Science.gov

Sample records for radioactive source applications

  1. Application of radioactive sources in analytical instruments for planetary exploration.

    PubMed

    Economou, Thanasis E

    2010-01-01

    Radioactive isotopes have been used in analytical instrumentation for planetary exploration since the very beginning of the space age. An Alpha Scattering Instrument (ASI) on board the Surveyor 5, 6 and 7 spacecrafts used the isotope (242)Cm to obtain the chemical composition of the lunar surface material in 1960s. The Alpha Proton X-ray Spectrometers (APXS) used on several mission to Mars (Pathfinder, Mars-96, Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) and on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), the next mission to Mars in 2011 and on the Rosetta mission to a comet) are improved derivatives of the original ASI, complimented with an X-ray mode and using the longer lived (244)Cm isotope. (57)Co, (55)Fe and many other radioisotopes have been used in several missions carrying XRF and Mössbauer instruments. In addition, (238)Pu isotope is exclusively being used in most of the space missions for heating and power generation. PMID:19850487

  2. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  3. Detecting Illicit Radioactive Sources

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Joseph C.; Coursey, Bert; Carter, Michael

    2004-11-01

    Specialized instruments have been developed to detect the presence of illicit radioactive sources that may be used by terrorists in radiation dispersal devices, so-called ''dirty bombs'' or improvised nuclear devices. This article discusses developments in devices to detect and measure radiation.

  4. PORTABLE SOURCE OF RADIOACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Goertz, R.C.; Ferguson, K.R.; Rylander, E.W.; Safranski, L.M.

    1959-06-16

    A portable source for radiogiaphy or radiotherapy is described. It consists of a Tl/sup 170/ or Co/sup 60/ source mounted in a rotatable tungsten alloy plug. The plug rotates within a brass body to positions of safety or exposure. Provision is made for reloading and carrying the device safely. (T.R.H.)

  5. Enhanced Radioactive Material Source Security.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Joseph G

    2016-02-01

    Requirements for additional security measures for sealed radioactive sources have evolved since they were first implemented after the terrorist events of 11 September 2001. This paper will describe the sequence of those measures, commencing with the early orders issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to the May 2013 adoption of 10 CFR Part 37, Physical Protections of Category 1 and Category 2 Quantities of Radioactive Material. Part 37 requirements will be discussed in detail, as the 37 NRC Agreement States, which regulate approximately 88% of the radioactive material licensees, will be required to enact by 19 March 2016. In addition to the Part 37 requirements, the paper will also highlight some of the other ongoing efforts of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration's Global Threat Reduction Initiative and the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors. PMID:26717170

  6. [Loss and uncontrolled use of radioactive sources].

    PubMed

    Govaerts, P

    2005-01-01

    In the course of history, exposure to radioactive sources escaping regular control, has been the main cause of fatal accidents, with the exception of the reactor accident at Chernobyl. After the disintegration of the Soviet Union, numerous lost sources have been found, sometimes with serious physical damage. The attacks of September 11, 2001 have focussed the attention on the possibility of nuclear terrorism. Although the risks of fatal consequences are rather limited, the possible uncontrolled exposure to ionizing radiation has an important psycho-social impact on the population. After a brief survey of the types of radioactive sources for medical and industrial applications and a discussion of the risks and exposure routes, possible scenarios are illustrated by well documented case histories. The main conclusions of this analysis are: Radioactive materials are not unique as a potential threat by toxic materials. The most serious consequences for individuals occur as the result of external radiation, mostly with skin contact with medium-active sources which are relatively easily accessible. The collective impact is mostly psycho-social and is more important for a dispersed contamination of the environment. Many sources are detected via medical complaints. The knowledge of the specific symptoms is consequently very important. A dispersion of radioactive contamination has usually considerable economic consequences. Accidents occur particularly, but certainly not exclusively, in relatively unstable countries. Change of owner or final evacuation of the source constitute a critical phase in many scenarios. PMID:16408827

  7. Preparation and characterization of cesium-137 aluminosilicate pellets for radioactive source applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, F.J.; Tompkins, J.A.; Haff, K.W.; Case, F.N.

    1981-07-01

    Twenty-seven fully loaded /sup 137/Cs aluminosilicate pellets were fabricated in a hot cell by the vacuum hot pressing of a cesium carbonate/montmorillonite clay mixture at 1500/sup 0/C and 570 psig. Four pellets were selected for characterization studies which included calorimetric measurements, metallography, scanning electron microscope and electron backscattering (SEM-BSE), electron microprobe, x-ray diffraction, and cesium ion leachability measurements. Each test pellet contained 437 to 450 curies of /sup 137/Cs as determined by calorimetric measurements. Metallographic examinations revealed a two-phase system: a primary, granular, gray matrix phase containing large and small pores and small pore agglomerations, and a secondary fused phase interspersed throughout the gray matrix. SEM-BSE analyses showed that cesium and silicon were uniformly distributed throughout both phases of the pellet. This indicated that the cesium-silicon-clay reaction went to completion. Aluminum homogeneity was unconfirmed due to the high background noise associated with the inherent radioactivity of the test specimens. X-ray diffraction analyses of both radioactive and non-radioactive aluminosilicate pellets confirmed the crystal lattice structure to be pollucite. Cesium ion quasistatic leachability measurements determined the leach rates of fully loaded /sup 137/Cs sectioned pollucite pellets to date to be 4.61 to 34.4 x 10/sup -10/ kg m/sup -2/s/sup -1/, while static leach tests performed on unsectioned fully loaded pellets showed the leach rates of the cesium ion to date to be 2.25 to 3.41 x 10/sup -12/ kg m/sup -2/s/sup -1/. The cesium ion diffusion coefficients through the pollucite pellet were calculated using Fick's first and second laws of diffusion. The diffusion coefficients calculated for three tracer level /sup 137/Cs aluminosilicate pellets were 1.29 x 10/sup -16/m/sup 2/s/sup -1/, 6.88 x 10/sup -17/m/sup 2/s/sup -1/, and 1.35 x 10/sup -17/m/sup 2/s/sup -1/, respectively.

  8. Automatic Searching Radioactive Sources by Airborne Radioactive Survey Using Multicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rim, H.; Eun, S. B.; Kim, K.; Park, S.; Jung, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    In order to prepare emergency situation lost a dangerous radioelement source in advance and to search a radioactive source automatically, we develop airborne radioelement survey system by multicopter. This multicopter radioelement survey system consists of a small portable customized BGO (Bismuth Germanate Oxide) detector, video recording part, wireless connecting part to ground pilot, GPS, and several equipments for automatic flight. This system is possible to search flight by preprogramed lines. This radioactive detecting system are tested to find intentional hidden source, The performance of detecting a source is well proved with very low flight altitude in spite of depending on the magnitude of radioelement sources. The advantage of multicopter system, one of UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle), is to avoid the potential of close access to a dangerous radioactive source by using fully automatic searching capability. In this paper, we introduce our multicopter system for detecting radioactive source and synthetic case history for demonstrating this system.

  9. RADIOACTIVE CONCENTRATOR AND RADIATION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, L.P.

    1959-12-29

    A method is presented for forming a permeable ion exchange bed using Montmorillonite clay to absorb and adsorb radioactive ions from liquid radioactive wastes. A paste is formed of clay, water, and a material that fomns with clay a stable aggregate in the presence of water. The mixture is extruded into a volume of water to form clay rods. The rods may then be used to remove radioactive cations from liquid waste solutions. After use, the rods are removed from the solution and heated to a temperature of 750 to 1000 deg C to fix the ratioactive cations in the clay.

  10. Radiation Safety of Sealed Radioactive Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, Kathryn H.

    2015-01-29

    Sealed radioactive sources are used in a wide variety of occupational settings and under differing regulatory/licensing structures. The definition of a sealed radioactive source varies between US regulatory authorities and standard-setting organizations. Potential problems with sealed sources cover a range of risks and impacts. The loss of control of high activity sealed sources can result in very high or even fatal doses to members of the public who come in contact with them. Sources that are not adequately sealed, and that fail, can cause spread of contamination and potential intake of radioactive material. There is also the possibility that sealed sources may be (or threatened to be) used for terrorist purposes and disruptive opportunities. Until fairly recently, generally-licensed sealed sources and devices received little, if any, regulatory oversight, and were often forgotten, lost or unaccounted for. Nonetheless, generally licensed devices can contain fairly significant quantities of radioactive material and there is some potential for exposure if a device is treated in a way that it was never designed. Industrial radiographers use and handle high activity and/or high-dose rate sealed sources in the field with a high degree of independence and minimal regulatory oversight. Failure to follow operational procedures and properly handle radiography sources can and has resulted in serious injuries and death. Industrial radiographers have experienced a disproportionately large fraction of incidents that result in unintended exposure to radiation. Sources do not have to contain significant quantities of radioactive material to cause problems in the event of their failure. A loss of integrity can cause the spread of contamination and potential exposure to workers and members of the public. The NCRP has previously provided recommendations on select aspects of sealed source programs. Future efforts to provide recommendations for sealed source programs are discussed.

  11. Radioactive source security: the cultural challenges.

    PubMed

    Englefield, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Radioactive source security is an essential part of radiation protection. Sources can be abandoned, lost or stolen. If they are stolen, they could be used to cause deliberate harm and the risks are varied and significant. There is a need for a global security protection system and enhanced capability to achieve this. The establishment of radioactive source security requires 'cultural exchanges'. These exchanges include collaboration between: radiation protection specialists and security specialists; the nuclear industry and users of radioactive sources; training providers and regulators/users. This collaboration will facilitate knowledge and experience exchange for the various stakeholder groups, beyond those already provided. This will promote best practice in both physical and information security and heighten security awareness generally. Only if all groups involved are prepared to open their minds to listen to and learn from, each other will a suitable global level of control be achieved. PMID:25377752

  12. 10 CFR 835.1201 - Sealed radioactive source control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sealed radioactive source control. 835.1201 Section 835.1201 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Sealed Radioactive Source Control § 835.1201 Sealed radioactive source control. Sealed radioactive sources shall be used, handled,...

  13. 10 CFR 835.1201 - Sealed radioactive source control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sealed radioactive source control. 835.1201 Section 835.1201 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Sealed Radioactive Source Control § 835.1201 Sealed radioactive source control. Sealed radioactive sources shall be used, handled,...

  14. 10 CFR 835.1201 - Sealed radioactive source control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sealed radioactive source control. 835.1201 Section 835.1201 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Sealed Radioactive Source Control § 835.1201 Sealed radioactive source control. Sealed radioactive sources shall be used, handled,...

  15. 10 CFR 835.1201 - Sealed radioactive source control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sealed radioactive source control. 835.1201 Section 835.1201 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Sealed Radioactive Source Control § 835.1201 Sealed radioactive source control. Sealed radioactive sources shall be used, handled,...

  16. 10 CFR 835.1201 - Sealed radioactive source control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sealed radioactive source control. 835.1201 Section 835.1201 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Sealed Radioactive Source Control § 835.1201 Sealed radioactive source control. Sealed radioactive sources shall be used, handled,...

  17. 10 CFR 835.1202 - Accountable sealed radioactive sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Accountable sealed radioactive sources. 835.1202 Section 835.1202 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Sealed Radioactive Source Control § 835.1202 Accountable sealed radioactive sources. (a) Each accountable sealed radioactive...

  18. 10 CFR 835.1202 - Accountable sealed radioactive sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accountable sealed radioactive sources. 835.1202 Section 835.1202 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Sealed Radioactive Source Control § 835.1202 Accountable sealed radioactive sources. (a) Each accountable sealed radioactive...

  19. 10 CFR 835.1202 - Accountable sealed radioactive sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Accountable sealed radioactive sources. 835.1202 Section 835.1202 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Sealed Radioactive Source Control § 835.1202 Accountable sealed radioactive sources. (a) Each accountable sealed radioactive...

  20. 10 CFR 835.1202 - Accountable sealed radioactive sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Accountable sealed radioactive sources. 835.1202 Section 835.1202 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Sealed Radioactive Source Control § 835.1202 Accountable sealed radioactive sources. (a) Each accountable sealed radioactive...

  1. 10 CFR 835.1202 - Accountable sealed radioactive sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Accountable sealed radioactive sources. 835.1202 Section 835.1202 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Sealed Radioactive Source Control § 835.1202 Accountable sealed radioactive sources. (a) Each accountable sealed radioactive...

  2. A Sensitive Cloud Chamber without Radioactive Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeze, Syoji; Itoh, Akio; Oyama, Ayu; Takahashi, Haruka

    2012-01-01

    We present a sensitive diffusion cloud chamber which does not require any radioactive sources. A major difference from commonly used chambers is the use of a heat sink as its bottom plate. The result of a performance test of the chamber is given. (Contains 8 figures.)

  3. Registration for the Hanford Site: Sources of radioactive emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Silvia, M.J.

    1993-04-01

    This Registration Application serves to renew the registration for all Hanford Site sources of radioactive air emissions routinely reported to the State of Washington Department of Health (DOH). The current registration expires on August 15, 1993. The Application is submitted pursuant to the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246--247, and is consistent with guidance provided by DOH for renewal. The Application subdivides the Hanford Site into six major production, processing or research areas. Those six areas are in the 100 Area, 200 East Area, 200 West Area, 300 Area, 400 Area, and 600 Area. Each major group of point sources within the six areas listed above is represented by a Source Registration for Radioactive Air Emissions form. Annual emissions. for the sources are listed in the ``Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for the Hanford Site,`` published annually. It is a requirement that the following Statement of Compliance be provided: ``The radioactive air emissions from the above sources do meet the emissions standards contained in Chapter 173-480-040 WAC, Ambient Air Quality Standards and Emissions Limits for Radionuclides. As the Statement of Compliance pertains to this submittal, the phrase ``above sources`` is to be understood as meaning the combined air emissions from all sources registered by this submittal.

  4. Ion sources and targets for radioactive beams

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J.P.; Back, B.B.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    A high-intensity ISOL-type radioactive beam facility depends critically on the performance of the target/ion source system. We developed a concept for producing high-intensity secondary beams of fission fragments, such as {sup 132}Sn, using a two-part target and ion source combination. The idea involves stopping a 1000-kW beam of 200-MeV deuterons in a target of Be or U to produce a secondary beam of neutrons. Just behind the neutron production target is a second target, typically a porous form of UC, coupled to an ISOL-type ion source. In December 1994, we tested this concept with 200-MeV deuterons at low intensity in an experiment at the NSCL. The yields of characteristic gamma rays were measured and confirmed our predictions.

  5. Particle beam generator using a radioactive source

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, David G.

    1993-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention selects from particles emitted by a radioactive source those particles having momentum within a desired range and focuses the selected particles in a beam having at least one narrow cross-dimension, and at the same time attenuates potentially disruptive gamma rays and low energy particles. Two major components of the present invention are an achromatic bending and focusing system, which includes sector magnets and quadrupole, and a quadrupole doublet final focus system. Permanent magnets utilized in the apparatus are constructed of a ceramic (ferrite) material which is inexpensive and easily machined.

  6. Particle beam generator using a radioactive source

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, D.G.

    1993-03-30

    The apparatus of the present invention selects from particles emitted by a radioactive source those particles having momentum within a desired range and focuses the selected particles in a beam having at least one narrow cross-dimension, and at the same time attenuates potentially disruptive gamma rays and low energy particles. Two major components of the present invention are an achromatic bending and focusing system, which includes sector magnets and quadrupole, and a quadrupole doublet final focus system. Permanent magnets utilized in the apparatus are constructed of a ceramic (ferrite) material which is inexpensive and easily machined.

  7. Compton scattering with low intensity radioactive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, Carroll

    2012-03-01

    Compton scattering experiments with gamma rays typically require a ``hot'' source (˜5mCi of Cs137) to observe the scattering as a function of angle. (See Ortec AN34 Experiment #10 Compton Scattering) Here a way is described to investigate Compton scattering with micro Curie level radioactive sources that are more commonly available in the undergraduate laboratory. A vertical-looking 2 inch coaxial hpGe detector, collimated with a 2 inch thick lead shield, was used. Cylindrical Al targets of various thicknesses were placed over the collimator and several available sources were placed around the target so that the average Compton scattering angle into the collimator was 90 deg. A peak could be observed at the expected energy for 90 deg. Compton scattering by doing 24 hour target-in minus target-out runs. The peak was broadened by the spread in the scattering angle due to the variation in the angle of the incoming gamma ray and the angular acceptance of the collimator. A rough analysis can be done by modeling the angular spread due to the geometry and correcting for the gamma ray absorption from the target center. Various target materials and sources can be used and some variation in average Compton scattering angle can be obtained by adjusting the geometry of the source and target.

  8. Integrated Management Program Radioactive Sealed Sources in Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, A.; Cochran, J. R.; El-Adham, K.; El-Sorougy, R.

    2003-02-26

    The radioactive materials in ''public'' locations are typically contained in small, stainless steel capsules known as sealed radiation sources (RS). These capsules seal in the radioactive materials, but not the radiation, because it is the radiation that is needed for a wide variety of applications at hospitals, medical clinics, manufacturing plants, universities, construction sites, and other facilities in the public sector. Radiation sources are readily available, and worldwide there are hundreds of thousands of RS. The IMPRSS Project is a cooperative development between the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority (EAEA), Egyptian Ministry of Health (MOH), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), New Mexico Tech University (NMT), and Agriculture Cooperative Development International (ACDI/VOCA). SNL will coordinate the work scope between the participant organizations.

  9. Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source for Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Beene, James R; Havener, Charles C; Vane, C Randy; Gottwald, T.; Wendt, K.; Mattolat, C.; Lassen, J.

    2009-01-01

    A resonant ionization laser ion source based on all-solid-state, tunable Ti:Sapphire lasers is being developed for the production of pure radioactive ion beams. It consists of a hot-cavity ion source and three pulsed Ti:Sapphire lasers operating at a 10 kHz pulse repetition rate. Spectroscopic studies are being conducted to develop ionization schemes that lead to ionizing an excited atom through an auto-ionization or a Rydberg state for numerous elements of interest. Three-photon resonant ionization of 12 elements has been recently demonstrated. The overall efficiency of the laser ion source measured for some of these elements ranges from 1 to 40%. The results indicate that Ti:Sapphire lasers could be well suited for laser ion source applications. The time structures of the ions produced by the pulsed lasers are investigated. The information may help to improve the laser ion source performance.

  10. Management of Disused Radioactive Sealed Sources in Egypt - 13512

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Y.T.; Hasan, M.A.; Lasheen, Y.F.

    2013-07-01

    The future safe development of nuclear energy and progressive increasing use of sealed sources in medicine, research, industry and other fields in Egypt depends on the safe and secure management of disused radioactive sealed sources. In the past years have determined the necessity to formulate and apply the integrated management program for radioactive sealed sources to assure harmless and ecological rational management of disused sealed sources in Egypt. The waste management system in Egypt comprises operational and regulatory capabilities. Both of these activities are performed under legislations. The Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center HLWMC, is considered as a centralized radioactive waste management facility in Egypt by law 7/2010. (authors)

  11. Obtaining and Investigating Unconventional Sources of Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapp, David R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides examples of naturally radioactive items that are likely to be found in most communities. Additionally, there is information provided on how to acquire many of these items inexpensively. I have found that the presence of these materials in the classroom is not only useful for teaching about nuclear radiation and debunking the…

  12. Radioactive target and source development at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.P.; Ahmad, I.; Thomas, G.E.

    1992-10-01

    An increased demand for low-level radioactive targets has created the need for a laboratory dedicated to the production of these foils. A description is given of the radioactive target produced as well as source development work being performed at the Physics Division target facility of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Highlights include equipment used and the techniques employed. In addition, some examples of recent source preparation are given as well as work currently in progress.

  13. Radioactive target and source development at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.P.; Ahmad, I.; Thomas, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    An increased demand for low-level radioactive targets has created the need for a laboratory dedicated to the production of these foils. A description is given of the radioactive target produced as well as source development work being performed at the Physics Division target facility of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Highlights include equipment used and the techniques employed. In addition, some examples of recent source preparation are given as well as work currently in progress.

  14. Automated management of radioactive sources in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kheliewi, Abdullah S.; Jamil, M. F.; Basar, M. R.; Tuwaili, W. R.

    2014-09-01

    For usage of radioactive substances, any facility has to register and take license from relevant authority of the country in which such facility is operating. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), the authority for managing radioactive sources and providing licenses to organizations for its usage is the National Center of Radiation Protection (NCRP). This paper describes the system that automates registration and licensing process of the National Center of Radiation Protection. To provide 24×7 accesses to all the customers of NCRP, system is developed as web-based application that provide facility to online register, request license, renew license, check request status, view historical data and reports etc. and other features are provided as Electronic Services that would be accessible to users via internet. The system also was designed to streamline and optimize internal operations of NCRP besides providing ease of access to its customers by implementing a defined workflow through which every registration and license request will be routed. In addition to manual payment option, the system would also be integrated with SADAD (online payment system) that will avoid lengthy and cumbersome procedures associated with manual payment mechanism. Using SADAD payment option license fee could be paid through internet/ATM machine or branch of any designated bank, Payment will be instantly notified to NCRP hence delay in funds transfer and verification of invoice could be avoided, SADAD integration is discussed later in the document.

  15. Automated management of radioactive sources in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Kheliewi, Abdullah S.; Jamil, M. F.; Basar, M. R.; Tuwaili, W. R.

    2014-09-30

    For usage of radioactive substances, any facility has to register and take license from relevant authority of the country in which such facility is operating. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), the authority for managing radioactive sources and providing licenses to organizations for its usage is the National Center of Radiation Protection (NCRP). This paper describes the system that automates registration and licensing process of the National Center of Radiation Protection. To provide 24×7 accesses to all the customers of NCRP, system is developed as web-based application that provide facility to online register, request license, renew license, check request status, view historical data and reports etc. and other features are provided as Electronic Services that would be accessible to users via internet. The system also was designed to streamline and optimize internal operations of NCRP besides providing ease of access to its customers by implementing a defined workflow through which every registration and license request will be routed. In addition to manual payment option, the system would also be integrated with SADAD (online payment system) that will avoid lengthy and cumbersome procedures associated with manual payment mechanism. Using SADAD payment option license fee could be paid through internet/ATM machine or branch of any designated bank, Payment will be instantly notified to NCRP hence delay in funds transfer and verification of invoice could be avoided, SADAD integration is discussed later in the document.

  16. Radioactive heat sources in the lunar interior.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    Published models for the moon's thermal history typically imply present day central temperatures far too high to be consistent with the recently proposed lunar temperature profile of Sonett et al. (1971). Furthermore, chemical data on Apollo samples show that the moon is depleted relative to chondrites in volatile elements, and possibly enriched relative to chondrites in refractory elements. Additional thermal models have therefore been investigated in order to set upper limits on lunar radioactivity consistent with the proposed temperature distribution. For an initially cold, uniform moon, devoid of potassium, a maximum uranium content of 23 parts per billion is inferred.

  17. Radioactivity as a significant energy source in prebiotic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Garzón, L; Garzón, M L

    2001-01-01

    Radioactivity in the continental crust (due mainly to the isotopes 238U, 235U, 232Th and 40K), as a energy source for chemical evolution in the early Archean (between 3.5 and approximately 4 Ga bp), is reviewed. The most important radioactive source in the continental crust is due to the production and accumulation of radioactive gases within the crust voids (porosity). The study of such mechanism has allowed us to reach a deeper understanding about the nature of the radioactive source and to describe its behavior, particularly with regard to prebiotic chemical evolution. An effective total energy of 3 x 10(18) Ja-1 has been obtained for a depth of 1 km, 4 Ga ago. If a depth of 30 km is taken, the obtained value is almost equal to the UV solar energy radiation (lambda < 150 nm). Within the voids the radioactive source of the continental crust played a relevant role in prebiotic synthesis. In uranium deposits of the same age, the role of radioactivity must have been even more relevant in favoring chemical evolution. PMID:11296523

  18. Technology applications for radioactive waste minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Devgun, J.S.

    1994-07-01

    The nuclear power industry has achieved one of the most successful examples of waste minimization. The annual volume of low-level radioactive waste shipped for disposal per reactor has decreased to approximately one-fifth the volume about a decade ago. In addition, the curie content of the total waste shipped for disposal has decreased. This paper will discuss the regulatory drivers and economic factors for waste minimization and describe the application of technologies for achieving waste minimization for low-level radioactive waste with examples from the nuclear power industry.

  19. Method for fabricating thin californium-containing radioactive source wires

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Ian G; Pierce, Larry A

    2006-08-22

    A method for reducing the cross-sectional diameter of a radioactive californium-containing cermet wire while simultaneously improving the wire diameter to a more nearly circular cross section. A collet fixture is used to reduce the wire diameter by controlled pressurization pulses while simultaneously improving the wire cross-sectional diameter. The method is especially suitable for use in hot cells for the production of optimized cermet brachytherapy sources that contain large amounts of radioactive californium-252.

  20. Neutron sources and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.L.; Rush, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

  1. Radioactive source materials in Los Estados Unidos de Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wyant, Donald G.; Sharp, William N.; Rodriguez, Carlos Ponte

    1953-01-01

    This report summarizes the data available on radioactive source materials in Los Estados Unidos de Venezuela accumulated by geologists of the Direccions Tecnica de Geolgia and antecedent agencies prior to June 1951, and the writers from June to November 1951. The investigation comprised preliminary study, field examination, office studies, and the preparation of this report, in which the areas and localities examined are described in detail, the uranium potentialities of Venezuela are summarized, and recommendations are made. Preliminary study was made to select areas and rock types that were known or reported to be radioactive or that geologic experience suggests would be favorable host for uranium deposits, In the office, a study of gamma-ray well logs was started as one means of amassing general radiometric data and of rapidly scanning many of ye rocks in northern Venezuela; gamma-ray logs from about 140 representative wells were examined and their peaks of gamma intensity evaluated; in addition samples were analyzed radiometrically, and petrographically. Radiometic reconnaissance was made in the field during about 3 months of 1951, or about 12 areas, including over 100 localities in the State of Miranda, Carabobo, Yaracuy, Falcon, Lara, Trujillo, Zulia, Merida, Tachira, Bolivar, and Territory Delta Amacuro. During the course of the investigation, both in the filed and office, information was given about geology of uranium deposits, and in techniques used in prospecting and analysis. All studies and this report are designed to supplement and to strengthen the Direccion Tecnica de Geologias's program of investigation of radioactive source in Venezuela now in progress. The uranium potentialities of Los Estados de Venezuela are excellent for large, low-grade deposits of uraniferous phospahtic shales containing from 0.002 to 0.027 percent uranium; fair, for small or moderate-sized, low-grade placer deposits of thorium, rare-earth, and uranium minerals; poor, for

  2. METHOD OF PREPARING RADIOACTIVE CESIUM SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, T.C.

    1963-12-17

    A method of preparing a cesium-containing radiation source with physical and chemical properties suitable for high-level use is presented. Finely divided silica is suspended in a solution containing cesium, normally the fission-product isotope cesium 137. Sodium tetraphenyl boron is then added to quantitatively precipitate the cesium. The cesium-containing precipitate is converted to borosilicate glass by heating to the melting point and cooling. Up to 60 weight percent cesium, with a resulting source activity of up to 21 curies per gram, is incorporated in the glass. (AEC)

  3. Study on effect of geometrical configuration of radioactive source material to the radiation intensity of betavoltaic nuclear battery

    SciTech Connect

    Badrianto, Muldani Dwi; Riupassa, Robi D.; Basar, Khairul

    2015-09-30

    Nuclear batteries have strategic applications and very high economic potential. One Important problem in application of nuclear betavoltaic battery is its low efficiency. Current efficiency of betavoltaic nuclear battery reaches only arround 2%. One aspect that can influence the efficiency of betavoltaic nuclear battery is the geometrical configuration of radioactive source. In this study we discuss the effect of geometrical configuration of radioactive source material to the radiation intensity in betavoltaic nuclear battery system. received by the detector. By obtaining the optimum configurations, the optimum usage of radioactive materials can be determined. Various geometrical configurations of radioactive source material are simulated. It is obtained that usage of radioactive source will be optimum for circular configuration.

  4. Fast pulsed operation of a small non-radioactive electron source with continuous emission current control

    SciTech Connect

    Cochems, P.; Kirk, A. T.; Bunert, E.; Runge, M.; Goncalves, P.; Zimmermann, S.

    2015-06-15

    Non-radioactive electron sources are of great interest in any application requiring the emission of electrons at atmospheric pressure, as they offer better control over emission parameters than radioactive electron sources and are not subject to legal restrictions. Recently, we published a simple electron source consisting only of a vacuum housing, a filament, and a single control grid. In this paper, we present improved control electronics that utilize this control grid in order to focus and defocus the electron beam, thus pulsing the electron emission at atmospheric pressure. This allows short emission pulses and excellent stability of the emitted electron current due to continuous control, both during pulsed and continuous operations. As an application example, this electron source is coupled to an ion mobility spectrometer. Here, the pulsed electron source allows experiments on gas phase ion chemistry (e.g., ion generation and recombination kinetics) and can even remove the need for a traditional ion shutter.

