masses of SNM in multiple shielding configurations to a pulsed neutron source using the MCNPX3 code, with emphasis on the neutron and photon response of the system as a function of time after the initial neutron pulse. We present here some preliminary results from these calculations. 1. D.L. Chichester and E.H. Seabury, Using Electronic Neutron Generators in Active Interrogation to Detect Shielded Nuclear Material, IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science 56 (2009) pp 441-447. 2. J.L. Jones et al., Photonuclear-based, nuclear material detection system for cargo containers, Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B 241 (2005) pp 770-776. 3. D.B. Pelowitz, MCNPXTM Users Manual version 2.6.0, Los Alamos National Laboratory Report LA-CP-07-1473 (2008).

  6. INEL and ISU BNCT research using a 2 MeV RFQ-based neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harker, Y. D.; Harmon, J. F.; Irwin, G. W.

    1995-05-01

    A radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) proton linear accelerator manufactured by AccSys Corp. was purchased by the U.S. Department of Energy and was installed in the Particle Beam Laboratory at Idaho State University (ISU). It is available for physics studies consistent with the INEL mission such as those related to accelerator produced neutron sources for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and waste interrogation. It is an AccSys model PL-1 and is designed to produce 2 MeV protons at an average current of 150 ?A. The overall objective of the INEL BNCT/ISU collaborative program is to evaluate neutron filter design concepts which use a 2 MeV proton accelerator with a lithium target as the neutron source. This paper will discuss the overall plan of INEL/ISU collaborative program and how it relates to other university and government laboratory studies, the methods being employed in this study and results of neutron spectra and angular distribution measurements for different lithium target configurations.

  7. An irradiation facility for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy application based on a radio frequency driven D-T neutron source and a new beam shaping assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerullo, Nicola; Esposito, Juan; Leung, Ka Ngo; Custodero, Salvatore

    2002-10-01

    A line of the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) research program aimed at the treatment of brain tumors, carried on at the Nuclear Departments of Pisa and Genova Universities (DIMNP and DITEC), is being focused on a new, 3H(d,n)4He (D-T), accelerator-based neutron source concept, developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Simple and compact accelerator designs, using mixed D+ T+ ion beam with relatively low energy, 100 keV, have been developed which, in turn, can generate high neutron yields. New approaches have thus been started to design an epithermal neutron irradiation facility able to selectively slow the 14.1 MeV D-T neutrons down to the epithermal (1 eV-10 KeV) energy range. New neutron spectrum shifter and filtering materials, as well as different facility layout approaches have been tested. Possible beam shaping assembly models have also been designed. The research demonstrates that a D-T neutron source could be successfully implemented to provide a 1109 n/cm2 s epithermal neutron flux, in spite of its hard spectrum, although a generator device, able to yield 1014 n/s is, at present, not yet available. The latest Monte Carlo simulation of an accelerator-based facility, which relies on a single or multiple rf driven DT fusion neutron generator, is presented.

  8. IPNS neutron scattering instrumentation: A -- Existing and planned; B -- Possibilities for IPNS upgrade, a 1-MW spallation source

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.; Crawford, K.

    1994-12-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) is a pulsed spallation neutron source located at Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago, Illinois in the US. This facility is the outgrowth of a long line of pioneering work on pulsed spallation neutron sources begun at Argonne in the early 1970s. IPNS uses protons accelerated in the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron to produce neutrons via the spallation process (effectively a nuclear evaporation in which 10--50 neutrons are released per incident proton) in a heavy-element target. These neutrons are then moderated to produce spectra peaked at thermal or subthermal energies, and directed into beams which serve a variety of instruments. This paper discusses the diffractometers, various spectrometers, and reflectometers in existence and those planned for the upgrade of the IPNS.

  9. Compact Short-Pulsed Electron Linac Based Neutron Sources for Precise Nuclear Material Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Tagi, K.; Matsuyama, D.; Fujiwara, T.; Dobashi, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Harada, H.

    2015-10-01

    An X-band (11.424GHz) electron linac as a neutron source for nuclear data study for the melted fuel debris analysis and nuclear security in Fukushima is under development. Originally we developed the linac for Compton scattering X-ray source. Quantitative material analysis and forensics for nuclear security will start several years later after the safe settlement of the accident is established. For the purpose, we should now accumulate more precise nuclear data of U, Pu, etc., especially in epithermal (0.1-10 eV) neutrons. Therefore, we have decided to modify and install the linac in the core space of the experimental nuclear reactor "Yayoi" which is now under the decommission procedure. Due to the compactness of the X-band linac, an electron gun, accelerating tube and other components can be installed in a small space in the core. First we plan to perform the time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurement for study of total cross sections of the nuclei for 0.1-10 eV energy neutrons. Therefore, if we adopt a TOF line of less than 10m, the o-pulse length of generated neutrons should be shorter than 100 ns. Electronenergy, o-pulse length, power, and neutron yield are ~30 MeV, 100 ns - 1 micros, ~0.4 kW, and ~1011 n/s (~103 n/cm2/s at samples), respectively. Optimization of the design of a neutron target (Ta, W, 238U), TOF line and neutron detector (Ce:LiCAF) of high sensitivity and fast response is underway. We are upgrading the electron gun and a buncher to realize higher current and beam power with a reasonable beam size in order to avoid damage of the neutron target. Although the neutron flux is limited in case of the X-band electron linac based source, we take advantage of its short pulse aspect and availability for nuclear data measurement with a short TOF system. First, we form a tentative configuration in the current experimental room for Compton scattering in 2014. Then, after the decommissioning has been finished, we move it to the "Yayoi" room and perform the operation and measurement.

  10. Flux stabilization in neutron problems with fixed sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tomatis, D.; Dall'Osso, A. [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA, 92084 Paris La Defense Cedex (France)

    2012-07-01

    Although critical core calculations are the most common in design and safety analysis, fixed source calculations are needed for specific applications, e.g. to compute ex-core detector response functions, to develop new methodologies for dilution and reload error accidents and more in general for all situations involving sub-critical shut-down states. It is well known that the source problem becomes difficult to be solved with core configuration close to criticality, i.e. with the multiplication factor approaching unity, for the occurrence of numerical ill-conditioning and very high number of iterations, possibly leading to failure in the flux convergence. In this work, the Wielandt Eigen-shift technique used in iterative methods of critical problems is developed for source problems too, in order to stabilize the solution. The mathematical basis and the proof of the convergence are discussed. Compared to the existing methods, this technique allows also more control to avoid singular behavior at inner iterations. Numerical tests with a 1D analytical benchmark are reported to prove the robustness of the technique. (authors)

