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1

Radioactive ion detector  

DOEpatents

Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity. 2 figs.

Bower, K.E.; Weeks, D.R.

1997-08-12

2

Radioactive ion detector  

DOEpatents

Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity.

Bower, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM); Weeks, Donald R. (Saratoga, CA)

1997-01-01

3

Radioactive materials in recycled metals.  

PubMed

In recent years, the metal recycling industry has become increasingly aware of an unwanted component in metal scrap--radioactive material. Worldwide, there have been 35 instances where radioactive sources were unintentionally smelted in the course of recycling metal scrap. In some cases contaminated metal consumer products were distributed internationally. In at least one case, serious radiation exposures of workers and the public occurred. Radioactive material appearing in metal scrap includes sources subject to licensing under the Atomic Energy Act and also naturally occurring radioactive material. U.S. mills that have smelted a radioactive source face costs resulting from decontamination, waste disposal, and lost profits that range from 7 to 23 million U.S. dollars for each event. To solve the problem, industry and the government have jointly undertaken initiatives to increase awareness of the problem within the metal recycling industry. Radiation monitoring of recycled metal scrap is being performed increasingly by mills and, to a lesser extent, by scrap processors. The monitoring does not, however, provide 100% protection. Improvements in regulatory oversight by the government could stimulate improved accounting and control of licensed sources. However, additional government effort in this area must be reconciled with competing priorities in radiation safety and budgetary constraints. The threat of radioactive material in recycled metal scrap will continue for the foreseeable future and, thus, poses regulatory policy challenges for both developed and developing nations. PMID:7883556

Lubenau, J O; Yusko, J G

1995-04-01

4

Charge Breeding of Radioactive Ions  

E-print Network

Charge breeding is a technique to increase the charge state of ions, in many cases radioactive ions. The singly charged radioactive ions, produced in an isotope separator on-line facility, and extracted with a low kinetic energy of some tens of keV, are injected into a charge breeder, where the charge state is increased to Q. The transformed ions are either directed towards a dedicated experiment requiring highly charged ions, or post-accelerated to higher beam energies. In this paper the physics processes involved in the production of highly charged ions will be introduced, and the injection and extraction beam parameters of the charge breeder defined. A description of the three main charge-breeding methods is given, namely: electron stripping in gas jet or foil; external ion injection into an electron-beam ion source/trap (EBIS/T); and external ion injection into an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). In addition, some preparatory devices for charge breeding and practical beam delivery aspects ...

Wenander, F J C

2013-01-01

5

A radioactive metal processing industry perspective source.  

PubMed

The current U.S. economic environment for the disposition of radioactive waste, including very-low-activity metals, is currently experiencing relatively low radioactive disposal costs and readily available disposal space. Despite the recent market increase in demand for recycled scrap metal commodities, there is still little change in the behavior of the nuclear industry (including radioactive waste processors and radioactive scrap metal recyclers) to pursue the recycling of potentially contaminated scrap metal. The relatively low cost of traditional radioactive waste disposal combined with the perceived risks associated with recycling of previously contaminated metals means that most U.S. radioactive facility managers and stakeholders will elect not to recycle. Current technology exists and precedence has been set for prescreening (by means of bulk radioactive assay techniques) scrap metal that is not contaminated and diverting it to industrial landfills for disposal. Other processes also allow some radiologically contaminated metals to be melted and recast into products with low, but acceptable, activity levels for restricted use in the nuclear industry. A new concept is being considered that would create a centralized licensed facility for the process and disposition of "very-low-activity" metals for "directed first use." The advantages to this type of approach would include a standardized method for licensing the clearance process. PMID:17033461

Johnson, A

2006-11-01

6

Method for decontamination of radioactive metal surfaces  

DOEpatents

Disclosed is a method for removing radioactive contaminants from metal surfaces by applying steam containing an inorganic acid and cerium IV. Cerium IV is applied to contaminated metal surfaces by introducing cerium IV in solution into a steam spray directed at contaminated metal surfaces. Cerium IV solution is converted to an essentially atomized or vapor phase by the steam.

Bray, Lane A. (Richland, WA)

1996-01-01

7

Method for decontamination of radioactive metal surfaces  

DOEpatents

Disclosed is a method for removing radioactive contaminants from metal surfaces by applying steam containing an inorganic acid and cerium IV. Cerium IV is applied to contaminated metal surfaces by introducing cerium IV in solution into a steam spray directed at contaminated metal surfaces. Cerium IV solution is converted to an essentially atomized or vapor phase by the steam.

Bray, L.A.

1996-08-13

8

Radioactive-ion-beam research at Livermore  

SciTech Connect

The availability of radioactive ion beams represents a major advance in the capbaility to attack important problems of basic and applied nuclear physics. For the first time we are able to study nuclear reactions on nuclides outside the valley of stability. These nuclides represent about 80% of particle-stable isotopes. Questions of nuclear reaction mechanisms, nuclear properties of bound and continuum states, and basic symmetries for these unstable nuclides can therefore be answered by direct mesurement rather than by speculation. The applications of radioactive ion beams are widespread and extensive. In astrophysical studies, nuclear reactions of radioactive ion beams are essential to understanding a wide range of problems in energy generation, nucleosynthesis, neutrino effects, and the implications of gamma-ray astrophysical measurements. In material studies, the implantation of radioactive ions has already seen important use. Well defined beams of these ions will greatly increase the specifity and sensititivity of this technology. Radioactive ion beams may also have significant applications in medical diagnostics and therapy. Finally, standard sources of beta and gamma radiation can be prepared with much greater precision than formerly available.

Haight, R.C.; Mathews, G.J.; Ward, R.A.; Woosley, S.E.

1983-06-01

9

Metals ions and neurodegeneration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neurodegenerative disorders include a variety of pathological conditions, which share similar critical metabolic processes\\u000a such as protein aggregation and oxidative stress, both of which are associated with the involvement of metal ions. In this\\u000a review Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease are mainly discussed, with the aim of identifying common trends underlying\\u000a these neurological conditions. Chelation therapy could be a valuable

Francisco Molina-Holgado; Robert C. Hider; Alessandra Gaeta; Robert Williams; Paul Francis

2007-01-01

10

Advances in metal ion sources  

SciTech Connect

Beams of metallic ion species can be produced by the ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) ion source and by the MEVVA (metal vapor vacuum arc) ion source. Although the ECR source is fundamentally a gaseous ion source, metal ion beams can be produced by introducing metallic feed material into the plasma discharge using a number of techniques. The ion charge states can be very high, which is a significant advantage to most applications. The MEVVA ion source, on the other hand, is specifically a metal ion source. It has produced metallic ion beams from virtually all the solid metallic elements at a current of typically hundreds of milliamperes; the ions produced are in general multiply ionized, but not as highly stripped as those generated in the ECR source. Although the MEVVA source at present operates in a pulsed mode with a low duty cycle (less than or equal to 1%), work is in progress to increase the duty cycle significantly. In this paper the operation and performance of the LBL ECR and MEVVA ion sources, with respect to metal ion generation, are described.

Brown, I.G.

1988-05-01

11

Radioactive scrap metal decontamination technology assessment report  

SciTech Connect

Within the DOE complex there exists a tremendous quantity of radioactive scrap metal. As an example, it is estimated that within the gaseous diffusion plants there exists in excess of 700,000 tons of contaminated stainless steel. At present, valuable material is being disposed of when it could be converted into a high quality product. Liquid metal processing represents a true recycling opportunity for this material. By applying the primary production processes towards the material`s decontamination and re-use, the value of the strategic resource is maintained while drastically reducing the volume of material in need of burial. Potential processes for the liquid metal decontamination of radioactively contaminated metal are discussed and contrasted. Opportunities and technology development issues are identified and discussed. The processes compared are: surface decontamination; size reduction, packaging and burial; melting technologies; electric arc melting; plasma arc centrifugal treatment; air induction melting; vacuum induction melting; and vacuum induction melting and electroslag remelting.

Buckentin, J.M.; Damkroger, B.K.; Schlienger, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Liquid Metal Processing Lab.

1996-04-01

12

Laser ion sources for radioactive beams (invited)  

SciTech Connect

Resonant ionisation laser ion sources are nowadays extensively used, when available, at many leading on-line facilities. Moreover, new laser ion sources are now under development in most of the recent on-line facility projects under construction worldwide. This success is mainly due to the reliability, the ionization efficiency and the high purity that this type of source can achieve for the production of radioactive species and for a large range of chemical elements. Laser ion sources for radioactive beams gather many different systems such as dye laser or all-solid state titanium:sapphire laser systems, high or low repetition rates, hot cavities or gas cells, additional selectivity by using chemical techniques, or the LIST technique (laser ion source trap). In this paper, the physics of laser ion sources will be described with the current limitations and challenges for the future. An overview of the laser ion source facilities will be given, with an emphasis on the ongoing developments and perspectives on LIS.

Lecesne, N. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds, BP 55027, 14076 Caen cedex 5 (France)

2012-02-15

13

Storage rings for radioactive ion beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Storage rings for radioactive heavy ions can be applied for a wide range of experiments in atomic and nuclear physics. The rare isotope beams are produced in flight via fragmentation or fission of high-intensity primary ions and they circulate in the storage ring at moderately relativistic energies (typically between 0.1 GeV/u up to 1 GeV/u). Due to their production mechanism they are usually highly charged or even fully stripped. The circulating radioactive heavy ion beams can be used to measure nuclear properties such as masses and decay times, which, in turn, can depend strongly on the ionic charge state. The storage rings must have large acceptances and dynamic apertures. The subsequent application of stochastic precooling of the secondary ions which are injected with large transverse and longitudinal emittances, and electron cooling to reach very high phase space densities has turned out to be a helpful tool for experiments with short-lived ions having lifetimes down to a few seconds. Some of these experiments have already been performed at the experimental storage ring ESR at GSI. The storage ring complex of the FAIR project is intended to enhance significantly the range of experimental possibilities. It is planned to extend the scope of experimental possibilities to collisions with electron or antiproton beams.

Nolden, F.; Dimopoulou, C.; Dolinskii, A.; Steck, M.

2008-10-01

14

Method for electrochemical decontamination of radioactive metal  

SciTech Connect

A decontamination method for stripping radionuclides from the surface of stainless steel or aluminum material comprising the steps of contacting the metal with a moderately acidic carbonate/bicarbonate electrolyte solution containing sodium or potassium ions and thereafter electrolytically removing the radionuclides from the surface of the metal whereby radionuclides are caused to be stripped off of the material without corrosion or etching of the material surface.

Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

2008-06-10

15

Radioactive Ion Beam Production Capabilities At The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) is a national user facility for research with radioactive ion beams (RIBs) that has been in routine operation since 1996. It is located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and operated by the ORNL Physics Division. The principal mission of the HRIBF is the production of high quality beams of shortlived radioactive isotopes to support research in nuclear structure physics and nuclear astrophysics. HRIBF is currently unique worldwide in its ability to provide neutron-rich fission fragment beams post-accelerated to energies above the Coulomb barrier for nuclear reactions. HRIBF produces RIBs by the isotope separator on-line (ISOL) technique using a particle accelerator system that consists of the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) driver accelerator, one of the two Injectors for Radioactive Ion Species (IRIS1 or IRIS2) production systems, and the 25-MV tandem electrostatic accelerator that is used for RIB post-acceleration. ORIC provides a light ion beam (proton, deuteron, or alpha) which is directed onto a thick target mounted in a target-ion source (TIS) assembly located on IRIS1 or IRIS2. Radioactive atoms that diffuse from the target material are ionized, accelerated, mass selected, and transported to the tandem accelerator where they are further accelerated to energies suitable for nuclear physics research. RIBs are transported through a beam line system to various experimental end stations including the Recoil Mass Spectrometer (RMS) for nuclear structure research, and the Daresbury Recoil Separator (DRS) for nuclear astrophysics research. HRIBF also includes two off-line ion source test facilities, one low-power on-line ISOL test facility (OLTF), and one high-power on-line ISOL test facility (HPTL). This paper provides an overview and status update of HRIBF, describes the recently completed $4.7M IRIS2 addition and incorporation of laser systems for beam production and purification, and discusses a proposed replacement of the ORIC driver accelerator.

Beene, J. R.; Dowling, D. T.; Gross, C. J.; Juras, R. C.; Liu, Y.; Meigs, M. J.; Mendez, A. J. II; Nazarewicz, W.; Sinclair, J. W.; Stracener, D. W.; Tatum, B. A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2011-06-01

16

Pure radioactive Ga ion beams provided by new laser ion source for nuclear research at ORNL  

E-print Network

Pure radioactive Ga ion beams provided by new laser ion source for nuclear research at ORNL pure beams of radioactive nuclei far from stability. · Beams of neutron-rich Ga isotopes were delivered to the Low-energy Radioactive Ion Beam Spectroscopy Station (LeRIBSS) with previously unattainable purity

17

Thermochemical Processing of Radioactive Waste Using Powder Metal Fuels  

SciTech Connect

Problematic radioactive wastes were generated during various activities of both industrial facilities and research institutions usually in relative small amounts. These can be spent ion exchange resins, inorganic absorbents, wastes from research nuclear reactors, irradiated graphite, mixed, organic or chlorine-containing radioactive waste, contaminated soils, un-burnable heavily surface-contaminated materials, etc. Conventional treatment methods encounter serious problems concerning processing efficiency of such waste, e.g. complete destruction of organic molecules and avoiding of possible emissions of radionuclides, heavy metals and chemically hazardous species. Some contaminations cannot be removed from surface using common decontamination methods. Conditioning of ash residues obtained after treatment of solid radioactive waste including ashes received from treating problematic wastes also is a complicated task. Moreover due to relative small volume of specific type radioactive waste the development of target treatment procedures and facilities to conduct technological processes and their deployment could be economically unexpedient and ecologically no justified. Thermochemical processing technologies are used for treating and conditioning problematic radioactive wastes. The thermochemical processing uses powdered metal fuels (PMF) that are specifically formulated for the waste composition and react chemically with the waste components. The composition of the PMF is designed in such a way as to minimize the release of hazardous components and radionuclides in the off gas and to confine the contaminants in the ash residue. The thermochemical procedures allow decomposition of organic matter and capturing hazardous radionuclides and chemical species simultaneously. A significant advantage of thermochemical processing is its autonomy. Thermochemical treatment technologies use the energy of exothermic reactions in the mixture of radioactive or hazardous waste with PMF. When used energy of exothermic reactions in waste thermochemical treatment processing, the problems concerned with heating method choice, appropriate heating equipment operation, and maintenance of this equipment reliability are excluded. Generally, the PMF consists of combustible powder metal, oxygen containing component, and some additives (pore-forming materials, stabilizers, surface-active substances, and other) with a predominance of metal powder. A thermodynamic simulation is applied widely at the designing of the PMF.

Ojovan, M. I.; Sobolev, I. A.; Dmitriev, S. A.; Panteleev, V. I.; Karlina, O. K.; Klimov. V. L.

2003-02-25

18

Evaluation of radioactive scrap metal recycling  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the human health risks and environmental and socio-political impacts of options for recycling radioactive scrap metal (RSM) or disposing of and replacing it. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is assisting the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Oak Ridge Programs Division, in assessing the implications of RSM management alternatives. This study is intended to support the DOE contribution to a study of metal recycling being conducted by the Task Group on Recycling and Reuse of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The focus is on evaluating the justification for the practice of recycling RSM, and the case of iron and steel scrap is used as an example in assessing the impacts. To conduct the evaluation, a considerable set of data was compiled and developed. Much of this information is included in this document to provide a source book of information.

Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y.; Kohout, E.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wilson, S.E.

1995-12-01

19

Scrap metals industry perspective on radioactive materials.  

PubMed

With more than 80 reported/confirmed accidental melts worldwide since 1983 and still counting, potential contamination by radioactive materials remains as a major concern among recycled scrap and steel companies. Some of these events were catastrophic and have cost the industry millions of dollars in business and, at the same time, resulted in declining consumer confidence. It is also known that more events with confirmed radioactive contamination have occurred that involve mining of old steel slag and skull dumps. Consequently, the steel industry has since undergone massive changes that incurred unprecedented expenses through the installation of radiation monitoring systems in hopes of preventing another accidental melt. Despite such extraordinary efforts, accidental melts continue to occur and plague the industry. One recent reported/confirmed event occurred in the Republic of China in 2004, causing the usual lengthy shutdown for expensive decontamination efforts before the steel mill could resume operations. With this perspective in mind, the metal industry has a long-standing opposition to the release of radioactive materials of any kind to commerce for fear of contamination and the potential consequences. PMID:17033460

Turner, Ray

2006-11-01

20

Prototype negative ion sources for radioactive ion beam generation (abstract)  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive ion beams (RIBs) of {sup 17}F and {sup 18}F are of interest for investigation of astrophysical phenomena such as the {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} CNO cycle and the rp stellar nuclear synthesis processes. In order to generate useful beam intensities of atomic F{sup {minus}}, the species must be efficiently and expediently released from the target material, thermally dissociated from fluoride release products during transport to the ionization chamber of the ion source, and efficiently ionized in the source upon arrival. We have conceived and evaluated two prototype negative ion sources for potential use for RIB generation: a direct extraction source and a kinetic ejection source. Both sources utilize Cs vapor to enhance F{sup {minus}} formation. The mechanical design features, operational parameters, ionization efficiencies for forming atomic F{sup {minus}} and delay times for transport of F and fluoride compounds for the respective sources are presented. The efficiency {eta} for formation and extraction of F{sup {minus}} for the direct extraction negative ion source is found to be {eta}{approximately}1.0{percent}, while the characteristic delay time {tau} for transport of F and fluorides through the source is typically, {eta}{approximately}120 s; the analogous efficiencies and delay times for the kinetic ejection negative ion source are, respectively: {eta}={approximately}3.2{percent} and {tau}={approximately}70 s. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Alton, G.D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6368 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6368 (United States); Welton, R.F.; Williams, C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6368 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6368 (United States); [Oak Ridge Institute of Science and Engineering, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Cui, B. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)] [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China); Murray, S.N. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6368 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6368 (United States)

1998-02-01

21

Miniature high current metal ion source  

SciTech Connect

A small, simple ion source for the production of high brightness beams of metal ions is described. A metal vapor vacuum arc discharge is used to establish the high density plasma from which the ion beam is extracted. The source is finger-sized, and can produce pulsed metal ion beams with current up to the 10 ma range. 9 refs., 6 figs.

Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.E.; MacGill, R.A.; Wright, R.T.

1986-04-01

22

Titanate-based adsorbents for radioactive ions entrapment from water.  

PubMed

This feature article reviews some titanate-based adsorbents for the removal of radioactive wastes (cations and anions) from water. At the beginning, we discuss the development of the conventional ion-exchangeable titanate powders for the entrapment of radioactive cations, such as crystalline silicotitanate (CST), monosodium titanate (MST), peroxotitanate (PT). Then, we specially emphasize the recent progress in the uptake of radioactive ions by one-dimensional (1D) sodium titanate nanofibers and nanotubes, which includes the synthesis and phase transformation of the 1D nanomaterials, adsorption ability (capacity, selectivity, kinetics, etc.) of radioactive cations and anions, and the structural evolution during the adsorption process. PMID:23412572

Yang, Dongjiang; Liu, Hongwei; Zheng, Zhanfeng; Sarina, Sarina; Zhu, Huaiyong

2013-03-21

23

Metal ion-containing epoxies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A variety of metallic and organometallic complexes to be used as potential additives for an epoxy used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin were investigated. A total of 9 complexes were screened for compatibility and for their ability to accelerate or inhibit the cure of a highly crosslinkable epoxy resin. Methods for combining the metallic complexes with the resin were investigated, gel times recorded, and cure exotherms studied by differential scanning calorimetry. Glass transition temperatures of cured metal ion containing epoxy castings were determined by thermomechanical analysis. Thermal stabilities of the castings were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. Mechanical strength and stiffness of these doped epoxies were also measured.

Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

1982-01-01

24

GISELE: A resonant ionization laser ion source for the production of radioactive ions at GANIL  

SciTech Connect

SPIRAL2 is the new project under construction at GANIL to produce radioactive ion beams and in particular neutron rich ion beams. For the past 10 yr SPIRAL1 at GANIL has been delivering accelerated radioactive ion beams of gases. Both facilities now need to extend the range of radioactive ion beams produced to condensable elements. For that purpose, a resonant ionization laser ion source, funded by the French Research National Agency, is under development at GANIL, in collaboration with IPN Orsay, University of Mainz (Germany) and TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada). A description of this project called GISELE (GANIL Ion Source using Electron Laser Excitation) is presented.

Lecesne, N.; Alves-Conde, R.; De Oliveira, F.; Dubois, M.; Flambard, J. L.; Franberg, H.; Jardin, P.; Leroy, R.; Pacquet, J. Y.; Pichard, A.; Saint-Laurent, M. G. [GANIL, BP 55027, 14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Coterreau, E.; Le Blanc, F.; Olivier, A. [IPN Orsay, BP 1-91406 Orsay (France); Gottwald, T.; Mattolat, C.; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Lassen, J. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Rothe, S. [Department of Engineering, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

2010-02-15

25

Reversible photodeposition and dissolution of metal ions  

DOEpatents

A cyclic photocatalytic process for treating waste water containing metal and organic contaminants. In one embodiment of the method, metal ions are photoreduced onto the photocatalyst and the metal concentrated by resolubilization in a smaller volume. In another embodiment of the method, contaminant organics are first oxidized, then metal ions removed by photoreductive deposition. The present invention allows the photocatalyst to be recycled until nearly complete removal of metal ions and organic contaminants is achieved.

Foster, Nancy S. (Boulder, CO); Koval, Carl A. (Golden, CO); Noble, Richard D. (Boulder, CO)

1994-01-01

26

Status of JAEA-KEK radioactive ion beam facility, TRIAC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In collaboration with Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), we have been constructed an ISOL-based radioactive ion beam facility, Tokai Radioactive Ion Accelerator Complex (TRIAC), at JAEA - Tokai. This facility consists of a Charge-Breeding 18 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion-Source (CB-ECRIS), the Split-Coaxial Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (SCRFQ)- and Interdigital-H (IH)-type linacs. An Isotope Separator On-line (JAEA-ISOL) is connected to the CB-ECRIS as the injector of radioactive ions which are produced in proton-induced fission of uranium and heavy-ion reaction. The primary beams are provided from the JAEA Tandem Accelerator. Radioactive singly-charged ions from the JAEA-ISOL are bred to q/ A ? 1/7 in the CB-ECRIS and then multi-charged ions are accelerated with the linac-complex from 2 keV/u to the energy between 0.14 and 1.1 MeV/u. So far, we successfully accelerate 8Li + and 138Xe 20+, the acceleration energy of 1.1 MeV/u was achieved. From October 2005, some radioactive ion beams of 1.1 MeV/u have become available for users.

Osa, Akihiko; TRIAC Collaboration

2007-08-01

27

Radioactive materials in recycled metals--an update.  

PubMed

In April 1995, Health Physics published a review paper titled "Radioactive Materials in Recycled Metals." At that time, 35 accidental meltings of radioactive sources in metal mills were reported, including 22 in the U.S., along with 293 other events in the U.S. where radioactive material was found in metals for recycling. Since that date, there have been additional accidental meltings of radioactive sources in metal mills both in the U.S. and elsewhere. There also was an incident in Texas that involved stolen radioactive devices, which resulted in exposures of members of the general public. Also, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission took steps to address the underlying problem of inadequate control and accountability of radioactive materials licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The Steel Manufacturers Association made available data collected by its members beginning in 1994 that expanded the database for radioactive materials found by the metal recycling industry in recycled metal scrap to over 2,300 reports as of 30 June 1997. PMID:9482594

Lubenau, J O; Yusko, J G

1998-03-01

28

Metallic ions in the equatorial ionosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Four positive ion composition measurements of the equatorial E region made at Thumba, India, are presented. During the day, the major ions between 90 and 125 km are NO(+) and O2(+). A metallic ion layer centered at 92 km is observed, and found to contain Mg(+), Fe(+), Ca(+), K(+), Al(+), and Na(+) ions. The layer is explained in terms of a similarly shaped latitude distribution of neutral atoms which are photoionized and charge-exchanged with NO(+) and O2(+). Three body reactions form molecular metallic ions which are rapidly lost by dissociative ion-electron recombination. Nighttime observations show downward drifting of the metallic ion layer caused by equatorial dynamo effects. These ions react and form neutral metals which exchange charges with NO(+) and O2(+) to produce an observed depletion of those ions within the metallic ion region.

Aikin, A. C.; Goldberg, R. A.

1972-01-01

29

EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS  

SciTech Connect

The construction of the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) for the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility is completed and its commissioning is being performed. In its full capacity, the CARIBU facility will use fission fragments from a 1 Curie (Ci) {sup 252}Cf source. The ions will be thermalized and collected into a low-energy ion beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge bred to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. To reach energies E/A 10 MeV/u, one should inject ions with charge-to-mass ratio (q/A) {ge} 1/7 into the ATLAS linac. In the first stage, the existing Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source will be used as a charge breeder. The maximum intensity of radioactive ion beams at the output of the gas catcher will not exceed 10{sup 7} ions per second. A charge breeder based on an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) has significant advantages over the ECR option for ion beam intensities up to about 10{sup 9} ions per second, providing 3-4 times higher efficiency and significantly better purity of highly charged radioactive ion beams for further acceleration. The proposed EBIS project for CARIBU will heavily utilize state-of-the-art EBIS technology recently developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will allow us to reduce both the project cost and timescale, simultaneously insuring reliable technical realization of the cutting-edge technology. Several parameters of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder (EBIS-CB) will be relaxed with respect to the BNL EBIS in favor of higher reliability and lower cost. Technical performance of the CARIBU charge breeder will not suffer from such a relaxation and will provide high efficiency for a whole range of radioactive ion beams. The goal of this paper is to present the initial design of the EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS.

Ostroumov, P.; Alessi, J.; Kondrashev, S.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Vondrasek, R.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A.

2010-07-20

30

EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The construction of the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) for the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility is completed and its commissioning is being performed. In its full capacity, the CARIBU facility will use fission fragments from a 1 Curie (Ci) 252Cf source. The ions will be thermalized and collected into a low-energy ion beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge bred to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. To reach energies E/A 10 MeV/u, one should inject ions with charge-to-mass ratio (q/A) >= 1/7 into the ATLAS linac. In the first stage, the existing Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source will be used as a charge breeder. The maximum intensity of radioactive ion beams at the output of the gas catcher will not exceed 107 ions per second. A charge breeder based on an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) has significant advantages over the ECR option for ion beam intensities up to about 109 ions per second, providing 3-4 times higher efficiency and significantly better purity of highly charged radioactive ion beams for further acceleration. The proposed EBIS project for CARIBU will heavily utilize state-of-the-art EBIS technology recently developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will allow us to reduce both the project cost and timescale, simultaneously insuring reliable technical realization of the cutting-edge technology. Several parameters of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder (EBIS-CB) will be relaxed with respect to the BNL EBIS in favor of higher reliability and lower cost. Technical performance of the CARIBU charge breeder will not suffer from such a relaxation and will provide high efficiency for a whole range of radioactive ion beams. The goal of this paper is to present the initial design of the EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS.

Ostroumov, P.; Kondrashev, S.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Vondrasek, R.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A.

2010-07-01

31

EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS.  

SciTech Connect

The construction of the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) for the Argonne National Laboratory ATLAS facility is completed and its commissioning is being performed. In its full capacity, the CARIBU facility will use fission fragments from a 1 Curie (Ci) {sup 252}Cf source. The ions will be thermalized and collected into a low-energy ion beam by a helium gas catcher, mass analyzed by an isobar separator, and charge bred to higher charge states for acceleration in ATLAS. To reach energies E/A 10 MeV/u, one should inject ions with charge-to-mass ratio (q/A) {ge} 1/7 into the ATLAS linac. In the first stage, the existing Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source will be used as a charge breeder. The maximum intensity of radioactive ion beams at the output of the gas catcher will not exceed 10{sup 7} ions per second. A charge breeder based on an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) has significant advantages over the ECR option for ion beam intensities up to about 10{sup 9} ions per second, providing 3-4 times higher efficiency and significantly better purity of highly charged radioactive ion beams for further acceleration. The proposed EBIS project for CARIBU will heavily utilize state-of-the-art EBIS technology recently developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will allow us to reduce both the project cost and timescale, simultaneously insuring reliable technical realization of the cutting-edge technology. Several parameters of the CARIBU EBIS charge breeder (EBIS-CB) will be relaxed with respect to the BNL EBIS in favor of higher reliability and lower cost. Technical performance of the CARIBU charge breeder will not suffer from such a relaxation and will provide high efficiency for a whole range of radioactive ion beams. The goal of this paper is to present the initial design of the EBIS charge breeder for radioactive ion beams at ATLAS.

Ostroumov, P.; Kondrashev, S.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Vondrasek, R.; Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Pikin, A. (Physics); (BNL)

2010-07-01

32

Liquid metal ion source and alloy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A liquid metal ion source and alloy, wherein the species to be emitted from the ion source is contained in a congruently vaporizing alloy. In one embodiment, the liquid metal ion source acts as a source of arsenic, and in a source alloy the arsenic is combined with palladium, preferably in a liquid alloy having a range of compositions from

Clark Jr. William M; Mark W. Utlaut; Robert G. Behrens; Eugene G. Szklarz; Edmund K. Storms; Robert P. Santandrea; Lynwood W. Swanson

1988-01-01

33

Protein-Transition Metal Ion Networks  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Proteins obtained from agricultural sources were blended with divalent metal ions. Feather keratin, egg albumin, and wheat gluten showed increases of 2-3 times in modulus with addition of divalent transition metal ions Cu2+ and Zn2+. Increasing concentrations of ions resulted in increased stiffnes...

34

Method for making radioactive metal articles having small dimensions  

DOEpatents

A method for making a radioactive article such as wire, includes the steps of providing a metal article having a first shape, such a cylinder, that is either radioactive itself or can be converted to a second, radioactive isotope by irradiation; melting the metal article one or more times; optionally adding an alloying metal to the molten metal in order to enhance ductility or other properties; placing the metal article having the first shape (e.g., cylindrical) into a cavity in the interior of an extrusion body (e.g., a cylinder having a cylindrical cavity therein); extruding the extrusion body and the article having the first shape located in the cavity therein, resulting in an elongated extrusion body and an article having a second shape; removing the elongated extrusion body, for example by chemical means, leaving the elongated inner article substantially intact; optionally repeating the extrusion procedure one or more times; and then drawing the elongated article to still further elongate it, into wire, foil, or another desired shape. If the starting metal is enriched in a radioactive isotope or a precursor thereof, the end product can provide a more intense radiation source than conventionally manufactured radioactive wire, foil, or the like.

Ohriner, Evan K. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-01-01

35

Managing the disposition of potentially radioactive scrap metal.  

PubMed

In 2002, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) issued Report No. 141, Managing Potentially Radioactive Scrap Metal. The report evaluates management policy and related issues regarding scrap metal generated in regulated facilities that have been under radiological control or have radiological concerns. It has been estimated that more than 9 million metric tons of scrap metal of all types that have been associated with the production or use of radioactive materials will be generated during the coming decades at various facilities across the United States. Currently, disposition of such metal has encountered particular obstacles, primarily because of the lack of a consistent disposition policy, systematic regulatory provisions, and, above all, public understanding. Without clarity in the regulatory passage, much of the scrap metal, including metal that has not been contaminated, could be mischaracterized as low-level radioactive waste, resulting in a costly disposition operation. NCRP Report No. 141 identifies this general category of metal as "potentially radioactive scrap metal" (PRSM) and discusses the viable disposition options for facilitating its management. Because much of the PRSM has been found to contain very low residual radioactivity or even none at all, one consideration is to release such metal outside of the radiological control framework. This would require the development and implementation of a set of strict release standards in the United States that would necessarily be risk-based and supported by a comprehensive management scheme. Developing a policy of this kind, however, would entail the resolution of many issues, not the least of which would be public acceptance, including that of the metal industry, of the possible recycling of PRSM in the general commerce. PMID:17033456

Chen, S Y

2006-11-01

36

Physics with energetic radioactive ion beams  

SciTech Connect

Beams of short-lived, unstable nuclei have opened new dimensions in studies of nuclear structure and reactions. Such beams also provide key information on reactions that take place in our sun and other stars. Status and prospects of the physics with energetic radioactive beams are summarized.

Henning, W.F.

1996-12-31

37

Ion beam analysis of radioactive samples  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The nuclear microprobe facility of the Pierre Süe Laboratory is fitted with two microbeam lines. One is dedicated to non-active samples. The other one, located in a controlled shielded area, offers the unique feature of being devoted to radioactive samples. Operational since 1998, it is strongly linked to nuclear research programs and has been dimensioned to accept radioactive but non-contaminant radioactive samples, including small quantities of UOX or MOX irradiated fuel. The samples, transported in a shipping cask, are unloaded and handled in hot cells with slaved arms. The analysis chamber, situated in a concrete cell, is equipped with charged particle detectors and a Si(Li) X-ray detector, shielded in order to reduce the radioactive noise produced by the sample, allowing ERDA, RBS, NRA and PIXE. After a description of the facility, including the sample handling in the hot cells and the analysis chamber, we will give an overview of the various experimental programs which have been performed, with an emphasis on the determination of the hydrogen distribution and local content in nuclear fuel cladding tubes.

Raepsaet, C.; Khodja, H.; Bossis, P.; Pipon, Y.; Roudil, D.

2009-06-01

38

Liquid metal ion source and alloy  

DOEpatents

A liquid metal ion source and alloy, wherein the species to be emitted from the ion source is contained in a congruently vaporizing alloy. In one embodiment, the liquid metal ion source acts as a source of arsenic, and in a source alloy the arsenic is combined with palladium, preferably in a liquid alloy having a range of compositions from about 24 to about 33 atomic percent arsenic. Such an alloy may be readily prepared by a combustion synthesis technique. Liquid metal ion sources thus prepared produce arsenic ions for implantation, have long lifetimes, and are highly stable in operation.

Clark, Jr., William M. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Utlaut, Mark W. (Saugus, CA); Behrens, Robert G. (Los Alamos, NM); Szklarz, Eugene G. (Los Alamos, NM); Storms, Edmund K. (Los Alamos, NM); Santandrea, Robert P. (Santa Fe, NM); Swanson, Lynwood W. (McMinnville, OR)

1988-10-04

39

ISOLATION OF RADIOACTIVE METALS FROM LIQUID WASTES  

EPA Science Inventory

Metals are present in many waste streams, and pose challenges with regard to their disposal. Release of metals into the environment presents both human health and ecological concerns. As a result, efforts are directed at reducing their toxicity, bioavailability, and environment...

40

PROTEIN-TRANSITION METAL ION NETWORKS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Proteins obtained from agricultural sources were blended with divalent metal ions. Feather keratin, egg albumin, and wheat gluten had low, medium, and high levels of aspartic and glutamic acid, respectively, and FT-IR showed that the divalent transition metal ions Mn2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ were tightly ...

41

Practical hardness scales for metal ion complexes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimentally determined log stability constant differences for substitution reactions of one ligand for another on a metal ion are used to derive practical metal ion hardness–softness scales applicable to aqueous solutions. These scales probably correspond to what most investigators imply when they use the terms hardness and softness. The correlation between the halide scale for fluoride minus bromide and the

R. Bruce Martin

2002-01-01

42

COMPUTATIONAL DESIGN OF METAL ION SEQUESTERING AGENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides...

43

Status report for the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility  

SciTech Connect

In 1992, the HHIRF became a project to develop a first-generation radioactive ion beam facility, the HRIBF, a national user facility for RIB research. Intense beams from ORIC will produce radioactive atoms as reaction products in thick targets using an ISOL-type target-ion source mounted on a 300-kV RIB injector. These radioactive atoms will be ionized, mass analyzed, charge exchanged, accelerated to ground potential, and analyzed again to separate isobars with a second-stage mass analyzer. The resulting RIBs will be injected into the tandem and accelerated to energies of interest for nuclear physics and astrophysics studied. The construction phase of the project has been completed. A report on the status and progress developing the facility is given, along with the long term development plans.

Olsen, D.K.; Auble, R.L.; Alton, G.D. [and others

1995-12-31

44

Spin Observables in Reactions with Radioactive Ion Beams  

SciTech Connect

Polarization observables in nuclear reactions with exotic nuclei will provide important information concerning structural properties of nuclei and reaction mechanisms. We are currently engaged in exploring the use of polarization observables with radioactive ion beams and in the development of a polarized cryogenic target.

Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn} [ORNL; Urrego Blanco, Juan Pablo [ORNL

2007-01-01

45

Contamination analysis of radioactive samples in focused ion beam instruments.  

PubMed

The use of Focused Ion Beam (FIB) instrument's to analyze and prepare samples that are radioactive requires attentiveness to the materials that are dislodged and free inside the chamber. Radioactive sputtered material must be understood even when observed at trace concentrations. Measurements using liquid scintillation counting and high purity germanium detectors were used to evaluate contamination on accessible surfaces inside a focused ion beam chamber that was used in the preparation of samples that were radioactive. The maximum removable contamination found was 0.27 0.4 Bq cm(-2), on the focused ion beam wall with 0.24 0.019 Bq cm(-2) on the door. Although these magnitudes of removable contamination are inconsequential for activation products, these same magnitudes of actinides, for example 239Pu, would represent 3.2% of an Annual Limit of Intake. This might be considered significant if one examines the relatively infrequent use of this device for the preparation of radioactive samples. Predicted activities of sputtered material were found using the software Transport of Ions in Matter, estimating that 0.003% of a radioactive samples activity is released into the FIB chamber. A used secondary electron detector's activity was measured to be 383.7 8.1 Bq. Preferential build-up of sputtered materials due to temperature or static charge gradients was considered. No temperature gradients were observed. Static charge gradients were measured inside the chamber varying between 0.057% below the mean to 34% higher than the mean. However, the magnitudes of contamination measured did not correlate to static charge gradients. Deposition in the chamber appears to have no mechanical cause but rather is sporadic however, measureable. Experience to date has been limited to samples of low activity; nevertheless, contamination inside the chamber was observed. Users should anticipate higher levels of readily dispersible radioactive contamination within the FIB as sample activity increases. PMID:23287516

Evelan, Audrey Ruth; Brey, Richard R

2013-02-01

46

?-delayed neutron spectroscopy using trapped radioactive ions.  

PubMed

A novel technique for ?-delayed neutron spectroscopy has been demonstrated using trapped ions. The neutron-energy spectrum is reconstructed by measuring the time of flight of the nuclear recoil following neutron emission, thereby avoiding all the challenges associated with neutron detection, such as backgrounds from scattered neutrons and ? rays and complicated detector-response functions. (137)I(+) ions delivered from a (252)Cf source were confined in a linear Paul trap surrounded by radiation detectors, and the ?-delayed neutron-energy spectrum and branching ratio were determined by detecting the ?(-) and recoil ions in coincidence. Systematic effects were explored by determining the branching ratio three ways. Improvements to achieve higher detection efficiency, better energy resolution, and a lower neutron-energy threshold are proposed. PMID:23496704

Yee, R M; Scielzo, N D; Bertone, P F; Buchinger, F; Caldwell, S; Clark, J A; Deibel, C M; Fallis, J; Greene, J P; Gulick, S; Lascar, D; Levand, A F; Li, G; Norman, E B; Pedretti, M; Savard, G; Segel, R E; Sharma, K S; Sternberg, M G; Van Schelt, J; Zabransky, B J

2013-03-01

47

A high intensity electron beam ion trap for charge state boosting of radioactive ion beams  

SciTech Connect

A high intensity electron beam ion trap under development at LLNL could be adapted for charge state boosting of radioactive ion beams, enabling a substantial reduction in the size and cost of a post-accelerator. We report estimates of the acceptance, ionization time, charge state distribution, emittance, and beam intensity for charge state boosting of radioactive ions in this device. The estimates imply that, for tin isotopes, over 10{sup 10} ions/s can be ionized to q=40+ with an absolute emittance of approximately 1 {pi} mm mrad at an energy of 30xq keV.

Marrs, R. E.; Slaughter, D. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

1999-06-10

48

A high intensity electron beam ion trap for charge state boosting of radioactive ion beams  

SciTech Connect

A high intensity electron beam ion trap under development at LLNL could be adapted for charge state boosting of radioactive ion beams, enabling a substantial reduction in the size and cost of a post-accelerator. We report estimates of the acceptance, ionization time, charge state distribution, emittance, and beam intensity for charge state boosting of radioactive ions in this device. The estimates imply that, for tin isotopes, over 10{sup 10}&hthinsp;ions/s can be ionized to q=40+ with an absolute emittance of approximately 1 {pi} mm mrad at an energy of 30{times}q&hthinsp;keV. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Marrs, R.E.; Slaughter, D.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

1999-06-01

49

Pseudo ribbon metal ion beam source  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes high broad metal ion source based on dc macroparticle filtered vacuum arc plasma generation with the dc ion-beam extraction. The possibility of formation of pseudo ribbon beam of metal ions with the parameters: ion beam length 0.6 m, ion current up to 0.2 A, accelerating voltage 40 kV, and ion energy up to 160 kV has been demonstrated. The pseudo ribbon ion beam is formed from dc vacuum arc plasma. The results of investigation of the vacuum arc evaporator ion-emission properties are presented. The influence of magnetic field strength near the cathode surface on the arc spot movement and ion-emission properties of vacuum-arc discharge for different cathode materials are determined. It was shown that vacuum-arc discharge stability can be reached when the magnetic field strength ranges from 40 to 70 G on the cathode surface.

Stepanov, Igor B., E-mail: stepanovib@tpu.ru; Ryabchikov, Alexander I.; Sivin, Denis O.; Verigin, Dan A. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenina Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)] [Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenina Avenue, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

2014-02-15

50

Pseudo ribbon metal ion beam source.  

PubMed

The paper describes high broad metal ion source based on dc macroparticle filtered vacuum arc plasma generation with the dc ion-beam extraction. The possibility of formation of pseudo ribbon beam of metal ions with the parameters: ion beam length 0.6 m, ion current up to 0.2 A, accelerating voltage 40 kV, and ion energy up to 160 kV has been demonstrated. The pseudo ribbon ion beam is formed from dc vacuum arc plasma. The results of investigation of the vacuum arc evaporator ion-emission properties are presented. The influence of magnetic field strength near the cathode surface on the arc spot movement and ion-emission properties of vacuum-arc discharge for different cathode materials are determined. It was shown that vacuum-arc discharge stability can be reached when the magnetic field strength ranges from 40 to 70 G on the cathode surface. PMID:24593634

Stepanov, Igor B; Ryabchikov, Alexander I; Sivin, Denis O; Verigin, Dan A

2014-02-01

51

Expansion of the radioactive ion beam program at Argonne  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System (ATLAS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) provides a wide range of stable ion beams and radioactive beams which have contributed to our understanding of nuclear structure and reactions. Until now, most radioactive ion beams at ATLAS were produced in flight using light-ion reactions such as (p, n), (d, n), (d, p), (d,3He), and (3He,n). Within the next few months, the radioactive ion beam program at ATLAS will acquire much extended, new capabilities with the commissioning of a new facility: the CAlifornium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU). CARIBU will supply ion beams of 252Cf fission fragments, which are thermalized in a gas catcher. The singly- and doubly-charged ions extracted from the gas catcher will be mass-separated and either delivered to a low-energy experimental area, or charge bred with a modified ECR source and subsequently reaccelerated by the ATLAS facility. Properties of hundreds of these neutron-rich nuclides will be investigated using ion traps, decay stations, the newly commissioned HELical Orbit Spectrometer (HELIOS), and other available experimental equipment such as Gammasphere and the FMA. HELIOS was constructed to take advantage of rare ion beams, such as those provided by CARIBU, through light-ion transfer reactions in inverse kinematics, and represents a new approach to the study of direct reactions in inverse kinematics which avoids kinematic broadening. Experiments are currently being conducted with HELIOS, and first results with the d(28Si,p) and d(12B,p) reactions have shown excellent energy resolution.

Clark, J. A.

2011-01-01

52

Radioactively Contaminated Scrap Metal An International Approach to Monitoring, Interception & Managing  

E-print Network

Radioactively Contaminated Scrap Metal An International Approach to Monitoring, Interception of uncontrolled radioactive source incidents. Aside from radiation exposure to workers and the public, this unwanted radioactive scrap material causes environmental and facility contamination with cleanup costs

53

The Use of Induction Melting for the Treatment of Metal Radioactive Waste - 13088  

SciTech Connect

The aim of the work is to assess the efficacy of induction melting metal for recycling radioactive waste in order to reduce the volume of solid radioactive waste to be disposed of, and utilization of the metal. (authors)

Zherebtsov, Alexander; Pastushkov, Vladimir; Poluektov, Pavel; Smelova, Tatiana; Shadrin, Andrey [JSC 'VNIINM', Rogova st., 5, 123098, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'VNIINM', Rogova st., 5, 123098, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01

54

The Scientific program with RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brasil)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radioactive Ion Beams Facility (RIBRAS) is in operation since 2004 at the Pelletron Accelerator Laboratory of the University of São Paulo and consists of two superconducting solenoids capable of producing low energy secondary beams of light exotic nuclei. Measurements of the elastic scattering, breakup and transfer reactions with radioactive projectiles such as 6He, 8Li, 7Be on several targets have been performed. A review of the research program carried on along the last four years using the RIBRAS facility is presented.

Lichtenthäler, R.; Lépine-Szily, A.; Guimarães, V.; de Faria, P. N.; Mendes, D. R.; Pires, K. C. C.; Morcelle, V.; Benjamim, E. A.; Moro, A. M.; Hussein, M. S.; Arazi, A.; Barioni, A.; Condori, R. Pampa; Morais, M. C.; Assunção, M.; Nunẽz, J. Alcantara; Padron, I.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Camargo, O.; Otani, Y.; Leistenschneider, E.; Scarduelli, V.

2009-06-01

55

Sorption of metal ions on alumina  

SciTech Connect

The adsorption of metal ions on aluminas is of great interest in different fields such as geochemistry, oceanography, limnology, and pollution control. Precipitation and adsorption of metal ions (Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and Cr(III)) on {gamma}-alumina were investigated experimentally. A surface chemical reaction model to calculate concentrations of aluminum ions, metal ions, and pH as variables depending on amount of alumina, volume of liquid and gas phase, initial metal concentration, and amount of acid or base added is presented. In the case of Co(II) the pH dependence of rest concentrations with and without alumina is equal; adsorption may be disregarded. For the other ions adsorption is important. Considering the charge of the surface does not improve the fit. In the pH region, where adsorption leads to lower rest concentrations than precipitation, adsorption may be described by a Henry isotherm.

Baumgarten, E.; Kirchhausen-Duesing, U. [Heinrich-Heine Univ. Duesseldorf (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie] [Heinrich-Heine Univ. Duesseldorf (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie

1997-10-01

56

Radioactive ion beam production challenges at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The radioactive ion beam (RIB) project at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) will provide for reconfiguration of the HHIRF accelerator system to enable provision of low-intensity RIBs for nuclear and astrophysics research. As we have progressed with the design of the reconfiguration, we have encountered several challenges that were not immediately obvious when first contemplating the project. The

M. J. Meigs; G. D. Alton; D. T. Dowling; D. L. Haynes; C. M. Jones; R. C. Juras; G. D. Mills; S. W. Mosko; D. K. Olsen; B. A. Tatum

1992-01-01

57

Nuclear astrophysics at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility  

SciTech Connect

The potential for understanding spectacular stellar explosions such as novae, supernovae, and X-ray bursts will be greatly enhanced by the availability of the low-energy, high-intensity, accelerated beams of proton-rich radioactive nuclei currently being developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These beams will be utilized in absolute cross section measurements of crucial (p, {gamma}) capture reactions in efforts to resolve the substantial qualitative uncertainties in current models of explosive stellar hydrogen burning outbursts. Details of the nuclear astrophysics research program with the unique HRIBF radioactive beams and a dedicated experimental endstation--centered on the Daresbury Recoil Separator--will be presented.

Smith, M.S.

1994-12-31

58

Proton-rich radioactive ion beams for nuclear astrophysics studies  

SciTech Connect

Novae and supernovae are spectacular stellar explosions which produce the majority of heavy elements in the Universe and generate prodigious amounts of energy. Our understanding of these catastrophic astrophysical events will be greatly enhanced by a new development in nuclear physics: the availability of low-energy, high-intensity, accelerated beams of proton-rich radioactive nuclei. By utilizing these beams for absolute cross section measurements of crucial (p,{gamma}) and ({alpha},{gamma}) capture reactions, we can begin to resolve the significant qualitative uncertainties in current models of explosive stellar hydrogen burning outbursts. Details of nuclear astrophysics studies with the unique radioactive beams planned for the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory will be presented.