  5. Fast pulsed operation of a small non-radioactive electron source with continuous emission current control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochems, P.; Kirk, A. T.; Bunert, E.; Runge, M.; Goncalves, P.; Zimmermann, S.

    2015-06-01

    Non-radioactive electron sources are of great interest in any application requiring the emission of electrons at atmospheric pressure, as they offer better control over emission parameters than radioactive electron sources and are not subject to legal restrictions. Recently, we published a simple electron source consisting only of a vacuum housing, a filament, and a single control grid. In this paper, we present improved control electronics that utilize this control grid in order to focus and defocus the electron beam, thus pulsing the electron emission at atmospheric pressure. This allows short emission pulses and excellent stability of the emitted electron current due to continuous control, both during pulsed and continuous operations. As an application example, this electron source is coupled to an ion mobility spectrometer. Here, the pulsed electron source allows experiments on gas phase ion chemistry (e.g., ion generation and recombination kinetics) and can even remove the need for a traditional ion shutter.

  6. Fast pulsed operation of a small non-radioactive electron source with continuous emission current control.

    PubMed

    Cochems, P; Kirk, A T; Bunert, E; Runge, M; Goncalves, P; Zimmermann, S

    2015-06-01

    Non-radioactive electron sources are of great interest in any application requiring the emission of electrons at atmospheric pressure, as they offer better control over emission parameters than radioactive electron sources and are not subject to legal restrictions. Recently, we published a simple electron source consisting only of a vacuum housing, a filament, and a single control grid. In this paper, we present improved control electronics that utilize this control grid in order to focus and defocus the electron beam, thus pulsing the electron emission at atmospheric pressure. This allows short emission pulses and excellent stability of the emitted electron current due to continuous control, both during pulsed and continuous operations. As an application example, this electron source is coupled to an ion mobility spectrometer. Here, the pulsed electron source allows experiments on gas phase ion chemistry (e.g., ion generation and recombination kinetics) and can even remove the need for a traditional ion shutter. PMID:26133868

  7. Don't Throw Away Your Radioactive Sources!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Charles; Cunningham, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a plea directed to schools in England that changed status to an "academy" and thus lost their Local Authority Radiation Protection Adviser (RPA) service. These schools have been encouraged to do all that they can to hang on to their sources (radioactive equipment used in classroom experiments to investigate…

  8. Analysis of radioactive metals by spark source mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A J; Kozy, A; Morris, R N

    1969-04-01

    A spark source mass spectrograph with photographic plate recording has been adapted for the analysis of plutonium and americium metals. Over seventy elements can be determined simultaneously in these metals. A comparison has been made between results obtained by mass spectrography and by conventional methods for impurity elements. The operations involved in handling radioactive materials in the mass spectrograph are also discussed. PMID:18960537

  9. Development of Approach for Long-Term Management of Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources - 13630

    SciTech Connect

    Kinker, M.; Reber, E.; Mansoux, H.; Bruno, G.

    2013-07-01

    Radioactive sources are used widely throughout the world in a variety of medical, industrial, research and military applications. When such radioactive sources are no longer used and are not intended to be used for the practice for which an authorization was granted, they are designated as 'disused sources'. Whether appropriate controls are in place during the useful life of a source or not, the end of this useful life is often a turning point after which it is more difficult to ensure the safety and security of the source over time. For various reasons, many disused sources cannot be returned to the manufacturer or the supplier for reuse or recycling. When these attempts fail, disused sources should be declared as radioactive waste and should be managed as such, in compliance with relevant international legal instruments and safety standards. However, disposal remains an unresolved issue in many counties, due to in part to limited public acceptance, insufficient funding, and a lack of practical examples of strategies for determining suitable disposal options. As a result, disused sources are often stored indefinitely at the facilities where they were once used. In order to prevent disused sources from becoming orphan sources, each country must develop and implement a comprehensive waste management strategy that includes disposal of disused sources. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) fosters international cooperation between countries and encourages the development of a harmonized 'cradle to grave' approach to managing sources consistent with international legal instruments, IAEA safety standards, and international good practices. This 'cradle to grave' approach requires the development of a national policy and implementing strategy, an adequate legal and regulatory framework, and adequate resources and infrastructure that cover the entire life cycle, from production and use of radioactive sources to disposal. (authors)

  10. Cable attachment for a radioactive brachytherapy source capsule

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Ian G; Pierce, Larry A

    2006-07-18

    In cancer brachytherapy treatment, a small californium-252 neutron source capsule is attached to a guide cable using a modified crimping technique. The guide cable has a solid cylindrical end, and the attachment employs circumferential grooves micromachined in the solid cable end. The attachment was designed and tested, and hardware fabricated for use inside a radioactive hot cell. A welding step typically required in other cable attachments is avoided.

  11. COMPARISON OF RECURSIVE ESTIMATION TECHNIQUES FOR POSITION TRACKING RADIOACTIVE SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    K. MUSKE; J. HOWSE

    2000-09-01

    This paper compares the performance of recursive state estimation techniques for tracking the physical location of a radioactive source within a room based on radiation measurements obtained from a series of detectors at fixed locations. Specifically, the extended Kalman filter, algebraic observer, and nonlinear least squares techniques are investigated. The results of this study indicate that recursive least squares estimation significantly outperforms the other techniques due to the severe model nonlinearity.

  12. Optimisation of the neutron source based on gas dynamic trap for transmutation of radioactive wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikeev, Andrey V.

    2012-06-01

    The Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in collaboration with the Russian and foreign organizations develop the project of 14 MeV neutron source, which can be used for fusion material studies and for other application. The projected neutron source of plasma type is based on the plasma Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT), which is a special magnetic mirror system for plasma confinement. Presented work continues the subject of development the GDT-based neutron source (GDT-NS) for hybrid fusion-fission reactors. The paper presents the results of recent numerical optimization of such neutron source for transmutation of the long-lives radioactive wastes in spent nuclear fuel.

  13. Active radiometric calorimeter for absolute calibration of radioactive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stump, K. E.; DeWerd, L. A.; Rudman, D. A.; Schima, S. A.

    2005-03-01

    This report describes the design and initial noise floor measurements of a radiometric calorimeter designed to measure therapeutic medical radioactive sources. The instrument demonstrates a noise floor of approximately 2 nW. This low noise floor is achieved by using high temperature superconducting (HTS) transition edge sensor (TES) thermometers in a temperature-control feedback loop. This feedback loop will be used to provide absolute source calibrations based upon the electrical substitution method. Other unique features of the calorimeter are (a) its ability to change sources for calibration without disrupting the vacuum of the instrument, and (b) the ability to measure the emitted power of a source in addition to the total contained source power.

  14. Flowsheets and source terms for radioactive waste projections

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1985-03-01

    Flowsheets and source terms used to generate radioactive waste projections in the Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program are given. Volumes of each waste type generated per unit product throughput have been determined for the following facilities: uranium mining, UF/sub 6/ conversion, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, boiling-water reactors (BWRs), pressurized-water reactors (PWRs), and fuel reprocessing. Source terms for DOE/defense wastes have been developed. Expected wastes from typical decommissioning operations for each facility type have been determined. All wastes are also characterized by isotopic composition at time of generation and by general chemical composition. 70 references, 21 figures, 53 tables.

  15. 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, Richard W.

    2012-06-27

    This report provides the results of the 2011 Radioactive Materials Usage Survey for Unmonitored Point Sources (RMUS), which was updated by the Environmental Protection (ENV) Division's Environmental Stewardship (ES) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). ES classifies LANL emission sources into one of four Tiers, based on the potential effective dose equivalent (PEDE) calculated for each point source. Detailed descriptions of these tiers are provided in Section 3. The usage survey is conducted annually; in odd-numbered years the survey addresses all monitored and unmonitored point sources and in even-numbered years it addresses all Tier III and various selected other sources. This graded approach was designed to ensure that the appropriate emphasis is placed on point sources that have higher potential emissions to the environment. For calendar year (CY) 2011, ES has divided the usage survey into two distinct reports, one covering the monitored point sources (to be completed later this year) and this report covering all unmonitored point sources. This usage survey includes the following release points: (1) all unmonitored sources identified in the 2010 usage survey, (2) any new release points identified through the new project review (NPR) process, and (3) other release points as designated by the Rad-NESHAP Team Leader. Data for all unmonitored point sources at LANL is stored in the survey files at ES. LANL uses this survey data to help demonstrate compliance with Clean Air Act radioactive air emissions regulations (40 CFR 61, Subpart H). The remainder of this introduction provides a brief description of the information contained in each section. Section 2 of this report describes the methods that were employed for gathering usage survey data and for calculating usage, emissions, and dose for these point sources. It also references the appropriate ES procedures for further information. Section 3 describes the RMUS and explains how the survey results are

  16. Recursive Estimation for the Tracking of Radioactive Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Howse, J.W.; Muske, K.R.; Ticknor, L.O.

    1999-02-01

    This paper describes a recursive estimation algorithm used for tracking the physical location of radioactive sources in real-time as they are moved around in a facility. The al- gorithm is a nonlinear least squares estimation that mini- mizes the change in, the source location and the deviation between measurements and model predictions simultane- ously. The measurements used to estimate position consist of four count rates reported by four different gamma ray de tectors. There is an uncertainty in the source location due to the variance of the detected count rate. This work repre- sents part of a suite of tools which will partially automate security and safety assessments, allow some assessments to be done remotely, and provide additional sensor modalities with which to make assessments.

  17. End of Life Decisions for Sealed Radioactive Sources.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Kathryn H

    2016-02-01

    Sealed radioactive sources are encountered in a wide variety of settings-from household smoke detectors and instrument check sources through fixed industrial gauges, industrial radiography, and well logging sources, to irradiators and medical teletherapy devices. In general, the higher the level of activity in the sealed source, the stricter the regulatory control that is applied to its use, control, and ultimate disposition. Lower levels of attention and oversight can and do lead to sources ending up in the wrong place--as orphan sources in uncontrolled storage, disposed in a sanitary landfill, melted down in metal recycling operations and incorporated into consumer products, or handled by an unsuspecting member of the public. There is a range of issues that contribute to the problem of improper disposal of sealed sources and, in particular, to disused source disposal. Generally licensed sources and devices are particularly at risk of being disposed incorrectly. Higher activity generally licensed sources, although required to be registered with the (NRC) or an Agreement State, receive limited regulatory oversight and are not tracked on a national scale. Users frequently do not consider the full life-cycle costs when procuring sources or devices and discover that they cannot afford and/or are unwilling to pay the associated costs to package, transport and dispose of their sources properly. The NRC requirements for decommissioning funding plans and financial assurance are not adequate to cover sealed source transport and disposal costs fully. While there are regulatory limits for storage of disused sources, enforcement is limited, and there are only limited financial incentives in a small number of states for owners to dispose of the sources. In some cases, the lack of availability of approved Type B shipping casks presents an additional barrier to sealed source disposal. The report of the Disused Sources Working Group does an excellent job of framing these issues

  18. Applications Where Snap is BPM for Radioactive Waste Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T.J.

    2008-07-01

    Historically, the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) at Aldermaston in the United Kingdom (UK), has used a variety of assay techniques to measure the radioactive content of a diverse range of waste packages from decommissioning, operational and legacy sources. The regulator, the Environment Agency in the UK, places conditions and limits on AWE through an authorisation within the Radioactive Substances Act (RSA93). The conditions and limits require Best Practical Means (BPM) measurements to be used to demonstrate compliance with the authorisation. Hence, the assay technique employed needs to achieve a balance between risk of exposure, environmental considerations, technological considerations, health and safety considerations and cost effectiveness, without being grossly disproportionate in terms of money, time or trouble. Recently published work has concluded that the Spectral Non-destructive Assay Platform (SNAP) assay system is BPM for Depleted Uranium (DU) waste assay at AWE (1) and low level plutonium in soft drummed waste, HEPA filters and soils (2-4). The purpose of this paper is to highlight other applications where SNAP represents BPM for radioactive waste assay. This has been done by intercomparison studies of SNAP with other assay techniques, such as Segmented Gamma Scanner (SGS) and Passive Neutron Coincidence Counter (PNCC). It has been concluded that, for a large range of waste packages encountered at AWE, SNAP is BPM. (author)

  19. Muon Tomography as a Tool to Detect Radioactive Source Shielding in Scrap Metal Containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonomi, G.; Cambiaghi, D.; Dassa, L.; Donzella, A.; Subieta, M.; Villa, V.; Zenoni, A.; Furlan, M.; Rigoni, A.; Vanini, S.; Viesti, G.; Zumerle, G.; Benettoni, M.; Checchia, P.; Gonella, F.; Pegoraro, M.; Zanuttigh, P.; Calvagno, G.; Calvini, P.; Squarcia, S.

    2014-02-01

    Muon tomography was recently proposed as a tool to inspect large volumes with the purpose of recognizing high density materials immersed in lower density matrices. The MU-STEEL European project (RFCS-CT-2010-000033) studied the application of such a technique to detect radioactive source shielding in truck containers filled with scrap metals entering steel mill foundries. A description of the muon tomography technique, of the MU-STEEL project and of the obtained results will be presented.

  20. A concentrated radioactive beam source for atom cooling and trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Maddi, J.; Dinneen, T.; Ghiorso, A.; Gould, H.

    1996-05-01

    The authors describe a novel oven to obtain concentrated beams of radioactive atoms. The Orthotropic oven works by ionizing atoms on its interior walls and electrostatically concentrating them on a neutralizer. Once neutralized the atoms can escape from the oven and form a narrow beam. Atoms that fail to escape become ionized again and repeat the cycle. The authors demonstrate the operation of this oven using {sup 221}Fr and compare both the theoretical and experimental efficiency of this source with standard effusive and channeled ovens.

  1. Current Situation for Management of Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources in Japan - 13025

    SciTech Connect

    Kusama, Keiji; Miyamoto, Yoichi

    2013-07-01

    As for the Sealed Radioactive Source currently used in Japan, many of them are imported from overseas. The U.S., Canada, Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium and Czech Republic are the main exporting States. Many of disused sealed radioactive sources are being returned to exporting States. The sealed radioactive sources which cannot be returned to exporting States are appropriately kept in the domestic storage facility. So, there are not main problem on the long term management of disused sealed radioactive sources in Japan. However, there are some difficulties on repatriate. One is reservation of a means of transport. The sea mail which conveys radioactive sources owing to reduction of movement of international cargo is decreasing in number. And there is a denial of shipment. Other one is that the manufacturer has already resigned from the work and cannot return disused sealed radioactive sources, or a manufacturer cannot specify and disused sources cannot be returned. The disused sealed radioactive source which cannot be repatriated is a little in term of radioactivity. As for the establishment of national measure of final disposal facility for disused sealed radioactive sources, in Japan, it is not yet installed with difficulty. Since there are many countries for which installation of a final disposal facility for disused sealed radioactive sources is difficult, the source manufacture country should respond positively to return the source which was manufactured and sold in the past. (authors)

  2. Radioactive source localization by a two detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitropoulos, C.; Kaissas, I.; Potiriadis, C.; Karafasoulis, K.; Loukas, D.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The development of instruments utilizing coded apertures has become more feasible with the progress of the Cd(Zn)Te hybrid detector technology. The collective performance of systems comprised by such devices can be evaluated in all the fields where traditionally coded aperture imaging has been applied. Along this direction, we present the evaluation of the performance of a system, which consists of two identical coded aperture gamma cameras. Each detector has an active area of 4.4× 4.4 cm2 with 16384 pixels. The two cameras are used for the estimation of the spatial coordinates of a radioactive source by employing triangulation. The system source location accuracy and efficiency are analyzed using experimental data and simulations.

  3. Probing new physics with underground accelerators and radioactive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izaguirre, Eder; Krnjaic, Gordan; Pospelov, Maxim

    2015-01-01

    New light, weakly coupled particles can be efficiently produced at existing and future high-intensity accelerators and radioactive sources in deep underground laboratories. Once produced, these particles can scatter or decay in large neutrino detectors (e.g. Super-K and Borexino) housed in the same facilities. We discuss the production of weakly coupled scalars ϕ via nuclear de-excitation of an excited element into the ground state in two viable concrete reactions: the decay of the 0+ excited state of 16O populated via a (p , α) reaction on fluorine and from radioactive 144Ce decay where the scalar is produced in the de-excitation of 144Nd*, which occurs along the decay chain. Subsequent scattering on electrons, e (ϕ , γ) e, yields a mono-energetic signal that is observable in neutrino detectors. We show that this proposed experimental setup can cover new territory for masses 250 keV ≤mϕ ≤ 2me and couplings to protons and electrons, 10-11 ≤gegp ≤10-7. This parameter space is motivated by explanations of the 'proton charge radius puzzle', thus this strategy adds a viable new physics component to the neutrino and nuclear astrophysics programs at underground facilities. For the LUNA-type setup, we show that such light particles can be efficiently produced by populating the first excited 6.05 MeV 0+ state of 16O in (p , α) reactions on fluorine. For the SOX-type setup we find similarly powerful sensitivity from the 144Ce-144Pr (νbare) radioactive source, which can produce a scalar with 2.19 or 1.49 MeV energies from the Nd144* de-excitation that occurs along the decay chain. The subsequent detection of a mono-energetic release in a Borexino-type detector with 6.05, 2.19, or 1.49 MeV will be free from substantial environmental backgrounds. The strategy proposed in this Letter is capable of advancing the sensitivity to such states by many orders of magnitude, completely covering the parameter space relevant for the rp puzzle.

  4. Assessment on security system of radioactive sources used in hospitals of Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jitbanjong, Petchara; Wongsawaeng, Doonyapong

    2016-01-01

    Unsecured radioactive sources have caused deaths and serious injuries in many parts of the world. In Thailand, there are 17 hospitals that use teletherapy with cobalt-60 radioactive sources. They need to be secured in order to prevent unauthorized removal, sabotage and terrorists from using such materials in a radiological weapon. The security system of radioactive sources in Thailand is regulated by the Office of Atoms for Peace in compliance with Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), U.S. DOE, which has started to be implemented since 2010. This study aims to perform an assessment on the security system of radioactive sources used in hospitals in Thailand and the results can be used as a recommended baseline data for development or improvement of hospitals on the security system of a radioactive source at a national regulatory level and policy level. Results from questionnaires reveal that in 11 out of 17 hospitals (64.70%), there were a few differences in conditions of hospitals using radioactive sources with installation of the security system and those without installation of the security system. Also, personals working with radioactive sources did not clearly understand the nuclear security law. Thus, government organizations should be encouraged to arrange trainings on nuclear security to increase the level of understanding. In the future, it is recommended that the responsible government organization issues a minimum requirement of nuclear security for every medical facility using radioactive sources.

  5. Demonstration and development of control mechanism for radioactive sources in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kheliewi, A. S.

    2012-06-01

    Saudi Arabia have no nuclear industry. Nevertheless, many radioactive sources, for different purposes, have been used in the country. There is upswing in the number of companies that recruit nuclear technology in their daily work. The National Center for Radiation Protection (NCRP) takes the full commitment and responsibility for monitoring and regulating the movement of radioactive sources in the country. NCRP issues the licenses for import, export, and use of radioactive sources. It, also, protects the country from any trespassing radiation through a sizable net of early warning and radiation monitoring stations along the borders of Saudi Arabia. This paper talks about the procedures of licensing, importing, exporting of radioactive sources. It, also, sheds light on types of implementing radioactive sources in different practices encompass medicine, industry, research. The NCRP has established an electronic web site to ease the communication with all users in the country. This site is yet in the experimental stage.

  6. Demonstration and development of control mechanism for radioactive sources in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Kheliewi, A. S.

    2012-06-06

    Saudi Arabia have no nuclear industry. Nevertheless, many radioactive sources, for different purposes, have been used in the country. There is upswing in the number of companies that recruit nuclear technology in their daily work. The National Center for Radiation Protection (NCRP) takes the full commitment and responsibility for monitoring and regulating the movement of radioactive sources in the country. NCRP issues the licenses for import, export, and use of radioactive sources. It, also, protects the country from any trespassing radiation through a sizable net of early warning and radiation monitoring stations along the borders of Saudi Arabia. This paper talks about the procedures of licensing, importing, exporting of radioactive sources. It, also, sheds light on types of implementing radioactive sources in different practices encompass medicine, industry, research. The NCRP has established an electronic web site to ease the communication with all users in the country. This site is yet in the experimental stage.

  7. Residual radioactive material guidelines: Methodology and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Yuan, Y.C.; Zielen, A.J.; Wallo, A. III

    1989-01-01

    A methodology to calculate residual radioactive material guidelines was developed for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This methodology is coded in a menu-driven computer program, RESRAD, which can be run on IBM or IBM-compatible microcomputers. Seven pathways of exposure are considered: external radiation, inhalation, and ingestion of plant foods, meat, milk, aquatic foods, and water. The RESRAD code has been applied to several DOE sites to calculate soil cleanup guidelines. This experience has shown that the computer code is easy to use and very user-friendly. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Safety and Security of Radioactive Sealed and Disused/Orphan Sources in Ukraine - German Contribution - 13359

    SciTech Connect

    Brasser, Thomas; Hertes, Uwe; Meyer, Thorsten; Uhlenbruck, Hermann; Shevtsov, Alexey

    2013-07-01

    Within the scope of 'Nuclear Security of Radioactive Sources', the German government implemented the modernization of Ukrainian State Production Company's transport and storage facility for radioactive sources (TSF) in Kiev. The overall management of optimizing the physical protection of the storage facility (including the construction of a hot cell for handling the radioactive sources) is currently carried out by the German Federal Foreign Office (AA). AA jointly have assigned Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Germany's leading expert institution in the area of nuclear safety and waste management, to implement the project and to ensure transparency by financial and technical monitoring. Sealed radioactive sources are widely used in industry, medicine and research. Their life cycle starts with the production and finally ends with the interim/long-term storage of the disused sources. In Ukraine, IZOTOP is responsible for all radioactive sources throughout their life cycle. IZOTOP's transport and storage facility (TSF) is the only Ukrainian storage facility for factory-fresh radioactive sources up to an activity of about 1 million Ci (3.7 1016 Bq). The TSF is specially designed for the storage and handling of radioactive sources. Storage began in 1968, and is licensed by the Ukrainian state authorities. Beside the outdated state of TSF's physical protection and the vulnerability of the facility linked with it, the lack of a hot cell for handling and repacking radioactive sources on the site itself represents an additional potential hazard. The project, financed by the German Federal Foreign Office, aims to significantly improve the security of radioactive sources during their storage and handling at the TSF site. Main tasks of the project are a) the modernization of the physical protection of the TSF itself in order to prevent any unauthorized access to radioactive sources as well as b) the construction of a hot cell to reduce the number of

  9. Evaluation of Trenchless Installation Technology for Radioactive Wastewater Piping Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Sharon M; Jubin, Robert Thomas; Patton, Bradley D; Sullivan, Nicholas M; Bugbee, Kathy P

    2009-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup mission at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) includes dispositioning facilities, contaminated legacy materials/waste, and contamination sources and remediation of soil under facilities, groundwater, and surface water to support final Records of Decision (RODs). The Integrated Facilities Disposition Project (IFDP) is a roughly $15B project for completion of the EM mission at Oak Ridge, with a project duration of up to 35 years. The IFDP Mission Need Statement - Critical Decision-0 (CD-0) - was approved by DOE in July 2007, and the IFDP Alternative Selection and Cost Range - Critical Decision-1 (CD-1) - was approved in November 2008. The IFDP scope includes reconfiguration of waste collection and treatment systems as needed to complete the IFDP remediation and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) missions in a safe and cost-effective manner while maintaining compliance with all governing regulations and bodies and preserving the support of continuing operations at ORNL. A step in the CD-1 approval process included an external technical review (ETR) of technical approaches proposed in the CD-1 document related to the facility reconfiguration for the ORNL radioactive waste and liquid low-level waste management systems. The ETR team recommended that the IFDP team consider the use of trenchless technologies for installing pipelines underground in and around contaminated sites as part of the alternatives evaluations required in support of the CD-2 process. The team specifically recommended evaluating trenchless technologies for installing new pipes in existing underground pipelines as an alternative to conventional open trench installation methods. Potential benefits could include reduction in project costs, less costly underground piping, fewer disruptions of ongoing and surface activities, and lower risk for workers. While trenchless technologies have been used extensively in the

  10. The patient as a radioactive source: an intercomparison of survey meters for measurements in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Uhrhan, K; Drzezga, A; Sudbrock, F

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the radiation exposure in nuclear medicine is evaluated by measuring dose rates in the proximity of patients and those in close contact to sources like capsules and syringes. A huge number of different survey meters (SMs) are offered commercially. This topic has recently gained interest since dosemeters and active personal dosemeters (APD) for the new dose quantities (ambient and directional dose equivalent) have become available. One main concern is the practical use of SMs and APD in daily clinical routines. Therefore, the radiation field of four common radiopharmaceuticals containing (18)F, (90)Y, (99m)Tc and (131)I in radioactive sources or after application to the patient was determined. Measurements were carried out with different SMs and for several distances. Dose rates decline significantly with the distance to the patient, and with some restrictions, APD can be used as SMs. PMID:25071244

  11. Spreadsheet application to classify radioactive material for shipment

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.N.

    1997-12-01

    A spreadsheet application has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to aid the shipper when classifying nuclide mixtures of normal form, radioactive materials. The results generated by this spreadsheet are used to confirm the proper US Department of Transportation (DOT) classification when offering radioactive material packages for transport. The user must input to the spreadsheet the mass of the material being classified, the physical form (liquid or not), and the activity of each regulated nuclide. The spreadsheet uses these inputs to calculate two general values: (1) the specific activity of the material, and (2) a summation calculation of the nuclide content. The specific activity is used to determine if the material exceeds the DOT minimal threshold for a radioactive material (Yes or No). If the material is calculated to be radioactive, the specific activity is also used to determine if the material meets the activity requirement for one of the three Low Specific Activity designations (LSA-I, LSA-II, LSA-III, or Not LSA). Again, if the material is calculated to be radioactive, the summation calculation is then used to determine which activity category the material will meet (Limited Quantity, Type A, Type B, or Highway Route Controlled Quantity).

  12. 78 FR 53020 - Branch Technical Position on the Import of Non-U.S. Origin Radioactive Sources

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... BTP on the Import of Non-U.S. Origin Radioactive Sources,'' 77 FR 2924 (January 20, 2012), and... Non-U.S. Origin Radioactive Sources,'' ] 77 FR 64435 (October 22, 2012), and received eight comment..., initially adopted in a 1995 rule.\\3\\ \\3\\ Import and Export of Radioactive Waste, 60 FR 37556 (July 21,...

  13. Implementation of an imaging spectrometer for localization and identification of radioactive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, H.; Khalil, R. Abou; Amgarou, K.; Angélique, J.-C.; Bonnet, F.; De Toro, D.; Carrel, F.; Giarmana, O.; Gmar, M.; Menaa, N.; Menesguen, Y.; Normand, S.; Patoz, A.; Schoepff, V.; Talent, P.; Timi, T.

    2014-11-01

    Spatial localization of radioactive sources is currently a main issue interesting nuclear industry as well as homeland security applications and can be achieved using gamma cameras. For several years, CEA LIST has been designing a new system, called GAMPIX, with improved sensitivity, portability and ease of use. The main remaining limitation of this system is the lack of spectrometric information, preventing the identification of radioactive materials. This article describes the development of an imaging spectrometer based on the GAMPIX technology. Experimental tests have been carried out according to both spectrometric methods enabled by the pixelated Timepix chip used in the GAMPIX gamma camera. The first method is based on the size of the impacts produced by a gamma-ray energy deposition in the detection matrix. The second one uses the Time over Threshold (ToT) mode of the Timepix chip and deals with time spent by pulses generated by charge preamplifiers over a user-specified threshold. Both energy resolution and sensitivity studies demonstrated the superiority of the ToT approach which will consequently be further explored. Energy calibration, tests of different pixel sizes for the Timepix chip and use of the Medipix3 chip are future milestones to improve performances of the newly implemented imaging spectrometer.

