These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Evaluation of the Parameters of Radioactive Contamination of Soils  

SciTech Connect

After Chornobyl NPP (ChNPP) accident the territory near destroyed Unit 4 (that now with the special confinement has the name the ''Shelter'' object) is contaminated of fuel fallouts. During liquidation of the accident consequences this territory was covered with pure earth, concrete, etc. As a result a contaminated anthropogenic layer of the soil on the depth up to 10 m was formed. Now the problem of contamination estimation and the soils management arose. For this tasks a gamma logging method was modified conformably to ChNPP conditions. The methods for necessary coefficients receiving and log treatment have been suggested.

Panasyuk M.I.; Skorbun A.D.; Klyuchnikov O.O.

2002-02-26

2

Immobilization of radioactive strontium in contaminated soils by phosphate treatment  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of in situ phosphate- and metal- (calcium, aluminum, and iron) solution treatment for {sup 90}Sr immobilization was investigated. Batch and column experiments were performed to find optimum conditions for coprecipitation of {sup 90}Sr with Ca-, Al-, and Fe-phosphate compounds in contaminated soils. Separate columns were packed with artificially {sup 85}Sr-contaminated acid soil as well as {sup 90}Sr-contaminated soil from the Oak Ridge Reservation. After metal-phosphate treatment, the columns were then leached successively with either tapwater or 0.001 M CaCl{sub 2} solution. Most of the {sup 85}Sr coprecipitated with the metal phosphate compounds. Immobilization of {sup 85}Sr and {sup 90}Sr was affected by such factors as solution pH, metal and phosphate concentration, metal-to-phosphate ratio, and soil characteristics. Equilibration time after treatments also affected {sup 85}Sr immobilization. Many technology aspects still need to be investigated before field applications are feasible, but these experiments indicate that phosphate-based in situ immobilization should prevent groundwater contamination and will be useful as a treatment technology for {sup 90}Sr-contaminated sites. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Kim, K.H.; Ammons, J.T. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Plant and Soil Science); Lee, S.Y. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-01-01

3

Bioavailability of caesium-137 from chernozem soils with high and low levels of radioactive contamination  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bioavailability of Cs-137 in "soil-plant" system of radioactively contaminated terrestrial ecosystems is the most important factor in the understanding of ecological situation. There are many factors affecting the features of Cs-137 biogeochemical cycle: period since an accident, type and intensity of radioactive fallout, general properties of landscape and the specifics of soil and plant covers, etc. In order to evaluate the importance of soil contamination level for the process of Cs-137 translocation from soil to plant the research in forest-steppe areas of Russia with similar natural properties, but contrasting high (Tula region) and low (Kursk region) levels of radioactive Chernobyl fallout (about 25 years after accident) was conducted. Soil cover of both sites is presented by chernozems with bulk density 1.1-1.2 g/cm3, 6-7% humus and neutral pH 6.5-7.2; plant cover under investigation consist of dry and wet meadows with bioproductivity 1.6-2.5 kg/m2 and 85-90% of biomass concentrated underground, that is typical for Russian forest-steppe landscapes. At the same time levels of soil regional contamination with Cs-137 differ by an order - 620-710 Bq/kg (210-250 kBq/m2) in Tula region and 30-55 Bq/kg (10-20 kBq/m2) in Kursk region. At a higher level of soil radioactive contamination specific activity of Cs-137 in vegetation of meadows is noticeably increased (103-160 Bq/kg in Tula region versus 12-14 Bq/kg in Kursk region) with correlation coefficient r 0.87. Increasing of Cs-137 in the underground parts of plants plays a decisive role in this process, while the specific radionuclide's activity in the aboveground parts of different sites is almost invariant (and ubiquitously roots contain 2-5 times more Cs-137 than shoots). The values of transfer factors for Cs-137 (the ratio of the specific Cs-137 activities in the plant tissue and in the soil) at various levels of soil radioactive contamination vary within a relatively narrow range 0.1-0.4, that confirms the discrimination in the radionuclide root uptake. And the higher the level of soil contamination, the more pronounced decreasing of Cs-137 transfer factors with correlation coefficient r -0.89. Further, transfer factors of Cs-137 for aboveground parts of meadow vegetation consist of 0.03-0.012 and always are 2-4 times lower than transfer factors for underground parts. This suggests an existence of biological barrier between the roots and shoots and suppression in the translocation of Cs-137s into aboveground parts of plants. Moreover bioavailability of Cs-137 in the sites of wet meadows is, in accordance with the transfer factors values, even a few more then in the sites of dry meadows regardless of the level of soil radioactive contamination. Thus, general parameters of radionuclide's accumulation in vegetation is closely dependent on its supplies in soil. However, the proportion of Cs-137 root uptake isn't determined by the level of soil radioactive contamination, but mostly by the biological features of vegetation. Study was conducted with the support from the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project no. 14-05-00903).

Paramonova, Tatiana; Shamshurina, Eugenia; Machaeva, Ekaterina; Belyaev, Vladimir

2014-05-01

4

Soil treatment to remove uranium and related mixed radioactive contaminants. Final report September 1992--October 1995  

SciTech Connect

A research and development project to remove uranium and related radioactive contaminants from soil by an ultrasonically-aided chemical leaching process began in 1993. The project objective was to develop and design, on the basis of bench-scale and pilot-scale experimental studies, a cost-effective soil decontamination process to produce a treated soil containing less than 35 pCi/g. The project, to cover a period of about thirty months, was designed to include bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to remove primarily uranium from the Incinerator Area soil, at Fernald, Ohio, as well as strontium-90, cobalt-60 and cesium-137 from a Chalk River soil, at the Chalk River Laboratories, Ontario. The project goal was to develop, design and cost estimate, on the basis of bench-scale and pilot-scale ex-situ soil treatment studies, a process to remove radionuclides form the soils to a residual level of 35 pCi/g of soil or less, and to provide a dischargeable water effluent as a result of soil leaching and a concentrate that can be recovered for reuse or solidified as a waste for disposal. In addition, a supplementary goal was to test the effectiveness of in-situ soil treatment through a field study using the Chalk River soil.

NONE

1996-07-01

5

Speciation of radioactive soil particles in the Fukushima contaminated area by IP autoradiography and microanalyses.  

PubMed

Radioactive soil particles several tens of micrometers in size were collected from litter soil in the radiation contaminated area by the Fukushima nuclear plant accident and characterized using electron and X-ray microanalyses. The radioactive particles were discriminated by autoradiography using imaging plates (IP) on which microgrids were formed by laser ablation in order to find the particles under microscopy. Fifty radioactive particles were identified and classified into three types from their morphology and chemical composition, namely: (1) aggregates of clay minerals, (2) organic matter containing clay mineral particulates, and (3) weathered biotite originating from local granite. With respect to the second type, dissolution of the organic matter did not reduce the radiation, suggesting that the radionuclides were also fixed by the clay minerals. The weathered biotite grains have a plate-like shape with well-developed cleavages inside the grains, and kaolin group minerals and goethite filling the cleavage spaces. The reduction of the radiation intensity was measured before and after the trimming of the plate edges using a focused ion beam (FIB), to examine whether radioactive cesium primarily sorbed at frayed edges. The radiation was attenuated in proportion to the volume decrease by the edge trimming, implying that radioactive cesium was sorbed uniformly in the porous weathered biotite. PMID:25343443

Mukai, Hiroki; Hatta, Tamao; Kitazawa, Hideaki; Yamada, Hirohisa; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kogure, Toshihiro

2014-11-18

6

Lateral migration of Caesium-137 as a heterogeneity factor of soil radioactive contamination within small catchments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Caesium-137 is long-lived artificial radionuclide with half-life of about 30.17 years. Due to Chernobyl accident in 1986 were received 270-280 PBq of 137Cs. The radioactive material is spread in different directions and then fell to the vast territory on the earth's surface as part of rainfall and under the influence of gravity. The deposition of 137Cs was very heterogeneous due to significant impact of changing weather conditions during the accident. Fixing 137Cs in the soil is because of the high content in the upper layer of fine fractions (especially clay) and organic substances that increase the sorption properties of soil. As a result of small vertical migration down the soil profile, the main migration processes of 137Cs is lateral migration which may occur in soil particles under the deflation but mainly water erosion.The aim of this study was to analyze the main factors of changing the current radioecological situation of small catchments in Chernozem zone of European Russia. The 1st small catchment with total area 1.98 km2 is located in the Kursk Region, where 137Cs soil inventories currently does not exceed 37 kBq/m2. The 2nd small catchment with total area 0.99 km2 is located in the Tula Region called "Plavsk Cs deposition hotspot" was highly contaminated with radioactive fallout with levels up to 600 kBq/m2.For reconstruction of 137Cs initial fallout was defined 4 references sites in Kursk Region and 5 sites in Tula Region. All reference sites were located at the flat interfluve areas in or nearby the study catchment. The analysis of 137Cs inventory within 1st study site references did not show significant differences between them which indicates the absence of the initial fallout heterogeneity. The mean values of 137Cs inventory is 8,7±0,5 kBq/m2 and Cv varies in a range of 13-22%, which are typical for the faraway from Chernobyl territory. Based on 4 references was created the map of initial Chernobyl fallout using the formula of radioactive decay. The next step was creation map of 137Cs contamination of soils using data from slopes and bottoms and its comparison with the map of initial Chernobyl fallout. Subsequently, the 137Cs inventory of soil on slopes and watersheds decreased due to the processes of radioactive decay and removal 137Cs with soil erosion but increased on foot of the slopes and bottoms as a result of accumulation processes. In the bottom of catchment formed zones with 2 times excess of the 137Cs initial fallout which is associated with concentrating runoff of soil material from large areas to the bottom, which occupies about 1 % of the total catchment area.The 137Cs inventory within 2nd study site references varies in a range of 82-211 kBq/m2. There is notable spatial trend on the map of initial fallout have been determined in submeridional direction but no trend in sublatitudinal direction. In 2013 the 137Cs inventories within small catchment bottom also in 1.5-2 times higher than the inventories within watershed. Soil erosion significantly changes composition of 137Cs contaminaition in catchment within no polluted area and no changes within heavily polluted area because of heterogeneous deposition.

Shamshurina, Evgeniya

2014-05-01

7

(Contaminated soil)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler attended the Third International Conference on Contaminated Soil, held in Karlsruhe, Germany. The Conference was a status conference for worldwide research and practice in contaminated soil assessment and environmental restoration, with more than 1500 attendees representing over 26 countries. The traveler made an oral presentation and presented a poster. At the Federal Institute for Water, Soil and Air Hygiene, the traveler met with Dr. Z. Filip, Director and Professor, and Dr. R. Smed-Hildmann, Research Scientist. Detailed discussions were held regarding the results and conclusions of a collaborative experiment concerning humic substance formation in waste-amended soils.

Siegrist, R.L.

1991-01-08

8

Comparing radiation dose rates in soils and riverine sediment to track the dispersion of radioactive contamination in Fukushima coastal rivers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident that occurred in March 2011 led to the formation of a 3000-km² radioactive pollution plume on soils located up to 70 km to the northwest of the damaged site. Forests and paddy fields are the dominant land uses in this mountainous region drained to the Pacific Ocean by several rivers that flow across densely inhabited coastal plains. It is then crucial to track the dispersion of radioactive material conveyed by those rivers to estimate the continental supply of radionuclides to the Ocean and to assess redistribution of radioactive sediment in those catchments. Radiations emitted by this contaminated material may indeed lead to an external exposure threat for local populations. As river discharge and sediment concentration data were not available during the first two years that followed the accident, alternative methods had to be developed to track this dispersion. We therefore organized field campaigns every six months and conducted local ground dose rate measurements to estimate whether fresh sediment drape deposits were more or less contaminated compared to local soils. Overall, our results showed that, in those regions exposed to violent typhoons and spring snowmelt, transfers of sediment are massive and episodic, and that they followed a seasonal cycle in 2011-2012. Then, in May 2013, contamination levels measured in sediment found in the upper parts of the catchments were almost systematically lower than the ones measured in nearby soils, whereas their contamination was higher in the coastal plains. This could have indicated a drying-up of the upstream sources of contamination. However, after the violent typhoons that occurred during summer in 2013, dose rates measured in fresh sediment deposits in November 2013 increased again systematically across the region. We thereby suggest that remobilization of contaminated sediment by typhoons and their storage in reservoirs and in coastal sections of the river channels now represent the most crucial issues to protect the local populations and manage the most contaminated catchments.

Evrard, Olivier; Onda, Yuichi; Lepage, Hugo; Chartin, Caroline; Lefèvre, Irène; Cerdan, Olivier; Bonté, Philippe; Ayrault, Sophie

2014-05-01

9

EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: VITRIFICATION OF SOILS CONTAMINATED BY HAZARDOUS AND/OR RADIOACTIVE WASTES  

EPA Science Inventory

A performance summary of an advanced multifuel-capable combustion and melting system (CMS) for the vitrification of hazardous wastes is presented. Vortex Corporation has evaluated its patented CMS for use in the remediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclid...

10

In situ vitrification: Immobilizing radioactive contaminants in place by melting soils into man-made rocks  

SciTech Connect

From 1951 to 1966 over 1 [times] 10[sup 6] Ci of Cs-137, Sr-90, and other radioisotopes in liquid wastes were disposed of in shallow seepage pits at ORNL. In situ methods to stabilize these sites are being investigated because of radiation exposure risks to personnel during excavation and removal activities. A field test at ORNL of In Situ Vitrification (ISV) was performed to evaluate its ability to resistance heating through graphite electrodes to melt contaminated soils in place. The resulting small lava lake cools and solidifies to a rock consisting of glassy and crystalline material. Volatile products released from the surface of the melt are collected and treated. The Sr-90 was incorporated into mineral phases and residual glass that form upon solidification. The Cs-137, however, is incompatible with the mineral structures and is concentrated into the small amount of residual glass that is trapped in the interstices between mineral grains. Leach tests were performed on samples of sludge, sludge + soil, crushed ISV rock, crushed ISV rock + soil, and low surface area fragments of ISV rock. First, sequential extractions with 0.1 N CaCl[sub 2] were used. Then, sequential treatments with 0.1 N HCl were used. Approximately 10% of the Sr-90 was released from the sludge, with or without soil, after CaCl[sub 2] was applied. Subsequent treatment with HCl released essentially all the Sr-90. The Sr-90 in the crushed ISV rock was resistant to cation exchange, with only 0.4% leached after treatment with CaCl[sub 2]. Treatment with HCl released only 4% of the total Sr-90 present in the crushed ISV rock. The low surface area fragments, more representative of expected field conditions, released 10 [times] less of the Sr-90 than the crushed ISV rock samples. The Cs-137 was not significantly leached from any of the samples of sludge or ISV rock.

Jacobs, G.K.; Spalding, B.P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Tixier, J.S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-01-01

11

Estimation of radioactive contamination of soils from the "Balapan" and the "Experimental field" technical areas of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site.  

PubMed

In spite of the long history of the research, radioactive contamination of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site (SNTS) in the Republic of Kazakhstan has not been adequately characterized. Our cartographic investigation has demonstrated highly variable radioactive contamination of the SNTS. The Cs-137, Sr-90, Eu-152, Eu-154, Co-60, and Am-241 activity concentrations in soil samples from the "Balapan" site were 42.6-17646, 96-18250, 1.05-11222, 0.6-4865, 0.23-4893, and 1.2-1037 Bq kg(-1), correspondingly. Cs-137 and Sr-90 activity concentrations in soil samples from the "Experimental field" site were varied from 87 up to 400 and from 94 up to 1000 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Activity concentrations of Co-60, Eu-152, and Eu-154 were lower than the minimum detectable activity of the method used. Concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides (K-40, Ra-226, U-238, and Th-232) in the majority of soil samples from the "Balapan" and the "Experimental field" sites did not exceed typical for surrounding of the SNTS areas levels. Estimation of risks associated with radioactive contamination based on the IAEA clearance levels for a number of key radionuclides in solid materials shows that soils sampled from the "Balapan" and the "Experimental field" sites might be considered as radioactive wastes. Decrease in specific activity of soil from the sites studied up to safety levels due to Co-60, Cs-137, Sr-90, Eu-152, Eu-154 radioactive decay and Am-241 accumulation-decay will occur not earlier than 100 years. In contrast, soils from the "Experimental field" and the "Balapan" sites (except 0.5-2.5 km distance from the "Chagan" explosion point) cannot be regarded as the radioactive wastes according safety norms valid in Russia and Kazakhstan. PMID:22285594

Evseeva, T; Belykh, E; Geras'kin, S; Majstrenko, T

2012-07-01

12

Mineralogical and geomicrobial examination of soil contamination by radioactive Cs due to 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soil contamination by radioactive Cs from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident was investigated. Absorption and desorption experiments of Cs were conducted for several phyllosillicates (kaolinite, sericite, montmorillonite, vermiculite, chrysotile and biotite), zeolite and solid organic matter (dead and green leaves). The results confirmed the characteristic sorption and desorption of Cs by these materials. The 2:1 type phyllosilicate, especially, vermiculite and montmorillonite absorbed Cs well. Heated vermiculite for agricultural use and weathered montmorillonite also adsorbed Cs. Leaves also absorbed Cs considerably but easily desorbed it. In summary, the relative capacity and strength of different materials for sorption of Cs followed the order: zeolite (clinoptilolite) > 2:1 type clay mineral > 1:1 type clay mineral > dead and green leaves. Culture experiments using bacteria of both naturally living on dead leaves in Iitate village, Fukushima Pref. and bacterial strains of Bacillus subtillis, Rhodococus erythropolis, Streptomyces aomiensis and Actinomycetospora chlora were carried out. Non-radioactive 1% Cs solution (CsCl) was added to the culture media. Two types of strong or considerable bacterial uptakes of Cs were found in bacterial cells. One is that Cs was contained mainly as globules inside bacteria and the other is that Cs was absorbed in the whole bacterial cells. The globules consisted mainly of Cs and P. Based on all these results, future diffusion and re-circulation behavior of Cs in the surface environment was discussed.

Akai, Junji; Nomura, Nao; Matsushita, Shin; Kudo, Hisaaki; Fukuhara, Haruo; Matsuoka, Shiro; Matsumoto, Jinko

13

Dynamics of radiostrontium leaching from radioactively contaminated floodplain soils of the Yenisei River  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gleyzation-mediated leaching of radiostrontium from floodplain soils of the Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC)\\u000a activity zone [Atamanovskii Island (front part), Oseredysh Island (front part), and Berezovyi Island (rear part)] is studied\\u000a with model systems. Leaching of radiostrontium from waterlogged soils is analyzed in terms of the model of anaerobic biosolubilization\\u000a of gel films. The leaching of radiostrontium is found

E. K. Legin; Yu. I. Trifonov; M. L. Khokhlov; D. N. Suglobov; E. E. Legina; V. K. Legin

2008-01-01

14

The assumption of heterogeneous or homogeneous radioactive contamination in soil/sediment: does it matter in terms of the external exposure of fauna?  

PubMed

The classical approach to environmental radioprotection is based on the assumption of homogeneously contaminated media. However, in soils and sediments there may be a significant variation of radioactivity with depth. The effect of this heterogeneity was investigated by examining the external exposure of various sediment and soil organisms, and determining the resulting dose rates, assuming a realistic combination of locations and radionuclides. The results were dependent on the exposure situation, i.e., the organism, its location, and the quality and quantity of radionuclides. The dose rates ranged over three orders of magnitude. The assumption of homogeneous contamination was not consistently conservative (if associated with a level of radioactivity averaged over the full thickness of soil or sediment that was sampled). Dose assessment for screening purposes requires consideration of the highest activity concentration measured in a soil/sediment that is considered to be homogeneously contaminated. A more refined assessment (e.g., higher tier of a graded approach) should take into consideration a more realistic contamination profile, and apply different dosimetric approaches. PMID:25170547

Beaugelin-Seiller, K

2014-12-01

15

Evaluating Soil Contamination  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This compilation was designed to help U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service contaminant specialists evaluate the degree of contamination of a soil, based on chemical analyses. Included are regulatory criteria, opinions, brief descriptions of scientific articles, and miscellaneous information that might be useful in making risk assessments. The intent was to make hard-to-obtain material readily available to contaminant specialists, but not to critique the material or develop new criteria. The compilation is to be used with its index, which includes about 200 contaminants. There are several entries for a few of the most thoroughly studied contaminants, but for most of them the information available is meager. Entries include soil contaminant criteria from other countries, contaminant guidelines for applying sewage sludge to soil, guidelines for evaluating sediments, background soil concentrations for various elements, citations to scientific articles that may help estimate the potential movement of soil contaminants into wildlife food chains, and a few odds and ends. Articles on earthworms were emphasized because they are a natural bridge between soil and many species of wildlife.

Beyer, W.N.

1990-01-01

16

Remediating munitions contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

The former Nebraska Ordnance Plant (NOP) at Mead, NE was a military loading, assembling, and packing facility that produced bombs, boosters and shells during World War II and the Korean War (1942-1945, 1950-1956). Ordnances were loaded with 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), amatol (TNT and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}), tritonal (TNT and Al) and Composition B (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine [RDX] and TNT). Process waste waters were discharged into wash pits and drainage ditches. Soils within and surrounding these areas are contaminated with TNT, RDX and related compounds. A continuous core to 300 cm depth obtained from an NOP drainage ditch revealed high concentrations of TNT in the soil profile and substantial amounts of monoamino reduction products, 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4ADNT) and 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2ADNT). Surface soil contained TNT in excess of 5000 mg kg{sup -1} and is believed to contain solid phase TNT. This is supported by measuring soil solution concentrations at various soil to solution ratios (1:2 to 1:9) and obtaining similar TNT concentrations (43 and 80 mg L{sup -1}). Remediating munitions-contaminated soil at the NOP and elsewhere is of vital interest since many of the contaminants are carcinogenic, mutagenic or otherwise toxic to humans and the environment. Incineration, the most demonstrated remediation technology for munitions-containing soils, is costly and often unacceptable to the public. Chemical and biological remediation offer potentially cost-effective and more environmentally acceptable alternatives. Our research objectives are to: (a) characterize the processes affecting the transport and fate of munitions in highly contaminated soil; (b) identify effective chemical and biological treatments to degrade and detoxify residues; and (c) integrate these approaches for effective and practical remediation of soil contaminated with TNT, RDX, and other munitions residues.

Shea, P.J.; Comfort, S.D. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

1995-10-01

17

Contaminated soil stabilization demonstration  

SciTech Connect

Long-term herbicide control along with a shotcrete cover was constructed at the Hanford Site in May 1991. The cover system allows for maintenance-free containment of contaminants by preventing wind and water transport of contaminants from the soil surface, preventing plant uptake of contaminants, and minimizing water infiltration through the soil column. The cover is composed of two parts: a commercial nonwoven geotextile material impregnated with trifluralin, and a >5-centimeter top cover of shotcrete containing polyethylene fibers. The herbicide-impregnated geotextile functions to prevent plant root growth into contaminated soil if any holes or cracks develop in the shotcrete layer. The herbicide component, trifluralin, is mixed into polymer nodules that degrade slowly over many years, thus releasing trifluralin slowly over time. The shotcrete topcover was sprayed using a sludge pump and air compressor to form a hard, impenetrable surface that prevents wind erosion and reduces water infiltration through the contaminated materials underneath. The benefits of the cover system are expected to last 20 to 30 years. 2 refs., 4 figs.

Kemp, C.J.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Sampson, A.E.; Phillips, S.J.

1991-10-01

18

New regulations for radiation protection for work involving radioactive fallout emitted by the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi APP accident--disposal of contaminated soil and wastes.  

PubMed

The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Atomic Power Plant that accompanied the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, released a large amount of radioactive material. To rehabilitate the contaminated areas, the government of Japan decided to carry out decontamination work and manage the waste resulting from decontamination. In the summer of 2013, the Ministry of the Environment planned to begin a full-scale process for waste disposal of contaminated soil and wastes removed as part of the decontamination work. The existing regulations were not developed to address such a large amount of contaminated wastes. The Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW), therefore, had to amend the existing regulations for waste disposal workers. The amendment of the general regulation targeted the areas where the existing exposure situation overlaps the planned exposure situation. The MHLW established the demarcation lines between the two regulations to be applied in each situation. The amendment was also intended to establish provisions for the operation of waste disposal facilities that handle large amounts of contaminated materials. Deliberation concerning the regulation was conducted when the facilities were under design; hence, necessary adjustments should be made as needed during the operation of the facilities. PMID:24856781

Yasui, Shojiro

2014-01-01

19

Status of outdoor radioactive contamination at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the status of outdoor radioactive contamination near Hanford Site facilities and disposal sites. It defines the nature and areal extend of the radioactively contaminated areas and describes the historical, ongoing, and planned radiological monitoring and control activities. Radioactive waste has been disposed of to the soil column since shortly after the reactors and production facilities began operating. Radioactive liquid wastes were placed directly into the ground via liquid discharges to cribs, ponds, ditches, and reverse wells. Solid wastes were placed in trenches, burial vaults, and caissons. Although the Hanford Site covers 1,450 km{sup 2}, the radioactively contaminated area is only about 36 km{sup 2} or 2.5% of the original site. Over time, contamination has migrated from some of the waste management sites through various vectors (e.g., burrowing animals, deep-rooted vegetation, erosion, containment system failure) or has been deposited to the surface soil via spills and unplanned releases (e.g., line leaks/breaks, tank leaks, and stack discharges) and created areas of outdoor radioactivity both on and below the surface. Currently 26 km{sup 2} are posted as surface contamination and 10 km{sup 2} are posted as underground contamination.

McKinney, S.M.; Markes, B.M.

1994-12-01

20

Radiocesium fallout in the grasslands on Sakhalin, Kunashir and Shikotan Islands due to Fukushima accident: the radioactive contamination of soil and plants in 2011.  

PubMed

The accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant has resulted in radioactive contamination of environmental media and food in the Far East of Russia, particularly in the Sakhalin Region. To obtain the knowledge about the (134)Cs and (137)Cs spatial distribution in the Sakhalin Region, soil samples were collected at 31 representative grassland sites on Sakhalin, Kunashir and Shikotan islands (43.80°-46.40° N and 142.73°-146.84° E) in the middle of May and around the end of September to early October 2011. In the autumn, vegetation samples (mixed grass/forb crop and bamboo, Sasa sp.) were collected together with soil samples. Maximum measured activity concentrations (on dry weight) of (134)Cs and (137)Cs in soil were 30 Bq kg(-1) and 210 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Within soil profile, (134)Cs activity concentrations declined rapidly with depth. Although for both sampling occasions (in the spring and autumn) the radionuclide was completely retained in the upper 3-4 cm of soil, a deeper penetration of the contaminant into the ground was observed in the autumn. In contrast with (134)Cs, activity concentrations of (137)Cs demonstrated a broad range of the vertical distribution in soil; at most sites, the radionuclide was found down to a depth of 20 cm. This resulted from interfering the aged pre-accidental (137)Cs and the new Fukushima-borne (137)Cs. To calculate contribution of these sources to the inventory of (137)Cs, the (134)Cs:(137)Cs activity ratio of 1:1 in Fukushima fallout (the reference date 15 March 2011) was used. The maximum deposition density of Fukushima-derived (137)Cs was found on Shikotan and Kunashir Islands with average density of 0.124 ± 0.018 kBq m(-2) and 0.086 ± 0.026 kBq m(-2), respectively. Sakhalin Island was less contaminated by Fukushima-derived (137)Cs of 0.021 ± 0.018 kBq m(-2). For the south of Sakhalin Island, the reference inventory of pre-Fukushima (137)Cs was calculated as 1.93 ± 0.25 kBq m(-2) (reference date 15 March 2011). For Shikotan and Kunashir Islands, the pre-Fukushima reference levels of (137)Cs ground contamination appeared to be higher: on average, 2.81 ± 0.35 kBq m(-2). Maximum measured activity concentrations (on wet weight) of (134)Cs and (137)Cs in the vegetation were 5 Bq kg(-1) and 18 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Soil-to-plant aggregated transfer factors, T(ag)s, for (134)Cs were more than an order of magnitude higher than those for (137)Cs. For the above-ground biomass density of 1 kg per m(2) (wet weight), plant contamination may contribute approximately 2% and 0.1% to the ground deposition of Fukushima-derived and pre-accidental (137)Cs, respectively. PMID:23344426

Ramzaev, V; Barkovsky, A; Goncharova, Yu; Gromov, A; Kaduka, M; Romanovich, I

2013-04-01

21

Aging Effects on the Kinetics of Cesium Desorption from Vermiculite And Contaminated Soil  

E-print Network

and ground disposal of liquid radioactive wastes. Since 137 Cs remains in the soil environment for many years. Brennan Radioactive 137 Cs is a worldwide environmental problem due to soil contamination from fallout

Sparks, Donald L.

22

Soil contamination standards for protection of personnel  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to recommend soil contamination levels that will ensure that radionuclide intakes by unprotected workers are likely to give internal doses below selected dose limits during the working year. The three internal dose limits are 1, 100, and 500 mrem per year. In addition, photon, beta, and alpha instrument readings are estimated for these soil concentration limits. Two exposure pathways are considered: the first is inhalation of resuspended dust and the second is ingestion of trace amounts of soil. In addition, radioactive decay and ingrowth of progeny during the year of exposure is included. External dose from the soil contamination is not included because monitoring and control of external exposures is carried out independently from internal exposures, which are the focus of this report. The methods used are similar to those used by Carbaugh and Bihl (1993) to set bioassay criteria for such workers.

Rittmann, P.D.

1998-04-16

23

Natural radioactivity contamination problems. Report no. 2. (final)  

SciTech Connect

Levels of naturally occurring radionuclides associated with the bauxite, columbium-tantalum, phosphate, tin, pumice, and titanium mineral extraction industries are reported. Data is also presented on radioactivity measurements in ground water, in selected geothermal waters, and in oil production brines. Radiation protection guidance is provided for uranium recovery from wet-process phosphate plants, for soil contamination limits, and for radiological exposure in natural caves. Dose pathways from incidental uses of naturally occurring radioactive materials are presented. Model state regulations for protecting public health and safety from use and disposal of naturally occurring radioactive material are outlined.

Not Available

1981-09-01

24

Perspectives of Radioactive Contamination in Nuclear War  

PubMed Central

The degrees of risk associated with the medical, industrial and military employment of nuclear energy are compared. The nature of radioactive contamination of areas and of persons resulting from the explosion of nuclear weapons, particularly the relationship between the radiation exposure and the amount of physical debris, is examined. Some theoretical examples are compared quantitatively. It is concluded that the amount of radio-activity that may be carried on the contaminated person involves a minor health hazard from gamma radiation, compared to the irradiation arising from contaminated areas. PMID:6015741

Waters, W. R.

1967-01-01

25

ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS FOUND IN LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE STREAMS  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes and presents the findings from two studies undertaken for the European Commission to assess the long-term impact upon the environment and human health of non-radioactive contaminants found in various low level radioactive waste streams. The initial study investigated the application of safety assessment approaches developed for radioactive contaminants to the assessment of nonradioactive contaminants in low level radioactive waste. It demonstrated how disposal limits could be derived for a range of non-radioactive contaminants and generic disposal facilities. The follow-up study used the same approach but undertook more detailed, disposal system specific calculations, assessing the impacts of both the non-radioactive and radioactive contaminants. The calculations undertaken indicated that it is prudent to consider non-radioactive, as well as radioactive contaminants, when assessing the impacts of low level radioactive waste disposal. For some waste streams with relatively low concentrations of radionuclides, the potential post-closure disposal impacts from non-radioactive contaminants can be comparable with the potential radiological impacts. For such waste streams there is therefore an added incentive to explore options for recycling the materials involved wherever possible.

R.H. Little, P.R. Maul, J.S.S. Penfoldag

2003-02-27

26

Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL  

SciTech Connect

A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr, with lesser amounts of {sup 6O}Co, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 239,240}Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the {sup 137}Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 241}Am, or {sup 239,240}Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500{degrees}C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dunbar, N.W. [New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-11-01

27

Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL  

SciTech Connect

A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were [sup 137]Cs and [sup 90]Sr, with lesser amounts of [sup 6O]Co, [sup 241]Am, and [sup 239,240]Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the [sup 137]Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of [sup 90]Sr, [sup 241]Am, or [sup 239,240]Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500[degrees]C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Dunbar, N.W. (New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States)); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-11-01

28

Soils: man-caused radioactivity and radiation forecast  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: One of the main tasks of the radiation safety guarantee is non-admission of the excess over critical radiation levels. In Russia they are man-caused radiation levels. Meanwhile any radiation measurement represents total radioactivity. That is why it is hard to assess natural and man-caused contributions to total radioactivity. It is shown that soil radioactivity depends on natural factors including radioactivity of rocks and cosmic radiation as well as man-caused factors including nuclear and non-nuclear technologies. Whole totality of these factors includes unpredictable (non-deterministic) factors - nuclear explosions and radiation accidents, and predictable ones (deterministic) - all the rest. Deterministic factors represent background radioactivity whose trends is the base of the radiation forecast. Non-deterministic factors represent man-caused radiation treatment contribution which is to be controlled. This contribution is equal to the difference in measured radioactivity and radiation background. The way of calculation of background radioactivity is proposed. Contemporary soils are complicated technologically influenced systems with multi-leveled spatial and temporary inhomogeneity of radionuclides distribution. Generally analysis area can be characterized by any set of factors of soil radioactivity including natural and man-caused factors. Natural factors are cosmic radiation and radioactivity of rocks. Man-caused factors are shown on Fig. 1. It is obvious that man-caused radioactivity is due to both artificial and natural emitters. Any result of radiation measurement represents total radioactivity i.e. the sum of activities resulting from natural and man-caused emitters. There is no gauge which could separately measure natural and man-caused radioactivity. That is why it is so hard to assess natural and man-caused contributions to soil radioactivity. It would have been possible if human activity had led to contamination of soil only by artificial radionuclides. But we can view a totality of soil radioactivity factors in the following way. (author)

Gablin, Vassily [Scientific-Industrial Association 'Radon', 7th Rostovsky Lane, Moscow 119121 (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01

29

TRANSPORT OF LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE SOIL AT DEEP-OCEAN DISPOSAL SITE  

EPA Science Inventory

Transport studies were conducted to assess ocean disposal of soil contaminated with low-level natural radioisotopes. he experimental approach involved characterization of the soil for parameters affecting transport and fate of radionuclides- Radioactivity was associated with disc...

30

Decontamination of protective clothing against radioactive contamination.  

PubMed

The aim of this study is to describe the experimental results of external surface mechanical decontamination of the studied materials forming selected suits. Seven types of personal protective suits declaring protection against radioactive aerosol contamination in different price ranges were selected for decontamination experiments. The outcome of this study is to compare the efficiency of a double-step decontamination process on various personal protective suits against radioactive contamination. A comparison of the decontamination effectiveness for the same type of suit, but for the different chemical mixtures ((140)La in a water-soluble or in a water-insoluble compound), was performed. PMID:25084793

Vošahlíková, I; Otáhal, P

2014-11-01

31

[Examination of radioactive contamination in foods].  

PubMed

Following the Fukushima nuclear plant accident in Mar. 2011, the examination of radioactive contamination in foods is being carried out in Nagoya. During the period between 30 Mar. 2011 and 31 Oct. 2012, a total of 300 food samples were collected and the concentrations of radioactive nuclides were determined by means of ?-ray spectrometry using a high-purity germanium semiconductor detector. The results of analysis indicate that the concentrations of radioactive iodine (I) and cesium (Cs) were below the regulatory limits. Radioactive I ((131)I) was detected in 7 samples which belonged to the categories of green and yellow vegetables and other vegetables. Radioactive Cs ((134)Cs and (137)Cs) was detected in 60 samples which belonged to the categories of rice and its processed products, potatoes and its processed products, nuts and seeds, green and yellow vegetables, other vegetables, fruits, mushrooms, fishes and shellfishes, processed sea foods, meat, milk and dairy products and other beverages. PMID:23676695

Miyazaki, Hitoshi; Tsuchiyama, Tomoyuki; Terada, Hisaya

2013-01-01

32

Remediation of groundwater contaminated with radioactive compounds  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Both naturally radioactive isotopes and isotopes from man-made sources may appear in groundwater. Depending on the physical and chemical characteristics of the contaminant, different types of treatment methods must be applied to reduce the concentration. The following chapter discusses treatment opt...

33

Contaminant resorption during soil washing  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate the applicability of soil washing to a specific site requires some basic research in how contaminants are bound. Much can be learned from sequential extraction methodology based on micronutrient bioavailability studies wherein the soil matrix is chemically dissected to selectively remove particular fixation mechanisms independently. This procedure uses a series of progressively more aggressive solvents to dissolve the principle phases that make up a soil, however, the published studies do not appear to consider the potential for a contaminant released from one type of site to resorb on another site during an extraction. This physical model assumes no ion exchange or adsorption at sites either previously occupied by other ions, or exposed by the dissolution. Therefore, to make engineering use of the sequential extraction data, the release of contamination must be evaluated relative to the effects of resorption. Time release studies were conducted to determine the optimum duration for extraction to maximize complete destruction of the target matrix fraction while minimizing contaminant resorption. Tests with and without a potassium brine present to inhibit cesium resorption indicated extraction efficiency could be enhanced by as much as a factor of ten using the brine.

Gombert, D.

1993-10-01

34

Radioactive contamination of the Yenisei River  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on observational data in the period 1971–1993, radioactive contamination of the Yenisei River ecosystem was analysed within 2000 km of the site of discharges from the Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Industrial Complex. Data on the content of 24Na, 32P, 46Sc, 51Cr, 54Mn, 56Mn, 58Co, 60Co, 59Fe, 65Zn, 90Sr, 95Zr, 95Nb, 103Ru, 106Ru, 134Cs, 137Cs, 140Ba, 141Ce, 144Ce and 239Np

E. G. Tertyshnik

1995-01-01

35

Radioactive contamination incidents involving protective clothing  

SciTech Connect

The study focuses on incidents at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities involving the migration of radioactive contaminants through protective clothing. The authors analyzed 68 occurrence reports for the following factors: (1) type of work; (2) working conditions; (3) type of anti-contamination (anti-C) material; (4) area of body or clothing contaminated; and (5) nature of spread of contamination. A majority of reports identified strenuous work activities such as maintenance, construction, or decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) projects. The reports also indicated adverse working conditions that included hot and humid or cramped work environments. The type of anti-C clothing most often identified was cotton or water-resistant, disposable clothing. Most of the reports also indicated contaminants migrating through perspiration-soaked areas, typically in the knees and forearms. On the basis of their survey, the authors recommend the use of improved engineering controls and resilient, breathable, waterproof protective clothing for work in hot, humid, or damp areas where the possibility of prolonged contact with contamination cannot be easily avoided or controlled.

Reichelt, R.; Clay, M.; Eichorst, J.

1996-10-01

36

ION-EXCHANGE PROCESSES FOR REMOVING RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION FROM MILK  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY These studies on removing radioactive contamination from milk were carried on for the purpose of developing a feasible standby process for use in dairy plants in the event that radioactive fallout should reach hazardous levels. Current levels of all the radioactive contaminants are far below what is con- sidered hazardous levels; Iodine-131 is essentially undetectable in all milk supplies.

L. E. Edmondson

1964-01-01

37

The total amounts of radioactively contaminated materials in forests in Fukushima, Japan  

PubMed Central

There has been leakage of radioactive materials from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. A heavily contaminated area (? 134, 137Cs 1000?kBq m?2) has been identified in the area northwest of the plant. The majority of the land in the contaminated area is forest. Here we report the amounts of biomass, litter (small organic matter on the surface of the soil), coarse woody litter, and soil in the contaminated forest area. The estimated overall volume and weight were 33?Mm3 (branches, leaves, litter, and coarse woody litter are not included) and 21?Tg (dry matter), respectively. Our results suggest that removing litter is an efficient method of decontamination. However, litter is being continuously decomposed, and contaminated leaves will continue to fall on the soil surface for several years; hence, the litter should be removed promptly but continuously before more radioactive elements are transferred into the soil. PMID:22639724

Hashimoto, Shoji; Ugawa, Shin; Nanko, Kazuki; Shichi, Koji

2012-01-01

38

Phytoremediation of soils contaminated by cadmium  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phytoremediation is a technique to clean up soils contaminated with heavy metals. Advantages of this method are that (1) This technique is suitable to cleanup soils slightly contaminated with heavy metals in relatively wide area. (2) The expense for clean up is lower than civil engineering techniques. (3) This method can remove heavy metals fundamentally from contaminated. (4) The heavy

H. Watai; T. Miyazaki; T. Fujikawa; M. Mizoguchi

2004-01-01

39

Phytoremediation of Metal-Contaminated Soils  

SciTech Connect

Recent concerns regarding environmental contamination have necessitated the development of appropriate technologies to assess the presence and mobility of metals in soil and estimate possible ways to decrease the level of soil metal contamination. Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that may be used to cleanup contaminated soils. Successful application of phytoremediation, however, depends upon various factors that must be carefully investigated and properly considered for specific site conditions. To efficiently affect the metal removal from contaminated soils we used the ability of plants to accumulate different metals and agricultural practices to improve soil quality and enhance plant biomass. Pot experiments were conducted to study metal transport through bulk soil to the rhizosphere and stimulate transfer of the metals to be more available for plants' form. The aim of the experimental study was also to find fertilizers that could enhance uptake of metals and their removal from contaminated soil.

Shtangeeva, I.; Laiho, J.V-P.; Kahelin, H.; Gobran, G.R.

2004-03-31

40

Treatment of NORM contaminated soil from the oilfields.  

PubMed

Uncontrolled disposal of oilfield produced water in the surrounding environment could lead to soil contamination by naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). Large volumes of soil become highly contaminated with radium isotopes ((226)Ra and (228)Ra). In the present work, laboratory experiments have been conducted to reduce the activity concentration of (226)Ra in soil. Two techniques were used, namely mechanical separation and chemical treatment. Screening of contaminated soil using vibratory sieve shaker was performed to evaluate the feasibility of particle size separation. The fractions obtained were ranged from less than 38 ?m to higher than 300 ?m. The results show that (226)Ra activity concentrations vary widely from fraction to fraction. On the other hand, leaching of (226)Ra from soil by aqueous solutions (distilled water, mineral acids, alkaline medias and selective solvents) has been performed. In most cases, relatively low concentrations of radium were transferred to solutions, which indicates that only small portions of radium are present on the surface of soil particles (around 4.6%), while most radium located within soil particles; only concentrated nitric acid was most effective where 50% of (226)Ra was removed to aqueous phase. However, mechanical method was found to be easy and effective, taking into account safety procedures to be followed during the implementation of the blending and homogenization. Chemical extraction methods were found to be less effective. The results obtained in this study can be utilized to approach the final option for disposal of NORM contaminated soil in the oilfields. PMID:24378731

Abdellah, W M; Al-Masri, M S

2014-03-01

41

Phytoremediation of Soils Contaminated by Chlorinnated Hydrocarbons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent years, the possible use of deep rooted plants for phytoremediation of soil contaminants has been offered as a potential alternative for waste management, particularly for in situ remediation of large volumes of contaminated soils. Major objectives of this study are to evaluate the effectiveness of a warm season grass (Eastern Gamagrass) and a cool season prairie grass (Annual Ryegrass) in the phytoremediation of the soil contaminated with volatile organic compounds e.g., trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) and to determine the main mechanisms of target contaminant dissipation. The preliminary tests and laboratory scale tests were conducted to identify the main mechanisms for phytoremediation of the target contaminants, and to apply the technique in green house application under field conditions. The results of microcosm and bioreactor experiments showed that volatilization can be the dominant pathway of the target contaminant mass losses in soils. Toxicity tests, conducted in nutrient solution in the growth room, and in the greenhouse, showed that both Eastern gamagrass and Annual ryegrass could grow without harmful effects at up to 400 ppm each of all three contaminants together. Preliminary greenhouse experimentw were conducted with the 1.5 m long and 0.3 m diameter PVC columns. Soil gas concentrations monitored and microbial biomass in bulk and rhizosphere soil, root properties, and contaminant concentration in soil after 100 days were analyzed. The results showed that the soil gas concentration of contaminants has rapidly decreased especially in the upper soil and the contaminant concentraitons in soil were also significantly decreased to 0.024, 0.228, and 0.002 of C/Co for TCE, PCE and TCA, respectively. Significant plant effects were not found however showed contaminant loss through volatilization and plant contamination by air.

Cho, C.; Sung, K.; Corapcioglu, M.

2001-12-01

42

Phytoremediation of Soils Contaminated by Chlorinnated Hydrocarbons  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, the possible use of deep rooted plants for phytoremediation of soil contaminants has been offered as a potential alternative for waste management, particularly for in situ remediation of large volumes of contaminated soils. Major objectives of this study are to evaluate the effectiveness of a warm season grass (Eastern Gamagrass) and a cool season prairie grass (Annual

C. Cho; K. Sung; M. Corapcioglu

2001-01-01

43

Dose Evaluation Assessment of Contaminated Skin with Radioactive Substances  

Microsoft Academic Search

In one of the accidents that might happen in the nuclear power station, there is a contamination accident caused by radioactive corrosion products during a periodic inspection. It is necessary to presume the skin absorbed dose from the adhesion area and the contamination density to forecast the level of the skin hazard by the adhesion of the radioactive substance. However,

Hideki KATO; Sukehiko KOGA; Takashi MUKOYAMA; Hirotaka TOMATSU; Yusuke SUZUKI; Shoichi SUZUKI

2009-01-01

44

Improving soil contamination monitoring in Hungary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Development of national surveys and monitoring activities of soil contamination is currently one of the most important challenges in soil protection studies. In Hungary, the national Soil Information and Monitoring System (SIMS) has been established aiming to estimate changes in soil contaminants in agricultural lands and identify contaminated sites. However, besides the relatively high sample sizes of TIM (1236 point measurements) accuracies of the derived information on soil contamination are not known. The objectives of MONTABIO project are (1) to estimate the accuracy of SIMS by using additional up-to-date samplings of the typical soil contaminants using new field measurement methods; and (2) to develop spatial sampling design to improve the accuracy of the monitoring system. Towards aim (1) we measured toxic inorganic pollutants: heavy-metals, organic pollutants: pesticide residues and hydrocarbons in fields with different agricultural practices. Soil, soil water sampling and chemical analyses were completed according to standards. Differences and statistical power of the datasets provided by SIMS and our field sampling will be evaluated. In the interest of aim (2) regionalization of soil contamination coupled with further information (actual agricultural practices, soil physical and chemical parameters) will be conducted to optimize the spatial allocation of sampling points, to identify the relevant affecting factors and to minimize the required sample sizes.

Dombos, M.; Szabó, J.; Anton, A.; Pásztor, L.

2009-04-01

45

In situ removal of contamination from soil  

DOEpatents

A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination. The process also uses further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed. 5 figs.

Lindgren, E.R.; Brady, P.V.

1997-10-14

46

In situ removal of contamination from soil  

DOEpatents

A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination, and further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed.

Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01

47

Mutagens in contaminated soil: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intentional and accidental discharges of toxic pollutants into the lithosphere results in soil contamination. In some cases (e.g., wood preserving wastes, coal-tar, airborne combustion by-products), the contaminated soil constitutes a genotoxic hazard. This work is a comprehensive review of published information on soil mutagenicity. In total, 1312 assessments of genotoxic activity from 118 works were examined. The majority of

Paul A. White; Larry D. Claxton

2004-01-01

48

LANDFARMING IN A PAH-CONTAMINATED SOIL  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present work describes a coke oven soil treatability study by landfarming, conducted on-site in a field scale facility covering 100 m. The soil contamination was mainly due to high concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) up to 1140 mg\\/Kg dry weight (?EPA). Along the treatment process the soil was characterised at the chemical, microbiological and ecotoxicological levels. After 3

Ana Picado; Anabela Nogueira; Lina Baeta-Hall; Elsa Mendonça; Maria de Fátima Rodrigues; Maria do Céu Sàágua; Aida Martins; Ana Maria Anselmo

2001-01-01

49

The Accumulation of Radioactive Contaminants in Drinking Water Distribution Systems  

EPA Science Inventory

The accumulation of trace contaminants in drinking water distribution systems has been documented and the subsequent release of the contaminants back to the water is a potential exposure pathway. Radioactive contaminants are of particular concern because of their known health eff...

50

Highly reduced mass loss rates and increased litter layer in radioactively contaminated areas.  

PubMed

The effects of radioactive contamination from Chernobyl on decomposition of plant material still remain unknown. We predicted that decomposition rate would be reduced in the most contaminated sites due to an absence or reduced densities of soil invertebrates. If microorganisms were the main agents responsible for decomposition, exclusion of large soil invertebrates should not affect decomposition. In September 2007 we deposited 572 bags with uncontaminated dry leaf litter from four species of trees in the leaf litter layer at 20 forest sites around Chernobyl that varied in background radiation by more than a factor 2,600. Approximately one quarter of these bags were made of a fine mesh that prevented access to litter by soil invertebrates. These bags were retrieved in June 2008, dried and weighed to estimate litter mass loss. Litter mass loss was 40% lower in the most contaminated sites relative to sites with a normal background radiation level for Ukraine. Similar reductions in litter mass loss were estimated for individual litter bags, litter bags at different sites, and differences between litter bags at pairs of neighboring sites differing in level of radioactive contamination. Litter mass loss was slightly greater in the presence of large soil invertebrates than in their absence. The thickness of the forest floor increased with the level of radiation and decreased with proportional loss of mass from all litter bags. These findings suggest that radioactive contamination has reduced the rate of litter mass loss, increased accumulation of litter, and affected growth conditions for plants. PMID:24590204

Mousseau, Timothy A; Milinevsky, Gennadi; Kenney-Hunt, Jane; Møller, Anders Pape

2014-05-01

51

A petroleum contaminated soil bioremediation facility  

SciTech Connect

The amount of petroleum contaminated soil (PCS) at the Savannah River site (SRS) that has been identified, excavated and is currently in storage has increased several fold during the last few years. Several factors have contributed to this problem: (1) South Carolina Department of Health ad Environmental control (SCDHEC) lowered the sanitary landfill maximum concentration for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in the soil from 500 to 100 parts per million (ppm), (2) removal and replacement of underground storage tanks at several sites, (3) most recently SCDHEC disallowed aeration for treatment of contaminated soil, and (4) discovery of several very large contaminated areas of soil associated with leaking underground storage tanks (LUST), leaking pipes, disposal areas, and spills. Thus, SRS has an urgent need to remediate large quantities of contaminated soil that are currently stockpiled and the anticipated contaminated soils to be generated from accidental spills. As long as we utilize petroleum based compounds at the site, we will continue to generate contaminated soil that will require remediation.