Smith, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-12-31

59

Transport of radioactive ions in soil by electrokinetics  

SciTech Connect

An electrokinetic approach is being evaluated for in situ soil remediation at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This approach uses an applied electric field to induce transport of both radioactive and hazardous waste ions in soil. The work discussed in this paper involves the development of a new method to monitor the movement of the radioactive ions within the soil during the electrokinetic process. A closed cell and a gamma counter were used to provide iii situ measurements of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co movement in Hanford soil. Preliminary results show that for an applied potential of 200 V over approximately 200 hr, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}60 were transported a distance of 4 to 5 in. The monitoring technique demonstrated the feasibility of using electrokinetics for soil separation applications.

Buehler, M.F.; Surma, J.E.; Virden, J.W.

1994-10-01

60

An ion source module for the Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility  

SciTech Connect

An ion source module is developed for Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility. The ion source module is designed to meet the requirements of remote handling. The connection and disconnection of the electricity, cooling and vacuum between the module and peripheral units can be executed without on-site manual work. The primary test of the target ion source has been carried out and a Li{sup +} beam has been extracted. Details of the ion source module and its primary test results are described.

Cui, B., E-mail: cui@ciae.ac.cn; Huang, Q.; Tang, B.; Ma, R.; Chen, L.; Ma, Y. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)] [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)

2014-02-15

61

An ion source module for the Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility.  

PubMed

An ion source module is developed for Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facility. The ion source module is designed to meet the requirements of remote handling. The connection and disconnection of the electricity, cooling and vacuum between the module and peripheral units can be executed without on-site manual work. The primary test of the target ion source has been carried out and a Li(+) beam has been extracted. Details of the ion source module and its primary test results are described. PMID:24593616

Cui, B; Huang, Q; Tang, B; Ma, R; Chen, L; Ma, Y

2014-02-01

62

Ion-Ion Oscillatory Potentials in Liquid Metals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radial distribution functions obtained by X-ray and neutron measurements have been analyzed for eight liquid metals, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, Hg, Al and Pb, and for the liquid insulator Ar. It is shown that pair potentials between the ions in liquid metals can be obtained from the data, and that the general features of these curves are similar on

M. D. Johnson; P. Hutchinson; N. H. March

1964-01-01

63

The SPES radioactive ion beam project of INFN  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The SPES Radioactive Ion Beam facility at INFN-LNL is presently in the construction phase. The facility is based on the Isol (Isotope separation on-line) method with an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 35-70 MeV and a beam current of 0.20.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced Uranium fission at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting Linac at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A = 130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 - 109 pps. Aim of the SPES project is to provide a facility for high intensity radioactive ion beams for nuclear physics research as well as to develop an interdisciplinary research center based on the cyclotron proton beam.

de Angelis, Giacomo; Spes Collaboration; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

2014-07-01

64

The SPES Radioactive Ion Beam facility of INFN  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility (SPES) is presently under construction at the Legnaro National Laboratories of INFN. The SPES facility is based on the ISOL method using an UCx Direct Target able to sustain a power of 10 kW. The primary proton beam is provided by a high current Cyclotron accelerator with energy of 40 MeV and a beam current of 0.2-0.5 mA. Neutron-rich radioactive ions are produced by proton induced fission at an expected fission rate of the order of 1013 fissions per second. After ionization and selection the exotic isotopes are re-accelerated by the ALPI superconducting LINAC at energies of 10A MeV for masses in the region A=130 amu. The expected secondary beam rates are of the order of 107 – 109 pps. Aim of the SPES facility is to deliver high intensity radioactive ion beams of neutron rich nuclei for nuclear physics research as well as to be an interdisciplinary research center for radio-isotopes production for medicine and for neutron beams.

de Angelis, G.; Spes collaboration; Prete, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Corradetti, S.; Scarpa, D.; Rossignoli, M.; Monetti, A.; Lollo, M.; Calderolla, M.; Vasquez, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Sarchiapone, L.; Benini, D.; Favaron, P.; Rigato, M.; Pegoraro, R.; Maniero, D.; Calabretta, L.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Bisoffi, G.; Pisent, A.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Bassato, G.; Canella, S.; Gramegna, F.; Valiente, J.; Bermudez, J.; Mastinu, P. F.; Esposito, J.; Wyss, J.; Russo, A.; Zanella, S.

2015-02-01

65

Liquid metal ion source and alloy  

Microsoft Academic Search

A liquid metal ion source is described comprising: emission means for emitting positively charged ions of an elemental chemical species; and source means for supplying the species to be emitted to the emission means, the species being supplied in a congruently vaporizing non-eutectic alloy of the elemental chemical species and at least one other element.

W. M. Jr. Clark; M. W. Utlaut; E. K. Storms; R. G. Behrens; E. G. Szklarz; L. W. Swanson; R. P. Santandrea

1988-01-01

66

ION EXCHANGE SOFTENING: EFFECTS ON METAL CONCENTRATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

A corrosion control pipe loop study to evaluate the effect of ion exchange water softening on metal leaching from household plumbing materials was conducted on two different water qualities having different pH's and hardness levels. The results showed that removing hardness ions ...

67

Detection of Heavy Metal Ions Based on Quantum Point Contacts  

E-print Network

Detection of Heavy Metal Ions Based on Quantum Point Contacts Vasanth Rajagopalan, Salah Boussaad. The ability to detect trace amounts of metal ions is important because of the toxicity of heavy metal ions on many living organisms and the consequence of heavy metal ions not being biodegradable. To date, heavy

Zhang, Yanchao

68

Holifield!Radioactive!Ion!Beam!Facility! Cyclotron!Driver!White!Paper!  

E-print Network

Holifield!Radioactive!Ion!Beam!Facility! Cyclotron!Driver!White!Paper! ! ! ! ! prepared!in!response!! to!a!recommendation!from!the! !! Annual!Science!and!Technology!Review!! of!the!! Holifield!Radioactive!provides!preliminary!details!of!a!proposed!hadron!driver!accelerator! upgrade!(HDU)!to!the!Holifield!Radioactive!Ion!Beam!Facility!(HRIBF),!a!national!user! facility! for

69

RADIOACTIVE ION BEAM FACILITIES IN EUROPE: CURRENT STATUS AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENT  

E-print Network

RADIOACTIVE ION BEAM FACILITIES IN EUROPE: CURRENT STATUS AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENT John C. Cornell, GANIL, BP 55027, Caen 14076 cedex 5, France Abstract The production and acceleration of Radioactive Ion, they've done all the interesting nuclear physics with stable beams, so now they have to use radioactive

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

70

Metal-ion rescue revisited: Biochemical detection of site-bound metal ions important for RNA folding  

E-print Network

Metal-ion rescue revisited: Biochemical detection of site-bound metal ions important for RNA-dimensional architectures of RNA molecules, divalent metal ions populate specific locations, shedding their water molecules make essential contributions to function. Defining the locations of these site-bound metal ions remains

Das, Rhiju

71

Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents  

SciTech Connect

Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort.

Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

2005-06-15

72

Computational Design of Metal Ion Sequestering Agents  

SciTech Connect

Organic ligands that exhibit a high degree of metal ion recognition are essential precursors for developing separation processes and sensors for metal ions. Since the beginning of the nuclear era, much research has focused on discovering ligands that target specific radionuclides. Members of the Group 1A and 2A cations (e.g., Cs, Sr, Ra) and the f-block metals (actinides and lanthanides) are of primary concern to DOE. Although there has been some success in identifying ligand architectures that exhibit a degree of metal ion recognition, the ability to control binding affinity and selectivity remains a significant challenge. The traditional approach for discovering such ligands has involved lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing that, in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, have resulted in much wasted research effort.

Hay, Benjamin P.; Rapko, Brian M.

2006-06-01

73

Mutagenicity of metal ions in bacteria  

SciTech Connect

The mutagenicity of 24 metal salts was investigated in plate incorporation and fluctuation assays with Salmonella TA strains or Escherichia coli WP2 uvrA pKm 101. Chromate(VI) and selenate(VI) ions were found to be mutagenic in plate incorporation assays employing conventional media. On the other hand, cadmium(II), beryllium(II), chromate(VI), and metavanadate(V) ions were detected in conventional fluctuation assays, indicating the importance of this technique in detection of metal mutagens. Modified culture media, with trimetaphosphate ions in place of orthophosphate as the sole phosphate source for bacterial growth, were also used in this study. The media modifications prevented precipitation of metals such as nickel and cadmium as their insoluble phosphates, and allowed detection of the mutagenicity of metavanadate ions in plate incorporation assays. However, the fluctuation technique using standard media was shown to detect a wider range of mutagenic metal ions than tests with modified media. It is notable that metaarsenite(III), arsenate(V), and nickel(II) ions were not found to be mutagenic in any of the assays although they are known to be carcinogenic and are mutagenic in other test systems. Their lack of mutagenicity in the modified media indicates that precipitation of these ions as orthophosphates is not the reason for their lack of activity in standard bacterial assays.

Arlauskas, A.; Baker, R.S.U.; Bonin, A.M.; Tandon, R.K.; Crisp, P.T.; Ellis, J.

1985-04-01

74

Metal vapor arc ion plating  

DOEpatents

A method and apparatus for ion plating are described. The apparatus uses more negative than a first electrode voltage in a vacuum arc remelt system to attract low energy ions from the anode electrode to the article to be plated. 2 figs.

Bertram, L.A.; Fisher, R.W.; Mattox, D.M.; Zanner, F.J.

1986-09-09

75

High power target approaches for intense radioactive ion beam facilities  

SciTech Connect

Development of conceptual approaches for targets to produce intense radioactive ion beams is needed in anticipation of activity for a next-generation, intense ISOL-type radioactive beams facility, strongly recommended in the NSAC 1995 Long Range Plan for Nuclear Science. The production of isotopes in vapor form for subsequent mass separation and acceleration will depend on the ability to control target temperature profiles within the target resulting from interactions of the intense production beams with the target material. A number of earlier studies have identified promising approaches which need, however, to be carefully analyzed for specific target systems. A survey will be made of these earlier concepts employing various cooling techniques, including imposition of thermal barriers between the target materials and cooling systems. Some results of preliminary analyses are summarized. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Talbert, W.L. [Amparo Corporation, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504 (United States)]|[TRIUMF, Vancouver, B.C., V6T2A3 (CANADA)]|[Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Hodges, T.A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, B.C., V6T2A3 (CANADA); Hsu, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Fikani, M.M. [Amparo Corporation, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87504 (United States)

1997-02-01

76

High power target approaches for intense radioactive ion beam facilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Development of conceptual approaches for targets to produce intense radioactive ion beams is needed in anticipation of activity for a next-generation, intense ISOL-type radioactive beams facility, strongly recommended in the NSAC 1995 Long Range Plan for Nuclear Science. The production of isotopes in vapor form for subsequent mass separation and acceleration will depend on the ability to control target temperature profiles within the target resulting from interactions of the intense production beams with the target material. A number of earlier studies have identified promising approaches which need, however, to be carefully analyzed for specific target systems. A survey will be made of these earlier concepts employing various cooling techniques, including imposition of thermal barriers between the target materials and cooling systems. Some results of preliminary analyses are summarized.

Talbert, W. L.; Hodges, T. A.; Hsu, H.-H.; Fikani, M. M.

1997-02-01

77

A Study on Removal of Iodine, Iodide Ion, and Iodate Ion from Radioactive Wastewater  

SciTech Connect

For the two methods to remove iodine, the iodide ion and the iodate ion from radioactive waste water, we proposed previously, the main reactions were experimentally investigated to examine the feasibility of them. One is the reaction of the iodide ion and the iodate ion. In this reaction, it was confirmed that the reaction rate is faster with a pH of less than 2 and, to undergo the reaction faster under the condition of pH 2, an addition of excess iodide ions and iodate ions is necessary. Another is the reduction of the iodate ion and the iodine by pyrite. In the experiment, it was found that when the iodate ion in the solution is in contact with pyrite, it is reduced to iodine on the surface of the pyrite and the produced iodine is consecutively reduced to the iodide ion. The reaction occurred at room temperature under a wide range of pHs. Based on the results of this preliminary study, it is expected that a more substantial method could be prepared for the effective removal of an iodine mixture from radioactive wastewater. (authors)

Yim, S.P.; Kim, K.R.; Lee, M.S.; Chung, H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O.Box 150, Yusong, Daejon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, M.H. [University of Science and Technology, 52 Eoeun-dong, Yusong-gu, Daejon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, C.K. [Handong Global University, 3 Namsong-ri, Heunghae-eub, Puk-gu, Pohang, Kyungbuk, 791-708 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01

78

Direct conversion of radioactive and chemical waste containing metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, and organics to glass  

SciTech Connect

The Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (CMODS) is a new process for direct conversion of radioactive, mixed, and chemical wastes to glass. The wastes can be in the chemical forms of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, and organics. GMODS destroys organics and it incorporates heavy metals and radionuclides into a glass. Processable wastes may include miscellaneous spent fuels (SF), SF hulls and hardware, plutonium wastes in different forms, high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, ion-exchange resins, failed equipment, and laboratory wastes. Thermodynamic calculations indicate theoretical feasibility. Small-scale laboratory experiments (< 100 g per test) have demonstrated chemical laboratory feasibility for several metals. Additional work is needed to demonstrate engineering feasibility.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1994-05-02

79

Selection of targets and ion sources for RIB generation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility  

SciTech Connect

In this report, the authors describe the performance characteristics for a selected number of target ion sources that will be employed for initial use at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) as well as prototype ion sources that show promise for future use for RIB applications. A brief review of present efforts to select target materials and to design composite target matrix/heat-sink systems that simultaneously incorporate the short diffusion lengths, high permeabilities, and controllable temperatures required to effect fast and efficient diffusion release of the short-lived species is also given.

Alton, G.D.

1995-12-31

80

Targets for ion sources for RIB generation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is based on the use of the well-known on-line isotope separator (ISOL) technique in which radioactive nuclei are produced by fusion type reactions in selectively chosen target materials by high-energy proton, deuteron, or He ion beams from the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC). Among several major challenges posed by generating and accelerating adequate intensities of radioactive ion beams (RIBs), selection of the most appropriate target material for production of the species of interest is, perhaps, the most difficult. In this report, we briefly review present efforts to select target materials and to design composite target matrix/heat-sink systems that simultaneously incorporate the short diffusion lengths, high permeabilities, and controllable temperatures required to effect maximum diffusion release rates of the short-lived species that can be realized at the temperature limits of specific target materials. We also describe the performance characteristics for a selected number of target ion sources that will be employed for initial use at the HRIBF as well as prototype ion sources that show promise for future use for RIB applications.

Alton, G.D.

1995-12-31

81

The role of radioactive ion beams in nuclear astrophysics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Short-lived exotic nuclei play essential roles in the dynamics of many stellar objects and their associated nucleosynthesis, including core-collapse and thermonuclear supernovae, novae, x-ray bursters and mass-accreting neutron stars in binary systems. To produce such nuclei and to study their properties requires radioactive ion-beam facilities. While the short-lived nuclei on the neutron-deficient side of the chart of nuclei are often within reach at current experimental facilities, albeit not necessarily with the beam intensities needed, the extremely neutron-rich nuclei, required for an understanding of the synthesis of heavy elements in the Universe by the astrophysical r-process, have to wait, in most cases, for the next-generation radioactive ion-beam facilities. This paper discusses highlights of recent experimental and theoretical advances in determining the properties of exotic nuclei and the further need for reliable studies of astrophysical objects such as supernovae, novae, x-ray bursters and neutron stars.

Langanke, Karlheinz; Schatz, Hendrik

2013-01-01

82

Ion exchangers in radioactive waste management: natural Iranian zeolites.  

PubMed

Five samples of natural zeolites from different parts of Iran were chosen for this study. In order to characterize and determine their structures, X-ray diffraction and infrared spectrometry were carried out for each sample. The selective absorption properties of each zeolite were found by calculating the distribution coefficient (K(d)) of various simulated wastes which were prepared by spiking the radionuclides with (131)I, (99)Mo, (153)Sm, (140)La and (147)Nd. All the zeolite samples used in this study had extremely high absorption value towards (140)La; clinoptolite from Mianeh and analsite from Ghalehkhargoshi showed good absorption for (147)Nd; clinoptolite from Semnan and clinoptolite from Firozkoh showed high absorption for (153)Sm; mesolite from Arababad Tabas showed good absorption for (99)Mo; and finally mesolite from Arababad Tabas, clinoptolite from Semnan and clinoptolite from Firozkoh could be used to selectively absorb (131)I from the stimulated waste which was prepared. The natural zeolites chosen for these studies show a similar pattern to those synthetic ion exchangers in the literature and in some cases an extremely high selectivity towards certain radioactive elements. Hence the binary separation of radioactive elements could easily be carried out. Furthermore, these zeolites, which are naturally occurring ion exchangers, are viable economically and extremely useful alternatives in this industry. PMID:16099667

Nilchi, A; Maalek, B; Khanchi, A; Ghanadi Maragheh, M; Bagheri, A; Savoji, K

2006-01-01

83

METAL IONS: Physiological function and Pathological rle  

E-print Network

COMPONENTS At least one-third of all proteins encoded in the human genome contain metal ions They can easily Bombastus von Hohenheim) (1493-1541) "...The dosage makes it either a poison or a remedy" ,,Alle Ding sind from the cell is continuously controlled by specific proteins #12;Metabolismo del Ferro nei macrofagi

Morante, Silvia

84

Material Removes Heavy Metal Ions From Water  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New high capacity ion-exchange polymer material removes toxic metal cations from contaminated water. Offers several advantages. High sensitivities for such heavy metals as lead, cadmium, and copper and capable of reducing concentrations in aqueous solutions to parts-per-billion range. Removes cations even when calcium present. Material made into variety of forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As result, adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water, usually hard wherever found, whether in wastewater-treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or homes. Another important feature that adsorbed metals easily reclaimed by either destructive or nondestructive process. Other tests show ion-exchange polymer made inexpensively; easy to use; strong, flexible, not easily torn; and chemically stable in storage, in aqueous solutions, and in acidic or basic solution.

Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol; Savino, Joseph M.

1995-01-01

85

Metal ions affecting reproduction and development.  

PubMed

Many metal ions (lead, mercury, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, nickel, vanadium, copper, lithium) exert a wide variety of adverse effects on reproduction and development, including influence on male and female subfertility or fertility, abortions, malformations, birth defects, and effects on the central nervous system. The effects produced by metal ions depend on several factors, such as timing and duration of exposure, their distribution and accumulation in various organs (e.g., the nervous system), and on the interference with specific developmental processes. Neonatal and early postnatal periods are lifespan segments during which sensitivity to metals is high; e.g., lead toxicity on the developing organism is paradigmatic of related well known and still open questions. In more recent decades, important mechanisms of action have been suggested: the endocrine disruption via impact of metal ions on reproductive hormones and the oxidative stress. While experimental data provide clear evidence of effects of many metals, human data are scant and traditionally limited to high levels of a few metal ions, like lead on male fertility. Less documented are reproductive effects for mercury, manganese, chromium, nickel, and arsenic for the same gender. More complex is the demonstration of effects on female reproduction and on pregnancy. The action of lead, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, and mercury may in fact be relevant in several stages, beginning in fetal life, during early development or maturity, and is characterized by subfertility, infertility, intrauterine growth retardation, spontaneous abortions, malformations, birth defects, postnatal death, learning and behavior deficits, and premature aging. Also, for females the evidences of specific aspects such as fertility or abortions are usually higher and clearer from animal experiments than from human studies. PMID:21473384

Apostoli, Pietro; Catalani, Simona

2011-01-01

86

A Radioactive Ion Beam Accelerator Concept Based on Linear Accelerators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A concept for an accelerator complex for efficiently producing high-quality radioactive beams at Coulomb barrier energies and higher will be presented. A high-power driver accelerator would be used to produce radionuclides in a target that is closely coupled to an ion source and mass separator, i.e. an Isotope-Separator-On-Line (ISOL) system. A challenge is to achieve high efficiency for the release, ionization, and acceleration of isotopes over a broad mass range, from atomic masses as low as 6 to well over mass 100. The scheme utilizes existing ISOL-type 1+ ion source technology followed by CW Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerators and superconducting linacs. Over 95% of the total acceleration is done by the superconducting linacs. A benchmark beam, ^132Sn, would require two stripping stages, one a gas stripper at very low velocity after the first RFQ section, and one a foil stripper at higher velocity after a superconducting-linac injector. Ions with mass 66 or less would require only the foil stripper.

Nolen, Jerry

1998-04-01

87

Radioactive Ions Production Ring for Beta-Beams  

E-print Network

Within the FP7 EUROnu program, Work Package 4 addresses the issues of production and acceleration of 8Li and 8B isotopes through the Beta-Beam complex, for the production of electron-neutrino. One of the major critical issues is the production of a high enougth ion ßux, to fulÞll the requirements for physics. In alternative to the direct ISOL production method, a new ap- proach is proposed in [1]. The idea is to use a compact ring for Litium ions at 25 MeV and an internal He or D target, in which the radioactive-isotopes production takes place. The beam is expected to survive for several thousands of turns, therefore cooling in 6D is required and, according this scheme, the ionization cooling provided by the target itself and a suitable RF system would be sufÞcient. We present some preliminary work on the Production ring lat- tice design and cooling issues, for the 7Li ions, and propose plans for future studies, within the EUROnu program.

Benedetto, E; Wehner, J

2010-01-01

88

Substrate Profile and Metal-ion Selectivity of Human Divalent Metal-ion Transporter-1*  

PubMed Central

Divalent metal-ion transporter-1 (DMT1) is a H+-coupled metal-ion transporter that plays essential roles in iron homeostasis. DMT1 exhibits reactivity (based on evoked currents) with a broad range of metal ions; however, direct measurement of transport is lacking for many of its potential substrates. We performed a comprehensive substrate-profile analysis for human DMT1 expressed in RNA-injected Xenopus oocytes by using radiotracer assays and the continuous measurement of transport by fluorescence with the metal-sensitive PhenGreen SK fluorophore. We provide validation for the use of PhenGreen SK fluorescence quenching as a reporter of cellular metal-ion uptake. We determined metal-ion selectivity under fixed conditions using the voltage clamp. Radiotracer and continuous measurement of transport by fluorescence assays revealed that DMT1 mediates the transport of several metal ions that were ranked in selectivity by using the ratio Imax/K0.5 (determined from evoked currents at ?70 mV): Cd2+ > Fe2+ > Co2+, Mn2+ ? Zn2+, Ni2+, VO2+. DMT1 expression did not stimulate the transport of Cr2+, Cr3+, Cu+, Cu2+, Fe3+, Ga3+, Hg2+, or VO+. 55Fe2+ transport was competitively inhibited by Co2+ and Mn2+. Zn2+ only weakly inhibited 55Fe2+ transport. Our data reveal that DMT1 selects Fe2+ over its other physiological substrates and provides a basis for predicting the contribution of DMT1 to intestinal, nasal, and pulmonary absorption of metal ions and their cellular uptake in other tissues. Whereas DMT1 is a likely route of entry for the toxic heavy metal cadmium, and may serve the metabolism of cobalt, manganese, and vanadium, we predict that DMT1 should contribute little if at all to the absorption or uptake of zinc. The conclusion in previous reports that copper is a substrate of DMT1 is not supported. PMID:22736759

Illing, Anthony C.; Shawki, Ali; Cunningham, Christopher L.; Mackenzie, Bryan

2012-01-01

89

High-current pulsed ion source for metallic ions  

SciTech Connect

A new sputter-ion PIG source and magnet system, optimized for intermediate charge states, q/A of 0.02 to 0.03, is described. This source will be used with the new Wideroe-based injector for the SuperHILAC. Pulsed electrical currents of several emA of heavy metal ions have been produced in a normalized emittance area of .05..pi.. cm-mr. The source system is comprised of two electrically separate anode chambers, one in operation and one spare, which can be selected by remote control. The entire source head is small and quickly removable.

Gavin, B.; Abbott, S.; MacGill, R.; Sorensen, R.; Staples, J.; Thatcher, R.

1981-03-01

90

Detection of Heavy Metal Ions in Drinking Water Using a  

E-print Network

Detection of Heavy Metal Ions in Drinking Water Using a High-Resolution Differential Surface-resolution differential surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor for heavy metal ion detection. The sensor surface using this sensor. Introduction The detection and quantification of heavy metal ions are important

Chen, Wilfred

91

The future radioactive ion beam research program at Oak Ridge  

SciTech Connect

Early in 1995, the ORNL Holifield Facility is scheduled to return to operation as a dedicated radioactive ion beam (RIB) facility. This enhanced capability will open up new possibilities for research on the structure of and phenomena occurring in proton-rich nuclei. Among the opportunities will be the creation of heavier N{approximately}Z nuclei, approaching {sup 100}Sn, and the study of exotic nuclear shapes, extensions of studies of the p-n interaction and super-allowed beta decay, and examination of nuclear structure near the proton drip line. In addition to new nuclear and atomic physics research opportunities, the beams from the Holifield RIB facility are expected to provide new capabilities for measurements important to nuclear astrophysics. To carry out this experimental program, various upgrades are planned to the existing experimental apparatus, and a new, third-generation, recoil-mass separator is being constructed.

Ball, J.B.

1993-11-01

92

a Gas Jet Target for Radioactive Ion Beam Experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the development of new radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities such as FRIB, which will push measurements further away from stability, the need for improved RIB targets is more crucial than ever. Important scattering, transfer and capture reaction measurements of rare, exotic, and unstable nuclei on hydrogen and helium require targets that are dense, highly localized, and pure. To this end, the JENSA Collaboration led by the Colorado ol of Mines (CSM) is designing, building and testing a supersonic gas jet target for use at existing and future RIB facilities. The gas jet target allows for a high density and purity of target nuclei (such as 3He) within a highly confined region, without the use of windows or backing materials, and will also enable the use of state-of-the-art detection systems. The motivation, specifications and status of the CSM gas jet target system is discussed.

Chipps, K. A.; Greife, U.; Hager, U.; Sarazin, F.; Smith, M. S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Pain, S. D.; Schmitt, K. T.; Schatz, H.; Montes, F.; Meisel, Z.; Blackmon, J. C.; Linhardt, L. E.; Wiescher, M.; Couder, M.; Berg, G. P. A.; Robertson, D.; Vetter, P. A.; Lemut, A.; Erikson, L.

2013-03-01

93

Intravascular brachytherapy with radioactive stents produced by ion implantation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

About 1 million patients are treated for stenosis of coronary arteries by percutaneous balloon angioplasty annually worldwide. In many cases a so called stent is inserted into the vessel to keep it mechanically open. Restenosis is observed in about 20-30% of these cases, which can be treated by irradiating the stented vessel segment. In our approach, we utilized the stent itself as radiation source by ion implanting 32P. Investigations of the surface properties were performed with special emphasis on activity retention. Clinical data of about 400 patients showed radioactive stents can suppress instent restenosis, but a so called edge effect appeared, which can be avoided by the new "drug eluting stents".

Golombeck, M.-A.; Heise, S.; Schloesser, K.; Schuessler, B.; Schweickert, H.

2003-05-01

94

Fluorescence polarization immunoassays for metal ions.  

PubMed

Antibodies raised against a given metal ion complex of a polyaminopolycarboxylate chelating agent can display specificity for the immunizing chelate and, when used in conjunction with a fluorophore-labeled analog of that chelate, can form the basis for highly sensitive and specific methods for detecting that metal ion by competitive inhibition fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA). Chelate complexes of ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'- tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and of a hetrocyclic ring-substituted derivative of diethylenetriamine-N, N', N"-triacetic acid (DTTA) have been used to configure such assays for the heavy metal ions lead(II) and cadmium(II) respectively. Limits of detection for the 1:1 metal chelates under ideal conditions are 20 ppt for lead(II) and below 100 ppt for cadmium(II). Standard curves for 0 - 100 nM cadmium (II) chelate can be constructed in the presence of fixed 250 nM concentrations of the corresponding, potentially cross-reactive chelates of zinc(II), copper(II) and mercury(II). Cross-reactivity of the lead (II) FPIA with 15 non-target metals is below 0.2% in all cases except for mercury(II) (0.37%). These characteristics have allowed the development of FPIA methods for the quantitative analysis of lead in a variety of samples relevant to environmental monitoring, including soil, dust, solid wastes and drinking water. Although applied thus far to heavy metals that are of concern as toxic contaminants in the environment, anti-chelate FPIA methods are also in principle applicable to a wide variety of other metal ions, including precious metals and various transition and main group elements used or monitored in a range of industrial applications. As conventional methods for trace metal analysis based on atomic spectroscopy are relatively slow, expensive and cumbersome, anti-chelate FPIA methods have the potential to supplant many existing techniques and in so doing extend the use of immunoassay technology beyond the biomedical, veterinary and agricultural spheres in which it has historically found use. PMID:12678703

Johnson, David K

2003-05-01

95

Metal ions in the atmosphere of Neptune.  

PubMed

Microwave propagation experiments performed with Voyager 2 at Neptune revealed sharp layers of electrons in Neptune's lower ionosphere with densities of approximately 10(4) per cubic centimeter. These layers are reminiscent of the sporadic-E layers in the Earth's ionosphere, and when taken together with data from the other giant planets, these data confirm the importance of the magnetic field in layer formation. A photochemical model that incorporates species produced by meteoroid ablation predicts that singly ionized magnesium is the most likely metal to be found in the layers, although laboratory data on the kinetics of metallic atoms and ions in a reducing environment are lacking. The metal chemistry discussed here is directly relevant to the abundant metals observed at the impact site of the G fragment of comet Shoemaker Levy 9 on Jupiter. PMID:7839139

Lyons, J R

1995-02-01

96

A gas jet target for radioactive ion beam experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities, like FRIB in the US or FAIR in Europe, will push further away from stability and enable the next generation of nuclear physics experiments. Thus, the need for improved RIB targets is more crucial than ever: developments in exotic beams should coincide with developments in targets for use with those beams, in order for nuclear physics to remain on the cutting edge. Of great importance to the future of RIB physics are scattering, transfer and capture reaction measurements of rare, exotic, and unstable nuclei on light targets such as hydrogen and helium. These measurements require targets that are dense, highly localized, and pure, and conventional targets often suffer too many drawbacks to allow for such experimental designs. Targets must also accommodate the use of large area, highly-segmented silicon detector arrays, high-efficiency gamma arrays, and novel heavy ion detectors to efficiently measure the reaction products. To address this issue, the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) Collaboration led by the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) is in the process of designing, building and testing a supersonic gas jet target for use at existing and future RIB facilities. The gas jet target provides a high density and high purity of target nuclei within a tightly confined region, without the use of windows or backing materials. The design also enables the use of multiple state-of-the-art detection systems.

Chipps, K. A.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Browne, J.; Couder, M.; Erikson, L. E.; Greife, U.; Hager, U.; Kontos, A.; Lemut, A.; Linhardt, L. E.; Meisel, Z.; Montes, F.; Pain, S. D.; Robertson, D.; Sarazin, F.; Schatz, H.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Vetter, P.; Wiescher, M.

2013-04-01

97

Production of light radioactive ion beams (RIB) using inverse kinematics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At Nuclear Science Centre (NSC), New Delhi, we have implemented a facility to produce low energy light radioactive ion beams (RIBs) using (p,n) type of reactions in inverse kinematics. For this purpose primary beams from the 15-UD Pelletron accelerator impinged on a thin polypropylene foil mounted on a rotating/linearly moving target assembly. For efficiently separating the secondary beam from primary beam, the existing recoil mass spectrometer (RMS) HIRA was operated with new ion optics. Suitable hardware modifications were also made. Using this facility, we have extracted a 7Be beam of purity better than 99% and spot-size ˜4 mm in diameter. This 7Be beam has been utilized in a variety of experiments in the energy range of 15-22 MeV. Typical beam parameters are: intensity 10 4 pps, angular spread ±30 mrad and energy spread ±0.5 MeV. Development of appropriate detector setup/target arrangement were also made to perform these experiments. In this paper, we describe the implementation of this project.

Das, J. J.; Sugathan, P.; Madhavan, N.; Madhusudhana Rao, P. V.; Jhingan, A.; Varughese, T.; Barua, S.; Nath, S.; Sinha, A. K.; Kumar, B.; Zacharias, J.

2005-12-01

98

A gas jet target for radioactive ion beam experiments  

SciTech Connect

New radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities, like FRIB in the US or FAIR in Europe, will push further away from stability and enable the next generation of nuclear physics experiments. Thus, the need for improved RIB targets is more crucial than ever: developments in exotic beams should coincide with developments in targets for use with those beams, in order for nuclear physics to remain on the cutting edge. Of great importance to the future of RIB physics are scattering, transfer and capture reaction measurements of rare, exotic, and unstable nuclei on light targets such as hydrogen and helium. These measurements require targets that are dense, highly localized, and pure, and conventional targets often suffer too many drawbacks to allow for such experimental designs. Targets must also accommodate the use of large area, highly-segmented silicon detector arrays, high-efficiency gamma arrays, and novel heavy ion detectors to efficiently measure the reaction products. To address this issue, the Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) Collaboration led by the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) is in the process of designing, building and testing a supersonic gas jet target for use at existing and future RIB facilities. The gas jet target provides a high density and high purity of target nuclei within a tightly confined region, without the use of windows or backing materials. The design also enables the use of multiple state-of-the-art detection systems.

Chipps, K. A.; Greife, U.; Hager, U.; Sarazin, F. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Bardayan, D. W.; Pain, S. D.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Blackmon, J. C.; Linhardt, L. E. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Browne, J.; Kontos, A.; Meisel, Z.; Montes, F.; Schatz, H. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory/Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Couder, M.; Robertson, D.; Wiescher, M. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (United States); Erikson, L. E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Lemut, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); and others

2013-04-19

99

Effects of Metal Ion Adduction on the Gas-Phase Conformations of Protein Ions  

PubMed Central

Changes in protein ion conformation as a result of nonspecific adduction of metal ions to the protein during electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions were investigated using traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). For all proteins examined, protein cations (and in most cases anions) with nonspecific metal ion adducts are more compact than the fully protonated (or deprotonated) ions with the same charge state. Compaction of protein cations upon nonspecific metal ion binding is most significant for intermediate charge state ions, and there is a greater reduction in collisional cross section with increasing number of metal ion adducts and increasing ion valency, consistent with an electrostatic interaction between the ions and the protein. Protein cations with the greatest number of adducted metal ions are no more compact than the lowest protonated ions formed from aqueous solutions. These results show that smaller collisional cross sections for metal-attached protein ions are not a good indicator of a specific metal-protein interaction in solution, because nonspecific metal ion adduction also results in smaller gaseous protein cation cross sections. In contrast, the collisional cross section of ?-lactalbumin, which specifically binds one Ca2+, is larger for the holo-form compared to the apo-form, in agreement with solution-phase measurements. Because compaction of protein cations occurs when metal ion adduction is nonspecific, elongation of a protein cation may be a more reliable indicator that a specific metal ion-protein interaction occurs in solution. PMID:23733259

Flick, Tawnya G.; Merenbloom, Samuel I.; Williams, Evan R.

2013-01-01

100

Effects of Metal Ion Adduction on the Gas-Phase Conformations of Protein Ions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Changes in protein ion conformation as a result of nonspecific adduction of metal ions to the protein during electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions were investigated using traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). For all proteins examined, protein cations (and in most cases anions) with nonspecific metal ion adducts are more compact than the fully protonated (or deprotonated) ions with the same charge state. Compaction of protein cations upon nonspecific metal ion binding is most significant for intermediate charge state ions, and there is a greater reduction in collisional cross section with increasing number of metal ion adducts and increasing ion valency, consistent with an electrostatic interaction between the ions and the protein. Protein cations with the greatest number of adducted metal ions are no more compact than the lowest protonated ions formed from aqueous solutions. These results show that smaller collisional cross sections for metal-attached protein ions are not a good indicator of a specific metal-protein interaction in solution because nonspecific metal ion adduction also results in smaller gaseous protein cation cross sections. In contrast, the collisional cross section of ?-lactalbumin, which specifically binds one Ca2+, is larger for the holo-form compared with the apo-form, in agreement with solution-phase measurements. Because compaction of protein cations occurs when metal ion adduction is nonspecific, elongation of a protein cation may be a more reliable indicator that a specific metal ion-protein interaction occurs in solution.

Flick, Tawnya G.; Merenbloom, Samuel I.; Williams, Evan R.

2013-11-01

101

Selection of RIB targets using ion implantation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Among several major challenges posed by generating and accelerating adequate intensities of RIBs, selection of the most appropriate target material is perhaps the most difficult because of the requisite fast and selective thermal release of minute amounts of the short-lived product atoms from the ISOL target in the presence of bulk amounts of target material. Experimental studies are under way at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) which are designed to measure the time evolution of implanted elements diffused from refractory target materials which are candidates for forming radioactive ion beams (RIBs) at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF). The diffusion coefficients are derived by comparing experimental data with numerical solutions to a one-dimensional form of Fick's second equation for ion implanted distributions. In this report, we describe the experimental arrangement, experimental procedures, and provide time release data and diffusion coefficients for releasing ion implanted 37Cl from Zr 5Si 3 and 75As, 79Br, and 78Se from Zr 5Ge 3 and estimates of the diffusion coefficients for 35Cl, 63Cu, 65Cu, 69Ga, and 71Ga diffused from BN; 35Cl, 63Cu, 65Cu, 69Ga, 75As, and 78Se diffused from C; 35Cl, 68Cu, 69Ga, 75As, and 78Se diffused from Ta.

Alton, G. D.; Dellwo, J.

1996-02-01

102

Potentiometric titration of metal ions in ethanol.  

PubMed

The potentiometric titrations of Zn2+, Cu2+ and 12 Ln3+ metal ions were obtained in ethanol to determine the titration constants (defined as the at which the [-OEt]/[Mx+]t ratios are 0.5, 1.5, and 2.5) and in two cases (La3+ and Zn2+) a complete speciation diagram. Several simple monobasic acids and aminium ions were also titrated to test the validity of experimental titration measurements and to establish new constants in this medium that will be useful for the preparation of buffers and standard solutions. The dependence of the titration constants on the concentration and type of metal ion and specific counterion effects is discussed. In selected cases, the titration profiles were analyzed using a commercially available fitting program to obtain information about the species present in solution, including La3+ for which a dimer model is proposed. The fitting provides the microscopic values for deprotonation of one to four metal-bound ethanol molecules. Kinetics for the La3+-catalyzed ethanolysis of paraoxon as a function of are presented and analyzed in terms of La3+ speciation as determined by the analysis of potentiometric titration curves. The stability constants for the formation of Zn2+ and Cu2+ complexes with 1,5,9-triazacyclododecane as determined by potentiometric titration are presented. PMID:16961382

Gibson, Graham T T; Mohamed, Mark F; Neverov, Alexei A; Brown, R S

2006-09-18

103

Spectroscopic investigations of fluoroquinolones metal ion complexes.  

PubMed

The complex formation reaction, between fluoroquinolones (FQ): ciprofloxacin (CPX), enoxacin (ENX), enrofloxacin (ENRX), lomefloxacin (LOMX), levofloxacin (LEVX), ofloxacin (OFX), norfloxacin (NFX), sparfloxacin (SPRX) and aluminum(III), iron(III), copper(II) and zinc(II) ions were investigated. The spectrophotometic titration method in a wide range of pH was utilized for estimation of complex formation equilibrium. The application of Bjerrum method allowed to estimate the complex equilibrium of analyzed species in the reaction mixture. The overall stability constants (logbeta(pqr)) of fluoroquinolones complexes with metal ions were calculated using HYPRERQUAD program. The most stable complexes FQ were created with iron(III) and aluminum(III) and than copper(II) and zinc(II) ions, respectively. The highest values of calculated logbeta(pqr) were obtained for the Me(FQ)3H3 species and the lowest for the Me(FQ)2OH forms. Furthermore, an additional studies have been performed. The effect of the polyvalent metal ions on the complex structure has been investigated. The IR and 1H, 13C and 19F NMR spectroscopy methods were used for the confirmation of the structure of the FQ-Me complex formations. The most significant shifts of signals of 1H NMR spectra of the fluoroquinolones and their complexes were found for the protons substituted in the positions 2, 5 and 8, whereas the 13C NMR spectra showed up the shifts changes for carbon atoms in positions 2, 3, 3a and 4. PMID:23923386

Urbaniak, Bartosz; Kokot, Zenon J

2013-01-01

104

Modeling Multi-Metal Ion Exchange in Biosorption  

E-print Network

Modeling Multi-Metal Ion Exchange in Biosorption S I L K E S C H I E W E R A N D B O H U M I L V O heavy metals often through ion exchange. This biosorption can be used for purification of metal Biosorption, the passive non-metabolically mediated pro- cess of metal ion binding by living or dead biomass

Volesky, Bohumil

105

Liquid metal alloy ion source based metal ion injection into a room-temperature electron beam ion source  

SciTech Connect

We have carried out a series of measurements demonstrating the feasibility of using the Dresden electron beam ion source (EBIS)-A, a table-top sized, permanent magnet technology based electron beam ion source, as a charge breeder. Low charged gold ions from an AuGe liquid metal alloy ion source were injected into the EBIS and re-extracted as highly charged ions, thereby producing charge states as high as Au{sup 60+}. The setup, the charge breeding technique, breeding efficiencies as well as acceptance and emittance studies are presented.

Thorn, A.; Ritter, E.; Zschornack, G. [Fachrichtung Physik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 10, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Ullmann, F. [DREEBIT GmbH, Zur Wetterwarte 50, D-01109 Dresden (Germany); Pilz, W.; Bischoff, L. [Helmholtzzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstrasse 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany)

2012-02-15

106

Metal ion levels in maternal and placental blood after metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty.  

PubMed

There is concern regarding elevated metal ion levels in the blood during pregnancy and the potential fetal effects in women with metal-on-metal (MOM) implants. We obtained maternal and umbilical cord blood samples from 3 patients with a MOM hip arthroplasty and 7 control subjects without any metallic implants. Serum metal ion levels including chromium, cobalt, titanium, and nickel were tested using high-resolution sector-field inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Mothers with MOM-bearing implants had significantly elevated levels of serum cobalt and chromium compared with control-group mothers, and umbilical cord blood from mothers with MOM implants also had significantly higher serum metal ion levels compared with control-group mothers. The results of this study show that circulating serum levels of metal ion degradation products from MOM bearings cross the placenta and expose the fetus to metal ions. However, the placenta exerts a modulatory effect on cord blood, resulting in decreased levels compared with maternal samples (approximately 15% of maternal chromium and 50% of maternal cobalt). Physicians and women of child-bearing age should be aware of this potential effect when considering the use of MOM-bearing implants. PMID:25490017

Novak, Clifford C; Hsu, Andrew R; Della Valle, Craig J; Skipor, Anastasia K; Campbell, Patricia; Amstutz, Harlan C; Jiranek, William A; Onyike, Aham; Pombar, Xavier F; Jacobs, Joshua J

2014-12-01

107

Metal ion binding to iron oxides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The biogeochemistry of trace elements (TE) is largely dependent upon their interaction with heterogeneous ligands including metal oxides and hydrous oxides of iron. The modeling of TE interactions with iron oxides has been pursued using a variety of chemical models. The objective of this work is to show that it is possible to model the adsorption of protons and TE on a crystallized oxide (i.e., goethite) and on an amorphous oxide (HFO) in an identical way. Here, we use the CD-MUSIC approach in combination with valuable and reliable surface spectroscopy information about the nature of surface complexes of the TE. The other objective of this work is to obtain generic parameters to describe the binding of the following elements (Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) onto both iron oxides for the CD-MUSIC approach. The results show that a consistent description of proton and metal ion binding is possible for goethite and HFO with the same set of model parameters. In general a good prediction of almost all the collected experimental data sets corresponding to metal ion binding to HFO is obtained. Moreover, dominant surface species are in agreement with the recently published surface complexes derived from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data. Until more detailed information on the structure of the two iron oxides is available, the present option seems a reasonable approximation and can be used to describe complex geochemical systems. To improve our understanding and modeling of multi-component systems we need more data obtained at much lower metal ion to iron oxide ratios in order to be able to account eventually for sites that are not always characterized in spectroscopic studies.

Ponthieu, M.; Juillot, F.; Hiemstra, T.; van Riemsdijk, W. H.; Benedetti, M. F.

2006-06-01

108

ION-EXCHANGE PROCESSES FOR REMOVING RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION FROM MILK  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY These studies on removing radioactive contamination from milk were carried on for the purpose of developing a feasible standby process for use in dairy plants in the event that radioactive fallout should reach hazardous levels. Current levels of all the radioactive contaminants are far below what is con- sidered hazardous levels; Iodine-131 is essentially undetectable in all milk supplies.

L. E. Edmondson

1964-01-01

109

Metal ion transporters in mammals: structure, function and pathological implications  

PubMed Central

Despite the importance of metal ions in several catalytic functions, there has been, until recently, little molecular information available on the mechanisms whereby metal ions are actively taken up by mammalian cells. The classical concept for iron uptake into mammalian cells has been the endocytosis of transferrin-bound Fe3+ by the transferrin receptor. Studies with hypotransferrinaemic mice revealed that in the intestine mucosal transferrin is derived from the plasma and that its presence is not required in the intestinal lumen for dietary iron absorption. This suggests that, at least in the intestine, other non-receptor-mediated uptake systems exist. The molecular identification of metal ion transporters is of great importance, in particular since an increasing number of human diseases are thought to be related to disturbances in metal ion homeostasis, including metal ion overload and deficiency disorders (i.e. anaemia, haemochromatosis, Menkes disease, Wilson's disease), and neurodegenerative diseases (i.e. Alzheimer's, Friedreich's ataxia and Parkinson's diseases). Furthermore, susceptibilities to mycobacterial infections are caused by metal ion transporter defects. The pathological implications of disturbed metal ion homeostasis confirm the vital roles these metal ions play in the catalytic function of many enzymes, in gene regulation (zinc-finger proteins), and in free radical homeostasis. Recent insights have significantly advanced our knowledge of how metal ions are taken up or released by mammalian cells. The purpose of this review is to summarize these advances and to give an overview on the growing number of mammalian metal ion transporters. PMID:10373684

Rolfs, Andreas; Hediger, Matthias A

1999-01-01

110

Potential use of IR dyes for metal ion sensors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fluorescence quenching of molecules by analytes of interest, is a widely employed phenomenon in fluorescence sensing technology. Forster type dipole-dipole energy transfer from dye molecules to transition metal ions, provides a method of monitoring the concentration of these ions with some degree of selectivity. Each metal ion has a different absorption spectrum, hence, in principle it is possible to

Olaf J. Rolinski; I. R. Downie; A. Sheila Holmes-Smith; David J. Birch

1995-01-01

111

Direct reaction measurements with a 132Sn radioactive ion beam  

SciTech Connect

The (d,p) neutron transfer and (d,d) elastic scattering reactions were measured in inverse kinematics using a radioactive ion beam of 132Sn at 630 MeV. The elastic scattering data were taken in a region where Rutherford scattering dominated the reaction, and nuclear effects account for less than 8% of the elastic scattering cross section. The magnitude of the nuclear effects, in the angular range studied, was found to be independent of the optical potential used, allowing the transfer data to be normalized in a reliable manner. The neutron-transfer reaction populated a previously unmeasured state at 1363 keV, which is most likely the single-particle 3p1/2 state expected above the N = 82 shell closure. The data were analyzed using finite-range adiabatic-wave calculations and the results compared with the previous analysis using the distorted-wave Born approximation. Angular distributions for the ground and first-excited states are consistent with the previous tentative spin and parity assignments. Spectroscopic factors extracted from the differential cross sections are similar to those found for the one-neutron states beyond the benchmark doubly magic nucleus 208Pb.

Jones, Katherine L.; Nunes, Filomena M.; Adekola, Aderemi S.; Bardayan, Dan W.; Blackmon, Jeff; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, Kelly A.; Cizewski, Jolie A.; Erikson, Luke E.; Harlin, C.; Hatarik, R.; Kapler, R.; Kozub, Raymond L.; Liang, J. F.; Livesay, Ronald J.; Ma, Zhongguo J.; Moazen, B. H.; Nesaraja, Caroline D.; Pain, Steven D.; Patterson, N. P.; Shapira, Dan; Shriner, Jr., John F.; Smith, Michael S.; Swan, Thomas P.; Thomas, Jeff S.

2011-09-01

112

Direct reaction measurements with a (132)Sn radioactive ion beam  

SciTech Connect

The (d,p) neutron transfer and (d,d) elastic scattering reactions were measured in inverse kinematics using a radioactive ion beam of {sup 132}Sn at 630 MeV. The elastic scattering data were taken in a region where Rutherford scattering dominated the reaction, and nuclear effects account for less than 8% of the elastic scattering cross section. The magnitude of the nuclear effects, in the angular range studied, was found to be independent of the optical potential used, allowing the transfer data to be normalized in a reliable manner. The neutron-transfer reaction populated a previously unmeasured state at 1363 keV, which is most likely the single-particle 3p{sub 1/2} state expected above the N=82 shell closure. The data were analyzed using finite-range adiabatic-wave calculations and the results compared with the previous analysis using the distorted-wave Born approximation. Angular distributions for the ground and first-excited states are consistent with the previous tentative spin and parity assignments. Spectroscopic factors extracted from the differential cross sections are similar to those found for the one-neutron states beyond the benchmark doubly magic nucleus {sup 208}Pb.