  14. Radioactivity in zirconium oxide powders used in industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Lischinsky, J; Vigliani, M A; Allard, D J

    1991-06-01

    Recent work involving the decommissioning of a former ceramic manufacturing facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for activities involving depleted uranium oxide has uncovered the presence of unexpected high levels of natural radioactivity in non-licensed zirconium oxide powders also used in the same facility. A comparison between the levels of source material found in samples of this material and the current regulatory guidance for licensed activities and decommissioning has been conducted. It has been determined that the radioactivity in the zirconium oxide is of a high enough magnitude to raise health physics concerns in the areas of licensing and regulatory compliance, decontamination criteria, and worker health and safety. An examination of these areas has been conducted and the implications associated with our findings are presented. PMID:2032840

  15. Verification of I-125 brachytherapy source strength for use in radioactive seed localization procedures.

    PubMed

    Metyko, John; Erwin, William; Landsberger, Sheldon

    2016-06-01

    A general-purpose nuclear medicine dose calibrator was assessed as a potential replacement for a dedicated air-communicating well-type ionization chamber (brachytherapy source strength verification instrument) for (125)I seed source strength verification for radioactive seed localization, where less stringent accuracy tolerances may be acceptable. The accuracy, precision and reproducibility of the dose calibrator were measured and compared to regulatory requirements. The results of this work indicate that a dose calibrator can be used for (125)I seed source strength verification for radioactive seed localization. PMID:27015651

  16. Calibration of a DSSSD detector with radioactive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Guadilla, V.; Tain, J. L.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Rubio, B.

    2013-06-10

    The energy calibration of a DSSSD is carried out with the spectra produced by a {sup 207}Bi conversion electron source, a {sup 137}Cs gamma source and a {sup 239}Pu/{sup 241}Am/{sup 244}Cm triple alpha source, as well as employing a precision pulse generator in the whole dynamic range. Multiplicity and coincidence of signals in different strips for the same event are also studied.

  17. Laser Ion Source Operation at the TRIUMF Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassen, J.; Bricault, P.; Dombsky, M.; Lavoie, J. P.; Gillner, M.; Gottwald, T.; Hellbusch, F.; Teigelhöfer, A.; Voss, A.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    2009-03-01

    The TRIUMF Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) for radioactive ion beam production is presented, with target ion source, laser beam transport, laser system and operation. In this context aspects of titanium sapphire (TiSa) laser based RILIS and facility requirements are discussed and results from the first years of TRILIS RIB delivery are given.

  18. Enrico Fermi's Discovery of Neutron-Induced Artificial Radioactivity: Neutrons and Neutron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Francesco; Leone, Matteo; Robotti, Nadia

    2006-09-01

    We reconstruct and analyze the path leading from James Chadwick’s discovery of the neutron in February 1932 through Frédéric Joliot and Irène Curie’s discovery of artificial radioactivity in January 1934 to Enrico Fermi’s discovery of neutron-induced artificial radioactivity in March 1934. We show, in particular, that Fermi’s innovative construction and use of radon-beryllium neutron sources permitted him to make his discovery.

  19. The Effect of Gamma-ray Detector Energy Resolution on the Ability to Identify Radioactive Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, K E; Gosnell, T B; Knapp, D A

    2009-03-05

    This report describes the results of an initial study on radiation detector spectral resolution, along with the underlying methodology used. The study was done as part of an ongoing effort in Detection Modeling and Operational Analysis (DMOA) for the DNDO System Architecture Directorate. The study objective was to assess the impact of energy resolution on radionuclide identification capability, measured by the ability to reliably discriminate between spectra associated with 'threats' (defined as fissile materials) and radioactive 'non-threats' that might be present in the normal stream of commerce. Although numerous factors must be considered in deciding which detector technology is appropriate for a specific application, spectral resolution is a critical one for homeland security applications in which a broad range of non-threat sources are present and very low false-alarm rates are required. In this study, we have proposed a metric for quantifying discrimination capability, and have shown how this metric depends on resolution. In future work we will consider other important factors, such as efficiency and volume, and the relative frequency of spectra known to be discrimination challenges in practical applications.

  20. The Belgian approach and status on the radiological surveillance of radioactive substances in metal scrap and non-radioactive waste and the financing of orphan sources

    SciTech Connect

    Braeckeveldt, Marnix; Preter, Peter De

    2007-07-01

    Numerous facilities in the non-nuclear sector in Belgium (e.g. in the non-radioactive waste processing and management sector and in the metal recycling sector) have been equipped with measuring ports for detecting radioactive substances. These measuring ports prevent radioactive sources or radioactive contamination from ending up in the material fluxes treated by the sectors concerned. They thus play an important part in the protection of the workers and the people living in the neighbourhood of the facilities, as well as in the protection of the population and the environment in general. In 2006, Belgium's federal nuclear control agency (FANC/AFCN) drew up guidelines for the operators of non-nuclear facilities with a measuring port for detecting radioactive substances. These guidelines describe the steps to be followed by the operators when the port's alarm goes off. Following the publication of the European guideline 2003/122/EURATOM of 22 December 2003 on the control of high-activity sealed radioactive sources and orphan sources, a procedure has been drawn up by FANC/AFCN and ONDRAF/NIRAS, the Belgian National Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials, to identify the responsible to cover the costs relating to the further management of detected sealed sources and if not found to declare the sealed source as an orphan source. In this latter case and from mid-2006 the insolvency fund managed by ONDRAF/NIRAS covers the cost of radioactive waste management. At the request of the Belgian government, a financing proposal for the management of unsealed orphan sources as radioactive waste was also established by FANC/AFCN and ONDRAF/NIRAS. This proposal applies the same approach as for sealed sources and thus the financing of unsealed orphan sources will also be covered by the insolvency fund. (authors)

  1. Safety and security management of disused sealed radioactive sources in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ya-anant, N.; Nuanjan, P.; Phattanasub, A.; Akharawutchayanon, T.; O-manee, A.; Prasertchiewchan, N.; Benitez-Navarro, J. C.

    2015-05-01

    When sealed radioactive sources are no longer in use, they should be returned back to the country of origin. However, most of them could not be returned to the origin; therefore, disused sealed radioactive sources (DSRS) have to be managed locally to ensure the safety and the security for long term storage before final disposal. The Radioactive Waste Management Center, Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology, is authorized to operate the treatment, conditioning and storage of DSRS in Thailand. This paper will describe the operational procedures on characterization technique, identifation of unknown sources, volume reduction technique, re-packaging, registration and record keeping of DSRS. The successful results included that the record keeping of DSRS has been developed, and the national inventory of stored DSRS has been made up to date. The results confirmed that the quality control at the DSRS storage facility at Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology was established and well implemented to ensure safe and secure management.

  2. Conditioning and Repackaging of Spent Radioactive Cs-137 and Co-60 Sealed Sources in Egypt - 13490

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, M.A.; Selim, Y.T.; El-Zakla, T.

    2013-07-01

    Radioactive Sealed sources (RSSs) are widely use all over the world in medicine, agriculture, industry, research, etc. The accidental misuse and exposure to RSSs has caused significant environmental contamination, serious injuries and many deaths. The high specific activity of the materials in many RSSs means that the spread of as little as microgram quantities can generate significant risk to human health and inhibit the use of buildings and land. Conditioning of such sources is a must to protect humans and environment from the hazard of ionizing radiation and contamination. Conditioning is also increase the security of these sources by decreasing the probability of stolen and/or use in terrorist attacks. According to the law No.7/2010, Egyptian atomic energy authority represented in the hot laboratories and waste management center (centralized waste facility, HLWMC) has the responsibility of collecting, conditioning, storing and management of all types of radioactive waste from all Egyptian territory including spent radioactive sealed sources (SRSSs). This paper explains the conditioning procedures for two of the most common SRSSs, Cs{sup 137} and Co{sup 60} sources which make up more than 90% of the total spent radioactive sealed sources stored in our centralized waste facility as one of the major activities of hot laboratories and waste management center. Conditioning has to meet three main objectives, be acceptable for storage, enable their safe transport, and comply with disposal requirements. (authors)

  3. Internet as a Source of Misconception: "Radiation and Radioactivity"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acar Sesen, Burcin; Ince, Elif

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine students' usage styles of the Internet for seeking information and to investigate whether information obtained from the Internet is a source of misconceptions. For this reason, a two-stage study was conducted. At the first stage, a questionnaire was developed to get information about students' Internet usage…

  4. Negative-ion source applications.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, J

    2008-02-01

    In this paper heavy negative-ion sources which we developed and their applications for materials science are reviewed. Heavy negative ions can be effectively produced by the ejection of a sputtered atom through the optimally cesiated surface of target with a low work function. Then, enough continuous negative-ion currents for materials-science applications can be obtained. We developed several kinds of sputter-type heavy negative-ion sources such as neutral- and ionized-alkaline metal bombardment-type heavy negative-ion source and rf-plasma sputter type. In the case where a negative ion is irradiated on a material surface, surface charging seldom takes place because incoming negative charge of the negative ion is well balanced with outgoing negative charge of the released secondary electron. In the negative-ion implantation into an insulator or insulated conductive material, high precision implantation processing with charge-up free properties can be achieved. Negative-ion implantation technique, therefore, can be applied to the following novel material processing systems: the surface modification of micrometer-sized powders, the nanoparticle formation in an insulator for the quantum devices, and the nerve cell growth manipulation by precise control of the biocompatibility of polymer surface. When a negative ion with low kinetic energy approaches the solid surface, the kinetic energy causes the interatomic bonding (kinetic bonding), and formation of a metastable material is promoted. Carbon films with high constituent of sp(3) bonding, therefore, can be formed by carbon negative-ion beam deposition. PMID:18315249

  5. Stronger Efforts are Needed to Improve the Control of Radioactive Sources: An IAEA Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Heard, R.; Friedrich, V.; Czarwinski, R.; Behan, C.

    2008-07-01

    High activity radioactive sources provide great benefit to humanity through their utilization in agriculture, industry, medicine, research and education, and the vast majority is used in well-controlled environments. None-the-less, control has been lost over a small fraction of those sources resulting in accidents of which some had serious - even fatal - consequences. In order to improve the existing situation, concerted national and international efforts are needed and, to some degree, are being implemented to strengthen the safety and security of sources in use, as well as to improve the control of disused sources located at numerous facilities throughout the world. More efforts must also be made to identify, recover, and bring into control vulnerable and orphan sources. The IAEA has been involved in efforts to bring about better control of radioactive sources for many years but since the events of September 2001 the amount of effort put into this area has increased considerably. This paper highlights IAEA work in this regard. This paper also discusses in some detail the overall nature of the problem with regards to disused sources and points out how there is still much to do in both improving the existing situation and ensuring the sustainability of control over radioactive sources for the future. (authors)

  6. Radiation Field of Packages Carrying Spent Co-60 Radioactive Sources - 12437

    SciTech Connect

    Marzo, Giuseppe A.; Giorgiantoni, Giorgio; Sepielli, Massimo

    2012-07-01

    Among the diverse radioactive sources commonly exploited in medical and industrial applications, Co- 60 is increasingly used as strong gamma emitter. Over time, source manufacturers favored Co-60 as opposed to other gamma emitters because its relatively short half-life (5.27 year) that minimizes issues related to the management of disused sources. Disused Co-60 sources can retain a significant amount of radioactivity (from hundreds of MBq to several GBq) that still poses safety concerns on their handling and transportation. In this context a detailed knowledge of their radiation field would provide the necessary information for taking actions in preventing unnecessary doses to the workers and the population by optimizing transportation procedures and handling operations. We modeled the geometry and the materials constituting a transportation packaging of a spent Co-60 source which had an original maximum activity of a few GBq and was enclosed in a small lead irradiator. Then we applied a Monte Carlo transport code (MCNP5) for tracking down the gamma photons emitted by the source, including the secondary photons resulting by the interaction of the source photons with the surrounding materials. This allowed for the evaluation of the radiation field inside and outside the packaging, and the corresponding equivalent dose useful for checking the compliance with the regulations and the health risk of possible radiation exposure. We found that a typical 60-liters drum carrying a spent Co-60 source, enclosed in its original irradiator, with a residual activity of 300 MBq could already overcome an equivalent dose of 0.2 mSv/h on the drum external surface, which is the maximum equivalent dose at any point of the surface for this packaging as prescribed by local regulations. This condition is even more apparent when the source is slightly displaced with respect to the rotation axis of the drum, an easily occurring condition for sources not properly packaged, generating non

  7. Quantitative radiochemical methods for determination of the sources of natural radioactivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosholt, J.N., Jr.

    1957-01-01

    Study of the state of equilibrium of any natural radioactive source requires determination of several key nuclides or groups of nuclides to find their contribution to the total amount of radioactivity. Alpha activity measured by scintillation counting is used for determination of protactinium-231, thorium-232, thorium-230, and radium-226. The chemical procedures for the separations of the specific elements are described, as well as the measurement techniques used to determine the abundances of the individual isotopes. To correct for deviations in the ore standards, an independent means of evaluating the efficiencies of the individual separations and measurements is used. The development of these methods of radiochemical analysis facilitates detailed investigation of the major sources of natural radioactivity.

  8. Using Radioactive Fallout Cesium (137Cs) to Distinguish Sediment Sources in an Agricultural Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Radioactive fallout Cesium (Cs-137) has been used for quantifying sources of accumulating sediment in water bodies and to determine the rates and pattern of soil erosion. The objectives of this research are to use Cs-137 as a tracer to determine patterns of soil erosion and deposition of eroding soi...

  9. The adequacy of current import and export controls on sealed radioactive sources.

    SciTech Connect

    Longley, Susan W.; Cochran, John Russell; Price, Laura L.; Lipinski, Kendra J.

    2003-10-01

    Millions of sealed radioactive sources (SRSs) are being used for a wide variety of beneficial purposes throughout the world. Security experts are now concerned that these beneficial SRSs could be used in a radiological dispersion device to terrorize and disrupt society. The greatest safety and security threat is from those highly radioactive Category 1 and 2 SRSs. Without adequate controls, it may be relatively easy to legally purchase a Category 1 or 2 SRS on the international market under false pretenses. Additionally, during transfer, SRSs are particularly susceptible to theft since the sources are in a shielded and mobile configuration, transportation routes are predictable, and shipments may not be adequately guarded. To determine if government controls on SRS are adequate, this study was commissioned to review the current SRS import and export controls of six countries. Canada, the Russian Federation, and South Africa were selected as the exporting countries, and Egypt, the Philippines, and the United States were selected as importing countries. A detailed review of the controls in each country is presented. The authors found that Canada and Russia are major exporters, and are exporting highly radioactive SRSs without first determining if the recipient is authorized by the receiving country to own and use the SRSs. Available evidence was used to estimate that on average there are tens to possibly hundreds of intercountry transfers of highly radioactive SRSs each day. Based on these and other findings, this reports recommends stronger controls on the export and import of highly radioactive SRSs.

  10. German Support Program for Retrieval and Safe Storage of Disused Radioactive Sealed Sources in Ukraine - 13194

    SciTech Connect

    Pretzsch, Gunter; Salewski, Peter; Sogalla, Martin

    2013-07-01

    The German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) on behalf of the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany supports the State Nuclear Regulatory Inspectorate of Ukraine (SNRIU) in enhancement of nuclear safety and radiation protection and strengthening of the physical protection. One of the main objectives of the agreement concluded by these parties in 2008 was the retrieval and safe interim storage of disused orphan high radioactive sealed sources in Ukraine. At present, the Ukrainian National Registry does not account all high active radiation sources but only for about 70 - 80 %. GRS in charge of BMU to execute the program since 2008 concluded subcontracts with the waste management and interim storage facilities RADON at different regions in Ukraine as well with the waste management and interim storage facility IZOTOP at Kiev. Below selected examples of removal of high active Co-60 and Cs-137 sources from irradiation facilities at research institutes are described. By end of 2012 removal and safe interim storage of 12.000 disused radioactive sealed sources with a total activity of more than 5,7.10{sup 14} Bq was achieved within the frame of this program. The German support program will be continued up to the end of 2013 with the aim to remove and safely store almost all disused radioactive sealed sources in Ukraine. (authors)

  11. Management of Disused Radioactive Sealed Sources in the Slovak Republic - 12100

    SciTech Connect

    Salzer, Peter

    2012-07-01

    After splitting-up the Czechoslovak Federation in 1993, the system of management of institutional radioactive waste, where disused sources represent its significant part, had had to build from beginning, since all corresponding activities had remained in the Czech part of the Federation. The paper presents the development of legislative and institutional framework of the disused radioactive sealed source management, development of the national inventory and development of management practices. According the Governmental decision (1994), the management of disused sealed sources and institutional radioactive waste at whole was based on maximal utilization of facilities inside nuclear facilities, particularly in the NPP A1 (shut down in the past, currently under decommissioning). This approach has been recently changing by Governmental decision (2009) to construct 'non-nuclear facility' - central storage for remained disused sealed sources collected from the places of use, where they were stored in some cases for tens of years. The approaches to siting and construction of this storage facility will be presented, as well as the current approaches to solution of the disused radioactive sources final disposal. Environmental impact assessment process in regard to the given facility/activity is slowly drawing to a close. The final statement of the Ministry of Environment can be expected in January or February 2012, probably recommending option 1 as preferred [6]. According to the Slovak legislation, the final statement has a status of recommendation for ongoing processes leading to the siting license. Very recently, in December 2012, Government of the Slovak republic decided to postpone putting the facility into operation by the end of June, 2014. (author)

  12. Low-level radioactive waste source terms for the 1992 integrated data base

    SciTech Connect

    Loghry, S L; Kibbey, A H; Godbee, H W; Icenhour, A S; DePaoli, S M

    1995-01-01

    This technical manual presents updated generic source terms (i.e., unitized amounts and radionuclide compositions) which have been developed for use in the Integrated Data Base (IDB) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These source terms were used in the IDB annual report, Integrated Data Base for 1992: Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Inventories, Projections, and Characteristics, DOE/RW-0006, Rev. 8, October 1992. They are useful as a basis for projecting future amounts (volume and radioactivity) of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) shipped for disposal at commercial burial grounds or sent for storage at DOE solid-waste sites. Commercial fuel cycle LLW categories include boiling-water reactor, pressurized-water reactor, fuel fabrication, and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) conversion. Commercial nonfuel cycle LLW includes institutional/industrial (I/I) waste. The LLW from DOE operations is category as uranium/thorium fission product, induced activity, tritium, alpha, and {open_quotes}other{close_quotes}. Fuel cycle commercial LLW source terms are normalized on the basis of net electrical output [MW(e)-year], except for UF{sub 6} conversion, which is normalized on the basis of heavy metal requirement [metric tons of initial heavy metal ]. The nonfuel cycle commercial LLW source term is normalized on the basis of volume (cubic meters) and radioactivity (curies) for each subclass within the I/I category. The DOE LLW is normalized in a manner similar to that for commercial I/I waste. The revised source terms are based on the best available historical data through 1992.

  13. A singly charged ion source for radioactive 11C ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katagiri, K.; Noda, A.; Nagatsu, K.; Nakao, M.; Hojo, S.; Muramatsu, M.; Suzuki, K.; Wakui, T.; Noda, K.

    2016-02-01

    A new singly charged ion source using electron impact ionization has been developed to realize an isotope separation on-line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive 11C ion beams. Low-energy electron beams are used in the electron impact ion source to produce singly charged ions. Ionization efficiency was calculated in order to decide the geometric parameters of the ion source and to determine the required electron emission current for obtaining high ionization efficiency. Based on these considerations, the singly charged ion source was designed and fabricated. In testing, the fabricated ion source was found to have favorable performance as a singly charged ion source.

  14. A singly charged ion source for radioactive ¹¹C ion acceleration.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, K; Noda, A; Nagatsu, K; Nakao, M; Hojo, S; Muramatsu, M; Suzuki, K; Wakui, T; Noda, K

    2016-02-01

    A new singly charged ion source using electron impact ionization has been developed to realize an isotope separation on-line system for simultaneous positron emission tomography imaging and heavy-ion cancer therapy using radioactive (11)C ion beams. Low-energy electron beams are used in the electron impact ion source to produce singly charged ions. Ionization efficiency was calculated in order to decide the geometric parameters of the ion source and to determine the required electron emission current for obtaining high ionization efficiency. Based on these considerations, the singly charged ion source was designed and fabricated. In testing, the fabricated ion source was found to have favorable performance as a singly charged ion source. PMID:26932062

  15. Application of the Commission's recommendations to naturally occurring radioactive material.

    PubMed

    Lecomte, J-F

    2015-06-01

    Since publication of the 2007 Recommendations (ICRP Publication 103), the International Commission on Radiological Protection has focused on preparing a series of publications dedicated to different types of existing exposure situations, such as radon exposure, cosmic exposure in aviation, and exposure to naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The publication related to NORM will present the main types of corresponding activities, and describe the characteristics of NORM exposure. It will also develop a conceptual framework for the practical application of the Commission's system to NORM exposure. In particular, the publication will explain why NORM activities are generally considered to be existing exposure situations, and when some of them should be managed as planned exposure situations. It will indicate when the workers should be considered as occupationally exposed. It will also provide recommendations regarding application of the three principles of radiological protection. The need to consider the justification of the re-use or recycling of residues carefully will be highlighted. Guidance will be provided for selection of the reference level, and for implementation of the optimisation process through a graded approach including both prevention and mitigation of exposures. Flexibility will be recommended for the application of dose limits, notably when the situation is managed as a planned exposure situation. PMID:25816272

  16. A compact ultra-clean system for deploying radioactive sources inside the KamLAND detector

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, T. I.; Freedman, S. J.; Wallig, J.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Mitsui, T.; Nakamura, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B. D.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, S.; Kozlov, A.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; Piepke, A.; Bloxham, T.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Han, K.; Ichimura, K.; Murayama, H.; O׳Donnell, T.; Steiner, H. M.; Winslow, L. A.; Dwyer, D. A.; McKeown, R. D.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B. E.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Sakai, M.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Downum, K. E.; Gratta, G.; Efremenko, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K. M.; Detwiler, J. A.; Enomoto, S.; Decowski, M. P.

    2014-10-14

    We describe a compact, ultra-clean device used to deploy radioactive sources along the vertical axis of the KamLAND liquid-scintillator neutrino detector for purposes of calibration. The device worked by paying out and reeling in precise lengths of a hanging, small-gauge wire rope (cable); an assortment of interchangeable radioactive sources could be attached to a weight at the end of the cable. All components exposed to the radiopure liquid scintillator were made of chemically compatible UHV-cleaned materials, primarily stainless steel, in order to avoid contaminating or degrading the scintillator. To prevent radon intrusion, the apparatus was enclosed in a hermetically sealed housing inside a glove box, and both volumes were regularly flushed with purified nitrogen gas. Finally, an infrared camera attached to the side of the housing permitted real-time visual monitoring of the cable’s motion, and the system was controlled via a graphical user interface.

  17. A compact ultra-clean system for deploying radioactive sources inside the KamLAND detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, T. I.; Freedman, S. J.; Wallig, J.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Mitsui, T.; Nakamura, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B. D.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, S.; Kozlov, A.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; Piepke, A.; Bloxham, T.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Han, K.; Ichimura, K.; Murayama, H.; O`Donnell, T.; Steiner, H. M.; Winslow, L. A.; Dwyer, D. A.; McKeown, R. D.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B. E.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Sakai, M.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Downum, K. E.; Gratta, G.; Efremenko, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K. M.; Detwiler, J. A.; Enomoto, S.; Decowski, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a compact, ultra-clean device used to deploy radioactive sources along the vertical axis of the KamLAND liquid-scintillator neutrino detector for purposes of calibration. The device worked by paying out and reeling in precise lengths of a hanging, small-gauge wire rope (cable); an assortment of interchangeable radioactive sources could be attached to a weight at the end of the cable. All components exposed to the radiopure liquid scintillator were made of chemically compatible UHV-cleaned materials, primarily stainless steel, in order to avoid contaminating or degrading the scintillator. To prevent radon intrusion, the apparatus was enclosed in a hermetically sealed housing inside a glove box, and both volumes were regularly flushed with purified nitrogen gas. An infrared camera attached to the side of the housing permitted real-time visual monitoring of the cable's motion, and the system was controlled via a graphical user interface.

  18. Quantitative radiochemical method for determination of major sources of natural radioactivity in ores and minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosholt, J.N., Jr.

    1954-01-01

    When an ore sample contains radioactivity other than that attributable to the uranium series in equilibrium, a quantitative analysis of the other emitters must be made in order to determine the source of this activity. Thorium-232, radon-222, and lead-210 have been determined by isolation and subsequent activity analysis of some of their short-lived daughter products. The sulfides of bismuth and polonium are precipitated out of solutions of thorium or uranium ores, and the ??-particle activity of polonium-214, polonium-212, and polonium-210 is determined by scintillation-counting techniques. Polonium-214 activity is used to determine radon-222, polonium-212 activity for thorium-232, and polonium-210 for lead-210. The development of these methods of radiochemical analysis will facilitate the rapid determination of some of the major sources of natural radioactivity.

  19. Identification of Low-level Point Radioactive Sources using a sensor network

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, J. C.; Rao, Nageswara S.; Yao, David K. Y.; Shankar, Mallikarjun; Yang, Yong; Hou, J. C.; Srivathsan, Sri; Iyengar, S. Sitharama

    2010-09-01

    Identification of a low-level point radioactive source amidst background radiation is achieved by a network of radiation sensors using a two-step approach. Based on measurements from three or more sensors, a geometric difference triangulation method or an N-sensor localization method is used to estimate the location and strength of the source. Then a sequential probability ratio test based on current measurements and estimated parameters is employed to finally decide: (1) the presence of a source with the estimated parameters, or (2) the absence of the source, or (3) the insufficiency of measurements to make a decision. This method achieves specified levels of false alarm and missed detection probabilities, while ensuring a close-to-minimal number of measurements for reaching a decision. This method minimizes the ghost-source problem of current estimation methods, and achieves a lower false alarm rate compared with current detection methods. This method is tested and demonstrated using: (1) simulations, and (2) a test-bed that utilizes the scaling properties of point radioactive sources to emulate high intensity ones that cannot be easily and safely handled in laboratory experiments.

  20. A Low-Tech, Low-Budget Storage Solution for High Level Radioactive Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Brett Carlsen; Ted Reed; Todd Johnson; John Weathersby; Joe Alexander; Dave Griffith; Douglas Hamelin

    2014-07-01

    The need for safe, secure, and economical storage of radioactive material becomes increasingly important as beneficial uses of radioactive material expand (increases inventory), as political instability rises (increases threat), and as final disposal and treatment facilities are delayed (increases inventory and storage duration). Several vendor-produced storage casks are available for this purpose but are often costly — due to the required design, analyses, and licensing costs. Thus the relatively high costs of currently accepted storage solutions may inhibit substantial improvements in safety and security that might otherwise be achieved. This is particularly true in areas of the world where the economic and/or the regulatory infrastructure may not provide the means and/or the justification for such an expense. This paper considers a relatively low-cost, low-technology radioactive material storage solution. The basic concept consists of a simple shielded storage container that can be fabricated locally using a steel pipe and a corrugated steel culvert as forms enclosing a concrete annulus. Benefits of such a system include 1) a low-tech solution that utilizes materials and skills available virtually anywhere in the world, 2) a readily scalable design that easily adapts to specific needs such as the geometry and radioactivity of the source term material), 3) flexible placement allows for free-standing above-ground or in-ground (i.e., below grade or bermed) installation, 4) the ability for future relocation without direct handling of sources, and 5) a long operational lifetime . ‘Le mieux est l’ennemi du bien’ (translated: The best is the enemy of good) applies to the management of radioactive materials – particularly where the economic and/or regulatory justification for additional investment is lacking. Development of a low-cost alternative that considerably enhances safety and security may lead to a greater overall risk reduction than insisting on

  1. The UK's Surplus Source Disposal Programme: successful management of a national radioactive legacy.

    PubMed

    Williams, Clive; Burns, Philip; Wakerley, Malcolm; Watson, Isabelle; Cook, Marianne; Moloney, Barry

    2010-06-01

    Between 2004 and 2009, the Surplus Source Disposal Programme (SSDP) arranged and subsidised the safe disposal or recycling of more than 11,000 unwanted radioactive items containing in total more than 8.5 x 10(14) Bq of activity, from some 500 sites throughout the United Kingdom. Sources were removed principally from universities, schools and colleges, museums, and hospitals. SSDP was funded by the UK Government and managed by the Environment Agency. The programme was delivered at a total cost of pound sterling 7.14 million, nearly pound sterling 2 million less than its initial budget. This was a big success for health and safety, the environment, business and the public purse. Current legislative requirements under the High Activity Sealed Sources Directive, which came into effect during 2005, will prevent a build-up of high activity surplus sources in future. Continuing vigilance may be needed to avoid a build-up of lower activity disused sources. PMID:20530861

  2. Radon Adsorbed in Activated Charcoal--A Simple and Safe Radiation Source for Teaching Practical Radioactivity in Schools and Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Mustapha, Amidu O.; Karunakara, N.

    2012-01-01

    Simple procedures for teaching practical radioactivity are presented in a way that attracts students' attention and does not make them apprehensive about their safety. The radiation source is derived from the natural environment. It is based on the radioactivity of radon, a ubiquitous inert gas, and the adsorptive property of activated charcoal.…

  3. Processing of historic high radioactive waste coming from nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect

    Van Velzen, L.P.M.; Vos, R.M. de; Roobol, L.P.; IJpelaan, R.; Van Tongeren, R.