Lombard, K.; Hazen, T.

1994-06-01

52

Evaluation of TENORMs field measurement with actual activity concentration in contaminated soil matrices  

Microsoft Academic Search

The occurrence of technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials (TENORMs) concentrated through anthropogenic processes in contaminated soils at oil and gas facilities represent one of the most challenging issues facing the Canadian and US oil and gas industry today. Natural occurring radioactivity materials (NORMs) field survey techniques are widely used as a rapid and cost-effective method for ascertaining NORMs risks

Roger Saint-Fort; Mirtyll Alboiu; Patrick Hettiaratchi

2007-01-01

53

Cadmium Removal from Contaminated Soil by Tunable  

E-print Network

Cadmium Removal from Contaminated Soil by Tunable Biopolymers G I R I D H A R P R A B H U K U M A R-binding biopolymer with high affinity toward cadmium. By taking advantage of the property of ELPH12 to undergo a reversible thermal precipitation, easy recovery of the sequestered cadmium from contaminated water

Chen, Wilfred

54

Chemical fixation of arsenic in contaminated soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Arsenic-contaminated soils have been successfully treated using fixation methods whereby chemicals are added to prevent As mobilization. However, the chemistry of the fixation process used in the field is poorly understood. We have examined one process which succeeded in immobilizing 0. I to 0.2 weight % As in soil at a 69 a old dump site through the addition of

Remy J.-C. Hennet; S. L. Brantley

1996-01-01

55

Release of Chemicals from Contaminated Soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

At sites that contain contaminated soils, there can be questions about the magnitude of risk posed by the chemicals in the soils and about the cleanup levels that should be achieved. Knowledge about the rate of release of chemicals is important to answers to such questions. This article: (1) describes a laboratory protocol to obtain rate of release information for

Derek G. Williamson; Raymond C. Loehr; Yosuke Kimura

1998-01-01

56

Early-stage bioassay for monitoring radioactive contamination in living livestock.  

PubMed

Soil samples from the ground surface and feces and blood from a mixed-breed male pig were collected on April 10, 2011 at a farm within 20 km of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The radioactivity of each sample was measured using a Ge semiconductor detector. Despite the fact that the pig had been fed non-contaminated imported feed, (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs were detected in the feces, and (134)Cs and (137)Cs were detected in the blood clots. Because it is considerably difficult to measure radioactive contamination in the edible muscle of living livestock, bioassays are an option for the screening of radioactive contamination in living livestock to ensure food safety. PMID:22864411

Yamaguchi, Toshiro; Sawano, Kaita; Kishimoto, Miori; Furuhama, Kazuhisa; Yamada, Kazutaka

2012-12-01

57

Speciation of Lead in Contaminated Soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lead contaminated soils from various origins were sampled and analyzed for total Pb content, dissolved Pb, soil pH, soil organic matter content and Mo-reactive phosphate in solution. The concentration of free Pb2+ ionic species in solution was determined using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV), assuming that ASV-labile Pb excludes organo–Pb complexes. The dataset shows the solubility relationships between the

Sébastien Sauvé; Murray B. McBride; William H. Hendershot

1997-01-01

58

Soil washing of fluorine contaminated soil using various washing solutions.  

PubMed

Bench-scale soil washing experiments were conducted to remove fluoride from contaminated soils. Five washing solutions including hydrochloric acid (HCl), nitric acid (HNO3), sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and tartaric acid (C4H6O6) were tested. The concentration of the washing solutions used ranged from 0.1 to 3 M with a liquid to solid ratio of 10. The soil washing results showed that the most effective washing solution for the removal of fluoride from contaminated soils was HCl. The highest fluoride removal results of approximately 97 % from the contaminated soil were obtained using 3 M HCl. The fluoride removal efficiency of the washing solution increases in the following order: C4H6O6 < NaOH < H2SO4 < HNO3 < HCl. PMID:25552323

Moon, Deok Hyun; Jo, Raehyun; Koutsospyros, Agamemnon; Cheong, Kyung Hoon; Park, Jeong-Hun

2015-03-01

59

Radioactivity of the Bega sediment-case study of a contaminated canal.  

PubMed

The Bega canal is one among many heavily polluted canals in Vojvodina (the northern province of Serbia and Montenegro). In the framework of the revitalization of this canal, the radionuclide content of the sediment was investigated in order to support the safe deposition after excavation. It was found that, in comparison with the Danube sediment and Vojvodina soil, the Bega sediment is contaminated with (238)U and (137)Cs. The origin of this contamination is discussed. No traces of contamination by nuclear power plants in the region were found, while the presence of technologically enhanced, natural occurring radioactive materials (TENORM) was proved. PMID:15946851

Bikit, I; Varga, E; Conki?, Lj; Slivka, J; Mrda, D; Curci?, S; Ziki?-Todorovi?, N; Veskovi?, M

2005-08-01

60

Radioactively Contaminated Scrap Metal An International Approach to Monitoring, Interception & Managing  

E-print Network

Radioactively Contaminated Scrap Metal An International Approach to Monitoring, Interception of uncontrolled radioactive source incidents. Aside from radiation exposure to workers and the public, this unwanted radioactive scrap material causes environmental and facility contamination with cleanup costs

61

Some aspects of remediation of contaminated soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soils are essential components of the environment, a limited precious and fragile resource, the quality of which should be preserved. The concentration, chemical form and distribution of potential harmful elements in soils depends on parent rocks, weathering, soil type and soil use. However, their concentration can be altered by mismanagement of industrial and mining activities, energy generation, traffic increase, overuse of agrochemicals, sewage sludge and waste disposal, causing contamination, environmental problems and health concerns. Heavy metals, some metalloids and radionuclides are persistent in the environment. This persistence hampers the cost/efficiency of remediation technologies. The choice of the most appropriate soil remediation techniques depends of many factors and essentially of the specific site. This contribution aims to offer an overview of the main remediation methods in contaminated soils. There are two main groups of technologies: the first group dealing with containment and confinement, minimizing their toxicity, mobility and bioavailability. Containment measures include covering, sealing, encapsulation and immobilization and stabilization. The second group, remediation with decontamination, is based on the remotion, clean up and/or destruction of contaminants. This group includes mechanical procedures, physical separations, chemical technologies such as soil washing with leaching or precipitation of harmful elements, soil flushing, thermal treatments and electrokinetic technologies. There are also two approaches of biological nature: bioremediation and phytoremediation. Case studies from Chile, Ecuador, Italy, Korea, Peru, Portugal, Russia and Spain, will be discussed in accordance with the time available.

Bech, Jaume; Korobova, Elena; Abreu, Manuela; Bini, Claudio; Chon, Hyo-Taek; Pérez-Sirvent, Carmen; Roca, Núria

2014-05-01

62

In Situ Vitrification: Recent test results for a contaminated soil melting process  

SciTech Connect

In Situ Vitrification (ISV) is being developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the Department of Energy and other clients for the stabilization of soils and sludges contaminated with radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes. ISV is a process that immobilizes contaminated soil in place by converting it to a durable glass and crystalline product that is similar to obsidian. In June 1987, a large-scale test of the process was completed at a transuranic- contaminated soil site. This constituted the first full-scale demonstration of the ISV process at an actual site. This paper summarizes the preliminary results of this test and describes the processes' potential adaptation to radioactive and hazardous chemical waste contaminated soils. 10 refs., 10 figs.

Buelt, J.L.; Timmerman, C.L.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

1988-06-01

63

In situ vitrification: Test results for a contaminated soil-melting process  

SciTech Connect

In situ vitrification (ISV) is being developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the Department of Energy to stabilize soils and sludges that are contaminated with radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes. ISV is a process that immobilizes contaminated soil in place by converting it to a durable glass and crystalline product similar to obsidian and basalt. In June 1987, a large-scale test of the process was completed at a transuranic-contaminated soil site. The test constituted the first full-scale demonstration of ISV at an actual site. This paper summarizes the results of that test and describes the potential adaptation of the process to radioactive and hazardous chemical waste-contaminated soils. 15 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Buelt, J.L.; Timmerman, C.L.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

1989-10-01

64

Phytoremediation of soils contaminated by cadmium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Phytoremediation is a technique to clean up soils contaminated with heavy metals. Advantages of this method are that (1) This technique is suitable to cleanup soils slightly contaminated with heavy metals in relatively wide area. (2) The expense for clean up is lower than civil engineering techniques. (3) This method can remove heavy metals fundamentally from contaminated. (4) The heavy metals are able to recycle by ashing of plants. Many researches have been done on the phytoremediation up to now, but almost all these researches were devoted to clarify the phytoremediation from the view point of plants themselves. However, few efforts have been devoted to analyze the migrations of heavy metals in soils during the phytoremediation process. The objective of this study is to clarify the features of Cd migration when plant roots are absorbing Cd from the ambient soils. Especially, we focused on finding the Cd migration pattern by changing the soil condition such as plant growing periods, planting densities, and the initial Cd concentration in soils. We planted sunflowers in columns filled with Cd contaminated soils because sunflower is a well-known hyperaccumulator of Cd from soils. By cutting the shoots of plants at the soil surface, and by keeping the plant roots in the soils without disturbance, the Cd concentrations, moisture contents, pH distributions, EC distributions, and dry weight of residual roots in the soils were carefully analyzed. The experimental results showed that (1)The growth of the planted sunflowers were suffered by applying of Cd. (2)The decrease of suction was affected by water uptake by roots at the depth from 0 to 5 cm. Water contents with plants in soils decrease more than without plants. (3)Cd adsorption by roots was predominant within 5cm from soil surface. In addition, it was also shown that there was an optimal Cd concentration where Cd is most effectively adsorbed by the plant. In this experiment we found that 40 to 60 mg kg-1 was the optimal concentration. By a trial calculation, it was revealed that more than 30 times of planting-cultivating processes were needed to decrease the Cd concentration from 9.75 to 0.4 mg Cd kg-1. When the sunflower was not planted, Cd did not move in the soils even when the soil water the sunflower was planted, Cd in the soil moved toward the plant roots associating with the water uptake by the roots. This Cd movement may have enhanced by the secretion of organic acid from plant roots.

Watai, H.; Miyazaki, T.; Fujikawa, T.; Mizoguchi, M.

2004-12-01

65

Measurement of residual radioactive surface contamination by 2-D laser heated TLD  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of applying and adapting a two-dimensional laser heated thermoluminescence dosimetry system to the problem of surveying for radioactive surface contamination was studied. The system consists of a CO{sub 2} laser-based reader and monolithic arrays of thin dosimeter elements. The arrays consist of 10,201 thermoluminescent phosphor elements of 40 micron thickness, covering a 900 cm{sup 2} area. Array substrates are 125 micron thick polyimide sheets, enabling them to easily conform to regular surface shapes, especially for survey of surfaces that are inaccessible for standard survey instruments. The passive, integrating radiation detectors are sensitive to alpha and beta radiation at contamination levels below release guideline limits. Required contact times with potentially contaminated surfaces are under one hour to achieve detection of transuranic alpha emission at 100 dpm/100 cm{sup 2}. Positional information obtained from array evaluation is useful for locating contamination zones. Unique capabilities of this system for survey of sites, facilities and material include measurement inside pipes and other geometrical configurations that prevent standard surveys, and below-surface measurement of alpha and beta emitters in contaminated soils. These applications imply a reduction of material that must be classified as radioactive waste by virtue of its possibility of contamination, and cost savings in soil sampling at contaminated sites.

Jones, S.C.

1997-06-01

66

Simplified method for detecting tritium contamination in plants and soil  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Cost-effective methods are needed to identify the presence and distribution of tritium near radioactive waste disposal and other contaminated sites. The objectives of this study were to (i) develop a simplified sample preparation method for determining tritium contamination in plants and (ii) determine if plant data could be used as an indicator of soil contamination. The method entailed collection and solar distillation of plant water from foliage, followed by filtration and adsorption of scintillation-interfering constituents on a graphitebased solid phase extraction (SPE) column. The method was evaluated using samples of creosote bush [Larrea tridentata (Sesse?? & Moc. ex DC.) Coville], an evergreen shrub, near a radioactive disposal area in the Mojave Desert. Laboratory tests showed that a 2-g SPE column was necessary and sufficient for accurate determination of known tritium concentrations in plant water. Comparisons of tritium concentrations in plant water determined with the solar distillation-SPE method and the standard (and more laborious) toluene-extraction method showed no significant difference between methods. Tritium concentrations in plant water and in water vapor of root-zone soil also showed no significant difference between methods. Thus, the solar distillation-SPE method provides a simple and cost-effective way to identify plant and soil contamination. The method is of sufficient accuracy to facilitate collection of plume-scale data and optimize placement of more sophisticated (and costly) monitoring equipment at contaminated sites. Although work to date has focused on one desert plant, the approach may be transferable to other species and environments after site-specific experiments.

Andraski, B.J.; Sandstrom, M.W.; Michel, R.L.; Radyk, J.C.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Johnson, M.J.; Mayers, C.J.

2003-01-01

67

Assessment of health risk from exposure to contaminated soil  

Microsoft Academic Search

The risk to human health posed by contaminated soil in a residential area depends on the potential extent of exposure to soil and on the toxic properties of the contaminants. A detailed soil exposure analysis is presented for young children, older children, and adults living in a house surrounded by contaminated soil. From this analysis, a lifetime exposure model is

John K. Hawley

1985-01-01

68

Soil contamination evaluations: Earthworms as indicators of soil quality  

SciTech Connect

Earthworms have frequently been evaluated in the field and laboratory as representatives of the soil community that are indicative of their habitat`s quality. Within a landscape or at a contaminated site, soil quality, or soil health, has become increasingly critical to cleanup-related issues that revolve around questions of ``how clean is clean`` and the bioaccumulation of soil contaminants. Through an overview of numerous field and laboratory studies, the role that earthworms have played in evaluating soil contamination will be reviewed with a particular focus on evaluations of the bioaccumulation potential of chemicals in soil. Within ecological contexts, earthworms can provide information regarding immediately observable adverse affects related, for example, to acute toxicity. Additionally, earthworms can provide information directly related to the bioaccumulation potential of a chemical and trophic transfer of environmental chemicals, especially through the food-chain. Within the decision-making process, soil contamination evaluations must consider future land-use, as well as current and future expressions of adverse biological and ecological effects under field conditions, potentially following remediation. Through integrated field and laboratory studies using earthworms, the authors have been able to identify adversely affected soil communities and have been able to provide information for assessing adverse ecological effects potentially caused by contaminants. Field surveys and on-site or in situ biological testing with earthworms, however, can not alone identify causes of effects. As such, standardized biological tests have been routinely completed in the laboratory so linkages between expression of effects and contaminants could be more readily addressed in conjunction with appropriate chemical data from the field.

Linder, G.; Wilbom, D. [HeronWorks Farm, Brooks, OR (United States)

1995-12-31

69

Effects of radioactive contamination on Scots pines in the remote period after the Chernobyl accident.  

PubMed

A 6 year study of Scots pine populations inhabiting sites in the Bryansk region of Russia radioactively contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl accident is presented. In six study sites, (137)Cs activity concentrations and heavy metal content in soils, as well as (137)Cs, (90)Sr and heavy metal concentrations in cones were measured. Doses absorbed in reproduction organs of pine trees were calculated using a dosimetric model. The maximum annual dose absorbed at the most contaminated site was about 130 mGy. Occurrence of aberrant cells scored in the root meristem of germinated seeds collected from pine trees growing on radioactively contaminated territories for over 20 years significantly exceeded the reference levels during all 6 years of the study. The data suggest that cytogenetic effects occur in Scots pine populations due to the radioactive contamination. However, no consistent differences in reproductive ability were detected between the impacted and reference populations as measured by the frequency of abortive seeds. Even though the Scots pine populations have occupied radioactively contaminated territories for two decades, there were no clear indications of adaptation to the radiation, when measured by the number of aberrant cells in root meristems of seeds exposed to an additional acute dose of radiation. PMID:21451948

Geras'kin, Stanislav; Oudalova, Alla; Dikareva, Nina; Spiridonov, Sergey; Hinton, Thomas; Chernonog, Elena; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline

2011-08-01

70

Activated Natural Zeolites on Textiles: Protection from Radioactive Contamination  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Clothing designed to protect against radioactive contamination was based on a simple principle. It was important not to inhale contaminated dust and air and to ensure that contaminated particles could not reach the skin. Therefore, the density of the textile was crucial. New developments, keeping in mind that textile should be lightweight, are focused on textiles which can chemically bind the contamination particles and not allow them either to diffuse to the skin or spread back into the environment. A great success would be if the clothing were made reusable (e.g., for use in the space station). Therefore, new methods (or chemical preparations) are being proposed for developing intelligent textiles.

Grancaric, A. M.; Prlic, I.; Tarbuk, A.; Marovic, G.

71

Integrated system for remediation of contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

A pilot-scale study was conducted to evaluate an integrated system for the remediation of soils contaminated primarily with pentachlorophenol (PCP), a wood preserver. The integrated soil remediation system consisting of three unit processes (1) Soil solvent washing; (2) solvent recovery; and (3) biotreatment of the contaminant residual. Pilot-scale countercurrent solvent washing was carried out using a 95% ethanol solution--a solvent that in an earlier bench-scale study was found to be effective in removing PCP and hydrocarbons (HCs) from soils. Three-stage countercurrent solvent washing of a field-contaminated soil was performed using batches of 7.5 kg of soil and 30 L of solvent. The washed soil was rinsed with water in a single stage after three countercurrent wash stages. Pilot-scale, three-stage countercurrent solvent washing with 95% ethanol reduced the PCP and HC contamination on the soil by 98 and 95%, respectively. The spent solvent and the spent rinse water were combined as the spent wash fluid for further treatment. A pilot-scale distillation unit was used to recover the ethanol from the spent wash fluid. The HC constituents of the spent wash fluid were removed by pH adjustment prior to feeding the spent wash fluid to a distillation unit. Greater than 96% of the ethanol in the spent wash fluid was recovered in the distillate stream, whereas PCP was captured in the bottoms stream. The bottoms stream was treated sequentially in anaerobic and aerobic granular-activated carbon fluidized-bed reactors. Complete mineralization of PCP was achieved using this treatment train.

Khodadoust, A.P.; Sorial, G.A.; Wilson, G.J.; Suidan, M.T.; Griffiths, R.A.; Brenner, R.C.

1999-11-01

72

STUDIES ON THE DEPOSITION AND REMOVAL OF RADIOACTIVE SOIL  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rate of deposition and removal of a radioactive milk soil from ; several surfaces have been studied. The nature of the surface exhibited a small ; but measurable effect on the rate of deposition of a radioactive milk soil on the ; surfaces tested. However, the surfaces showed no significant effect on the rate ; of soil removal. The

I. J. Pflug; T. I. Hedrick; O. W. Kaufmann; R. A. Keppeler; C. G. Pheil

1961-01-01

73

Evolution of radioactive dose rates in fresh sediment deposits along coastal rivers draining Fukushima contamination plume  

PubMed Central

Measurement of radioactive dose rates in fine sediment that has recently deposited on channel bed-sand provides a solution to address the lack of continuous river monitoring in Fukushima Prefecture after Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. We show that coastal rivers of Eastern Fukushima Prefecture were rapidly supplied with sediment contaminated by radionuclides originating from inland mountain ranges, and that this contaminated material was partly exported by typhoons to the coastal plains as soon as by November 2011. This export was amplified during snowmelt and typhoons in 2012. In 2013, contamination levels measured in sediment found in the upper parts of the catchments were almost systematically lower than the ones measured in nearby soils, whereas their contamination was higher in the coastal plains. We thereby suggest that storage of contaminated sediment in reservoirs and in coastal sections of the river channels now represents the most crucial issue. PMID:24165695

Evrard, Olivier; Chartin, Caroline; Onda, Yuichi; Patin, Jeremy; Lepage, Hugo; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie; Ottlé, Catherine; Bonté, Philippe

2013-01-01

74

Evolution of radioactive dose rates in fresh sediment deposits along coastal rivers draining Fukushima contamination plume  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measurement of radioactive dose rates in fine sediment that has recently deposited on channel bed-sand provides a solution to address the lack of continuous river monitoring in Fukushima Prefecture after Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. We show that coastal rivers of Eastern Fukushima Prefecture were rapidly supplied with sediment contaminated by radionuclides originating from inland mountain ranges, and that this contaminated material was partly exported by typhoons to the coastal plains as soon as by November 2011. This export was amplified during snowmelt and typhoons in 2012. In 2013, contamination levels measured in sediment found in the upper parts of the catchments were almost systematically lower than the ones measured in nearby soils, whereas their contamination was higher in the coastal plains. We thereby suggest that storage of contaminated sediment in reservoirs and in coastal sections of the river channels now represents the most crucial issue.

Evrard, Olivier; Chartin, Caroline; Onda, Yuichi; Patin, Jeremy; Lepage, Hugo; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie; Ottlé, Catherine; Bonté, Philippe

2013-10-01

75

Evolution of radioactive dose rates in fresh sediment deposits along coastal rivers draining Fukushima contamination plume.  

PubMed

Measurement of radioactive dose rates in fine sediment that has recently deposited on channel bed-sand provides a solution to address the lack of continuous river monitoring in Fukushima Prefecture after Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. We show that coastal rivers of Eastern Fukushima Prefecture were rapidly supplied with sediment contaminated by radionuclides originating from inland mountain ranges, and that this contaminated material was partly exported by typhoons to the coastal plains as soon as by November 2011. This export was amplified during snowmelt and typhoons in 2012. In 2013, contamination levels measured in sediment found in the upper parts of the catchments were almost systematically lower than the ones measured in nearby soils, whereas their contamination was higher in the coastal plains. We thereby suggest that storage of contaminated sediment in reservoirs and in coastal sections of the river channels now represents the most crucial issue. PMID:24165695

Evrard, Olivier; Chartin, Caroline; Onda, Yuichi; Patin, Jeremy; Lepage, Hugo; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie; Ottlé, Catherine; Bonté, Philippe

2013-01-01

76

Evaluation of soil washing for radiologically contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

Soil washing has been applied internationally to decontaminate soils due to the widespread increase in environmental awareness manifested in the United States by promulgation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, yet we continue to lack understanding on why the technique works in one application and not in another. A soil washing process typically integrates a variety of modules, each designed to decontaminate the matrix by destroying a particular phase or segregating a particle size fraction in which the contaminants are concentrated. The more known about how the contaminants are fixed, the more likely the process will succeed. Much can be learned from bioavailability studies on heavy metals in soils. Sequential extraction experiments designed to destroy one fixation mechanism at a time can be used to determine how contaminants are bound. This knowledge provides a technical basis for designing a processing strategy to efficiently decontaminate soil while creating a minimum of secondary wastes. In this study, a soil from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was physically and chemically characterized, then sequentially extracted to determine if soil washing could be effectively used to remove cesium, cobalt and chromium.

Gombert, D. II

1994-03-01

77

Mutagens in contaminated soil: a review.  

PubMed

The intentional and accidental discharges of toxic pollutants into the lithosphere results in soil contamination. In some cases (e.g., wood preserving wastes, coal-tar, airborne combustion by-products), the contaminated soil constitutes a genotoxic hazard. This work is a comprehensive review of published information on soil mutagenicity. In total, 1312 assessments of genotoxic activity from 118 works were examined. The majority of the assessments (37.6%) employed the Salmonella mutagenicity test with strains TA98 and/or TA100. An additional 37.6% of the assessments employed a variety of plant species (e.g., Tradescantia clone 4430, Vicia faba, Zea mays, Allium cepa) to assess mutagenic activity. The compiled data on Salmonella mutagenicity indicates significant differences (p<0.0001) in mean potency (revertents per gram dry weight) between industrial, urban, and rural/agricultural sites. Additional analyses showed significant empirical relationships between S9-activated TA98 mutagenicity and soil polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentration (r2=0.19 to 0.25, p<0.0001), and between direct-acting TA98 mutagenicity and soil dinitropyrene (DNP) concentration (r2=0.87, p<0.0001). The plant assay data revealed excellent response ranges and significant differences between heavily contaminated, industrial, rural/agricultural, and reference sites, for the anaphase aberration in Allium cepa (direct soil contact) and the waxy locus mutation assay in Zea mays (direct soil contact). The Tradescantia assays appeared to be less responsive, particularly for exposures to aqueous soil leachates. Additional data analyses showed empirical relationships between anaphase aberrations in Allium, or mutations in Arabidopsis, and the 137Cs contamination of soils. Induction of micronuclei in Tradescantia is significantly related to the soil concentration of several metals (e.g., Sb, Cu, Cr, As, Pb, Cd, Ni, Zn). Review of published remediation exercises showed effective removal of genotoxic petrochemical wastes within one year. Remediation of more refractory genotoxic material (e.g., explosives, creosote) frequently showed increases in mutagenic hazard that remained for extended periods. Despite substantial contamination and mutagenic hazards, the risk of adverse effect (e.g., mutation, cancer) in humans or terrestrial biota is difficult to quantify. PMID:15572286

White, Paul A; Claxton, Larry D

2004-11-01

78

Remediation of MTBE Contaminated Water and Soil  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the number of leaking underground fuel tank sites with MTBEcontamination continues to grow, there is a need to develop cost-effectivesolutions for treatment of soil and water contamination. MTBE poses specialchallenges due to its physicochemical properties, in particular high solubility andlow Henry s constant, low affinity for sorption, and very slow rate of microbialdegradation. Advanced oxidation processes tend to generate

Arturo A. Keller; Sanya Sirivithayapakorn; Mark Kram

1999-01-01

79

REMEDIATION OF RADIUM FROM CONTAMINATED SOIL  

EPA Science Inventory

The objective of this study was to demonstrate the application of a physico-chemical separation process for the removal of radium from a sample of contaminated soil at the Ottawa, Illinois, site near Chicago. The size/activity distribution analyzed among the particles coarser tha...

80

SOLVENT WASHING OF AGED PCP CONTAMINATED SOILS  

EPA Science Inventory

This study evaluates the removal of pentachlorophenol (PCP), a wood preserving agent, from soils that have been contaminated over a period of time. reviously, equal proportions of ethanol and water were found to have the highest PCP removal efficiencies for above ground batch ext...

81

REMEDIATING PESTICIDE CONTAMINATED SOILS USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION  

EPA Science Inventory

Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDD,, p,p'-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as sol...

82

Radioactivity in Virgin Soils and Soils from Some Areas with Closed Uranium Mining Facilities in Bulgaria  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The soil radioecology is an important part of the environmental research in the country. Since the beginning of the 1970's regular monitoring of the content of different radionuclides in Bulgarian soils has been done. Objective of the studies were virgin soils from high mountain areas, hills and plains (the region of Kozloduy NPP and the Danube river valley). Natural and men-made radionuclides were observed. In the 25-year period after the the contamination with radionuclides due to the 1986 Chernobyl NPP accident a rich data base has been collected, recording the radiation status of the soils in Bulgaria. Special attention has been paid to the contamination with the long-lived technogenic radionuclides caesium-137 and strontium-90. This paper presents a summary of the obtained results. Caesium-137 and strontium-90 were the main men-made radionuclides detected in the examined Bulgarian soils few years after the Chernobyl NPP accident. Their content in the soils from high mountain areas (Rodopa and Rila mountains) is several times higher than that in the soils from North Bulgaria and Sofia fields. High non-homogenity in the pollution within small areas (even as small as several square meters) has been observed. Natural radioactivity was also studied. Averaged values for natural radionuclides like uranium-238, thorium-232, and radium-226 in virgin soils from different areas in the country are presented. A comparison of the dynamics of their behavior throughout the years is done. Bulgaria is a country with intensive uranium mining activities in the past years. That is why radiological monitoring of closed uranium mining facilities in different regions of the country are obligatory and of great interest. This work presents results from such investigations made in regions where remediation has been done. The results have been evaluated according to the Bulgarian radionuclide environment contamination legislation. The necessity of permanent environmental monitoring is assessed.

Yordanova, I.; Staneva, D.; Misheva, L.; Bineva, Ts.; Banov, M.

2012-04-01

83

Zinc Speciation in a Smelter-Contaminated Soil Profile  

E-print Network

Zinc Speciation in a Smelter-Contaminated Soil Profile Using Bulk and Microspectroscopic Techniques. One significant metal contaminant in soils is zinc, which is mined in 50 countries and smelted in 21

Sparks, Donald L.

84

TREATMENT OF HAZARDOUS PETROLEUM CONTAMINATED SOILS BY THERMAL DESORPTION TECHNOLOGIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Spills, leaks, and accidental discharges of petroleum products have contaminated soil at thousands of sites in the United States. ne remedial action technique for treating petroleum contaminated soil is the use of thermal desorption technologies. his paper describes key elements ...

85

Management and disposal of waste from sites contaminated by radioactivity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Various methods of managing and disposing of wastes generated by decontamination and decommissioning (D & D) activities are described. This review of current waste management practices includes a description of waste minimization and volume reduction techniques and their applicability to various categories of radwaste. The importance of the physical properties of the radiation and radioactivity in determining the methodology of choice throughout the D & D process is stressed. The subject is introduced by a survey of the common types of radioactive contamination that must be managed and the more important hazards associated with each type. Comparisons are made among high level, transuranic, low level, and radioactive mixed waste, and technologically-enhanced, naturally-occurring radioactive material (TENORM). The development of appropriate clean-up criteria for each category of contaminated waste is described with the aid of examples drawn from actual practice. This includes a discussion of the application of pathway analysis to the derivation of residual radioactive material guidelines. The choice between interim storage and permanent disposal of radioactive wastes is addressed. Approaches to permanent disposal of each category of radioactive waste are described and illustrated with examples of facilities that have been constructed or are planned for implementation in the near future. Actual experience at older, existing, low-level waste disposal facilities is discussed briefly.

Roberts, Carlyle J.

1998-06-01

86

Arsenic speciation in contaminated soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method for arsenic speciation in soils is developed, based on extraction with a mixture of 1 mol l?1 of phosphoric acid and 0.1 mol l?1 of ascorbic acid, and further measurement with the coupling liquid chromatography (LC)–ultraviolet (UV) irradiation–hydride generation (HG)–inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP\\/MS). The stability of the arsenic species in the extracts is also studied. The

S Garcia-Manyes; G Jiménez; A Padró; Roser Rubio; G Rauret

2002-01-01

87

Determination of 226Ra contamination depth in soil using the multiple photopeaks method.  

PubMed

Radioactive contamination presents a diverse range of challenges in many industries. Determination of radioactive contamination depth plays a vital role in the assessment of contaminated sites, because it can be used to estimate the activity content. It is determined traditionally by measuring the activity distributions along the depth. This approach gives accurate results, but it is time consuming, lengthy and costly. The multiple photopeaks method was developed in this work for (226)Ra contamination depth determination in a NORM contaminated soil using in-situ gamma spectrometry. The developed method bases on linear correlation between the attenuation ratio of different gamma lines emitted by (214)Bi and the (226)Ra contamination depth. Although this method is approximate, but it is much simpler, faster and cheaper than the traditional one. This method can be applied for any case of multiple gamma emitter contaminant. PMID:24292393

Haddad, Kh; Al-Masri, M S; Doubal, A W

2014-02-01

88

Electrochemical screening procedure for arsenic contaminated soils.  

PubMed

Voltammetry of immobilized microparticles was used to find arsenic and heavy metals in contaminated soils from areas with long history of industrial development. Traditional sample dissolution and extraction procedures are time consuming and might distort the chemical equilibrium of the sample causing a change in the original physicochemical forms of distribution. A minute amount of sample was physically attached to the carbon paste working electrode surface and an anodic differential pulse voltammogram was obtained without disturbing the original equilibria. The position of the peaks revealed the presence of Pb and Cu and As(V) and As(III) for the most contaminated soils. As(III) was detected when its percentage in soil was more than 0.001% (expressed as As(2)O(3)). The limit of detectability was strongly dependent on the presence of iron(III) which increased the signal 10 times. PMID:18970066

Cepriá, G; Alexa, N; Cordos, E; Castillo, J R

2005-05-15

89

Radioactive Elements in Soils of Siberia (Russia)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Center of State Sanitary and Epidemiological Surveillance Department in Krasnoyarsk Territory, Krasnoyarsk In the course of long-term research a great deal of information on the content of natural and artificial radionuclides in soils of the Siberian regions has been obtained and summarized (Altai and Krasnoyarsk Territories, Altai Republic, Buryatia, Yakutia, Khakassia, Irkutsk, Novosibirsk, Tomsk Oblasts and a number of other Siberian regions). The content level of U(Ra), Th and K in soil of studied areas is within the range of values obtained for soil of other areas of Russia and the world and defined, first of all, by radioactivity of parent rocks. The authors have studied the total level of specific activity for 137Cs most completely in soils of different Siberian regions. The maximum density of such sites with global fallouts (nuclear air explosions in Novaya Zemlya, Lop Nor, Semipalatinsk etc.) is typical for the areas of Altai Territory and Buryatia Republic. Elevated level of radiocesium (to 1000 and more than Bq/kg) is characteristic for the sites adjacent to the area of NFP (Seversk, Zheleznogorsk). Our data obtained in determination of plutonium in soils of different Siberian regions excess remarkably its background accepted for Siberia. Particularly high accumulation levels of Pu in soil were observed in the zones of NFP operation (Seversk, Tomsk Oblast; Zheleznogorsk, Krasnoyarsk Territory, in the sites of accidents fallouts at underground nuclear explosions in Sakha Republic (Yakutia). Abnormally high ratio of 238Pu/239,240Pu in soils of Sakha republic, Aginsk Buryatia Autonomous District, Krasnoyarsk Territory has engaged our attention.

Baranovskaya, N. V.; Rikhvanov, L. P.; Matveenko, I. N.; Strakhovenko, V. D.; Malikova, I. N.; Shcherbakov, B. L.; Sukhorukov, F. V.; Aturova, V. P.

2012-04-01

90

Firm contracts for treatability tests on contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

Geosafe Corporation, a Pacific Northwest-headquartered hazardous waste remediation company, announced that is has successfully completed treatability testing of contaminated soils under contract with Woodward Clyde Consultants of Denver, Colorado, the prime contractor for a major hazardous waste site in the Western United States. The tests are being conducted at the University of Washington with Geosafe's specially-designed test equipment. The recently concluded testing confirms the ability of Geosafe's patented in situ vitrification (ISV) technology to treat soils containing a variety of organic and inorganic contaminants. ISV, for which Geosafe has worldwide rights, is the only technology available today that will fully comply with the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act. The ability of ISV to treat mixtures of organic, inorganic and radioactive wastes in situ, in a single process, offers distinct advantages over excavation, transportation and incineration. During the ISV process, organic contaminants are pyrolized and the inorganics present are chemically incorporated into the molten soil which, when cooled, resembles naturally-occurring obsidian.

Not Available

1989-08-01

91

Activated Peroxygens for Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater  

E-print Network

i Activated Peroxygens for Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater Ph.D. thesis Submitted May 2011 #12;ii Activated Peroxygens for Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater Ph.D. thesis peroxygens for remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater" along with 5 papers describing part

Hansen, René Rydhof

92

SRXRF for investigation of plants in conditions of radioactive contamination  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

X-ray fluorescence analysis using synchrotron radiation (SRXRF) was applied to determine element composition in the aboveground part of Pentaphylloides fruticosa (bush cinquefoil) under conditions of man-caused radionuclide contamination. It is ascertained that Ti, V, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Zr, and Ba content increases and S, Mn, Ag, Sn, I, and Cd content decreases in plants from the contaminated area in comparison with those from locations with background radiation. Significant changes are determined in element ratios Fe/Mn, Cu/Zn, Ba/Ca, and K/Rb, which indicate adverse conditions of bush cinquefoil growing. These findings allow using these plants as a phytometer of radioactive contamination.

Chankina, O. V.; Khramova, E. P.; Koutsenogii, K. P.; Krylova, E. I.; Syeva, S. Ya.; Tarasov, O. V.

2007-05-01

93

Guide to treatment technology for contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

This document is a guide for the screening of alternative treatment technologies for contaminated soils. The contents of this guide are organized into: 1. Introduction, II. Utilizing the table, III. Tables: Contamination Versus Technology, TV. Contaminant Waste Groups, and V. References. The four Contaminations Versus Technology tables are designed to identify the effectiveness and/or potential applicability of technologies to some or all compounds within specific waste groups. The tables also present limitations and special use considerations for the particular treatment technology. The phase of development of the technology is also included in the table. The phases are: Available, Innovative, and Emerging technologies. The technologies presented in this guide are organized according to the method of treatment. The four (4) treatment methods are Biological, Solidification/Stabilization, Thermal, and Chemical/Physical Treatment. There are several processing methods; some are well developed and proven, and others are in the development stage.

Tran, H.; Aylward, R.

1992-08-04

94

Removal of depleted uranium from contaminated soils.  

PubMed

Contamination of soil and water with depleted uranium (DU) has increased public health concerns due to the chemical toxicity of DU at elevated dosages. For this reason, there is great interest in developing methods for DU removal from contaminated sources. Two DU laden soils, taken from U.S. Army sites, were characterized for particle size distribution, total uranium concentration and removable uranium. Soil A was found to be a well graded sand containing a total of 3210 mg/kg DU (3.99 x 10(4) Bq/kg, where a Becquerel (Bq) is a unit of radiation). About 83% of the DU in the fines fraction (particle diameter <0.075 mm, total DU 7732 mg/kg (9.61 x 10(4) Bq/kg)) was associated with the carbonate, iron and manganese oxide and organic matter fractions of the material. Soil B was classified as a sandy silt with total DU of 1560 mg/kg (1.94 x 10(4) Bq/kg). The DU content in the fines fraction was 5171 mg/kg (6.43 x 10(4) Bq/kg). Sequential extraction of the Soil B fines fraction indicated that 64% of the DU was present either as soluble U(VI) minerals or as insoluble U(IV). Citric acid, sodium bicarbonate and hydrogen peroxide were used in batch experiments to extract DU from the fines fraction of both soils. Citric acid and sodium bicarbonate were relatively successful for Soil A (50-60% DU removal), but not for Soil B (20-35% DU removal). Hydrogen peroxide was found to significantly increase DU extraction from both soils, attaining removals up to 60-80%. PMID:16386369

Choy, Christine Chin; Korfiatis, George P; Meng, Xiaoguang

2006-08-10

95

Evaluation of soil radioactivity data from the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Since 1951, 933 nuclear tests have been conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and test areas on the adjacent Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR). Until the early 1960s. the majority of tests were atmospheric, involving detonation of nuclear explosive devices on the ground or on a tower, suspended from a balloon or dropped from an airplane. Since the signing of the Limited Test Ban Treaty in 1963, most tests have been conducted underground, although several shallow subsurface tests took place between 1962 and 1968. As a result of the aboveground and near-surface nuclear explosions, as well as ventings of underground tests, destruction of nuclear devices with conventional explosives, and nuclear-rocket engine tests, the surface soil on portions of the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides. Relatively little consideration was given to the environmental effects of nuclear testing during the first two decades of operations at the NTS. Since the early 1970s, however, increasingly strict environmental regulations have forced greater attention to be given to contamination problems at the site and how to remediate them. One key element in the current environmental restoration program at the NTS is determining the amount and extent of radioactivity in the surface soil. The general distribution of soil radioactivity on the NTS is already well known as a result of several programs carried out in the 1970s and 1980s. However, questions have been raised as to whether the data from those earlier studies are suitable for use in the current environmental assessments and risk analyses. The primary purpose of this preliminary data review is to determine to what extent the historical data collected at the NTS can be used in the characterization/remediation process.

NONE

1995-03-01

96

Method for treatment of soils contaminated with organic pollutants  

DOEpatents

A method for treating soil contaminated by organic compounds wherein an ozone containing gas is treated with acid to increase the stability of the ozone in the soil environment and the treated ozone applied to the contaminated soil to decompose the organic compounds. The soil may be treated in situ or may be removed for treatment and refilled.

Wickramanayake, Godage B. (Cranbury, NJ)

1993-01-01

97

Soil Properties Controlling Zn Speciation and Fractionation in Contaminated Soils  

SciTech Connect

We determined the speciation of Zn in 49 field soils differing widely in pH (4.1-7.7) and total Zn content (251-30,090 mg/kg) by using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. All soils had been contaminated since several decades by inputs of aqueous Zn with runoff-water from galvanized power line towers. Pedogenic Zn species identified by EXAFS spectroscopy included Zn in hydroxy-interlayered minerals (Zn-HIM), Zn-rich phyllosilicates, Zn-layered double hydroxide (Zn-LDH), hydrozincite, and octahedrally and tetrahedrally coordinated sorbed or complexed Zn. Zn-HIM was only observed in (mostly acidic) soils containing less than 2000 mg/kg of Zn, reflecting the high affinity but limited sorption capacity of HIM. Zn-bearing precipitates, such as Zn-LDH and Zn-rich trioctahedral phyllosilicates, became more dominant with increasing pH and increasing total Zn content relative to available adsorption sites. Zn-LDH was the most abundant Zn-precipitate and was detected in soils with pH > 5.2. Zn-rich phyllosilicates were detected even at lower soil pH, but were generally less abundant than Zn-LDH. Hydrozincite was only identified in two calcareous soils with extremely high Zn contents. In addition to Zn-LDH, large amounts of Zn in highly contaminated soils were mainly accumulated as sorbed/complexed Zn in tetrahedral coordination. Soils grouped according to their Zn speciation inferred from EXAFS spectroscopy mainly differed with respect to soil pH and total Zn content. Clear differences were observed with respect to Zn fractionation by sequential extraction: From Zn-HIM containing soils, most of the total Zn was recovered in the exchangeable and the most recalcitrant fractions. In contrast, from soils containing the highest percentage of Zn-precipitates, Zn was mainly extracted in intermediate extraction steps. The results of this study demonstrate that soil pH and Zn contamination level relative to available adsorption sites are the most important factors controlling the formation of pedogenic Zn-species in aerobic soils and, consequently, Zn fractionation by sequential extraction.

Jacquat, O.; Voegelin, A; Kretzschmar, R

2009-01-01

98

Monitoring Potential Transport of Radioactive Contaminants in Shallow Ephemeral Channels  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Restoration Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550, Area 8 Smoky Contamination Area (CA), during precipitation runoff events. CAU 550 includes Corrective Action Sites (CASs) 08-23-03, 08-23-04, 08-23-06, and 08-23-07; these CASs are associated with tests designated Ceres, Smoky, Oberon, and Titania, respectively.

Miller Julianne J.,Mizell Steve A.,Nikolich George,Campbell Scott A.

2012-02-01

99

t -software package for numerical simulations of radioactive contaminant transport in groundwater  

E-print Network

r3 t - software package for numerical simulations of radioactive contaminant transport equations that arise from the modelling of radioactive contaminant transport in porous media. It can solve, see [6]) can help to numerically simulate the spreading of radioactive contaminants in flowing ground

Frolkovic, Peter

100

Radioactivity of the soil in Vojvodina (northern province of Serbia and Montenegro).  

PubMed

The widespread public belief that during the bombardment of Vojvodina (Yugoslavia) this region was contaminated by depleted uranium has recently raised public concern with respect to the potential contamination of agricultural products due to soil radioactivity. Based on the gamma-spectrometric analysis of 50 soil samples taken from the region of Vojvodina we concluded that there is no increase of radioactivity that could endanger the food production. Taking into account the transfer factors of 137Cs to plants, the measured activity concentrations of this isotope should not endanger the health safety of the produced food. No traces of depleted uranium have been found. The natural radioactivity levels are compared with the results form other countries. PMID:15465176

Bikit, I; Slivka, J; Conki?, Lj; Krmar, M; Veskovi?, M; Ziki?-Todorovi?, N; Varga, E; Curci?, S; Mrdja, D

2005-01-01

101

Industrial-Scale Processes For Stabilizing Radioactively Contaminated Mercury Wastes  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes two industrial-scaled processes now being used to treat two problematic mercury waste categories: elemental mercury contaminated with radionuclides and radioactive solid wastes containing greater than 260-ppm mercury. The stabilization processes were developed by ADA Technologies, Inc., an environmental control and process development company in Littleton, Colorado. Perma-Fix Environmental Services has licensed the liquid elemental mercury stabilization process to treat radioactive mercury from Los Alamos National Laboratory and other DOE sites. ADA and Perma-Fix also cooperated to apply the >260-ppm mercury treatment technology to a storm sewer sediment waste collected from the Y-12 complex in Oak Ridge, TN.

Broderick, T. E.; Grondin, R.

2003-02-24

102

Sites in the United States contaminated with radioactivity.  

PubMed

Over the century that radioactive materials have been mined, processed, produced, and utilized, many sites across the United States have become contaminated. Such sites include bases and installations of the Department of Defense, weapons production and research facilities of the Department of Energy, properties under the authority of other Federal agencies, privately-owned and governmental facilities that are licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and its Agreement States, and sites licensed by or the responsibility of states. This review reports on aspects of work by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and others to identify sites contaminated with radioactive materials. It also describes the principal programs that have been instituted to deal with them. PMID:10456495

Wolbarst, A B; Blom, P F; Chan, D; Cherry, R N; Doehnert, M; Fauver, D; Hull, H B; MacKinney, J A; Mauro, J; Richardson, A C; Zaragoza, L

1999-09-01

103

The organic contamination level based on the total soil mass is not a proper index of the soil contamination intensity  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Concentrations of organic contaminants in common productive soils based on the total soil mass give a misleading account of actual contamination effects. This is attributed to the fact that productive soils are essentially water-saturated, with the result that the soil uptake of organic compounds occurs principally by partition into the soil organic matter (SOM). This report illustrates that the soil contamination intensity of a compound is governed by the concentration in the SOM (Com) rather than by the concentration in whole soil (Cs). Supporting data consist of the measured levels and toxicities of many pesticides in soils of widely differing SOM contents and the related levels in in-situ crops that defy explanation by the Cs values. This SOM-based index is timely needed for evaluating the contamination effects of food crops grown in different soils and for establishing a dependable priority ranking for intended remediation of numerous contamination sites.

Hung, H.-W.; Daniel, Sheng G.; Lin, T.-F.; Su, Y.; Chiou, C.T.

2009-01-01

104

Auxiliary analyses in support of performance assessment of a hypothetical low-level waste facility: Two-phase flow and contaminant transport in unsaturated soils with application to low-level radioactive waste disposal. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

A numerical model of multiphase air-water flow and contaminant transport in the unsaturated zone is presented. The multiphase flow equations are solved using the two-pressure, mixed form of the equations with a modified Picard linearization of the equations and a finite element spatial approximation. A volatile contaminant is assumed to be transported in either phase, or in both phases simultaneously. The contaminant partitions between phases with an equilibrium distribution given by Henry`s Law or via kinetic mass transfer. The transport equations are solved using a Galerkin finite element method with reduced integration to lump the resultant matrices. The numerical model is applied to published experimental studies to examine the behavior of the air phase and associated contaminant movement under water infiltration. The model is also used to evaluate a hypothetical design for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. The model has been developed in both one and two dimensions; documentation and computer codes are available for the one-dimensional flow and transport model.

Binning, P. [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia); Celia, M.A.; Johnson, J.C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Operations Research

1995-05-01

105

Cadmium Removal From Contaminated Soil by Thermally Responsive Elastin  

E-print Network

. The cleanup of many contaminated sites remains a challenging task but an essential one for site restorationARTICLE Cadmium Removal From Contaminated Soil by Thermally Responsive Elastin (ELPEC20: Cadmium contamination of soil is a major concern in the biosphere. Beyond the suite of available phy- sico

Chen, Wilfred

106

Monitoring Potential Transport of Radioactive Contaminants in Shallow Ephemeral Channels: FY 2012  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Management’s Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550, Smoky Contamination Area (CA), during precipitation runoff events. CAU 550 includes Corrective Action Sites (CASs) 08-23-03, 08-23-04, 08-23-06, and 08-23-07; these CASs are associated with tests designated Ceres, Smoky, Oberon, and Titania, respectively. Field measurements at the T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, CAU 370, suggest that radioactive material may have migrated along a shallow ephemeral drainage that traverses the site (NNSA/NSO, 2009). (It is not entirely clear how contaminated soils got into their present location at the T-4 Site, but flow to the channel has been redirected and the contamination does not appear to be migrating at present.) Although DRI initially looked at the CAU 370 site, given that it could not be confirmed that migration of contamination into the channel was natural, an alternate study site was selected at CAU 550. Aerial surveys in selected portions of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) also suggest that radioactivity may be migrating along ephemeral channels in Areas 3, 8, 11, 18, and 25 (Colton, 1999). Figure 1 shows the results of a low-elevation aerial survey (Colton, 1999) in Area 8. The numbered markers in Figure 1 identify ground zero for three safety experiments conducted in 1958 [Oberon (number 1), Ceres (number 2), and Titania (number 4)] and a weapons effects test conducted in 1964, Mudpack (number 3). This survey suggests contaminants may be migrating down the ephemeral channels that traverse CAU 550. Note particularly the lobe of higher concentration extending southeastward at the south end of the high concentration area marked as number 3 in Figure 1. CAU 550 in Area 8 of the NNSS was selected for the study because the aerial survey indicates that a channel mapped on the United States Geological Survey topographic map of the area traverses the south end of the area of surface contamination; this channel lies south of the point marked number 3 in Figure 1, and anecdotal information indicates that sediment has been deposited on the road bordering the southeast boundary of the CAU from an adjacent channel (Traynor, J, personal communication, 2011). Because contamination is particularly close to the boundary of CAU 550, Smoky CA, it is important to know if contaminants are moving, what meteorological conditions result in movement of contaminated soils, and what particle size fractions associated with contamination are involved. Closure plans are being developed for the CAUs on the NNSS. The closure plans may include post-closure monitoring for possible release of radioactive contaminants. Determining the potential for transport of contaminated soils under ambient climatic conditions will facilitate an appropriate closure design and post-closure monitoring program.

