Note: This page contains sample records for the topic radioactive metal recycling from Science.gov.
While these samples are representative of the content of Science.gov,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of Science.gov
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.
Last update: August 15, 2014.
1

Evaluation of radioactive scrap metal recycling  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report evaluates the human health risks and environmental and socio-political impacts of options for recycling radioactive scrap metal (RSM) or disposing of and replacing it. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is assisting the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Oak Ridge Programs Division, in assessing the implications of RSM management alternatives. This study is

L. A. Nieves; S. Y. Chen; E. J. Kohout; B. Nabelssi; R. W. Tilbrook; S. E. Wilson

1995-01-01

2

Evaluation of radioactive scrap metal recycling  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the human health risks and environmental and socio-political impacts of options for recycling radioactive scrap metal (RSM) or disposing of and replacing it. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is assisting the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Oak Ridge Programs Division, in assessing the implications of RSM management alternatives. This study is intended to support the DOE contribution to a study of metal recycling being conducted by the Task Group on Recycling and Reuse of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The focus is on evaluating the justification for the practice of recycling RSM, and the case of iron and steel scrap is used as an example in assessing the impacts. To conduct the evaluation, a considerable set of data was compiled and developed. Much of this information is included in this document to provide a source book of information.

Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y.; Kohout, E.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wilson, S.E.

1995-12-01

3

Assessment of recycling or disposal alternatives for radioactive scrap metal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, is participating with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is an evaluation of management alternatives for radioactive scarp metals. For this purpose, Argonne National Laboratory is assessing alternatives for radioactive scrap metals. For this purpose, Argonne National Laboratory is assessing environmental and societal implications of recycling

W. E. Murphie; M. J. Lilly; L. A. Nieves; S. Y. Chen

1993-01-01

4

Assessment of recycling or disposal alternatives for radioactive scrap metal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Oak Ridge Programs Division, is participating with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development in providing analytical support for evaluation of management alternatives for radioactive scrap metals. For this purpose, Argonne National Laboratory is assessing environmental and societal implications of recycling and\\/or disposal process alternatives. This effort includes

W. E. Murphie; M. J. Lilly; L. A. Nieves; S. Y. Chen

1993-01-01

5

Assessment of recycling or disposal alternatives for radioactive scrap metal  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Oak Ridge Programs Division, is participating with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development in providing analytical support for evaluation of management alternatives for radioactive scrap metals. For this purpose, Argonne National Laboratory is assessing environmental and societal implications of recycling and/or disposal process alternatives. This effort includes development of inventory estimates for contaminated metals; investigation of scrap metal market structure, processes, and trends; assessment of radiological and nonradiological effects of recycling; and investigation of social and political factors that are likely to either facilitate or constrain recycling opportunities. In addition, the option of scrap metal disposal is being assessed, especially with regard to the environmental and health impacts of replacing these metals if they are withdrawn from use. This paper focuses on the radiological risk assessment and dose estimate sensitivity analysis. A {open_quotes}tiered{close_quotes} concept for release categories, with and without use restrictions, is being developed. Within the tiers, different release limits may be indicated for specific groupings of radionuclides. Depending on the spectrum of radionuclides that are present and the level of residual activity after decontamination and/or smelting, the scrap may be released for unrestricted public use or for specified public uses, or it may be recycled within the nuclear industry. The conservatism of baseline dose estimates is examined, and both more realistic parameter values and protective measures for workers are suggested.

Murphie, W.E.; Lilly, M.J. III [US Dept. of Energy, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-11-01

6

INEL metal recycle radioactive scrap metal survey report  

Microsoft Academic Search

DOE requested that inventory and characterization of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) be conducted across the DOE complex. Past studies have estimated the metal available from unsubstantiated sources. In meetings held in FY-1993, with seven DOE sites represented and several DOE-HQ personnel present, INEL personnel discovered that these numbers were not reliable and that large stockpiles did not exist. INEL proposed

Funk

1994-01-01

7

Assessment of recycling or disposal alternatives for radioactive scrap metal  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, is participating with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is an evaluation of management alternatives for radioactive scarp metals. For this purpose, Argonne National Laboratory is assessing alternatives for radioactive scrap metals. For this purpose, Argonne National Laboratory is assessing environmental and societal implications of recycling and/or disposal process alternatives (with metal replacement). Findings will be presented in a report from the OECD Task Group. This paper focuses on the radiological risk assessment and dose estimate sensitivity analysis. A ``tiered`` concept for release categories, with and without use restrictions, is being developed. Within the tiers, different release limits may be indicated for specific groupings of radionuclides. Depending on the spectrum of radionuclides that are present and the level of residual activity after decontamination and/or smelting, the scrap may be released for unrestricted public use or for specified public uses, or it may be recycled within the nuclear industry. The conversatism of baseline dose estimates is examined, and both more realistic parameter values and protective measures for workers are suggested.

Murphie, W.E.; Lilly, M.J. III [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Environmental Restoration; Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-10-01

8

The DOE`s radioactively contaminated metal recycling: The policy and its implementation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Millions of tons of potentially recoverable materials have accumulated over the years at U.S. DOE sites and facilities now undergrowing environmental restoration. These materials include thousands of tones of scrap metals, both radioactively contaminated and not. This article discusses the DOE`s policy on contaminated metal recycling and its implementation in the following topic areas: the recycling policy concept; an innovative

S. Warren; E. Rizkalla

1997-01-01

9

Health risk and impact evaluation for recycling of radioactive scrap metal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The DoE, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, is participating with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development in providing analytical support for developing international standards for recycling of radioactive scrap metals. For this purpose, Argonne National Laboratory is assessing health, environmental and societal implications of recycling and\\/or disposal process alternatives. This effort includes development of international inventory estimates

L. A. Nieves; S. Y. Chen; W. E. Murphie; M. J. Lilly

1994-01-01

10

Resrad-recycle: a computer model for analyzing radiation exposures resulting from recycling radioactively contaminated scrap metals or reusing radioactively surface-contaminated materials and equipment.  

PubMed

RESRAD-RECYCLE is a computer code designed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to be used in making decisions about the disposition of radioactively contaminated materials and scrap metals. It implements a pathway analysis methodology to evaluate potential radiation exposures resulting from the recycling of contaminated scrap metals and the reuse of surface-contaminated materials and equipment. For modeling purposes, it divides the entire metal recycling process into six steps: (1) scrap delivery, (2) scrap melting, (3) ingot delivery, (4) product fabrication, (5) product distribution, and (6) use of finished product. RESRAD-RECYCLE considers the reuse of surface-contaminated materials in their original forms. It contains representative exposure scenarios for each recycling step and the reuse process; users can also specify scenarios if desired. The model calculates individual and collective population doses for workers involved in the recycling process and for the public using the finished products. The results are then used to derive clearance levels for the contaminated materials on the basis of input dose restrictions. The model accounts for radiological decay and ingrowth, dilution and partitioning during melting, and distribution of refined metal in the various finished products, as well as the varying densities and geometries of the radiation sources during the recycling process. A complete material balance in terms of mass and radioactivity during the recycling process can also be implemented. In an international validation study, the radiation doses calculated by RESRAD-RECYCLE were shown to agree fairly well with actual measurement data. PMID:15551790

Cheng, Jing-Jy; Kassas, Bassel; Yu, Charley; Amish, John; LePoire, Dave; Chen, Shih-Yew; Williams, W A; Wallo, A; Peterson, H

2004-11-01

11

Securing the metal recycling chain for the steel industry by detecting orphan radioactive sources in scrap metal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experimental tests are reported for the detection of the heavy metal shielding of orphan sources hidden inside scrap metal by using a recently developed muon tomography system. Shielded sources do not trigger alarm in radiation portal commonly employed at the entrance of steel industry using scrap metal. Future systems integrating radiation portals with muon tomography inspection gates will substantially reduce the possibility of accidental melting of radioactive sources securing the use of recycled metal.

Pesente, S.; Vanini, S.; Benettoni, M.; Bonomi, G.; Calvini, P.; Checchia, P.; Conti, E.; Gonella, F.; Nebbia, G.; Squarcia, S.; Viesti, G.; Zenoni, A.; Zumerle, G.

2010-08-01

12

Securing the metal recycling chain for the steel industry by detecting orphan radioactive sources in scrap metal  

SciTech Connect

Experimental tests are reported for the detection of the heavy metal shielding of orphan sources hidden inside scrap metal by using a recently developed muon tomography system. Shielded sources do not trigger alarm in radiation portal commonly employed at the entrance of steel industry using scrap metal. Future systems integrating radiation portals with muon tomography inspection gates will substantially reduce the possibility of accidental melting of radioactive sources securing the use of recycled metal.

Pesente, S.; Benettoni, M.; Checchia, P.; Conti, E.; Gonella, F.; Nebbia, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova Italy (Italy); Vanini, S.; Viesti, G.; Zumerle, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova Italy (Italy); University of Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova Italy (Italy); Bonomi, G.; Zenoni, A. [University of Brescia, via Branze 38, 25123 Brescia and INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Calvini, P.; Squarcia, S. [University of Genova and INFN Sezione di Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy)

2010-08-04

13

RESRAD-RECYCLE : a computer model for analyzing radiation exposures resulting from recycling radioactively contaminated scrap metals or reusing ratioactively surface-contaminated materials and equipment  

Microsoft Academic Search

RESRAD-RECYCLE is a computer code designed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to be used in making decisions about the disposition of radioactively contaminated materials and scrap metals. It implements a pathway analysis methodology to evaluate potential radiation exposures resulting from the recycling of contaminated scrap metals and the reuse of surface-contaminated materials and equipment. For modeling purposes, it divides the

Jing-Jy Cheng; Bassel Kassas; Charley Yu; John Arnish; Dave LePoire; Shih-Yew Chen; W. A. Williams; A. Wallo; H. Peterson

2004-01-01

14

Refining technology for the recycling of stainless steel radioactive scrap metals, FY 94 bi-annual report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The research addressed under this project is the recycling of metallic nuclear-related by-product materials under the direction of Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO). The program addresses the recycling of radioactive scrap metals (RSM) for beneficial re-use within the DOE complex; in particular, this program addresses the recycling of stainless steel RSM. It is anticipated that various stainless steel components under

R. E. Mizia; D. G. Atteridge; J. Buckentin; J. Carter; H. L. Davis; J. H. Devletian; M. R. Scholl; R. B. Turpin; S. L. Webster

1994-01-01

15

Recycling radioactive scrap metal by producing concrete shielding with steel granules  

SciTech Connect

Siempelkamp foundry at Krefeld, Germany, developed a method for recycling radioactively contaminated steel from nuclear installations. The material is melted and used for producing shielding plates, containers, etc., on a cast-iron basis. Because the percentage of stainless steel has recently increased significantly, problems in the production of high-quality cast iron components have also grown. The metallurgy, the contents of nickel and chromium especially, does not allow for the recycling of stainless steel in a percentage to make this process economical. In Germany, the state of the art is to use shielded concrete containers for the transport of low active waste; this concrete is produced by using hematite as an additive for increasing shielding efficiency. The plan was to produce steel granules from radioactive scrap metal as a substitute for hematite in shielding concrete.

Sappok, M. [Siempelkamp Giesserei GmbH, Krefeld (Germany)

1996-12-31

16

RESRAD-RECYCLE : a computer model for analyzing radiation exposures resulting from recycling radioactively contaminated scrap metals or reusing ratioactively surface-contaminated materials and equipment.  

SciTech Connect

RESRAD-RECYCLE is a computer code designed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to be used in making decisions about the disposition of radioactively contaminated materials and scrap metals. It implements a pathway analysis methodology to evaluate potential radiation exposures resulting from the recycling of contaminated scrap metals and the reuse of surface-contaminated materials and equipment. For modeling purposes, it divides the entire metal recycling process into six steps: (1) scrap delivery, (2) scrap melting, (3) ingot delivery, (4) product fabrication, (5) product distribution, and (6) use of finished product. RESRAD-RECYCLE considers the reuse of surface-contaminated materials in their original forms. It contains representative exposure scenarios for each recycling step and the reuse process; users can also specify scenarios if desired. The model calculates individual and collective population doses for workers involved in the recycling process and for the public using the finished products. The results are then used to derive clearance levels for the contaminated materials on the basis of input dose restrictions. The model accounts for radiological decay and ingrowth, dilution and partitioning during melting, and distribution of refined metal in the various finished products, as well as the varying densities and geometries of the radiation sources during the recycling process. A complete material balance in terms of mass and radioactivity during the recycling process can also be implemented. In an international validation study, the radiation doses calculated by RESRAD-RECYCLE were shown to agree fairly well with actual measurement data.

Cheng, J. J.; Kassas, B.; Yu, C.; Arnish, J. J.; LePoire, D.; Chen, S.-Y.; Williams, W. A.; Wallo, A.; Peterson, H.; Environmental Assessment; DOE; Univ. of Texas

2004-11-01

17

Health risk and impact evaluation for recycling of radioactive scrap metal  

SciTech Connect

The DoE, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, is participating with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development in providing analytical support for developing international standards for recycling of radioactive scrap metals. For this purpose, Argonne National Laboratory is assessing health, environmental and societal implications of recycling and/or disposal process alternatives. This effort includes development of international inventory estimates for contaminated metals; investigation of international scrap metal markets; assessment of radiological and non-radiological human health risks; impacts on environmental quality and resources; and investigation of social and political factors. The RSM disposal option is being assessed with regard to the environmental and health impacts of replacing the metals if they are withdrawn from use. Impact estimates are developed for steel as an illustrative example because steel comprises a major portion of the scrap metal inventory. Current and potential sources of RSM include nuclear power plants, fuel cycle and weapons production facilities, industrial and medical facilities and equipment, and petroleum and phosphate rock extraction equipment. Millions of metric tons (t) of scrap iron and steel, stainless steel, and copper, as well as lesser quantities of aluminum, nickel, lead, and zirconium, are likely to become available in the future as these facilities are withdrawn from service.

Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Murphie, W.E.; Lilly, M.J. III [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-03-01

18

Approach and issues toward development of risk-based release standards for radioactive scrap metal recycle and reuse  

Microsoft Academic Search

The decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities is expected to generate large amounts of slightly radioactive scrap metal (RSM). It is likely that some of these materials will be suitable for recycling and reuse. The amount of scrap steel from DOE facilities, for instance, is estimated to be more than one million tons (Hertzler 1993). However, under current practice and

S. Y. Chen; L. A. Nieves; B. K. Nabelssi; D. J. LePoire

1994-01-01

19

Recycling radioactive scrap metal by producing concrete shielding with steel granules  

Microsoft Academic Search

Siempelkamp foundry at Krefeld, Germany, developed a method for recycling radioactively contaminated steel from nuclear installations. The material is melted and used for producing shielding plates, containers, etc., on a cast-iron basis. Because the percentage of stainless steel has recently increased significantly, problems in the production of high-quality cast iron components have also grown. The metallurgy, the contents of nickel

Sappok

1996-01-01

20

WINCO Metal Recycle annual report, FY 1993  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report is a summary of the first year progress of the WINCO Metal Recycle Program. Efforts were directed towards assessment of radioactive scrap metal inventories, economics and concepts for recycling, technology development, and transfer of technology to the private sector. Seven DOE laboratories worked together to develop a means for characterizing scrap metal. Radioactive scrap metal generation rates were

Bechtold

1993-01-01

21

Newell's metals recycling tradition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 1976, Newell Recycling Co., Inc.'s metals recycling facility in Atlanta has been processing everything from aluminum cans to automobiles. It is a full-service metals recycling center, handling both ferrous and non-ferrous metals. Newell Recycling takes metal components and machinery and processes it into usable feedstock for metal smelters and steel mills. The facility is split into five basic processing

Dabaie

1994-01-01

22

Using Established Regulations to Recycle Contaminated Metals  

Microsoft Academic Search

DOE restoration projects require acceptable standards for processing volumetrically contaminated metals: ⢠NRC has no regulations addressing recycling of scrap metal containing residual volumetric radioactivity. ⢠DOE is currently restricting outside radioactive scrap metal sales; however, previous Fernald and Ohio State clean-ups have released metals with measurable levels of radioactivity into the open market. ⢠Public sensitivity to the subject

Loewen; Eric Paul

2000-01-01

23

Limits of Metal Recycling  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work points out different limits for the metal recycling of aluminium, copper and zinc. Being the most important parameter of the recycling activities of every metal, the scrap availability is focused on by the discussion. Knowing the availability of secondary raw materials in an existing system, the respective recycled metal content of production can be determined. However, this varies

Georg Rombach; RWTH Aachen

24

Fernald's dilemma: Recycle the radioactively contaminated scrap metal, or bury it?  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the past 5 years, a number of US Department of Energy (DOE) funded efforts have demonstrated the technical efficacy of converting various forms of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) into useable products. From the development of accelerator shielding blocks, to the construction of low level waste containers, technology has been applied to this fabrication process in a safe and stakeholder

Katherine L. Yuracko; Stanton W. Hadley; Robert D. Perlack; Rafael G. Rivera; T. Randall Curlee

1997-01-01

25

A life cycle decision methodology for recycle of radioactive scrap metal  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the past five years, a number of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded efforts have demonstrated the technical efficacy\\u000a of converting various forms of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) into useable products. While health and safety and other technical\\u000a issues have been addressed, the question remains: do the benefits of fabricating products from RSM outweigh the costs? This\\u000a paper presents

Katherine L. Yuracko; Stanton W. Hadley; Robert D. Perlack; Rafael G. Rivera; T. Randall Curlee

1997-01-01

26

Using Established Regulations to Recycle Contaminated Metals  

SciTech Connect

DOE restoration projects require acceptable standards for processing volumetrically contaminated metals: • NRC has no regulations addressing recycling of scrap metal containing residual volumetric radioactivity. • DOE is currently restricting outside radioactive scrap metal sales; however, previous Fernald and Ohio State clean-ups have released metals with measurable levels of radioactivity into the open market. • Public sensitivity to the subject of non-governmental disposal of materials with residual radioactivity was heightened with the Below Regulatory Concern (BRC) issue. There are no clear guidelines for free release of volumetrically contaminated material.

Loewen, Eric Paul

2000-09-01

27

Assessment of potential radiation exposures by uncontrolled recycle or reuse of radioactive scrap metals  

Microsoft Academic Search

With current waste monitoring technology it is reasonable to assume that much of the material designated as low level waste, generated within nuclear facilities, is in fact uncontaminated. A criterion for uncontrolled disposal of low-level radioactive contaminated waste is that the radiation exposure of the public and of each individual caused by this disposal is so low that radiation protection

Sang-Yoon Lee; Kun Jai Lee

1999-01-01

28

Securing the metal recycling chain for the steel industry by detecting orphan radioactive sources in scrap metal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimental tests are reported for the detection of the heavy metal shielding of orphan sources hidden inside scrap metal by using a recently developed muon tomography system. Shielded sources do not trigger alarm in radiation portal commonly employed at the entrance of steel industry using scrap metal. Future systems integrating radiation portals with muon tomography inspection gates will substantially reduce

S. Pesente; S. Vanini; M. Benettoni; G. Bonomi; P. Calvini; P. Checchia; E. Conti; F. Gonella; G. Nebbia; S. Squarcia; G. Viesti; A. Zenoni; G. Zumerle

2010-01-01

29

A radioactive metal processing industry perspective source.  

PubMed

The current U.S. economic environment for the disposition of radioactive waste, including very-low-activity metals, is currently experiencing relatively low radioactive disposal costs and readily available disposal space. Despite the recent market increase in demand for recycled scrap metal commodities, there is still little change in the behavior of the nuclear industry (including radioactive waste processors and radioactive scrap metal recyclers) to pursue the recycling of potentially contaminated scrap metal. The relatively low cost of traditional radioactive waste disposal combined with the perceived risks associated with recycling of previously contaminated metals means that most U.S. radioactive facility managers and stakeholders will elect not to recycle. Current technology exists and precedence has been set for prescreening (by means of bulk radioactive assay techniques) scrap metal that is not contaminated and diverting it to industrial landfills for disposal. Other processes also allow some radiologically contaminated metals to be melted and recast into products with low, but acceptable, activity levels for restricted use in the nuclear industry. A new concept is being considered that would create a centralized licensed facility for the process and disposition of "very-low-activity" metals for "directed first use." The advantages to this type of approach would include a standardized method for licensing the clearance process. PMID:17033461

Johnson, A

2006-11-01

30

International Recycling of LLW Metals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Melting of radioactive scrap metal has been successfully practiced for more than 15 years, with approximately 60,000 tons of steel being processed into beneficial reuse applications. This process has converted radioactive scrap metal at a licensed facility into useful products such as shield blocks, security barriers and shield containers. These products are used within the nuclear industry, such as nuclear

T. Eshleman; J. Jansen; Sawada Shinya

2008-01-01

31

Minerals Yearbook, 1992: Recycling-Nonferrous Metals.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Because of the increasing importance of recycling to domestic metal supply and the intense public interest, the United States Bureau of Mines (USBM) initiated this separate chapter on nonferrous metal recycling as part of its Annual Report series in 1991....

J. F. Carlin D. Edelstein J. H. Jolly J. L. W. Jolly J. F. Papp

1994-01-01

32

Potential radiation dose to man from recycle of metals reclaimed from a decommissioned nuclear power plant  

Microsoft Academic Search

A generic methodology is presented for estimating potential radiation doses to man from recycling radioactively contaminated scrap metals that may be reclaimed from decommissioned nuclear facilities. The heart of the methodology is a set of tables of radionuclide-specific, radiation-dose factors that may be used to estimate doses to individuals and population groups from recycling any radioactively contaminated scrap metal. The

F. R. ODonnell; S. J. Cotter; D. C. Kocher; E. L. Etnier; A. P. Watson

1978-01-01

33

Metals recycling in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty-two metals for which secondary recovery is important, in terms of quantity and\\/or value, were compared and ranked for rate and efficiency of recycling, and availability of recycled metal. In general, their recycling rates trended upward over the period 1970–1993. Iron, aluminum, copper, gold, platinum, and lead accounted for most of the value of all secondary metal produced, while iron

Scott F. Sibley; William C. Butterman

1995-01-01

34

Recycling radioactively contaminated materials: Experience and prognosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, federal agencies, especially the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), as well as the commercial nuclear enterprise, have begun to consider certain radioactively contaminated materials as resources for beneficial reuse rather than wastes. Most outstanding among these materials is metal

D. E. Large; H. W. Arrowsmith

1993-01-01

35

The Use of Induction Melting for the Treatment of Metal Radioactive Waste - 13088  

SciTech Connect

The aim of the work is to assess the efficacy of induction melting metal for recycling radioactive waste in order to reduce the volume of solid radioactive waste to be disposed of, and utilization of the metal. (authors)

Zherebtsov, Alexander; Pastushkov, Vladimir; Poluektov, Pavel; Smelova, Tatiana; Shadrin, Andrey [JSC 'VNIINM', Rogova st., 5, 123098, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'VNIINM', Rogova st., 5, 123098, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01

36

Recycling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the range of benefits resulting from recycling efforts and projects. Presents information and data related to the recycling of metals, cans, paper, fans, and plastics. Suggestions for motivating and involving youth in recycling programs are also offered. (ML)

Sinker, Barbara

1986-01-01

37

Fernald scrap metal recycling and beneficial reuse  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fernald site, formerly the Feed Materials Production Facility, produced uranium metal products to meet defense production requirements for the Department of Energy from 1953 to 1989. In this report is is described how the Fernald scrap metal project has demonstrated that contractor capabilities can be used successfully to recycle large quantities of Department of Energy scrap metal. The project

G. P. Motl; D. D. Burns

1993-01-01

38

Feasibility analysis of recycling radioactive scrap steel  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to: (1) establish a conceptual design that integrates commercial steel mill technology with radioactive scrap metal (RSM) processing to produce carbon and stainless steel sheet and plate at a grade suitable for fabricating into radioactive waste containers; (2) determine the economic feasibility of building a micro-mill in the Western US to process 30,000 tons of RSM per year from both DOE and the nuclear utilities; and (3) provide recommendations for implementation. For purposes of defining the project, it is divided into phases: economic feasibility and conceptual design; preliminary design; detail design; construction; and operation. This study comprises the bulk of Phase 1. It is divided into four sections. Section 1 provides the reader with a complete overview extracting pertinent data, recommendations and conclusions from the remainder of the report. Section 2 defines the variables that impact the design requirements. These data form the baseline to create a preliminary conceptual design that is technically sound, economically viable, and capitalizes on economies of scale. Priorities governing the design activities are: (1) minimizing worker exposure to radionuclide hazards, (2) maximizing worker safety, (3) minimizing environmental contamination, (4) minimizing secondary wastes, and (5) establishing engineering controls to insure that the plant will be granted a license in the state selected for operation. Section 3 provides details of the preliminary conceptual design that was selected. The cost of project construction is estimated and the personnel needed to support the steel-making operation and radiological and environmental control are identified. Section 4 identifies the operational costs and supports the economic feasibility analysis. A detailed discussion of the resulting conclusions and recommendations is included in this section.

Nichols, F. [Manufacturing Sciences Corp., Woodland, WA (United States); Balhiser, B. [MSE, Inc., Butte, MT (United States); Cignetti, N. [Cignetti Associates, North Canton, OH (United States)] [and others

1995-09-01

39

Radioactive scrap metal decontamination technology assessment report  

SciTech Connect

Within the DOE complex there exists a tremendous quantity of radioactive scrap metal. As an example, it is estimated that within the gaseous diffusion plants there exists in excess of 700,000 tons of contaminated stainless steel. At present, valuable material is being disposed of when it could be converted into a high quality product. Liquid metal processing represents a true recycling opportunity for this material. By applying the primary production processes towards the material`s decontamination and re-use, the value of the strategic resource is maintained while drastically reducing the volume of material in need of burial. Potential processes for the liquid metal decontamination of radioactively contaminated metal are discussed and contrasted. Opportunities and technology development issues are identified and discussed. The processes compared are: surface decontamination; size reduction, packaging and burial; melting technologies; electric arc melting; plasma arc centrifugal treatment; air induction melting; vacuum induction melting; and vacuum induction melting and electroslag remelting.

Buckentin, J.M.; Damkroger, B.K.; Schlienger, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Liquid Metal Processing Lab.

1996-04-01

40

Characterization of Transport and Solidification in the Metal Recycling Processes  

SciTech Connect

The characterization of the transport and solidification of metal in the melting and casting processes is significant for the optimization of the radioactively contaminated metal recycling and refining processes. . In this research project, the transport process in the melting and solidification of metal was numerically predicted, and the microstructure and radionuclide distribution have been characterized by scanning electron microscope/electron diffractive X-ray (SEWEDX) analysis using cesium chloride (CSC1) as the radionuclide surrogate. In the melting and solidification process, a resistance furnace whose heating and cooling rates are program- controlled in the helium atmosphere was used. The characterization procedures included weighing, melting and solidification, weighing after solidification, sample preparation, and SEM/EDX analysis. This analytical methodology can be used to characterize metal recycling and refining products in order to evaluate the performance of the recycling process. The data obtained provide much valuable information that is necessary for the enhancement of radioactive contaminated metal decontamination and recycling technologies. The numerical method for the prediction of the melting and solidification process can be implemented in the control and monitoring system-of the melting and casting process in radioactive contaminated metal recycling. The use of radionuclide surrogates instead of real radionuclides enables the research to be performed without causing harmfid effects on people or the community. This characterization process has been conducted at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University since October 1995. Tests have been conducted on aluminum (Al) and copper (Cu) using cesium chloride (CSCI) as a radionuclide surrogate, and information regarding the radionuclide transfer and distribution in melting and solidification process has been obtained. The numerical simulation of the solidification of molten metal has been very successful for aluminium; however, a stability problem in the simulation of iron/steel solidification poses a challenge. Thus, additional development is needed to simulate the radionuclide transfer and distribution behaviors in the melting and casting processes. This project was initially based on a two-year plan. However, due to technical and financial difficulties, the project ended in FY96. The work which has been accomplished in the first year includes the characterization of radionuclide transfer and distribution in the melting-solidification process and the numerical simulation of metal solidification. The Argon-arc melting method was tested for the melting of copper and steel materials. Five tests were performed to characterize the transfer and distribution of radionuclides in the aluminiurn and copper melting/solidification process using CSC1 as radionuclide surrogates. The numerical simulation of molten aluminium and steel solidification process was performed. Different boundary conditions were applied in the simulations.

M. A. Ebadian; R. C. Xin; Z. F. Dong

1997-08-06

41

Should uniform release criteria be established for metal recycling?  

PubMed

This debate examines the potential benefits and pitfalls associated with the recycling of metals and other materials contaminated with low or trace amounts of radioactive material. As is often the case when discussing radioactivity, the question arises as to the level that can be considered safe. Our debaters have taken somewhat different approaches to the question. On the one hand, the scientific basis for releasing slightly radioactive materials has been established in national and international standards. Therefore, there is presumably no technical reason for avoiding the use of such materials. However, the perception of the public regarding radioactivity must be considered in regulatory decisions on the use of slightly contaminated materials. If the results of the poll referred to in the debate are to be considered, then it may be difficult to sell products containing recycled radioactive material. Although this perception may be unwarranted, it is clear that it must be acknowledged and possibly mitigated. It is up to radiation protection professionals to provide relevant information so that the public can make informed decisions based on scientific facts. Of course, this is easy to suggest but difficult to implement. PMID:11548332

Kennedy, W E; LaMastra, A

2001-01-01

42

Metals recycling maps and allocation procedures in life cycle assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goal, scope, and background  The aim of this work is to present guidance on the application of ISO 14044 to allocation procedures for metal recycling.\\u000a As such, graphical patterns of metal recycling and generic “rules” for metal recycling maps are presented. The results are\\u000a intended to be useful in assessing and validating the suitability of allocation procedures for metal recycling in

Alain Dubreuil; Steven B. Young; John Atherton; Thomas P. Gloria

2010-01-01

43

Issues in recycling and disposal of radioactively contaminated materials  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s present stock of potentially re-usable and minimally radioactively contaminated materials will increase significantly as the Department`s remediation activities expand. As part of its effort to minimize wastes, the Department is pursuing several approaches to recover valuable materials such as nickel, copper, and steel, and reduce the high disposal costs associated with contaminated materials. Key approaches are recycling radioactively contaminated materials or disposing of them as non-radioactive waste. These approaches are impeded by a combination of potentially conflicting Federal regulations, State actions, and Departmental policies. Actions to promote or implement these approaches at the Federal, State, or Departmental level involve issues which must be addressed and resolved. The paramount issue is the legal status of radioactively contaminated materials and the roles of the Federal and State governments in regulating those materials. Public involvement is crucial in the debate surrounding the fate of radioactively contaminated materials.

Kluk, A.F. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Hocking, E.K. [Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Roberts, R. [Dept. of Energy, San Francisco, CA (United States); Phillips, J.W. [Analytical Services, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

1993-10-01

44

Recycling and reuse of radioactive materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Radiochemistry Program at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) has a Radiation Protection Program that was designed to provide students with the ability to safely work with radioactive materials in quantities that are not available in other academic environments. Requirements for continuous training and supervision make this unique program capable of turning out graduates that have an understanding of contamination and dose control techniques that complement their knowledge of the elements that they work with. The Program has also adopted a radionuclide recovery and reuse program that has provided materials from other universities, government agencies, and private companies for use in experiments.

O'Dou, Thomas Joseph

45

Recycling light metals from end-of-life vehicle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The amount of aluminum used in cars and light trucks is growing steadily. However, without new developments in aluminum recycling technologies, sheet from automotive aluminum could eventually flood all current markets for recycled aluminum. This article summarizes the use of light metals and different alloys in transportation applications, the current auto recycling system, and new developments in the sorting of light metals by the metal recycling industry and by Huron Valley Steel Corporation, the world’s largest non-ferrous scrap sorter.

Gesing, A.; Wolanski, R.

2001-11-01

46

Risk and impact tradeoffs in radioactive scrap metal management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two management alternatives for radioactive scrap metal were evaluated: (1) recycling and reuse, and (2) disposal and replacement. The human health risks, environmental impacts, and sociopolitical issues potentially associated with these alternatives were assessed in an international context. For each alternative, the health risks from workplace and transportation accidents are greater in magnitude than the risks from potential exposure to

L. A. Nieves; S. Y. Chen

1995-01-01

47

Recycling lead to recover refractory precious metals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lead recycling has many benefits. For example, it provides an alternative to virgin lead, thereby avoiding the environmental impacts of primary lead smelting. In addition, as with other secondary metal operations, it consumes less energy at a lower cost than primary production. An emerging process has been evaluated in which these attributes are leveraged to process refractory precious metals ores. Direct cyanidation of refractory gold and silver ore yields poor gold and silver recoveries. In fact, some ores are simply not amenable to direct cyanidation. The process described in this paper consists of smelting lead-bearing material together with argentopyrite concentrate that contains precious metals. Sodium carbonate is used as a fluxing agent and scrap iron is used as a reductant. The reaction product is molten lead bullion enriched with the precious metals. Smelting recoveries of both silver and gold can be as high as 98%.

Parga, J. R.; Muzquiz, G. G.; Valenzuela, J. L.; Ojebuoboh, F. K.

2001-12-01

48

Managing potentially radioactive scrap metal  

SciTech Connect

The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements published NCRP Report No. 141 on November 19, 2002. Contract DE-FG02-98CH10945 provided the sole support for this report titled ''Managing Potentially Radioactive Scrap Metal.'' Some preliminary work supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that led to an NCRP Letter Report provided some background information for this work. NCRP Report No. 141 provides recommendations on the methodologies and techniques available to the United States for disposing of radioactive, contaminated scrap metals.

None

2002-11-19

49

Considerations in recycling contaminated scrap metal and rubble  

Microsoft Academic Search

Management options for the Department of Energy's increasing amounts of contaminated scrap metal and rubble include reuse as is, disposal, and recycling. Recycling, with its promise of resource recovery, virgin materials conservation, and land disposal minimization, emerges as a preferred management technique. Implementing a cost effective recycling program requires resolution of several issues including: establishing release limits for contaminants, controlling

A. F. Kluk; E. K. Hocking

1992-01-01

50

Considerations in recycling contaminated scrap metal and rubble  

Microsoft Academic Search

Management options for the Department of Energy`s increasing amounts of contaminated scrap metal and rubble include reuse as is, disposal, and recycling. Recycling, with its promise of resource recovery, virgin materials conservation, and land disposal minimization, emerges as a preferred management technique. Implementing a cost effective recycling program requires resolution of several issues including: establishing release limits for contaminants, controlling

A. F. Kluk; E. K. Hocking

1992-01-01

51

The decommissioning of accelerators: an exercise in the recycling of radioactive material  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Compared with the number of nuclear power plants that will be decommissioned over the next few years accelerators are only a ``small'' source of radioactivity although at CERN the total amount of mostly metallic material activated in the operation of the accelerators is estimated to be of the order of 15 Mtons. Various existing approaches to classify and administer radioactive material will be presented with all of them clearly earmarked by the requirements of the nuclear cycle. There are however important differences between activation in reactors and accelerators that will be worked out. It will be shown that an attitude based on reuse or recycling of activated accelerator material should be preferred to the elimination as radioactive waste.

Höfert, M.; Tuyn, J. W. N.; Forkel-Wirth, D.

1999-06-01

52

An industry response to recycle 2000  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US DOE is expected to issue a policy early this year articulating DOE`s position on the recycle of DOE radioactive scrap metal. In anticipation of this `Recycle 2000` initiative, the nuclear industry has formed a new trade association called the Association of Radioactive Metal Recyclers (ARMR). This article describes the Recycle 2000 initiative, provides some background on the ARMR

G. P. Motl; V. Loiselle

1996-01-01

53

Scrap metals industry perspective on radioactive materials.  

PubMed

With more than 80 reported/confirmed accidental melts worldwide since 1983 and still counting, potential contamination by radioactive materials remains as a major concern among recycled scrap and steel companies. Some of these events were catastrophic and have cost the industry millions of dollars in business and, at the same time, resulted in declining consumer confidence. It is also known that more events with confirmed radioactive contamination have occurred that involve mining of old steel slag and skull dumps. Consequently, the steel industry has since undergone massive changes that incurred unprecedented expenses through the installation of radiation monitoring systems in hopes of preventing another accidental melt. Despite such extraordinary efforts, accidental melts continue to occur and plague the industry. One recent reported/confirmed event occurred in the Republic of China in 2004, causing the usual lengthy shutdown for expensive decontamination efforts before the steel mill could resume operations. With this perspective in mind, the metal industry has a long-standing opposition to the release of radioactive materials of any kind to commerce for fear of contamination and the potential consequences. PMID:17033460

Turner, Ray

2006-11-01

54

What do we know about metal recycling rates?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The recycling of metals is widely viewed as a fruitful sustainability strategy, but little information is available on the degree to which recycling is actually taking place. This article provides an overview on the current knowledge of recycling rates for 60 metals. We propose various recycling metrics, discuss relevant aspects of recycling processes, and present current estimates on global end-of-life recycling rates (EOL-RR; i.e., the percentage of a metal in discards that is actually recycled), recycled content (RC), and old scrap ratios (OSRs; i.e., the share of old scrap in the total scrap flow). Because of increases in metal use over time and long metal in-use lifetimes, many RC values are low and will remain so for the foreseeable future. Because of relatively low efficiencies in the collection and processing of most discarded products, inherent limitations in recycling processes, and the fact that primary material is often relatively abundant and low-cost (which thereby keeps down the price of scrap), many EOL-RRs are very low: Only for 18 metals (silver, aluminum, gold, cobalt, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, niobium, nickel, lead, palladium, platinum, rhenium, rhodium, tin, titanium, and zinc) is the EOL-RR above 50% at present. Only for niobium, lead, and ruthenium is the RC above 50%, although 16 metals are in the 25% to 50% range. Thirteen metals have an OSR greater than 50%. These estimates may be used in considerations of whether recycling efficiencies can be improved; which metric could best encourage improved effectiveness in recycling; and an improved understanding of the dependence of recycling on economics, technology, and other factors. ?? 2011 by Yale University.

Graedel, T. E.; Allwood, J.; Birat, J. -P.; Buchert, M.; Hageluken, C.; Reck, B. K.; Sibley, S. F.; Sonnemann, G.

2011-01-01

55

Effective Technology for Recycling Metal. Proceedings of Two Special Workshops.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Association of Secondary Material Industries (NASMI) and the Bureau of Mines have cooperated to sponsor two technically-oriented workshops related to the role of metals recycling and air pollution control technology. The proceedings of these workshops, "Effective Technology and Research for Scrap Metal Recycling" and "Air Pollution…

National Association of Secondary Material Industries, Inc., New York, NY.

56

Energy use patterns for metal recycling. Information circular  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data were collected on energy requirements to recycle prompt industrial and obsolete scrap for nine metal commodities: iron and steel, aluminum, copper, zinc, lead, stainless steel, titanium, tin, and nickel and nickel alloys. Major process routes for recycling were considered, starting from the first collection point through scrap preparation, transportation, smelting and\\/or refining to the molten metal, ingot, or other

C. L. Kusik; C. B. Kenahan

1978-01-01

57

Metal-ion recycle technology for metal electroplating waste waters  

SciTech Connect

As a result of a collaboration with Boeing Aerospace, the authors have begun a program to identify suitable treatments or to develop new treatments for electroplating baths. The target baths are mixed-metal or alloy baths that are being integrated into the Boeing electroplating complex. These baths, which are designed to replace highly toxic chromium and cadmium baths, contain mixtures of two metals, either nickel-tungsten, nickel-zinc, or zinc-tin. This report reviews the literature and details currently available on emerging technologies that could affect recovery of metals from electroplating baths under development by Boeing Aerospace. This literature survey summarizes technologies relevant to the recovery of metals from electroplating processes. The authors expanded the scope to investigate single metal ion recovery technologies that could be applied to metal ion recovery from alloy baths. This review clearly showed that the electroplating industry has traditionally relied on precipitation and more recently on electrowinning as its waste treatment methods. Despite the almost ubiquitous use of precipitation to remove contaminant metal ions from waste electroplating baths and rinse waters, this technology is clearly no longer feasible for the electroplating industry for several reasons. First, disposal of unstabilized sludge is no longer allowed by law. Second, these methods are no longer adequate as metal-removal techniques because they cannot meet stringent new metal discharge limits. Third, precious resources are being wasted or discarded because these methods do not readily permit recovery of the target metal ions. As a result, emerging technologies for metal recovery are beginning to see application to electroplating waste recycle. This report summarizes current research in these areas. Included are descriptions of various membrane technologies, such as reverse osmosis and ultrafiltration, ion exchange and chelating polymer technology, and electrodialysis.