  11. Research and Development of the Humanitarian Landmine Detection System by a Compact Fusion Neutron Source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kiyoshi Yoshikawa; Kai Masuda; Teruhisa Takamatsu; Yasushi Yamamoto; Hisayuki Toku; Takeshi Fujimoto; Eiki Hotta; Kunihito Yamauchi; Masami Ohnishi; Hodaka Osawa; Seiji Shiroya; Tsuyoshi Misawa; Yoshiyuki Takahashi; Yoshikazu Kubo; Toshiro Doi

    2009-01-01

    A 5 year task is described on the research and development of the advanced humanitarian landmine detection system by using a compact discharge-type fusion neutron source called IECF (Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement fusion) device and 3 dual sensors made of BGO and NaI. With 107 D-D neutrons\\/s stably produced in steady-state mode, H-2.2 MeV, N-5.3, 10.8 MeV, gamma rays from (n, gamma)

  12. Determination of the average neutron activation cross section with an annular-shaped 241 Am\\/Be neutron source and a Nal(T1) detector for the 27 Al (n,p)27 Mg-reaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Rieppo

    1984-01-01

    The average neutron activation cross section was determined with an annular-shaped 241 Am\\/Be neutron source and an Nal(T1) detector. The calculated average neutron flux in the center of the cavity space of the source is used with the experimental data to give the average neutron activation cross section for the 27Al(n,p)27Mg reaction. The mean value of the measured neutron activation

  13. Experiments with Gravitationally-bound Ultracold Neutrons at the European Spallation Source ESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenke, Tobias; Abele, Hartmut

    Experiments with gravitationally-bound ultracold neutrons have made substantial progress in the last decade. They have been contributing to answer scientific questions ranging from gravity tests at micron distances, the direct search for dark matter particles as axions, and dark energy realizations. Comparing the present accuracy of around 10-14 eV - achieved with a gravity resonance spectroscopy technique - with the by many orders of magnitude expected smaller size of inevitable systematic errors, one may conclude that the present experiments are heavily restricted by the limited strength of today's ultracold neutron (UCN) sources. We propose to build a dedicated UCN source at the European Spallation Source in order to perform experiments with gravitationally-bound UCN.

  14. Experimental determination of the thermal neutron flux around two different types of high intensity 252Cf sources.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, B; Maughan, R L; Yudelev, M; Kota, C; Wanwilairat, S

    1999-01-01

    The application of neutron emitting radioisotopes in brachytherapy facilitates the use of the higher biological effectiveness of neutrons compared to photons in treating some cancers. Different types of high intensity 252Cf sources are in use for the treatment of different cancers. To improve the therapy of bulky tumors the dose can be augmented by the additional use of the boron capture reaction of thermal neutrons. This requires information about the thermal neutron dose component around the Cf source. In this work, a Mg/Ar-ionization chamber internally coated with 10B was used to measure the thermal neutrons. These measurements were performed on two different 252Cf sources, one in use in the Gershenson Radiation Oncology Center at Harper Hospital in Detroit, MI, and one at the University Hospital of Chiang Mai in Chiang Mai, Thailand. The results of these measurements are compared and indicate that the differences in the construction of the sources influence the thermal dose component. PMID:9949402

  15. Low-energy beam transport studies supporting the spallation neutron source 1-MW beam operationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, B. X.; Kalvas, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M. P.

    2012-02-01

    The H- injector consisting of a cesium enhanced RF-driven ion source and a 2-lens electrostatic low-energy beam transport (LEBT) system supports the spallation neutron source 1 MW beam operation with 38 mA beam current in the linac at 60 Hz with a pulse length of up to 1.0 ms. In this work, two important issues associated with the low-energy beam transport are discussed: (1) inconsistent dependence of the post-radio frequency quadrupole accelerator beam current on the ion source tilt angle and (2) high power beam losses on the LEBT electrodes under some off-nominal conditions compromising their reliability.

  16. Research and Development of Compact Neutron Sources based on Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Kai; Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi; Nagasaki, Kazunobu [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Takamatsu, Teruhisa; Fujimoto, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Tomoya; Kajiwara, Taiju [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Shiroya, Seiji; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2009-03-10

    Recent progress is described in the research and development of an inertial-electrostatic confinement fusion (IECF) device. Use of a water-cooling jacket with non-uniform thickness shows promising success for landmine detection application, such as effective channeling of neutron flux toward the target and a very stable dc yield in excess of 10{sup 7} D-D neutrons/sec. Addition of an ion source to the conventional glow-discharge-driven IECF enhances the converging deuterium ion energy distribution by allowing a lower operating gas pressure. Improvement in normalized neutron yield, which corresponds to the fusion cross-section averaged over the device radius, by a factor often has been observed.

  17. IFMIF, a fusion relevant neutron source for material irradiation current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, J.; Chel, S.; Fischer, U.; Groeschel, F.; Heidinger, R.; Ibarra, A.; Micciche, G.; Mslang, A.; Sugimoto, M.; Wakai, E.

    2014-10-01

    The d-Li based International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) will provide a high neutron intensity neutron source with a suitable neutron spectrum to fulfil the requirements for testing and qualifying fusion materials under fusion reactor relevant irradiation conditions. The IFMIF project, presently in its Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activities (EVEDA) phase under the Broader Approach (BA) Agreement between Japan Government and EURATOM, aims at the construction and testing of the most challenging facility sub-systems, such as the first accelerator stage, the Li target and loop, and irradiation test modules, as well as the design of the entire facility, thus to be ready for the IFMIF construction with a clear understanding of schedule and cost at the termination of the BA mid-2017. The paper reviews the IFMIF facility and its principles, and reports on the status of the EVEDA activities and achievements.

  18. Plasma focus sources: Supplement to the neutron resonance radiography workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Nardi, V.; Brzosko, J.

    1989-01-01

    Since their discovery, plasma focus discharges have been recognized as very intense pulsed sources of deuterium-deuterium (D-D) or deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion-reaction neutrons, with outstanding capabilities. Specifically, the total neutron emission/shot, YN, and the rate of neutron emission, Y/sub n/, of an optimized plasma focus (PF) are higher than the corresponding quantities observed in any other type of pinched discharge at the same level of powering energy W/sub 0/. Recent developments have led to the concept and experimental demonstration of an Advanced Plasma Focus System (APF) that consists of a Mather-geometry plasma focus in which field distortion elements (FDEs) are inserted in the inter-electrode gap for increasing the neutron yield/shot, Y/sub n/. The FDE-induced redistribution of the plasma current increases Y/sub n/ by a factor approx. =5-10 above the value obtained without FDEs under otherwise identical conditions of operation of the plasma focus. For example, an APF that is fed by a fast capacitor bank with an energy, W/sub 0/ = 6kJ, and voltage, V/sub 0/ = 16.5 kV provides Y/sub n/ /congruent/ 4 /times/ 10/sup 9/ D-D neutrons/shot (pure D/sub 2/ filling) and Y/sub n/ = 4 /times/ 10/sup 11/ D-T neutrons/shot (filling is 50% deuterium and 50% tritium). The FDE-induced increase of Y/sub n/ for fixed values of (W/sub 0/, V/sub 0/), the observed scaling law Y/sub n/ /proportional to/ W/sub 0//sup 2/ for optimized plasma focus systems, and our experience with neutron scattering in bulk objects lead us to the conclusion that we can use an APF as a source of high-intensity neutron pulses (10/sup 14/ n/pulse) in the field off neutron radiography (surface and bulk) with a nanosecond or millisecond time resolution.