Jones, K. L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chae, K. Y. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kapler, R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ma, Zhanwen [ORNL; Moazen, Brian [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Cizewski, J. A. [Rutgers University; Hatarik, Robert [Rutgers University; Pain, S. D. [Rutgers University; Swan, T. P. [University of Surrey, UK; Nunes, F. M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Adekola, Aderemi S [ORNL; Bardayan, Daniel W [ORNL; Blackmon, Jeff C [ORNL; Chae, Kyung Yuk [ORNL; Liang, J Felix [ORNL; Nesaraja, Caroline D [ORNL; Pain, Steven D [ORNL; Shapira, Dan [ORNL; Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL; Chipps, Kelly A [ORNL; Erikson, Luke [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Livesay, R. J. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Harlin, Christopher W [ORNL; Patterson, N. P. [University of Surrey, UK; Thomas, J. S. [University of Surrey, England; Kozub, R. L. [Tennessee Technological University; Shriner, Jr., John F [ORNL

2011-01-01

113

Direct reaction measurements with a 132Sn radioactive ion beam  

E-print Network

The (d,p) neutron transfer and (d,d) elastic scattering reactions were measured in inverse kinematics using a radioactive ion beam of 132Sn at 630 MeV. The elastic scattering data were taken in a region where Rutherford scattering dominated the reaction, and nuclear effects account for less than 8% of the cross section. The magnitude of the nuclear effects was found to be independent of the optical potential used, allowing the transfer data to be normalized in a reliable manner. The neutron-transfer reaction populated a previously unmeasured state at 1363 keV, which is most likely the single-particle 3p1/2 state expected above the N=82 shell closure. The data were analyzed using finite range adiabatic wave calculations and the results compared with the previous analysis using the distorted wave Born approximation. Angular distributions for the ground and first excited states are consistent with the previous tentative spin and parity assignments. Spectroscopic factors extracted from the differential cross sections are similar to those found for the one neutron states beyond the benchmark doubly-magic nucleus 208Pb.

K. L. Jones; A. S. Adekola; D. W. Bardayan; J. C. Blackmon; K. Y. Chae; K. A. Chipps; J. A. Cizewski; L. Erikson; C. Harlin; R. Hatarik; R. Kapler; R. L. Kozub; J. F. Liang; R. Livesay; Z. Ma; B. H. Moazen; C. D. Nesaraja; F. M. Nunes; S. D. Pain; N. P. Patterson; D. Shapira; J. F. Shriner Jr; M. S. Smith; T. P. Swan; J. S. Thomas

2011-05-24

114

Prototype negative-ion sources for radioactive ion-beam generation  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive ion beams (RIBs) of {sup 17}F and {sup 18}F are of interest for investigation of astrophysical phenomena such as the {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} CNO cycle and the rp stellar nuclear synthesis processes. In order to generate useful beam intensities of atomic F{sup {minus}}, the species must be efficiently and expediently released from the target material, thermally dissociated from fluoride release products during transport to the ionization chamber of the ion source, and efficiently ionized in the source upon arrival. We have conceived and evaluated two prototype negative-ion sources for potential use for RIB generation: (1) a direct extraction source and (2) a kinetic-ejection source. Both sources utilize Cs vapor to enhance F{sup {minus}} formation. The mechanical design features, operational parameters, ionization efficiencies for forming atomic F{sup {minus}}, and delay times for transport of F and fluoride compounds for the respective sources are presented. The efficiency {eta} for formation and extraction of F{sup {minus}} for the direct extraction negative-ion source is found to be {eta}{approximately}1.0{percent} while the characteristic delay time {tau} for transport of F and fluorides through the source is, typically, {eta}{approximately}120thinsps; the analogous efficiencies and delay times for the kinetic ejection negative-ion source are, respectively: {eta}={approximately}3.2{percent} and {tau}={approximately}70thinsps. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Alton, G.D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6368 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6368 (United States); Welton, R.F.; Williams, C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6368 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6368 (United States); [Oak Ridge Institute of Science and Engineering, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6368 (United States); Cui, B. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)] [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China); Murray, S.N. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6368 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6368 (United States)

1998-06-01

115

Accumulation of metal ions by pectinates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The knowledge of the mechanisms which regulate the interactions of metal ions with partially methyl esterified linear polymers of ?-1,4 linked D-galacturonic acid units (pectinates), well represented in the root inner and outer apoplasm, is of great relevance to understand the processes which control their accumulation at the soil-root interface as well as their mobilization by plant metabolites. Accumulation of a metal by pectinates can be affected by the presence of other metals so that competition or distribution could be expected depending on the similar or different affinity of the metal ions towards the binding sites, mainly represented by the carboxylate groups. In order to better understand the mechanism of accumulation in the apoplasm of several metal ions, the sorption of Cd(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Cr(III) by a Ca-polygalacturonate gel, used as model of the soil-root interface, with a degree of esterification of 18% (PGAE1) and 65% (PGAE2) was studied at pH 3.0, 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 in the presence of CaCl2 2.5 mM.. The results show that sorption increases with increasing both the initial metal concentration and pH. A similar sorption trend was evidenced for Cu(II) and Pb(II) and for Zn(II) and Cd(II), indicating that the mechanism of sorption for these two ionic couples is quite different. As an example, at pH 6.0 and an initial metal concentration equal to 2.0 mM, the amount of Cu(II) and Pb(II) sorbed was about 1.98 mg-1 of PGAE1 while that of Cd(II) and Zn(II) was about 1.2 mg-1. Cr(III) showed a rather different sorption trend and a much higher amount (2.8 mg-1of PGAE1 at pH 6.0) was recorded. The higher affinity of Cr(III) for the polysaccharidic matrix is attributable to the formation of Cr(III) polynuclear species in solution, as shown by the distribution diagrams obtained through the MEDUSA software. On the basis of these findings, the following affinity towards the PGAE1 can be assessed: Cr(III) > Cu(II) ? Pb(II) > Zn (II) ? Cd(II). Surprisingly, simultaneous sorption tests and SEM analyses indicate that a different mechanism regulates the sorption of Cu(II) and Pb(II) by PGAE1. In fact, the amount of Pb(II) sorbed (0.92 moles mg-1of PGAE1) by PGAE1 was nearly independent by the presence of Cu(II) ions, at least at the three different concentrations tested, that indicates a higher affinity of Pb(II). Such an aspect was further confirmed by exchange experiments. Samples of PGAE1 saturated with 1.96 moles mg-1of Cu(II) or 2.01 moles mg-1of Pb(II) were put in contact with 100 mL of solutions containing 97.3 moles of Pb(II) or 99.4 moles Cu(II), respectively. The exchange kinetics show that about 80% of Cu(II) was stochiometrically exchanged by Pb(II). In contrast, only about 10% of Pb(II) complexed by PGAE1 was exchanged by Cu(II). The kinetics of simultaneous sorption of all the metal ions tested indicate that Pb(II) is selectively sorbed by the PGAE1 gels. Cd(II) and Zn(II) show a similar affinity towards PGAE1. Thus, in the simultaneous presence of these ions, their selectivity towards this matrix follows the order: Pb > Cu > Cd ? Zn. Sorption of Cr(III) in the presence of the ions considered was not possible to carry out due to interference phenomena. The sorption of the same ions by 50 mg of PGAE2 evidences that the amount of Cu(II), Pb(II), and Cr(III) sorbed is markedly lower than that found for PGAE1. By considering that two carboxylic groups are involved in the complexation of a metal ion, the data show that such a stoichiometry is respected only for Pb(II). The amount of Cu(II) sorbed is about 50% lower than that of Pb(II) at all the pH values tested whereas those of Zn(II) and Cd(II) are negligible whereas that of Cr(III) is the highest. The different behaviour of Cu(II) compared to Pb(II) can be explained taking into account for both hydrophobic and steric effects of the methyl groups as well as to their different charge density. Thus, it can be concluded that the accumulation of metals at the soil-root interface strictly depends on the esterification degree of the root p

Deiana, S.; Deiana, L.; Palma, A.; Premoli, A.; Senette, C.

2009-04-01

116

Metal-ion rescue revisited: Biochemical detection of site-bound metal ions important for RNA folding  

PubMed Central

Within the three-dimensional architectures of RNA molecules, divalent metal ions populate specific locations, shedding their water molecules to form chelates. These interactions help the RNA adopt and maintain specific conformations and frequently make essential contributions to function. Defining the locations of these site-bound metal ions remains challenging despite the growing database of RNA structures. Metal-ion rescue experiments have provided a powerful approach to identify and distinguish catalytic metal ions within RNA active sites, but the ability of such experiments to identify metal ions that contribute to tertiary structure acquisition and structural stability is less developed and has been challenged. Herein, we use the well-defined P4–P6 RNA domain of the Tetrahymena group I intron to reevaluate prior evidence against the discriminatory power of metal-ion rescue experiments and to advance thermodynamic descriptions necessary for interpreting these experiments. The approach successfully identifies ligands within the RNA that occupy the inner coordination sphere of divalent metal ions and distinguishes them from ligands that occupy the outer coordination sphere. Our results underscore the importance of obtaining complete folding isotherms and establishing and evaluating thermodynamic models in order to draw conclusions from metal-ion rescue experiments. These results establish metal-ion rescue as a rigorous tool for identifying and dissecting energetically important metal-ion interactions in RNAs that are noncatalytic but critical for RNA tertiary structure. PMID:22539523

Frederiksen, John K.; Li, Nan-Sheng; Das, Rhiju; Herschlag, Daniel; Piccirilli, Joseph A.

2012-01-01

117

Improvement of technology for treatment of spent radioactive ion-exchange resins at nuclear power stations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results from tests of technology for decontaminating spent radioactive ion-exchange resins at the Balakovo and Kalinin nuclear power stations are presented. Versions of technological schemes with cleaning and repeated use of decontaminating solution are considered. The possibility of considerably reducing the volume of radioactive wastes is demonstrated.

Korchagin, Yu. P.; Aref'ev, E. K.; Korchagin, E. Yu.

2010-07-01

118

Behavior of metal ions in bioelectrochemical systems: A review  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) have been focused on by many researchers to treat wastewater and recover energy or valuable chemicals from wastes. In BESs, metal ions play an important role in the conductivity of solution, reactors' internal resistance, power generation, chemical production and activity of microorganisms. Additionally, the metal ions are also involved in anodic or cathodic reaction processes directly or indirectly in BESs. This paper reviews the behavior of metal ions in BESs, including (1) increase of the conductivity of electrolyte and decrease of internal resistance, (2) transfer for desalination, (3) enhancement or inhibition of the biocatalysis in anode, (4) improvement of cathodic performance by metal ions through electron acceptance or catalysis in cathodic process and (5) behavior of metal ions on membranes. Moreover, the perspectives of BESs removing heavy metal ions in wastewater or solid waste are discussed to realize recovery, reduction and detoxification simultaneously.

Lu, Zhihao; Chang, Dingming; Ma, Jingxing; Huang, Guangtuan; Cai, Lankun; Zhang, Lehua

2015-02-01

119

Securing the metal recycling chain for the steel industry by detecting orphan radioactive sources in scrap metal  

SciTech Connect

Experimental tests are reported for the detection of the heavy metal shielding of orphan sources hidden inside scrap metal by using a recently developed muon tomography system. Shielded sources do not trigger alarm in radiation portal commonly employed at the entrance of steel industry using scrap metal. Future systems integrating radiation portals with muon tomography inspection gates will substantially reduce the possibility of accidental melting of radioactive sources securing the use of recycled metal.

Pesente, S.; Benettoni, M.; Checchia, P.; Conti, E.; Gonella, F.; Nebbia, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova Italy (Italy); Vanini, S.; Viesti, G.; Zumerle, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova Italy (Italy); University of Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova Italy (Italy); Bonomi, G.; Zenoni, A. [University of Brescia, via Branze 38, 25123 Brescia and INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Calvini, P.; Squarcia, S. [University of Genova and INFN Sezione di Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy)

2010-08-04

120

Securing the metal recycling chain for the steel industry by detecting orphan radioactive sources in scrap metal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experimental tests are reported for the detection of the heavy metal shielding of orphan sources hidden inside scrap metal by using a recently developed muon tomography system. Shielded sources do not trigger alarm in radiation portal commonly employed at the entrance of steel industry using scrap metal. Future systems integrating radiation portals with muon tomography inspection gates will substantially reduce the possibility of accidental melting of radioactive sources securing the use of recycled metal.

Pesente, S.; Vanini, S.; Benettoni, M.; Bonomi, G.; Calvini, P.; Checchia, P.; Conti, E.; Gonella, F.; Nebbia, G.; Squarcia, S.; Viesti, G.; Zenoni, A.; Zumerle, G.

2010-08-01

121

Separation of traces of metal ions from sodium matrices  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Method for isolating metal ion traces from sodium matrices consists of two extractions and an ion exchange step. Extraction is accomplished by using 2-thenoyltrifluoracetone and dithizone followed by cation exchange.

Korkisch, J.; Orlandini, K. A.

1969-01-01

122

Radioactive Ion Beams with the HHIRF (Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility) accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Our present understanding of nuclear structure is almost completely based on facts obtained for nuclei that can be produced with stable projectiles and targets which have equilibrated for a significant fraction of the lifetime of the universe. The use of Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) could overcome this limitation and provide unique opportunities for the study of nuclear structure with nuclei far from stability. These nuclei could answer critical issues concerning some of the most fundamental current nuclear structure themes and allow the study of entirely new phenomena, unobservable with current techniques and not derivable from our present knowledge of nuclear theory. RIB will also open new opportunities for the study of processes taking place at less equilibrated astrophysical sites, such as supernovae, cataclysmic binaries, and accreted shells of neutron stars. Widespread interest in RIB has developed in the last few years and a steering committee has recently been established to consider the construction of a large radioactive beam facility in North America. With this interest in mind, we have performed a feasibility study for a low-cost extension of the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) accelerators which would provide access, on a short time scale, to much of the physics of proton-rich nuclei.

Meigs, M.J.; Alton, G.D.; Baktash, C.; Dowling, D.T.; Garrett, J.D.; Haynes, D.L.; Jones, C.M.; Juras, R.C.; Lane, S.N.; Lee, I.Y.; Mills, G.D.; Mosko, S.W.; Olsen, D.K.; Tatum, B.A.; Toth, K.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Carter, H.K. (Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (USA))

1990-01-01

123

High-current metal ion implantation for industrial applications  

SciTech Connect

Ion implantation, as an efficient surface processing technique, has developed to include the implantation of various metallic ions for improving not only wear properties, but also such other surface properties as solid lubrication, fatigue, chemical stability, and engineering reliability. The high-dose metal ion implantation that can be accumulated in a short time over a relatively large implanting area makes metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) source ion implantation well suited to practical surface engineering modification applications. This paper presents some experimental results and successful examples of critical tools and sophisticated components implanted by using MEVVA source ion implantation.

Lin, W.L.; Ding, X.J. (Beijing Normal Univ. (China). Inst. of Low Energy Nuclear Physics); Sang, J.M.; Xu, J.; Yuan, X.M. (Beijing General Research Inst. of Non-Ferrous Metals (China))

1994-10-01

124

Biosorption of metal ions from aqueous solutions  

SciTech Connect

Copper biosorption from aqueous solutions by calcium alginate is reported in this paper. The experimental section includes potentiometric titrations of biosorbents, batch equilibrium and kinetic studies of copper biosorption, as well as fixed-bed biosorption experiments. The potentiometric titration results show that the surface charge increases with decreasing pH. The biosorption of copper strongly depends on solution pH; the metal ion binding increases from 0 to 90 percent in pH ranging from 1.5 to 5.0. In addition, a decrease in ionic strength results in an increase of copper ion removal. Kinetic studies indicate that mass transfer plays an important role in the biosorption rate. Furthermore, a fixed-bed biosorption experiment shows that calcium alginate has a significant capacity for copper ion removal. The two-pK Basic Stem model successfully represents the surface charge and equilibrium biosorption experimental data. The calculation results demonstrate that the copper removal may result from the binding of free copper and its hydroxide with surface functional groups of the biosorbents.

Chen, Jiaping; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

1997-01-01

125

A biosystem for removal of metal ions from water  

SciTech Connect

The presence of heavy metal ions in ground and surface waters constitutes a potential health risk and is an environmental concern. Moreover, processes for the recovery of valuable metal ions are of interest. Bioaccumulation or biosorption is not only a factor in assessing the environmental risk posed by metal ions; it can also be used as a means of decontamination. A biological system for the removal and recovery of metal ions from contaminated water is reported here. Exopolysaccharide-producing microorganisms, including a methanotrophic culture, are demonstrated to have superior metal binding ability, compared with other microbial cultures. This paper describes a biosorption process in which dried biomass obtained from exopolysaccharide-producing microorganisms is encapsulated in porous plastic beads and is used for metal ion binding and recovery. 22 refs., 13 figs.

Kilbane, J.J. II.

1990-01-01

126

Plasma immersion ion implantation for reducing metal ion release  

SciTech Connect

Plasma immersion ion implantation of Nitrogen and Oxygen on CoCrMo alloys was carried out to improve the tribological and corrosion behaviors of these biomedical alloys. In order to optimize the implantation results we were carried experiments at different temperatures. Tribocorrosion tests in bovine serum were used to measure Co, Cr and Mo releasing by using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis after tests. Also, X-ray Diffraction analysis were employed in order to explain any obtained difference in wear rate and corrosion tests. Wear tests reveals important decreases in rate of more than one order of magnitude for the best treatment. Moreover decreases in metal release were found for all the implanted samples, preserving the same corrosion resistance of the unimplanted samples. Finally this paper gathers an analysis, in terms of implantation parameters and achieved properties for industrial implementation of these treatments.

Diaz, C.; Garcia, J. A.; Maendl, S.; Pereiro, R.; Fernandez, B.; Rodriguez, R. J. [Centro de Ingenieria Avanzada de Superficies AIN, 31191, Cordovilla-Pamplona (Spain); Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Universidad de Oviedo, Departamento Quimica Fisica y Analitica (Spain); Centro de Ingenieria Avanzada de Superficies AIN, 31191, Cordovilla-Pamplona (Spain)

2012-11-06

127

Nuclear astrophysics and the Daresbury Recoil Separator at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Daresbury Recoil Separator (DRS) has been installed for nuclear astrophysics research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. It will be used for direct measurements of capture reactions on radioactive ions which occur in stellar explosions such as novae, supernovae and X-ray bursts. These measurements will be made in inverse kinematics with radioactive heavy ion beams incident on hydrogen and helium targets, and the DRS will separate the capture reaction recoils from the intense flux of beam particles. Details of the new DRS experimental equipment and preliminary results from the first commissioning experiments with stable beams are described, along with the plans for the first measurements with radioactive beams. Other astrophysics research efforts at ORNL--in theoretical astrophysics, nuclear astrophysics data evaluation, heavy element nucleosynthesis, theoretical atomic astrophysics, and atomic astrophysics data--are also briefly described.

Smith, M.S.

1997-12-01

128

Metal cation\\/anion adsorption on calcium carbonate: Implications to metal ion concentrations in groundwater  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter evaluates the sorption behavior of metallic ions on specimen calcite as a basis for determining the importance of calcite relative to other subsurface sorbents, such as layer silicates and oxides, in controlling metal ion concentration in calcareous groundwaters. A review of the literature shows the sorption of both metallic cations and anions on calcite over ranges in pH

J. M. Zachara; C. E. Cowan; C. T. Resch

1990-01-01

129

Spectroscopic detection of metals ions using a novel selective sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Colorimetric chemosensors are simple, economical and practical optical approach for detecting toxic metal ions (Hg2+, Pb2+, Ni2+, etc.) in the environment. In this work, we present a simple but highly specific organic compound 4-chloro-2-((E)-((E)-3-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)allylidene)amino)phenol (L1) that acts as a colorimetric sensor for divalent metal ions in H2O. The mechanism of the interaction between L1 and various metal-ions has been established by UV-vis absorption and emission spectroscopic experiments that indicate favorable coordination of metal ions with L1 in different solvents. Experimental results indicate that the shape of the electronic transition band of L1 (receptor compound) changed after the interaction with divalent metal-ions, such as Hg2+, Pb2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Cu2+, and Ni2+ in aqueous solution. We found that L1 have a considerable selectivity for Ni2+ ions, even in presence of other metals ions when mixtures of DMSO/H2O as are used as solvents. L1, which has been targeted for sensing transition metal ions, exhibits binding-induced color changes from yellow to pink observed even by the naked eye in presence of Ni2+ ions.

Peralta-Domínguez, D.; Ramos-Ortiz, G.; Maldonado, J. L.; Rodriguez, M.; Meneses-Nava, M. A.; Barbosa-Garcia, O.; Santillan, R.; Farfan, N.

2011-09-01

130

Succinylated machined corncobs: Titration and heavy metal ion binding characteristics  

SciTech Connect

The use of inexpensive natural materials for waste water treatment is economically attractive. In this study chemical modifications of an agricultural by-product, Lite-R-Cobs, were explored to increase its utility for reduction of metal ions in waste water effluent. Corn cob particles have been succinylated to increase their capacity for binding heavy metal ions. The carboxyl groups introduced into this cellulosic material were quantitated by base titration. Equilibrium metal ion binding characteristics of the material was studied for Cu{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Ni{sup 2+} ions.

McCall, R.C.; Getman, T.D.; Hunsley, J.R. [Southern Illinois Univ., Edwardsville, IL (United States)

1996-10-01

131

Microstructural characterisation of metal ion implanted silicon nitride  

Microsoft Academic Search

The microstructure of silicon nitride after metal ion implantation at different dosages has been studied. A metal vapour vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source was employed to implant Ni, Ti and Ni+Ti ions into silicon nitride. Characterisation of the implanted surfaces was carried out by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM), in conjunction with nano-beam electron diffraction

Huaxia Ji; Peter J. Evans; Masoud Samandi

2000-01-01

132

Mechanism of metal ion biosorption by fungal biomass  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alkali extracted mycelial biomass from Aspergillus niger, referred to as Biosorb, was found to sequester metal ions (Cd2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Ni2+ and Co2+) efficiently both from dilute and concentrated solutions upto 10% of its weight (w\\/w). Sequestration of metal ions from a mixture was also efficient but with attendant antagonisms. The kinetics of metal binding by Biosorb indicated that it

K. Sivarama Sastry; P. Maruthi Mohan

1996-01-01

133

A self-sputtering ion source: A new approach to quiescent metal ion beams  

SciTech Connect

A new metal ion source is presented based on sustained self-sputtering plasma in a magnetron discharge. Metals exhibiting high self-sputtering yield like Cu, Ag, Zn, and Bi can be used in a high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) discharge such that the plasma almost exclusively contains singly charged metal ions of the target material. The plasma and extracted ion beam are quiescent. The ion beams consist mostly of singly charged ions with a space-charge limited current density which reached about 10 mA/cm2 at an extraction voltage of 45 kV and a first gap spacing of 12 mm.

Oks, Efim M.; Anders, Andre

2009-09-03

134

Reusable chelating resins concentrate metal ions from highly dilute solutions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Column chromatographic method uses new metal chelating resins for recovering heavy-metal ions from highly dilute solutions. The absorbed heavy-metal cations may be removed from the chelating resins by acid or base washes. The resins are reusable after the washes are completed.

Bauman, A. J.; Weetal, H. H.; Weliky, N.

1966-01-01

135

Structural Resolution of 4-Substituted Proline Diastereomers with Ion Mobility Spectrometry via Alkali Metal Ion Cationization.  

PubMed

The chirality of substituents on an amino acid can significantly change its mode of binding to a metal ion, as shown here experimentally by traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS) of different proline isomeric molecules complexed with alkali metal ions. Baseline separation of the cis- and trans- forms of both hydroxyproline and fluoroproline was achieved using TWIMS-MS via metal ion cationization (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Cs(+)). Density functional theory calculations indicate that differentiation of these diastereomers is a result of the stabilization of differing metal-complexed forms adopted by the diastereomers when cationized by an alkali metal cation, [M + X](+) where X = Li, Na, K, and Cs, versus the topologically similar structures of the protonated molecules, [M + H](+). Metal-cationized trans-proline variants exist in a linear salt-bridge form where the metal ion interacts with a deprotonated carboxylic acid and the proton is displaced onto the nitrogen atom of the pyrrolidine ring. In contrast, metal-cationized cis-proline variants adopt a compact structure where the carbonyl of the carboxylic acid, nitrogen atom, and if available, the hydroxyl and fluorine substituent solvate the metal ion. Experimentally, it was observed that the resolution between alkali metal-cationized cis- and trans-proline variants decreases as the size of the metal ion increases. Density functional theory demonstrates that this is due to the decreasing stability of the compact charge-solvated cis-proline structure with increased metal ion radius, likely a result of steric hindrance and/or weaker binding to the larger metal ion. Furthermore, the unique structures adopted by the alkali metal-cationized cis- and trans-proline variants results in these molecules having significantly different quantum mechanically calculated dipole moments, a factor that can be further exploited to improve the diastereomeric resolution when utilizing a drift gas with a higher polarizability constant. PMID:25664640

Flick, Tawnya G; Campuzano, Iain D G; Bartberger, Michael D

2015-03-17

136

The acceleration and storage of radioactive ions for a neutrino factory  

SciTech Connect

The term beta-beam has been coined for the production of a pure beam of electron neutrinos or their antiparticles through the decay of radioactive ions circulating in a storage ring. This concept requires radioactive ions to be accelerated to a Lorentz gamma of 150 for {sup 6}He and 60 for {sup 18}Ne. The neutrino source itself consists of a storage ring for this energy range, with long straight sections in line with the experiment(s). Such a decay ring does not exist at CERN today, nor does a high-intensity proton source for the production of the radioactive ions. Nevertheless, the existing CERN accelerator infrastructure could be used as this would still represent an important saving for a beta-beam facility. This paper outlines the first study, while some of the more speculative ideas will need further investigations.

B. Autin et al.

2003-12-23

137

Microbial controls on metal ion mobility  

E-print Network

In this dissertation, the biogeochemical controls on metal mobility in the subsurface are examined; specifically, the release of metals from buried mineralization, the transport of metals through overburden, and the ...

Leslie, Karla Louise

2012-12-31

138

Coloration of Sapphire by Metal-Ion Implantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relations between the coloration of synthetic sapphire and impure elements introduced by ion implantation were investigated. Ion species used for implantation were Nb+, Fe+, Cu+, Co+, Ti+, Cr+. Doses of metal ions were 1× 1017˜ 3× 1017 ions\\/cm2. The color of the parts implanted with Fe+ or Co+ and subsequently annealed at 1000°C for 3 h was yellowish-brown or light

Yukinori Saito; Hideo Kumagai; Shinji Suganomata

1985-01-01

139

Proceedings of the workshop on prospects for research with radioactive beams from heavy ion accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The SuperHILAC Users Executive Committee organized a workshop on Prospects for Research with Radioactive Beams from Heavy Ion Accelerators. The main purpose of the workshop was to bring together a diverse group of scientists who had already done experients with radioactive beams or were interested in their use in the future. The topics of the talks ranged from general nuclear physics, astrophysics, production of radioactive beams and high energy projectile fragmentation to biomedical applications. This publication contains the abstracts of the talks given at the workshop and copies of the viewgraphs as they were supplied to the editor.

Nitschke, J.M. (ed.)

1984-04-01

140

Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers  

DOEpatents

In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

1983-07-21

141

Ion-exchange material and method of storing radioactive wastes  

DOEpatents

A new cation exchanger is a modified tobermorite containing aluminum isomorphously substituted for silicon and containing sodium or potassium. The exchanger is selective for lead, rubidium, cobalt, and cadmium and is selective for cesium over calcium or sodium. The tobermorites are compatible with cement and are useful for the long-term fixation and storage of radioactive nuclear wastes.

Komarneni, S.; Roy, D.M.

1983-10-31

142

Radioactive Ion Beams at FAIR-NuSTAR  

SciTech Connect

The future FAIR facility will open up an unprecedented range of exotic nuclear beams in the energy interval between 0-1.5 GeV/u produced by the Super-FRS. The envisaged experimental programme with radioactive beams, being prepared within the NuSTAR collaboration, will cover most aspects of contemporary physics within nuclear structure, astrophysics and reactions.

Nilsson, Thomas [Fundamental Physics, Chalmers Tekniska Hogskola, Gothenburg (Sweden)

2009-06-03

143

Adhesive bonding of ion beam textured metals and fluoropolymers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An electron bombardment argon ion source was used to ion etch various metals and fluoropolymers. The metal and fluoropolymers were exposed to (0.5 to 1.0) keV Ar ions at ion current densities of (0.2 to 1.5) mA/sq cm for various exposure times. The resulting surface texture is in the form of needles or spires whose vertical dimensions may range from tenths to hundreds of micrometers, depending on the selection of beam energy, ion current density, and etch time. The bonding of textured surfaces is accomplished by ion beam texturing mating pieces of either metals or fluoropolymers and applying a bonding agent which wets in and around the microscopic cone-like structures. After bonding, both tensile and shear strength measurements were made on the samples. Also tested, for comparison's sake, were untextured and chemically etched fluoropolymers. The results of these measurements are presented.

Mirtich, M. J.; Sovey, J. S.

1978-01-01

144

Adhesive bonding of ion beam textured metals and fluoropolymers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An electron-bombardment argon ion source was used to ion-etch various metals and fluoropolymers. The metal and fluoropolymers were exposed to (0.5 to 1.0)-keV Ar ions at ion current densities of 0.2 to 1.5 mA/sq cm for various exposure times. The resulting surface texture is in the form of needles or spires whose vertical dimensions may range from tenths to hundreds of micrometers, depending on the selection of beam energy, ion current density, and etch time. The bonding of textured surfaces is accomplished by ion-beam texturing mating pieces of either metals or fluoropolymers and applying a bonding agent which wets in and around the microscopic conelike structures. After bonding, both tensile and shear strength measurements were made on the samples. Also tested, for comparison's sake, were untextured and chemically etched fluoropolymers. The results of these measurements are presented in this paper.

Mirtich, M. J.; Sovey, J. S.

1978-01-01

145

The role of metal ions in oxygen activation.  

PubMed

The reaction of oxygen with a common organic molecule is a spin-forbidden process catalyzed by transition metal ions. Some reactions of this type were proved to be trace metal catalyzed. It is therefore reasonable to assume that all reactions of molecular oxygen with organic molecules are induced by trace metals; in the absolute absence of transition metal ions these reactions would not proceed at all. Based on detailed studies of two well known oxygen reactions the mechanism of trace metal catalysis was formulated. The experimental results are consistent with the conception that transition metal ions associate with all species present in the system to form complexes or clusters of various composition and stability. Some of them are redox reactive and represent true intermediates of the catalyzed reaction. PMID:517007

Veprek-Siska, J

1979-01-01

146

Separation of platinum group metal ions by Donnan dialysis  

SciTech Connect

Separations of metal ions on the basis of Donnan dialysis across anion-exchange membranes should be possible if the receiver electrolyte composition favors the formation of selected anionic complexes of the sample metal ions. Moreover, such a separation has the possibility of being better suited from some applications than batch or column experiments with anion-exchange resins. The above hypothesis are tested on the platinum-group metal ions, Pt(IV), Rh(III), Pd(II), Ir(III), and Ir(IV). 13 references, 4 tables.

Brajter, K.; Slonawska, K.; Cox, J.A.

1985-10-01

147

Progress in metal ion separation and preconcentration : an overview.  

SciTech Connect

A brief historical perspective covering the most mature chemically-based metal ion separation methods is presented, as is a summary of the recommendations made in the 1987 National Research Council (NRC) report entitled ''Separation and Purification: Critical Needs and Opportunities''. A review of Progress in Metal Ion Separation and Preconcentration shows that advances are occurring in each area of need cited by the NRC. Following an explanation of the objectives and general organization of this book, the contents of each chapter are briefly summarized and some future research opportunities in metal ion separations are presented.

Bond, A. H.

1998-05-19

148

Recent results of experiments with radioactive 21Na and 7Be ion beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report here on experiments with radioactive 21Na and 7Be beams performed by Colorado School of Mines students at the ISAC facility of TRIUMF and the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) of ORNL. At TRIUMF, the DRAGON recoil separator and its segmented BGO array were used to investigate higher energy resonances in the reaction H( 21Na, ?) 22Mg. Using the HRIBF we performed an experiment with a 7Be ion beam to measure scattering off Hydrogen and Carbon. Both elastic 7Be + p scattering and for the first time resonant inelastic scattering 7Be(p, p') 7Be ? were observed.

Greife, U.; Livesay, J.; Jewett, C.; Chipps, K.; Sarazin, F.; Bardayan, D.; Blackmon, J.; Nesaraja, C.; Smith, M. S.; Champagne, A.; Fitzgerald, R.; Jones, K.; Thomas, J.; Kozub, R.; Buchmann, L.; Caggiano, J.; Hunter, D.; Hutcheon, D.; Olin, A.; Ottewell, D.; Rogers, J.; Ruiz, C.; Ruprecht, G.; Trinczek, M.; Vockenhuber, C.; Bishop, S.; D'Auria, J.; Lamay, M.; Liu, W.; Wrede, C.; Chatterjee, M. L.; Chen, A. A.; Pearson, J.; Engel, S.; Laird, A. M.; Gigliotti, D.; Hussein, A.

2007-08-01

149

High pressure metal vapor discharge lamp with radioactive material impregrated in ceramic  

SciTech Connect

A high pressure metal vapor discharge lamp including an arc tube having opposed ends at which are provided respective main electrodes and a fill including mercury and a starting gas, a radioactive source material including a radioactive substance having a half-life less than 1X10/sup 4/ years sealed in the arc tube, an outer tube enclosing the arc tube and a circuit for starting the arc tube.

Iroue, A.; Ishigami, T.; Kamei, T.; Kamiya, A.; Kanoh, T.; Kohno, A.; Sasaki, H.

1984-04-24

150

Metal ion levels decrease after revision for metallosis arising from large-diameter metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty.  

PubMed

Concerns have been renewed regarding the possible long-term effects of elevated circulating levels of cobalt and chromium as a direct result of implantation of large femoral head diameter metal-on-metal bearings. In order to establish whether metal ion levels remain persistently elevated, we compared metal ion levels before and after revision surgery in patients with large head diameter (greater than 38 mm) metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty or hip resurfacing arthroplasty. At greater than one year post removal of a large-diameter metal-on-metal hip implant for the indication of symptomatic metallosis, metal ion levels were found to fall to almost normal levels. PMID:22308623

Ebreo, Darren; Khan, Abdul; El-Meligy, Mohammed; Armstrong, Catherine; Peter, Viju

2011-12-01

151

Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility A leading international facility with unique capabilities for research in nuclear structure  

E-print Network

HRIBF Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility A leading international facility with unique (+26 more unaccelerated) · 32 proton-rich species · 143 neutron-rich species The Holifield Radioactive a dedicated user program in nuclear physics using exotic beams. Radioactive species are produced by intense

152

Metal ion levels: how can they help us?  

PubMed

Ion levels have been shown to reliably predict abnormal function of the bearing surface with increased wear, but ion levels should not be used alone as a trigger for when to proceed with revision surgery with metal-metal articulations. Risk stratification strategies help determine which patients should be monitored more closely with serial ion levels, cross-sectional imaging with a MARS MRI, or proceed on to revision. Based on the current data available, an ion level greater than 4.5 ppb (Cr or Co) may serve as a threshold for when abnormal wear is occurring, and is suggested as a trigger for a MARS MRI scan. PMID:24655610

Griffin, William L

2014-04-01

153

Metal ion acquisition in Staphylococcus aureus: overcoming nutritional immunity  

PubMed Central

Transition metals are essential nutrients to virtually all forms of life, including bacterial pathogens. In Staphylococcus aureus, metal ions participate in diverse biochemical processes such as metabolism, DNA synthesis, regulation of virulence factors, and defense against oxidative stress. As an innate immune response to bacterial infection, vertebrate hosts sequester transition metals in a process that has been termed “nutritional immunity.” To successfully infect vertebrates, S. aureus must overcome host sequestration of these critical nutrients. The objective of this review is to outline the current knowledge of staphylococcal metal ion acquisition systems, as well as to define the host mechanisms of nutritional immunity during staphylococcal infection. PMID:22048835

Cassat, James E.

2013-01-01

154

Silica-polyamine composite materials for heavy metal ion removal, recovery, and recycling. 2. Metal ion separations from mine wastewater and soft metal ion extraction efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Silica-polyamine composites have been synthesized which have metal ion capacities as high as 0.84 mmol/g for copper ions removed from aqueous solutions. In previous reports it has been demonstrated that these materials survive more than 3,000 cycles of metal ion extraction, elution, and regeneration with almost no loss of capacity (less than 10%). This paper describes two modified silica-polyamine composite materials and reveals the results of tests designed to determine the effectiveness of these materials for extracting and separating metal ions from actual mining wastewater samples. Using these materials, the concentration of copper, aluminum, and zinc in Berkeley Pit mine wastewater is reduced to below allowable discharge limits. The recovered copper and zinc solutions were greater than 90% pure, and metal ion concentration factors of over 20 for copper were realized. Further, the ability of one of these materials to decrease low levels of the soft metals cadmium, mercury, and lead from National Sanitation Foundation recommended challenge levels to below Environmental Protection Agency allowable limits is also reported.

Fischer, R.J.; Pang, D.; Beatty, S.T.; Rosenberg, E.

1999-12-01

155

Metal ion removal from aqueous solution using physic seed hull.  

PubMed

The potential of physic seed hull (PSH), Jantropha curcas L. as an adsorbent for the removal of Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) metal ions from aqueous solution has been investigated. It has been found that the amount of adsorption for both Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) increased with the increase in initial metal ions concentration, contact time, temperature, adsorbent dosage and the solution pH (in acidic range), but decreased with the increase in the particle size of the adsorbent. The adsorption process for both metal ions on PSH consists of three stages-a rapid initial adsorption followed by a period of slower uptake of metal ions and virtually no uptake at the final stage. The kinetics of metal ions adsorption on PSH followed a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption equilibrium data were fitted in the three adsorption isotherms-Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. The data best fit in the Langmuir isotherm indication monolayer chemisorption of the metal ions. The adsorption capacity of PSH for both Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) was found to be comparable with other available adsorbents. About 36-47% of the adsorbed metal could be leached out of the loaded PSH using 0.1M HCl as the eluting medium. PMID:20362390

Mohammad, Masita; Maitra, Saikat; Ahmad, Naveed; Bustam, Azmi; Sen, T K; Dutta, Binay K

2010-07-15

156

Metal Ion Substrate Inhibition of Ferrochelatase*S?  

PubMed Central

Ferrochelatase catalyzes the insertion of ferrous iron into protoporphyrin IX to form heme. Robust kinetic analyses of the reaction mechanism are complicated by the instability of ferrous iron in aqueous solution, particularly at alkaline pH values. At pH 7.00 the half-life for spontaneous oxidation of ferrous ion is approximately 2 min in the absence of metal complexing additives, which is sufficient for direct comparisons of alternative metal ion substrates with iron. These analyses reveal that purified recombinant ferrochelatase from both murine and yeast sources inserts not only ferrous iron but also divalent cobalt, zinc, nickel, and copper into protoporphyrin IX to form the corresponding metalloporphyrins but with considerable mechanistic variability. Ferrous iron is the preferred metal ion substrate in terms of apparent kcat and is also the only metal ion substrate not subject to severe substrate inhibition. Substrate inhibition occurs in the order Cu2+ > Zn2+ > Co2+ > Ni2+ and can be alleviated by the addition of metal complexing agents such as ?-mercaptoethanol or imidazole to the reaction buffer. These data indicate the presence of two catalytically significant metal ion binding sites that may coordinately regulate a selective processivity for the various potential metal ion substrates. PMID:18593702

Hunter, Gregory A.; Sampson, Matthew P.; Ferreira, Gloria C.

2008-01-01

157

Prospects for studies of astrophysical interest with radioactive ion beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Realistic estimates of the new nuclei that will become accessible for study with the planned new generation of radioactive beam facilities are compared with the predicted paths of the various nucleosynthetic processes. These facilities should permit studies of essentially the complete set of nuclei associated with the rp- and p-processes, the CNL cycle, and big-bang nucleosynthesis, as well as the r-process below A congruent to 150.

Garrett, J. D.

158

Studies of sorbent\\/ion-exchange materials for the removal of radioactive strontium from liquid radioactive waste and high hardness groundwaters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Different sorbents were studied in terms of their full-scale applicability for radioactive strontium removal in low-level liquid radioactive waste (LLRW) management. The following types of sorbent\\/ion-exchange materials were investigated: natural zeolite–clinoptilolite, modified natural clinoptilolite, synthetic zeolites, new synthetic crystalline materials selective to strontium, ion-exchange resins, and modified fiber sorbents. Simulated solutions for experimental tests were prepared according to the composition

Dmitry V Marinin; Garrett N Brown

2000-01-01

159

MODELING AN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR CESIUM REMOVAL FROM ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

The performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde ion-exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline radioactive waste solutions has been investigated through computer modeling. Cesium adsorption isotherms were obtained by fitting experimental data using a thermodynamic framework. Results show that ion-exchange is an efficient method for cesium removal from highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions. On average, two 1300 liter columns operating in series are able to treat 690,000 liters of waste with an initial cesium concentration of 0.09 mM in 11 days achieving a decontamination factor of over 50,000. The study also tested the sensitivity of ion-exchange column performance to variations in flow rate, temperature and column dimensions. Modeling results can be used to optimize design of the ion exchange system.

Smith, F; Luther Hamm, L; Sebastian Aleman, S; Johnston Michael, J

2008-08-26

160

Effects of metal ions on fibroblasts and spiral ganglion cells.  

PubMed

Degeneration of spiral ganglion cells (SGC) after deafness and fibrous tissue growth around the electrode carrier after cochlear implantation are two of the major challenges in current cochlear implant research. Metal ions are known to possess antimicrobial and antiproliferative potential. The use of metal ions could therefore provide a way to reduce tissue growth around the electrode array after cochlear implantation. Here, we report on in vitro experiments with different concentrations of metal salts with antiproliferative and toxic effects on fibroblasts, PC-12 cells, and freshly isolated spiral ganglion cells, the target cells for electrical stimulation by a cochlear implant. Standard cell lines (NIH/3T3 and L-929 fibroblasts and PC-12 cells) and freshly isolated SGC were incubated with concentrations of metal ions between 0.3 ?mol/liter and 10 mmol/liter for 48 hr. Cell survival was investigated by neutral red uptake, CellQuantiBlue assay, or counting of stained surviving neurons. Silver ions exhibited distinct thresholds for proliferating and confluent cells. For zinc ions, the effective concentration was lower for fibroblasts than for PC-12 cells. SGC showed comparable thresholds for reduced cell survival not only for silver and zinc ions but also for copper(II) ions, indicating that these ions might be promising for reducing tissue growth on the surface of CI electrode arrays. These effects were also observed when combinations of two of these ions were investigated. PMID:21312225

Paasche, G; Ceschi, P; Löbler, M; Rösl, C; Gomes, P; Hahn, A; Rohm, H W; Sternberg, K; Lenarz, T; Schmitz, K-P; Barcikowski, S; Stöver, T

2011-04-01

161

Ion exchange extraction of heavy metals from wastewater sludges.  

PubMed

Heavy metals are common contaminants of some industrial wastewater. They find their way to municipal wastewaters due to industrial discharges into the sewerage system or through household chemicals. The most common heavy metals found in wastewaters are lead, copper, nickel, cadmium, zinc, mercury, arsenic, and chromium. Such metals are toxic and pose serious threats to the environment and public health. In recent years, the ion exchange process has been increasingly used for the removal of heavy metals or the recovery of precious metals. It is a versatile separation process with the potential for broad applications in the water and wastewater treatment field. This article summarizes the results obtained from a laboratory study on the removal of heavy metals from municipal wastewater sludges obtained from Ardhiya plant in Kuwait. Data on heavy metal content of the wastewater and sludge samples collected from the plant are presented. The results obtained from laboratory experiments using a commercially available ion exchange resin to remove heavy metals from sludge were discussed. A technique was developed to solubilize such heavy metals from the sludge for subsequent treatment by the ion exchange process. The results showed high efficiency of extraction, almost 99.9%, of heavy metals in the concentration range bound in wastewater effluents and sludges. Selective removal of heavy metals from a contaminated wastewater/sludge combines the benefits of being economically prudent and providing the possibility of reuse/recycle of the treated wastewater effluents and sludges. PMID:15027828

Al-Enezi, G; Hamoda, M F; Fawzi, N

2004-01-01

162

Noble metal ion bombardment of polycrystalline metal surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measurements have been made of electron ejection and positive ion reflection from clean and contaminated vacuum-deposited films of silver, gold and aluminium by positive ions of nitrogen, sodium, copper, silver and gold with incident kinetic energies between 20 and 500 eV. An attempt has been made to account for the experimental results by calculating the effects of ion neutralization.

N. G. Burrow; R. B. Burtt

1972-01-01

163

Extracting metal ions with diphosphonic acid, or derivative thereof  

DOEpatents

Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulfur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described. 1 fig.

Horwitz, E.P.; Gatrone, R.C.; Nash, K.L.

1994-07-26

164

Ion plating seals microcracks or porous metal components  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Description of ion plating process is given. Advantage of this process is that any plating metal or alloy can be selected, whereas, for conventional welding, material selection is limited by compatability.

Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.; Brainard, W. A.

1972-01-01

165

Extracting metal ions with diphosphonic acid, or derivative thereof  

DOEpatents

Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulphur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described.

Horwitz, Earl P. (Argonne, IL); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Argonne, IL); Nash, Kenneth L. (Argonne, IL)

1994-01-01

166

Development of melt refining decontamination technology for low level radioactive metal waste contaminated with uranium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The feasibility study of Melt Refining Decontamination by Slagging (MRDS) havs been performed for the release and recycling of Low Level Radioactive Metal Waste (LLRMW) contaminated with uranium discharged from nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Experiments and their evaluation have been performed for the decontamination performance of the waste containing aluminum and have clarified the followings. Simulated waste was decontaminated to 0.01 Bq/g when the addition of aluminum is below 1.5 wt% in laboratory scale test equipment. This was demonstrated also in the engineering scale experiment for MRDS. These results demonstrate that the MRDS is an effective processing technology for low level radioactive metal waste with uranium.

Aoyama, M.; Miyamoto, Y.; Fukumoto, M.; Suto, O.

2005-02-01

167

An Engineered Palette of Metal Ion Quenchable Fluorescent Proteins  

PubMed Central

Many fluorescent proteins have been created to act as genetically encoded biosensors. With these sensors, changes in fluorescence report on chemical states in living cells. Transition metal ions such as copper, nickel, and zinc are crucial in many physiological and pathophysiological pathways. Here, we engineered a spectral series of optimized transition metal ion-binding fluorescent proteins that respond to metals with large changes in fluorescence intensity. These proteins can act as metal biosensors or imaging probes whose fluorescence can be tuned by metals. Each protein is uniquely modulated by four different metals (Cu2+, Ni2+, Co2+, and Zn2+). Crystallography revealed the geometry and location of metal binding to the engineered sites. When attached to the extracellular terminal of a membrane protein VAMP2, dimeric pairs of the sensors could be used in cells as ratiometric probes for transition metal ions. Thus, these engineered fluorescent proteins act as sensitive transition metal ion-responsive genetically encoded probes that span the visible spectrum. PMID:24752441

Yu, Xiaozhen; Strub, Marie-Paule; Barnard, Travis J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Buchanan, Susan K.; Taraska, Justin W.

2014-01-01

168

Development of compact cluster ion sources using metal cluster complexes  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to develop a new compact cluster ion source as a low damage sputtering source for SIMS to analyze ultra-shallow dopant state we have studied the possibility of using a metal cluster complex as an ion beam source. Metal cluster complexes such as Os3(CO)12 and Ir4(CO)12 have been studied from the view point of their stability in high vacuum

T. Mizota; H. Nonaka; T. Fujimoto; A. Kurokawa; S. Ichimura

2004-01-01

169

Metal ion implantation for large scale surface modification  

SciTech Connect

Intense energetic beams of metal ions can be produced by using a metal vapor vacuum arc as the plasma discharge from which the ion beam is formed. We have developed a number of ion sources of this kind and have built a metal ion implantation facility which can produce repetitively pulsed ion beams with mean ion energy up to several hundred key, pulsed beam current of more than an ampere, and time averaged current of several tens of milliamperes delivered onto a downstream target. We've also done some preliminary work on scaling up this technology to very large size. For example, a 50-cm diameter (2000 cm[sup 2]) set of beam formation electrodes was used to produce a pulsed titanium beam with ion current over 7 amperes at a mean ion energy of 100 key. Separately, a dc embodiment has been used to produce a dc titanium ion beam with current over 600 mA, power supply limited in this work, and up to 6 amperes of dc plasma ion current was maintained for over an hour. In a related program we've developed a plasma immersion method for applying thin metallic and compound films in which the added species is atomically mixed to the substrate. By adding a gas flow to the process, well-bonded compound films can also be formed; metallic films and multilayers as well as oxides and nitrides with mixed transition zones some hundreds of angstroms thick have been synthesized. Here we outline these parallel metal-plasma-based research programs and describe the hardware that we've developed and some of the surface modification research that we've done with it.