Sauer, N.N.; Smith, B.F.

1993-06-01

58

Analysis of disposition alternatives for radioactively contaminated scrap metal  

SciTech Connect

Millions of tonnes of slightly radioactive, scrap iron and steel, stainless steel, and copper are likely to become available as nuclear and other facilities and equipment are withdrawn from service. Disposition of this material is an international policy issue under consideration currently. The major alternatives for managing this material are to either develop a regulatory process for decontamination and recycling that will safeguard human health or to dispose of the scrap and replace the metal stocks. To evaluate the alternatives, we estimate quantities of scrap arising from nuclear power plant decommissioning, evaluate potential price impacts of recycling on regional markets, and assess the health and environmental impacts of the management alternatives. We conclude that decontaminating and recycling the scrap is the superior alternative.

Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y.; Kohout, E.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wilson, S.E.

1997-01-01

59

Managing the disposition of potentially radioactive scrap metal.  

PubMed

In 2002, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) issued Report No. 141, Managing Potentially Radioactive Scrap Metal. The report evaluates management policy and related issues regarding scrap metal generated in regulated facilities that have been under radiological control or have radiological concerns. It has been estimated that more than 9 million metric tons of scrap metal of all types that have been associated with the production or use of radioactive materials will be generated during the coming decades at various facilities across the United States. Currently, disposition of such metal has encountered particular obstacles, primarily because of the lack of a consistent disposition policy, systematic regulatory provisions, and, above all, public understanding. Without clarity in the regulatory passage, much of the scrap metal, including metal that has not been contaminated, could be mischaracterized as low-level radioactive waste, resulting in a costly disposition operation. NCRP Report No. 141 identifies this general category of metal as "potentially radioactive scrap metal" (PRSM) and discusses the viable disposition options for facilitating its management. Because much of the PRSM has been found to contain very low residual radioactivity or even none at all, one consideration is to release such metal outside of the radiological control framework. This would require the development and implementation of a set of strict release standards in the United States that would necessarily be risk-based and supported by a comprehensive management scheme. Developing a policy of this kind, however, would entail the resolution of many issues, not the least of which would be public acceptance, including that of the metal industry, of the possible recycling of PRSM in the general commerce. PMID:17033456

Chen, S Y

2006-11-01

60

Entropy analysis of metal production and recycling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The paper attempts to address both resource consumption and recycling effectiveness, using concepts from thermodynamics: entropy production for evaluating the costs (resource consumption) and statistical entropy for evaluating the benefits (separation of materials) of recycling processes. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Resource consumption, in this context, is to be understood as the overall thermodynamic devaluation of matter and energy flows. The

Stefan Gößling-Reisemann

2008-01-01

61

Scrap metal management issues associated with naturally occurring radioactive material  

SciTech Connect

Certain industrial processes sometimes generate waste by-products that contain naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) at elevated concentrations. Some industries, including the water treatment, geothermal energy, and petroleum industries, generate scrap metal that may be contaminated with NORM wastes. Of these three industries, the petroleum industry probably generates the largest quantity of NORM-contaminated equipment, conservatively estimated at 170,000 tons per year. Equipment may become contaminated when NORM-containing scale or sludge accumulates inside water-handling equipment. The primary radionuclides of concern in these NORM wastes are radium-226 and radium-228. NORM-contaminated equipment generated by the petroleum industry currently is managed several ways. Some equipment is routinely decontaminated for reuse; other equipment becomes scrap metal and may be disposed of by burial at a licensed landfill, encapsulation inside the wellbore of an abandoned well, or shipment overseas for smelting. In view of the increased regulatory activities addressing NORM, the economic burden of managing NORM-contaminated wastes, including radioactive scrap metal, is likely to continue to grow. Efforts to develop a cost-effective strategy for managing radioactive scrap metal should focus on identifying the least expensive disposition options that provide adequate protection of human health and the environment. Specifically, efforts should focus on better characterizing the quantity of radioactive scrap available for recycle or reuse, the radioactivity concentration levels, and the potential risks associated with different disposal options.

Smith, K.P.; Blunt, D.L.

1995-08-01

62

Evaluation of the Metals Industry's Position on Recycling and its Implications for Environmental Emissions  

Microsoft Academic Search

A healthy debate on the treatment of metals recycling in the life cycle assessment (LCA) community has persisted for more than a decade. While no clear consensus across stakeholder groups has emerged, the metals industry has endorsed a set of recycling “facts” that support a single approach, end?of?life recycling, for evaluating the environmental benefits of metals recycling. In this article

Colin A. McMillan; Steven J. Skerlos; Gregory A. Keoleian

2012-01-01

63

Improving metal returns and eco-efficiency in electronics recycling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract—The efficient recovery of precious and special metals from electronic scrap has significant benefits - economically, environmentally, but also under a resource conservation aspect. The yields of these metals could be substantially improved by higher collection rates, less scrap exports to regions with insuffi- cient recycling structures, and by interface optimisation, as pointed out in this document. Keywords - electronic

Christian Hagelüken; Ag Umicore; Kg Co

64

Method for decontamination of radioactive metal surfaces  

DOEpatents

Disclosed is a method for removing radioactive contaminants from metal surfaces by applying steam containing an inorganic acid and cerium IV. Cerium IV is applied to contaminated metal surfaces by introducing cerium IV in solution into a steam spray directed at contaminated metal surfaces. Cerium IV solution is converted to an essentially atomized or vapor phase by the steam.

Bray, Lane A. (Richland, WA)

1996-01-01

65

Method for decontamination of radioactive metal surfaces  

DOEpatents

Disclosed is a method for removing radioactive contaminants from metal surfaces by applying steam containing an inorganic acid and cerium IV. Cerium IV is applied to contaminated metal surfaces by introducing cerium IV in solution into a steam spray directed at contaminated metal surfaces. Cerium IV solution is converted to an essentially atomized or vapor phase by the steam.

Bray, L.A.

1996-08-13

66

Metal recycling experience at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Reuse, release, and recycle of metals from radiological control areas``  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately 15% of the Low-Level Waste (LLW) produced at Los Alamos consists of scrap metal equipment and materials. The majority of this material is produced by decommissioning and the modification of existing facilities. To reduce this waste stream, Department of Energy Headquarters, EM-77 Office, sponsored the Reuse, Recycle, and Release of Metals from Radiological Control Areas High Return on Investment

Gogol

1997-01-01

67

Unanticipated potential cancer risk near metal recycling facilities  

SciTech Connect

Metal recycling is an important growing industry. Prior to this study, area sources consisting of metal recycling facilities fell in a category of limited regulatory scrutiny because of assumed low levels of annual emissions. Initiating with community complaints of nuisance from smoke, dust and odor, the Houston Department of Health and Human Services (HDHHS) began a monitoring program outside metal recycler facilities and found metal particulates in outdoor ambient air at levels which could pose a carcinogenic human health risk. In a study of five similar metal recycler facilities which used a torch cutting process, air downwind and outside the facility was sampled for eight hours between 6 and 10 times each over 18 months using a mobile laboratory. Ten background locations were also sampled. Iron, manganese, copper, chromium, nickel, lead, cobalt, cadmium and mercury were detected downwind of the metal recyclers at frequencies ranging from 100% of the time for iron to 2% of the time for mercury. Of these metals, chromium, nickel, lead, cobalt, cadmium and mercury were not detected in any sample in the background. Two pairs of samples were analyzed for total chromium and hexavalent chromium to establish a ratio of the fraction of hexavalent chromium in total chromium. This fraction was used to estimate hexavalent chromium at all locations. The carcinogenic risk posed to a residential receptor from metal particulate matter concentrations in the ambient air attributed to the metal recyclers was estimated from each of the five facilities in an effort to rank the importance of this source and inform the need for further investigation. The total risk from these area sources ranged from an increased cancer risk of 1 in 1,000,000 to 6 in 10,000 using the 95th upper confidence limit of the mean of the carcinogenic metal particulate matter concentration, assuming the point of the exposure is the sample location for a residential receptor after accounting for wind direction and the number of shifts that could operate a year. Further study is warranted to better understand the metal air pollution levels in the community and if necessary, to evaluate the feasibility of emission controls and identify operational improvements and best management practices for this industry. This research adds two new aspects to the literature: identification of types and magnitude of metal particulate matter air pollutants associated with a previously unrecognized area source, metal recyclers and their potential risk to health. -- Highlights: • Air monitoring study in response to community complaints found metal contamination. • Metal recyclers found to potentially pose cancer from metal particulates • Chromium, nickel, cobalt and cadmium samples were detected in five metal recyclers. • These metals were not detected in background air samples. • Estimated increased cancer risk ranges from 1 in 1,000,000 to 8 in 10,000.

Raun, Loren, E-mail: raun@rice.edu [Department of Statistics, MS 138, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States)] [Department of Statistics, MS 138, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States); Pepple, Karl, E-mail: pepple.karl@epa.gov [State and Local Programs Group, Air Quality Policy Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Policy, Analysis, and Communications Staff, Mail Drop C404-03, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [State and Local Programs Group, Air Quality Policy Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Policy, Analysis, and Communications Staff, Mail Drop C404-03, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Hoyt, Daniel, E-mail: hoyt.daniel@epa.gov [Air Surveillance Section, US EPA, Region 6, 6EN-AS, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, TX 75202-2733 (United States)] [Air Surveillance Section, US EPA, Region 6, 6EN-AS, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, TX 75202-2733 (United States); Richner, Donald, E-mail: Donald.Richner@houstontx.gov [Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Pollution Control and Prevention, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States)] [Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Pollution Control and Prevention, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States); Blanco, Arturo, E-mail: arturo.blanco@houstontx.gov [Pollution Control and Prevention, Environmental Health Division, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States)] [Pollution Control and Prevention, Environmental Health Division, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States); Li, Jiao, E-mail: jiao.li@rice.edu [Wiess School of Natural Science, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005 (United States)] [Wiess School of Natural Science, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

2013-07-15

68

Recycling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

You will be learning all about recycling and asking questions as you learn more about recycling. Afterward, you will be making recycling bins that we will use in our classroom. Click on each of the different links and research about recycling. Find out what recycling is, what can be recycled, and why we should recycle. As you find information, add it to the "describing wheel" that is given to you by Ms. Pollak. Answer the main question: What is recycling? Come ...

sgp0002

2010-03-27

69

A review of the UK metals recycling industry.  

PubMed

This paper reviews the volatile nature of the price of recycled metals over the past decade and examines legislative and fiscal drivers that have affected the industry. Results from this study have shown that the UK scrap metals markets are presently seeing some of the lowest scrap prices for nearly a decade for both ferrous and non-ferrous metals, in many cases halving in value in less than a year. Scrap metals and other recycled materials prices were high in 1994-96, which have since fallen back to more traditional low levels. World recessions and the steady decline of the UK manufacturing and engineering sectors have effected prices. With tougher new Government legislation, such as the Climate Change Levy and the proposed End of Life Vehicles Directive, small and medium sized scrap merchants are finding it increasingly difficult to compete. PMID:12498482

Emery, Andrew; Williams, Keith P; Griffiths, Anthony J

2002-10-01

70

Recycling of Metals and Materials: A Selected Bibliography.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Recycling of metals and materials has as its purpose the easing of two major environmental crises. First, we re-utilize scarce and non-renewable resources. Second, solid waste disposal problems can be alleviated. Industry has long been concerned with recl...

R. Seidman L. Castrow

1972-01-01

71

Innovative technologies for recycling contaminated concrete and scrap metal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Decontamination and decommissioning of US DOE`s surplus facilities will generate enormous quantities of concrete and scrap metal. A solicitation was issued, seeking innovative technologies for recycling and reusing these materials. Eight proposals were selected for award. If successfully developed, these technologies will enable DOE to clean its facilities by 2019.

S. J. Bossart; J. Moore

1993-01-01

72

Technical assessment of processes to enable recycling of low-level contaminated metal waste  

SciTech Connect

Accumulations of metal waste exhibiting low levels of radioactivity (LLCMW) have become a national burden, both financially and environmentally. Much of this metal could be considered as a resource. The Department of Energy was assigned the task of inventorying and classifying LLCMW, identifying potential applications, and applying and/or developing the technology necessary to enable recycling. One application for recycled LLCMW is high-quality canisters for permanent repository storage of high-level waste (HLW). As many as 80,000 canisters will be needed by 2035. Much of the technology needed to decontaminate LLCMW has already been developed, but no integrated process has been described, even on a pilot scale, for recycling LLCMW into HLW canisters. This report reviews practices for removal of radionuclides and for producing low carbon stainless steel. Contaminants that readily form oxides may be reduced to below de minimis levels and combined with a slag. Most of the radioactivity remaining in the ingot is concentrated in the inclusions. Radionuclides that chemically resemble the elements that comprise stainless steel can not be removed effectively. Slag compositions, current melting practices, and canister fabrication techniques were reviewed.

Reimann, G.A.

1991-10-01

73

Metal recycling from scrap and waste materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Out of a total U.K. consumption of 2.5 million tonnes per annum of nonferrous metals, as much as 33% is recovered from scrap. The structure of the industry which makes this important contribution to the economy is briefly outlined, and the technology is described by which the various nonferrous metals are recovered in reusable form from waste materials. Data on

A. W. Fletcher

1976-01-01

74

Upgrading nonferrous metal scrap for recycling purposes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reusing materials in the post-consumer phase of a product is very important; however, it is often difficult to separate the metals, resulting in a scrap that is high in impurities and limited in application. To prevent the mixing of scrap, separation at the source is required. Recently, several techniques for separating nonferrous metals have become available, including eddy-current separation to

Gerrit H. Nijhof; Peter C. Rem

1999-01-01

75

Recycling metal scrap. (Latest citations from the EI COMPENDEX*plus database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the methods and equipment for recycling metal and steel scrap. Citations discuss automatic scrap recycling, scrap metal reprocessing, contaminated metal scrap, and mass-produced building materials from scrap. The design and evaluation of recycling processes in automotive, aircraft, beverage, electronics, and milling industries are examined. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-03-01

76

Platinum Group Metal Recycling Technology Development.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The research performed at BASF from 2003 to 2009 relating to recovery of platinum group metals from fuel cell electrode membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) has been successful in inventing a single approach for processing fuel cells of differing architect...

L. Shore

2009-01-01

77

Upgrading nonferrous metal scrap for recycling purposes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reusing materials in the post-consumer phase of a product is very important; however, it is often difficult to separate the\\u000a metals, resulting in a scrap that is high in impurities and limited in application. To prevent the mixing of scrap, separation\\u000a at the source is required. Recently, several techniques for separating nonferrous metals have become available, including\\u000a eddy-current separation to

Gerrit H. Nijhof; Peter C. Rem

1999-01-01

78

Recycling light metals: Optimal thermal de-coating  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thermal de-coating of painted and lacquered scrap is one of the new innovations developed for aluminum recycling. If implemented in all recycling and optimized as suggested in this article, recovery would be improved with considerable economic impact. Generally, contaminated scrap is difficult to recycle. Direct re-melting of coated scrap results in the generation of gaseous emissions, with increased metal oxidation, contamination, and salt flux usage. By thermal de-coating of the scrap these problems are avoided. Thermal de-coating followed by remelting of aluminum scrap is now common practice, while painted magnesium scrap is not currently de-coated and recycled. This article presents observations during heating of the contaminated light metals together with the mass loss, evolved gases, and residue after de-coating in order to give a general description of the de-coating process. It is argued that the main behavior during de-coating may be described as two distinct regimes—scission and combustion—regardless of metal substrate and coating. Monitoring the combustion regime should assure optimum de-coating.

Kvithyld, Anne; Meskers, C. E. M.; Gaal, Sean; Reuter, Markus; Engh, Thorvald Abel

2008-08-01

79

Recycling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

What objects can be recycled? 1. Click on link. Watch video. Recycle Guy Video 2. Click on link. Watch video. Talking Trash Video 3. Click on link. Watch video. Recycling At School Video 4. Click on link. Play game. Star Fall Recycling Game 5. Click on link. Play game. National Geographic Recycling Game 6. Click on link. Ask Ms. Owens how to do it. Things We Recycle Chart 7. Please see Miss Owens for instructions on the following ...

2011-04-07

80

Recycling metal scrap. (Latest citations from the EI compendex*plus database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the processes, techniques, and benefits of recycling metal scrap. The recycling processes for aluminum, chromium, nickel, cobalt, lead, copper, and precious metals scrap are discussed. Recycling in the jewelry, electronics, milling, beverage, automotive, and aircraft industries is considered. Analyses of the current global scrap metal recycling trends are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-11-01

81

Guidance document for multi-facility recycle/reuse/free release of metals from radiological control areas  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 15% of the Low Level Waste (LLW) produced at Los Alamos consists of scrap metal equipment and materials. The majority of this material is produced by decommissioning and modification of existing facilities. To address this waste stream, Los Alamos has developed a scrap metal recycling program that is operated by the Environmental Stewardship Office to minimize the amount of LLW metal sent for LLW landfill disposal. Past practice has supported treating all waste metals generated within RCA`s as contaminated. Through the metal recycling project, ESO is encouraging the use of alternatives to LLW disposal. Diverting RSM from waste landfill, disposal protects the environment, reduces the cost of operation, and reduces the cost of maintenance and operation at landfill sites. Waste minimization efforts also results in a twofold economic reward: The RSM has a market value and decontamination reduces the volume and therefore the amount of the radioactive waste to be buried within landfills.

Gogol, S.; Starke, T.

1997-08-15

82

INEEL Lead Recycling in a Moratorium Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since 1999, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Lead Project successfully recycled over 700,000 pounds of excess INEEL lead to the private sector. On February 14, 2000, the Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, formalized the January 12, 2000, moratorium on recycling radioactive scrap metal that prevented the unrestricted release of recycled scrap metals to the private sector. This

K. E. Kooda; K. Galloway; C. W. McCray; D. W. Aitken

2003-01-01

83

Recycle  

SciTech Connect

;Contents: The Problem; What`s In Our Trash; Where Does Trash Go; Where Does Our Trash Go; The Solution; What Is Recycling; Why Should We Recycle; A National Goal of 25%; What Can We Recycle; What Do We Do With Our Recyclables.

NONE

1988-10-01

84

Hydrogen production during processing of radioactive sludge containing noble metals.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Hydrogen was produced when radioactive sludge from Savannah River Site radioactive waste containing noble metals was reacted with formic acid. This will occur in a process tank in the Defense Waste Facility at SRS when waste is vitrified. Radioactive slud...

B. C. Ha D. M. Ferrara N. E. Bibler

1992-01-01

85

Radioactive scrap metal decontamination technology assessment report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Within the DOE complex there exists a tremendous quantity of radioactive scrap metal. As an example, it is estimated that within the gaseous diffusion plants there exists in excess of 700,000 tons of contaminated stainless steel. At present, valuable mate...

J. M. Buckentin B. K. Damkroger M. E. Schlienger

1996-01-01

86

The impact of radioactive steel recycling on the public and professionals.  

PubMed

The decommissioning of nuclear power plants represents a complex process resulting in the generation of large amounts of waste materials, e.g. steel scrap containing various concentrations of radionuclides. Recycling some of these materials is highly desirable due to numerous reasons. Herein presented scenarios of recycling of radioactive steel within the nuclear as well as civil engineering industry are analyzed from the radiation protection point of view. An approach based on the dose constraints principle is chosen. The aim of the study is to derive conditional clearance levels (maximal specific mass activity of material allowing its recycling/clearance) for analyzed radionuclides ensuring that the detrimental impact on human health is kept on a negligible level. Determined conditional clearance levels, as the result of performed software calculations, are valid for the reuse of radioactive steel in four selected scenarios. Calculation results indicate that the increase of the amount of recyclable radioactive steel due to its reuse in specific applications may be feasible considering the radiation impact on the public and professionals. However, issues connected with public acceptance, technical difficulties and financing of potential realization are still open and they have to be examined in more detail. PMID:23608061

Hrncir, Tomas; Panik, Michal; Ondra, Frantisek; Necas, Vladimir

2013-06-15

87

Protocols for implementing DOE authorized release of radioactive scrap metals  

Microsoft Academic Search

A process to implement the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) policy for authorized release of radioactive materials from DOE facilities is provided in the Draft Handbook for Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle of Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material, published by DOE in 1997 and distributed to DOE field offices for interim use and implementation. The authorized release of such

S. Y. Chen; J. Arnish; S. Kamboj; L. A. Nieves

1999-01-01

88

Recycling metal scrap. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the methods and equipment for recycling metal and steel scrap. Citations discuss automatic scrap recycling, scrap metal reprocessing, contaminated metal scrap, and mass-produced building materials from scrap. The design and evaluation of recycling processes in automotive, aircraft, beverage, electronics, and milling industries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-11-01

89

Proceedings of the waste recycling workshop  

SciTech Connect

Recorded are seventeen talks from five sessions at the workshop. FERMCO`s recycling program, state of the art recycling technology, and an integrated demonstration of deactivation, decommissioning and decommissioning are presented in the plenary session. In the concrete session, decontamination and recycling are discussed. In the transite session, regulations are considered along with recycling and decontamination. In the metals session, radioactive scrap metals are emphasized. And in the regulatory considerations and liabilities session, DOE and EPA viewpoints are discussed. (GHH)

Bailey, R.E.; Thomas, A.F.; Ries, M.A. [eds.] [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)] [eds.; Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1993-12-31

90

Metal-ion recycle technology for metal electroplating waste waters.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

As a result of a collaboration with Boeing Aerospace, the authors have begun a program to identify suitable treatments or to develop new treatments for electroplating baths. The target baths are mixed-metal or alloy baths that are being integrated into th...

N. N. Sauer B. F. Smith

1993-01-01

91

Metal-ion recycle technology for metal electroplating waste waters  

Microsoft Academic Search

As a result of a collaboration with Boeing Aerospace, the authors have begun a program to identify suitable treatments or to develop new treatments for electroplating baths. The target baths are mixed-metal or alloy baths that are being integrated into the Boeing electroplating complex. These baths, which are designed to replace highly toxic chromium and cadmium baths, contain mixtures of

N. N. Sauer; B. F. Smith

1993-01-01

92

Recycling in the major metal industries: Trends, developments, and regulatory impacts. Information circular/1994  

SciTech Connect

Public awareness of, and involvement in, recycling has increased significantly in recent years. The actual magnitude and scope of metals recycling in the United States have gone virtually unnoticed. Over time, both the quantitative and qualitative aspects of secondary metals recovery and reuse have changed substantially, while the attendant regulations have become increasingly stringent. This U.S. Bureau of Mines report examines trends and developments in major metal demand and recycling, and analyzes the possible impacts of regulations with regard to recycling activities.

Foster, R.J.

1994-01-01

93

Recycling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recycling systems are classified into those employing typically three methods, and the progress of each method is described. In mechanical recycling, powders of phenolic materials are recovered via a mechanical process and reused as fillers or additives in virgin materials. The effects to flowability, curability, and mechanical properties of the materials are explained. In feedstock recycling, monomers, oligomers, or oils are recovered via chemical processes and reused as feedstock. Pyrolysis, solvolysis or hydrolysis, and supercritical or subcritical fluid technology will also be introduced. When using a subcritical fluid of phenol, the recycled material maintains excellent properties similar to the virgin material, and a demonstration plant has been constructed to carry out mass production development. In energy recovery, wastes of phenolic materials are used as an alternative solid fuel to coal because they are combustible and have good calorific value. Industrial wastes of these have been in practical use in a cement plant. Finally, it is suggested that the best recycling method should be selected according to the purpose or situation, because every recycling method has both strengths and weaknesses. Therefore, quantitative and objective evaluation methods in recycling are desirable and should be established.

Goto, Junya; Santorelli, Michael

94

Recycle of contaminated scrap metal, Volume 2. Semi-annual report, September 1993--January 1996  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) has been demonstrated to be a robust, one-step process that is relatively insensitive to wide variations in waste composition and is applicable to a broad spectrum of DOE wastes. Catalytic Processing Unit (CPU) design models have been validated through experimentation to provide a high degree of confidence in our ability to design a bulk solids CPU for processing DOE wastes. Two commercial CEP facilities have been placed in commission and are currently processing mixed low level wastes. These facilities provide a compelling indication of the maturity, regulatory acceptance, and commercial viability of CEP. In concert with the DOE, Nolten Metal Technology designed a program which would challenge preconceptions of the limitations of waste processing technologies: demonstrate the recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals--to establish that radioactively contaminated scrap metal could be converted to high-grade, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys which can be reused by DOE or reintroduced into commerce; immobilize radionuclides--that CEP would concentrate the radionuclides in a durable vitreous phase, minimize secondary waste generation and stabilize and reduce waste volume; destroy hazardous organics--that CEP would convert hazardous organics to valuable industrial gases, which could be used as an energy source; recover volatile heavy metals--that CEP`s off-gas treatment system would capture volatile heavy metals, such as mercury and lead; and establish that CEP is economical for processing contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory. The execution of this program resulted in all objectives being met. Volume II contains: Task 1.4, optimization of the vitreous phase for stabilization of radioactive species; Task 1.5, experimental testing of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes; and Task 1.6, conceptual design of a CEP facility.

NONE

1996-07-01

95

Guidance for the Identification and Control of Safety and Health Hazards in Metal Scrap Recycling.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Anyone who works in the metal scrap recycling industry- employers, employees, safety professionals, and industrial hygienists-should read this publication. This guide can help you identify and manage the hazards associated with exposure to various metals ...

2008-01-01

96

U.S. Department of Energy National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle has recently been established. The vision of this new program is to develop a DOE culture that promotes pollution prevention by considering the recycle and reuse of metal as the first and primary disposition option and burial as a last option. The Center of Excellence takes the

Vincent Adams; Marvin Bennett; Lee Bishop

1998-01-01

97

USE OF RECYCLED POLYMERS FOR ENCAPSULATION OF RADIOACTIVE, HAZARDOUS AND MIXED WASTES  

SciTech Connect

Polyethylene encapsulation is a waste treatment technology developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory using thermoplastic polymers to safely and effectively solidify hazardous, radioactive and mixed wastes for disposal. Over 13 years of development and demonstration with surrogate wastes as well as actual waste streams on both bench and full scale have shown this to be a viable and robust technology with wide application. Process development efforts have previously focused on the use of virgin polymer feedstocks. In order to potentially improve process economics and serve to lessen the municipal waste burden, recycled polymers were investigated for use as encapsulating agents. Recycled plastics included low-density polyethylene, linear low-density polyethylene, high-density polyethylene and polypropylene, and were used as a direct substitute for or blended together with virgin resin. Impacts on processing and final waste form performance were examined.

LAGERRAAEN,P.R.; KALB,P.D.

1997-11-01

98

Consortium seeks solution for low-level radioactive steel  

Microsoft Academic Search

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has begun testing an innovative radioactive scrap metal recycling program that could reduce utilities radioactive waste disposal costs significantly by allowing them to turn irradiated crap metal from decommissioned nuclear plants into spent fuel canisters.

1994-01-01

99

Analysis of disposition alternatives for radioactively contaminated scrap metal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Millions of tonnes of slightly radioactive, scrap iron and steel, stainless steel, and copper are likely to become available as nuclear and other facilities and equipment are withdrawn from service. Disposition of this material is an international policy issue under consideration currently. The major alternatives for managing this material are to either develop a regulatory process for decontamination and recycling

L. A. Nieves; S. Y. Chen; E. J. Kohout; B. Nabelssi; R. W. Tilbrook; S. E. Wilson

1997-01-01

100

Analysis of disposition alternatives for radioactively contaminated scrap metal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Millions of tons of slightly radioactive scrap iron and steel, stainless steel, and copper are likely to become available as nuclear and other facilities and equipment are withdrawn from service. Disposition of this material is an international policy issue under consideration currently. The major alternatives for managing this material are either to develop a regulatory process for decontamination and recycling

L. A. Nieves; S. Y. Chen; E. J. Kohout; B. Nabelssi; R. W. Tilbrook; S. E. Wilson

1998-01-01

101

Tungsten Recycling in the United States in 2000. Flow Studies for Recycling Metal Commodities in the United States.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report, which is one of a series of reports on metals recycling, defines and quantifies the 2000 flow of tungsten-bearing materials in the United States from imports and stock releases through consumption and disposition with particular emphasis on t...

K. B. Shedd

2005-01-01

102

Recycling of metal scraps—a positive concept leading to augmentation of reserve base  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recycling gives the industry a means to create treasure out of trash. Recycling of used metals in the form of scrap or secondary\\u000a articles has assumed significance, especially in developing countries like India where reprocessing to recover metal is needed\\u000a to meet the raw material deficit as well as conservation of minerals. For India, where labour is cheap, the metal

Pradeep Kumar Jain

103

Recycling metal scrap. June 1970-January 1990 (A Bibliography from the COMPENDEX database). Report for June 1970-January 1990  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations concerning the processes, techniques, and benefits of recycling metal scrap. The recycling processes for aluminum, chromium, nickel, cobalt, lead, copper, and precious metals scrap are discussed. Recycling in the jewelry, electronics, milling, beverage, automotive, and aircraft industries is considered. Analyses of the current global scrap metal recycling trends are included. (This updated bibliography contains 362 citations, 21 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1990-03-01

104

Recycling metal scrap. June 1970-April 1989 (Citations from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for June 1970-April 1989  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations concerning the processes, techniques, and benefits of recycling metal scrap. The recycling processes for aluminum, chromium, nickel, cobalt, lead, copper, and precious metals scrap are discussed. Recycling in the jewelry, electronics, milling, beverage, automotive, and aircraft industries are considered. Analysis of the current global scrap metal recycling trends are included. (This updated bibliography contains 341 citations, 63 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1989-05-01

105

Recycle of contaminated scrap metal, Volume 1. Semi-annual report, September 1993--January 1996  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) has been demonstrated to be a robust, one-step process that is relatively insensitive to wide variations in waste composition and is applicable to a broad spectrum of DOE wastes. Catalytic Processing Unit (CPU) design models have been validated through experimentation to provide a high degree of confidence in our ability to design a bulk solids CPU for processing DOE wastes. Two commercial CEP facilities have been placed in commission and are currently processing mixed low level wastes. These facilities provide a compelling indication of the maturity, regulatory acceptance, and commercial viability of CEP. In concert with the DOE, Nolten Metal Technology designed a program which would challenge preconceptions of the limitations of waste processing technologies: demonstrate the recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals--to establish that radioactively contaminated scrap metal could be converted to high-grade, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys which can be reused by DOE or reintroduced into commerce; immobilize radionuclides--that CEP would concentrate the radionuclides in a durable vitreous phase, minimize secondary waste generation and stabilize and reduce waste volume; destroy hazardous organics--that CEP would convert hazardous organics to valuable industrial gases, which could be used as an energy source; recover volatile heavy metals--that CEP`s off-gas treatment system would capture volatile heavy metals, such as mercury and lead; establish that CEP is economical for processing contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory. The execution of this program resulted in all objectives being met. Volume I covers: executive summary; task 1.1 design CEP system; Task 1.2 experimental test plan; Task 1.3 experimental testing.

NONE

1996-07-01

106

ENVIRONMENTALLY CONSCIOUS ELECTROCHEMICAL MACHINING FOR ZERO DISCHARGE AND METAL RECYCLING - PHASE I  

EPA Science Inventory

This Phase I SBIR addresses the need for a manufacturing method for recovery and recycle of metal removed during electrochemical machining (ECM). Direct current (DC) ECM uses viscous solutions with additives such as fluoride, resulting in difficult to control electrolytes...

107

A Fundamental Metric for Metal Recycling Applied to Coated Magnesium  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fundamental metric for the assessment of the recyclability and, hence, the sustainability of coated magnesium scrap is presented; this metric combines kinetics and thermodynamics. The recycling process, consisting of thermal decoating and remelting, was studied by thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TG\\/DTA) experiments and thermodynamic simulations. Decoating phenomena are interpreted using kinetic analysis, applying existing reaction models. The derived

C. E. M. Meskers; M. A. Reuter; U. Boin; A. Kvithyld

2008-01-01

108

Fenton–biological treatment of reverse osmosis membrane concentrate from a metal plating wastewater recycle system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although reverse osmosis (RO) has been widely used in the recycling of metal plating wastewater, organic compounds and heavy metals in the RO concentrate are difficult to remove by conventional treatment. A combination process including Fenton oxidation and a biological aerated filter was used to treat RO concentrate containing complex Cu and Ni from metal plating. During the Fenton treatment,

R. M. Huang; J. Y. He; J. Zhao; Q. Luo; C. M. Huang

2011-01-01

109

Direct Solid-State Conversion of Recyclable Metals and Alloys.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Friction Stir Extrusion (FSE) is a novel energy-efficient solid-state material synthesis and recycling technology capable of producing large quantity of bulk nano-engineered materials with tailored, mechanical, and physical properties. The novelty of FSE ...

V. K. Manchiraju

2012-01-01

110

A Fundamental Metric for Metal Recycling Applied to Coated Magnesium  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fundamental metric for the assessment of the recyclability and, hence, the sustainability of coated magnesium scrap is presented;\\u000a this metric combines kinetics and thermodynamics. The recycling process, consisting of thermal decoating and remelting, was\\u000a studied by thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TG\\/DTA) experiments and thermodynamic simulations. Decoating\\u000a phenomena are interpreted using kinetic analysis, applying existing reaction models. The derived

C. E. M. Meskers; M. A. Reuter; U. Boin; A. Kvithyld

2008-01-01

111

Study of Recycled and Virgin Compounded Metal Injection Moulded Feedstock for Stainless Steel 630  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fine rounded powders preferable for metal injection moulding (MIM) are expensive. This forces MIM makers to recycle green scraps, for example, the runner system and defected green parts. This is particularly necessary for injection moulded small parts where parts are only a small portion of the injection short size. There is very little published data, although recycling feedstock has been practise throughout the industry. This work aims at investigating the effects of recycled stainless steel 630 feedstock content on the density, mechanical properties, dimensional changes and microstructure. Five batches of compounded virgin and recycled feedstock were studies from 0% to 100% recycled feedstock with the increment of 25%. Homogenously compounded feedstock was injected using the same injection condition. Subsequently, green parts were debinded and sintered at 1325°C for 2 hours in argon atmosphere. The results suggest that the green density increases linearly with increasing percentage of recycled feedstock because the polymeric binder was broken down during previous process. However, the sintered density remains nominally constant. As a result, the mechanical properties and microstructure of sintered parts are independent of recycled feedstock content. However, the volumetric and linear shrinkage decreases linearly with the increase in percentage of recycled feedstock. The difference in shrinkage is vital to dimensional control during commercial production. For example, only 4.5% of recycled feedstock can be added to virgin feedstock if a tolerance of ±0.3 mm is required for a 25 mm MIM part.

Manonukul, Anchalee; Likityingwara, Warakij; Rungkiatnawin, Phataraporn; Muenya, Nattapol; Amoranan, Suttha; Kittinantapol, Witoo; Surapunt, Suphachai

112

A Fundamental Metric for Metal Recycling Applied to Coated Magnesium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A fundamental metric for the assessment of the recyclability and, hence, the sustainability of coated magnesium scrap is presented; this metric combines kinetics and thermodynamics. The recycling process, consisting of thermal decoating and remelting, was studied by thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA) experiments and thermodynamic simulations. Decoating phenomena are interpreted using kinetic analysis, applying existing reaction models. The derived kinetic model parameters ln A and E a /( RT p ) are used to characterize the decoating process. The impact of inorganic coating components on remelting is quantified using exergy. Oxidation and entrapment losses, quality losses, and material resource depletion caused by the inorganic components are expressed in exergy units and combined into the single parameter {mathcal{R}} . Based on the results, the coating characteristics favorable for recycling are derived. The obtained metric is a three-dimensional (3 D) combination of ln A, E a /( RT p ), and {mathcal{R}} , which represent the decoating velocity, the ease of decoating, and the impact of coating materials on the remelting process, respectively. The metric, therefore, directly links coating characteristics, coating design, and product design with process technology and recyclability, enabling the ranking of coating alternatives in terms of their respective recyclability. Therefore, the key idea of this article is to use fundamental metallurgical theory to express the recyclability of postconsumer scrap in a unique combination of parameters. This should pave the way for ranking the sustainability of different materials.

Meskers, C. E. M.; Reuter, M. A.; Boin, U.; Kvithyld, A.

2008-06-01

113

Recycling of non-metallic fractions from waste printed circuit boards: a review.  

PubMed

The major economic driving force for recycling of waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) is the value of the metallic fractions (MFs) of PCBs. The non-metallic fractions (NMFs), which take up almost 70wt% of waste PCBs, were treated by combustion or land filling in the past. However, combustion of the NMFs will cause the formation of highly toxic polybrominated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs) while land filling of the NMFs will lead to secondary pollution caused by heavy metals and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) leaching to the groundwater. Therefore, recycling of the NMFs from waste PCBs is drawing more and more attention from the public and the governments. Currently, how to recycle the NMFs environmental soundly has become a significant topic in recycling of waste PCBs. In order to fulfill the better resource utilization of the NMFs, the compositions and characteristics of the NMFs, methods and outcomes of recycling the NMFs from waste PCBs and analysis and treatment for the hazardous substances contained in the NMFs were reviewed in this paper. Thermosetting resin matrix composites, thermoplastic matrix composites, concrete and viscoelastic materials are main applications for physical recycling of the NMFs. Chemical recycling methods consisting of pyrolysis, gasification, supercritical fluids depolymerization and hydrogenolytic degradation can be used to convert the NMFs to chemical feedstocks and fuels. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) can be used to determine the toxicity characteristic (TC) of the NMFs and to evaluate the environmental safety of products made from the recycled NMFs. It is believed that physical recycling of the NMFs has been a promising recycling method. Much more work should be done to develop comprehensive and industrialized usage of the NMFs recycled by physical methods. Chemical recycling methods have the advantages in eliminating hazardous substances in the NMFs. The trend in chemical recycling of the NMFs is to make the best of advantages over physical recycling of the NMFs to compensate its higher cost. Removing and treating the hazardous substances in the NMFs is an ultimate method to eliminate the pollution. PMID:19303702

Guo, Jiuyong; Guo, Jie; Xu, Zhenming

2009-09-15

114

Recycling of non-metallic fractions from waste printed circuit boards: A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The major economic driving force for recycling of waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) is the value of the metallic fractions (MFs) of PCBs. The non-metallic fractions (NMFs), which take up almost 70wt% of waste PCBs, were treated by combustion or land filling in the past. However, combustion of the NMFs will cause the formation of highly toxic polybrominated dibenzodioxins and

Jiuyong Guo; Jie Guo; Zhenming Xu

2009-01-01

115

Heavy Metal Contamination from Electronic Waste Recycling at Guiyu, Southeastern China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Th is study evaluated the eff ect of electronic waste (e-waste) recycling activities at a regional center, Guiyu, Guangdong, China on heavy metal pollution in the surrounding waterway system. Surface water and sediment collected from the Lianjiang River and its tributaries were analyzed for concentrations of Cu, Pb, Ni, Cd, Hg, and As. Spatially, heavy metals in water and sediment

Yan Guo; Changjiang Huang; Hong Zhang; Qiaoxiang Dong

2009-01-01

116

Method for making radioactive metal articles having small dimensions  

DOEpatents

A method for making a radioactive article such as wire, includes the steps of providing a metal article having a first shape, such a cylinder, that is either radioactive itself or can be converted to a second, radioactive isotope by irradiation; melting the metal article one or more times; optionally adding an alloying metal to the molten metal in order to enhance ductility or other properties; placing the metal article having the first shape (e.g., cylindrical) into a cavity in the interior of an extrusion body (e.g., a cylinder having a cylindrical cavity therein); extruding the extrusion body and the article having the first shape located in the cavity therein, resulting in an elongated extrusion body and an article having a second shape; removing the elongated extrusion body, for example by chemical means, leaving the elongated inner article substantially intact; optionally repeating the extrusion procedure one or more times; and then drawing the elongated article to still further elongate it, into wire, foil, or another desired shape. If the starting metal is enriched in a radioactive isotope or a precursor thereof, the end product can provide a more intense radiation source than conventionally manufactured radioactive wire, foil, or the like.