Julianne J. Miller, Steve A. Mizell, Greg McCurdy, and Scott A. Campbell

2012-09-01

107

Trench 'bathtubbing' and surface plutonium contamination at a legacy radioactive waste site.  

PubMed

Radioactive waste containing a few grams of plutonium (Pu) was disposed between 1960 and 1968 in trenches at the Little Forest Burial Ground (LFBG), near Sydney, Australia. A water sampling point installed in a former trench has enabled the radionuclide content of trench water and the response of the water level to rainfall to be studied. The trench water contains readily measurable Pu activity (~12 Bq/L of (239+240)Pu in 0.45 ?m-filtered water), and there is an associated contamination of Pu in surface soils. The highest (239+240)Pu soil activity was 829 Bq/kg in a shallow sample (0-1 cm depth) near the trench sampling point. Away from the trenches, the elevated concentrations of Pu in surface soils extend for tens of meters down-slope. The broader contamination may be partly attributable to dispersion events in the first decade after disposal, after which a layer of soil was added above the trenched area. Since this time, further Pu contamination has occurred near the trench-sampler within this added layer. The water level in the trench-sampler responds quickly to rainfall and intermittently reaches the surface, hence the Pu dispersion is attributed to saturation and overflow of the trenches during extreme rainfall events, referred to as the 'bathtub' effect. PMID:24256473

Payne, Timothy E; Harrison, Jennifer J; Hughes, Catherine E; Johansen, Mathew P; Thiruvoth, Sangeeth; Wilsher, Kerry L; Cendón, Dioni I; Hankin, Stuart I; Rowling, Brett; Zawadzki, Atun

2013-12-01

108

Trench ‘Bathtubbing’ and Surface Plutonium Contamination at a Legacy Radioactive Waste Site  

PubMed Central

Radioactive waste containing a few grams of plutonium (Pu) was disposed between 1960 and 1968 in trenches at the Little Forest Burial Ground (LFBG), near Sydney, Australia. A water sampling point installed in a former trench has enabled the radionuclide content of trench water and the response of the water level to rainfall to be studied. The trench water contains readily measurable Pu activity (?12 Bq/L of 239+240Pu in 0.45 ?m-filtered water), and there is an associated contamination of Pu in surface soils. The highest 239+240Pu soil activity was 829 Bq/kg in a shallow sample (0–1 cm depth) near the trench sampling point. Away from the trenches, the elevated concentrations of Pu in surface soils extend for tens of meters down-slope. The broader contamination may be partly attributable to dispersion events in the first decade after disposal, after which a layer of soil was added above the trenched area. Since this time, further Pu contamination has occurred near the trench-sampler within this added layer. The water level in the trench-sampler responds quickly to rainfall and intermittently reaches the surface, hence the Pu dispersion is attributed to saturation and overflow of the trenches during extreme rainfall events, referred to as the ‘bathtub’ effect. PMID:24256473

2013-01-01

109

The accumulation of radioactive contaminants in drinking water distribution systems.  

PubMed

The accumulation of trace contaminants in drinking water distribution system sediment and scales has been documented, raising concerns that the subsequent release of the contaminants back to the water is a potential human exposure pathway. Radioactive contaminants are of concern because of their known health effects and because of their persistence within associated distribution system materials. The objective of this work was to measure the amount of a number of radioactive contaminants (radium, thorium, and uranium isotopes, and gross alpha and beta activity) in distribution solids collected from water systems in four states (Wisconsin, Illinois, Minnesota, and Texas). The water utilities chosen had measurable levels of radium in their source waters. In addition, 19 other elements in the solids were quantified. Water systems provided solids primarily collected during routine fire hydrant flushing. Iron was the dominant element in nearly all of the solids and was followed by calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, silicon, aluminum and barium in descending order. Gross alpha and beta radiation averaged 255 and 181 pCi/g, and were as high as 1602 and 1169 pCi/g, respectively. Total radium, thorium and uranium averaged 143, 40 and 6.4 pCi/g, respectively. Radium-226 and -228 averaged 74 and 69 pCi/g, and were as high as 250 and 351 pCi/g, respectively. PMID:24275108

Lytle, Darren A; Sorg, Thomas; Wang, Lili; Chen, Abe

2014-03-01

110

REVIEW OF SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR TREATING PESTICIDE-CONTAMINATED SOIL  

EPA Science Inventory

Pesticide contamination results from manufacturing, improper storage, handling, or disposal of pesticides, and from agricultural processes. Since most pesticides are mixtures of different compounds, selecting a remedy for pesticide-contaminated soils can be a complicated process....

111

System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors  

DOEpatents

A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources. 4 figs.

Weidner, J.R.; Downs, W.C.; Kaser, T.G.; Hall, H.J.

1997-12-16

112

System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors  

DOEpatents

A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources.

Weidner, Jerry R. (Iona, ID); Downs, Wayne C. (Sugar City, ID); Kaser, Timothy G. (Ammon, ID); Hall, H. James (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01

113

Bioremediation of diesel-contaminated soil with composting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The major objective of this research was to find the appropriate mix ratio of organic amendments for enhancing diesel oil degradation during contaminated soil composting. Sewage sludge or compost was added as an amendment for supplementing organic matter for composting of contaminated soil. The ratios of contaminated soil to organic amendments were 1:0.1, 1:0.3, 1:0.5, and 1:1 as wet weight

Wan Namkoong; Eui-Young Hwang; Joon-Seok Park; Jung-Young Choi

2002-01-01

114

Removal of Lead from Contaminated Soils by Typha Angustifolia  

Microsoft Academic Search

A greenhouse study was demonstrated for removal of lead (Pb) from contaminated soil by the narrow — leaved cattail, Typha angustifolia. The plants were grown in sandy loam soil containing various concentrations of Pb(NO3)2 (53.3, 106.7, 160, 213.3, and 266.7 mg Pb kg-1 soil). Most lead was accumulated in roots and then transported to leaves. In soil contaminated with 266.7

T. Panich-Pat; P. Pokethitiyook; M. Kruatrachue; E. S. Upatham; P. Srinives; G. R. Lanza

2004-01-01

115

Natural and man-made radioactivity: Chernobyl soils.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1986 a reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant suffered a large explosion. The result had wide-ranging impacts. 31 severely exposed emergency workers died from acute radiation syndrome and 19 more later died from different causes. The perhaps controversial prediction by some authors is that around 4,000 will eventually die as a result of the increased cancer risk. A 19-mile restriction zone exists around the former reactor, but during the past 25 years radiation levels have fallen and it is now possible to take part in conducted tours of the deserted city of Pripyat, and the Chernobyl reactor site. Soil levels, however, remain highly radioactive, particularly in the restricted area. Kingston University holds:- • Soil profile sets from 3 locations in Belarus, with repeats at same location 1996 and 2000. • Lake sediment core samples. • Soil profiles at forestry sites. • Surface samples in a region suspected to have actinide content at 200km from Chernobyl. In addition to the above the impact of naturally occurring radon on human health around Chernobyl should not be ignored. About 23 per cent of homes in Ukraine are estimated to have radon levels above 100 Bq m-3, whilst concentrations of 10,000 Bq m-3 or more are known to exist in public water supplies. Some researchers have also suggested that mean annual doses of irradiation of the population caused by radon and it's progeny in air in buildings exceeds the doses received now by inhabitants of settlements located in the territories polluted by Chernobyl-derived nuclides in the Mogilev and Gomel regions in Belarus. This project incorporates a temporal comparison of transport results in undisturbed soils variously over a number of years, demonstrating relative measurements using both the original and new samples. This project will also focus on lake sediments from Southern Belarus and is a 'work in progress'. However, what we can say at this stage is that it is notable that the long lived isotopes of Cs-137 and Sr-90 strongly chemically bind into both the sandy and clay soils found in Southern Belarus, consequently have low solubility, and hence the temporal radiation levels from soil contamination change only slowly at near the half-life of these isotopes, with weathering being a minor contribution to reducing the radiation dose rates, in regions with such soil chemistry.

Gillmore, Gavin; Flowers, Alan

2014-05-01

116

Comprehensive methodology for ecological risk assessment of contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

Development of a comprehensive methodology for ecological risk assessment and monitoring of contaminated soils is essential to assess the impacts of environmental contaminants on soil community and biologically-mediated processes in soil. The proposed four-step plan involves (1) a thorough survey of the soil community to establish biodiversity and a base-line community structure, (2) toxicity trials on indicator species and whole soil invertebrate communities, (3) laboratory and field tests on indicator processes and (4) the use of statistical and simulation models to ascertain changes in the soil ecosystems. This methodology was used in portions of the US Army`s Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland as part of an ecological risk assessment. Previous soil analyses showed extensive surface soil contamination with metals, nitrate and PCBs. Preliminary results from field surveys of soil invertebrate communities showed significant reductions in total abundance of animals, reductions in the abundance of several taxonomic and functional groups of soil invertebrates, and changes in the activity of epigeic arthropods in contaminated areas when compared with the local ``background`` area. Laboratory tests also demonstrated that microbial activity and success of egg hatching of ground beetle Harpalus pensylvanicus were reduced in contaminated soils. These results suggest that impacts to soil ecosystems should be explicitly considered in ecological risk assessment. The proposed comprehensive methodology appears to offer an efficient and potentially cost saving tool for remedial investigations of contaminated sites.

Kuperman, R.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-12-31

117

Environmental review of options for managing radioactively contaminated carbon steel  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to develop a strategy for the management of radioactively contaminated carbon steel (RCCS). Currently, most of this material either is placed in special containers and disposed of by shallow land burial in facilities designed for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or is stored indefinitely pending sufficient funding to support alternative disposition. The growing amount of RCCS with which DOE will have to deal in the foreseeable future, coupled with the continued need to protect the human and natural environment, has led the Department to evaluate other approaches for managing this material. This environmental review (ER) describes the options that could be used for RCCS management and examines the potential environmental consequences of implementing each. Because much of the analysis underlying this document is available from previous studies, wherever possible the ER relies on incorporating the conclusions of those studies as summaries or by reference.

NONE

1996-10-01

118

Innovative technologies for recycling and reusing radioactively contaminated materials from DOE facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) major goals is to clean up its contaminated facilities by the year 2019. The primary contaminants at DOE sites are radioactive materials, organic compounds, and heavy metals. The most common radioactive materials are isotopes of uranium and plutonium, although lesser quantities of thorium, technetium, neptunium and americium are also found. Organic contamination

S. J. Bossart; J. Hyde

1993-01-01

119

Radioactive contamination of fishes in lake and streams impacted by the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident.  

PubMed

The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident in March 2011 emitted radioactive substances into the environment, contaminating a wide array of organisms including fishes. We found higher concentrations of radioactive cesium ((137)Cs) in brown trout (Salmo trutta) than in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus nerka), and (137)Cs concentrations in brown trout were higher in a lake than in a stream. Our analyses indicated that these differences were primarily due to differences in diet, but that habitat also had an effect. Radiocesium concentrations ((137)Cs) in stream charr (Salvelinus leucomaenis) were higher in regions with more concentrated aerial activity and in older fish. These results were also attributed to dietary and habitat differences. Preserving uncontaminated areas by remediating soils and releasing uncontaminated fish would help restore this popular fishing area but would require a significant effort, followed by a waiting period to allow activity concentrations to fall below the threshold limits for consumption. PMID:24657366

Yoshimura, Mayumi; Yokoduka, Tetsuya

2014-06-01

120

Chemical methods and phytoremediation of soil contaminated with heavy metals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of chemical amendments (calcium carbonate (CC), steel sludge (SS) and furnace slag (FS)) on the growth and uptake of cadmium (Cd) by wetland rice, Chinese cabbage and wheat grown in a red soil contaminated with Cd were investigated using a pot experiment. The phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated soil with vetiver grass was also studied in a field

H. M Chen; C. R Zheng; C Tu; Z. G Shen

2000-01-01

121

ELECTROCHEMICAL PROCESSES FOR IN-SITU TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED SOILS  

EPA Science Inventory

This project will study electrochemical processes for the in situ treatment of soils contaminated by mixed wastes, i.e., organic and inorganic. Soil samples collected from selected DOE waste sites will be characterized for specific organic and metal contaminants and hydraulic per...

122

Toxicity tests of soil contaminated by recycling of scrap plastics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present investigation studied the toxicity of soil contaminated by untreated discharge from a factory that recycles used plastics. The nearby agricultural areas and freshwater fish ponds were polluted with high concentrations of Cu, Ni, and Mn. Water extracts from the contaminated soil retarded root growth of Brassica chinensis (Chinese white cabbage) and Cynodon dactylon (Bermuda grass) where their seeds

M. H. Wong; V. W. Chui

1990-01-01

123

ADSORPTION OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES BY SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT SOIL  

Microsoft Academic Search

The adsorption of radioisotopes on soil was investigated in the ; laboratory to determine the behavior of lowlevel radioactive waste solutions ; discharged to the ground. Strontium, cesium, and plutonium distributions between ; soil and waste solution were studied. The effects of cation concentration and ; acidity were determined. The results of the distribution experiments, and ; material balance considerations,

W. E. PROUT

1958-01-01

124

Operating and life-cycle costs for uranium-contaminated soil treatment technologies  

SciTech Connect

The development of a nuclear industry in the US required mining, milling, and fabricating a large variety of uranium products. One of these products was purified uranium metal which was used in the Savannah River and Hanford Site reactors. Most of this feed material was produced at the US Department of Energy (DOE) facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald, Ohio. During operation of this facility, soils became contaminated with uranium from a variety of sources. To avoid disposal of these soils in low-level radioactive waste burial sites, increasing emphasis has been placed on the remediating soils contaminated with uranium and other radionuclides. To address remediation and management of uranium-contaminated soils at sites owned by DOE, the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) evaluates and compares the versatility, efficiency, and economics of various technologies that may be combined into systems designed to characterize and remediate uranium-contaminated soils. Each technology must be able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from soil, (3) treat or dispose of resulting waste streams, (4) meet necessary state and federal regulations, and (5) meet performance assessment objectives. The role of the performance assessment objectives is to provide the information necessary to conduct evaluations of the technologies. These performance assessments provide the basis for selecting the optimum system for remediation of large areas contaminated with uranium. One of the performance assessment tasks is to address the economics of full-scale implementation of soil treatment technologies. The cost of treating contaminated soil is one of the criteria used in the decision-making process for selecting remedial alternatives.

Douthat, D.M.; Armstrong, A.Q. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Health Sciences Research Div.; Stewart, R.N. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-09-01

125

40 CFR 267.116 - What must I do with contaminated equipment, structure, and soils?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...contaminated equipment, structure, and soils? 267.116 Section 267.116 Protection...contaminated equipment, structure, and soils? You must properly dispose of or decontaminate...contaminated equipment, structures, and soils during the partial and final closure...

2012-07-01

126

40 CFR 267.116 - What must I do with contaminated equipment, structure, and soils?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...contaminated equipment, structure, and soils? 267.116 Section 267.116 Protection...contaminated equipment, structure, and soils? You must properly dispose of or decontaminate...contaminated equipment, structures, and soils during the partial and final closure...

2014-07-01

127

40 CFR 267.116 - What must I do with contaminated equipment, structure, and soils?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...contaminated equipment, structure, and soils? 267.116 Section 267.116 Protection...contaminated equipment, structure, and soils? You must properly dispose of or decontaminate...contaminated equipment, structures, and soils during the partial and final closure...

2013-07-01

128

40 CFR 267.116 - What must I do with contaminated equipment, structure, and soils?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...contaminated equipment, structure, and soils? 267.116 Section 267.116 Protection...contaminated equipment, structure, and soils? You must properly dispose of or decontaminate...contaminated equipment, structures, and soils during the partial and final closure...

2011-07-01

129

40 CFR 267.116 - What must I do with contaminated equipment, structure, and soils?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...contaminated equipment, structure, and soils? 267.116 Section 267.116 Protection...contaminated equipment, structure, and soils? You must properly dispose of or decontaminate...contaminated equipment, structures, and soils during the partial and final closure...

2010-07-01

130

Current methods for evaluating the bioavailability of chemicals from contaminated soils using soil invertebrates  

SciTech Connect

Contaminated soils are an extremely complex, variable matrix where many modifying factors of toxicity (e.g., particle size, organic matter content) alter the availability of chemicals to biota. Although many methods have been standardized for assessing the toxicity of contaminated soils to invertebrates and plants, few studies have actually addressed the issue of contaminant bioavailability from soils. Since bioavailability is a measure of uptake of contaminants from the soil by living organisms, one approach to determining bioavailability is to measure residues of contaminants in biota. Body residues related to a specific lethal or sublethal toxicity endpoint offer the unique opportunity to relate bioavailability to biological response. This paper will present an overview of the use of body residues in assessing the bioavailability of soil contaminants by earthworms and soil arthropods. The applications of body residues in the development of soil quality guidelines will also be discussed.

Lanno, R.P. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Biology

1995-12-31

131

Reducing logistical barriers to radioactive soil remediation after the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant accident  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an updated assessment of soil contamination due to the nuclear accident at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant on 11 March 2011. A safe limit for the spatial dose rate (micro-Sv/h) of gamma rays from 134,137Cs has been established in this work. Based on this value, the highly contaminated region within Fukushima Prefecture that must be decontaminated could be defined. Moreover, a conceptual model for the chemical speciation that occurred during the accident has been delineated. The compound model Cs2CO3 was found to be meaningful and practical (non-radioactive) to simulate contamination in our decontamination experiments. Finally, we explain the mechanism of action of our soil remediation technique, which effectively reduces the total volume of contaminated soil by isolating the highly Cs-adsorptive clay fraction. The adsorption of non-radioactive Cs atoms on clay particles with diameters <25 ?m were analyzed using micro-particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE).

Ishii, K.; Terakawa, A.; Matsuyama, S.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fujishiro, F.; Ishizaki, A.; Osada, N.; Arai, H.; Sugai, H.; Takahashi, H.; Nagakubo, K.; Sakurada, T.; Yamazaki, H.; Kim, S.

2014-01-01

132

Urban Community Gardeners' Knowledge and Perceptions of Soil Contaminant Risks  

PubMed Central

Although urban community gardening can offer health, social, environmental, and economic benefits, these benefits must be weighed against the potential health risks stemming from exposure to contaminants such as heavy metals and organic chemicals that may be present in urban soils. Individuals who garden at or eat food grown in contaminated urban garden sites may be at risk of exposure to such contaminants. Gardeners may be unaware of these risks and how to manage them. We used a mixed quantitative/qualitative research approach to characterize urban community gardeners' knowledge and perceptions of risks related to soil contaminant exposure. We conducted surveys with 70 gardeners from 15 community gardens in Baltimore, Maryland, and semi-structured interviews with 18 key informants knowledgeable about community gardening and soil contamination in Baltimore. We identified a range of factors, challenges, and needs related to Baltimore community gardeners' perceptions of risk related to soil contamination, including low levels of concern and inconsistent levels of knowledge about heavy metal and organic chemical contaminants, barriers to investigating a garden site's history and conducting soil tests, limited knowledge of best practices for reducing exposure, and a need for clear and concise information on how best to prevent and manage soil contamination. Key informants discussed various strategies for developing and disseminating educational materials to gardeners. For some challenges, such as barriers to conducting site history and soil tests, some informants recommended city-wide interventions that bypass the need for gardener knowledge altogether. PMID:24516570

Kim, Brent F.; Poulsen, Melissa N.; Margulies, Jared D.; Dix, Katie L.; Palmer, Anne M.; Nachman, Keeve E.

2014-01-01

133

Urban community gardeners' knowledge and perceptions of soil contaminant risks.  

PubMed

Although urban community gardening can offer health, social, environmental, and economic benefits, these benefits must be weighed against the potential health risks stemming from exposure to contaminants such as heavy metals and organic chemicals that may be present in urban soils. Individuals who garden at or eat food grown in contaminated urban garden sites may be at risk of exposure to such contaminants. Gardeners may be unaware of these risks and how to manage them. We used a mixed quantitative/qualitative research approach to characterize urban community gardeners' knowledge and perceptions of risks related to soil contaminant exposure. We conducted surveys with 70 gardeners from 15 community gardens in Baltimore, Maryland, and semi-structured interviews with 18 key informants knowledgeable about community gardening and soil contamination in Baltimore. We identified a range of factors, challenges, and needs related to Baltimore community gardeners' perceptions of risk related to soil contamination, including low levels of concern and inconsistent levels of knowledge about heavy metal and organic chemical contaminants, barriers to investigating a garden site's history and conducting soil tests, limited knowledge of best practices for reducing exposure, and a need for clear and concise information on how best to prevent and manage soil contamination. Key informants discussed various strategies for developing and disseminating educational materials to gardeners. For some challenges, such as barriers to conducting site history and soil tests, some informants recommended city-wide interventions that bypass the need for gardener knowledge altogether. PMID:24516570

Kim, Brent F; Poulsen, Melissa N; Margulies, Jared D; Dix, Katie L; Palmer, Anne M; Nachman, Keeve E

2014-01-01

134

Studies About Remediation of Contaminated Soils with Toxic Metals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The heavy metals pollution of soils represents sometimes a serious concern regarding the earth’s health, and therefore studies\\u000a about heavy metals removal from contaminated soils are of increased interest. The aim of this work was to study in situ Cd\\u000a and Zn immobilization in three types of contaminated soils with synthetic calcium phosphate and also to present new results\\u000a concerning

Elisabeta Chirila; Ionela Popovici Carazeanu

135

Critical evaluation of soil contamination assessment methods for trace metals.  

PubMed

Correctly distinguishing between natural and anthropogenic trace metal contents in soils is crucial for assessing soil contamination. A series of assessment methods is critically outlined. All methods rely on assumptions of reference values for natural content. According to the adopted reference values, which are based on various statistical and geochemical procedures, there is a considerable range and discrepancy in the assessed soil contamination results as shown by the five methods applied to three weakly contaminated sites. This is a serious indication of their high methodological specificity and bias. No method with off-site reference values could identify any soil contamination in the investigated trace metals (Pb, Cu, Zn, Cd, Ni), while the specific and sensitive on-site reference methods did so for some sites. Soil profile balances are considered to produce the most plausible site-specific results, provided the numerous assumptions are realistic and the required data reliable. This highlights the dilemma between model and data uncertainty. Data uncertainty, however, is a neglected issue in soil contamination assessment so far. And the model uncertainty depends much on the site-specific realistic assumptions of pristine natural trace metal contents. Hence, the appropriate assessment of soil contamination is a subtle optimization exercise of model versus data uncertainty and specification versus generalization. There is no general and accurate reference method and soil contamination assessment is still rather fuzzy, with negative implications for the reliability of subsequent risk assessments. PMID:22542230

Desaules, André

2012-06-01

136

Study on magnetic separation for decontamination of cesium contaminated soil by using superconducting magnet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The accident of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant caused the diffusion of radioactive cesium over the wide area. We examined the possibility of applying magnetic separation method using the superconducting magnet, which can process a large amount of the soil in high speed, to the soil decontamination and volume reduction of the radioactive cesium contaminated soil. Clay minerals are classified as 2:1 and 1:1 types by the difference of their layer structures, and these types of minerals are respectively paramagnetic and diamagnetic including some exception. It is known that most of the radioactive cesium is strongly adsorbed on the clay, especially on 2:1 type clay minerals. It is expected that the method which can separate only 2:1 type clay minerals selectively from the mixture clay minerals can enormously contribute to the volume reduction of the contaminated soil. In this study, the components in the clay before and after separation were evaluated to estimate the magnetic separation efficiency by using X-ray diffraction. From the results, the decontamination efficiency and the volume reduction ratio were estimated in order to examine the appropriate separation conditions for the practical decontamination of the soil.

Igarashi, Susumu; Nomura, Naoki; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko

2014-09-01

137

In Situ Remediation and Ecosystem Restoration on Toxic Mine and Smelter Contaminated Soils Using Soil Amendments  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

At many locations, dispersal of mine wastes or smelter emissions caused extensive contamination of soils with Zn, Cd, Pb, Ni, or Cu and associated elements. When contaminated soils are acidic (from pyrite in ores, or SO2 emissions, or native acidic soils), highly phytoavailable Zn or Ni caused seve...

138

Apparatus for treatment of soils contaminated with organic pollutants  

DOEpatents

An apparatus for treating soil contaminated by organic compounds wherein an ozone containing gas is treated with acid to increase the stability of the ozone in the soil environment and the treated ozone applied to the contaminated soil in a manner adapted to decompose the organic compounds; one embodiment of the apparatus comprises a means to supply ozone as a gas-ozone mixture, a stability means to treat ozone obtained from the supply and distribution means to apply the stabilized gas-ozone to soil. The soil may be treated in situ or may be removed for treatment and refilled.

Wickramanayake, Godage B. (Columbus, OH)

1993-01-01

139

Evaluation and ranking of restoration strategies for radioactively contaminated sites.  

PubMed

An international project, whose aim was the development of a transparent and robust method for evaluating and ranking restoration strategies for radioactively contaminated sites (RESTRAT), was carried out under the Fourth Framework of the Nuclear Fission Safety Programme of the EU. The evaluation and ranking procedure used was based on the principles of justification and optimisation for radiation protection. A multi-attribute utility analysis was applied to allow for the inclusion of radiological health effects, economic costs and social factors. Values of these attributes were converted into utility values by applying linear utility functions and weighting factors, derived from scaling constants and expert judgement. The uncertainties and variabilities associated with these utility functions and weighting factors were dealt with by a probabilistic approach which utilised a Latin Hypercube Sampling technique. Potentially relevant restoration techniques were identified and their characteristics determined through a literature review. The methodology developed by this project has been illustrated by application to representative examples of different categories of contaminated sites; a waste disposal site, a uranium tailing site and a contaminated freshwater river. PMID:11446122

Zeevaert, T; Bousher, A; Brendler, V; Jensen, P H; Nordlinder, S

2001-01-01

140

Control and assessment of the hydrocarbon contamination of Ukrainian soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Regularities governing the self-purification of soils from oil hydrocarbons, as well as migration of hydrocarbons, and the effect on the water-physical properties and fertility of soils were revealed in a series of experiments. A system of ecological, economic, and reclamation standards was proposed for regulating economic activities in the case of soil contamination with hydrocarbons.

Miroshnichenko, N. N.

2008-05-01

141

Relative bioavailability of arsenic contaminated soils in a mouse model  

EPA Science Inventory

Exposure to As contaminated soils compels extensive soil cleanups so that human health risks are minimized. In order to improve exposure estimates and potentially reduce remediation costs, determination of the bioavailability of As in soils is needed. The objective of this study ...

142

Speciation of arsenic in a contaminated soil by solvent extraction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soil collected from a disused cattle dip in northern New South Wales was studied with the aim of developing an inexpensive, yet effective method for quantitative determination of arsenic(III), arsenic(V) and total organic arsenic in a contaminated soil. Hydrochloric acid extractions were used as a method for removal of the arsenic from the soil in a form suitable for speciation.

J. Chappell; B. Chiswell; H. Olszowy

1995-01-01

143

Uncertainty Assessment for Management of Soil Contaminants with Sparse Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order for soil resources to be sustainably managed, it is necessary to have reliable, valid data on the spatial distribution of their environmental impact. However, in practice, one often has to cope with spatial interpolation achieved from few data that show a skewed distribution and uncertain information about soil contamination. We present a case study with 76 soil samples

Ute Schnabel; Olaf Tietje; Roland W. Scholz

2004-01-01

144

THE IMPORTANCE OF BIOAVAILABILITY IN REMEDIATION OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS  

EPA Science Inventory

Reduction in exposure to soil metal contamination has typically been accomplished by soil removal and off site disposal, by covering, or by diluting with uncontaminated soil. Cost, logistical concerns, and regulatory requirements associated with excavation and disposal or ex-situ...

145

New developments in treatment of heavy metal contaminated soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contamination of soil and groundwater by heavymetals is a widespread problem due to theformer activities of metal processing, sufracetreatment and mining industry and theuncontrolled dumping of waste in landfills.Several methods do exist to treat soil andgroundwater. This paper will pay attention tosome new developed methods based on removal ofthe metals from the soil (simultaneousextraction and binding to biomass) or thegorundwater

L. Diels; N. van der Lelie; L. Bastiaens

2002-01-01

146

Transport of radioactive ions in soil by electrokinetics  

SciTech Connect

An electrokinetic approach is being evaluated for in situ soil remediation at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This approach uses an applied electric field to induce transport of both radioactive and hazardous waste ions in soil. The work discussed in this paper involves the development of a new method to monitor the movement of the radioactive ions within the soil during the electrokinetic process. A closed cell and a gamma counter were used to provide iii situ measurements of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co movement in Hanford soil. Preliminary results show that for an applied potential of 200 V over approximately 200 hr, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}60 were transported a distance of 4 to 5 in. The monitoring technique demonstrated the feasibility of using electrokinetics for soil separation applications.

Buehler, M.F.; Surma, J.E.; Virden, J.W.

1994-10-01

147

Biological Treatment of Petroleum in Radiologically Contaminated Soil  

SciTech Connect

This chapter describes ex situ bioremediation of the petroleum portion of radiologically co-contaminated soils using microorganisms isolated from a waste site and innovative bioreactor technology. Microorganisms first isolated and screened in the laboratory for bioremediation of petroleum were eventually used to treat soils in a bioreactor. The bioreactor treated soils contaminated with over 20,000 mg/kg total petroleum hydrocarbon and reduced the levels to less than 100 mg/kg in 22 months. After treatment, the soils were permanently disposed as low-level radiological waste. The petroleum and radiologically contaminated soil (PRCS) bioreactor operated using bioventing to control the supply of oxygen (air) to the soil being treated. The system treated 3.67 tons of PCRS amended with weathered compost, ammonium nitrate, fertilizer, and water. In addition, a consortium of microbes (patent pending) isolated at the Savannah River National Laboratory from a petroleum-contaminated site was added to the PRCS system. During operation, degradation of petroleum waste was accounted for through monitoring of carbon dioxide levels in the system effluent. The project demonstrated that co-contaminated soils could be successfully treated through bioventing and bioaugmentation to remove petroleum contamination to levels below 100 mg/kg while protecting workers and the environment from radiological contamination.

BERRY, CHRISTOPHER

2005-11-14

148

Pleasure Boatyard Soils are Often Highly Contaminated  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The contamination in pleasure boatyards has been investigated. Measured concentrations of copper, zinc, lead, mercury, cadmium, tributyltin (TBT), the 16 most common polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (?16 PAHs), and the seven most common polychlorinated biphenyls (?7 PCBs) from investigations at 34 boatyards along the Swedish coast have been compiled. The maximum concentrations were 7,700 for Cu, 10,200, for Zn, 40,100 for Pb, 188 for Hg, 18 for Cd, 107 for TBT, 630 for carcinogenic PAHs, 1,480 for ?16 PAHs, and 3.8 mg/kg DW for ?7 PCB; all 10-2,000 higher than the Swedish environmental qualitative guidelines. In addition, the mean of the median values found at the 34 places shows that the lower guidance value for sensitive use of land was exceeded for the ?7 PCBs, carcinogenic PAHs, TBT, Pb, Hg, and Cu by a factor of 380, 6.8, 3.6, 2.9, 2.2 and 1.7, respectively. The even higher guideline value for industrial use was exceeded for the ?7 PCBs and TBT by a factor of 15 and 1.8, respectively. TBT, PAHs, Pb, Cd, and Hg are prioritized substances in the European Water Framework Directive and should be phased out as quickly as possible. Because of the risk of leakage from boatyards, precautions should be taken. The high concentrations measured are considered to be dangerous for the environment and human health and highlight the urgent need for developing and enforcing pleasure boat maintenance guidelines to minimize further soil and nearby water contamination.

Eklund, Britta; Eklund, David

2014-05-01

149

Public perceptions of a radioactively contaminated site: concerns, remediation preferences, and desired involvement.  

PubMed Central

A public attitudes survey was conducted in neighborhoods adjacent to a radioactively contaminated site whose remediation is now under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The survey's purpose was to ascertain levels of actual and desired public involvement in the remediation process; to identify health, environmental, economic, and future land-use concerns associated with the site; and to solicit remediation strategy preferences. Surface water and groundwater contamination, desire for public involvement, and potential health risks were found to be the most highly ranked site concerns. Preferred remediation strategies included treatment of contaminated soil and excavation with off-site disposal. Among on-site remediation strategies, only institutional controls that leave the site undisturbed and do not require additional excavation of materials were viewed favorably. Cost of remediation appeared to influence remediation strategy preference; however, no strategy was viewed as a panacea. Respondents were also concerned with protecting future generations, better assessment of risks to health and the environment, and avoiding generation of additional contaminated materials. PMID:9118878

Feldman, D L; Hanahan, R A

1996-01-01

150

Soil Contamination and Remediation Strategies. Current research and future challenge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soil contamination: the heritage of industrial development Contamination is only a part of a whole set of soil degradation processes, but it is one of paramount importance since soil pollution greatly influences the quality of water, food and human health. Soil contamination has been identified as an important issue for action in the European strategy for soil protection, it has been estimated that 3.5 million of sites are potentially contaminated in Europe. Contaminated soils have been essentially discovered in industrial sites landfills and energy production plants, but accumulation of heavy metals and organic compounds can be found also in agricultural land . Remediation strategies. from incineration to bioremediation The assessment of soil contamination is followed by remedial action. The remediation of contaminated soils started using consolidates technologies (incineration inertization etc.) previously employed in waste treatment,. This has contributed to consider a contaminated soil as an hazardous waste. This rough approximation was unfortunately transferred in many legislations and on this basis soil knowledge have been used only marginally in the clean up procedures. For many years soil quality has been identified by a value of concentration of a contaminant and excavation and landfill disposal of soil has been largely used. In the last years the knowledge of remediation technology has rapidly grown, at present many treatment processes appear to be really feasible at field scale, and soil remediation is now based on risk assessment procedures. Innovative technologies, largely dependent on soil properties, such as in situ chemical oxidation, electroremediation, bioventing, soil vapor extraction etc. have been successfully applied. Hazardous organic compounds are commonly treated by biological technologies, biorememdiation and phytoremediation, being the last partially applied also for metals. Technologies selection is no longer exclusively based on eliminating the source of pollution, but also on blocking the pathways from contaminants to receptors or reducing the exposure to contaminants,. Future challenge integration of sustainability into remediation decision-making. Soil is not a waste! There is a growing interest in the clean up approaches that maintain soil quality after remediation treatments. This issue is of great importance in the U.S.A. where the EPA from 2009 is promoting innovative clean-up strategies (Green Remediation). Green remediation is defined as the practice of considering all environmental effects of remedy and incorporating options to maximize environmental benefit of cleanup actions . These remediation strategies restore contaminated sites to productive use with a great attention to the global environmental quality, including the preservation of soil functionality according to the following principles: use minimally invasive technologies; use passive energy technologies such as bioremediation and phytoremediation as primary remedies or finishing steps where possible and effective; minimize soil and habitat disturbance; minimize bioavailability of contaminants trough adequate contaminant source and plume control If we move from the current definition of remedial targets based on total concentrations, technologies with low impact on the environment can be utilized reducing the wrong choice to disposal soil in landfill destroying quickly a not renewable essential resource.

Petruzzelli, G.

2012-04-01

151

Phytoremediation of oil-sludge-contaminated soil.  

PubMed

The aim of this research was to select plant species that could be effective in the phytoremediation ofa former oil-sludge pit. Seven crop plants (Triticum aestivum L., Secale cereale L., Avena sativa L., Hordeum vulgare, Sorghum bicolor L Moench, Panicum miliaceum L, and Zea mays L.),five wild grasses (Lolium perenne L., Bromopsis inermis, Agropyron cristatum L., Agropyrum tenerum L., and Festuca pratensis Huds.), and three legumes (Medicago sativa L., Trifolium pratense L., and Onobrychis antasiatica Khin.) were screened for phytotoxicity, including the assessment of germination, shoot biomass, and root biomass, in a pot experiment. The estimation of oil-sludge degradation in the root zone of the tested plants showed that rye accelerated cleanup most effectively, degrading all of the main contaminant fractions in the oil sludge by a total of 52%. Although alfalfa had a lower phytoremediation potential than did rye, it maintained large numbers of soil microorganisms, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degraders, in its rhizosphere. Rye and alfalfa were chosen for a large-scale study to remediate an oil-sludge pit on the grounds of a petroleum refinery. Remediation monitoring confirmed the effectiveness of rye: the oil-sludge content decreased consistently for 3 years and remained low in comparison with the results from other plant species. PMID:19260228

Muratova, A Y; Dmitrieva, T V; Panchenko, L V; Turkovskaya, O V

2008-01-01

152

Laboratory and greenhouse assessment of phytoremediation of petroleum contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

Phytoremediation of soils contaminated with petroleum and associated priority pollutants was evaluated in greenhouse and laboratory experiments. Mineralization of several PAHs was measured in rhizosphere soil, non-rhizosphere soil, and sterile soil amended with simulated root exudates. The least amount of mineralization was observed in sterile soil, but there were no differences among all other soils. Mineralization of 14 C-benzo[a]pyrene was determined in chambers to determine the effects of tall fescue on dissipation of this compound. After 180 days, the soils with fescue had more than twice the mineralization than soils without plants. In the soils with plants, evolution of 14CO2 from the soil was five times greater than from the plant biomass. These experiments demonstrate that the presence of plants is a necessary part of the phytoremediation process. There appears to be no residual rhizosphere effect, and the simple exudation of organic compounds does not mimic fully the presence of roots.

Banks, M.K.; Schwab, A.P.; Wang, X. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

1996-12-31

153

Bioremediation of pentachlorophenol-contaminated soil by bioaugmentation using activated soil  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of an indigenous microbial consortium, pollutant-acclimated and attached to soil particles (activated soil), was\\u000a studied as a bioaugmentation method for the aerobic biodegradation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in a contaminated soil. A 125-l\\u000a completely mixed soil slurry (10% soil) bioreactor was used to produce the activated soil biomass. Results showed that the\\u000a bioreactor was very effective in producing a

C. Barbeau; L. Deschênes; D. Karamanev; Y. Comeau; R. Samson

1997-01-01

154

Genetics of cattails in radioactively contaminated areas around Chornobyl.  

PubMed

Research on populations from radioactively contaminated areas around Chornobyl has produced ambiguous results for the presence of radiation effects. More studies are needed to provide information on whether radiation exposure at Chornobyl significantly affected genetic diversity in natural populations of various taxa. Eleven and nine variable microsatellite loci were used to test for differences in genetic diversity between reference and Chornobyl populations of two cattail species (Typha angustifolia and Typha latifolia, respectively) from Ukraine. Our purpose was to determine whether radiation had a significant impact on genetic diversities of the Chornobyl Typha populations, or if their genetic composition might be better explained by species demography and/or changes in population dynamics, mainly in sexual and asexual reproduction. Populations closest to the reactor had increased genetic diversities and high number of genets, which likely were due to factors other than radiation including increased gene flow among Chornobyl populations, enhanced sexual reproduction within populations, and/or origin of the genets from seed bank. Both Typha species also demonstrated small but significant effects associated with latitude, geographical regions, and watersheds. Typha's demography in Ukraine possibly varies with these three factors, and the small difference between Chornobyl and reference populations of T. latifolia detected after partitioning the total genetic variance between them is probably due primarily to these factors. However, the positive correlations of several genetic characteristics with radionuclide concentrations suggest that radiation may have also affected genetics of Chornobyl Typha populations but much less than was expected considering massive contamination of the Chornobyl area. PMID:16842431

Tsyusko, Olga V; Smith, Michael H; Oleksyk, Taras K; Goryanaya, Julia; Glenn, Travis C

2006-08-01

155

Background in the context of land contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive material.  

PubMed

The financial implications of choosing a particular threshold for clearance of radioactively contaminated land are substantial, particularly when one considers the volume of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) created each year by the production and combustion of fossil fuels and the exploitation of industrial minerals. Inevitably, a compromise needs to be reached between the level of environmental protection sought and the finite resources available for remediation. In the case of natural series radionuclides, any anthropogenic input is always superimposed on the inventory already present in the soil; this 'background' inventory is conventionally disregarded when assessing remediation targets. Unfortunately, the term is not well defined and the concept of 'background dose' is open to alternative interpretations. In this paper, we address the issue of natural background from a geochemical rather than from a solely radiological perspective, illustrating this with an example from the china clay industry. We propose a simple procedure for decision making based on activity concentrations of primordial radionuclides and their progeny. Subsequent calculations of dose need to take into account the mineralogical and chemical characteristics of the contamination, which in the case of NORM are invariably reflected in uranium series disequilibrium. PMID:23519083

Read, D; Read, G D; Thorne, M C

2013-06-01

156

The Study of Phytoremediation of PCP Contaminated Soil.  

E-print Network

??In this study, the phytoremediation techniques are used to treat the soil contaminated by pentachlorophenol(PCP).First, four plants species were selected,including Allium tuberosum, Vigna radiata (L.)… (more)

Cheng, Hsiu-chen

2006-01-01

157

IN-SITU TREATMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE CONTAMINATED SOILS  

EPA Science Inventory

Techniques were investigated for in-situ treatment of hazardous wastes that could be applied to contaminated soils. Included were chemical treatment methods, biological treatment, photochemical transformations and combination methods. Techniques were developed based on fundamenta...

158

Assessing soil and groundwater contamination in a metropolitan redevelopment project.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to assess contaminated soil and groundwater for the urban redevelopment of a rapid transit railway and a new mega-shopping area. Contaminated soil and groundwater may interfere with the progress of this project, and residents and shoppers may be exposed to human health risks. The study area has been remediated after application of first remediation technologies. Of the entire area, several sites were still contaminated by waste materials and petroleum. For zinc (Zn) contamination, high Zn concentrations were detected because waste materials were disposed in the entire area. For petroleum contamination, high total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) and hydrocarbon degrading microbe concentrations were observed at the depth of 7 m because the underground petroleum storage tank had previously been located at this site. Correlation results suggest that TPH (soil) concentration is still related with TPH (groundwater) concentration. The relationship is taken into account in the Spearman coefficient (?). PMID:23307052

Yun, Junki; Lee, Ju Young; Khim, Jeehyeong; Ji, Won Hyun

2013-08-01

159

Soil remediation: humic acids as natural surfactants in the washings of highly contaminated soils.  

PubMed

The remediation of the highly contaminated site around the former chemical plant of ACNA (near Savona) in Northern Italy is a top priority in Italy. The aim of the present work was to contribute in finding innovative and environmental-friendly technology to remediate soils from the ACNA contaminated site. Two soils sampled from the ACNA site (A and B), differing in texture and amount and type of organic contaminants, were subjected to soil washings by comparing the removal efficiency of water, two synthetic surfactants, sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) and Triton X-100 (TX100), and a solution of a natural surfactant, a humic acid (HA) at its critical micelle concentration (CMC). The extraction of pollutants by sonication and soxhlet was conducted before and after the soil washings. Soil A was richer in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, whereas soil B had a larger content of thiophenes. Sonication resulted more analytically efficient in the fine-textured soil B. The coarse-textured soil A was extracted with a general equal efficiency also by soxhlet. Clean-up by water was unable to exhaustively remove contaminants from the two soils, whereas all the organic surfactants revealed very similar efficiencies (up to 90%) in the removal of the contaminants from the soils. Hence, the use of solutions of natural HAs appears as a better choice for soil washings of highly polluted soils due to their additional capacity to promote microbial activity, in contrast to synthetic surfactants, for a further natural attenuation in washed soils. PMID:15749548

Conte, Pellegrino; Agretto, Anna; Spaccini, Riccardo; Piccolo, Alessandro

2005-06-01

160

X-231B technology demonstration for in situ treatment of contaminated soil: Contaminant characterization and three dimensional spatial modeling  

SciTech Connect

Fine-textured soils and sediments contaminated by trichloroethylene (TCE) and other chlorinated organics present a serious environmental restoration challenge at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. DOE and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. initiated a research and demonstration project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The goal of the project was to demonstrate a process for closure and environmental restoration of the X-231B Solid Waste Management Unit at the DOE Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The X-231B Unit was used from 1976 to 1983 as a land disposal site for waste oils and solvents. Silt and clay deposits beneath the unit were contaminated with volatile organic compounds and low levels of radioactive substances. The shallow groundwater was also contaminated, and some contaminants were at levels well above drinking water standards. This document begins with a summary of the subsurface physical and contaminant characteristics obtained from investigative studies conducted at the X-231B Unit prior to January 1992 (Sect. 2). This is then followed by a description of the sample collection and analysis methods used during the baseline sampling conducted in January 1992 (Sect. 3). The results of this sampling event were used to develop spatial models for VOC contaminant distribution within the X-231B Unit.

West, O.R.; Siegrist, R.L.; Mitchell, T.J.; Pickering, D.A.; Muhr, C.A.; Greene, D.W.; Jenkins, R.A.

1993-11-01

161

Microorganism-Plant Combined Bioremediation on Heavy Metal Contaminated Soil In the Industrial District  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heavy metal contaminated soil problem has already become the global focus. With the increasing attention to the environment protection, scientist began to search new methods for remediation of contaminated soil. This paper mainly studied the effect of microorganism-plant combined bioremediation on contaminated soil in the industrial district, hoping to provide an effective bioremediation technique for heavy metal contaminated soil. In

Zhou Guoying; Li Lin; Li He; He Yuanhao

2009-01-01

162

Remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils and groundwaters  

DOEpatents

An in situ method is described for extraction of arsenic contaminants from a soil medium and remediation of the medium including contacting the medium with an extractant solution, directing the solution within and through the medium, and collecting the solution and contaminants. The method can also be used for arsenate and/or arsenite removal. 8 figs.

Peters, R.W.; Frank, J.R.; Feng, X.

1998-06-23

163

Remediation of arsenic-contaminated soils and groundwaters  

DOEpatents

An in situ method for extraction of arsenic contaminants from a soil medium and remediation of the medium including contacting the medium with an extractant solution, directing the solution within and through the medium, and collecting the solution and contaminants. The method can also be used for arsenate and/or arsenite removal.

Peters, Robert W. (Naperville, IL); Frank, James R. (Glen Ellyn, IL); Feng, Xiandong (West Richland, WA)

1998-01-01

164

Natural remediation processes: bioavailability interactions in contaminated soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metals are very common contaminants at 'Superfund' sites in US, and similarly contaminated sites worldwide. Long-term deposition of metals in soils can lead to accumulation, transport and biotoxicity\\/zootoxicity caused by mobility and bioavailability of significant fraction of the metals. Because of their immutable nature strict natural remediation processes alone may not be successful in mitigating the risks from metals at

Glen Osmond

165

Remediating dinoseb-contaminated soil with zerovalent iron.  

PubMed

Dinoseb, a dinitroherbicide, was once commonly used in aerial crop dusting of agronomic crops in the western United States. Widespread use combined with improper disposal practices at rural air strips has contaminated numerous sites. Our objective was to determine if zerovalent iron (Fe(0)) could remediate dinoseb-contaminated soil. This was accomplished by conducting a series of batch experiments where we first determined if Fe(0) could remove dinoseb in aqueous solutions, then in contaminated soil slurries, and finally, in unsaturated soil microcosms (25 degrees C, theta(g)=0.30 kg H(2)O kg(-1)). Results showed quantitative dinoseb removal in the presence of Fe(0) in all three media (aqueous solutions, soil slurries, moist soils) and that removal increased by including either ferrous or aluminum sulfate with the iron treatment. Incubating contaminated soils with Fe(0) or Fe(0) plus salts (FeSO(4) or Al(2)(SO(4))(3)) resulted in 100% removal of dinoseb within 7 d. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of degradation products showed the transformations imposed by the iron treatments were reduction of one or both nitro groups to amino groups. These amino degradation products were further transformed to quinonimine and benzoquinone and did not persist. These results support the use of zerovalent iron for on-site treatment of dinoseb-contaminated soil. PMID:19345492

Satapanajaru, T; Onanong, S; Comfort, S D; Snow, D D; Cassada, D A; Harris, C

2009-09-15

166

ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SEPARATION/CONCENTRATION TECHNOLOGY ALTERNATIVES FOR THE REMEDIATION OF PESTICIDE-CONTAMINATED SOIL  

EPA Science Inventory

Pesticide contamination includes a wide variety of compounds and may result from manufacturing improper storage, handling, disposal; or agricultural processes. It can occur in soil and can lead to secondary contamination of groundwater. Remediation of pesticide-contaminated soils...

167

ENGINEERING ISSUE: IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED UNSATURATED SUBSURFACE SOILS  

EPA Science Inventory

An emerging technology for the remediation of unsaturated subsurface soils involves the use of microorganisms to degrade contaminants which are present in such soils. Understanding the processes which drive in situ bioremediation, as well as the effectiveness and efficiency of th...

168

Toxicity testing of trinitrotoluene-contaminated soil composts  

SciTech Connect

The Mutatox{trademark} assay and earthworm acute toxicity test were employed to evaluate the efficacy of composting in reducing the toxicity of TNT-contaminated soils. The Mutatox assay is a proprietary bacterial bioluminescence test that determines the mutagenic potential of sample extracts. The earthworm acute toxicity test was chosen because it exposes the organisms to the unaltered contaminant/solid matrix. Rockeye soil, a TNT-contaminated soil collected from a military installation, was composted using two methods. This yielded five samples, Rockeye, Compost A composting. Soil extracts were prepared for Mutatox using the sonification method. Ten serial dilution samples were tested soils/artificial soil were tested in the earthworm toxicity test. In the Rockeye soil samples, a toxic response was shown in both test methods. Mutatox indicated no toxicity in Composts A and B after composting but did not show a positive mutagenic response in the lower serial dilutions. The LC50s for Compost A and B after composting in the earthworm toxicity test were 35.3% and 100%, respectively. Using Mutatox and the earthworm toxicity test together provides a sensitive means of monitoring the effectiveness of various composting techniques for remediating TNT-contaminated soils.