  19. Development of high-intensity deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-trittium neutron sources and neutron filters for medical and industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbeke, Jerome Maurice

    This thesis consists of three main parts. The first part is related to boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), the second part to boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS), and the third part to the neutron generator development. A monoenergetic neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the most suitable neutron energy for treatment of shallow and deep-seated brain tumors in the context of BNCT. Two figures-of-merit---the absorbed skin dose and the absorbed tumor dose at a given depth in the brain---are used to measure the neutron beam quality. Based on the results of this study, moderators, reflectors and delimiters are designed and optimized to moderate the high-energy neutrons from the fusion reactions D-D and D-T down to a suitable energy spectrum. Two different computational models have been used to study the dose distribution in the brain. A monoenergetic neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the optimal neutron energy for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Two figures-of-merit are used to measure the neutron beam quality, the ratio of the synovium absorbed dose to the skin absorbed dose, and the ratio of the synovium absorbed dose to the bone absorbed dose. It was found that thermal neutron beams are optimal for treatment. Computation of the dose distribution in the knee requires the simulation of particle transport from the neutron source to the knee phantom through the moderator. The third part describes the development of high-intensity D-D and D-T neutron generators. Thick target neutron yield computations have been performed to estimate the neutron yield of titanium and scandium targets. With an average deuteron beam current of 1 A and an energy of 120 keV, a neutron production of about 1014 n/s can be estimated for a tritiated target. In mixed deuteron/triton beam operation, a beam current of 2 A at 150 keV is required for the same neutron output. Despite this lower neutron production, this mode of operation is advantageous because the target lifetime can be increased from a few hours to more than 1000 h. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  20. Evaluation of a moderator assembly for an accelerator based epithermal neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, T.E. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Previously, the authors have evaluated a moderator/reflector assembly design for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility (AENIF) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) on the basis of parameters which are calculated in air. Beam design for BNCT is evolving from being based on beam parameters in air to being based on beam parameters in head phantoms. It has been recognized for some time that beam parameters in air lack clinical relevance. However, more clinically relevant parameters based on biological effects in patients` heads, besides being complicated (through their dependence on absorbed dose distributions) by their dependence on head dimensions, necessarily incorporate factors relating absorbed doses in tissues to biological effects. These factors, such as RBE`s and compound factors were, in the judgment of most beam designers, not known in the past with sufficient accuracy to justify the added complexity of basing beam designs on parameters based on dose distributions in head phantoms. In this paper, the authors discuss the basis for their design of an epithermal neutron field for an accelerator source of neutrons for BNCT. In their presentation, they discuss development of a spectrum-dependent neutron normal-tissue RBE which is normalized to RBE measurements in dogs. They also review the treatment planning methodology of Gahbauer and discuss how this treatment planning methodology is modified and merged with their spectrum-dependent neutron normal-tissue RBE to create a beam design methodology with beam optimization parameters which account for the effects of fractionation and neutron flux energy spectra. Finally, they discuss the application of their beam design methodology and beam optimization parameters to the analysis of the combinations of moderator and reflector materials and thicknesses that they evaluated previously on the basis of parameters which were calculated in air.

  1. Reaction rates for the s-process neutron source 22Ne+?

    E-print Network

    Richard Longland; Christian Iliadis; Amanda I. Karakas

    2012-06-18

    The 22Ne({\\alpha},n)25Mg reaction is an important source of neutrons for the s-process. In massive stars responsible for the weak component of the s-process, 22Ne({\\alpha},n)25Mg is the dominant source of neutrons, both during core helium burning and in shell carbon burning. For the main s-process component produced in Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars, the 13C({\\alpha},n)16O reaction is the dominant source of neutrons operating during the interpulse period, with the 22Ne+{\\alpha} source affecting mainly the s-process branchings during a thermal pulse. Rate uncertainties in the competing 22Ne({\\alpha},n)25Mg and 22Ne({\\alpha},{\\gamma})26Mg reactions result in large variations of s-process nucleosynthesis. Here, we present up-to-date and statistically rigorous 22Ne+{\\alpha} reaction rates using recent experimental results and Monte Carlo sampling. Our new rates are used in post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations both for massive stars and AGB stars. We demonstrate that the nucleosynthesis uncertainties arising from the new rates are dramatically reduced in comparison to previously published results, but several ambiguities in the present data must still be addressed. Recommendations for further study to resolve these issues are provided.

  2. Computer simulations for rf design of a Spallation Neutron Source external antenna H{sup -} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. W.; Kang, Y. W.; Shin, K.; Welton, R. F. [Spallation Neutron Source, ORNL, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Goulding, R. H. [Fusion Energy Division, ORNL, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Electromagnetic modeling of the multicusp external antenna H{sup -} ion source for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been performed in order to optimize high-power performance. During development of the SNS external antenna ion source, antenna failures due to high voltage and multicusp magnet holder rf heating concerns under stressful operating conditions led to rf characteristics analysis. In rf simulations, the plasma was modeled as an equivalent lossy metal by defining conductivity as {sigma}. Insulation designs along with material selections such as ferrite and Teflon could be included in the computer simulations to compare antenna gap potentials, surface power dissipations, and input impedance at the operating frequencies, 2 and 13.56 MHz. Further modeling and design improvements are outlined in the conclusion.

  3. Phase 1 environmental report for the Advanced Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Blasing, T.J.; Brown, R.A.; Cada, G.F.; Easterly, C.; Feldman, D.L.; Hagan, C.W.; Harrington, R.M.; Johnson, R.O.; Ketelle, R.H.; Kroodsma, R.L.; McCold, L.N.; Reich, W.J.; Scofield, P.A.; Socolof, M.L.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Van Dyke, J.W.