Ohriner, Evan K. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-01-01

117

Titanium recycling in the United States in 2004, chap. Y of Sibley, S.F., ed., Flow studies for recycling metal commodities in the United States  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As one of a series of reports that describe the recycling of metal commodities in the United States, this report discusses the titanium metal fraction of the titanium economy, which generates and uses titanium metal scrap in its operations. Data for 2004 were selected to demonstrate the titanium flows associated with these operations. This report includes a description of titanium metal supply and demand in the United States to illustrate the extent of titanium recycling and to identify recycling trends. In 2004, U.S. apparent consumption of titanium metal (contained in various titanium-bearing products) was 45,000 metric tons (t) of titanium, which was distributed as follows: 25,000 t of titanium recovered as new scrap, 9,000 t of titanium as titanium metal and titanium alloy products delivered to the U.S. titanium products reservoir, 7,000 t of titanium consumed by steelmaking and other industries, and 4,000 t of titanium contained in unwrought and wrought products exported. Titanium recycling is concentrated within the titanium metals sector of the total titanium market. The titanium market is otherwise dominated by pigment (titanium oxide) products, which generate dissipative losses instead of recyclable scrap. In 2004, scrap (predominantly new scrap) was the source of roughly 54 percent of the titanium metal content of U.S.-produced titanium metal products.

Goonan, Thomas G.

2010-01-01

118

Recycling of LiCl-KCl eutectic based salt wastes containing radioactive rare earth oxychlorides or oxides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recycling of LiCl-KCl eutectic salt wastes containing radioactive rare earth oxychlorides or oxides was studied to recover renewable salts from the salt wastes and to minimize the radioactive wastes by using a vacuum distillation method. Vaporization of the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt was effective above 900 °C and at 5 Torr. The condensations of the vaporized salt were largely dependent on temperature gradient. Based on these results, a recycling system of the salt wastes as a closed loop type was developed to obtain a high efficiency of the salt recovery condition. In this system, it was confirmed that renewable salt was recovered at more than 99 wt.% from the salt wastes, and the changes in temperature and pressure in the system could be utilized to understand the present condition of the system operation.

Eun, H. C.; Cho, Y. Z.; Son, S. M.; Lee, T. K.; Yang, H. C.; Kim, I. T.; Lee, H. S.

2012-01-01

119

Lead decontamination and recycling under RCRA regulatory implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radioactively contamination lead is a significant scrap metal recycling opportunity for the Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Unfortunately, the regulatory maze to determine exactly how to manage scrap metal before it goes to the market may deter facilities from pursuing this opportunity. This paper presents an analysis of the regulatory issues, provides some management guidelines and identifies recycling and reuse

S. Moore-Mayne; M. Romero; H. Grover; S. L. Harnett

1996-01-01

120

Recycling of non-metallic fractions from waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE): a review.  

PubMed

The world's waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) consumption has increased incredibly in recent decades, which have drawn much attention from the public. However, the major economic driving force for recycling of WEEE is the value of the metallic fractions (MFs). The non-metallic fractions (NMFs), which take up a large proportion of E-wastes, were treated by incineration or landfill in the past. NMFs from WEEE contain heavy metals, brominated flame retardant (BFRs) and other toxic and hazardous substances. Combustion as well as landfill may cause serious environmental problems. Therefore, research on resource reutilization and safe disposal of the NMFs from WEEE has a great significance from the viewpoint of environmental protection. Among the enormous variety of NMFs from WEEE, some of them are quite easy to recycle while others are difficult, such as plastics, glass and NMFs from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs). In this paper, we mainly focus on the intractable NMFs from WEEE. Methods and technologies of recycling the two types of NMFs from WEEE, plastics, glass are reviewed in this paper. For WEEE plastics, the pyrolysis technology has the lowest energy consumption and the pyrolysis oil could be obtained, but the containing of BFRs makes the pyrolysis recycling process problematic. Supercritical fluids (SCF) and gasification technology have a potentially smaller environmental impact than pyrolysis process, but the energy consumption is higher. With regard to WEEE glass, lead removing is requisite before the reutilization of the cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass, and the recycling of liquid crystal display (LCD) glass is economically viable for the containing of precious metals (indium and tin). However, the environmental assessment of the recycling process is essential and important before the industrialized production stage. For example, noise and dust should be evaluated during the glass cutting process. This study could contribute significantly to understanding the recycling methods of NMFs from WEEE and serve as guidance for the future technology research and development. PMID:24726822

Wang, Ruixue; Xu, Zhenming

2014-08-01

121

ISOLATION OF RADIOACTIVE METALS FROM LIQUID WASTES  

EPA Science Inventory

Metals are present in many waste streams, and pose challenges with regard to their disposal. Release of metals into the environment presents both human health and ecological concerns. As a result, efforts are directed at reducing their toxicity, bioavailability, and environment...

122

Overview of flow studies for recycling metal commodities in the United States  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Metal supply consists of primary material from a mining operation and secondary material, which is composed of new and old scrap. Recycling, which is the use of secondary material, can contribute significantly to metal production, sometimes accounting for more than 50 percent of raw material supply. From 2001 to 2011, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists studied 26 metals to ascertain the status and magnitude of their recycling industries. The results were published in chapters A-Z of USGS Circular 1196, entitled, "Flow Studies for Recycling Metal Commodities in the United States." These metals were aluminum (chapter W), antimony (Q), beryllium (P), cadmium (O), chromium (C), cobalt (M), columbium (niobium) (I), copper (X), germanium (V), gold (A), iron and steel (G), lead (F), magnesium (E), manganese (H), mercury (U), molybdenum (L), nickel (Z), platinum (B), selenium (T), silver (N), tantalum (J), tin (K), titanium (Y), tungsten (R), vanadium (S), and zinc (D). Each metal commodity was assigned to a single year: chapters A-M have recycling data for 1998; chapters N-R and U-W have data for 2000, and chapters S, T, and X-Z have data for 2004. This 27th chapter of Circular 1196 is called AA; it includes salient data from each study described in chapters A-Z, along with an analysis of overall trends of metals recycling in the United States during 1998 through 2004 and additional up-to-date reviews of selected metal recycling industries from 1991 through 2008. In the United States for these metals in 1998, 2000, and 2004 (each metal commodity assigned to a single year), 84 million metric tons (Mt) of old scrap was generated. Unrecovered old scrap totaled 43 Mt (about 51 percent of old scrap generated, OSG), old scrap consumed was 38 Mt (about 45 percent of OSG), and net old scrap exports were 3.3 Mt (about 4 percent of OSG). Therefore, there was significant potential for increased recovery from scrap. The total old scrap supply was 88 Mt, and the overall new-to-old-scrap ratio was 36:64. On a weighted-average basis, the recycling rate overall for these metals was 40 percent, and the estimated efficiency of recovery was 63 percent. New scrap consumed was 21 Mt. The United States was a net exporter of most scrap metals, and the net exports of 3.3 Mt were valued at $2 billion in constant 1998 dollars. Metals show a wide range of recycling rates, recycling efficiency, and new-to-old-scrap ratios. Recycling rates cluster in the range from 15 to 45 percent, whereas efficiencies are fairly evenly distributed over a range from 7 to 97 percent.

Sibley, Scott F.

2011-01-01

123

Reverse-flow adsorption for process-integrated recycling of homogeneous transition-metal catalysts.  

PubMed

Supramolecular strategies, based on hydrogen bonds and ionic interactions, were investigated as tools for the recovery and recycling of homogeneous transition-metal catalysts by using reverse-flow adsorption (RFA) technology. The association (in solution) and adsorption (on support) of new functionalized host materials and phosphine guest ligands, functionalized with the complementary binding motifs, were fine-tuned for the application of these materials in a RFA reactor. The RFA technology for process-integrated recycling of homogeneous catalysts using these tailor-made phosphine ligands and silica-supported host materials resulted in a stable, semicontinuous catalytic system. Rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of methyl acetamidoacrylate and asymmetric hydrosilylation of acetophenone were studied as test reactions. Depending on the catalytic process the metal complex could be recycled several times without significant loss in conversion. PMID:21574193

Marras, Fabrizio; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M; Reek, Joost N H

2011-06-27

124

Method for electrochemical decontamination of radioactive metal  

DOEpatents

A decontamination method for stripping radionuclides from the surface of stainless steel or aluminum material comprising the steps of contacting the metal with a moderately acidic carbonate/bicarbonate electrolyte solution containing sodium or potassium ions and thereafter electrolytically removing the radionuclides from the surface of the metal whereby radionuclides are caused to be stripped off of the material without corrosion or etching of the material surface.

Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

2008-06-10

125

Recovery and recycling of aluminum, copper, and precious metals from dismantled weapon components.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is tasked to support the Department of Energy in the dismantlement and disposal of SNL designed weapon components. These components are sealed in a potting compound, and contain heavy metals, explosive, radioactive, and ...

J. D. Lutz W. T. Wheelis I. H. Gundiler

1995-01-01

126

Movement behavior in electrostatic separation: Recycling of metal materials from waste printed circuit board  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recycling of metal materials from waste printed circuit board (PCB) is one of the major applications of the electrostatic separation technologies. This paper analyzed the particle shape factor that affected the efficiency of electrostatic separation and addressed influence of the particle shape from both a computational and an experimental point of view. It was performed on three kinds of different

Hongzhou Lu; Jia Li; Jie Guo; Zhenming Xu

2008-01-01

127

Quantification of heavy metals for the recycling of waste plastics from electrotechnical applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analytical data on element concentrations in plastics is an important prerequisite for the recycling of technical waste plastics. The chemical resistance and high additive contents of such materials place a high demand on analytical methods for quantifying elements in thermoplastics from electrotechnical applications. The applicability of three common independent analytical methods (EDXRF, AAS, ICP-AES) for the quantification of heavy metals

Tobias Ernst; Ralf Popp; Rudi van Eldik

2000-01-01

128

The Belgian approach and status on the radiological surveillance of radioactive substances in metal scrap and non-radioactive waste and the financing of orphan sources  

SciTech Connect

Numerous facilities in the non-nuclear sector in Belgium (e.g. in the non-radioactive waste processing and management sector and in the metal recycling sector) have been equipped with measuring ports for detecting radioactive substances. These measuring ports prevent radioactive sources or radioactive contamination from ending up in the material fluxes treated by the sectors concerned. They thus play an important part in the protection of the workers and the people living in the neighbourhood of the facilities, as well as in the protection of the population and the environment in general. In 2006, Belgium's federal nuclear control agency (FANC/AFCN) drew up guidelines for the operators of non-nuclear facilities with a measuring port for detecting radioactive substances. These guidelines describe the steps to be followed by the operators when the port's alarm goes off. Following the publication of the European guideline 2003/122/EURATOM of 22 December 2003 on the control of high-activity sealed radioactive sources and orphan sources, a procedure has been drawn up by FANC/AFCN and ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Belgian National Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials, to identify the responsible to cover the costs relating to the further management of detected sealed sources and if not found to declare the sealed source as an orphan source. In this latter case and from mid-2006 the insolvency fund managed by ONDRAF/NIRAS covers the cost of radioactive waste management. At the request of the Belgian government, a financing proposal for the management of unsealed orphan sources as radioactive waste was also established by FANC/AFCN and ONDRAF/NIRAS. This proposal applies the same approach as for sealed sources and thus the financing of unsealed orphan sources will also be covered by the insolvency fund. (authors)

Braeckeveldt, Marnix; Preter, Peter De [ONDRAF/NIRAS, Kunstlaan 14, B 1210 Brussels (Belgium); Michiels, Jan; Pepin, Stephane; Schrauben, Manfred; Wertelaers, An [FANC/AFCN, Ravensteinstraat 36 B 1000 Brussels (Belgium)

2007-07-01

129

A NOVEL RECYCLING PROCESS OF TITANIUM METAL SCRAPS BY USING CHLORIDE WASTES  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel process of recycling titanium metal scraps by utilizing chloride wastes (e.g., FeClx and AlCl3) that are obtained as by-products in the Kroll process or any other chlorination process has been investigated in this study. This is important from the viewpoint of the increase in titanium metal scraps and chloride wastes in the future. Thermodynamic analyses and some primary

Haiyan Zheng; Toru H. Okabe

130

Washing of metal contaminated soil with EDTA and process water recycling.  

PubMed

We demonstrate here, in a laboratory scale experiment, the feasibility of using the base/acid pair Ca(OH)(2)/H(2)SO(4) to impose a pH gradient for EDTA recycling and, coupled with an electrochemical advanced oxidation process using a graphite anode, of recycling process water as part of a novel remediation technology for multi-metal contaminated soils. In the first batch, 60 mmol EDTA kg(-1) of soil removed 72, 27, and 71% of Pb, Zn, and Cd, respectively, from soil contaminated with 5329±685, 3401±193, and 35±6 mg kg(-1) of Pb, Zn, and Cd, respectively. In the subsequent four batches, we demonstrated that up to 88% of EDTA was recycled from each batch, with the potential to extract up to 98, 94, and 109% of Pb, Zn, and Cd, respectively, that the fresh EDTA extracted. Accumulation of salts in the process water through multiple remediation batches/recycles was prevented by CaSO(4) precipitation. Recycled process water toxicity testing indicated no significant effect on plant seed germination but some inhibition of root elongation. PMID:22921125

Pociecha, Maja; Lestan, Domen

2012-10-15

131

Fernald scrap metal and recycling and beneficial reuse  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Fernald plant, formerly known as the Feed Materials Production Facility, is located on a 1050-acre site 17 miles northwest of downtown Cincinnati, Ohio. Site construction was initiated in 1951 to fabricate uranium metal to meet defense production requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In October 1990, the DOE transferred management responsibility for the site from its Defense

Motl

1993-01-01

132

Informal e-waste recycling: environmental risk assessment of heavy metal contamination in Mandoli industrial area, Delhi, India.  

PubMed

Nowadays, e-waste is a major source of environmental problems and opportunities due to presence of hazardous elements and precious metals. This study was aimed to evaluate the pollution risk of heavy metal contamination by informal recycling of e-waste. Environmental risk assessment was determined using multivariate statistical analysis, index of geoaccumulation, enrichment factor, contamination factor, degree of contamination and pollution load index by analysing heavy metals in surface soils, plants and groundwater samples collected from and around informal recycling workshops in Mandoli industrial area, Delhi, India. Concentrations of heavy metals like As (17.08 mg/kg), Cd (1.29 mg/kg), Cu (115.50 mg/kg), Pb (2,645.31 mg/kg), Se (12.67 mg/kg) and Zn (776.84 mg/kg) were higher in surface soils of e-waste recycling areas compared to those in reference site. Level exceeded the values suggested by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). High accumulations of heavy metals were also observed in the native plant samples (Cynodon dactylon) of e-waste recycling areas. The groundwater samples collected form recycling area had high heavy metal concentrations as compared to permissible limit of Indian Standards and maximum allowable limit of WHO guidelines for drinking water. Multivariate analysis and risk assessment studies based on total metal content explains the clear-cut differences among sampling sites and a strong evidence of heavy metal pollution because of informal recycling of e-waste. This study put forward that prolonged informal recycling of e-waste may accumulate high concentration of heavy metals in surface soils, plants and groundwater, which will be a matter of concern for both environmental and occupational hazards. This warrants an immediate need of remedial measures to reduce the heavy metal contamination of e-waste recycling sites. PMID:24652574

Pradhan, Jatindra Kumar; Kumar, Sudhir

2014-07-01

133

Scrap metal management issues associated with naturally occurring radioactive material  

Microsoft Academic Search

Certain industrial processes sometimes generate waste by-products that contain naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) at elevated concentrations. Some industries, including the water treatment, geothermal energy, and petroleum industries, generate scrap metal that may be contaminated with NORM wastes. Of these three industries, the petroleum industry probably generates the largest quantity of NORM-contaminated equipment, conservatively estimated at 170,000 tons per year.

K. P. Smith; D. L. Blunt

1995-01-01

134

Determination of metal additives and bromine in recycled thermoplasts from electronic waste by TXRF analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new method for analysis of metal additives in recycled thermoplasts from electronic waste was developed, based on dissolving\\u000a the samples in an organic solvent and subsequent analysis of the corresponding solutions or suspensions by total-reflection\\u000a X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (TXRF). The procedure proved to be considerably less time consuming than the conventional\\u000a digestion of the polymer matrix. Additives containing Ti,

H. Fink; U. Panne; M. Theisen; R. Niessner; T. Probst; X. Lin

2000-01-01

135

Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) Report: Seven Career Fire Fighters Injured at a Metal Recycling Facility Fire in California.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

On July 13, 2010, seven career fire fighters were injured while fighting a fire at a large commercial structure containing recyclable combustible metals. At 2345 hours, 3 engines, 2 trucks, 2 rescue ambulances, an emergency medical service (EMS) officer a...

M. E. Bowyer

2011-01-01

136

Validation of the RESRAD-RECYCLE computer code.  

SciTech Connect

The RESRAD-RECYCLE computer code was developed by Argonne National Laboratory under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy. It was designed to analyze potential radiation exposures resulting from the reuse and recycling of radioactively contaminated scrap metal and equipment. It was one of two codes selected in an international model validation study concerning recycling of radioactively contaminated metals. In the validation study, dose measurements at various stages of melting a spent nuclear fuel rack at Studsvik RadWaste AB, Sweden, were collected and compared with modeling results. The comparison shows that the RESRAD-RECYCLE results agree fairly well with the measurement data. Among the scenarios considered, dose results and measurement data agree within a factor of 6. Discrepancies may be explained by the geometrical limitation of the RESRAD-RECYCLE's external exposure model, the dynamic nature of the recycling activities, and inaccuracy in the input parameter values used in dose calculations.

Cheng, J.-J.; Yu, C.; Williams, W. A.; Murphie, W.

2002-02-01

137

New binding materials for metal hydride electrodes which permit good recyclability  

SciTech Connect

Thermoplastic elastomers such as styrene-butadiene-styrene block copolymer (SBS) and styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene block copolymer (SEBS) were used successfully as binding materials for metal hydride (MH) electrodes of a nickel-metal hydride battery. These binding materials have a rubber-like nature and are soluble in organic solvents. It was easy to remove the alloy powder from a used electrode for recycling. The battery performance depended on both the kind and amount of binding materials. The best discharge capacity and rate capability were obtained for MH electrodes containing 2--5 weight percent (w/o) SEBS. The particle size distributions for the alloy were examined successfully.

Hara, T.; Yasuda, N. (Japan Synthetic Rubber Co., Ltd., Yokkaichi (Japan). Development Center); Takeuchi, Y. (Japan Synthetic Rubber Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Electronics Project Dept.); Sakai, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Miyamura, H.; Kuriyama, N.; Ishikawa, H. (Government Industrial Research Inst., Osaka (Japan))

1993-09-01

138

Metal complexes containing natural and and artificial radioactive elements and their applications.  

PubMed

Recent advances (during the 2007-2014 period) in the coordination and organometallic chemistry of compounds containing natural and artificially prepared radionuclides (actinides and technetium), are reviewed. Radioactive isotopes of naturally stable elements are not included for discussion in this work. Actinide and technetium complexes with O-, N-, N,O, N,S-, P-containing ligands, as well ?-organometallics are discussed from the view point of their synthesis, properties, and main applications. On the basis of their properties, several mono-, bi-, tri-, tetra- or polydentate ligands have been designed for specific recognition of some particular radionuclides, and can be used in the processes of nuclear waste remediation, i.e., recycling of nuclear fuel and the separation of actinides and fission products from waste solutions or for analytical determination of actinides in solutions; actinide metal complexes are also usefulas catalysts forcoupling gaseous carbon monoxide,as well as antimicrobial and anti-fungi agents due to their biological activity. Radioactive labeling based on the short-lived metastable nuclide technetium-99m (99mTc) for biomedical use as heart, lung, kidney, bone, brain, liver or cancer imaging agents is also discussed. Finally, the promising applications of technetium labeling of nanomaterials, with potential applications as drug transport and delivery vehicles, radiotherapeutic agents or radiotracers for monitoring metabolic pathways, are also described. PMID:25061724

Kharissova, Oxana V; Méndez-Rojas, Miguel A; Kharisov, Boris I; Méndez, Ubaldo Ortiz; Martínez, Perla Elizondo

2014-01-01

139

Efficient magnetic recycling of covalently attached enzymes on carbon-coated metallic nanomagnets.  

PubMed

In the pursuit of robust and reusable biocatalysts for industrial synthetic chemistry, nanobiotechnology is currently taking a significant part. Recently, enzymes have been immobilized on different nanoscaffold supports. Carbon coated metallic nanoparticles were found to be a practically useful support for enzyme immobilization due to their large surface area, high magnetic saturation, and manipulatable surface chemistry. In this study carbon coated cobalt nanoparticles were chemically functionalized (diazonium chemistry), activated for bioconjugation (N,N-disuccinimidyl carbonate), and subsequently used in enzyme immobilization. Three enzymes, ?-glucosidase, ?-chymotrypsin, and lipase B were successfully covalently immobilized on the magnetic nonsupport. The enzyme-particle conjugates formed retained their activity and stability after immobilization and were efficiently recycled from milliliter to liter scales in short recycle times. PMID:24673490

Zlateski, Vladimir; Fuhrer, Roland; Koehler, Fabian M; Wharry, Scott; Zeltner, Martin; Stark, Wendelin J; Moody, Thomas S; Grass, Robert N

2014-04-16

140

Liquid Metal Walls, Lithium, And Low Recycling Boundary Conditions In Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

At present, the only solid material believed to be a viable option for plasma-facing components (PFCs) in a fusion reactor is tungsten. Operated at the lower temperatures typical of present-day fusion experiments, tungsten is known to suffer from surface degradation during long-term exposure to helium-containing plasmas, leading to reduced thermal conduction to the bulk, and enhanced erosion. Existing alloys are also quite brittle at temperatures under 700oC. However, at a sufficiently high operating temperature (700 - 1000 oC), tungsten is selfannealing and it is expected that surface damage will be reduced to the point where tungsten PFCs will have an acceptable lifetime in a reactor environment. The existence of only one potentially viable option for solid PFCs, though, constitutes one of the most significant restrictions on design space for DEMO and follow-on fusion reactors. In contrast, there are several candidates for liquid metal-based PFCs, including gallium, tin, lithium, and tin-lithium eutectics. We will discuss options for liquid metal walls in tokamaks, looking at both high and low recycling materials. We will then focus in particular on one of the candidate liquids, lithium. Lithium is known to have a high chemical affinity for hydrogen, and has been shown in test stands1 and fusion experiments2,3 to produce a low recycling surface, especially when liquid. Because it is also low-Z and is usable in a tokamak over a reasonable temperature range (200 - 400 oC), it has been now been used as a PFC in several confinement experiments (TFTR, T11- M, CDX-U, NSTX, FTU, and TJ-II), with favorable results. The consequences of substituting low recycling walls for the traditional high recycling variety on tokamak equilibria are very extensive. We will discuss some of the expected modifications, briefly reviewing experimental results, and comparing the results to expectations.

R. Majeski

2010-01-15

141

Heavy metals, organics and radioactivity in soil of western Serbia.  

PubMed

Western Serbia is a region well-known for potato production. Concentrations of selected metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and radioactivity were measured in the soil in order to evaluate the quality and characteristics. The examined soils (Luvisol and Pseudogley) showed unsuitable agrochemical characteristics (acid reaction, low content of organic matter and potassium). Some samples contained Ni, Mn and Cr above the maximal permissible concentration (MPC). The average concentration of total PAHs was 1.92 mg/kg, which is larger than the maximal permissible concentration in Serbia but below the threshold values in the European Union for food production. The average radioactivity of (238)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and the fission product (137)Cs were 60.4+/-26.2, 33.2+/-13.4, 49.1+/-18.5, 379+/-108 and 36.4+/-23.3 Bq/kg. Enhanced radioactivity in the soils was found. The total absorbed dose rate in air above the soil at 1m height calculated for western Serbia was 73.4 nGy/h and the annual effective dose was 90 microSv, which are similar to earlier reports for the study region. PMID:20060645

Dugalic, Goran; Krstic, Dragana; Jelic, Miodrag; Nikezic, Dragoslav; Milenkovic, Biljana; Pucarevic, Mira; Zeremski-Skoric, Tijana

2010-05-15

142

Advanced Recycling Core Accommodating Oxide Fuel and Metal Fuel for Closed Fuel Cycle  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This report presents a unique TRU burning core capable of accommodating oxide fuel and metal fuel and easy to change oxide core to metal core conforming to the design requirements. For the homogeneous oxide fueled core containing transuranics (TRU) fuel with 12% of the moderator pins, the results of calculation show the TRU conversion ratio (ratio of loss of TRU to loss of heavy metal) of 0.33 and the TRU burning capability (ratio of loss of TRU per electric generation) of 67 kg/TWeh. On the other hand, the calculations replacing from oxide fuel assemblies to metal fuel assemblies have indicated the TRU transmutation capability of 69 kg/TWeh with the TRU conversion ratio of 0.30. As the result of simulation calculations, three ordinary fuel exchanges transform the oxide equilibrium core to the full metal core by way of transitional cores, where the maximum linear heat rates are still equal to the metal equilibrium core or less. With this, the presented core concept is concluded that a full oxide core, a full metal core, mixed fueled cores can be materialized in the presented first unit of Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR1).

Ikeda, Kazumi; Maddox, James W.; Nakazato, Wataru; Kunishima, Shigeru

143

Guidance document for multi-facility recycle\\/reuse\\/free release of metals from radiological control areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately 15% of the Low Level Waste (LLW) produced at Los Alamos consists of scrap metal equipment and materials. The majority of this material is produced by decommissioning and modification of existing facilities. To address this waste stream, Los Alamos has developed a scrap metal recycling program that is operated by the Environmental Stewardship Office to minimize the amount of

S. Gogol; T. Starke

1997-01-01

144

Recycling of metals: accounting of greenhouse gases and global warming contributions.  

PubMed

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions related to recycling of metals in post-consumer waste are assessed from a waste management perspective; here the material recovery facility (MRF), for the sorting of the recovered metal. The GHG accounting includes indirect upstream emissions, direct activities at the MRF as well as indirect downstream activities in terms of reprocessing of the metal scrap and savings in terms of avoided production of virgin metal. The global warming factor (GWF) shows that upstream activities and the MRF causes negligible GHG emissions (12.8 to 52.6 kg CO(2)-equivalents tonne(-1) recovered metal) compared to the reprocessing of the metal itself (360-1260 kg CO(2)-equivalents tonne(-1) of recovered aluminium and 400- 1020 kg CO(2)-equivalents tonne(- 1) of recovered steel).The reprocessing is however counterbalanced by large savings of avoided virgin production of steel and aluminium. The net downstream savings were found to be 5040-19 340 kg CO(2)-equivalents tonne(-1) of treated aluminium and 560-2360 kg CO(2)-equivalents tonne(-1) of treated steel. Due to the huge differences in reported data it is hard to compare general data on the recovery of metal scrap as they are very dependent on the technology and data choices. Furthermore, the energy used in both the recovery process as well as the avoided primary production is crucial. The range of avoided impact shows that recovery of metals will always be beneficial over primary production, due to the high energy savings, and that the GHG emissions associated with the sorting of metals are negligible. PMID:19767324

Damgaard, Anders; Larsen, Anna W; Christensen, Thomas H

2009-11-01

145

Improving metal returns and eco-efficiency in electronics recycling - a holistic approach for interface optimisation between pre-processing and integrated metals smelting and refining  

Microsoft Academic Search

The efficient recovery of precious and special metals from electronic scrap has significant benefits - economically, environmentally, but also under a resource conservation aspect. The yields of these metals could be substantially improved by higher collection rates, less scrap exports to regions with insufficient recycling structures, and by interface optimisation, as pointed out in this document

Christian Hagelüken

2006-01-01

146

Advances in biotreatment of acid mine drainage and biorecovery of metals: 1. Metal precipitation for recovery and recycle.  

PubMed

Acid mine drainage (AMD), an acidic metal-bearing wastewater, poses a severe pollution problem attributed to post mining activities. The metals usually encountered in AMD and considered of concern for risk assessment are arsenic, cadmium, iron, lead, manganese, zinc, copper and sulfate. The pollution generated by abandoned mining activities in the area of Butte, Montana has resulted in the designation of the Silver Bow Creek-Butte Area as the largest Superfund (National Priorities List) site in the U.S. This paper reports the results of bench-scale studies conducted to develop a resource recovery based remediation process for the clean up of the Berkeley Pit. The process utilizes selective, sequential precipitation (SSP) of metals as hydroxides and sulfides, such as copper, zinc, aluminum, iron and manganese, from the Berkeley Pit AMD for their removal from the water in a form suitable for additional processing into marketable precipitates and pigments. The metal biorecovery and recycle process is based on complete separation of the biological sulfate reduction step and the metal precipitation step. Hydrogen sulfide produced in the SRB bioreactor systems is used in the precipitation step to form insoluble metal sulfides. The average metal recoveries using the SSP process were as follows: aluminum (as hydroxide) 99.8%, cadmium (as sulfide) 99.7%, cobalt (as sulfide) 99.1% copper (as sulfide) 99.8%, ferrous iron (sulfide) 97.1%, manganese (as sulfide) 87.4%, nickel (as sulfide) 47.8%, and zinc (as sulfide) 100%. The average precipitate purity for metals, copper sulfide, ferric hydroxide, zinc sulfide, aluminum hydroxide and manganese sulfide were: 92.4, 81.5, 97.8, 95.6, 92.1 and 75.0%, respectively. The final produced water contained only calcium and magnesium and both sulfate and sulfide concentrations were below usable water limits. Water quality of this agriculturally usable water met the EPA's gold standard criterion. PMID:14669873

Tabak, Henry H; Scharp, Richard; Burckle, John; Kawahara, Fred K; Govind, Rakesh

2003-12-01

147

Proposed pyrometallurgical process for rapid recycle of discharged fuel materials from the integral fast reactor. [Metal fuel  

SciTech Connect

The pool-type Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory includes on-site recycle of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process and fabrication steps will be demonstrated in the EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility with IFR fuel irradiated in EBR-II and the Fast Flux Test Facility. The proposed process consists of two major steps: a halide slagging step and an electrorefining step. The fuel is maintained in the metallic form to yield directly a metal product sufficiently decontaminated to allow recycle to the reactor as new fuel. The process is further described and available information to support its feasibility is presented.

Burris, L.; Steindler, M.; Miller, W.

1984-01-01

148

Porous metal filter collects radioactive strontium in hot cell operation  

SciTech Connect

The separation of a purified inorganic salt from a batch of slurry containing a high level radionuclide presented some unusual requirements at Rockwell Hanford's fission products production facility in Richland, WA. The product, radioactive strontium, is encapsulated as purified strontium fluoride after the recovered precipitate is sintered in a furnace to drive off all volatiles. The separation process required a filter to collect the finely divided strontium fluoride particles. The filter is required to withstand temperatures of 300-400/sup 0/C and maintain chemical stability in high levels of radioactivity. The filter also has to be sturdy enough to be manageable by a remote master/slave electromechanical manipulator in a hot cell. In addition, the filter must withstand a corrosive environment where the potential of traces of hydrofluoric acid exists. A uniformly permeable filter medium with low pressure drop and high particulate removal efficiency was necessary to ensure total recovery and clean filtrate. Strontium fluoride is precipitated batchwise from a reaction between sodium fluoride and strontium nitrate. After chemical adjustments are completed, the whole batch is filtered through a bank of four vacuum filters which contain a porous metal filter medium. Cylinders of sintered porous stainless steel were chosen as the filter medium because they were adaptable to the handling requirements and met the stringent separation criteria. The overall reaction-to-encapsulation operation at Rockwell Hanford has been developed to achieve better than 99% recovery of the strontium. The consistent performance of the porous metal cartridge filter medium has played an important part in maintaining this high recovery.

Fulton, J.; Hodel, A.E.

1985-03-01

149

Assuring the continued recycling of light metals in end-of-life vehicles: A global perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article reviews issues and technologies in recycling, both current and future, with a focus on end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) and their increasing light material content. Discussion includes the issues involved in designing for recycling, the existing global scrap recycling system, and interactions between different types of recyclables and different sections of the global market. A review follows of current scrap recycling technologies and compares the vehicle recycling regulations in the United States, European Union, and Japan. Finally, opinions are presented on useful, and some not so useful, global and local recycling regulations and initiatives.

Gesing, Adam

2004-08-01

150

The Spanish Protocol for radiological surveillance of metal recycling: a collaboration of government and industry.  

PubMed

The presence of radioactive materials in scrap metal has been detected relatively often in recent years. As a result of an accidental melting of a 137Cs source in a Spanish steel mill (Acerinox) in 1998, the national authorities, the involved private companies, and the main trade unions drafted a protocol for prevention of and responding to such events ("Spanish Protocol"). The Protocol was signed in 1999. The number of subscribing companies is 90. The Protocol is a voluntary agreement defining the radiological surveillance of scrap metal and its products and the duties and rights of the signatories. From the effective date of the Protocol to December 2004, 461 pieces of ferric scrap were detected including sources of radiation and contaminated metal. Four melting incidents have happened in different companies. PMID:17033458

Cadierno, Juan Pedro García; Renedo, J I Serrano; Lopez, E Gil

2006-11-01

151

Nuclear energy and radioactive waste disposal in the age of recycling  

SciTech Connect

The magnitude of humanity's energy needs requires that we embrace a multitude of various energy sources and applications. For a variety of reasons, nuclear energy must be a major portion of the distribution, at least one third. The often-cited strategic hurdle to this approach is nuclear waste disposal. Present strategies concerning disposal of nuclear waste need to be changed if the world is to achieve both a sustainable energy distribution by 2040 and solve the largest environmental issue of the 21. century - global warming. It is hoped that ambitious proposals to replace fossil fuel power generation by alternatives will drop the percentage of fossil fuel use substantially, but the absolute amount of fossil fuel produced electricity must be kept at or below its present 10 trillion kW-hrs/year. Unfortunately, the rapid growth in consumption to over 30 trillion kW-hrs/year by 2040, means that 20 trillion kW-hrs/yr of non-fossil fuel generated power has to come from other sources. If half of that comes from alternative non-nuclear, non-hydroelectric sources (an increase of 3000%), then nuclear still needs to increase by a factor of four worldwide to compensate. Many of the reasons nuclear energy did not expand after 1970 in North America (proliferation, capital costs, operational risks, waste disposal, and public fear) are no longer a problem. The WIPP site in New Mexico, an example of a solution to the nuclear waste disposal issue, and also to public fear, is an operating deep geologic nuclear waste repository in the massive bedded salt of the Salado Formation. WIPP has been operating for eight years, and as of this writing, has disposed of over 50,000 m{sup 3} of transuranic waste (>100 nCi/g but <23 Curie/liter) including high activity waste. The Salado Formation is an ideal host for any type of nuclear waste, especially waste from recycled spent fuel. (authors)

Conca, James L. [New Mexico State University, CEMRC IEE, 1400 University Drive, Carlsbad New Mexico 88220 (United States); Apted, Michael [Monitor Scientific, 3900 S. Wadsworth, Denver, CO 80235 (United States)

2007-07-01

152

Small Mobile Installation for Reprocessing of Radioactive Waste from Technological Circuits of Nuclear Power Facilities of Nuclear Submarines Subject to Recycling  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a One of significant issues that are to be borne in mind in the process of nuclear submarine (NS) decommissioning, temporary\\u000a storage and recycling is reduction of risk of radiation impact upon personnel, population and the environment. In this respect,\\u000a liquid radioactive waste (LRAW) presents most serious difficulties from the viewpoint of isolation. Reprocessing of LRAW that\\u000a consists in considerable reduction

S. P. Malyshev; A. N Krylov

153

Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) Report for New Jersey: Crane Failure Kills Worker at Scrap Metal Recycling Yard.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A crane boom at a scrap metal recycling yard collapsed onto a 41-year-old male worker as a result of a structural failure within the crane, resulting in the worker's death. Three other workers were injured during this incident, which occurred at approxima...

2009-01-01

154

Physical upgrading of scrap from Ni-Cd batteries. A first step toward an integrated metal-recycling process  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with the initial stages of an integrated, metal-recycling process for Ni-Cd batteries (potable, sealed type), that is with the dismantling of spent cells and the physical processing of their resulting scrap. The experiments herein are focused on the performance of a customised shredder and granulometric analysis as to the ability of optimising the waste stream prior to

L. I. C. Barros; C. Guimaraes; F. Margarido; A. M. G. Pacheco

1999-01-01

155

RECYCLING A NONIONIC AQUEOUS-BASED METAL-CLEANING SOLUTION WITH A CERAMIC MEMBRANE: PILOT SCALE EVALUATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The effectiveness of a zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) membrane filter was evaluated for recycling a nonionic aqueous metal cleaning bath under real-world conditions. The pilot-scale study consisted of four 7- to 16-day filtration runs, each processed a portion of the cleaning bath duri...

156

The future of recycling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recycling in general and metal recycling in particular, many believe, enjoy a very bright future. As resource depletion, environmental concerns, and other factors drive primary production costs up, the relative importance of recycling in supplying the material needs of society will grow. This optimistic view, however, may paint an overly rosy and misleading picture.A large portion of secondary metal production

John E. Tilton

1999-01-01

157

Recovery and recycling of aluminum, copper, and precious metals from dismantled weapon components  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is tasked to support The Department of Energy in the dismantlement and disposal of SNL designed weapon components. These components are sealed in a potting compound, and contain heavy metals, explosive, radioactive, and toxic materials. SNL developed a process to identify and remove the hazardous sub-components utilizing real-time radiography and abrasive water-jet cutting. The components were then crushed, granulated, screened, and separated into an aluminum and a precious-and-base-metals fraction using air-tables. Plastics were further cleaned for disposal as non-hazardous waste. New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources assisted SNL in investigation of size-reduction and separation technologies.

Gundiler, I.H. [New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States); Lutz, J.D.; Wheelis, W.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-03

158

Recovery and recycling of aluminum, copper, and precious metals from dismantled weapon components  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is tasked to support the Department of Energy in the dismantlement and disposal of SNL designed weapon components. These components are sealed in a potting compound, and contain heavy metals, explosive, radioactive, and toxic materials in discrete sub-components. SNL developed and demonstrated a process to identify and remove the hazardous sub-components utilizing real-time radiography and abrasive water-jet cutting. The remaining components were then crushed, granulated, screened, and separated into an aluminum and a precious-and-base-metals fraction using air-tables. Plastics were further cleaned for disposal as non-hazardous waste. The New Mexico Bureau of Mines & Mineral Resources assisted SNL in investigation of size-reduction and separation technologies and in the development of a conceptual design for a mechanical separation system.

Lutz, J.D.; Wheelis, W.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gundiler, I.H. [New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States)

1995-02-01

159

Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction  

DOEpatents

A method is described for treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation. 2 figs.

Ellis, T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

1995-08-01

160

Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction  

DOEpatents

Method of treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation.

Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA)

1995-08-01

161

[Health risk assessment in the metal scrap recycle: the case of Brescia].  

PubMed

The recycle of metal scraps is one of the most important industrial activity of Brescia: almost 40% of the metal scraps produced in Italy are reprocessed in this Province. The melting process currently used produces air emissions containing dioxins, PCB and other pollutants which are dispersed in the atmosphere giving a contribution to the general environment pollution. This contribution has been and is being extensively studied in terms of air concentration and soil deposition but, because of its complexity and the difficulty to gather the necessary data, very little investigation has been made up to now on its impact on the health of workers and population. The difficulties are overcome by RAMET, a research Consortium established and financed by the main 24 metallurgical and siderurgical companies of Brescia, which can take advantage of the availability of the production facilities of its shareholders as pilot plants and has access to their database and experience. Starting from this unique favourable condition and in collaboration with the University of Brescia, RAMET is working on a research project having as main objective the assessment of the POPs dose adsorbed and the relevant consequences on workers and public health. The general scheme and organization of this project are given in this paper together with the outlines and the results of the main activities already completed or in progress. PMID:23213800

Corsaro, G B; Gabusi, V; Pilisi, A

2012-01-01

162

Recycling Opportunities for Neighbourhoods and Communities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper discusses recycling paper, glass, plastics, and metals. It presents a community technology approach to recycling, and reviews present efforts in repair and renovation, reuse, and recycling. A final chapter on the appropriateness of recycling te...

C. Thomas

1981-01-01

163

Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method is described for treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material

T. W. Ellis; F. A. Schmidt

1995-01-01

164

Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Method of treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant

Timothy W. Ellis; Frederick A. Schmidt

1995-01-01

165

Fate of heavy metals and radioactive metals in gasification of sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect

The fates of radioactive cadmium, strontium, cesium, cobalt, arsenic, mercury, zinc, and copper spiked into sewage sludge were determined when the sludge was gasified by a process that maximizes production of char from the sludge (ChemChar process). For the most part the metals were retained in the char product in the gasifier. Small, but measurable quantities of arsenic were mobilized by gasification and slightly more than 1% of the arsenic was detected in the effluent gas. Mercury was largely mobilized from the solids in the gasifier, but most of the mercury was retained in a filter composed of char prepared from the sludge. The small amounts of mercury leaving the gasification system were found to be associated with an aerosol product generated during gasification. The metals retained in the char product of gasification were only partially leachable with 50% concentrated nitric acid.