Brown, I.G.

1992-10-01

170

Exploiting neutron-rich radioactive ion beams to constrain the symmetry energy  

E-print Network

The Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and 4 Tm Sweeper magnet were used to measure the free neutrons and heavy charged particles from the radioactive ion beam induced 32Mg + 9Be reaction. The fragmentation reaction was simulated with the Constrained Molecular Dynamics model(CoMD), which demonstrated that the of the heavy fragments and free neutron multiplicities were observables sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy at sub-saturation densities. Through comparison of these simulations with the experimental data constraints on the density dependence of the symmetry energy were extracted. The advantage of radioactive ion beams as a probe of the symmetry energy is demonstrated through examination of CoMD calculations for stable and radioactive beam induced reactions.

Kohley, Z; Baumann, T; DeYoung, P A; Finck, J E; Frank, N; Jones, M; Smith, J K; Snyder, J; Spyrou, A; Thoennessen, M

2013-01-01

171

Exploiting neutron-rich radioactive ion beams to constrain the symmetry energy  

E-print Network

The Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and 4 Tm Sweeper magnet were used to measure the free neutrons and heavy charged particles from the radioactive ion beam induced 32Mg + 9Be reaction. The fragmentation reaction was simulated with the Constrained Molecular Dynamics model(CoMD), which demonstrated that the of the heavy fragments and free neutron multiplicities were observables sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy at sub-saturation densities. Through comparison of these simulations with the experimental data constraints on the density dependence of the symmetry energy were extracted. The advantage of radioactive ion beams as a probe of the symmetry energy is demonstrated through examination of CoMD calculations for stable and radioactive beam induced reactions.

Z. Kohley; G. Christian; T. Baumann; P. A. DeYoung; J. E. Finck; N. Frank; M. Jones; J. K. Smith; J. Snyder; A. Spyrou; M. Thoennessen

2013-10-03

172

Ion beam mixing of metals and ceramics--material considerations  

SciTech Connect

Most studies on ion beam mixing have been concerned with metal-metal or metal-silicon systems. The great activity in this field is attested by the fact that a 1983 review tabulated data for 38 bilayer and 25 multilayer systems. The initial models for mixing focused on the dynamics of ion-solid interactions and produced models based on direct recoils, cascades, and enhanced diffusion due to radiation-produced defects. An earlier chapter contains a description of ion beam mixing processes and the mechanisms that have been proposed to describe material transport across the layer/substrate interface. In this chapter, the issues raised by the application of ion beam mixing to a system where at least one component is an insulating compound, e.g., a ceramic, are discussed. In order to narrow the subject, this chapter will deal with some of the questions arising from ion bombardment of thin metal films and insulator substrate systems. Much of the interest in ion beam mixing as applied to metal-insulator couples arises from the observation that bombardment with an ion beam often increases the adhesion of the film to the substrate. However, this chapter will not address that issue but will discuss the role of the materials properties that influence the microstructures so produced. 56 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

McHargue, C.J.

1988-01-01

173

Erosion yield of metal surface under ion pulsed irradiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper is devoted to the study of erosion processes on a metal surface (Ag, Ni, Cu, W) under argon ion bombardment. The erosion yields including the sputtered and evaporated particles have been calculated for a wide range of the initial ion energy (1-1000 keV). They are revealed to reach the values from units to 104 atom/ion under a pulsed ion beam with the power density of 102-1010 W/cm2. The ion beam and target parameters are shown to influence on the erosion intensity.

Krivobokov, Valery; Stepanova, Olga; Yuryeva, Alena

2013-11-01

174

Production of negative hydrogen ions on metal grids  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Negative hydrogen ions are produced on a nickel grid with positive-ion irradiation. In order to investigate the production mechanism, a copper grid without the chemisorption of hydrogen atoms and positive helium ions without negative ionization are used for comparison. Positive hydrogen ions reflected on the metal surface obtain two electrons from the surface and become negatively ionized. It is found that the production yield of negative ions by desorption ionization of chemisorbed hydrogen atoms seems to be small, and the production is a minor mechanism.

Oohara, W.; Maetani, Y.; Takeda, Takashi; Takeda, Toshiaki; Yokoyama, H.; Kawata, K.

2015-03-01

175

Activities of the Center of Excellence for Radioactive Ion Beam Studies for Stewardship Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Center of Excellence for Radioactive Ion Beam Studies for Stewardship Science is a consortium of universities, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, led by Rutgers University. The purpose of this project, funded by the NNSA/DP Academic Alliance for Stewardship Science program, is to use radioactive ion beams to study low-energy nuclear reactions of importance to stewardship science, as well as to prepare future researchers in applied nuclear science. These studies are enabled by the plethora of unstable accelerated beams available at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge. The initial measurements use neutron-rich beams of uranium fission fragments to study the neutron-transfer (d,p) reaction, a possible surrogate of neutron capture reactions. We also develop new radioactive ion beams of interest to nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, and stewardship science. This talk will present an overview of the activities of the Center and the available facilities, describe initial results of a (d,p) reaction with a fission fragment beam, and outline activities proposed for the near term. In collaboration with H.K. Carter, ORAU.

Cizewski, J. A.

2006-10-01

176

Michigan state upgrade to produce intense radioactive ion beams by fragmentation technique  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the planned upgrading of accelerator facilities to produce intense radioactive ion beams, by a fragmentation technique, for experimental simulation of nucleosynthesis in novas and supernovas. (AIP) {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.} {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital American Institute of Physics}

Lubkin, G.B. [Physics Today, American Center for Physics, One Physics Ellipse, College Park, Maryland 20740-3843 (United States)

1997-05-01

177

Behavior of actinide ions during sludge washing of alkaline radioactive.  

SciTech Connect

It is difficult to accurately predict actinide behavior during the alkaline leaching of Hanford's radioactive sludges due to the diverse chemical and radiolytic conditions existing in these wastes. The results of Pu dissolution during experimental washing of sludge simulants from the BiPO{sub 4} Redox, and PUREX processes shows that {le} 2.l% Pu is dissolved during contact with alkaline media, but up to 65.5% Pu may be dissolved in acidic media. The dissolution of Cr, Fe, Nd, and Mn has also been observed, and the results of solid state, radioanalytical, and spectroscopic investigations are detailed.

Bond, A. H.; Nash, K. L.; Gelis, A. V.; Jensen, M. P.; Sullivan, J. C.; Rao, L.

1999-11-15

178

Structural metals in the group I intron: a ribozyme with a multiple metal ion core  

PubMed Central

Summary Metal ions play key roles in the folding and function for many structured RNAs, including group I introns. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of the Azoarcus bacterial group I intron in complex with its 5’ and 3’ exons. In addition to 222 nucleotides of RNA, the model includes eighteen Mg2+ and K+ ions. Five of the metals bind within 12 Å of the scissile phosphate and coordinate the majority of the oxygens biochemically implicated in conserved metal-RNA interactions. The metals are buried deep within the structure and form a multiple metal ion core that is critical to group I intron structure and function. Eight metal ions bind in other conserved regions of the intron structure, and the remaining five interact with peripheral structural elements. Each of the eighteen metals mediates tertiary interactions, facilitates local bends in the sugar-phosphate backbone or binds in the major groove of helices. The group I intron has a rich history of biochemical efforts aimed to identify RNA-metal ion interactions. The structural data are correlated to the biochemical results to further understand the role of metal ions in group I intron structure and function. PMID:17612557

Stahley, Mary R.; Adams, Peter L.; Wang, Jimin; Strobel, Scott A.

2007-01-01

179

Structural metals in the group I intron: a ribozyme with a multiple metal ion core.  

PubMed

Metal ions play key roles in the folding and function for many structured RNAs, including group I introns. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of the Azoarcus bacterial group I intron in complex with its 5' and 3' exons. In addition to 222 nucleotides of RNA, the model includes 18 Mg(2+) and K(+) ions. Five of the metals bind within 12 A of the scissile phosphate and coordinate the majority of the oxygen atoms biochemically implicated in conserved metal-RNA interactions. The metals are buried deep within the structure and form a multiple metal ion core that is critical to group I intron structure and function. Eight metal ions bind in other conserved regions of the intron structure, and the remaining five interact with peripheral structural elements. Each of the 18 metals mediates tertiary interactions, facilitates local bends in the sugar-phosphate backbone or binds in the major groove of helices. The group I intron has a rich history of biochemical efforts aimed to identify RNA-metal ion interactions. The structural data are correlated to the biochemical results to further understand the role of metal ions in group I intron structure and function. PMID:17612557

Stahley, Mary R; Adams, Peter L; Wang, Jimin; Strobel, Scott A

2007-09-01

180

Conversion of ion-exchange resins, catalysts and sludges to glass with optional noble metal recovery using the GMODS process  

SciTech Connect

Chemical processing and cleanup of waste streams (air and water) typically result in products, clean air, clean water, and concentrated hazardous residues (ion exchange resins, catalysts, sludges, etc.). Typically, these streams contain significant quantities of complex organics. For disposal, it is desirable to destroy the organics and immobilize any heavy metals or radioactive components into stable waste forms. If there are noble metals in the residues, it is desirable to recover these for reuse. The Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS) is a new process that directly converts radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes to borosilicate glass. GMODS oxidizes organics with the residue converted to glass; converts metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass; converts halides (eg chlorides) to borosilicate glass and a secondary sodium halide stream; and recovers noble metals. GMODS has been demonstrated on a small laboratory scale (hundreds of grams), and the equipment needed for larger masses has been identified.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.

1996-11-01

181

Enhancement of metal bioleaching from contaminated sediment using silver ion  

Microsoft Academic Search

A silver-catalyzed bioleaching process was used to remove heavy metals from contaminated sediment in this study. The effects of silver concentration added on the performance of bioleaching process were investigated. High pH reduction rate was observed in the bioleaching process with silver ion. The silver ion added in the bioleaching process was incorporated into the lattice of the initial sulfide

Shen-Yi Chen; Jih-Gaw Lin

2009-01-01

182

Metal ion stabilities correlate with electron affinity rather than hardness or softness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Quantitative metal ion hardness values allow a test of their correlation with aqueous metal ion stability constants of four hard ligands: hydroxide, fluoride, acetate and ammonia. For all four ligands the correlation is weak and dependent on the metal ion charge. For all but fluoride the correlation is in the wrong direction. Metal ion electron affinity correlates much better than

R. Bruce Martin

1998-01-01

183

Modification of medical metals by ion implantation of copper  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of copper ion implantation on the antibacterial activity, wear performance and corrosion resistance of medical metals including 317 L of stainless steels, pure titanium, and Ti-Al-Nb alloy was studied in this work. The specimens were implanted with copper ions using a MEVVA source ion implanter with ion doses ranging from 0.5 × 10 17 to 4 × 10 17 ions/cm 2 at an energy of 80 keV. The antibacterial effect, wear rate, and inflexion potential were measured as a function of ion dose. The results obtained indicate that copper ion implantation improves the antibacterial effect and wear behaviour for all the three medical materials studied. However, corrosion resistance decreases after ion implantation of copper. Experimental results indicate that the antibacterial property and corrosion resistance should be balanced for medical titanium materials. The marked deteriorated corrosion resistance of 317 L suggests that copper implantation may not be an effective method of improving its antibacterial activity.

Wan, Y. Z.; Xiong, G. Y.; Liang, H.; Raman, S.; He, F.; Huang, Y.

2007-10-01

184

Comparative study of metal and non-metal ion implantation in polymers: Optical and electrical properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The implantation of 1 MeV metal (63Cu+, 107Ag+, 197Au+) and non-metal (4He+, 12C+) ions in a polycarbonate (PC) matrix has been studied in order to evaluate the role of ion species in the modification of optical and electrical properties of the polymer. When the ion fluence is above ?1 × 1013 ions cm-2, the threshold for latent tracks overlapping is overcome and ?-bonded carbon clusters grow and aggregate forming a network of conjugated Cdbnd C bonds. For fluences around 1 × 1017 ions cm-2, the aggregation phenomena induce the formation of amorphous carbon and/or graphite like structures. At the same time, nucleation of metal nanoparticles (NPs) from implanted species can take place when the supersaturation threshold is overcome. The optical absorption of the samples increases in the visible range and the optical band gap redshifts from 3.40 eV up to 0.70 eV mostly due to the carbonization process and the formation of C0x clusters and cluster aggregates. Specific structures in the extinction spectra are observed when metal ions are selected in contrast to the non-metal ion implanted PC, thus revealing the possible presence of noble metal based NPs interstitial to the C0x cluster network. The corresponding electrical resistance decreases much more when metal ions are implanted with at least a factor of 2 orders of magnitude difference than the non-metal ions based samples. An absolute value of ?107 ?/sq has been measured for implantation with metals at doses higher than 5 × 1016 ions cm-2, being 1017 ?/sq the corresponding sheet resistance for pristine PC.

Resta, V.; Quarta, G.; Farella, I.; Maruccio, L.; Cola, A.; Calcagnile, L.

2014-07-01

185

Oxidative mechanisms in the toxicity of metal ions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of reactive oxygen species, with the subsequent oxidative deterioration of biological macromolecules in the toxicities associated with transition metal ions, is reviewed. Recent studies have shown that metals, including iron, copper, chromium, and vanadium undergo redox cycling, while cadmium, mercury, and nickel, as well as lead, deplete glutathione and protein-bound sulfhydryl groups, resulting in the production of reactive

S. J. Stohs; D. Bagchi

1995-01-01

186

Current and prospective applications of metal ion–protein binding  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) was first introduced, several variants of this method and many other metal affinity-based techniques have been devised. IMAC quickly established itself as a highly reliable purification procedure, showing rapid expansion in the number of preparative and analytical applications while not remaining confined to protein separation. It was soon applied to protein refolding (matrix-assisted

E. K. M Ueda; P. W Gout; L Morganti

2003-01-01

187

Ion beam mixing of metal\\/fluoropolymer interfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ion beam mixing of metals and polymers with very low dielectric constants such as Teflon can provide many applications in the area of electronic materials. This work is a study of the “mixing” effect of 50 keV nitrogen implanted thin metal layers on Teflon PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) substrates. RBS analysis shows that the distribution of thin layers of copper and chromium

D. L. Dennis; R. E. Giedd; Y. Q. Wang; G. A. Glass

1999-01-01

188

Ion beam mixing of metal\\/fluoropolymer interfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ion beam mixing of metals and polymers with very low dielectric constants such as Teflon can provide many applications in the area of electronic materials. This work is a study of the ``mixing'' effect of 50 keV nitrogen implanted thin metal layers on Teflon PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) substrates. RBS analysis shows that the distribution of thin layers of copper and chromium

D. L. Dennis; R. E. Giedd; Y. Q. Wang; G. A. Glass

1999-01-01

189

Coprecipitation of trace metal ions during the synthesis of hectorite  

Microsoft Academic Search

Physicochemical sequestration of transition metal ions is increasingly promoted as a cost-effective remediation technique for heavily contaminated soils and sediments. In enhanced stabilization\\/solidification strategies, this sequestration is hypothesized to result from the neoformation of various oxides, hydroxides and silicate minerals. However, more detailed information on the conditions that facilitate these neoformations or on the resulting metal sequestration is needed. In

Matteo Spagnuolo; Carmen Enid Mart??nez; Astrid R. Jacobson; Philippe Baveye; Murray B. McBride; Jeffrey Newton

2004-01-01

190

Surface Precipitation of Hydrolyzable Metal Ions on Oxide Surfaces  

E-print Network

Surface Precipitation of Hydrolyzable Metal Ions on Oxide Surfaces S. E. Fendorf Heavy metalO2 and TiO2 near and beyond monolayer coverage. Surface precipitation of Al(III) and La(III) was observed on MnO2, but was not apparent on TiO2 nor in bulk solution. Al(III) formed a surface precipitate

Sparks, Donald L.

191

Energy distribution properties of focused ion beams from liquid metal ion sources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary form only given, as follows. The field-emitted electron and ion beams in a high-voltage diode are found to be sources of very high brightness. For example, liquid metal ion sources (LMIS) produce ion beams of 5 ?A current from a source size estimated to 10-7 cm. This is why the focused ion beams are often used in the direct

H. S. Uhm; E. H. Choi; G. S. Cho; S. O. Kang

1995-01-01

192

PROTIC SOLVATION EFFECT IN ANIONEXCHANGE EXTRACTION OF METAL COMPLEX IONS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of organic solvent was studied in the anion-exchange extraction of metal-chloride complexes, typically, 2(Q·C1)O + (M)W + 2(Cl)W? (Q2·MCl4)O (Q : liquid anion-exchanger; M: divalent metal ion; subscripts o and w denote organic and aqueous phases, respectively). When protic solvents such as chloroform, pentanol, octanol, and p-nonylphenol, were used as diluent, a large depression in the metal extraction

Akira OHKI; Shunsuke IDE; Makoto TAKAGI

1986-01-01

193

Plasma spectroscopy of metal ions for hyper-electron cyclotron resonance ion source  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this research, the optical line spectra of metal ions from ECR plasma were observed using a grating monochromator with a photomultiplier. The light intensity of line spectrum from the ECR plasma had a strong correlation with ion beam intensity measured by a magnetic mass analyzer. This correlation is a significant information for the beam tuning process, because it allows to conduct the extraction of the desired metal ion species from the ECR plasma. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process, but this research provides a new approach for its simplification. In this paper the grating monochromator method for metal ion beam tuning such as 40Ca12+, 56Fe15+, and 85Rb20+ of hyper-ECR ion source as an injector for RIKEN Azimuthal Varying Field cyclotron is described.

Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shoichi; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kubono, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Kase, Masayuki; Hattori, Toshiyuki; Shimoura, Susumu

2014-02-01

194

Fabrication of metal’s nanoparticles in silicon and sapphire by low energy ion implantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work devoted to the fabrication of metal nanoparticles in silicon and sapphire by ion implantation and their modification by laser annealing. This approach is promising for the development of optical composite materials in the optoelectronics production technology. Composite layers were fabricated in silicon by implantation of 40-keV Cu+ ions at a dose of 1017 ion\\/cm2 and an ion beam

D. Kh. Mirkarimov; T. D. Radjabov; A. I. Kamardin; Z. T. Khakimov

2007-01-01

195

Surgical Variables Influence Metal Ion Levels After Hip Resurfacing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Metal-on-metal bearings in surface arthroplasty are associated with prolonged periods of elevated ion circulation. However,\\u000a there exists some controversy regarding the effect of different surgical variables on the concentration of metal ions in whole\\u000a blood of patients after hip resurfacing.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Questions\\/purposes  We sought to confirm which clinical and radiographic parameters are associated with elevated levels of cobalt, chromium, and\\u000a molybdenum after

Nicholas M. Desy; Stephane G. Bergeron; Alain Petit; Olga L. Huk; John Antoniou

2011-01-01

196

Metal ion induced-assembly of amylose in aqueous solution.  

PubMed

Cu(2+)/amylose assemblies of various sizes were prepared through the Cu(2+) ion induced-assembly of amylose. These assembly structures were characterized via transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), (1)H NMR analysis, fluorescence spectroscopy (FL) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis). The results from these characterizations revealed the existence of a complexation effect and/or a bridging effect between the hydroxyl groups of amylose and Cu(2+) ions, and that the formation of the hydrophobic domains promoted the formation of Cu(2+)/amylose assemblies. The use of other metal ions to induce the formation of spherical, flower- and wire-like amylose assemblies was investigated as well. A preliminary investigation on the ability of amylose to capture various metal ions was also performed, and the results of this work demonstrated that amylose could bind quantitatively metal ions that were at low concentrations. This work provided an alternative strategy for the recovery of precious metals from metal ion-containing aqueous solutions and the reduction of water pollution. PMID:24507310

Li, Yinhui; Lin, Shudong; Hu, Jiwen; Liu, Guojun; Zhang, Gangwei; Tu, Yuanyuan; Luo, Hongsheng; Li, Wei

2014-02-15

197

Fernald's dilemma: Recycle the radioactively contaminated scrap metal, or bury it?  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the past 5 years, a number of US Department of Energy (DOE) funded efforts have demonstrated the technical efficacy of converting various forms of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) into useable products. From the development of accelerator shielding blocks, to the construction of low level waste containers, technology has been applied to this fabrication process in a safe and stakeholder

Katherine L. Yuracko; Stanton W. Hadley; Robert D. Perlack; Rafael G. Rivera; T. Randall Curlee

1997-01-01

198

RATIONAL DESIGN OF METAL ION SEQUESTERING AGENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

An enormous amount of radioactive and toxic chemical waste remains at over one hundred sites managed by the Department of Energy. Despite the investment of large sums, major goals associated with the cleanup remain unmet. It is our thesis that economically practical accomplishmen...

199

Multiply stripped ion generation in the metal vapor vacuum arc  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider the charge state distribution of ions produced in the metal vapor vacuum arc plasma discharge. A new kind of high current metal ion source in which the ion beam is extracted from a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma has been used to obtain the spectra of multiply charged ions produced within the cathode spots. The cathode materials used and the species reported on here are: C, Mg, Al, Si, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Rh, Pd, Ag, In, Sn, Gd, Ho, Ta, W, Pt, Au, Pb, Th, and U; the arc current was 200 A for all measurements. Charge state spectra were measured using a time-of-flight method. The arc voltage was also measured. In this paper we report on the measured charge state distributions and arc voltages and compare the distributions with the predictions of a theory in which ionization occurs in the cathode spots via stepwise ionization by electron impact.

Brown, I. G.; Feinberg, B.; Galvin, J. E.

1987-09-01

200

Adsorption study of metal ions onto crosslinked seaweed Laminaria japonica.  

PubMed

An efficient and cost effective non-conventional adsorbent has been prepared from seaweed Laminaria japonica by crosslinking with epichlorohydrin. Its adsorption behavior for trivalent and divalent metal ions was studied and it was found to exhibit excellent selectivity towards several metal ions. As a typical example, binary mixture of Pb(II) and Zn(II) was studied by using a packed column, indicating that the Pb(II) ion can be easily separated from its mixture with a concentration factor of 74 times. The maximum adsorption capacity for Pb(II), Cd(II), Fe(III) was found to be 1.35, 1.1, 1.53 mol kg(-1), respectively, while 0.8 7 mol kg(-1) for both La(III) and Ce(III) from the single metal ion solution according to the adsorption isotherm. The obtained values are comparable to the commercially available synthetic chelating resins. PMID:17267212

Ghimire, Kedar Nath; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Ohto, Keisuke; Hayashida, Takehiro

2008-01-01

201

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOEpatents

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (both Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (both Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-11-13

202

Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution  

DOEpatents

A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

1990-01-01

203

Sorption of Heavy Metal Ions on New Metal-Ligand Complexes Chemically Derived from Lycopodium clavatum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sorption of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution has been investigated as a function of pH using a novel exchanger system whereby Lycopodium clavatum is functionalized with carboxylate and glyoxime metal-ligand complexes. The new ligand exchangers were prepared using a reaction of diaminosporopollenin with various metal-ligand complexes of glyoxime and monocarboxylic acid. The sorptive behavior of these metal-ligand exchangers and

Erol Pehlivan; Mustafa Ersoz; Salih Yildiz; Harry J. Duncan

1994-01-01

204

Metal ions affecting the neurological system.  

PubMed

Several individual metals including aluminum, arsenic, cadmium, lead, manganese, and mercury were demonstrated to affect the neurological system. Metals are ubiquitous in the environment. Environmental and occupational exposure to one metal is likely to be accompanied by exposure to other metals, as well. It is, therefore, expected that interactions or "joint toxic actions" may occur in populations exposed to mixtures of metals or to mixtures of metals with other chemicals. Some metals seem to have a protective role against neurotoxicity of other metals, yet other interactions may result in increased neurotoxicity. For example, zinc and copper provided a protective role in cases of lead-induced neurotoxicity. In contrast, arsenic and lead co-exposure resulted in synergistic effects. Similarly, information is available in the current literature on interactions of metals with some organic chemicals such as ethanol, polychlorinated biphenyls, and pesticides. In depth understanding of the toxicity and the mechanism of action (including toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics) of individual chemicals is important for predicting the outcomes of interactions in mixtures. Therefore, plausible mechanisms of action are also described. PMID:21473383

Pohl, Hana R; Roney, Nickolette; Abadin, Henry G

2011-01-01

205

Complexation-induced supramolecular assembly drives metal-ion extraction.  

PubMed

Combining experiment with theory reveals the role of self-assembly and complexation in metal-ion transfer through the water-oil interface. The coordinating metal salt Eu(NO3)3 was extracted from water into oil by a lipophilic neutral amphiphile. Molecular dynamics simulations were coupled to experimental spectroscopic and X-ray scattering techniques to investigate how local coordination interactions between the metal ion and ligands in the organic phase combine with long-range interactions to produce spontaneous changes in the solvent microstructure. Extraction of the Eu(3+)-3(NO3(-)) ion pairs involves incorporation of the "hard" metal complex into the core of "soft" aggregates. This seeds the formation of reverse micelles that draw the water and "free" amphiphile into nanoscale hydrophilic domains. The reverse micelles interact through attractive van der Waals interactions and coalesce into rod-shaped polynuclear Eu(III) -containing aggregates with metal centers bridged by nitrate. These preorganized hydrophilic domains, containing high densities of O-donor ligands and anions, provide improved Eu(III) solvation environments that help drive interfacial transfer, as is reflected by the increasing Eu(III) partitioning ratios (oil/aqueous) despite the organic phase approaching saturation. For the first time, this multiscale approach links metal-ion coordination with nanoscale structure to reveal the free-energy balance that drives the phase transfer of neutral metal salts. PMID:25169678

Ellis, Ross J; Meridiano, Yannick; Muller, Julie; Berthon, Laurence; Guilbaud, Philippe; Zorz, Nicole; Antonio, Mark R; Demars, Thomas; Zemb, Thomas

2014-09-26

206

Transition Metal Speciation in the Cell: Insights from the Chemistry of Metal Ion Receptors  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The essential transition metal ions are avidly accumulated by cells, yet they have two faces: They are put to use as required cofactors, but they also can catalyze cytotoxic reactions. Several families of proteins are emerging that control the activity of intracellular metal ions and help confine them to vital roles. These include integral transmembrane transporters, metalloregulatory sensors, and diffusible cytoplasmic metallochaperone proteins that protect and guide metal ions to targets. It is becoming clear that many of these proteins use atypical coordination chemistry to accomplish their unique goals. The different coordination numbers, types of coordinating residues, and solvent accessibilities of these sites are providing insight into the inorganic chemistry of the cytoplasm.

Lydia Finney (Northwestern University; Department of Chemistry, Molecular Biology and Cell Biology)

2003-05-09

207

Does Ion Release Differ Between Hip Resurfacing and Metal-on-metal THA?  

PubMed Central

Modern metal-on-metal hip resurfacing was introduced as a bone-preserving method of joint reconstruction for young and active patients; however, the large diameter of the bearing surfaces is of concern for potential increased metal ion release. We hypothesized there were no differences in serum concentrations of chromium, cobalt, and molybdenum between patients who had metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (Group A; average head diameter, 48 mm; median followup, 24 months) and patients who had 28-mm metal-on-metal THA (Group B; median followup, 25 months). Serum concentrations also were compared with concentrations in healthy subjects. We identified no differences in ion levels between Groups A and B. A distinction was made according to gender. Women showed a higher chromium release in Group A whereas men had a higher cobalt release in Group B. Values obtained from Group A were higher than those of the control subjects. Our data suggest metal-on-metal bearings for THA should not be rejected because of concern regarding potential increased metal ion release; however, patients with elevated ion levels, even without loosening or toxicity, could be at higher risk and should be followed up periodically. Level of Evidence: Level III, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18196364

Moroni, Antonio; Cadossi, Matteo; Baldini, Nicola; Giannini, Sandro

2008-01-01

208

Ion source developments for the production of radioactive isotope beams at TRIUMF  

SciTech Connect

At the ISAC facility at TRIUMF radioactive ions are produced by bombarding solid targets with up to 100 ?A of 500 MeV protons. The reaction products have to diffuse out of the hot target into an ion source. Normally, singly charged ions are extracted. They can be transported either directly to experiments or via an ECR charge state breeder to a post accelerator. Several different types of ion sources have to be used in order to deliver a large variety of rare isotope beams. At ISAC those are surface ion sources, forced electron beam arc discharge (FEBIAD) ion sources and resonant laser ionization sources. Recent development activities concentrated on increasing the selectivity for the ionization to suppress isobaric contamination in the beam. Therefore, a surface ion rejecting resonant laser ionization source (SIRLIS) has been developed to suppress ions from surface ionization. For the FEBIAD ion source a cold transfer line has been introduced to prevent less volatile components from reaching the ion source.

Ames, F., E-mail: ames@triumf.ca; Bricault, P.; Heggen, H.; Kunz, P.; Lassen, J.; Mjøs, A.; Raeder, S.; Teigelhöfer, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T2A3 (Canada)] [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T2A3 (Canada)

2014-02-15

209

Ion source developments for the production of radioactive isotope beams at TRIUMF.  

PubMed

At the ISAC facility at TRIUMF radioactive ions are produced by bombarding solid targets with up to 100 ?A of 500 MeV protons. The reaction products have to diffuse out of the hot target into an ion source. Normally, singly charged ions are extracted. They can be transported either directly to experiments or via an ECR charge state breeder to a post accelerator. Several different types of ion sources have to be used in order to deliver a large variety of rare isotope beams. At ISAC those are surface ion sources, forced electron beam arc discharge (FEBIAD) ion sources and resonant laser ionization sources. Recent development activities concentrated on increasing the selectivity for the ionization to suppress isobaric contamination in the beam. Therefore, a surface ion rejecting resonant laser ionization source (SIRLIS) has been developed to suppress ions from surface ionization. For the FEBIAD ion source a cold transfer line has been introduced to prevent less volatile components from reaching the ion source. PMID:24593617

Ames, F; Bricault, P; Heggen, H; Kunz, P; Lassen, J; Mjøs, A; Raeder, S; Teigelhöfer, A

2014-02-01

210

Ion source developments for the production of radioactive isotope beams at TRIUMF  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the ISAC facility at TRIUMF radioactive ions are produced by bombarding solid targets with up to 100 ?A of 500 MeV protons. The reaction products have to diffuse out of the hot target into an ion source. Normally, singly charged ions are extracted. They can be transported either directly to experiments or via an ECR charge state breeder to a post accelerator. Several different types of ion sources have to be used in order to deliver a large variety of rare isotope beams. At ISAC those are surface ion sources, forced electron beam arc discharge (FEBIAD) ion sources and resonant laser ionization sources. Recent development activities concentrated on increasing the selectivity for the ionization to suppress isobaric contamination in the beam. Therefore, a surface ion rejecting resonant laser ionization source (SIRLIS) has been developed to suppress ions from surface ionization. For the FEBIAD ion source a cold transfer line has been introduced to prevent less volatile components from reaching the ion source.

Ames, F.; Bricault, P.; Heggen, H.; Kunz, P.; Lassen, J.; Mjøs, A.; Raeder, S.; Teigelhöfer, A.

2014-02-01

211

Transport of radioactive ion beams and related safety issues: The 132Sn+ case study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The transport of intense radioactive ion beam currents requires a careful design in order to limit the beam losses, the contamination and thus the dose rates. Some investigations based on numerical models and calculations have been performed in the framework of the SPIRAL 2 project to evaluate the performance of a low energy beam transport line located between the isotope separation on line (ISOL) production cell and the experiment areas. The paper presents the results of the transverse phase-space analysis, the beam losses assessment, the resulting contamination, and radioactivity levels. They show that reasonable beam transmission, emittance growth, and dose rates can be achieved considering the current standards.

Osswald, F.; Bouquerel, E.; Boutin, D.; Dinkov, A.; Kazarinov, N.; Perrot, L.; Sellam, A.

2014-12-01

212

Metal chelates of N,N'-dihydroxyethyl-N,N'-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid and selected metal ions  

E-print Network

, "Elementary Coord. ination Chemistry, " Prentice Hall, Inc. , Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1964, 2. L, G, Sillen and A. E. Martell, "Stability Constants of Metal-Ion Complexes, " The Chemical Society, London, 1964. 3. P, Job, Ann. Chim, , (France) & 9, 113...(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Ni (I I), and Fe(I II) are the metal ions employed in this study. Metal chelate formation constants were deter- mined from potentiometric equilibrium data obtained at 25' C and at an ionic strength of 0. 10 (0. 10 M KN03). Metal...

Hampton, Joan Martiner

1972-01-01

213

Recently, crown ethers have become very popular extractants for metal ions separation from aqueous solution. Crown ethers form complex with metal ion.  

E-print Network

Recently, crown ethers have become very popular extractants for metal ions separation from aqueous solution. Crown ethers form complex with metal ion. Selection of suitable crown ether and metal ion depends on various factors such as proper spatial orientation of the crown ether oxygen dipole in the direction

Singh, Jayant K.

214

Metal ions affect neuronal membrane fluidity of rat cerebral cortex.  

PubMed

The effect of various metal ions on neuronal membrane fluidity was examined using 2-(14-carboxypropyl)-2-ethyl-4,4-dimethyl-3-oxazolidinyloxy, which has been used for the examination of membrane fluidity in hydrophobic areas by electron spin resonance spectrometry. Potassium, cobalt, calcium, magnesium, nickel, copper, ferric, and aluminium ions decreased the membrane fluidity while ferrous ions increased it at each high concentration. Sodium and zinc ions had no effect. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid decreased membrane fluidity at high concentrations. Nicardipine lowered membrane fluidity and flunarizine elevated it at each high concentration. There was no change in membrane fluidity by other calcium antagonists, nimodipine and nifedipine. PMID:8177364

Ohba, S; Hiramatsu, M; Edamatsu, R; Mori, I; Mori, A

1994-03-01

215

Process for modifying the metal ion sorption capacity of a medium  

DOEpatents

A process for modifying a medium is disclosed that includes treating a medium having a metal ion sorption capacity with a solution that includes: A) an agent capable of forming a complex with metal ions; and B) ions selected from the group consisting of sodium ions, potassium ions, magnesium ions, and combinations thereof, to create a medium having an increased capacity to sorb metal ions relative to the untreated medium.

Lundquist, Susan H. (White Bear Township, MN)

2002-01-01

216

[Electric current around dental metals as a factor producing allergenic metal ions in the oral cavity].  

PubMed

Allergy to dental metal alloys has been reported to occasionally cause dermatitis, stomatitis, lichen planus and pustulosis palmaris et plantaris. According to Faraday's law of electrolysis, when electric current flows into an anode, cationic metal ions dissolve in parallel with the amount of the electric current. Therefore, when patients hypersensitive to metals have suffered from the above mentioned persistent dermatoses, measurement of voltages and electric currents around the dental alloys of the patient's oral cavities was deemed necessary, in order to investigate whether or not such dental metals have been supplied causative metal ions to the patients. For the investigation of electrochemical dissolution of metal ions; firstly, voltages and electric currents between the mucous membrane and standard dental alloy tips placed in the oral cavities of each 15 healthy volunteers and patients were measured. Secondly, the same study was performed with the mucous membrane and actually installed dental metals with 158 patients who showed positive reactions to dental metal series patch test allergens composed of 19 reagents. The results were as follows: 1) Voltages between the mucous membranes and standard metal plates placed in the oral cavities varied depending on the composition of the dental metal. 2) The above-mentioned voltages changed when various food were present in the oral cavity. 3) With the dental metals actually present in the metal-hypersensitive patient's oral cavities, the voltages between the adjacent mucous membrane and dental metals varied greatly, depending on the individual patient rather than on the types of metal. Certain alloys acted as cathodes with some patients, but as anodes with others. 4) Amalgam and silver alloys showed higher voltages and more electric current with the smaller ranges of variation than other kinds of alloys. Both of these alloys tended to act as anodes, therefore, the electrochemical dissolution of metal ions was expected to be higher than with other metals. 5) The voltages and electric currents were often higher between mucous membrane and metals than between metals. These findings indicate that the patient's own mucous membrane acts as cathode for the electrochemical dissolution rather than the dental metals. 6) Measuring the voltage and electric current in the patient's oral cavities is technically easy, and is considered to be valuable since the tendancy of electrochemical dissolution of metal ions from the dental metals is clearly demonstrated. PMID:2622059

Nogi, N

1989-11-01

217

In vitro and in vivo metal ion release.  

PubMed

A series of experiments was conducted to study in vitro and in vivo metal ion release and the urine excretion of metal ions. Metal salts were injected and urine analyzed. Anodic potentials were applied to stainless steel and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CCM) specimens to cause an acceleration of corrosion rates. Corrosion experiments were done in saline, 10% serum and in a subcutaneous space in hamsters. Corrosion rates were determined by measurements of weight loss and calculations of net charge transfer. Metal ion concentrations were determined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy, and were calculated from total charge using Faraday's law. The results with stainless steel showed that the weight loss and metal ion release from stainless steel in vitro and in vivo can be calculated using Faraday's Law, assuming release in proportion to alloy composition. The results with CCM indicated that release rates in vitro can be used to determine the proportionality of release in vivo. All the nickel and most of the cobalt was rapidly excreted, while less than 50% of the chromium was excreted. The excretion of metals following salt injection or in vivo corrosion were very similar. PMID:3372552

Brown, S A; Farnsworth, L J; Merritt, K; Crowe, T D

1988-04-01

218

Radioactive ion beams for biomedical research and nuclear medical application  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this article a review is given on the research strategies, on experimental work and application of ISOLDE produced radionuclides used in the field of biomedicine over a period of more than 2 decades. Special attention will be directed to the radio-lanthanides for several reasons: firstly, the radio-lanthanides are three-valent metallic radionuclides which show any radiation properties we wish (single photon emission suitable for SPECT, positron emission suitable for PET, ?-- and Auger electron emission suitable for therapy). Even the alpha decay mode (suitable for therapy in selected cases) is available in the lanthanide group. Secondly, the 15 lanthanides can be seen chemically as one single element for labelling of tracer molecules, providing the unique possibility to study systematically relationships between physico-chemical molecule parameter and a biological response without changes in the basic tracer molecule. Very recent developments in bioconjugation chemistry call for three-valent metallic radionuclides for all kinds of nuclear medical application: diagnosis, in vivo dosimetry and radionuclide therapy where the rare-earth elements will play an important role in future.

Beyer, G. J.

2000-12-01

219

Metal ion release kinetics from nanoparticle silicone composites.  

PubMed

Metal ion release kinetics from silver and copper nanoparticle silicone composites generated by laser ablation in liquids are investigated. The metal ion transport mechanism is studied by using different model equations and their fit to experimental data. Results indicate that during the first 30 days of immersion, Fickian diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism. After this time period, the oxidation and dissolution of nanoparticles from the bulk determine the ion release. This second mechanism is very slow since the dissolution of the nanoparticle is found to be anisotropic. Silver ion release profile is best described by pseudo-first order exponential equation. Copper ion release profile is best described by a second order exponential equation. For practical purposes, the in vitro release characteristics of the bioactive metal ions are evaluated as a function of nanoparticle loading density, the chemistry and the texture of the silicone. Based on the proposed two-step release model, a prediction of the release characteristics over a time course of 84 days is possible and a long-term ion release could be demonstrated. PMID:21645564

Hahn, Anne; Brandes, Gudrun; Wagener, Philipp; Barcikowski, Stephan

2011-09-01

220

Membranes Remove Metal Ions Fron Industrial Liquids  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Use of membrane films affords convenient and economical alternative for removing and recovering metal cations present in low concentrations from large quantities of liquid solutions. Possible applications of membrane films include use in analytical chemistry for determination of small amounts of toxic metallic impurities in lakes, streams, and municipal effluents. Also suitable for use as absorber of certain pollutant gases and odors present in confined areas.

Hsu, W. P. L.; May, C.

1983-01-01

221

Low energy nuclear reactions with RIBRAS, Radioactive Ion Beam in Brasil, system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

RIBRAS, Radioactive Ion beam in Brasil, is a system based on superconducting solenoids which can produce low energy RNB (Radioactive Nuclear Beams) at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. Secondary radioactive beams of light particles such as 6He, 7Be and 8Li have been produced and low energy elastic scattering and transfer reaction experiments have been performed. The recent scientific program using this facility includes elastic scattering and transfer reactions of 6He halo nucleus on 9Be, 27Al, 51V and 120Sn targets and 8Li on 9Be, 12C and 51V targets. The total reaction cross section as a function of energy has been extracted from the elastic scattering data and the role of breakup of weakly bound or exotic nuclei is discussed. Also spectroscopic factors have been obtained from the transfer reactions.

Guimarães, V.; Lépine-Szily, A.; Lichtenthäler, R.; de Faria, P. N.; Barioni, A.; Pires, K. C. C.; Morcelle, V.; Mendes, D. R.; Zamora, J. C.; Morais, M. C.; Condori, R. P.; Benjamim, E. A.; Monteiro, D. S.; Crema, E.; Moro, A. M.; Lubian, J.

2011-09-01

222

Metal ion coordination, conditional stability constants, and solution behavior of chelating surfactant metal complexes.  

PubMed

Coordination complexes of some divalent metal ions with the DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid)-based chelating surfactant 2-dodecyldiethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (4-C12-DTPA) have been examined in terms of chelation and solution behavior. The headgroup of 4-C12-DTPA contains eight donor atoms that can participate in the coordination of a metal ion. Conditional stability constants for five transition metal complexes with 4-C12-DTPA were determined by competition measurements between 4-C12-DTPA and DTPA, using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Small differences in the relative strength between the coordination complexes of DTPA and 4-C12-DTPA indicated that the hydrocarbon tail only affected the chelating ability of the headgroup to a limited extent. The coordination of Cu(2+) ions was investigated in particular, using UV-visible spectroscopy. By constructing Job's plots, it was found that 4-C12-DTPA could coordinate up to two Cu(2+) ions. Surface tension measurements and NMR diffusometry showed that the coordination of metal ions affected the solution behavior of 4-C12-DTPA, but there were no specific trends between the studied divalent metal complexes. Generally, the effects of the metal ion coordination could be linked to the neutralization of the headgroup charge of 4-C12-DTPA, and the resulting reduced electrostatic repulsions between adjacent surfactants in micelles and monolayers. The pH vs concentration plots, on the other hand, showed a distinct difference between 4-C12-DTPA complexes of the alkaline earth metals and the transition metals. This was explained by the difference in coordination between the two groups of metal ions, as predicted by the hard and soft acid and base (HSAB) theory. PMID:24702119

Svanedal, Ida; Boija, Susanne; Almesåker, Ann; Persson, Gerd; Andersson, Fredrik; Hedenström, Erik; Bylund, Dan; Norgren, Magnus; Edlund, Håkan

2014-04-29

223

Photophysical properties of metal ion functionalized NaY zeolite.  

PubMed

A series of luminescent ion exchanged zeolite are synthesized by introducing various ions into NaY zeolite. Monometal ion (Eu(3+), Tb(3+), Ce(3+), Y(3+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Cu(2+)) exchanged zeolite, rare-earth ion (Eu(3+), Tb(3+), Ce(3+)) exchanged zeolite modified with Y(3+) and rare-earth ion (Eu(3+), Tb(3+), Ce(3+)) exchanged zeolite modified with Zn(2+) are discussed here. The resulting materials are characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrum radiometer (FTIR), XRD, scanning electronic microscope (SEM), PLE, PL and luminescence lifetime measurements. The photoluminescence spectrum of NaY indicates that emission band of host matrix exhibits a blueshift of about 70 nm after monometal ion exchange process. The results show that transition metal ion exchanged zeolites possess a similar emission band due to dominant host luminescence. A variety of luminescence phenomenon of rare-earth ion broadens the application of zeolite as a luminescent host. The Eu(3+) ion exchanged zeolite shows white light luminescence with a great application value and Ce(3+) exchanged zeolite steadily exhibits its characteristic luminescence in ultraviolet region no matter in monometal ion exchanged zeolite or bimetal ions exchanged zeolite. PMID:24392790

Duan, Tian-Wei; Yan, Bing

2014-01-01

224

Low coefficient of thermal expansion polyimides containing metal ion additives  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Polyimides have become widely used as high performance polymers as a result of their excellent thermal stability and toughness. However, lowering their coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) would increase their usefulness for aerospace and electronic applications where dimensional stability is a requirement. The incorporation of metal ion-containing additives into polyimides, resulting in significantly lowered CTE's, has been studied. Various metal ion additives have been added to both polyamic acid resins and soluble polyimide solutions in the concentration range of 4-23 weight percent. The incorporation of these metal ions has resulted in reductions in the CTE's of the control polyimides of 12 percent to over 100 percent depending on the choice of additive and its concentration.

Stoakley, D. M.; St. Clair, A. K.

1992-01-01

225

Refractory metal silicides synthesized by metal vapor vacuum arc ion source implantation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Refractory metal silicides, namely NbSi2, TaSi2, WSi2, and MoSi2, were successfully synthesized by using a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source to implant the respective metal ions with high current density into Si(111) and Si(100) wafers. The implantation was conducted at room temperature with an extracted voltage of 40 kV. When the current densities of the refractory metal ions were up to 65 ?A/cm2, the equilibrium hexagonal NbSi2 and TaSi2 phases were formed at an implantation dose of 3×1017 ions/cm2, while the hexagonal WSi2 and MoSi2 phases were formed at a dose of 5×1017 ions/cm2. With increasing the current density up to 90 ?A/cm2, the transition of the hexagonal WSi2 and MoSi2 phases to their most stable tetragonal structures was observed. Postannealing at 750 and 950 °C resulted in the formation of the unique tetragonal WSi2 and MoSi2 phases, respectively. The electrical property of the MEVVA-synthesized refractory metal silicides was measured for both as-implanted and postannealed wafers. In addition, the formation of the refractory metal silicides by MEVVA implantation is discussed in terms of the beam heating effect caused by high current ion implantation.

Zhu, D. H.; Liu, B. X.

1995-04-01

226

Detection of Heavy Metal Ions in Water by High-Resolution Surface Plasmon Resonance  

E-print Network

Detection of Heavy Metal Ions in Water by High-Resolution Surface Plasmon Resonance Spectroscopy voltammetry (ASV) capability has been demonstrated for detecting heavy metal ions in water. Metal ions in water from part-per-million to sub-part-per-billion levels with good linearity. Heavy metal poisoning

Zhang, Yanchao

227

Liquid metal ion source and alloy for ion emission of multiple ionic species  

Microsoft Academic Search

A liquid metal ion source and alloy for the simultaneous ion evaporation of arsenic and boron, arsenic and phosphorus, or arsenic, boron and phosphorus. The ionic species to be evaporated are contained in palladium-arsenic-boron and palladium-arsenic-boron-phosphorus alloys. The ion source, including an emitter means such as a needle emitter and a source means such as U-shaped heater element, is preferably

Clark Jr. William M; Mark W. Utlaut; Joseph A. Wysocki; Edmund K. Storms; Eugene G. Szklarz; Robert G. Behrens; Lynwood W. Swanson; Anthony E. Bell

1987-01-01

228

Development of a 1+/N+ setup for the production of multicharged radioactive alkali ions in SPIRAL  

SciTech Connect

In the framework of the production of radioactive ion beams by the isotope separator online method, a new system has been developed at GANIL/SPIRAL I to produce multicharged alkali ions. The principle, referred to as the ''direct 1+/N+ method,'' consists of a surface ionization source associated with a multicharged electron-cyclotron-resonance ion source without an intermediate mass separator. This new system has been tested online using a {sup 48}Ca primary beam at 60.3 A MeV. The experimental evidence of the direct 1+/N+ process has been obtained for a potential difference between the two sources of 11 V and with a 1+/N+ charge breeding efficiency of 0.04% for {sup 47}K{sup 5+}. This value is significantly lower than the value of 6% obtained for stable K ions with the standard 1+/N+ method. A possible explanation is given in the text.