    2007-07-01

    At ECN-NRG irradiations of materials have been performed with the aid of the High Flux Reactor at the site for investigations of their properties under different conditions as well for nuclear isotope productions since 1967 e.g. molybdenum. The high radioactive waste (HRW) coming from these nuclear applications are stored since the start in an interim storage facility located at the site. Due to the site license the HRW has to be transported to COVRA. Therefore a project has been set-up to transport all the HRW to COVRA. However, COVRA accepts a limited number of HLW containers among the CASTOR{sup R} MTR-2 container and thus all temporary stored drums have to be over packed. As the existing infra structure at the site is not suited a new facility has to be build. This also creates the opportunity to minimize, by separation of the HRW in low- and intermediate level waste, the amount of waste that has to be classified as HLW. The applied methodology, design and specifications of the HRW-ILW non-destructive assay characterization and separation system will be described. (authors)

  4. Radionuclide sources and radioactive decay figures pertinent to the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Heeb, C.M.

    1991-03-01

    The origin and radioactive decay schemes of radionuclides currently expected to be the major contributors to potential radiation doses that populations might have received as a result of nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944 are identified and illustrated in this report. The reactions considered include actinide neutron capture and decay sequences, fission product decays, and neutron activation reactions. It is important to note that the radioactive half-life of a given nuclide does not, by itself, fully determine the significance of a given radionuclide as a potential source term. This report does not address environmental transport mechanisms, behavior in the environment, or radiological dose impact of any of the radionuclides shown. 1 ref., 10 figs.

  5. Development of Laser Light Sources for Trapping Radioactive Francium Atoms Toward Tests of Fundamental Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Ken-ichi; Ezure, Saki; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Kato, Ko; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Inoue, Takeshi; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aoki, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Aiko; Itoh, Masatoshi; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takatoshi; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Imai, Kenichi; Murakami, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Sato, Tomoya; Wakasa, Tomotsugu; Yoshida, Hidetomo P.; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    We have developed laser light sources and a magneto-optical trap system for cooling and trapping radioactive francium (Fr) atoms. Because Fr is the heaviest alkali element, a Fr atom exhibits high sensitivity to symmetry violation effects such as atomic parity nonconservation (APNC) and the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM). A laser cooling and trapping technique reduces the systematic errors due to the Doppler effect and the motion-induced magnetic field effect caused by the velocity of atoms. Thus, optically cooled and trapped Fr atoms are among a few promising candidates considered for APNC and eEDM measurements. Frequency stabilization of laser light is required for any stable measurement involving trapped radioactive atoms, including Fr. Since the hyperfine splitting in iodine molecules (127I2) is close to the resonance frequency of the Fr D2 line, we performed frequency modulation spectroscopy of hyperfine structures of I2.

  6. Investigation of three-dimensional localisation of radioactive sources using a fast organic liquid scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, K. A. A.; Joyce, M. J.; Taylor, G. C.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we discuss the possibility of locating radioactive sources in space using a scanning-based method, relative to the three-dimensional location of the detector. The scanning system comprises an organic liquid scintillator detector, a tungsten collimator and an adjustable equatorial mount. The detector output is connected to a bespoke fast digitiser (Hybrid Instruments Ltd., UK) which streams digital samples to a personal computer. A radioactive source has been attached to a vertical wall and the data have been collected in two stages. In the first case, the scanning system was placed a couple of metres away from the wall and in the second case it moved few centimetres from the previous location, parallel to the wall. In each case data were collected from a grid of measurement points (set of azimuth angles for set of elevation angles) which covered the source on the wall. The discrimination of fast neutrons and gamma rays, detected by the organic liquid scintillator detector, is carried out on the basis of pulse gradient analysis. Images are then produced in terms of the angular distribution of events for total counts, gamma rays and neutrons for both cases. The three-dimensional location of the neutron source can be obtained by considering the relative separation of the centres of the corresponding images of angular distribution of events. The measurements have been made at the National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex, UK.

  7. Management of Spent and Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources in the Czech Republic - 12124

    SciTech Connect

    Podlaha, J.

    2012-07-01

    The Czech Republic is a country with a well-developed peaceful utilization of nuclear energy and ionizing radiation. Sealed Radioactive Sources (further also SRS) are broadly used in many areas in the Czech Republic, e.g. in research, industry, medicine, education, agriculture, etc. Legislation in the field of ionizing radiation source utilization has been fully harmonized with European Community legislation. SRS utilization demands a proper system which must ensure the safe use of SRS, including the management of disused (spent) and orphaned SRS. In the Czech Republic, a comprehensive system of SRS management has been established that is comparable with systems in other developed countries. The system covers both legal and institutional aspects. The Central Register of Ionizing Radiation Sources is an important part of the system. It is a tracking system that covers all activities related to SRS, from their production or import to the end of their use (recycling or disposal). Many spent SRS are recycled and can be used for other purposes after inspection, repacking or reprocessing. When the disused SRS are not intended for further use, they are managed as radioactive waste (RAW). The system of SRS management also ensures the suitable resolution of situations connected with improper SRS handling (in the case of orphaned sources, accidents, etc.). (author)

  8. Radon adsorbed in activated charcoal—a simple and safe radiation source for teaching practical radioactivity in schools and colleges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Mustapha, Amidu O.; Karunakara, N.

    2012-07-01

    Simple procedures for teaching practical radioactivity are presented in a way that attracts students' attention and does not make them apprehensive about their safety. The radiation source is derived from the natural environment. It is based on the radioactivity of radon, a ubiquitous inert gas, and the adsorptive property of activated charcoal. Radon gas from ambient air in the laboratory was adsorbed into about 70 g of activated charcoal inside metallic canisters. Gamma radiation was subsequently emitted from the canisters, following the radioactive decay of radon and its progenies. The intensities of the emitted gamma-rays were measured at suitable intervals using a NaI gamma-ray detector. The counts obtained were analysed and used to demonstrate the radioactive decay law and determine the half-life of radon. In addition to learning the basic properties of radioactivity the students also get practical experience about the existence of natural sources of radiation in the environment.

  9. 77 FR 73054 - Application for a License To Export Radioactive Waste

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... COMMISSION Application for a License To Export Radioactive Waste Pursuant to 10 CFR 110.70(b) ``Public Notice.... 2012, October 25, 2012, XW020, radioactive 1178 pounds disposal by the 11006061. waste in the... various a heat transport radionuclides in impeller and varying associated combinations. equipment...

  10. Ion source developments for the production of radioactive isotope beams at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, F.; Bricault, P.; Heggen, H.; Kunz, P.; Lassen, J.; Mjøs, A.; Raeder, S.; Teigelhöfer, A.

    2014-02-01

    At the ISAC facility at TRIUMF radioactive ions are produced by bombarding solid targets with up to 100 μA of 500 MeV protons. The reaction products have to diffuse out of the hot target into an ion source. Normally, singly charged ions are extracted. They can be transported either directly to experiments or via an ECR charge state breeder to a post accelerator. Several different types of ion sources have to be used in order to deliver a large variety of rare isotope beams. At ISAC those are surface ion sources, forced electron beam arc discharge (FEBIAD) ion sources and resonant laser ionization sources. Recent development activities concentrated on increasing the selectivity for the ionization to suppress isobaric contamination in the beam. Therefore, a surface ion rejecting resonant laser ionization source (SIRLIS) has been developed to suppress ions from surface ionization. For the FEBIAD ion source a cold transfer line has been introduced to prevent less volatile components from reaching the ion source.

  11. RadTrac : A system for detecting, localizing, and tracking radioactive sources in real time.

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R.; Klann, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-10-01

    Within the homeland security and emergency response communities, there is a need for a low-profile system to detect and locate radioactive sources. RadTrac has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory as an integrated system for the detection, localization, identification, and tracking of radioactive sources in real time. The system is based on a network of radiation detectors and advanced signal-processing algorithms. Features include video surveillance, automated tracking, easy setup, and logging of all data and images. This paper describes the advanced algorithms that were developed and implemented for source detection, localization, and tracking in real time. In the physio-spatial integration approach to source localization, counts from multiple detectors are processed according to the underlying physics linking these counts to obtain the probability that a source is present at any point in space. This information is depicted in a probability density function map. This type of depiction allows the results to be presented in a simple, easy-to-understand manner. It also allows for many different complicated factors to be accounted for in a single image as each factor is computed as a probability density in space. These factors include spatial limitations, variable shielding, directional detectors, moving detectors, and different detector sizes and orientations. The utility and versatility of this approach is described in further detail. Advanced signal-processing algorithms have also been incorporated to improve real-time tracking and to increase signal-to-noise ratios including temporal linking and energy binning. Measurements aimed at demonstrating the sensitivity improvements through the use of advanced signal-processing techniques were performed and are presented. Results of tracking weak sources (<100 {micro}Ci {sup 137}Cs) using four fixed-position detectors are presented.

  12. Application of a nonradioactive pulsed electron source for ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gunzer, Frank; Zimmermann, Stefan; Baether, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a well-known method for detecting hazardous compounds in air. Typical applications are the detection of chemical warfare agents, highly toxic industrial compounds, explosives, and drugs of abuse. Detection limits in the low part per billion range, fast response times, and simple instrumentation make this technique more and more popular. Common ion mobility spectrometers work by employing a radioactive source to provide electrons with high energy to ionize analytes in a series of chemical reactions. General security as well as regulatory concerns related to radioactivity result in the need for a different ionization source which on the other hand produces ions in a similar manner as a radioactive source since the ion chemistry is well-known. Here we show the application of a novel nonradioactive source that produces spectra similar to those obtained with radioactive tritium sources. Using this source in a pulsed mode offers the additional advantage of selecting certain analytes by their recombination time and thus significantly increasing the selectivity. The successful isolation of a target signal in the presence of contaminants using a pulsed electron beam or more precisely the difference in recombination times will be demonstrated for the case of dimethyl-methylphosphonate (DMMP) showing the potential of this source to reduce the possibility for false-positive detection of corresponding chemical warfare agents (CWA) by IMS. PMID:20353158

  13. A Neutron Source Facility for Neutron Cross-Section Measurements on Radioactive Targets at RIA

    SciTech Connect

    Ahle, L E; Bernstein, L; Rusnak, B; Berio, R

    2003-05-20

    The stockpile stewardship program is interested in neutron cross-section measurements on nuclei that are a few nucleons away from stability. Since neutron targets do not exist, radioactive targets are the only way to directly perform these measurements. This requires a facility that can provide high production rates for these short-lived nuclei as well as a source of neutrons. The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) promises theses high production rates. Thus, adding a co-located neutron source facility to the RIA project baseline would allow these neutron cross-section measurements to be made. A conceptual design for such a neutron source has been developed, which would use two accelerators, a Dynamitron and a linac, to create the neutrons through a variety of reactions (d-d, d-t, deuteron break-up, p-Li). This range of reactions is needed in order to provide the desired energy range from 10's of keV to 20 MeV. The facility would also have hot cells to perform chemistry on the radioactive material both before and after neutron irradiation. The present status of this design and direction of future work will be discussed.

  14. Special Application Thermoelectric Micro Isotope Power Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Heshmatpour, Ben; Lieberman, Al; Khayat, Mo; Leanna, Andrew; Dobry, Ted

    2008-01-21

    Promising design concepts for milliwatt (mW) size micro isotope power sources (MIPS) are being sought for use in various space and terrestrial applications, including a multitude of future NASA scientific missions and a range of military applications. To date, the radioisotope power sources (RPS) used on various space and terrestrial programs have provided power levels ranging from one-half to several hundred watts. In recent years, the increased use of smaller spacecraft and planned new scientific space missions by NASA, special terrestrial and military applications suggest the need for lower power, including mW level, radioisotope power sources. These power sources have the potential to enable such applications as long-lived meteorological or seismological stations distributed across planetary surfaces, surface probes, deep space micro-spacecraft and sub-satellites, terrestrial sensors, transmitters, and micro-electromechanical systems. The power requirements are in the range of 1 mW to several hundred mW. The primary technical requirements for space applications are long life, high reliability, high specific power, and high power density, and those for some special military uses are very high power density, specific power, reliability, low radiological induced degradation, and very low radiation leakage. Thermoelectric conversion is of particular interest because of its technological maturity and proven reliability. This paper summarizes the thermoelectric, thermal, and radioisotope heat source designs and presents the corresponding performance for a number of mW size thermoelectric micro isotope power sources.

  15. A compact ultra-clean system for deploying radioactive sources inside the KamLAND detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Banks, T. I.; Freedman, S. J.; Wallig, J.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; et al

    2014-10-14

    We describe a compact, ultra-clean device used to deploy radioactive sources along the vertical axis of the KamLAND liquid-scintillator neutrino detector for purposes of calibration. The device worked by paying out and reeling in precise lengths of a hanging, small-gauge wire rope (cable); an assortment of interchangeable radioactive sources could be attached to a weight at the end of the cable. All components exposed to the radiopure liquid scintillator were made of chemically compatible UHV-cleaned materials, primarily stainless steel, in order to avoid contaminating or degrading the scintillator. To prevent radon intrusion, the apparatus was enclosed in a hermetically sealedmore » housing inside a glove box, and both volumes were regularly flushed with purified nitrogen gas. Finally, an infrared camera attached to the side of the housing permitted real-time visual monitoring of the cable’s motion, and the system was controlled via a graphical user interface.« less

  16. CARTOGAM - a portable gamma camera for remote localisation of radioactive sources in nuclear facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, O.; Izac, C.; Jean, F.; Lainé, F.; Lévêque, C.; Nguyen, A.

    2001-03-01

    We have developed a compact gamma-imaging system, CARTOGAM, for remote localisation of radioactive sources in nuclear facilities. This system is under industrial development and commercialisation by the firm EURISYS Mesures. The most specific characteristics of CARTOGAM lie in its size (8 cm in diameter) and mass (15 kg for the detection head, including the shield), which make it portable by a person. As an example, CARTOGAM detects a 660 keV source producing a 0.4 μGy/h dose rate at the camera location in 10 min. The angular resolution at that energy ranges from 1° to 3°, depending on the field of view (30° or 50°) and scintillator thickness (2 or 4 mm). We present here a review of the specifications of the camera and show a few images illustrating its performance.

  17. SIMPLIFIED PRACTICAL TEST METHOD FOR PORTABLE DOSE METERS USING SEVERAL SEALED RADIOACTIVE SOURCES.

    PubMed

    Mikamoto, Takahiro; Yamada, Takahiro; Kurosawa, Tadahiro

    2016-09-01

    Sealed radioactive sources which have small activity were employed for the determination of response and tests for non-linearity and energy dependence of detector responses. Close source-to-detector geometry (at 0.3 m or less) was employed to practical tests for portable dose meters to accumulate statistically sufficient ionizing currents. Difference between response in the present experimentally studied field and in the reference field complied with ISO 4037 due to non-uniformity of radiation fluence at close geometry was corrected by use of Monte Carlo simulation. As a consequence, corrected results were consistent with the results obtained in the ISO 4037 reference field within their uncertainties. PMID:27521204

  18. Calibration of the CDF tile-fiber endplug calorimeters using moving radioactive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, V.; Laasanen, A.; Pompos, A.; Wilson, M.

    1998-11-01

    The use of moving radioactive gamma sources to assess, calibrate and monitor scintillating tile calorimeters is discussed, and the techniques and equipment are described. The capabilities of the technique are illustrated using Cs{sup 137} sources with the CDF Endplug Upgrade EM and Hadron calorimeters at testbeams and at a cosmic ray test stand. Source measurements of all the tiles in testbeam modules which are exact replicas of the calorimeters, predict the relative responses of EM towers to 50 GeV positrons and muons, and of Hadron towers to 50 GeV pions, with RMS accuracies of 1.3{percent}, 1.8{percent} and 2.0{percent}, respectively. Source measurements will be used in lieu of testbeam measurements for the initial calibration of all towers in the final calorimeters. Source measurements of single tiles are reproducible to 0.4{percent} and will be used to monitor gain changes of the photomultiplier tubes. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Metrological tests of a 200 L calibration source for HPGE detector systems for assay of radioactive waste drums.

    PubMed

    Boshkova, T; Mitev, K

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present test procedures, approval criteria and results from two metrological inspections of a certified large volume (152)Eu source (drum about 200L) intended for calibration of HPGe gamma assay systems used for activity measurement of radioactive waste drums. The aim of the inspections was to prove the stability of the calibration source during its working life. The large volume source was designed and produced in 2007. It consists of 448 identical sealed radioactive sources (modules) apportioned in 32 transparent plastic tubes which were placed in a wooden matrix which filled the drum. During the inspections the modules were subjected to tests for verification of their certified characteristics. The results show a perfect compliance with the NIST basic guidelines for the properties of a radioactive certified reference material (CRM) and demonstrate the stability of the large volume CRM-drum after 7 years of operation. PMID:26640236

  20. Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) program : implementing physical security to protect large radioactive sources worldwide.

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, Daniel L.

    2004-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) Program strives to reduce the threat of a Radiological Dispersion Device (RDD) incident that could affect U.S. interests worldwide. Sandia National Laboratories supports the RTR program on many different levels. Sandia works directly with DOE to develop strategies, including the selection of countries to receive support and the identification of radioactive materials to be protected. Sandia also works with DOE in the development of guidelines and in training DOE project managers in physical protection principles. Other support to DOE includes performing rapid assessments and providing guidance for establishing foreign regulatory and knowledge infrastructure. Sandia works directly with foreign governments to establish cooperative agreements necessary to implement the RTR Program efforts to protect radioactive sources. Once necessary agreements are in place, Sandia works with in-country organizations to implement various security related initiatives, such as installing security systems and searching for (and securing) orphaned radioactive sources. The radioactive materials of interest to the RTR program include Cobalt 60, Cesium 137, Strontium 90, Iridium 192, Radium 226, Plutonium 238, Americium 241, Californium 252, and Others. Security systems are implemented using a standardized approach that provides consistency through out the RTR program efforts at Sandia. The approach incorporates a series of major tasks that overlap in order to provide continuity. The major task sequence is to: Establish in-country contacts - integrators, Obtain material characterizations, Perform site assessments and vulnerability assessments, Develop upgrade plans, Procure and install equipment, Conduct acceptance testing and performance testing, Develop procedures, and Conduct training. Other tasks are incorporated as appropriate and commonly include such as support of reconfiguring infrastructure, and developing security

  1. Radiological protection, safety and security issues in the industrial and medical applications of radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    The use of radiation sources, namely radioactive sealed or unsealed sources and particle accelerators and beams is ubiquitous in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation. Besides radiological protection of the workers, members of the public and patients in routine situations, the use of radiation sources involves several aspects associated to the mitigation of radiological or nuclear accidents and associated emergency situations. On the other hand, during the last decade security issues became burning issues due to the potential malevolent uses of radioactive sources for the perpetration of terrorist acts using RDD (Radiological Dispersal Devices), RED (Radiation Exposure Devices) or IND (Improvised Nuclear Devices). A stringent set of international legally and non-legally binding instruments, regulations, conventions and treaties regulate nowadays the use of radioactive sources. In this paper, a review of the radiological protection issues associated to the use of radiation sources in the industrial and medical applications of ionizing radiation is performed. The associated radiation safety issues and the prevention and mitigation of incidents and accidents are discussed. A comprehensive discussion of the security issues associated to the global use of radiation sources for the aforementioned applications and the inherent radiation detection requirements will be presented. Scientific, technical, legal, ethical, socio-economic issues are put forward and discussed.

  2. Compact, energy EFFICIENT neutron source: enabling technology for various applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hershcovitch, A.; Roser, T.

    2009-12-01

    A novel neutron source comprising of a deuterium beam (energy of about 100 KeV) injected into a tube filled with tritium gas and/or tritium plasma that generates D-T fusion reactions, whose products are 14.06 MeV neutrons and 3.52 MeV alpha particles, is described. At the opposite end of the tube, the energy of deuterium ions that did not interact is recovered. Beryllium walls of proper thickness can be utilized to absorb 14 MeV neutrons and release 2-3 low energy neutrons. Each ion source and tube forms a module. Larger systems can be formed from multiple units. Unlike currently proposed methods, where accelerator-based neutron sources are very expensive, large, and require large amounts of power for operation, this neutron source is compact, inexpensive, easy to test and to scale up. Among possible applications for this neutron source concept are sub-critical nuclear breeder reactors and transmutation of radioactive waste.

  3. Investigation of gigawatt millimeter wave source applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bruder, J.A.; Belcher, M.L.

    1991-09-01

    The Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) investigated potential applications of millimeter wave (MMW) sources with peak powers on the order of a gigawatt. This power level is representative of MMW devices such as the free electron laser (FEL) and the cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM) that are under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In addition to determining the technical requirements for these applications, the investigation considered potential users and how a high power MMW system would expand their current capabilities. Two of the more promising applications were examined in detail to include trade-off evaluations system parameters. The trade-off evaluations included overall system configuration, frequency and coherence, component availability, and performance estimates. Brainstorming sessions were held to try and uncover additional applications for a gigawatt MMW source. In setting up guidelines for the session, the need to attempt to predict applications for the years 2000 to 2030 was stressed. Also, possible non-DoD applications needed to be considered. While some of these applications could not in themselves justify the costs involved in the development of the radar system, they could be considered potential secondary applications of the system. As a result of the sessions, a number of interesting potential applications evolved including: space object identification; low angle tracking; illuminator for space-based radar; radio astronomy; space vehicle navigation; space debris location; atmospheric research; wind shear detection; electronic countermeasures; low observable detection; and long range detection via ducting.

  4. Analysis of source term modeling for low-level radioactive waste performance assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Icenhour, A.S.

    1995-03-01

    Site-specific radiological performance assessments are required for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at both commercial and US Department of Energy facilities. This work explores source term modeling of LLW disposal facilities by using two state-of-the-art computer codes, SOURCEI and SOURCE2. An overview of the performance assessment methodology is presented, and the basic processes modeled in the SOURCE1 and SOURCE2 codes are described. Comparisons are made between the two advective models for a variety of radionuclides, transport parameters, and waste-disposal technologies. These comparisons show that, in general, the zero-order model predicts undecayed cumulative fractions leached that are slightly greater than or equal to those of the first-order model. For long-lived radionuclides, results from the two models eventually reach the same value. By contrast, for short-lived radionuclides, the zero-order model predicts a slightly higher undecayed cumulative fraction leached than does the first-order model. A new methodology, based on sensitivity and uncertainty analyses, is developed for predicting intruder scenarios. This method is demonstrated for {sup 137}Cs in a tumulus-type disposal facility. The sensitivity and uncertainty analyses incorporate input-parameter uncertainty into the evaluation of a potential time of intrusion and the remaining radionuclide inventory. Finally, conclusions from this study are presented, and recommendations for continuing work are made.

  5. Source characterization refinements for routine modeling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paine, Robert; Warren, Laura L.; Moore, Gary E.

    2016-03-01

    Steady-state dispersion models recommended by various environmental agencies worldwide have generally been evaluated with traditional stack release databases, including tracer studies. The sources associated with these field data are generally those with isolated stacks or release points under relatively ideal conditions. Many modeling applications, however, involve sources that act to modify the local dispersion environment as well as the conditions associated with plume buoyancy and final plume rise. The source characterizations affecting plume rise that are introduced and discussed in this paper include: 1) sources with large fugitive heat releases that result in a local urbanized effect, 2) stacks on or near individual buildings with large fugitive heat releases that tend to result in buoyant "liftoff" effects counteracting aerodynamic downwash effects, 3) stacks with considerable moisture content, which leads to additional heat of condensation during plume rise - an effect that is not considered by most dispersion models, and 4) stacks in a line that result in at least partial plume merging and buoyancy enhancement under certain conditions. One or more of these effects are appropriate for a given modeling application. We present examples of specific applications for one or more of these procedures in the paper. This paper describes methods to introduce the four source characterization approaches to more accurately simulate plume rise to a variety of dispersion models. The authors have focused upon applying these methods to the AERMOD modeling system, which is the United States Environmental Protection Agency's preferred model in addition to being used internationally, but the techniques are applicable to dispersion models worldwide. While the methods could be installed directly into specific models such as AERMOD, the advantage of implementing them outside the model is to allow them to be applicable to numerous models immediately and also to allow them to

  6. Radioactive sealed sources: Reasonable accountability, exemption, and licensing activity thresholds -- A technical basis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.W.; Shingleton, K.L.

    1996-07-01

    Perhaps owing to their small size and portability, some radiation accidents/incidents have involved radioactive sealed sources (RSSs). As a result, programs for the control and accountability of RSSs have come to be recommended and emplaced that essentially require RSSs to be controlled in a manner different from bulk, unsealed radioactive material. Crucially determining the total number of RSSs for which manpower-intensive radiation protection surveillance is provided is the individual RSS activity above which such surveillance is required and below which such effort is not considered cost effective. Individual RSS activity thresholds are typically determined through scenarios which impart a chosen internal or external limiting dose to Reference Man under specified exposure conditions. The resultant RSS threshold activity levels have meaning commensurate with the assumed scenario exposure parameters, i.e., if they are realistic and technically based. A review of how the Department of Energy (DOE), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have determined their respective accountability, exemption, and licensing threshold activity values is provided. Finally, a fully explained method using references readily available to practicing health physicists is developed using realistic, technically-based calculation parameters by which RSS threshold activities may be locally generated.

  7. Simulated Performance of Algorithms for the Localization of Radioactive Sources from a Position Sensitive Radiation Detecting System (COCAE)

    SciTech Connect

    Karafasoulis, K.; Zachariadou, K.; Seferlis, S.; Kaissas, I.; Potiriadis, C.; Lambropoulos, C.; Loukas, D.

    2011-12-13

    Simulation studies are presented regarding the performance of algorithms that localize point-like radioactive sources detected by a position sensitive portable radiation instrument (COCAE). The source direction is estimated by using the List Mode Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (LM-ML-EM) imaging algorithm. Furthermore, the source-to-detector distance is evaluated by three different algorithms based on the photo-peak count information of each detecting layer, the quality of the reconstructed source image, and the triangulation method. These algorithms have been tested on a large number of simulated photons over a wide energy range (from 200 keV to 2 MeV) emitted by point-like radioactive sources located at different orientations and source-to-detector distances.

  8. Securing the metal recycling chain for the steel industry by detecting orphan radioactive sources in scrap metal

    SciTech Connect

    Pesente, S.; Benettoni, M.; Checchia, P.; Conti, E.; Gonella, F.; Nebbia, G.; Vanini, S.; Viesti, G.; Zumerle, G.; Bonomi, G.; Zenoni, A.; Calvini, P.; Squarcia, S.

    2010-08-04

    Experimental tests are reported for the detection of the heavy metal shielding of orphan sources hidden inside scrap metal by using a recently developed muon tomography system. Shielded sources do not trigger alarm in radiation portal commonly employed at the entrance of steel industry using scrap metal. Future systems integrating radiation portals with muon tomography inspection gates will substantially reduce the possibility of accidental melting of radioactive sources securing the use of recycled metal.

  9. Reverse osmosis applications to low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, L.

    1990-09-01

    The Hanford Site at Richland, Washington, is operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Since the Hanford Site was established in the 1940's, the operation of the various facilities has resulted in the contamination of liquid effluents and some groundwater with radioactive constituents. Westinghouse Hanford Company has been testing various technologies to determine their effectiveness in decontaminating these two types of liquids. Reverse osmosis (RO) has been applied to two process effluents and two groundwaters. Rejection data have been collected for uranium, technetium, tritium, strontium, cesium, and total alpha and beta. 4 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  10. Computer applications to radioactive-seed: Brain-tumor implants

    SciTech Connect

    Meli, J.A.; Dicker, C.S.; Schulz, R.J.

    1989-05-01

    Malignant brain tumors, in general, and anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma multiforme in particular, have been highly refractory to conventional treatments including surgery, chemotherapy and external-beam irradiation. Although better local control can be achieved with high-dose, external beam irradiation, necrosis of normal brain tissue reduces the quality of life and survival. In order to localize the radiation dose given to brain tumors, the temporary implantation of /sup 125/I and /sup 192/Ir seeds is undergoing clinical trials at several medical centers. Computers play a key role in this treatment modality: in addition to being essential for image reconstruction of CT scans, a computer is used to reconstruct a tumor volume from outlined regions on individual cuts; a programable calculator is used in conjunction with a stereotaxic head holder to obtain the coordinates of the radioactive seeds; a radiation-therapy, treatment-planning computer is used to optimize the radioactive-seed positions and strengths, and to generate the corresponding dose distribution.

  11. Small-angle Compton Scattering to Determine the Depth of a Radioactive Source in Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Oberer, R. B.; Gunn, C. A.; Chiang, L. G.; Valiga, R. E.; Cantrell, J. A.