Marrero, Thomas W.; McAuley, Brendan P.; Sutterlin, William R.; Steven Morris, J.; Manahan, Stanley E

2004-07-01

166

P2Pro(RSM) : a computerized management tool for implementing DOE's authorized release process for radioactive scrap metals.  

SciTech Connect

Within the next few decades, several hundred thousand tons of metal and several million cubic meters of concrete are expected to be removed from nuclear facilities across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex as a result of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities. These materials, together with large quantities of tools, equipment, and other items that are commonly recovered from site cleanup or D&D activities, constitute non-real properties that warrant consideration for release from regulatory control for reuse or recycle, as permitted and practiced under current DOE policy. The provisions for implementing this policy are contained in the Draft Handbook for Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle of Non-Real Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material published by DOE in 1997 and distributed to DOE Field Offices for interim use and implementation. This manual describes a computer management tool, P2Pro(RSM), that implements the first 5 steps of the 10-step process stipulated by the Handbook. P2Pro(RSM) combines an easy-to-use Windows interface with a comprehensive database to facilitate the development of authorized release limits for non-real property.

Arnish, J.; Chen, S. Y.; Kamboj, S.; Nieves, L.

1999-07-22

167

Over the border - the problems of uncontrolled radioactive materials crossing national borders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cross-border movement of radioactive materials and contaminated items, in particular metallurgical scrap, has become a problem of increasing importance. Radioactive sources out of regulatory control, now often called `orphan sources', have frequently caused serious, even deadly, radiation exposures and widespread contamination. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission reported over 2300 incidents of radioactive materials found in recycled metal scrap and

K. E. Duftschmid

2002-01-01

168

Removal of mixed heavy metal ions in wastewater by zeolite 4A and residual products from recycled coal fly ash  

Microsoft Academic Search

The removal performance and the selectivity sequence of mixed metal ions (Co2+, Cr3+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Ni2+) in aqueous solution were investigated by adsorption process on pure and chamfered-edge zeolite 4A prepared from coal fly ash (CFA), commercial grade zeolite 4A and the residual products recycled from CFA. The pure zeolite 4A (prepared from CFA) was synthesized under a novel

K. S. Hui; C. Y. H. Chao; S. C. Kot

2005-01-01

169

Use of scalp hair as indicator of human exposure to heavy metals in an electronic waste recycling area  

Microsoft Academic Search

Scalp hair samples were collected at an electronic waste (e-waste) recycling area and analyzed for trace elements and heavy metals. Elevated levels were found for Cu and Pb with geometric means (GMs) at 39.8 and 49.5 ?g\\/g, and the levels of all elements were found in the rank order Pb > Cu ? Mn > Ba > Cr > Ni > Cd > As > V. Besides Cu and Pb, Cd (GM: 0.518 ?g\\/g) was also found to

Thanh Wang; Jianjie Fu; Yawei Wang; Chunyang Liao; Yongqing Tao; Guibin Jiang

2009-01-01

170

Thermochemical Processing of Radioactive Waste Using Powder Metal Fuels.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Problematic radioactive wastes were generated during various activities of both industrial facilities and research institutions usually in relative small amounts. These can be spent ion exchange resins, inorganic absorbents, wastes from research nuclear r...

M. I. Ojovan I. A. Sobolev S. A. Dmitriev

2004-01-01

171

Pollution of the Begej Canal sediment-metals, radioactivity and toxicity assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Begej Canal is one among a large number of canals in Vojvodina (Northern Province of Serbia and Montenegro). The paper describes a study of metal and radioactivity contamination of the Begej Canal sediment. It is also concerned with the evaluation of sediment acute toxicity based on standard test species Daphnia magna and simultaneously extracted metals and acid volatile sulfides.

B. Dalmacija; M. Prica; I. Ivancev-Tumbas; A. van der Kooij; S. Roncevic; D. Krcmar; I. Bikit; I. Teodorovic

2006-01-01

172

THE MANAGEMENT ROUTES FOR CONTAMINATED METALS FROM DISMANTLING OF NUCLEAR REACTORS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The dismantling of the BR3 reactor produces quite large masses of contaminated materials, mainly metals or concrete. The main management routes are: conditioning of the radioactive wastes and disposal, recycling of radioactive materials in the nuclear sector and the recycling of cleared materials in the industrial sector or their evacuation as industrial waste. The paper is focused on the management

O. Emond; M. Klein; Y. Demeulemeester; I. Majkowski; M. Ponnet; V. Massaut; J. Dadoumont

173

Association between lung function in school children and exposure to three transition metals from an e-waste recycling area.  

PubMed

The informal processing of electronic waste or e-waste contributes to the release of high concentrations of transition metals into the ambient air. The damage caused by chromium, nickel and manganese exposure on lung function in school children from an e-waste recycling area and the role of oxidative stress in this process were evaluated. We recruited school children (n=144, 8-13 years) from an e-waste recycling area in China compared with the control. Spirometry was performed to assess lung function status. The blood levels of chromium, nickel and manganese, antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation of the subjects were examined. The concentrations of blood manganese (bMn) and serum nickel (sNi) in the exposed group were significantly higher than those in controls for all three age groups. The forced vital capacity value of boys aged 8-9 years was significantly lower than that of the control. Malondialdehyde levels and superoxide dismutase activities increased significantly in children aged 8-9 years from e-waste environment, but catalase activities declined. School children from an e-waste recycling area were exposed to high levels of the three transition metals. The accumulation of bMn and sNi may be risk factors for oxidative damage and decreased pulmonary function. PMID:22854517

Zheng, Guina; Xu, Xijin; Li, Bin; Wu, Kusheng; Yekeen, Taofeek Akangbe; Huo, Xia

2013-01-01

174

Natural radioactivity and trace metals in crude oils: implication for health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crude oil samples were collected from six different fields in the central Niger Delta in order to determine their natural\\u000a radioactivity and trace element contents, with the aim of assessing the radiological health implications and environmental\\u000a health hazard of the metals, and also to provide natural radioactivity baseline data that could be used for more comprehensive\\u000a future study in this

T. R. Ajayi; N. Torto; P. Tchokossa; A. Akinlua

2009-01-01

175

Potential radioactive scrap metal quantities from nuclear power plants worldwide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately 12 million tons of scrap metals are likely to be generated worldwide during the next 50 years from decommissioning and dismantling nuclear power plants. A large portion of this material will be only slightly contaminated it at all, and, it it is releasable, it would have a scrap value of billions of dollars. Disposition of the metal is complicated

L. A. Nieves; R. W. Tilbrook

1996-01-01

176

Natural radioactivity consideration for high-? dielectrics and metal gates choice in nanoelectronic devices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to face downscaling, new chemical elements are used and suggested for the semiconductor industry. However, some of these elements have natural radioactive isotopes, which may cause reliability issues in nanoelectronic devices by triggering soft errors. In this paper, we focus on high-? dielectric materials and metal gates. We show that besides physical, chemical and mechanical properties of high-? dielectrics and metal gates, natural radioactivity is also a crucial property to be considered in order to select suitable materials. Using samarium in gate oxides and platinum in electrodes turns out to be a crucial issue for ground level applications.

Gedion, Michael; Wrobel, Frédéric; Saigné, Frédéric

2010-07-01

177

Factors affecting acceptability of radioactive metal recycling to the public and stakeholders  

Microsoft Academic Search

The perception of risk takes place within a cultural context that is affected by individual and societal values, risk information, personal experience, and the physical environment. Researchers have found that measures of {open_quotes}voluntariness of risk assumption,{close_quotes} of {open_quotes}disaster potential,{close_quotes} and of {open_quotes}benefit{close_quotes} are important in explaining risk acceptability. A review of cross-cultural studies of risk perception and risk acceptance, as

L. A. Nieves; C. J. Burke

1995-01-01

178

Heavy metal inventory and fuel sustainability of recycling TRU in FBR design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nuclear fuel materials from spent fuel of light water reactors have a potential to be used for destructive devices with very huge energy release or in the same time, it can be utilized as a peaceful energy or civil applications, for generating electricity, desalination of water, medical application and others applications. Several research activities showed some recycled spent fuel can be used as additional fuel loading for increasing fuel breeding capability as well as improving intrinsic aspect of nuclear non-proliferation. The present investigation intends to evaluate the composition of heavy metals inventories and fuel breeding capability in the FBR design based on the loaded fuel of light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel (SF) of 33 GWd/t with 5 years cooling time by adopting depletion code of ORIGEN. Whole core analysis of FBR design is performed by adopting and coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes. Nuclear data library, JFS-3-J-3.2R which is based on the JENDL 3.2 has been used for nuclear data analysis. JSFR design is the basis design reference which basically adopted 800 days cycle length for 4 batches system. Higher inventories of plutonium of MOX fuel and TRU fuel types at equilibrium composition than initial composition have been shown. Minor actinide (MA) inventory compositions obtain a different inventory trends at equilibrium composition for both fuel types. Higher Inventory of MA is obtained by MOX fuel and less MA inventory for TRU fuel at equilibrium composition than initial composition. Some different MA inventories can be estimated from the different inventory trend of americium (Am). Higher americium inventory for MOX fuel and less americium inventory for TRU fuel at equilibrium condition. Breeding ratio of TRU fuel is relatively higher compared with MOX fuel type. It can be estimated from relatively higher production of Pu-238 (through converted MA) in TRU fuel, and Pu-238 converts through neutron capture to produce Pu-239. Higher breeding ratio of MOX fuel and TRU fuel types at equilibrium condition are estimated from converted fertile material during reactor operation into fissile material of plutonium such as converted uranium fuel (converted U-238 into Pu-239) or additional converted fuel from MA into Pu-238 and changes into Pu-239 by capturing neutron. Loading LWR SF gives better fuel breeding capability and increase inventory of MA for doping material of MOX fuel; however, it requires more supply MA inventory for TRU fuel type.

Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su'ud, Zaki

2012-06-01

179

Determination of noble metals in Savannah River Site high-level radioactive sludge  

SciTech Connect

High-level radioactive sludge at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will be processed at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) into durable borosilicate glass wasteforms. The sludges are analyzed for elemental content before processing to ensure compatibility with the glass-making processes. Noble metal fission products in sludge, can under certain conditions, cause problems in the glass melter. Therefore, reliable noble metal determinations are important. The scheme used to measure noble metals in SRS sludges consists of dissolving sludge with hot aqua regia followed by determinations with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and ICP-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) techniques. ICP-MS is the preferred method for measuring trace levels of noble metals in SRS radioactive waste because of superior sensitivity. Analytical results are presented for the two major types of SRS sludge.

Coleman, C.J.; Kinard, W.F.; Bibler, N.E.; Bickford, D.F.; Ramsey, W.G.

1990-12-31

180

Determination of noble metals in Savannah River Site high-level radioactive sludge  

SciTech Connect

High-level radioactive sludge at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will be processed at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) into durable borosilicate glass wasteforms. The sludges are analyzed for elemental content before processing to ensure compatibility with the glass-making processes. Noble metal fission products in sludge, can under certain conditions, cause problems in the glass melter. Therefore, reliable noble metal determinations are important. The scheme used to measure noble metals in SRS sludges consists of dissolving sludge with hot aqua regia followed by determinations with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and ICP-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) techniques. ICP-MS is the preferred method for measuring trace levels of noble metals in SRS radioactive waste because of superior sensitivity. Analytical results are presented for the two major types of SRS sludge.

Coleman, C.J.; Kinard, W.F.; Bibler, N.E.; Bickford, D.F.; Ramsey, W.G.

1990-01-01

181

Mixing of process heels, process solutions, and recycle streams: Results of the small-scale radioactive tests  

SciTech Connect

Various recycle streams will be combined with the low-activity waste (LAW) or the high-level waste (HLW) feed solutions during the processing of the Hanford tank wastes by BNFL, Inc. In addition, the LAW and HLW feed solutions will also be mixed with heels present in the processing equipment. This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of mixing specific process streams. Observations were made regarding adverse reactions (mainly precipitation) and effects on the Tc oxidation state (as indicated by K{sub d} measurements with SuperLig{reg_sign} 639). The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-023, Rev. 0, Small Scale Mixing of Process Heels, Solutions, and Recycle Streams. The test went according to plan, with only minor deviations from the test plan. The deviations from the test plan are discussed in the experimental section.

GJ Lumetta; JP Bramson; OT Farmer III; LR Greenwood; FV Hoopes; MA Mann; MJ Steele; RT Steele; RG Swoboda; MW Urie

2000-05-17

182

In situ bioremediation of soils contaminated with radioactive elements and toxic heavy metals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two experimental plots of an agricultural land contaminated with radioactive elements (uranium, radium thorium) and toxic heavy metals (copper, zinc, cadmium) were treated by two different biotechnological in situ methods. The soil in this land was characterized by a negative net neutralization potential, and the soil pH was in a slightly acidic pH range (from 4 to 5). The contaminants

S. N. Groudev; I. I. Spasova; P. S. Georgiev

2001-01-01

183

A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling  

SciTech Connect

Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

1991-04-01

184

HEAVY METALS IN RECOVERED FINES FOR CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOLITION DEBRIS RECYCLING FACILITIES IN FLORIDA  

EPA Science Inventory

A major product recovered from the processing and recycling of construction and demolition (C&D) debris is screened soil, also referred to as fines. A proposed reuse option for C&D debris fines is fill material, typically in construction projects as a substitute for natural soil....

185

Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy application to control of the process of precious metal recovery and recycling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we discuss the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to precious metal alloys used for the control of the process of recovery and recycling of scraps and waste of industrial processes. In particular, the possibility to obtain sensitivity and trueness comparable to the current systems used in industrial environment in the quantitative determination of the elements of interest was explored. The present study demonstrates that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy can be considered as a viable alternative to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of recovered precious metals. The limits of detection obtained are of the order of 0.2 mg/g for all the elements considered. The maximum deviation with respect to the nominal concentrations is around 1 mg/g at concentrations around 20 mg/g (gold) corresponding to a relative error slightly higher than ± 5%.

Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Pardini, L.; Palleschi, V.; Pace, D. M. Diaz; Garcia, F. Anabitarte; Grassi, R.; Sorrentino, F.; Carelli, G.; Francesconi, M.; Francesconi, F.; Borgogni, R.

2012-05-01

186

Characterization of Chromized Metallic Surfaces by Means of Radioactive Cr  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spatial distribution of Cr deposited on metallic surfaces at concentrations of about 10 at\\/cm was examined by detecting the radiation components emitted in the Cr decay. The autoradiography revealed a non-homogeneous Cr covering. Combined Auger electron and X-ray spectroscopies yielded information on the Cr concentration, especially in the 2 nm thick surface layer. This concentration was found to depend

V. Rö?iger; A. Freyer; E. Hartmann; C. Treutler; V. Brabec; O. Dragoun; A. Kovalik

1986-01-01

187

Radioactive metals complexed with phosphonate derivatives of dicyclopentadienebis (methylamine)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complexes of radionuclides with a compound of the formula (X-N(-Y)-CHââ,(A-N(-B)-CHââPerhydro-4,7-Methanoindene wherein substituents A, B, X and Y are each independently selected from radicals including hydrogen, hydroxyalkyl (wherein the alkyl group contains 2-6 carbon atoms) phosphonic, sulfonic, methylenephosphonic, methylene-, ethylene- and propylene-sulfonic, carboxylic acid radicals (having 2-4 carbon atoms) and the alkali or alkaline earth metal, ammonia and amine salts, thereof

J. Simon; W. Volkert; D. A. Wilson

1985-01-01

188

Use of natural radionuclides to determine the time range of the accidental melting of an orphan radioactive source in a steel recycling plant.  

PubMed

In the rare event that an orphan radioactive source is melted in an Electric Arc Furnace steel recycling plant, the radionuclides present are partitioned in the different products, by-products and waste. As a consequence of an unforeseen melting of a radiocesium source, cesium radioisotopes can be found in the dust, together with many natural radionuclides from the decay of radon and thoron, which are present in the atmosphere, picked up from the off-gas evacuation system and associated with the dust of the air filtration system ("baghouse"). In this work we verified that the activity concentration of ²¹²Pb in this dust is essentially constant in a specific factory so that it is possible to use it to date back to the time of the accidental melting of the orphan radioactive source. The main features of this method are described below, together with the application to a particular case in which this method was used for dating the moment in which the dust was contaminated with ¹³?Cs. PMID:22103976

Cantaluppi, Chiara; Ceccotto, Federica; Cianchi, Aldo

2012-02-01

189

A new two-roll electrostatic separator for recycling of metals and nonmetals from waste printed circuit board.  

PubMed

The electrostatic separation is an effective method for recycling waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). The efficiency of electrostatic separation processes depends on the ability of the separator. As a classical one, the roll-type corona-electrostatic separator has some advantages in recycling metals and plastics from waste printed circuit board (PCB). However, its industry application still faces some problems, such as: the further disposal of the middling products of the separation process; the balance of the production capacity and the good separation efficiency; the separation of the fine granular mixture and the stability of the separation process. A new "two-roll-type corona-electrostatic separator" was built to overcome the limitation of the classical one. The experimental data were discussed and the results showed that the outcome of the separation process was improved by using the new separator. Compared with the classical machine, the mass of conductive products increases 8.9% (groups 2 and 3) and10.2% (group 4) while the mass of the middling products decreases 45% (groups 2 and 3) and 31.7% (group 4), respectively. The production capacity of the new machine increases, and the stability of the separation process is enhanced. PMID:18554788

Jiang, Wu; Jia, Li; Zhen-Ming, Xu

2009-01-15

190

Muon Tomography as a Tool to Detect Radioactive Source Shielding in Scrap Metal Containers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Muon tomography was recently proposed as a tool to inspect large volumes with the purpose of recognizing high density materials immersed in lower density matrices. The MU-STEEL European project (RFCS-CT-2010-000033) studied the application of such a technique to detect radioactive source shielding in truck containers filled with scrap metals entering steel mill foundries. A description of the muon tomography technique, of the MU-STEEL project and of the obtained results will be presented.

Bonomi, G.; Cambiaghi, D.; Dassa, L.; Donzella, A.; Subieta, M.; Villa, V.; Zenoni, A.; Furlan, M.; Rigoni, A.; Vanini, S.; Viesti, G.; Zumerle, G.; Benettoni, M.; Checchia, P.; Gonella, F.; Pegoraro, M.; Zanuttigh, P.; Calvagno, G.; Calvini, P.; Squarcia, S.

2014-02-01

191

Analysis of Th, U, Pu, and Am in radioactive metal waste using extraction chromatography  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to analyze actinide elements in radioactive metal waste, the dissolution and chemical separation conditions were\\u000a optimized. The surfaces of a type 304 stainless steel plate and of pipe waste sampled from the prototype advanced thermal\\u000a reactor (Fugen) were dissolved in mixed acid solution (HNO3:HCl:H2O = 1:1:4). The resulting solution was evaporated to dryness and dissolved with 2 mol\\/dm3 of HNO3 to

Asako Shimada; Tomoko Haraga; Akiko Hoshi; Yutaka Kameo; Mikio Nakashima; Kuniaki Takahashi

2010-01-01

192

Evaluation of the electrorefining technique for the processing of radioactive scrap metals  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a literature study performed to identify applications of the electrorefining technique to the decontamination of radioactively-contaminated scrap metal (RSM). Upon the completion of the literature search and the review of numerous references, it was concluded that there were applications of this technique that were appropriate for the decontamination of some types of RSM, especially when the desired product is a pure elemental metal of high purity. It was also concluded that this technique was not well-suited for the decontamination of RSM stainless steels and other alloys, when it was desired that the metallurgical characteristics of the alloy be present in the decontaminated product.

Kessinger, G.F.

1993-10-01

193

Assessment of metal contaminations leaching out from recycling plastic bottles upon treatments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background, aims, and scope  Heavy metal contaminants in environment, especially in drinking water, are always of great concern due to their health impact.\\u000a Due to the use of heavy metals as catalysts during plastic syntheses, particularly antimony, human exposure to metal release\\u000a from plastic bottles has been a serious concern in recent years. The aim and scope of this study were

Xiaoliang Cheng; Honglan Shi; Craig D. Adams; Yinfa Ma

2010-01-01

194

An improved model for computing the trajectories of conductive particles in roll-type electrostatic separator for recycling metals from WEEE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electrostatic separation presents an effective and environmentally friendly way for recycling metals and nonmetals from ground waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). For this process, the trajectory of conductive particle is significant and some models have been established. However, the results of previous researches are limited by some simplifying assumptions and lead to a notable discrepancy between the model prediction

Jiang Wu; Jia Li; Zhenming Xu

2009-01-01

195

The recycling of 25 litre plastic drums used to supply process chemistry into the printed circuit board (PCB) and metal finishing industries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty five litre plastic drums are widely used throughout industry and find application in the printed circuit board (PCB) and metal finishing sectors for the supply of process chemistry to manufacturers. These drums represent an important source of recyclable high density polyethylene since the containers are made of single polymer and constitute an easily recognisable waste stream that provides a

Kate Geraghty

2003-01-01

196

[Recycle of contaminated scrap metal]: Task 1.3.2, Bulk solids feed system. Topical report, October 1993-- January 1996  

SciTech Connect

A critical requirement in DOE`s efforts to recycle, reuse, and dispose of materials from its decontamination and decommissioning activities is the design of a robust system to process a wide variety of bulk solid feeds. The capability to process bulk solids will increase the range of materials and broaden the application of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP). The term bulk solids refers to materials that are more economically fed into the top of a molten metal bath than by submerged injection through a tuyere. Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT) has characterized CEP`s ability to process bulk solid feed materials and has achieved significant growth in the size of bulk solid particles compatible with Catalytic Extraction Processing. Parametric experimental studies using various feed materials representative of the components of various DOE waste streams have validated design models which establish the reactor operating range as a function of feed material, mass flow rate, and particle size. MMT is investigating the use of a slurry system for bulk solid addition as it is the most efficient means for injecting soils, sludges, and similar physical forms into a catalytic processing unit. MMT is continuing to evaluate condensed phase product removal systems and alternative energy addition sources to enhance the operating efficiency of bulk solids CEP units. A condensed phase product removal system capable of on-demand product removal has been successfully demonstrated. MMT is also investigating the use of a plasma arc torch to provide supplemental heating during bulk solids processing. This comprehensive approach to bulk solids processing is expected to further improve overall process efficiency prior to the deployment of CEP for the recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from DOE decontamination and decommissioning Activities.

NONE

1996-07-01

197

Novel application of the nonmetallic fraction of the recycled printed circuit boards as a toxic heavy metal adsorbent.  

PubMed

Printed circuit boards (PCBs) constitute one of the major sources of toxicity in landfill areas throughout the world. Hence, PCB recycling and separation of its metallic and nonmetallic components has been considered a major ecological breakthrough. Many studies focus on the metallic fraction of the PCBs due to its economic benefits whereas the nonmetallic powder (NMP) has been left isolated. In this work, the feasibility of using NMP as an adsorbent to remove charged toxic heavy metal ions have been studied and its efficiency has been compared with two widely-used commercial adsorbents. The results indicated that the virgin NMP material has no adsorption capacity, while the application of an activation stage to modify the NMP process has a significant effect on its porosity and thus adsorption capacity. The Cu and Pb removal capacity of the activated sample (A-NMP) at a pH level of 4 was 3 mmol and 3.4 mmol per gram of the adsorbent, respectively, which was considerably higher than the commercial ones. PMID:23523907

Hadi, Pejman; Gao, Ping; Barford, John P; McKay, Gordon

2013-05-15

198

Recycling, Inc.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggestions for creating a successful office recycling system are enumerated from start up plans to waste reduction and paper recycling. Contact information for recycling equipment, potential buyers of recycled materials, recycled products for purchase, and ideas for promotion and education of staff are included. (MCO)

Martin, Amy

1992-01-01

199

ADVANCES IN BIOTREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE AND BIORECOVERY OF METALS: 1. METAL PRECIPITATION FOR RECOVERY AND RECYCLE  

EPA Science Inventory

Acid-mine drainage (AMD) is a severe pollution problem attributed to past mining activities. AMD is an acidic, metal-bearing wastewater generated by the oxidation of metal sulfides to sulfates by Thiobacillus bacteria in both active and abandoned mining operations. The wastewater...

200

A novel approach to estimating potential maximum heavy metal exposure to ship recycling yard workers in Alang, India.  

PubMed

The 180 ship recycling yards located on Alang-Sosiya beach in the State of Gujarat on the west coast of India is the world's largest cluster engaged in dismantling. Yearly 350 ships have been dismantled (avg. 10,000 ton steel/ship) with the involvement of about 60,000 workers. Cutting and scrapping of plates or scraping of painted metal surfaces happens to be the commonly performed operation during ship breaking. The pollutants released from a typical plate-cutting operation can potentially either affect workers directly by contaminating the breathing zone (air pollution) or can potentially add pollution load into the intertidal zone and contaminate sediments when pollutants get emitted in the secondary working zone and gets subjected to tidal forces. There was a two-pronged purpose behind the mathematical modeling exercise performed in this study. First, to estimate the zone of influence up to which the effect of plume would extend. Second, to estimate the cumulative maximum concentration of heavy metals that can potentially occur in ambient atmosphere of a given yard. The cumulative maximum heavy metal concentration was predicted by the model to be between 113 ?g/Nm(3) and 428 ?g/Nm(3) (at 4m/s and 1m/s near-ground wind speeds, respectively). For example, centerline concentrations of lead (Pb) in the yard could be placed between 8 and 30 ?g/Nm(3). These estimates are much higher than the Indian National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Pb (0.5 ?g/Nm(3)). This research has already become the critical science and technology inputs for formulation of policies for eco-friendly dismantling of ships, formulation of ideal procedure and corresponding health, safety, and environment provisions. The insights obtained from this research are also being used in developing appropriate technologies for minimizing exposure to workers and minimizing possibilities of causing heavy metal pollution in the intertidal zone of ship recycling yards in India. PMID:23018053

Deshpande, Paritosh C; Tilwankar, Atit K; Asolekar, Shyam R

2012-11-01

201

A Practical Recycling Project . . .  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Descirbes a school district's recycling program of aluminum lunch trays that are collected after their use. The trays are used as scrap metal in industrial education workshop and used for sand castings. (PS)

Durant, Raymond H.; Mikuska, James M.

1973-01-01

202

Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recycle of radioactive scrap metals (RSM) from decommissioning of DOE uranium enrichment and nuclear weapons manufacturing facilities is mandatory to recapture the value of these metals and avoid the high cost of disposal by burial. The scrap metals conversion project detailed below focuses on the contaminated nickel associated with the gaseous diffusion plants. Stainless steel can be produced in MSC`s

T. R. Muth; J. Moore; D. Olson; B. Mishra

1994-01-01

203

Eco-toxicity and metal contamination of paddy soil in an e-wastes recycling area  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paddy soil samples taken from different sites in an old primitive electronic-waste (e-waste) processing region were examined for eco-toxicity and metal contamination. Using the environmental quality standard for soils (China, Grade II) as reference, soil samples of two sites were weakly contaminated with trace metal, but site G was heavily contaminated with Cd (6.37mgkg?1), and weakly contaminated with Cu (256.36mgkg?1)

Zhang Jun-hui; Min Hang

2009-01-01

204

Advances in biotreatment of acid mine drainage and biorecovery of metals: 1. Metal precipitation for recovery and recycle  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acid mine drainage (AMD), an acidic metal-bearingwastewater, poses a severe pollution problem attributedto post mining activities. The metals usuallyencountered in AMD and considered of concern for riskassessment are arsenic, cadmium, iron, lead, manganese,zinc, copper and sulfate. The pollution generated byabandoned mining activities in the area of Butte, Montanahas resulted in the designation of the Silver Bow Creek–ButteArea as the largest

Henry H. Tabak; Richard Scharp; John Burckle; Fred K. Kawahara; Rakesh Govind

2003-01-01

205

Direct conversion of radioactive and chemical waste containing metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, and organics to glass  

SciTech Connect

The Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (CMODS) is a new process for direct conversion of radioactive, mixed, and chemical wastes to glass. The wastes can be in the chemical forms of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, and organics. GMODS destroys organics and it incorporates heavy metals and radionuclides into a glass. Processable wastes may include miscellaneous spent fuels (SF), SF hulls and hardware, plutonium wastes in different forms, high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, ion-exchange resins, failed equipment, and laboratory wastes. Thermodynamic calculations indicate theoretical feasibility. Small-scale laboratory experiments (< 100 g per test) have demonstrated chemical laboratory feasibility for several metals. Additional work is needed to demonstrate engineering feasibility.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1994-05-02

206

Optimization of a microbial fuel cell for wastewater treatment using recycled scrap metals as a cost-effective cathode material.  

PubMed

Microbial fuel cell (MFC) for wastewater treatment is still hindered by the prohibitive cost of cathode material, especially when platinum is used to catalyze oxygen reduction. In this study, recycled scrap metals could be used efficiently as cathode material in a specially-designed MFC. In terms of raw power, the scrap metals ranked as follows: W/Co > Cu/Ni > Inconel 718 > carpenter alloy; however, in terms of cost and long term stability, Inconel 718 was the preferred choice. Treatment performance--assessed on real and synthetic wastewater--was considerably improved either by filling the anode compartment with carbon granules or by operating the MFC in full-loop mode. The latter option allowed reaching 99.7% acetate removal while generating a maximum power of 36 W m(-3) at an acetate concentration of 2535 mg L(-1). Under these conditions, the energy produced by the system averaged 0.1 kWh m(-3) of wastewater treated. PMID:23138054

Lefebvre, Olivier; Tan, Zi; Shen, Yujia; Ng, How Y

2013-01-01

207

A preliminary investigation of unintentional POP emissions from thermal wire reclamation at industrial scrap metal recycling parks in China.  

PubMed

Thermal wire reclamation is considered to be a potential source of unintentional persistent organic pollutants (unintentional POPs). In this study, unintentional POP concentrations, including PCDD/Fs, dioxin like PCBs (dl-PCBs), polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs), hexachlorobenzene (HxCBz) and pentachlorobenzene (PeCBz), were quantified in flue gas and residual ash emissions from thermal wire reclamation at scrap metal dismantling parks in Zhejiang Province, China. The total average TEQ emissions of the investigated unintentional POPs from flue gas and residual ash in two typical scrap metal recycling plants ranged from 13.1 to 48.3ngTEQNm(-3) and 0.08 to 2.8ngTEQg(-1), respectively. The dominant PCDD/F congeners were OCDD, 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDD, OCDF and 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDF, while PCB-126 and PCB-169 were the main contributors to the toxicity of the dl-PCBs. There were clear differences in the distribution dl-PCBs congeners contributing to the TEQ concentrations in the flue gas samples from the two plants. The PCN TEQs were dominated by PCN-66/67 and PCN-73. Although thermal wire reclamation in incinerators has been proposed as an alternative to open burning, there are still considerable environmental risks associated with regulated incinerators, and unintentional POP emissions from thermal wire reclamation sites need to be controlled by local government agencies. PMID:22436338

Nie, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Minghui; Liu, Guorui; Liu, Wenbin; Lv, Pu; Zhang, Bing; Su, Guijin; Gao, Lirong; Xiao, Ke

2012-05-15

208

The application of metal cutting technologies in tasks performed in radioactive environments  

SciTech Connect

The design and use of equipment to perform work in radioactive environments is uniquely challenging. Some tasks require that the equipment be operated by a person wearing a plastic suit or full face respirator and donning several pairs of rubber gloves. Other applications may require that the equipment be remotely controlled. Other important, design considerations include material compatibility, mixed waste issues, tolerance to ionizing radiation, size constraints and weight capacities. As always, there is the ``We need it ASAP`` design criteria. This paper describes four applications where different types of metal cutting technologies were used to successfully perform tasks in radioactive environments. The technologies include a plasma cutting torch, a grinder with an abrasive disk, a hydraulic shear, and a high pressure abrasive water jet cutter.

Fogle, R.F.; Younkins, R.M.

1997-05-01

209

UPTAKE OF HEAVY METALS IN BATCH SYSTEMS BY A RECYCLED IRON-BEARING MATERIAL  

EPA Science Inventory

An iron-bearing material deriving from surface finishing operations in the manufacturing of cast-iron components demonstrates potential for removal of heavy metals from aqueous waste streams. Batch isotherm and rate experiments were conducted for uptake of cadmium, zinc, and lead...

210

How to recycle asbestos containing materials (ACM)  

SciTech Connect

The current disposal of asbestos containing materials (ACM) in the private sector consists of sealing asbestos wetted with water in plastic for safe transportation and burial in regulated land fills. This disposal methodology requires large disposal volumes especially for asbestos covered pipe and asbestos/fiberglass adhering to metal framework, e.g. filters. This wrap and bury technology precludes recycle of the asbestos, the pipe and/or the metal frameworks. Safe disposal of ACM at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, likewise, requires large disposal volumes in landfills for non-radioactive ACM and large disposal volumes in radioactive burial grounds for radioactive and suspect contaminated ACM. The availability of regulated disposal sites is rapidly diminishing causing recycle to be a more attractive option. Asbestos adhering to metal (e.g., pipes) can be recycled by safely removing the asbestos from the metal in a patented hot caustic bath which prevents airborne contamination /inhalation of asbestos fibers. The dissolution residue (caustic and asbestos) can be wet slurry fed to a melter and vitrified into a glass or glass-ceramic. Palex glasses, which are commercially manufactured, are shown to be preferred over conventional borosilicate glasses. The Palex glasses are alkali magnesium silicate glasses derived by substituting MgO for B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in borosilicate type glasses. Palex glasses are very tolerant of the high MgO and high CaO content of the fillers used in forming asbestos coverings for pipes and found in boiler lashing, e.g., hydromagnesite (3MgCO{sub 3} Mg(OH){sub 2} 3H{sub 2}O) and plaster of paris, gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}). The high temperate of the vitrification process destroys the asbestos fibers and renders the asbestos non-hazardous, e.g., a glass or glass-ceramic. In this manner the glass or glass-ceramic produced can be recycled, e.g., glassphalt or glasscrete, as can the clean metal pipe or metal framework.

Jantzen, C.M.

2000-04-11

211

Pollution of the Begej Canal sediment--metals, radioactivity and toxicity assessment.  

PubMed

The Begej Canal is one among a large number of canals in Vojvodina (Northern Province of Serbia and Montenegro). The paper describes a study of metal and radioactivity contamination of the Begej Canal sediment. It is also concerned with the evaluation of sediment acute toxicity based on standard test species Daphnia magna and simultaneously extracted metals and acid volatile sulfides. The quality of sediment was assessed according to Dutch standards, but the results were also compared with some Canadian and USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) guidelines for sediment quality. The results showed severe pollution with chromium, copper, cadmium and zinc, whereby the anthropogenic origin of these contaminants was indicated. The tests of toxicity of sediment pore water to D. magna, gave no indication of the presence of substances in acutely toxic concentrations to this species. It can be speculated that, despite of high metal contents, the observed toxicity was low because of the high contents of clay and iron, as well as sulphide. Also, based on a comparison with the Danube sediment and Vojvodina soil in general, the data of the Begej sediment contamination with 238U and 137Cs. The 137Cs data were used for approximate dating of the sediment. No traces of contamination by nuclear power plants in the region were found, while the presence of technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) was proved. Conclusions based on different criteria for sediment quality assessment were in some cases contradictory. Study also showed that radioactivity aspects can be useful in sediment quality surveys. The obtained results will be invaluable for the future activities regarding integrated water management based on EC Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC) in the Danube basin, and particularly in the region of crossborder water body of the Begej Canal. PMID:16527352

Dalmacija, B; Prica, M; Ivancev-Tumbas, I; van der Kooij, A; Roncevic, S; Krcmar, D; Bikit, I; Teodorovic, I

2006-07-01

212

The relationship between magnetic parameters and heavy metal contents of indoor dust in e-waste recycling impacted area, Southeast China.  

PubMed

Environmental contamination due to uncontrolled e-waste recycling is an emerging global problem. The aim of this study is to test the applicability of magnetic methods for detecting the metal pollutants emitted from e-waste recycling activities. Dust samples collected from a typical e-waste recycling region in Guiyu, Guangdong Province, China, were investigated using magnetic, geochemical, micro-morphological and mineralogical analysis. The values of mass-specific susceptibility (?) and saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) in dusts from e-waste recycling impacted areas ranged from 101 to 636×10(-8) m(3) kg(-1) and from 10.5 to 85.2×10(-3) Am(2) kg(-1), respectively. There was a significant correlation between SIRM and ? (r(2)=0.747, p<0.001), indicating that ferrimagnetic minerals were dominating ? in the dust samples. The values of ?(fd)% varied from 2.6 to 4.6% with a mean of 3.4%, which suggested that magnetic carriers in the dusts are predominately coarse-grained particles. Two shapes of magnetic particles, spherule (10-150 ?m) and angular-shaped particles (30-300 ?m), were identified by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) analyses. ?-T curves, magnetic hysteresis loops and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that these magnetic particles were magnetite and goethite. There were significant correlations between SIRM and heavy metals (especially Cd, Co, Fe, Ni and Zn) as well as the Tomlinson pollution load index (PLI) of the dust, indicating that SIRM can be used as an efficient proxy for metal pollution in the e-waste recycling impacted area. PMID:22796729

Zhu, Zongmin; Han, Zhixuan; Bi, Xiangyang; Yang, Wenlin

2012-09-01

213

Responsible recycling  

SciTech Connect

The issues that affect the recycling of lead-acid batteries and the challenges that this issue brings to both the lead industry and to the battery manufacturers are covered. Topics include the lead market (its size and structure), the economic constraints on the recycling system, recycling rates for batteries, the technology of recycling, and future considerations.

Pugh, A. (Britannia Refined Metals, Northfleet (United Kingdom))

1993-05-01

214

The Three Rs: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A student hand-out for a recycling unit defines the terms reduce, recycle, and reuse as they relate to solid waste management. Presents the characteristics of recyclable items such as yard wastes, metals, glass, and paper. Lists organizations through which more information about recycling can be obtained. (MCO)

Science Activities, 1991

1991-01-01

215

Recovery of platinum-group metals from recycled automotive catalytic converters by carbochlorination  

Microsoft Academic Search

The carbochlorination behavior of scrapped honeycomb-type automobile catalysts was investigated using a chlorine and carbon monoxide gas mixture to fully extract platinum and rhodium in the catalysts. The recoveries of platinum, rhodium, and base metals are monitored by ICP-AES analyses. Upflow type of fixed-bed carbochlorination experiments were performed between 250 and 700 C. The effects of flow rate, time, and

Choong-Hyon Kim; Seong Ihl Woo; Sung Hwan Jeon

2000-01-01

216

Transition metal (Fe, Co and Ni) oxide nanoparticles grafted graphitic carbon nitrides as efficient optical limiters and recyclable photocatalysts  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A single-step pyrolysis assisted route towards the large scale fabrication of metal oxide nanoparticles (Fe2O3, Co3O4 and NiO) ingrained in graphitic carbon nitride (GCN) is demonstrated. Urea, an abundantly available precursor, plays a dual role during the synthesis: while it acts as a reducing agent, it also gets converted to GCN. The formation of GCN and the in-situ growth and embedment of oxide nanoparticles are discussed on the basis of the experimental results. The wide absorption of the samples in the visible light region makes them suitable for nonlinear transmission and photocatalytic activity studies. Visible light photocatalytic activities of the samples are studied by monitoring the degradation of Rhodamine B dye. Optical limiting properties of the prepared samples are studied through the open aperture z-scan technique using 5 ns laser pulses at a wavelength of 532 nm. The cost-efficient and time saving synthetic approach is complemented by the magnetic behaviour of the samples, which enables their use as recyclable photocatalyst and magnetically controllable optical limiters.

Sridharan, Kishore; Kuriakose, Tintu; Philip, Reji; Park, Tae Joo

2014-07-01

217

Platinum group metals bulk analysis in automobile catalyst recycling material by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Development and application of an in-situ applicable method to provide rapid determination of platinum group metals (platinum, palladium, and rhodium) elemental concentration in automobile catalyst scrap is reported. Application is based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Actual automobile catalyst slurry in powder form was used to develop the application. With a method requiring approximately 1.5 min of examination per sample, calibration curves are presented with linear regression coefficients close to 0.99 and stability better than 3.0%.