    1992-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed the construction and operation of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), a 330-MW(f) reactor, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support neutron scattering and nuclear physics experiments. ANS would provide a steady-state source of neutrons that are thermalized to produce sources of hot, cold, and very coal neutrons. The use of these neutrons in ANS experiment facilities would be an essential component of national research efforts in basic materials science. Additionally, ANS capabilities would include production of transplutonium isotopes, irradiation of potential fusion and fission reactor materials, activation analysis, and production of medical and industrial isotopes such as {sup 252}Cf. Although ANS would not require licensing by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), DOE regards the design, construction, and operation of ANS as activities that would produce a licensable facility; that is, DOE is following the regulatory guidelines that NRC would apply if NRC were licensing the facility. Those guidelines include instructions for the preparation of an environmental report (ER), a compilation of available data and preliminary analyses regarding the environmental impacts of nuclear facility construction and operation. The ER, described and outlined in NRC Regulatory Guide 4.2, serves as a background document to facilitate the preparation of environmental impact statements (EISs). Using Regulatory Guide 4.2 as a model, this ANS ER provides analyses and information specific to the ANS site and area that can be adopted (and modified, if necessary) for the ANS EIS. The ER is being prepared in two phases. Phase 1 ER includes many of the data and analyses needed to prepare the EIS but does not include data or analyses of alternate sites or alternate technologies. Phase 2 ER will include the additional data and analyses stipulated by Regulatory Guide 4.2.

  4. Optimization of a moderator assembly for use in an accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey Earl Woollard

    1997-01-01

    In this dissertation, the development and application of in-phantom neutron field optimization parameters for use in evaluating neutron fields for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is presented. These parameters are based on dose rate distributions in a head phantom and include the effects of fractionation and an energy dependent normal-tissue neutron RBE. As a step in the development of these

  5. The Argonne ACWL, a potential accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, G.E.; Yule, T.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Zhou, X.L. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The CWDD (Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator) accelerator was designed to accelerate 80 mA cw of D{sup {minus}} to 7.5 MeV. Most of the hardware for the first 2 MeV was installed at Argonne and major subsystems had been commissioned when program funding from the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization ended in October 1993. Renamed the Argonne Continuous Wave Linac (ACWL), we are proposing to complete it to accelerate either deuterons to 2 MeV or protons to 33.5 MeV. Equipped with a beryllium or other light-element target, it would make a potent source of neutrons (on the order of 10{sup 13} n/s) for BNCT and/or neutron radiography. Project status and proposals for turning ACWL into a neutron source are reviewed, including the results of a computational study that was carried out to design a target/moderator to produce an epithermal neutron beam for BNCT.

  6. The Argonne ACWL, a potential accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, G.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The CWDD (Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator) accelerator was designed to accelerate 80 mA cw of D{sup {minus}} to 7.5 MeV. Most of the hardware for the first 2 MeV was installed at Argonne and major subsystems had been commissioned when program funding from the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization ended in October 1993. Renamed the Argonne Continuous Wave Linac (ACWL) to emphasize its new mission, the authors are proposing to complete it to accelerate either deuterons to 2 MeV or protons to 3-3.5 MeV. Equipped with a beryllium or other light-element target, it would make a potent source of neutrons (on the order of 10{sup 13} n/s) for BNCT and/or neutron radiography. Project status and proposals for turning ACWL into a neutron source will be reviewed, including the results of a computational study that was carried out to design a target/moderator to produce an epithermal neutron beam for BNCT.

  7. Self characterization of a coded aperture array for neutron source imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volegov, P. L.; Danly, C. R.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F. E.; Wilde, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is an important diagnostic tool for measuring the two-dimensional size and shape of the neutrons produced in the burning deuterium-tritium plasma during the stagnation stage of inertial confinement fusion implosions. Since the neutron source is small (100 ?m) and neutrons are deeply penetrating (>3 cm) in all materials, the apertures used to achieve the desired 10-?m resolution are 20-cm long, triangular tapers machined in gold foils. These gold foils are stacked to form an array of 20 apertures for pinhole imaging and three apertures for penumbral imaging. These apertures must be precisely aligned to accurately place the field of view of each aperture at the design location, or the location of the field of view for each aperture must be measured. In this paper we present a new technique that has been developed for the measurement and characterization of the precise location of each aperture in the array. We present the detailed algorithms used for this characterization and the results of reconstructed sources from inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments at NIF.

  8. Self characterization of a coded aperture array for neutron source imaging.

    PubMed

    Volegov, P L; Danly, C R; Fittinghoff, D N; Guler, N; Merrill, F E; Wilde, C H

    2014-12-01

    The neutron imaging system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is an important diagnostic tool for measuring the two-dimensional size and shape of the neutrons produced in the burning deuterium-tritium plasma during the stagnation stage of inertial confinement fusion implosions. Since the neutron source is small (?100 ?m) and neutrons are deeply penetrating (>3 cm) in all materials, the apertures used to achieve the desired 10-?m resolution are 20-cm long, triangular tapers machined in gold foils. These gold foils are stacked to form an array of 20 apertures for pinhole imaging and three apertures for penumbral imaging. These apertures must be precisely aligned to accurately place the field of view of each aperture at the design location, or the location of the field of view for each aperture must be measured. In this paper we present a new technique that has been developed for the measurement and characterization of the precise location of each aperture in the array. We present the detailed algorithms used for this characterization and the results of reconstructed sources from inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments at NIF. PMID:25554292

  9. Evaluation of D(d,n) 3 He reaction neutron source models for BNCT irradiation system design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    YAO Ze'en; LUO Peng; Tooru KOBAYASHI; Gerard BENGUA

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical method was developed to calculate the yield, energy spectrum and angular distribution of neutrons from D(d,n)3 He (D-D) reaction in a thick deuterium-titanium target for incident deuterons in energies lower than 1.0MeV. The data of energy spectrum and angular distribution were applied to set up the neutron source model for the beam-shaping-assembly (BSA) design of Boron-Neutron-Capture-Therapy (BNCT) using

  10. Design and simulation of a neutron source based on an electron linear accelerator for BNCT of skin melanoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ali Pazirandeh; Ali Torkamani; Ali Taheri

    2011-01-01

    The PNS project is devoted to the design and simulation of a Photo-Neutron Source for BNCT using a Varian 2300C\\/D electron accelerator. This paper describes the production of the high-energy gamma-rays followed by neutron production in (gamma,n) reaction. To optimize the whole setup and maximize the neutron flux, the FLUKA code is employed to simulate the system. The results show

  11. Relativistic neutron fireball from a supernova explosion as a possible source of chiral effect. The role of bremsstrahlung photons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. A. Gusev; V. A. Tsarev

    2007-01-01

    We develop the idea, proposed earlier, of a possible role of neutrons, released in a supernova (SN) explosion, as a source\\u000a of polarized electrons that cause chiral asymmetry of organic molecules in interstellar gas-dust clouds. The neutrons are\\u000a carried away from the dense SN shell by a relativistic neutron fireball with Lorentz factor ? of order 100. At the early

  12. Study of an External Neutron Source for an Accelerator-Driven System using the PHITS Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Takanori; Iwasaki, Tomohiko; Chiba, Takashi

    2005-05-01

    A code system for the Accelerator Driven System (ADS) has been under development for analyzing dynamic behaviors of a subcritical core coupled with an accelerator. This code system named DSE (Dynamics calculation code system for a Subcritical system with an External neutron source) consists of an accelerator part and a reactor part. The accelerator part employs a database, which is calculated by using PHITS, for investigating the effect related to the accelerator such as the changes of beam energy, beam diameter, void generation, and target level. This analysis method using the database may introduce some errors into dynamics calculations since the neutron source data derived from the database has some errors in fitting or interpolating procedures. In this study, the effects of various events are investigated to confirm that the method based on the database is appropriate.