Honeycutt, M.E. [TNRCC TARA, Austin, TX (United States); McFarland, V.A.; Jarvis, A.S. [USAEWES, Vicksburg, MS (United States)

1997-10-01

169

Assessing Plants for Phytoremediation of Arsenic-Contaminated Soils  

E-print Network

24 Assessing Plants for Phytoremediation of Arsenic-Contaminated Soils Nandita Singh and Lena Q. Ma. Phytoremediation is potentially a cost-effective and environmentally benign method of extracting pollutants from soils. Key Words: Arsenic (As); hyperaccumulation; phytoremediation; Pteris vittata. 1. Introduction

Ma, Lena

170

Biosensors for detection of mercury in contaminated soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Biosensors based on whole bacterial cells and on bacterial heavy metal binding protein were used to determine the mercury concentration in soil. The soil samples were collected in a vegetable garden accidentally contaminated with elemental mercury 25 years earlier. Bioavailable mercury was measured using different sensors: a protein-based biosensor, a whole bacterial cell based biosensor, and a plant sensor, i.e.

Ibolya Bontidean; Alessia Mortari; Suzanne Leth; Nigel L. Brown; Ulrich Karlson; Martin M. Larsen; Jaco Vangronsveld; Philippe Corbisier; Elisabeth Csöregi

2004-01-01

171

Chelant extraction of heavy metals from contaminated soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current state of the art regarding the use of chelating agents to extract heavy metal contaminants has been addressed. Results are presented for treatability studies conducted as worst-case and representative soils from Aberdeen Proving Ground's J-Field for extraction of copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn). The particle size distribution characteristics of the soils determined from hydrometer tests are

Robert W Peters

1999-01-01

172

Plant protection under conditions of radioactive contamination of agricultural lands  

SciTech Connect

Increasing influence of anthropogenic contaminants as well as substantiated risk of the action of ionizing radiation on agroecosystems suggest the necessity of studying both the state of separate components of cenosis and search for methods on retention of ecosystem stability as a whole. In this case it should be taken into account that by retention of resistance of living organisms to the action of stress agents not only genetically conditioned potential but induction of protective reactions at the expense of ecogene action is of deciding significance as well. Protection of agricultural plants on the territories subjected to radioactive contamination resulting from the ChNPP accident brings attention of research works to a series of problems, the main one being the minimization of pesticide use by the total ecologization of technological processes, in plant growing. But an ordinary discontinuance of conducting protective chemical measures leads to growth in the number of harmful organisms in crop sowings and as a consequence an increase of crop loss and decrease of its quality. It is possible to solve this problem by introduction of measures increasing the resistance of agricultural plants to the action of unfavorable factors of environment. Application of biologically active substances (BAS) of natural and synthetic nature for incrustation of seeds fits into these methods. For the territories with increased content of radionuclides and especially by their rehabilitation the methods of preventive treatments directed to retarding the development of harmful organisms in crop sowings and excluding subsequent technological operations on chemical protection of sowings takes on special significance as it is directly connected with the problem of radiation burden on workers of agroindustrial complex.

Filipas, A.S.; Oulianenko, L.N.; Pimenov, E.P.

1995-12-31

173

40 CFR 268.49 - Alternative LDR treatment standards for contaminated soil.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...LDR treatment standards for contaminated soil. 268.49 Section 268.49 Protection...LDR treatment standards for contaminated soil. (a) Applicability. You must comply with LDRs prior to placing soil that exhibits a characteristic...

2011-07-01

174

40 CFR 268.49 - Alternative LDR treatment standards for contaminated soil.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...LDR treatment standards for contaminated soil. 268.49 Section 268.49 Protection...LDR treatment standards for contaminated soil. (a) Applicability. You must comply with LDRs prior to placing soil that exhibits a characteristic...

2013-07-01

175

40 CFR 268.49 - Alternative LDR treatment standards for contaminated soil.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...LDR treatment standards for contaminated soil. 268.49 Section 268.49 Protection...LDR treatment standards for contaminated soil. (a) Applicability. You must comply with LDRs prior to placing soil that exhibits a characteristic...

2014-07-01

176

40 CFR 268.49 - Alternative LDR treatment standards for contaminated soil.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...LDR treatment standards for contaminated soil. 268.49 Section 268.49 Protection...LDR treatment standards for contaminated soil. (a) Applicability. You must comply with LDRs prior to placing soil that exhibits a characteristic...

2012-07-01

177

Solvent washing of aged PCP-contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

The study evaluates the removal of pentachlorophenol (PCP), a wood preserving agent, from soils that have been contaminated over a period of time. Previously, equal proportions of ethanol and water were found to have the highest PCP removal efficiencies for above ground batch extractions at various soil:solvent ratios. In addition, the 50% and 75% ethanol solutions achieved higher removal efficiencies at low solvent throughputs in in-situ soil flushing experiments.

Khodadoust, A.P.; Wagner, J.A.; Suidan, M.T.; Safferman, S.I.

1993-01-01

178

Selection of plants for phytoremediation of soils contaminated with radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Remediation of soil contaminated with radionuclides typically requires that soil be removed from the site and treated with various dispersing and chelating chemicals. Numerous studies have shown that radionuclides are generally not leached from the top 0.4 meters of soil, where plant roots actively accumulate elements. Restoration of large areas of land contaminated with low levels of radionuclides may be feasible using phytoremediation. Criteria for the selection of plants for phytoremediation, molecular approaches to increase radio nuclide uptake, effects of cultural practices on uptake and assessment of environmental effects of phytoremediation will be discussed.

Entry J.A. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Vance, N.C. [PNW Research Station, Corvallis, OR (United States); Watrud, L.S. [National Health and Environmental Effects Research Lab., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1996-12-31

179

The existence state in the soil of radioactive cesium from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident by imaging plate photograph  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the wide area in east Japan was polluted seriously with radioactive cesium. But, unlike Chernobyl, reactor core explosion did not occur in Fukushima. Therefore, it is thought that many radioactive nuclides emitted into the atmosphere were in the gas state and aerosol. However, when the imaging plate photographs of the surface soils in Fukushima was observed, many granular radionuclides existed. Then, in order to confirm a radioactive cesium of particle state, the treatment for the soils contaminated with radioactive cesium by using chemical operation was tried. Three type soils, that is, paddy soil, river sediment, and sea sand, were made applicable to research. The contaminated soil samples were collected in Fukushima and Ibaraki prefecture. Radioactivity concentrations of 137Cs and 134Cs were measured by using gamma-ray spectrometry with a high pure germanium (HPGe) detector. After the radioactively measurement, soils had been burned in oven for five hours in 500 degree Celsius. Concentrated hydrochloric acid was added to soil samples, and they were heated for three hours. These samples were divided into residue and elution by centrifugal separation, and then radioactivity of cesium contained in residue was measured. After chemical operations, 70% and 85% of radioactive cesium from river sediment and sea sand were extracted approximately into elution, respectively. In contrast, in the soil of the paddy field, only 30% of radioactive cesium was approximately eluted. When radiation image photograph of the residues of all three types of soils were taken and observed, the granular radioactive nuclides remained clearly in paddy soil and river sediment. In contrast, all the granular radioactive nuclides in sea sand disappeared after treatment. The results of above things that desorption of radioactive cesium depend on the kind of soil. Furthermore, it was suggested that there was radioactive cesium of particle state in paddy soil and river sediment. It is a possibility that the substances on which radioactive cesium are concentrated depends on the kind of soil. The necessity of clarifying adsorption objects and particle state in the actual condition was suggested to elucidate Fukushima accident in more detail.

Satou, Yukihiko; Sueki, Keisuke

2013-04-01

180

Biotreatment of aqueous extract from chlorobenzene-contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect

Chlorobenzene-contaminated groundwater originating from soil steam flooding was considered for treatment in a biological reactor. The present study addresses optimal conditions for biotreatment of 1,2-dichlorobenzene, 1,3-dichlorobenzene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene at average initial concentrations (mg/L) of 25, 2.1, 3.9, and 0.4, respectively. Microcosm tests demonstrated that soil indigenous populations were able to mineralize all contaminants, with a 57 to 72% CO{sub 2} recovery. Assays were performed in a mechanically stirred bioreactor that was inoculated with contaminated soil and municipal activated sludge. Contaminants such as tri- and dichlorobenzene are easily degraded under aerobic conditions. Concentrations of all contaminants were less than 10 {micro}g/L in the released effluent after 30 to 45 days of reaction with soil at 5% (w/w) and dissolved O{sub 2} at 80% of saturation. Within the bioreactor operating range, the contaminant did not volatilize significantly. Biodegradation was preceded by a transient adsorption of the compounds. The specific rate of dichlorobenzene degradation was improved four-fold when the soil inoculum was supplemented with municipal activated sludge.

Guiot, S.R.; Frigon, J.C.; Albu-Cimpoia, R.; Deschamps, S.; Zhou, X.Q.; Hawari, J.; Sanschagrin, S. [National Research Council-Canada, Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Biotechnology Research Inst.; Samson, R. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Chemical Engineering Dept.

1995-12-31

181

Prototype SDSS for using probability analysis in soil contamination  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the benefits of applying spatial decision support system (SDSS) methodologies for assessing soil contamination problems. A nonparametric geostatistical technique, indicator kriging (IK), was used to determine the probability distributions for characterizing the uncertainty in the unsampled area. Such distributions over a contaminated site allow mapping of block maps of the probability above some maximum allowable limit, estimate the risks of decisions, and provide information for remediation assessment. Geographical information systems offer spatial analysis and data management capabilities that can benefit IK analysis. A prototype system, PASCA (Probability Analysis for Soil Contamination Assessment), was developed for this study. It utilizes a menu-driven interface to combine the Taiwan geographical database and models for IK analysis. PASCA was designed to specially aid users in preliminary screening of remediation priorities and in designating contaminated soil blocks that need additional sampling. The application of PASCA is analyzed through a case study involving the heavy metal cadmium.

Chiueh, P.T.; Lo, S.L. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Inst. of Environmental Engineering; Lee, C.D. [Chung-Yuan Univ., Chung-Li (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1997-05-01

182

Agricultural soils potentially contaminated: risk assessment procedure case studies.  

PubMed

At the moment, the health-environmental risk analysis is used to decision-making targets in the contaminated sites management; this procedure allows to assess the quantitative health risk related to the pollutants presence in environmental compartments, as soil and waters. As regards potentially contaminated agricultural soils, the ingestion of food from vegetable and/or animal source, produced inside the contaminated area, is the most suitable way to assess the health risk. As an official procedure to this assessment is not available, the National Institute for Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità, ISS) has worked out an operating procedure, organized into several phases, depending on the available specific-site know-how. In this document, agricultural soils potentially contaminated in two sites have been studied; the sites are the following: Brescia Caffaro and Torviscosa. PMID:20847466

Beccaloni, Eleonora; Vanni, Fabiana; Giovannangeli, Silvana; Beccaloni, Massimiliano; Carere, Mario

2010-01-01

183

The Allium cepa chromosome aberration test reliably measures genotoxicity of soils of inhabited areas in the Ukraine contaminated by the Chernobyl accident  

Microsoft Academic Search

The accident on the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant reactor IV in April 1986 led to the release of an enormous amount of radioactive material into the biosphere and to the formation of a complex pattern of nuclear contamination over a large area. As a consequence more than 5 million km2 of the soil in the Ukraine became contaminated with more

Olga Kovalchuk; Igor Kovalchuk; Andrey Arkhipov; Polina Telyuk; Barbara Hohn; Larisa Kovalchuk

1998-01-01

184

Effect of biodegradable amendments on uranium solubility in contaminated soils.  

PubMed

Chelate-assisted phytoextraction has been proposed as a potential tool for phytoremediation of U contaminated sites. In this context, the effects of five biodegradable amendments on U release in contaminated soils were evaluated. Three soils were involved in this study, one with a relatively high background level of U, and two which were contaminated with U from industrial effluents. Soils were treated with 5 mmol kg(-1) dry weight of either citric acid, NH(4)-citrate/citric acid, oxalic acid, S,S-ethylenediamine disuccinic acid or nitrilotriacetic acid. Soil solution concentration of U was monitored during 2 weeks. All amendments increased U concentration in soil solution, but citric acid and NH(4)-citrate/citric acid mixture were most effective, with up to 479-fold increase. For oxalic acid, S,S-ethylenediamine disuccinic acid and nitrilotriacetic acid, the increase ranged from 10-to 100-fold. The highest concentrations were observed 1 to 7 days after treatment, after which U levels in soil solution gradually decreased. All amendments induced a temporary increase of soil solution pH and TOC that could not be correlated with the release of U in the soil solution. Thermodynamic stability constants (log K) of complexes did not predict the relative efficiency of the selected biodegradable amendments on U release in soil solution. Amendments efficiency was better predicted by the relative affinity of the chelate for Fe compared to U. PMID:18061243

Duquène, L; Tack, F; Meers, E; Baeten, J; Wannijn, J; Vandenhove, H

2008-02-25

185

Chemical oxidation of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) in contaminated soils.  

PubMed

Chemical oxidation of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) was evaluated in (i) artificially spiked sand with HCH isomers (?, ?, ? and ?) and (ii) contaminated soil sampled from a former gravel pit backfilled with wastes of lindane (?-HCH). Following oxidation treatments were employed: hydrogen peroxide alone (HP), hydrogen peroxide with soluble Fe(II) (Fenton-F), sodium persulfate alone (PS), Fe(II) activated persulfate (AP) and permanganate (PM). GC-MS results revealed a significant degradation of all isomers in spiked soil in the order: F>PS>AP>HP>PM. Soluble Fe(II) enhanced the efficiency of H2O2 but decreased the reactivity of persulfate. Similar trend was observed in contaminated soil, but with less degradation probably caused by scavenging effect of organic matter and soil minerals and/or pollutant unavailability. No significant increase in oxidation efficiency was observed after using availability-enhancement agents in contaminated soil. Other limitation factors (oxidant dose, pH, catalyst type etc.) were also addressed. Among all the isomers tested, ?-HCH was the most recalcitrant one which could be explained by higher metabolic and chemical stability. No by-products were observed by GC-MS regardless of the oxidant used. For being the premier study reporting chemical oxidation of HCH isomers in contaminated soils, it will serve as a base for in-situ treatments of sites contaminated by HCH isomers and other persistent organic pollutants. PMID:24486498

Usman, M; Tascone, O; Faure, P; Hanna, K

2014-04-01

186

Clean-up criteria for remediation of contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

{open_quotes}How clean is clean?{close_quotes} is a question commonly raised in the remediation of contaminated soils. To help with the answer, criteria are proposed to serve as guidelines for remedial actions and to define a clean-up level such that the remaining contaminant residuals in the soil will not violate the Drinking Water Standards (DWS). The equations for computing those criteria are developed from the principle of conservation of mass and are functions of the maximum concentration level in the water (MCL) and the sorption coefficient. A multiplier, ranging from 10 to 1000, is also factored into the soil standard equation to reflect the effectiveness of various remediation techniques. Maximum allowable concentration in the soil (MSCL) is presented for several contaminants which are being regulated at the present time. Future modifications are recommended for better estimates of the MSCLs as additional transport mechanisms are incorporated to account for other potentially dominant effects.

Nguyen, H.D.; Wilson, J.R. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Sato, Chikashi [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States). College of Engineering

1997-08-01

187

Radioactive contamination in Croatia by phosphate fertilizer production.  

PubMed

The contents of natural radionuclides (radium, uranium and potassium) were measured in the area of a phosphate fertilizer factory in central Croatia, as a part of extended and still ongoing monitoring program of radioactive contamination of human environment in Croatia that is performed by the Radiation Protection Unit of the Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health in Zagreb. Activity concentrations in all analysed media (waste water, trickling water from piezometers, phosphogypsum deposit and final products) considerably fluctuated, especially in phosphogypsum and waste water. Mean (226)Ra activity concentration in waste phosphogypsum was measured to be 483+/-190 Bqkg(-1). Based on that value, it was estimated that 4 million m(3) of phosphogypsum that have been deposited up to now contain about 4.3 x 10(12) Bq, i.e. about 200 g of (226)Ra. However, effective dose for an adult that would be incurred by consumption of water from nearby wells was estimated to be 5.3+/-1.3 microSv. The results show that (226)Ra activities cause effective doses, which are below the recommended maximum as the estimated annual (226)Ra effective dose does not exceed 0.1 mSv as recommended by the World Health Organization. PMID:18619732

Bituh, Tomislav; Marovic, Gordana; Franic, Zdenko; Sencar, Jasminka; Bronzovic, Maja

2009-03-15

188

Characterization of Pu-contaminated soils from Nuclear Site 201 at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Distribution and characteristics of Pu-bearing radioactive particles throughout five soil profiles from Nuclear Site (NS) 201 were investigated. Concentrations of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu and /sup 241/Am decreased with depth and most of the contamination was contained in the top 5 cm except in profile 4 where it extended to 10 cm. The mean activity ratio of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu to /sup 241/Am and its standard error were 5.8 +- 0.3 (N=42). Most of the total radioactivity of the soils was contributed by 0.25 to 2 mm sand size fraction which comprised 20 to 50% by weight of the soils. The radioactive particles in the 0.25 to 2 mm size fraction occurred as spherical glass particles or as glass coatings on sand particles. The glass coatings had gas voids in the matrix but were not as porous as the radioactive particles from NS 219. After impact grinding the >0.25-mm size fractions for one hour, 85% of the initial activity in a NS 201 sample remained with the particles on the 0.25 mm sieve, whereas in the NS 219 sample only 10% remained. The results show that the radioactive particles from NS 201 were much more stable against the impact grinding force than those from NS 219. Therefore, the NS 201 soils would be expected to have a lower probability of producing respirable-size radioactive particles by saltation during wind erosion. 19 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

Lee, S.Y.; Tamura, T.; Larsen, I.L.

1983-01-01

189

Characterization of organic contamination in soil at military bases  

SciTech Connect

There is a growing concern over organic chemical residues in soil at military bases as potential point sources of contamination. In order to characterize the extent of contamination and to monitor remediation activities, soil and air sampling methods are currently under development. Soil samples obtained from USAF and US Army sites were studied by HPLC, GC and GC/MS. Soil extractions by both conventional solvent (soxhlet) and supercritical CO{sub 2} were compared for effectiveness of recovery of the contaminants. The principal organophosphate (OP) ester soil contaminant was identified as tricresyl phosphate, a component of hydraulic fluids and a known neurotoxicant. Other OP compounds under study are tributyl and triphenyl phosphate. Sampling methods for determining sources of airborne OPs were also developed. Soil samples taken from munitions ponds at a US Army base were analyzed for Trinitrotoluene (TNT) and Trinitrobenzene (TNB), the primary photolysis product of TNT. Methods for decontaminating soil containing OPs or TNT/TNB are under study, to include both chemical and biological characterization.

David, M.D.; Wujcik, C.E.; Seiber, J. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Center for Environmental Science and Engineering

1994-12-31

190

REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SOILS BY SOLVENT FLUSHING  

EPA Science Inventory

Solvent flushing is a potential technique for remediating a waste disposal/spill site contaminated with organic chemicals. This technique involves the injection of a solvent mixture (e.g., water plus alcohols) that enhances contaminant solubility, reduces the retardation factor, ...

191

REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SOILS BY SOLVENT FLUSHING  

EPA Science Inventory

Solvent flushing is a potential technique for remediating a waste disposal/spill site contaminated with organic chemicals. his technique involves the injection of a solvent mixture (e.g., water plus alcohols) that enhances contaminant solubility, reduces the retardation factor, a...

192

Patterns and inventories of radioactive contamination of island sites of the Yenisey River, Russia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The distribution of radioactive contamination at three island sites downstream from the Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Combine (KMCC) was studied with the objectives of mapping contamination levels, interpreting radionuclide distributions through consideration of alluvial processes and determining radionuclide inventories. Contamination was measured using in situ gamma spectrometry and landforms characterised using topographic surveying methods. Maximum 137Cs contamination densities (700kBqm?2) were

V. G. Linnik; J. E. Brown; M. Dowdall; V. N. Potapov; A. V. Nosov; V. V. Surkov; A. V. Sokolov; S. M. Wright; S. Borghuis

2006-01-01

193

SOLVENT EXTRACTION AND SOIL WASHING TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED SOILS FROM WOOD PRESERVING SITES: BENCH SCALE STUDIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Bench-scale solvent extraction and soil washing studies were performed on soil samples obtained from three abandoned wood preserving sites that included in the NPL. The soil samples from these sites were contaminated with high levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pentachlo...

194

Solubility measurement of uranium in uranium-contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

A short-term equilibration study involving two uranium-contaminated soils at the Fernald site was conducted as part of the In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. The goal of this study is to predict the behavior of uranium during on-site remediation of these soils. Geochemical modeling was performed on the aqueous species dissolved from these soils following the equilibration study to predict the on-site uranium leaching and transport processes. The soluble levels of total uranium, calcium, magnesium, and carbonate increased continually for the first four weeks. After the first four weeks, these components either reached a steady-state equilibrium or continued linearity throughout the study. Aluminum, potassium, and iron, reached a steady-state concentration within three days. Silica levels approximated the predicted solubility of quartz throughout the study. A much higher level of dissolved uranium was observed in the soil contaminated from spillage of uranium-laden solvents and process effluents than in the soil contaminated from settling of airborne uranium particles ejected from the nearby incinerator. The high levels observed for soluble calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate are probably the result of magnesium and/or calcium carbonate minerals dissolving in these soils. Geochemical modeling confirms that the uranyl-carbonate complexes are the most stable and dominant in these solutions. The use of carbonate minerals on these soils for erosion control and road construction activities contributes to the leaching of uranium from contaminated soil particles. Dissolved carbonates promote uranium solubility, forming highly mobile anionic species. Mobile uranium species are contaminating the groundwater underlying these soils. The development of a site-specific remediation technology is urgently needed for the FEMP site.

Lee, S.Y.; Elless, M.; Hoffman, F.

1993-08-01

195

Electrokinetic remediation of fluorine-contaminated soil: conditioning of anolyte.  

PubMed

The feasibility of anolyte conditioning on electrokinetic remediation of fluorine-contaminated soil was investigated with a field soil. The initial concentration of fluorine, pH and water content in the soil were 414mg/kg, 8.91 and 15%, respectively. Because the extraction of fluorine generally increased with the soil pH, the pH of the anode compartment was controlled by circulating strong alkaline solution to enhance the extraction of fluorine during electrokinetic remediation. The removal of fluorine increased with the concentration of the alkaline solution and applied current density and fluorine removed up to 75.6% within 14 days. Additionally, anolyte conditioning sharply increased the electro-osmotic flow, which enhanced the removal of fluorine in this study. In many respects, anolyte conditioning in electrokinetic remediation of fluorine-contaminated soil will be a promising technology. PMID:18462872

Kim, Do-Hyung; Jeon, Chil-Sung; Baek, Kitae; Ko, Sung-Hwan; Yang, Jung-Seok

2009-01-15

196

Biochar: an effective amendment for remediating contaminated soil.  

PubMed

Biochar is a carbon-rich material derived from incomplete combustion of biomass.Applying biochar as an amendment to treat contaminated soils is receiving increasing attention, and is a promising way to improve soil quality. Heavy metals are persistent and are not environmentally biodegradable. However, they can be stabilized in soil by adding biochar. Moreover, biochar is considered to be a predominant sorptive agent for organic pollutants, having a removal efficiency of about 1 order of magnitude higher than does soil/sediment organic matter or their precursor substances alone.When trying to stabilize organic and inorganic pollutants in soil, several features of biochar' s sorption capacity should be considered, viz., the nature of the pollutants to be remediated, how the biochar is prepared, and the complexity of the soil systemin which biochar may be used. In addition, a significant portion of the biochar or some of its components that are used to remediate soils do change over time through abiotic oxidation and microbial decomposition. This change process is commonly referred to as "aging:" Biochar "aging" in nature is inevitable, and aged biochar exhibits an effect that is totally different than non-aged biochar on stabilizing heavy metals and organic contaminants in soils.Studies that have been performed to date on the use of biochar to remediate contaminated soil are insufficient to allow its use for wide-scale field application.Therefore, considerable new data are necessary to expand both our understanding of how biochar performs in the field, and where it can be best used in the future for soil remediation. For example, how biochar and soil biota (microbial and faunal communities)interact in soils is still poorly understood. Moreover, studies are needed on how to best remove new species of heavy metals, and on how biochar aging affects sorption capacity are also needed. PMID:24162093

Kong, Lu-Lu; Liu, Wei-Tao; Zhou, Qi-Xing

2014-01-01

197

Environmental projects. Volume 14: Removal of contaminated soil and debris  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Numerous diverse activities at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex (GDSCC) are carried out in support of six parabolic dish antennas. Some of these activities can result in possible spills or leakages of hazardous materials and wastes stored both above ground in steel drums and below ground in underground storage tanks (UST's). These possible leaks or spills, along with the past practice of burial of solid debris and waste in trenches and pits, could cause local subsurface contamination of the soil. In 1987, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), retained Engineering-Science, Inc. (E-S), Pasadena, California, to identify the specific local areas within the GDSCC with subsurface soil contamination. The E-S study determined that some of the soils at the Apollo Site and the Mars Site were contaminated with hydrocarbons, while soil at a nonhazardous waste dumpsite at the Mojave Base site was contaminated with copper. This volume is a JPL-expanded version of the PE209 E-S report, and it also reports that all subsurface contaminated soils at the GDSCC were excavated, removed, and disposed of in an environmentally acceptable way, and the excavations were backfilled and covered in accordance with accepted Federal, State, and local environmental rules and regulations.

Kushner, Len

1992-01-01

198

Phytoremediation of organic contaminants in soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soil pollution, a very important environmental problem, has been attracting considerable public attention over the last decades. Unfortunately, the enormous costs associated with the removal of pollutants from soils by means of traditional physicochemical methods have been encouraging companies to ignore the problem. Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that uses plants to clean up pollutants in the environment. As overwhelmingly

Itziar Alkorta; Carlos Garbisu

2001-01-01

199

RESULTS OF TREATMENT EVALUATIONS OF CONTAMINATED SOILS  

EPA Science Inventory

Soil and debris from Superfund sites must be treated to minimize their threat to human health and the environment as part of remedial actions at such sites. Studies were conducted on the effectiveness with which five treatment processes removed or immobilized synthetic soils cont...

200

Bioremediation of RDX-contaminated soil: A preliminary field trial  

SciTech Connect

The biotreatability of a clay soil contaminated with of 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and octahydro1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) at nominal 2000 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg, respectively, was examined in small scale biopiles. These piles were prepared from concentrated soils having RDX and HMX contamination levels of 100,000 mg/kg and 25,000 mg/kg, respectively. The overall soil composition of the piles was a mixture of clay, sand and black earth. The 4 m{sup 3} biopiles were set up in wooden forms having impermeable plastic liners, and were equipped with a spray irrigation system allowing a closed-loop recirculation of the aqueous leachate from the pile. Lime and alfalfa were used as soil amendments. The physical and chemical parameters of the piles were monitored over a period of 4 months. The analysis of soil samples for the determination of RDX and HMX concentrations was carried out by acetonitrile extraction and high performance liquid chromatography. The results showed a rapid decrease in contaminants concentrations with no significant lag time. The biopile with amended soil achieved a complete degradation of explosives contaminants. Finally, scale-up aspects of this bioremediation process will be discussed.

Dubois, C.; Ampleman, G.; Thiboutot, S. [Defence Research Establishment, Val-Belair, Quebec (Canada); Greer, C.W.; Hawari, J.; Sunahara, G. [National Research Council of Canada, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

1997-12-31

201

Release of polyaromatic hydrocarbons from coal tar contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

A variety of process wastes generated from manufactured gas production (MGP) have contaminated soils and groundwater at production and disposal sites. Coal tar, consisting of a complex mixture of hydrocarbons present as a nonaqueous phase liquid, makes up a large portion of MGP wastes. Of the compounds in coal tar, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the major constituents of environmental concern due to their potential mutagenic and carcinogenic hazards. Characterization of the release of PAHs from the waste-soil matrix is essential to quantifying long-term environmental impacts in soils and groundwater. Currently, conservative estimates for the release of PAHs to the groundwater are made assuming equilibrium conditions and using relationships derived from artificially contaminated soils. Preliminary work suggests that aged coal tar contaminated soils have much lower rates of desorption and a greater affinity for retaining organic contaminants. To obtain better estimates of desorption rates, the release of PAHs from a coal tar soil was investigated using a flow-interruption, miscible displacement technique. Methanol/water solutions were employed to enhance PAH concentrations above limits of detection. For each methanol/water solution employed, a series of flow interrupts of varying times was invoked. Release rates from each methanol/water solution were estimated from the increase in concentration with duration of flow interruption. Aqueous-phase release rates were then estimated by extrapolation using a log-linear cosolvency model.

Priddy, N.D.; Lee, L.S. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Agronomy

1996-11-01

202

Radioactivities vs. depth in Apollo 16 and 17 soil  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The radioactivities of Ar-37, Ar-39, and H-3 measured at a number of depths for Apollo 16 and 17 soil are reported. The Ar-37 activities vs depth in the Apollo 16 drill string increased with depth and reached a broad maximum in the neighborhood of 50 g per sq cm before decreasing. The Ar-39 activities in Apollo 17 soil were higher than in Apollo 16 soil, probably owing to the higher Fe and Ti contents. The H-3 activities in Apollo 16 and 17 soil were quite similar and indicate that the 4 August 1972 flare produced very little H-3 compared to the amount produced by solar flares during the previous 50 years.

Fireman, E. L.; D'Amico, J.; Defelice, J.

1973-01-01

203

Coupling Sorption to Soil Weathering during Reactive Transport: Impacts of Mineral Transformation and Sorbate Aging on Contaminant Speciation and Mobility  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford subsurface has become contaminated with highly alkaline, radioactive waste generated as a result of weapons production. The radioactive brine was stored in underground storage tanks, a number of which developed leaks and contaminated the surrounding subsurface. The high pH and ionic strength of these wastes has been predicted to accelerate the degree of soil weathering to produce new mineral phases--cancrinite and sodalite among the most abundant. Previous work has demonstrated that Cs and Sr, which along with I represent the most radioactive components in the waste, are sequestered by these neo-formed solids. The present work is aimed at assessing the stability of these neo-formed solids, with special emphasis on the degree of Cs, Sr and I release under ambient (neutral pH, low ionic strength) conditions expected to return to the Hanford area after the caustic radioactive brine waste is removed.

Carl I. Steefel; Aaron Thompson; Jon Chorover

2006-06-01

204

Germination and initial growth of Campomanesia xanthocarpa O. Berg. (Myrtaceae), in petroleum-contaminated soil and bioremediated soil.  

PubMed

In 2000 there was an oil spill at the Getúlio Vargas Refinery (REPAR) in Paraná. Nearly five years after contamination and the use of bioremediation, a study was carried out to identify the effects of the contaminated soil and the bioremediated soil on the germination and initial growth of C. xanthocarpa. The experiment was established with soil from REPAR, with three treatment groups: contaminated soil (C), bioremediated soil (B) and uncontaminated soil (U); with five repetitions of 50 seeds each. There was no significant difference in the percentage of germination and the speed of germination index. The production of total biomass (30 - 60 days) and shoot biomass (60 days) was greater in the bioremediated soil compared to the other treatments. The averages for the root biomass were lower in the contaminated soil than in the bioremediated soil. The shoot length and the total length of the seedling in the contaminated soil and uncontaminated soil were lower than in the bioremediated soil. PMID:21180902

Gogosz, A M; Bona, C; Santos, G O; Botosso, P C

2010-11-01

205

Sorption of radioactive contaminants by sediment from the Kara Sea  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to quantify some of the parameters needed to perform near-field modeling of sites in the Kara Sea that were impacted by the disposal of radioactive waste. The parameters of interest are: the distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) for several important radionuclides, the mineralogy of the sediment, and the relationship of K{sub d} to liquid to solid ratio. Sediment from the Kara Sea (location: 73{degrees} 00` N, 58{degrees} 00` E) was sampled from a depth of 287 meters on August 23/24, 1992, during a joint Russian/Norwegian scientific cruise. Analysis of the material included mineralogy, grain size and total organic carbon. Uptake kinetics were determined for {sup 85}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 125}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 232}U, and {sup 241}Am and distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) were determined for these radionuclides using batch type experiments. Sorption isotherms were developed for {sup 85}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 137}Cs to examine the effect that varying the concentration of a tracer has on the quantity of that tracer taken up by the solid. The effect of liquid to solid ratio on the uptake of contaminants was determined for {sup 99}Tc and {sup 137}Cs. In another set of experiments, the sediment was separated into four size fractions and uptake was determined for each fraction for {sup 85}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 137}Cs. In addition, the sediment was analyzed to determine if it contains observable concentrations of anthropogenic radionuclides.

Fuhrmann, M.; Zhou, H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Neiheisel, J.; Dyer, R.

1995-02-01

206

Radioactive contamination monitoring for the Korean public following Fukushima nuclear accident.  

PubMed

On March 11, 2011, as a result of the Great East Japan Earthquake, severe damage to the Fukushima nuclear power plant caused the release of radioactive materials. We conducted radioactive contamination monitoring for Korean residents in Japan and Korean travelers to East Japan after the accident. More than 800 members of the Korean public were surveyed for personal monitoring. Measured levels of external and internal contamination were within the screening levels for each monitoring method. PMID:23541790

Ha, Wi-Ho; Yoo, Jaeryong; Yoon, Seokwon; Pak, Min-Jeong; Park, Seyong; Kim, Mi-Ryeong; Lee, Seung-Sook

2013-11-01

207

Mercury uptake by Silene vulgaris grown on contaminated spiked soils.  

PubMed

Mercury is a highly toxic pollutant with expensive clean up, because of its accumulative and persistent character in the biota. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of Silene vulgaris, facultative metallophyte which have populations on both non-contaminated and metalliferous soils, to uptake Hg from artificially polluted soils. A pot experiment was carried out in a rain shelter for a full growth period. Two soils (C pH = 8.55 O.M. 0.63% and A pH = 7.07 O.M. 0.16%) were used, previously contaminated with Hg as HgCl(2) (0.6 and 5.5 mg Hg kg(-1) soil). Plants grew healthy and showed good appearance throughout the study without significantly decreasing biomass production. Mercury uptake by plants increased with the mercury concentration found in both soils. Differences were statistically significant between high dosage and untreated soil. The fact that S. vulgaris retains more mercury in root than in shoot and also, the well known effectiveness of these plants in the recovering of contaminated soils makes S. vulgaris a good candidate to phytostabilization technologies. PMID:20708330

Pérez-Sanz, Araceli; Millán, Rocío; Sierra, M José; Alarcón, Remedios; García, Pilar; Gil-Díaz, Mar; Vazquez, Saúl; Lobo, M Carmen

2012-03-01

208

Bioremediation of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate in contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect

An efficient process has been developed for bioremediation of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) using soil tilling. The process involves application of a proprietary nutrient formulation and bioaugmentation with a site-specific DEHP-degrading inoculum. Laboratory feasibility studies were conducted to evaluate different factors that affect the process. The effects of moisture content, inoculum, nutrient rate, and initial DEHP concentration on biodegradation were investigated. A novel supplementary system--treatment system 2--was shown to accelerate DEHP degradation and facilitate remediation of residual persistent contaminant DEHP, which may be tightly bound to soil. In pilot studies, DEHP-contaminated soils were remediated to below 100 mg/kg in 70 to 80 days. Use of treatment system 2 resulted in reduction of contaminants to less than 15 mg/kg.

Yu, J.J.; Ward, O.P. [Biorem Technologies Inc., Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

1995-12-31

209

Magnetic mineralogy of heavy metals-contaminated soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soils around mine and in urban areas are often contaminated by heavy metals derived from industrial and human activities [1, 2]. These contaminated soils are often characterized by a magnetic enhancement on topsoils. Many studies demonstrated that there are significant correlations between heavy metals and various magnetic parameters in contaminated soils, indicating a strong affinity of heavy metals to magnetic minerals. The magnetic particles in contaminated soils were separated by a magnetic separation technique. The rock magnetism, XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy equiped with an energy-dispersive X-ray analyzer (FESEM/EDX) were used to characterize their magnetic mineralogy. Results of XRD analysis indicated that the magnetic particles separated from heavy metal-contaminated soils are composed of quartz, magnetite, and hematite. Based on the X-ray diffraction peak intensity, the Fe3O4 was identified as the predominant magnetic mineral phase. The high-temperature magnetization (Ms-T) curves of magnetic particles extracted from contaminated soils show a sharp Ms decrease at about 580C (the Curie temperature of magnetite), suggesting that magnetite is the dominant magnetic carrier. The hysteresis loops of contaminated soils are closed at about 100-200 mT which is consistent with the presence of a dominant ferrimagnetic mineral phase. The FESEM analysis showed a great variety of shapes of magnetic particles in contaminated soils. The most common morphology are observed in the form of spherules, with the sizes ranging from 20 to 100 um. The chemical composition of magnetic particles consist mainly of Fe, Si, Al, and Ca with minor heavy metal elements (Cu, Zn, Hg, and Cr). The semi-quantitative Fe content identified by FESEM/EDX ranged from 40 to 90%. Combined studies of rock magnetism, XRD, and FESEM/EDX indicated that magnetic mineral phases responsible for the magnetic enhancement of contaminated soils are anthropogenic origin which are coarse-grained multi-domain (MD) ferrimagnetic minerals. These spherical magnetic particles in contaminated soils are most likely related to airborne particles from coal combusition and industrial activities. Coal burning, metallurgical and industrial dusts contain a significant fraction of ferrimagnetic minerals. The magnetic particles in fly ash from coal-burning power plant have a typical spherical morphology, ranging from 10 to 100 ?m. Vehicle emissions have been suggested to be another source of magnetic particles. These anthropogenic ferrimagnetic mineral phases are directly responsible for the magnetic enhancement in the contaminated soils. Therefore, the strong magnetic signature in contaminated soils can be used as an effective tool for identifying pollution sources and quantifying pollution level of heavy metals. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China (No. 41171182 and 40971131) and the Ph.D. Programs Foundation of Ministry of Education of China (20090101110088). [1] Lu, S.G. & Bai, S.Q. (2006) J. Appl. Geophys., 60, 1-12. [2] Lu, S.G., Bai, S.Q. & Xue, Q.F. (2007) Geophys. J. Inter., 171, 568-580.

Shenggao, L.

2012-04-01

210

Laboratory scale vitrification of low-level radioactive nitrate salts and soils from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

INEL has radiologically contaminated nitrate salt and soil waste stored above and below ground in Pad A and the Acid Pit at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Pad A contain uranium and transuranic contaminated potassium and sodium nitrate salts generated from dewatered waste solutions at the Rocky Flats Plant. The Acid Pit was used to dispose of liquids containing waste mineral acids, uranium, nitrate, chlorinated solvents, and some mercury. Ex situ vitrification is a high temperature destruction of nitrates and organics and immobilizes hazardous and radioactive metals. Laboratory scale melting of actual radionuclides containing INEL Pad A nitrate salts and Acid Pit soils was performed. The salt/soil/additive ratios were varied to determine the range of glass compositions (resulted from melting different wastes); maximize mass and volume reduction, durability, and immobilization of hazardous and radioactive metals; and minimize viscosity and offgas generation for wastes prevalent at INEL and other DOE sites. Some mixtures were spiked with additional hazardous and radioactive metals. Representative glasses were leach tested and showed none. Samples spiked with transuranic showed low nuclide leaching. Wasteforms were two to three times bulk densities of the salt and soil. Thermally co-processing soils and salts is an effective remediation method for destroying nitrate salts while stabilizing the radiological and hazardous metals they contain. The measured durability of these low-level waste glasses approached those of high-level waste glasses. Lab scale vitrification of actual INEL contaminated salts and soils was performed at General Atomics Laboratory as part of the INEL Waste Technology Development and Environmental Restoration within the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program.

Shaw, P. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Anderson, B. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States). NRT Div.; Davis, D. [Envitco Inc., Toledo, OH (United States)

1993-07-01

211

Assessment of radioecological situation of a site contaminated by technologically enhanced natural radioactivity in Croatia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper deals with radioactivity contamination originating from the coal fired power plant and its waste dumps located in\\u000a a bay of the Adriatic which is due to geographical characteristics sensitive to any kind of pollution including radioactivity.\\u000a Investigations of coal used in regular plant operation and of solid incombustible ash and slag showed increased concentrations\\u000a of natural radioactivity which

G. Marovi?; J. Sen?ar

1999-01-01

212

Analyses of soils at commercial radioactive waste disposal sites  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory, in order to provide technical assistance to the NRC, has measured a number of physical and chemical characteristics of soils from three commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites. Samples were collected from an area adjacent to the disposal site at Sheffield, IL, and from two operating sites: one at Barnwell, SC, and the other near Richland, WA. The soil samples, which were analyzed from each site, were believed to include soil which was representative of that in contact with buried waste forms. Results of field measurements of earth resistivity and of soil pH will be presented. Additionally, the results of laboratory measurements of resistivity, moisture content, pH, exchange acidity and the soluble ion content of the soils will be discussed. The soluble ion content of the soils was determined by analysis of aqueous extracts of saturated soil pastes. The concentrations of the following ions were determined: Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, K/sup +/, Na/sup +/, HCO/sub 3//sup -/, CO/sub 3//sup 2 -/, SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, Cl/sup -/, S/sup 2 -/.

Piciulo, P.L.; Shea, C.E.; Barletta, R.E.

1983-01-01

213

Depleted uranium mobility and fractionation in contaminated soil (Southern Serbia)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Goal, Scope and Background  During the Balkan conflict in 1999, soil in contaminated areas was enriched in depleted uranium (DU) isotopic signature, relative\\u000a to the in-situ natural uranium present. After the military activities, most of kinetic DU penetrators or their fragments remained\\u000a buried in the ground in certain geomorphological and geochemical environments exposed to local weathering conditions. The\\u000a contamination distribution, mobility

Mirjana B. Radenkovi?; Svjetlana A. Cupa?; Jasminka D. Joksi?; Dragana J. Todorovi?

2008-01-01

214

Extraction of pesticides from contaminated soil using supercritical carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

The demand for processes to clean up contaminated soils without generating additional contaminants, such as hazardous solvents, is increasing. One approach to minimizing this problem is to use supercritical fluids like light hydrocarbons and CO[sub 2] to extract contaminants from soils. Gases exhibit unique properties under supercritical conditions. They retain the ability to diffuse through the interstitial spaces of solid materials, plus they have the solvating power of liquids. Some examples of extractions using SCFs are caffeine from coffee, cholesterol from eggs, drugs from plants, and nicotine from tobacco. Supercritical CO[sub 2] is an attractive, alternative extraction medium for removal of pesticides from soils. Carbon dioxide is readily available, relatively inexpensive, and if recycled, nonpolluting. Contaminants may be easily recovered by evaporating the CO[sub 2] into an expansion vessel. Supercritical fluid extraction technology is discussed and results are given for the extraction of atrazine, bentazon, alachlor, and permethrin from contaminated soil prepared in the laboratory. Initial studies show >95% removal for these pesticides.

Hunter, G.B.

1991-01-01

215

Extraction of pesticides from contaminated soil using supercritical carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

The demand for processes to clean up contaminated soils without generating additional contaminants, such as hazardous solvents, is increasing. One approach to minimizing this problem is to use supercritical fluids like light hydrocarbons and CO{sub 2} to extract contaminants from soils. Gases exhibit unique properties under supercritical conditions. They retain the ability to diffuse through the interstitial spaces of solid materials, plus they have the solvating power of liquids. Some examples of extractions using SCFs are caffeine from coffee, cholesterol from eggs, drugs from plants, and nicotine from tobacco. Supercritical CO{sub 2} is an attractive, alternative extraction medium for removal of pesticides from soils. Carbon dioxide is readily available, relatively inexpensive, and if recycled, nonpolluting. Contaminants may be easily recovered by evaporating the CO{sub 2} into an expansion vessel. Supercritical fluid extraction technology is discussed and results are given for the extraction of atrazine, bentazon, alachlor, and permethrin from contaminated soil prepared in the laboratory. Initial studies show >95% removal for these pesticides.

Hunter, G.B.

1991-12-31

216

Magnetic susceptibility properties of pesticide contaminated volcanic soil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pesticides, unfortunately, are still widely used in many countries as way to eradicate agricultural pests. As they are being used continuously over a long period of time, they accumulate as residues in soils posing serious threats to the environment. In this study, we study the changes in magnetite-rich volcanic soils that were deliberately contaminated by pesticide. Such changes, in any, would be useful in the detection of pesticide residue in contaminated soils. Two different types of magnetically strong volcanic soil from the area near Lembang, West Java, Indonesia were used in this study where they were contaminated with varying concentrations of pesticide. The samples were then measured for magnetic susceptibility at two different frequencies. The measurements were then repeated after a period of three months. We found a reduction of magnetic susceptibility as well as a reduction in SP (superparamagnetic) grains proportion in contaminated soil. These might be caused by pesticide-induced magnetic dissolution as supported by SEM analyses. However the impact of pesticide concentration as well as exposure time on magnetic dissolution is still inconclusive.

Agustine, Eleonora; Fitriani, Dini; Safiuddin, La Ode; Tamuntuan, Gerald; Bijaksana, Satria

2013-09-01

217

Phytoremediation of contaminated soils: Progress and promise  

SciTech Connect

{open_quotes}Phytoremediation{close_quotes} refers to the use of green plants, including plant-associated microflora, to remediated contaminated sites. The talk addresses the remediation of solids only, although green-plant based systems are well established in waste-water treatment and air pollution control. Phytoremediation has potential significant economic, regulatory and aesthetic advantages over many engineering-based solutions. The technology can be targeted to both inorganic and organic contaminants. The focus of this talk will be on lead (Pb). A brief overview of activities in organic remediation will be included at the end of the talk.

Cunningham, S.D.; Berti, D.R.; Dupont, E.I. [Glasgow Business Community, Newark, DE (United States)

1993-12-31

218

Potential for phytoextraction of PCBs from contaminated soils using weeds  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive investigation of the potential of twenty-seven different species of weeds to phytoextract polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from contaminated soil was conducted at two field sites (Etobicoke and Lindsay) in southern Ontario, Canada. Soil concentrations were 31?g\\/g and 4.7?g\\/g at each site respectively. All species accumulated PCBs in their root and shoot tissues. Mean shoot concentrations at the two sites

Sarah A. Ficko; Allison Rutter; Barbara A. Zeeb

2010-01-01

219

Environmental effects of soil contamination by shale fuel oils.  

PubMed

Estonia is currently one of the leading producers of shale oils in the world. Increased production, transportation and use of shale oils entail risks of environmental contamination. This paper studies the behaviour of two shale fuel oils (SFOs)--'VKG D' and 'VKG sweet'--in different soil matrices under natural climatic conditions. Dynamics of SFOs' hydrocarbons (C10-C40), 16 PAHs, and a number of soil heterotrophic bacteria in oil-spiked soils was investigated during the long-term (1 year) outdoor experiment. In parallel, toxicity of aqueous leachates of oil-spiked soils to aquatic organisms (crustaceans Daphnia magna and Thamnocephalus platyurus and marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri) and terrestrial plants (Sinapis alba and Hordeum vulgare) was evaluated. Our data showed that in temperate climate conditions, the degradation of SFOs in the oil-contaminated soils was very slow: after 1 year of treatment, the decrease of total hydrocarbons' content in the soil did not exceed 25 %. In spite of the comparable chemical composition of the two studied SFOs, the VKG sweet posed higher hazard to the environment than the heavier fraction (VKG D) due to its higher mobility in the soil as well as higher toxicity to aquatic and terrestrial species. Our study demonstrated that the correlation between chemical parameters (such as total hydrocarbons or total PAHs) widely used for the evaluation of the soil pollution levels and corresponding toxicity to aquatic and terrestrial organisms was weak. PMID:24865504

Kanarbik, Liina; Blinova, Irina; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Künnis-Beres, Kai; Kahru, Anne

2014-10-01

220

Soil immobilization: New concept for biotreatment of soil contaminants  

SciTech Connect

A new concept for the development of microbial consortia for the degradation of persistent soil pollutants and for pollutant treatment is proposed. The concept defined as soil immobilization is based on the entrapment of soil particles, showing microbial activity in degrading the target pollutant, into a solid membrane with a large pore size distribution. The particular hydrodynamic and mass transfer properties of this system result in a very efficient process. A new type of bioreactor is proposed for carrying out the immobilized soil process. The performance of the system was tested by developing a microbial system for the mineralization of pentachlorophenol (PCP). The results show that the volumetric efficiency of the process for PCP mineralization in the immobilized soil bioreactor is 1--3 orders of magnitude higher than reported literature values. Chlorine and carbon atoms of PCP are both nearly completely (99%) mineralized.

Karamanev, D.G.; Chavarie, C.; Samson, R. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

1998-02-20

221

Accelerated remediation of pesticide-contaminated soil with zerovalent iron.  