Asimellis, George; Michos, Nikolaos; Fasaki, Ioanna; Kompitsas, Michael

2008-11-01

218

Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The contract was conceived to establish the commercial capability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) to treat contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory. In so doing, Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT), pursued the following objectives: demonstration of the recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals--to establish that radioactively contaminated scrap metal can be converted to high-grade, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys which

T. P. Griffin; J. E. Johnston

1994-01-01

219

Analysis of the application of decontamination technologies to radioactive metal waste minimization using expert systems  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive metal waste makes up a significant portion of the waste currently being sent for disposal. Recovery of this metal as a valuable resource is possible through the use of decontamination technologies. Through the development and use of expert systems a comparison can be made of laser decontamination, a technology currently under development at Ames Laboratory, with currently available decontamination technologies for applicability to the types of metal waste being generated and the effectiveness of these versus simply disposing of the waste. These technologies can be technically and economically evaluated by the use of expert systems techniques to provide a waste management decision making tool that generates, given an identified metal waste, waste management recommendations. The user enters waste characteristic information as input and the system then recommends decontamination technologies, determines residual contamination levels and possible waste management strategies, carries out a cost analysis and then ranks, according to cost, the possibilities for management of the waste. The expert system was developed using information from literature and personnel experienced in the use of decontamination technologies and requires validation by human experts and assignment of confidence factors to the knowledge represented within.

Bayrakal, S.

1993-09-30

220

Assessment of some trace heavy metals and radioactivity concentration in water of Bendimahi River Basin (Van, Turkey).  

PubMed

The levels of heavy metals were determined in the water of Bendimahi River Basin, statistically analysed and compared to natural gross radioactivity concentration. Fifteen samples of water were collected from Bendimahi River and Van Lake for two seasons in 2005. Water samples were analyzed for eight trace elements and concluded together with gross-alpha and gross-beta radioactivity concentrations. Atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) was used to determine the concentrations of heavy metals in water samples collected from Bendimahi River basin. Correlation analysis was made for radioactivity and heavy metal concentrations and the Pearson correlation coefficients between gross-alpha and gross-beta radioactivity and heavy metal were determined. The concentrations of all metals were found to be higher than WHO, EC, EPA and TSE-266 guidelines for drinking water, except for Zn and Cu. Generally, the heavy metal concentrations in water samples obtained in May and in August were found to be in sequence of Fe>Zn>Pb>Cr>Cu>Mn>Co>Cd and Fe>Zn>Cu>Pb>Cr>Mn>Co>Cd, respectively. The gross-alpha and gross-beta activity concentration varies between 0.063 and 0.782, 0.021 and 0.816 Bq l(-1) in samples collected in May, and 0.009 and 0.037, 0.081 and 3.116 Bq l(-1) in samples collected in August. PMID:18085419

Zorer, Ozlem Selçuk; Ceylan, Hasan; Do?ru, Mahmut

2008-12-01

221

MOBILE ON-SITE RECYCLING OF METALWORKING FLUIDS  

EPA Science Inventory

This evaluation addresses the product quality, waste reduction, and economic issues involved in recycling metalworking fluids through a mobile recycling unit. The specific recycling unit evaluated is based on the technology of filtration, pasteurization, and centrifugation. Metal...

222

Recycling Of Uranium- And Plutonium-Contaminated Metals From Decommissioning Of The Hanau Fuel Fabrication Plant  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of a nuclear facility comprises not only actual dismantling but also, above all, management of the resulting residual materials and waste. Siemens Decommissioning Projects (DP) in Hanau has been involved in this task since 1995 when the decision was taken to decommission and dismantle the Hanau Fuel Fabrication Plant. Due to the decommissioning, large amounts of contaminated steel scrap have to be managed. The contamination of this metal scrap can be found almost exclusively in the form of surface contamination. Various decontamination technologies are involved, as there are blasting and wiping. Often these methods are not sufficient to meet the free release limits. In these cases, SIEMENS has decided to melt the scrap at Siempelkamp's melting plant. The plant is licensed according to the German Radiation Protection Ordinance Section 7 (issue of 20.07.2001). The furnace is a medium frequency induction type with a load capacity of 3.2 t and a throughput of 2 t/h for steel melting. For safety reasons, the furnace is widely operated by remote handling. A highly efficient filter system of cyclone, bag filter and HEPA-filter in two lines retains the dust and aerosol activity from the off-gas system. The slag is solidified at the surface of the melt and gripped before pouring the liquid iron into a chill. Since 1989, in total 15,000 t have been molten in the plant, 2,000 t of them having been contaminated steel scrap from the decommissioning of fuel fabrication plants. Decontamination factors could be achieved between 80 and 100 by the high affinity of the uranium to the slag former. The activity is transferred to the slag up to nearly 100 %. Samples taken from metal, slag and dust are analyzed by gamma measurements of the 186 keV line of U235 and the 1001 keV line of Pa234m for U238. All produced ingots showed a remaining activity less than 1 Bq/g and could be released for industrial reuse.

Kluth, T.; Quade, U.; Lederbrink, F. W.

2003-02-26

223

Benefits of recycling galvanized steel scrap for recovery of high-quality steel and zinc metal  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Metal Recovery Industries, Inc. (MRII), in cost-sharing collaboration, have developed an electrolytic process to separate and recover steel and zinc from galvanized steel scrap. This work has been supported by the US DOE. An assessment of available dezinc technology was begun in 1987 which (1) screened process concepts for separating and recovering zinc and steel from galvanized ferrous scrap, (2) selected electrochemical stripping in hot caustic as the most promising process, (3) evaluated the technical and economic feasibility of the selected process on the basis of fundamental electrochemical studies, (4) experimentally verified the technical and economic feasibility of the process in a phased evaluation from bench-scale controlled experiments through batch tests of actual scrap up to six ton lots, and (5) concluded that the process has technical and economic merit and requires larger- scale evaluation in a continuous mode as the final phase of process development. This work has attracted worldwide interest. Preliminary economic analysis indicates that the cost of the recovered ferrous scrap would be about $150/ton (at a base cost of $110/ton for galvanized scrap), including credit for the co-product zinc. Concentrations of zinc, lead, cadmium and other coating constituents on loose scrap are reduced by a minimum of 98%, with zinc, in particular, reduced to below 0.1%. Removal efficiencies on baled scrap with bulk densities between 60 and 245 pounds per cubic foot range from 80 to 90%. About 1000 tons of galvanized scrap bales have been treated in batch operation at MRII in Hamilton, Ontario. A pilot plant for continuous treatment of 40 ton/day of loose scrap is being built by MRII in East Chicago, Indiana, with operation starting in early 1992. 9 refs.

Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Morgan, W.A. (Metal Recovery Industries, Inc., Hamilton, ON (Canada))

1991-11-04

224

Converting Garbage to Gold: Recycling Our Materials.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recycling conserves energy, fights pollution and inflation, creates jobs, and improves the outlook for the future of materials. But converting a throwaway society to recycling will depend on finding good markets for waste paper and scrap metals. (RM)

Chandler, William U.

1984-01-01

225

Natural radioactivity and trace metals in crude oils: implication for health.  

PubMed

Crude oil samples were collected from six different fields in the central Niger Delta in order to determine their natural radioactivity and trace element contents, with the aim of assessing the radiological health implications and environmental health hazard of the metals, and also to provide natural radioactivity baseline data that could be used for more comprehensive future study in this respect. The activity concentrations of the radionuclides were measured using a well, accurately calibrated and shielded vertical cryostat, Canberra coaxial high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector system, and the derived doses were evaluated. The metal concentrations were determined by the graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopic (GFAAS) method. The radionuclides identified with reliable regularity belong to the decay series of naturally occurring radionuclides headed by (238)U and (232)Th along with the non-decay series radionuclide, (40)K. The averaged activity concentrations obtained were 10.52 +/- 0.03 Bq kg(-1), 0.80 +/- 0.37 Bq kg(-1) and 0.17 +/- 0.09 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K, (238)U and (232)Th, respectively. The equivalent doses were very low, ranging from 0.0028 to 0.012 mSv year(-1) with a mean value of 0.0070 mSv year(-1). The results obtained were low, and hence, the radioactivity content from the crude oils in the Niger delta oil province of Nigeria do not constitute any health hazard to occupationally exposed workers, the public and the end user. The concentrations of the elements (As, Cd, Co, Fe, Mn, Ni, Se and V) determined ranged from 0.73 to 202.90 ppb with an average of 74.35 ppb for the oil samples analysed. The pattern of occurrence of each element agreed with the earlier studies from other parts of the Niger Delta. It was obvious from this study and previous ones that the Niger Delta oils have low metal contents. However, despite the low concentrations, they could still pose an intrinsic health hazard considering their cumulative effects in the environment. Also, various studies on the impact of oil spillage and activities of oil exploration and production on organisms in the immediate environment suggest this. PMID:18320332

Ajayi, T R; Torto, N; Tchokossa, P; Akinlua, A

2009-02-01

226

Recycle City  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Recycle City contains an interactive city map that demonstrates how residents of every section of the city, formerly Dumptown, have recycled, reduced, and reused waste to turn their town around. There is a Dumptown Game with a Control Center to monitor displays while Dumptown changes as waste reduction programs are put in place. Students can create their own Recycle City scavenger hunt or go to the Activities area and see other ways to put Recycle City to use to help protect the environment.

1997-01-01

227

Hanford recycling.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper is a study of the past and present recycling efforts on the Hanford site and options for future improvements in the recycling program. Until 1996, recycling goals were voluntarily set by the waste generators: this year, DOE has imposed goals fo...

I. M. Leonard

1996-01-01

228

Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Department of Energy (DOE) accumulated large quantities of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) through historic maintenance activities. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of major sites formerly engaged in production of nuclear materials and manufacture of nuclear weapons will generate additional quantities of RSM, as much as 3 million tons of such metal according to a recent study. The recycling of

T. R. Muth; K. E. Shasteen; A. L. Liby

1995-01-01

229

RECYCLING TODAY  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

We have probably heard of recycling but what is it really and why is it so improtant to do? Please answer the questions below as well as visiting the different websites to explore what recycling really is. Form groups of 4 and explore the following websites as well as answer the questions which follow. The first website is of Recycle City where you will be exploring the City and how they recycle. Recyle City Why Recycling is Important Now please answer the following questions on paper. 1. What are the 3 R's? Explain in further ...

Smith, Miss

2010-12-03

230

Natural radioactive elements and heavy metals in coal, fly ash and bottom ash from a thermal power plant  

Microsoft Academic Search

The composition of coal used as fuel at a thermal power plant and those of the fly and bottom ashes it produces were determined. Radioactive elements were analysed for by alpha and gamma spectrometry, while sulphur, carbon and nitrogen were determined by burning. Heavy metals were quantified by X?ray fluorescence spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES). The

M. Casas; R. Forteza; V. Cerda; F. Garcias

1993-01-01

231

Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal  

Microsoft Academic Search

In October 1993, Manufacturing Sciences Corporation was awarded DOE contract DE-AC21-93MC30170 to develop and test recycling of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) to high value and intermediate and final product forms. This work was conducted to help solve the problems associated with decontamination and reuse of the diffusion plant barrier nickel and other radioactively contaminated scrap metals present in the diffusion

V. MacNair; T. Muth; K. Shasteen; A. Liby; G. Hradil; B. Mishra

1996-01-01

232

Silica-Polyamine Composite Materials for Heavy Metal Ion Removal, Recovery, and Recycling. II. Metal Ion Separations from Mine Wastewater and Soft Metal Ion Extraction Efficiency  

Microsoft Academic Search

Silica-polyamine composites have been synthesized which have metal ion capacities as high as 0.84 mmol\\/g for copper ions removed from aqueous solutions. In previous reports it has been demonstrated that these materials survive more than 3000 cycles of metal ion extraction, elution, and regeneration with almost no loss of capacity (less than 10%). This paper describes two modified silica-polyamine composite

ROBERT J. FISCHER; DAVID PANG; SUSAN T. BEATTY; EDWARD ROSENBERG

1999-01-01

233

COPPER CABLE RECYCLING TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective technologies for use in deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsors large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs). At these LSDDPs, developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to the DOE's projects and to others in the D&D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, and decreased costs of operation. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) generated a list of statements defining specific needs and problems where improved technology could be incorporated into ongoing D&D tasks. One such need is to reduce the volume of waste copper wire and cable generated by D&D. Deactivation and decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities generates hundreds of tons of contaminated copper cable, which are sent to radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology separates the clean copper from contaminated insulation and dust materials in these cables. The recovered copper can then be reclaimed and, more importantly, landfill disposal volumes can be reduced. The existing baseline technology for disposing radioactively contaminated cables is to package the cables in wooden storage boxes and dispose of the cables in radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology is applicable to facility decommissioning projects at many Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and commercial nuclear power plants undergoing decommissioning activities. The INEEL Copper Cable Recycling Technology Demonstration investigated the effectiveness and efficiency to recycle 13.5 tons of copper cable. To determine the effectiveness of separating out radioactive contamination, the copper cable was coated with a surrogate contaminant. The demonstration took place at the Bonneville County Technology Center in Idaho Falls, Idaho.

Chelsea Hubbard

2001-05-01

234

Silica-polyamine composite materials for heavy metal ion removal, recovery, and recycling. 2. Metal ion separations from mine wastewater and soft metal ion extraction efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Silica-polyamine composites have been synthesized which have metal ion capacities as high as 0.84 mmol/g for copper ions removed from aqueous solutions. In previous reports it has been demonstrated that these materials survive more than 3,000 cycles of metal ion extraction, elution, and regeneration with almost no loss of capacity (less than 10%). This paper describes two modified silica-polyamine composite materials and reveals the results of tests designed to determine the effectiveness of these materials for extracting and separating metal ions from actual mining wastewater samples. Using these materials, the concentration of copper, aluminum, and zinc in Berkeley Pit mine wastewater is reduced to below allowable discharge limits. The recovered copper and zinc solutions were greater than 90% pure, and metal ion concentration factors of over 20 for copper were realized. Further, the ability of one of these materials to decrease low levels of the soft metals cadmium, mercury, and lead from National Sanitation Foundation recommended challenge levels to below Environmental Protection Agency allowable limits is also reported.

Fischer, R.J.; Pang, D.; Beatty, S.T.; Rosenberg, E.

1999-12-01

235

Recycling of nonmetallics  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The first factor determining recyclability is the composition of the material itself. Metals, for example, can be reused with little or no loss in quality. Paper and rubber, by this criterion, are less recyclable. Each time paper is recycled, some cellulose fibers are broken. Shorter fibers can mean weaker paper of perceived lower quality and value. Vulcanizing is an irreversible chemical process that precludes recycling rubber in its original form. Both materials may be reused in other applications often of lower value than the original one. To be recyclable, the discarded material must have a collection infrastructure at the source of waste generation, at a central collection site, or at curbside. The recovered material must also have a market. If it is priced noncompetitively or no market exists, if it does not meet specifications, or if it requires special technology investments which cannot be recovered through future sales, the recovered material may be stockpiled or discarded rather than recycled. ?? 1996 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

Amey, E. B.; Kelly, T. D.

1996-01-01

236

National Recycling Directory. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The directory focuses on manufacturers and/or distributors of products made from waste materials. Companies listed in the directory manufacture products which contain some recycled or recovered material. The directory consists of separate sections for the types of recycled materials used: glass, ferrous metals, non-ferrous metals, paper, plastic, rubber, and textiles. The states are listed alphabetically within each subsection, and the companies are listed alphabetically under the state in which they are located.

Not Available

1982-01-01

237

Municipal solid waste recycling issues  

SciTech Connect

Municipal solid waste (MSW) recycling targets have been set nationally and in many states. Unfortunately, the definitions of recycling, rates of recycling, and the appropriate components of MSW vary. MSW recycling has been found to be costly for most municipalities compared to landfill disposal. MSW recycling policy should be determined by the cost to the community and to society more generally. In particular, recycling is a good policy only if environmental impacts and the resources used to collect, sort, and recycle a material are less than the environmental impacts and resources needed to provide equivalent virgin material plus the resources needed to dispose of the postconsumer material safely. From a review of the existing economic experience with recycling and an analysis of the environmental benefits (including estimation of external social costs), the authors find that, for most communities, curbside recycling is only justifiable for some postconsumer waste, such as aluminum and other metals. They argue that alternatives to curbside recycling collection should be explored, including product takeback for products with a toxic content (such as batteries) or product redesign to permit more effective product remanufacture.

Lave, L.B.; Hendrickson, C.T.; Conway-Schempf, N.M.; McMichael, F.C. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1999-10-01

238

An improved model for computing the trajectories of conductive particles in roll-type electrostatic separator for recycling metals from WEEE.  

PubMed

Electrostatic separation presents an effective and environmentally friendly way for recycling metals and nonmetals from ground waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). For this process, the trajectory of conductive particle is significant and some models have been established. However, the results of previous researches are limited by some simplifying assumptions and lead to a notable discrepancy between the model prediction and the experimental results. In the present research, a roll-type corona-electrostatic separator and ground printed circuit board (PCB) wastes were used to investigate the trajectory of the conductive particle. Two factors, the air drag force and the different charging situation, were introduced into the improved model. Their effects were analyzed and an improved model for the theoretical trajectory of conductive particle was established. Compared with the previous one, the improved model shows a good agreement with the experimental results. It provides a positive guidance for designing of separator and makes a progress for recycling the metals and nonmetals from WEEE. PMID:19201534

Wu, Jiang; Li, Jia; Xu, Zhenming

2009-08-15

239

Fate of nine recycled water trace organic contaminants and metal(loid)s during managed aquifer recharge into a anaerobic aquifer: Column studies.  

PubMed

Water quality changes associated with the passage of aerobic reverse osmosis (RO) treated recycled water through a deep anaerobic pyritic aquifer system was evaluated in sediment-filled laboratory columns as part of a managed aquifer recharge (MAR) strategy. The fate of nine recycled water trace organic compounds along with potential negative water quality changes such as the release of metal(loid)s were investigated in large-scale columns over a period of 12 months. The anaerobic geochemical conditions provided a suitable environment for denitrification, and rapid (half-life <1-25 days) degradation of the endocrine disrupting compounds (bisphenol A, 17beta-estradiol, 17alpha-ethynylestradiol), and iodipamide. However, pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine and oxazepam), disinfection by-products (N-nitrosodimethylamine, N-nitrosomorpholine) and iohexol did not degrade rapidly (half-life > 100 days). High retardation coefficients (R) determined for many of the trace organics (R 13 to 67) would increase aquifer residence time and be beneficial for many of the slow degrading compounds. However, for the trace organics with low R values (1.1-2.6) and slow degradation rates (half-life > 100 days), such as N-nitrosodimethylamine, N-nitrosomorpholine and iohexol, substantial biodegradation during aquifer passage may not occur and additional investigations are required. Only minor transient increases in some metal(loid) concentrations were observed, as a result of either pyrite oxidation, mineral dissolution or pH induced metal desorption, followed by metal re-sorption downgradient in the oxygen depleted zone. PMID:19939429

Patterson, B M; Shackleton, M; Furness, A J; Pearce, J; Descourvieres, C; Linge, K L; Busetti, F; Spadek, T

2010-03-01

240

Radioactive scrap metal (RSM) inventory & tracking system and prototype RSM field survey  

SciTech Connect

Based on very preliminary information, it has been estimated that the radioactive scrap metal (RSM) inventories at DOE facilities amount to about 1.5 million tons and a much larger amount will be generated from decontamination and decommissioning of surplus DOE facilities. To implement a national DOE program for beneficial reuse of RSM, it will be necessary to known the location and characteristics of RSM inventories that are available and will be generated to match them with product demands. It is the intent of this task to provide a standardized methodology via a RSM database for recording, tracking, and reporting data on RSM inventories. A multiple relational database in dBASE IV was designed and a PC-based code was written in Clipper 5.0 syntax to expedite entry, editing, querying, and reporting of RSM survey data. The PC based-code, the multiple relational database files, and other external files used by the code to generate reports and queries constitute a customized software application called the RSM Inventory & Tracking System (RSM I&TS). A prototype RSM field survey was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to demonstrate the field use of the RSM I&TS and logistics of conducting the survey. During the demonstration, about 50 tons of RSM were sized, characterized, sorted, and packaged in transport containers.

Thomas, T.R.

1994-09-01

241

Analysis for metal elements and radioactive isotopes in fly ash produced in lignite combustion at a thermal power plant  

Microsoft Academic Search

We determined the composition of fly ash from a thermal power plant and from the lignites used as mixed fuels at the plant.Heavy metals were analysed for qualitatively by emission spectrography and quantitatively by X?ray fluorescence. On the other hand, radioactive actinide elements were assayed by gamma and alpha spectrometry, and sulphur and carbon were determined by combustion.The analysis of

M. Casas; F. Garcias; Ll. Serra; M. Baucells; G. Lacort; M. Roura; R. Forteza; V. Cerdà

1992-01-01

242

Recycled Towers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students learn about material reuse by designing and building the strongest and tallest towers they can, using only recycled materials. They follow design constraints and build their towers to withstand earthquake and high wind simulations.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

243

Recycle City  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Recycling made fun. The Environmental Protection Agency's Recycle City Web site offers students an interactive way to learn how recycling can affect their environment. Users can click any part of the cartoon drawing of the city to learn about that particular building or site and what can be done to decrease waste. The site also contains a more involved exercise called the Dumptown game, where visitors click on City Hall to view various recycling programs and choose the program(s) the city will implement. Once implemented, that activity can be seen taking place in Dumptown. Although the Dumptown exercise may require the help of a teacher to navigate for younger students, both exercises are excellent for K-12 teachers and students.

1997-01-01

244

Ideas: Recycling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents classroom ideas focusing on connections among mathematics, concern for the environment, and conservation of natural resources, including decomposition, water conservation, packaging materials, use of manufactured cans, and recycling. Includes reproducible student worksheets. (MKR)

Chessin, Debby A.; And Others

1994-01-01

245

Recycling industries: Booming with scrap growth  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rise of consolidation in the scrap metal recycling industry trails, but parallels, the larger waste hauling industry, according to one of the leading scrap metal processors in the US. Recycling Industries (Englewood, CO) has been extremely active in acquiring new businesses since it received a $220 million capital loan last December. The company`s facilities number about 56 in 12

Malloy

1998-01-01

246

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR DECONTAMINATION AND CONVERSION OF SCRAP METAL  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Department of Energy (DOE) confronts the major responsibility of decommissioni ng most of the U.S. Nuclear Complex, which also includes the disposition of large amounts of radioactively contaminated scrap metal (RSM) including but not limited to steel, nickel, copper, and aluminum. The decontamination and recycling of RSM has become a key element in the DOE's strategy for cleanup of

Jagdish Malhotra

2000-01-01

247

Advanced technologies for decomtamination and conversion of scrap metal  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Department of Energy (DOE) faces the task of decommissioning much of the vast US weapons complex. One challenge of this effort includes the disposition of large amounts of radioactively contaminated scrap metal (RSM) including but not limited to steel, nickel, copper, and aluminum. The decontamination and recycling of RSM has become a key element in the DOE's strategy for

Valerie MacNair; Steve Sarten; Thomas Muth; Brajendra Mishra

1999-01-01

248

Textile recycling  

SciTech Connect

The most common household textiles include clothing, linens, draperies, carpets, shoes, handbags, and rugs. Old clothing, of course, is the most readily reused and/or recycled residentially generated textile category. State and/or local mandates to recycle a percentage of the waste stream are providing the impetus to add new materials to existing collection programs. Concurrently, the textile industry is aggressively trying to increase its throughput by seeking new sources of material to meet increased world demand for product. As experienced with drop-off programs for traditional materials, a majority of residents will not recycle materials unless the collection programs are convenient, i.e., curbside collection. The tonnage of marketable textiles currently being landfilled provide evidence of this. It is the authors' contention that if textile recycling is made convenient and accessible to every household in a municipality or region, then the waste stream disposed may be reduced in a similar fashion as when traditional recyclables are included in curbside programs.

Jablonowski, E. (Killam Associates, Millburn, NJ (United States)); Carlton, J.

1995-01-01

249

Recycling polyurethanes  

SciTech Connect

This article reports on the PolyUrethane Recycle and Recovery Council`s continuing evaluation of the technical and commercial viability of polyurethane recovery and recycling technologies. In North America, 240,000 tonnes of post-industrial and 16,000 tonnes of post-consumer polyurethane foam was recycled into carpet rebound underlay and other applications in 1993. Demand was so great in North America that 60,000 t of primarily post-industrial scarp was imported from Europe and the Far East. Polyurethane from the seats of the 9 million vehicles scrapped each year could yield 82,000 t of flexible post-consumer foam scrap: instrument and door panels could yield another 10,000 t of semi-flexible scrap.

NONE

1995-08-01

250

Tire Recycling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cryopolymers, Inc. tapped NASA expertise to improve a process for recycling vehicle tires by converting shredded rubber into products that can be used in asphalt road beds, new tires, hoses, and other products. In conjunction with the Southern Technology Applications Center and Stennis Space Center, NASA expertise in cryogenic fuel-handling needed for launch vehicle and spacecraft operations was called upon to improve the recycling concept. Stennis advised Cryopolymers on the type of equipment required, as well as steps to reduce the amount of liquid nitrogen used in the process. They also guided the company to use more efficient ways to control system hardware. It is estimated that more than 300 million tires nationwide are produced per year. Cryopolymers expects to reach a production rate of 5,000 tires recycled per day.

1997-01-01

251

Comparison of costs for solidification of high-level radioactive waste solutions: glass monoliths vs metal matrices  

SciTech Connect

A comparative economic analysis was made of four solidification processes for liquid high-level radioactive waste. Two processes produced borosilicate glass monoliths and two others produced metal matrix composites of lead and borosilicate glass beads and lead and supercalcine pellets. Within the uncertainties of the cost (1979 dollars) estimates, the cost of the four processes was about the same, with the major cost component being the cost of the primary building structure. Equipment costs and operating and maintenance costs formed only a small portion of the building structure costs for all processes.

Jardine, L.J.; Carlton, R.E.; Steindler, M.J.

1981-05-01

252

Endocytic recycling  

Microsoft Academic Search

After endocytosis, most membrane proteins and lipids return to the cell surface, but some membrane components are delivered to late endosomes or the Golgi. We now understand that the pathways taken by internalized molecules that eventually recycle to the cell surface can be surprisingly complex and can involve a series of sorting events that occur in several organelles. The molecular

Frederick R. Maxfield; Timothy E. McGraw

2004-01-01

253

Recycled soundscapes  

Microsoft Academic Search

An interactive system collects noise from a public place and transforms it into content for a public orchestration: the noise is split in specific sounds which are recomposed through sonic interface in a new soundscape. The SoundCam is the most visible part of the Recycling Soundscapes system. It rotates scanning a public space and gives the possibility to spy and

Karmen Franinovic; Yon Visell

2004-01-01

254

Recycling Philology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Proposes that English teachers recycle philology as a field of study. Redefines the shape of philology in view of postmodern theories of signification. Considers concepts of hermeneutics in retheorizing the aims of philology. Shows how such philological investigation might be used in the classroom to study literary texts. (HB)

Knapp, Peggy A.

1993-01-01

255

Feasibility of re-melting NORM-contaminated scrap metal  

SciTech Connect

Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) sometimes accumulate inside pieces of equipment associated with oil and gas production and processing activities. Typically, the NORM accumulates when radium that is present in solution in produced water precipitates out in scale and sludge deposits. Scrap equipment containing residual quantities of these NORM-bearing scales and sludges can present a waste management problem if the radium concentrations exceed regulatory limits or activate the alarms on radiation screening devices installed at most scrap metal recycling facilities. Although NORM-contaminated scrap metal currently is not disposed of by re-melting, this form of recycling could present a viable disposition option for this waste stream. Studies indicate that re-melting NORM-contaminated scrap metal is a viable recycling option from a risk-based perspective. However, a myriad of economic, regulatory, and policy issues have caused the recyclers to turn away virtually all radioactive scrap metal. Until these issues can be resolved, re-melting of the petroleum industry's NORM-impacted scrap metal is unlikely to be a widespread practice. This paper summarizes the issues associated with re-melting radioactive scrap so that the petroleum industry and its regulators will understand the obstacles. This paper was prepared as part of a report being prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission's NORM Subcommittee.

Winters, S. J.; Smith, K. P.

1999-10-26

256

Metal decontamination for waste minimization using liquid metal refining technology  

SciTech Connect

The current Department of Energy Mixed Waste Treatment Project flowsheet indicates that no conventional technology, other than surface decontamination, exists for metal processing. Current Department of Energy guidelines require retrievable storage of all metallic wastes containing transuranic elements above a certain concentration. This project is in support of the National Mixed Low Level Waste Treatment Program. Because of the high cost of disposal, it is important to develop an effective decontamination and volume reduction method for low-level contaminated metals. It is important to be able to decontaminate complex shapes where surfaces are hidden or inaccessible to surface decontamination processes and destruction of organic contamination. These goals can be achieved by adapting commercial metal refining processes to handle radioactive and organic contaminated metal. The radioactive components are concentrated in the slag, which is subsequently vitrified; hazardous organics are destroyed by the intense heat of the bath. The metal, after having been melted and purified, could be recycled for use within the DOE complex. In this project, we evaluated current state-of-the-art technologies for metal refining, with special reference to the removal of radioactive contaminants and the destruction of hazardous organics. This evaluation was based on literature reports, industrial experience, plant visits, thermodynamic calculations, and engineering aspects of the various processes. The key issues addressed included radioactive partitioning between the metal and slag phases, minimization of secondary wastes, operability of the process subject to widely varying feed chemistry, and the ability to seal the candidate process to prevent the release of hazardous species.

Joyce, E.L. Jr.; Lally, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ozturk, B.; Fruehan, R.J. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1993-09-01

257

Radioactivity and heavy metal concentrations of some commercial fish species consumed in the Black Sea Region of Turkey.  

PubMed

Marine fish is an important daily diet item for the people of Turkey. The Black Sea Region of Turkey was contaminated by the Chernobyl accident in 1986, a comprehensive study was planned and carried out to determine the radioactivity levels ((226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs) and heavy metal concentrations (As, Mn, Fe, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu and Pb) in four of the most common fish species: Engraulis encrasicholus (anchovy), Oncorhynchus mykiss (trout), Trachurus mediterranus (bluefin) and Merlangius merlangus (whiting) samples collected from eight stations in the Black Sea Region of Turkey during 2010. The dose due to consumption of fish by the public was estimated and it was shown that this dose imposes no threat to human healthy. The concentrations of heavy metal are below the daily intake recommended by the international organizations. PMID:22225706

Korkmaz Görür, F; Keser, R; Akçay, N; Dizman, S

2012-04-01

258

ADSORPTION OF RADIOACTIVE METALS BY STRONGLY MAGNETIC IRON SULFIDE NANOPARTICLES PRODUCED BY SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The adsorption of a number of radioactive ions from solution by a strongly magnetic iron sulfide material was studied. The material was produced by sulfate-reducing bacteria in a novel bioreactor. The uptake was rapid and loading on the adsorbent was high due to the high surface area of the adsorbent and because many of the ions were chemisorbed. The structural

J. H. P. Watson; I. W. Croudace; P. E. Warwick; P. A. B. James; J. M. Charnock; D. C. Ellwood

2001-01-01

259

Engineering 'Deinococcus Radiodurans' for Metal Remediation in Radioactive Mixed Waste Sites. (Final Report, 1997-2004).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Immense volumes of radioactive waste were generated from the production of 46,000 nuclear weapons in the United States between 1945 and 1986. This is a period when national security priorities often surmounted concerns over the environment. Most wastes in...

M. J. Daly J. K. Fredrickson L. P. Wackett

2005-01-01

260

THERMODYNAMICS OF THE VOLATILIZATION OF ACTINIDE METALS IN THE HIGH-TEMPERATURE TREATMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

EPA Science Inventory

We are proposing to perform a detailed study of the volatilization behavior of the U, Pu and possibly Am under conditions relevant to the thermal treatment (destruction) of actinide-containing organic-based mixed and radioactive wastes. The primary objective of this 3-year projec...

261

Secondary sulfate minerals associated with acid drainage in the eastern US: Recycling of metals and acidity in surficial environments  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Weathering of metal-sulfide minerals produces suites of variably soluble efflorescent sulfate salts at a number of localities in the eastern United States. The salts, which are present on mine wastes, tailings piles, and outcrops, include minerals that incorporate heavy metals in solid solution, primarily the highly soluble members of the melanterite, rozenite, epsomite, halotrichite, and copiapite groups. The minerals were identified by a combination of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron-microprobe. Base-metal salts are rare at these localities, and Cu, Zn, and Co are commonly sequestered as solid solutions within Fe- and Fe-Al sulfate minerals. Salt dissolution affects the surface-water chemistry at abandoned mines that exploited the massive sulfide deposits in the Vermont copper belt, the Mineral district of central Virginia, the Copper Basin (Ducktown) mining district of Tennessee, and where sulfide-bearing metamorphic rocks undisturbed by mining are exposed in Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee. Dissolution experiments on composite salt samples from three minesites and two outcrops of metamorphic rock showed that, in all cases, the pH of the leachates rapidly declined from 6.9 to 30 mg L-1), Fe (>47 mg L-1), sulfate (>1000 mg L-1), and base metals (>1000 mg L-1 for minesites, and 2 mg L-1 for other sites). Geochemical modeling of surface waters, mine-waste leachates, and salt leachates using PHREEQC software predicted saturation in the observed ochre minerals, but significant concentration by evaporation would be needed to reach saturation in most of the sulfate salts. Periodic surface-water monitoring at Vermont minesites indicated peak annual metal loads during spring runoff. At the Virginia site, where no winter-long snowpack develops, metal loads were highest during summer months when salts were dissolved periodically by rainstorms following sustained evaporation during dry spells. Despite the relatively humid climate of the eastern United States, where precipitation typically exceeds evaporation, salts form intermittently in open areas, persist in protected areas when temperature and relative humidity are appropriate, and contribute to metal loadings and acidity in surface waters upon dissolution, thereby causing short-term perturbations in water quality.

Hammarstrom, J. M.; Seal, II, R. R.; Meier, A. L.; Kornfeld, J. M.

2005-01-01

262

Precipitation Recycling  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The water cycle regulates and reflects natural variability in climate at the regional and global scales. Large-scale human activities that involve changes in land cover, such as tropical deforestation, are likely to modify climate through changes in the water cycle. In order to understand, and hopefully be able to predict, the extent of these potential global and regional changes, we need first to understand how the water cycle works. In the past, most of the research in hydrology focused on the land branch of the water cycle, with little attention given to the atmospheric branch. The study of precipitation recycling which is defined as the contribution of local evaporation to local precipitation, aims at understanding hydrologic processes in the atmospheric branch of the water cycle. Simply stated, any study on precipitation recycling is about how the atmospheric branch of the water cycle works, namely, what happens to water vapor molecules after they evaporate from the surface, and where will they precipitate?

Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.; Bras, Rafael L.

1996-01-01

263

Computer Recycling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Given current rates of computer consumerism and technological advances, one might expect to find a lot of computers out there in the world. What happens to these old computers? This Topic in Depth explores this issue, reviews some options for recycling computers, and provides tips for anyone considering purchasing a refurbished computer. The first article from BBC News (1) reports on research which suggests that "the number of personal computers worldwide is expected to double by 2010 to 1.3 billion machines." The second article from Oasis, a project of the Irish eGovernment initiative, (2) reviews some of the issues surrounding waste from electrical and electronic equipment. This next article from PC World (3) gives some ideas for how to dispose of an old notebook computer. One option, of course, is to donate your notebook, which is discussed in this article from Tech Soup (4). Another resource for information on computer recycling and reuse is this website from CompuMentor (5). Given the current market for computers, many are considering refurbished computers. This article from Vnunet (6 ) explains what a refurbished computer is while the next website provides some tips for buying a refurbished computer (7 ). Finally, this article from About.com reports on the recently introduced National Computer Recycling Act (8).

264

Argonne National Laboratory's Recycling Pilot Plant  

ScienceCinema

Argonne has a Recycling Pilot Plant designed to save the non-metal portions of junked cars. Here, program managers demonstrate how plastic shredder residue can be recycled. (Currently these automotive leftovers are sent to landfills.) For more information, visit Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center Web site at http://www.transportation.anl.gov.

Spangenberger, Jeff; Jody, Sam;

2013-04-19

265

Argonne National Laboratory's Recycling Pilot Plant  

ScienceCinema

Argonne has a Recycling Pilot Plant designed to save the non-metal portions of junked cars. Here, program managers demonstrate how plastic shredder residue can be recycled. (Currently these automotive leftovers are sent to landfills.) For more information, visit Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center Web site at http://www.transportation.anl.gov.

266

Argonne National Laboratory's Recycling Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

Argonne has a Recycling Pilot Plant designed to save the non-metal portions of junked cars. Here, program managers demonstrate how plastic shredder residue can be recycled. (Currently these automotive leftovers are sent to landfills.) For more information, visit Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center Web site at http://www.transportation.anl.gov.

Spangenberger, Jeff; Jody, Sam

2009-01-01

267

Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) accumulated large quantities of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) through historic maintenance activities. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of major sites formerly engaged in production of nuclear materials and manufacture of nuclear weapons will generate additional quantities of RSM, as much as 3 million tons of such metal according to a recent study. The recycling of RSM is quickly becoming appreciated as a key strategy in DOE`s cleanup of contaminated sites and facilities.

Muth, T.R.; Shasteen, K.E.; Liby, A.L. [and others

1995-12-01

268

Melting, Solidification, Remelting, and Separation of Glass and Metal  

SciTech Connect

Several kinds of radioactive waste exist in mixed forms at DOE sites throughout the United States. These Wastes consist of radionuclides and some usefil bme materials. One purpose of waste treatment technologies is to vitrify the radionuclides into durable, stable glass-like materials to reduce the size of the waste form requiring final disposal. The other purpose is to recycle and reuse most of the usefi.d base materials. Thus, improved techniques for the separation of molten metal and glass are essential. Several high temperature vitrification technologies have been developed for the treatment of a wide range of mixed waste types in both the low-level waste and transuranic (TRU) mixed waste categories currently in storage at DOE sites throughout the nation. These processes include the plasma hearth process, which is being developed by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), and the arc melter vitrification process, which is being developed at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The products of these processes are an oxide slag phase and a reduced metal phase. The metal phase has the potential to be recycled within the DOE Complex. Enhanced slag/metal separation methods are needed to suppoti these process. A separation method is also needed for the radioactively contaminated scrap metal recycling processe; in order to obtain highly refined recycled metals.

M. A. Ebadian; R. C.Xin; Z. F. Dong

1998-11-02

269

Recovery and recycling of post-consumer waste materials. Part 2. Target wastes (glass beverage bottles, plastics, scrap metal and steel cans, end-of-life tyres, batteries and household hazardous waste)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first part of the review paper dealt with general information and covered the specific sectors of paper\\/cardboard and aluminium cans. The present Part 2 should be read in conjunction with Part 1 and assesses the recovery and recycling of additional post-consumer waste sectors, i.e. glass beverage bottles, plastics, scrap metal and steel cans, end-of-life tyres, batteries and household hazardous

Jan Baeyens; Anke Brems; Raf Dewil

2010-01-01

270

Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals form water using magnetic resin.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrite...

R. L. Kochen J. D. Navratil

1995-01-01

271

Green Science: Revisiting Recycling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recycling has been around for a long time--people have reused materials and refashioned them into needed items for thousands of years. More recently, war efforts encouraged conservation and reuse of materials, and in the 1970s recycling got its official start when recycling centers were created. Now, curbside recycling programs and recycling

Palliser, Janna

2011-01-01

272

Regeneration and recycle of spent oxide reduction solvent salts used in pyrochemical plutonium recovery operations at Los Alamos  

SciTech Connect

One method used at Los Alamos for producing plutonium metal is to chemically reduce the oxide with calcium metal in molten CaCl/sub 2/ at 850/sup 0/C. The solvent CaCl/sub 2/ from this reduction step is currently discarded as low-level radioactive waste because it is saturated with the reaction by-product, CaO. We have developed and demonstrated a molten salt technique for rechlorinating the CaO, thereby regenerating the CaCl/sub 2/ and incorporating solvent recycle into the batch PuO/sub 2/ reduction process. We discuss results from salt regeneration and recycle experiments, and present our plans for incorporating the technique into an advanced design for semi-continuous plutonium metal production.