  13. A search for ultra-high energy neutron point sources with the Auger surface detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shih-Ho

    A thorough blind search for point sources of the entire exposed sky, and a stacked targeted search across ten Galactic stellar object target sets, are conducted with the Pierre Auger surface detector data. Theses two analyses reveal no evidence of statistically significant excess of events in any small solid angle that would be indicative of a flux of EeV neutrons from a discrete source. The search covers from -90 to +15 in declination for energy ranges of 1-2 EeV, 2-3 EeV, E ? 3 EeV, and E ? 1 EeV. In addition, the flux upper limits on the neutron flux, for the four energy ranges, are derived for a dense grid of directions covering the entire exposed sky. These results contrain scenarios for the production of Galactic ultra-high energy cosmic rays.

  14. Performance of the solid deuterium ultra-cold neutron source at the pulsed reactor TRIGA Mainz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karch, J.; Sobolev, Yu.; Beck, M.; Eberhardt, K.; Hampel, G.; Heil, W.; Kieser, R.; Reich, T.; Trautmann, N.; Ziegner, M.

    2014-04-01

    The performance of the solid deuterium ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source at the pulsed reactor TRIGA Mainz with a maximum peak energy of 10MJ is described. The solid deuterium converter with a volume of cm3 (8mol), which is exposed to a thermal neutron fluence of n/cm2, delivers up to 240000 UCN ( m/s) per pulse outside the biological shield at the experimental area. UCN densities of 10 cm3 are obtained in stainless-steel bottles of 10 L. The measured UCN yields compare well with the predictions from a Monte Carlo simulation developed to model the source and to optimize its performance for the upcoming upgrade of the TRIGA Mainz into a user facility for UCN physics.

  15. The second generation superthermal Ultra-Cold Neutron Source at RCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Edgard; Masuda, Yasuhiro; Kawasaki, Shinsuke; Jeong, Sun Chan; Watanabe, Yutaka; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Matsumiya, Ryohei; Shin, Yun Chang; Matsuta, Kensaku; Mihara, Mototsugu

    2014-09-01

    The project of a second generation superthermal ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source is currently going on at RCNP, Osaka University, Japan. It is aiming to produce the world's highest density of polarized UCNs using down-scattering of spallation-produced and moderated cold neutrons in superfluid helium (He-II) at 0.6 K. This project is developed in collaboration between KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) and RCNP. The first generation UCN source was using a vertical extraction and was optimized from 2002 to 2012 to increase its density of UCN from 0.7 UCN/cc to 26 UCN/cc. We have built a second generation UCN source which use a horizontal extraction system thanks to the energy boost induced by the field of a superconducting polarizer magnet (SCM). The SCM allows only one spin state to pass through, which make our UCN source a source of polarized UCN. Polarization is kept thanks to new UCN guides. The first experimental results, the performances and the future improvements of this second generation source will be presented in this talk.

  16. The Mission and Technology of a Gas Dynamic Trap Neutron Source for Fusion Material and Component Testing and Qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Simonen, T C

    2009-07-17

    This report summarizes discussions and conclusions of the workshop to 'Assess The Mission and Technology of a Gas Dynamic Trap Neutron Source for Fusion Material and Component Testing and Qualification'. The workshop was held at LBNL, Berkeley, CA on March 12, 2009. Most workshop attendees have worked on magnetic mirror systems, several have worked on similar neutron source designs, and others are knowledgeable of materials, fusion component, and neutral beams The workshop focused on the gas dynamic trap DT Neutron Source (DTNS) concept being developed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP) in Novosibirsk, Russia. The DTNS may be described as a line source of neutrons, in contrast to a spallation or a D-Lithium source with neutrons beaming from a point, or a tokamak volume source. The DTNS is a neutral beam driven linear plasma system with magnetic mirrors to confine the energetic deuterium and tritium beam injected ions, which produce the 14 MeV neutrons. The hot ions are imbedded in warm-background plasma, which traps the neutral atoms and provides both MHD and micro stability to the plasma. The 14 MeV neutron flux ranges typically at the level of 1 to 4 MW/m2.

  17. Mixed-field dosimetry measurement of a target assembly for an accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, M. K.; Dobelbower, M. C.; Woollard, J. E.; Blue, T. E.

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this work was to measure the neutron and gamma-ray absorbed dose components for a target assembly for an Accelerator-Based Neutron Source (ABNS) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), and to compare these measurements with MCNP calculations in order to verify the calculations of the in-air neutron and gamma-ray absorbed dose components. The measurements were made using the paired ionization chamber technique. The measured neutron and gamma-ray specific absorbed dose components agreed with calculations within experimental errors, which were approximately 10%. The measured gamma-ray specific absorbed dose rate of 140 cGy s -1 A -1 12% is consistent with reported yields of 478 keV gamma rays due to the 7Li(p, p') 7Li * reaction. This specific gamma absorbed dose rate is significant and should not be neglected in moderator assembly design.

  18. Evaluation of two-stage system for neutron measurement aiming at increase in count rate at Japan Atomic Energy Agency-Fusion Neutronics Source.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, K; Ishii, K; Ochiai, K; Baba, M; Sukegawa, A; Sasao, M; Kitajima, S

    2014-11-01

    In order to increase the count rate capability of a neutron detection system as a whole, we propose a multi-stage neutron detection system. Experiments to test the effectiveness of this concept were carried out on Fusion Neutronics Source. Comparing four configurations of alignment, it was found that the influence of an anterior stage on a posterior stage was negligible for the pulse height distribution. The two-stage system using 25 mm thickness scintillator was about 1.65 times the count rate capability of a single detector system for d-D neutrons and was about 1.8 times the count rate capability for d-T neutrons. The results suggested that the concept of a multi-stage detection system will work in practice. PMID:25430388

  19. Characterization of a plutonium beryllium source for use in neutron damage studies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Griffin; S. Landsberger; S. Biegalski; M. E. Cournoyer

    2008-01-01

    Standard lead loaded Hypalon gloves deteriorate at an accelerated pace in the glovebox environments of Los Alamos National\\u000a Laboratory. In an effort to minimize glovebox breaches, a project was undertaken to characterize polymer damage due to various\\u000a environments. For one such study, experimental techniques were used to facilitate the use of a neutron source in damage studies\\u000a involving glovebox gloves.