PubMed

High pesticide concentrations in soil from spills or discharges can result in point-source contamination of ground and surface waters. Cost-effective technologies are needed for on-site treatment that meet clean-up goals and restore soil function. Remediation is particularly challenging when a mixture of pesticides is present. Zerovalent iron (Fe0) has been shown to promote reductive dechlorination and nitro group reduction of a wide range of contaminants in soil and water. We employed Fe0 for on-site treatment of soil containing > 1000 mg metolachlor, > 55 mg alachlor, > 64 mg atrazine, > 35 mg pendimethalin, and > 10 mg chlorpyrifos kg(-1). While concentrations were highly variable within the windrowed soil, treatment with 5% (w/w) Fe0 resulted in > 60% destruction of the five pesticides within 90 d and increased to > 90% when 2% (w/w) Al2(SO4)3 was added to the Fe0. GC/MS analysis confirmed dechlorination of metolachlor and alachlor during treatment. Our observations support the use of Fe0 for ex situ treatment of pesticide-contaminated soil. PMID:15312933

Shea, P J; Machacek, T A; Comfort, S D

2004-11-01

222

Remediation of Contaminated Soils By Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The contaminants that can be found in soils are many, inorganic, like heavy metals, as well as organic. Among the organic contaminants, oil and coal refineries are responsi- ble for several cases of soil contamination with PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocar- bons). Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have toxic, carcinogenic and mu- tagenic effects. Limits have been set on the concentration of most contaminants, and growing concern is focusing on soil contamination issues. USA regulations set the maximum acceptable level of contamination by PAHs equal to 40 ppm at residential sites and 270 ppm at industrial sites. Stricter values are usually adopted in European Countries. Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction is a possible alternative technology to remove volatile organic compounds from contaminated soils. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) offers many advantages over conventional solvent extraction. Super- critical fluids combine gaseous properties as a high diffusion coefficient, and liquid properties as a high solvent power. The solvent power is strongly pressure-dependent near supercritical conditions: selective extractions are possible without changing the solvent. Solute can be separate from the solvent depressurising the system; therefore, it is possible to recycle the solvent and recover the contaminant. Carbon dioxide is frequently used as supercritical fluid, because it has moderate critical conditions, it is inert and available in pure form. In this work, supercritical fluid extraction technology has been used to remove a polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon from contaminated soils. The contaminant choice for the experiment has been naphthalene since several data are available in literature. G. A. Montero et al. [1] studied soil remediation with supercrit- ical carbon dioxide extraction technology; these Authors have found that there was a mass-transfer limitation. In the extraction vessel, the mass transfer coefficient in- creases with the superficial velocity of the supercritical carbon dioxide; therefore, the mass transfer resistance can be reduced increasing such velocity. In this work, higher values of superficial velocity were investigated. The experimental apparatus includes a pump, an extraction vessel, an adjustable restrictor and a trap to collect the extracted substance. Liquid carbon dioxide coming from a cylinder with a dip-tube is cooled by a cryostatic bath and then it is compressed by a pneumatic drive pump (the max- imum available pressure is 69 MPa). Subsequently, the pressurised current flows into 1 a heating coil and then into the extraction vessel, which is contained in a stove; the outlet flow is depressurised in an adjustable restrictor and the extracted substance is collected in a trap by dissolution into a solvent. The extracted naphthalene quantity was obtained by weighting the solvent and measuring the naphthalene concentration with a gas chromatograph. The soil sample is a sandy soil geologically representative of the North of Italy that was sampled and physically and chemically characterized: particle-size distribution analysis, diffractometric analysis, Cation Exchange Capac- ity, Total Organic Carbon, iron content and manganese content in order to evaluate the potential sorption degree. The soil was artificially polluted by means of a naphta- lene and methylene chloride solution. The experimental work consists in a number of naphthalene extractions from the spiked soil, that were carried out at different operat- ing conditions, temperature, pressure and flow rate by means of supercritical carbon dioxide evaluating the corresponding recovery efficiencies. The results obtained were analysed and compared in order to determine which parameters influence the system. [1] G. A. Montero, T.D. Giorgio, and K. B. Schnelle, Jr..Removal of Hazardous ,1994, Contaminants form Soils by Supercritical Fluid Extraction. Innovations in Supercriti- cal Fluids. ACS Symposium Series, 608, 280-197. 2

Ferri, A.; Zanetti, M. C.; Banchero, M.; Fiore, S.; Manna, L.

223

Imaging plant leaves to determine changes in radioactive contamination status in Fukushima, Japan.  

PubMed

The chemical composition of plant leaves often reflects environmental contamination. The authors analyzed images of plant leaves to investigate the regional radioactivity ecology resulting from the 2011 accident at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant, Japan. The present study is not an evaluation of the macro radiation dose per weight, which has been performed previously, but rather an image analysis of the radioactive dose per leaf, allowing the capture of various gradual changes in radioactive contamination as a function of elapsed time. In addition, the leaf analysis method has potential applications in the decontamination of food plants or other materials. PMID:24670905

Nakajima, Hiroo; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Tanihata, Isao; Saito, Tadashi; Matsuda, Norihiro; Todo, Takeshi

2014-05-01

224

Use of Carboxymethyl-beta-cyclodextrin (CMCD) as Flushing Agent for Remediation of Metal Contaminated Soil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the major challenges in remediating soil and ground water is the presence of mixed organic and inorganic contaminants. Due to their very different behavior, research has to a large extent focused on remediation of either organic or inorganic contaminants rather than mixed waste. Cyclodextrins (CDs) are a group of non-toxic sugar based molecules that do not sorb to soil particles and do not experience pore size exclusion. Thus, they have good hydraulic properties. CDs enhance the solubility of organic compounds by forming inclusion complexes between organic contaminants and the non-polar cavity at the center of the CD. By substituting functional groups to the cyclodextrin molecule it can form complexes with heavy metals. Previous studies have shown that carboxymethyl-beta-cyclodextrin (CMCD) can simultaneously complex organic and inorganic contaminants. The aim of this study is to compare how strongly CMCD complexes several common heavy metals, radioactive elements and a common divalent cation. Results from batch experiments show that CMCD has the ability to complex a wide array of heavy metals and radioactive elements. The solubility of metal oxalates and metal oxides clearly increased in the presence of CMCD. Logarithmic conditional formation constants ranged from 3.5 to 6 for heavy metals and from 3 to 6 for radioactive elements. Calcium, which may compete for binding sites, has a logarithmic conditional formation constant of 3.1. Batch experiments performed at 10 and 25 degrees C showed little temperature effect on conditional formation constants. Results from batch experiments were compared to results from column experiments where Pb was sorbed onto hydrous ferric oxide coated sand and subsequently removed by a CMCD solution. The results indicate that CMCD is a potential flushing agent for remediation of mixed waste sites.

Skold, M. E.; Thyne, G. D.; McCray, J. E.; Drexler, J. W.

2005-12-01

225

Phytoremediation of uranium-contaminated soils: Role of organic acids in triggering uranium hyperaccumulation in plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uranium phytoextraction, the use of plants to extract U from contaminated soils, is an emerging technology. The authors report on the development of this technology for the cleanup of U-contaminated soils. In this research, they investigated the effects of various soil amendments on U desorption from soil to soil solution, studied the physiological characteristics of U uptake and accumulation in

Jianwei W. Huang; Michael J. Blaylock; Yoram Kapulnik; Burt D. Ensley

1998-01-01

226

Role of soil rhizobacteria in phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated soils*  

PubMed Central

Heavy metal pollution of soil is a significant environmental problem and has its negative impact on human health and agriculture. Rhizosphere, as an important interface of soil and plant, plays a significant role in phytoremediation of contaminated soil by heavy metals, in which, microbial populations are known to affect heavy metal mobility and availability to the plant through release of chelating agents, acidification, phosphate solubilization and redox changes, and therefore, have potential to enhance phytoremediation processes. Phytoremediation strategies with appropriate heavy metal-adapted rhizobacteria have received more and more attention. This article paper reviews some recent advances in effect and significance of rhizobacteria in phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated soils. There is also a need to improve our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the transfer and mobilization of heavy metals by rhizobacteria and to conduct research on the selection of microbial isolates from rhizosphere of plants growing on heavy metal contaminated soils for specific restoration programmes. PMID:17323432

Jing, Yan-de; He, Zhen-li; Yang, Xiao-e

2007-01-01

227

DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: HYDRAULIC FRACTURING OF CONTAMINATED SOIL  

EPA Science Inventory

Hydraulic fracturing is a physical process that creates fractures in silty clay soil to enhance its permeability. The technology, developed by the Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL) and the University of Cincinnati, creates sand-filled horizontal fractures up to 1 in. i...

228

Partitioning of heavy metals in contaminated soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three soils and a sediment which had undergone massive prior additions of heavy metals were sequentially extracted so that Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn could be partitioned into five operationally defined geochemical fractions: exchangeable, bound to carbonates, bound to Fe-Mn oxides, bound to organic matter, and residual. The highest amount of Cd (ca. 37%) was found in the exchangeable fraction,

Hickey

1982-01-01

229

Phytoremediation: using green plants to clean up contaminate soil, groundwater, and wastewater  

SciTech Connect

Phytoremediation, an emerging cleanup technology for contaminated soils, groundwater, and wastewater that is both low-tech and low-cost, is defined as the engineered use of green plants (including grasses, forbs, and woody species) to remove, contain, or render harmless such environmental contaminants as heavy metals, trace elements, organic compounds and radioactive compounds in soil or water. Our research includes a successful field demonstration of a plant bioreactor for processing the salty wastewater from petroleum wells; the demonstration is currently under way at a natural gas well site in Oklahoma, in cooperation with Devon Energy Corporation. A greenhouse experiment on zinc uptake in hybrid poplar (Populus sp.) was initiated in 1995. These experiments are being conducted to confirm and extend field data indicating high levels of zinc (4,200 ppm) in leaves of hybrid poplar growing as a cleanup system at a site with zinc contamination in the root zone of some of the trees. Analyses of soil water from experimental pots that had received several doses of zinc indicated that the zinc was totally sequestered by the plants in about 4 hours during a single pass through the root system. The data also showed concentrations of sequestered metal of >38,000 ppm Zn in the dry root tissue. These levels of sequestered zinc exceed the levels found in either roots or tops of many of the known ``hyperaccumulator`` species. Because the roots sequester most of the contaminant taken up in most plants, a major objective of this program is to determine the feasibility of root harvesting as a method to maximize the removal of contaminants from soils. Available techniques and equipment for harvesting plant roots, including young tree roots, are being evaluated and modified as necessary for use with phytoremediation plants.

Negri, M.C.; Hinchman, R.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gatliff, E.G. [Applied Natural Sciences, Inc., Hamilton, OH (United States)

1996-07-01

230

Phytoremediation: Using green plants to clean up contaminated soil, groundwater, and wastewater  

SciTech Connect

Phytoremediation, an emerging cleanup technology for contaminated soils, groundwater, and wastewater that is both low-tech and low-cost, is defined as the engineered use of green plants (including grasses, forbs, and woody species) to remove, contain, or render harmless such environmental contaminants as heavy metals, trace elements, organic compounds ({open_quotes}organics{close_quotes}), and radioactive compounds in soil or water. Current research at Argonne National Laboratory includes a successful field demonstration of a plant bioreactor for processing the salty wastewater from petroleum wells; the demonstration is currently under way at a natural gas well site in Oklahoma, in cooperation with Devon Energy Corporation. A greenhouse experiment on zinc uptake in hybrid poplar (Populus sp.) was initiated in 1995. These experiments are being conducted to confirm and extend field data from Applied Natural Sciences, Inc. (our CRADA partner), indicating high levels of zinc (4,200 ppm) in leaves of hybrid poplar growing as a cleanup system at a site with zinc contamination in the root zone of some of the trees. Analyses of soil water from experimental pots that had received several doses of zinc indicated that the zinc was totally sequestered by the plants in about 4 hours during a single pass through the root system. The data also showed concentrations of sequestered metal of >38,000 ppm Zn in the dry root tissue. These levels of sequestered zinc exceed the levels found in either roots or tops of many of the known {open_quotes}hyperaccumulator{close_quotes} species. Because the roots sequester most of the contaminant taken up in most plants, a major objective of this program is to determine the feasibility of root harvesting as a method to maximize the removal of contaminants from soils. Available techniques and equipment for harvesting plant roots, including young tree roots, are being evaluated and modified as necessary for use with phytoremediation plants.

Negri, M.C.; Hinchman, R.R.

1996-05-01

231

APPLICATION, PERFORMANCE, AND COSTS OF BIOTREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR CONTAMINATED SOILS  

EPA Science Inventory

A critical review of biological treatment processes for remediation of contaminated soils is presented. The focus of the review is on documented cost and performance of biological treatment technologies demonstrated at full- or field-scale. Some of the data were generated b...

232

HANDBOOK ON IN SITU TREATMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE- CONTAMINATED SOILS  

EPA Science Inventory

This handbook comprises an update of Volume1 of the 1984 USEPA document entitled "Review of In-Place Treatment Techniques for Contaminated Surface Soils." The purpose of this handbook is the same as that of the original document - to provide state-of-the-art information on in sit...

233

PHYTOREMEDIATION OF SOIL CONTAMINATED WITH CADMIUM, COPPER AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A pot experiment and a field trial were conducted to study the remediation of an aged field soil contaminated with cadmium, copper and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (7.67 ± 0.51 mg kg Cd, 369 ± 1 mg kg Cu in pot experiment; 8.46 ± 0.31 mg kg Cd, 468 ± 7 mg kg Cu, 323 ± 12 ?g kg PCBs for

Longhua Wu; Zhu Li; Cunliang Han; Ling Liu; Ying Teng; Xianghui Sun; Cheng Pan; Yujuan Huang; Yongming Luo; Peter Christie

2012-01-01

234

LINKING WATERFOWL WITH CONTAMINANT SPECIATION IN RIPARIAN SOILS  

EPA Science Inventory

This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 38, Linking Waterfowl with Contaminant Speciation in Riparian Soils, implemented and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U...

235

DERMAL ABSORPTION OF CONTAMINANTS FROM SEDIMENTS/SOILS  

EPA Science Inventory

The mechanisms by which contaminants are released from sediments/soils and absorbed into the skin are poorly understood. The project will first conduct invitro experiments to study the effects of particle layering and chemical saturation. Secondly, mechanistic models will be de...

236

Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717)  

E-print Network

Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717) Authors: E. Peltier* - Univ. of Delaware D.L. Sparks - Univ. of Delaware Abstract: The formation of secondary metal precipitate phases controlling precipitate formation is still needed. In this study, we have combined experimental data on nickel

Sparks, Donald L.

237

MUTAGENICITY OF PAH-CONTAMINATED SOILS DURING BIOREMEDIATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Bioremediation of contaminated soils is considered an effective method for reducing potential health hazards. Although it is assumed that (bio)remediation is a detoxifying process, degradation products of compounds such as polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) can be more toxic th...

238

SUMMARY PAPER: IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED VADOSE ZONE SOIL  

EPA Science Inventory

The Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Laboratory (RSKERL) has developed a number of Issue Papers and Briefing Documents which are designed to exchange up-to-date information related to the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water at hazardous waste sites. In an attem...

239

AN ESTIMATE OF SOILS CONTAMINATED WITH SECONDARY EXPLOSIVES  

EPA Science Inventory

This report provides the results of a study that examined the quantities of explosives-contaminated soils at Army installations in the United States in order to understand the user requirements for environmental technology research and development work. This report provides a tim...

240

Sources and remediation techniques for mercury contaminated soil.  

PubMed

Mercury (Hg) in soils has increased by a factor of 3 to 10 in recent times mainly due to combustion of fossil fuels combined with long-range atmospheric transport processes. Other sources as chlor-alkali plants, gold mining and cement production can also be significant, at least locally. This paper summarizes the natural and anthropogenic sources that have contributed to the increase of Hg concentration in soil and reviews major remediation techniques and their applications to control soil Hg contamination. The focus is on soil washing, stabilisation/solidification, thermal treatment and biological techniques; but also the factors that influence Hg mobilisation in soil and therefore are crucial for evaluating and optimizing remediation techniques are discussed. Further research on bioremediation is encouraged and future study should focus on the implementation of different remediation techniques under field conditions. PMID:25454219

Xu, Jingying; Bravo, Andrea Garcia; Lagerkvist, Anders; Bertilsson, Stefan; Sjöblom, Rolf; Kumpiene, Jurate

2015-01-01

241

Assessing the bioavailability and risk from metal-contaminated soils and dusts  

EPA Science Inventory

Exposure to contaminated soil and dust is an important pathway in human health risk assessment. Physical and chemical characteristics, as well as biological factors, determine the bioaccessibility/bioavailability of soil and dust contaminants. Within a single sample, contaminat...

242

EVALUATION OF SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION AS A BEST DEMONSTRATED AVAILABLE TECHNOLOGY FOR CONTAMINATED SOILS  

EPA Science Inventory

This project involved the evaluation of solidification/stabilization technology as a BDAT for contaminated soil. Three binding agents were used on four different synthetically contaminated soils. Performance evaluation data included unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and the T...

243

EFFECT OF SOIL MODIFYING FACTORS ON THE BIOAVAILABILITY AND TOXICITY OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS  

EPA Science Inventory

Heavy metal and organic chemical contamination of soils is a worldwide problem posing a risk to humans and more directly, soil organisms. Metal toxicity is often not directly related to the total concentration of metals present due to a number of modifying factors that depend,...

244

Modeling EDTA enhanced electrokinetic remediation of lead contaminated soils.  

PubMed

Electrokinetic extraction has been tested for lead removal from Algerian contaminated soils. For this purpose, a chelating reagent (EDTA, 0.1M) has been injected into the catholyte. This procedure is expected to enhance the process by desorption of the contaminant and formation of new mobile species negatively charged. A mathematical model based on Nernst-Planck theory has also been developed to predict the evolution of lead distribution across the soil as a function of time. The results of several experiments carried out on various duration (10, 20 and 40 days) have shown the importance on treatment efficiency of pollution age and contaminant speciation as determined by sequential chemical extraction. PMID:16054906

Amrate, S; Akretche, D E

2005-09-01

245

Phytoremediation of Metal-Contaminated Soil for Improving Food Safety  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The contamination of the environment is a serious problem which provokes great interest in our society and in the whole scientific community. The input of metals into soils has increased during the last few decades as a consequence of different human activities (storage of industrial and municipal wastes, burning of fuels, mining and wastewater treatments, functioning of non-ferrous-metal-producing smelters, etc.). Nowadays, this type of contamination is one of the most serious concerning the chronic toxic effect which it renders on human health and the environment. As a consequence of all these activities, a huge number of toxic metals and metalloids, such as Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Hg and As, among many others, have been accumulated in soils, reaching toxic values. Unfortunately, much contaminated land is still in use for crop production, despite the danger that the metal content poses.

Shilev, Stefan; Benlloch, Manuel; Dios-Palomares, R.; Sancho, Enrique D.

246

Multiscale structure of Cs-137 soil contamination on the Bryansk Region (Russia) due to the accident at the Chernobyl NPP  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Cs-137 contamination of the Bryansk Region occurred in the period from April 27 to May 10 into several stages. The complicated character of the soil radionuclide contamination on the Bryansk Region is caused by different nature of the radioactive fallout: dry and wet. Thus, in a number of cases Cs-137 soil pollution is directly connected with the rain intensity, which is well known, have multifractal nature. In some parts of contaminated territory the overlay of different types of fallout was observed. The radioactive contamination of the landscape is a result from nonlinear interplay of geophysical factors which intervene over a large range of scale. As a result of the fallout Cs-137 pattern can be described as a multifractal. Consequently, fields of contamination observed have an extreme spatial variability, frequently cited "hot spots" or "leopard's skin. As an estimate of background radiation levels, we relied on a dataset of air-gamma-survey of the Bryansk Region, carried out by SSC AEROGEOFIZIKA in the summer of 1993. This dataset includes geo-positioned data of Cs-137 deposition in a grid of 100x100 m with values range from 3 to 11*104 kBq/m2. Airborne gamma survey gave the smoothed values of the Cs-137 density of contamination in comparison with the data, obtained directly as a result of soil sampling. However, even in this case in the east part of the Bryansk test site we can observed the"hot spots" (by size several hundred meters) as natural phenomenon. The article presents the results of the geostatistical and multifractal analysis of the Cs-137 contamination. Scaling analysis was conducted to investigate the linkages between the spatial variability of soil Cs-137 contamination and some landscape characteristics.

Linnik, Vitaly; Sokolov, Alexander

2013-04-01

247

Uncertainty assessment for management of soil contaminants with sparse data.  

PubMed

In order for soil resources to be sustainably managed, it is necessary to have reliable, valid data on the spatial distribution of their environmental impact. However, in practice, one often has to cope with spatial interpolation achieved from few data that show a skewed distribution and uncertain information about soil contamination. We present a case study with 76 soil samples taken from a site of 15 square km in order to assess the usability of information gleaned from sparse data. The soil was contaminated with cadmium predominantly as a result of airborne emissions from a metal smelter. The spatial interpolation applies lognormal anisotropic kriging and conditional simulation for log-transformed data. The uncertainty of cadmium concentration acquired through data sampling, sample preparation, analytical measurement, and interpolation is factor 2 within 68.3 % confidence. Uncertainty predominantly results from the spatial interpolation necessitated by low sampling density and spatial heterogeneity. The interpolation data are shown in maps presenting likelihoods of exceeding threshold values as a result of a lognormal probability distribution. Although the results are not deterministic, this procedure yields a quantified and transparent estimation of the contamination, which can be used to delineate areas for soil improvement, remediation, or restricted area use, based on the decision-makers' probability safety requirement. PMID:15517687

Schnabel, Ute; Tietje, Olaf; Scholz, Roland W

2004-06-01

248

Plant Uptake of Mercury from Contaminated Soil, Oxford, Alabama  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mercury contamination in the Oxford, Alabama, area is well documented in soil tests in the Snow Creek watershed. In this investigation, mercury levels in soils as well as local plant species were examined. The objectives of the study were first determining the amount of mercury in the soil and then to determine to what degree this mercury is taken in by plant tissue from specimens at each survey site. Variation in accumulation within the individual plant species (leaves, stems) was also examined. Protocols developed for this study were used to achieve both objectives and also to ascertain if a particular plant species hyper accumulates this toxin at levels that would make it useful in bioremediation of mercury contamination in the area.

Steffy, D. A.; Nichols, A. C.

2005-12-01

249

Electrokinetic treatment of firing ranges containing tungsten-contaminated soils.  

PubMed

Tungsten-based alloys and composites are being used and new formulations are being considered for use in the manufacturing of different types of ammunition. The use of tungsten heavy alloys (WHA) in new munitions systems and tungsten composites in small caliber ammunition could potentially release substantial amounts of this element into the environment. Although tungsten is widely used in industrial and military applications, tungsten's potential environmental and health impacts have not been thoroughly addressed. This necessitates the research and development of remedial technologies to contain and/or remove tungsten from soils that may serve as a source for water contamination. The current work investigates the feasibility of using electrokinetics for the remediation of tungsten-contaminated soils in the presence of other heavy metals of concern such as Cu and Pb with aim to removing W from the soil while stabilizing in situ, Pb and Cu. PMID:17686582

Braida, Washington; Christodoulatos, Christos; Ogundipe, Adebayo; Dermatas, Dimitris; O'Connor, Gregory

2007-11-19

250

Electrokinetic remediation of six emerging organic contaminants from soil.  

PubMed

Some organic contaminants can accumulate in organisms and cause irreversible damages in biological systems through direct or indirect toxic effects. In this study the feasibility of the electrokinetic (EK) process for the remediation of 17?-oestradiol (E2), 17?-ethinyloestradiol (EE2), bisphenol A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP), octylphenol (OP) and triclosan (TCS) in soils was studied in a stationary laboratory cell. The experiments were conducted using a silty loam soil (S2) at 0, 10 and 20mA and a sandy soil (S3) at 0 and 10mA. A pH control in the anolyte reservoir (pH>13) at 10mA was carried out using S2, too. Photo and electrodegradation experiments were also fulfilled. Results showed that EK is a viable method for the remediation of these contaminants, both through mobilization by electroosmotic flow (EOF) and electrodegradation. As EOF is very sensible to soil pH, the control in the anolyte increased EOF rate, consequently enhancing contaminants mobilization towards the cathode end. The extent of the mobilization towards the electrode end was mainly dependent on compounds solubility and octanol-water partition coefficient. In the last 24h of experiments, BPA presented the highest mobilization rate (ca. 4?gmin(-1)) with NP not being detected in the catholyte. At the end of all experiments the percentage of contaminants that remained in the soil ranged between 17 and 50 for S2, and between 27 and 48 for S3, with no statistical differences between treatments. The mass balance performed showed that the amount of contaminant not detected in the cell is similar to the quantity that potentially may suffer photo and electrodegradation. PMID:24997283

Guedes, Paula; Mateus, Eduardo P; Couto, Nazaré; Rodríguez, Yadira; Ribeiro, Alexandra B

2014-12-01

251

Identifying root exudates in field contaminated soil systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon (C) compounds exuded from plant roots comprise a significant and reactive fraction of belowground C pools. These exudates substantially alter the soil directly surrounding plant roots and play a vital role in the global C cycle, soil ecology, and ecosystem mobility of both nutrients and contaminants. In soils, the solubility and bioavailability of metals such as iron, zinc, and cadmium are intricately linked to the quantity and chemical characteristics of the C compounds allocated to the soil by plants. Cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, forms stronger bonds with reduced S- and N-containing compounds than with carboxylic acids, which may influence exudate composition in hyperaccumulator and tolerant plants grown in Cd contaminated soils. We hypothesize that hyperaccumulator plants will exude a larger quantity of aromatic N and chelating di- and tri-carboxylic acid molecules, while plants that exclude heavy metals from uptake will exude a larger proportion of reduced S containing molecules. This study examines how a variety of techniques can measure the low concentrations of complex organic mixtures exuded by hyperaccumulator and non-hyperaccumulator plants grown in Cd-contaminated soils. Two congeneric plants, Thlaspi caerulescens (Ganges ecotype), and T. caerulescens (Prayon ecotype) were grown in 0.5 kg pots filled with Cd-contaminated field soils from Chicago, IL. Field soils were contaminated as a result of the application of contaminated biosolids in the 1960's and 1970's. Pots were fitted for rhizon soil moisture samplers, micro-lysimeters developed for in situ collection of small volumes in unsaturated soils, prior to planting. Plants were grown for 8 weeks before exudate collection. After the 8 weeks of growth, a pulse-chase isotope tracer method using the C stable isotope, 13C, was employed to differentiate plant-derived compounds from background soil and microbial-derived compounds. Plants were placed in a CO2 impermeable chamber, and the soil surface was covered by CO2 impermeable sheets to ensure that all 13C in the soil results from photoassimilated C released by roots and not soil-atmosphere gas exchange. Ambient CO2 was drawn down in the system until the CO2 concentration within the tent was less than 50 ppm, after which the labeled 13CO2 was introduced, returning the CO2 concentration to the ambient level (~375 ppm). The CO2 pulse lasted for 60 minutes to allow enough time for 13C assimilation within the plants. In order to determine the ideal sampling time, soil pore water samples were extracted every 1-2 hours following the 13C pulse application, over the course of 24 hours. Samples were analyzed for delta 13C as well as %C, and results indicate that the greatest plant-derived dissolved organic C is present at about 6 hours following the 13C pulse. A second experiment will also be conducted using a combination of NMR and mass spectrometry methods to obtain detailed information regarding chemical structures within exudate samples.

Rosenfeld, C.; Martinez, C. E.

2012-12-01

252

Overcoming phytoremediation limitations. A case study of Hg contaminated soil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Phytoremediation is a broad term that comprises several technologies to clean up water and soil. Despite the numerous articles appearing in scientific journals, very few field applications of phytoextraction have been successfully realized. The research here reported on Phytoextraction, the use the plant to "extract" metals from contaminated soil, is focused on implementations to overcome two main drawbacks: the survival of plants in unfavorable environmental conditions (contaminant toxicity, low fertility, etc.) and the often lengthy time it takes to reduce contaminants to the requested level. Moreover, to overcome the imbalance between the technology's potential and its drawbacks, there is growing interest in the use of plants to reduce only the fraction that is the most hazardous to the environment and human health, that is to target the bioavailable fractions of metals in soil. Bioavailable Contaminant Stripping (BCS) would be a remediation approach focused to remove the bioavailable metal fractions. BCS have been used in a mercury contaminated soil from Italian industrial site. Bioavailable fractions were determined by sequential extraction with H2O and NH4Cl.Combined treatments of plant hormone and thioligand to strength Hg uptake by crop plants (Brassica juncea and Helianthus annuus) were tested. Plant biomass, evapotranspiration, Hg uptake and distribution following treatments were compared. Results indicate the plant hormone, cytokinine (CK) foliar treatment, increased evapotranspiration rate in both tested plants. The Hg uptake and translocation in both tested plants increased with simultaneous addition of CK and TS treatments. B. juncea was the most effective in Hg uptake. Application of CK to plants grown in TS-treated soil lead to an increase in Hg concentration of 232% in shoots and 39% in roots with respect to control. While H. annuus gave a better response in plant biomass production, the application of CK to plants grown in TS-treated soil lead to an increase in Hg concentration of 248% in shoots and 185% in roots with respect to control plants. The BCS efficiency were evaluated analyzing the labile-Hg residue in the soil after the plant growing. Plants grown with CK and TS in one growing cycle significantly affected labile-Hg pools in soil characterized by sequential extraction, but did not significantly reduce the total metals in the soil. Moreover, if properly optimized, the use of a coupled phytohormone/thioligand system may be a viable strategy to strength Hg uptake by crop plants.

Barbafieri, Meri

2013-04-01

253

Heavy-metal contamination of soils in Saxony/Germany by foundry fumes and low-cost rapid analyses of contaminated soils by XRF  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Heavy-metal contamination of soils in Saxony/Germany by foundry fumes and low-cost rapid analysis of contaminated soils by XRF Dieter Mucke, Rolf Kumann, Sebastian Baldauf GEOMONTAN Gesellschaft für Geologie und Bergbau mbH&Co.KG, Muldentalstrasse 56, 09603 Rothenfurth, Saxony/Germany For hundreds of years in the Ore Mountains between Bohemia and Saxony silver and other ores are produced and smelted. Sulphide- and sulpharsenide-ores needed to be roasted first. In doing so the sulphide sulphur was oxidised under formation of sulphur dioxide SO2 and arsenide conversed into elemental arsenic and arsenide trioxide As2O3 respectively. Also the metals lead, cadmium and zinc are components of hut smokes, in the field of nickel foundries also nickel. The contents of soils basically reflect the geogenic conditions, which are caused by decomposition- and relocation-effects of the mineralisations, in the area of foundries also with influences by with the hut smokes anthropogenic mobilised elements. The Saxonian Agency for Environment and Geology drafted in 1992 a Soil Investigation Program with the aim of investigation of the contamination of Saxonian soils with arsenic and toxic heavy metals. In order of this Agency GEOMONTAN investigated 1164 measuring points in the grid 4 * 4 km.soil profiles and extracted soil samples for analysis. In the result of the laboratory examinations the Agency edited the "Soil atlas of the Free State of Saxony". 27 elements, pH and PAK are shown in detailed maps and allow in whole Saxony the first assessment of the contamination of soils with arsenic and toxic heavy metals. Each of the investigated soil profiles represent an area of 16 km2. Already by the different use of the districts (agricultural, industrial, urban) restricts representative values. GEOMONTAN in the meantime used at the exploration of a copper deposit in Brandenburg/Germany with approx. 50,000 single tests at drill cores a very fast low-cost method: the X Ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) with a handheld instrument. Approx. 40 elements hereby are determined in a focussed X-ray spot of 3 mm of diameters. The device can be put directly on a section of the soil or measure loose substrata in a PVC bag through or in a cuvette. The measurement time is 30 seconds. In connection with the input of information, the relocating and the sample preparation 20 measurings can be carried out per hour. This leads at personnel expenditures of € 50/hour at a price of € 2.50/analysis of simultaneous 40 components. At requirement the transfer of the files from the instrument in Excel tables still would rise expenses. XRF is a fast low-cost method for the first assessment of the contamination of soils and the delimitation of areas of different contaminations. When exact laboratory analyses are still requested, the interesting areas from which bulk samples have to be taken for the laboratory examinations, with XRF can be fixed. The contamination with arsenic and toxic heavy metals is only subordinated by modern flue gas treatment in metallurgical plants and renunciation of thermal methods with hut smoke today. The whereabouts of arsenic and lead in the soil shows, though, that the soil has protected the groundwater against the contamination. GEOMONTAN has examined the Saxonian areas with radioactive fallout of the Chernobyl accident in the order of the BGR Hannover 1993. In the results of the analysis by BGR Cs-134 was already disintegrated and Cs-137 only 13 cm deep in the uppermost soil layers infiltrated during the 8 years after the accident. This means that soil protects groundwater against contaminations out of the air too. In the last years some German federal state governments decided the end of mine water winning for the public water supply and deregulated the water protection zones. The water supply was converted in water of water supply dams. The hazard of contamination of this open reservoirs by accidents or terrorism is increasing. Underground water bodies in karst caves and old mines without toxic mineralizations would be

Mucke, D.

2012-04-01

254

Concluding Remarks In this work, we have explored in depth many types of radioactive contamination that are  

E-print Network

Concluding Remarks In this work, we have explored in depth many types of radioactive contamination as radiopurity testing facilities, capable of measuring the radioactivity levels of materials to be used

255

[Influence of the consumption of radioactive contaminated food on the formation of the irradiation levels and health of the inhabitants of radioactive contaminated regions of Ukraine].  

PubMed

Within all these years after the Chernobyl disaster the population of contaminated areas of the Rivne region was shown to consume radioactive contaminated foodstuffs. The main components of the formation of the internal irradiation of the population in them were and remain locally sourced milk and meat, forest mushrooms and berries. After 1991, the largest annual internal doses in persons observed in 1997 varied from 2,2 to 1,45 mSv/year and in 2011--in the inhabitants of the village of El'no they were yet reaching 1.43 mSv/year. After 2003, exposure levels in most inhabitatants of affected areas exceeded the criterion specified by national legislation for residents of the tightened radioecological control zone (0,5 mSv/year). The long-term residence in the contaminated area, elevated levels of chronic internal exposure, lack of radioactively sound foodstuffs and involuntary consumption in 1987-2011 radioactively contaminated food of local production were noted to led to an increase in general morbidity, and incidence of endocrine diseases rate and their separate nosological forms. PMID:24749279

Khomenko, I M; Omel'yanets, N I

2014-01-01

256

Testing amendments for remediation of military range contaminated soil.  

PubMed

Military range soils are often strongly contaminated with metals. Information on the effectiveness of remediation of these soils is scarce. We tested the effectiveness of compost and mineral treatments for remediation and revegetation of military range soil collected in Aberdeen, MD. The soil was barren due to zinc (Zn) phytotoxicity while lead (Pb) posed a substantial risk to soil biota, wildlife and humans through various pathways. Seven treatments were tested: untreated control, agricultural NPK fertilization, high phosphate fertilization plus agricultural rates of NK, CaCO(3), "Orgro" biosolid compost, "Orgro" + CaCO(3), "Orgro" + CaCO(3) + Mn sulfate. All compost treatments alleviated Zn phytotoxicity to tall fescue; however compost combined with liming reduced plant Zn content up to 158-162 mg kg(-1). Compost added with lime reduced Pb in-vitro bioaccessibility from 32.5 to 20.4% of total Pb and was the most effective among the tested treatments. The study revealed the effectiveness of biosolids compost and lime mixture in the rapid stabilization of metals and revegetation of military range contaminated soils. The persistence of the remediation needs to be, however, confirmed in the long-term field study. PMID:22609964

Siebielec, Grzegorz; Chaney, Rufus L

2012-10-15

257

[Anolyte enhanced electrokinetic remediation of fluorine-contaminated soils].  

PubMed

An experimental study was carried out in order to determine the characteristics of migration and its influencing factor of soil fluorine in the electrokinetic process under different applied voltage and concentration of anolyte. The feasibility of anolyte enhanced on electrokinetic remediation of fluorine-contaminated soil was analyzed. The results show that when deionized water is used as anolyte with the 1.0 V/cm voltage gradient, the cumulative mass of fluorine in catholyte and anolyte are 8.2 mg and 47.7 mg respectively and the removal rate of fluorine is only 8.8%. Anolyte enhanced electrokinetic process can promote effectively the migration of fluoride in soil. When 0.02 mol/L NaOH solutionis employed as the anolyte, the removal rates are 25.9%, 31.2% and 47.3% with 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 V/cm voltage gradient respectively. As the concentration of anolyte increased to 0.1 mol/L, the removal rates are 55.4%, 61.1% and 73.0%. The electromigration is the main transport mechanism and the electroosmotic flow has an effect on the migration of fluorine in soil. The voltage gradient and the concentration of anolyte are the main factors influencing the removal rate of fluorine in soil. Appropriate anolyte enhanced electrokinetic method can be applied to remediate fluorine from contaminated soil. PMID:19775012

Zhu, Shu-Fa; Yan, Chun-Li; Dong, Tie-You; Tang, Hong-Yan

2009-07-15

258

Arsenic and chromium partitioning in a podzolic soil contaminated by chromated copper arsenate  

E-print Network

impregnation salts at a contaminated site. Fresen. J. Anal.in a contaminated soil at a wood preserving site. Bull.contaminated by CCA using a combination of selective extractions and x-ray spectroscopic techniques. Experimental section Site

Hopp, Luisa

2008-01-01

259

Cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of tannery waste contaminated soils.  

PubMed

Soil samples from agricultural fields in the vicinity of industrial area of Jajmau, Kanpur (India) were collected and found to be heavily contaminated with various toxic heavy metals. GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of organic compounds mainly phthalates in contaminated soils. Samples were extracted using dichloromethane (DCM) and hexane solvents, and the extracts were assayed for genotoxic potential using three different bioassays namely Ames Salmonella/mammalian microsome test, DNA repair defective Escherichia coli K-12 mutants and Allium cepa chromosomal aberration assay. TA98 was found to be the most sensitive strain to all the soil extracts tested. The highest mutagenic potential was observed in DCM extracts of soil as compared with hexane extracts for each strain of Salmonella typhimurium. DCM extracts of the soil exhibited maximum damage to the cells at a dose of 40 ?l of soil extracts/ml of culture after a 6-h treatment. The survival was 23% in polA, 40% in lexA and 53% in recA mutants when treated with DCM extract of site I. In A. cepa assay, all the test concentrations of soil extracts (5-100%) affected mitotic index in a dose-dependent manner and several types of abnormalities were observed at different mitotic stages with the treatments: C-mitosis, anaphase bridges, laggards, binucleated cells, stickiness, broken and unequal distributions of chromosomes at anaphase stage of cell division. The soil is accumulating a large number of pollutants as a result of wastewater irrigation and this practice of accumulation has an adverse impact on soil health. PMID:23268142

Masood, Farhana; Malik, Abdul

2013-02-01

260

Pilot study to determine levels of contamination in indoor dust resulting from contamination of soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to develop more realistic risk assessments, an experimental program was conducted to characterize indoor, residential environments and the relationship between the indoor environment and contaminants that originated from the outdoor environment. Parameters measured included concentration of uranium in soils, mass loading of dust on indoor surfaces, and concentrations of uranium in indoor dust. Samples of indoor dust were

Eugene Rutz; John Valentine; Roy Eckart; An Yu

1997-01-01

261

Chelant extraction of heavy metals from contaminated soils.  

PubMed

The current state of the art regarding the use of chelating agents to extract heavy metal contaminants has been addressed. Results are presented for treatability studies conducted as worst-case and representative soils from Aberdeen Proving Ground's J-Field for extraction of copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn). The particle size distribution characteristics of the soils determined from hydrometer tests are approximately 60% sand, 30% silt, and 10% clay. Sequential extractions were performed on the 'as-received' soils (worst case and representative) to determine the speciation of the metal forms. The technique speciates the heavy metal distribution into an easily extractable (exchangeable) form, carbonates, reducible oxides, organically-bound, and residual forms. The results indicated that most of the metals are in forms that are amenable to soil washing (i.e. exchangeable+carbonate+reducible oxides). The metals Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cr have greater than 70% of their distribution in forms amenable to soil washing techniques, while Cd, Mn, and Fe are somewhat less amenable to soil washing using chelant extraction. However, the concentrations of Cd and Mn are low in the contaminated soil. From the batch chelant extraction studies, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid, and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) were all effective in removing copper, lead, and zinc from the J-Field soils. Due to NTA being a Class II carcinogen, it is not recommended for use in remediating contaminated soils. EDTA and citric acid appear to offer the greatest potential as chelating agents to use in soil washing the Aberdeen Proving Ground soils. The other chelating agents studied (gluconate, oxalate, Citranox, ammonium acetate, and phosphoric acid, along with pH-adjusted water) were generally ineffective in mobilizing the heavy metals from the soils. The chelant solution removes the heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn, Fe, Cr, As, and Hg) simultaneously. Using a multiple-stage batch extraction, the soil was successfully treated passing both the Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and EPA Total Extractable Metal Limit. The final residual Pb concentration was about 300 mg/kg, with a corresponding TCLP of 1.5 mg/l. Removal of the exchangeable and carbonate fractions for Cu and Zn was achieved during the first extraction stage, whereas it required two extraction stages for the same fractions for Pb. Removal of Pb, Cu, and Zn present as exchangeable, carbonates, and reducible oxides occurred between the fourth- and fifth-stage extractions. The overall removal of copper, lead, and zinc from the multiple-stage washing were 98.9%, 98.9%, and 97.2%, respectively. The concentration and operating conditions for the soil washing extractions were not necessarily optimized. If the conditions had been optimized and using a more representative Pb concentration (approximately 12000 mg/kg), it is likely that the TCLP and residual heavy metal soil concentrations could be achieved within two to three extractions. The results indicate that the J-Field contaminated soils can be successfully treated using a soil washing technique. PMID:10379036

Peters, R W

1999-04-23

262

Subchronic exposure of mice to Love Canal soil contaminants  

SciTech Connect

The health hazard potential of soil collected from the surface of the Love Canal chemical dump site in Niagara Falls, New York, was assessed in 90-day exposure studies. Female CD-1 mice were exposed to two concentrations of the volatile components of 1 kg of soil with and without direct soil contact. Control mice were identically housed but without soil. The soil was replaced weekly and 87 compounds were detected in the air in the cages above fresh and 7-day-old soil as analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The concentration of many of these compounds decreased during the 7-day exposure cycle. Histopathologic, hematologic, and serum enzyme studies followed necropsy of all mice. There was no mortality of mice exposed for up to 90 days under any condition. Thymus and spleen weights relative to body weight were increased after 4 weeks of exposure by inhalation but not after 8 or 12 weeks of exposure. alpha-, beta-, and delta- Benzenehexachlorides , pentachlorobenzene, and hexachlorobenzene were detected in liver tissue from these animals. Mice exposed to 5- to 10-fold elevated concentration of volatiles had increased body and relative kidney weights. There was no chemically induced lesion in any animal exposed only to the volatile soil contaminants. Mice exposed by direct contact with the soil without elevated volatile exposure had increased body (10%) and relative liver weights (169%). Centrolobular hepatocyte hypertrophy, which involved 40 to 70% of the lobules, was observed in all mice in this group.

Silkworth, J.B.; McMartin, D.N.; Rej, R.; Narang, R.S.; Stein, V.B.; Briggs, R.G.; Kaminsky, L.S.

1984-04-01

263

Organochlorinated pesticide degrading microorganisms isolated from contaminated soil.  

PubMed

Degradation of selected organochlorinated pesticides (?-hexachlorocyclohexane - ?-HCH, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane - DDT, hexachlorobenzene - HCB) by soil microorganisms was studied. Bacterial strains isolated from contaminated soil from Klatovy-Luby, Hajek and Neratovice, Czech Republic, capable of growth on the selected pesticides were isolated and characterised. These isolates were subjected to characterisation and identification by MS MALDI-TOF of whole cells and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes. The isolates were screened by gas chromatography for their ability to degrade the selected pesticides. Some isolates were able to degrade pesticides, and the formation of degradation products (?-pentachlorocyclohexane (?-PCCH), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD)) observed in liquid culture confirmed their degradation capability. The isolates and DNA samples isolated from the contaminated soil were also screened for the bphA1 gene (encoding biphenyl-2,3-dioxygenase, the first enzyme in the PCB degradation pathway) and its occurrence was demonstrated. The isolates were also screened for the presence of linA, encoding dehydrochlorinase, the first enzyme of the HCH degradation pathway. The linA gene could not be found in any of the tested isolates, possibly due to the high specificity of the primers used. The isolates with the most effective degradation abilities could be used for further in situ bioremediation experiments with contaminated soil. PMID:25094051

Lovecka, Petra; Pacovska, Iva; Stursa, Petr; Vrchotova, Blanka; Kochankova, Lucie; Demnerova, Katerina

2015-01-25

264

Assessing impediments to hydrocarbon biodegradation in weathered contaminated soils.  

PubMed

In this study, impediments to hydrocarbon biodegradation in contaminated soils were assessed using chemical and molecular methodologies. Two long-term hydrocarbon contaminated soils were utilised which were similar in physico-chemical properties but differed in the extent of hydrocarbon (C10-C40) contamination (S1: 16.5 g kg(-1); S2: 68.9 g kg(-1)). Under enhanced natural attenuation (ENA) conditions, hydrocarbon biodegradation was observed in S1 microcosms (26.4% reduction in C10-C40 hydrocarbons), however, ENA was unable to stimulate degradation in S2. Although eubacterial communities (PCR-DGGE analysis) were similar for both soils, the alkB bacterial community was less diverse in S2 presumably due to impacts associated with elevated hydrocarbons. When hydrocarbon bioaccessibility was assessed using HP-?-CD extraction, large residual concentrations remained in the soil following the extraction procedure. However, when linear regression models were used to predict the endpoints of hydrocarbon degradation, there was no significant difference (P>0.05) between HP-?-CD predicted and microcosm measured biodegradation endpoints. This data suggested that the lack of hydrocarbon degradation in S2 resulted primarily from limited hydrocarbon bioavailability. PMID:23454918

Adetutu, Eric; Weber, John; Aleer, Sam; Dandie, Catherine E; Aburto-Medina, Arturo; Ball, Andrew S; Juhasz, Albert L

2013-10-15

265

Dose assessment for radioactive contamination of a child  

E-print Network

Dose assessments produced using the computer code MCNP are important to simulate events that are difficult to recreate experimentally. An emergency scenario involving whole-body skin contamination is one example of such an event. For these scenarios...

Kowalczik, Jeffrey Aaron

2009-05-15

266

Measurement of radioactivity levels and assessment of radioactivity hazards of soil samples in Karaman, Turkey.  

PubMed

In this study, the levels of the natural and artificial radioactivity in soil samples collected from surrounding of Karaman in Turkey were measured. Activity concentrations of the concerned radionuclides were determined by gamma-ray spectrometry using a high-purity germanium detector with a relative efficiency of 40 % at 1.332 MeV. The results obtained for the (238)U series ((226)Ra, (214)Pb and (214)Bi), (232)Th series ((228)Ac), (40)K and fission product (137)Cs are discussed. To evaluate the radiological hazard of radioactivity in samples, the radium equivalent activity (Raeq), the absorbed dose rate (D), the annual effective dose and the external (Hex) and internal hazard index (Hin) were calculated and presented in comparison with the data collected from different areas in the world and Turkey. PMID:24587487

Agar, O; Boztosun, I; Korkmaz, M E; Özmen, S F

2014-12-01

267

A humic acid extract from lignite for reclaiming contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

A unique form of a humic compound was developed by A.I. Shulgin, A.A. Shapovalov and U.G. Putsykin of Moscow, Russia using a patented process from lignite coal. This material appears to have properties that complexes certain heavy metals such as Pb, Cu, Cd, etc. as well as PCB's. This study was restricted to its interaction with Pb. Both greenhouse and laboratory studies were conducted from a quantity of humic acid (Stabilite) from the SET company in Louisville, KY. Although Stabilite contains some Pb, in the laboratory study, significant reductions in Pb concentration occurred. Stabilite also reduced Pb levels of an artificially contaminated soil having 1,000 ppm Pb for both the residual soil as well as water leached through this soil. Corn grown in this did not extract Pb from the Stabilite treated soil.

Barnhisel, R.I.

1999-07-01

268

Sources of arsenic and fluoride in highly contaminated soils causing groundwater contamination in Punjab, Pakistan  

SciTech Connect

Highly contaminated groundwater, with arsenic (As) and fluoride (F{sup -}) concentrations of up to 2.4 and 22.8 mg/L, respectively, has been traced to anthropogenic inputs to the soil. In the present study, samples collected from the soil surface and sediments from the most heavily polluted area of Punjab were analyzed to determine the F{sup -} and As distribution in the soil. The surface soils mainly comprise permeable aeolian sediment on a Pleistocene terrace and layers of sand and silt on an alluvial flood plain. Although the alluvial sediments contain low levels of F, the terrace soils contain high concentrations of soluble F{sup -} (maximum, 16 mg/kg; mean, 4 mg/kg; pH > 8.0). Three anthropogenic sources were identified as fertilizers, combusted coal, and industrial waste, with phosphate fertilizer being the most significance source of F{sup -} accumulated in the soil. The mean concentration of As in the surface soil samples was 10.2 mg/kg, with the highest concentration being 35 mg/kg. The presence of high levels of As in the surface soil implies the contribution of air pollutants derived from coal combustion and the use of fertilizers. Intensive mineral weathering under oxidizing conditions produces highly alkaline water that dissolves the F{sup -} and As adsorbed on the soil, thus releasing it into the local groundwater.

Farooqi, A.; Masuda, H.; Siddiqui, R.; Naseem, M. [Fatima Jinnah Women University, Rawalpindi (Pakistan). Dept. of Environmental Science

2009-05-15

269

Electrokinetic electrode system for extraction of soil contaminants from unsaturated soils  

DOEpatents

An electrokinetic electrode assembly is described for use in extraction of soil contaminants from unsaturated soil in situ. The assembly includes a housing for retaining a liquid comprising an electrolyte solution, pure water, and soil water, the housing being in part of porous material capable of holding a vacuum. An electrode is mounted in the housing. The housing is provided with a vacuum orifice for effecting a vacuum within the housing selectively to control flow of soil water through the housing into the chamber and to control outflow of the liquid from the chamber. The assembly further includes conduit means for removing the liquid from the housing and returning the electrolyte solution to the housing, and a conduit for admitting pure water to the housing. An electrode system and method are also revealed for extraction of soil contaminants. The system and method utilize at least two electrode assemblies as described above. 5 figs.

Lindgren, E.R.; Mattson, E.D.