Fife, K.W.; Bowersox, D.F.; Simpson, J.J.; Davis, C.C.; Phillips, B.J.; McCormick, E.D.

1986-01-01

273

Marshall Space Flight Center solid waste characterization and recycling improvement study: General office and laboratory waste, scrap metal, office and flight surplus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary objectives of the study were to characterize the solid waste stream for MSFC facilities in Huntsville, Alabama, and to evaluate their present recycling program. The purpose of the study was to determine if improvements could be made in terms of increasing quantities of the present commodities collected, adding more recyclables to the program, and streamlining or improving operational

Michael H. Eley; Lavonne Crews; Ben Johnston; David Lee; James Colebaugh

1995-01-01

274

Marshall Space Flight Center solid waste characterization and recycling improvement study: General office and laboratory waste, scrap metal, office and flight surplus  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The primary objectives of the study were to characterize the solid waste stream for MSFC facilities in Huntsville, Alabama, and to evaluate their present recycling program. The purpose of the study was to determine if improvements could be made in terms of increasing quantities of the present commodities collected, adding more recyclables to the program, and streamlining or improving operational efficiency. In conducting the study, various elements were implemented. These included sampling and sorting representative samples of the waste stream; visually inspecting each refuse bin, recycle bin, and roll-off; interviewing employees and recycling coordinators of other companies; touring local material recycling facilities; contacting experts in the field; and performing a literature search.

Eley, Michael H.; Crews, Lavonne; Johnston, Ben; Lee, David; Colebaugh, James

1995-01-01

275

Designing Aluminum Alloys for a Recycling Friendly World  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recycling aluminum alloys has been shown to provide major economic benefits, as a result it is appropriate for the aluminum industry and the United States as a whole to identify, develop, and implement all technologies that will optimize the benefits of recycling. This paper will focus primarily alloy design for optimizing the reuse of recycled metal; this is both the

Subodh K. Das

2006-01-01

276

Comparison of ion release from new and recycled orthodontic brackets  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bracket corrosion can occur in the oral environment. The purpose of this study was to compare the release of metal ions from new and recycled brackets in artificial saliva and buffers with different pH values over a 12-week immersion period. The brackets were divided into 2 groups: new and recycled. The recycled bracket bases were coated with adhesive and the

Tsui-Hsien Huang; Chen-Chieh Yen; Chia-Tze Kao

2001-01-01

277

Antimony recycling in the United States in 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The importance of recycling has become more obvious as concerns about the environment and import dependence have grown in recent years. When materials are recycled, fewer natural resources are consumed, and less waste products go to landfills or pollute the water and air. This study, one of a series of reports on metals recycling in 2000, discusses the flow of antimony from mining through its uses and disposal with emphasis on recycling. In 2000, the recycling efficiency for antimony was estimated to be 89 percent, and the recycling rate was about 20 percent.

Carlin, James F., Jr.

2006-01-01

278

Recycling: Additional Efforts Could Increase Municipal Recycling.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Although recycling can generate environmental and economic benefits, the national recycling rate has increased only slightly since 2000, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). While local governments have the primary role in operating rec...

2006-01-01

279

Economics and Environmental Compatibility of Fusion Reactors —Its Analysis and Coming Issues— 3. Expected Effect of Fusion Reactor on Global Environment 3.1 Research Aimed at Reducing Radioactive Waste  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Waste management at fusion power plants is reviewed. Recent study indicates that most of the waste from a fusion reactor can be cleared from regulatory control over a 50-year cooling after decommissioning. In addition, the remaining metal radioactive waste is anticipated to be recyclable within 100-year cooling. These results indicate the prospect of a low emission system of fusion energy materials.

Tobita, Kenji; Hiwatari, Ryouji

280

Galactic Cosmochronometry from Radioactive Elements in the Spectra of Very Old Metal-Poor Stars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a short review of neutron-capture elemental abundances in Galactic halo stars, emphasis is placed on the use of these elements to estimate the age of the Galactic halo. Two prominent characteristics of neutron-capture elements in halo stars are their large star-to-star scatter in the overall abundance level with respect to lighter elements, and the dominance of r-process abundance patterns at lowest stellar metallicities. The r-process abundance signature potentially allows the direct determination of the age of the earliest Galactic halo nucleosynthesis events, but further developments in r-process theory, high resolution spectroscopy of very metal-poor stars, and in basic atomic data are needed to narrow the uncertainties in age estimates. Attention is brought to the importance of accurate transition probabilities in neutron-capture element cosmochronometry. Recent progress in the transition probabilities of rare earth elements is discussed, along with suggestions for future work on other species.

Sneden, Christopher; Lawler, James E.; Cowan, John J.

281

Development of DOE complex wide authorized release protocols for radioactive scrap metals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within the next few decades, several hundred thousand tons of metal are expected to be removed from nuclear facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex as a result of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities. These materials, together with large quantities of tools, equipment, and other items that are commonly recovered from site cleanup or D&D activities, constitute non-real

1998-01-01

282

Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin  

DOEpatents

Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

Kochen, Robert L. (Boulder, CO); Navratil, James D. (Simi Valley, CA)

1997-01-21

283

Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin  

DOEpatents

Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

1997-01-21

284

Recycling Improves USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Changes are occurring in recycling that will improve the United States. There are significant improvements in the economy, environment and the health of Americans due to recycling efforts. Recycling will be shown as a superior option compared to landfill, incineration and virgin material processing. Many Case studies will be discussed that show how communities are making long-term decisions for recycling.

Luke Monroe

285

Radiation dose assessments to support evaluations of radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of materials and equipment  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory is providing Environmental Protection Support and Assistance to the USDOE, Office of Environmental Guidance. Air, Water, and Radiation Division. As part of this effort, PNL is collecting data and conducting technical evaluations to support DOE analyses of the feasibility of developing radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of metals, concrete, or equipment containing residual radioactive contamination from DOE operations. The radiological control levels will be risk-based, as developed through a radiation exposure scenario and pathway analysis. The analysis will include evaluation of relevant radionuclides, potential mechanisms of exposure, and both health and non-health-related impacts. The main objective of this report is to develop a methodology for establishing radiological control levels for recycle or reuse. This report provides the results of the radiation exposure scenario and pathway analyses for 42 key radionuclides generated during DOE operations that may be contained in metals or equipment considered for either recycling or reuse. The scenarios and information developed by the IAEA. Application of Exemption Principles to the Recycle and Reuse of Materials from Nuclear Facilities, are used as the initial basis for this study. The analyses were performed for both selected worker populations at metal smelters and for the public downwind of a smelter facility. Doses to the public downwind were estimated using the US (EPA) CAP88-PC computer code with generic data on atmospheric dispersion and population density. Potential non-health-related effects of residual activity on electronics and on film were also analyzed.

Hill, R.L.; Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

1995-07-01

286

DWPF Recycle Evaporator Simulant Tests  

SciTech Connect

Testing was performed to determine the feasibility and processing characteristics of an evaporation process to reduce the volume of the recycle stream from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The concentrated recycle would be returned to DWPF while the overhead condensate would be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Plant. Various blends of evaporator feed were tested using simulants developed from characterization of actual recycle streams from DWPF and input from DWPF-Engineering. The simulated feed was evaporated in laboratory scale apparatus to target a 30X volume reduction. Condensate and concentrate samples from each run were analyzed and the process characteristics (foaming, scaling, etc) were visually monitored during each run. The following conclusions were made from the testing: Concentration of the ''typical'' recycle stream in DWPF by 30X was feasible. The addition of DWTT recycle streams to the typical recycle stream raises the solids content of the evaporator feed considerably and lowers the amount of concentration that can be achieved. Foaming was noted during all evaporation tests and must be addressed prior to operation of the full-scale evaporator. Tests were conducted that identified Dow Corning 2210 as an antifoam candidate that warrants further evaluation. The condensate has the potential to exceed the ETP WAC for mercury, silicon, and TOC. Controlling the amount of equipment decontamination recycle in the evaporator blend would help meet the TOC limits. The evaporator condensate will be saturated with mercury and elemental mercury will collect in the evaporator condensate collection vessel. No scaling on heating surfaces was noted during the tests, but splatter onto the walls of the evaporation vessels led to a buildup of solids. These solids were difficult to remove with 2M nitric acid. Precipitation of solids was not noted during the testing. Some of the aluminum present in the recycle streams was converted from gibbsite to aluminum oxide during the evaporation process. The following recommendations were made: Recycle from the DWTT should be metered in slowly to the ''typical'' recycle streams to avoid spikes in solids content to allow consistent processing and avoid process upsets. Additional studies should be conducted to determine acceptable volume ratios for the HEME dissolution and decontamination solutions in the evaporator feed. Dow Corning 2210 antifoam should be evaluated for use to control foaming. Additional tests are required to determine the concentration of antifoam required to prevent foaming during startup, the frequency of antifoam additions required to control foaming during steady state processing, and the ability of the antifoam to control foam over a range of potential feed compositions. This evaluation should also include evaluation of the degradation of the antifoam and impact on the silicon and TOC content of the condensate. The caustic HEME dissolution recycle stream should be neutralized to at least pH of 7 prior to blending with the acidic recycle streams. Dow Corning 2210 should be used during the evaporation testing using the radioactive recycle samples received from DWPF. Evaluation of additional antifoam candidates should be conducted as a backup for Dow Corning 2210. A camera and/or foam detection instrument should be included in the evaporator design to allow monitoring of the foaming behavior during operation. The potential for foam formation and high solids content should be considered during the design of the evaporator vessel.

Stone, M

2005-04-05

287

Evaluation of tritium recycle and buildup in a pressurized water reactor. Technical note  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recycling radioactive liquid wastes at light-water cooled nuclear power reactors is becoming a popular method of limiting release levels to as low as practicable. As a result of recycling the liquid wastes the tritium in the liquid waste streams is not removed. Combined with its relatively long half life (12.33 years), recycling results in a buildup of large volumes of

1977-01-01

288

Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

2003-02-26

289

Natural radioactive elements and heavy metals in coal, fly ash and bottom ash from a thermal power plant  

SciTech Connect

The composition of coal used as fuel at a thermal power plant and those of the fly and bottom ashes it produces were determined. Radioactive elements were analysed for by alpha and gamma spectrometry, while sulphur, carbon and nitrogen were determined by burning. Heavy metals were quantified by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES). The low sulphur content of the coal (0.68%) gives rise to fly ash containing only 0.21% of this element. The radiochemical analyses performed by alpha spectrometry revealed that most of the uranium remains in the solid residue resulting from disaggregation of the sample with Na[sub 2]CO[sub 3] in the separation process. Also, the gamma spectrometric results show that the elements from the 4n and 4n + 2 series and [sup 40]K concentrate in fly ash, the mean particle size of which is the smallest of all the residues assayed. 8 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

Font, J.; Casas, M.; Forteza, R.; Cerda, V.; Garcias, F. (Univ. of the Balearic Islands, Palma de Mallorca (Spain))

1993-11-01

290

Aluminum recycling in the United States in 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As one of a series of reports on metals recycling, this report discusses the flow of aluminum from production through its uses with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap) and used products (old scrap) in 2000. This materials flow study includes a description of aluminum supply and demand factors for the United States to illustrate the extent of aluminum recycling and to identify recycling trends. Understanding the system of materials flow from source to ultimate disposition can assist in improving the management of natural resources in a manner that is compatible with sound environmental practices. In 2000, the old scrap recycling efficiency for aluminum was estimated to be 42 percent. Almost 60 percent of the aluminum that was recycled in 2000 came from new scrap, and the recycling rate was estimated to be 36 percent. The principal source of old scrap was recycled aluminum beverage cans.

Plunkert, Patricia A.

2006-01-01

291

Recycling opportunities for neighbourhoods and communities  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses recycling paper, glass, plastics, and metals. It presents a community technology approach to recycling, and reviews present efforts in repair and renovation, reuse, and recycling. A final chapter on the appropriateness of recycling technologies to neighborhoods and communities concludes that only a paper recycling plant can be supported by a neighborhood (100 people) and a pulp packaging unit would require a community (1000 people). A district (10,000) people would be required to support a small-scale cellulose insulation manufacturing plant, 100,000 people are needed to support a glass/resin tile production plant, and 1,000,000 people are needed to support small-scale aluminum smelting.

Thomas, C.

1981-10-01

292

Recycle Used Oil on America Recycles Day.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains that motor oils can be reused and recycled. Educates students about environmental hazards and oil management and includes classroom activities. Addresses the National Science Education Standards. (YDS)

White, Boyd W.

2000-01-01

293

Recycled Art: Create Puppets Using Recycled Objects.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an activity from "Healthy Foods from Healthy Soils" for making puppets using recycled food packaging materials. Includes background information, materials, instructions, literature links, resources, and benchmarks. (NB)

Clearing, 2003

2003-01-01

294

Platinum recycling in the United States in 1998  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the United States, catalytic converters are the major source of secondary platinum for recycling. Other sources of platinum scrap include reforming and chemical process catalysts. The glass industry is a small but significant source of platinum scrap. In North America, it has been estimated that in 1998 more than 20,000 kilograms per year of platinum-group metals from automobile catalysts were available for recycling. In 1998, an estimated 7,690 kilograms of platinum were recycled in the United States. U.S. recycling efficiency was calculated to have been 76 percent in 1998; the recycling rate was estimated at 16 percent.

Hilliard, Henry E.

2001-01-01

295

Recycle of battery components. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recycle-disposal scenario has been considered for the batteries nickel\\/zinc, nickel\\/iron, zinc\\/chlorine, zinc\\/bromine, sodium\\/sulfur and lithium-aluminum\\/metal sulfide. Flowsheets are presented which include disassembly, materials handling, melting or solubilization, liquid\\/solid separations, purifications and waste handling. Material and energy balances are provided for all major streams and capital and operating costs for typical plant sizes are presented. Recycle is a viable option

J. P. Pemsler; R. A. Spitz

1981-01-01

296

ASSESSMENTS OF FUTURE ENVIRONMENTAL TRENDS AND PROBLEMS OF INCREASED USE, RECYCLING, AND COMBUSTION OF FIBER-REINFORCED, PLASTIC AND METAL COMPOSITE MATERIALS  

EPA Science Inventory

The purpose of the study is to identify and define future environmental concerns related to the projected utilization, recycling, and combustion of composite materials. The study is being conducted for the Office of Strategic Assessment and Special Studies (OSASS) of the U.S. Env...

297

Feasibility of recycling thorium in a fusion-fission hybrid/PWR symbiotic system  

SciTech Connect

A study was made of the economic impact of high levels of radioactivity in the thorium fuel cycle. The sources of this radioactivity and means of calculating the radioactive levels at various stages in the fuel cycle are discussed and estimates of expected levels are given. The feasibility of various methods of recycling thorium is discussed. These methods include direct recycle, recycle after storage for 14 years to allow radioactivity to decrease, shortening irradiation times to limit radioactivity build up, and the use of the window in time immediately after reprocessing where radioactivity levels are diminished. An economic comparison is made for the first two methods together with the throwaway option where thorium is not recycled using a mass energy flow model developed for a CTHR (Commercial Tokamak Hybrid Reactor), a fusion-fission hybrid reactor which serves as fuel producer for several PWR reactors.

Josephs, J. M.

1980-12-31

298

Natural radioactivity levels and heavy metals in chemical and organic fertilizers used in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.  

PubMed

The present work deals with identifying and determining the activity levels of natural occuring radionuclides, (226)Ra and (232)Th series, their decay products and (40)K, in chemical and organic fertilizers used in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A total of 30 samples: 20 phosphatic fertilizers (single super-phosphate SSP and triple super-phosphate,TSP) and 10 organic fertilizers (cow, sheep and chicken) collected from markets and farms. The gamma-ray spectrometer consists of NaI(Tl) detector and its electronic circuit was used for measuring ?-ray spectra. The ranges of radioactivity levels of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in chemical fertilizers are 51.5±5.2-106.3±7.5, 5.1±1.6-9.9±3.2. and 462.6±21-607.3±14Bqkg(-1), respectively. The activities of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in natural fertilizers (cow, sheep and chicken) are lower than the activities in chemical fertilizers. The obtained data are compared with available reported data from other countries in literature. The Ra(eq) in chemical fertilizer ranges from 100.37 to 161.43Bqkg(-1) and in organic fertilizer ranges from 34.07 to 102.19Bqkg(-1), which are lower than the limit of 370Bqkg(-1) adopted from NEA-OECD (1979). The average heavy metal (Pb, Cd, Ni, Co and Cr) contents of the fertilizers marketed in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia are also determined and within the limits of those used worldwide. PMID:21906958

El-Taher, A; Althoyaib, S S

2012-01-01

299

Recycling Rules: Understanding Recycling and a MRF  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners simulate the separation techniques that materials recovery facilities (MRFs) use and then design their own series of recycling techniques. Learners identify four ways recyclable materials can be separated and sorted at a MRF: conveyor belts, blowers, flotation, and magnetism.

Keep America Beautiful, Inc.

2010-01-01

300

Recycling of automotive aluminum  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the global warming of concern, the secondary aluminum stream is becoming an even more important component of aluminum production and is attractive because of its economic and environmental benefits. In this work, recycling of automotive aluminum is reviewed to highlight environmental benefits of aluminum recycling, use of aluminum alloys in automotive applications, automotive recycling process, and new technologies in

Jirang CUI; Hans J. ROVEN

2010-01-01

301

Understanding radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

Murray, R.L.

1981-12-01

302

Magnesium recycling in the United States in 1998  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As concern for the environment has grown in recent years, the importance of recycling has become more evident. The more materials that are recycled, the fewer natural resources will be consumed and the fewer waste products will end up in landfills, the water, and the air. As one of a series of reports on metals recycling, this report discusses the 1998 flow of magnesium in the United States from extraction through its uses with particular emphasis on recycling. In 1998, the recycling efficiency for magnesium was estimated to be 33 percent--almost 60 percent of the magnesium that was recycled came from new scrap, primarily waste from die-casting operations. The principal source of old scrap was recycled aluminum beverage cans.

Kramer, Deborah A.

2002-01-01

303

Magnesium recycling in the United States in 1998  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As concern for the environment has grown in recent years, the importance of recycling has become more evident. The more materials that are recycled, the fewer natural resources will be consumed and the fewer waste products will end up in landfills, in the water, and in the air. As one of a series of reports on metals recycling, this report discusses the 1998 flow of magnesium from extraction through its uses with particular emphasis on recycling. In 1998, the recycling rate for magnesium was estimated to be 33 percent?almost 60 percent of the magnesium that was recycled came from new scrap, primarily waste from diecasting operations. The principal source of old scrap was recycled aluminum beverage cans.

Kramer, Deborah A.

2001-01-01

304

Decontaimination of radioactive metals  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of extracting technetium and actinide radiocontaminants from radiocontaminated nickel comprising the steps: fabricating a nickel electrode contaminated with technetium and actinides; and then anodically dissolving the electrode contaminated with technetium and actinides in a oxidizing acid electrolyte solution to produce a solution containing actinide ions and at least 30 grams/liter of nickel and to oxidize the technetium to produce pertechnetate anions; and then removing pertechnetate anions and actinides by counter-current solvent extraction with a barren solution containing TOPO, D[sub 2]EHPA or mixtures thereof dissolved in an organic solvent, to produce a decontaminated, nickel containing raffinate, and a contaminated, loaded solvent stream; and then stripping the technetium values from the contaminated, loaded solvent stream with hydrochloric acid; passing the decontaminated, nickel containing raffinate through an absorbent for organic solvent; and then electrowinning the raffinate in an electrolysis cell with acidic electrolyte to remove residual actinides present, and to recover cathodic nickel.

Snyder, T.S.; Gass, W.R.; Worcester, S.A.; Ayers, L.J.

1992-10-20

305

A rationale for recycling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The decision as to whether to recycle discarded objects or not has traditionally been made on a simple financial basis. However, over the last few years a popular movement has sprung up which regards recycling as a good in itself, and this movement finds itself at odds with the present financial basis for recycling. In this paper a rationale for recycling is worked out in an attempt to resolve this conflict. It is concluded that the normal market signals do not provide a proper basis for recycling decisions and that this market failure must be corrected by government intervention. However, this intervention should not take the form of uncritical support for recycling. Rather the societal objectives of individual recycling proposals should be identified and the proposal should then be evaluated in terms of whether it would achieve these objectives more effectively than some alternative action.

Evans, David G.

1994-05-01

306

Metal Surface Decontamination by the PFC Solution  

SciTech Connect

PFC (per-fluorocarbon) spray decontamination equipment was fabricated and its decontamination behavior was investigated. Europium oxide powder was mixed with the isotope solution which contains Co-60 and Cs-137. The different shape of metal specimens artificially contaminated with europium oxide powder was used as the surrogate contaminants. Before and after the application of the PFC spray decontamination method, the radioactivity of the metal specimens was measured by MCA. The decontamination factors were in the range from 9.6 to 62.4. The spent PFC solution was recycled by distillation. Before and after distillation, the turbidity of PFC solution was also measured. From the test results, it was found that more than 98% of the PFC solution could be recycled by a distillation. (authors)

Hui-Jun Won; Gye-Nam Kim; Wang-Kyu Choi; Chong-Hun Jung; Won-Zin Oh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute - KAERI, P.O.Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon, Korea, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01

307

Recyclable automobiles. (Latest citations from Engineered Materials abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and characteristics of non-metal, recyclable components used in automobiles. Existing polymer, plastic, and composite technology and materials are discussed. The citations also examine design and development of new recyclable materials that are durable. Design features and constraints are included. Some citations address future trends leading to the 100 percent recyclable automobile. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-01-01

308

Recyclable automobiles. (Latest citations from Engineered Materials abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and characteristics of non-metal, recyclable components used in automobiles. Existing polymer, plastic, and composite technology and materials are discussed. The citations also examine design and development of new recyclable materials that are durable. Design features and constraints are included. Some citations address future trends leading to the 100 percent recyclable automobile. (Contains a minimum of 77 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01

309

Recyclable automobiles. (Latest citations from Engineered Materials abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and characteristics of non-metal, recyclable components used in automobiles. Existing polymer, plastic, and composite technology and materials are discussed. The citations also examine design and development of new recyclable materials that are durable. Design features and constraints are included. Some citations address future trends leading to the 100 percent recyclable automobile. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-01-01

310

Vanadium recycling for fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Very stringent purity specifications must be applied to low activation vanadium alloys, in order to meet recycling goals requiring low residual dose rates after 50--100 years. Methods of vanadium production and purification which might meet these limits are described. Following a suitable cooling period after their use, the vanadium alloy components can be melted in a controlled atmosphere to remove volatile radioisotopes. The aim of the melting and decontamination process will be the achievement of dose rates low enough for ``hands-on`` refabrication of new reactor components from the reclaimed metal. The processes required to permit hands-on recycling appear to be technically feasible, and demonstration experiments are recommended. Background information relevant to the use of vanadium alloys in fusion reactors, including health hazards, resources, and economics, is provided.

Dolan, T.J.; Butterworth, G.J.

1994-04-01

311

Reclamation of automotive batteries: Assessment of health impacts and recycling technology. Task 1: Assessment of recycling technology. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Approximately ten different candidate EV battery technologies were examined based on their performance and recyclability, and were ranked based on these examinations. The batteries evaluated were lead-acid (all types), nickel-cadmium, nickel-iron, nickel-metal hydride, sodium-sulfur, sodium-nickel chloride, lithium-iron disulfide, lithium-ion, lithium polymer, and zinc (zinc-air and zinc-bromine). Locations of present recycling facilities were identified. Markets for recycled products were assessed: the

S. Unnasch; M. Montano; P. Franklin; G. Nowell; C. Martin

1995-01-01

312

Aluminium recycling and environmental issues of salt slag treatment.  

PubMed

Environmental friendly recycling is the trend toward total recycling of aluminium metal. In the secondary aluminium industry, due to the complexity of compositions and contaminants in the various types of aluminium scraps, an understanding of the behavior of different scraps during melting is crucial in the recycling process. Salt slags are the byproducts of the secondary aluminium industry, which should be recycled and processed in a proper way by taking the environmental impact into consideration. This article provides qualitative assessment on 10 different commercial aluminium scraps for their relative recyclability via well-designed and controlled laboratory experiments. It confirms that more nonmetallic contaminants, smaller size, and higher ratio of surface area to body volume generally lead to a lower metal recovery. Recycling the scraps with lower recyclability normally generates more salt slags. High slag viscosity leads to more fine aluminum metal entrapped in the salt slag and thus increases the load of salt slag recycling. It was found that viscosity of the salt flux is increased with the amount of entrapped nonmetallic components, which affect the settling of heavier materials. In addition, the slag samples from the melting tests were leached and analyzed to evaluate the behavior of carbon containing scrap. The elevated carbon content in the scrap resulted in more carbide formation in salt slags and thus more methane generation in salt slag recycling with a higher environmental impact. PMID:16194908

Xiao, Yanping; Reuter, Markus A; Boin, Udo

2005-01-01

313

Some aspects of risk reduction strategy by multiple recycling in fast burner reactors of the plutonium and minor actinide inventories  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper shows the impact of recycling light water reactor (LWR) mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in a fast burner reactor on the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) inventories and on the related radioactivities. Reprocessing of the targets for multiple recycling will become increasingly difficult as the burnup increases. Multiple recycling of Pu + MA in fast reactors is a

L. H. Baetslé; Ch. De Raedt

1997-01-01

314

28 CFR 25.56 - Responsibilities of junk yards and salvage yards and auto recyclers.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...requirements. (h) Scrap metal processors and shredders...receive automobiles for recycling where the condition...ascertained, however, scrap metal processors and shredders...on this inspection, scrap metal processors and...

2013-07-01

315

Endocytic Recycling Compartments Altered in Cisplatin-Resistant Cancer Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

The clinical utility of cisplatin to treat human malignancies is often limited by the development of drug resistance. We have previously shown that cisplatin-resistant human KB adeno- carcinoma cells that are cross-resistant to methotrexate and heavy metals have altered endocytic recycling. In this work, we tracked lipids in the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) and found that the distribution of the

Xing-Jie Liang; Sushmita Mukherjee; Ding-Wu Shen; Frederick R. Maxfield; Michael M. Gottesman

2006-01-01

316

Atmospheric levels and cytotoxicity of PAHs and heavy metals in TSP and PM 2.5 at an electronic waste recycling site in southeast China  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty-nine air samples of total suspended particles (TSP, particles less than 30–60?m) and thirty samples of particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5?m (PM2.5) were collected at Guiyu, an electronic waste (e-waste) recycling site in southeast China from 16 August 2004 to 17 September 2004. The results showed that mass concentrations contained in TSP and PM2.5 were 124±44.1 and 62.12±20.5?gm?3,

W. J. Deng; P. K. K. Louie; W. K. Liu; X. H. Bi; J. M. Fu; M. H. Wong

2006-01-01

317

THE HANDLING OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fundamentals and the dangers inherent in handling radioactive ; materials are discussed, making particular reference to reactor coolants (gas, ; water, and liquid metals). The danger inherent in handling radioactive ma ; terials lies in the electromagnetic radiation produced when atomic particles ; collide or interact with various substances. Precautions and methods of ; protection from radioactive materials are

Hadrill; H. F. J

1961-01-01

318

Factors Influencing Household Recycling Behavior  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate factors encouraging or deterring recycling, telephone interviews were used to study recycling behavior, attitudes, and knowledge of 221 randomly selected adults in a suburban city that had begun a citywide curbside recycling program within the past year. Approximately 40% reported participation in the curbside recycling program, and nearly 20% more claimed that their household had been recycling in

Stuart Oskamp; Maura J. Harrington; Todd C. Edwards; Deborah L. Sherwood; Shawn M. Okuda; Deborah C. Swanson

1991-01-01

319

Recycling of electric-arc-furnace dust  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electric arc furnace (EAF) dust is one of the largest solid waste streams produced by steel mills, and is classified as a waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Successful recycle of the valuable metals (iron, zinc, and lead) present in the dust will result in resource conservation while simultaneously reducing

Sresty

1990-01-01

320

The energy benefit of stainless steel recycling  

Microsoft Academic Search

The energy used to produce austenitic stainless steel was quantified throughout its entire life cycle for three scenarios: (1) current global operations, (2) 100% recycling, and (3) use of only virgin materials. Data are representative of global average operations in the early 2000s. The primary energy requirements to produce 1 metric ton of austenitic stainless steel (with assumed metals concentrations

Jeremiah Johnson; B. K. Reck; T. Wang; T. E. Graedel

2008-01-01

321

Resource Recovery. Redefining the 3 Rs. Reduce...Reuse...Recycle. Resources in Technology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the problems of waste disposal, recycling, and resource recovery. Includes information on the social and cultural impact, the three classes of resource recovery (reuse, direct recycling, and indirect recycling), and specific products (paper, glass, plastics, metals, and so on). Includes a student quiz and possible outcomes. (JOW)

Technology Teacher, 1991

1991-01-01

322

The development of recycle-friendly automotive aluminum alloys  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The continuing growth of aluminum alloy usage in transportation applications, notably passenger automobiles and minivans, and the demonstrated economic benefits of recycling aluminum-rich vehicles increase the need to seriously consider the desirability of designing recycling-friendly alloys. This article focuses on that aspect of the recycling process for passenger vehicles. The goals are to illustrate the opportunities afforded by identifying and taking full advantage of potential metal streams in guiding the development of new alloys that use those streams. In speculating on several possible aluminum recovery practices and systems that might be used in recycling passenger vehicles, likely compositions are identified and preliminary assessments of their usefulness for direct recycling are made. Specific compositions for possible new recycle-friendly alloys are suggested. In addition, recommendations on how the aluminum enterprise, including industry, academia, and government, can work together to achieve the aggressive but important goals described here are discussed.

Das, Subodh K.; Green, J. A. S.; Kaufman, J. Gilbert

2007-11-01

323

Recycled materials in asphalt pavements. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of asphalt pavement materials, and the use of other recycled materials to manufacture asphalt pavement. Articles discuss methods used for recycling bituminous pavement including hot-mix and cold-mix. Materials used to improve recycled pavement, and recycled materials used in asphalt pavement include latexes, rubber scrap such as tires, glass shards, concretes, dusts, waste oils, roofing wastes, sulfur, and metal refining sludges. Testing and evaluation of recycled pavements both in laboratories and in test cases are considered. (Contains a minimum of 160 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-05-01

324

Method of preparing bodies containing radioactive substances  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

Radioactive substances are disposed of by incorporating glass particles containing the radioactive substance in molten metal, heat treating the molten metal containing the glass particles to convert the glass to glass ceramic, and cooling the resulting composite to solidify the metal and provide the glass ceramic particles embedded in a matrix of the metal.

1980-06-24

325

ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS FOUND IN LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE STREAMS  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes and presents the findings from two studies undertaken for the European Commission to assess the long-term impact upon the environment and human health of non-radioactive contaminants found in various low level radioactive waste streams. The initial study investigated the application of safety assessment approaches developed for radioactive contaminants to the assessment of nonradioactive contaminants in low level radioactive waste. It demonstrated how disposal limits could be derived for a range of non-radioactive contaminants and generic disposal facilities. The follow-up study used the same approach but undertook more detailed, disposal system specific calculations, assessing the impacts of both the non-radioactive and radioactive contaminants. The calculations undertaken indicated that it is prudent to consider non-radioactive, as well as radioactive contaminants, when assessing the impacts of low level radioactive waste disposal. For some waste streams with relatively low concentrations of radionuclides, the potential post-closure disposal impacts from non-radioactive contaminants can be comparable with the potential radiological impacts. For such waste streams there is therefore an added incentive to explore options for recycling the materials involved wherever possible.

R.H. Little, P.R. Maul, J.S.S. Penfoldag

2003-02-27

326

Recycling Conform Design.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The flow of materials in a real recycling system can be demonstrated in a simplified manner by a recycling model system. The analysis of this system results in additional new goals and guide lines for design. The guide lines are interpreted by examples sh...

W. Jorden

1984-01-01

327

Is mandated recycling possible  

Microsoft Academic Search

If piles of potentially recyclable materials are accumulated as a result of a mandatory source separation program, what options exist for the community First, it could attempt to market the recyclables through normal commercial channels. Second, the community could attempt to market the materials at lower prices to the consumers, since any contribution above available disposal cost is a profit

Cutler

1988-01-01

328

Partnership: Recycling $/$ Outdoor Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Ottawa Board of Education (Ontario, Canada) has committed revenues generated by a districtwide recycling program to help fund the MacSkimming Outdoor Education Centre. A partnership between recycling and outdoor education is valuable in developing an environmental ethic among students and in finding new ways to fund outdoor education. (LP)

Weir, Phil

1996-01-01

329

Making Recycled Paper  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This video and accompanying text describe the three-pronged resource conservation strategy known as "reduce, reuse, and recycle". The video segment, adapted from the television program 'ZOOM', features cast members demonstrating how something that might otherwise be discarded, such as newspaper, can be recycled to create a functional or even beneficial new product. Questions for discussion are also provided.

2005-01-01

330

Reuse, Reduce, Recycle.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discussion of recycling paper in law libraries is also applicable to other types of libraries. Results of surveys of law libraries that investigated recycling practices in 1987 and again in 1990 are reported, and suggestions for reducing the amount of paper used and reusing as much as possible are offered. (LRW)

Briscoe, Georgia

1991-01-01

331

Recycling at Camp.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Outlines a Michigan summer camp's efforts to reduce solid waste disposal by recycling cardboard, tin, glass, aluminum, and plastic milk containers. Points out variables affecting the success of such efforts. Discusses Michigan state funding for the development of recycling programs. (SV)

Cummins, William M.

1988-01-01

332

Wee Recyclers Resources.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hands-on activities in this guide are designed to help preschool children (ages 3-5) understand that reducing, reusing, and recycling preserves natural resources and prolongs the life of landfills. Children sort, match and compare recyclable items and learn to separate some items by number and color. The 29 activities are divided into units that…

Wisconsin State Dept. of Natural Resources, Madison.

333

The Fermilab recycler ring  

SciTech Connect

The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

Martin Hu

2001-07-24

334

AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY WASTEWATER RECYCLING  

EPA Science Inventory

The feasibility of recycling certain categories of water used in the manufacture of airplanes was demonstrated. Water in four categories was continuously recycled in 380-liter (100-gallon) treatment plants; chemical process rinse water, dye-penetrant crack-detection rinse water, ...

335

Advances in plastic recycling. Volume 1: Recycling of polyurethanes  

SciTech Connect

``Recycling of Polyurethanes'', the first volume in the Advances in Plastics Recycling series, is focused on the physical and chemical recycling of polyurethanes, with attention given to energy conversion. A compilation of the present ongoing studies on recycling of urethane and, in general, isocyanate-based polymers, the focus is on thermosetting urethane polymers. Contents include: Recycling of Polyurethane Plastics in the European Automotive Industry; Present State of Polyurethane Recycling in Europe; Processing Overview of Bonded Polyurethane Foam; Mechanical Recycling of Polyurethane Scrap; Ecostream{trademark}--A Technology Beyond Recycling; Recycling of Flexible polyurethane Foam; General purpose Adhesives Prepared from Chemically Recycled Waste Rigid Polyurethane Foams; and Utilization of Isocyanate Binders in Recycling of Scrap Automotive Headliners.

Frisch, K.C.; Klempner, D.; Prentice, G.

1999-07-01

336

"Final Report for Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER62492 "Engineering Deinococcus radiodurans for Metal Remediation in Radioactive Mixed Waste Sites"  

SciTech Connect

The groundwater and sediments of numerous U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) field sites are contaminated with mixtures of heavy metals (e.g., Hg, Cr, Pd) and radionuclides (e.g., U, Tc), as well as the fuel hydrocarbons benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX); chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as trichloroethylene (TCE); and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The remediation of such mixed wastes constitutes an immediate and complex waste management challenge for DOE, particularly in light of the costliness and limited efficacy of current physical and chemical strategies for treating mixed wastes. In situ bioremediation via natural microbial processes (e.g., metal reduction) remains a potent, potentially cost-effective approach to the reductive immobilization or detoxification of environmental contaminants. Seventy million cubic meters of soil and three trillion liters of groundwater have been contaminated by leaking radioactive waste generated in the United States during the Cold War. A cleanup technology is being developed based on the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. Our recent isolation and characterization of D. radiodurans from a variety of DOE environments, including highly radioactive sediments beneath one of the leaking tanks (SX-108) at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington state, underscores the potential for this species to survive in such extreme environments. Research aimed at developing D. radiodurans for metal remediation in radioactive waste sites was started by this group in September 1997 with support from DOE NABIR grant DE-FG02-97ER62492. Our grant was renewed for the period 2000-2003, which includes work on the thermophilic radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus geothermalis. Work funded by the existing grant contributed to 18 papers in the period 1997-2004 on the fundamental biology of D. radiodurans and its design for bioremediation of radioactive waste environments. Our progress since September 2000 closely matches the Aims proposed in our second NABIR application and is summarized as follows. We have further refined expression vectors for D. radiodurans and successfully tested engineered strains in natural DOE sediment and groundwater samples. Further, we have shown that D. geothermalis is transformable with plasmids and integration vectors designed for D. radiodurans. This was demonstrated by engineering Hg(II)-resistant D. geothermalis strains capable of reducing Hg(II) at elevated temperatures and under chronic irradiation. Additionally, we showed that D. geothermalis, like D. radiodurans, is naturally capable of reducing U(VI), Cr(VI), and Fe(III). These characteristics support the prospective development of this thermophilic radiophile for bioremediation of radioactive mixed waste environments with temperatures as high as 55 C, of which there are many examples. Our annotation of the D. radiodurans genome has been an important guide throughout this project period and continues to be a source of inspiration in the development of new genetic technologies dedicated to this bacterium. For example, our genome analyses have enabled us to achieve engineering goals that were unattainable in our first NABIR project (1997-2000), where uncertainties relating to its metabolic configuration prevented efforts to expand its metabolic capabilities. As just one example, we showed that D. radiodurans has a functioning tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle glyoxylate bypass which could be integrated with toluene oxidation. And, we successfully engineered D. radiodurans to derive carbon and energy from complete toluene mineralization and showed that toluene oxidation can be coupled to cellular biosynthesis, survival, as well as its native and engineered metal reducing capabilities. We have also constructed a whole genome microarray for D. radiodurans covering {approx}94% of its predicted genes and have successfully used the array to examine the response of cells to radiation and other DOE relevant conditions. Similarly, we have used high throughput proteomic approaches to

Michael J. Daly, Ph.D.

2005-03-17

337

Recycling: General studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the processes, techniques, and benefits of recycling. The recycling processes for aluminum, chromium, nickel, cobalt, lead, copper, and precious metals scrap are discussed. Also included are citations on recycling of waste paper fibers and rubber wastes for the production of new products. Recycling in the jewelry, electronics, milling, beverage, automotive, and aircraft industries are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-11-01

338

Recycling: General studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the processes, techniques, and benefits of recycling. The recycling processes for aluminum, chromium, nickel, cobalt, lead, copper, and precious metals scrap are discussed. Also included are citations on recycling of waste paper fibers and rubber wastes for the production of new products. Recycling in the jewelry, electronics, milling, beverage, automotive, and aircraft industries are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-12-01

339

Recycling: General studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the processes, techniques, and benefits of recycling. The recycling processes for aluminum, chromium, nickel, cobalt, lead, copper, and precious metals scrap are discussed. Also included are citations on recycling of waste paper fibers and rubber wastes for the production of new products. Recycling in the jewelry, electronics, milling, beverage, automotive, and aircraft industries are considered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-12-01

340

Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Site Report on the Production and Use of Recycled Uranium  

SciTech Connect

Recent allegations regarding radiation exposure to radionuclides present in recycled uranium sent to the gaseous diffusion plants prompted the Department of Energy to undertake a system-wide study of recycled uranium. Of particular interest, were the flowpaths from site to site operations and facilities in which exposure to plutonium, neptunium and technetium could occur, and to the workers that could receive a significant radiation dose from handling recycled uranium. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory site report is primarily concerned with two locations. Recycled uranium was produced at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant where highly enriched uranium was recovered from spent fuel. The other facility is the Specific Manufacturing Facility (SMC) where recycled, depleted uranium is manufactured into shapes for use by their customer. The SMC is a manufacturing facility that uses depleted uranium metal as a raw material that is then rolled and cut into shapes. There are no chemical processes that might concentrate any of the radioactive contaminant species. Recyclable depleted uranium from the SMC facility is sent to a private metallurgical facility for recasting. Analyses on the recast billets indicate that there is no change in the concentrations of transuranics as a result of the recasting process. The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant was built to recover high-enriched uranium from spent nuclear fuel from test reactors. The facility processed diverse types of fuel which required uniquely different fuel dissolution processes. The dissolved fuel was passed through three cycles of solvent extraction which resulted in a concentrated uranyl nitrate product. For the first half of the operating period, the uranium was shipped as the concentrated solution. For the second half of the operating period the uranium solution was thermally converted to granular, uranium trioxide solids. The dose reconstruction project has evaluated work exposure and exposure to the public as the result of normal operations and accidents that occurred at the INEEL. As a result of these studies, the maximum effective dose equivalent from site activities did not exceed seventeen percent of the natural background in Eastern Idaho. There was no year in which the radiation dose to the public exceeded the applicable limits for that year. Worker exposure to recycled uranium was minimized by engineering features that reduced the possibility of direct exposure.