    2011-04-01

    A gamma-ray peak in a spectrum is often accompanied by a discontinuity in the Compton continuum at the peak. The Compton continuum results from Compton scattering in the detector. The discontinuity at a peak results from small-angle Compton scattering by the gamma rays in matter situated directly between the gamma-ray source and the detector. The magnitude of this discontinuity with respect to the gamma-ray peak is therefore an indicator of the amount of material or shielding between the gamma-ray source and the detector. This small-angle scattering was used to determine the depth of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) solution standards in a concrete floor mockup. The empirical results of the use of this small-angle scattering discontinuity in a concrete floor experiment will be described. A Monte Carlo calculation of the experiment will also be described. In addition, the depth determined from small-angle scattering was used in conjunction with differential attenuation to more accurately measure the uranium content of the mockup. Following these empirical results, the theory of small-angle scattering will be discussed. The magnitude of the discontinuity compared to the peak count rate is directly related to the depth of the gamma-ray source in matter. This relation can be described by relatively simple mathematical expressions. This is the first instance that we are aware of in which the small-angle Compton scattering has been used to determine the depth of a radioactive source. Furthermore this is the first development of the theoretical expressions for the magnitude of the small-angle scattering discontinuity.

  12. A thalium-doped sodium iodide well counter for radioactive tracer applications with naturally-abundant 40K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Andrew J.; Boxall, Colin; Joyce, Malcolm J.; Schotanus, Paul

    2013-09-01

    The use of a thallium-doped sodium-iodide well-type scintillation detector for the assay of the low-activity radioisotope 40K, in open-source potassium chloride aqueous solutions, is described. The hazards, safety concerns and radiowaste generation associated with using open-source radioactive isotopes can present significant difficulties, the use of hot cells and escalated costs in radioanalytical laboratory research. A solution to this is the use of low-hazard alternatives that mimic the migration and dispersion characteristics of notable fission products (in this case 137Cs). The use of NaI(Tl) as a detection medium for naturally-abundant levels of 40K in a range of media is widespread, but the use of 40K as a radioactive tracer has not been reported. The use of such low-activity sources is often complicated by the ability to detect them efficiently. In this paper a scintillator detector designed to detect the naturally-abundant 40K present in potassium chloride in tracer applications is described. Examples of the use of potassium chloride as a tracer are given in the context of ion exchange and electrochemical migration studies, and comparisons in performance are drawn from literature with hyper pure germanium semiconductor detectors, which are more commonly utilised detectors in high-resolution counting applications.

  13. Documentation generator application for VHDL source codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niton, B.; Pozniak, K. T.; Romaniuk, R. S.

    2011-06-01

    The UML, which is a complex system modeling and description technology, has recently been expanding its uses in the field of formalization and algorithmic approach to such systems like multiprocessor photonic, optoelectronic and advanced electronics carriers; distributed, multichannel measurement systems; optical networks, industrial electronics, novel R&D solutions. The paper describes a realization of an application for documenting VHDL source codes. There are presented own novel solution based on Doxygen program which is available on the free license, with accessible source code. The used supporting tools for parser building were Bison and Flex. There are presented the practical results of the documentation generator. The program was applied for exemplary VHDL codes. The documentation generator application is used for design of large optoelectronic and electronic measurement and control systems. The paper consists of three parts which describe the following components of the documentation generator for photonic and electronic systems: concept, MatLab application and VHDL application. This is part three which describes the VHDL application. VHDL is used for behavioral description of the Optoelectronic system.

  14. Radioactivities from Supernovae and Its Application to Cosmochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Hayakawa, T.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Chiba, S.; Kajino, T.; Mathews, G. J.

    2012-08-01

    An excess of 92Zr observed in meteorites suggests that the solar system was rich in the parent radioactive nuclei 92Nb (half life ˜ 34.7 Myr) at its formation epoch. We have investigated the neutrino-induced 92Nb production in core-collapse supernovae and estimated the abundance ratio of 92Nb to 93Nb with newly calculated reaction rates. The isotopic ratio of 10-5 from our simulations is supported by the analyses of primitive meteorites (Schönbächler et al. 2002, 2005). We infer the timescale from the last supernova event to the solar system formation to be 30 million years, which is consistent with r-process chronometric study.

  15. 77 FR 64435 - Branch Technical Position on the Import of Non-U.S. Origin Radioactive Sources

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... greater than the number of new sources exported. \\3\\ Import and Export of Radioactive Waste, 60 FR 37556... into ADAMS. II. Background As a result of the Federal Register Notice (77 FR 2924) ``Notice of Public....'' B. Background On July 28, 2010, the NRC published a final rule in the Federal Register (75 FR...

  16. An overview on TRIUMF's developments on ion source for radioactive beams.

    PubMed

    Bricault, Pierre; Ames, Friedhelm; Achtzehn, Tobias; Dombsky, Marik; Labrecque, Francis; Lassen, Jens; Lavoie, Jean-Phillipe; Lecesne, Nathalie

    2008-02-01

    The ISAC facility at TRIUMF utilizes up to 100 microA from the 500 MeV H(-) cyclotron to produce the radioactive ion beam (RIB) using the isotopic separation on line method. The ISAC-I facility comprised the RIB production target stations, the mass separator, and the beam delivery to low energy area and to a room temperature linear accelerator composed of a four-rod radio frequency quadrupole and an interdigital H-type structure drift tube LINAC. ISAC-I linear accelerator can provide beam from A=3 to 30 amu with an energy range from 0.15 to 1.5 A MeV. Since the beginning of operations target development program has been to increase proton beam currents on targets. Now we routinely operate our target at 50-85 microA and recently we have operated our target at 100 microA. Other developments are in place to add other ion sources, laser, force electron beam induced are discharge and electron cyclotron resonance ion source to the actual surface ion source. The last two five year plans were mainly devoted to the construction of a heavy ion superconducting LINAC (ISAC-II) that will upgrade the mass and the energy range from 30 to 150 and from 1.5 to 6.5 A MeV, respectively. The intermediate stage E< or =4.2 A MeV is already completed and commissioned; three experiments using (11)Li, (9)Li, and (29)Na have been completed this summer. PMID:18315163

  17. Global threat reduction initiative efforts to address transportation challenges associated with the recovery of disused radioactive sealed sources - 10460

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, Julie; Abeyta, Cristy L; Griffin, Justin M; Matzke, James L; Pearson, Michael W; Cuthbertson, Abigail; Rawl, Richard; Singley, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Proper disposition of disused radioactive sources is essential for their safe and secure management and necessary to preclude their use in malicious activities. Without affordable, timely transportation options, disused sealed sources remain in storage at hundreds of sites throughout the country and around the world. While secure storage is a temporary measure, the longer sources remain disused or unwanted the chances increase that they will become unsecured or abandoned. The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's Off-Site Source Recovery Project (GTRIlOSRP), recovers thousands of disused and unwanted sealed sources annually as part of GTRl's larger mission to reduce and protect high risk nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. Faced with decreasing availability of certified transportation containers to support movement of disused and unwanted neutron- and beta/gamma-emitting radioactive sealed sources, GTRIlOSRP has initiated actions to ensure the continued success of the project in timely recovery and management of sealed radioactive sources. Efforts described in this paper to enhance transportation capabilities include: {sm_bullet} Addition of authorized content to existing and planned Type B containers to support the movement of non-special form and other Type B-quantity sealed sources; {sm_bullet} Procurement of vendor services for the design, development, testing and certification of a new Type B container to support transportation of irradiators, teletherapy heads or sources removed from these devices using remote handling capabilities such as the IAEA portable hot cell facility; {sm_bullet} Expansion of shielded Type A container inventory for transportation of gamma-emitting sources in activity ranges requiring use of shielding for conformity with transportation requirements; {sm_bullet} Approval of the S300 Type A fissile container for transport of Pu-239 sealed sources internationally; {sm_bullet} Technology transfer of field

  18. Application of an ion mobility spectrometer with pulsed ionisation source in the detection of dimethyl methylphosphonate and toluene diisocyanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baether, Wolfgang; Zimmermann, Stefan; Gunzer, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a well known technique; offering small size and a sensitivity in the ppb range makes it a typical technique for the detection of explosives or chemical warfare agents. Ordinary IMS devices use in general a continuously working radioactive ionization source. We use a pulsed non-radioactive electron source for ionization which offers the innovative possibility of introducing delay times in between ionization and ion detection. The application and benefits of such a pulsed ionization source in the detection of the chemical warfare agent simulant dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and the toxic toluene diisocyanate (TDI) will be demonstrated.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A ROTARY MICROFILTER FOR RADIOACTIVE WASTE APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; David Herman, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2008-02-25

    The processing rate of Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste decontamination processes are limited by the flow rate of the solid-liquid separation. The baseline process, using a 0.1 micron cross-flow filter, produces {approx}0.02 gpm/sq. ft. of filtrate under expected operating conditions. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) demonstrated significantly higher filter flux for actual waste samples using a small-scale rotary filter. With funding from the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Cleanup Technology, SRNL personnel are evaluating and developing the rotary microfilter for radioactive service at SRS. The authors improved the design for the disks and filter unit to make them suitable for high-level radioactive service. They procured two units using the new design, tested them with simulated SRS wastes, and evaluated the operation of the units. Work to date provides the following conclusions and program status: (1) The authors modified the design of the filter disks to remove epoxy and Ryton{reg_sign}. The new design includes welding both stainless steel and ceramic coated stainless steel filter media to a stainless steel support plate. The welded disks were tested in the full-scale unit. They showed good reliability and met filtrate quality requirements. (2) The authors modified the design of the unit, making installation and removal easier. The new design uses a modular, one-piece filter stack that is removed simply by disassembly of a flange on the upper (inlet) side of the filter housing. All seals and rotary unions are contained within the removable stack. (3) While it is extremely difficult to predict the life of the seal, the vendor representative indicates a minimum of one year in present service conditions is reasonable. Changing the seal face material from silicon-carbide to a graphite-impregnated silicon-carbide is expected to double the life of the seal. Replacement of the current seal with an air seal could increase the lifetime to 5 years

  20. Concentrating Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  1. Source term evaluation model for high-level radioactive waste repository with decay chain build-up.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Manish; Sunny, Faby; Oza, R B

    2016-09-18

    A source term model based on two-component leach flux concept is developed for a high-level radioactive waste repository. The long-lived radionuclides associated with high-level waste may give rise to the build-up of activity because of radioactive decay chains. The ingrowths of progeny are incorporated in the model using Bateman decay chain build-up equations. The model is applied to different radionuclides present in the high-level radioactive waste, which form a part of decay chains (4n to 4n + 3 series), and the activity of the parent and daughter radionuclides leaching out of the waste matrix is estimated. Two cases are considered: one when only parent is present initially in the waste and another where daughters are also initially present in the waste matrix. The incorporation of in situ production of daughter radionuclides in the source is important to carry out realistic estimates. It is shown that the inclusion of decay chain build-up is essential to avoid underestimation of the radiological impact assessment of the repository. The model can be a useful tool for evaluating the source term of the radionuclide transport models used for the radiological impact assessment of high-level radioactive waste repositories. PMID:27337157

  2. Source team evaluation for radioactive low-level waste disposal performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Cowgill, M.G.; Sullivan, T.M.

    1993-01-01

    Information compiled on the low-level radioactive waste disposed at the three currently operating commercial disposal sites during the period 1987--1989 have been reviewed and processed in order to determine the total activity distribution in terms of waste stream, waste classification and waste form. The review identified deficiencies in the information currently being recorded on shipping manifests and the development of a uniform manifest is recommended (the NRC is currently developing a rule to establish a uniform manifest). The data from waste disposed during 1989 at one of the sites (Richland, WA) were more detailed than the data available during other years and at other sites, and thus were amenable to a more in-depth treatment. This included determination of the distribution of activity for each radionuclide by waste form, and thus enabled these data to be evaluated in terms of the specific needs for improved modeling of releases from waste packages. From the results, preliminary lists have been prepared of the isotopes which might be the most significant from the aspect of the development of a source term model.

  3. RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE USSR: A REVIEW OF UNCLASSIFIED SOURCES, 1963-1990

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D. J.; Schneider, K. J.

    1990-03-01

    year capacity as the first of several modules, was about 30% completed by July 1989. The completion of this plant was subsequently "indefinitely postponed." The initial reprocessing scheme at the Kyshtym site used sodium uranyl acetate precipitation from fuel dissolved in nitric acid solutions. The basic method~ ology now appears to be based on the conventional PUREX process. Dry reprocessing on a pilot or laboratory scale has been under way in Dimitrovgrad since 1984, and a larger unit is now being built, according to the French CEA. Perhaps significantly, much research is being done on partitioning high-level waste into element fractions. The Soviets appear to have the technology to remove radioactive noble gases released during reprocessing operations; however, there are no indications of its implementation. Millions of curies of liquid low- and intermediate-level wastes have been disposed of by well injection into underground areas where they were supposedly contained by watertight rock strata. Some gaseous wastes were also disposed of by well injection. This practice is not referred to in recent literature and thus may not be widely used today. Rather, it appears that these waste streams are now first treated to reduce volume, and then solidified using bitumen or concrete. These solidified liquid wastes from Soviet nuclear power reactor operations, along with solid wastes, are disposed of in shallow-land burial sites located at most large power reactor stations. In addition, 35 shallow-land burial sites have been alluded to by the Soviets for disposal of industrial, medical, and research low-level wastes as well as ionization sources. Research on tritium-bearing and other gaseous wastes is mentioned, as well as a waste minimization program aimed at reducing the volume of waste streams by 30%. The Soviets have announced that their high-level waste management plan is to 1) store liquid wastes for 3-5 years; 2) incorporate the waste into glass (at a final glass

  4. Microwave applicator for in-drum processing of radioactive waste slurry

    DOEpatents

    White, Terry L.

    1994-01-01

    A microwave applicator for processing of radioactive waste slurry uses a waveguide network which splits an input microwave of TE.sub.10 rectangular mode to TE.sub.01 circular mode. A cylindrical body has four openings, each receiving 1/4 of the power input. The waveguide network includes a plurality of splitters to effect the 1/4 divisions of power.

  5. 78 FR 45578 - Application For a License to Export Radioactive Waste

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ... COMMISSION Application For a License to Export Radioactive Waste Pursuant to 10 CFR 110.70 (b) ``Public... intervene may be filed with the NRC electronically in accordance with NRC's E-Filing rule promulgated in... the NRC's public Web site at http://www.nrc.gov/site-help/e-submittals.html . To ensure...

  6. Tunable infrared laser sources and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libatique, Nathaniel Joseph C.

    Fiber lasers are emerging as attractive alternative technologies for wavelength-selectable WDM sources because of a number of reasons which include: (1) their direct compatibility with the fiber-optic transmission medium, (2) the excellent amplifying properties of rare-earth doped fibers and the rapidly continuing progress in novel fiber gain media (i.e. L-Band, S-band, and Raman fiber amplifiers), (3) the potential for order-of-magnitude power scalability via the use of double-clad geometries, (4) the maturity and robustness of the laser diode pumps used, and (5) the ready availability of fiber-based components and fiber-pigtailed devices (i.e. fused couplers, Bragg gratings, polarization controllers, etalons). The tunable laser applications of interest to this work have two distinct performance requirements, the need for either continuous tunability (the ability to tune the lasing emission through a continuous range of wavelengths) or discrete tunability (the ability to switch the lasing emission to an arbitrarily-fixed set of wavelengths). The latter class of "push-button" switchability to pre-set wavelength channels is especially critical for WDM optical communications. In this Thesis, I will discuss experimental achievements and key issues related to the design and demonstration of these two classes of tunable lasers, with a special emphasis on channel-selectable sources for optical communications. In particular I will discuss: (1) Novel FBG-based rapidly wavelength-selectable WDM sources, the scaling of such FBG-string-based tunable sources to intermediate channel counts, and the demonstration of single frequency tunable WDM sources based on line-narrowed tunable FBGs. (2) The first demonstration of a potentially all-fiber wavelength-selectable WDM laser source based on a fiber Sagnac loop filter. (3) Wavelength-selectable WDM laser sources based on the novel use of a current-tunable (semiconductor Fabry-Perot) grid filter. (4) The first demonstration of a

  7. Children's Ideas about Radioactivity and Radiation: sources, modes of travel, uses and dangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyes, Edward; Stanisstreet, Martin

    1994-01-01

    The understanding concerning radioactivity and radiation of pupils ages 11-16 was studied using a closed-form questionnaire with a large cohort of children and interviews with subsets of this group. A majority of children demonstrated confusion about the environmental impacts of radioactivity and radiation. (LZ)

  8. Effects of source rocks, soil features and climate on natural gamma radioactivity in the Crati valley (Calabria, Southern Italy).

    PubMed

    Guagliardi, Ilaria; Rovella, Natalia; Apollaro, Carmine; Bloise, Andrea; De Rosa, Rosanna; Scarciglia, Fabio; Buttafuoco, Gabriele

    2016-05-01

    The study, which represents an innovative scientific strategy to approach the study of natural radioactivity in terms of spatial and temporal variability, was aimed to characterize the background levels of natural radionuclides in soil and rock in the urban and peri-urban soil of a southern Italy area; to quantify their variations due to radionuclide bearing minerals and soil properties, taking into account nature and extent of seasonality influence. Its main novelty is taking into account the effect of climate in controlling natural gamma radioactivity as well as analysing soil radioactivity in terms of soil properties and pedogenetic processes. In different bedrocks and soils, activities of natural radionuclides ((238)U, (232)Th (4) K) and total radioactivity were measured at 181 locations by means of scintillation γ-ray spectrometry. In addition, selected rocks samples were collected and analysed, using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) equipped with an Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) and an X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD), to assess the main sources of radionuclides. The natural-gamma background is intimately related to differing petrologic features of crystalline source rocks and to peculiar pedogenetic features and processes. The radioactivity survey was conducted during two different seasons with marked changes in the main climatic characteristics, namely dry summer and moist winter, to evaluate possible effects of seasonal climatic variations and soil properties on radioactivity measurements. Seasonal variations of radionuclides activities show their peak values in summer. The activities of (238)U, (232)Th and (4) K exhibit a positive correlation with the air temperature and are negatively correlated with precipitations. PMID:26891362

  9. Handling of Highly Radioactive Radiation Sources in a Hot Cell Using a Mechanically Driven Cell Crane - 13452

    SciTech Connect

    Klute, Stefan; Huber, Wolfgang-Bruno

    2013-07-01

    In 2010, Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH was awarded the contract for design and erection of a Hot Cell for handling and storage of highly radioactive radiation sources. This Hot Cell is part of a new hot cell laboratory, constructed for the NHZ (Neues Handhabungszentrum = New Handling Center) of the Nuclear Engineering Seibersdorf GmbH (NES). All incurring radioactive materials from Austria are collected in the NHZ, where they are safely conditioned and stored temporarily until their final storage. The main tasks of the NES include, apart from the collection, conditioning and storage of radioactive waste, also the reprocessing and the decontamination of facilities and laboratories originating from 45 years of research and development at the Seibersdorf site as well as the operation of the Hot Cell Laboratory [1]. The new Hot Cell Laboratory inside the NHZ consists of the following room areas: - One hot cell, placed in the center, for remote controlled, radiation protected handling of radioactive materials, including an integrated floor storage for the long-term temporary storage of highly radioactive radiation sources; - An anteroom for the loading and unloading of the hot cell; - One control room for the remote controlling of the hot cell equipment; - One floor storage, placed laterally to the hot cell, for burial, interim storage and removal of fissionable radioactive material in leak-proof packed units in 100 l drums. The specific design activity of the hot cell of 1.85 Pbq relating to 1-Me-Radiator including the integrated floor storage influences realization and design of the components used in the cell significantly. (authors)

  10. [The history of radioactivity and its applications in hygiene and therapy].

    PubMed

    Corrao, Carmela Romana Natalina; Serarcangeli, Carla

    2011-01-01

    Since Antiquity, the observation of matter and its composition has been fascinating for the human mind. It represented the core of philosophical studies since the atomistic theory by Leucippus and Democritus, as well as of the opposed theory of elements by Empedocles, Plato and Aristoteles. Research on the atom, on its spontaneous or artificial disgregation, on the practical application of radioactive substances has strongly influenced daily life and the development of knowledge. Products containing radioactive substances have been used, often without regulation or control, in many scientific fields, as well as in medicine and cosmetics. PMID:23057209

  11. Compact microwave ion source for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yong-Sub; Kim, Dae-Il; Kim, Han-Sung; Seol, Kyung-Tae; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Hong, In-Seok

    2012-02-15

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source for ion implanters has many good properties for industrial application, such as easy maintenance and long lifetime, and it should be compact for budget and space. But, it has a dc current supply for the solenoid and a rf generator for plasma generation. Usually, they are located on high voltage platform because they are electrically connected with beam extraction power supply. Using permanent magnet solenoid and multi-layer dc break, high voltage deck and high voltage isolation transformer can be eliminated, and the dose rate on targets can be controlled by pulse duty control with semiconductor high voltage switch. Because the beam optics does not change, beam transfer components, such as focusing elements and beam shutter, can be eliminated. It has shown the good performances in budget and space for industrial applications of ion beams.

  12. Compact microwave ion source for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong-Sub; Kim, Dae-Il; Kim, Han-Sung; Seol, Kyung-Tae; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Hong, In-Seok

    2012-02-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source for ion implanters has many good properties for industrial application, such as easy maintenance and long lifetime, and it should be compact for budget and space. But, it has a dc current supply for the solenoid and a rf generator for plasma generation. Usually, they are located on high voltage platform because they are electrically connected with beam extraction power supply. Using permanent magnet solenoid and multi-layer dc break, high voltage deck and high voltage isolation transformer can be eliminated, and the dose rate on targets can be controlled by pulse duty control with semiconductor high voltage switch. Because the beam optics does not change, beam transfer components, such as focusing elements and beam shutter, can be eliminated. It has shown the good performances in budget and space for industrial applications of ion beams. PMID:22380346

  13. Poster — Thur Eve — 41: Considerations for Patients with Permanently Implant Radioactive Sources Requiring Unrelated Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Basran, P. S; Beckham, WA; Baxter, P

    2014-08-15

    Permanent implant of sealed radioactive sources is an effective technique for treating cancer. Typically, the radioactive sources are implanted in and near the disease, depositing dose locally over several months. There may be instances where these patients must undergo unrelated surgical procedures when the radioactive material remains active enough to pose risks. This work explores these risks, discusses strategies to mitigate those risks, and describes a case study for a permanent I-125 prostate brachytherapy implant patient who developed colo-rectal cancer and required surgery 6 months after brachytherapy. The first consideration is identifying the risk from unwarranted radiation to the patient and staff before, during, and after the surgical procedure. The second is identifying the risk the surgical procedure may have on the efficacy of the brachytherapy implant. Finally, there are considerations for controlling for radioactive substances from a regulatory perspective. After these risks are defined, strategies to mitigate those risks are considered. These strategies may include applying the concepts of ALARA, the use of protective equipment and developing a best practice strategy with the operating room team. We summarize this experience with some guidelines: If the surgical procedure is near (ex: 5 cm) of the implant; and, the surgical intervention may dislodge radioisotopes enough to compromise treatment or introduces radiation safety risks; and, the radioisotope has not sufficiently decayed to background levels; and, the surgery cannot be postponed, then a detailed analysis of risk is advised.

  14. A Basic Positron Emission Tomography System Constructed to Locate a Radioactive Source in a Bi-dimensional Space.

    PubMed

    Montaño-Zetina, Luis Manuel; Villalobos-Mora, Omar

    2016-01-01

    A simple Positron Emission Tomography (PET) prototype has been constructed to fully characterize its basic working principles. The PET prototype was created by coupling plastic scintillator crystals to photomultipliers or PMT's which are placed at opposing positions to detect two gamma rays emitted from a radioactive source, of which is placed in the geometric center of the PET set-up. The prototype consists of four detectors placed geometrically in a 20 cm diameter circle, and a radioactive source in the center. By moving the radioactive source centimeters from the center the system one is able to detect the displacement by measuring the time of flight difference between any two PMT's and, with this information, the system can calculate the virtual position in a graphical interface. In this way, the prototype reproduces the main principles of a PET system. It is capable to determine the real position of the source with intervals of 4 cm in 2 lines of detection taking less than 2 min. PMID:26863081

  15. Environmentally friendly power sources for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapeña-Rey, Nieves; Mosquera, Jonay; Bataller, Elena; Ortí, Fortunato; Dudfield, Christopher; Orsillo, Alessandro

    One of the crucial challenges of the aviation industry in upcoming years is to reduce emissions not only in the vicinity of airfields but also in cruise. Amongst other transport methods, airplanes emissions count for 3% of the CO 2 emissions. Initiatives to reduce this include not only investing in more fuel-efficient aircrafts or adapting existing ones to make them more efficient (e.g. by fitting fuel-saving winglets), but also more actively researching novel propulsion systems that incorporate environmentally friendly technologies. The Boeing Company through its European subsidiary, Boeing Research and Technology Europe (BR&TE) in collaboration with industry partners throughout Europe is working towards this goal by studying the possible application of advanced batteries and fuel-cell systems in aeronautical applications. One example is the development of a small manned two-seater prototype airplane powered only by proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel-cell stacks, which runs on compressed hydrogen gas as fuel and pressurized air as oxidant, and Li-ion batteries. The efficient all composite motorglider is an all electric prototype airplane which does not produce any of the noxious engine exhaust by-products, such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide or NO x, that can contribute to climate change and adversely affect local air quality. Water and heat are the only exhaust products. The main objective is to demonstrate for the first time in aviation history a straight level manned flight with fuel-cells as the only power source. For this purpose, the original engine of a super Dimona HK36TTC glider from Diamond Aircraft Industries (Austria) was replaced by a hybrid power system, which feeds a brushless dc electrical motor that rotates a variable pitch propeller. Amongst the many technical challenges encountered when developing this test platform are maintaining the weight and balance of the aircraft, designing the thermal management system and the power management

  16. User`s Manual for the SOURCE1 and SOURCE2 Computer Codes: Models for Evaluating Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility Source Terms (Version 2.0)

    SciTech Connect

    Icenhour, A.S.; Tharp, M.L.

    1996-08-01

    The SOURCE1 and SOURCE2 computer codes calculate source terms (i.e. radionuclide release rates) for performance assessments of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facilities. SOURCE1 is used to simulate radionuclide releases from tumulus-type facilities. SOURCE2 is used to simulate releases from silo-, well-, well-in-silo-, and trench-type disposal facilities. The SOURCE codes (a) simulate the degradation of engineered barriers and (b) provide an estimate of the source term for LLW disposal facilities. This manual summarizes the major changes that have been effected since the codes were originally developed.

  17. Identifying sediment sources in a gullied catchment using natural and anthropogenic radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olley, J. M.; Murray, A. S.; MacKenzie, D. H.; Edwards, K.

    1993-04-01

    The ratio of the lithogenic nuclides 226Ra and 232Th indicates that the major source of sediment in transport in a gullied catchment, located in the head waters of Whiteheads Creek, New South Wales, Australia, is the gully itself. This observation is supported by 7Be and 137Cs concentrations which indicate that the sediment is derived from erosion of either gully floor or gully wall material. While subcatchment 7Be and 137Cs data show sheet, rill, and gully erosion are occurring in the upstream catchments, sediment from these sources is either being trapped before entering the gully, or the volume of sediment is small compared to that derived from the gully itself. The differences in the 226Ra to 232Th ratio between the suspended solids collected on the rising stage and samples of sediment deposited during the falling stage at the outlet of the catchment, indicate a change in the source of sediment during storm events. The results presented here demonstrate the applicability of radionuclide tracers in providing quantitative estimates of the relative contributions of individual catchments to the sediment moving within a drainage network, and in determining whether or not the sediments are mainly derived from subsoil or topsoil sources.

  18. Radioactive waste management in the USSR: A review of unclassified sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.J.

    1991-03-01

    The Soviet Union does not currently have an overall radioactive waste management program or national laws that define objectives, procedures, and standards, although such a law is being developed, according to the Soviets. Occupational health and safety does not appear to receive major attention as it does in Western nations. In addition, construction practices that would be considered marginal in Western facilities show up in Soviet nuclear power and waste management operations. The issues involved with radioactive waste management and environmental restoration are being investigated at several large Soviet institutes; however, there is little apparent interdisciplinary integration between them, or interaction with the USSR Academy of Sciences. It is expected that a consensus on technical solutions will be achieved, but it may be slow in coming, especially for final disposal of high-level radioactive wastes and environmental restoration of contaminated areas. Meanwhile, many treatment, solidification, and disposal options for radioactive waste management are being investigated by the Soviets.

  19. Radioactive waste management in the USSR: A review of unclassified sources. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.J.