Eleon, C.; Gaubert, G.; Jardin, P.; Saint-Laurent, M.-G.; Alcantara, J.; Alves Conde, R.; Barue, C.; Boilley, D.; Cornell, J. C.; Delahaye, P.; Dubois, M.; Jacquot, B.; Leherissier, P.; Leroy, R.; Lhersonneau, G.; Marie-Jeanne, M.; Maunoury, L.; Pacquet, J.-Y.; Pellemoine, F.; Pierret, C. [GANIL CEA/DSN-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd. H. Becquerel, BP 55027, 14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); CERN ISOLDE, 1211 GENEVA 23 (Switzerland); GANIL CEA/DSN-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd. H. Becquerel, BP 55027, 14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); CERN ISOLDE, 1211 GENEVA 23 (Switzerland); CIRIL, Bd. H. Becquerel, BP 5133, 14070 Caen Cedex 5 (France); GANIL CEA/DSN-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd. H. Becquerel, BP 55027, 14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); CIRIL, Bd. H. Becquerel, BP 5133, 14070 Caen Cedex 5 (France); GANIL CEA/DSN-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd. H. Becquerel, BP 55027, 14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France)] (and others)

2008-02-15

229

Sorption of heavy metal ions on new metal-ligand complexes chemically derived from Lycopodium clavatum  

SciTech Connect

Sorption of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution has been investigated as a function of pH using a novel exchanger system whereby Lycopodium clavatum is functionalized with carboxylate and glyoxime metal-ligand complexes. The new ligand exchangers were prepared using a reaction of diaminosporopollenin with various metal-ligand complexes of glyoxime and monocarboxylic acid. The sorptive behavior of these metal-ligand exchangers and the possibilities to remove and to recover selectively heavy metal cations using these systems are discussed on the basis of their chemical natures and their complexing properties.

Pehlivan, E.; Ersoz, M.; Yildiz, S. [Univ. of Selcuk, Konya (Turkey); Duncan, H.J. [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

1994-08-01

230

2008 John Charnley Award: Metal Ion Levels After Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Randomized Trial  

PubMed Central

Metal-on-metal bearing total hip arthroplasty is performed more commonly than in the past. There may be manufacturing differences such as clearance, roughness, metallurgy, and head size that affect performance. In a prospective, randomized trial, we compared 2-year postoperative ion levels for a 28-mm metal-on-polyethylene bearing with 28-mm and 36-mm metal-on-metal bearings. We measured serum, erythrocyte, and urine ion levels. We observed no difference in the ion levels for the 28-mm and 36-mm metal-on-metal bearings. The ion levels in these patients were lower than reported for most other metal-on-metal bearings. Although both erythrocyte and serum cobalt increased, erythrocyte chromium and erythrocyte titanium did not increase despite a four- to sixfold serum chromium and a three- to fourfold serum titanium increase. This may represent a threshold level for serum chromium and serum titanium below which erythrocytes are not affected. Level of Evidence: Level I, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18855089

Engh, C. Anderson; MacDonald, Steven J.; Thompson, Abigail; Naudie, Douglas; Engh, Charles A.

2008-01-01

231

Adsorption behaviour of metal ions on hydroximate resins.  

PubMed

Some new chelating ion-exchange resins containing a hydroxamic acid moiety attached to a divinylbenzene styrene (DVBS) copolymer, i.e. glycine hydroximate in DVBS (GH-DVBS). anthranilic acid hydroximate in DVBS (AAHDVBS), malonic acid dihydroximate in DVBS (MAH-DVBS) and iminodiacetic acid dihydroximate in DVBS (IDAAH-DVBS). have been synthesized and their various physicochemical characteristics studied. The degree of retention of metal ions by the resins at equilibrium has been determined in terms of the molar distribution coefficient (k(d)). In general, the resins having a dihydroximate moiety are found to be more efficient compared to monohydroximate resins. However, it is of interest to note that the monohydroximate derivative of amino acid (GH-DVBS) showed better metal retention capability than the dihydroximate of carboxylic acid (MAH-DVBS). The selectivity of the resins for transition and highly charged metal ions is quite high compared to that for alkaline earth metals. All the synthesized resins can be utilized for the separation of a mixture of metal ions because the differences in the distribution coefficient values are large enough to permit good separations on columns. However, the GH-DVBS resin was tried for the separation of copper cobalt and copper nickel mixtures at pH 5.5 using the column mode of operation. PMID:18966686

Ahuja, M; Rai, A K; Mathur, P N

1996-11-01

232

In vivo liberation of silver ions from metallic silver surfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

In vivo liberation of electrically charged silver atoms\\/silver ions from metallic silver pellets, silver grids and silver\\u000a threads placed in the brain, skin and abdominal cavity was proved by way of the histochemical technique autometallography\\u000a (AMG). A bio-film or “dissolution membrane” inserted between the metallic surface and macrophages was recognized on the surface\\u000a of the implanted silver after a short

Gorm Danscher; Linda Jansons Locht

2010-01-01

233

Metal-Ion Additives Reduce Thermal Expansion Of Polyimides  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Polyimides widely used as high-performance polymers because of their excellent thermal stability and toughness. However, their coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE's) greater than those of metals, ceramics, and glasses. Decreasing CTE's of polyimides increase usefulness for aerospace and electronics applications in which dimensional stability required. Additives containing metal ions reduce coefficients of thermal expansion of polyimides. Reductions range from 11 to over 100 percent.

Stoakley, Diane M.; St. Clair, Anne K.; Emerson, Burt R., Jr.; Willis, George L.

1994-01-01

234

Determination of radioactivity and heavy metals of Bakirçay river in Western Turkey.  

PubMed

In this study, radioactive and heavy metal contaminations in sediments and waters of Bak?rçay River in Western Turkey were investigated to determine their pollution potential. The radium concentrations in the water samples were measured using the collector-chamber method. The radioactivities of (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th in sediments and soils were found to be 45.30 to 839.19 Bq kg(-1), 35.26 to 160.57 Bq kg(-1) and 1.86 to 131.49 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The activity of (226)Ra in the water samples ranged from 0.09 to 0.36 Bq/L. To determine the radiological hazard of natural radioactivity in the samples, the external terrestrial gamma dose rate in air (n Gyh(-1)), annual effective dose rate (mSv y(-1)), radium equivalent activity (Bq kg(-1)) were calculated and compared with internationally recommended values. PMID:22878109

Saç, M M; Ortabuk, F; Kumru, M N; Içhedef, M; Sert, S

2012-10-01

235

Heavy metal ions are potent inhibitors of protein folding  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and occupational exposure to heavy metals such as cadmium, mercury and lead results in severe health hazards including prenatal and developmental defects. The deleterious effects of heavy metal ions have hitherto been attributed to their interactions with specific, particularly susceptible native proteins. Here, we report an as yet undescribed mode of heavy metal toxicity. Cd{sup 2+}, Hg{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} proved to inhibit very efficiently the spontaneous refolding of chemically denatured proteins by forming high-affinity multidentate complexes with thiol and other functional groups (IC{sub 50} in the nanomolar range). With similar efficacy, the heavy metal ions inhibited the chaperone-assisted refolding of chemically denatured and heat-denatured proteins. Thus, the toxic effects of heavy metal ions may result as well from their interaction with the more readily accessible functional groups of proteins in nascent and other non-native form. The toxic scope of heavy metals seems to be substantially larger than assumed so far.

Sharma, Sandeep K. [Biochemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Departement de Biologie Moleculaire Vegetale, Universite de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Goloubinoff, Pierre [Departement de Biologie Moleculaire Vegetale, Universite de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Christen, Philipp [Biochemisches Institut, Universitaet Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: christen@bioc.uzh.ch

2008-07-25

236

Metal ion binding to iron oxides  

Microsoft Academic Search

The biogeochemistry of trace elements (TE) is largely dependent upon their interaction with heterogeneous ligands including metal oxides and hydrous oxides of iron. The modeling of TE interactions with iron oxides has been pursued using a variety of chemical models. The objective of this work is to show that it is possible to model the adsorption of protons and TE

M. Ponthieu; F. Juillot; T. Hiemstra; W. H. van Riemsdijk; M. F. Benedetti

2006-01-01

237

Ion exchange columns for selective removal of cesium from aqueous radioactive waste using hydrous crystalline silico-titanates  

E-print Network

ION EXCHANGE COLUMNS FOR SELECTIVE REMOVAL OF CESIUM FROM AQUEOUS RADIOACTIVE WASTE USING HYDROUS CRYSTALLINE SILICO-TITANATES A Thesis by DAVID MICHAEL RICCI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1995 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering ION EXCHANGE COLUMNS FOR SELECTIVE REMOVAL OF CESIUM FROM AQUEOUS RADIOACTIVE WASTE USING HYDROUS CRYSTALLINE SILICO-TITANATES A Thesis...

Ricci, David Michael

1995-01-01

238

Superconductivity in Metal-mixed Ion-Implanted Polymer Films  

E-print Network

Ion-implantation of normally insulating polymers offers an alternative to depositing conjugated organics onto plastic films to make electronic circuits. We used a 50 keV nitrogen ion beam to mix a thin 10 nm Sn/Sb alloy film into the sub-surface of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and report the low temperature properties of this material. We observed metallic behavior, and the onset of superconductivity below 3 K. There are strong indications that the superconductivity does not result from a residual thin-film of alloy, but instead from a network of alloy grains coupled via a weakly conducting, ion-beam carbonized polymer matrix.

A. P. Micolich; E. Tavenner; B. J. Powell; A. R. Hamilton; M. T. Curry; R. E. Giedd; P. Meredith

2006-03-15

239

Superconductivity in metal-mixed ion-implanted polymer films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ion implantation of normally insulating polymers offers an alternative to depositing conjugated organics onto plastic films to make electronic circuits. We used a 50keV nitrogen ion beam to mix a thin 10nm Sn /Sb alloy film into the subsurface of polyetheretherketone and report the low temperature properties of this material. We observed metallic behavior, and the onset of superconductivity below 3K. There are strong indications that the superconductivity does not result from a residual thin film of alloy, but instead from a network of alloy grains coupled via a weakly conducting, ion-beam carbonized polymer matrix.

Micolich, A. P.; Tavenner, E.; Powell, B. J.; Hamilton, A. R.; Curry, M. T.; Giedd, R. E.; Meredith, P.

2006-10-01

240

Producing large-aperture metal-ion beams  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of a pulsed source providing large-aperture beams of ions of various metals with pulse lengths of 100-500 ..mu..sec, repetition frequency 10-50 Hz, ion energy 20-150 keV, and beam current of a few amperes. The source is intended for research in implantation metallurgy. A time of 5-15 min is required to provide about 10/sup 17/ ions/cm/sup 3/ over an area of up to 300 cm/sup 2/.

Aksenov, A.I.; Bugaev, S.P.; Emel'yanov, V.A.; Erokhin, G.P.; Pankovets, N.G.; Tolopa, A.M.; Chesnokov, S.M.

1987-12-01

241

DUHOCAMIS: A dual hollow cathode ion source for metal ion beams  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we describe a novel ion source named DUHOCAMIS for multiply charged metal ion beams. This ion source is derived from the hot cathode Penning ion gauge ion source (JINR, Dubna, 1957). A notable characteristic is the modified Penning geometry in the form of a hollow sputter electrode, coaxially positioned in a compact bottle-magnetic field along the central magnetic line of force. The interaction of the discharge geometry with the inhomogeneous but symmetrical magnetic field enables this device to be operated as hollow cathode discharge and Penning discharge as well. The main features of the ion source are the very high metal ion efficiency (up to 25%), good operational reproducibility, flexible and efficient operations for low charged as well as highly charged ions, compact setup, and easy maintenance. For light ions, e.g., up to titanium, well-collimated beams in the range of several tens of milliamperes of pulsed ion current (1 ms, 10/s) have been reliably performed in long time runs.

Zhao, W. J.; Mueller, M. W. O.; Janik, J.; Liu, K. X.; Ren, X. T. [Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China); GSI, D64291 Darmstadt (Germany) and Sentastr. 12, D68199, Mannheim (Germany); Institute of Microelectronics, Slovak Technical University, Bratislava, Llcovicova 3 (Slovakia); Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China) and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China)

2008-02-15

242

Crystallographic analysis of metal-ion binding to human ubiquitin.  

PubMed

The metal-binding ability of human ubiquitin (hUb) towards a selection of biologically relevant metal ions and complexes has been probed. Different techniques have been used to obtain crystals suitable for crystallographic analysis. In the first type of experiments, crystals of hUb have been soaked in solutions containing copper(II) acetate and two metallodrugs, Zeise salt (K[PtCl(3)(?(2)-C(2)H(4))]·H(2)O) and cisplatin (cis-[PtCl(2)(NH(3))(2)]). The Zeise salt is used in a test for hepatitis, whereas cisplatin is one of the most powerful anticancer drugs in clinical use. The Zeise salt readily reacts with hUb crystals to afford an adduct with three platinum residues per protein molecule, Pt(3)-hUb. In contrast, copper(II) acetate and cisplatin were found to be unreactive for contact times up to one hour and to cause degradation of the hUb crystals for longer times. In the second type of experiments, hUb was cocrystallized with a solution of copper(II) or zinc(II) acetate or cisplatin. Zinc(II) acetate gives, at low metal-to-protein molar ratios (8:1), crystals containing one metal ion per three molecules of protein, Zn-hUb(3) (already reported in previous work), whereas at high metal-to-protein ratios (70:1) gives crystals containing three Zn(II) ions per protein molecule, Zn(3)-hUb. In contrast, once again, copper(II) acetate and cisplatin, even at low metal-to-protein ratios, do not give crystalline material. In the soaking experiment, the Zeise anion leads to simultaneous platination of His68, Met1, and Lys6. Present and previous results of cocrystallization experiments performed with Zn(II) and other Group 12 metal ions allow a comprehensive understanding of the metal-ion binding properties of hUb with His68 as the main anchoring site, followed by Met1 and carboxylic groups of Glu16, Glu18, Glu64, Asp21, and Asp32, to be reached. In the case of platinum, Lys6 can also be a binding site. The amount of bound metal ion, with respect to that of the protein, appears to be a relevant parameter influencing crystal packing. PMID:21268159

Arnesano, Fabio; Belviso, Benny Danilo; Caliandro, Rocco; Falini, Giuseppe; Fermani, Simona; Natile, Giovanni; Siliqi, Dritan

2011-02-01

243

Muon Tomography as a Tool to Detect Radioactive Source Shielding in Scrap Metal Containers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Muon tomography was recently proposed as a tool to inspect large volumes with the purpose of recognizing high density materials immersed in lower density matrices. The MU-STEEL European project (RFCS-CT-2010-000033) studied the application of such a technique to detect radioactive source shielding in truck containers filled with scrap metals entering steel mill foundries. A description of the muon tomography technique, of the MU-STEEL project and of the obtained results will be presented.

Bonomi, G.; Cambiaghi, D.; Dassa, L.; Donzella, A.; Subieta, M.; Villa, V.; Zenoni, A.; Furlan, M.; Rigoni, A.; Vanini, S.; Viesti, G.; Zumerle, G.; Benettoni, M.; Checchia, P.; Gonella, F.; Pegoraro, M.; Zanuttigh, P.; Calvagno, G.; Calvini, P.; Squarcia, S.

2014-02-01

244

Evaluation of the electrorefining technique for the processing of radioactive scrap metals  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a literature study performed to identify applications of the electrorefining technique to the decontamination of radioactively-contaminated scrap metal (RSM). Upon the completion of the literature search and the review of numerous references, it was concluded that there were applications of this technique that were appropriate for the decontamination of some types of RSM, especially when the desired product is a pure elemental metal of high purity. It was also concluded that this technique was not well-suited for the decontamination of RSM stainless steels and other alloys, when it was desired that the metallurgical characteristics of the alloy be present in the decontaminated product.

Kessinger, G.F.

1993-10-01

245

Metal ion bombardment of onion skin cell wall  

SciTech Connect

Ion bombardment of living cellular material is a novel subfield of ion beam surface modification that is receiving growing attention from the ion beam and biological communities. Although it has been demonstrated that the technique is sound, in that an adequate fraction of the living cells can survive both the vacuum environment and energetic ion bombardment, there remains much uncertainty about the process details. Here we report on our observations of onion skin cells that were subjected to ion implantation, and propose some possible physical models that tend to support the experimental results. The ion beams used were metallic (Mg, Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu), mean ion energy was typically 30keV, and the implantation fluence was in the range 1014 1016 ions/cm2. The cells were viewed using Atomic Force Microscopy, revealing the formation of microcrater-like structures due to ion bombardment. The implantation depth profile was measured with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and compared to the results of the TRIM, T-DYN and PROFILE computer codes.

Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Vilaithong, T.; Yu, L.D.; Verdaguer, A.; Ratera, I.; Ogletree, D.F.; Monteiro, O.R.; Brown, I.G.

2004-05-10

246

Changes in blood ion levels after removal of metal-on-metal hip replacements  

PubMed Central

Background and purpose In patients with metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses, pain and joint effusions may be associated with elevated blood levels of cobalt and chromium ions. Since little is known about the kinetics of metal ion clearance from the body and the rate of resolution of elevated blood ion levels, we examined the time course of cobalt and chromium ion levels after revision of MoM hip replacements. Patients and methods We included 16 patients (13 female) who underwent revision of a painful MoM hip (large diameter, modern bearing) without fracture or infection, and who had a minimum of 4 blood metal ion measurements over an average period of 6.1 (0–12) months after revision. Results Average blood ion concentrations at the time of revision were 22 ppb for chromium and 43 ppb for cobalt. The change in ion levels after revision surgery varied extensively between patients. In many cases, over the second and third months after revision surgery ion levels decreased to 50% of the values measured at revision. Decay of chromium levels occurred more slowly than decay of cobalt levels, with a 9% lag in return to normal levels. The rate of decay of both metals followed second-order (exponential) kinetics more closely than first-order (linear) kinetics. Interpretation The elimination of cobalt and chromium from the blood of patients who have undergone revision of painful MoM hip arthroplasties follows an exponential decay curve with a half-life of approximately 50 days. Elevated blood levels of cobalt and chromium ions can persist for at least 1 year after revision, especially in patients with high levels of exposure. PMID:24758321

Durrani, Salim K; Sampson, Barry; Panetta, Therese; Liddle, Alexander D; Sabah, Shiraz A; Chan, Newton K; Skinner, John A; Hart, Alister J

2014-01-01

247

Stable alkali metal ion intercalation compounds as optimized metal oxide nanowire cathodes for lithium batteries.  

PubMed

Intercalation of ions in electrode materials has been explored to improve the rate capability in lithium batteries and supercapacitors, due to the enhanced diffusion of Li(+) or electrolyte cations. Here, we describe a synergistic effect between crystal structure and intercalated ion by experimental characterization and ab initio calculations, based on more than 20 nanomaterials: five typical cathode materials together with their alkali metal ion intercalation compounds A-M-O (A = Li, Na, K, Rb; M = V, Mo, Co, Mn, Fe-P). Our focus on nanowires is motivated by general enhancements afforded by nanoscale structures that better sustain lattice distortions associated with charge/discharge cycles. We show that preintercalation of alkali metal ions in V-O and Mo-O yields substantial improvement in the Li ion charge/discharge cycling and rate, compared to A-Co-O, A-Mn-O, and A-Fe-P-O. Diffraction and modeling studies reveal that preintercalation with K and Rb ions yields a more stable interlayer expansion, which prevents destructive collapse of layers and allow Li ions to diffuse more freely. This study demonstrates that appropriate alkali metal ion intercalation in admissible structure can overcome the limitation of cyclability as well as rate capability of cathode materials, besides, the preintercalation strategy provides an effective method to enlarge diffusion channel at the technical level, and more generally, it suggests that the optimized design of stable intercalation compounds could lead to substantial improvements for applications in energy storage. PMID:25654208

Zhao, Yunlong; Han, Chunhua; Yang, Junwei; Su, Jie; Xu, Xiaoming; Li, Shuo; Xu, Lin; Fang, Ruopian; Jiang, Hong; Zou, Xiaodong; Song, Bo; Mai, Liqiang; Zhang, Qingjie

2015-03-11

248

Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete  

DOEpatents

Quick setting polymer concrete compositions are described which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

1983-05-13

249

Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete  

DOEpatents

Quick setting polymer concrete compositions which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

1981-11-04

250

COAGULATION AND PRECIPITATION OF SELECTED METAL IONS FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of laboratory jar tests to develop data on the removal from aqueous solution of 12 metal ions of environmental concern. The project, of very limited scope, provides initial screening data only: coagulants were evaluated at only two dose levels (1.1 and 1....

251

A new method for modifying metallic materials by ion irradiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new method of radiation surface modification of metal materials is proposed. The method permits to apply the equipment, which is usually employed for ion implantation or plasma treatment with minimum and cheap constructive changes. But the substantially more high characteristics of materials can be obtained as compared with other radiation hardening methods due to the different base principles. The

Davit Danielyan

252

Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete  

DOEpatents

Quick setting polymer concrete compositions with excellent structural properties are disclosed; these polymer concrete compositions are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate, which may be wet, and with a source of bivalent metallic ions.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY); Kukacka, Lawrence E. (Port Jefferson, NY); Horn, William H. (Brookhaven, NY)

1985-01-01

253

Accumulation of heavy-metal ions by Zoogloea ramigera  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biomass has been produced from glucose using the organism Zoogloea ramigera 115. This biomass has been used to remove copper, cadmium, and uranyl ions from water solutions. The metal uptake was studied with two different methods: either by spectrophotometric measurements on the solutions after flocculation or by potentiometric measurements with amalgam electrodes in order to follow the entire complex formation.

Anders B. Norberg; Hans Persson

1984-01-01

254

Commissioning of the Daresbury Recoil Separator for nuclear astrophysics measurements at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Daresbury Recoil Separator (DRS) has been installed for nuclear astrophysics research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. it will be used for direct measurements of capture reactions on radioactive ions which occur in stellar explosions such as novae and X-ray bursts. The physics motivation and plans for the first measurements with radioactive beams are described, and details of the new DRS experimental equipment and preliminary results from the first commissioning experiments with stable beams are given.

Smith, M.S.; Blackmon, J.C.; Koehler, P.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Physics Div.] [and others

1997-12-01

255

[Spectroscopic studies on transition metal ions in colored diamonds].  

PubMed

Transition metals like nickel, cobalt and iron have been often used as solvent catalysts in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) synthesis of diamond, and nickel and cobalt ions have been found in diamond lattice. Available studies indicated that nickel and cobalt ions could enter the lattice as interstitial or substitutional impurities and form complexes with nitrogen. Polarized microscopy, SEM-EDS, EPR, PL and FTIR have been used in this study to investigate six fancy color natural and synthetic diamonds in order to determine the spectroscopic characteristics and the existing forms of transition metal ions in colored diamond lattice. Cobalt-related optical centers were first found in natural chameleon diamonds, and some new nickel and cobalt-related optical and EPR centers have also been detected in these diamond samples. PMID:15766067

Meng, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ming-Sheng

2004-07-01

256

Quadrupole ion trap studies of the structure and reactivity of transition metal ion pair complexes  

PubMed

Ion pairs are common species observed in the electrospray mass spectra of transition metal coordination complexes. To understand the nature of these ion pairs, a systematic study of the gas-phase chemistry of these species using ion-molecule reactions and collision-induced dissociation (CID) was carried out. Ion pair complexes of the type MLnX+ (where M is Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) or Zn(II), L is 1,10-phenanthroline, 2,2'-bipyridine, ethylenediamine, diethylenetriamine or 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane and X is Cl-, NO3-, acetylacetonate, ClO4-, acetate or SCN-) were studied. Ion-molecule reactions can distinguish whether the counterion in an ion pair is an inner- or outer-sphere ligand and can determine the coordination mode of the counterion. In addition, CID and ion-molecule reactions reveal some interesting chemistry of these complexes and unique coordination modes for some of the anions studied here were inferred from the ion-molecule reactions. For example, the thiocyanate ion is found to coordinate in a bidentate fashion in Zn(II) and Ni(II) complexes, contrasting behavior typically observed in solution. Also, certain Co(II) and Fe(II) ion pair complexes undergo oxidation reactions in which species such as dioxygen and nitric oxide from the counterions ClO4- and NO3- are transferred to the Co(II) and Fe(II) complexes, showing the inherent affinity of these metals for these molecules. These complexes were also studied by ion-molecule reactions and CID. Dioxygen in complexes formed by CID is demonstrated to be bidentate, suggesting the formation of a peroxo ligand with concurrent oxidation of the metal. PMID:10767759

Vachet; Callahan

2000-03-01

257

Method for removing metal ions from solution with titanate sorbents  

DOEpatents

A method for removing metal ions from solution comprises the steps of providing titanate particles by spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising sorbent titanates having a particle size up to 20 micrometers, optionally in the presence of polymer free of cellulose functionality as binder, said sorbent being active towards heavy metals from Periodic Table (CAS version) Groups IA, IIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, and VIII, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size distribution in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers. The particles can be used free flowing in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove metal ions from aqueous or organic liquid.

Lundquist, Susan H. (White Bear Township, MN); White, Lloyd R. (Minneapolis, MN)

1999-01-01

258

Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln{sup 11}]-amyloid {beta}-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will become routine tomorrow.

Nicholas B. Lentz

2007-12-01

259

Chitosan removes toxic heavy metal ions from cigarette mainstream smoke  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study investigated the removal of heavy metal ions from cigarette mainstream smoke using chitosan. Chitosan of various deacetylation degrees and molecular weights were manually added to cigarette filters in different dosages. The mainstream smoke particulate matter was collected by a Cambridge filter pad, digested by a microwave digestor, and then analyzed for contents of heavy metal ions, including As(III/V), Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II), by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The results showed that chitosan had a removal effect on Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II). Of these, the percent removal of Ni(II) was elevated with an increasing dosage of chitosan. Chitosan of a high deace tylation degree exhibited good binding performance toward Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II), though with poor efficiency for Pb(II). Except As(III/V), all the tested metal ions showed similar tendencies in the growing contents with an increasing chitosan molecular weight. Nonetheless, the percent removal of Cr(III/VI) peaked with a chitosan molecular weight of 200 kDa, followed by a dramatic decrease with an increasing chitosan molecular weight. Generally, chitosan had different removal effects on four out of five tested metal ions, and the percent removal of Cd(II), Pb(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II) was approximately 55%, 45%, 50%, and 16%, respectively. In a word, chitosan used in cigarette filter can remove toxic heavy metal ions in the mainstream smoke, improve cigarette safety, and reduce the harm to smokers.

Zhou, Wen; Xu, Ying; Wang, Dongfeng; Zhou, Shilu

2013-09-01

260

Metal ion influence on eumelanin fluorescence and structure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Melanin has long been thought to have an unworkably weak and complex fluorescence, but here we study its intrinsic fluorescence in order to demonstrate how metal ions can be used to control the rate of formation, constituents and structure of eumelanin formed from the well-known laboratory auto-oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA). The effect on eumelanin absorption and fluorescence of a range of solvated metal ions is reported including Cu, Zn, Ni, Na and K. Monovalent cations and Zn have little effect, but the effect of transition metal cations can be considerable. For example, at pH 10, copper ions are shown to accelerate the onset of eumelanin formation, but not the rate of formation once it commences, and simplify the usual complex structure and intrinsic fluorescence of eumelanin in a way that is consistent with an increased abundance of 5,5-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA). The presence of a dominant 6 ns fluorescence decay time at 480 nm, when excited at 450 nm describes a distinct photophysical species, which we tentatively assign to small oligomers. Copper is well-known to normally quench fluorescence, but increasing amounts of copper surprisingly leads to an increase in the fluorescence decay time of eumelanin, while reducing the fluorescence intensity, suggesting copper modification of the excited state. Such results have bearing on diverse areas. The most accepted morphology for melanin is that of a graphite-like sheet structure, and one which readily binds metal ions, an interaction that is thought to have an important, though as yet unclear bearing on several areas of medicine including neurology. There is also increasing interest in bio-mimicry by preparing and labelling sheet structures with metal ions for new electronic and photonic materials.

Sutter, Jens-Uwe; Birch, David J. S.

2014-06-01

261

Development and properties of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) ion exchangers for radioactive waste applications  

SciTech Connect

Crystalline silicotitanates (CSTs) are a new class of ion exchangers that were jointly invented by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A&M University. One particular CST, known as TAM-5, is remarkable for its ability to separate parts-per-million concentrations of cesium from highly alkaline solutions (pH> 14) containing high sodium concentrations (>5M). It is also highly effective for removing cesium from neutral and acidic solutions, and for removing strontium from basic and neutral solutions. Cesium isotopes are fission products that account for a large portion of the radioactivity in waste streams generated during weapons material production. Tests performed at numerous locations with early lab-scale TAM-5 samples established the material as a leading candidate for treating radioactive waste volumes such as those found at the Hanford site in Washington. Thus Sandia developed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) partnership with UOP, a world leader in developing, commercializing, and supplying adsorbents and associated process technology to commercialize and further develop the material. CSTs are now commercially available from UOP in a powder (UOP IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-910 ion exchanger) and granular form suitable for column ion exchange operations (UOP IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-911 ion exchanger). These materials exhibit a high capacity for cesium in a wide variety of solutions of interest to the Department of Energy, and they are chemically, thermally, and radiation stable. They have performed well in tests at numerous sites with actual radioactive waste solutions, and are being demonstrated in the 100,000 liter Cesium Removal Demonstration taking place at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with Melton Valley Storage Tank waste. It has been estimated that applying CSTs to the Hanford cleanup alone will result in a savings of more than $300 million over baseline technologies.

Miller, J.E.; Brown, N.E.

1997-04-01

262

Solution NMR Refinement of a Metal Ion Bound Protein Using Metal Ion Inclusive Restrained Molecular Dynamics Methods  

PubMed Central

Correctly calculating the structure of metal coordination sites in a protein during the process of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure determination and refinement continues to be a challenging task. In this study, we present an accurate and convenient means by which to include metal ions in the NMR structure determination process using molecular dynamics (MD) constrained by NMR-derived data to obtain a realistic and physically viable description of the metal binding site(s). This method provides the framework to accurately portray the metal ions and its binding residues in a pseudo-bond or dummy-cation like approach, and is validated by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) MD calculations constrained by NMR-derived data. To illustrate this approach, we refine the zinc coordination complex structure of the zinc sensing transcriptional repressor protein Staphylococcus aureus CzrA, generating over 130 ns of MD and QM/MM MD NMR-data compliant sampling. In addition to refining the first coordination shell structure of the Zn(II) ion, this protocol benefits from being performed in a periodically replicated solvation environment including long-range electrostatics. We determine that unrestrained (not based on NMR data) MD simulations correlated to the NMR data in a time-averaged ensemble. The accurate solution structure ensemble of the metal-bound protein accurately describes the role of conformational dynamics in allosteric regulation of DNA binding by zinc and serves to validate our previous unrestrained MD simulations of CzrA. This methodology has potentially broad applicability in the structure determination of metal ion bound proteins, protein folding and metal template protein-design studies. PMID:23609042

Chakravorty, Dhruva K.; Wang, Bing; Lee, Chul Won; Guerra, Alfredo J.; Giedroc, David P.; Merz, Kenneth M.

2013-01-01

263

Recoil separators for radiative capture using radioactive ion beams. Recent advances and detection techniques  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiative capture reactions involving the fusion of hydrogen or helium are ubiquitous in the stellar history of the universe, and are some of the most important reactions in the processes that govern nucleosynthesis and energy generation in both static and explosive scenarios. However, radiative capture reactions pose some of the most difficult experimental challenges due to extremely small cross sections. With the advent of recoil separators and techniques in inverse kinematics, it is now possible to measure radiative capture reactions on very short-lived radioactive nuclei, and in the presence of high experimental backgrounds. In this paper we review the experimental needs for making measurements of astrophysical importance on radiative capture reactions. We also review some of the important historical advances in the field of recoil separators as well as describe current techniques and performance milestones, including descriptions of some of the separators most recently working at radioactive ion beam facilities, such as DRAGON at TRIUMF and the DRS at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. We will also summarize some of the scientific highlight measurements at the RIB facilities.

Ruiz, Chris; Greife, Uwe; Hager, Ulrike

2014-06-01

264

Liquid metal ion source and alloy for ion emission of multiple ionic species  

DOEpatents

A liquid metal ion source and alloy for the simultaneous ion evaporation of arsenic and boron, arsenic and phosphorus, or arsenic, boron and phosphorus. The ionic species to be evaporated are contained in palladium-arsenic-boron and palladium-arsenic-boron-phosphorus alloys. The ion source, including an emitter means such as a needle emitter and a source means such as U-shaped heater element, is preferably constructed of rhenium and tungsten, both of which are readily fabricated. The ion sources emit continuous beams of ions having sufficiently high currents of the desired species to be useful in ion implantation of semiconductor wafers for preparing integrated circuit devices. The sources are stable in operation, experience little corrosion during operation, and have long operating lifetimes.

Clark, Jr., William M. (Thousand Oaks, CA); Utlaut, Mark W. (Saugus, CA); Wysocki, Joseph A. (Oxnard, CA); Storms, Edmund K. (Los Alamos, NM); Szklarz, Eugene G. (Los Alamos, NM); Behrens, Robert G. (Los Alamos, NM); Swanson, Lynwood W. (McMinnville, OR); Bell, Anthony E. (McMinnville, OR)

1987-06-02

265

The Structure of the Metal Transporter Tp34 and its Affinity for Divalent Metal Ions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tp34 is periplasmic membrane protein of the nonculitvatable spirochete Treponema pallidum, the pathogen of syphillis. It was proposed that Tp34 is a divalent metal transporter, but the identity of the preferred metal ion(s) was unclear. In this study we investigated the ability of divalent metal ions to induce rTp34 dimerization using hydrodynamic techniques and determine the crystal structure of metal bound forms. Using analytical ultracentrifugation sedimentation velocity experiments, we determined that cobalt is superior to nickel at inducing the dimerization of rTp34. rTp34 was crystallized and selected crystals were incubated at a pH 7.5 with CuSO4 and NiSO4. Diffraction experiments were conducted and the processed electron density maps showed that copper was bound to the major metal binding site as well as to three additional minor binding sites. By contrast nickel was only bound to the major metal binding site in one monomer and to three additional minor sites. These results along with previous findings support evidence of Tp34 being involved with metal transport and/or iron utilization.

Knutsen, Gregory; Deka, Ranjit; Brautigam, Chad; Tomchick, Diana; Machius, Mischa; Norgard, Michael

2007-10-01

266

Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a 18O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line.

Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawamura, H.; Kato, K.; Kato, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

2014-02-01

267

Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms.  

PubMed

The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a (18)O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line. PMID:24593466

Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ando, S; Aoki, T; Ezure, S; Harada, K; Hayamizu, T; Inoue, T; Ishikawa, T; Itoh, M; Kawamura, H; Kato, K; Kato, T; Uchiyama, A; Aoki, T; Furukawa, T; Hatakeyama, A; Hatanaka, K; Imai, K; Murakami, T; Nataraj, H S; Sato, T; Shimizu, Y; Wakasa, T; Yoshida, H P; Sakemi, Y

2014-02-01

268

Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms  

SciTech Connect

The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a {sup 18}O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line.

Arikawa, Hiroshi, E-mail: arikawa@cyric.tohoku.ac.jp; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawamura, H.; Kato, K.; Kato, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Sakemi, Y. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan)] [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Aoki, T. [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Furukawa, T. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan)] [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Hatakeyama, A. [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)] [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Hatanaka, K.; Yoshida, H. P. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 606-8502 (Japan)] [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 606-8502 (Japan); Imai, K. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 319-1184 (Japan)] [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 319-1184 (Japan); and others

2014-02-15

269

Treatment and Stabilization of Potentially Pyrophoric Radioactive Metal Chips and Turnings  

SciTech Connect

As part of the continuing mission to decontaminate, decommission, and restore environmental quality at multiple sites throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear complex, approximately 2,000 containers of potentially pyrophoric radioactive metal chips and turnings, weighing over 192,000 kilograms have been identified. These wastes, mostly depleted uranium (DU) and thorium metals, must be treated to remove or immobilize a wide range of hazardous and toxic regulated waste constituents without igniting the radioactive metal. Also, the treated metal wastes must be placed in an inert condition to prevent any future pyrophoric problems during storage, transportation, and disposal. All secondary wastes resulting from treatment activities must have a pathway to final disposal or destruction, in accordance with all applicable US federal and state laws, and regulations. To further this mission and to begin reducing the pyrophoric radioactive metal inventories throughout the US DOE system, a contract was awarded to Perma-Fix Environmental Services, Inc. to develop appropriate treatment methods, prove those methods in a First Article Test (FAT), and treat US DOE's existing inventory of pyrophoric radioactive metal wastes. The FAT was performed successfully between October 2002 and December 2002 using four containers of waste from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. The treated chips and turnings from this FAT were shipped for disposal at a private land disposal facility in the State of Utah. Since the FAT, two full-scale treatment projects have been performed under the contract. Between November 6, 2003 and March 4, 2004, 478 containers of Hanford DU chip wastes in mineral oil and soil matrices were treated. The treated chip waste was returned for disposal at the permitted mixed waste landfill at the Hanford Site. Between February 5, 2004, and February 25, 2005, another 222 containers of Rocky Flats DU chip waste, comprised of three distinct physical waste forms, were treated and disposed at the same land disposal facility in Utah. Complicating this task was the wide variety of hazardous and toxic contaminants, and great variability in the physical waste form. The chemical contaminants included mineral oil, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), numerous volatile and semi-volatile organic contaminants, and toxic metals. Three main physical waste forms were included in the US DOE pyrophoric radioactive metal waste inventory: (1) chips and turnings in oil, (2) chips and turnings in soil, and (3) chips and turnings in sludge. The successful treatment method had to be capable of removing oil, PCBs, and volatile organics without resulting in ignition of the pyrophoric metals. After successful removal of hazardous and toxic organic contaminants, the toxic metals remaining in the waste required further stabilization to limit their potential for long-term leaching in land disposal facilities. The final waste form and its packaging also had to comply with the waste acceptance criteria of the land disposal facilities at the US DOE Hanford Site, in Richland, Washington, and the private disposal facility in Utah. This paper will describe the treatment process, the challenges encountered and overcome, the lessons learned, and final quality of the treated chip waste. Disposal and/or destruction of secondary wastes from the treatment process will also be discussed. (authors)

Crocker, B.R.; Grondin, R.; Yarbrough, T. [Perma-Fix Environmental Services Inc., 701 Scarboro Road, Suite 300, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2006-07-01

270

Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection.  

PubMed

In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization.The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution. PMID:21711937

Sam, Sabrina S; Chazalviel, Jean-Noël Jn; Gouget-Laemmel, Anne Chantal Ac; Ozanam, François F; Etcheberry, Arnaud A; Gabouze, Nour-Eddine N

2011-01-01

271

Peptide immobilisation on porous silicon surface for metal ions detection  

PubMed Central

In this work, a Glycyl-Histidyl-Glycyl-Histidine (GlyHisGlyHis) peptide is covalently anchored to the porous silicon PSi surface using a multi-step reaction scheme compatible with the mild conditions required for preserving the probe activity. In a first step, alkene precursors are grafted onto the hydrogenated PSi surface using the hydrosilylation route, allowing for the formation of a carboxyl-terminated monolayer which is activated by reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimide in the presence of a peptide-coupling carbodiimide N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and subsequently reacted with the amino linker of the peptide to form a covalent amide bond. Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to investigate the different steps of functionalization. The property of peptides to form stable complexes with metal ions is exploited to achieve metal-ion recognition by the peptide-modified PSi-based biosensor. An electrochemical study of the GlyHisGlyHis-modified PSi electrode is achieved in the presence of copper ions. The recorded cyclic voltammograms show a quasi-irreversible process corresponding to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple. The kinetic factors (the heterogeneous rate constant and the transfer coefficient) and the stability constant of the complex formed on the porous silicon surface are determined. These results demonstrate the potential role of peptides grafted on porous silicon in developing strategies for simple and fast detection of metal ions in solution. PMID:21711937

2011-01-01

272

Near-barrier reactions with radioactive ion beams at the ReA3 facility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The new ReA3 re-accelerated beam facility at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) will provide high quality radioactive ion beams (RIBs), produced from fast fragmentation reactions, at energies around the Coulomb barrier. These radioactive isotopes can have exotic properties such as neutron/proton skins, halos, or unexpected changes in their shell structure. ReA3 will allow us to explore how these exotic properties manifest themselves in low-energy reactions. In particular, heavy-ion fusion induced with medium mass RIBs remains almost completely unexplored as only three fusion reactions using RIBs, between fluorine (Z = 9) and tin (Z = 50), have ever been measured. A new research program focused on the study of heavy-ion fusion reactions is being developed to take advantage of the world-unique RIBs offered by the ReA3 facility. Along with an overview of the ReA3 facility, details about three devices being developed for exploration of fusion reactions induced by RIBs will be presented.

Kohley, Z.

2013-12-01

273

New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ion  

SciTech Connect

We aim to develop new DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides, such as uranium, technetium, and plutonium, and metal contaminants, such as lead, chromium, and mercury. The sensors will be highly sensitive and selective. They will be applied to on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation, and stability of the individual contaminants before and during bioremediation, and for long-term monitoring of DOE contaminated sites. To achieve this goal, we have employed a combinatorial method called “in vitro selection” to search from a large DNA library (~ 1015 different molecules) for catalytic DNA molecules that are highly specific for radionuclides or other metal ions through intricate 3-dimensional interactions as in metalloproteins. Comprehensive biochemical and biophysical studies have been performed on the selected DNA molecules. The findings from these studies have helped to elucidate fundamental principles for designing effective sensors for radionuclides and metal ions. Based on the study, the DNA have been converted to fluorescent or colorimetric sensors by attaching to it fluorescent donor/acceptor pairs or gold nanoparticles, with 11 part-per-trillion detection limit (for uranium) and over million fold selectivity (over other radionuclides and metal ions tested). Practical application of the biosensors for samples from the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center (FRC) at Oak Ridge has also been demonstrated.

Yi Lu

2008-03-01

274

Effect of ion implantation on the tribology of metal-on-metal hip prostheses.  

PubMed

Nitrogen ion implantation (which considerably hardens the surface of the bearing) may represent one possible method of reducing the wear of metal-on-metal (MOM) hip bearings. Currently there are no ion-implanted MOM bearings used clinically. Therefore a physiological hip simulator test was undertaken using standard test conditions, and the results compared to previous studies using the same methods. N2-ion implantation of high carbon cast Co-Cr-Mo-on-Co-Cr-Mo hip prostheses increased wear by 2-fold during the aggressive running-in phase compared to untreated bearing surfaces, plus showing no wear reductions during steady-state conditions. Although 2 specimens were considered in the current study, it would appear that ion implantation has no clinical benefit for MOM. PMID:15578563

Bowsher, John G; Hussain, Azad; Williams, Paul; Nevelos, Jim; Shelton, Julia C

2004-12-01

275

Polymer filtration systems for dilute metal ion recovery  

SciTech Connect

Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a metal recovery system that meets the global treatment demands for all kinds of industrial and metal-processing streams. The Polymer Filtration (PF) System--a process that is easily operated and robust--offers metal-finishing businesses a convenient and inexpensive way to recover and recycle metal ions in-house, thus reducing materials costs, waste removal costs, and industrial liability. As a valuable economic and environmental asset, the PF System has been named a winner of a 1995 R and D 100 Award. These awards are presented annually by R and D Magazine to the one hundred most significant technical innovations of the year. The PF System is based on the use of water-soluble metal-binding polymers and on advanced ultrafiltration membranes. Customers for this technology will receive new soluble polymers, especially formulated for their waste stream, and the complete PF processing unit: a reaction reservoir, pumps, plumbing, controls, and the advanced ultrafiltration membranes, all in a skid mounted frame. Metal-bearing waste water is treated in the reaction reservoir, where the polymer binds with the metal ions under balanced acid/base conditions. The reservoir fluid is then pumped through the ultrafiltration system--a cartridge packed with ultrafiltration membranes shaped in hollow fibers. As the fluid travels inside the fiber, water and other small molecules--simple salts such as calcium and sodium, for example--pass through the porous membrane walls of the fibers and are discharged through the outlet as permeate. The polymer-bound metal, which is too large to pass through the pores, is both purified and concentrated inside the hollow fibers and is returned to the fluid reservoir for further waste water treatment.

Smith, B.F.; Robison, T.W.; Jarvinen, G.D.

1998-12-01

276

Ion beam mixing of metal/fluoropolymer interfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ion beam mixing of metals and polymers with very low dielectric constants such as Teflon can provide many applications in the area of electronic materials. This work is a study of the "mixing" effect of 50 keV nitrogen implanted thin metal layers on Teflon PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) substrates. RBS analysis shows that the distribution of thin layers of copper and chromium (approximately 300-400 Å thick) through the implant layer of the Teflon depends on the reactivity of the metal. As the implant fluence is increased, the distribution of metal atoms in the polymer matrix becomes concentrated over smaller ranges near the bottom of the implant layer. In situ RGA analysis during the implantation shows the liberation of an abundance of fluorine in many different forms. This is supported by results from a NRA experiment that shows the non-uniform concentration profile of fluorine throughout the implant layer. During the implantation process, the fluorine is released through the incident ion track leaving a carbon and metal rich region near the surface of the implant layer. The fluorine density increases with depth through the implant layer making a smooth transition to the undamaged bulk Teflon below. Low dielectric materials with highly conductive surfaces, such as this one, may provide an opportunity for a broad range of new microelectronic applications.

Dennis, D. L.; Giedd, R. E.; Wang, Y. Q.; Glass, G. A.

1999-06-01

277

Ion beam mixing of metal/fluoropolymer interfaces  

SciTech Connect

Ion beam mixing of metals and polymers with very low dielectric constants such as Teflon can provide many applications in the area of electronic materials. This work is a study of the 'mixing' effect of 50 keV nitrogen implanted thin metal layers on Teflon PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) substrates. RBS analysis shows that the distribution of thin layers of copper and chromium (approximately 300-400 A thick) through the implant layer of the Teflon depends on the reactivity of the metal. As the implant fluence is increased, the distribution of metal atoms in the polymer matrix becomes concentrated over smaller ranges near the bottom of the implant layer. In situ RGA analysis during the implantation shows the liberation of an abundance of fluorine in many different forms. This is supported by results from a NRA experiment that shows the non-uniform concentration profile of fluorine throughout the implant layer. During the implantation process, the fluorine is released through the incident ion track leaving a carbon and metal rich region near the surface of the implant layer. The fluorine density increases with depth through the implant layer making a smooth transition to the undamaged bulk Teflon below. Low dielectric materials with highly conductive surfaces, such as this one, may provide an opportunity for a broad range of new microelectronic applications.

Dennis, D. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Giedd, R. E. [Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri 65804 (United States); Wang, Y. Q. [Center for Interfacial Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Glass, G. A. [Acadiana Research Laboratory, University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, Louisiana 70504 (United States)

1999-06-10

278

Ion beam mixing of metal/fluoropolymer interfaces  

SciTech Connect

Ion beam mixing of metals and polymers with very low dielectric constants such as Teflon can provide many applications in the area of electronic materials. This work is a study of the {open_quotes}mixing{close_quotes} effect of 50 keV nitrogen implanted thin metal layers on Teflon PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) substrates. RBS analysis shows that the distribution of thin layers of copper and chromium (approximately 300-400 {Angstrom} thick) through the implant layer of the Teflon depends on the reactivity of the metal. As the implant fluence is increased, the distribution of metal atoms in the polymer matrix becomes concentrated over smaller ranges near the bottom of the implant layer. {ital In situ} RGA analysis during the implantation shows the liberation of an abundance of fluorine in many different forms. This is supported by results from a NRA experiment that shows the non-uniform concentration profile of fluorine throughout the implant layer. During the implantation process, the fluorine is released through the incident ion track leaving a carbon and metal rich region near the surface of the implant layer. The fluorine density increases with depth through the implant layer making a smooth transition to the undamaged bulk Teflon below. Low dielectric materials with highly conductive surfaces, such as this one, may provide an opportunity for a broad range of new microelectronic applications. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Dennis, D.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Giedd, R.E. [Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri 65804 (United States); Wang, Y.Q. [Center for Interfacial Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Glass, G.A. [Acadiana Research Laboratory, University of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, Louisiana 70504 (United States)

1999-06-01

279

NOVEL APPROACH TO METAL-HUMIC COMPLEXATION STUDIES BY LANTHANID ION PROBE SPECTROSCOPY  

EPA Science Inventory

Naturally occurring humic substances are known to be potentially strong binders of metals in the environment. ensitive spectroscopic technique, based on the unique luminescence properties of the tripositive lanthanide metal ions, has been developed to selectively probe metal bind...

280

Novel synthetic phytochelatin-based capacitive biosensor for heavy metal ion detection  

E-print Network

Novel synthetic phytochelatin-based capacitive biosensor for heavy metal ion detection Ibolya on synthetic phytochelatins for sensitive detection of heavy metals is described. Synthetic phytochelatin (Glu: Biosensors; Heavy metals; Phytochelatins; Capacitance 1. Introduction Evolution of our society has lead

Chen, Wilfred

281

Study of Collectivity in n-rich A=80 Nuclei using Radioactive Ion Beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on recent experiments performed at the HRIBF of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) aimed to study neutron-rich nuclei in the A 80 mass region. First time use of Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) (78,80)Ge complemented with stable beam information allowed a systematic study of B(E2)-values that characterize the n-rich even-even Ge and Se isotopes. A comparison of the experimental results with IBA2 calculations will be presented. *Supported by US-DOE under the contract DE-AC05-00AOR22725.