L. C. Lewis; D. C. Barg; C. L. Bendixsen; J. P. Henscheid; D. R. Wenzel; B. L. Denning

2000-09-01

341

Recycle Experience of Dismantled Cask Handling Crane by Surface Removal Sampling at Kori No. 1.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Kori No.1, which began operation in 1978, replaced its cask handling crane in 2000. To prove the safety of recycling and reuse of crane scrap, a particular calculation method for surface contamination was used. Because surface radioactive contaminatio...

K. D. Kim C. Y. Baeg J. K. Son H. S. Kim J. H. Ha M. J. Song

2002-01-01

342

Recycle Used Oil on America Recycles Day  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Motor oil doesn't wear out--it just gets dirty. Students and the general public may not know that used oil can be reused or recycled. The fact is, used oil can be re-fined, blended with additives, and used again. When you consider that 1.4 billion gallons

White, Boyd W.

2000-11-01

343

Integrated Recycling Test Fuel Fabrication  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Recycling Test is a collaborative irradiation test that will electrochemically recycle used light water reactor fuel into metallic fuel feedstock. The feedstock will be fabricated into a metallic fast reactor type fuel that will be irradiation tested in a drop in capsule test in the Advanced Test Reactor on the Idaho National Laboratory site. This paper will summarize the fuel fabrication activities and design efforts. Casting development will include developing a casting process and system. The closure welding system will be based on the gas tungsten arc burst welding process. The settler/bonder system has been designed to be a simple system which provides heating and controllable impact energy to ensure wetting between the fuel and cladding. The final major pieces of equipment to be designed are the weld and sodium bond inspection system. Both x-radiography and ultrasonic inspection techniques have been examine experimentally and found to be feasible, however the final remote system has not been designed. Conceptual designs for radiography and an ultrasonic system have been made.

R.S. Fielding; K.H. Kim; B. Grover; J. Smith; J. King; K. Wendt; D. Chapman; L. Zirker

2013-03-01

344

Recovery of recyclable materials from shredder residue  

SciTech Connect

Each year, about 11 million tons of metals (ferrous and nonferrous) are recovered in the US from about 10 million discarded automobiles. The recovered metals account for about 75% of the total weight of the discarded vehicles. The balance of the material or shredder residue, which amounts to about 3 million tons annually, is currently landfilled. The residue contains a diversity of potentially recyclable materials, including polyurethane foams, iron oxides, and certain thermoplastics. This paper discusses a process under development at Argonne National Laboratory to separate and recover the recyclable materials from this waste stream. The process consists essentially of two-stages. First, a physical separation is used to recover the foams and the metal oxides, followed by a chemical process to extract certain thermoplastics. Status of the technology is discussed and process economics reviewed.

Jody, B.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Bonsignore, P.V.; Brockmeier, N.F.

1994-01-01

345

Recovering recyclable materials from shredder residue  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Each year, about 11 million tons of metals are recovered in the United States from about 10 million discarded automobiles. The recovered metals account for about 75 percent of the total weight of the discarded vehicles. The balance of the material, known as shredder residue, amounts to about three million tons annually and is currently landfilled. The residue contains a diversity of potentially recyclable materials, including polyurethane foams, iron oxides, and certain thermoplastics. This article discusses a process under development at Argonne National Laboratory to separate and recover the recyclable materials from this waste stream. The process consists essentially of two stages. First, a physical separation is used to recover the foams and the metal oxides, followed by a chemical process to extract certain thermoplastics. The status of the technology and the process economics are reviewed here.

Jody, Bassam J.; Daniels, Edward J.; Bonsignore, Patrick V.; Brockmeier, Norman F.

1994-02-01

346

Dragnet: Nonprofit Computer Recyclers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you have ever wondered what happens to obsolete computers, check out these current awareness Websites. The disposal of computers is classified as hazardous waste, which has become an environmental concern as the number of obsolete computers rises. In fact, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and the State of Massachusetts have banned computer equipment from landfills. Dragnet: Nonprofit Computer Recyclers is an EPA-licensed computer recycling organization that reuses all acceptable components and systems or recycles damaged or unusable components. Rebuilt computer systems are given to "persons with disabilities and persons living in disadvantaged situations."

347

The Totem Pole Recycled.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents an activity that integrates science, environmental education, art, and social studies. Students identify and research an endangered species and construct a totem pole depicting the species using a recyclable material. (MDH)

Sewall, Susan Breyer

1991-01-01

348

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this media-rich lesson featuring LOOP SCOOPS videos, students consider how the concept of needs vs. wants can help them think about ways to protect Earth's natural resources by reducing, reusing, and recycling materials.

Foundation, Wgbh E.

2010-11-30

349

Making Recycled Paper  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity on page 11 of the PDF, learners follow simple steps to recycle old newspaper into new paper. Use this activity to introduce conservation as well as the chemistry of cellulose and how paper products are made.

Society, American C.

2011-01-01

350

Climate Kids: Recycle This!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The site features an online game in which participants keep recyclable items out of the trash by guiding them into proper bins. Accompanying the game is a list of three categories of items that can be recycled, along with the benefits of doing so. This lesson is part of the Climate Kids website, a NASA education resource featuring articles, videos, images and games focused on the science of climate change.

351

Recyclability Index for Automobiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

A rating system was developed to quantify the environmental impacts of light-duty motor vehicles at the end of their life-cycle based on recyclability, toxic material content and ultimate disposal. Each year, 10-11 million vehicles are retired from service in the United States. The vehicle material not recycled is called automotive shredder residue (ASR). About 4.5 to 5 million tons of

Alexander Tsuji; Yarrow Nelson; Andrew Kean; Samuel A. Vigil

2006-01-01

352

Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal  

SciTech Connect

In October 1993, Manufacturing Sciences Corporation was awarded DOE contract DE-AC21-93MC30170 to develop and test recycling of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) to high value and intermediate and final product forms. This work was conducted to help solve the problems associated with decontamination and reuse of the diffusion plant barrier nickel and other radioactively contaminated scrap metals present in the diffusion plants. Options available for disposition of the nickel include decontamination and subsequent release or recycled product manufacture for restricted end use. Both of these options are evaluated during the course of this research effort. work during phase I of this project successfully demonstrated the ability to make stainless steel from barrier nickel feed. This paved the way for restricted end use products made from stainless steel. Also, after repeated trials and studies, the inducto-slag nickel decontamination process was eliminated as a suitable alternative. Electro-refining appeared to be a promising technology for decontamination of the diffusion plant barrier material. Goals for phase II included conducting experiments to facilitate the development of an electro-refining process to separate technetium from nickel. In parallel with those activities, phase II efforts were to include the development of the necessary processes to make useful products from radioactive scrap metal. Nickel from the diffusion plants as well as stainless steel and carbon steel could be used as feed material for these products.

MacNair, V.; Muth, T.; Shasteen, K.; Liby, A.; Hradil, G.; Mishra, B.

1996-12-31

353

Recycling of electric-arc-furnace dust  

SciTech Connect

Electric arc furnace (EAF) dust is one of the largest solid waste streams produced by steel mills, and is classified as a waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Successful recycle of the valuable metals (iron, zinc, and lead) present in the dust will result in resource conservation while simultaneously reducing the disposal problems. Technical feasibility of a novel recycling method based on using hydrogen as the reductant was established under this project through laboratory experiments. Sponge iron produced was low in zinc, cadmium, and lead to permit its recycle, and nontoxic to permit its safe disposal as an alternative to recycling. Zinc oxide was analyzed to contain 50% to 58% zinc by weight, and can be marketed for recovering zinc and lead. A prototype system was designed to process 2.5 tons per day (600 tons/year) of EAF dust, and a preliminary economic analysis was conducted. The cost of processing dust by this recycling method was estimated to be comparable to or lower than existing methods, even at such low capacities.

Sresty, G.C.

1990-05-01

354

Influence of Heavy Metals and PCBs Pollution on the Enzyme Activity and Microbial Community of Paddy Soils around an E-Waste Recycling Workshop  

PubMed Central

Due to the emerging environmental issues related to e-waste there is concern about the quality of paddy soils near e-waste workshops. The levels of heavy metals and PCBs and their influence on the enzyme activity and microbial community of paddy soils obtained from the immediate vicinity of an e-waste workshop were investigated in the present study. The results indicated that the heavy metal and PCB pollution did not differ significantly with an increase of the sampling point distances (5 to 30 m). The concentration of Cd (2.16 mg·kg?1) and Cu (69.2 mg·kg?1) were higher, and the PCB pollution was also serious, ranging from 4.9 to 21.6 ?g·kg?1. The highest enzyme activity was found for urease compared to phosphatase and catalase, and a fluctuating trend in soil enzyme activity was observed in soils from different sampling sites. The microbial analysis revealed that there was no apparent correlation between the microbial community and the pollutants. However, a slight influence for soil microbial communities could be found based on DGGE, the Shannon index and PCA analysis. The present study suggests that the contamination stress of heavy metals and PCBs might have a slight influence on microbial activity in paddy soils. This study provides the baseline data for enzyme activities and microbial communities in paddy soil under the influence of mixed contamination.

Tang, Xianjin; Hashmi, Muhammad Z.; Long, Dongyan; Chen, Litao; Khan, Muhammad I.; Shen, Chaofeng

2014-01-01

355

P2Pro(RSM) : a computerized management tool for implementing DOE's authorized release process for radioactive scrap metals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Within the next few decades, several hundred thousand tons of metal and several million cubic meters of concrete are expected to be removed from nuclear facilities across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex as a result of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities. These materials, together with large quantities of tools, equipment, and other items that are commonly recovered from

J. Arnish; S. Y. Chen; S. Kamboj; L. Nieves

1999-01-01

356

Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOEpatents

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter.

Gotovchikov, Vitaly T. (Moscow, RU); Ivanov, Alexander V. (Moscow, RU); Filippov, Eugene A. (Moscow, RU)

1998-05-12

357

Processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOEpatents

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

1998-05-12

358

Deep Recycling of Carbon  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While most of the subducted H2O is recycled at shallow and subarc depths, carbon is less readily mobilized and susceptive to complex redox processes involving CO2 in solids, fluids and melts, elemental carbon, Fe- and Si- carbides, and methane. Here I review the various ways of recycling carbon during subduction and present a spectrum of possible reaction products in the mantle. Metamorphic reactions liberate <20% of the subducted CO2 to the subarc region (Connolly 2005, EPSL). Larger amounts might be mobilized through (sediment) melting. Although the wet pelite solidus is only shifted by 30-50 oC (at 3 GPa) with carbonates, the latter remain stable with melts that are saturated in a H2O+CO2-fluid. Complete dissolution of carbonates requires temperatures above any predicted subduction geotherm. Carbonated sediments yield CO2-rich phonolites to 5 GPa but carbonatites at higher pressures. The silicate melts become increasingly potassic with pressure, while the alkali-rich carbonatites have their highest K/Na at 8 GPa, slightly decreasing to 13 GPa and become sodic with the disappearance of residual cpx at ~16 GPa. What may happen when carbonated pelite derived melts migrate into the mantle is illustrated in Central Italy: in this case, it can be experimentally demonstrated that hybridization of ultrapotassic phonolitic melts with ~2 wt% H2O and ~6 wt% CO2 in the mantle results in the primitive parents of the ultrapotassic kamafugite suites which have ~43 wt% SiO2. Hence, despite a crustal isotopic signature of C, O, and Sr in these rocks, the CO2 of the Italian magmatism does not stem from assimilation in the crust but from melts derived from subducted marine carbonates mixed with pelagic clays and then reacted in the mantle. The migration of CO2-bearing fluids and melts into the mantle may lead to a redox-shock. Where high liquid/mantle ratios prevail, carbonatites rest in their oxidized form and may only freeze in relatively cold lithospheric keels where they form metasomatic zones prone to generate kimberlites in the context of a much later remelting event. Where the redox-capacity of the oxidized crust-derived material is subequal to the reduced mantle, iron carbides are to be expected. The eutectic in the Fe-Ni-C system is at lower temperatures than the mantle adiabat, leading to the distinct possibility that such zones entrained in global mantle convection will contain ~1% of eutectic Fe-C-melt. When the amount of subduction derived CO2 is small compared to the redox capacity of a metal bearing reduced mantle, diamond will form, but diamond itself is not truly reducing at high pressures. The most extreme reducing case leads to moissanite (found together with diamond), which isotopic signature implies involvement of organically derived carbon. Moissanite (SiC) only forms at fO2 <6-8 log units below iron-wustite and coexists with mantle silicates that have an XMg of 0.995-0.998. Our calculations show that a fluid or melt with a bulk, which is slightly more reduced than the CO2-H2O-tieline in C-O-H, may evolve to ultra-reduced residual C-H-rich fluids through removal of CO2 (through carbonate precipitation) followed by removal of H2O (through hydrous silicate formation). As SiC may only be in grain scale equilibrium with the mantle and requires a protracted fluid-fractionation, we propose that SiC is generally a low temperature phase formed from originally already reducing fluids involving organic carbon and hence subduction.

Schmidt, M. W.

2012-12-01

359

Process design and solvent recycle for the supercritical Fischer-Tropsch synthesis  

SciTech Connect

A recycle reactor system for supercritical Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was successfully designed and tested. The new reactor system has these characteristics: (1) integration of supercritical Fischer-Tropsch reactions, natural separation of produced wax from liquid phase, and recycle of the solvent and (2) natural recycle of solvent driven by self-gravity. A 20% Co/SiO{sub 2} catalyst and n-hexane were used as a catalyst and supercritical fluid, respectively. The results show that the average CO conversion at the steady state was 45% with recycle and 58% without recycle. The lumped hydrocarbon products distribution did not have any obvious difference between with and without recycle operation; however, {alpha}-olefin content of products with recycle was lower than that without recycle. The XRD result indicates that most of the reduced cobalt remains in the metallic state during the Fischer-Tropsch reactions for both cases. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Wensheng Linghu; Xiaohong Li; Kenji Asami; Kaoru Fujimoto [University of Kitakyushu, Fukuoka (Japan). Department of Chemical Processes and Environments, Faculty of Environmental Engineering

2006-02-01

360

Cobalt recycling in the United States in 1998  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report is one of a series of reports on metals recycling. It defines and quantifies the 1998 flow of cobalt-bearing materials in the United States, from imports and stock releases through consumption and disposition, with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap) and used products (old scrap). Because of cobalt?s many and diverse uses, numerous types of scrap were available for recycling by a wide variety of processes. In 1998, an estimated 32 percent of U.S. cobalt supply was derived from scrap. The ratio of cobalt consumed from new scrap to that from old scrap was estimated to be 50:50. Of all the cobalt in old scrap available for recycling, an estimated 68 percent was either consumed in the United States or exported to be recycled.

Shedd, Kim B.

2002-01-01

361

Tungsten recycling in the United States in 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report, which is one of a series of reports on metals recycling, defines and quantifies the flow of tungsten-bearing materials in the United States from imports and stock releases through consumption and disposition in 2000, with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap) and used products (old scrap). Because of tungsten's many diverse uses, numerous types of scrap were available for recycling by a wide variety of processes. In 2000, an estimated 46 percent of U.S. tungsten supply was derived from scrap. The ratio of tungsten consumed from new scrap to that consumed from old scrap was estimated to be 20:80. Of all the tungsten in old scrap available for recycling, an estimated 66 percent was either consumed in the United States or exported to be recycled.

Shedd, Kim B.

2011-01-01

362

Recycling of Reinforced Plastics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work has shown is that it is possible to recycle continuous and short fibre reinforced thermosetting resins while keeping almost the whole of the original material, both fibres and matrix, within the recyclate. By splitting, crushing hot or cold, and hot forming, it is possible to create a recyclable material, which we designate a Remat, which can then be used to remanufacture other shapes, examples of plates and tubes being demonstrated. Not only can remanufacturing be done, but it has been shown that over 50 % of the original mechanical properties, such as the E modulus, tensile strength, and interlaminar shear strength, can be retained. Four different forms of composite were investigated, a random mat Glass Fibre Reinforced Plastic (GFRP) bathroom component and boat hull, woven glass and carbon fibre cloth impregnated with an epoxy resin, and unidirectional carbon fibre pre-preg. One of the main factors found to affect composite recyclability was the type of resin matrix used in the composite. Thermoset resins tested were shown to have a temperature range around the Glass Transition Temperature (Tg) where they exhibit ductile behaviour, hence aiding reforming of the material. The high-grade carbon fibre prepreg was found to be less easy to recycle than the woven of random fibre laminates. One method of remanufacturing was by heating the Remat to above its glass transition temperature, bending it to shape, and then cooling it. However, unless precautions are taken, the geometric form may revert. This does not happen with the crushed material.

Adams, R. D.; Collins, Andrew; Cooper, Duncan; Wingfield-Digby, Mark; Watts-Farmer, Archibald; Laurence, Anna; Patel, Kayur; Stevens, Mark; Watkins, Rhodri

2014-02-01

363

Cadmium Recycling in the United States in 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Recycling of cadmium is a young and growing industry that has been influenced by environmental concerns and regulatory constraints. Domestic recycling of cadmium began in 1989 as a byproduct of processing of spent nickel-cadmium batteries. In 1995, International Metals Reclamation Co. Inc. expanded its operations by building a dedicated cadmium recycling plant. In 2000, an estimated 13 percent of cadmium consumption in the United States was sourced from recycled cadmium, which is derived mainly from old scrap or, to lesser degree, new scrap. The easiest forms of old scrap to recycle are small spent nickel-cadmium batteries followed by flue dust generated during recycling of galvanized steel and small amounts of alloys that contain cadmium. Most of new scrap is generated during manufacturing processes, such as nickel-cadmium battery production. All other uses of cadmium are in low concentrations and, therefore, difficult to recycle. Consequently, much of this cadmium is dissipated and lost. The amount of cadmium in scrap that was unrecovered in 2000 was estimated to be 2,030 t, and an estimated 285 t was recovered. Recycling efficiency was estimated to be about 15 percent.

Plachy, Jozef

2003-01-01

364

Cadmium recycling in the United States in 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Recycling of cadmium is a young and growing industry that has been influenced by environmental concerns and regulatory constraints. Domestic recycling of cadmium began in 1989 as a byproduct of processing of spent nickel-cadmium batteries. In 1995, International Metals Reclamation Co. Inc. expanded its operations by building a dedicated cadmium recycling plant. In 2000, an estimated 13 percent of cadmium consumption in the United States was sourced from recycled cadmium, which is derived mainly from old scrap or, to lesser degree, new scrap. The easiest forms of old scrap to recycle are small spent nickel-cadmium batteries followed by flue dust generated during recycling of galvanized steel and small amounts of alloys that contain cadmium. Most of new scrap is generated during manufacturing processes, such as nickel-cadmium battery production. All other uses of cadmium are in low concentrations and, therefore, difficult to recycle. Consequently, much of this cadmium is dissipated and lost. The amount of cadmium in scrap that was unrecovered in 2000 was estimated to be 2,030 metric tons, and an estimated 285 tons was recovered. Recycling efficiency was estimated to be about 15 percent.

Plachy, Jozef

2003-01-01

365

World War II and the birth of modern recycling  

SciTech Connect

The concept of reusing waste materials had been around for many decades before the war, but few municipalities collected recyclables in an organized, controlled fashion. Though today`s thriving recycling industry seems brand new, its roots run far deeper to a time when both industry and citizens were called upon to help save the world. With so many goods rationed during World War II, hundreds of collectors would buy scrap metal and textiles and resell them back to mills.

Woods, R.; Peterson, C.

1995-04-01

366

Scrap tire recycling  

SciTech Connect

As the automobile tire technology has grown and met the need for safer and more durable tires, stronger reinforcement and more chemically resistant rubber compounds have made recycling tires more difficult. In an effort to resolve this problem, techniques and equipment were developed to grind tires into small pieces, and new markets were sought to utilize the crumb rubber product streams from ground tires. Industrial combustion processes were modified to accept scrap tires as fuel. These efforts have been beneficial, steadily increasing the percentage of scrap tires recycled to about 10% in 1985, and reaching 72% in 1995. By the end of 1997, fully 100% of tires generated in the U.S. are expected to be recycled.

Lula, J.W.; Bohnert, G.W.

1997-03-01

367

Recycled Aluminum Ornaments  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson plan from ATEEC will explain the principles of recycling. The activity would be most appropriate for technology studies or high school science classes. In all, it would require 2-5 hours of class time to complete. The purpose of the lesson is to demonstrate how aluminum is recycled. This laboratory activity does require some special equipment including a heat source capable of melting aluminum and an outdoor work area. Extension activities are also provided. The lesson plan is available for download as a PDF; users must create a free, quick login with ATEEC to access the materials.

Wishart, Ray

2013-06-14

368

Metals  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This radio broadcast reviews the evolution of metals since the discovery of copper in ancient times, and looks at how science and technology are continually upgrading the design and development of metal alloys. There are explanations of five ways the chemical composition of an alloy can be modified to produce different properties; how heat treating is used to process metals; how mining metals can be sped up by microwaving metals; how metals are deformed to test them for structural properties; and how nano-crystalline alloys are designed using computer models to find the best chemical composition and processing parameters with minimal experimentation. The broadcast is 30 minutes in length.

2007-02-03

369

Recycling of lead solder dross, Generated from PCB manufacturing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main purpose of this work is to analyze lead solder dross, a waste product from manufacturing of printed circuit boards by wave soldering, and to develop an effective and environmentally sound technology for its recycling. A methodology for determination of the content and chemical composition of the metal and oxide phases of the dross is developed. Two methods for recycling of lead solder dross were examined—carbothermal reduction and recycling using boron-containing substances. The influence of various factors on the metal yield was studied and the optimal parameters of the recycling process are defined. The comparison between them under the same parameters-temperature and retention time, showed that recycling of dross with a mixture of borax and boric acid in a 1:2 ratio provides higher metal yield (93%). The recycling of this hazardous waste under developed technology gets glassy slag and solder, which after correction of the chemical composition can be used again for production of PCB.

Lucheva, Biserka; Tsonev, Tsonio; Iliev, Peter

2011-08-01

370

Closed loop recycling of lead/acid batteries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The traditional lead/acid battery is a recycleable product, irrespective whether it is of an automotive, traction or standby design. The product benefits from the traditional lead metallurgy that has been developed for both primary (mines) and secondary (recycling) smelting. Secondary smelting accounts for 60% of total lead production in Europe, and this market lead the most effectively metal. In secondary smelters, scrapped batteries are crushed and smelted. The polypropylene from the boxes is recycled to produce secondary plastic for battery, automotive, or other miscellaneous uses. The lead metal is refined to be re-used in the battery industry. The acid is retreated. Recycling requires a collection network. The lead/acid battery benefits from the traditional collection network that has been established for scrap-iron and non-ferrous metal scrap. In Western Europe, the recycling rate for scrapped batteries is estimated to be 80 to 90%. All participants in the battery recycling loop agree that the process must be a clean cycle for it to be credible. The collection organization is improving the quality of storage and transportation, especially with regard to the acid that can only be neutralized in correctly-controlled facilities, generally located at the smelters. The smelters themselves tend, through local regulations, to run at the optimum level of protection of the environment.

Bied-Charreton, B.

371

Microbiological treatment of radioactive wastes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The ability of microorganisms which are ubiquitous throughout nature to bring about information of organic and inorganic compounds in radioactive wastes has been recognized. Unlike organic contaminants, metals cannot be destroyed, but must be either remov...

A. J. Francis

1992-01-01

372

A Survey of Monitoring and Assay Systems for Release of Metals from Radiation Controlled Areas at LANL  

SciTech Connect

At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a recent effort in waste minimization has focused on scrap metal from radiological controlled areas (RCAs). In particular, scrap metal from RCAs needs to be dispositioned in a reasonable and cost effective manner. Recycling of DOE scrap metals from RCAs is currently under a self-imposed moratorium. Since recycling is not available and reuse is difficult, often metal waste from RCAs, which could otherwise be recycled, is disposed of as low-level waste. Estimates at LANL put the cost of low-level waste disposal at $550 to $4000 per cubic meter, depending on the type of waste and the disposal site. If the waste is mixed, the cost for treatment and disposal can be as high as $50,000 per cubic meter. Disposal of scrap metal as low-level waste uses up valuable space in the low-level waste disposal areas and requires transportation to the disposal site under Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations for low-level waste. In contrast, disposal as non-radioactive waste costs as little as $2 per cubic meter. While recycling is unavailable, disposing of the metal at an industrial waste site could be the best solution for this waste stream. A Green Is Clean (GIC) type verification program needs to be in place to provide the greatest assurance that the waste does not contain DOE added radioactivity. This paper is a review of available and emerging radiation monitoring and assay systems that could be used for scrap metal as part of the LANL GIC program.

Gruetzmacher, K. M.; MacArthur, D. W.

2002-02-28

373

A survey of monitoring and assay systems for release of metals from radiation controlled areas at LANL.  

SciTech Connect

At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a recent effort in waste minimization has focused on scrap metal from radiological controlled areas (RCAs). In particular, scrap metal from RCAs needs to be dispositioned in a reasonable and cost effective manner. Recycling of DOE scrap metals from RCAs is currently under a self-imposed moratorium. Since recycling is not available and reuse is difficult, often metal waste from RCAs, which could otherwise be recycled, is disposed of as low-level waste. Estimates at LANL put the cost of low-level waste disposal at $550 to $4000 per cubic meter, depending on the type of waste and the disposal site. If the waste is mixed, the cost for treatment and disposal can be as high as $50,000 per cubic meter. Disposal of scrap metal as low-level waste uses up valuable space in the low-level waste disposal areas and requires transportation to the disposal site under Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations for low-level waste. In contrast, disposal as non-radioactive waste costs as little as $2 per cubic meter. While recycling is unavailable, disposing of the metal at an industrial waste site could be the best solution for this waste stream. A Green Is Clean (GIC) type verification program needs to be in place to provide the greatest assurance that the waste does not contain DOE added radioactivity. This paper is a review of available and emerging radiation monitoring and assay systems that could be used for scrap metal as part of the LANL GIC program.

Gruetzmacher, K. M. (Kathleen M.); MacArthur, D. W. (Duncan W.)

2002-01-01

374

Recycling Decisions and Green Design.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explores the facts and perceptions regarding recycling, what can be done to make products more environmentally compatible, and how to think about recycling decisions in a more helpful way. (Contains 39 references.) (MDH)

Lave, Lester B.; And Others

1994-01-01

375

Recycling: General studies. January 1987-November 1991 (Citations from the NTIS Data-Base). Rept. for Jan 87-Nov 91  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the processes, techniques, and benefits of recycling. The recycling processes for aluminum, chromium, nickel, cobalt, lead, copper, and precious metals scrap are discussed. Also included are citations on recycling of waste paper fibers and rubber wastes for the production of new products. Recycling in the jewelry, electronics, milling, beverage, automotive, and aircraft industries are considered. (Contains 177 citations with title list and subject index.)

Not Available

1991-10-01

376

Recycle Your Own Paper!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity (page 2 of PDF), learners will prepare sheets of homemade recycled paper from several different source pulps. Once dry, each sample will be drawn on with a marker to test how far ink spreads in the fibers of the different kinds of papers. Relates to the linked video, DragonflyTV GPS: Garbology.

Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

2007-01-01

377

Computer Recycling Farm USA  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

USGS conducted a study of plastic pollution at this rural US site in the Midwest.  The recycler was receiving computers from companies at a rate which greatly exceeded the capacity of the operation.  Approximately 50,000 computers remained outdoors on 15 acres for nearly a decade.  The site has sinc...

2010-08-13

378

Recycle of Waste Paper.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

One of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant's long range goals is to reduce the amount of waste from the plant. The large amount of waste paper generated by the plant is currently buried in the state permitted landfill. Methods of recycling cardboard and paper which ...

G. D. Hackett G. E. Harris

1988-01-01

379

Recycled Insect Models  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents an engaging activity in which high school students use a dichotomous key to guide the creation and classification of model insects from recycled plastic lids and containers. Besides teaching the use of a dichotomous key and the effect of evolutionary descent upon groupings of organisms, this activity focuses on an…

Rule, Audrey C.; Meyer, Mary Ann

2007-01-01

380

Recycling Study Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study guide was designed to help teachers and students understand the problems surrounding solid wastes. It includes an overview of solid waste and recycling, a glossary, suggested activities and a list of resource publications, audiovisual materials and organizations. There are 19 activity suggestions included in this guide designed for use…

Hallowell, Anne; And Others

381

Helium-Recycling Plant  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Proposed system recovers and stores helium gas for reuse. Maintains helium at 99.99-percent purity, preventing water vapor from atmosphere or lubricating oil from pumps from contaminating gas. System takes in gas at nearly constant low back pressure near atmospheric pressure; introduces little or no back pressure into source of helium. Concept also extended to recycling of other gases.

Cook, Joseph

1996-01-01

382

Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Boys and girls, grab your nose-plugs because today we are going to be digging through some garbage! We use a lot of garbage; the average American throws away nearly four pounds everyday. That\\'s a whopping 1,600 pounds a year! That means that every year, EACH one of you toss enough trash to equal the weight of all the students in our class...COMBINED! That\\'s a lot of garbage. Our world is big, but you might not have realized just how small it really is when it comes to holding all this trash. Would you want garbage in your backyard? Your playground? The park? There\\'s only so many places to store our waste. So, what do we do? We RECYCLE! What Does It Mean To Recycle? Recycling is taking things we use and would normally through into the trash can and putting them in a separate container. Instead of going to the dump, it goes to a recycling plant. Things like paper, newspaper, cardboard, plastic, glass, and aluminum are all products ...

Nicole

2008-11-19

383

Fuels from Recycling Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three systems, operating at sufficient scale, produce fuels that may be alternatives to oil and gas. These three recycling systems are: Black Clawson Fiberclaim, Franklin, Ohio; Union Carbide, South Charleston, West Virginia; and Union Electric, St. Louis, Missouri. These produce a wet fuel, a pyrolytic gas, and a dry fuel, respectively. (BT)

Tillman, David A.

1975-01-01

384

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership: DOE Should Reassess Its Approach to Designing and Building Spent Nuclear Fuel Recycling Facilities.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes under the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) to build facilities to begin recycling the nation's commercial spent nuclear fuel. GNEP's objectives include reducing radioactive waste disposed of in a geologic re...

2008-01-01

385

Recovering metals from wastes  

SciTech Connect

Metal recycling has come a long way from the scrap heap. Today, metals recovery is not simply a matter of collecting and remelting automobile and process scrap and beverage cans for profit, but of wringing out and reusing hazardous metals from plant wastes and soil, to comply with environmental laws. Processes developed to extract metal from ore are being redesigned to recover used metals, and companies in the minerals industry are redirecting their efforts and know how to metal-bearing wastes. Some have even reorganized to emphasize this change in focus. The paper describes catalyst recycling; lead recovery from battery waste and blasting materials; and soil remediation.

Parkinson, G.; Moore, S.; Fouhy, K.

1994-04-01

386

Minerals Yearbook, 1992: Materials Recycling.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A large variety of materials are recycled by different sectors of our society. The materials recycling that is mainly addressed in this writing is from waste that is generated after manufacturing and use. Included is recycling that is generally more obvio...

A. O. Tanner

1992-01-01

387

Recycling incineration: Evaluating the choices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conflicts between proponents of municipal solid waste incineration and advocates of recycling have escalated with efforts to reduce the volume of waste that ends up in landfills. Central to this debate is competition for materials that are both combustible and recyclable. Environmental and economic concerns also play a major role. This book, produced by the Environmental Defense Fund, compares recycling

R. A. Denison; J. Ruston

1993-01-01

388

Recycling Behavior: A Multidimensional Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This work centers on the study of consumer recycling roles to examine the sociodemographic and psychographic profile of the distribution of recycling tasks and roles within the household. With this aim in mind, an empirical work was carried out, the results of which suggest that recycling behavior is multidimensional and comprises the undertaking…

Meneses, Gonzalo Diaz; Palacio, Asuncion Beerli

2005-01-01

389

THE OPTIMAL LOCATION OF TWO RECYCLING CENTERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Suppose a municipality optimally locates two recycling\\/sorting centers to minimize the sum of the transportation costs from i) households to the recycling centers and ii) recycling centers to the landfill. Assume that all household waste is taken to a recycling center, sorted, and the non-recyclables are subsequently transported to the landfill. The landfill location and the proportion of waste recycled

Jannett Highfill; Michael McAsey; Libin Mou

390

Advanced technologies for decomtamination and conversion of scrap metal  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) faces the task of decommissioning much of the vast US weapons complex. One challenge of this effort includes the disposition of large amounts of radioactively contaminated scrap metal (RSM) including but not limited to steel, nickel, copper, and aluminum. The decontamination and recycling of RSM has become a key element in the DOE's strategy for cleanup of contaminated sites and facilities. Recycling helps to offset the cost of decommissioning and saves valuable space in the waste disposal facilities. It also reduces the amount of environmental effects associated with mining new metals. Work on this project is geared toward finding decontamination and/or recycling alternatives for the RSM contained in the decommissioned gaseous diffusion plants including approximately 40,000 tons of nickel. The nickel is contaminated with Technetium-99, and is difficult to remove using traditional decontamination technologies. The project, titled ``Advanced Technologies for Decontamination and Conversion of Scrap Metal'' was proposed as a four phase project. Phase 1 and 2 are complete and Phase 3 will complete May 31, 1999. Stainless steel made from contaminated nickel barrier was successfully produced in Phase 1. An economic evaluation was performed and a market study of potential products from the recycled metal was completed. Inducto-slag refining, after extensive testing, was eliminated as an alternative to remove technetium contamination from nickel. Phase 2 included successful lab scale and pilot scale demonstrations of electrorefining to separate technetium from nickel. This effort included a survey of available technologies to detect technetium in volumetrically contaminated metals. A new process to make sanitary drums from RSM was developed and implemented. Phase 3 included a full scale demonstration of electrorefining, an evaluation of electro-refining alternatives including direct dissolution, melting of nickel into anodes, a laser cutting demonstration, an investigation of commercial markets for RSM, and refinement of methods to quantify isotopic elements.

Valerie MacNair; Steve Sarten; Thomas Muth; Brajendra Mishra

1999-05-27

391

Determination of radioactive elements and heavy metals in sediments and soil from domestic water sources in northern peninsular Malaysia.  

PubMed

Soil serves as a major reservoir for contaminants as it posseses an ability to bind various chemicals together. To safeguard the members of the public from an unwanted exposure, studies were conducted on the sediments and soil from water bodies that form the major sources of domestic water supply in northern peninsular Malaysia for their trace element concentration levels. Neutron Activation Analysis, using Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1) located at the Centre for Energy Research and Training, Zaria, Nigeria was employed as the analytical tool. The elements identified in major quantities include Na, K, and Fe while As, Br, Cr, U, Th, Eu, Cs, Co, La, Sm, Yb, Sc, Zn, Rb, Ba, Lu, Hf, Ta, and Sb were also identified in trace quantities. Gamma spectroscopy was also employed to analyze some soil samples from the same area. The results indicated safe levels in terms of the radium equivalent activity, external hazard index as well as the mean external exposure dose rates from the soil. The overall screening of the domestic water sources with relatively high heavy metals concentration values in sediments and high activity concentration values in soil is strongly recommended as their accumulation overtime as a consequence of leaching into the water may be of health concern to the members of the public. PMID:21901308

Muhammad, Bashir G; Jaafar, Mohammad Suhaimi; Abdul Rahman, Azhar; Ingawa, Farouk Abdulrasheed

2012-08-01

392

Automotive recycling in the United States : energy conservation and enviromental benefits.  

SciTech Connect

The production and use of polymers has been growing and that trend is expected to continue. Likewise, the production of metals from ores is on the rise because of increasing demand. Recycling polymers and residual metals can result in significant energy savings and environmental benefits including a reduction in CO2 emissions. This article describes recycling options for the polymers and metals in end-of-life vehicles.

Pomykala, J. A; Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Spangenberger, J. S.; Energy Systems

2007-11-01

393

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOEpatents

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24

394

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOEpatents

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01

395

Alternative Approaches to Recycling Nuclear Wastes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nuclear power exists, and as the demand for non-fossil electricity generation increases, many more nuclear plants are being planned and built. The result is growing inventories of spent nuclear fuel containing plutonium that -- in principle, at least -- can be used to make nuclear explosives. There are countries and organizations that are believed to want nuclear weapons, posing a knotty proliferation problem that calls for realistic control of nuclear materials. Phasing out nuclear power and sequestering all dangerous materials in guarded storage or in geological formations would not be a realistic approach. Plutonium from commercial spent fuel is very hard to make into a weapon. However, a rogue nation could operate a power plant so as to produce plutonium with weapons-quality isotopics, and then chemically purify it. IAEA safeguards are designed to discourage this, but the only enforcement is referral to the United Nations General Assembly. The traditional reprocessing method, PUREX, produces plutonium that has the chemical purity needed for weapons. However, there are alternative approaches that produce only highly radioactive blends of fissionable materials and fission products. Recycle offers a market for spent nuclear fuel, promoting more rigorous accounting of these materials. Unlike PUREX, the new technologies permit the recycle and consumption of essentially all of the high-hazard transuranics, and will reduce the required isolation time for the waste to less than 500 years. Facilities for recovering recyclable materials from LWR spent fuel will be large and expensive. Only a very few such plants will be needed, leading to appropriate concentration of safeguards measures. Plants for recycling the spent fuel from fast burner reactors can be collocated with the power plants and share the safeguards.

Hannum, William H.

2007-04-01

396

The development and prospects of the end-of-life vehicle recycling system in Taiwan.  

PubMed

Automobiles usually contain toxic substances, such as lubricants, acid solutions and coolants. Therefore, inappropriate handling of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) will result in environmental pollution. ELV parts, which include metallic and non-metallic substances, are increasingly gaining recycling value due to the recent global shortage of raw materials. Hence, the establishment of a proper recycling system for ELVs will not only reduce the impact on the environment during the recycling process, but it will also facilitate the effective reuse of recycled resources. Prior to 1994, the recycling of ELVs in Taiwan was performed by related operators in the industry. Since the publishing of the "End-of-life vehicle recycling guidelines" under the authority of the Waste Disposal Act by the Environmental Protection Administration (EPA) in 1994, the recycling of ELVs in Taiwan has gradually become systematic. Subsequently, the Recycling Fund Management Board (RFMB) of the EPA was established in 1998 to collect a Collection-Disposal-Treatment Fee (recycling fee) from responsible enterprises for recycling and related tasks. Since then, the recycling channels, processing equipment, and techniques for ELVs in Taiwan have gradually become established. This paper reviews the establishment of the ELV recycling system, analyzes the current system and its performance, and provides some recommendations for future development. The reduction of auto shredder residue (ASR) is a key factor in maximizing the resource recovery rate and recycling efficiency. The RFMB needs to provide strong economic incentives to further increase the recycling rate and to encourage the automobile industry to design and market greener cars. PMID:20382516

Chen, Kuan-chung; Huang, Shih-han; Lian, I-wei

2010-01-01

397

Refrigerator recycling and CFCs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Utility-sponsored refrigerator and freezer pick-up programs have removed almost 900,000 inefficient appliances from the North American electric grid to date. While the CFC-12 refrigerant from the discarded appliances is typically removed and recycled, in all but a few programs the CFC-11 in the foam insulation is not. About a quarter-billion pounds of CFC-11 are banked in refrigerator foam in the

M. Shepard; W. Hawthorne; A. Wilson

1994-01-01

398

Decontaminating and Melt Recycling Tritium Contaminated Stainless Steel  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and several university and industrial partners are evaluating recycling radioactively contaminated stainless steel. The goal of this program is to recycle contaminated stainless steel scrap from US Department of Energy national defense facilities. There is a large quantity of stainless steel at the DOE Savannah River Site from retired heavy water moderated Nuclear material production reactors (for example heat exchangers and process water piping), that will be used in pilot studies of potential recycle processes. These parts are contaminated by fission products, activated species, and tritium generated by neutron irradiation of the primary reactor coolant, which is heavy (deuterated) water. This report reviews current understanding of tritium contamination of stainless steel and previous studies of decontaminating tritium exposed stainless steel. It also outlines stainless steel refining methods, and proposes recommendations based on this review.