    1991-03-01

    The Soviet Union does not currently have an overall radioactive waste management program or national laws that define objectives, procedures, and standards, although such a law is being developed, according to the Soviets. Occupational health and safety does not appear to receive major attention as it does in Western nations. In addition, construction practices that would be considered marginal in Western facilities show up in Soviet nuclear power and waste management operations. The issues involved with radioactive waste management and environmental restoration are being investigated at several large Soviet institutes; however, there is little apparent interdisciplinary integration between them, or interaction with the USSR Academy of Sciences. It is expected that a consensus on technical solutions will be achieved, but it may be slow in coming, especially for final disposal of high-level radioactive wastes and environmental restoration of contaminated areas. Meanwhile, many treatment, solidification, and disposal options for radioactive waste management are being investigated by the Soviets.

  20. Use of natural radionuclides to determine the time range of the accidental melting of an orphan radioactive source in a steel recycling plant.

    PubMed

    Cantaluppi, Chiara; Ceccotto, Federica; Cianchi, Aldo

    2012-02-01

    In the rare event that an orphan radioactive source is melted in an Electric Arc Furnace steel recycling plant, the radionuclides present are partitioned in the different products, by-products and waste. As a consequence of an unforeseen melting of a radiocesium source, cesium radioisotopes can be found in the dust, together with many natural radionuclides from the decay of radon and thoron, which are present in the atmosphere, picked up from the off-gas evacuation system and associated with the dust of the air filtration system ("baghouse"). In this work we verified that the activity concentration of ²¹²Pb in this dust is essentially constant in a specific factory so that it is possible to use it to date back to the time of the accidental melting of the orphan radioactive source. The main features of this method are described below, together with the application to a particular case in which this method was used for dating the moment in which the dust was contaminated with ¹³⁷Cs. PMID:22103976

  1. Modular Design of Processing and Storage Facilities for Small Volumes of Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste including Disused Sealed Sources - 12372

    SciTech Connect

    Keene, David R.; Kumar Samanta, Susanta; Drace, Zoran

    2012-07-01

    There are a number of IAEA Member States generating relatively small quantities of radioactive waste and/or disused sealed sources in application of nuclear techniques in medicine, industry and research and in nuclear research centres having small research reactors. At present many of these Member States do not have facilities for processing and storing their radioactive wastes; notably in those countries with small quantities of generated radioactive wastes. In other Member States the existing waste processing and storage facilities (WPSF) are in need of varying degrees of upgrading in order to address new waste streams, incorporate new waste processing technologies, or expand interim storage capacities. The IAEA has developed a modular design approach for a WPSF that is based on a variety of modules for different waste stream treatment and conditioning processes. The modular WPSF design is elaborated in a substantial Design Engineering Package that will be published by IAEA as a technical report. The Design Engineering Package enables users to select the optimum waste processing and storage modules to meet their needs, and to specify the requirements for procurement of individual modules and their integration into a waste processing and storage facility. The Design Engineering Package is planned for publication by the IAEA in 2012 and is presented as: - A Design Engineering Package Summary document. - A supporting CD that contains: - Process module general specifications. - Process module interface specifications. - Design Engineering Package for process modules. - Sample technical specifications for design and construction of modular processing facility. - Design Engineering Package for storage modules. (authors)

  2. Mössbauer and Raman spectroscopy characterization of concretes used in the conditioning of spent radioactive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroy-Guzman, F.; González-Neri, M.; González-Díaz, R. C.; Ortíz-Arcivar, G.; Corona-Pérez, I. J.; Nava, N.; Cabral-Prieto, A.; Escobar-Alarcón, L.

    2015-06-01

    Spent radioactive sources are considered a type of radioactive waste which must be stored properly. These sources are usually conditioned in concrete that functions as shield and physical barrier to prevent the potential migration of radionuclides, and must have suitable properties: mechanical, thermal or irradiation resistance. Concretes used in the conditioning of spent radioactive source in Mexico were tested, preparing concrete test specimens with Portland cement CPC 30RS EXTRA CEMEX and aggregates, and subjected to compression strength, γ-ray-irradiation and thermal resistance assays and subsequently analyzed by Mössbauer and Raman Spectroscopies as well as by Scanning Electron Microscopy, in order to correlate the radiation and temperature effects on the compressive strengths, the oxidation states of iron and the structural features of the concrete. Iron was found in the concrete in Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ in the tetrahedral (T) and two octahedral positions (O1, O2). Radiolysis of water causes the dehydratation (200-600 kGy) and rehydratation (1000-10000 kGy) of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) and ferric hydrate phases in concretes and structural distortion around the iron sites in concretes. The compressive strength of concretes are not significantly affected by γ-radiation or heat.

  3. Energy Recovery Linacs for Light Source Applications

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2011-04-01

    Energy Recovery Linacs are being considered for applications in present and future light sources. ERLs take advantage of the continuous operation of superconducting rf cavities to accelerate high average current beams with low losses. The electrons can be directed through bends, undulators, and wigglers for high brightness x ray production. They are then decelerated to low energy, recovering power so as to minimize the required rf drive and electrical draw. When this approach is coupled with advanced continuous wave injectors, very high power, ultra-short electron pulse trains of very high brightness can be achieved. This paper will review the status of worldwide programs and discuss the technology challenges to provide such beams for photon production.

  4. Application of the laser ion source for isotope shift and hyperfine structure investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzakh, A. E.; Chubukov, I. Ya.; Fedorov, D. V.; Panteleev, V. N.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    1998-12-01

    A high-efficient method for measuring isotope shifts and hyperfine structures in optical transitions of radioactive atoms is presented. The method is based on application of laser resonance ionization in the mass-separator ion source. The sensitivity of the method is determined by a high efficiency of the laser ion source and low background of the detection system, making use of counting α-particles following the decay of the isotope under investigation. The possibilities of this method are shown in the experiment with 155Yb and 154Tm (I=9). The isotope shifts and electromagnetic moments have been measured.

  5. The application of metal cutting technologies in tasks performed in radioactive environments

    SciTech Connect

    Fogle, R.F.; Younkins, R.M.

    1997-05-01

    The design and use of equipment to perform work in radioactive environments is uniquely challenging. Some tasks require that the equipment be operated by a person wearing a plastic suit or full face respirator and donning several pairs of rubber gloves. Other applications may require that the equipment be remotely controlled. Other important, design considerations include material compatibility, mixed waste issues, tolerance to ionizing radiation, size constraints and weight capacities. As always, there is the ``We need it ASAP`` design criteria. This paper describes four applications where different types of metal cutting technologies were used to successfully perform tasks in radioactive environments. The technologies include a plasma cutting torch, a grinder with an abrasive disk, a hydraulic shear, and a high pressure abrasive water jet cutter.

  6. Neural network application for radionuclide modelling and prediction of radioactivity levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Myron Corbett, Jr.

    Existing applications of artificial neural networks in physics research and development have been analyzed as a basis for proposing new opportunities using that AI technology for data analysis in physics. A taxonomy was developed, based on an extensive literature search, for physics problems where neural network applications have been useful. Then, a particular use of neural networks was carried out to study ways to predict normal concentrations of radioactivity measured at monitoring stations in different geographic locations. The purpose of the data collection and analysis was to establish background levels that would serve as bases for detecting unusual levels of radioactivity, for example due to nuclear weapons testing, in these physical environments. Useful data sets were developed in this area and a process was discovered for modeling the background levels.

  7. Microwave applicator for in-drum processing of radioactive waste slurry

    DOEpatents

    White, T.L.

    1994-06-28

    A microwave applicator for processing of radioactive waste slurry uses a waveguide network which splits an input microwave of TE[sub 10] rectangular mode to TE[sub 01] circular mode. A cylindrical body has four openings, each receiving 1/4 of the power input. The waveguide network includes a plurality of splitters to effect the 1/4 divisions of power. 4 figures.

  8. Application of a CZT detector to in situ environmental radioactivity measurement in the Fukushima area.

    PubMed

    Kowatari, M; Kubota, T; Shibahara, Y; Fujii, T; Fukutani, S; Takamiya, K; Mizuno, S; Yamana, H

    2015-11-01

    Instead of conventional Ge semiconductor detectors and NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometers, an application of a CdZnTe semiconductor (CZT) whose crystal has the dimension of 1 cm cubic to the in situ environmental radioactivity measurement was attempted in deeply affected areas in Fukushima region. Results of deposition density on soil for (134)Cs/(137)Cs obtained seemed consistent, comparing obtained results with those measured by the Japanese government. PMID:25953790

  9. A Small Radioactive Source in a Large Media - Localization by Multi-detector Measurement. The Case of a Lung Counter

    SciTech Connect

    Alfassi, Z. B.; Pelled, O.; German, U.

    2008-08-14

    Considerable errors in the determination of radioactive contamination in lungs can be induced if there is no homogeneous distribution, as assumed for the calibration. Modern lung counter systems use several detectors, and the count rate ratios of the detectors can be used for localization of the radioactive contamination, enabling the use of correction algorithms. This greatly reduces the errors in the determination of the activity. Further reduction of the errors can be obtained by simultaneous analysis of several gamma lines (if several energies are emitted by the radioisotope), and by optimizing the number and location of the detectors. This presentation deals with the case of a point source of natural uranium in human lungs.

  10. Evaluation of two rounds of testing of types of devices for monitoring radioactive sources in loaded vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryák, P.; Šuráň, J.; Kovář, P.; Kubala, H.

    1999-02-01

    Tests of stationary devices for the detection of radioactive sources in moving trucks were performed by the Czech Metrological Institute - Inspectorate for Ionising Radiation, Prague in December 1996 and September 1997. The different systems were installed at a railway polygon. Each system contained two detection units placed symmetrically at the rail in a distance 2.3 m from the axes of each rail. The train comprising empty and scrap-filled trucks passed along the detection units at a speed of 5-30 km/h. The wide range of radioactive sources with 137Cs (activity ranging from 0.4 MBq to 5 GBq) were located at different positions in the truck. The purpose was to determine a detection limit under different conditions. Sources with 57Co, 60Co, 241Am were also used. The truck passed the polygon more than 1000 times. About 250 passes were free of source. All systems were also tested in a climatic chamber. The main parameters evaluated were the detection limit for an empty truck, detection limit for a truck filled with scrap (density 0.89 t/m 3), percentage of false alarms and stability of response at different temperatures. The other parameters like energy dependence, position dependence, linearity and overload, detection response time, etc., were also evaluated. The tested systems showing a positive result will be used in the field of steel recycling, metallurgy and the supervision of illegal transport.

  11. A radiological incident with a radioactive lightning rod source found in a vehicle used by film crewmembers: a case study.

    PubMed

    Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Kovacevic, Milojko; Kosutic, Dusko; Arandjic, Danijela; Lazarevic, Djordje

    2010-10-01

    An overview of radiological incident involving radiation source from a lightning rod (152Eu/154Eu), together with dose estimation for individuals exposed to ionising radiation is given in the paper. The cause of the incident was an orphaned source from a lightning rod. The dose received by individuals was assessed using a retrospective dosimetry technique, based on the information on behaviour of individuals and results of dose rate measurements in the vicinity of the source. Several people have been exposed to relatively high dose rates for an extended period of time. The conservatively estimated cumulative dose values for two categories of individuals were 50 and 40 mSv, respectively, which are significantly higher than annual dose limit for public exposure of 1 mSv. The need to identify radioactive sources incorporated in radioactive lightning rods, to maintain control and accountability and to remove and dispose of them properly along with appropriate record keeping in Serbia was highlighted. These activities would reduce the probability of occurrence of radiation incidents in Serbia. PMID:20639515

  12. Radioactivity in HgCdTe devices: potential source of "snowballs"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, P.

    2009-12-01

    We hypothesize that the "snowballs" observed in HgCdTe infrared detectors are caused by natural radioactivity in the devices themselves. As characterized by Hilbert (2009) in the WFC3 flight IR array (FPA165), "snowballs" are transient events that instantaneously saturate a few pixels and deposit a few hundred thousand electrons over a ~5-pixel (~100-um) diameter region. In 2008, prior to flight of detector FPA165, Hilbert (2009) detected 21 snowballs during thermal vaccum test three (TV3) and inferred a rate of ~1100 ± 200 snowballs per year per cm2 of the HgCdTe detector. Alpha particles emitted from either (or both) naturally radioactive thorium and/or uranium, at ~1 ppm concentrations within the device, can explain the observed characteristics of the "snowballs." If thorium is present, up to four distinctly observable snowballs should appear at the same location on the pixel array over the course of many years. While the indium in the bump bonds is almost entirely the radioactive isotope In-115, and 12% of the cadmium is naturally radioactive Cd-113, both of those emit only betas, which are too penetrating and not energetic enough to match the observed characteristics of "snowballs." Also, the Cd-113 emission rate is much less than that of the observed snowballs.

  13. Streamtube Fate and Transport Modeling of the Source Term for the Old Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, K.

    2000-11-16

    The modeling described in this report is an extension of previous fate and transport modeling for the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study. The purpose of this and the previous modeling is to provide quantitative input to the screening of remedial alternatives for the CMS/FS for this site.

  14. 40 CFR 63.190 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applicability and designation of source... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES... Negotiated Regulation for Equipment Leaks § 63.190 Applicability and designation of source. (a) This...

  15. 40 CFR 63.190 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability and designation of source... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES... Negotiated Regulation for Equipment Leaks § 63.190 Applicability and designation of source. (a) This...

  16. Thulium heat sources for space power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, C.J.

    1992-05-01

    Reliable power supplies for use in transportation and remote systems will be an important part of space exploration terrestrial activities. A potential power source is available in the rare earth metal, thulium. Fuel sources can be produced by activating Tm-169 targets in the space station reactor. The resulting Tm-170 heat sources can be used in thermoelectric generators to power instrumentation and telecommunications located at remote sites such as weather stations. As the heat source in a dynamic Sterling or Brayton cycle system, the heat source can provide a lightweight power source for rovers or other terrestrial transportation systems.

  17. Environmental radioactivity measurements and applications - Difficulties, current status and future trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostakis, Marios J.

    2015-11-01

    For several decades natural and artificial radioactivity in the environment have been extensively studied all around the world. Nuclear accidents - mainly that of Chernobyl - have led to the development of the field of radioecology, while detector systems and techniques - with predominant that of γ-spectrometry - have been continuously developed through the years to meet researchers' needs. The study of natural radionuclides that was originally limited to 226Ra, 232Th and 40K was then extended to include radionuclides such as 234Th, 210Pb, 235U and 7Be, which allowed the study of radioactive equilibrium. Besides their importance from the radiation protection point of view, many radionuclides are also used as tracers of environmental processes, such as aerosol and transportation of air masses studies (7Be, 10Be, 22Na), soil erosion, sedimentation and geochronology (210Pb, 137Cs), marine ecosystems studies and studies related to climate change. All these studies require specialized samplings strategies and sampling preparation techniques as well as high quality measurements, while the improvement of detection limits is often of vital importance. This work is a review of environmental radioactivity measurements and applications, mainly focused in the field of γ-spectrometry, for which difficulties and limitations will be presented, together with future trends, new challenges and applications.

  18. 40 CFR 61.170 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability and designation of source... for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Primary Copper Smelters § 61.170 Applicability and designation of source. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to each copper converter at any new or...

  19. 40 CFR 61.170 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applicability and designation of source... for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Primary Copper Smelters § 61.170 Applicability and designation of source. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to each copper converter at any new or...

  20. Specific radioactivity of neutron induced radioisotopes: assessment methods and application for medically useful 177Lu production as a case.

    PubMed

    Le, Van So

    2011-01-01

    The conventional reaction yield evaluation for radioisotope production is not sufficient to set up the optimal conditions for producing radionuclide products of the desired radiochemical quality. Alternatively, the specific radioactivity (SA) assessment, dealing with the relationship between the affecting factors and the inherent properties of the target and impurities, offers a way to optimally perform the irradiation for production of the best quality radioisotopes for various applications, especially for targeting radiopharmaceutical preparation. Neutron-capture characteristics, target impurity, side nuclear reactions, target burn-up and post-irradiation processing/cooling time are the main parameters affecting the SA of the radioisotope product. These parameters have been incorporated into the format of mathematical equations for the reaction yield and SA assessment. As a method demonstration, the SA assessment of 177Lu produced based on two different reactions, 176Lu (n,γ)177Lu and 176Yb (n,γ) 177Yb (β- decay) 177Lu, were performed. The irradiation time required for achieving a maximum yield and maximum SA value was evaluated for production based on the 176Lu (n,γ)177Lu reaction. The effect of several factors (such as elemental Lu and isotopic impurities) on the 177Lu SA degradation was evaluated for production based on the 176Yb (n,γ) 177Yb (β- decay) 177Lu reaction. The method of SA assessment of a mixture of several radioactive sources was developed for the radioisotope produced in a reactor from different targets. PMID:21248665

  1. Thulium heat sources for space power application

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, C.J. )

    1993-01-15

    Reliable electrical power supplies for use in transportation and remote systems will be an important part of space exploration activities on planet surfaces. A potential power source is available through the use of thulium, a rare earth metal. Heat sources can be produced by neutron activation of naturally occurring thulium (Tm-169) targets in the base station nuclear power reactor. The resulting Tm-170 heat sources can be used in thermoelectric generators to power instrumentation and telecommunications systems located at remote sites. Combined with a dynamic Sterling or Brayton cycle conversion system, the heat source can power a lightweight electrical source for rovers or other surface transportation systems.

  2. Low Power Polysilicon Sources for IR Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, N. C.; Jhabvala, M.; Shu, P.

    1998-01-01

    We have designed and fabricated polysilicon thin film infrared (IR) sources by micromachining technology. These sources are made with a lightly doped middle region for light emission and heavy doping of the supporting legs. The sources are fabricated on a 10 mm thick, low temperature process parameters in the fabrication of these silicon dioxide layer. Different doping levels were used to achieve various source resistances. From the power requirement to reach the required light emission versus source resistance curve it is seen that there exists a resistance value which minimizes the necessary input power.

  3. Impact of technology applications to the management of low-level radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Devgun, J.S. )

    1989-01-01

    Low-level radioactive wastes are generated from reactor sources (nuclear power reactors) as well as from nonreactor sources (academic, medical, governmental, and industrial). In recent years, about 50,000 m{sup 3} per year of such wastes have been generated in the United States and about 10,000 m{sup 3} per year in Canada. Direct disposal of these wastes in shallow ground has been a favored method in both countries in the past. In the United States, three operating commercial sites at Barnwell, South Carolina; Beatty, Nevada; and Richland, Washington, receive most of the commercial low-level waste generated. However, with recent advances in waste management, technologies are being applied to achieve optimum goals in terms of protection of human health and safety and the environment, as well as cost-effectiveness. These technologies must be applied from the generation sources through waste minimization and optimum segregation -- followed by waste processing, conditioning, storage, and disposal. A number of technologies that are available and can be applied as appropriate -- given the physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics of the waste -- include shredding, baling, compaction, supercompaction, decontamination, incineration, chemical treatment/conditioning, immobilization, and packaging. Interim and retrievable storage can be accomplished in a wide variety of storage structures, and several types of engineered disposal facility designs are now available. By applying an integrated approach to radioactive waste management, potential adverse impacts on human health and safety and the environment can be minimized. 15 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Source holder collimator for encapsulating radioactive material and collimating the emanations from the material

    DOEpatents

    Laurer, G.R.

    1974-01-22

    This invention provides a transportable device capable of detecting normal levels of a trace element, such as lead in a doughnutshaped blood sample by x-ray fluorescence with a minimum of sample preparation in a relatively short analyzing time. In one embodiment, the blood is molded into a doughnut-shaped sample around an annular array of low-energy radioactive material that is at the center of the doughnut-shaped sample but encapsulated in a collimator, the latter shielding a detector that is close to the sample and facing the same so that the detector receives secondary emissions from the sample while the collimator collimates ths primary emissions from the radioactive material to direct these emissions toward the sample around 360 deg and away from the detector. (Official Gazette)

  5. DRINK: a biogeochemical source term model for low level radioactive waste disposal sites.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, P; McGarry, R; Hoffmann, A; Binks, P

    1997-07-01

    Interactions between element chemistry and the ambient geochemistry play a significant role in the control of radionuclide migration in the geosphere. These same interactions influence radionuclide release from near surface, low level radioactive waste, disposal sites once physical containment has degraded. In situations where LLW contains significant amounts of metal and organic materials such as cellulose, microbial degradation in conjunction with corrosion can significantly perturb the ambient geochemistry. These processes typically produce a transition from oxidising to reducing conditions and can influence radionuclide migration through changes in both the dominant radionuclide species and mineral phases. The DRINK (DRIgg Near field Kinetic) code is a biogeochemical transport code designed to simulate the long term evolution of the UK low level radioactive waste disposal site at Drigg. Drigg is the UK's principal solid low level radioactive waste disposal site and has been receiving waste since 1959. The interaction between microbial activity, the ambient geochemistry and radionuclide chemistry is central to the DRINK approach with the development of the ambient pH, redox potential and bulk geochemistry being directly influenced by microbial activity. This paper describes the microbial aspects of the code, site data underpinning the microbial model, the microbiology/chemistry interface and provides an example of the code in action. PMID:9340003

  6. SoFiA: Source Finding Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Paolo; Westmeier, Tobias; Giese, Nadine; Jurek, Russell; Flöer, Lars; Popping, Attila; Winkel, Benjamin; van der Hulst, Thijs; Meyer, Martin; Koribalski, Bärbel; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Courtois, Hélène

    2014-12-01

    SoFiA is a flexible source finding pipeline designed to detect and parameterise sources in 3D spectral-line data cubes. SoFiA combines several powerful source finding and parameterisation algorithms, including wavelet denoising, spatial and spectral smoothing, source mask optimisation, spectral profile fitting, and calculation of the reliability of detections. In addition to source catalogues in different formats, SoFiA can also generate a range of output data cubes and images, including source masks, moment maps, sub-cubes, position-velocity diagrams, and integrated spectra. The pipeline is controlled by simple parameter files and can either be invoked on the command line or interactively through a modern graphical user interface.

  7. Methods and Data Used to Investigate Polonium-210 as a Source of Excess Gross-Alpha Radioactivity in Ground Water, Churchill County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seiler, Ralph L.

    2007-01-01

    Ground water is the major source of drinking water in the Carson River Basin, California and Nevada. Previous studies have shown that uranium and gross-alpha radioactivities in ground water can be greater than U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Maximum Contaminant Levels, particularly in the Carson Desert, Churchill County, Nevada. Studies also have shown that the primary source of the gross-alpha radioactivity and alpha-emitting radionuclides in ground water is the dissolution of uranium-rich granitic rocks and basin-fill sediments that have their origins in the Sierra Nevada. However, ground water sampled from some wells in the Carson Desert had gross-alpha radioactivities greater than could be accounted for by the decay of dissolved uranium. The occurrence of polonium-210 (Po-210) was hypothesized to explain the higher than expected gross-alpha radioactivities. This report documents and describes the study design, field and analytical methods, and data used to determine whether Po-210 is the source of excess gross-alpha radioactivity in ground water underlying the Carson Desert in and around Fallon, Nevada. Specifically, this report presents: 1) gross alpha and uranium radioactivities for 100 wells sampled from June to September 2001; and 2) pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, and Po-210 radioactivity for 25 wells sampled in April and June 2007. Results of quality-control samples for the 2007 dataset are also presented.

  8. Search and removal of radioactive seeds: another application of postmortem computed tomography prior to autopsy.

    PubMed

    Makino, Yohsuke; Itoda, Nozomi; Ikegaya, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Naoko; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Motomura, Ayumi; Uno, Takashi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-09-01

    We herein introduce 3 cases illustrating a new application for pre-autopsy postmortem computed tomography (PMCT). In all 3 cases, there was insufficient background information about the victims provided to the forensic pathologists' department. PMCT showed metallic particles in the prostate gland, an indication of metallic seeds containing radioactive isotopes. In 2 of 3 cases, migrated seeds were also detected by CT imaging in the lungs and the heart. Also in 2 of 3 cases, authorities reinvestigated the victim's history before autopsy was completed, which resulted in following appropriate procedure for dealing with the seeds. Although all 3 cadavers were cremated after autopsy, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) discourages cremation for deaths soon after radioactive seeds implantation to prevent air pollution by radioactive isotopes in the ash. Our opinion from the present cases is that pre-autopsy PMCT can be recommended for use by forensic pathologists and guidelines for investigating deaths after permanent brachytherapy should include how to deal with cadavers when medical history is limited. PMID:27334769

  9. APPLICATION FO FLOW FORMING FOR USE IN RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING DESIGNS

    SciTech Connect

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.; Abramczyk, G.

    2012-07-11

    This paper reports on the development and testing performed to demonstrate the use of flow forming as an alternate method of manufacturing containment vessels for use in radioactive material shipping packaging designs. Additionally, ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Subsection NB compliance along with the benefits compared to typical welding of containment vessels will be discussed. SRNL has completed fabrication development and the testing on flow formed containment vessels to demonstrate the use of flow forming as an alternate method of manufacturing a welded 6-inch diameter containment vessel currently used in the 9975 and 9977 radioactive material shipping packaging. Material testing and nondestructive evaluation of the flow formed parts demonstrate compliance to the minimum material requirements specified in applicable parts of ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section II. Destructive burst testing shows comparable results to that of a welded design. The benefits of flow forming as compared to typical welding of containment vessels are significant: dimensional control is improved due to no weld distortion; less final machining; weld fit-up issues associated with pipes and pipe caps are eliminated; post-weld non-destructive testing (i.e., radiography and die penetrant tests) is not necessary; and less fabrication steps are required. Results presented in this paper indicate some of the benefits in adapting flow forming to design of future radioactive material shipping packages containment vessels.

  10. Imaging of primary and secondary radiation-Modelling and experimental results of a radioactive source and a water phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, K. A. A.; Taylor, G. C.; Joyce, M. J.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper the contribution of primary and secondary radiation from a water phantom to a pinhole volume, as a result of three neutron sources (Cf, AmBe and 5 MeV mono-energetic) and two gamma sources (Cs and Co), is separately estimated using the PTRAC particle tracking option available in MCNP. Also in this paper imaging of the mixed radiation field produced by a Van de Graaf accelerator (when a water phantom is present) is described. In the model, a spherical tally volume, 2 cm in diameter, was placed equidistantly from a radioactive source and 30×30×15 cm3 water phantom. Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out to investigate the level of primary and secondary radiation contributing to the pinhole volume directly from the source and from interactions in the phantom respectively. The spatial distribution of counts clearly discriminated the source and the phantom. The results have shown that the percentage of neutrons reflected from the phantom with energies above 1 MeV increases with mean energy of the source. This method has significant potential to characterise secondary radiation in proton therapy, where it would help to verify the location and the energy delivered during the treatment.

  11. Calibration of a radioactive ink-based stack phantom and its applications in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    El-Ali, H; Ljungberg, M; Strand, S-E; Palmer, J; Malmgren, L; Nilsson, J

    2003-04-01

    This paper describes a stack phantom useful for imaging complex activity distributions. It is based on images printed with radioactive ink using a commercial ink-jet printer. The application for the phantom is in the evaluation of planar and SPECT scintillation camera images and for validation of Monte Carlo simulated images. The accuracy in generating the activity distributions on paper sheets is especially important. Here we describe the calibration procedure for the ink-jet printer. The goal of the printer calibration is to find the relationship between the digital image count (voxel grey level) and its corresponding activity on the paper sheets (radioactivity). The relationship between the voxel grey level and the radioactivity on the paper sheets (measured by scanning technique and well counter) was found to be logarithmic, and a 3rd degree polynomial was found to fit the relationship. The distribution of radioactivity in the ink cartridge was investigated by pinhole SPECT. The distribution of (99m)Tc solution was found to be homogeneous in the ink solution. Experimental studies were done directly on Monte Carlo simulated heart images from the NCAT phantom. The result showed that the simulated images are similar to the images measured using the ink-jet technique. This stack phantom could be a promising solution with an advantage that the exact geometry generated in Monte Carlo could be imitated in the phantom. The phantom is a very flexible device and clearly much more versatile than conventional phantoms which have a fixed geometry and spatial limitation. PMID:12804045

  12. Metal complexes containing natural and and artificial radioactive elements and their applications.

    PubMed

    Kharissova, Oxana V; Méndez-Rojas, Miguel A; Kharisov, Boris I; Méndez, Ubaldo Ortiz; Martínez, Perla Elizondo

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances (during the 2007-2014 period) in the coordination and organometallic chemistry of compounds containing natural and artificially prepared radionuclides (actinides and technetium), are reviewed. Radioactive isotopes of naturally stable elements are not included for discussion in this work. Actinide and technetium complexes with O-, N-, N,O, N,S-, P-containing ligands, as well π-organometallics are discussed from the view point of their synthesis, properties, and main applications. On the basis of their properties, several mono-, bi-, tri-, tetra- or polydentate ligands have been designed for specific recognition of some particular radionuclides, and can be used in the processes of nuclear waste remediation, i.e., recycling of nuclear fuel and the separation of actinides and fission products from waste solutions or for analytical determination of actinides in solutions; actinide metal complexes are also usefulas catalysts forcoupling gaseous carbon monoxide,as well as antimicrobial and anti-fungi agents due to their biological activity. Radioactive labeling based on the short-lived metastable nuclide technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) for biomedical use as heart, lung, kidney, bone, brain, liver or cancer imaging agents is also discussed. Finally, the promising applications of technetium labeling of nanomaterials, with potential applications as drug transport and delivery vehicles, radiotherapeutic agents or radiotracers for monitoring metabolic pathways, are also described. PMID:25061724

  13. Application of total uncertainty theory in radioactive waste disposal facilities safety assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Lemos, Francisco Luiz de; Ross, Timothy; Sullivan, Terry

    2007-07-01

    Safety assessment requires the interaction of a large number of disciplines to model the environmental phenomena necessary to evaluate the safety of the disposal system. In this complex process, the identification and quantification of both types of uncertainties, random and epistemic, plays a very important role for confidence building. In this work an application of the concept of total uncertainty to radioactive waste disposal facilities safety assessment is proposed. By combining both types of uncertainty, aleatory and epistemic, in the same framework, this approach ultimately aims to assess the confidence one can pose in the safety-assessment decisions. (authors)

  14. Model tracking system for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities: License application interrogatories and responses

    SciTech Connect

    Benbennick, M.E.; Broton, M.S.; Fuoto, J.S.; Novgrod, R.L.