Padilla, E.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Baktash, C.; Fuentes, B.; Gross, C.; Mueller, P.; Radford, D. C.; Stracener, D.; Yu, C.-H.; Bijker, R.; Castanos, O.; Batchelder, J.; Hartley, D. J.

2002-04-01

282

The Corrosion Protection of Metals by Ion Vapor Deposited Aluminum  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study of the corrosion protection of substrate metals by ion vapor deposited aluminum (IVD Al) coats has been carried out. Corrosion protection by both anodized and unanodized IVD Al coats has been investigated. Base metals included in the study were 2219-T87 Al, 7075-T6 Al, Titanium-6 Al-4 Vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V), 4130 steel, D6AC steel, and 4340 steel. Results reveal that the anodized IVD Al coats provide excellent corrosion protection, but good protection is also achieved by IVD Al coats that have not been anodized.

Danford, M. D.

1993-01-01

283

The application of metal cutting technologies in tasks performed in radioactive environments  

SciTech Connect

The design and use of equipment to perform work in radioactive environments is uniquely challenging. Some tasks require that the equipment be operated by a person wearing a plastic suit or full face respirator and donning several pairs of rubber gloves. Other applications may require that the equipment be remotely controlled. Other important, design considerations include material compatibility, mixed waste issues, tolerance to ionizing radiation, size constraints and weight capacities. As always, there is the ``We need it ASAP`` design criteria. This paper describes four applications where different types of metal cutting technologies were used to successfully perform tasks in radioactive environments. The technologies include a plasma cutting torch, a grinder with an abrasive disk, a hydraulic shear, and a high pressure abrasive water jet cutter.

Fogle, R.F.; Younkins, R.M.

1997-05-01

284

Interactions of metal ions with ? synuclein and amyloid ? peptides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Amyloid ? (A?) and alfa synuclein (?S) share the ability to selectively bind copper ions (Cu(II) and Cu(I)). During the last decade large efforts have been directed to fully characterize Cu(II) binding domains in A? and ?S. On the other hand, the corresponding Cu(I) sites have been less considered. In this study we have analyzed Cu(I) interactions with peptides derived from A? and ?S, by means of CD and NMR spectroscopy. Beyond Cu(I), we have also used Ag(I) as a probe. By monitoring the metal induced effects on ?S and A? systems, the Cu(I)/Ag(I) binding domains have been identified. The corresponding protein structural rearrangements induced by the metal ions have been investigated as well. The Cu(I) coordination spheres are discussed with a particular emphasis to the role played by Met and His residues.

Valensin, Daniela; Kozlowski, Henryk; Tessari, Isabella; Dell'Acqua, Simone; Bubacco, Luigi; Casella, Luigi; Gaggelli, Elena; Valensin, Gianni

2014-10-01

285

Nanomagnetic chelators for removal of toxic metal ions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ethylenediamine trtraaceteic acid (EDTA) functionalized Fe3O4 nanomagnetic chelators (NMCs) were synthesized by co-precipitation method followed by in-situ grafting of EDTA. XRD and TEM analyses reveal the formation of highly crystalline single-phase Fe3O4 nanoparticles of size about 10 nm. Surface functionalization of Fe3O4 with EDTA was evident from FTIR spectroscopy, TGA analysis and zeta-potential measurement. These NMCs exhibit superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature with strong field dependent magnetic responsivity. It has been observed that NMCs have strong tendency for adsorption of various toxic metal ions (Ni2+, Cr3+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Co2+ and Pb2+) from waste-water. Furthermore, these magnetic chelators can be used as highly efficient separable and reusable material for removal of toxic metal ions.

Singh, Sarika; Barick, K. C.; Bahadur, D.

2013-02-01

286

A metallic room-temperature oxide ion conductor.  

PubMed

Nanoparticles of Bi3 Ir, obtained from a microwave-assisted polyol process, activate molecular oxygen from air at room temperature and reversibly intercalate it as oxide ions. The closely related structures of Bi3 Ir and Bi3 IrOx (x?2) were investigated by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and quantum-chemical modeling. In the topochemically formed metallic suboxide, the intermetallic building units are fully preserved. Time- and temperature-dependent monitoring of the oxygen uptake in an oxygen-filled chamber shows that the activation energy for oxide diffusion (84?meV) is one order of magnitude smaller than that in any known material. Bi3 IrOx is the first metallic oxide ion conductor and also the first that operates at room temperature. PMID:24866268

Heise, Martin; Rasche, Bertold; Isaeva, Anna; Baranov, Alexey I; Ruck, Michael; Schäfer, Konrad; Pöttgen, Rainer; Eufinger, Jens-Peter; Janek, Jürgen

2014-07-01

287

MRI findings following metal on metal hip arthroplasty and their relationship with metal ion levels and acetabular inclination angles.  

PubMed

Following the global recall of all ASR metal on metal hip products, our aim was to correlate MRI findings with acetabular inclination angles and metal ion levels in patients with these implants. Both cobalt and chromium levels were significantly higher in the presence of a periprosthetic fluid collection. There was no association between the presence of a periprosthetic mass, bone marrow oedema, trochanteric bursitis or greater levels of abductor muscle destruction for cobalt or chromium. There was no association between the level of periprosthetic tissue reaction and the acetabular inclination angle with any of the pathologies identified on MRI. The relationship between MRI pathology, metal ion levels and acetabular inclination angles in patients with ASR implants remains unclear adding to the complexity of managing patients. PMID:24793890

Fox, Ciara M; Bergin, Karen M; Kelly, Gabrielle E; McCoy, Gerry F; Ryan, Anthony G; Quinlan, John F

2014-08-01

288

Equilibrium sorption isotherm for metal ions on tree fern  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new sorbent system for removing heavy metal ions, such as Zn(II), Cu(II) and Pb(II), from aqueous solutions has been investigated. This new sorbent is tree fern, an agriculture product. Variables of the system include solution temperature and sorbent particle size. The experimental results were fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich–Peterson isotherms to obtain the characteristic parameters of each

Y. S. Ho; C. T. Huang; H. W. Huang

2002-01-01

289

HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS (HEP & NP) ECR Ion Sources For Radioactive Ion Beam Production  

E-print Network

of stable elements, but in addition they are subject to more specific constraints such as radiation hardness during 3 months without failures, and without access to it. In contrast to the standard criteria of the specific ion of interest within the mass spectrum. The target is strongly heated to accelerate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

290

Selective extraction of metal ions with polymeric extractants by ion exchange/redox  

DOEpatents

The specification discloses a method for the extraction of metal ions having a reduction potential of above about +0.3 from an aqueous solution. The method includes contacting the aqueous solution with a polymeric extractant having primary phosphinic acid groups, secondary phosphine oxide groups, or both phosphinic acid and phosphine oxide groups.

Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN)

1987-01-01

291

Acetabular bone density and metal ions after metal-on-metal versus metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty; short-term results.  

PubMed

Information on periprosthetic acetabular bone density is lacking for metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties. These bearings use cobalt-chromium instead of titanium acetabular components, which could lead to stress shielding and hence periprosthetic bone loss. Cobalt and chromium ions have detrimental effects on bone. It is unknown whether serum metal ion levels affect bone density clinically. We compared cementless large femoral head (mean 48 mm) metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties (M2a-Magnum, Biomet) to cementless 28 mm metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasties (Mallory-Head, Biomet) in a randomised clinical trial. We evaluated periprosthetic acetabular bone density and serum metal ion levels at 1 year postoperatively. Acetabular bone density was analyzed with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry in four horizontal regions of interest in 70 patients. After one year, acetabular bone density decreased (-3.5% to -7.8%) in three of four regions of interest in metal-on-polyethylene patients, but was retained in metal-on-metal patients. Bone density preservation was most pronounced superior to the metal-on-metal cup (+1% versus -3.7%). Serum cobalt, chromium and titanium ion levels were not related to bone density, nor to acetabular inclination or femoral head size. Oxford and Harris hip scores were similar in both groups. Contrary to our hypothesis, acetabular bone density was retained with metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty, compared to metal-on-polyethylene arthroplasty. Bone preservation was most pronounced in the area superior to the cup. This could be a benefit during future revision surgery. PMID:24186673

Zijlstra, Wierd P; van der Veen, Hugo C; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Zee, Mark J M; Bulstra, Sjoerd K; van Raay, Jos J A M

2014-01-01

292

Pollution of the Begej Canal sediment--metals, radioactivity and toxicity assessment.  

PubMed

The Begej Canal is one among a large number of canals in Vojvodina (Northern Province of Serbia and Montenegro). The paper describes a study of metal and radioactivity contamination of the Begej Canal sediment. It is also concerned with the evaluation of sediment acute toxicity based on standard test species Daphnia magna and simultaneously extracted metals and acid volatile sulfides. The quality of sediment was assessed according to Dutch standards, but the results were also compared with some Canadian and USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) guidelines for sediment quality. The results showed severe pollution with chromium, copper, cadmium and zinc, whereby the anthropogenic origin of these contaminants was indicated. The tests of toxicity of sediment pore water to D. magna, gave no indication of the presence of substances in acutely toxic concentrations to this species. It can be speculated that, despite of high metal contents, the observed toxicity was low because of the high contents of clay and iron, as well as sulphide. Also, based on a comparison with the Danube sediment and Vojvodina soil in general, the data of the Begej sediment contamination with 238U and 137Cs. The 137Cs data were used for approximate dating of the sediment. No traces of contamination by nuclear power plants in the region were found, while the presence of technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) was proved. Conclusions based on different criteria for sediment quality assessment were in some cases contradictory. Study also showed that radioactivity aspects can be useful in sediment quality surveys. The obtained results will be invaluable for the future activities regarding integrated water management based on EC Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC) in the Danube basin, and particularly in the region of crossborder water body of the Begej Canal. PMID:16527352

Dalmacija, B; Prica, M; Ivancev-Tumbas, I; van der Kooij, A; Roncevic, S; Krcmar, D; Bikit, I; Teodorovic, I

2006-07-01

293

Superhydrogels of nanotubes capable of capturing heavy-metal ions.  

PubMed

Self-assembly regulated by hydrogen bonds was successfully achieved in the system of lithocholic acid (LCA) mixed with three organic amines, ethanolamine (EA), diethanolamine (DEA), and triethanolamine (TEA), in aqueous solutions. The mixtures of DEA/LCA exhibit supergelation capability and the hydrogels consist of plenty of network nanotubes with uniform diameters of about 60 nm determined by cryogenic TEM. Interestingly, the sample with the same concentration in a system of EA and LCA is a birefringent solution, in which spherical vesicles and can be transformed into nanotubes as the amount of LCA increases. The formation of hydrogels could be driven by the delicate balance of diverse noncovalent interactions, including electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, steric effects, van der Waals forces, and mainly hydrogen bonds. The mechanism of self-assembly from spherical bilayer vesicles into nanotubes was proposed. The dried hydrogels with nanotubes were explored to exhibit the excellent capability for capturing heavy-metal ions, for example, Cu(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), and Hg(2+). The superhydrogels of nanotubes from the self-assembly of low-molecular-weight gelators mainly regulated by hydrogen bonds used for the removal of heavy-metal ions is simple, green, and high efficiency, and provide a strategic approach to removing heavy-metal ions from industrial sewage. PMID:24136830

Song, Shasha; Wang, Haiqiao; Song, Aixin; Hao, Jingcheng

2014-01-01

294

The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beams Facility (HRIBF) -- getting ready to do experiments  

SciTech Connect

The conversion of the HHIRF facility to a Radioactive Ion Beam facility started in 1994. In this ISOL type facility the Cyclotron has been re-fitted as a driver providing high intensity proton beams which react with the target from which the radioactive products are extracted and then accelerated in the Tandem Electrostatic Accelerator to the desired energy for nuclear science studies. Facilities for nuclear physics experiments are at different stages of development: A Recoil Mass Spectrometer (RMS) with a complement of detectors at the focal plane and around the target is used primarily for nuclear structure studies. A large recoil separator combining velocity and momentum selection, with its complement of focal plane detectors, will be dedicated to measurements relevant to nuclear astrophysics. The Enge Split Pole spectrograph is being re-fitted for operation in a gas filled mode, making it a more versatile tool for nuclear reaction studies. With the new experimental equipment being commissioned and the prospects of running experiments with low intensity radioactive beams a significant effort to develop equipment for beam diagnostics is underway. Some of the efforts and results in developing beam diagnostic tools will be described.

Shapira, D.; Lewis, T.A.

1998-02-26

295

Sealed Radioactive Sources  

MedlinePLUS

... in which the metal can become contaminated with radioactivity, EPA determined that lost, abandoned, or stolen radioactive ... and Health Administration (OSHA) OSHA regulates exposure to radioactivity in the workplace. Radioactive Source Recovery Efforts This ...

296

Factors affecting acceptability of radioactive metal recycling to the public and stakeholders  

SciTech Connect

The perception of risk takes place within a cultural context that is affected by individual and societal values, risk information, personal experience, and the physical environment. Researchers have found that measures of {open_quotes}voluntariness of risk assumption,{close_quotes} of {open_quotes}disaster potential,{close_quotes} and of {open_quotes}benefit{close_quotes} are important in explaining risk acceptability. A review of cross-cultural studies of risk perception and risk acceptance, as well as an informal stakeholder survey, are used to assess the public acceptability of radioactive scrap metal recycling.

Nieves, L.A.; Burke, C.J.

1995-08-01

297

Ion-driven deuterium retention in high-Z metals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The candidate armour material must provide high temperature resistance and accommodate the operation conditions with minimal erosion and acceptable tritium retention. Refractory metals such as tungsten and molybdenum can provide these capabilities and accommodate the high energy deposition. However, a major concern is the possible tritium and helium inventories from ion implantation. The deuterium retention in polycrystalline tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) has been investigated for various irradiation temperatures, incident ion energies and fluences at Garching ion beam facility by means of thermal desorption spectroscopy. Lower deuterium retention in Mo compared to W was observed at moderated temperatures. Model including the deuterium implantation, diffusion, trapping and second order of desorption was used to understand deuterium inventory and release kinetics. The mechanism of the deuterium retention in W and Mo is discussed.

Ogorodnikova, O. V.

2009-06-01

298

Template-directed synthesis of oligoguanylic acids - Metal ion catalysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects of Zn(2+), Pb(2+) and other metal ions on the efficiency and stereo-selectivity of the template-directed oligomerization of guanosine 5'-phosphorimidazolide are investigated. Reactions were run in the presence of a polyC template in a 2,6-lutidine buffer, and products analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography on an RPC-5 column. The presence of the Pb(2+) ion is found to lead to the formation of 2'-5' linked oligomers up to the 40-mer, while Zn(2+) favors the formation of predominantly 3'-5' linked oligomers up to the 35-mer. When amounts of uracil, cytidine or adenosine 5'-phosphorimidazole equal to those of the guanosine derivative are included in the reaction mixture, the incorrect base is incorporated into the oligomer about 10% of the time with a Pb(2+) catalyst, but less than 0.5% of the time with Zn(2+). The Sn(2+), Sb(3+) and Bi(3+) ions are also found to promote the formation of 2'-5' oligomers, although not as effectively as Pb(2+), while no metal ions other than Zn(2+) promote the formation of the 3'-5' oligomers. The results may be important for the understanding of the evolution of nucleic acid replication in the absence of enzymes.

Bridson, P. K.; Fakhrai, H.; Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.; Van Roode, M.

1981-01-01

299

Reexamination of the ORAC assay: effect of metal ions.  

PubMed

The oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay method has been employed extensively in the field of antioxidant and oxidative stress. It uses fluorescein as probe for oxidation by peroxyl radical. Hundreds of reports have been published on the use of this method to determine antioxidant capacity in food and biological samples. The question is whether the results of all these reports are influenced by antioxidant autoxidation, which occurs during the ORAC test. Indeed, the presence of metal ions in the studied matrix will influence antioxidant stability, thereby leading to the underestimation of their antioxidant properties. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid hydrate (EDTA) can be used as a metal complexation agent. This paper examines the effect of the addition of EDTA on the ORAC values of pure compounds (quercetin, ascorbic, and dehydroascorbic acid) and five food juices (kiwi, orange, tomato, red grape, and apple). Metal complexation by EDTA (80 ?M) clearly increased the ORAC values, given that the antioxidant was protected against rapid autoxidation incited by trace metal ions within samples and then by free radicals. Our finding also undoubtedly demonstrated that the number of literature values is potentially underestimated. PMID:21512895

Nkhili, E; Brat, P

2011-05-01

300

A combined thermal dissociation and electron impact ionization source for radioactive ion beam generation{sup a}  

SciTech Connect

The probability for simultaneously dissociating and efficiently ionizing the individual atomic constituents of molecular feed materials with conventional, hot-cathode, electron-impact ion sources is low and consequently, the ion beams from these sources often appear as mixtures of several molecular sideband beams. This fragmentation process leads to dilution of the intensity of the species of interest for radioactive ion beam (RIB) applications where beam intensity is at a premium. We have conceived an ion source that combines the excellent molecular dissociation properties of a thermal dissociator and the high ionization efficiency characteristics of an electron impact ionization source that will, in principle, overcome this handicap. The source concept will be evaluated as a potential candidate for use for RIB generation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility, now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The design features and principles of operation of the source are described in this article. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Alton, G.D.; Williams, C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6368 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6368 (United States)

1996-04-01

301

A combined thermal dissociation and electron impact ionization source for radioactive ion beam generation (abstract){sup a}  

SciTech Connect

The probability for simultaneously dissociating and efficiently ionizing the individual atomic constituents of molecular feed materials with conventional, hot-cathode, electron-impact ion sources is low and consequently, the ion beams from these sources often appear as mixtures of several molecular sideband beams. This fragmentation process leads to dilution of the intensity of the species of interest for radioactive ion beam (RIB) applications where beam intensity is at a premium. We have conceived an ion source that combines the excellent molecular dissociation properties of a thermal dissociator and the high ionization efficiency characteristics of an electron impact ionization source that will, in principle, overcome this handicap. The source concept will be evaluated as a potential candidate for use for RIB generation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility, now under construction at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The design features and principles of operation of the source are described in this article. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Alton, G.D.; Williams, C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6368 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6368 (United States)

1996-03-01

302

Interactions between metal ions and carbohydrates. The coordination behavior of neutral erythritol to neodymium ion.  

PubMed

A single crystal of a coordinated complex of neutral erythritol (C4H10O4,E) with a neodymium ion, NdE(II), was synthesized and studied using FT-IR and X-ray diffraction analysis. In NdE(II) (NdCl3.2.5C4H10O4.C2H5OH) the Nd3+ coordinates with one chloride ion and eight OH groups from three erythritol molecules. There are two neodymium centers linked by one erythritol molecule with same coordination structure in the molecule. Two erythritol molecules provide 1,3,4-hydroxyl groups to coordinate with a neodymium ion; another erythritol molecule coordinates to two Nd ions via its 1,2-hydroxyl groups and 3,4-hydroxyl groups, respectively. The OH groups of erythritol act as ligand to coordinate to neodymium ions, and OH groups of erythritol form hydrogen bond networks that link chain and layer together to build three-dimensional structures. The ratio of metal to ligand is 1:2.5. The structure of NdE(II) is more complicated than the previously reported NdE(I), which is NdCl3.C4H10O4.6H2O; in NdE(I), Nd3+ is coordinated to four hydroxyl groups from two erythritol molecules, four water molecules and one chloride ion. The results indicate the complexity of metal-sugar interaction. PMID:15833332

Yang, Limin; Xie, Datao; Xu, Yizhuang; Wang, Yalei; Zhang, Shiwei; Weng, Shifu; Zhao, Kui; Wu, Jinguang

2005-05-01

303

Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Polymer Systems Doped with Rare-Earth Metal Ions and Their Complexes  

Microsoft Academic Search

There has been an increased attention to explore the possibility of using polymer materials with rare-earth (RE) metal ions and their complexes as potential optical materials due to their capability of exhibiting novel and unusual properties. The fluorescence characteristics of polymer systems doped with RE metal ions and\\/or their complexes were analyzed and the effects of the doping metal ion\\/metal

K. S. V. Krishna Rao; Hong-Guo Liu; Yong-Ill Lee

2010-01-01

304

Binding of hard and soft metal ions to Rhizopus arrhizus biomass  

Microsoft Academic Search

The greater the covalent index value of a metal ion, the greater its potential to form covalent bonds with biological ligands. In this study, freeze-dried Rhizopus arrhizus biomass was tested for its potential to adsorb the hard metal ion Sr2+ and the borderline metal ions Mn2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, and Pb2+ from aqueous solutions. Equilibrium metal uptake values increased in

Joseph M. Brady; John M. Tobin

1995-01-01

305

Structure Determination of Noble Metal Clusters by Trapped Ion Electron Diffraction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The structures of noble metal cluster ions have been studied by the recently developed technique of trapped ion electron diffraction (TIED)^1. In brief, cluster ions are generated by a magnetron sputter source and injected into a cooled (95 K) quadrupole ion trap. After mass selection and thermalization, the trapped ions are irradiated with a 40 keV electron beam. The resulting

Detlef Schooss

2006-01-01

306

SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF METAL IONS AND SEPARATION OF NICKEL(II) FROM OTHER METAL IONS BY ORGANOPHOSPHORUS ACIDS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Such physicochemical properties of bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphinic acid, 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester and bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid as the solubilities and the dissociation constants in water, the dimerization constants in organic solvent and distribution constants in organic solvent-water were examined by a potentiometric two-phase titration. The solvent extraction of seven kinds of transition metal ions and magnesium(II) from aqueous sulfate media was studied with

Yao Binghua; Yukio Nagaosa; Masatada Satake; Akihiko Nomura; Kiyoshi Horita

1996-01-01

307

No association between serum metal ions and implant fixation in large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty  

PubMed Central

Background The mechanism of failure of metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been related to a high rate of metal wear debris, which is partly generated from the head-trunnion interface. However, it is not known whether implant fixation is affected by metal wear debris. Patients and methods 49 cases of MoM THA in 41 patients (10 women) with a mean age of 52 (28–68) years were followed with stereoradiographs after surgery and at 1, 2, and 5 years to analyze implant migration by radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Patients also participated in a 5- to 7-year follow-up with measurement of serum metal ions, questionnaires (Oxford hip score (OHS) and Harris hip score (HHS)), and measurement of cup and stem positions and systemic bone mineral density. Results At 1–2 years, mean total translation (TT) was 0.04 mm (95% CI: –0.07 to 0.14; p = 0.5) for the stems; at 2–5 years, mean TT was 0.13 mm (95% CI: –0.25 to –0.01; p = 0.03), but within the precision limit of the method. For the cups, there was no statistically significant TT or total rotation (TR) at 1–2 and 2–5 years. At 2–5 years, we found 4 cups and 5 stems with TT migrations exceeding the precision limit of the method. There was an association between cup migration and total OHS < 40 (4 patients, 4 hips; p = 0.04), but there were no statistically significant associations between cup or stem migration and T-scores < –1 (n = 10), cup and stem positions, or elevated serum metal ion levels (> 7µg/L (4 patients, 6 hips)). Interpretation Most cups and stems were well-fixed at 1–5 years. However, at 2–5 years, 4 cups and 5 stems had TT migrations above the precision limits, but these patients had serum metal ion levels similar to those of patients without measurable migrations, and they were pain-free. Patients with serum metal ion levels > 7 µg/L had migrations similar to those in patients with serum metal ion levels < 7 µg/L. Metal wear debris does not appear to influence the fixation of hip components in large-head MoM articulations at medium-term follow-up. PMID:24847790

Søballe, Kjeld; Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Lorenzen, Nina Dyrberg; Mechlenburg, Inger; Stilling, Maiken

2014-01-01

308

Metal-ion Absorption in Conductively Evaporating Clouds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present computations of the ionization structure and metal-absorption properties of thermally conductive interface layers that surround evaporating warm spherical clouds embedded in a hot medium. We rely on the analytical steady-state formalism of Dalton and Balbus to calculate the temperature profile in the evaporating gas, and we explicitly solve the time-dependent ionization equations for H, He, C, N, O, Si, and S in the conductive interface. We include photoionization by an external field. We estimate how departures from equilibrium ionization affect the resonance-line cooling efficiencies in the evaporating gas, and determine the conditions for which radiative losses may be neglected in the solution for the evaporation dynamics and temperature profile. Our results indicate that nonequilibrium cooling significantly increases the value of the saturation parameter ?0 at which radiative losses begin to affect the flow dynamics. As applications, we calculate the ion fractions and projected column densities arising in the evaporating layers surrounding dwarf-galaxy-scale objects that are also photoionized by metagalactic radiation. We compare our results to the UV metal-absorption column densities observed in local highly ionized metal absorbers, located in the Galactic corona or intergalactic medium. Conductive interfaces significantly enhance the formation of high ions such as C3+, N4+, and O5+ relative to purely photoionized clouds, especially for clouds embedded in a high-pressure corona. However, the enhanced columns are still too low to account for the O VI columns (~1014 cm-2) observed in the local high-velocity metal-ion absorbers. We find that column densities larger than ~1013 cm-2 cannot be produced in evaporating clouds. Our results do support the conclusion of Savage and Lehner that absorption due to evaporating O VI likely occurs in the local interstellar medium, with characteristic columns of ~1013 cm-2.

Gnat, Orly; Sternberg, Amiel; McKee, Christopher F.

2010-08-01

309

Probing the Role of Metal Ions in RNA Catalysis: Kinetic and Thermodynamic Characterization of a Metal Ion Interaction with the 2-Moiety of the Guanosine  

E-print Network

of a Metal Ion Interaction with the 2-Moiety of the Guanosine Nucleophile in the Tetrahymena Group I Ribozyme2+ rescues the deleterious effect of replacing the 2-OH of the guanosine nucleophile (G) by -NH2 in the coupled binding of the oligonucleotide substrate and the guanosine nucleophile. This metal ion may be used

Herschlag, Dan

310

Charge instabilities in ion-metal cluster collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Collisions of ions with metal clusters offer the possibility to study the onset and development of Coulomb instabilities in an as yet unexplored regime. Soft peripheral collisions with highly charged ions (Ar8+ or Xe25+ for example) allow to resonantly strip a few hundred atom sodium cluster of a number of delocalized weakly bound electrons without strong additional excitation and subsequent heating. This number can be large enough (of the order of 10) to reach the Rayleigh stability limit. Beyond this limit the cluster experiences long range instabilities that lead to fission. Theoretical and experimental data that emphasize the specific phenomenology associated with ion-cluster collisions are reported. A theoretical model, based on the Vlasov equation, provides new insight on the stopping power of protons in jellium clusters. In good agreement with theory, experimental results showed that clusters of size about 200 can be ionized up to a 5+ charge state in collisions with 19 keV H+ ions. Much higher ionization states are experimentally observed in collisions with a highly charged ion beam. Old and new experimental data are discussed in terms of stability criteria and preferred decay channels. Coincidence data that associate the heavy charged residue with singly charged light fragments contain much information in that respect.

Bergen, T.; Biquard, X.; Bjørnholm, S.; Blundell, S.; Brenac, A.; Chandezon, F.; Guet, C.; Huber, B. A.; Jalabert, D.; Plagne, L.

1997-06-01

311

Radiation damage from single heavy ion impacts on metal surfaces  

SciTech Connect

The effects of single ion impacts on the surfaces of films of Au, Ag, In and Pb have been studied using in-situ transmission electron microscopy. On all of these materials, individual ion impacts produce surface craters, in some cases, with associated expelled material. The cratering efficiency scales with the density of the irradiated metal. For very thin Au foils ({approx} 20--50 nm), in some cases individual ions are seen to punch small holes completely through the foil. Continued irradiation results in a thickening of the foil. The process giving rise to crater and hole formation and other changes observed in the thin foils has been found to be due to pulsed localized flow--i.e. melting and flow due to the thermal spikes arising from individual ion impacts. Experiments carried out on thin films of silver sandwiched between SiO{sub 2} layers have indicated that pulsed localized flow also occurs in this system and contributes to the formation of Ag nanoclusters in SiO{sub 2}--a system of interest for its non-linear optical properties. Calculation indicates that, when ion-induced, collision cascades occur near surfaces (within {approx} 5 nm) with energy densities sufficient to cause melting, craters are formed. Crater formation occurs as a result of the explosive outflow of material from the hot molten core of the cascade. Processes occurring in the sandwiched layer are less well understood.

Donnelly, S.E. [Univ. of Salford, Manchester (United Kingdom); Birtcher, R.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Materials Science Div.

1998-06-01

312

The Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil (RIBRAS) facility. Description, program, main results, future plans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brazil) is a facility installed at the Institute of Physics of the University of São Paulo (IFUSP), Brazil. The RIBRAS system consists of two superconducting solenoids and uses the "in-flight method" to produce radioactive ion beams using the primary beam provided by the 8UD Pelletron Tandem of IFUSP. The ion beams produced so far by RIBRAS are 6He, 8Li, 7Be, 10Be, 8B, 12B with intensities that can vary from 104 to 106 pps. Initially the experimental program covered the study of elastic and inelastic scattering with the objective to study the interaction potential and the reaction mechanisms between weakly bound (RIB) and halo (6He and 8B projectiles on light, medium and heavy mass targets. With highly purified beams, the study of resonant elastic scattering and resonant transfer reactions, using inverse kinematics and thick targets, has also been included in our experimental program. Also, transfer reactions of astrophysical interest and fusion reactions induced by halo nuclei are part of the near-future research program. Our recent results on elastic scattering, alpha-particle production and total reaction cross sections, as well as the resonant elastic and transfer reactions, are presented. Our plans for the near future are related to the installation of a new beam line and a cave for gamma-ray detection. We intend to place in operation a large area neutron detector available in our laboratory. The long-range plans could be the move of the RIBRAS system to the more energetic beam line of the LINAC post-accelerator (10MeV/nucleon primary beams) still in construction in our laboratory.

Lépine-Szily, A.; Lichtenthäler, R.; Guimarães, V.

2014-08-01

313

Removal of Radioactive Nuclides by Multi-Functional Microcapsules Enclosing Inorganic Ion-Exchangers and Organic Extractants  

SciTech Connect

The microcapsules enclosing two kinds of functional materials, inorganic ion-exchangers and organic extractants, were prepared by taking advantage of the high immobilization ability of alginate gel polymer. The fine powders of inorganic ion-exchanger and oil drops of extractant were kneaded with sodium alginate (NaALG) solution and the kneaded sol readily gelled in a salt solution of CaCl2, BaCl2 or HCl to form spherical gel particles. The uptake properties of various nuclides, 137Cs, 85Sr, 60Co, 88Y, 152Eu and 241Am, for thirty-four specimens of microcapsules in the presence of 10-1-10-4 M HNO3 were evaluated by the batch method. The distribution coefficient (Kd) of Cs+ above 103 cm3/g was obtained for the microcapsules enclosing CuFC or AMP. The Kd of Sr2+ around 102 cm3/g was obtained for the microcapsules containing clinoptilolite, antimonic acid, zeolite A, zeolite X or titanic acid. The microcapsules enclosing DEHPA exhibited relatively large Kd values of trivalent metal ions above 103 cm3/g; for example, the Kd values of Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ for a favorable microcapsule (CuFC/clinoptilolite/DEHPA/CaALG) were 1.1x104, 7.5x10, 1.1x10, 1.0x104, 1.4x104, 3.4x103 cm3/g, respectively. The uptake rates of Cs+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ for this microcapsule were rather fast; the uptake percentage above 90% was obtained after 19 h-shaking and the uptake equilibrium was attained within 1 d. The AMP/CaALG exhibited high uptake ability for Cs+ even after irradiation of 188 kGy, and DEHPA/CaALG microcapsule had similar Kd values of Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, Y3+, Eu3+ and Am3+ ions before and after irradiation. The microcapsules with various shapes such as spherical, columnar, fibrous and filmy forms were easily prepared by changing the way of dipping kneaded sol into gelling salt solution. The microcapsules enclosing inorganic ion-exchangers and extractants have a potential possibility for the simultaneous removal of various radioactive nuclides from waste solutions.

Mimura, H.; Akiba, K.; Onodera, Y.

2002-02-26

314

Studies on Thorium Phosphate Ion Exchanger. Part III. Paper Chromatographic Behavior and Separations of Metal Ions on Thorium Phosphate Papers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thorium phosphate papers have been prepared by treatment with thorium nitrate and phosphoric acid solutions. Several metal ions have been chromatographed on thorium phosphate paper. The effect of pH on RF values has been investigated. Some useful analytical separations of metal ions have been achieved by using only dilute mineral acid and a mixed solvent system.

Anil K. De; Kailas Chowdhury

1975-01-01

315

Probing the Metal Ion Selectivity in Methionine Aminopeptidase via Changes in the Luminescence Properties of the Enzyme Bound Europium Ion  

PubMed Central

We report herein, for the first time, that Europium ion (Eu3+) binds to the “apo” form of E. coli methionine aminopeptidase (EcMetAP), and such binding results in the activation of the enzyme as well as enhancement in the luminescence intensity of the metal ion. Due to competitive displacement of the enzyme-bound Eu3+ by different metal ions, we could determine the binding affinities of both “activating” and “non-activating” metal ions for the enzyme via fluorescence spectroscopy. The experimental data revealed that among all metal ions, Fe2+ exhibited the highest binding affinity for the enzyme, supporting the notion that it serves as the physiological metal ion for the enzyme. However, the enzyme-metal binding data did not adhere to the Irving-William series. On accounting for the binding affinity vis a vis the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme for different metal ions, it appears evident that that the “coordination states” and the relative softness” of metal ions are the major determinants in facilitating the EcMetAP catalyzed reaction. PMID:22112844

Sule, Nitesh; Singh, Raushan K.; Zhao, Pinjing; Srivastava, D. K.

2011-01-01

316

Headgroup interactions and ion flotation efficiency in mixtures of a chelating surfactant, different foaming agents, and divalent metal ions.  

PubMed

The correlation between interaction parameters and ion flotation efficiency in mixtures of chelating surfactant metal complexes and different foaming agents was investigated. We have recently shown that chelating surfactant 2-dodecyldiethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (4-C12-DTPA) forms strong coordination complexes with divalent metal ions, and this can be utilized in ion flotation. Interaction parameters for mixed micelles and mixed monolayer formation for Mg(2+) and Ni(2+) complexes with the chelating surfactant 4-C12-DTPA and different foaming agents were calculated by Rubingh's regular solution theory. Parameters for the calculations were extracted from surface tension measurements and NMR diffusometry. The effects of metal ion coordination on the interactions between 4-C12-DTPA and the foaming agents could be linked to a previously established difference in coordination chemistry between the examined metal ions. As can be expected from mixtures of amphoteric surfactants, the interactions were strongly pH-dependent. Strong correlation was found between interaction parameter ?(?) for mixed monolayer formation and the phase-transfer efficiency of Ni(2+) complexes with 4-C12-DTPA during flotation in a customized flotation cell. In a mixture of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), the significant difference in conditional stability constants (log K) between the metal complexes was utilized to selectively recover the metal complex with the highest log K (Cu(2+)) by ion flotation. Flotation experiments in an excess concentration of metal ions confirmed the coordination of more than one metal ion to the headgroup of 4-C12-DTPA. PMID:24824327

Svanedal, Ida; Boija, Susanne; Norgren, Magnus; Edlund, Håkan

2014-06-10

317

Probing the metal ion selectivity in methionine aminopeptidase via changes in the luminescence properties of the enzyme bound europium ion.  

PubMed

We report herein, for the first time, that Europium ion (Eu(3+)) binds to the "apo" form of Escherichia coli methionine aminopeptidase (EcMetAP), and such binding results in the activation of the enzyme as well as enhancement in the luminescence intensity of the metal ion. Due to competitive displacement of the enzyme-bound Eu(3+) by different metal ions, we could determine the binding affinities of both "activating" and "non-activating" metal ions for the enzyme via fluorescence spectroscopy. The experimental data revealed that among all metal ions, Fe(2+) exhibited the highest binding affinity for the enzyme, supporting the notion that it serves as the physiological metal ion for the enzyme. However, the enzyme-metal binding data did not adhere to the Irving-William series. On accounting for the binding affinity vis a vis the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme for different metal ions, it appears evident that that the "coordination states" and the relative softness" of metal ions are the major determinants in facilitating the EcMetAP catalyzed reaction. PMID:22112844

Sule, Nitesh; Singh, Raushan K; Zhao, Pinjing; Srivastava, D K

2012-01-01

318

Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin  

DOEpatents

Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

Kochen, Robert L. (Boulder, CO); Navratil, James D. (Simi Valley, CA)

1997-01-21

319

Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin  

DOEpatents

Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

1997-01-21

320

Risk assessment for chemical pickling of metals contaminated by radioactive materials.  

PubMed

In recent years, many cases of contamination of metal scraps by unwanted radioactive materials have occurred. Moreover, international organisations are evaluating the possibility to re-use or to recycle metals coming from nuclear power plants. The metal recycling industry has started to worry about radiation exposure of workers that could be in contact with contaminated metals during each manufacturing phase. Risks are strongly dependent on the radiation source features. The aim of this study is to perform risk assessment for workers involved in chemical pickling of steel coils. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed, using the MCNP package and considering coils contaminated with (60)Co, (137)Cs, (241)Am and (226)Ra. Under the most conservative conditions (coil contaminated with 1.0 kBq g(-1) of (60)Co), the dose assessment results lower than the European dose limit for the population (1 mSv y(-1)), considering a maximum number of 10 contaminated coils handled per year. The only exception concerns the case of (241)Am, for which internal contamination could be non- negligible and should be verified in the specific cases. In every case, radiation exposure risk for people standing at 50 m from the coil is widely <1 mSv y(-1). PMID:16849378

Donzella, A; Formisano, P; Giroletti, E; Zenoni, A

2007-01-01

321

Analysis of the application of decontamination technologies to radioactive metal waste minimization using expert systems  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive metal waste makes up a significant portion of the waste currently being sent for disposal. Recovery of this metal as a valuable resource is possible through the use of decontamination technologies. Through the development and use of expert systems a comparison can be made of laser decontamination, a technology currently under development at Ames Laboratory, with currently available decontamination technologies for applicability to the types of metal waste being generated and the effectiveness of these versus simply disposing of the waste. These technologies can be technically and economically evaluated by the use of expert systems techniques to provide a waste management decision making tool that generates, given an identified metal waste, waste management recommendations. The user enters waste characteristic information as input and the system then recommends decontamination technologies, determines residual contamination levels and possible waste management strategies, carries out a cost analysis and then ranks, according to cost, the possibilities for management of the waste. The expert system was developed using information from literature and personnel experienced in the use of decontamination technologies and requires validation by human experts and assignment of confidence factors to the knowledge represented within.

Bayrakal, S.

1993-09-30

322

High current metal ion implantation to synthesize some conducting metal-silicides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High current metal-ion implantation by a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source was conducted to synthesize some conducting metal-silicides. It was found that C54-TiSi2, ZrSi2, NiSi2, CoSi2, ?-FeSi2, NbSi2 and TaSi2 layers on Si wafers with good electric properties could be obtained directly after implantation. In comparison, the formation of some other silicides like ?-FeSi2, NbSi2, TaSi2, tetragonal-WSi2 and tetragonal-MoSi2 required an additional post-annealing to improve their crystallinity and thus their electric properties. Interestingly, the NiSi2 layers of superior electric properties were obtained at a selected Ni-ion current density of 35 ?A/cm2. At this current, a beam heating raised the Si wafer to a specific temperature of 380 °C, at which the size difference between NiSi2 and Si lattices was nil. The resistivity of the NiSi2 layers so obtained was much lower than that of the Ni-disilicide formed by solid-state reaction at >750 °C. The formation mechanism of the above metal-silicides and the associated electric properties will also be discussed.

Liu, B. X.; Gao, K. Y.

1999-06-01

323

An overview on TRIUMF's developments on ion source for radioactive beams.  

PubMed

The ISAC facility at TRIUMF utilizes up to 100 microA from the 500 MeV H(-) cyclotron to produce the radioactive ion beam (RIB) using the isotopic separation on line method. The ISAC-I facility comprised the RIB production target stations, the mass separator, and the beam delivery to low energy area and to a room temperature linear accelerator composed of a four-rod radio frequency quadrupole and an interdigital H-type structure drift tube LINAC. ISAC-I linear accelerator can provide beam from A=3 to 30 amu with an energy range from 0.15 to 1.5 A MeV. Since the beginning of operations target development program has been to increase proton beam currents on targets. Now we routinely operate our target at 50-85 microA and recently we have operated our target at 100 microA. Other developments are in place to add other ion sources, laser, force electron beam induced are discharge and electron cyclotron resonance ion source to the actual surface ion source. The last two five year plans were mainly devoted to the construction of a heavy ion superconducting LINAC (ISAC-II) that will upgrade the mass and the energy range from 30 to 150 and from 1.5 to 6.5 A MeV, respectively. The intermediate stage E< or =4.2 A MeV is already completed and commissioned; three experiments using (11)Li, (9)Li, and (29)Na have been completed this summer. PMID:18315163

Bricault, Pierre; Ames, Friedhelm; Achtzehn, Tobias; Dombsky, Marik; Labrecque, Francis; Lassen, Jens; Lavoie, Jean-Phillipe; Lecesne, Nathalie

2008-02-01

324

A metal plasma source ion implantation and deposition system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article presents a metal plasma source ion implantation and deposition system, which is a qualitative extension of plasma source ion implantation by combining pulsed metal plasma and steady-state gas plasma. The pulsed metal plasma is produced by pulsed cathodic arc discharge and the steady-state gas plasma by magnetic multipole filament discharge. The existence of gas plasma greatly facilitates the breakdown of the pulsed cathodic arc plasma source, which does not need the conventional trigger system. Some operation characteristics of this system were measured. It was shown that the cathodic arc plasma parameters depend strongly on gas pressure. 0.45% C steel was modified in nitrogen plasma and pulsed aluminum plasma. The corrosion resistance ability of the treated 0.45% C steel sample was increased by about 30 times over that of the untreated sample. AlN/Al2O3/Al composite film was deposited on 0.45% C steel using a glow-arc technique.

Liu, Bin; Li, B.; Sun, M.; Jiang, B. Y.; Ren, Y. F.; Yang, Si-Ze

1999-03-01

325

ION IMPLANTATION AND HYPERFINE INTERACTIONS IN METALS Institut de Physique Nuclaire, BP 1, 91406 Orsay, France  

E-print Network

575 ION IMPLANTATION AND HYPERFINE INTERACTIONS IN METALS H. BERNAS Institut de Physique Nucléaire is given, with a view to presenting their applications in ion-implantation studies of metals. Some typical in hyperfine interaction studies after ion-implantation. REVUE DE PHYSIQUE APPLIQUÉE TOME 9, MAI 1974, PAGE

Boyer, Edmond

326

Temperature Dependence On The Emission Characteristics Of A AuGe Liquid Metal Alloy Ion Source  

SciTech Connect

Focused ion beam systems employing liquid metal ion sources have become of increasing importance in the microelectronics industry. Maskless ion implantation as a modern patterning technique is one of the most attractive application of Focused Ion Beams. In spite of the fact that a great deal of research has been carried out on liquid metal ion sources, surprisingly few results exist on the temperature dependence of their emission characteristics. In this article we study a AuGe liquid metal alloy ion source. The unusual results are explained in terms of the abnormal behavior of the surface tension of the alloy with temperature.

Ganetsos, Theodore; Laskaris, Nikos; Kotsos, Bill [TEI of Lamia, Department of Electronics, 3rd Km O.N.R. Lamia-Athens, 35100, Lamia (Greece); Bischoff, Lothar; Pilz, Wolfgang; Akhmadaliev, Chavkat [Research Center Rossendorf Inc., Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314, Dresden (Germany)

2007-04-23

327

Metal ions and protein aggregation: the case fo Prion protein and -amyloids  

E-print Network

, metals high chemical reactivity can easily become harmful. Metals are essential cell components in allMetal ions and protein aggregation: the case fo Prion protein and -amyloids Silvia Morante macromolecules and the cloud of surrounding small molecules (solvent, ions, membrane components, etc

Morante, Silvia

328

The kinetics of sorption of divalent metal ions onto sphagnum moss peat  

Microsoft Academic Search

A pseudo-second order rate equation describing the kinetics of sorption of divalent metal ions onto sphagnum moss peat at different initial metal ion concentrations and peat doses has been developed. The kinetics of sorption were followed based on the amounts of metal sorbed at various time intervals. Results show that sorption (chemical bonding) might be rate-limiting in the sorption of

Y. S. Ho; G. McKay

2000-01-01

329

Morphologies of oriented alginate gels crosslinked with various divalent metal ions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Optically anisotropic cylinder-shaped alginate gels crosslinked with various divalent metal ions such as Ca, Cu, Zn, and Pb were prepared by the flow-gelation method in which semidilute sodium alginate solution was extruded through a tube into metal nitrate salt solutions. Effects of metal ions on the morphological and structural features of the gels were examined mainly by polarized optical microscopy.

F. Yokoyama; C. E. Achife; K. Takahira; Y. Yamashita; K. Monobe; F. Kusano; K. Nishi

1992-01-01

330

Rotating target facility for in-flight radioactive ion beam production using a recoil mass spectrometer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A facility has been developed for production of light radioactive ion beams (RIBs) using (p,n), (d,n) reactions in inverse kinematics using an in-flight technique. Primary beams from the 15UD Pelletron accelerator are used on a hydrogenous target and the RIB is separated and re-focused to a secondary target position using the existing recoil mass spectrometer (RMS), HIRA operated in a new ion-optical configuration. To satisfy the ion-optical requirement of a well-defined object spot-size, we opted for polypropylene foil targets instead of hydrogen gas. As these foils get rapidly damaged with beam irradiation, a new design has been used to fabricate a rotary/linear motion device. This design allows the utilization of large area foils as production targets. It also, intrinsically, avoids scattering of primary beam from unwanted materials, which is crucial for beam rejection with an RMS operating at zero degrees. In this paper we present the details of the design and beam test results.

Varughese, T.; Das, J. J.; Madhavan, N.; Sugathan, P.; Madhusudhana Rao, P. V.; Jhingan, A.; Nath, S.; Sinha, A. K.; Zacharias, J.

2004-03-01

331

Low-energy and secondary (radioactive) ion-beam profile measurements and optimization using modified Gafchromic® EBT film  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A modified version of Gafchromic EBT radiochromic medical imaging film, which is light insensitive and requires no special development or processing, is shown to be useful for imaging low-energy (few MeV) ion beams and radioactive sources. It appears especially well suited for use with low-intensity short-lived (radioactive) secondary beams (RNB). The film can assist in optimizing the collimation needed to minimize unwanted background ions, and to accurately determine the ion-optical alignment of RNB production and transport systems. It allows for effective imaging of beam profiles and relative intensities throughout the beam-transport system and especially at locations not readily accessible to electronic imaging detectors. The special advantages of using the film for RNBs, which often are spatially extended and contaminated with unwanted ions, are demonstrated.

Jiang, Hao; Becchetti, F. D.; Ojaruega, M.; Torres-Isea, R.; Raymond, R. S.; Villano, A. N.; Kolata, J. J.; Roberts, A.

2010-08-01

332

Perovskite-Ni composite: A potential route for management of radioactive metallic waste.  

PubMed

Management of nickel - based radioactive metallic wastes is a difficult issue. To arrest the release of hazardous material to the environment it is proposed to develop perovskite coating for the metallic wastes. Polycrystalline BaCe0.8Y0.2O3-? perovskite with orthorhombic structure has been synthesized by sol-gel route. Crystallographic analyses show, the perovskite belong to orthorhombic Pmcn space group at room temperature, and gets converted to orthorhombic Incn space group at 623K, cubic Pm3m space group (with a=4.434Å) at 1173K and again orthorhombic Pmcn space group at room temperature after cooling. Similar observations have been made from micro-Raman study as well. Microstructural studies of BaCe0.8Y0.2O3-?-NiO/Ni composites showed absence of any reaction product at the interface. This suggests that both the components (i.e. perovskite and NiO/Ni) of the composite are compatible to each other. Interaction of BaCe0.8Y0.2O3-?-NiO/Ni composites with simulated barium borosilicate waste glass melt also did not reveal any reaction product at the interfaces. Importantly, uranium from the waste glass melt was found to be partitioned within BaCe0.8Y0.2O3-? perovskite structure. It is therefore concluded that BaCe0.8Y0.2O3-? can be considered as a good coating material for management of radioactive Ni based metallic wastes. PMID:25666975

Mahadik, Pooja Sawant; Sengupta, Pranesh; Halder, Rumu; Abraham, G; Dey, G K

2015-04-28

333

Performance of the Recoil Mass Spectrometer and its detector systems at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recently commissioned Recoil Mass Spectrometer (RMS) at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) is described. Consisting of a momentum separator followed by an E-D-E Rochester-type mass spectrometer, the RMS is the centerpiece of the nuclear structure endstation at the HRIBF. Designed to transport ions with rigidities near K=100, the RMS has acceptances of ±10% in energy and ±4.9%

C. J Gross; T. N Ginter; D. Shapira; W. T Milner; J. W McConnell; A. N James; J. W Johnson; J. Mas; P. F Mantica; R. L Auble; J. J. Das; J. L Blankenship; J. H Hamilton; R. L Robinson; Y. A Akovali; C. Baktash; J. C Batchelder; C. R Bingham; M. J Brinkman; H. K Carter; R. A Cunningham; T. Davinson; J. D Fox; A. Galindo-Uribarri; R. Grzywacz; J. F Liang; B. D MacDonald; J. MacKenzie; S. D Paul; A. Piechaczek; D. C Radford; A. V. Ramayya; W. Reviol; D. Rudolph; K. Rykaczewski; K. S Toth; W. Weintraub; C. Williams; P. J Woods; C.-H Yu; E. F Zganjar

2000-01-01

334

High-resolution mass spectrometer for liquid metal ion sources  

SciTech Connect

Recently, a mass spectrometer for liquid metal ion sources (LMIS) has been built and set into operation. This device uses an E×B-filter as mass dispersive element and provides sufficient resolution to analyse the emission of clusters from LMIS to much higher mass ranges (>2000 amu) than commercially available mass filters for focused ion beam systems. It has also been shown that for small masses the composition of clusters from different isotopes can be resolved. Furthermore, a rather high fluence of monodisperse clusters in the range of 10{sup 6}–10{sup 7} clusters/s can be achieved with this setup. This makes it a promising tool for the preparation of mass selected clusters. In this contribution, theoretical considerations as well as technical details and the results of first measurements are presented.