Clark, E.A.

1995-04-03

399

White goods recycling in the United States: Economic and technical issues in recovering, reclaiming, and reusing nonmetallic materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

Obsolete white goods (appliances such as refrigerators, freezers, washers, dryers, ranges, dishwashers, water heaters, dehumidifiers, and air conditioners) contain significant quantities of recyclable materials, but because of economic and environmental concerns, only limited quantities of these scrap materials are currently being recycled. Appliances are manufactured from a mix of materials, such as metals, polymers, foam, and fiberglass; metals represent more

D. E. Karvelas; B. J. Jody; E. J. Daniels

1995-01-01

400

Neutron activation analysis of recycled paper and board in contact with food  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recycling of wastepaper has been shown to increase the concentration of metals in the product. Although it is generally assumed that there is no risk of migration of chemical contaminants from recycled paper and board into food, the UK Food Standards Agency has identified limited evidence of such migration. Therefore, it is important to carry out research to establish the

S. J. Parry

2001-01-01

401

THE ROLE OF HYDROMETALLURGY IN THE RECYCLING OF ZINC, COPPER AND LEAD  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metals recycling remains an important industrial activity for both economic and environmental reasons, and the role of hydrometallurgical processing in the recycling of zinc, copper and lead is discussed. Hydrometallurgical processes are being developed to leach zinc from galvanized steel scrap prior to remelting, and both alkaline and acid leaching technologies are being evaluated to eliminate zinc from electric arc

402

Sanitary-landfill leachate recycle and environmental problems at selected Army landfills: lessons learned. Final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report provides information on experience with leachate recycling - a method of treating leachate from landfills that removes various leachate components. Advantages of leachate recycling are its ability to increase the rate of stabilization of biodegradable organic matter and its potential to remove some heavy metals and organics from the leachate. Its major disadvantage is its potential to contribute

Maloney

1986-01-01

403

Evaluation of Productivity, Consumption, and Uncontrolled Total Particulate Matter Emission Factors of Recyclable Abrasives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dry abrasive blasting is a commonly used surface preparation operation by many process industries to clean up metallic surfaces and achieve surface finishes suitable for future adhesion. Abrasives used in this process can be recyclable or expendable. This study was undertaken to evaluate the performance of three recyclable abrasives: garnet, barshot and steel grit\\/shot in terms of productivity (area cleaned

Sivaramakrishnan Sangameswaran

2006-01-01

404

Decontamination of metals by melt refinings/slagging: An annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect

As the number of nuclear installations undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) increases, current radioactive waste storage space is consumed and establishment of new waste storage areas becomes increasingly difficult, the problem of handling and storing radioactive scrap metal (RSM) gains increasing importance in the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. To alleviate present and future waste storage problems, Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) is managing a program for the recycling of RSM for beneficial use within the DOE complex. As part of that effort, Montana Tech has been awarded a contract to help optimize melting and refining technology for the recycling of stainless steel RSM. The scope of the Montana Tech program includes a literature survey, a decontaminating slag design study, small scale melting studies to determine optimum slag compositions for removal of radioactive contaminant surrogates, analysis of preferred melting techniques, and coordination of large scale melting demonstrations (100--500 lbs) to be conducted at selected facilities. The program will support recycling and decontaminating stainless steel RSM for use in waste canisters for Idaho Waste Immobilization Facility densified high level waste. This report is the result of the literature search conducted to establish a basis for experimental melt/slag program development.

Mizia, R.E. [ed.; Worcester, S.A.; Twidwell, L.G.; Paolini, D.J.; Weldon, T.A.

1993-07-01

405

Decontamination of metals by melt refining/slagging: First year progress report  

SciTech Connect

As the number of nuclear installations undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) increases, current radioactive waste storage space is consumed and establishment of new waste storage areas becomes increasingly difficult. The problem of handling and storing radioactive scrap metal (RSM) gains increasing importance in the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program. To alleviate present and future waste storage problems, Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) is managing a program for the recycling of RSM for beneficial use within the DOE complex. As part of that effort, Montana Tech has been awarded a contract to help optimize melting and refining technologies for the recycling of stainless steel RSM. The scope of the Montana Tech program includes a literature survey, a decontaminating slag design study, small scale melting studies to determine optimum slag compositions for removal of radioactive contaminant surrogates, analysis of preferred melting techniques, and coordination of pilot scale melting demonstrations (100-500 lbs) to be conducted at selected commercial facilities. This program will identify methods that can be used to recycle stainless steel RSM which will be used to fabricate high and low level waste canisters for the Idaho Waste Immobilization Facility. This report summarizes the results of an extensive literature review and the first year`s progress on slag design, small-scale melt refining of surrogate-containing stainless steel (presently only a three month effort), and pilot-scale preparation of surrogate master ingots.

Mizia, R.E. [ed.; Worcester, S.A.; Twidwell, L.G.; Paolini, D.J.; Weldon, T.A.

1994-03-01

406

Why recycle? A comparison of recycling motivations in four communities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Four Illinois communities with different sociode-mographic compositions and at various stages of planning for solid waste management were surveyed to determine the influence of sociodemographic variables and planning stages on the factors that motivate recycling behavior. A factor analysis of importance ratings of reasons for recycling and for not recycling yielded five factors interpreted as altruism, personal inconvenience, social influences, economic incentives, and household storage. The four communities were shown to be significantly different in multivariate analyses of the five motivational factors. However, attempts to explain these community differences with regression analyses, which predicted the motivational factors with dummy codes for planning stages, a measure of self-reported recycling behavior, and sociodemographic measures were unsatisfactory. Contrary to expectation, the solid waste management planning stages of the cities (curbside pickup, recycling dropoff center, and planning in progress) contributed only very slightly to the prediction of motivational factors for recycling. Community differences were better explained by different underlying motivational structures among the four communities. Altruistic reasons for recycling (e.g., conserving resources) composed the only factor which was similar across the four communities. This factor was also perceived to be the most important reason for recycling by respondents from all four communities. The results of the study supported the notion that convenient, voluntary recycling programs that rely on environmental concern and conscience for motivation are useful approaches to reducing waste.

Vining, Joanne; Linn, Nancy; Burdge, Rabel J.

1992-11-01

407

Understanding recycling behavior in Kentucky: Who recycles and why  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recycling behavior and the motivations behind recycling are being analyzed in a collaborative study between the Sloan Industry Center for a Sustainable Aluminum Industry, the Center for Aluminum Technology, Secat, and the Gatton College of Business and Economics at the University of Kentucky in Lexington. The goals of this study are to determine why people recycle and to find ways to motivate people to recycle more, using Fayette County, Kentucky, as a sample study. It is hoped that the information gathered through educational and motivational efforts in this county can be used on a larger scale in communities throughout the United States.

Morgan, Fred W.; Hughes, Margaret V.

2006-08-01

408

INEL metal recycle annual report, FY94  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1992, the mission of the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant was changed from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels to development of technologies for conditioning of spent nuclear fuels and other high-level wastes for disposal in a geologic repository. In addition, the Department of Energy (DOE) directed Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop a program plan addressing the management of

Bechtold

1994-01-01

409

Abrasive blasting, a technique for the industrial decontamination of metal components and concrete blocks from decommissioning to unconditional release levels  

SciTech Connect

When decommissioning nuclear installations, large quantities of metal components are produced as well as significant amounts of other radioactive materials, which mostly show low surface contamination. Having been used or having been brought for a while in a controlled area marks them as 'suspected material'. In view of the very high costs for radioactive waste processing and disposal, alternatives have been considered, and much effort has gone to recycling through decontamination, melting and unconditional release of metals. In a broader context, recycling of materials can considered to be a first order ecological priority in order to limit the quantities of radioactive wastes for final disposal and to reduce the technical and economic problems involved with the management of radioactive wastes. It will help as well to make economic use of primary material and to conserve natural resources of basic material for future generations. In a demonstration programme, Belgoprocess has shown that it is economically interesting to decontaminate metal components to unconditional release levels using dry abrasive blasting techniques, the unit cost for decontamination being only 30 % of the global cost for radioactive waste treatment, conditioning, storage and disposal. As a result, an industrial dry abrasive blasting unit was installed in the Belgoprocess central decontamination infrastructure. At the end of December 2006, more than 1,128 Mg of contaminated metal has been treated as well as 313 Mg of concrete blocks. The paper gives an overview of the experience relating to the decontamination of metal material and concrete blocks at the decommissioning of the Eurochemic reprocessing plant in Dessel, Belgium as well from the decontamination of concrete containers by abrasive blasting. (authors)

Gills, R.; Lewandowski, P.; Ooms, B.; Reusen, N.; Van Laer, W.; Walthery, R. [Belgoprocess N.V., Gravenstraat 73, 2480 Dessel (Belgium)

2007-07-01

410

Printed-circuit-board manufacturer maximizes recycling opportunities  

SciTech Connect

A major New England printed-circuit-board manufacturer has avoided land disposal of several metallic wastes for more than 15 years by recycling them offsite. For example, the company uses ammoniacal etchant to etch copper. Waste generated by this process is used by an offsite recycler to produce copper compounds for pressure-treated lumber and for use as a catalyst. Sodium persulfate and peroxide-sulfuric micro-etchants are used at the facility, generating a crude copper sulfate solution, and copper sulfate also is the basis for the company's electroplating process. Wastes from all of these processes are used by an offsite recycler to produce copper compounds that are sold for use in wood treatment and as mining reagents. Finally, metal hydroxide sludge generated by the company's wastewater treatment system contains substantial amounts of copper, which is sent for refining at a copper smelter.

Edelstein, P. (CP Chemicals Inc., Fort Lee, NJ (United States))

1993-02-01

411

Recycler barrier RF buckets  

SciTech Connect

The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01

412

Energy and Recycling  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Energy and Garbage is one section of a US Department of Energy's educational Web site for kids. Features of this Web site include a section detailing the connection between energy and garbage, a thorough introduction to the history of garbage that includes facts and figures on how much waste we produce, information on recycling and reducing garbage at the source, and much more. The information in this Web site is presented in a friendly, narrative style. A short downloadable activity titled Energy from Garbage, created by the National Energy Education Development Project, is also available (grades 4-6).

413

Phytoremediation of soil metals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The phytoremediation of metal-contaminated soils offers a low-cost method for soil remediation and some extracted metals may be recycled for value. Both the phytoextraction of metals and the phytovolatilization of Se or Hg by plants offer great promise for commercial development. Natural metal hyperaccumulator phenotype is much more important than high-yield ability when using plants to remove metals from contaminated

Rufus L Chaney; Minnie Malik; Yin M Li; Sally L Brown; Eric P Brewer; J Scott Angle; Alan JM Baker

1997-01-01

414

SOLUBILITY CHARACTERIZATION OF AIRBORNE URANIUM FROM A URANIUM RECYCLING PLANT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solubility profiles of uranium dusts in a uranium r ecycling plant were determined by performing in vitro solubility tests on breathing zone air samples con ducted in all process areas of the processing plant. The recycling plant produces hig h density shields, closed end tubes that are punch and formed from uranium sheet metal, and high-fired uranium oxide which is

Robert Metzger; Leslie Cole

2004-01-01

415

Cobalt Recycling in the United States in 1998.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is one of a series of reports on metals recycling. It defines and quantifies the 1998 flow of cobalt-bearing materials in the United States, from imports and stock releases through consumption and disposition, with particular emphasis on the r...

K. Shedd

2002-01-01

416

A robust method to heterogenise and recycle group 9 catalysts.  

PubMed

This paper provides a viable, reproducible and robust method for immobilising hydroxyl tethered iridium-rhodium complexes. The materials have been shown to be both effective and recyclable in the process of catalytic transfer hydrogenation with minimal metal leaching. PMID:23673927

Lucas, Stephanie J; Crossley, Benjamin D; Pettman, Alan J; Vassileiou, Antony D; Screen, Thomas E O; Blacker, A John; McGowan, Patrick C

2013-06-21

417

EVALUATION OF USFILTER MEMBRALOX SILVERBACK MODEL 900 AKALINE CLEANER RECYCLING SYSTEM  

EPA Science Inventory

The Membralox Silverback Model 900 (Silverback Unit) is a microfiltration system for recycling used alkaline cleaning solutions (cleaners). Alkaline cleaning is performed on metal parts at different times during the manufacturing process to remove oils, coolants and other metalwo...

418

Current Status and Tasks in Development of Cable Recycling Technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper shows current status and tasks in development of cable recycling technology and it’s items to be solved. Electric cable recycle system has been activated especially for copper conductor recycle in Japan. Previously removed cable coverings materials were mainly land filled. But landfill capacity is decreased and limited in recent years, at the same time, recycle technology was highly developed. A cable recycle technology has 4 tasks. (1) Applying new high efficiency separation system instead of electrostatic and gravity methods to classify mixed various kind of plastics materials including recently developed ecological material (ex PE, PVC, Rubber), (2) Removing heavy metal, especially lead from PVC material, (3) Treatment of optical glass fiber core, which has possibility going to be harmful micro particles, and (4) Establishment of social recycle system for electric wire and cable. Taking action for these tasks shall be proceeded under environmentally sensitive technology together with local government, user, manufacturer, and waste-disposal company on cost performance basis.

Ezure, Takashi; Goto, Kazuhiko

419

CFC recycling system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for recycling freon. It comprises attaching a freon removal valve to a freon supply located in an appliance such as an air conditioner, refrigerator, freezer or the like, positioning a substantially empty freon collecting vessel in gas flow relationship to the valve by providing the freon removal valve with a puncture needle extending upwardly and adapted to puncture a freon supply tubing in the appliance, below the puncture needle is positioned a spring means, and below the spring means is positioned a piercing means adapted to pierce a closure in the collecting vessel to thereby establish a gas passage means extending from the supply tube, through the needle, through the piercing means to the collecting vessel, collecting the freon thereby in the collecting vessel, providing a substantially gas-free sealing means on the collecting vessel to insure substantial total containment of the freon within the collecting vessel, and delivering the collecting vessel to a collection center for reuse and recycling of the freon.

Furmanek, D.J.

1991-06-25

420

40 CFR 141.76 - Recycle provisions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recycle provisions. 141.76 Section 141...Filtration and Disinfection § 141.76 Recycle provisions. (a) Applicability...or direct filtration treatment and that recycle spent filter backwash water,...

2010-07-01

421

40 CFR 141.76 - Recycle provisions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...and Disinfection] [Sec. 141.76 - Recycle provisions.] 40 PROTECTION OF ENVIRONMENT...Filtration and Disinfection Sec. 141.76 Recycle provisions. (a) Applicability. All...or direct filtration treatment and that recycle spent filter backwash water,...

2009-07-01

422

State Strategy for Recycling Market Development.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The ultimate importance of developing recycling markets is to accomplish these five objectives: Assist local governments and state offices in achieving the recycling goals in the SCORE (Select Committee on Recycling and the Environment) legislation throug...

L. Millberg

1991-01-01

423

Chromage de Pieces Suivi de Rincages, avec Regeneration du Dernier Bain de Rincage Froid sur Resines Echangeuses d'Ions et Recyclage (Chromium Metal Plating Followed by Rinsing and by Regeneration of Rinse Water on Ion Exchange Resins with Recycling).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This audit presents a modification of the rinsing stages of the conventional chromium plating technology. After chromium plating the parts are rinsed. The first rinsing bath which is high in chromic acid, is recycled and the last cold rinsing bath is rege...

1995-01-01

424

Protecting groundwater resources at biosolids recycling sites.  

PubMed

In developing the national biosolids recycling rule (Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulation Part 503 or Part 503), the USEPA conducted deterministic risk assessments whose results indicated that the probability of groundwater impairment associated with biosolids recycling was insignificant. Unfortunately, the computational capabilities available for performing risk assessments of pollutant fate and transport at that time were limited. Using recent advances in USEPA risk assessment methodology, the present study evaluates whether the current national biosolids pollutant limits remain protective of groundwater quality. To take advantage of new risk assessment approaches, a computer-based groundwater risk characterization screening tool (RCST) was developed using USEPA's Multimedia, Multi-pathway, Multi-receptor Exposure and Risk Assessment program. The RCST, which generates a noncarcinogenic human health risk estimate (i.e., hazard quotient [HQ] value), has the ability to conduct screening-level risk characterizations. The regulated heavy metals modeled in this study were As, Cd, Ni, Se, and Zn. Results from RCST application to biosolids recycling sites located in Yakima County, Washington, indicated that biosolids could be recycled at rates as high as 90 Mg ha, with no negative human health effects associated with groundwater consumption. Only under unrealistically high biosolids land application rates were public health risks characterized as significant (HQ ? 1.0). For example, by increasing the biosolids application rate and pollutant concentrations to 900 Mg ha and 10 times the regulatory limit, respectively, the HQ values varied from 1.4 (Zn) to 324.0 (Se). Since promulgation of Part 503, no verifiable cases of groundwater contamination by regulated biosolids pollutants have been reported. PMID:23673931

McFarland, Michael J; Kumarasamy, Karthik; Brobst, Robert B; Hais, Alan; Schmitz, Mark D

2013-01-01

425

Bacterial cell-wall recycling  

PubMed Central

Many Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria recycle a significant proportion of the peptidoglycan components of their cell walls during their growth and septation. In many—and quite possibly all—bacteria, the peptidoglycan fragments are recovered and recycled. While cell-wall recycling is beneficial for the recovery of resources, it also serves as a mechanism to detect cell-wall–targeting antibiotics and to regulate resistance mechanisms. In several Gram-negative pathogens, anhydro-MurNAc-peptide cell-wall fragments regulate AmpC ?-lactamase induction. In some Gram-positive organisms, short peptides derived from the cell wall regulate the induction of both ?-lactamase and ?-lactam-resistant penicillin-binding proteins. The involvement of peptidoglycan recycling with resistance regulation suggests that inhibitors of the enzymes involved in the recycling might synergize with cell-wall-targeted antibiotics. Indeed, such inhibitors improve the potency of ?-lactams in vitro against inducible AmpC ?-lactamase-producing bacteria. We describe the key steps of cell-wall remodeling and recycling, the regulation of resistance mechanisms by cell-wall recycling, and recent advances toward the discovery of cell-wall recycling inhibitors.

Johnson, Jarrod W.; Fisher, Jed F.; Mobashery, Shahriar

2012-01-01

426

Recycling Study Guide [Resource Packet].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This resource packet contains six documents developed by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources in order to help teachers infuse the environmental education topics of recycling and solid waste into social studies, art, English, health, mathematics, science, and environmental education classes. "Recycling Study Guide" contains 19 activities…

Wisconsin State Dept. of Natural Resources, Madison.

427

The Dynamic Earth: Recycling Naturally!  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article begins with a thought-provoking question: What do you think of when you hear the term "recycle?" Many think about paper, glass, aluminum cans, landfills, and reducing waste by reusing some of these materials. How many of us ever consider the way the systems of Earth dynamically recycle its materials? In the following…

Goldston, M. Jenice; Allison, Elizabeth; Fowler, Lisa; Glaze, Amanda

2013-01-01

428

Tomato Cleaning and Water Recycle.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A full-scale dump tank water recycle system was developed and demonstrated. A false bottom-ejector transport system removed soil from the water. Clarified water was either recycled back to the dump tank or discharged to the sewer. A vacuum belt was develo...

W. W. Rose

1982-01-01

429

Recycling Solid Waste in Chattanooga  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students undertook a group project in collaboration with city officials to study garbage types in the community and possibilities of recycling solid wastes. Data collected from various sources revealed that public attitude was favorable for recycling efforts and that it was feasible economically. (PS)

Vredeveld, Ruth; Martin, Robin

1973-01-01

430

Climate Kids: Recycling Program Educator  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Using her countywide program as an example, a recycling educator offers incentives for recycling by providing data on energy savings and explaining how her county in Michigan supports the program. The Climate Kids website is a NASA education resource featuring articles, videos, images and games focused on the science of climate change.

431

Information Sources on Rural Recycling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides resources for rural recycling operations with the principle aim of assisting rural government officials, planners, residents, and educators to encourage recycling as an integral part of an individual's or community's solid waste management plan. Sources range from bibliographies, directories, and government documents to case studies. (49…

Notess, Greg; Kuske, Jodee

1992-01-01

432

TOMATO CLEANING AND WATER RECYCLE  

EPA Science Inventory

A full-scale dump tank water recycle system was developed and demonstrated. A false bottom-ejector transport system removed soil from the water. Clarified water was either recycled back to the dump tank or discharged to the sewer. A vacuum belt was developed for dewatering the mu...

433

Radioactive Decay  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

With knowledge of Maple, Mathmatica, or MatLab, one should be able to develop a mathematical model for decay of radioactive substances and develop a technique for deciding whether quantitative data fits the model or not.

Smith, David

2001-01-22

434

Radioactive Iodine  

MedlinePLUS

... form of iodide, is made into two radioactive isotopes that are commonly used in patients with thyroid ... the best results? I-123 is the usual isotope used to take pictures and determine the activity ...

435

Radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

This paper briefly reviews current literature regarding management of radioactive wastes including: national programs; waste repositories; mixed wastes; decontamination and decommissioning; remedial actions and treatment; and, environmental occurrence and transport of radionuclides. 193 refs.

Devarakonda, M.S.; Seiler, M.C. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-06-01

436

Simulated Radioactivity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the errors in the sugar-cube experiment related to radioactivity as described in Project Physics course. The discussion considers some of the steps overlooked in the experiment and generalizes the theory beyond the sugar-cube stage. (PS)

Boettler, James L.

1972-01-01

437

Concentrating Radioactivity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

Herrmann, Richard A.

1974-01-01

438

Radioactivity Calculations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three problems in radioactive buildup and decay are presented and solved. Matrix algebra is used to solve the second problem. The third problem deals with flux depression and is solved by the use of differential equations. (LC)

Onega, Ronald J.

1969-01-01

439

Handling radioactivity  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this book is to present an overall view in a descriptive and essentially nonmathematical way of the practicalities of handling radioactivity. It is hoped that the material will be particularly helpful to those entering the nuclear field for the first time and to those working in related areas whose responsibilities require them to have a general knowledge of the subject of radioactivity handling and its vocabulary.

Stewart, D.C.

1988-01-01

440

Apparatus for the processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOEpatents

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination of a plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter. 6 figs.

Gotovchikov, V.T.; Ivanov, A.V.; Filippov, E.A.

1999-03-16

441

Apparatus for the processing of solid mixed waste containing radioactive and hazardous materials  

DOEpatents

Apparatus for the continuous heating and melting of a solid mixed waste bearing radioactive and hazardous materials to form separate metallic, slag and gaseous phases for producing compact forms of the waste material to facilitate disposal includes a copper split water-cooled (cold) crucible as a reaction vessel for receiving the waste material. The waste material is heated by means of the combination oaf plasma torch directed into the open upper portion of the cold crucible and an electromagnetic flux produced by induction coils disposed about the crucible which is transparent to electromagnetic fields. A metallic phase of the waste material is formed in a lower portion of the crucible and is removed in the form of a compact ingot suitable for recycling and further processing. A glass-like, non-metallic slag phase containing radioactive elements is also formed in the crucible and flows out of the open upper portion of the crucible into a slag ingot mold for disposal. The decomposition products of the organic and toxic materials are incinerated and converted to environmentally safe gases in the melter.

Gotovchikov, Vitaly T. (Moscow, RU); Ivanov, Alexander V. (Moscow, RU); Filippov, Eugene A. (Moscow, RU)

1999-03-16

442

Recycle of waste paper  

SciTech Connect

One of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant's long range goals is to reduce the amount of waste from the plant. The large amount of waste paper generated by the plant is currently buried in the state permitted landfill. Methods of recycling cardboard and paper which comply with all security requirements, health, safety, and environmental regulations of the Y-12 Plant are sought to conserve the landfill. A process to compact paper into a form which may be used as fuel and fed into the existing steam plant has been developed. A water-resistant briquette has been made from waste paper, a binder, and coal. Laboratory and pilot scale briquetting and pulverizing tests have been completed. These briquettes have physical properties similar to those of coal. 12 tabs.

Hackett, G.D.; Harris, G.E.

1988-01-01

443

Decontamination and Recycling of Radioactive Material from Retired Components  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the development of the EPRI DFDX (Decontamination For Decommissioning, electrochemical ion exchange) process for the chemical decontamination of reactor coolant systems and components. A US patent has been awarded and a plant, conforming to exacting nuclear industry standards, has been constructed to demonstrate the process at a number of sites. The plant has completed successful demonstration tests at Studsvik in Sweden and Dounreay in Scotland. The R and D phase for this technology is now complete, and the plant is now in commercial operation in the United Kingdom. (authors)

Bushart, S.P.; Wood, C.J. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Bradbury, D.; Elder, G. [Bradtec Decon Technologies, Gloucestershire GL10 3RF (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01

444

Decontamination and Recycling of Radioactive Material from Retired Components  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the development of the EPRI DFDX (Decontamination For Decommissioning, electrochemical ion exchange) process for the chemical decontamination of reactor coolant systems and components. A US patent has been awarded and a plant, conforming to exacting nuclear industry standards, has been constructed to demonstrate the process at a number of sites. The plant has completed successful demonstration tests

S. P. Bushart; C. J. Wood; D. Bradbury; G. Elder

2007-01-01

445

Open-loop recycling: A LCA case study of PET bottle-to-fibre recycling  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assesses the environmental impact of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottle-to-fibre recycling using the methodology of life-cycle assessment (LCA). Four recycling cases, including mechanical recycling, semi-mechanical recycling, back-to-oligomer recycling and back-to-monomer recycling were analysed. Three allocation methods are applied for open-loop recycling, i.e. the “cut-off” approach, the “waste valuation” approach and the “system expansion” approach. Nine environmental impact indicators were

Li Shen; Ernst Worrell; Martin K. Patel

2010-01-01

446

End-of-life vehicle recycling : state of the art of resource recovery from shredder residue.  

SciTech Connect

Each year, more than 50 million vehicles reach the end of their service life throughout the world. More than 95% of these vehicles enter a comprehensive recycling infrastructure that includes auto parts recyclers/dismantlers, remanufacturers, and material recyclers (shredders). Today, about 75% of automotive materials are profitably recycled via (1) parts reuse and parts and components remanufacturing and (2) ultimately by the scrap processing (shredding) industry. The process by which the scrap processors recover metal scrap from automobiles involves shredding the obsolete automobiles, along with other obsolete metal-containing products (such as white goods, industrial scrap, and demolition debris), and recovering the metals from the shredded material. The single largest source of recycled ferrous scrap for the iron and steel industry is obsolete automobiles. The non-metallic fraction that remains after the metals are recovered from the shredded materials (about 25% of the weight of the vehicle)--commonly called shredder residue--is disposed of in landfills. Over the past 10 to 15 years, a significant amount of research and development has been undertaken to enhance the recycle rate of end-of-life vehicles (ELVs), including enhancing dismantling techniques and improving remanufacturing operations. However, most of the effort has focused on developing technology to recover materials, such as polymers, from shredder residue. To make future vehicles more energy efficient, more lighter-weight materials--primarily polymers and polymer composites--will be used in manufacturing these vehicles. These materials increase the percentage of shredder residue that must be disposed of, compared with the percentage of metals. Therefore, as the complexity of automotive materials and systems increases, new technologies will be required to sustain and maximize the ultimate recycling of these materials and systems at end-of-life. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), in cooperation with the Vehicle Recycling Partnership (VRP) and the American Plastics Council (APC), is working to develop technology for recycling materials from shredder residue. Several other organizations worldwide are also working on developing technology for recycling shredder residue. Without a commercially viable shredder industry, our nation may face greater environmental challenges and a decreased supply of quality scrap and be forced to turn to primary ores for the production of finished metals. This document presents a review of the state of the art in shredder residue recycling. Available technologies and emerging technologies for the recycling of materials from shredder residue are discussed.

Jody, B. J.; Daniels, E. J.; Energy Systems

2007-03-21

447

Plastics recycling: challenges and opportunities  

PubMed Central

Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight and durable materials, which can readily be moulded into a variety of products that find use in a wide range of applications. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased markedly over the last 60 years. However, current levels of their usage and disposal generate several environmental problems. Around 4 per cent of world oil and gas production, a non-renewable resource, is used as feedstock for plastics and a further 3–4% is expended to provide energy for their manufacture. A major portion of plastic produced each year is used to make disposable items of packaging or other short-lived products that are discarded within a year of manufacture. These two observations alone indicate that our current use of plastics is not sustainable. In addition, because of the durability of the polymers involved, substantial quantities of discarded end-of-life plastics are accumulating as debris in landfills and in natural habitats worldwide. Recycling is one of the most important actions currently available to reduce these impacts and represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Recycling provides opportunities to reduce oil usage, carbon dioxide emissions and the quantities of waste requiring disposal. Here, we briefly set recycling into context against other waste-reduction strategies, namely reduction in material use through downgauging or product reuse, the use of alternative biodegradable materials and energy recovery as fuel. While plastics have been recycled since the 1970s, the quantities that are recycled vary geographically, according to plastic type and application. Recycling of packaging materials has seen rapid expansion over the last decades in a number of countries. Advances in technologies and systems for the collection, sorting and reprocessing of recyclable plastics are creating new opportunities for recycling, and with the combined actions of the public, industry and governments it may be possible to divert the majority of plastic waste from landfills to recycling over the next decades.

Hopewell, Jefferson; Dvorak, Robert; Kosior, Edward

2009-01-01

448

Coal liquefaction with preasphaltene recycle  

DOEpatents

A coal liquefaction system is disclosed with a novel preasphaltene recycle from a supercritical extraction unit to the slurry mix tank wherein the recycle stream contains at least 90% preasphaltenes (benzene insoluble, pyridine soluble organics) with other residual materials such as unconverted coal and ash. This subject process results in the production of asphaltene materials which can be subjected to hydrotreating to acquire a substitute for No. 6 fuel oil. The preasphaltene-predominant recycle reduces the hydrogen consumption for a process where asphaltene material is being sought.

Weimer, Robert F. (Allentown, PA); Miller, Robert N. (Allentown, PA)

1986-01-01

449

Recycling and Life Cycle Issues  

SciTech Connect

This chapter addresses recycling and life cycle considerations related to the growing use of lightweight materials in vehicles. The chapter first addresses the benefit of a life cycle perspective in materials choice, and the role that recycling plays in reducing energy inputs and environmental impacts in a vehicle s life cycle. Some limitations of life cycle analysis and results of several vehicle- and fleet-level assessments are drawn from published studies. With emphasis on lightweight materials such as aluminum, magnesium, and polymer composites, the status of the existing recycling infrastructure and technological challenges being faced by the industry also are discussed.

Das, Sujit [ORNL

2010-01-01

450

LCI modelling approaches applied on recycling of materials in view of environmental sustainability, risk perception and eco-efficiency  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose and scope  Two ISO-compliant approaches on modelling the recycling of plastics and metals are frequently applied in life cycle assessment\\u000a case studies and intensively debated: the recycled content or cutoff approach and the end of life recycling or avoided burden\\u000a approach. This paper discusses the two approaches from three different perspectives: (1) the kind of sustainability concept\\u000a served, (2) the

Rolf Frischknecht

2010-01-01

451

Radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews research and technological progress in radioactive waste management and disposal. The scope of material covered is very broad, ranging from international cooperation in radioactive waste management to evaluation of specific treatment technologies. The issue of safely managing and disposing of the plutonium resulting from the dismantling of weapons across the world is discussed and a series of papers on low-level waste management practices across the world is mentioned. Environmental restoration, risk assessment, and the health hazards of radon are also discussed.

Devarakonda, M.S. [International Technology Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-06-01

452

EXPLAINING RURAL HOUSEHOLD PARTICIPATION IN RECYCLING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rising landfill costs have forced solid waste managers to consider waste stream reduction alternatives such as household recycling. Explaining the factors which motivate households to recycle is important to regions where households must bear a large portion of the recycling cost because unit-based garbage disposal fees and curbside recycling are not feasible options. Empirical results indicate that residents are responsive

Paul M. Jakus; Kelly H. Tiller; William M. Park

1997-01-01

453

Copper Recycling in the United States in 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As one of a series of reports that describe the recycling of metal commodities in the United States, this report discusses the flow of copper from production through distribution and use, with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap1) and used products (old scrap) in the year 2004. This materials flow study includes a description of copper supply and demand for the United States to illustrate the extent of copper recycling and to identify recycling trends. Understanding how materials flow from a source through disposition can aid in improving the management of natural resource delivery systems. In 2004, the U.S. refined copper supply was 2.53 million metric tons (Mt) of refined unalloyed copper. With adjustment for refined copper exports of 127,000 metric tons (t) of copper, the net U.S. refined copper supply was 2.14 Mt of copper. With this net supply and a consumer inventory decrease of 9,000 t of refined copper, 2.42 Mt of refined copper was consumed by U.S. semifabricators (brass mills, wire rod mills, ingot makers, and foundries and others) in 2004. In addition to the 2.42 Mt of refined copper consumed in 2004, U.S. copper semifabricators consumed 853,000 t of copper contained in recycled scrap. Furthermore, 61,000 t of copper contained in scrap was consumed by noncopper alloy makers, for example, steelmakers and aluminum alloy makers. Old scrap recycling efficiency for copper was estimated to be 43 percent of theoretical old scrap supply, the recycling rate for copper was 30 percent of apparent supply, and the new-scrap-to-old-scrap ratio for U.S. copper product production was 3.2 (76:24).

Goonan, Thomas G.

2009-01-01

454

Recycling Plant for Paint Sludges.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The efficiency of paint spraying is, according to present technology, not satisfactory because the percentage of overspraying is too big. A pilot plant demonstrated that the amount of overspray can be reduced and the paint sludge can be recycled, resultin...

K. H. Berewinkel

1981-01-01

455

Recycling Practices for Environmental Materials.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Two environmental materials, tree and brush debris and large animal roadkill carcasses were investigated. The disposal methods for these materials were reviewed as opportunities/methods for possible recycling. KYTC established several pilot composting ope...

S. Palle S. Higgins T. Hopwood

2007-01-01

456

Disposal, Degradation, and Recycling; Bioplastics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Everyone is familiar with plastic waste. We throw away large volumes of it, at home, at school, at work, at fast food restaurants, on vacation. Much of it ends up in the trash. We see some of it as litter along the sides of roads, streams and lakes, and floating up on beaches. We probably recycle some used plastics, although how much depends upon where we live. In many localities, only items produced from PET (polyethylene terephthalate) and HDPE (high-density polyethylene) are collected for recycling. Why don't we recycle more of it? Why not LDPE (low-density polyethylene) and polystyrene? And what happens to it when we do? We'll develop some basic principles in this chapter on some of the avenues that help us follow the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's advice to "reduce, reuse, recycle."

Teegarden, David

2004-01-01

457

Cost benefit of caustic recycle for tank waste remediation at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

The potential cost savings due to the use of caustic recycle used in conjunction with remediation of radioactive underground storage tank waste, is shown in a figure for the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Two cost savings estimates for each case have been made for Hanford, and one cost savings estimate for each case have been made for Hanford, and

S. DeMuth; D. Kurath

1998-01-01

458

Proliferation aspects of plutonium recycling  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plutonium recycling offers benefits in an energy perspective of sustainable development, and, moreover it contributes to non-proliferation. Prior to recycling, reactor-grade plutonium from light-water reactors does not lend itself easily to the assembly of explosive nuclear devices; thereafter, practically not at all. Control systems for material security and non-proliferation should identify and adopt several categories of plutonium covering various isotopic

Bruno Pellaud

2002-01-01

459

Vanadium recycling in the United States in 2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As one of a series of reports that describe the recycling of metal commodities in the United States, this report discusses the flow of vanadium in the U.S. economy in 2004. This report includes a description of vanadium supply and demand in the United States and illustrates the extent of vanadium recycling and recycling trends. In 2004, apparent vanadium consumption, by end use, in the United States was 3,820 metric tons (t) in steelmaking and 232 t in manufacturing, of which 17 t was for the production of superalloys and 215 t was for the production of other alloys, cast iron, catalysts, and chemicals. Vanadium use in steel is almost entirely dissipative because recovery of vanadium from steel scrap is chemically impeded under the oxidizing conditions in steelmaking furnaces. The greatest amount of vanadium recycling is in the superalloy, other-alloy, and catalyst sectors of the vanadium market. Vanadium-bearing catalysts are associated with hydrocarbon recovery and refining in the oil industry. In 2004, 2,850 t of vanadium contained in alloy scrap and spent catalysts was recycled, which amounted to about 44 percent of U.S. domestic production. About 94 percent of vanadium use in the United States was dissipative (3,820 t in steel/4,050 t in steel+fabricated products).

Goonan, Thomas G.

2011-01-01

460

Recycling readiness of advanced batteries for electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Maximizing the reclamation/recycle of electric-vehicle (EV) batteries is considered to be essential for the successful commercialization of this technology. Since the early 1990s, the US Department of Energy has sponsored the ad hoc advanced battery readiness working group to review this and other possible barriers to the widespread use of EVs, such as battery shipping and in-vehicle safety. Regulation is currently the main force for growth in EV numbers and projections for the states that have zero-emission vehicle (ZEV) programs indicate about 200,000 of these vehicles would be offered to the public in 2003 to meet those requirements. The ad hoc Advanced Battery Readiness Working Group has identified a matrix of battery technologies that could see use in EVs and has been tracking the state of readiness of recycling processes for each of them. Lead-acid, nickel/metal hydride, and lithium-ion are the three EV battery technologies proposed by the major automotive manufacturers affected by ZEV requirements. Recycling approaches for the two advanced battery systems on this list are partly defined, but could be modified to recover more value from end-of-life batteries. The processes being used or planned to treat these batteries are reviewed, as well as those being considered for other longer-term technologies in the battery recycling readiness matrix. Development efforts needed to prepare for recycling the batteries from a much larger EV population than exists today are identified.

Jungst, R.G.

1997-09-01

461

RECOVERY OF METALS USING ALUMINUM DISPLACEMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

The removal of typical metals (Cu, Pb, Sn, Ni) from printed circuit and metal finishing waste streams was evaluated using displacement with aluminum. he metal is recovered as non-hazardous metal particles and can be recycled by smelting. n acceptable aluminum metal configuration ...

462

RECOVERY OF METAL USING ALUMINUM DISPLACEMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

The removal of typical metals (Cu, Pb, Sn, Ni) from printed circuit and metal finishing waste streams was evaluated using displacement with aluminum. he metal is recovered as non-hazardous metal particles and can be recycled by smelting. n acceptable aluminum metal configuration ...

463

Radioactive Wastes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Using Mathcad, Maple, Mathmatica, or MatLab, the user should be able to develop multiple representations for decay of radioactive substances, in the context of environmental policies on a university campus, and to determine storage times for wastes to decay to safe levels for disposal.

Smith, David

2001-01-22

464

Radioactive Wastes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by David Smith for the Connected Curriculum Project, this module develops multiple representations for decay of radioactive substances, in the context of environmental policies on a university campus, and discusses storage times for wastes to decay to safe levels for disposal. This is one of a much larger set of learning modules hosted by Duke University.

Smith, David

2010-04-29

465

Radioactive Decay  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by William Barker and David Smith for the Connected Curriculum Project, the purposes of this module are to develop a mathematical model for decay of radioactive substances, and to develop a technique for deciding whether quantitative data fits the model or not. This is one lesson within a larger set of learning modules hosted by Duke University.

Barker, William; Smith, David

2010-07-05

466

Radioactive Decay  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by William Barker and David Smith for the Connected Curriculum Project, this module develops a mathematical model for decay of radioactive substances, and a technique for deciding whether quantitative data fits the model or not. This is one within a much larger set of learning modules hosted by Duke University.

Barker, William; Smith, David

2010-06-28

467

Radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a review of literature published in 1995 on the subject of radioactive wastes. Topics covered include: national programs; waste repositories; mixed wastes; decontamination and decommissioning; remedial actions and treatment; and environmental occurrence and transport of radionuclides. 155 refs.

Devarakonda, M.S.; Hickox, J.A. [IT Corporation, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-11-01