1995-07-25

270

Electrokinetic electrode system for extraction of soil contaminants from unsaturated soils  

DOEpatents

There is presented an electrokinetic electrode assembly for use in extraction of soil contaminants from unsaturated soil in situ. The assembly includes a housing for retaining a liquid comprising an electrolyte solution, pure water, and soil water, the housing being in part of porous material capable of holding a vacuum. An electrode is mounted in the housing. The housing is provided with a vacuum orifice for effecting a vacuum within the housing selectively to control flow of soil water through the housing into the chamber and to control outflow of the liquid from the chamber. The assembly further includes conduit means for removing the liquid from the housing and returning the electrolyte solution to the housing, and a conduit for admitting pure water to the housing. There is further presented an electrode system and method for extraction of soil contaminants, the system and method utilizing at least two electrode assemblies as described above.

Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Mattson, Earl D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01

271

Assessing the Educational Needs of Urban Gardeners and Farmers on the Subject of Soil Contamination  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Participation in urban agriculture is growing throughout the United States; however, potential soil contaminants in urban environments present challenges. Individuals in direct contact with urban soil should be aware of urban soil quality and soil contamination issues to minimize environmental and human health risks. The study reported here…

Harms, Ashley Marie Raes; Presley, DeAnn Ricks; Hettiarachchi, Ganga M.; Thien, Stephen J.

2013-01-01

272

LAND TREATMENT OF PAH-CONTAMINATED SOIL: PERFORMANCE MEASURED BY CHEMICAL AND TOXICITY ASSAYS  

EPA Science Inventory

The performance of a soil remediation process can be determined by measuring the reduction in target soil contaminant concentrations and by assessing the treatment's ability to lower soil toxicity. Land treatment of polycyclic armomatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil from a ...

273

LAND TREATMENT OF PAH-CONTAMINATED SOIL: PERFORMANCE MEASURED BY CHEMICAL AND TOXICITY ASSAYS  

EPA Science Inventory

The performance of a soil remediation process can be determined by measuring the reduction in target soil contaminant concentrations and by assessing the treatment's ability to lower soil toxicity. Land treatment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil from a ...

274

Ecotoxicological risk assessment of undisturbed metal contaminated soil at two remote lighthouse sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecotoxicological risk assessments of contaminated soil are commonly completed using guideline values based on total concentrations. However, only certain fractions of contaminants are bioavailable and pose a hazard to the environment. This paper investigates the relationship between measured metal concentrations in soil and soil leachate, and the effects in organisms exposed to intact, undisturbed soil cores (wheat, Tricum aestivum) and

E. Emily V. Chapman; Göran Dave; John D. Murimboh

2010-01-01

275

Do Chernobyl-like contaminations with (137)Cs and (90)Sr affect the microbial community, the fungal biomass and the composition of soil organic matter in soil?  

PubMed

(137)Cs and (90)Sr are the main radionuclides responsible for contamination of agricultural soils due to core melts in nuclear power plants such as Chernobyl or Fukushima. The present study focused on effects of Chernobyl-like contaminations on the bacterial and fungal community structure, the fungal biomass and the formation of soil organic matter in native and in sterilized and reinoculated soils. 2% wheat straw [m/m] was applied to a typical agricultural soil, artificially contaminated with (137)Cs and (90)Sr, and it was then incubated in microcosms for three months at 20 °C and 50% of the water-holding capacity. The development of the microbial communities was monitored with 16S and 18S rDNA denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The quantification of the ergosterol content was used as a proxy for changes in the fungal biomass. Changes in the soil organic matter were determined using the (13)C cross polarization/magic angle spinning nuclear magnet resonance technique ((13)C-CP/MAS NMR). Slight but significant population shifts in the DGGE gel patterns could be related to the applied radionuclides. However, radiation-induced impacts could not be seen in either the chemical composition of the soil organic matter or in the development of the fungal biomass. Impacts caused by sterilization and reinoculation prevailed in the microcosms of the present study. Contaminations with (137)Cs or (90)Sr up to 50-fold that of the hotspots occurring in Chernobyl led to minor changes in soil microbial functions suggesting a strong resilience of natural soils with respect to radioactive contamination. PMID:23231995

Niedrée, Bastian; Berns, Anne E; Vereecken, Harry; Burauel, Peter

2013-04-01

276

Influence of organic and inorganic soil amendments on plant growth in crude oil-contaminated soil.  

PubMed

Phytoremediation can be a viable alternative to traditional, more costly remediation techniques. Three greenhouse studies were conducted to evaluate plant growth with different soil amendments in crude oil-contaminated soil. Growth of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L., cultivar: Riley), bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L., cultivar: Common), crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis, cultivar: Large), fescue (Lolium arundinaceum Schreb., cultivar: Kentucky 31), and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam., cultivar: Marshall) was determined in crude oil-contaminated soil amended with either inorganic fertilizer, hardwood sawdust, papermill sludge, broiler litter or unamended (control). In the first study, the addition of broiler litter reduced seed germination for ryegrass, fescue, and alfalfa. In the second study, bermudagrass grown in broiler litter-amended soil produced the most shoot biomass, bermudagrass produced the most root biomass, and crabgrass and bermudagrass produced the most root length. In the third study, soil amended with broiler litter resulted in the greatest reduction in gravimetric total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) levels across the six plant treatments following the 14-wk study. Ryegrass produced more root biomass than any other species when grown in inorganic fertilizer- or hardwood sawdust + inorganic fertilizer-amended soil. The studies demonstrated that soil amendments and plant species selection were important considerations for phytoremediation of crude oil-contaminated soil. PMID:14750564

White, P M; Wolf, D C; Thoma, G J; Reynolds, C M

2003-01-01

277

Evaluation of the Effect of Arsenic Contamination on Selected Soil Enzyme Activities and Microbial Diversity  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Environmental impact of different contaminants which enter the soil can alter the diversity of the soil microflora thus disrupting their ability to maintain soil quality and health. Due to the vital role played by the diverse soil microbes in soil, the measurement of the soil microbial diversity has...

278

Combining phytoextraction and biochar addition improves soil biochemical properties in a soil contaminated with Cd.  

PubMed

The main goal of phytoremediation is to improve ecosystem functioning. Soil biochemical properties are considered as effective indicators of soil quality and are sensitive to various environmental stresses, including heavy metal contamination. The biochemical response in a soil contaminated with cadmium was tested after several treatments aimed to reduce heavy metal availability including liming, biochar addition and phytoextraction using Amaranthus tricolor L. Two biochars were added to the soil: eucalyptus pyrolysed at 600°C (EB) and poultry litter at 400°C (PLB). Two liming treatments were chosen with the aim of bringing soil pH to the same values as in the treatments EB and PLB. The properties studied included soil microbial biomass C, soil respiration and the activities of invertase, ?-glucosidase, ?-glucosaminidase, urease and phosphomonoesterase. Both phytoremediation and biochar addition improved soil biochemical properties, although results were enzyme specific. For biochar addition these changes were partly, but not exclusively, mediated by alterations in soil pH. A careful choice of biochar must be undertaken to optimize the remediation process from the point of view of metal phytoextraction and soil biological activity. PMID:25010741

Lu, Huanping; Li, Zhian; Fu, Shenglei; Méndez, Ana; Gascó, Gabriel; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge

2015-01-01

279

Relationship between the {sup 137}Cs whole-body counting results and soil and food contamination in farms near Chernobyl  

SciTech Connect

The authors measured the radioactivity in the soil and child food samples from farms near Mogilev (56--270 GBq km{sup {minus}2} {sup 137}Cs), Gomel (36--810 GBq km{sup {minus}2} {sup 137}Cs), and Klincy (59--270 GBq km{sup {minus}2} {sup 137}Cs), who had whole-body {sup 137}Cs counting results measured as part of a health examination in the Chernobyl Sasakawa Health and Medical Cooperation Project. Soil contamination on the family farm seems to be the main source of human contamination because most of the people in the area live on small farms and they and their domestic animals eat crops from the farms. A clear correlation was found between the children's whole-body {sup 137}Cs counting results and the radioactivity in their food (correlation coefficient: 0.76; confidence level of correlation: 3.2 x 10{sup {minus}9}). There were also significant correlations between the whole-body {sup 137}Cs counting results and both the radioactivity of the soil samples (correlation coefficient: 0.22; confidence level of correlation: 0.0107) and the average contamination level of their current residence (correlation coefficient: 0.20; confidence level of correlation: 0.0174).

Takatsuji, Toshihiro; Sato, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun [and others] [and others

2000-01-01

280

Remediation of Mercury Contaminated Soils at the Miramas Site - 12243  

SciTech Connect

Beneficial 'new' use of the Miramas Site is the remediation objective for a former light isotope manufacturing facility. Remediation operations will remove contaminated soils and materials and deconstruct facilities. The remediation objective is faced with project challenges and regulatory requirements that dictate/influence the outcome. The operation consists of the remediation of approximately 100,000 cubic meters of soil and the decommissioning of facilities. The types and ranges of waste are the result of historical processing activities (chemical facilities, pyrotechnic components storage, mining component treatment and light isotope manufacturing activities). Mercury is the primary component of the waste, but metals and organic compounds are also possible waste components. A thermal desorption process is used to remove Mercury from the polluted soil while a biological treatment is considered to the organic nitrate compound removal. A focus is done on the technologies used to remediate the Mercury contaminated soil. After few months of operation, the first results confirm that the technology choices were relevant and the soil remediation project is a success. The first successful month of operation at an industrial scale demonstrate that the Thermal Desorption is an efficient and relevant process to remediate large quantity of mercury contaminated soils. The project is on cost and the mercury removal should be end by 2014. The scrubbing is a good way to limit the volume of material to be treated with the Thermal Desorption Unit. The biological treatment is a promising process for the organic nitrate compound removal and testing at a pilot scale will be done in 2012. (authors)

Potier, G.; Chambon, F. [AREVA NC (France)

2012-07-01

281

Phytoremediation of soils contaminated with toxic elements and radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

At many US Department of Energy (US DOE) facilities and other sites, surface soils over relatively large areas are contaminated with heavy metals, radionuclides, and other toxic elements, often at only a relatively small factor above regulatory action levels. Cleanup of such sites presents major challenges, because currently available soil remediation technologies can be very expensive. In response, the US DOE`s Office of Technology Development, through the Western Environmental Technology Office, is sponsoring research in the area of phytoremediation. Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that uses higher plants to transfer toxic elements and radionuclides from surface soils into aboveground biomass. Some plants, termed hyperaccumulators, take up toxic elements in substantial amounts, resulting in concentrations in aboveground biomass over 100 times those observed with conventional plants. After growth, the plant biomass is harvested, and the toxic elements are concentrated and reclaimed or disposed of. As growing, harvesting, and processing plant biomass is relatively inexpensive, phytoremediation can be a low-cost technology for remediation of extensive areas having lightly to moderately contaminated soils. This paper reviews the potential of hyper- and moderate accumulator plants in soil remediation, provides some comparative cost estimates, and outlines ongoing work initiated by the US DOE.

Cornish, J.E.; Goldberg, W.C. [MSE, Inc., Butte, MT (United States); Levine, R.S. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Office of Technology Development; Benemann, J.R.

1995-12-31

282

Washing of various lead compounds from a contaminated soil column  

SciTech Connect

Soil samples artificially contaminated with 10 different lead compounds to produce 5,000 mg/kg Pb were washed with acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solutions. For variable pH, the highest washing efficiencies were achieved at pH 2, the lowest value examined. Washing with EDTA enhanced the removal of lead, the removal increasing with an increase in the EDTA:lead molar ratio. High removals (70--106%) of adsorbed lead (as lead nitrate), lead carbonate, basic lead carbonate, lead sulfate, and lead oxide were achieved with both types of washing. Although not washed effectively with acid, significant lead dioxide removal occurred with EDTA wash. The removals of lead sulfide, lead paint, lead dimethyldithiocarbamate, and elemental lead were low (near 0--16%) under all washing conditions. The removal efficiency of the lead is affected by the compound solubility, lead solid dissolution kinetics, and lead sorption into the soil. Results clearly indicate the importance of the form of lead contamination in determining the success of a soil washing operation. Comparison of these results with other suggests that soil washing success and soil lead bioaccessibility are related phenomena.

Davis, A.P.; Hotha, B.V. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

1998-11-01

283

[The radioecological problems of Eurasia and the sources of radioactive environmental contamination in the former USSR].  

PubMed

There is three major sites of radioactive environmental contamination in the former USSR: the Chelyabinsk region in the Urals, Chernobyl NPP in Ukraine and Novaya Zemlya in the Arctic Ocean. The first mentioned is the most important with regard to local (potential) contamination, the last one dominates the global contamination. A number of sites and sources are less well known with regard to environmental contamination. This is thus the case for the plutonium production factories at Tomsk and Dodonovo. More information on nuclear reactors in lost or dumped submarines is also needed. From a global point of view reliable assessment of the radioactive run-off from land and deposits of nuclear waste in the Arctic Ocean are in particular pertinent. PMID:8469738

Polikarpov, G G; Aarkrog, A

1993-01-01

284

EFFECTIVE DOSIMETRIC HALF LIFE OF CESIUM 137 SOIL CONTAMINATION  

SciTech Connect

In the early 1960s, an area of privately-owned swamp adjacent to the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS), known as Creek Plantation, was contaminated by site operations. Studies conducted in 1974 estimated that approximately 925 GBq of {sup 137}Cs was deposited in the swamp. Subsequently, a series of surveys--composed of 52 monitoring locations--was initiated to characterize and trend the contaminated environment. The annual, potential, maximum doses to a hypothetical hunter were estimated by conservatively using the maximum {sup 137}Cs concentrations measured in the soil. The purpose of this report is to calculate an 'effective dosimetric' half-life for {sup 137}Cs in soil (based on the maximum concentrations) and compare it to the effective environmental half-life (based on the geometric mean concentrations).

Jannik, T; P Fledderman, P; Michael Paller, M

2008-01-09

285

Reductive dissolution approaches to removal of uranium from contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

Traditional approaches to uranium recovery from ores have employed oxidation of U(IV) minerals to form the uranyl cation which is subsequently complexed by carbonate or maintained in solution by strong acids. Reductive approaches for uranium decontamination have been limited to removing soluble uranium from solutions by formation of U{sup 4+} which readily hydrolyses and precipitates. As part of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration, we have developed a reductive approach to solubilization of uranium from contaminated soils which employs reduction to destabilize U(VI) solid and sorbed species, and strong chelators for U(IV) to prevent hydrolysis and solubilize the reduced from. This strategy has particular application to sites where the uranium is present primarily as intractable U(VI) phases and where high fractions of the contamination must be removed to meet regulatory requirements.

Brainard, J.R.; Iams, H.D.; Strietelmeier, B.A.; Del-Rio Garcia, M.

1994-06-01

286

Advanced Assay Systems for Radionuclide Contamination in Soils  

SciTech Connect

Through the support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technical Assistance Program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed and deployed a suite of systems that rapidly scan, characterize, and analyze surface soil contamination. The INL systems integrate detector systems with data acquisition and synthesis software and with global positioning technology to provide a real-time, user-friendly field deployable turn-key system. INL real-time systems are designed to characterize surface soil contamination using methodologies set forth in the Multi-Agency Radiation Surveys and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM provides guidance for planning, implementing, and evaluating environmental and facility radiological surveys conducted to demonstrate compliance with a dose or risk-based regulation and provides real-time information that is immediately available to field technicians and project management personnel. This paper discusses the history of the development of these systems and describes some of the more recent examples and their applications.

J. R. Giles; L. G. Roybal; M. V. Carpenter; C. P. Oertel; J. A. Roach

2008-02-01

287

COPING WITH CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS AND SOILS IN THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT.  

SciTech Connect

Soils and sediments contaminated with toxic organic and inorganic compounds harmful to the environment and to human health are common in the urban environment. We report here on aspects of a program being carried out in the New York/New Jersey Port region to develop methods for processing dredged material from the Port to make products that are safe for introduction to commercial markets. We discuss some of the results of the program in Computational Environmental Science, Laboratory Environmental Science, and Applied Environmental Science and indicate some possible directions for future work. Overall, the program elements integrate the scientific and engineering aspects with regulatory, commercial, urban planning, local governments, and community group interests. Well-developed connections between these components are critical to the ultimate success of efforts to cope with the problems caused by contaminated urban soils and sediments.

JONES,K.W.; VAN DER LELIE,D.; MCGUIGAN,M.; ET AL.

2004-05-25

288

Plant uptake of radiocaesium from artificially contaminated soil monoliths covering major European soil types.  

PubMed

Uptake of (137)Cs was measured in different agricultural plant species (beans, lettuce, barley and ryegrass) grown in 5 undisturbed soil monoliths covering major European soil types. The first cultivation was made three years after soil contamination and plants were grown during 3 successive years. The plant-soil (137)Cs transfer factors varied maximally 12-fold among soils and 35-fold among species when grown on the same soil. Single correlations between transfer factors and soil properties were found, but they varied widely with plant type and can hardly be used as a predictive tool because of the few soils used. The variation of (137)Cs concentrations in plants among soils was related to differences in soil solution (137)Cs and K concentrations, consistent with previous observations in hydroponics and pot trials. Absolute values of transfer factors could not be predicted based on a model validated for pot trials. The (137)Cs activity concentration in soil solution decreased significantly (11- to 250-fold) for most soils in the 1997-1999 period and is partly explained by decreasing K in soil solution. Transfer factors of lettuce showed both increasing and decreasing trends between 2 consecutive years depending on soil type. The trends could be explained by the variation in (137)Cs and K concentrations in soil solution. It is concluded that differences in (137)Cs transfer factors among soils and trends in transfer factors as a function of time can be explained from soil solution composition, as shown previously for pot trials, although absolute values of transfer factors could not be predicted. PMID:19375202

Waegeneers, Nadia; Sauras-Yera, Teresa; Thiry, Yves; Vallejo, V Ramón; Smolders, Erik; Madoz-Escande, Chantal; Bréchignac, François

2009-06-01

289

Renewed soil erosion and remobilisation of radioactive sediment in Fukushima coastal rivers after the 2013 typhoons.  

PubMed

Summer typhoons and spring snowmelt led to the riverine spread of continental Fukushima fallout to the coastal plains of Northeastern Japan and the Pacific Ocean. Four fieldwork campaigns based on measurement of radioactive dose rates in fine riverine sediment that has recently deposited on channel bed-sand were conducted between November 2011 and May 2013 to document the spread of fallout by rivers. After a progressive decrease in the fresh riverine sediment doses rates between 2011 and early spring in 2013, a fifth campaign conducted in November 2013 showed that they started to increase again after the occurrence of violent typhoons. We show that this increase in dose rates was mostly due to remobilization of contaminated material that was temporarily stored in river channels or, more importantly, in dam reservoirs of the region during the typhoons. In addition, supply of particles from freshly eroded soils in autumn 2013 was the most important in areas where decontamination works are under progress. Our results underline the need to monitor the impact of decontamination works and dam releases in the region, as they may provide a continuous source of radioactive contamination to the coastal plains and the Pacific Ocean during the coming years. PMID:24694549

Evrard, Olivier; Chartin, Caroline; Onda, Yuichi; Lepage, Hugo; Cerdan, Olivier; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie

2014-01-01

290

Renewed soil erosion and remobilisation of radioactive sediment in Fukushima coastal rivers after the 2013 typhoons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Summer typhoons and spring snowmelt led to the riverine spread of continental Fukushima fallout to the coastal plains of Northeastern Japan and the Pacific Ocean. Four fieldwork campaigns based on measurement of radioactive dose rates in fine riverine sediment that has recently deposited on channel bed-sand were conducted between November 2011 and May 2013 to document the spread of fallout by rivers. After a progressive decrease in the fresh riverine sediment doses rates between 2011 and early spring in 2013, a fifth campaign conducted in November 2013 showed that they started to increase again after the occurrence of violent typhoons. We show that this increase in dose rates was mostly due to remobilization of contaminated material that was temporarily stored in river channels or, more importantly, in dam reservoirs of the region during the typhoons. In addition, supply of particles from freshly eroded soils in autumn 2013 was the most important in areas where decontamination works are under progress. Our results underline the need to monitor the impact of decontamination works and dam releases in the region, as they may provide a continuous source of radioactive contamination to the coastal plains and the Pacific Ocean during the coming years.

Evrard, Olivier; Chartin, Caroline; Onda, Yuichi; Lepage, Hugo; Cerdan, Olivier; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie

2014-04-01

291

Renewed soil erosion and remobilisation of radioactive sediment in Fukushima coastal rivers after the 2013 typhoons  

PubMed Central

Summer typhoons and spring snowmelt led to the riverine spread of continental Fukushima fallout to the coastal plains of Northeastern Japan and the Pacific Ocean. Four fieldwork campaigns based on measurement of radioactive dose rates in fine riverine sediment that has recently deposited on channel bed-sand were conducted between November 2011 and May 2013 to document the spread of fallout by rivers. After a progressive decrease in the fresh riverine sediment doses rates between 2011 and early spring in 2013, a fifth campaign conducted in November 2013 showed that they started to increase again after the occurrence of violent typhoons. We show that this increase in dose rates was mostly due to remobilization of contaminated material that was temporarily stored in river channels or, more importantly, in dam reservoirs of the region during the typhoons. In addition, supply of particles from freshly eroded soils in autumn 2013 was the most important in areas where decontamination works are under progress. Our results underline the need to monitor the impact of decontamination works and dam releases in the region, as they may provide a continuous source of radioactive contamination to the coastal plains and the Pacific Ocean during the coming years. PMID:24694549

Evrard, Olivier; Chartin, Caroline; Onda, Yuichi; Lepage, Hugo; Cerdan, Olivier; Lefèvre, Irène; Ayrault, Sophie

2014-01-01

292

Characterization of the Contaminated Soil Under the Hanford 324 Building B Cell, Washington, USA - 12182  

SciTech Connect

The 324 Building on the Hanford site played a key role in radiochemical and metallurgical research programs conducted by DOE. The B hot cell in the 324 Building was the site of high-level waste vitrification research. During clean-out operations in November 2009, a tear was noted in the stainless steel liner on the floor of B Cell. Exposure rate readings taken at various locations in the soil about 0.5 meters below B Cell reached 8,900 Roentgen (R) per hour, confirming the existence of a significant soil contamination field. The source of the radioactive material was likely a 510 L spill from the Canister Fabrication Project, consisting of purified, concentrated Cs-137 and Sr-90 solutions totaling 48,000 TBq (1.3 MCi). MCNP modeling was used to estimate that the measured exposure rates were caused by 5,900 TBq (160 kCi) of Sr- 90 and Cs-137, although additional contamination was thought to exist deeper in the soil column. Two physical soil samples were obtained at different depths, which helped verify the contamination estimates. A detailed exposure rate survey inside B Cell was combined with additional MCNP modeling to estimate that an additional 1,700 TBq (460 kCi) is present just below the floor. Based on the results of the sampling campaign, it is likely that the radioactive material below B Cell is primarily consists of feed solutions from the FRG Canister Fabrication Project, and that it contains purified Sr-90 and Cs-137 with enough actinide carryover to make some of the soil transuranic. The close agreement between the Geoprobe calculations and the physical samples adds confidence that there are more than 3700 TBq (100,000 Ci) of Sr-90 and Cs-137 in the soil approximately 1 meter below the cell floor. The majority of the Cs-137 is contained in the first meter of soil, while significant Sr-90 contamination extends to 10 meters below the cell floor. It is also likely that an additional 15,000 TBq (400,000 Ci) of Cs-137 and Sr-90 activity is present directly below the floor of the cell, and that the residual activity inside the cell is only half of the previous estimates. However, the partitioning of activity between residuals in the cell and in the soil below the floor is much more uncertain than the activity calculations associated with the Geoprobe measurements. Taken together, the calculated soil activities represent about half of the spill associated with the FRG Canister Fabrication project. The remainder of the spill is believed to have remained in the cell, where the majority has been removed as part of cell cleanup activities. The magnitude of the soil contamination below 324 B Cell is sobering, and it represents one of the most challenging remediation activities in the DOE complex. Of course, safe remediation begins with a good understanding of the magnitude of the problem. As a result, additional modeling and cross-comparison efforts are planned for 2012. (authors)

Josephson, Walter S. [Worley Parsons Polestar, 601 Williams Boulevard, Suite 4A, Richland WA 99352 (United States)

2012-07-01

293

Phytoremediation of soil contaminated with cadmium, copper and polychlorinated biphenyls  

Microsoft Academic Search

A pot experiment and a field trial were conducted to study the remediation of an aged field soil contaminated with cadmium, copper and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (7.67±0.51 mg kg Cd, 369±1 mg kg Cu in pot experiment; 8.46±0.31 mg kg Cd, 468±7 mg kg Cu, 323±12 ?g kg PCBs for field experiment) under different cropping patterns. In the pot experiment

Longhua Wu; Zhu Li; Cunliang Han; Ling Liu; Ying Teng; Xianghui Sun; Cheng Pan; Yujuan Huang; Yongming Luo; Peter Christie

2011-01-01

294

The potential of Thlaspi caerulescens for phytoremediation of contaminated soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Uptake of Cd, Zn, Pb and Mn by the hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens was studied by pot trials in plant growth units and in populations of wild plants growing over Pb\\/Zn base-metal mine wastes at Les Malines in the south of France. The pot trials utilised metal-contaminated soils from Auby in the Lille area. Zinc and Cd concentrations in wild plants

Brett H. Robinson; Marc Leblanc; Daniel Petit; Robert R. Brooks; John H. Kirkman; Paul E. H. Gregg

1998-01-01

295

Mesoscale modelling of radioactive contamination formation in Ukraine caused by the Chernobyl accident  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work is devoted to the reconstruction of time-dependent radioactive contamination fields in the territory of Ukraine in the initial period of the Chernobyl accident using the model of atmospheric transport LEDI (Lagrangian–Eulerian DIffusion model). The modelling results were compared with available 137Cs air and ground contamination measurement data. The 137Cs atmospheric transport over the territory of Ukraine was simulated

Nikolai Talerko

2005-01-01

296

Development of Plasma Vitrification Technology for Contaminated Soil at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) of the United States Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development is developing treatment technologies for a wide variety of materials containing mixed low-level waste, i.e., having low levels of radioactivity along with hazardous constituents. Vitrification is a promising treatment technology for many of these wastes, including contaminated soil such as that found at the Savannah River Site. Proof-of-principle tests were performed to demonstrate the feasibility of both ex-situ and in-situ vitrification of contaminated soil by means of a plasma torch. A mixture of 89 percent as-excavated Savannah River Site sandy clay loam with 11 percent lime addition was tested. Vitrification of a mixture of this feed, in a 10 in. diameter crucible with a non-transferred arc plasma torch at a nominal 160 kW, was successful. The process produced homogeneous glass (albeit with local compositional variations), surrounded by a skull of incompletely reacted feed. Characterization of the resultant product durability using the Product Consistency Test showed elemental leaching well below the Environmental Assessment glass (which is often used as a minimum standard of glass acceptability in high-level waste glass assessment) for both the glass and the skull regions. Future tests should include doping the soil with hazardous constituents to enable further verification of the wasteform integrity via the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure. In-situ operation was mimicked in the test crucible by segregating the lime additive from the soil within the crucible. Making full use of the available torch maneuvering capabilities (which would likely exceed those of a torch used in-situ) failed to produce a homogeneous melt. Therefore, intimate mechanical mixture of the additive with the soil appears crucial to the success of SRS soil vitrification, and must be included in design considerations for in-situ operation.

Kielpinski, A.L.; Marra, J.C.; Rogers, V.; Schumacher, R.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Etheridge, J.; Kirkland, R. [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States). Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Lab.

1995-03-01

297

Dispersal of radioactivity by wildlife from contaminated sites in a forested landscape  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is located within the Valley and Ridge Physiographic Province of eastern Tennessee (USA). Wildlife populations have access to some radioactively contaminated sites at ORNL. Contaminated animals or animal nests within the Laboratory's boundaries have been found to contain {sup 90}Sr or {sup 137}Cs on the order of 10{sup -2}-10{sup 4} Bqg{sup -1} and trace amounts of other radionuclides (including transuranic elements). Animals that are capable of flight and animals with behavior patterns or developmental life stages involving contact with sediments in radioactive ponds, like benthic invertebrates, present the greatest potential for dispersal of radioactivity. The emigration of frogs and turtles from waste ponds also presents a potential for dispersal of radioactivity but over distances < 5 km. Mud-dauber wasps (Hymenoptera) and swallows (Hirundinidae) may transport radioactive mud for nest building, but also over relatively short distances (0.2-1 km). Movement by small mammals is limited by several factors, including physical barriers and smaller home ranges. Larger animals, like white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), are potential vectors of radioactivity due to their greater body size, longer life expectancy, and larger home range. Larger animals contain greater amounts of total radioactivity than smaller animals, but tissue concentrations of {sup 137}Cs generally decline with body size.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

1995-12-01

298

In-Situ Contained And Of Volatile Soil Contaminants  

DOEpatents

The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

Varvel, Mark Darrell (Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-12-27

299

In-Situ Containment and Extraction of Volatile Soil Contaminants  

DOEpatents

The invention relates to a novel approach to containing and removing toxic waste from a subsurface environment. More specifically the present invention relates to a system for containing and removing volatile toxic chemicals from a subsurface environment using differences in surface and subsurface pressures. The present embodiment generally comprises a deep well, a horizontal tube, at least one injection well, at least one extraction well and a means for containing the waste within the waste zone (in-situ barrier). During operation the deep well air at the bottom of well (which is at a high pressure relative to the land surface as well as relative to the air in the contaminated soil) flows upward through the deep well (or deep well tube). This stream of deep well air is directed into the horizontal tube, down through the injection tube(s) (injection well(s)) and into the contaminate plume where it enhances volatization and/or removal of the contaminants.

Varvel, Mark Darrell

2005-12-27

300

Shielded containers for radioactive waste using recycled contaminated metals  

Microsoft Academic Search

A family of shielded containers constructed of recycled contaminated lead and stainless steel from the US Deptartment of Energy (DOE) stockpile have been developed as a joint effort by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems-Oak Ridge. The containers were designed primarily for the transportation and storage of 30- or 55-gallon drums of remote handled

W. D Richins; T. E Fewell; H. J Welland; H. R Sheely

2000-01-01

301

Two dimensional imaging of radiation accidents and radioactive contamination  

Microsoft Academic Search

An accident in a nuclear power plant caused by an unpredictable event such as an explosion, fire and earthquake is so serious that we have to carefully and precisely detect any radiation leakage from the plants, given that the number of nuclear power plants is recently increasing in order to cope with the contamination of air due to carbon dioxide

Tomoya Ogawa; Nobuhiko Sarukura; Masahito Watanabe; Tsuguo Fukuda; Nobuhito Nango

2010-01-01

302

Development of an on-site ex-situ unsaturated-flow remediation process for trace metal contaminated soils.  

E-print Network

??Innovative means and methods were tested to develop an economical, pragmatic and environmentally sustainable soil remediation process for heavy metal contaminated soils. An unsaturated-flow soil… (more)

Andrade, Marc-David

2005-01-01

303

Remediation of AMD Contaminated Soil by Two Types of Reeds.  

PubMed

Acid mine drainage (AMD) adversely impacts many regions in the world. The interactions among citric acid (CA), rhizosphere bacteria and metal uptake in different types of Phragmites australis cultured in spiked AMD contaminated soil were investigated. Compared with non-contaminated reeds cultured under the same conditions, wild reeds harvested from a contaminated site accumulated more metals into tissues. Rhizosphere iron oxidizing bacteria (Fe(II)OB) enhanced the development of Fe plaque but had no significant impact on the formation of Mn and Al plaque on the root surface of either reeds. Plaque may restrain the accumulation of Fe and Mn into tissues of reeds. CA inhibited the growth of Fe(II)OB, reduced the formation of metal plaque and significantly elevated metal accumulations into both underground and aboveground biomass of reeds. The concentrations of Fe, Al and Mn were higher in belowground organs than aboveground tissues. The roots contained 0.28 ± 0.01 mg/g Mn, 3.09 ± 0.51 mg/g Al, 94.47 ± 5.75 mg/g Fe, while the stems accumulated 0.19 ± 0.01 mg/g Mn, 1.34 ± 0.02 mg/g Al, 10.32 ± 0.60 mg/g Fe in wild reeds cultured in soil added with 33,616 ppm CA. Further field investigations may be required to study the effect of CA to enhance phytoremediation of metals from real AMD contaminated sites. PMID:25409253

Guo, Lin; Cutright, Teresa J

2015-01-01

304

Toxicological responses of earthworm (Eisenia fetida) exposed to metal-contaminated soils.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicological responses of earthworm (Eisenia fetida) induced by field-contaminated, metal-polluted soils. Biochemical responses and DNA damage of earthworm exposed to two multi-metal-contaminated soils in a steel industry park and a natural reference soil in Zijin Mountain for 2, 7, 14, and 28 days were studied. Results showed that three enzyme activities, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and cellulase, in earthworm in metal-contaminated soils were significantly different from those of the reference soil. Cellulase and AChE were more sensitive than SOD to soil contamination. The Olive tail moment of the comet assay after 2-day exposure increased 56.5 and 552.0 % in two contaminated soils, respectively, compared to the reference soil. Our findings show that cellulase and DNA damage levels can be used as potential biomarkers for exposure of earthworm to metal-polluted soils. PMID:23589267

Zheng, Kai; Liu, ZhengTao; Li, YaJie; Cui, YiBin; Li, Mei

2013-12-01

305

Spatial uncoupling of biodegradation, soil respiration, and PAH concentration in a creosote contaminated soil.  

PubMed

Hotspots and coldspots of concentration and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) marginally overlapped at the 0.5-100 m scale in a creosote contaminated soil in southern Sweden, suggesting that concentration and biodegradation had little spatial co-variation. Biodegradation was substantial and its spatial variability considerable and highly irregular, but it had no spatial autocorrelation. The soil concentration of PAHs explained only 20-30% of the variance of their biodegradation. Soil respiration was spatially autocorrelated. The spatial uncoupling between biodegradation and soil respiration seemed to be governed by the aging of PAHs in the soil, since biodegradation of added 13C phenanthrene covaried with both soil respiration and microbial biomass. The latter two were also correlated with high concentrations of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) that are common in gram-negative bacteria. However, several of the hotspots of biodegradation coincided with hotspots for the distribution of a PLFA indicative of fungal biomass. PMID:20630638

Bengtsson, Göran; Törneman, Niklas; Yang, Xiuhong

2010-09-01

306

Final report: survey and removal of radioactive surface contamination at environmental restoration sites, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the survey and removal of radioactive surface contamination at Sandia`s Environmental Restoration (ER) sites. Radiological characterization was performed as a prerequisite to beginning the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective action process. The removal of radioactive surface contamination was performed in order to reduce potential impacts to human health and the environment. The predominant radiological contaminant of concern was depleted uranium (DU). Between October 1993 and November 1996 scanning surface radiation surveys, using gamma scintillometers, were conducted at 65 sites covering approximately 908 acres. A total of 9,518 radiation anomalies were detected at 38 sites. Cleanup activities were conducted between October 1994 and November 1996. A total of 9,122 anomalies were removed and 2,072 waste drums were generated. The majority of anomalies not removed were associated with a site that has subsurface contamination beyond the scope of this project. Verification soil samples (1,008 total samples) were collected from anomalies during cleanup activities and confirm that the soil concentration achieved in the field were far below the target cleanup level of 230 pCi/g of U-238 (the primary constituent of DU) in the soil. Cleanup was completed at 21 sites and no further radiological action is required. Seventeen sites were not completed since cleanup activities wee precluded by ongoing site activity or were beyond the original project scope.

Lambert, K.A.; Mitchell, M.M. [Brown and Root Environmental, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jean, D. [MDM/Lamb, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, C. [Environmental Dimensions, Inc., Albuquerque, NM 87109 (United States); Byrd, C.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-09-01

307

Environmental toxicity testing of contaminated soil based on microcalorimetry.  

PubMed

Contaminated site assessment and monitoring requires efficient risk-management tools including innovative environmental toxicity tests. The first application of microcalorimetry for toxicity testing draw the attention to a possible new tool to increase sensitivity, to eliminate matrix effect and to study effect-mechanism. A Thermal Activity Monitor (TAM) microcalorimeter was used for measuring the heat production of various test organisms when getting in contact with sterile toxic soils. Well known bacterial (Azomonas agilis), animal (Folsomia candida) and plant test organisms (Sinapis alba) were tested for heat production. The heat response of selected testorganisms was measured in case of metal (Cu and Zn) and organic pollutant (Diesel oil, DBNPA and PCP) contaminated soils. In addition to the quantitative determination of the heat production, the mechanism of the toxic effect can be characterized from the shape of the power-time curve (slope of the curve, height and time of the maximum). In certain concentration ranges the higher the pollutant concentration of the soil the lower the maximum of the time-heat curve. At low pollutant concentrations an increased heat production was measured in case of A. agile and 20 and 200 mg Zn kg(-1) soil. The microcalorimetric testing was more sensitive in all cases than the traditional test methods. Our results showed that the microcalorimetric test method offers a new and sensitive option in environmental toxicology, both for research and routine testing. PMID:20549622

Gruiz, K; Feigl, V; Hajdu, Cs; Tolner, M

2010-10-01

308

Development of Fungal Inocula for Bioaugmentation of Contaminated Soils  

PubMed Central

This report describes novel fungal inocula for bioaugmentation of soils contaminated with hazardous organic compounds. The inocula are in the form of pelleted solid substrates coated with a sodium alginate suspension of fungal spores or mycelial fragments and incubated until overgrown with the mycelium of selected lignin-degrading fungi. The organisms evaluated were Phanerochaete chrysosporium (BKM F-1767, ATCC 42725), P. sordida (HHB-8922-Sp), Irpex lacteus (Mad-517, ATCC 11245), Bjerkandera adusta (FP-135160-Sp, ATCC 62023), and Trametes versicolor (MD-277). The pelleted fungal inocula resisted competition and proliferation from indigenous soil microbes, were lower in moisture content than current fungal inocula, and had sufficient mechanical strength to allow handling and introduction into the soil without a change in the mechanical consistency of the pellets. Inoculated at a rate of 3% in artificially contaminated nonsterile soil, I. lacteus, B. adusta, and T. versicolor removed 86, 82, and 90%, respectively, of the pentachlorophenol in 4 weeks. A mathematical model was developed to explain moisture distribution in a hydrogel-coated pelleted substrate. PMID:16535337

Lestan, D.; Lamar, R. T.

1996-01-01

309

[Stabilization and long-term effect of chromium contaminated soil].  

PubMed

Short-term (3 d and 28 d) and long-term (1 a) stabilization effects of Cr contaminated soil were investigated through nature curing, using four amendments including ferrous sulfide, ferrous sulfate, zero-valent iron and sodium dithionite. The results indicated that ferrous sulfide and zero-valent iron were not helpful for the stabilization of Cr(VI) when directly used because of their poor solubility and immobility. Ferrous sulfate could effectively and rapidly decrease total leaching Cr and Cr(VI) content. The stabilization effect was further promoted by the generation of iron hydroxides after long-term curing. Sodium dithionite also had positive effect on soil stabilization. Appropriate addition ratio of the two chemicals could help maintain the soil pH in range of 6-8. PMID:24364328

Wang, Jing; Luo, Qi-Shi; Zhang, Chang-Bo; Tan, Liang; Li, Xu

2013-10-01

310

Implementation of in situ vitrification for contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

Geosafe Corporation will be implementing the in situ vitrification (ISV) technology commercially at a Superfund site in Michigan. In preparation for the Michigan site, Geosafe Corporation performed two operational acceptance tests (OATs) at the Geosafe Test Site in Richland, Washington. The objectives were to test the performance of the equipment and to train operating personnel. In addition, Geosafe cooperated with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the US Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development in a full-scale field data collection effort to obtain data characterizing the dynamic conditions in the soil created by the advancing ISV melt. This full-scale information provides empirical data to support the current understanding of the ISV technology for contaminated soil applications and provides verification of the accuracy of computational modeling tools being used to evaluate the applicability of the ISV technology to different soil sites.

Luey, J.; Roberts, J.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Timmerman, C.L. [Geosafe Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-08-01

311

Cleaning Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Contaminated Garden Soil by Phytoremediation  

PubMed Central

A poplar planted system resulted in the complete removal of at least 19 of the 29 potential polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners detected in trace amounts (37.9 ng g-1 in total) in a commercial garden soil, while the unplanted soil only had 2 congeners completely removed after 96 days. In addition, the most recalcitrant congener, PCB 52, only decreased by 0.1% in the unplanted reactors while declining by 22.3% in the planted system. There was also greater removal of a PCB 77 spike in the planted system when compared to the unplanted system, 17.2% in the planted system versus 2.8% in the unplanted system. The results suggest that phytoremediation may be an effective tool in cleaning commercially available garden soils that are lightly contaminated with PCBs. PMID:24409084

Schnoor, Jerald L.

2013-01-01

312

Evaluation of the phytostabilisation efficiency in a trace elements contaminated soil using soil health indicators.  

PubMed

The efficiency of a remediation strategy was evaluated in a mine soil highly contaminated with trace elements (TEs) by microbiological, ecotoxicological and physicochemical parameters of the soil and soil solution (extracted in situ), as a novel and integrative methodology for assessing recovery of soil health. A 2.5-year field phytostabilisation experiment was carried out using olive mill-waste compost, pig slurry and hydrated lime as amendments, and a native halophytic shrub (Atriplex halimus L.). Comparing with non-treated soil, the addition of the amendments increased soil pH and reduced TEs availability, favoured the development of a sustainable vegetation cover (especially the organic materials), stimulated soil microorganisms (increasing microbial biomass, activity and functional diversity, and reducing stress) and reduced direct and indirect soil toxicity (i.e., its potential associated risks). Therefore, under semi-arid conditions, the use of compost and pig slurry with A. halimus is an effective phytostabilisation strategy to improve soil health of nutrient-poor soils with high TEs concentrations, by improving the habitat function of the soil ecosystem, the reactivation of the biogeochemical cycles of essential nutrients, and the reduction of TEs dissemination and their environmental impact. PMID:24468528

Pardo, T; Clemente, R; Epelde, L; Garbisu, C; Bernal, M P

2014-03-15

313

Measurements of internal radioactive contamination in samples of Roman lead to be used in experiments on rare events  

E-print Network

Measurements of internal radioactive contamination in samples of Roman lead to be used events are reported. The chemical impurities in both samples have been determined by neutron activation in both samples of radioactive contamination from 214 Bi and 232 Th, in secular equilibrium, with upper

314

Soil microbial community responses to antibiotic-contaminated manure under different soil moisture regimes.  

PubMed

Sulfadiazine (SDZ) is an antibiotic frequently administered to livestock, and it alters microbial communities when entering soils with animal manure, but understanding the interactions of these effects to the prevailing climatic regime has eluded researchers. A climatic factor that strongly controls microbial activity is soil moisture. Here, we hypothesized that the effects of SDZ on soil microbial communities will be modulated depending on the soil moisture conditions. To test this hypothesis, we performed a 49-day fully controlled climate chamber pot experiments with soil grown with Dactylis glomerata (L.). Manure-amended pots without or with SDZ contamination were incubated under a dynamic moisture regime (DMR) with repeated drying and rewetting changes of >20 % maximum water holding capacity (WHCmax) in comparison to a control moisture regime (CMR) at an average soil moisture of 38 % WHCmax. We then monitored changes in SDZ concentration as well as in the phenotypic phospholipid fatty acid and genotypic 16S rRNA gene fragment patterns of the microbial community after 7, 20, 27, 34, and 49 days of incubation. The results showed that strongly changing water supply made SDZ accessible to mild extraction in the short term. As a result, and despite rather small SDZ effects on community structures, the PLFA-derived microbial biomass was suppressed in the SDZ-contaminated DMR soils relative to the CMR ones, indicating that dynamic moisture changes accelerate the susceptibility of the soil microbial community to antibiotics. PMID:24743980

Reichel, Rüdiger; Radl, Viviane; Rosendahl, Ingrid; Albert, Andreas; Amelung, Wulf; Schloter, Michael; Thiele-Bruhn, Sören

2014-07-01

315

Accumulation of heavy metals from contaminated soil to plants and evaluation of soil remediation by vermiculite.  

PubMed

We evaluated the distribution of 15 metal ions, namely Al, Cd, Cu, Cr, Fe, La, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sc, Ti, V, Y, Zn and Zr, in the soil of a contaminated site in Piedmont (Italy). This area was found to be heavily contaminated with Cu, Cr and Ni. The availability of these metal ions was studied using Tessier's sequential extraction procedure: the fraction of mobile species, which potentially is the most harmful for the environment, was much higher than that normally present in unpolluted soils. This soil was hence used to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment with vermiculite to reduce the availability of the pollutants to two plants, Lactuca sativa and Spinacia oleracea, by pot experiments. The results indicated that the addition of vermiculite significantly reduces the uptake of metal pollutants by plants, confirming the possibility of using this clay in amendment treatments of metal-contaminated soils. The effect of plant growth on metal fractionation in soils was investigated. Finally, the sum of the metal percentages extracted into the first two fractions of Tessier's protocol was found to be suitable in predicting the phytoavailability of most of the pollutants present in the investigated soil. PMID:21055788

Malandrino, Mery; Abollino, Ornella; Buoso, Sandro; Giacomino, Agnese; La Gioia, Carmela; Mentasti, Edoardo

2011-01-01

316

Radioactive artifacts: historical sources of modern radium contamination.  

PubMed

Radium has been distributed in a wide variety of devices during the early part of this century. Antique objects containing significant amounts of radium turn up at flea markets, antique shows, and antique dealers, in a variety of locations. These objects include radium in devices which were used by legitimate medical practitioners for legitimate medical purposes such as therapy, as well as a wide variety of "quack cures." These devices may contain anywhere from a few nanocuries to as much as several hundred microcuries of radium. In addition to medical sources, a large variety of scientific instruments utilize radium in luminous dials. These instruments include compasses, azimuth indicators, and virtually any object which might require some form of calibration. In addition, the consumer market utilized a large amount of radium in the production of wrist watches, pocket watches, and clocks with luminous dials. Some of these watches contained as much as 4.5 microCi of radium, and between 1913 and 1920 about 70 gm was produced for the manufacture of luminous compounds. In addition to the large amount of radium produced for scientific and consumer utilization, there were a number of materials produced which were claimed to contain radium but in fact did not, further adding to the confusion in this area. The wide availability of radium is a result of the public's great fascination with radioactivity during the early part of this century and a belief in its curative properties. A number of objects were produced in order to trap the emanations of radium in water for persons to drink in order to benefit from their healing effects. Since the late 20s and early 30s the public's attitude towards radiation has shifted 180 degrees and it is now considered an extremely dangerous and harmful material. However, even as late as the 1950s, there were still some items produced containing radioactivity which today would be unthinkable. The "Buck Rogers Mystery Ring" of the 1950s was activated with polonium. With the shift in public attitudes towards radioactivity, and increasing problems in disposal of radioactive materials, the disposal of radium presents a particularly perplexing problem. The radium which was produced in the early part of the century is still around in various forms and is extremely difficult to dispose of. All objects discovered claiming to contain radium should be taken seriously and should be properly surveyed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3278386

Blaufox, M D

1988-01-01

317

FINAL REPORT: REAL-TIME IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ASBESTOS AND CONCRETE MATERIALS WITH RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Concrete and asbestos-containing materials were widely used in DOE building construction in the 1940s and 1950s. Over the years, many of these porous materials have been contaminated with radioactive sources, on and below the surface. To improve current practice in identifying ha...

318

Spatial Data Analysis and Modeling of Radioactively-Contaminated Territories: Lessons Learned from Chernobyl  

E-print Network

Chernobyl M. Kanevski1 , L. Bolshov2 , V. Demyanov3 , E. Savelieva4 , V. Timonin5 , S. Chernov6 Abstract territories after the Chernobyl accident. The Chernobyl accident resulted in radioactive contamination, concerning environmental spatial data analysis. The spatial patterns of the Chernobyl fallout are very

319

REAL-TIME IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ASBESTOS AND CONCRETE MATERIALS WITH RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Concrete and asbestos-containing materials were widely used in DOE building construction in the 1940s and 1950s. Over the years, many of these porous materials have been contaminated with radioactive sources, on and below the surface. Current practice to identify hazardous asbe...

320

REAL-TIME IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ASBESTOS AND CONCRETE MATERIALS WITH RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION  

SciTech Connect

Concrete and asbestos-containing materials were widely used in DOE building construction in the 1940s and 1950s. Over the years, many of these porous materials have been contaminated with radioactive sources, on and below the surface. To improve current practice in identifying hazardous materials and in characterizing radioactive contamination, an interdisciplinary team from Rensselaer has conducted research in two aspects: (1) to develop terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and imaging system that can be used to analyze environmental samples such as asbestos in the field, and (2) to develop algorithms for characterizing the radioactive contamination depth profiles in real-time in the field using gamma spectroscopy. The basic research focused on the following: (1) mechanism of generating of broadband pulsed radiation in terahertz region, (2) optimal free-space electro-optic sampling for asbestos, (3) absorption and transmission mechanisms of asbestos in THz region, (4) the role of asbestos sample conditions on the temporal and spectral distributions, (5) real-time identification and mapping of asbestos using THz imaging, (7) Monte Carlo modeling of distributed contamination from diffusion of radioactive materials into porous concrete and asbestos materials, (8) development of unfolding algorithms for gamma spectroscopy, and (9) portable and integrated spectroscopy systems for field testing in DOE. Final results of the project show that the combination of these innovative approaches has the potential to bring significant improvement in future risk reduction and cost/time saving in DOE's D and D activities.

XU, X. George; Zhang, X.C.

2002-05-10

321

Subchronic exposure of mice to Love Canal soil contaminants.  