Wortmann, Martin; Ludwig, Arne; Reuter, Dirk; Wieck, Andreas D. [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstr. 150, 44780 Bochum (Germany)] [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universitätsstr. 150, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Meijer, Jan [Institut für Experimentelle Physik II, Universität Leipzig, Linnestr. 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)] [Institut für Experimentelle Physik II, Universität Leipzig, Linnestr. 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

2013-09-15

335

Printed disposable colorimetric array for metal ion discrimination.  

PubMed

One of the main limiting factors in optical sensing arrays is the reproducibility in the preparation, typically by spin coating and drop casting techniques, which produce membranes that are not fully homogeneous. In this paper, we increase the discriminatory power of colorimetric arrays by increasing the reproducibility in the preparation by inkjet printing and measuring the color from the image of the array acquired by a digital camera, using the H coordinate of the HSV color space as the analytical parameter, which produces robust and precise measurements. A disposable 31 mm × 19 mm nylon membrane with 35 sensing areas with 7 commercial chromogenic reagents makes it possible to identify 13 metal ions and to determine mixtures with up to 5 ions using a two-stage neural network approach with higher accuracy than with previous approaches. PMID:25088790

Ariza-Avidad, M; Salinas-Castillo, A; Cuéllar, M P; Agudo-Acemel, M; Pegalajar, M C; Capitán-Vallvey, L F

2014-09-01

336

Metallic atoms and ions in comets: Comet Halley 1986 3  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The origin of metallic atoms and ions in the cometary comae is investigated theoretically. Two effects are revealed in the comas of bright comets: (1) the Na anomalous type effect is possible within the gas-dust jets of comet P/Halley 1986 3 due to cooling cometary dust by cryogenic gas flow from the nucleus; and (2) the production of ions of refractory elements (Fe(+), Si(+), etc.) at large heliocentric distances is possible in the comas of the Halley type dusty comets due to high-velocity impacts between cometary and zodiacal dust particles. Spectral observations of comets with high sensitivity and spatial resolution are important for studying both comets and interplanetary dust.

Ibadov, S.

1992-01-01

337

Theoretical study of transition-metal ions bound to benzene  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Theoretical binding energies are reported for all first-row and selected second-row transition metal ions (M+) bound to benzene. The calculations employ basis sets of at least double-zeta plus polarization quality and account for electron correlation using the modified coupled-pair functional method. While the bending is predominantly electrostatic, the binding energies are significantly increased by electron correlation, because the donation from the metal d orbitals to the benzene pi* orbitals is not well described at the self-consistent-field level. The uncertainties in the computed binding energies are estimated to be about 5 kcal/mol. Although the calculated and experimental binding energies generally agree to within their combined uncertainties, it is likely that the true binding energies lie in the lower portion of the experimental range. This is supported by the very good agreement between the theoretical and recent experimental binding energies for AgC6H6(+).

Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.

1992-01-01

338

Metal-ion metathesis in metal-organic frameworks: a synthetic route to new metal-organic frameworks.  

PubMed

A porous metal-organic framework, Mn(H(3)O)[(Mn(4)Cl)(3)(hmtt)(8)] (POST-65), was prepared by the reaction of 5,5',10,10',15,15'-hexamethyltruxene-2,7,12-tricarboxylic acid (H(3)hmtt) with MnCl(2) under solvothermal conditions. POST-65(Mn) was subjected to post-synthetic modification with Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu according to an ion-exchange method that resulted in the formation of three isomorphous frameworks, POST-65(Co/Ni/Cu), as well as a new framework, POST-65(Fe). The ion-exchanged samples could not be prepared by regular solvothermal reactions. The complete exchange of the metal ions and retention of the framework structure were verified by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface-area analysis. Single-crystal X-ray diffractions studies revealed a single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC)-transformation nature of the ion-exchange process. Hydrogen-sorption and magnetization measurements showed metal-specific properties of POST-65. PMID:23154964

Kim, Yonghwi; Das, Sunirban; Bhattacharya, Saurav; Hong, Soonsang; Kim, Min Gyu; Yoon, Minyoung; Natarajan, Srinivasan; Kim, Kimoon

2012-12-21

339

Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts  

DOEpatents

The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity. 2 figs.

Lee, H.S.; Geng, L.; Skotheim, T.A.

1996-07-23

340

Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts  

DOEpatents

The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity.

Lee, Hung-Sui (East Setauket, NY); Geng, Lin (Coram, NY); Skotheim, Terje A. (Shoreham, NY)

1996-07-23

341

Recent progress in the development of a polarized proton target for reactions with radioactive ion beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Polarization observables in nuclear reactions with stable beams have provided important information concerning structural properties of nuclei and reaction mechanisms and hold great promise in the context of exotic nuclei. We report on the development of a polarized target based on plastic foils of 20-200 ?m thickness to be used with radioactive ion beams. The operation of such a target requires a moderately high magnetic field and very low temperatures. The plastic foil is placed inside a chamber attached to the mixing chamber of a 3He- 4He dilution refrigerator. Cooling of the foil is achieved via a superfluid film of 4He that can be supplied through two capillaries. The chamber has two thin, highly uniform silicon nitride windows. An NMR coil is attached to the target to monitor the polarization. Results of a first test to characterize the target system, using the elastic scattering of 38 MeV 12C by protons in inverse kinematics are presented.

Urrego-Blanco, J. P.; Bingham, C. R.; van den Brandt, B.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gómez del Campo, J.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Schmelzbach, P. A.

2007-08-01

342

Beam dynamics design studies of a superconducting radioactive ion beam postaccelerator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The HIE-ISOLDE project at CERN proposes a superconducting upgrade to increase the energy range and quality of the radioactive ion beams produced at ISOLDE, which are currently postaccelerated by the normal conducting radioactive ion beam experiment linac. The specification and design choices for the HIE-ISOLDE linac are outlined along with a comprehensive beam dynamics study undertaken to understand and mitigate the sources of beam emittance dilution. The dominant cause of transverse emittance growth was attributed to the coupling between the transverse and longitudinal motions through the phase dependence of the rf defocusing force in the accelerating cavities. A parametric resonance induced by the coupling was observed and its excitation surveyed as a function of transverse phase advance using numerical simulations and analytic models to understand and avoid the regions of transverse beam instability. Other sources of emittance growth were studied and where necessary ameliorated, including the beam steering force in the quarter-wave resonator and the asymmetry of the rf defocusing forces in the solenoid focusing channel. A racetrack shaped beam port aperture was shown to improve the symmetry of the fields in the high-? quarter-wave resonator and reduce the loss of acceptance under the offset used to compensate the steering force. The methods used to compensate the beam steering are described and an optimization routine written to minimize the steering effect when all cavities of a given family are offset by the same amount, taking into account the different velocity profiles across the range of mass-to-charge states accepted. The assumptions made in the routine were shown to be adequate and the results well correlated with the beam quality simulated in multiparticle beam dynamics simulations. The specification of the design tolerances is outlined based on studies of the sensitivity of the beam to misalignment and errors, with particular emphasis on the phase and amplitude stability required for the independently phased quarter-wave resonators.

Fraser, M. A.; Jones, R. M.; Pasini, M.

2011-02-01

343

Novel fungus-titanate bio-nanocomposites as high performance adsorbents for the efficient removal of radioactive ions from wastewater.  

PubMed

Reclaimable adsorbents have a critical application in the adsorption of radioactive materials. In this study, the novel bio-nanocomposites comprising fungi and titanate nanotubes are successfully synthesized by a simple and low-cost method. Morphological characterizations and composite mechanism analysis confirm that the composites are sufficiently stable to avoid dust pollution resulting from the titanate nanomaterials. Adsorption experiments demonstrate that the bio-nanocomposites are efficient adsorbents with a saturated sorption capacity as high as 120 mg g(-1) (1.75 meq. g(-1)) for Ba(2+) ions. The results suggest that the bio-nanocomposites can be used as promising radioactive adsorbents for removing radioactive ions from water caused by nuclear leakage. PMID:24287628

Xu, Mingze; Wei, Guodong; Liu, Na; Zhou, Liang; Fu, Chengwei; Chubik, M; Gromov, A; Han, Wei

2014-01-21

344

Blood metal ion testing is an effective screening tool to identify poorly performing metal-on-metal bearing surfaces  

PubMed Central

Objectives The aims of this piece of work were to: 1) record the background concentrations of blood chromium (Cr) and cobalt (Co) concentrations in a large group of subjects; 2) to compare blood/serum Cr and Co concentrations with retrieved metal-on-metal (MoM) hip resurfacings; 3) to examine the distribution of Co and Cr in the serum and whole blood of patients with MoM hip arthroplasties; and 4) to further understand the partitioning of metal ions between the serum and whole blood fractions. Methods A total of 3042 blood samples donated to the local transfusion centre were analysed to record Co and Cr concentrations. Also, 91 hip resurfacing devices from patients who had given pre-revision blood/serum samples for metal ion analysis underwent volumetric wear assessment using a coordinate measuring machine. Linear regression analysis was carried out and receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to assess the reliability of metal ions to identify abnormally wearing implants. The relationship between serum and whole blood concentrations of Cr and Co in 1048 patients was analysed using Bland-Altman charts. This relationship was further investigated in an in vitro study during which human blood was spiked with trivalent and hexavalent Cr, the serum then separated and the fractions analysed. Results Only one patient in the transfusion group was found to have a blood Co > 2 µg/l. Blood/Serum Cr and Co concentrations were reliable indicators of abnormal wear. Blood Co appeared to be the most useful clinical test, with a concentration of 4.5 µg/l showing sensitivity and specificity for the detection of abnormal wear of 94% and 95%, respectively. Generated metal ions tended to fill the serum compartment preferentially in vivo and this was replicated in the in vitro study when blood was spiked with trivalent Cr and bivalent Co. Conclusions Blood/serum metal ion concentrations are reliable indicators of abnormal wear processes. Important differences exist however between elements and the blood fraction under study. Future guidelines must take these differences into account. PMID:23836464

Sidaginamale, R. P.; Joyce, T. J.; Lord, J. K.; Jefferson, R.; Blain, P. G.; Nargol, A. V. F.; Langton, D. J.

2013-01-01

345

[Effect of bivalent metal ions on the fluctuations of ion currents in rat liver mitochondria].  

PubMed

Ions of bivalent metals are shown to arrange in the Sr2+ greater than Ca2+ greater than Ba2+ greater than Mn2+ series as to their ability to induce ion flow vibration in the rat liver mitochondria. Application of Sr2+ results in the most stable prolonged vibrations of ion flows in mitochondria. Ca2+, Ba2+ and Mn2+ induce slightly pronounced and intensively damped vibrations. The studied Mg2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Pb2+ Fe2+ cations have effect on valinomycin-induced K+ transport in mitochondria and do not induce vibrations. It is established that the ability of bivalent cations to induce vibrations is associated with the possibility of their transfer through the mitochondrion membrane and accumulation in the matrix. Inhibitors of the electrogenic Ca2+ transport in mitochondria produce the similar effect on vibrations induced by Sr2+, Ca2+, Ba2+ and Mn2+. PMID:2412325

Kholmukhamedov, E L; Chukhlova, E A

1985-01-01

346

Radiation and Electromagnetic Induction Data Fusion for Detection of Buried Radioactive Metal Waste - 12282  

SciTech Connect

At the United States Army's test sites, fired penetrators made of Depleted Uranium (DU) have been buried under ground and become hazardous waste. Previously, we developed techniques for detecting buried radioactive targets. We also developed approaches for locating buried paramagnetic metal objects by utilizing the electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensor data. In this paper, we apply data fusion techniques to combine results from both the radiation detection and the EMI detection, so that we can further distinguish among DU penetrators, DU oxide, and non- DU metal debris. We develop a two-step fusion approach for the task, and test it with survey data collected on simulation targets. In this work, we explored radiation and EMI data fusion for detecting DU, oxides, and non-DU metals. We developed a two-step fusion approach based on majority voting and a set of decision rules. With this approach, we fuse results from radiation detection based on the RX algorithm and EMI detection based on a 3-step analysis. Our fusion approach has been tested successfully with data collected on simulation targets. In the future, we will need to further verify the effectiveness of this fusion approach with field data. (authors)

Long, Zhiling; Wei, Wei; Turlapaty, Anish; Du, Qian; Younan, Nicolas H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (United States); Waggoner, Charles [Institute for Clean Energy Technology, Mississippi State University, MS 39762 (United States)

2012-07-01

347

Novel fungus-titanate bio-nanocomposites as high performance adsorbents for the efficient removal of radioactive ions from wastewater  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reclaimable adsorbents have a critical application in the adsorption of radioactive materials. In this study, the novel bio-nanocomposites comprising fungi and titanate nanotubes are successfully synthesized by a simple and low-cost method. Morphological characterizations and composite mechanism analysis confirm that the composites are sufficiently stable to avoid dust pollution resulting from the titanate nanomaterials. Adsorption experiments demonstrate that the bio-nanocomposites are efficient adsorbents with a saturated sorption capacity as high as 120 mg g-1 (1.75 meq. g-1) for Ba2+ ions. The results suggest that the bio-nanocomposites can be used as promising radioactive adsorbents for removing radioactive ions from water caused by nuclear leakage.Reclaimable adsorbents have a critical application in the adsorption of radioactive materials. In this study, the novel bio-nanocomposites comprising fungi and titanate nanotubes are successfully synthesized by a simple and low-cost method. Morphological characterizations and composite mechanism analysis confirm that the composites are sufficiently stable to avoid dust pollution resulting from the titanate nanomaterials. Adsorption experiments demonstrate that the bio-nanocomposites are efficient adsorbents with a saturated sorption capacity as high as 120 mg g-1 (1.75 meq. g-1) for Ba2+ ions. The results suggest that the bio-nanocomposites can be used as promising radioactive adsorbents for removing radioactive ions from water caused by nuclear leakage. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The experimental section and supplementary figures are shown in supplementary information. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03467d

Xu, Mingze; Wei, Guodong; Liu, Na; Zhou, Liang; Fu, Chengwei; Chubik, M.; Gromov, A.; Han, Wei

2013-12-01

348

Selective exchange of divalent transition metal ions in cryptomelane-type manganic acid with tunnel structure  

SciTech Connect

The ion-exchange selectivity of divalent transition metal ions on cryptomelane-type manganic acid (CMA) with tunnel structure has been studied using the distribution coefficients ([ital K][sub [ital d

Tsuji, M. (Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152 (Japan)); Komarneni, S. (Materials Research Laboratory and Department of Agronomy, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802-4801 (United States))

1993-03-01

349

Nuclear reactions with 11C and 14O radioactive ion beams  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive ion beams (RIBs) have been shown to be a useful tool for studying proton-rich nuclides near and beyond the proton dripline and for evaluating nuclear models. To take full advantage of RIBs, Elastic Resonance Scattering in Inverse Kinematics with Thick Targets (ERSIKTT), has proven to be a reliable experimental tool for investigations of proton unbound nuclei. Following several years of effort, Berkeley Experiments with Accelerated Radioactive Species (BEARS), a RIBs capability, has been developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron. The current BEARS provides two RIBs: a 11C beam of up to 2x108 pps intensity on target and an 14O beam of up to 3x104 pps intensity. While the development of the 11C beam has been relatively easy, a number of challenges had to be overcome to obtain the 14O beam. The excellent 11C beam has been used to investigate several reactions. The first was the 197Au(11C,xn)208-xnAt reaction, which was used to measure excitation functions for the 4n to 8n exit channels. The measured cross sections were generally predicted quite well using the fusion-evaporation code HIVAP. Possible errors in the branching ratios of ?? decays from At isotopes as well as the presence of incomplete fusion reactions probably contribute to specific overpredictions. 15F has been investigated by the p(14O,p)14O reaction with the ERSIKTT technology. Several 14O+p runs have been performed. Excellent energy calibration was obtained using resonances from the p(14N,p)14N reaction in inverse kinematics, and comparing the results to those obtained earlier with normal kinematics. The differences between 14N+p and 14O+p in the stopping power function have been evaluated for better energy calibration. After careful calibration, the energy levels of 15F were fitted with an R-matrix calculation. Spins and parities were assigned to the two observed resonances. This new measurement of the 15F ground state supports the disappearance of the Z = 8 proton magic number for odd Z, Tz=-3/2 nuclei. It is expected that future work on proton-rich nuclides will rely heavily on RIBs and/or mass separators. Currently, radioactive ion beam intensities are sufficient for the study of a reasonable number of very proton-rich nuclides.

Guo, Fanqing

2004-12-09

350

Photoluminescence properties of Jahn-Teller transition-metal ions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work investigates the influence of electron-phonon coupling associated with E ?e and T ?e Jahn-Teller (JT) effect in different transition-metal (TM) ions on de-excitation phenomena through nonradiative multiphonon relaxation, i.e., photoluminescence (PL) quenching. We developed a configurational curve model which is able to predict from the absorption spectrum whether a given JT-TM ion is PL or quenched. The prediction is made on the basis of an adapted Dexter-Klick-Russell parameter for JT systems, defined in terms of spectroscopic parameters through ?JT=??eabs/Eabs, where ?eabs refers to the splitting of the parent octahedral Eg states by the JT distortion in E ?e (? =3/4) or T ?e (? =1/4), and Eabs is the energy of the first absorption band involving electronic transition between Eg and T2g. We show that PL in any JT-TM ion occurs whenever ?JT<0.1 or is quenched if ?JT>0.2. This result is noteworthy since it allows us to establish structural requirements for the JT-TM ion and the host crystal to be PL. Although PL properties of materials containing TM ions depend on a variety of structural factors such as the electronic configuration, the site symmetry, and the crystal field produced by neighboring atoms, the present model achieves this goal through a simple spectroscopic parameter: ?JT. In this work we correlated the PL properties of different sixfold-coordinated JT systems such as Ti3+, Cu2+, Mn3+, Cr2+, Fe2+, Co3+, and Ni3+ in halides and oxides with ?JT obtained from their respective absorption spectra. From this analysis we conclude that depending on the nature of the JT coupling and its strength, PL is either strongly favored or quenched in T ?e while it is mostly quenched in E ?e systems due to the larger JT distortion.

Sanz-Ortiz, Marta N.; Rodríguez, Fernando

2009-09-01

351

Amorphous Metallic Glass as New High Power and Energy Density Anodes For Lithium Ion Rechargeable Batteries  

E-print Network

We have investigated the use of aluminum based amorphous metallic glass as the anode in lithium ion rechargeable batteries. Amorphous metallic glasses have no long-range ordered microstructure; the atoms are less closely ...

Meng, Shirley Y.

352

Electrospray droplet exposure to organic vapors: metal ion removal from proteins and protein complexes.  

PubMed

The exposure of aqueous nanoelectrospray droplets to various organic vapors can dramatically reduce sodium adduction on protein ions in positive ion mass spectra. Volatile alcohols, such as methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol lead to a significant reduction in sodium ion adduction but are not as effective as acetonitrile, acetone, and ethyl acetate. Organic vapor exposure in the negative ion mode, on the other hand, has essentially no effect on alkali ion adduction. Evidence is presented to suggest that the mechanism by which organic vapor exposure reduces alkali ion adduction in the positive mode involves the depletion of alkali metal ions via ion evaporation of metal ions solvated with organic molecules. The early generation of metal/organic cluster ions during the droplet desolvation process results in fewer metal ions available to condense on the protein ions formed via the charged residue mechanism. These effects are demonstrated with holomyoglobin ions to illustrate that the metal ion reduction takes place without detectable protein denaturation, which might be revealed by heme loss or an increase in charge state distribution. No evidence is observed for denaturation with exposure to any of the organic vapors evaluated in this work. PMID:25517019

DeMuth, J Corinne; McLuckey, Scott A

2015-01-20

353

SORPTION OF TRIVALENT METAL ION ON FIBROUS CERIUM(IV) HYDROGENPHOSPHATE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thermodynamics of trivalent metal ions\\/hydrogen ions exchange on a fibrous cerium(IV) hydrogenphosphate have been investigated by the micro-amount uptake. Selectivities for trivalent metal ions increase in the order; La ion exchange reaction increase in the order of Eu

H. HAYASHI; T. EBINA; T. NAGASE; Y. ONODERA; T. IWASAKI

1999-01-01

354

Anion-exchange separations of metal ions in thiocyanate media.  

PubMed

The analytical potential of a weak-base macroreticular anion-exchange resin for the quantitative separation of metal ions in thiocyanate media is investigated and demonstrated. Distribution data are given for the sorption of some 25 metal ions from aqueous mixtures of potassium thiocyanate (1.0M or less) and 0.5M hydrochloric acid. The magnitude of the distribution data suggests many possible separations, some of which were quantitatively performed by procedures which are fast, simple and require only mild conditions. Representative separations are removal of traces of iron(III) and copper(II) from water samples prior to the determination of water hardness (calcium and magnesium), separation of nickel(II) from vanadium(IV) and the separation of thorium(IV) from titanium(IV). Some multicomponent separations are the separation of rare earths(III) and thorium(IV) from scandium(III) and the separation of rare earths(III) from iron(III) and uranium(VI). PMID:18960914

Fritz, J S; Kaminski, E E

1971-05-01

355

New Proton-Ionizable, Calixarene-Based Ligands for Selective Metal Ion Separations  

SciTech Connect

The project objective was the discovery of new ligands for performing metal ion separations. The research effort entailed the preparation of new metal ion complexing agents and polymers and their evaluation in metal ion separation processes of solvent extraction, synthetic liquid membrane transport, and sorption. Structural variations in acyclic, cyclic, and bicyclic organic ligands were used to probe their influence upon the efficiency and selectivity with which metal ion separations can be performed. A unifying feature of the ligand structures is the presence of one (or more) side arm with a pendent acidic function. When a metal ion is complexed within the central cavity of the ligand, ionization of the side arm(s) produces the requisite anion(s) for formation of an overall electroneutral complex. This markedly enhances extraction/transport efficiency for separations in which movement of aqueous phase anions of chloride, nitrate, or sulfate into an organic medium would be required. Through systematic structural variations, new ligands have been developed for efficient and selective separations of monovalent metal ions (e.g., alkali metal, silver, and thallium cations) and of divalent metal ion species (e.g., alkaline earth metal, lead, and mercury cations). Research results obtained in these fundamental investigations provide important insight for the design and development of ligands suitable for practical metal ion separation applications.

Bartsch, Richard A.

2012-06-04

356

Metal complexes containing natural and and artificial radioactive elements and their applications.  

PubMed

Recent advances (during the 2007-2014 period) in the coordination and organometallic chemistry of compounds containing natural and artificially prepared radionuclides (actinides and technetium), are reviewed. Radioactive isotopes of naturally stable elements are not included for discussion in this work. Actinide and technetium complexes with O-, N-, N,O, N,S-, P-containing ligands, as well ?-organometallics are discussed from the view point of their synthesis, properties, and main applications. On the basis of their properties, several mono-, bi-, tri-, tetra- or polydentate ligands have been designed for specific recognition of some particular radionuclides, and can be used in the processes of nuclear waste remediation, i.e., recycling of nuclear fuel and the separation of actinides and fission products from waste solutions or for analytical determination of actinides in solutions; actinide metal complexes are also usefulas catalysts forcoupling gaseous carbon monoxide,as well as antimicrobial and anti-fungi agents due to their biological activity. Radioactive labeling based on the short-lived metastable nuclide technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) for biomedical use as heart, lung, kidney, bone, brain, liver or cancer imaging agents is also discussed. Finally, the promising applications of technetium labeling of nanomaterials, with potential applications as drug transport and delivery vehicles, radiotherapeutic agents or radiotracers for monitoring metabolic pathways, are also described. PMID:25061724

Kharissova, Oxana V; Méndez-Rojas, Miguel A; Kharisov, Boris I; Méndez, Ubaldo Ortiz; Martínez, Perla Elizondo

2014-01-01

357

Viscoplasticity of simulated high-level radioactive waste glass containing platinum group metal particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The shear rate dependency of the viscosity of three simulated high-level radioactive waste glasses containing 0, 1.2 and 4.5 wt% platinum group metals (PGMs) was examined at a temperature range of 1173-1473 K by a rotating viscometer. Shear stress when the shear rate equals zero, i.e. yield stress, was also measured by capillary method. The viscosity of the glass containing no PGM was shear rate-independent Newtonian fluid. On the other hand, the apparent viscosity of the glasses containing PGMs increased with decreasing shear rate, and nonzero amount of yield stresses were detected from both glasses. The viscosity and yield stress of the glass containing 4.5 wt% PGMs was roughly one to two orders of magnitude greater than the glass containing 1.2 wt% PGMs. These viscoplastic properties were numerically expressed by Casson equation.

Uruga, Kazuyoshi; Usami, Tsuyoshi; Tsukada, Takeshi; Komamine, Satoshi; Ochi, Eiji

2014-09-01

358

Metal ion sorption by untreated and chemically treated biomass  

SciTech Connect

The metal-binding ability of biosorbents is well known; however, in comparison with commercial ion-exchange resins the capacity of biosorbents is low. The purpose of this research was to examine chemically modified biosorbents and biosorbents prepared from microorganisms isolated from extreme environments to determine if significant improvements in metal-binding capacity or biosorbents with unique capabilities could be produced. Chemical treatments examined included acid, alkali, carbon disulfide, phosphorus oxychloride, anhydrous formamide, sodium thiosulfate, sodium chloroacetic acid, and phenylsulfonate. Biosorbents were prepared from microorganisms isolated from pristine and acid mine drainage impacted sites and included heterotrophs, methanotrophs, algae, and sulfate reducers. Chemical modification with carbon disulfide, phosphorous oxychloride, and sodium thiosulfate yielded biosorbents with such as much as 74%, 133%, and 155% improvements, respectively, in metal-binding capacity, but the performance of these chemically modified biosorbents deteriorated upon repeated use. A culture isolated from an acid mine drainage impacted site, IGTM17, exhibits about 3-fold higher metal-binding capacity in comparison with other biosorbents examined in this study. IGTM17 also exhibits superior metal-binding ability at decreased pH or in the presence of interfering common cations in comparison with other biosorbents or some commercially available cation exchange resins. Some biosorbents, such as IGTM5, can bind anions. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of the ability of biosorbents to bind anions. Moreover, preliminary data indicate that the chemical modification of biosorbents may be capable of imparting the ability to selectively bind certain anions. Further research is needed to optimize conditions for the chemical modification and stabilization of biosorbents.

Kilbane, J.J.; Xie, J.

1992-12-31

359

Resrad-recycle: a computer model for analyzing radiation exposures resulting from recycling radioactively contaminated scrap metals or reusing radioactively surface-contaminated materials and equipment.  

PubMed

RESRAD-RECYCLE is a computer code designed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to be used in making decisions about the disposition of radioactively contaminated materials and scrap metals. It implements a pathway analysis methodology to evaluate potential radiation exposures resulting from the recycling of contaminated scrap metals and the reuse of surface-contaminated materials and equipment. For modeling purposes, it divides the entire metal recycling process into six steps: (1) scrap delivery, (2) scrap melting, (3) ingot delivery, (4) product fabrication, (5) product distribution, and (6) use of finished product. RESRAD-RECYCLE considers the reuse of surface-contaminated materials in their original forms. It contains representative exposure scenarios for each recycling step and the reuse process; users can also specify scenarios if desired. The model calculates individual and collective population doses for workers involved in the recycling process and for the public using the finished products. The results are then used to derive clearance levels for the contaminated materials on the basis of input dose restrictions. The model accounts for radiological decay and ingrowth, dilution and partitioning during melting, and distribution of refined metal in the various finished products, as well as the varying densities and geometries of the radiation sources during the recycling process. A complete material balance in terms of mass and radioactivity during the recycling process can also be implemented. In an international validation study, the radiation doses calculated by RESRAD-RECYCLE were shown to agree fairly well with actual measurement data. PMID:15551790

Cheng, Jing-Jy; Kassas, Bassel; Yu, Charley; Amish, John; LePoire, Dave; Chen, Shih-Yew; Williams, W A; Wallo, A; Peterson, H

2004-11-01

360

Insight into the Interaction of Metal Ions with TroA from Streptococcus suis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundThe scavenging ability of sufficient divalent metal ions is pivotal for pathogenic bacteria to survive in the host. ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type metal transporters provide a considerable amount of different transition metals for bacterial growth. TroA is a substrate binding protein for uptake of multiple metal ions. However, the function and structure of the TroA homologue from the epidemic Streptococcus suis

Beiwen Zheng; Qiangmin Zhang; Jia Gao; Huiming Han; Ming Li; Jingren Zhang; Jianxun Qi; Jinghua Yan; George F. Gao

2011-01-01

361

Research in and industrial application of metal source ion implantation at Beijing Normal University  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-current metal-ion sources for the surface modification of materials have been under development at Beijing Normal University since 1988. The present paper discusses both a large-scale metal source ion implanter installed at this Institute at the end of 1995 for research and industrial applications, and a metal plasma deposition\\/implantation system with three filtered vacuum-arc plasma sources. The metal source implanter

Huixing Zhang; Xiaoji Zhang; Fengsheng Zhou; Qiang Li; Xanying Wu; Wenlian Lin; Tonghe Zhang

1998-01-01

362

Structure of the alkali-metal-atom + strontium molecular ions: Towards photoassociation and formation of cold molecular ions  

SciTech Connect

The potential energy curves, permanent and transition dipole moments, and the static dipolar polarizability, of molecular ions composed of one alkali-metal atom and a strontium ion are determined with a quantum chemistry approach. The molecular ions are treated as effective two-electron systems and are treated using effective core potentials including core polarization, large gaussian basis sets, and full configuration interaction. In the perspective of upcoming experiments aiming at merging cold atom and cold ion traps, possible paths for radiative charge exchange, photoassociation of a cold lithium or rubidium atom and a strontium ion are discussed, as well as the formation of stable molecular ions.

Aymar, M.; Dulieu, O. [Laboratoire Aime Cotton, CNRS, UPR3321, Ba circumflex t. 505, Univ Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Guerout, R. [Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, CNRS, ENS, Univ Pierre et Marie Curie case 74, Campus Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

2011-08-14

363

Upgrade of the facility EXOTIC for the in-flight production of light Radioactive Ion Beams  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The facility EXOTIC for the in-flight production of light weakly-bound Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) has been operating at INFN-LNL since 2004. RIBs are produced via two-body reactions induced by high intensity heavy-ion beams impinging on light gas targets and selected by means of a 30°-dipole bending magnet and a 1-m long Wien filter. The facility has been recently upgraded (i) by developing a cryogenic gas target, (ii) by replacing the power supplies of the middle lenses of the two quadrupole triplets, (iii) by installing two y-steerers and (iv) by placing two Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters upstream the secondary target to provide an event-by-event reconstruction of the position hit on the target. So far, RIBs of 7Be, 8B and 17F in the energy range 3-5 MeV/u have been produced with intensities about 3 × 105, 1.6 × 103 and 105 pps, respectively. Possible light RIBs (up to Z = 10) deliverable by the facility EXOTIC are also reviewed.

Mazzocco, M.; Torresi, D.; Strano, E.; Boiano, A.; Boiano, C.; Costa, L.; Glodariu, T.; Guglielmetti, A.; La Commara, M.; Parascandolo, C.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Signorini, C.; Soramel, F.; Stroe, L.

2013-12-01

364

Prostate cancer outcome and tissue levels of metal ions  

USGS Publications Warehouse

BACKGROUND There are several studies examining prostate cancer and exposure to cadmium, iron, selenium, and zinc. Less data are available on the possible influence of these metal ions on prostate cancer outcome. This study measured levels of these ions in prostatectomy samples in order to examine possible associations between metal concentrations and disease outcome. METHODS We obtained formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue blocks of prostatectomy samples of 40 patients with PSA recurrence, matched 1:1 (for year of surgery, race, age, Gleason grading, and pathology TNM classification) with tissue blocks from 40 patients without recurrence (n = 80). Case-control pairs were compared for the levels of metals in areas adjacent to tumors. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for quantification of Cd, Fe, Zn, and Se. RESULTS Patients with biochemical (PSA) recurrence of disease had 12% lower median iron (95 ??g/g vs. 111 ??g/g; P = 0.04) and 21% lower zinc (279 ??g/g vs. 346 ??g/g; P = 0.04) concentrations in the normal-appearing tissue immediately adjacent to cancer areas. Differences in cadmium (0.489 ??g/g vs. 0.439 ??g/g; 4% higher) and selenium (1.68 ??g/g vs. 1.58 ??g/g; 5% higher) levels were not statistically significant in recurrence cases, when compared to non-recurrences (P = 0.40 and 0.21, respectively). CONCLUSIONS There is an association between low zinc and low iron prostate tissue levels and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer. Whether these novel findings are a cause or effect of more aggressive tumors, or whether low zinc and iron prostatic levels raise implications for therapy, remains to be investigated. Copyright ?? 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Sarafanov, A.G.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; MacIas, V.; Gao, W.; Liang, W.-M.; Beam, C.; Gray, Michael A.; Kajdacsy-Balla, A.

2011-01-01

365

The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Present status and future plans  

SciTech Connect

The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) is a first generation national user facility for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics research with radioactive ion beams (RIBS). The reconfiguration, construction, and equipment-commissioning phases have been completed and the beam development program is in progress. In this article, descriptions of the facility and newly implemented experimental equipment for use in the nuclear and astrophysics programs will be given and an outline of the initial experimental program will be presented. Special target/ion source related problems, endemic to the production of specific short-lived RIBs will be discussed. In addition, plans, which involve either a 200-MeV or a 1-GeV proton-linac driver for a second-generation ISOL facility, will be presented.

Alton, G.D.; Beene, J.R.

1998-03-01

366

The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Present status and future plans  

SciTech Connect

The Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) is a first generation national user facility for nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics research with radioactive ion beams (RIBs). The reconfiguration, construction, and equipment commissioning phases have been completed and the beam development program is in progress. In this article, descriptions of the facility and newly implemented experimental equipment for use in the nuclear and astrophysics programs will be given and an outline of the initial experimental program will be presented. Special target ion source related problems, endemic to the production of specific short lived RIBs will be discussed. In addition, plans, which involve either a 200 MeV or a 1 GeV proton linac driver for a second generation ISOL facility, will be presented.

Alton, G.D.; Beene, J.R.

1998-01-01

367

Most spin-1/2 transition-metal ions do have single ion anisotropy  

SciTech Connect

The cause for the preferred spin orientation in magnetic systems containing spin-1/2 transition-metal ions was explored by studying the origin of the easy-plane anisotropy of the spin-1/2 Cu{sup 2+} ions in CuCl{sub 2}·2H{sub 2}O, LiCuVO{sub 4}, CuCl{sub 2}, and CuBr{sub 2} on the basis of density functional theory and magnetic dipole-dipole energy calculations as well as a perturbation theory treatment of the spin-orbit coupling. We find that the spin orientation observed for these spin-1/2 ions is not caused by their anisotropic spin exchange interactions, nor by their magnetic dipole-dipole interactions, but by the spin-orbit coupling associated with their crystal-field split d-states. Our study also predicts in-plane anisotropy for the Cu{sup 2+} ions of Bi{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} and Li{sub 2}CuO{sub 2}. The results of our investigations dispel the mistaken belief that magnetic systems with spin-1/2 ions have no magnetic anisotropy induced by spin-orbit coupling.

Liu, Jia; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan, E-mail: hxiang@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: mike-whangbo@ncsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Koo, Hyun-Joo [Department of Chemistry and Research Institute for Basic Sciences, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Xiang, Hongjun, E-mail: hxiang@fudan.edu.cn, E-mail: mike-whangbo@ncsu.edu [Key Laboratory of Computational Physical Sciences (Ministry of Education), State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Kremer, Reinhard K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Festkörperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2014-09-28

368

Conditions of accumulation of radioactive metals in the process of differentiation of ultrabasic alkaline-carbonatite rock associations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The distribution of radioactive elements in alkaline rocks from Polar Siberia and Ukraine shows that U and Th are markedly concentrated in carbonatite complex and nepheline syenite as final products of magma fractionation. Peralkaline nepheline syenites from Polar Siberia are characterized by very high contents of radioactive elements, which are close to the economic level. Radioactive elements are also concentrated in rocks of the carbonatite complex. For example, some soevites contain up to 294 × 10-4%U and 916 × 10-4% Th. In late dolomite carbonatites, the contents of radioactive elements are appreciably lower. The Th/U ratio in alkaline rocks of Polar Siberia is close to the chondrite value in primary high-Mg rocks and increases in late derivatives: phoscorite, calcite and dolomite carbonatites. The main amount of radioactive elements is contained in rare-metal accessory minerals: perovskite, pyrochlore, calzirtite, and apatite. Rock-forming minerals are distinguished by very low concentrations of radioactive elements. In alkaline series of the Chernigovka massif (Ukraine), U and Th also accumulate in the course of crystal fractionation, especially in phoscorites from the carbonatite complex. Mantle xenoliths and alkaline rocks from Ukraine reveal uranium specialization. Most likely, the discrepancy in fractionation of radioactive elements between Polar Siberia and Ukraine is caused by different geodynamic regimes of these provinces. The Mesozoic alkaline magmatism of Polar Siberia is a part of the Siberian superplume, whereas the Proterozoic alkaline complex in Ukraine is related to subduction of the oceanic crust.

Kogarko, L. N.

2014-07-01

369

Serum metal ion concentrations after unilateral vs bilateral large-head metal-on-metal primary total hip arthroplasty.  

PubMed

It is unknown if the presence of bilateral well-functioning large-head metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip arthroplasties (THAs) leads to higher serum metal ion concentrations than unilateral MOM THA. Elevated levels (chromium, 17 ?g/L; cobalt, 19 ?g/L) have been associated with poorly functioning MOM THA with metallosis. Fourteen patients having undergone bilateral and 25 patients having undergone unilateral large-head primary MOM THA were compared. Harris Hip Scores, University of California Los Angeles activity scores, radiographs, serum creatinine, and serum cobalt and chromium levels were obtained. Only cobalt ion levels were significantly higher in the bilateral group than in the unilateral group (1.8 ?g/L vs 1.0 ?g/L, P = .029). Comparatively, this magnitude is clinically rather low because ion levels did not approach those associated with metallosis in either group. We conclude that although patients with well-functioning bilateral MOM THA may have slightly higher cobalt levels, neither cobalt nor chromium levels approach those seen in poorly functioning MOM THA with metallosis. PMID:21570800

Pelt, Christopher E; Bergeson, Adam G; Anderson, Lucas A; Stoddard, Gregory J; Peters, Christopher L

2011-12-01

370

Development of a radioactive ion beam facility using 15 UD tandem accelerator at NSC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An inflight radioactive ion beam (RIB) facility is being developed at the Nuclear Science Centre (NSC), using the existing 15 UD Pelletron accelerator and the recoil mass spectrometer (RMS) HIRA. Though the basic principle of operation of the facility will be similar to those described in [1-3], ion optics of the facility are optimized for precise nuclear reaction measurements. In this facility, primary beams from the Pelletron accelerator will be used to produce RIB species using reactions such as 0954-3899/24/8/009/img10, 0954-3899/24/8/009/img11, 0954-3899/24/8/009/img12 etc in inverse kinematics. To ensure an efficient beam rejection for inverse kinematic reactions with good focusing of the RIB, HIRA will operate in a new ion optical mode. In this mode, there is an intermediate focal plane where a beam filtering slit system will be installed to stop primary beam particles while allowing RIB particles to be transported unhindered to the final focal plane which will be the secondary target position. In the case of many RIB species, more than one charge state will be focused into a single spot at the experimental target site. The design and installation of hardware for the facility is in progress. RIB species such 0954-3899/24/8/009/img13, 0954-3899/24/8/009/img14, 0954-3899/24/8/009/img15 etc, will be available with intensity in the range of 0954-3899/24/8/009/img16-0954-3899/24/8/009/img17 with 0954-3899/24/8/009/img18 diameter spot size with high purity. The facility is expected to be operational for user experiments by the end of 1998.

Das, J. J.; Sugathan, P.; Madhavan, N.; Kumar, B.; Varughese, T.; Madhusudhana Rao, P. V.; Sinha, A. K.

1998-08-01

371

Metal cation/anion adsorption on calcium carbonate: Implications to metal ion concentrations in groundwater  

SciTech Connect

This chapter evaluates the sorption behavior of metallic ions on specimen calcite as a basis for determining the importance of calcite relative to other subsurface sorbents, such as layer silicates and oxides, in controlling metal ion concentration in calcareous groundwaters. A review of the literature shows the sorption of both metallic cations and anions on calcite over ranges in pH and CO{sub 2} partial pressure to be consistent with a surface-exchange process where cations exchange with surface Ca and anions exchange with surface CO{sub 3}. A general surface-exchange model was developed to account for the effects of Ca and CO{sub 3} concentrations, pH, and calcite surface area on cation and anion sorption onto calcite. The model was applied to recently developed experimental sorption data of Zn and SeO{sub 3} on specimen calcite in equilibrium CaCO{sub 3}(aq) suspensions. The surface-exchange model was able to describe the effects of pH on both cation and anion sorption, and provided good predictions of the effects of variable CO{sub 2}(g) pressure on Zn sorption and of PO{sub 4} on SeO{sub 3} sorption. The surface-exchange model, combined with sorption constants for other phases, was used to calculate Cd sorption to a hypothetical aquifer material containing a mixture of sorbents. The sorbent concentrations were fixed to those expected in groundwater zones. The multi-sorbent calculation documented the importance of calcite as a sorbent for metallic ions in groundwater.93 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

Zachara, J.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Resch, C.T.

1990-05-01

372

Metal Ions, Not Metal-Catalyzed Oxidative Stress, Cause Clay Leachate Antibacterial Activity  

PubMed Central

Aqueous leachates prepared from natural antibacterial clays, arbitrarily designated CB-L, release metal ions into suspension, have a low pH (3.4–5), generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and H2O2, and have a high oxidation-reduction potential. To isolate the role of pH in the antibacterial activity of CB clay mixtures, we exposed three different strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to 10% clay suspensions. The clay suspension completely killed acid-sensitive and acid-tolerant E. coli O157:H7 strains, whereas incubation in a low-pH buffer resulted in a minimal decrease in viability, demonstrating that low pH alone does not mediate antibacterial activity. The prevailing hypothesis is that metal ions participate in redox cycling and produce ROS, leading to oxidative damage to macromolecules and resulting in cellular death. However, E. coli cells showed no increase in DNA or protein oxidative lesions and a slight increase in lipid peroxidation following exposure to the antibacterial leachate. Further, supplementation with numerous ROS scavengers eliminated lipid peroxidation, but did not rescue the cells from CB-L-mediated killing. In contrast, supplementing CB-L with EDTA, a broad-spectrum metal chelator, reduced killing. Finally, CB-L was equally lethal to cells in an anoxic environment as compared to the aerobic environment. Thus, ROS were not required for lethal activity and did not contribute to toxicity of CB-L. We conclude that clay-mediated killing was not due to oxidative damage, but rather, was due to toxicity associated directly with released metal ions. PMID:25502790

Otto, Caitlin C.; Koehl, Jennifer L.; Solanky, Dipesh; Haydel, Shelley E.

2014-01-01

373

Transition metal ions at the crossroads of mucosal immunity and microbial pathogenesis  

PubMed Central

Transition metal ions are essential micronutrients for all living organisms. In mammals, these ions are often protein-bound and sequestered within cells, limiting their availability to microbes. Moreover, in response to infection, mammalian hosts further reduce the availability of metal nutrients by activating epithelial cells and recruiting neutrophils, both of which release metal-binding proteins with antimicrobial function. Microorganisms, in turn, have evolved sophisticated systems to overcome these limitations and acquire the metal ions essential for their growth. Here we review some of the mechanisms employed by the host and by pathogenic microorganisms to compete for transition metal ions, with a discussion of how evading “nutritional immunity” benefits pathogens. Furthermore, we provide new insights on the mechanisms of host-microbe competition for metal ions in the mucosa, particularly in the inflamed gut. PMID:24478990

Diaz-Ochoa, Vladimir E.; Jellbauer, Stefan; Klaus, Suzi; Raffatellu, Manuela

2013-01-01

374

Some aspects of metallic ion chemistry and dynamics in the mesosphere and thermosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The relationship between the formation of sporadic layers of metallic ion and the dumping of these ions into the upper mesosphere is discussed in terms of the tidal wind, classical (i.e., windshear) and other more complex, perhaps highly nonlinear layer formation mechanisms, and a possible circulation mechanism for these ions. Optical, incoherent scatter radar, rocket, and satellite derived evidence for various layer formation mechanisms and for the metallic ion circulation system is reviewed. The results of simple one dimensional numerical model calculations of sporadic E and intermediate layer formation are presented along with suggestions for more advanced models of intense or blanketing sporadic E. The flux of metallic ions dumped by the tidal wind system into the mesosphere is estimated and compared with estimates of total particle flux of meteoric origin. Possible effects of the metallic ion flux and of meteoric dust on D region ion chemistry are discussed.

Mathews, J. D.

1987-01-01

375

Selective factor VIII and V inactivation by iminodiacetate ion exchange resin through metal ion adsorption.  

PubMed

The procoagulant activity of factors VIII and V depends on the presence of metal ion(s). We examined the effect of cation-exchange resins with different functional groups on both factors, of which only reaction with iminodiacetate resin resulted in the complete loss of their activity levels in plasma. However, the antigen level of factor VIII was preserved by >95%. This resin reduced divalent cations content present in factor VIII preparations, indicating that it inactivated this factor by direct deprivation of predominant Ca(2+) (>Mn(2+)>Cu(2+)), rather than adsorption of the factor itself. The antigen level of recombinant factor VIII alone was decreased by >95% by reaction with resin, whilst that complexed with von Willebrand factor was preserved by >95%. Iminodiacetate resin-treated plasma was evaluated by measuring factor VIII and V activity in plasma with various levels of either activity. These were significantly correlated to the values obtained using factor VIII- or V-deficient plasma prepared commercially by immunodepletion. We demonstrated that iminodiacetate resin-induced factors VIII and V inactivation is because of direct deprivation of metal ions, predominantly Ca(2+), which is more essential for the functional structure of their molecules. Furthermore, iminodiacetate resin-treated plasma would be useful as a substrate for measuring the activity of these factors. PMID:18643923

Takeyama, Masahiro; Nogami, Keiji; Okuda, Masahiro; Sakurai, Yoshihiko; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Tanaka, Ichiro; Yoshioka, Akira; Shima, Midori

2008-09-01

376

Process for the displacement of cyanide ions from metal-cyanide complexes  

DOEpatents

The present invention relates to water-soluble polymers and the use of such water-soluble polymers in a process for the displacement of the cyanide ions from the metal ions within metal-cyanide complexes. The process waste streams can include metal-cyanide containing electroplating waste streams, mining leach waste streams, mineral processing waste streams, and related metal-cyanide containing waste streams. The metal ions of interest are metals that give very strong complexes with cyanide, mostly iron, nickel, and copper. The physical separation of the water-soluble polymer-metal complex from the cyanide ions can be accomplished through the use of ultrafiltration. Once the metal-cyanide complex is disrupted, the freed cyanide ions can be recovered for reuse or destroyed using available oxidative processes rendering the cyanide nonhazardous. The metal ions are released from the polymer, using dilute acid, metal ion oxidation state adjustment, or competing chelating agents, and collected and recovered or disposed of by appropriate waste management techniques. The water-soluble polymer can then be recycled. Preferred water-soluble polymers include polyethyleneimine and polyethyleneimine having a catechol or hydroxamate group.