    1994-08-01

    This report describes a model tracking system for a low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility license application. In particular, the model tracks interrogatories (questions, requests for information, comments) and responses. A set of requirements and desired features for the model tracking system was developed, including required structure and computer screens. Nine tracking systems were then reviewed against the model system requirements and only two were found to meet all requirements. Using Kepner-Tregoe decision analysis, a model tracking system was selected.

  15. Ion source development for various applications in Korea (invited) (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Y. S.

    2008-02-15

    Ion source development in Korea has been related with various applications from accelerator to nanotechnology. Conventional ion sources such as Duoplasmatron and PIG ion sources were developed for high power proton accelerator and small cyclotron accelerators. To improve lifetime of the high current proton ion source, helicon plasma ion sources were developed with external rf antenna and applied for neutron generation in drive-in-target configuration. Negative hydrogen ion sources were also developed for tandem and cyclotron accelerators by using both rf and filament discharges. Large-area high-current ion sources for the KSTAR NBI system were developed and successfully tested for long-pulse operation of up to 300 s. Several broad beam ion sources for industrial applications such as ion implantation and surface treatment were also developed by using arc, rf, and microwave discharges. Recently, ion source applications become diversified to the area of nano- and biotechnologies. For example, C60 ion source was developed for the use of bioapplications in nanometer scale. For focused ion beam as a nanofabrication tool, liquid metal ion sources were improved and a novel plasma ion source was developed by utilizing localized sheath discharges. Research and development activities of these ion sources will be discussed with short description of appropriate applications.

  16. Radioactivity in books printed in Japan: its source and relation to the year of issue.

    PubMed

    Kobashi, A

    1996-06-01

    The radioactivities of the naturally occurring radionuclides (226Ra, 228Ra, 228Th and 40K) and a fallout nuclide (137Cs) in books produced in Japan in the 20th century were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry to obtain information on radiation emitted from books. The respective concentration ranges of 226Ra, 228Ra, 228Th, 40K, and 137Cs were 0.2-6.4, 0.4-11.2, 0.3-11.3, 1-112, and 0-3 Bq kg-1. X-ray diffraction spectra of the papers used in book printing showed that pyrophyllite, talc, kaolinite, and calcium carbonate were contained as fillers. A comparison of the radioactivity contents of the pulp and filler indicated that most of 226Ra, 228Ra, and 228Th in the books was present in the filler whereas 137Cs was in the pulp. The pattern of the concentration of each nuclide vs. the year of issue of the book was investigated. Patterns for the naturally occurring radionuclides were similar and were explained by the kinds of filler used. The pattern for 137Cs differed from the patterns of the naturally occurring radionuclides, having a marked peak in the mid-1960s. PMID:8840719

  17. Process for decontaminating radioactive liquids using a calcium cyanamide-containing composition. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Silver, G.L.

    1980-09-24

    The present invention provides a process for decontaminating a radioactive liquid containing a radioactive element capable of forming a hydroxide. This process includes the steps of contacting the radioactive liquid with a decontaminating composition and separating the resulting radioactive sludge from the resulting liquid. The decontaminating composition contains calcium cyanamide.

  18. The PERC{trademark} process: Existing and potential applications for induction coupled plasma technology in hazardous and radioactive waste treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Blutke, A.S.; Vavruska, J.S.; Serino, J.F.

    1996-12-31

    Plasma Technology, Inc. (PTI), a Santa Fe, New Mexico corporation has developed the Plasma Energy Recycle and Conversion (PERC){trademark} treatment process as a safe and environmentally clean alternative to conventional thermal destruction technologies. The PERC{trademark} treatment process uses as its heat source an advanced Induction Coupled Plasma (ICP) torch connected to a reaction chamber system with an additional emission control system. For example, organic-based gas, liquid, slurry, and/or solid waste streams can be converted into usable or even salable products while residual emissions are reduced to an absolute minimum. In applications for treatment of hazardous and radioactive waste streams, the PERC system could be used for destruction of the hazardous organic constituents and/or significant waste volume reduction while capturing the radioactive fraction in a non-leachable form. Like Direct Current (DC) and Alternating Current (AC) arc plasma systems, ICP torches offer sufficient energy to decompose, melt and/or vitrify any waste stream. The decision for an arc plasma or an IC plasma system has to be made on a case by case evaluation and is highly dependent on the specific waste stream`s form and composition. Induction coupled plasma technology offers one simple, but significant difference compared to DC or AC arc plasma systems: the ICP torch is electrodeless. To date, enormous research effort has been spent to improve the lifetime of electrodes and the effectiveness of related cooling systems. Arc plasma systems are established in research laboratories worldwide and are approaching a broad use in commercial applications. ICP technology has been improved relatively recently, but nowadays offers complete new and beneficial approaches in the field of waste conversion and treatment.

  19. 40 CFR 63.190 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... source. 63.190 Section 63.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES... Negotiated Regulation for Equipment Leaks § 63.190 Applicability and designation of source. (a) This...

  20. 40 CFR 63.190 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... source. 63.190 Section 63.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES... Negotiated Regulation for Equipment Leaks § 63.190 Applicability and designation of source. (a) This...

  1. 40 CFR 63.190 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... source. 63.190 Section 63.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES... Negotiated Regulation for Equipment Leaks § 63.190 Applicability and designation of source. (a) This...

  2. A portable Si/CdTe Compton camera and its applications to the visualization of radioactive substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Shin`ichiro; Harayama, Atsushi; Ichinohe, Yuto; Odaka, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Shin; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Genba, Kei; Matsuura, Daisuke; Ikebuchi, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Yoshikatsu; Tomonaka, Tetsuya

    2015-07-01

    Gamma-ray imagers with the potential for visualizing the distribution of radioactive materials are required in the fields of astrophysics, medicine, nuclear applications, and homeland security. Based on the technology of the Si/CdTe Compton camera, we have manufactured the first commercial Compton camera for practical use. Through field tests in Fukushima, we demonstrated that the camera is capable of hot spot detection and the evaluation of radioactive decontamination.

  3. Atmospheric-pressure plasma sources for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, G. Y.; Park, S. J.; Choi, M. Y.; Koo, I. G.; Byun, J. H.; Hong, J. W.; Sim, J. Y.; Collins, G. J.; Lee, J. K.

    2012-08-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APPs) have attracted great interest and have been widely applied in biomedical applications, as due to their non-thermal and reactive properties, they interact with living tissues, cells and bacteria. Various types of plasma sources generated at atmospheric pressure have been developed to achieve better performance in specific applications. This article presents an overview of the general characteristics of APPs and a brief summary of their biomedical applications, and reviews a wide range of these sources developed for biomedical applications. The plasma sources are classified according to their power sources and cover a wide frequency spectrum from dc to microwaves. The configurations and characteristics of plasma sources are outlined and their biomedical applications are presented.

  4. A patch source model for treatment planning of ruthenium ophthalmic applicators.

    PubMed

    Astrahan, Melvin A

    2003-06-01

    Beta-ray emitting Ru-106/Rh-106 ophthalmic applicators have been used for close to 4 decades in the treatment of choroidal melanoma. The form factor of these applicators is a spherically concave silver bowl with an inner radius of curvature between 12 and 14 mm, and a total shell thickness of 1 mm. The radioactive nuclide is deposited in a layer 0.1 mm below the concave surface of the applicator. Calculation of dose distributions for clinical treatment planning purposes is complicated by the concave nature of the distributed source, the asymmetric shape of the active region of some applicators, imperfections in the manufacturing process which can result in an inhomogeneous distribution of activity across the active surface, and absorption and scatter in the 0.1 mm layer of silver which seals and protects the radioactive layer. A semi-empirical method of calculating dose distributions for these applicators is described which is fundamentally compatible with treatment planning systems that use the AAPM TG43 brachytherapy formalism. Dose to water is estimated by summing a "patch source" dose function over a discrete number of overlapping patches uniformly distributed over the active surface of the applicator. The patch source dose function differs conceptually from a point source dose function in that it is intended to represent the macroscopic behavior of a small, disk-like region of the applicator. The patch source dose function includes an anisotropy term to account for angular variation in absorption and scatter as particles traverse the 0.1 mm silver window. It geometrically models the nearfield of a patch with properties akin to both a small disk and infinite plane, and models the farfield as if the patch were a point. This allows a manageable number of discrete patches (300 to 1000) to provide accuracy appropriate for clinical treatment planning. This approach has the advantages of using familiar concepts and data structures, it is computationally quick, and it

  5. Radar applications of gigawatt sources at millimeter wave frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Bruder, J.A.; Belcher, M.L. . Research Inst.)

    1991-06-01

    The high transmit powers provided by free electron laser (FEL) sources in combination with the narrow antenna beamwidths achievable at millimeter wave (MMW) frequencies offer potential for use in a number of radar applications. Potential applications of high power millimeter wave sources include satellite imaging, low angle radar tracking, radar astronomy, and a number of other possible applications such as atmospheric research, space debris detection, and space vehicle tracking. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Ion source design for industrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The design of broad-beam industrial ion sources is described. The approach used emphasizes refractory metal cathodes and permanent-magnet multipole discharge chambers. Design procedures and sample calculations are given for the discharge chamber, ion optics, cathodes, and magnetic circuit. Hardware designs are included for the isolator, cathode supports, anode supports, pole-piece assembly, and ion-optics supports. There are other ways of designing most ion source components, but the designs presented are representative of current technology and adaptable to a wide range of configurations.

  7. Detection of free liquid in drums of radioactive waste. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1979-10-16

    A nondestructive thermal imaging method for detecting the presence of a liquid such as water within a sealed container is described. The process includes application of a low amplitude heat pulse to an exterior surface area of the container, terminating the heat input and quickly mapping the resulting surface temperatures. The various mapped temperature values can be compared with those known to be normal for the container material and substances in contact. The mapped temperature values show up in different shades of light or darkness that denote different physical substances. The different substances can be determined by direct observation or by comparison with known standards. The method is particularly applicable to the detection of liquids above solidified radioactive wastes stored in sealed containers.

  8. A new method of testing space-based high-energy electron detectors with radioactive electron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. Y.; Shen, G. H.; Sun, Y.; Zhou, D. Z.; Zhang, X. X.; Li, J. W.; Huang, C.; Zhang, X. G.; Dong, Y. J.; Zhang, W. J.; Zhang, B. Q.; Shi, C. Y.

    2016-05-01

    Space-based electron detectors are commonly tested using radioactive β-sources which emit a continuous spectrum without spectral lines. Therefore, the tests are often to be considered only qualitative. This paper introduces a method, which results in more than a qualitative test even when using a β-source. The basic idea is to use the simulated response function of the instrument to invert the measured spectrum and compare this inverted spectrum with a reference spectrum obtained from the same source. Here we have used Geant4 to simulate the instrument response function (IRF) and a 3.5 mm thick Li-drifted Si detector to obtain the reference 90Sr/90Yi source spectrum to test and verify the geometric factors of the Omni-Direction Particle Detector (ODPD) on the Tiangong-1 (TG-1) and Tiangong-2 (TG-2) spacecraft. The TG spacecraft are experimental space laboratories and prototypes of the Chinese space station. The excellent agreement between the measured and reference spectra demonstrates that this test method can be used to quantitatively assess the quality of the instrument. Due to its simplicity, the method is faster and therefore more efficient than traditional full calibrations using an electron accelerator.

  9. The Case for the Application of Worldwide Marine Radioactivity Studies In the Search for Undeclared Facilities and Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Schanfein

    2013-06-01

    Undeclared nuclear facilities unequivocally remain the most difficult safeguards challenge facing the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Recent cases of undeclared facilities revealed in Iran and Syria, which are NPT signatory States, show both the difficulty and the seriousness of this threat to nonproliferation. In the case of undeclared nuclear facilities, the most effective deterrent against proliferation is the application of Wide-Area Environmental Sampling (WAES); however, WAES is currently cost-prohibitive. As with any threat, the most effective countering strategy is a multifaceted approach. Some of the approaches applied by the IAEA include: open source analysis, satellite imagery, on-site environmental sampling, complementary access under the Additional Protocol (where in force), traditional safeguards inspections, and information provided by member States. These approaches, naturally, are focused on specific States. Are there other opportunities not currently within the IAEA purview to assess States that may provide another opportunity to detect clandestine facilities? In this paper, the author will make the case that the IAEA Department of Safeguards should explore the area of worldwide marine radioactivity studies as one possible opportunity. One such study was released by the IAEA Marine Environment Laboratory in January 2005. This technical document focused on 90Sr, 137Cs, and 239/240Pu. It is clearly a challenging area because of the many sources of anthropogenic radionuclides in the world’s oceans and seas including: nuclear weapons testing, reprocessing, accidents, waste dumping, and industrial and medical radioisotopes, whose distributions change based on oceanographic, geochemical, and biological processes, and their sources. It is additionally challenging where multiple States share oceans, seas, and rivers. But with the application of modern science, historical sampling to establish baselines, and a focus on the most relevant

  10. FOSTERING MULTI-LATERAL COOPERATION BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENTS OF MEXICO, COLOMBIA, AND THE UNITED STATES TO ENHANCE THE PROTECTION OF HIGH-ACTIVITY RADIOACTIVE SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Nicholas; Watson, Erica E.; Wright, Kyle A.

    2009-10-07

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) reduces and protects vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide from sabotage, theft or diversion. The GTRI program has worked successfully with foreign countries to remove and protect nuclear and radioactive materials including high-activity sources used in medical, commercial, and research applications. There are many barriers to successful bilateral cooperation that must be overcome including language, preconceived perceptions, long distances, and different views on the threat and protection requirements. Successful cooperation is often based on relationships and building trusting relationships takes time. In the case of Mexico, GTRI first made contact in 2005. The project then lost momentum and stalled. At the same time, GTRI’s cooperation with the Republic of Colombia was a resounding success resulting in the securing of forty sites; the consolidation of numerous disused/orphan sources at a secure national storage facility; and, the development of a comprehensive approach to security including, inter alia, training and sustainability. The government of Colombia also showcased this comprehensive approach to thirteen Central American and Caribbean countries at a GTRI regional security conference held in Panama in October 2004. Representatives from the Colombian government were aware of GTRI’s interest in initiating cooperation with the Government of Mexico and to facilitate this cooperation, they offered to invite their Mexican counterparts to Colombia to observe its successful cooperation with GTRI. Shortly after that visit, the Government of Mexico agreed to move forward and requested that the cooperative efforts in Mexico be performed in a tripartite manner, leveraging the skills, experience, and resources of the Colombians. As a result, 22 of Mexico’s largest radioactive sites have had security upgrades in place within 18 months of cooperation.

  11. Total occupational exposure during characterisation, conditioning and securing of radioactive sealed sources: a new dosimetric concept using active electronic dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Prlić, Ivica; Mihić, Marija Surić; Marović, Gordana; Mestrović, Tomislav

    2009-03-01

    Radiation dosimetry in protection against ionising radiation involves research of all possible pathways through which natural or man-made radioactive materials can contaminate a habitat and actually harm its biota. It also takes into account natural and artificial (man-made) electromagnetic ionizing radiation (gamma and x radiation). This article presents a dosimetric study assessing exposure to man-made ionising radiation of local environment and total occupational exposure of two professional workers involved in characterisation, conditioning, and securing of unused radioactive sealed sources. The purpose of the study was to validate a new active electronic dosimeter (AED) of type ALARA OD and to develop a new monitoring method by tracing the external occupational exposure over real time. This method is used to continuously measure and record external radiation doses and, which is a novelty, establish dose rates receiving pattern as a function of real time. Occupational whole body dosimetric results obtained with AED were compared with results obtained with passive dosimetry (film badge and thermoluminiscence). Air, dust, and silicon sand samples were analysed by gamma-spectrometry to estimate internal exposure of the two workers to 222Rn due to inhalation or ingestion of dust and sand in indoor air. In order to establish total occupational exposure, control radon measurement was performed in the immediate environment and the external Hazard index (Hex) was calculated. PMID:19329376

  12. Radioactivity determination of sealed pure beta-sources by surface dose measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chang Heon; Jung, Seongmoon; Choi, Kanghyuk; Son, Kwang-Jae; Lee, Jun Sig; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to determine the activity of a sealed pure beta-source by measuring the surface dose rate using an extrapolation chamber. A conversion factor (cGy s-1 Bq-1), which was defined as the ratio of surface dose rate to activity, can be calculated by Monte Carlo simulations of the extrapolation chamber measurement. To validate this hypothesis the certified activities of two standard pure beta-sources of Sr/Y-90 and Si/P-32 were compared with those determined by this method. In addition, a sealed test source of Sr/Y-90 was manufactured by the HANARO reactor group of KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) and used to further validate this method. The measured surface dose rates of the Sr/Y-90 and Si/P-32 standard sources were 4.615×10-5 cGy s-1 and 2.259×10-5 cGy s-1, respectively. The calculated conversion factors of the two sources were 1.213×10-8 cGy s-1 Bq-1 and 1.071×10-8 cGy s-1 Bq-1, respectively. Therefore, the activity of the standard Sr/Y-90 source was determined to be 3.995 kBq, which was 2.0% less than the certified value (4.077 kBq). For Si/P-32 the determined activity was 2.102 kBq, which was 6.6% larger than the certified activity (1.971 kBq). The activity of the Sr/Y-90 test source was determined to be 4.166 kBq, while the apparent activity reported by KAERI was 5.803 kBq. This large difference might be due to evaporation and diffusion of the source liquid during preparation and uncertainty in the amount of weighed aliquot of source liquid. The overall uncertainty involved in this method was determined to be 7.3%. We demonstrated that the activity of a sealed pure beta-source could be conveniently determined by complementary combination of measuring the surface dose rate and Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. Long-Term Safe Storage and Disposal of Spent Sealed Radioactive Sources in Borehole Type Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    Ojovan, M. I.; Dmitriev, S. A.; Sobolev, I. A.

    2003-02-26

    Russian Federation has the leading experience in applying borehole storage/disposal method for SRS. A new immobilization technology for sources being disposed of in underground repositories was mastered by 1986 and since then it is used in the country. This method uses all advantages of borehole type repositories supplementing them with metal encapsulation of sources. Sources being uniformly allocated in the volume of underground vessel are fixed in the metal block hence ensuring long-term safety. The dissipation of radiogenic heat from SRS is considerably improved, radiation fields are reduced, and direct contact of sources to an environment is completely eliminated. The capacity of a typical borehole storage/disposal facility is increased almost 6 times applying metal immobilization. That has made new technology extremely favourable economically. The metal immobilization of SRS is considered as an option in Belarus and Ukraine as well as Bulgaria. Immobilization of sources in metal matrices can be a real solution for retrieval of SRS from inadequate repositories.

  14. Characterization of Sealed Radioactive Sources: An Uncertainty Analysis to Improve Detection Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel G. Cummings; James D. Sommers; Mary L. Adamic; Marcos Jimenez; Jeffrey G. Giglio; Kevin P. Carney; Karl Grimm

    2009-12-01

    The characterization of several types of sealed radiation sources has been accomplished. Specifically, cesium and strontium sources have been chemically characterized by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). One of the important pieces of information coming from the characterization is the “age” since purification. The age refers to the time since purification of the Cs or Sr components. A detailed error analysis of the mass spectrometric work has been undertaken to identify areas of improvement, as well as quantitating the effect the errors have on the “age” determined. This paper reports an uncertainty analysis associated with the measurements and identifying areas of improvement and alternative techniques that may reduce the uncertainties. In particular, work on isotope dilution using ICP-MS for the “age” determination of sealed sources will be presented, along with a detailed error analysis. The results will be compared to the original work done with simple instrument calibration.

  15. FOSTERING MULTI-LATERAL COOPERATION BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENTS OF DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, COLOMBIA, AND THE UNITED STATES TO ENHANCE THE PROTECTION OF HIGH-ACTIVITY RADIOACTIVE SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Nicholas; McCaw, Erica E.; Wright, Kyle A.; Medina, Maximo

    2009-10-06

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) reduces and protects vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide from sabotage, theft or diversion. The GTRI has worked successfully with foreign countries to remove and protect nuclear and radioactive materials including high-activity sources used in medical, commercial, and research applications. There are many barriers to successful bilateral cooperation that must be overcome including language, preconceived perceptions, long distances, and different views on the threat and protection requirements. Successful cooperation is often based on relationships and building trusting relationships takes time. In the case of Dominican Republic, the GTRI first received contact in 2008 from the Government of Dominican Republic. They requested cooperation that was similar to the tri-partite cooperation between Colombia, Mexico and the United States. Throughout the region it was widely known that the GTRI’s cooperation with the Government of Colombia was a resounding success resulting in the securing of forty sites; the consolidation of numerous disused/orphan sources at a secure national storage facility; and, the development of a comprehensive approach to security including, inter alia, training and sustainability. The Government of Colombia also showcased this comprehensive approach to thirteen Central American and Caribbean countries at a GTRI regional security conference held in Panama in October 2004. In 2007, Colombia was an integral component of GTRI multi-lateral cooperation initiation in Mexico. As a result, twenty two of Mexico’s largest radioactive sites have been upgraded in the past eighteen months. These two endeavors served as catalysts for cooperation opportunities in the Dominican Republic. Representatives from the Colombian government were aware of GTRI’s interest in initiating cooperation with the Government of Dominican Republic and to facilitate this cooperation, they

  16. rf-driven ion sources for industrial applications (invited) (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-02-15

    The Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been developing rf-driven ion sources for the last two decades. These sources are being used to generate both positive and negative ion beams. Some of these sources are operating in particle accelerators such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge, while others are being employed in various industrial ion beam systems. There are four areas where the rf-driven ion sources are commonly used in industry. (1) In semiconductor manufacturing, rf-driven sources have found important applications in plasma etching, ion beam implantation, and ion beam lithography. (2) In material analysis and surface modification, miniature rf-ion sources can be found in focused ion beam systems. They can provide ion beams of essentially any element in the Periodic Table. The newly developed combined rf ion-electron beam unit improves greatly the performance of the secondary ion mass spectrometry tool. (3) For neutron production, rf ion source is a major component of compact, high flux D-D, D-T, or T-T neutron generators. These neutron sources are now being employed in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as well as in neutron imaging and material interrogation. (4) Large area rf-driven ion source will be used in an industrial design neutral beam diagnostic system for probing fusion plasmas. Such sources can be easily scaled to provide large ion beam current for future fusion reactor applications.

  17. Innovative methodology for intercomparison of radionuclide calibrators using short half-life in situ prepared radioactive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, P. A.; Santos, J. A. M.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: An original radionuclide calibrator method for activity determination is presented. The method could be used for intercomparison surveys for short half-life radioactive sources used in Nuclear Medicine, such as{sup 99m}Tc or most positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals. Methods: By evaluation of the resulting net optical density (netOD) using a standardized scanning method of irradiated Gafchromic XRQA2 film, a comparison of the netOD measurement with a previously determined calibration curve can be made and the difference between the tested radionuclide calibrator and a radionuclide calibrator used as reference device can be calculated. To estimate the total expected measurement uncertainties, a careful analysis of the methodology, for the case of{sup 99m}Tc, was performed: reproducibility determination, scanning conditions, and possible fadeout effects. Since every factor of the activity measurement procedure can influence the final result, the method also evaluates correct syringe positioning inside the radionuclide calibrator. Results: As an alternative to using a calibrated source sent to the surveyed site, which requires a relatively long half-life of the nuclide, or sending a portable calibrated radionuclide calibrator, the proposed method uses a source preparedin situ. An indirect activity determination is achieved by the irradiation of a radiochromic film using {sup 99m}Tc under strictly controlled conditions, and cumulated activity calculation from the initial activity and total irradiation time. The irradiated Gafchromic film and the irradiator, without the source, can then be sent to a National Metrology Institute for evaluation of the results. Conclusions: The methodology described in this paper showed to have a good potential for accurate (3%) radionuclide calibrators intercomparison studies for{sup 99m}Tc between Nuclear Medicine centers without source transfer and can easily be adapted to other short half-life radionuclides.

  18. Application of compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Iwata, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Hojo, S.; Kubo, T.; Kato, Y.; Biri, S.; Fekete, E.; Yoshida, Y.; Drentje, A. G.

    2008-02-15

    The compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source with a permanent magnet configuration (Kei2 source) has been developed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences for a new carbon therapy facility. The Kei2 source was designed for production of C{sup 4+} ions; its performance such as beam intensity and stability has already reached the medical requirements. Therefore, the prototype development of the source for medical use is essentially finished. Recently, we have started a few studies on other applications of the source. One is the production of fullerenes in the ECR plasma and modified fullerenes with various atoms for new materials. A second application is the production of multiply charged ions (not only carbon) for ion implantation. In this paper, some basic experiments for these applications are reported.

  19. Noise Characterization of Supercontinuum Sources for Low Coherence Interferometry Applications

    PubMed Central

    Brown, William J.; Kim, Sanghoon; Wax, Adam

    2015-01-01

    We examine the noise properties of supercontinuum light sources when used in low coherence interferometry applications. The first application is a multiple-scattering low-coherence interferometry (ms2/LCI) system where high power and long image acquisition times are required to image deep into tissue. For this system we compare the noise characteristics of two supercontinuum sources from different suppliers. Both sources have long term drift that limits the amount of time over which signal averaging is advantageous for reducing noise. The second application is a high resolution optical coherence tomography system where broadband light is needed for high axial resolution. For this system we compare the noise performance of the two supercontinuum sources and a light source based on four superluminescent diodes (SLDs) using imaging contrast as a comparative metric. We find that the NKT SuperK has superior noise performance compared to the Fianium SC-450-4 but neither meets the performance of the SLDs. PMID:25606759

  20. Nondestructive decontamination of mortar and concrete by electro-kinetic methods: application to the extraction of radioactive heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Castellote, Marta; Andrade, Carmen; Alonso, Cruz

    2002-05-15

    Because the service lives of nuclear power plants are limited to a certain number of years, the need for the management of quite a large volume of radioactive contaminated concrete arises, which, in most cases, was not taken into account when the capacities of the low and medium activity repositories were designed. Therefore, the decontamination of these structures would be of great interest in order to declassify the wastes as radioactive and manage them as conventional ones. This research studies the reliability of the application of electrical fields to decontaminate radioactive contaminated concrete. Three series of decontamination experiments have been carried out, using Cs+, Sr2-, Co2+, and Fe3+ ions added during casting and that have penetrated from the outside, testing carbonated and uncarbonated matrixes, and using laboratory devices as well as the homemade device for in situ application named "honeycomb device". As a result, the application of electrical fields to concrete-contaminated structures has been developed as a new technique to extract radioactive ionic species from concrete. This method of decontamination has been patented by ENRESA (Spanish Company for the Management of Radioactive Wastes) in association with the IETcc. PMID:12038838

  1. Principle and applications of dual source CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flohr, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    Dual source CT (DSCT) has the potential to solve remaining limitations of conventional multi-detector row CT (MDCT)-scanners, such as insufficient temporal resolution for ECG-controlled cardiac imaging. A DSCT is equipped with two X-ray tubes and two corresponding detectors that are mounted onto the rotating gantry with an angular offset of 90°. The key benefit of DSCT for cardiac scanning is improved temporal resolution equivalent to a quarter of the gantry rotation time (83 ms at 0.33 s rotation time). Additionally, both X-ray tubes can be operated at different kV- and mA-settings, enabling the acquisition of dual energy data. The acquisition of dual energy CT data can add functional information to the morphological information based on different X-ray attenuation coefficients that is usually obtained in a CT examination.