PubMed

The health hazard potential of soil collected from the surface of the Love Canal chemical dump site in Niagara Falls, New York, was assessed in 90-day exposure studies. Female CD-1 mice were exposed to two concentrations of the volatile components of 1 kg of soil with and without direct soil contact. Control mice were identically housed but without soil. The soil was replaced weekly and 87 compounds were detected in the air in the cages above fresh and 7-day-old soil as analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The concentration of many of these compounds decreased during the 7-day exposure cycle. Histopathologic, hematologic, and serum enzyme studies followed necropsy of all mice. There was no mortality of mice exposed for up to 90 days under any condition. Thymus and spleen weights relative to body weight were increased after 4 weeks of exposure by inhalation but not after 8 or 12 weeks of exposure. alpha-, beta-, and delta- Benzenehexachlorides , pentachlorobenzene, and hexachlorobenzene were detected in liver tissue from these animals. Mice exposed to 5- to 10-fold elevated concentration of volatiles had increased body and relative kidney weights. There was no chemically induced lesion in any animal exposed only to the volatile soil contaminants. Mice exposed by direct contact with the soil without elevated volatile exposure had increased body (10%) and relative liver weights (169%). Centrolobular hepatocyte hypertrophy, which involved 40 to 70% of the lobules, was observed in all mice in this group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6724196

Silkworth, J B; McMartin, D N; Rej, R; Narang, R S; Stein, V B; Briggs, R G; Kaminsky, L S

1984-04-01

322

Multicomponent and multistep radioactive decay modeling module for groundwater flow and contaminant transport computer code  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Correct calculations of multistep radioactive decay is important for radionuclide transport forecast at contaminated sites and designing radionuclide storage facilities as well as for a number applications of natural radioactive tracers for understanding of groundwater flow in complex hydrogeological systems. Radioactive chains can involves a number of branches with certain probabilities of decay and up to fourteen steps. General description of radioactive decay in complex system could be presented as a system of linear differential equations. Numerical solution of this system encounters a difficulties connected with wide rage of radioactive decay constants variations. In present work the database with 1253 records of radioactive isotope decay parameters for 97 elements was created. An algorithm of analytical solution construction and solving was elaborated for arbitrary radioactive isotope system taking into account the possible chain branching and connection. The algorithm is based on radionuclide decay graphs. The main steps of algorithm is as follows: a) searching of all possible isotopes in database, creation full isotope list; b) looking for main parent isotopes; c) construction of all possible radioactive chains; d) looking for branching and connections in decay chains, marking of links as primary (left chain in graph for main parent isotope), secondary (after connection), and recurring (before branching); e) construction and calculation the coefficients for analytical solutions. The developed computer code was tested on a few simple systems like follows: Cs-135 - one step decay, Sr-90 (Y-90) - two steps decay, U-238+U-235 mixture - complex decay with branching. Calculation of radiogenic He-4 is also possible witch could be important application for groundwater flow and transport model calibration using natural tracers. The computer code for multistep radioactive calculation was elaborated for incorporation into NIMFA code. NIMFA is a parallel computer code for groundwater flow and reactive contaminant transport modeling.

Kharkhordin, I. L.

2013-12-01

323

Contaminated soil; Proceedings of the first TNO conference on contaminated soil, 11-15 November 1985, Utrecht, Netherlands  

SciTech Connect

The technical papers contained in this book have two distinct areas of contribution that recommend it to the potential reader. The first is in the scientific study of the behavior of pollutants in the entire terrestrial system. Emphasis is on specific organics with some studies of metals. The second area is the documentation as case studies of seriously contaminated sites, almost all landfills, and efforts at clean-up. The book is not clearly divided into the soil science information on the fate of pollutants and the information on site investigations and clean-up. Of particular note are the studies reported on soil-air exchange in pores, the effect of heterogeneity on pollutant movement, and plant behavior of heavy metals in sludge and contaminated soils. The second half of these proceedings described the management and remediation of polluted areas. Many practical experiences, such as fire hazards and success/failures are given. Interwoven in the papers on remediation are a number of good data on the behavior of chemicals in soils. Finally, there are a number of experiences with in situ clean-up, which delineate the potential for these techniques.

Assink, J.W.; van den Briak, W.J. (eds.)

1987-01-01

324

Contaminant transport in soil with depth-dependent reaction coefficients and time-dependent boundary conditions.  

PubMed

Predicting the fate and movement of contaminant in soils and groundwater is essential to assess and reduce the risk of soil contamination and groundwater pollution. Reaction processes of contaminant often decreased monotonously with depth. Time-dependent input sources usually occurred at the inlet of natural or human-made system such as radioactive waste disposal site. This study presented a one-dimensional convection-dispersion equation (CDE) for contaminant transport in soils with depth-dependent reaction coefficients and time-dependent inlet boundary conditions, and derived its analytical solution. The adsorption coefficient and degradation rate were represented as sigmoidal functions of soil depth. Solute breakthrough curves (BTCs) and concentration profiles obtained from CDE with depth-dependent and constant reaction coefficients were compared, and a constant effective reaction coefficient, which was calculated by arithmetically averaging the depth-dependent reaction coefficient, was proposed to reflect the lumped depth-dependent reaction effect. With the effective adsorption coefficient and degradation rate, CDE could produce similar BTCs and concentration profiles as those from CDE with depth-dependent reactions in soils with moderate chemical heterogeneity. In contrast, the predicted concentrations of CDE with fitted reaction coefficients at a certain depth departed significantly from those of CDE with depth-dependent reactions. Parametric analysis was performed to illustrate the effects of sinusoidally and exponentially decaying input functions on solute BTCs. The BTCs and concentration profiles obtained from the solutions for finite and semi-infinite domain were compared to investigate the effects of effluent boundary condition. The finite solution produced higher concentrations at the increasing limb of the BTCs and possessed a higher peak concentration than the semi-infinite solution which had a slightly long tail. Furthermore, the finite solution gave a higher concentration in the immediate vicinity of the exit boundary than the semi-infinite solution. The applicability of the proposed model was tested with a field herbicide and tracer leaching experiment in an agricultural area of northeastern Greece. The simulation results indicated that the proposed CDE with depth-dependent reaction coefficients was able to capture the evolution of metolachlor concentration at the upper soil depths. However, the simulation results at deep depths were not satisfactory as the proposed model did not account for preferential flow observed in the field. PMID:23490106

Gao, Guangyao; Fu, Bojie; Zhan, Hongbin; Ma, Ying

2013-05-01

325

LEACHING BEHAVIOR OF PETROLEUM CONTAMINATED SOILS STABILIZED WITH HIGH CARBON CONTENT FLY ASH  

E-print Network

1 LEACHING BEHAVIOR OF PETROLEUM CONTAMINATED SOILS STABILIZED WITH HIGH CARBON CONTENT FLY ASH the stabilization of petroleum- contaminated soils (PCSs) using another recycled material, high carbon content fly; however, the level of petroleum contamination has a significant effect on the leaching properties

Aydilek, Ahmet

326

Contribution from the Yenisei River to the total radioactive contamination of the Kara Sea  

SciTech Connect

An attempt is made to estimate the contribution from the Yenisei River and, therefore, the Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Plant (MCP), which discharged wastewaters to the Yenisei, to the total contamination of the Kara Sea using results from a study of the radioactive contamination of the Yenisei River, Yenisei Bay, Yenisei Gulf, and the Kara Sea itself. Radionuclides generated from using river water in cooling circuits of production reactors make the largest contribution to the total activity. The radioactive contamination of the river decreased by more than 20 times after two of the three operating reactors were shut down. Only several wetlands are actually affected by MCP hundreds of kilometers from the discharge point.

Kuznetsov, Yu.V.; Revenko, Yu.A.; Legin, V.K. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)] [and others

1995-07-01

327

Dispersal of radioactivity by wildlife from contaminated sites in a forested landscape  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is located within the Ridge and Valley physiographic province of eastern Tennessee (USA). This area is characterized by deciduous forests dominated by hardwood and mixed mesophytic tree species. Wildlife populations have access to some radioactively contaminated sites at ORNL, and contaminated animals or animal nests within the Laboratory`s boundaries have been found to contain on the order of 10{sup {minus}12} to 10{sup {minus}6} Ci/g of {sup 90}Sr or {sup 137}Cs, and trace amounts of other radionuclides (including transuranic elements). Theoretical calculations indicate that nanocurie levels of {sup 90}Sr in bone can arise from relatively small amounts (1%) of contaminated browse vegetation in a deer`s diet. Measures that have been undertaken at ORNL to curtail the dispersal of radioactivity by animals are briefly reviewed.

Garten, C.T. Jr.

1992-03-27

328

Dispersal of radioactivity by wildlife from contaminated sites in a forested landscape  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is located within the Ridge and Valley physiographic province of eastern Tennessee (USA). This area is characterized by deciduous forests dominated by hardwood and mixed mesophytic tree species. Wildlife populations have access to some radioactively contaminated sites at ORNL, and contaminated animals or animal nests within the Laboratory's boundaries have been found to contain on the order of 10{sup {minus}12} to 10{sup {minus}6} Ci/g of {sup 90}Sr or {sup 137}Cs, and trace amounts of other radionuclides (including transuranic elements). Theoretical calculations indicate that nanocurie levels of {sup 90}Sr in bone can arise from relatively small amounts (1%) of contaminated browse vegetation in a deer's diet. Measures that have been undertaken at ORNL to curtail the dispersal of radioactivity by animals are briefly reviewed.

Garten, C.T. Jr.

1992-03-27

329

Toxicity Assessment of Contaminated Soils of Solid Domestic Waste Landfill  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The paper delivers the analysis of an 18-year dynamic pattern of land pollutants concentration in the soils of a solid domestic waste landfill. It also presents the composition of the contaminated soils from different areas of the waste landfill during its operating period. The authors calculate the concentrations of the following pollutants: chrome, nickel, tin, vanadium, lead, cuprum, zinc, cobalt, beryllium, barium, yttrium, cadmium, arsenic, germanium, nitrate ions and petrochemicals and determine a consistent pattern of their spatial distribution within the waste landfill area as well as the dynamic pattern of their concentration. Test-objects are used in experiments to make an integral assessment of the polluted soil's impact on living organisms. It was discovered that the soil samples of an animal burial site are characterized by acute toxicity while the area of open waste dumping is the most dangerous in terms of a number of pollutants. This contradiction can be attributed to the synergetic effect of the polluted soil, which accounts for the regularities described by other researchers.

Pasko, O. A.; Mochalova, T. N.

2014-08-01

330

Phytoremediation of soil contaminated with cadmium, copper and polychlorinated biphenyls.  

PubMed

A pot experiment and afield trial were conducted to study the remediation of an aged field soil contaminated with cadmium, copper and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (7.67 +/- 0.51 mg kg(-1) Cd, 369 +/- 1 mg kg(-1) Cu in pot experiment; 8.46 +/- 0.31 mg kg(-1) Cd, 468 +/- 7 mg kg(-1) Cu, 323 +/- 12 microg kg(-1) PCBs for field experiment) under different cropping patterns. In the pot experiment Sedum plumbizincicola showed pronounced Cd phytoextraction. After two periods (14 months) of cropping the Cd removal rates in these two treatments were 52.2 +/- 12.0 and 56.1 +/- 9.1%, respectively. Total soil PCBs in unplanted control pots decreased from 323 +/- 11 to 49.3 +/- 6.6 microg kg(-1), but with no significant difference between treatments. The field microcosm experiment intercropping of three plant species reduced the yield of S. plumbizincicola, with a consequent decrease in soil Cd removal. S. plumbizincicola intercropped with E. splendens had the highest shoot Cd uptake (18.5 +/- 1.8 mg pot(-1)) after 6 months planting followed by intercropping with M. sativa (15.9 +/- 1.9 mg pot(-1)). Liming with S. plumbizincicola intercropped with M. sativa significantly promoted soil PCB degradation by 25.2%. Thus, adjustment of soil pH to 5.56 combined with intercropping with S. plumbizincicola and M. sativagave high removal rates of Cd, Cu, and PCBs. PMID:22908627

Wu, Longhua; Li, Zhu; Han, Cunliang; Liu, Ling; Teng, Ying; Sun, Xianghui; Pan, Cheng; Huang, Yujuan; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

2012-07-01

331

Evaluation of soil flushing potential for clean-up of desert soil contaminated by industrial wastewater.  

PubMed

The flushing potential of a desert loess soil contaminated by the flame retardant Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), chloride (Cl(-)) and bromide (Br(-)) was studied in undisturbed laboratory column experiments (20 cm diameter, 45 cm long) and a small field plot (2 x 2 m). While the soluble inorganic ions (Cl(-) and Br(-)) were efficiently flushed from the soil profile after less than three pore volumes (PV) of water, about 50% of the initial amount of TBBPA in the soil was also flushed, despite its hydrophobic nature. TBBPA leaching was made possible due to a significant increase in the pH of the soil solution from 7.5 to 9, which increased TBBPA aqueous solubility. The remaining TBBPA mass in the soil was not mobilized from its initial location in the topsoil due to the decrease in pH at this horizon. In situ soil flushing demonstrated that this method is a feasible treatment for reducing soil contamination at this site. PMID:15949835

Arnon, Shai; Ronen, Zeev; Yakirevich, Alexander; Adar, Eilon

2006-01-01

332

Olive mill waste biochar: a promising soil amendment for metal immobilization in contaminated soils.  

PubMed

The potential use of biochar from olive mill waste for in situ remediation of metal contaminated soils was evaluated. Biochar was mixed with metal contaminated soil originating from the vicinity of an old zinc smelter. Soil-biochar mixtures were equilibrated for 30 and 90 days. At these time points, Ca(NO3)2 exchangeable metals were determined, and effects of the biochar amendment on soil toxicity were investigated using plants, bacteria, and earthworms. Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) growth, metal content, antioxidative enzymes activities, and soluble protein contents were determined. Furthermore, effects on soil microbial communities (activity, diversity, richness) were examined using Biolog ECOplates. After 120 days of soil-biochar equilibration, effects on weight and reproduction of Eisenia foetida were evaluated. With increasing biochar application rate and equilibration period, Ca(NO3)2 exchangeable metals decreased, and growth of bean plants improved; leaf metal contents reduced, the activities of antioxidative stress enzymes decreased, and soluble protein contents increased. Soil microbial activity, richness, and diversity were augmented. Earthworm mortality lowered, and their growth and reproduction showed increasing trends. PMID:25146122

Hmid, Amine; Al Chami, Ziad; Sillen, Wouter; De Vocht, Alain; Vangronsveld, Jaco

2015-01-01

333

Indices for bioavailability and biotransformation potential of contaminants in soils.  

PubMed

Bioavailability is an important consideration in risk assessment of soil contaminants and in the selection of appropriate remediation technologies for polluted sites. The present study examined the bioavailability and biodegradation potential of phenanthrene with respect to a pseudomonad in 15 different soils through separate measurements of mineralization, transformation, and desorption to a polymeric infinite sink (Tenax) after 180-d sterile pre-equilibration with phenanthrene. Fractions strongly resistant to desorption and mineralization at long times were evident in all cases. After correcting for bioconversion (moles mineralized per mole transformed) determined in aqueous particle-free soil extracts, a correlation was found between the biotransformation-resistant fraction and the Tenax desorption-resistant fraction. Indices are proposed to assess bioavailability (BAt) and biotransformation potential (BTPt) of a compound in a soil based on parallel desorption and degradation studies over a selected period t. The BAt is the ratio of moles biotransformed to moles desorbed to an infinite sink, and it reflects the biotransformation rate relative to the maximal desorption rate. Values of BA30 (30-d values) ranged from 0.64 (for dark gray silt loam) to 1.12 (Wurtsmith Air Force Base [AFB] 2B, Oscoda, MI, USA). The BTPt is the ratio between moles biotransformed and moles of contaminant remaining sorbed after maximal desorption. The BTPt provides an indication of the maximum extent of biotransformation that may be expected in a system, assuming desorption is a prerequisite for biodegradation. Values of BTP30 ranged between 0.3 (Wurtsmith AFB 1B) and 13 (Mount Pleasant silt loam, NY, USA). The combination of BAt and BTPt provides insights regarding the relationship between physical availability (desorption) and biological processes (biotransformation kinetics, toxicity, other soil factors) that occur during biodegradation and are suggested to represent the remediation potential of the chemical. The BA30 values less than 0.9 and BTP30 values less than five indicate poor potential for site remediation. PMID:15230309

Braida, Washington J; White, Jason C; Pignatello, Joseph J

2004-07-01

334

Soil & Sediment Contamination, 17:137149, 2008 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC  

E-print Network

Soil & Sediment Contamination, 17:137­149, 2008 Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC ISSN: 1532 of the Human Health Risks of Asbestos in Soils FRANK A. SWARTJES1 AND PETER C. TROMP2 1 National Institute, Apeldoorn, The Netherlands A tiered approach for the assessment of human health risks of soil contamination

Ahmad, Sajjad

335

Dermal absorption of environmental contaminants from soil and sediment: a critical review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Risk assessment of hazardous wastes sites may require characterization of the dermal availability of chemical contaminants in soil and\\/or sediment. Current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency guidance for assessment of dermal exposures to contaminants in water and soil was finalized in 2004 as a supplement (Part E) to the Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (RAGS). The soil protocol presented in RAGS

Elizabeth W Spalt; John C Kissel; Jeffry H Shirai; Annette L Bunge

2009-01-01

336

APPLICATION OF STEAM INJECTION/VACUUM EXTRACTION TREATMENT SYSTEMS TO CONTAMINATED SOILS  

EPA Science Inventory

Steam Injection/Vacuum Extraction (SIVE) is a method to enable vacuum extraction to treat soils contaminated with semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCS) and to speed the cleanup of soils contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). he steam injection raises the soil tempe...

337

RISK ASSESSMENT AND REMEDIATION OF SOILS CONTAMINATED BY MINING AND SMELTING OF LEAD, ZINC AND CADMIUM  

EPA Science Inventory

Mining nd smelting of Pb, Zn and Cd ores have caused widespread soil contamination in many countries. In locations with severe soil contamination, and strongly acidic soil or mine waste, ecosystems are devastated. Research has shown that An phytotoxicity, Pb-induced phosphate def...

338

An in vitro gastrointestinal method to estimate bioavailable arsenic in contaminated soils and solid media  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method was developed to simulate the human gastrointestinal environment and to estimate bioavailability of arsenic in contaminated soil and soil media. In this in vitro gastrointestinal (IVG) method, arsenic is sequentially extracted from contaminated soil with simulated gastric and intestinal solutions. A modified IVG-AB method, where iron hydroxide gel is used to simulate the absorption of arsenic, was also

Robin R. Rodriguez; Nicholas T. Basta; Stan W. Casteel; Lanny W. Pace

1999-01-01

339

Acid washing and stabilization of an artificial arsenic-contaminated soil  

Microsoft Academic Search

An acid-washing process was studied on a laboratory scale to extract the bulk of arsenic(V) from a highly contaminated Kuroboku soil (Andosol) so as to minimize the risk of arsenic to human health and the environment. The sorption and desorption behavior of arsenic in the soil suggested the possibility of arsenic leaching under acidic conditions. Artificially contaminated Kuroboku soil (2830

Shuzo Tokunaga; Toshikatsu Hakuta

2002-01-01

340

Assessing the bioavailability and risk from metal contaminated soils and dusts#  

EPA Science Inventory

Exposure to contaminated soil and dust is an important pathway in human and ecological risk assessment and often is the "risk-driver" for metal contaminated soil. Site-specific soil physical and chemical characteristics, as well as biological factors, determine the bioavailabilit...

341

Quality of trace element contaminated soils amended with compost under fast growing tree Paulownia fortunei plantation.  

PubMed

The use of fast growing trees could be an alternative in trace element contaminated soils to stabilize these elements and improve soil quality. In this study we investigate the effect of Paulownia fortunei growth on trace element contaminated soils amended with two organic composts under semi-field conditions for a period of 18 months. The experiment was carried out in containers filled with tree different soils, two contaminated soils (neutral AZ and acid V) and a non contaminated soil, NC. Three treatments per soil were established: two organic amendments (alperujo compost, AC, and biosolid compost, BC) and a control without amendment addition. We study parameters related with fertility and contamination in soils and plants. Paulownia growth and amendments increased pH in acid soils whereas no effect of these factors was observed in neutral soils. The plant and the amendments also increased organic matter and consequently, soil fertility. Positive results were also found in soils that were only affected by plant growth (without amendment). A general improvement of "soil biochemical quality" was detected over time and treatments, confirming the positive effect of amendments plus paulownia. Even in contaminated soils, except for Cu and Zn, trace element concentrations in leaves were in the normal range for plants. Results of this mid-term study showed that Paulownia fortunei is a promising species for phytoremediation of trace element polluted soils. PMID:24950211

Madejón, P; Xiong, J; Cabrera, F; Madejón, E

2014-11-01

342

Research Spotlight: Potential pathways of radioactive contaminants to surface waters  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

From the 1940s to the end of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy maintained production facilities for manufacturing nuclear weapons along the Columbia River north of Richland, Wash. Known as the Hanford Site, the Rhode Island-sized area contains more than 53 million gallons of radioactive waste and is the location of a massive environmental cleanup. Of particular concern is that when the facility was active, fluids containing 33-59 tons of uranium were discharged into the shallow subsurface aquifer underneath Hanford. Studies suggest that this pollution is pervasively moving with the groundwater in the direction of the Columbia River. (Water Resources Research, doi:10.1029/2010WR009110, 2010)

Kumar, Mohi

2011-02-01

343

Physical properties, structure, and shape of radioactive Cs from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident derived from soil, bamboo and shiitake mushroom measurements.  

PubMed

We conducted an elution experiment with contaminated soils using various aqueous reagent solutions and autoradiography measurements of contaminated bamboo shoots and shiitake mushrooms to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of radioactive Cs from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Based on our study results and data in the literature, we conclude that the active Cs emitted by the accident fell to the ground as granular non-ionic materials. Therefore, they were not adsorbed or trapped by minerals in the soil, but instead physically adhere to the rough surfaces of the soil mineral particles. Granular Cs* can be transferred among media, such as soils and plants. The physical properties and dynamic behavior of the granular Cs* is expected to be helpful in considering methods for decontamination of soil, litter, and other media. PMID:24445055

Niimura, Nobuo; Kikuchi, Kenji; Tuyen, Ninh Duc; Komatsuzaki, Masakazu; Motohashi, Yoshinobu

2015-01-01

344

Spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for urban soil contaminants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Urbanization has become one of the major forces of change around the globe. Land use transformation, especially urbanization has the most profound influences of human activities because it affects so many of the planet's physical and biological systems. Land use changes directly impact the ability of the earth to continue to provide ecological services to human society and the other occupants of the ecosystems. The urban process gradually degrades and transforms agricultural and natural ecosystems into built environments. The urban environment includes cities, suburbs, peri-urban areas and towns. Urban ecosystems are highly heterogeneous due to the variety of land covers and land purposes. Thus, the choices on managing the extent and arranging the land cover patches (e.g., lawns) assist to shape the emergent structure and function of the urban ecosystems. As a result of ecological conditions and current management status the urban soils show substantial spatial heterogeneity. Whereas, adverse effects of pollutants on ecosystems have been demonstrated, one important need for environmental impact assessment have been defined as maintenance of long-term monitoring systems, which can enable to improve monitoring, modelling and assessment of various stressors in agriculture environment. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy across visible-near- short- mid- and long- wave infrared (0.4-14?m) has the potential to meet this demand. Relationships between spectral reflectance and soil properties, such as grain size distribution, moisture, iron oxides, carbonate content, and organic matter, have already been established in many studies (Krishnan et al. 1980, Ben-Dor and Banin 1995, Jarmer et al. 2008, Richter et al. 2009). The aims of this study are to develop diagnostic tool for heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, asbestos and other anthropogenic contaminants in urban soil using spectroscopy across 0.4-14?m spectral range. To examine the potential of the above-mentioned technique on contaminated and uncontaminated urban areas in Northern Israel, we propose to use both portable field spectrometers across 0.4-2.5?m and laboratory FTIR system across 3-14?m testing selected bare soil samples and integrate the obtained knowledge into the expert prototype system. The significances and contributions of the proposed work are expected in: 1) estimate morphological and biochemical characteristics of urban soils, 2) examine the possibility to detect early soil response to stress before damage occurs, 3) study the concentration of pollution on urban soils, 4) design and develop the methodology for a near real-time expert monitoring system. The present research will focus on spectral identification and characterization of urban soils toward quality assessment of the urban ecosystem.

Brook, Anna; Kopel, Daniella

2014-05-01

345

Arsenic and chromium speciation in an urban contaminated soil.  

PubMed

The distribution and speciation of As and Cr in a contaminated soil were studied by synchrotron-based X-ray microfluorescence (?-XRF), microfocused X-ray absorption spectroscopy (?-XAS), and bulk extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). The soil was taken from a park in Wilmington, DE, which had been an important center for the leather tanning industry along the Atlantic seaboard of the United States, until the early 20th century. Soil concentrations of As, Cr, and Pb measured at certain locations in the park greatly exceeded the background levels of these heavy metals in the State of Delaware. Results show that Cr(III) and As(V) species are mainly present in the soil, with insignificant amounts of Cr(VI) and As(III). Micro-XRF maps show that Cr and Fe are distributed together in regions where their concentrations are diffuse, and at local spots where their concentrations are high. Iron oxides, which can reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III), are present at some of these hot spots where Cr and Fe are highly concentrated. Arsenic is mainly associated with Al in the soil, and to a minor extent with Fe. Arsenate may be sorbed to aluminum oxides, which might have transformed after a long period of time into an As-Al precipitate phase, having a structure and chemical composition similar to mansfieldite (AlAsO(4)?2H(2)O). The latter hypothesis is supported by the fact that only a small amount of As present in the soil was desorbed using the characteristic toxicity leaching procedure tests. This suggests that As is immobilized in the soil. PMID:22520924

Landrot, Gautier; Tappero, Ryan; Webb, Samuel M; Sparks, Donald L

2012-08-01

346

Mechanisms for surface contamination of soils and bottom sediments in the Shagan River zone within former Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site.  

PubMed

The Shagan River is the only surface watercourse within the former Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS). Research in the valley of the Shagan River was carried out to study the possible migration of artificial radionuclides with surface waters over considerable distances, with the possibility these radionuclides may have entered the Irtysh River. The investigations revealed that radioactive contamination of soil was primarily caused by the first underground nuclear test with soil outburst conducted at the "Balapan" site in Borehole 1004. The surface nuclear tests carried out at the "Experimental Field" site and global fallout made insignificant contributions to contamination. The most polluted is the area in the immediate vicinity of the "Atomic" Lake crater. Contamination at the site is spatial. The total area of contamination is limited to 10-12 km from the crater piles. The ratio of plutonium isotopes was useful to determine the source of soil contamination. There was virtual absence of artificial radionuclide migration with surface waters, and possible cross-border transfer of radionuclides with the waters of Shagan and Irtysh rivers was not confirmed. PMID:23811126

Aidarkhanov, A O; Lukashenko, S N; Lyakhova, O N; Subbotin, S B; Yakovenko, Yu Yu; Genova, S V; Aidarkhanova, A K

2013-10-01

347

Land contamination and soil evolution in abandoned mine areas (Italy)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Italy ore research and exploitation are nearly exhausted since the end of the last century, leaving on the land a huge amount of mine waste, therefore provoking evident environmental damage including landscape, vegetation and the food chain, and a potential threat to human health. The increasing environmental consciousness of general population compelled Public Administrators to set down effective legislation acts on this subject (e.g. D.L. 152/2006), and more generally on environmental contamination. In this work we present the results of a survey carried out at several mixed sulphides mine sites in Italy, exploited for at least a millennium, and closed in the '60s of the last century. Biogeochemical analyses carried out on 50 soil profiles (mostly Entisols and Inceptisols) and vegetation in the proximal and distal areas of ore exploitation show metal concentrations overcoming legislation limits on average (Cu up to 3160 mg kg-1 , Pb up to 23600 mg kg-1, Zn up to 1588 mg kg-1, Fe up to 52,30 %). Ni, Cr and Mn concentrations, instead, are generally below the reference levels. Metal concentrations in native vegetation of the examined areas are moderately to highly elevated. Significant amounts of Cu, Pb, Zn in roots of Plantago major and Silene dioica, in leaves of Taraxacum officinale, and Salix spp, have been recorded. Essential elements, in particular, present Translocation Coefficients (TC) >1, with Mn>Zn>Cu>Fe. Toxic elements (Cd, Cr, Pb), instead, present TC<1, suggesting a synergic/antagonist effect to occur among metals and plants, according to their role in mineral nutrition. The results obtained suggest the abandoned mine sites to represent actual natural aboratories where to experiment new opportunities for restoration of anthropogenically contaminated areas, and to study new pedogenetic trends from these peculiar parent materials. Moreover, the examined plants are genetically adapted to naturally metal-enriched soils, and therefore may be utilized in phytoremediation of contaminated sites. Furthermore, the institution of natural parks in these areas could enhance their educational and scientific value, contributing in the meantime to general population amusement and recreation. Finally, it is the occasion for soil scientists to submit to the scientific community new classification proposals of this new kind of soils. Key-words: mine waste, heavy metals, accumulator plants, phytoremediation, soil genesis, soil classification

Bini, Claudio; Wahsha, Mohammad; Spiandorello, Massimo

2014-05-01

348

Phytotoxicity of trace metals in spiked and field-contaminated soils: Linking soil-extractable metals with toxicity.  

PubMed

Soil tests have been widely developed to predict trace metal uptake by plants. The prediction of metal toxicity, however, has rarely been tested. The present study was set up to compare 8 established soil tests for diagnosing phytotoxicity in contaminated soils. Nine soils contaminated with Zn or Cu by metal mining, smelting, or processing were collected. Uncontaminated reference soils with similar soil properties were sampled, and series of increasing contamination were created by mixing each with the corresponding soil. In addition, each reference soil was spiked with either ZnCl2 or CuCl2 at several concentrations. Total metal toxicity to barley seedling growth in the field-contaminated soils was up to 30 times lower than that in corresponding spiked soils. Total metal (aqua regia-soluble) toxicity thresholds of 50% effective concentrations (EC50) varied by factors up to 260 (Zn) or 6 (Cu) among soils. For Zn, variations in EC50 thresholds decreased as aqua regia?>?0.43?M HNO3? >?0.05?M ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA)?>?1?M NH4 NO3? >?cobaltihexamine?>?diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT)?>?0.001?M CaCl2 , suggesting that the last extraction is the most robust phytotoxicity index for Zn. The EDTA extraction was the most robust for Cu-contaminated soils. The isotopically exchangeable fraction of the total soil metal in the field-contaminated soils markedly explained the lower toxicity compared with spiked soils. The isotope exchange method can be used to translate soil metal limits derived from soils spiked with metal salts to site-specific soil metal limits. PMID:25053440

Hamels, Fanny; Malevé, Jasmina; Sonnet, Philippe; Kleja, Dan Berggren; Smolders, Erik

2014-11-01

349

Application, chemistry, and environmental implications of contaminant-immobilization amendments on agricultural soil and water quality.  

PubMed

Contaminants such as nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), arsenic (As), heavy metals, and infectious pathogens are often associated with agricultural systems. Various soil and water remediation techniques including the use of chemical amendments have been employed to reduce the risks associated with these contaminants. This paper reviews the use of chemical amendments for immobilizing principal agricultural contaminants, the chemistry of contaminant immobilization, and the environmental consequences associated with the use of these chemical products. The commonly used chemical amendments were grouped into aluminum-, calcium-, and iron-containing products. Other products of interest include phosphorus-containing compounds and silicate clays. Mechanisms of contaminant immobilization could include one or a combination of the following: surface precipitation, adsorption to mineral surfaces (ion exchange and formation of stable complexes), precipitation as salts, and co-precipitation. The reaction pH, redox potential, clay minerals, and organic matter are potential factors that could control contaminant-immobilization processes. Reviews of potential environmental implications revealed that undesirable substances such as trace elements, fluoride, sulfate, total dissolved solids, as well as radioactive materials associated with some industrial wastes used as amendment could be leached to ground water or lost through runoff to receiving water bodies. The acidity or alkalinity associated with some of the industrial-waste amendments could also constitute a substantial environmental hazard. Chemical amendments could introduce elements capable of inducing or affecting the activities of certain lithotrophic microbes that could influence vital geochemical processes such as mineral dissolution and formation, weathering, and organic matter mineralization. PMID:20832118

Udeigwe, Theophilus K; Eze, Peter N; Teboh, Jasper M; Stietiya, Mohammed H

2011-01-01

350

Natural radioactivity content in soil and indoor air of Chellanam.  

PubMed

Contribution of terrestrial radiation due to the presence of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil and air constitutes a significant component of the background radiation exposure to the population. The concentrations of natural radionuclides in the soil and indoor air of Chellanam were investigated with an aim of evaluating the environmental radioactivity level and radiation hazard to the population. Chellanam is in the suburbs of Cochin, with the Arabian Sea in the west and the Cochin backwaters in the east. Chellanam is situated at ?25 km from the sites of these factories. The data obtained serve as a reference in documenting changes to the environmental radioactivity due to technical activities. Soil samples were collected from 30 locations of the study area. The activity concentrations of (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K in the samples were analysed using gamma spectrometry. The gamma dose rates were calculated using conversion factors recommended by UNSCEAR [United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. Sources and effects of ionizing radiation. UNSCEAR (2000)]. The ambient radiation exposure rates measured in the area ranged from 74 to 195 nGy h(-1) with a mean value of 131 nGy h(-1). The significant radionuclides being (232)Th, (238)U and (40)K, their activities were used to arrive at the absorbed gamma dose rate with a mean value of 131 nGy h(-1) and the radium equivalent activity with a mean value of 162 Bq kg(-1). The radon progeny levels varied from 0.21 to 1.4 mWL with a mean value of 0.6 mWL. The thoron progeny varied from 0.34 to 2.9 mWL with a mean value of 0.85 mWL. The ratio between thoron and radon progenies varied from 1.4 to 2.3 with a mean of 1.6. The details of the study, analysis and results are discussed. PMID:22951996

Mathew, S; Rajagopalan, M; Abraham, J P; Balakrishnan, D; Umadevi, A G

2012-11-01

351

Artificial radioactivity in environmental media (air, rainwater, soil, vegetation) in Austria after the Fukushima nuclear accident.  

PubMed

Several environmental media in Austria were monitored for artificial radionuclides released during the Fukushima nuclear accident. Air (up to 1.2 mBq/m(3) particulate (131)I) and rainwater (up to 5.2 Bq/L (131)I) proved to be the media best suited for the environmental monitoring, allowing also a temporal resolution of the activity levels. Significant regional differences in the wet deposition of (131)I with rain could be observed within the city of Vienna during the arrival of the contaminated air masses. Forward-trajectory analysis supported the hypothesis that the contaminated air masses coming from the northwest changed direction to northeast over Northern Austria, leading to a strong activity concentration gradient over Vienna. In the course of the environmental monitoring of the Fukushima releases, this phenomenon-significant differences of (131)I activity concentrations in rainwater on a narrow local scale (8.1 km)-appears to be unique. Vegetation (grass) was contaminated with (131)I and/or (137)Cs at a low level. Soil (up to 22 Bq/kg (137)Cs) was only affected by previous releases (nuclear weapon tests, Chernobyl). Here, also significant local differences can be observed due to different deposition rates during the Chernobyl accident. The effective ecological half-lives of (137)Cs in soil were calculated for four locations in Austria. They range from 7 to 30 years. No Austrian sample investigated herein exceeded the detection limit for (134)Cs; hence, the Fukushima nuclear accident did not contribute significantly to the total radiocesium inventory in Austrian environmental media. The levels of detected radioactivity were of no concern for public health. PMID:22961486

Steinhauser, Georg; Merz, Stefan; Hainz, Dieter; Sterba, Johannes H

2013-04-01

352

Phytoextraction of metals and metalloids from contaminated soils.  

PubMed

The removal of inorganic contaminants by plants is termed phytoextraction. Recent studies have looked at the feasibility of phytoextraction, and demonstrate that both good biomass yields and metal hyperaccumulation are required to make the process efficient. Adding chelating agents to soil to increase the bioavailability of contaminants can sometimes induce hyperaccumulation in normal plants, but may produce undesirable environmental risks. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the mechanisms responsible for hyperaccumulation, using natural hyperaccumulators as model plant species. Recent advances have been made in understanding the mechanisms responsible for hyperaccumulation of Zn, Cd, Ni and As by plants. Attempts to engineer metal tolerance and accumulation have so far been limited to Hg, As and Cd, and although promising results have been obtained they may be some way from practical application. More fundamental understanding of the traits and mechanisms involved in hyperaccumulation are needed so that phytoextraction can be optimised. PMID:12849780

McGrath, Steve P; Zhao, Fang-Jie

2003-06-01

353

Biochemical remediation of a TNT contaminated soil. Doctoral thesis  

SciTech Connect

This research presents the first field evidence for the phytoremediation of a TNT contaminated soil by the emersed aquatic plant, Myriophyllum brasiliense. Commonly known as Parrotfeather, this plant features a nitroreductase enzyme capable of promoting the reduction of the nitro groups on TNT to the corresponding amino groups. The proposed reductive pathway takes the TNT through isomers of monoamino and diamino to the final triaminonitrotoluene (TNT) Once in the TAT form and in the presence of oxygen, the final oxidative step quickly yields ring opened products and complete phytoremediation of TNT.

Young, D.G.

1995-06-01

354

RETENTION OF LIQUID CONTAMINANTS IN LAYERED SOILS. (R825549C063)  

EPA Science Inventory

Observations of organic contaminant liquids retained in layered soil profiles indicate contaminant saturations much greater than residual, where residual saturation would be expected, if one assumes a static distribution of fluid pressure. It is theorized that the increased re...

355

[Study on composite stabilization of arsenic (As) contaminated soil].  

PubMed

Since the contaminated soil may contain various kinds of heavy metals, use of single chemical reagent leads to poor remediation and high cost. In this study, soil containing As, Zn, Cd was sampled, and different reagents were selected to carry out the rapid stabilization of contaminated soil. The TCLP (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure) was used to evaluate the leachate toxicity of heavy metals and the results indicated that calcium-containing, sulphur-containing and iron-containing reagents had good performance in reducing the metal mobility. The stabilization efficiency of the six reagents tested ranked in the order of CaO > Na2S > organic sulfur > Chitosan > FeSO4 > (C2H5)2NCS2Na. Two types of reagents (six reagents) were combined based on the target properties of different reagents and the stabilization efficiency was evaluated and analyzed. The results indicated that the composite reagents had higher stabilization efficiency: the efficiency of 3% FeSO4 + 5% CaO was 81.7%, 97.2% and 68.2% for As, Cd and Zn, respectively, and the efficiency of 3% CaO + 5% organic sulfur was 76.6%, 95.7% and 93.8% for these three metals, respectively. Speciation analysis was carried out in this study and the results suggested that it was the change of metals from the exchangeable state to the reduction (for inorganic reagent) or oxidation state (for organic reagent) that caused the soil stabilization and the degree of change determined the stabilization efficiency. PMID:24289009

Wang, Hao; Pan, Li-xiang; Zhang, Xiang-yu; Li, Meng; Song, Bao-hua

2013-09-01

356

Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil by composting in biopiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Composting of contaminated soil in biopiles is an ex situ technology, where organic matter such as bark chips are added to contaminated soil as a bulking agent. Composting of lubricating oil-contaminated soil was performed in field scale (5×40 m3) using bark chips as the bulking agent, and two commercially available mixed microbial inocula as well as the effect of the

K. S. Jørgensen; J. Puustinen; A.-M. Suortti

2000-01-01

357

Polysulfide speciation and reactivity in chromate-contaminated soil.  

PubMed

Calcium polysulfide (CPS) has been observed to maintain a reducing capacity for prolonged time periods when used to treat Cr(VI)-contaminated soils. This study utilized bulk and micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy to investigate sulfur speciation in soil samples treated with CPS in batch and column studies and to determine the source of the reducing potential. Bulk XANES spectra indicated the presence of two dominant sulfur species: elemental sulfur, which is the product of the sulfide-chromate redox reaction, and thiosulfate (S2O3(2-)). Micro-XANES analyses confirmed these findings and showed that elemental sulfur precipitated as large particles, while thiosulfate was diffused within the soil grains and thus available to react with chromate that leached from slowly dissolving PbCrO4. Micro-X-ray fluorescence (?XRF) analyses indicated a close association of Pb and thiosulfate, so that PbS2O3 is a likely sink for thiosulfate, accounting for up to 20% of the total S added. Sorption of thiosulfate on iron oxides below pH 8 is a second retention mechanism for thiosulfate in the solid. Given that thiosulfate cannot reduce chromate but can reduce solid-bound Fe(III) under neutral pH conditions, it is hypothesized that ferrous iron production is an additional mechanism to maintain reductive conditions in CPS-treated soils. PMID:25092639

Chrysochoou, Maria; Johnston, Chad P

2015-01-01

358

Application of PIXE analysis to investigation of plants cultivated with contaminated soil of Fukushima  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a method to research low radioactive cesium contaminated plants by the use of PIXE analysis. Highly contaminated regions still remain in the Fukushima prefecture. We collected wild plants growing in this area, that is, Butterbur, Welsh onion, Alpine leek and White clover and measured their specific activities of 137Cs and 40K. We also measured 137Cs and 40K specific activities of soil under these plants. Soil-to-plant transfer factors of 137Cs were ?0.02 for 4 wild plants and those of 40K were ?0.5 except for White clover. Using PIXE analysis, we measured the concentration of mineral elements in these plants. Among mineral elements, we noted the concentrations of additional alkali metal elements such as Na, K and Rb. The experimental results showed that the concentration of Rb was proportional to the specific activities of 137Cs except for Welsh onion and other elements had no strong correlation with 137Cs. These results indicate that there may be correlations between the adsorption of Cs and Rb.

Ishii, K.; Terakawa, A.; Matsuyama, S.; Ishizaki, A.; Arai, H.; Osada, N.; Sugai, H.; Takahashi, H.; Sera, K.; Sasaki, H.; Sasaki, K.; Sawamura, T.

2014-08-01

359

Radioactive artifacts: historical sources of modern radium contamination  

SciTech Connect

Radium has been distributed in a wide variety of devices during the early part of this century. Antique objects containing significant amounts of radium turn up at flea markets, antique shows, and antique dealers, in a variety of locations. These objects include radium in devices which were used by legitimate medical practitioners for legitimate medical purposes such as therapy, as well as a wide variety of quack cures. These devices may contain anywhere from a few nanocuries to as much as several hundred microcuries of radium. In addition to medical sources, a large variety of scientific instruments utilize radium in luminous dials. These instruments include compasses, azimuth indicators, and virtually any object which might require some form of calibration. In addition, the consumer market utilized a large amount of radium in the production of wrist watches, pocket watches, and clocks with luminous dials. Some of these watches contained as much as 4.5 microCi of radium, and between 1913 and 1920 about 70 gm was produced for the manufacture of luminous compounds. In addition to the large amount of radium produced for scientific and consumer utilization, there were a number of materials produced which were claimed to contain radium but in fact did not, further adding to the confusion in this area. The wide availability of radium is a result of the public's great fascination with radioactivity during the early part of this century and a belief in its curative properties. A number of objects were produced in order to trap the emanations of radium in water for persons to drink in order to benefit from their healing effects. Since the late 20s and early 30s the public's attitude towards radiation has shifted 180 degrees and it is now considered an extremely dangerous and harmful material.

Blaufox, M.D.

1988-01-01

360

Mixing of an anthracene-contaminated soil: a simple but efficient remediation technique?  

PubMed

Contamination of soils with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is a serious problem in petroleum producing countries, such as México, and environment-friendly easy to apply techniques are required to accelerate the removal of the contaminants. Removal of anthracene was monitored in an arable and a pasture soil regularly mixed or amended with organic material, a non-ionic surfactant (Surfynol(®) 485) or earthworms (Eisenia fetida (Savigny, 1826)). In both soils the same results were obtained although the removal of anthracene was faster from the pasture than from the arable soil. The fastest removal of anthracene was obtained when the soil was mixed every 7 days and no contaminant was detected in both soils after 56 days. The second fastest removal of anthracene was obtained when earthworms were added to soil and no contaminant was detected in both soils after 112 days. Application of organic material that served as feed for the earthworms also accelerated the removal of the contaminant compared to the unamended soil, but application of the surfactant inhibited the dissipation of the contaminant. Only 37% of the spiked anthracene was removed from soil when surfactant was applied, while 62% was dissipated in the unamended soil after 112 days. It was found that simply mixing a soil removed anthracene faster than when earthworms were applied, while the application of the surfactant inhibited the removal of anthracene by the autochthonous soil microorganisms. PMID:23896178

Delgado-Balbuena, Laura; Aguilar-Chávez, Ángel R; Luna-Guido, Marco L; Dendooven, Luc

2013-10-01

361

Uptake and transport of radioactive nickel and cadmium into three vegetables after wet aerial contamination.  

PubMed

Knowledge of radionuclide or trace element retention and translocation to plants following an aerial contamination event, for example, sprinkling with contaminated water, is necessary for the evaluation of human exposure through consumption of contaminated vegetables. The fate of 63Ni and 109Cd in all plant parts of three different vegetables after wet deposition on leaves or on fruits was studied. Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), radish (Raphanus sativus L.), and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) grown under controlled conditions in a growth chamber were contaminated with 63Ni and 109Cd either on leaves, by means of two different contamination methods (a single early contamination and a repetitive one), or on bean husks (third contamination method: a single contamination at a late stage). Spiked and nonspiked organs were harvested at maturity and radionuclide contents were measured. The fraction retained was on average 56% of the initially administered doses of 63Ni and 87% of 109Cd. The leaf-to-other organ translocation factor was considerably higher for 63Ni (on average 43% of retained radioactivity) than for 109Cd (8%). Nickel-63 migrated throughout the whole plant following foliar contamination, and mainly toward young leaves, seeds in formation, and sink organs, whereas 109Cd migrated to a much lesser extent and only to the organs that were closest to the spiked one, and not at all into fruit. After a fruit contamination event, both radionuclides were translocated into the seeds of spiked fruits. Radionuclide retention and translocation were not affected by plant species, but principally by the type of organ contaminated. PMID:16091602

Fismes, Joëlle; Echevarria, Guillaume; Leclerc-Cessac, Elisabeth; Morel, Jean Louis

2005-01-01

362

Bioremediation of a weathered and a recently oil-contaminated soils from Brazil: a comparison study.  

PubMed

The facility with which hydrocarbons can be removed from soils varies inversely with aging of soil samples as a result of weathering. Weathering refers to the result of biological, chemical and physical processes that can affect the type of hydrocarbons that remain in a soil. These processes enhance the sorption of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) to the soil matrix, decreasing the rate and extent of biodegradation. Additionally, pollutant compounds in high concentrations can more easily affect the microbial population of a recently contaminated soil than in a weathered one, leading to inhibition of the biodegradation process. The present work aimed at comparing the biodegradation efficiencies obtained in a recently oil-contaminated soil (spiked one) from Brazil and an weathered one, contaminated for four years, after the application of bioaugmentation and biostimulation techniques. Both soils were contaminated with 5.4% of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) and the highest biodegradation efficiency (7.4%) was reached for the weathered contaminated soil. It could be concluded that the low biodegradation efficiencies reached for all conditions tested reflect the treatment difficulty of a weathered soil contaminated with a high crude oil concentration. Moreover, both soils (weathered and recently contaminated) submitted to bioaugmentation and biostimulation techniques presented biodegradation efficiencies approximately twice as higher as the ones without the aforementioned treatment (natural attenuation). PMID:15620743

Trindade, P V O; Sobral, L G; Rizzo, A C L; Leite, S G F; Soriano, A U

2005-01-01

363

Legacy soil contamination at abandoned mine sites: making a case for guidance on soil protection.  

PubMed

Within the European Union, guidance in the form of a uniform Soil Directive does not exist and member states are left to enact their own legislation governing historic soil contamination. Several historic or "legacy" sites exist in Cyprus - an EU member state with a long history of mining and a significant number of abandoned mining sites. The gold-silver enrichment plant of Mitsero village was abandoned 70 years ago, yet soil samples inside and outside the plant were extremely low in pH, exhibited high leachability of heavy metals and high cyanide levels. Water samples collected from an ephemeral stream located down-gradient of the site contained high levels of heavy metals. Two abandoned open-pit mines (Kokkinopezoula and Mathiatis) were investigated, where elevated metal content in soil samples from the surrounding streams and spoil heaps, and extremely low pH and high metal content in water samples from the mine crater were measured. PMID:25600021

Kostarelos, Konstantinos; Gavriel, Ifigenia; Stylianou, Marinos; Zissimos, Andreas M; Morisseau, Eleni; Dermatas, Dimitris

2015-03-01

364

Chemometric assessment of enhanced bioremediation of oil contaminated soils.  