  20. Loss-of-coolant accident mitigation for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. C. J. Chen; M. W. Wendel; G. L. Jr. Yoder

    1994-01-01

    A RELAP5 Advanced Neutron Source Reactor system model has been developed for the conceptual design safety analysis. Three major regions modeled are the core, the heat exchanger loops, and letdown\\/pressurizing system. The model has been used to examine design alternatives for mitigation of loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) transients. The safety margins to the flow excursion limit and critical heat flux are

  1. Results of the Thermal-Shock Modeling and Analyses for the National Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkan, . .

    2001-08-01

    An overview is provided on preliminary observations from simulations of thermal shock in the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) at various power levels. The simulation framework being utilized and under development is presented. Results of simulations for pressure and stress profiles at key locations are presented. Variation of results with possible onset of mercury cavitation were modeled and the results are discussed. Significant reductions in stresses on structures may be possible with cavitation onset. Key thermal-shock related issues are highlighted.

  2. Current Status of IEC (Inertial Electrostatic Confinement) Fusion Neutron\\/Proton Source Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kiyoshi Yoshikawa; Ken Takiyama; Yasushi Yamamoto; Kai Masuda; Hisayuki Toku; Takahiro Koyama; Kenji Taruya; Hirofumi Hashimoto; Masami Ohnishi; Hiroshi Horiike; Nobuyuki Inoue

    A compact fusion neutron\\/proton source, i.e., IEC (Inertial Electrostatic Confinement) fusion device is introduced with its principle, function, application and research history. 1. What is IEC? An IECF (Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement fusion) device is an extremely compact, and simple configuration device as is shown in Fig. 1, running by electrical discharge on D-D\\/D- T\\/D-3He fuel gases. It basically consists of a

  3. Probabilistic risk assessment in the design of the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, R.M.; Ramsey, C.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Fullwood, R.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been used extensively in the design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor to safety risk and enhance availability. Design feautures incorporated to minimize risk include submerged primary coolant piping, circulation cooling capability, and dual independent and diverse shutdown systems. The recently completed Level I, Phase 1 PRA shows that the risk dominating event sequence initiator is now blockage; a program to minimize this identified risk is described.

  4. A comparison between a TESQ accelerator and a reactor as a neutron sources for BNCT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. A. Burlon; A. J. Kreiner

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the performance of an accelerator-based neutron source design has been compared with that of a modern fluoride-filtered reactor-based epithermal beam having near-optimal quality for treatment of deep seated tumors in relation to its applicability for BNCT. The accelerator is a Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole (TESQ) accelerator which is a design under development at the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) in

  5. Thermal-Hydraulic Design of the Accelerator Production of Tritium Tungsten Neutron Source

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu; Gordon J. Jr. Willcutt; Jay S. Elson; Donald A. Siebe

    2000-01-01

    The thermal-hydraulic design of the accelerator production of tritium (APT) tungsten neutron source is presented. A carefully engineered thermal-hydraulic design is required to remove the deposited power effectively during normal operations and remove the decay power during plant shutdown and postulated accidents. For steady-state operations and operational and anticipated transients, the design criterion is to maintain single-phase flow conditions with

  6. Some Thoughts Concerning the Statistics and Ultracold Neutron Source Requirements for the UCN? Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, A. R.

    2014-03-01

    Some general considerations concerning the necessary number of measured de- cays to reach a target precision of roughly 10-3 for a UCN storage neutron lifetime experiment are presented. In the context of the UCN? experiment, a brief summary of UCN sources available at present and those expected to be operational are also tabulated, together with a "lumped-element" analysis of the target transport properties of the guide system used to load the experiment.

  7. Application of accelerator sources for pulsed neutron logging of oil and gas wells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. R. Randall

    1985-01-01

    Dresser Atlas introduced the first commercial pulsed neutron oil well log in the early 1960s. This log had the capability of differentiating oil from salt water in a completed well. In the late 1970s the first continuous carbon\\/oxygen (C\\/O) log capable of differentiating oil from fresh water was introduced. The sources used in these commercial logs are radial geometry deuterium-tritium

  8. Design of an RFQ-Based Neutron Source for Cargo ContainerInterrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, John W.; Hoff, M.D.; Kwan, J.W.; Li, D.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Ratti, A.; Virostek, S.P.; Wells, R.P.

    2006-08-01

    An RFQ-based neutron generator system is described that produces pulsed neutrons for the active screening of sea-land cargo containers for the detection of shielded special nuclear materials (SNM).A microwave-driven deuteron source is coupled to an electrostatic LEBT that injects a 40 mA D+ beam into a 6 MeV, 5.1 meter-long 200 MHz RFQ.The RFQ has a unique beam dynamics design and is capable of operating at duty factors of 5 to 10 percent accelerating a D+ time-averaged current of up to 1.5 mA at 5 percent duty factor, including species and transmission loss. The beam is transported through a specially-designed thin window into a 2.5-atmosphere deuterium gas target. A high-frequency dipole magnet is used to scan the beam over the long dimension of the 5by 35 cm target window. The source will deliver a neutron flux of 1 cdot107 n/(cm2s) to the center of an empty cargo container. Details of the ion source, LEBT, RFQ beam dynamics and gas target design are presented.

  9. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  10. Computational characterization and experimental validation of the thermal neutron source for neutron capture therapy research at the University of Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Broekman, J. D. [University of Missouri, Research Reactor Center, 1513 Research Park Drive, Columbia, MO 65211-3400 (United States); Nigg, D. W. [Idaho National Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Hawthorne, M. F. [University of Missouri, International Institute of Nano and Molecular Medicine, 1514 Research Park Dr., Columbia, MO 65211-3450 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline constructed for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The computational models used for the final beam design and performance evaluation are based on coupled discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques that permit detailed modeling of the neutron transmission properties of the filtering crystals with very few approximations. Validation protocols based on neutron activation spectrometry measurements and rigorous least-square adjustment techniques show that the beam produces a neutron spectrum that has the anticipated level of thermal neutron flux and a somewhat higher than expected, but radio-biologically insignificant, epithermal neutron flux component. (authors)

  11. Physics design for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor epithermal neutron source.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, F J; Parsons, D K; Nigg, D W; Wessol, D E; Miller, L G; Fairchild, R G

    1990-01-01

    A collaborative effort by researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Brookhaven National Laboratory has resulted in the design and implementation of an epithermal-neutron source at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Large aluminum containers, filled with aluminum oxide tiles and aluminum spacers, were tailored to pre-existing compartments on the animal side of the reactor facility. A layer of cadmium was used to minimize the thermal-neutron component. Additional bismuth was added to the pre-existing bismuth shield to minimize the gamma component of the beam. Lead was also added to reduce gamma streaming around the bismuth. The physics design methods are outlined in this paper. Information available to date shows close agreement between calculated and measured beam parameters. The neutron spectrum is predominantly in the intermediate energy range (0.5 eV - 10 keV). The peak flux intensity is 6.4E + 12 n/(m2.s.MW) at the center of the beam on the outer surface of the final gamma shield. The corresponding neutron current is 3.8E + 12 n/(m2.s.MW). Presently, the core operates at a maximum of 3 MW. The fast-neutron KERMA is 3.6E-15 cGy/(n/m2) and the gamma KERMA is 5.0E-16 cGY/(n/m2) for the unperturbed beam. The neutron intensity falls off rapidly with distance from the outer shield and the thermal flux realized in phantom or tissue is strongly dependent on the beam-delimiter and target geometry. PMID:2268249