Smith, Barbara F. (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01

377

MeRNA: a Database of Metal Ion Binding Sites in RNAStructures  

SciTech Connect

Metal ions are essential for the folding of RNA into stable tertiary structures and for the catalytic activity of some RNA enzymes. To aid in the study of the roles of metal ions in RNA structural biology, we have created MeRNA (Metals in RNA), a comprehensive compilation of all metal binding sites identified in RNA three-dimensional structures available from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Nucleic Acid Database (NDB). Currently, our database contains information relating to binding of 9764 metal ions corresponding to 23 distinct elements; in 256 RNA structures. The metal ion locations were confirmed and ligands characterized using original literature references. MeRNA includes eight manually identified metal-ion binding motifs, which are described in the literature. MeRNA is searchable by PDB identifier, metal ion, method of structure determination, resolution and R-values for X-ray structure, and distance from metal to any RNA atom or to water. New structures with their respective binding motifs will be added to the database as they become available. The MeRNA database will further our understanding of the roles of metal ions in RNA folding and catalysis and have applications in structural and functional analysis, RNA design and engineering.

Stefan, Liliana R.; Zhang, Rui; Levitan, Aaron G.; Hendrix, DonnaF.; Brenner, Steven E.; Holbrook, Stephen R.

2005-10-05

378

MeRNA: a Database of Metal Ion Binding Sites in RNAStructures  

SciTech Connect

Metal ions are essential for the folding of RNA into stable tertiary structures and for the catalytic activity of some RNA enzymes. To aid in the study of the roles of metal ions in RNA structural biology, we have created MeRNA (Metals in RNA), a comprehensive compilation of all metal binding sites identified in RNA 3D structures available from the PDB and Nucleic Acid Database. Currently, our database contains information relating to binding of 9764 metal ions corresponding to 23 distinct elements, in 256 RNA structures. The metal ion locations were confirmed and ligands characterized using original literature references. MeRNA includes eight manually identified metal-ion binding motifs, which are described in the literature. MeRNA is searchable by PDB identifier, metal ion, method of structure determination, resolution and R-values for X-ray structure and distance from metal to any RNA atom or to water. New structures with their respective binding motifs will be added to the database as they become available. The MeRNA database will further our understanding of the roles of metal ions in RNA folding and catalysis and have applications in structural and functional analysis, RNA design and engineering. The MeRNA database is accessible at http://merna.lbl.gov.

Stefan, Liliana R.; Zhang, Rui; Levitan, Aaron G.; Hendrix, DonnaF.; Brenner, Steven E.; Holbrook, Stephen R.

2005-10-05

379

Columinescence of dye molecules in nanostructures of metal ion complexes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mechanism of columinescence (fluorescence sensitization) of dyes incorporated in nanostructures of metal complexes is studied. It is shown for the first time that the columinescence of dyes is due to the transfer of excitation energy from ligands and metal ions of complexes that form nanostructures. It is proven that the dye columinescence of rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules incorporated into nanostructures of Al(DBM)3phen, Al(DBM) n (OH)6 - 2 n , and Eu(DBM)3phen (DBM is dibenzoylmethane) nanostructures is completely determined by the singlet excitation energy migration from ligands to R6G molecules. It is shown that, at small concentrations of R6G, the R6G columinescence intensity is lower in nanostructures of metal complexes with a high probability of S-T conversion and that this difference disappears at large concentrations of R6G. In the case of Nile blue (whose S 1 level lies below the 5 D 0 level of Eu(III)) incorporated in nanostructures of Eu(DBM)3phen complexes, as well as in nanostructures of Al(DBM)3phen and Gd(DBM)3phen complexes with admixture of Eu complexes, we observed the S-S energy transfer from DBM to NB in addition to the delayed sensitized fluorescence of NB previously observed in nanostructures of Eu complexes, which was caused by the energy transfer from the 5 D 0 level of Eu(III) to NB. At dye concentrations below 100 nM, the efficiency of NB sensitization due to the migration of singlet excitation energy from DBM is lower than in the case of the energy transfer from Eu(III) ions, while, at large concentrations of the dye, the S-S energy transfer successfully competes with the sensitization of NB by Eu(III) ions. The use of dye columinescence makes it possible to easily determine dye concentrations of 2-100 nM in solutions with standard spectrofluorimeters.

Dudar', S. S.; Sveshnikova, E. B.; Ermolaev, V. L.; Mamonchikov, E. V.; Gulyaev, A. V.

2009-07-01

380

Ion-molecule clusters involving doubly charged metal ions (M2+)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Doubly charged metal ion-ligand L clusters, M2+ (L)n, where M2+ = Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+, Mn2+, Fe2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, can be produced in the gas phase by electrospray of solutions of chloride, bromide or nitrate salts of M2+ in methanol-water. L may be added to the solution or to the gas phase. The ions produced by electrospray at atmospheric pressure are transferred to an interface chamber containing pure N2. When known amounts of ligand vapour are added, the equilibria M2+ (L)n-1 + L = M2+ (L)n can be determined by sampling the ions escaping from an orifice in the interface chamber with a quadrupole mass spectrometry. Equilibria for Ni2+ (H2O)n are determined. The clusters are with n [approximate] 10 and the binding energies are in the 15 kcal mol-1 range. Bonding of the ligands at n < 6 is much stronger. It can be studied with collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The binding energies in the inner shell, n = 0-6, are in the 60 kcal mol-1 range. At low n, charge reduction to M+ may occur. The water clusters undergo the charge reduction Different ligands may accelerate (NH3, pyridine) or retard (DMF, DMSO) the onset of charge reduction. Charge reduction with DMF and DMSO occurs by simple charge transfer Polydentate cage-type ligands protect ions from charge reduction. Thus the only triply charged ion, M3+, so far observed was Co3+ sepulchrate where the ion is coordinated to six nitrogens.

Blades, Arthur T.; Jayaweera, Palitha; Ikonomou, Michael G.; Kebarle, Paul

1990-12-01

381

Highly charged Ar{sup q+} ions interacting with metals  

SciTech Connect

Using computer simulation, alternative methods of the interaction of highly charged ions Ar{sup q+} with metals (Au, Ag) are used and verified in the present work. Based on the classical over-barrier model, we discussed the promotion loss and peeling off processes. The simulated total potential electron yields agree well with the experiment data in incident energy ranging from 100 eV to 5 keV and all charge states of Ar{sup q+}. Based on the TRIM code, we obtain the side-feeding rate as well as the motion and charge transfer of HCI below the surface. Some results, including the array of KL{sup x} x-ray satellite lines, the respective contribution of autoionization, and side-feeding to inner shells, and the filling rates and lifetime of inner shells for Ar agree well with experiment or theory.

Wang Jijin; Zhang Jian; Gu Jiangang; Luo Xianwen; Hu Bitao [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2009-12-15

382

Highly Emissive Transition Metal Ion Doped Semiconducting Nanocrystals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Doped semiconductor nanocrystals (d-dots), specifically ones not containing heavy metal ions, have the potential to become a class of mainstream emissive materials. Mn- and Cu-doped ZnSe or ZnS d-dots can cover an emission window similar to that of the current workhorse of intrinsic quantum dot (q-dots) emitters, CdSe nanocrystals. We synthesized high quality stable Cu doped ZnSe in nonpolar as well as polar solvent. The emission intensity of these doped nanocrystals is found stable for months under UV irradiation, after different multifunctional ligand which is important for any biological detection. We have also synthesized the stable Mn doped ZnS in nonpolar solvent more than 50% QY.. The doped nanocrystals are characterized by TEM, XRD, EPR and ICP analysis.

Jana, Santanu; Srivastava, Bhupendra B.; Sarma, D. D.; Pradhan, Narayan

2011-07-01

383

Caging metal ions with visible light-responsive nanopolymersomes.  

PubMed

Polymersomes are bilayer vesicles that self-assemble from amphiphilic diblock copolymers, and provide an attractive system for the delivery of biological and nonbiological molecules due to their environmental compatibility, mechanical stability, synthetic tunability, large aqueous core, and hyperthick hydrophobic membrane. Herein, we report a nanoscale photoresponsive polymersome system featuring a meso-to-meso ethyne-bridged bis[(porphinato)zinc] (PZn2) fluorophore hydrophobic membrane solute and dextran in the aqueous core. Upon 488 nm irradiation in solution or in microinjected zebrafish embryos, the polymersomes underwent deformation, as monitored by a characteristic red-shifted PZn2 emission spectrum and confirmed by cryo-TEM. The versatility of this system was demonstrated through the encapsulation and photorelease of a fluorophore (FITC), as well as two different metal ions, Zn(2+) and Ca(2+). PMID:25518002

Griepenburg, Julianne C; Sood, Nimil; Vargo, Kevin B; Williams, Dewight; Rawson, Jeff; Therien, Michael J; Hammer, Daniel A; Dmochowski, Ivan J

2015-01-20

384

Ion-irradiation studies of cascade damage in metals  

SciTech Connect

Ion-irradiation studies of the fundamental aspects of cascade damage in metals are reviewed. The emphasis of these studies has been the determination of the primary state of damage (i.e. the arrangement of atoms in the cascade region prior to thermal migration of defects). Progress has been made towards understanding the damage function (i.e. the number of Frenkel pairs produced as a function of primary recoil atom energy), the spatial configuration of vacancies and interstitials in the cascade and the cascade-induced mixing of atoms. It is concluded for these studies that the agitation of the lattice in the vicinity of energetic displacement cascades stimulates the defect motion and that such thermal spike motion induces recombination and clustering of Frenkel defects. 9 figures.

Averback, R.S.

1982-03-01

385

Influence of metal ions on the interaction between gatifloxacin and calf thymus DNA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To study the interaction between gatifloxacin (GT), metal ions (Cu 2+, Cd 2+, Co 2+, Mg 2+) and calf thymus DNA under condition of physiology pH, UV absorption and fluorescence methods were adopted. Result shows that metal ions and DNA are able to react with GT in ground state. In further research, by studying the influence of metal ions on binding of GT with DNA in metal ions-GT-DNA ternary system, we found that influential mechanism of Mg 2+ on the binding of GT with DNA may be different from the other three. Mg 2+ can act as a bridge in the binding of GT's carboxyl/carbonyl with DNA phosphate in certain concentration range; while Cu 2+, Cd 2+, Co 2+ can combine directly with GT by reaction between GT carboxyl/carbonyl and DNA base, and enhance the binding ability of GT with DNA. The influence extent and type depend not only on the binding site of DNA with metal ions (phosphate or base), but also the binding ability of which. The stronger the binding ability of metal ions with DNA base is, the larger their promotion to binding of GT with DNA is. The order of metal ions' influential ability on the binding of GT-DNA is identical to the binding ability order of metal ions with DNA base, that is: Cu 2+ > Cd 2+ > Co 2+ > Mg 2+.

Yuan, Xiao-ying; Qin, Jun; Lu, Ling-ling

2010-02-01

386

Synthesis, characterization and application of titanium oxide nanocomposites for removal of radioactive cesium, cobalt and europium ions.  

PubMed

New nanocomposite material containing TiO2/Poly (acrylamide-styrene sodium sulfonate) [TiO2/(P (AAm-SSS)] was prepared by in-situ intercalative polymerization of poly acrylamide (PAAm) and styrene sodium sulfonate (SSS) in the presence of TiO2 nanoparticles as inorganic filler. N, N-methylene bis acrylamide (MBA) was used as a cross linker. The polymerization process was performed using ?-radiation as reaction initiator. Moreover, new nanocomposite material containing poly styrene-TiO2 (PS-TiO2) was also prepared by ionic polymerization method. Styrene was catalytically polymerized by Ti(4+) via an ionic polymerization route to produce polystyrene (PS). The structure characteristics of the nanocomposites were investigated by XRD, TGA, SEM, surface area, and FTIR. The nanoparticles and nanocomposites were investigated for removal of some metal ions from aqueous solutions. The effective key parameters on the sorption behavior of radioactive cesium (Cs(+)), cobalt (Co(2+)) and europium (Eu(3+)) were investigated using batch equilibrium technique with respect to solution pH and contact time. The obtained results revealed that the equilibrium for Cs(+), Co(2+) and Eu(3)(+) is reached at 2-3h for all nanocomposites. The data indicated that there is no significant change in the uptake between TiO2 nanoparticles and TiO2-PS. On the contrary, the uptake process is significantly improved using TiO2/(P (AAm-SSS) nanocomposite and the maximum experimental retention capacities for Cs(+), Co(2+) and Eu(3+) were found to be 120, 100.9 and 85.7mg/g, respectively. PMID:25797394

Borai, E H; Breky, M M E; Sayed, M S; Abo-Aly, M M

2015-07-15

387

Metal-clad optical waveguide fluorescence device for the detection of heavy metal ions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We developed Hg-sensing chips by decorating the external surface of metal-clad optical waveguides with a monolayer of Hg-sensitive fluorescent molecular probes. The emission properties of the original water-soluble form of the molecule were previously found to be selectively quenched in the presence of Hg ions. The fabricated samples were tested with optical waveguide fluorescence spectroscopy by putting them in contact with a 5-?M water solution of Hg ions and recording the emission spectra versus incubation time. The estimate of the limit of detection was 150 nM. A preliminary evaluation of the selectivity of the structure was also performed by using Cd as possible interfering analytes.

Margheri, Giancarlo; Giorgetti, Emilia; Marsili, Paolo; Zoppi, Angela; Lascialfari, Luisa; Cicchi, Stefano

2014-07-01

388

Selective Removal of Alkali Metal Cations from Multiply-Charged Ions via Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Reactions Using Weakly Coordinating Anions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Selective removal of alkali metal cations from mixed cation multiply-charged peptide ions is demonstrated here using gas-phase ion/ion reactions with a series of weakly coordinating anions (WCAs), including hexafluorophosphate (PF6 -), tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate (BARF), tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate (TPPB), and carborane (CHB11Cl11 -). In all cases, a long-lived complex is generated by dication/anion condensation followed by ion activation to compare proton transfer with alkali ion transfer from the peptide to the anion. The carborane anion was the only anion studied to undergo dissociation exclusively through loss of the metallated anion, regardless of the studied metal adduct. All other anions studied yield varying abundances of protonated and metallated peptide depending on the peptide sequence and the metal identity. Density functional theory calculations suggest that for the WCAs studied, metal ion transfer is most strongly favored thermodynamically, which is consistent with the experimental results. The carborane anion is demonstrated to be a robust reagent for the selective removal of alkali metal cations from peptide cations with mixtures of excess protons and metal cations.

Luongo, Carl A.; Bu, Jiexun; Burke, Nicole L.; Gilbert, Joshua D.; Prentice, Boone M.; Cummings, Steven; Reed, Christopher A.; McLuckey, Scott A.

2015-03-01

389

Selective Removal of Alkali Metal Cations from Multiply-Charged Ions via Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Reactions Using Weakly Coordinating Anions.  

PubMed

Selective removal of alkali metal cations from mixed cation multiply-charged peptide ions is demonstrated here using gas-phase ion/ion reactions with a series of weakly coordinating anions (WCAs), including hexafluorophosphate (PF6 (-)), tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate (BARF), tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)borate (TPPB), and carborane (CHB11Cl11 (-)). In all cases, a long-lived complex is generated by dication/anion condensation followed by ion activation to compare proton transfer with alkali ion transfer from the peptide to the anion. The carborane anion was the only anion studied to undergo dissociation exclusively through loss of the metallated anion, regardless of the studied metal adduct. All other anions studied yield varying abundances of protonated and metallated peptide depending on the peptide sequence and the metal identity. Density functional theory calculations suggest that for the WCAs studied, metal ion transfer is most strongly favored thermodynamically, which is consistent with the experimental results. The carborane anion is demonstrated to be a robust reagent for the selective removal of alkali metal cations from peptide cations with mixtures of excess protons and metal cations. PMID:25560986

Luongo, Carl A; Bu, Jiexun; Burke, Nicole L; Gilbert, Joshua D; Prentice, Boone M; Cummings, Steven; Reed, Christopher A; McLuckey, Scott A

2015-03-01

390

Interacion of Heavy Metal Ions with C-Phycocyanin: Binding Isotherms and Cooperative Effects  

E-print Network

The binding constant of copper(II) ions to C-PC were determined at different ionic strengths from binding isotherms by equilibrium dialysis and flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Fluorescence and absorbtion spectroscopy provides insight of metal-C-phycocyanin interactions. Fluorescence measurements demonstrate C-PC quenching of heavy metal ions emission intensities. Stern-Volmer quenching constants were obtained from the linear quenching plots. Blue shifts in the fluorescence spectra were observed during metal binding to C-PC. It was shown, that between bound metal ions in C-PC there exists positive cooperativity.

Gelagutashvili, Eteri

2007-01-01

391

Method for forming metallic silicide films on silicon substrates by ion beam deposition  

DOEpatents

Metallic silicide films are formed on silicon substrates by contacting the substrates with a low-energy ion beam of metal ions while moderately heating the substrate. The heating of the substrate provides for the diffusion of silicon atoms through the film as it is being formed to the surface of the film for interaction with the metal ions as they contact the diffused silicon. The metallic silicide films provided by the present invention are contaminant free, of uniform stoichiometry, large grain size, and exhibit low resistivity values which are of particular usefulness for integrated circuit production.

Zuhr, Raymond A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Holland, Orin W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1990-01-01

392

Ligand and metal-ion effects in metal-ion clusters used for chiral analysis of alpha-hydroxy acids by the kinetic method.  

PubMed

Chiral recognition of alpha-hydroxy acids has been achieved, and mixtures of enantiomers have been quantified in the gas phase, by using the kinetics of competitive unimolecular dissociation of singly-charged transition metal ion-bound trimeric complexes, [M(II)(A)(ref*)(2)-H](+) (M(II)=divalent transition metal ion; A=alpha-hydroxy acid; ref*=chiral reference ligand), to form the dimeric complexes [M(II)(A)(ref*)-H](+) and [M(II)(ref*)(2)-H](+). Chiral selectivity, the ratio of these two fragment ion abundances for the complex containing the analyte in one enantiomeric form expressed relative to that for the fragments of the corresponding complex containing the other enantiomer, ranges from 0.65 to 7.32. Chiral differentiation is highly dependent on the choice of chiral reference compound and central metal ion. The different coordination geometry of complexes resulting from the different d-orbital electronic configurations of these transition metal ions plays a role in chiral discrimination. Of all the transition metal ions examined chiral recognition is lowest for Cu(II), because of large distortion of the coordination complexes, and hence weak metal-ligand interactions and small stereochemical effects. It seems that two independent pi-cation interactions occur when N-acetyl-substituted aromatic amino acids used as the reference ligands and this accounts for improved chiral discrimination. If both metal-ligand and ligand-ligand interactions are optimized, large chiral selectivity is achieved. The sensitive nature of the methodology and the linear relationship between the logarithm of the fragment ion abundance ratio and the optical purity, which are intrinsic to the kinetic method, enable mixtures to be analyzed for small enantiomeric excess ( ee) by simply recording the ratios of fragment ion abundances in a tandem mass spectrum. PMID:12185574

Wu, Lianming; Tao, W Andy; Cooks, R G

2002-08-01

393

Humic Ion-Binding Model VI: An Improved Description of the Interactions of Protons and Metal Ions with Humic Substances  

Microsoft Academic Search

Humic Ion-Binding Model VI, a discrete site\\/electrostatic model of the interactions of protons and metals with fulvic and humic acids, is applied to 19 sets of published data for proton binding, and 110 sets for metal binding. Proton binding is described with a site density, two median intrinsic equilibrium constants, two parameters defining the spread of equilibrium constants around the

Edward Tipping

1998-01-01

394

METAL INTERACTIONS AT SULFIDE MINERAL SURFACES: PART 3, METAL AFFINITIES IN SINGLE AND MULTIPLE ION ADSORPTION REACTIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Adsorption reactions of both single ions and multiple ion mixtures with sulfide minerals (chalcocite, galena, pyrite, and sphalerite) were investigated in the metal concentration range of 0.0001 to 0.00001 M. Chromium (III), iron (III), barium (II), cadmium (II), copper (II), nic...

395

Post-synthesis addition of transition metal ions and lanthanide ions to the surface of anatase titanium (IV) dioxide nanorods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Solar energy utilization is an attractive option for new energy technology and economic development. Our research is the formulation of catalyst materials for solar production of hydrogen from water. Titanium(IV) oxide has been explored for water splitting; however, a major challenge is that titanium(IV) oxide can only absorb UV light. Visible light absorption can be increased by metal ion or anion doping by creating interband states. Most dopant protocols lead to deposition of dopant ions throughout the solid, and interfacial deposition has received very little attention. We have developed a method to selectively attach transition metal ions and lanthanide ions on the surface of titanium(IV) oxide nanorods using metal chlorides as precursors. The present study demonstrates that Cr(III), Mn(II), Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu (II), Eu(III), Ce(III), Pr(III) and Er(III) were coordinated to the surface of oleic acid capped TiO2 nanorods (NRs) by post-synthesis method without any phase or morphology transformation. Metal ion loading could be carefully controlled, and we show a titration curve for addition of transition metal ions and Eu(III) to the nanorod surface. The materials were characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, elemental analysis, XPS and powder X-ray diffraction. X-ray photoelectron spectra were obtained for a series of M-TiO2 samples in which transition metal (M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) ions are directly attached to the surface of anatase TiO2 nanocrystals. Further, we report sequential, quantitative loading of transition metal ions (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) to the surface of rod-shape anatase TiO2 nanocrystals in bimetallic combinations (6C2 = 15). TEM, PXRD, UV-Vis, XPS and elemental analysis characterization show that bimetallic combinations were synthesized successfully.

Balasanthiran, Choumini

396

Study of iodine migration in zirconia using stable and radioactive ion implantation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The large uranium fission cross section leading to iodine and the behaviour of this element in the cladding tube during energy production and afterwards during waste storage is a crucial problem, especially for 129I which is a very long half-life isotope ( T = 1.59 × 10 7yr). Since a combined external and internal oxidation of the zircaloy cladding tube occurs during the reactor processing, iodine diffusion parameters in zirconia are needed. In order to obtain these data, stable iodine atoms were first introduced by ion implantation into zirconia with an energy of 200 keV and a dose equal to 8 × 10 15at cm -2. Diffusion profiles were measured using 3 MeV alpha-particle Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry at each step of the annealing procedure between 700°C and 900°C. In such experiments a reduced iodine concentration was observed, which correlated to a diffusion-like process. Similar analysis has been performed using radioactive 131I implanted at a very low dose of 10 9 at cm -2. In this case the iodine release is deduced from gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements. The results are discussed in this paper.

Chevarier, N.; Brossard, F.; Chevarier, A.; Crusset, D.; Moncoffre, N.

1998-03-01

397

Generic NICA-Donnan model parameters for metal-ion binding by humic substances  

Microsoft Academic Search

A total of 171 datasets of literature and experimental data for metal-ion binding by fulvic and humic acids have been digitized and re-analyzed using the NICA-Donnan model. Generic parameter values have been derived that can be used for modeling in the absence of specific metal-ion binding measurements. These values complement the previously derived generic descriptions of proton binding. For ions

Christopher J. Milne; David G. Kinniburgh; Riemsdijk van W. H; Edward Tipping

2003-01-01

398

Ion beam mixing and radiation enhanced diffusion in metal\\/ceramic interfaces  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ion beam techniques are frequently used to modify the physical properties of materials. It is the aim of this contribution to obtain information on ion beam effects on irradiated metal\\/ceramic interfaces with bilayer geometry. Ion beam mixing and radiation enhanced diffusion have been investigated in CuAl2O3, AuAl2O3 and AuZrO2 samples. Specimen, with thicknesses of the metallic film in the range

K. Neubeck; C.-E. Lefaucheur; H. Hahn; A. G. Balogh; H. Baumann; K. Bethge; D. M. Rück

1995-01-01

399

Effect of heavy metal ion excess on sunflower leaves: evidence for involvement of oxidative stress  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between heavy metal ion toxicity and oxidative stress in plant cells was studied. Leaf segments from 14 day old sunflower seedlings were incubated in solutions containing 0.5 mM Fe(II), Cu(II) or Cd(II) ions for 12 h in the light. Treatment with metal ions studied produced a decrease in chlorophyll and GSH contents as well as increases in lipid

Susana M. Gallego; María P. Benavídes; María L. Tomaro

1996-01-01

400

Metallic LiMo3Se3 Nanowire Film Sensors for Electrical Detection of Metal Ions in Water  

E-print Network

Metallic LiMo3Se3 Nanowire Film Sensors for Electrical Detection of Metal Ions in Water Mark Allen sensors were fabricated by drop-coating a 0.05% (mass) aqueous nanowire solution onto microfabricated to exhibit superior performance as chemical sensors, both in terms of detection limits and in terms of time

Osterloh, Frank

401

DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002135 High Gas Sorption and Metal-Ion Exchange of Microporous MetalOrganic  

E-print Network

DOI: 10.1002/chem.201002135 High Gas Sorption and Metal-Ion Exchange of Microporous Metal of their potential ap- plications in gas storage, gas separation, catalysis, and fabri- cation of nanoparticles.[1 nanoparticles in the MOF.[1,2f,3] Gas sorption properties also depend on pore volume and ligand structures

Paik Suh, Myunghyun

402

Positive secondary ion yield enhancement of metal elements using trichlorotrifluoroethane and tetrachloroethene backfilling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Positive secondary ion yields are strongly enhanced by the presence of reactive gas species. Oxygen primary ion beam or oxygen backfilling is commonly used for this purpose. However, for some metal elements that form a weak oxide bond such as Nb, Mo and Ag, depth profiling with an oxygen primary beam may not enhance the ion yields. This lead us to find an alternative way to study the yield enhancement on metal ion species by backfilling the sample surface with reactive gas species such as trichlorotrifluoroethane (C 2Cl 3F 3) and tetrachloroethene (C 2Cl 4) while depth profiling with an argon primary ion beam.

Chi, P. H.; Gillen, G.

2004-06-01

403

Role of oxide surface in coordination chemistry of transition metal ions in catalytic systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

On going from the solution into the bulk of an oxide through the fluid-solid interface, it is possible to encounter four types of coordina- tion chemistry (CC) for a transition metal ion (TMI) : solution coordina- tion chemistry, extraframework ion CC, surface framework ion CC and solid state CC. In each case, the reactivity of the TMI is discussed on

L. Bonneviot; M. Curie

1988-01-01

404

Heavy-metal ion sensors using chitosan-capped gold nanoparticles  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report a novel strategy for using gold nanoparticles capped with chitosan for sensing ions of heavy metals. Acidic anions (glutamate ions in our case) are expected to cap the nanoparticle surfaces similar to conventional methods of stabilization of gold nanoparticles by citrate ions. The polycationic nature of chitosan enables attachment of the polymer to the negatively charged gold nanoparticle

A. Sugunan; C. Thanachayanont; J. Dutta; J. G. Hilborn

2005-01-01

405

Effect of the formation of EDTA complexes on the diffusion of metal ions in water  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The diffusion coefficients of aquo metal ions (M z+ ) and their EDTA complexes (M-EDTA ( z-4)+ ) were compared to understand the effect of EDTA complexation on the diffusion of metal ions by the diffusion cell method for Co 2+, Ga 3+, Rb +, Sr 2+, Ag +, Cd 2+, Cs +, Th 4+, UO22+, and trivalent lanthanides. Most studies about ionic diffusion in water have dealt with free ion (hydrated ion). In many cases, however, polyvalent ions are dissolved as complexed species in natural waters. Hence, we need to study the diffusion behavior of complexes in order to understand the diffusion phenomenon in natural aquifer and to measure speciation by diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT), which requires the diffusion coefficients of the species examined. For many ions, the diffusion coefficients of M-EDTA ( z-4)+ are smaller than those of hydrated ions, but the diffusion coefficients of M-EDTA ( z-4)+ are larger than those of hydrated ions for ions with high ionic potentials (Ga 3+ and Th 4+). As a result, the diffusion coefficients of EDTA complexes are similar among various metal ions. In other words, the diffusion of each ion loses its characteristics by the complexation with EDTA. Although the difference is subtle, it was also found that the diffusion coefficients of EDTA complexes increase as the ionic potential increases, which can be explained by the size of the EDTA complex of each metal ion.

Furukawa, Kenji; Takahashi, Yoshio; Sato, Haruo

2007-09-01

406

Ion exchangers in radioactive waste management VII. Radiotracer studies on adsorption of Ba(II) and Sr(II) ions on hydrous thorium oxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hydrous thorium oxide (HTO) was synthesized and laboratory study was conducted to address its applicability for decontamination of barium and strontium ions from radioactive liquid wastes using radiotracer technique. The adsorption of Ba(II) and Sr(II) on HTO has been investigated as a function of pH, concentration and temperature of the adsorptive solution and the results obtained show that these parameters

S. P. Mishra; D. Tiwary

1995-01-01

407

Isospin dependence of nucleon emission and radial flow in heavy-ion collisions induced by high energy radioactive beams  

E-print Network

Using an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model we study the emission of free nucleons and the nuclear radial flow in central heavy-ion collisions induced by high energy radioactive beams. The midrapidity neutron/proton ratio and its transverse momentum dependence are found very sensitive to the high density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy. The nuclear radial flow, however, depends only weakly on the symmetry energy.

Bao-An Li; Gao-Chan Yong; Wei Zuo

2004-12-20

408

A gas-jet transport and catcher technique for on-line production of radioactive ion beams using an electron cyclotron resonance ion-source.  

PubMed

Radioactive ion beams (RIB) have been produced on-line, using a gas-jet recoil transport coupled Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion-source at the VECC-RIB facility. Radioactive atoms?molecules carried through the gas-jet were stopped in a catcher placed inside the ECR plasma chamber. A skimmer has been used to remove bulk of the carrier gas at the ECR entrance. The diffusion of atoms?molecules through the catcher has been verified off-line using stable isotopes and on-line through transmission of radioactive reaction products. Beams of (14)O (71 s), (42)K (12.4 h), (43)K (22.2 h), and (41)Ar (1.8 h) have been produced by bombarding nitrogen and argon gas targets with proton and alpha particle beams from the K130 cyclotron at VECC. Typical measured intensity of RIB at the separator focal plane is found to be a few times 10(3) particles per second (pps). About 3.2 × 10(3) pps of 1.4 MeV (14)O RIB has been measured after acceleration through a radiofrequency quadrupole linac. The details of the gas-jet coupled ECR ion-source and RIB production experiments are presented along with the plans for the future. PMID:23556809

Naik, V; Chakrabarti, A; Bhattacharjee, M; Karmakar, P; Bandyopadhyay, A; Bhattacharjee, S; Dechoudhury, S; Mondal, M; Pandey, H K; Lavanyakumar, D; Mandi, T K; Dutta, D P; Kundu Roy, T; Bhowmick, D; Sanyal, D; Srivastava, S C L; Ray, A; Ali, Md S

2013-03-01

409

A gas-jet transport and catcher technique for on-line production of radioactive ion beams using an electron cyclotron resonance ion-source  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive ion beams (RIB) have been produced on-line, using a gas-jet recoil transport coupled Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion-source at the VECC-RIB facility. Radioactive atoms/molecules carried through the gas-jet were stopped in a catcher placed inside the ECR plasma chamber. A skimmer has been used to remove bulk of the carrier gas at the ECR entrance. The diffusion of atoms/molecules through the catcher has been verified off-line using stable isotopes and on-line through transmission of radioactive reaction products. Beams of {sup 14}O (71 s), {sup 42}K (12.4 h), {sup 43}K (22.2 h), and {sup 41}Ar (1.8 h) have been produced by bombarding nitrogen and argon gas targets with proton and alpha particle beams from the K130 cyclotron at VECC. Typical measured intensity of RIB at the separator focal plane is found to be a few times 10{sup 3} particles per second (pps). About 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} pps of 1.4 MeV {sup 14}O RIB has been measured after acceleration through a radiofrequency quadrupole linac. The details of the gas-jet coupled ECR ion-source and RIB production experiments are presented along with the plans for the future.

Naik, V.; Chakrabarti, A.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Karmakar, P.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Dechoudhury, S.; Mondal, M.; Pandey, H. K.; Lavanyakumar, D.; Mandi, T. K.; Dutta, D. P.; Kundu Roy, T.; Bhowmick, D.; Sanyal, D.; Srivastava, S. C. L.; Ray, A.; Ali, Md. S. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Sector-1, Block-AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Bhattacharjee, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kolkata Centre, III/LB-8, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700098 (India)

2013-03-15

410

Recovery of metal values from a mixture of spent lithium-ion batteries and nickel-metal hydride batteries  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel process for the recovery of metal values from a mixture of spent lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) batteries is presented. The iron shells of spent batteries were firstly dismantled using a specially designed dismantling machine. Then after the separation of aluminum substrate and electrolyte and the subsequent heating treatment, iron shells and metal-mesh substrate in the

Junmin Nan; Dongmei Han; Minjie Yang; Ming Cui; Xianlu Hou

2006-01-01

411

Biosorption of metal ions from aqueous solution and tannery effluent by Bacillus sp. FM1.  

PubMed

The metal binding capacity of Bacillus sp. FM1 isolated from soil irrigated with tannery effluent was assessed using synthetic metal solutions and tannery wastewater. Biosorption of Cr(VI) and Cu(II) ions from aqueous solutions using Bacillus was investigated as a function of pH, initial metal ion concentration and contact time. The optimum adsorption pH value observed for Cr(VI) and Cu(II) ions was 2 and 5, respectively. Metal ion uptake increased with increasing initial metal concentration but no significant difference was observed by increasing the time after 60 min. Maximum uptake capacity of chromium was estimated as 64.102 mg g(-1), and of copper to 78.125 mg g(-1). Equilibrium data were well described by the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption relations. The presence of functional groups on the cell wall surface of the biomass that may interact with the metal ion was confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The application of Bacillus to remove Cr(VI) and Cu(II) in tannery effluent revealed that the biomass was capable of removing both the metal ions. However, the biosorption performance was slightly lower compared to that of synthetic metal solutions. Several factors may be responsible for this difference. However, the most important factor appears to be the presence of other contaminants such as anions, organics, and other trace metals in the effluent. PMID:22126236

Masood, Farhana; Malik, Abdul

2011-01-01

412

Selective retention of basic compounds by metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography.  

PubMed

A novel metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography has been developed for the analysis of basic compounds using heat-treated silica gel containing hydrated metal cations (metal aquo-ions) as the packing material. The packing materials of the metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography were prepared by the immobilization of a single metal component such as Fe(III), Al(III), Ag(I), and Ni(II) on silica gel followed by extensive heat treatment. The immobilized metals form aquo-ions to present cation-exchange ability for basic analytes and the cation-exchange ability for basic analytes depends on pKa of the immobilized metal species. In the present study, to evaluate the retention characteristics of metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography, the on-line solid-phase extraction of drugs was investigated. Obtained data clearly evidence the selective retention capability of metal aquo-ion affinity chromatography for basic analytes with sufficient capacity. PMID:25044622

Asakawa, Yoshiki; Yamamoto, Eiichi; Asakawa, Naoki

2014-10-01

413

Interactions between metal ions and biogeo-surfaces in soil and water  

Microsoft Academic Search

To provide the basis for an improved quantitative risk assessment of heavy metals in the environment, the interactions between the metal ions and the biogeo-surfaces in soil and water were studied using both experimental and modelling approaches.The Donnan membrane technique was developed and optimised for the measurement of metal speciation in soil solutions, in which a soil column was linked

L. Weng

2002-01-01

414

Designing Multielectron Lithium-Ion Phosphate Cathodes by Mixing Transition Metals  

E-print Network

Designing Multielectron Lithium-Ion Phosphate Cathodes by Mixing Transition Metals Geoffroy Hautier is to develop materials capable of exchanging more than one Li atom per transition metal. However, constraints transition metals in crystal structures known to be able to accommodate lithium in insertion and delithiation

Ceder, Gerbrand

415

Does bearing size influence metal ion levels in large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty? A comparison of three total hip systems  

PubMed Central

Background The purpose of the study was twofold: first, to determine whether there is a statistically significant difference in the metal ion levels among three different large-head metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip systems. The second objective was to assess whether position of the implanted prostheses, patient demographics or factors such as activity levels influence overall blood metal ion levels and whether there is a difference in the functional outcomes between the systems. Methods In a cross-sectional cohort study, three different metal-on-metal total hip systems were assessed: two monoblock heads, the Durom socket (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN, USA) and the Birmingham socket (Smith and Nephew, Memphis, TN, USA), and one modular metal-on-metal total hip system (Pinnacle, Depuy Orthopedics, Warsaw, IN, USA). Fifty-four patients were recruited, with a mean age of 59.7 years and a mean follow-up time of 41 months (12 to 60). Patients were evaluated clinically, radiologically and biochemically. Statistical analysis was performed on all collected data to assess any differences between the three groups in terms of overall blood metal ion levels and also to identify whether there was any other factor within the group demographics and outcomes that could influence the mean levels of Co and Cr. Results Although the functional outcome scores were similar in all three groups, the blood metal ion levels in the larger monoblock large heads (Durom, Birmingham sockets) were significantly raised compared with those of the Pinnacle group. In addition, the metal ion levels were not found to have a statistically significant relationship to the anteversion or abduction angles as measured on the radiographs. Conclusions When considering a MOM THR, the use of a monoblock large-head system leads to higher elevations in whole blood metal ions and offers no advantage over a smaller head modular system. PMID:24472283

2014-01-01

416

Metal Ion Concentrations in Body Fluids after Implantation of Hip Replacements with Metal-on-Metal Bearing – Systematic Review of Clinical and Epidemiological Studies  

PubMed Central

Introduction The use of metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) increased in the last decades. A release of metal products (i.e. particles, ions, metallo-organic compounds) in these implants may cause local and/or systemic adverse reactions. Metal ion concentrations in body fluids are surrogate measures of metal exposure. Objective To systematically summarize and critically appraise published studies concerning metal ion concentrations after MoM THA. Methods Systematic review of clinical trials (RCTs) and epidemiological studies with assessment of metal ion levels (cobalt, chromium, titanium, nickel, molybdenum) in body fluids after implantation of metalliferous hip replacements. Systematic search in PubMed and Embase in January 2012 supplemented by hand search. Standardized abstraction of pre- and postoperative metal ion concentrations stratified by type of bearing (primary explanatory factor), patient characteristics as well as study quality characteristics (secondary explanatory factors). Results Overall, 104 studies (11 RCTs, 93 epidemiological studies) totaling 9.957 patients with measurement of metal ions in body fluids were identified and analyzed. Consistently, median metal ion concentrations were persistently elevated after implantation of MoM-bearings in all investigated mediums (whole blood, serum, plasma, erythrocytes, urine) irrespective of patient characteristics and study characteristics. In several studies very high serum cobalt concentrations above 50 µg/L were measured (detection limit typically 0.3 µg/L). Highest metal ion concentrations were observed after treatment with stemmed large-head MoM-implants and hip resurfacing arthroplasty. Discussion Due to the risk of local and systemic accumulation of metallic products after treatment with MoM-bearing, risk and benefits should be carefully balanced preoperatively. The authors support a proposed „time out“ for stemmed large-head MoM-THA and recommend a restricted indication for hip resurfacing arthroplasty. Patients with implanted MoM-bearing should receive regular and standardized monitoring of metal ion concentrations. Further research is indicated especially with regard to potential systemic reactions due to accumulation of metal products. PMID:23950923

Hartmann, Albrecht; Hannemann, Franziska; Lützner, Jörg; Seidler, Andreas; Drexler, Hans; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Schmitt, Jochen

2013-01-01

417

Computational scheme for the prediction of metal ion binding by a soil fulvic acid  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The dissociation and metal ion binding properties of a soil fulvic acid have been characterized. Information thus gained was used to compensate for salt and site heterogeneity effects in metal ion complexation by the fulvic acid. An earlier computational scheme has been modified by incorporating an additional step which improves the accuracy of metal ion speciation estimates. An algorithm is employed for the prediction of metal ion binding by organic acid constituents of natural waters (once the organic acid is characterized in terms of functional group identity and abundance). The approach discussed here, currently used with a spreadsheet program on a personal computer, is conceptually envisaged to be compatible with computer programs available for ion binding by inorganic ligands in natural waters.

Marinsky, J.A.; Reddy, M.M.; Ephraim, J.H.; Mathuthu, A.S.

1995-01-01

418

Development of a plasma immersion ion implanter for the surface treatment of metal components  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plasma immersion ion implantation (PI3) has emerged as a viable alternative to conventional ion implantation for specific applications, such as the implantation of non-planar components and in hybrid treatments such as high energy, ion-assisted deposition and energetic ion nitriding. It is particularly suitable for the treatment of metal components where improvement in surface hardness and wear resistance is required. This

G. A. Collins; R. Hutchings; K. T. Short; J. Tendys; C. H. Van Der Valk

1996-01-01

419

Soil treatment to remove uranium and related mixed radioactive heavy metal contaminants. Quarterly report, January--March 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to design and develop a physico- chemical treatment process for the removal of uranium and heavy metals from contaminated soil to achieve target contamination levels below 35 pCi/g of soil and a target for non-radioactive heavy metals below concentration levels permissible for release of the soil. Ex- situ pilot-scale soil decontamination and leachate treatment test using Chalk River Chemical Pit soil are nearing completion. Soil decontamination tests using Fernald Incinerator Area soil originally scheduled for February 1995 was postponed to May 1995 as result of unexpected delays in the preparation of two drums of soils.

NONE

1995-05-01

420

Characterization of Metal Ion ­ Colloid Interaction: Impact On Colloid-facilitated Transport  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is generally accepted, that metal transport in natural aquatic systems strongly de- pends on the metal binding form. Besides complex formation with well defined inor- ganic and organic ligands, the interaction with colloidal particles and soil material is one of the most important reactions of metal ions in aquatic systems. Mobile colloids compete with the stationary soil matrix for binding of metal ions and might facili- tate their transport. Important representatives for mineral and organic colloids are clay minerals and natural organic matter (NOM), respectively. In this work, the interaction of metal ions with clay minerals and NOM is characterized by coupling of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation AF4 to inductively coupled plasma ­ mass spectrometry (ICPMS). A method for separating mineral from organic colloids is presented, which allows to quantify the amount of metals being bound to either colloid. For different metal ions (Cu, Zn, Pb, Pt) and a metalloid (As) a different extent of binding to either colloid was found.The information obtained from the AF4-ICPMS measurements was useful for the understanding of the observations from column experiments which were conducted to quantify the colloid-facilitated metal transport. In column experiments, the transport of the mineral colloids itself and the influence of NOM onto the colloid transport were investigated. Furthermore, the dependance of colloid transport from the ionic strength and the pH value was elucidated. In order to get information about the co-transport of metal ions by organic and mineral colloids, metal ions were adsorbed onto the colloidal material and a distribution coef- ficient of the metal ions between the colloidal phase and the solution was determined. The colloidal suspension containing both, "free" and adsorbed metal ions were then injected onto the column. The direct metal breakthrough caused by colloidal trans- port was detected at the column outlet. The results clearly revealed that the amount of metal ions being transported agreed well with the amount of colloids being mobile and the amount of metal ions being bound to the colloids. Particle mobility is strongly affected by the ionic strength of the eluent and by organic coatings. In the presence of NaCl organic coatings enhanced particle mobility, whereas in the presence of CaCl2 it was reduced.

Specht, C. H.; Schmitt, D.; Kaulisch, E.-M.; Frimmel, F. H.

421

Preparation and metal ion-binding of 4-N-substituted cytosine pairs in DNA duplexes.  

PubMed

We report the synthesis and metal ion-binding properties of DNA duplexes containing 4-N-substituted cytosine base pairs. Thermal denaturation studies of these modified DNA duplexes in the presence of various metal ions revealed that the DNA duplexes containing 4-N-carboxymethylcytosine (1) base pair(s) bound Ag (I), Ni(II), and Cu(II) ions. Moreover, ESI-TOF MS analysis of the DNA duplexes containing 1-1 base pair(s) in the presence of Cu(II) ions was consistent with one 1-1 base pair region binding one equivalent of Cu(II) ions. These results indicate that the DNA duplexes containing 1-1 base pair(s) may be useful as a new metal ion-binding motif. PMID:18029644

Sugiyama, Kumiko; Kageyama, Yoshihiko; Okamoto, Itaru; Ono, Akira

2007-01-01

422

Influence of Metal Ions on the Conductivity of Nafion 112 in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell  

SciTech Connect

Nafion 112 membranes were soaked in 1 M H2SO4 solutions containing variable amounts of Fe and Cr ions, either individually or mixed. An even distribution of the metal ions on the surface of the membranes was observed with electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) mapping. The proton conductivity of the soaked membranes was investigated using a conductivity cell. For Fe ions, the conductivity was almost constant until the Fe-ion solution concentration reached 300 ppm. Over the 300-ppm threshold, the conductivity decreased significantly. Similar results were obtained with Cr ions in the membrane, but here the threshold was approximately 200 ppm in the solution. Mixed metal ions were found to decrease these threshold values due to the additive effect of the two metals.

Wang, H.; Turner, J.

2008-01-01

423

Physiological and toxicological changes in the skin resulting from the action and interaction of metal ions.  

PubMed

The human environment contains more than 50 metal or metalloid elements. At least 15 are recognized as trace elements, with zinc, calcium, copper, magnesium, and iron having specific roles in skin morphogenesis and function. The present review focuses on the presumed role of metal ions in the skin, their competition for carrier proteins, and membrane receptors. Evidence presented shows that the balance of trace metal ions is critical for normal skin and repair mechanisms following injury. Xenobiotic ions can impair this balance, leading to pathological change. The skin acts as an organ of elimination of excess trace metals and xenobiotic ions from the body, but mechanisms of voidance vary for different metals. Metal ions are an important cause of allergies, and evidence is presented to show that the majority of metals or metal compounds can induce allergic changes. Except for chromium and nickel, which are among the most common human allergens, animal models have provided little information. At least cadmium, thorium, lead, chromium, nickel, beryllium, and arsenic and proven or putative carcinogens in animals or humans on the basis of cytological or epidemiological evidence. However, only arsenic exhibits a clear predilection for the skin. Other metals such as gold can induce subcutaneous sarcoma following injection, but the relevance of this observation in terms of human occupational risk is discounted. PMID:8845064

Lansdown, A B

1995-01-01

424

Ion microscopy of the thyroid gland: a method for imaging stable and radioactive iodine  

SciTech Connect

Analytical ion microscopy has been applied to the study of distribution of stable and radioactive iodine in the thyroid gland. Analytical images, each of them representing the distribution of one isotope of iodine, can easily be obtained in a few seconds from an Epon section with a resolution of 0.5 micron. In thyroids of normal rats, intrafollicular and intracytoplasmic stable 127I can be clearly distinguished. After thyreostimulin injection, a rapid and important redistribution of 127I is observed which reflects an intense cytoplasmic reabsorption of intrafollicular iodine. After injection of a long-lived isotope of iodine, 129I, the progressive incorporation of this isotope has been observed and the images of the natural iodine 129I have been compared to the images of 127I. An unusual iodine distribution has been observed in proliferating cells of an autonomous nodule. The very high sensitivity of this method makes possible the study of intracellular and extracellular stable iodine in the thyroid gland in a number of physiological and pathological conditions; its ability for isotopic analysis in microscopic volumes offers new possibilities for kinetic studies of iodine metabolism. However, in the present state of the art the specimen cannot be studied at the ultrastructural level as it is with other methods, and some difficulties remain in qualitative analysis such as the contamination of spectra with organic mass fragments which makes difficult the study of some elements such as sulfur. In addition, the matrix effect on ionization efficiency or on sputtering rate makes quantitative analysis difficult. In the future, image processing systems will be needed for a better quantitative interpretation.

Berry, J.P.; Escaig, F.; Lange, F.; Galle, P.

1986-07-01

425

Film-pore diffusion modeling for the sorption of metal ions from aqueous effluents onto peat.  

PubMed

The sorption of three metal ions, namely, copper, nickel and lead onto sphagnum peat moss has been studied using an agitated batch sorber system. The equilibrium isotherms were determined and kinetic runs were performed over a range of concentrations for each metal ion. A film-pore diffusion mass transfer model has been developed based on a single effective diffusion coefficient for each system. Error analysis of the experimental and theoretical data indicated relatively large errors at low initial metal ion concentrations. Therefore the model was modified to introduce a surface coverage concentration dependent effective diffusivity to account for a contribution from surface diffusion. PMID:11547855

Chen, B; Hui, C W; McKay, G

2001-10-01

426

Direct observation of ion transfer in contact charging between a metal and a polymer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Triboelectric charging between metals and insulators is usually thought to involve electron transfer. Doping some polymers with a small amount of salt can significantly change their charging properties, even reversing the sign to which they charge upon contact with a given metal. We show by means of secondary-ion mass spectrometry that ions of the salt are transferred across the interface in contacts between a doped polymer and a metal. Specifically, we observe a transfer of bromine ions when polystyrene doped with a small amount of the salt cetylpyridinium bromide is contacted to an indium surface.

Mizes, H. A.; Conwell, E. M.; Salamida, D. P.

1990-04-01