PubMed

Bioremediation is a promising technique for reclamation of oil polluted soils. In this study, six methods for enhancing bioremediation were tested on oil contaminated soils from three refinery areas in Iran (Isfahan, Arak, and Tehran). The methods included bacterial enrichment, planting, and addition of nitrogen and phosphorous, molasses, hydrogen peroxide, and a surfactant (Tween 80). Total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations and CHEMometric analysis of Selected Ion Chromatograms (SIC) termed CHEMSIC method of petroleum biomarkers including terpanes, regular, diaromatic and triaromatic steranes were used for determining the level and type of hydrocarbon contamination. The same methods were used to study oil weathering of 2 to 6 ring polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs). Results demonstrated that bacterial enrichment and addition of nutrients were most efficient with 50% to 62% removal of TPH. Furthermore, the CHEMSIC results demonstrated that the bacterial enrichment was more efficient in degradation of n-alkanes and low molecular weight PACs as well as alkylated PACs (e.g. C?-C? naphthalenes, C? phenanthrenes and C?-C? dibenzothiophenes), while nutrient addition led to a larger relative removal of isoprenoids (e.g. norpristane, pristane and phytane). It is concluded that the CHEMSIC method is a valuable tool for assessing bioremediation efficiency. PMID:23644688

Soleimani, Mohsen; Farhoudi, Majid; Christensen, Jan H

2013-06-15

365

Investigation of permeability and leaching of hot mix asphalt concrete containing oil-contaminated soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oil-contaminated soil (OCS) results from leaking underground storage tanks, oil spills on clean soils, or soils surrounding petroleum refineries and crude oil wells. In Oman, Petroleum Development Oman (PDO) generates more than 50,000ton\\/year of oil-contaminated soil. Recycling of OCS can be considered a viable solution to the disposal problem. This paper presents the results of investigating the permeability and leaching

Hossam F. Hassan; Amer Al Rawas; Abdel Wahid Hago; Ahmad Jamrah; Ahmed Al-Futaisi; Talal Al-Sabqi

2008-01-01

366

IPEC Gels for Remediating Soils Contaminated as Result of Nuclear and Industrial Activities  

SciTech Connect

Under International Scientific and Technological Center (ISTC, Moscow) Project no. 1567 the Moscow research team in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory developed and tested new kind of inter-polyelectrolyte complexes with micro-gel (IPECs) for soil surface stabilization, prevention of radioactive contamination distribution with wind and water streams and for site remediation using mixtures of new water-soluble polymers with seeding grasses. Evidently, the most important factor responsible for the effectiveness of a polymeric aggregator is the ratio of the size of poly-complex particles to that of dispersion particles being aggregated. The particle size of IPEC produced of a pair of linear oppositely charged poly-electrolytes is usually fractions of a micron. Such a particle can fix only small aggregates ({approx}10 {mu}m and less). One of the ways of improving poly-complex aggregators is to use loose cross-linked poly-electrolytic gels as an IPEC component. When generating/dispersing these poly-electrolytic gels, particles of specified sizes can be produced. These poly-electrolytic micro-gels introduced into soil save moisture, what is important for arid sites. Wind erosion was studied as a function of soil physical-chemical properties and the air stream velocity. A laboratory wind tunnel instrumented to follow the process on a real-time basis was used for our study. Polymer-treated samples show a high wind erosion resistance in the wind velocity range up to 40 m/s. The micro-gel dispersion MGD-2 was injected in combination with MLA-1 in the experiments with water flow - water erosion resistance. With an increase in the water-polymer solution application rate from 2.0 to 4.0 l/m{sup 2} the soil resistance to eroding water streams with velocity of 55 cm/s (2.0 l/m{sup 2}) and at 70.0 cm/s with 4.0 l/m{sup 2}. Based on the classification of soils by erosion resistance, soils eroded with a water stream 1 cm high at a velocity of 50 cm/s are considered to be highly erosion-resistant. It showed that new kinds of IPECs based with micro-gels are very useful as soil stabilizers and applicable as activating agent of grass vegetation in the remediation activities. It may successfully apply also in the post-accidental activities in the case of spray radioactive materials onto topsoils. (authors)

Mikheykin, S.V.; Anciferova, E.Yu.; Simonov, V.P. [Moscow Scientific and Industrial Association 'Radon' - Mos SIA Radon, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zezin, A.B.; Rogacheva, V.B.; Bolusheva, T.N. [Moscow State University - MSU, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2006-07-01

367

Arsenic speciation in multiple metal environments II. Micro-spectroscopic investigation of a CCA contaminated soil  

E-print Network

the soil solution pH [6]. The pH- dependent sorption/desorption behavior of arsenate and other oxyanions contaminated soil Markus Gräfe a,,1 , Ryan V. Tappero a , Matthew A. Marcus b , Donald L. Sparks a a Environmental Soil Chemistry Group, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, 152 Townsend Hall, University

368

Effects of incubation on solubility and mobility of trace metals in two contaminated soils  

E-print Network

.8) of Tampa soil, Montreal soil had an alkaline pH of 7.7 and high Ca of 1.6%. Concentrations of FeEffects of incubation on solubility and mobility of trace metals in two contaminated soils Lena Q. Ma*, Yan Dong Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611

Ma, Lena

369

Plant tolerance to diesel minimizes its impact on soil microbial characteristics during rhizoremediation of diesel-contaminated soils.  

PubMed

Soil contamination due to petroleum-derived products is an important environmental problem. We assessed the impacts of diesel oil on plants (Trifolium repens and Lolium perenne) and soil microbial community characteristics within the context of the rhizoremediation of contaminated soils. For this purpose, a diesel fuel spill on a grassland soil was simulated under pot conditions at a dose of 12,000 mg diesel kg(-1) DW soil. Thirty days after diesel addition, T. repens (white clover) and L. perenne (perennial ryegrass) were sown in the pots and grown under greenhouse conditions (temperature 25/18 °C day/night, relative humidity 60/80% day/night and a photosynthetic photon flux density of 400 ?mol photon m(-2) s(-1)) for 5 months. A parallel set of unplanted pots was also included. Concentrations of n-alkanes in soil were determined as an indicator of diesel degradation. Seedling germination, plant growth, maximal photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (F(v)/F(m)), pigment composition and lipophylic antioxidant content were determined to assess the impacts of diesel on the studied plants. Soil microbial community characteristics, such as enzyme and community-level physiological profiles, were also determined and used to calculate the soil quality index (SQI). The presence of plants had a stimulatory effect on soil microbial activity. L. perenne was far more tolerant to diesel contamination than T. repens. Diesel contamination affected soil microbial characteristics, although its impact was less pronounced in the rhizosphere of L. perenne. Rhizoremediation with T. repens and L. perenne resulted in a similar reduction of total n-alkanes concentration. However, values of the soil microbial parameters and the SQI showed that the more tolerant species (L. perenne) was able to better maintain its rhizosphere characteristics when growing in diesel-contaminated soil, suggesting a better soil health. We concluded that plant tolerance is of crucial importance for the recovery of soil health during rhizoremediation of contaminated soils. PMID:21741073

Barrutia, O; Garbisu, C; Epelde, L; Sampedro, M C; Goicolea, M A; Becerril, J M

2011-09-01

370

Bacterial acquisition of hexachlorobenzene-derived carbon in contaminated soil.  

PubMed

Pesticides are a class of xenobiotics intentionally released into the environment. Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) was used as a fungicide from 1945, leaving behind many contaminated sites. Very few studies have examined the biodegradation of HCB or the fate of HCB-derived carbon. Here we report that certain bacterial populations are capable of deriving carbon from HCB in contaminated soil under aerobic conditions. These populations are primarily Proteobacteria, including Methylobacterium and Pseudomonas, which predominated as detected by stable isotope probing (SIP) and 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing. Due to the nature of SIP, which can be used as a functional method solely for assimilatory processes, it is not possible to elucidate whether these populations metabolized directly HCB or intermediates of its metabolism produced by different populations. The possibility exists that HCB is degraded via the formation of pentachlorophenol (PCP), which is further mineralized. With this in mind, we designed primers to amplify PCP 4-monooxygenase-coding sequences based on the available pcpB gene sequence from Methylobacterium radiotolerans JCM 2831. Based on 16S rRNA gene analysis, organisms closely related to this strain were detected in (13)C-labeled DNA. Using the designed primers, we were able to amplify pcpB genes in both total community DNA and (13)C-DNA. This indicates that HCB might be transformed into PCP before it gets assimilated. In summary, this study is the first report on which bacterial populations benefit from carbon originating in the pesticide HCB in a contaminated soil. PMID:25065801

Uhlik, Ondrej; Strejcek, Michal; Vondracek, Jan; Musilova, Lucie; Ridl, Jakub; Lovecka, Petra; Macek, Tomas

2014-10-01

371

SPECTROMTRIE Y A LA CONTAMINATION RADIO-ACTIVE DU LAIT 251 MODALITS NOUVELLES POUR LE STOCKAGE  

E-print Network

SPECTROM�TRIE Y A LA CONTAMINATION RADIO-ACTIVE DU LAIT 251 MODALIT�S NOUVELLES POUR LE STOCKAGE ET poteries qui sont de 1,5 AF par litre, augmenté de 1 AF s'il y avait réfrigération et stockage à l frais de refroidissement et de stockage à la ferme qui sont d'environ 2,50 AF par litre, représentant l

Boyer, Edmond

372

Impact of coal mine dump contaminated soils on elemental uptake by Spinacia oleracea (spinach)  

SciTech Connect

The elemental uptake and the growth response of Spinacia oleracea (spinach) to the soil contaminated with the South African bituminous coal mine dump soil, viz. 0%, 5%, 15%, and 25% w/w, was investigated. The contaminated soils were analyzed for pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), soil organic matter (SOM), and concentrations of selected heavy metals. The pH, SOM, and CEC decreased with an increase in contamination indicating the acidic nature of coal mine soil and the raise in the soil binding sites. The distribution of Fe, Mn, Ni, Cd, and Pb in the roots and leaves of the plants was determined in two stages of plant growth. Spinach showed high accumulation of Fe and increased levels of Ni and Cd with an increase in contamination. No plant growth was recorded with 25% contamination.

Chunilall, V.; Kindness, A.; Jonnalagadda, S.B. [University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban (South Africa)

2006-07-01

373

The effect of oil contamination on bacteria in a soddy-podzolic soil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of oil contamination on bacteria in a soddy-podzolic soil was studied. Oil was introduced into the soil 8, 11, and 17 years ago. It was found that oil contamination has exerted long-term negative effects on the number and biomass of the soil bacteria. The deficiency of available phosphorus was one of the major negative factors affecting these parameters in the old-contaminated soils. The application of Na2HPO4 to the contaminated soils eliminated this negative effect. The effect of oil contamination on the taxonomic diversity and structure of the bacterial community in the studied soil was determined with the help of denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis.

Nazarov, A. V.; Anan'ina, L. N.; Yastrebova, O. V.; Plotnikova, E. G.

2010-12-01

374

Using soil and contaminant properties to assess the potential for groundwater contamination to the lower Great Lakes, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contaminant risk factors in surface soil were evaluated within the urbanized Rouge River watershed in southeastern Michigan, USA, which includes metropolitan Detroit. An analytical risk factor model and Geographic Information Systems overlays were used to quantify and characterize the potential impacts of five categories of contaminants including DNAPLs (dense nonaqueous phase liquids), LNAPLs (light nonaqueous phase liquids), PAHs (polynuclear aromatic

Martin M. Kaufman; Daniel T. Rogers; Kent S. Murray

2009-01-01

375

Partitioning and speciation of chromium, copper, and arsenic in CCA-contaminated soils: influence of soil composition  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study focused on the influence of soil composition and physicochemical characteristics on the retention and partitioning of Cu, Cr and As in nine chromated copper arsenate (CCA) artificially contaminated soils. A statistical mixture design was used to set up the number of soils and their respective composition. Sequential extraction and modified solvent extraction were used to assess Cu and

Cristina F Balasoiu; Gérald J Zagury; Louise Deschênes

2001-01-01

376

EFFECT OF SOIL PB INACTIVATION TREATMENTS ON BIOAVAILABILITY OF JOPLIN, MO, SMELTER CONTAMINATED SOIL PB TO RATS  

EPA Science Inventory

The effects of treating contaminated soils with various soil amendments on the bioavailability of lead were assessed in the weanling rat model. The effect of treatment was assessed by comparing the adsorption of Pb of animals fed soil samples treated with (0.5%, 1% P and 2.5% Fe ...

377

A Review of Removable Surface Contamination on Radioactive Materials Transportation Containers  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results of a study sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) of removable surface contamination on radioactive materials transportation containers. The purpose of the study is to provide information to the NRC during their review of existing regulations. Data was obtained from both industry and literature on three major topics: 1) radiation doses, 2) economic costs, and 3) contamination frequencies. Containers for four categories of radioactive materials are considered including radiopharmaceuticals, industrial sources, nuclear fuel cycle materials, and low-level radioactive waste. Assumptions made in this study use current information to obtain realistic yet conservative estimates of radiation dose and economic costs. Collective and individual radiation doses are presented for each container category on a per container basis. Total doses, to workers and the public, are also presented for spent fuel cask and low-level waste drum decontamination. Estimates of the additional economic costs incurred by lowering current limits by factors of 10 and 100 are presented. Current contamination levels for each category of container are estimated from the data collected. The information contained in this report is designed to be useful to the NRC in preparing their recommendations for new regulations.

Kennedy, Jr, W. E.; Watson, E. C.; Murphy, D. W.; Harrer, B. J.; Harty, R.; Aldrich, J. M.

1981-05-01

378

Potential for phytoextraction of PCBs from contaminated soils using weeds.  

PubMed

A comprehensive investigation of the potential of twenty-seven different species of weeds to phytoextract polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from contaminated soil was conducted at two field sites (Etobicoke and Lindsay) in southern Ontario, Canada. Soil concentrations were 31 microg/g and 4.7 microg/g at each site respectively. All species accumulated PCBs in their root and shoot tissues. Mean shoot concentrations at the two sites ranged from 0.42 microg/g for Chenopodium album to 35 microg/g for Vicia cracca (dry weight). Bioaccumulation factors (BAF=[PCB](plant tissue)/[PCB](mean soil)) at the two sites ranged from 0.08 for Cirsium vulgare to 1.1 for V. cracca. Maximum shoot extractions were 420 microg for Solidago canadensis at the Etobicoke site, and 120 microg for Chrysanthemum leucanthemum at the Lindsay site. When plant density was taken into account with a theoretical density value, seventeen species appeared to be able to extract a similar or greater quantity of PCBs into the shoot tissue than pumpkins (Curcurbita pepo ssp. pepo) which are known PCB accumulators. Therefore, some of these weed species are promising candidates for future phytoremediation studies. PMID:20483449

Ficko, Sarah A; Rutter, Allison; Zeeb, Barbara A

2010-07-15

379

Test plan for the soils facility demonstration: A petroleum contaminated soil bioremediation facility  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this test plan are to show the value added by using bioremediation as an effective and environmentally sound method to remediate petroleum contaminated soils (PCS) by: demonstrating bioremediation as a permanent method for remediating soils contaminated with petroleum products; establishing the best operating conditions for maximizing bioremediation and minimizing volatilization for SRS PCS during different seasons; determining the minimum set of analyses and sampling frequency to allow efficient and cost-effective operation; determining best use of existing site equipment and personnel to optimize facility operations and conserve SRS resources; and as an ancillary objective, demonstrating and optimizing new and innovative analytical techniques that will lower cost, decrease time, and decrease secondary waste streams for required PCS assays.

Lombard, K.H.

1994-08-01

380

Assessment of sampling strategy for explosives-contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

An explosives-contaminated site was characterized using composite sampling, in-field sample homogenization and on-site analysis. Explosives contaminated sites demonstrate large short-range heterogeneity due to the crystalline nature and poor water solubility of the dispersed contaminants. The sampling strategy must be carefully planned in order to minimize sampling error and total uncertainty. The site investigated in this particular study is an anti-tank firing range that has been in-use for over 20 years. The ammunition fired at this range is a melt-cast explosive based on a mixture of HMX and TNT in the ratio of 70:30. Two previous preliminary sampling surveys of this site have shown high levels of HMX in soil samples collected nearby the targeted tanks. This particular site was chosen for a collaborative effort between the Canadian Department of National Defence and the USA Department of Defense to study sampling strategies and sample heterogeneity where HMX is the main contaminant. On-site colorimetric TNT and HMX methods and enzyme immunoassay TNT and RDX methods were used initially to evaluate if the sampling pattern used provided representative results. A 6 m square grid (36 m{sup 2}) pattern was established, including two of the targeted tanks. Seventeen grids were installed and composite samples were collected within those grids. Four surface composite samples were collected in each quadrant of each grid using a circular pattern that sampled about 10% of the top 5 cm of the surface. Replicates were collected to assess the representativeness achieved. Field analysis showed concentrations of HMX ranged from as high as 1640 mg/kg near one target to 2.1 mg/kg at a distance of 15 m from the target. On the other hand, TNT concentrations were much lower than would be expected based on the 70:30 composition ratio. Results from the colorimetric on-site analyses were in excellent agreement with laboratory results.

Thiboutot, S.; Ampleman, G. [Defence Research Establishment, Val-Belair, Quebec (Canada); Jenkins, T.F.; Walsh, M.E.; Thorne, P.G. [Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab., Hanover, NH (United States); Ranney, T.A. [Science and Technology Corp., Hanover, NH (United States); Grant, C.L. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States). Chemistry Dept.

1997-12-31

381

Contamination of soils in the urbanized areas of Belarus with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the soils of urbanized areas, including the impact zones of Belarus, were studied. The concentrations of 16 PAHs in the soils were determined for individual and high-rise building zones, forests, and forest parks of Belarus. The levels of the PAH accumulation in the soils of different industrial enterprises and boiler stations were analyzed. Possible sources of soil contamination with PAHs were considered, and the structure of the PAHs in the soils was shown. The levels of the soil contamination were determined from the regulated parameters for individual compounds and the sum of 16 PAHs.

Kukharchyk, T. I.; Khomich, V. S.; Kakareka, S. V.; Kurman, P. V.; Kozyrenko, M. I.

2013-02-01

382

Four methods for determining the composition of trace radioactive surface contamination of low-radioactivity metal  

E-print Network

Four methods for determining the composition of low-level uranium- and thorium-chain surface contamination are presented. One method is the observation of Cherenkov light production in water. In two additional methods a position-sensitive proportional counter surrounding the surface is used to make both a measurement of the energy spectrum of alpha particle emissions and also coincidence measurements to derive the thorium-chain content based on the presence of short-lived isotopes in that decay chain. The fourth method is a radiochemical technique in which the surface is eluted with a weak acid, the eluate is concentrated, added to liquid scintillator and assayed by recording beta-alpha coincidences. These methods were used to characterize two `hotspots' on the outer surface of one of the He-3 proportional counters in the Neutral Current Detection array of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory experiment. The methods have similar sensitivities, of order tens of ng, to both thorium- and uranium-chain contamination.

H. M. O'Keeffe; T. H. Burritt; B. T. Cleveland; G. Doucas; N. Gagnon; N. A. Jelley; C. Kraus; I. T. Lawson; S. Majerus; S. R. McGee; A. W. Myers; A. W. P. Poon; K. Rielage; R. G. H. Robertson; R. C. Rosten; L. C. Stonehill; B. A. VanDevender; T. D. Van Wechel

2011-03-29

383

Phytoremediation of dye contaminated soil by Leucaena leucocephala (subabul) seed and growth assessment of Vigna radiata in the remediated soil  

PubMed Central

The present study was investigated for soil bioremediation through sababul plant biomass (Leucaena leucocephala). The soil contaminated with textile effluent was collected from Erode (chithode) area. Various physico-chemical characterizations like N, P, and K and electrical conductivity were assessed on both control and dye contaminated soils before and after remediation. Sababul (L. leucocephala) powder used as plant biomass for remediation was a tool for textile dye removal using basic synthetic dyes by column packing and eluting. The concentration of the dye eluted was compared with its original concentration of dye and were analyzed by using UV–vis spectrophotometer. Sababul plant biomass was analyzed for its physico-chemical properties and active compounds were detected by GC–MS, HPTLC and FTIR. Plant growth was assessed with green gram on the textile contaminated soil and sababul had the potential of adsorbing the dye as the contaminated soil and also check the growth of green gram. PMID:25183943

Jayanthy, V.; Geetha, R.; Rajendran, R.; Prabhavathi, P.; Karthik Sundaram, S.; Dinesh Kumar, S.; Santhanam, P.

2013-01-01

384

Calcium polysulfide treatment of Cr(VI)-contaminated soil.  

PubMed

Batch treatability studies for a Cr(VI)-contaminated glacial soil from a Cr plating facility were conducted using 1X and 2X the stoichiometric ratio of calcium polysulfide (CPS). The pH of the treated soil increased from 6 to 11 upon CPS addition, but progressively returned to 8-8.5 over the course of 1 year. The 1X dosage maintained a highly reducing environment up to 21 days of monitoring with the samples exposed to atmospheric oxygen, while 2X was reducing up to 180 days of curing. The EPA regulatory method for solid Cr(VI) could not reliably predict Cr(VI) in the treated solid due to ongoing reduction during the test. SPLP results showed that the CPS created an apparent Cr(VI) mobilization during the first 60 days of treatment, with subsequent decrease in soluble Cr(VI) up to 1 year of monitoring. Synchrotron micro-X-ray analyses at 60 days curing showed that Cr(VI) was predominantly bound as highly insoluble PbCrO(4) that precipitated in the interstitial pores of the soil, with very little to no Cr(VI) associated with the abundant iron oxyhydroxides. Despite its spatial accessibility and due to its low solubility, PbCrO(4) was recalcitrant to treatment, which proceeded only very slowly as judged by the SPLP data. It is concluded that, while CPS has a long residence time in the environment and is a promising reductant, in situ reduction is not an efficient treatment method for soils with highly insoluble Cr(VI) compounds, especially in surficial layers such as the one studied. PMID:20381961

Chrysochoou, Maria; Ferreira, Daniel R; Johnston, Chad P

2010-07-15

385

SAFETY ASPECTS RELATED TO THE RADIOACTIVELY CONTAMINATED FOREST AREAS IN BELARUS  

SciTech Connect

Doses currently received in Belarus through various pathways related to the contamination of forests are evaluated through calculations. A major pathway is, as expected, generally found to be the external radiation from a contaminated forest floor. Also other pathways may in some cases be highly significant. Generally, it is found that the dose contributions to people spending time in the contaminated forest or consuming forest products are highest, whereas for instance doses received from domestic use of fire-wood are found to be negligible. Recommendations for storage of waste from combustion plants fired with radioactive forest material are also given, together with an estimate of the specific activity of the waste to be disposed of.

SULLIVAN,T.; GIBBS,B.; ANDERSSON,K.G.; ROED,J.; RYMKEVICH,V.; BREKKE,D.

1998-03-01

386

Corrosion mechanisms of low level vitrified radioactive waste in a loamy soil M.I. Ojovan1  

E-print Network

Corrosion mechanisms of low level vitrified radioactive waste in a loamy soil M.I. Ojovan1 , W-sodium content radioactive waste borosilicate glass buried in a loamy soil (glass K-26) and in an open testing. INTRODUCTION Vitrification of low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) is attracting great interest

Sheffield, University of

387

PILOT-SCALE INCINERABILITY EVALUATION OF ARSENIC- AND LEAD-CONTAMINATED SOILS FROM TWO SUPERFUND SITES  

EPA Science Inventory

Two incineration test programs were conducted at EPA's Incineration Research Facility to evaluate the suitability of incineration as an option to treat-contaminated Superfund site soils. he soils from the Purity Oil Sales site in Region 9 are contaminated with lead, up to several...

388

Efficacy of in-situ for the remediation of PAH contaminated soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are of environmental concern because many PAHs are either carcinogens or potential carcinogens. Petroleum products are a major source of PAHs. The occurrence of PAH contamination is widespread and novel treatment technologies for the remediation of contaminated soils are necessary.Ozone has been found to be extremely useful for the degradation of PAHs in soils. For these

Susan J. Masten; Simon H. R. Davies

1997-01-01

389

Contaminant Immobilization and Nutrient Release by Biochar Soil Amendment: Roles of Natural Organic Matter  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Contamination of soil interstitial waters by labile heavy metals such as CuII, CdII, and NiII is of worldwide concern. Carbonaceous materials such as char and activated carbon have received considerable attention in recent years as soil amendment for both sequestering heavy metal contaminants and r...

390

Vertical distribution of lead and arsenic in soils contaminated with lead arsenate pesticide residues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many deciduous fruit tree orchard sites throughout the world are contaminated with lead (Pb) and arsenic (As) from past use of lead arsenate insecticides. The vertical distribution of Pb and As was examined in six contaminated orchard soils in the State of Washington, USA. Most of the Pb and As was restricted to the upper 40 cm of soil, with

F. J. Peryea; T. L. Creger

1994-01-01

391

AIR EMISSIONS FROM THE TREATMENT OF SOILS CONTAMINATED WITH PETROLEUM FUELS AND OTHER SUBSTANCES  

EPA Science Inventory

The report updates a 1992 report that summarizes available information on air emissions from the treatment of soils contaminated with fuels. Soils contaminated by leaks or spills of fuel products, such as gasoline or jet fuel, are a nationwide concern. Air emissions during remedi...

392

Simple Iron Treatment Inexpensive Way to Remove Pesticides from Contaminated Soil  

E-print Network

Simple Iron Treatment Inexpensive Way to Remove Pesticides from Contaminated Soil by Steve Ress University of Nebraska Water Center/Environmental Programs A relatively simple method of mixing iron-contaminated soil with fine-grained metallic iron and water. This approach can successfully eliminate up to 99

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

393

Isolation and identification of dioxin degrading bacteria found in soils contaminated with dioxins  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

There is a need to identify bacteria that can degrade environmental contaminants; a fruitful place to identify such bacteria is within contaminated soil. The dioxin content and congener distribution in soils collected from adjacent to old railroad track that were treated with pentachlorophenol (PCP...

394

PHYTOREMEDIATION OF SOILS CONTAMINATED WITH WOOD PRESERVATIVES: GREENHOUSE AND FIELD EVALUATIONS  

EPA Science Inventory

Phytoremediation was evaluated as a potential treatment for the creosote-contaminated surface soil at the McCormick and Baxter (M&B) Superfund Site in Portland, OR. Soil a the M&B site is contaminated with pentachlorophenol (PCP) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Eight indivi...

395

Removal of Heavy Metals from Calcareous Contaminated Soils by EDTA Leaching  

Microsoft Academic Search

The performance of EDTA for the treatment of calcareous soils contaminated with heavy metals from mining and smelting activities was evaluated in this study. Soil samples containing variable levels of contamination, from 500 to 35 000 mg kg-1 Pb and 700 to 20 000 mg kg-1 Zn, were subjected to EDTA treatment and the extraction of heavy metals was found

N. Papassiopi; S. Tambouris; A. Kontopoulos

1999-01-01

396

Heavy metal contamination of soil around Pali Industrial Area, Rajasthan, India  

Microsoft Academic Search

Due to rapid industrialization, urbanization and intensive agriculture in India increasing contamination of heavy metals in soil has become a major concern. An environmental geochemical investigation was carried out in and around the Pali industrial development area of Rajasthan to determine the effect of contamination in the study area. Soil samples collected near the Pali industrial area were analyzed for

A. K. Krishna; P. K. Govil

2004-01-01

397

Remediation of Heavy Metal Contaminated Soils: Phytoremediation as a Potentially Promising Clean-Up Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increased soil pollution with heavy metals due to various human and natural activities has led to a growing need to address environmental contamination. Some remediation technologies have been developed to treat contaminated soil, but a biology-based technology, phytoremediation, is emerging. Phytoremediation includes phytovolatilization, phytostabilization, and phytoextraction using hyperaccumulator species or a chelate-enhancement strategy. To enhance phytoremediation as a viable strategy,

Ana P. G. C. Marques; António O. S. S. Rangel; Paula M. L. Castro

2009-01-01

398

Bioremediation of Poly-Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH)Contaminated Soil by Composting  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a comprehensive and critical review of research on different co-composting approaches to bioremediate hydrocarbon contaminated soil, organisms that have been found to degrade PAHs, and PAH breakdown products. Advantages and limitations of using certain groups of organisms and recommended areas of further research effort are identified. Studies investigating the use of composting techniques to treat contaminated soil

Nadine Loick; Phil J. Hobbs; Mike D. C. Hale; Davey L. Jones

2009-01-01

399

Chelant extraction and REDOX manipulation for mobilization of heavy metals from contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

Was the result of open burning and open detonation of chemical agents and munitions in the Toxic Burning Pits area at J-Field, located in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County, Maryland, soils have been contaminated with heavy metals. Simultaneous extraction is complicated because of the multitude of contaminant forms that exist. This paper uses data from a treatability study performed at Argonne National Laboratory to discuss and compare several treatment methods that were evaluated for remediating metals-contaminated soils. J-Field soils were subjected to a series of treatability experiments designed to determine the feasibility of using soil washing/soil flushing, enhancements to soil washing/soil flushing, solidification/stabilization, and electrokinetics for remediating soils contaminated with metals. Chelating and mobilizing agents evaluated included ammonium acetate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, citric acid, Citranox, gluconic acid, phosphoric acid, oxalic acid, and nitrilotriacetic acid, in addition to pH-adjusted water. REDOX manipulation can maximize solubilities, increase desorption, and promote removal of heavy metal contaminants. Reducing agents that were studied included sodium borohydride, sodium metabisulfite, and thiourea dioxide. The oxidants studied included hydrogen peroxide, sodium percarbonate, sodium hypochlorite, and potassium permanganate. This paper summaries the results from the physical/chemical characterization, soil washing/soil flushing, and enhancements to soil washing/soil flushing portions of the study.

Brewster, M.D.; Peters, R.W.; Miller, G.A.; Patton, T.L.; Martino, L.E.

1994-12-01

400

Efficiency of non-ionic surfactants - EDTA for treating TPH and heavy metals from contaminated soil.  

PubMed

Introduction of fuel hydrocarbons and inorganic compounds (heavy metals) into the soil, resulting in a change of the soil quality, which is likely to affect use of the soil or endangering public health and ground water. This study aimed to determine a series of parameters to remediation of TPH and heavy metals contaminated soil by non-ionic surfactants- chelating agents washing process. In this experimental study, the effects of soil washing time, agitation speed, concentration of surfactant, chelating agent and pH on the removal efficiency were studied. The results showed that TPH removal by nonionic surfactants (Tween 80, Brij 35) in optimal condition were 70-80% and 60-65%, respectively. Addition of chelating agent (EDTA) significantly increases Cd and Pb removal. The washing of soil by non- ionic surfactants and EDTA was effective in remediation of TPH and heavy metals from contaminated soil, thus it can be recommended for remediation of contaminated soil. PMID:24359927

Baziar, Mansour; Mehrasebi, Mohammad Reza; Assadi, Ali; Fazli, Mehran Mohammadian; Maroosi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Fooad

2013-01-01

401

Comparison of bioassays by testing whole soil and their water extract from contaminated sites.  

PubMed

The harmful effects of contaminants on the ecosystems and humans are characterised by their environmental toxicity. The aim of this study was to assess applicability and reliability of several environmental toxicity tests, comparing the result of the whole soils and their water extracts. In the study real contaminated soils were applied from three different inherited contaminated sites of organic and inorganic pollutants. The measured endpoints were the bioluminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri (bacterium), the dehydrogenase activity inhibition of Azomonas agilis (bacterium), the reproduction inhibition of Tetrahymena pyriformis (protozoon), and Panagrellus redivivus (nematode), the mortality of Folsomia candida (springtail), the root and shoot elongation inhibition of Sinapis alba (plant: white mustard) and the nitrification activity inhibition of an uncontaminated garden soil used as "test organism". Besides the standardised or widely used methods some new, direct contact ecotoxicity tests have been developed and introduced, which are useful for characterisation of the risk of contaminated soils due to their interactive nature. Soil no. 1 derived from a site polluted with transformer oil (PCB-free); Soil no. 2 originated from a site contaminated with mazout; Soil no. 3 was contaminated with toxic metals (Zn, Cd, Cu, Pb, As). In most cases, the interactive ecotoxicity tests indicated more harmful effect of the contaminated soil than the tests using soil extracts. The direct contact environmental toxicity tests are able to meet the requirements of environmental toxicology: reliability, sensibility, reproducibility, rapidity and low cost. PMID:16860849

Leitgib, Laura; Kálmán, Judit; Gruiz, Katalin

2007-01-01

402

Determination of the Content of Heavy Metals in Pyrite Contaminated Soil and Plants  

PubMed Central

Determination of a pyrite contaminated soil texture, content of heavy metals in the soil and soil pH, was the aim in the investigation. Acidification of damaged soil was corrected by calcium carbonate. Mineral nutrients and organic matter (NPK, dung, earthworm cast, straw and coal dust) were added to damaged soil. Afterwards, the soil was used for oat production. Determination of total heavy metal contents (Cu, Pb, Zn, Fe) in soil was performed by atomic absorption spectrofotometry. Plant material (stems, seeds) was analysed, too. Total concentration of the heavy metals in the plant material were greater than in crop obtained in unaffected soil.

Antonijevi?, Milan M.; Mari?, Miroslava

2008-01-01

403

Using biochar for remediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals and organic pollutants.  

PubMed

Soil contamination with heavy metals and organic pollutants has increasingly become a serious global environmental issue in recent years. Considerable efforts have been made to remediate contaminated soils. Biochar has a large surface area, and high capacity to adsorb heavy metals and organic pollutants. Biochar can potentially be used to reduce the bioavailability and leachability of heavy metals and organic pollutants in soils through adsorption and other physicochemical reactions. Biochar is typically an alkaline material which can increase soil pH and contribute to stabilization of heavy metals. Application of biochar for remediation of contaminated soils may provide a new solution to the soil pollution problem. This paper provides an overview on the impact of biochar on the environmental fate and mobility of heavy metals and organic pollutants in contaminated soils and its implication for remediation of contaminated soils. Further research directions are identified to ensure a safe and sustainable use of biochar as a soil amendment for remediation of contaminated soils. PMID:23589248

Zhang, Xiaokai; Wang, Hailong; He, Lizhi; Lu, Kouping; Sarmah, Ajit; Li, Jianwu; Bolan, Nanthi S; Pei, Jianchuan; Huang, Huagang

2013-12-01

404

Assessing the technogenic contamination of urban soils from the profile distribution of heavy metals and the soil bulk density  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The contamination of soils with heavy metals in the city of Moscow has been assessed using the conventional procedure and a new resource approach developed at the Faculty of Soil Science of Moscow State University. The approach involved the consideration of the profile distribution of a pollutant and the variation in the bulk density of the enclosing soil. The integral parameter of contamination was the reserve of the pollutant in a conventional normative soil layer 1 m in thickness according to the Moscow Law On the Urban Soils. In the soil samples taken in the main administrative districts of Moscow, the contents of heavy metals of the first (zinc, lead, cadmium, arsenic, and mercury) and second (nickel and copper) hazard classes were determined. For each profile, distribution graphs of all of the above elements have been developed, and the element reserves have been calculated in the upper 1-m-thick layer with consideration for the changes in the soil density with depth. The obtained data have been compared with the normative reserves of heavy metals and the estimates of technogenic contamination derived using the conventional procedure. An increase in the total reserves of pollutants has been observed at the increase in their concentrations with depth; therefore, a clean soil according to the conventional procedure can be classified as contaminated. Analogously, a decrease in the total reserve of a pollutant in the upper 1-m-thik layer and, hence, a decrease in the degree of soil contamination have been observed when the concentration of the pollutant reduced with the depth. In general, the profile distributions of heavy metals and the soil bulk density strongly interfere with the estimation of the contamination of the soil as a spatially heterogeneous body and should be taken into consideration in the development of a present-day system of quality criteria and norms for urban soils.

Korchagina, K. V.; Smagin, A. V.; Reshetina, T. V.

2014-08-01

405

2011 investigation of internal contamination with radioactive strontium following rubidium Rb 82 cardiac PET scan.  

PubMed

During routine screening in 2011, US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) identified 2 persons with elevated radioactivity. CBP, in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory, informed the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that these people could have increased radiation exposure as a result of undergoing cardiac Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans several months earlier with rubidium Rb 82 chloride injection from CardioGen-82. We conducted a multistate investigation to assess the potential extent and magnitude of radioactive strontium overexposure among patients who had undergone Rb 82 PET scans. We selected a convenience sample of clinical sites in 4 states and reviewed records to identify eligible study participants, defined as people who had had an Rb 82 PET scan between February and July 2011. All participants received direct radiation screening using a radioisotope identifier able to detect the gamma energy specific for strontium-85 (514 keV) and urine bioassay for excreted radioactive strontium. We referred a subset of participants with direct radiation screening counts above background readings for whole body counting (WBC) using a rank ordering of direct radiation screening. The rank order list, from highest to lowest, was used to contact and offer voluntary enrollment for WBC. Of 308 participants, 292 (95%) had direct radiation screening results indistinguishable from background radiation measurements; 261 of 265 (98%) participants with sufficient urine for analysis had radioactive strontium results below minimum detectable activity. None of the 23 participants who underwent WBC demonstrated elevated strontium activity above levels associated with routine use of the rubidium Rb 82 generator. Among investigation participants, we did not identify evidence of strontium internal contamination above permissible levels. This investigation might serve as a model for future investigations of radioactive internal contamination incidents. PMID:24552361

Pillai, Satish K; Chang, Arthur; Murphy, Matthew W; Buzzell, Jennifer; Ansari, Armin; Whitcomb, Robert C; Miller, Charles; Jones, Robert; Saunders, David P; Cavicchia, Philip; Watkins, Sharon M; Blackmore, Carina; Williamson, John A; Stephens, Michael; Morrison, Melissa; McNees, James; Murphree, Rendi; Buchanan, Martha; Hogan, Anthony; Lando, James; Nambiar, Atmaram; Torso, Lauren; Melnic, Joseph M; Yang, Lucie; Lewis, Lauren

2014-01-01

406

Microbial interactions with organic contaminants in soil: definitions, processes and measurement.  

PubMed

There has been and continues to be considerable scientific interest in predicting bioremediation rates and endpoints. This requires the development of chemical techniques capable of reliably predicting the bioavailability of organic compounds to catabolically active soil microbes. A major issue in understanding the link between chemical extraction and bioavailability is the problem of definition; there are numerous definitions, of varying degrees of complexity and relevance, to the interaction between organic contaminants and microorganisms in soil. The aim of this review is to consider the bioavailability as a descriptor for the rate and extent of biodegradation and, in an applied sense, bioremediation of organic contaminants in soil. To address this, the review will (i) consider and clarify the numerous definitions of bioavailability and discuss the usefulness of the term 'bioaccessibility'; (ii) relate definition to the microbiological and chemical measurement of organic contaminants' bioavailability in soil, and (iii) explore the mechanisms employed by soil microorganisms to attack organic contaminants in soil. PMID:17881105

Semple, Kirk T; Doick, Kieron J; Wick, Lukas Y; Harms, Hauke

2007-11-01

407

The effects of perennial ryegrass and alfalfa on microbial abundance and diversity in petroleum contaminated soil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Enhanced rhizosphere degradation uses plants to stimulate the rhizosphere microbial community to degrade organic contaminants. We measured changes in microbial communities caused by the addition of two species of plants in a soil contaminated with 31,000 ppm of total petroleum hydrocarbons. Perennial ryegrass and\\/or alfalfa increased the number of rhizosphere bacteria in the hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. These plants also increased the

Jennifer L. Kirk; John N. Klironomos; Hung Lee; Jack T. Trevors

2005-01-01

408

Phytoremediation of Aged Aromatic Contaminants in Soil Using White Lupin Principle Investigators  

E-print Network

., 1989), and the chelation of iron in iron oxides in soil by citrate may modify the nanopore structure II. Contaminant aged 0 weeks ­ Not planted III. Contaminant aged 4 weeks ­ Planted IV. Contaminant, and the concentrated extract analyzed by HPLC with UV detection. Results The highest mean concentrations of naphthalene

Rhode Island, University of

409

Application of neural network model for the prediction of Chromium concentration in phytoremediated contaminated soils  

E-print Network

in phytoremediated contaminated soils Nour HATTABa* , Ridha HAMBLIb , Mikael MOTELICA-HEINOa , Xavier BOURRATa for the prediction of Cr concentration in dwarf bean leaves grown in the laboratory on phytoremediated contaminated a phytoremediated contaminated site located in south-western France. Second, a series of measurements were performed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

410

DESIGNING A CONTAMINATED SOIL SAMPLING STRATEGY FOR HUMAN HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT  

E-print Network

if an old site contamination may have harmful effects on human health in view of the planned or current use hot spots as a preliminary site investigation usually is nor to allow the calculation of contaminated2001-88 DESIGNING A CONTAMINATED SOIL SAMPLING STRATEGY FOR HUMAN HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT L

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

411

EFFECTS OF ORGANIC AMENDMENTS ON MICROBIAL PROPERTIES IN LEAD-CONTAMINATED SOILS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The Environmental Protection Agency lists more than 17,000 contaminated sites in the United States, many of which are contaminated with heavy metals including lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn). Lead contamination in soil has been shown to be a threat to human health and ecosystem functioning through adverse e...

412

AN IN VITRO GASTROINTESTINAL METHOD TO ESTIMATE BIOAVAILABLE ARSENIC IN CONTAMINATED SOILS AND SOLID MEDIA. (R825410)  

EPA Science Inventory

A method was developed to simulate the human gastrointestinal environment and to estimate bioavailability of arsenic in contaminated soil and solid media. In this in vitro gastrointestinal (IVG) method, arsenic is sequentially extracted from contaminated soil with ...

413

Toxicity assessment for petroleum-contaminated soil using terrestrial invertebrates and plant bioassays.  

PubMed

The assessment of soil quality after a chemical or oil spill and/or remediation effort may be measured by evaluating the toxicity of soil organisms. To enhance our understanding of the soil quality resulting from laboratory and oil field spill remediation, we assessed toxicity levels by using earthworms and springtails testing and plant growth experiments. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH)-contaminated soil samples were collected from an oilfield in Sfax, Tunisia. Two types of bioassays were performed. The first assessed the toxicity of spiked crude oil (API gravity 32) in Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development artificial soil. The second evaluated the habitat function through the avoidance responses of earthworms and springtails and the ability of Avena sativa to grow in TPH-contaminated soils diluted with farmland soil. The EC50 of petroleum-contaminated soil for earthworms was 644 mg of TPH/kg of soil at 14 days, with 67 % of the earthworms dying after 14 days when the TPH content reached 1,000 mg/kg. The average germination rate, calculated 8 days after sowing, varied between 64 and 74 % in low contaminated soils and less than 50 % in highly contaminated soils. PMID:22773148

Hentati, Olfa; Lachhab, Radhia; Ayadi, Mariem; Ksibi, Mohamed

2013-04-01

414

Effect of organic amendments on microbial activity in chlorpyrifos contaminated soil.  

PubMed

The aim of this research was to study the inhibitory effect of chlorpyrifos (CPF) on soil microbial activity and to evaluate the efficacy of different organic amendments as a biostimulation agent for sustaining the microbial activity and thereby assisting in the remediation of CPF (10 ppm) contaminated soil. Experiments were carried out under controlled conditions (37 °C) up to 74 days; CPF was analyzed by GC-ECD while dehydrogenase activity (DHA) was measured as one of the indices of soil microbial activity. Throughout the experiment, there was higher microbial activity in uncontaminated soil (S) as compared to CPF contaminated soil (SP) and overall a considerably high reduction (63.51%) in average DHA was noticed in CPF contaminated soil. Organic amendments enhanced the microbial activity over unamended CPF contaminated soil. The trend of DHA on 24th day was MS (SP + 1% Mushroom Spent) >VC (SP + 1% Vermicompost) >BS (SP + 1% Biogas Slurry) >SP (Soil spiked with 10 ppm CPF) >FM (SP + 1% Farmyard Manure). The enhancement in pesticide dissipation over the unamended soil showed the following trend VC (37%)>MS (24%) >FM (1.9%). In spite of sufficient DHA, BS could not enhance pesticide dissipation over the unamended soil (SP). These results indicate the potential of vermicompost and mushroom spent compost as suitable biostimulation agents to sustain the microbial activity in CPF contaminated soil. PMID:21035243

Kadian, Neeru; Malik, Anushree; Satya, Santosh; Dureja, Prem

2012-03-01

415

Study of Soil Washing for Remediation of Pb and Zn Contaminated Coastal Landfill  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As a result of analyzing the pre-treatment process of Pb, Zn in contaminated coastal landfill soil presented by Korean Soil Analysis Method, the each concentration was presented 577.00mg/kg, 3894.34mg/kg. This soil was critically contaminated with Pb and Zn because it was exceeded the Standard of soil contamination(2area: Pb-400mg/kg, Zn-600mg/kg). Soil remediation efficiency of the soil washing process for the removal of Pb and Zn was determined to be consistent with the results. The batch experiment on the several washing solutions(HCl, HNO3), washing solutions concentrations(0.1-0.8M) and the ratio of soil vs. solution for soil washing(1:3, 1:5 and 1:10) was performed. The results of experiments, washing time was appropriate in 30 minutes. The removal efficiency of soil washing increased as the ratio of soil vs. washing solution increased. But, in the case of heavy metals, the soil vs. solution for soil washing was determined as the optimal ratio of 1 : 5. Five consecutive soil washing with 0.5M of HCl and HNO3 solutions were performed. Results of experiments, in case of Pb was removed by target removal efficiency from soil on the twice washing. With in case of Zn was over on the first washing by target removal efficiency, but suggesting that twice consecutive soil washing is desirable as stability at field. Results of consecutive soil washing experiments, the removal efficiency maintained lower than 10 % after the 4th washing. From the results, demanding consecutive washing is not recommended. Results about the heavy metal contaminated soil washing experiments of the coastal landfill, in the case of HCl with more than 0.5 M of solution was performed at 1:5 of soil ratio vs. solution, 30 minutes of washing time and 2-3 consecutive soil washing. And in the case of HNO3 with 0.8 M of solution was performed various ratios of soil vs. washing solution, suggesting that 2-3 consecutive soil washing was reached to Pb and Zn target removal efficiency. Key words : landfill soil; washing solution; heavy metal contamination; soil remediation; soil washing; soil contamination

Park, S.; Kim, S.; Lee, M.

2013-12-01

416

Cadmium contaminated soil affects retinogenesis in lizard embryos.  

PubMed

Lizards are soil surface animals that represent an important link between invertebrates and higher predators. Being part of wild fauna, they can be affected by contamination from anthropic activities and in particular, pesticides and chemical substances of various nature that reach the soil surface directly or through fall out. Among these substances, heavy metals such as cadmium may exert particularly marked toxic effect on both adult and embryos. In lizards, recent studies show that cadmium may cause developmental defects, including alteration of eye development, with appearance of unilateral microphthalmia and retinal folding. In the present study, the effects of cadmium incubation on retinal development were investigated demonstrating that cadmium interferes with cell cycle regulation by increasing proliferation. An increased expression of Otx2 and Pax6 genes, markers of retinal differentiation, was also found. However, the cellular localization of Pax6 and Otx2 transcripts did not change in treated embryos: in the early stages of retinogenesis, the two genes were expressed in all retinal cells; in the differentiated retina, Otx2 remained in the cellular bodies of retinal cells forming the nuclear and the ganglion layers, whereas Pax6 was expressed only in the cells of the inner nuclear and the ganglion layers. Data suggest that the increased expression of Pax6 and Otx2 could be ascribed to the hyperproliferation of retinal cells rather than to an effective gene overexpression. PMID:24482418

Simoniello, Palma; Trinchella, Francesca; Filosa, Silvana; Scudiero, Rosaria; Magnani, Dario; Theil, Thomas; Motta, Chiara Maria

2014-04-01

417

Abstract No. Graf0383 Arsenic Speciation in a Lead-Arsenate Contaminated Orchard Soil  

E-print Network

-arsenate contaminated orchard soil (pH ~ 4.5) using µ-XRF and the newly improved µ-XANES features. The fate and mobilityAbstract No. Graf0383 Arsenic Speciation in a Lead-Arsenate Contaminated Orchard Soil M. Gräfe, D on whole soil samples from two different depths (FP 10-A = 0-20cm, FP 10-B = 20 ­ 40cm) to identify

Sparks, Donald L.

418

Extraction of arsenic in a synthetic arsenic-contaminated soil using phosphate  

Microsoft Academic Search

An environment-friendly and cost-effective extraction method has been studied for the removal of arsenic from contaminated soil. A yellow-brown forest soil was contaminated with arsenic(V) and used as a model soil. Among various potassium and sodium salts, potassium phosphate was most effective in extracting arsenic, attaining more than 40% extraction in the pH range of 6–8 with minimum damage to

M. G. M Alam; S Tokunaga; T Maekawa

2001-01-01

419

The application of bioassays as indicators of petroleum-contaminated soil remediation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bioremediation has proven successful in numerous applications to petroleum contaminated soils. However, questions remain as to the efficiency of bioremediation in lowering long-term soil toxicity. In the present study, the bioassays Spirotox, Microtox®, Ostracodtoxkit F™, umu-test with S-9 activation, and plant assays were applied, and compared to evaluate bioremediation processes in heavily petroleum contaminated soils. Six higher plant species (Secale

Gra?yna P?aza; Grzegorz Na??cz-Jawecki; Krzysztof Ulfig; Robin L. Brigmon

2005-01-01

420

Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification Treatability Study of Mercury Contaminated Soil from the Y-12 Site  

SciTech Connect

As a result of past operations, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Plant) has extensive mercury-contamination in building structures, soils, storm sewer sediments, and stream sediments, which are a source of pollution to the local ecosystem. Because of mercury’s toxicity and potential impacts on human health and the environment, DOE continues to investigate and implement projects to support the remediation of the Y-12 site.URS and #9122;CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) under its prime contract with DOE has cleanup responsibilities on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation and is investigating potential mercury-contaminated soil treatment technologies through an agreement with Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) Y-12, the Y-12 operating contractor to DOE. As part of its investigations, UCOR has subcontracted with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to conduct laboratory-scale studies evaluating the applicability of the Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process using surrogate and actual mixed waste Y-12 soils containing mercury (Hg) at 135, 2,000, and 10,000 ppm.SPSS uses a thermoplastic sulfur binder to convert Hg to stable mercury sulfide (HgS) and solidifies the chemically stable product in a monolithic solid final waste form to reduce dispersion and permeability. Formulations containing 40 – 60 dry wt% Y-12 soil were fabricated and samples were prepared in triplicate for Environmental Protection Agency Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing by an independent laboratory. Those containing 50 and 60 wt% soil easily met the study criteria for maximum allowable Hg concentrations (47 and 1 ppb, respectively compared with the TCLP limit of 200 ppb Hg). The lowest waste loading of 40 wt% yielded TCLP Hg concentrations slightly higher (240 ppb) than the allowable limit. Since the Y-12 soil tended to form clumps, the improved leaching at higher waste loadings was probably due to reduction in particle size from friction of the soil mixing, which creates more surface area for chemical conversion. This was corroborated by the fact that the same waste loading pre-treated by ball milling to reduce particle size prior to SPSS processing yielded TCLP concentrations almost 30 times lower, and at 8.5 ppb Hg was well below EPA limits. Pre-treatment by ball milling also allowed a reduction in the time required for stabilization, thus potentially reducing total process times by 30%.Additional performance testing was conducted including measurement of compressive strength to confirm mechanical integrity and immersion testing to determine the potential impacts of storage or disposal