  12. An irradiation facility for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy application based on a radio frequency driven DT neutron source and a new beam shaping assembly

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicola Cerullo; Juan Esposito; Ka Ngo Leung; Salvatore Custodero

    2002-01-01

    A line of the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) research program aimed at the treatment of brain tumors, carried on at the Nuclear Departments of Pisa and Genova Universities (DIMNP and DITEC), is being focused on a new, 3H(d,n)4He (D-T), accelerator-based neutron source concept, developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Simple and compact accelerator designs, using mixed D+ T+

  13. Investigation and optimisation of mobile NaI(Tl) and 3He-based neutron detectors for finding point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Jonas M. C.; Finck, Robert R.; Rf, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    Neutron radiation produces high-energy gamma radiation through (n,?) reactions in matter. This can be used to detect neutron sources indirectly using gamma spectrometers. The sensitivity of a gamma spectrometer to neutrons can be amplified by surrounding it with polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The hydrogen in the PVC acts as a moderator and the chlorine emits prompt gammas when a neutron is captured. A 4.7-l 3He-based mobile neutron detector was compared to a 4-l NaI(Tl)-detector covered with PVC using this principle. Methods were also developed to optimise the measurement parameters of the systems. The detector systems were compared with regard to their ability to find 241AmBe, 252Cf and 238Pu-13C neutron sources. Results from stationary measurements were used to calculate optimal integration times as well as minimum detectable neutron emission rates. It was found that the 3He-based detector was more sensitive to 252Cf sources whereas the NaI(Tl) detector was more sensitive to 241AmBe and 238Pu-13C sources. The results also indicated that the sensitivity of the detectors to sources at known distances could theoretically be improved by 60% by changing from fixed integration times to list mode in mobile surveys.

  14. Opportunities afforded by the intense nanosecond neutron pulses from a plasma focus source for neutron capture therapy and the preliminary simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannini, G.; Gribkov, V.; Longo, F.; Ramos Aruca, M.; Tuniz, C.

    2012-11-01

    The use of short and powerful neutron pulses for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) can potentially increase selectivity and reduce the total dose absorbed by the patient. The biological effects of radiation depend on the dose, the dose power and the spatial distribution of the microscopic energy deposition. A dense plasma focus (DPF) device emits very short (in the nanosecond range) and extremely intense pulses of fast neutrons (2.5 or 14 MeV neutronsfrom D-D or D-T nuclear reactions) and x-rays. Optimal spectra of neutrons formed for use in BNCT must contain an epithermal part to ensure a reasonable penetration depth into tissues at high enough cross-section on boron. So the powerful nanosecond pulses of fast neutrons generated by DPF must be moderated. After this moderation, the pulse duration must be shorter compared with the duration of the reaction with free radicals, that is, ?1 ?s. In this work we focus on the development of a detailed simulation of interaction of short-pulse radiation from a DPF with the device's materials and with different types of moderators to estimate the dose power at the cells for this dynamic case. The simulation was carried out by means of the Geant4 toolkit in two main steps: the modeling of the pulsed neutron source device itself; the study of the interaction of fast mono-energetic neutrons with a moderator specific for BNCT.

  15. NIFTI and DISCOS: New concepts for a compact accelerator neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Powell; H. Ludewig; M. Todosow; M. Reich

    1995-01-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses fluoride compounds, such as lead or beryllium fluoride, to efficiently degrade high energy neutrons from the lithium target

  16. Accelerating Data Acquisition, Reduction, and Analysis at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Stuart I [ORNL; Kohl, James Arthur [ORNL; Granroth, Garrett E [ORNL; Miller, Ross G [ORNL; Doucet, Mathieu [ORNL; Stansberry, Dale V [ORNL; Proffen, Thomas E [ORNL; Taylor, Russell J [ORNL; Dillow, David [None

    2014-01-01

    ORNL operates the world's brightest neutron source, the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Funded by the US DOE Office of Basic Energy Science, this national user facility hosts hundreds of scientists from around the world, providing a platform to enable break-through research in materials science, sustainable energy, and basic science. While the SNS provides scientists with advanced experimental instruments, the deluge of data generated from these instruments represents both a big data challenge and a big data opportunity. For example, instruments at the SNS can now generate multiple millions of neutron events per second providing unprecedented experiment fidelity but leaving the user with a dataset that cannot be processed and analyzed in a timely fashion using legacy techniques. To address this big data challenge, ORNL has developed a near real-time streaming data reduction and analysis infrastructure. The Accelerating Data Acquisition, Reduction, and Analysis (ADARA) system provides a live streaming data infrastructure based on a high-performance publish subscribe system, in situ data reduction, visualization, and analysis tools, and integration with a high-performance computing and data storage infrastructure. ADARA allows users of the SNS instruments to analyze their experiment as it is run and make changes to the experiment in real-time and visualize the results of these changes. In this paper we describe ADARA, provide a high-level architectural overview of the system, and present a set of use-cases and real-world demonstrations of the technology.

  17. Intense Pulsed Neutron Source: Progress report 1991--1996. 15. Anniversary edition -- Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The 15th Anniversary Edition of the IPNS Progress Report is being published in recognition of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source`s first 15 years of successful operation as a user facility. To emphasize the importance of this milestone, the author shave made the design and organization of the report significantly different from previous IPNS Progress Reports. This report consists of two volumes. For Volume 1, authors were asked to prepare articles that highlighted recent scientific accomplishments at IPNS, from 1991 to present; to focus on and illustrate the scientific advances achieved through the unique capabilities of neutron studies performed by IPNS users; to report on specific activities or results from an instrument; or to focus on a body of work encompassing different neutron-scattering techniques. Articles were also included on the accelerator system, instrumentation, computing, target, and moderators. A list of published and ``in press` articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings, resulting from work done at IPNS since 1991, was compiled. This list is arranged alphabetically according to first author. Publication references in the articles are listed by last name of first author and year of publication. The IPNS experimental reports received since 1991 are compiled in Volume 2. Experimental reports referenced in the articles are listed by last name of first author, instrument designation, and experiment number.

  18. Shielding analysis and design of the KIPT experimental neutron source facility of Ukraine.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Naberezhnev, D.; Duo, J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-31

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an experimental neutron source facility based on the use of an electron accelerator driven subcritical (ADS) facility [1]. The facility uses the existing electron accelerators of KIPT in Ukraine. The neutron source of the sub-critical assembly is generated from the interaction of 100 KW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The electron beam has a uniform spatial distribution and the electron energy in the range of 100 to 200 MeV, [2]. The main functions of the facility are the production of medical isotopes and the support of the Ukraine nuclear power industry. Reactor physics experiments and material performance characterization will also be carried out. The subcritical assembly is driven by neutrons generated by the electron beam interactions with the target material. A fraction of these neutrons has an energy above 50 MeV generated through the photo nuclear interactions. This neutron fraction is very small and it has an insignificant contribution to the subcritical assembly performance. However, these high energy neutrons are difficult to shield and they can be slowed down only through the inelastic scattering with heavy isotopes. Therefore the shielding design of this facility is more challenging relative to fission reactors. To attenuate these high energy neutrons, heavy metals (tungsten, iron, etc.) should be used. To reduce the construction cost, heavy concrete with 4.8 g/cm{sup 3} density is selected as a shielding material. The iron weight fraction in this concrete is about 0.6. The shape and thickness of the heavy concrete shield are defined to reduce the biological dose equivalent outside the shield to an acceptable level during operation. At the same time, special attention was give to reduce the total shield mass to reduce the construction cost. The shield design is configured to maintain the biological dose equivalent during operation {le} 0.5 mrem/h inside the subcritical hall, which is five times less than the allowable dose for working forty hours per week for 50 weeks per year. This study analyzed and designed the thickness and the shape of the radial and top shields of the neutron source based on the biological dose equivalent requirements inside the subcritical hall during operation. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX is selected because of its capabilities for transporting electrons, photons, and neutrons. Mesh based weight windows variance reduction technique is utilized to estimate the biological dose outside the shield with good statistics. A significant effort dedicated to the accurate prediction of the biological dose equivalent outside the shield boundary as a function of the shield thickness without geometrical approximations or material homogenization. The building wall was designed with ordinary concrete to reduce the biological dose equivalent to the public with a safety factor in the range of 5 to 20.

  19. Development of a kinematically focused neutron source with the p(7Li,n)7Be inverse reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebois, M.; Wilson, J. N.; Halipr, P.; Leniau, B.; Matea, I.; Oberstedt, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Verney, D.

    2014-01-01

    Directional beams of neutrons can be produced, if a nuclear reaction, which emits neutrons, is initiated in inverse kinematics with a heavy ion projectile bombarding a light target. In this paper we investigate the use of the p(7Li,n)7Be inverse reaction to produce kinematically focused, quasi-mono-energetic neutron beams with a view to develop such an unusual neutron source for fundamental and applied nuclear physics studies. An experiment was carried out to validate the concept and to test the viability of two types of hydrogen-rich solid targets: polypropylene and TiH2. Neutron time-of-flight/energy spectra at 3 m distance from the source have been measured at 7Li bombarding energies of 13.5, 15, 15.5, 16, and 17 MeV, and neutron backgrounds from parasitic reactions have been characterized. The neutron angular distribution in the laboratory has been measured at 15 MeV. A Monte-Carlo code based on two-body relativistic kinematics has been developed and validated by comparison with the experimental data. Code-based extrapolations have then been used to deduce neutron energy spectra and maximum neutron fluxes available for future irradiation of samples placed in the neutron beam at small distances. For neutrons produced with thin (4 ?m) and thick (28 ?m) polypropylene targets the maximum available fluxes are calculated to be 107n/s/sr and 7107 n/s/sr respectively. The development of a dedicated facility to produce kinematically focused neutrons is discussed.

  20. Dose Measurements of Bremsstrahlung-Produced Neutrons at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Job, P.K.; Pisharody, M.; Semones, E.

    1998-08-01

    Bremsstrahlung is generated in the storage rings of the synchrotron radiation facilities by the radiative interaction of the circulating particle beam with both the residual gas molecules and storage ring components. These bremsstrahlung photons, having an energy range of zero to the maximum energy of the particle beam, interact with beamline components like beam stops and collimators generating photoneutrons of varying energies. There are three main processes by which photoneutrons may be produced by the high energy bremsstrahlung photons: giant nuclear dipole resonance and decay (10 MeV < E{sub {gamma}} < 30 MeV), quasi-deuteron production and decay (50 MeV < E{sub {gamma}} < 300 MeV), and intranuclear cascade and evaporation (E{sub {gamma}} > 140 MeV). The giant resonance neutrons are emitted almost isotropically and have an average energy of about 2 MeV. High energy neutrons (E > 10 MeV) emitted from the quasi-deuteron decay and intranuclear cascade are peaked in the forward direction. At the Advanced Photon Source (APS), where bremsstrahlung energy can be as high as 7 GeV, production of photoneutrons in varying yields is possible from all of the above three processes. The bremsstrahlung produced along a typical 15.38-m straight path of the insertion device (ID) beamline of the APS has been measured and analyzed in previous studies. High-Z materials constituting the beamline components, such as collimators and beam stops, can produce photoneutrons upon interaction with these bremsstrahlung photons. The 1/E nature of the bremsstrahlung spectrum and the fact that the photoneutron production cross section is comparatively larger in the energy region 10 MeV < E{sub {gamma}} < 30 MeV, results in the giant resonance interaction being the dominant mechanism that generates photoneutrons at the APS. Such neutron flux in the vicinities of the first optics enclosures (FOEs) of ID beamlines is important, from the point of view of radiation protection of the personnel. Only a few of such neutron flux measurements were conducted at high photon energies. Monte Carlo codes and analytical formulas are used to calculate the differential photon track length in targets. Together with the known photoneutron cross sections, the neutron yields are then determined as a function of incident electron energy. Neutron fluence calculated from these yields assumes isotropic emission of neutrons from a point source target. Because neutron transport is not handled in most of these studies, possible neutron interactions inside the target are not accounted for in calculating the energy and intensity outside the target. There is also the uncertainty of photoneutron production cross section at higher energies. A simultaneous measurement of bremsstrahlung and corresponding photoneutron production will provide photoneutron dose rates as a function of bremsstrahlung energy or power. Along with our already existing bremsstrahlung spectrum measurement expertise, we conducted simultaneous photoneutron dose measurements at the APS from thick targets of Fe, Cu, W, and Pb that are placed in the bremsstrahlung beam inside the FOE of the insertion device beamlines. An Andersson-Braun (AB) remmeter that houses a BF{sub 3} detector, as well as a very sensitive pressurized {sup 3}He detector, is used for neutron dose measurements. The dose equivalent rates, normalized to bremsstrahlung power, beam current, and storage ring vacuum, are measured for various targets. This report details the experimental setup, data acquisition system, calibration procedures, analysis of the data and the results of the measurements.