  2. 40 CFR 63.340 - Applicability and designation of sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... permit under 40 CFR part 70 or 71, provided you are not required to obtain a permit under 40 CFR 70.3(a... National Emission Standards for Chromium Emissions From Hard and Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks § 63.340 Applicability and designation of sources. (a) The affected source...

  3. 40 CFR 63.340 - Applicability and designation of sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... permit under 40 CFR part 70 or 71, provided you are not required to obtain a permit under 40 CFR 70.3(a... National Emission Standards for Chromium Emissions From Hard and Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks § 63.340 Applicability and designation of sources. (a) The affected source...

  4. 40 CFR 63.340 - Applicability and designation of sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... permit under 40 CFR part 70 or 71, provided you are not required to obtain a permit under 40 CFR 70.3(a... National Emission Standards for Chromium Emissions From Hard and Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks § 63.340 Applicability and designation of sources. (a) The affected source...

  5. 40 CFR 74.16 - Application requirements for combustion sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Application requirements for combustion sources. 74.16 Section 74.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED...; (10) If the combustion source seeks to qualify for a transfer of allowances from the replacement...

  6. 40 CFR 63.340 - Applicability and designation of sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... permit under 40 CFR part 70 or 71, provided you are not required to obtain a permit under 40 CFR 70.3(a... Chromium Anodizing Tanks § 63.340 Applicability and designation of sources. (a) The affected source to which the provisions of this subpart apply is each chromium electroplating or chromium anodizing tank...

  7. 40 CFR 63.340 - Applicability and designation of sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... permit under 40 CFR part 70 or 71, provided you are not required to obtain a permit under 40 CFR 70.3(a... Chromium Anodizing Tanks § 63.340 Applicability and designation of sources. (a) The affected source to which the provisions of this subpart apply is each chromium electroplating or chromium anodizing tank...

  8. 40 CFR 63.100 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., recovery, or recycling operations at hazardous waste TSDF facilities requiring a permit under 40 CFR part... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applicability and designation of source... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...

  9. Analytical source term optimization for radioactive releases with approximate knowledge of nuclide ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofman, Radek; Seibert, Petra; Kovalets, Ivan; Andronopoulos, Spyros

    2015-04-01

    We are concerned with source term retrieval in the case of an accident in a nuclear power with off-site consequences. The goal is to optimize atmospheric dispersion model inputs using inverse modeling of gamma dose rate measurements (instantaneous or time-integrated). These are the most abundant type of measurements provided by various radiation monitoring networks across Europe and available continuously in near-real time. Usually, a source term of an accidental release comprises of a mixture of nuclides. Unfortunately, gamma dose rate measurements do not provide a direct information on the source term composition; however, physical properties of respective nuclides (deposition properties, decay half-life) can yield some insight. In the method presented, we assume that nuclide ratios are known at least approximately, e.g. from nuclide specific observations or reactor inventory and assumptions on the accident type. The source term can be in multiple phases, each being characterized by constant nuclide ratios. The method is an extension of a well-established source term inversion approach based on the optimization of an objective function (minimization of a cost function). This function has two quadratic terms: mismatch between model and measurements weighted by an observation error covariance matrix and the deviation of the solution from a first guess weighted by the first-guess error covariance matrix. For simplicity, both error covariance matrices are approximated as diagonal. Analytical minimization of the cost function leads to a liner system of equations. Possible negative parts of the solution are iteratively removed by the means of first guess error variance reduction. Nuclide ratios enter the problem in the form of additional linear equations, where the deviations from prescribed ratios are weighted by factors; the corresponding error variance allows us to control how strongly we want to impose the prescribed ratios. This introduces some freedom into the

  10. Terahertz parametric sources and imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, M.; Ogawa, Y.; Otani, C.; Kawase, K.

    2005-12-01

    We have studied the generation of terahertz (THz) waves by optical parametric processes based on laser light scattering from the polariton mode of nonlinear crystals. Using parametric oscillation of LiNbO 3 or MgO-doped LiNbO 3 crystal pumped by a nano-second Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, we have realized a widely tunable coherent THz-wave sources with a simple configuration. We report the detailed characteristics of the oscillation and the radiation including tunability, spatial and temporal coherency, uni directivity, and efficiency. A Fourier transform limited THz-wave spectrum narrowing was achieved by introducing the injection seeding method. Further, we have developed a spectroscopic THz imaging system using a TPO, which allows detection and identification of drugs concealed in envelopes, by introducing the component spatial pattern analysis. Several images of the envelope are recorded at different THz frequencies and then processed. The final result is an image that reveals what substances are present in the envelope, in what quantity, and how they are distributed across the envelope area. The example presented here shows the identification of three drugs, two of which illegal, while one is an over-the-counter drug.

  11. Natural proteins: Sources, isolation, characterization and applications.

    PubMed

    Nehete, Jitendra Y; Bhambar, Rajendra S; Narkhede, Minal R; Gawali, Sonali R

    2013-07-01

    Worldwide, plant protein contributes substantially as a food resource because it contains essential amino acids for meeting human physiological requirements. However, many versatile plant proteins are used as medicinal agents as they are produced by using molecular tools of biotechnology. Proteins can be obtained from plants, animals and microorganism cells. The abundant economical proteins can be obtained from plant seeds. These natural proteins are obtained by isolation procedures depending on the physicochemical properties of proteins. Isolation and purification of single protein from cells containing mixtures of unrelated proteins is achievable due to the physical and chemical attributes of proteins. The following characteristics are unique to each protein: Amino acid composition, sequence, subunit structures, size, shape, net charge, isoelectric point, solubility, heat stability and hydrophobicity. Based on these properties, various methods of isolation exist, like salting out and isoionic precipitation. Purification of proteins is quiet challenging and, therefore, several approaches like sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis and chromatography are available. Characterization of proteins can be performed by mass spectrometry/liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The amino acid sequence of a protein can be detected by using tandem mass spectrometry. In this article, a review has been made on the sources, isolation, purification and characterization of natural proteins. PMID:24347918

  12. 36 CFR 223.190 - Sourcing area application procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... information the applicant may believe is appropriate to support approval of the requested sourcing area; and... Act (16 U.S.C. 620d) and the False Statements Act (18 U.S.C. 1001) that the information provided in... information provided in support of this application, is true, complete, and accurate to the best of...

  13. Properties and Applications of Laser Generated X-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R F; Key, M H

    2002-02-25

    The rapid development of laser technology and related progress in research using lasers is shifting the boundaries where laser based sources are preferred over other light sources particularly in the XUV and x-ray spectral region. Laser based sources have exceptional capability for short pulse and high brightness and with improvements in high repetition rate pulsed operation, such sources are also becoming more interesting for their average power capability. This study presents an evaluation of the current capabilities and near term future potential of laser based light sources and summarizes, for the purpose of comparison, the characteristics and near term prospects of sources based on synchrotron radiation and free electron lasers. Conclusions are drawn on areas where the development of laser based sources is most promising and competitive in terms of applications potential.

  14. Source term estimation and the isotopic ratio of radioactive material released from the WIPP repository in New Mexico, USA.

    PubMed

    Thakur, P

    2016-01-01

    After almost 15 years of operations, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) had one of its waste drums breach underground as a result of a runaway chemical reaction in the waste it contained. This incident occurred on February 14, 2014. Moderate levels of radioactivity were released into the underground air. A small portion of the contaminated underground air also escaped to the surface through the ventilation system and was detected approximately 1 km away from the facility. According to the source term estimation, the actual amount of radioactivity released from the WIPP site was less than 1.5 mCi. The highest activity detected on the surface was 115.2 μBq/m(3) for (241)Am and 10.2 μBq/m(3) for (239+240)Pu at a sampling station located 91 m away from the underground air exhaust point and 81.4 μBq/m(3) of (241)Am and 5.8 μBq/m(3) of (239+240)Pu at a monitoring station located approximately 1 km northwest of the WIPP facility. The dominant radionuclides released were americium and plutonium, in a ratio that matches the content of the breached drum. Air monitoring across the WIPP site intensified following the first reports of radiation detection underground to determine the extent of impact to WIPP personnel, the public, and the environment. In this paper, the early stage monitoring data collected by an independent monitoring program conducted by the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center (CEMRC) and an oversight monitoring program conducted by the WIPP's management and operating contractor, the Nuclear Waste Partnership (NWP) LLC were utilized to estimate the actual amount of radioactivity released from the WIPP underground. The Am and Pu isotope ratios were measured and used to support the hypothesis that the release came from one drum identified as having breached that represents a specific waste stream with this radionuclide ratio in its inventory. This failed drum underwent a heat and gas producing reaction that overpowered its vent and

  15. Laser wakefield accelerator based light sources: potential applications and requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, F.; Thomas, A. G.; Mangles, S. P.D.; Banerjee, S.; Corde, S.; Flacco, A.; Litos, M.; Neely, D.; Viera, J.; Najmudin, Z.; Bingham, R.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.

    2015-01-15

    In this article we review the prospects of laser wakefield accelerators as next generation light sources for applications. This work arose as a result of discussions held at the 2013 Laser Plasma Accelerators Workshop. X-ray phase contrast imaging, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and nuclear resonance fluorescence are highlighted as potential applications for laser-plasma based light sources. We discuss ongoing and future efforts to improve the properties of radiation from plasma betatron emission and Compton scattering using laser wakefield accelerators for these specific applications.

  16. Vacuum Arc Ion Sources: Recent Developments and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Ian; Oks, Efim

    2005-05-01

    The vacuum arc ion source has evolved over the past twenty years into a standard laboratory tool for the production of high current beams of metal ions, and is now used in a number of different embodiments at many laboratories around the world. The primary application of this kind of source has evolved to be ion implantation for material surface modification. Another important use is for injection of high current beams of heavy metal ions into the front ends of particle accelerators, and much excellent work has been carried out in recent years in optimizing the source for reliable accelerator application. The source also provides a valuable tool for the investigation of the fundamental plasma physics of vacuum arc plasma discharges. As the use of the source has grown and diversified, at the same time the ion source performance and operational characteristics have been improved in a variety of different ways also. Here we review the growth and status of vacuum arc ion sources around the world, and summarize some of the applications for which the sources have been used.

  17. Burnup estimation of fuel sourcing radioactive material based on monitored Cs and Pu isotopic activity ratios in Fukushima N. P. S. accident

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, T.; Suzuki, M.; Ando, Y.

    2012-07-01

    After the severe core damage of Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Station, radioactive material leaked from the reactor buildings. As part of monitoring of radioactivity in the site, measurements of radioactivity in soils at three fixed points have been performed for {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs with gamma-ray spectrometry and for Pu, Pu, and {sup 240}Pu with {alpha}-ray spectrometry. Correlations of radioactivity ratios of {sup 134}Cs to {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 238}Pu to the sum of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu with fuel burnup were studied by using theoretical burnup calculations and measurements on isotopic inventories, and compared with the Cs and Pu radioactivity rations in the soils. The comparison indicated that the burnup of the fuel sourcing the radioactivity was from 18 to 38 GWd/t, which corresponded to that of the fuel in the highest power and, therefore, the highest decay heat in operating high-burnup fueled BWR cores. (authors)

  18. Solar neutrino experiments and a test for neutrino oscillations with radioactive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, B.T.; Davis, R. Jr.; Rowley, J.K.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the Brookhaven solar neutrino experiment are given and compared to the most recent standard solar model calculations. The observations are about a factor of 4 below theoretical expectations. In view of the uncertainties involved in the theoretical models of the sun, the discrepancy is not considered to be evidence for neutrino oscillations. The status of the development of a gallium solar neutrino detector is described. Radiochemical neutrino detectors can be used to search for ..nu../sub e/ oscillations by using megacurie sources of monoenergetic neutrinos like /sup 65/Zn. A quantitative evaluation of possible experiments using the Brookhaven chlorine solar neutrino detector and a gallium detector is given. 6 figures, 3 tables.

  19. CENTRAL STORAGE FACILITY PROJECT IN COLOMBIA TO PROVIDE THE SAFE STORAGE AND PROTECTION OF HIGH-ACTIVITY RADIOACTIVE SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Raymond; Wright, Kyle A.; McCaw, Erica E.; Vallejo, Jorge

    2009-10-07

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) reduces and protects vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide. Internationally, over 40 countries are cooperating with GTRI to enhance the security of these materials. The GTRI program has worked successfully with foreign countries to remove and protect nuclear and radioactive materials, including orphaned and disused high-activity sources. GTRI began cooperation with the Republic of Colombia in April 2004. This cooperation has been a resounding success by securing forty high-risk sites, consolidating disused/orphan sources at an interim secure national storage facility, and developing a comprehensive approach to security, training, and sustainability. In 2005 the Colombian Ministry of Mines and Energy requested the Department of Energy’s support in the construction of a new Central Storage Facility (CSF). In December 2005, the Ministry selected to construct this facility at the Institute of Geology and Mining (Ingeominas) site in Bogota. This site already served as Colombia’s national repository, where disused sources were housed in various buildings around the complex. The CSF project was placed under contract in May 2006, but environmental issues and public protests, which led to a class action lawsuit against the Colombian Government, forced the Ministry to quickly suspend activities, thereby placing the project in jeopardy. Despite these challenges, however, the Ministry of Mines and Energy worked closely with public and environmental authorities to resolve these issues, and continued to be a strong advocate of the GTRI program. In June 2008, the Ministry of Mines and Energy was granted the construction and environmental licenses. As a result, construction immediately resumed and the CSF was completed by December 2008. A commissioning ceremony was held for the new facility in January 2009, which was attended by representatives from the Department of Energy, U.S. Embassy

  20. Potential application of microsensor technology in radioactive waste management with emphasis on headspace gas detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Chad Edward; Thomas, Michael Loren; Wright, Jerome L.; Pohl, Phillip Isabio; Hughes, Robert Clark; Wang, Yifeng; McGrath, Lucas K.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Gao, Huizhen

    2004-09-01

    Waste characterization is probably the most costly part of radioactive waste management. An important part of this characterization is the measurements of headspace gas in waste containers in order to demonstrate the compliance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) or transportation requirements. The traditional chemical analysis methods, which include all steps of gas sampling, sample shipment and laboratory analysis, are expensive and time-consuming as well as increasing worker's exposure to hazardous environments. Therefore, an alternative technique that can provide quick, in-situ, and real-time detections of headspace gas compositions is highly desirable. This report summarizes the results obtained from a Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) project entitled 'Potential Application of Microsensor Technology in Radioactive Waste Management with Emphasis on Headspace Gas Detection'. The objective of this project is to bridge the technical gap between the current status of microsensor development and the intended applications of these sensors in nuclear waste management. The major results are summarized below: {sm_bullet} A literature review was conducted on the regulatory requirements for headspace gas sampling/analysis in waste characterization and monitoring. The most relevant gaseous species and the related physiochemical environments were identified. It was found that preconcentrators might be needed in order for chemiresistor sensors to meet desired detection {sm_bullet} A long-term stability test was conducted for a polymer-based chemresistor sensor array. Significant drifts were observed over the time duration of one month. Such drifts should be taken into account for long-term in-situ monitoring. {sm_bullet} Several techniques were explored to improve the performance of sensor polymers. It has been demonstrated that freeze deposition of black carbon (CB)-polymer composite can effectively eliminate the so-called 'coffee ring

  1. Asymptotic Giant Branch stars as a source of short-lived radioactive nuclei in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserburg, G. J.; Busso, M.; Gallino, R.; Raiteri, C. M.

    1994-01-01

    We carried out a theoretical evaluation of the contribution of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars to some short-lived (10(exp 6) less than or equal to Tau-bar less than or equal to 2 x 10(exp 7) yr) isotopes in the Interstellar Medium (ISM) and in the early solar system using stellar model calculations for thermally pulsing evolutionary phases of low-mass stars. The yields of s-process nuclei in the convective He-shell for different neutron exposures tau(sub 0) were obtained, and AGB stars were shown to produce several radioactive nuclei (especially Pd-107, Pb-205, Fe-60, Zr-93, Tc-99, Cs-135, and Hf-182) in diferent amounts. Assuming either contamination of the solar nebula from a single AGB star or models for continuous injection and mixing from many stars into the ISM, we calculate the ratios of radioactive to stable nuclei at the epoch of the Sun's formation. The dilution factor between the AGB ejecta and the early solar system matter is obtained by matching the observed Pd-107/Pd-108 and depends on the value of tau(sub 0). It is found that small masses M(sub He) of He-shell material (10(exp -4)-10(exp -7) solar mass) enriched in s-process nuclei are sufficient to contaminate 1 solar mass of the ISM to produce the Pd-107 found in the early solar system. Predictions are made for all of the other radioactive isotopes. The optimal model to explain several observed radioactive species at different states of the proto-solar nebula involves a single AGB star with a low neutron exposure (tau(sub 0) = 0.03 mbarn(sup -1)) which contaminated the cloud with a dilution factor of M(sub He)/solar mass approximately 1.5 x 10(exp -4). This will also contribute newly synthesized stable s-process nuclei in the amount of approximately 10(exp -4) of their abundances already present in the proto-solar cloud. Variations in the degree of homogenization (approximately 30%) of the injected material may account for some of the small general isotopic anomalies found in meteorites. It is

  2. RADIOACTIVE BATTERY

    DOEpatents

    Birden, J.H.; Jordan, K.C.

    1959-11-17

    A radioactive battery which includes a capsule containing the active material and a thermopile associated therewith is presented. The capsule is both a shield to stop the radiations and thereby make the battery safe to use, and an energy conventer. The intense radioactive decay taking place inside is converted to useful heat at the capsule surface. The heat is conducted to the hot thermojunctions of a thermopile. The cold junctions of the thermopile are thermally insulated from the heat source, so that a temperature difference occurs between the hot and cold junctions, causing an electrical current of a constant magnitude to flow.

  3. RADIO-ACTIVE TRANSDUCER

    DOEpatents

    Wanetick, S.

    1962-03-01

    ABS>ure the change in velocity of a moving object. The transducer includes a radioactive source having a collimated beam of radioactive particles, a shield which can block the passage of the radioactive beam, and a scintillation detector to measure the number of radioactive particles in the beam which are not blocked by the shield. The shield is operatively placed across the radioactive beam so that any motion normal to the beam will cause the shield to move in the opposite direction thereby allowing more radioactive particles to reach the detector. The number of particles detected indicates the acceleration. (AEC)

  4. AGB stars as a source of short-lived radioactive nuclei in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserburg, G. J.; Gallino, R.; Busso, M.; Raiteri, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose is to estimate the possible contribution of some short-lived nuclei to the early solar nebula from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) sources. Low mass (1 to 3 solar mass) AGB stars appear to provide a site for synthesis of the main s process component for solar system material with an exponential distribution of neutron irradiations varies as exp(-tau/tau(sub 0)) (where tau is the time integrated neutron flux with a mean neutron exposure tau(sub 0)) for solar abundances with tau(sub 0) = 0.28 mb(sup -1). Previous workers estimated the synthesis of key short-lived nuclei which might be produced in AGB stars. While these calculations exhibit the basic characteristics of nuclei production by neutron exposure, there is need for a self-consistent calculation that follows AGB evolution and takes into account the net production from a star and dilution with the cloud medium. Many of the general approaches and the conclusions arrived at were presented earlier by Cameron. The production of nuclei for a star of 1.5 solar mass during the thermal pulsing of the AGB phase was evaluated. Calculations were done for a series of thermal pulses with tau(sub 0) = 0.12 and 0.28 mb(sup -1). These pulses involve s nucleosynthesis in the burning shell at the base of the He zone followed by the ignition of the H burning shell at the top of the He zone. After about 10-15 cycles the abundances of the various nuclei in the He zone become constant. Computations of the abundances of all nuclei in the He zone were made following Gallino. The mass of the solar nebula was considered to consist of some initial material of approximately solar composition plus some contributions from AGB stars. The ratios of the masses required from the AGB He burning zone to the ISM necessary to produce the observed value of Pd-107/Pd-108 in the early solar system were calculated and this dilution factor was applied to all other relevant nuclei.

  5. Investigation of gigawatt millimeter wave source applications. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bruder, J.A.; Belcher, M.L.

    1991-09-01

    The Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) investigated potential applications of millimeter wave (MMW) sources with peak powers on the order of a gigawatt. This power level is representative of MMW devices such as the free electron laser (FEL) and the cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM) that are under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In addition to determining the technical requirements for these applications, the investigation considered potential users and how a high power MMW system would expand their current capabilities. Two of the more promising applications were examined in detail to include trade-off evaluations system parameters. The trade-off evaluations included overall system configuration, frequency and coherence, component availability, and performance estimates. Brainstorming sessions were held to try and uncover additional applications for a gigawatt MMW source. In setting up guidelines for the session, the need to attempt to predict applications for the years 2000 to 2030 was stressed. Also, possible non-DoD applications needed to be considered. While some of these applications could not in themselves justify the costs involved in the development of the radar system, they could be considered potential secondary applications of the system. As a result of the sessions, a number of interesting potential applications evolved including: space object identification; low angle tracking; illuminator for space-based radar; radio astronomy; space vehicle navigation; space debris location; atmospheric research; wind shear detection; electronic countermeasures; low observable detection; and long range detection via ducting.

  6. Design, construction, and use of a shipping case for radioactive sources used in the calibration of portal monitors in the radiation portal monitoring project

    SciTech Connect

    Lepel, Elwood A.; Hensley, Walter K.

    2009-12-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is working with US Customs and Border Protection to assist in the installation of radiation portal monitors. We need to provide radioactive sources – both gamma- and neutron-emitting – to ports of entry where the monitors are being installed. The monitors must be calibrated to verify proper operation and detection sensitivity. We designed a portable source-shipping case using numerical modeling to predict the neutron dose rate at the case’s surface. The shipping case including radioactive sources meets the DOT requirements for “limited quantity.” Over 300 shipments, domestic and international, were made in FY2008 using this type of shipping case.

  7. Characterization and Source Term Assessments of Radioactive Particles from Marshall Islands Using Non-Destructive Analytical Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jernstrom, J; Eriksson, M; Simon, R; Tamborini, G; Bildstein, O; Carlos-Marquez, R; Kehl, S R; Betti, M; Hamilton, T

    2005-06-11

    A considerable fraction of radioactivity entering the environment from different nuclear events is associated with particles. The impact of these events can only be fully assessed where there is some knowledge about the mobility of particle bound radionuclides entering the environment. The behavior of particulate radionuclides is dependent on several factors, including the physical, chemical and redox state of the environment, the characteristics of the particles (e.g., the chemical composition, crystallinity and particle size) and on the oxidative state of radionuclides contained in the particles. Six plutonium-containing particles stemming from Runit Island soil (Marshall Islands) were characterized using non-destructive analytical and microanalytical methods. By determining the activity of {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am isotopes from their gamma peaks structural information related to Pu matrix was obtained, and the source term was revealed. Composition and elemental distribution in the particles were studied with synchrotron radiation based micro X-ray fluorescence (SR-{mu}-XRF) spectrometry. Scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray detector (SEMEDX) and secondary ion mass spectrometer (SIMS) were used to examine particle surfaces. Based on the elemental composition the particles were divided into two groups; particles with plain Pu matrix, and particles where the plutonium is included in Si/O-rich matrix being more heterogeneously distributed. All of the particles were identified as fragments of initial weapons material. As containing plutonium with low {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atomic ratio, {approx}2-6%, which corresponds to weapons grade plutonium, the source term was identified to be among the safety tests conducted in the history of Runit Island.

  8. 40 CFR 191.21 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... TRANSURANIC RADIOACTIVE WASTES Environmental Standards for Ground-Water Protection § 191.21 Applicability. (a... activities subject to subpart B of this part; and (2) Radioactive contamination of underground sources...

  9. Potential applications of an electron cyclotron resonance multicusp plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Berry, L.A.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Haselton, H.H.; Roberto, J.B.; Stirling, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasmatron has been developed by feeding a multicusp bucket arc chamber with a compact ECR plasma source. This novel source produced large (about 25-cm-diam), uniform (to within {plus minus}10%), dense (>10{sup 11}-cm{sup -3}) plasmas of argon, helium, hydrogen, and oxygen. It has been operated to produce an oxygen plasma for etching 12.7-cm (5-in.) positive photoresist-coated silicon wafers with uniformity within {plus minus}8%. Results and potential applications of this new ECR plasma source for plasma processing of thin films are discussed. 21 refs., 10 figs.

  10. High brightness sources for MeV microprobe applications

    SciTech Connect

    Read, P.M.; Alton, G.D.; Maskrey, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    State of the art MeV ion microprobe facilities are now approaching current density limitations on targets imposed by the fundamental nature of conventional gaseous ion sources. With a view to addressing this problem efforts are under way which have the ultimate objective of developing high brightness Li liquid metal ion sources suitable for MeV ion microprobe applications. Prototype Li/sup +/ and Ga/sup +/ liquid metal ion sources have been designed, fabricated and are undergoing preliminary testing. This paper describes the first total emittance and brightness measurements of a Ga liquid metal ion source. The effect of the geometry of the ion extraction system is investigated and the brightness data are compared to those of a radio frequency ion source.

  11. Survey of agents and techniques applicable to the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhrmann, M.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Colombo, P.

    1981-12-01

    A review of the various solidification agents and techniques that are currently available or potentially applicable for the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes is presented. An overview of the types and quantities of low-level wastes produced is presented. Descriptions of waste form matrix materials, the wastes types for which they have been or may be applied and available information concerning relevant waste form properties and characteristics follow. Also included are descriptions of the processing techniques themselves with an emphasis on those operating parameters which impact upon waste form properties. The solidification agents considered in this survey include: hydraulic cements, thermoplastic materials, thermosetting polymers, glasses, synthetic minerals and composite materials. This survey is part of a program supported by the United States Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program (LLWMP). This work provides input into LLWMP efforts to develop and compile information relevant to the treatment and processing of low-level wastes and their disposal by shallow land burial.

  12. Novel application of nanozeolite for radioactive cesium removal from high-salt wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun-Young; Kim, Kwang-Wook; Park, Minsung; Kim, Jimin; Oh, Maengkyo; Lee, Eil-Hee; Chung, Dong-Yong; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2016-05-15

    Finding a striking peculiarity of nanomaterials and evaluating its feasibility for practical use are interesting topics of research. We investigated the application of nanozeolite's outstanding reactivity for a rapid and effective method for radioactive cesium removal in the wastewater generated from nuclear power plant accident, as a new concept. Extremely fast removal of cesium, even without stirring, was achieved by the nanozeolite at efficiencies never observed with bulk materials. The nanozeolite reached an adsorption equilibrium state within 1 min. Cesium adsorption by nanozeolite was demonstrated at reaction rates of orders of magnitude higher than that of larger zeolite phases. This observation was strongly supported by the positive correlation between the rate constant ratio (k2,bulk/k2,nano) and the initial Cs concentrations with a correlation coefficient (R(2)) of 0.99. A potential drawback of a nanoadsorbent is the difficulty of particle settling and separation because of its high dispersivity in solution. However, our results also demonstrated that the nanozeolite could be easily precipitated from the high-salt solution with ferric flocculant. The flocculation index reached a steady state within 10 min. A series of our experimental results met the goal of rapid processing in the case of emergency by applying the well-suited nanozeolite adsorption and flocculation. PMID:26990838

  13. Analysis of the application of decontamination technologies to radioactive metal waste minimization using expert systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bayrakal, S.

    1993-09-30

    Radioactive metal waste makes up a significant portion of the waste currently being sent for disposal. Recovery of this metal as a valuable resource is possible through the use of decontamination technologies. Through the development and use of expert systems a comparison can be made of laser decontamination, a technology currently under development at Ames Laboratory, with currently available decontamination technologies for applicability to the types of metal waste being generated and the effectiveness of these versus simply disposing of the waste. These technologies can be technically and economically evaluated by the use of expert systems techniques to provide a waste management decision making tool that generates, given an identified metal waste, waste management recommendations. The user enters waste characteristic information as input and the system then recommends decontamination technologies, determines residual contamination levels and possible waste management strategies, carries out a cost analysis and then ranks, according to cost, the possibilities for management of the waste. The expert system was developed using information from literature and personnel experienced in the use of decontamination technologies and requires validation by human experts and assignment of confidence factors to the knowledge represented within.

  14. APPLICATION OF POLYURETHANE FOAM FOR IMPACT ABSORPTION AND THERMAL INSULATION FOR RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS PACKAGINGS.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A; Glenn Abramczyk, G; Paul Blanton, P; Steve Bellamy, S; William Daugherty, W; Sharon Williamson, S

    2007-05-15

    Polyurethane foam has been widely used as an impact absorbing and thermal insulating material for large radioactive materials packages, since the 1980's. With the adoption of the regulatory crush test requirement, for smaller packages, polyurethane foam has been adopted as a replacement for cane fiberboard, because of its ability to withstand the crush test. Polyurethane foam is an engineered material whose composition is much more closely controlled than that of cane fiberboard. In addition, the properties of the foam can be controlled by controlling the density of the foam. The conditions under which the foam is formed, whether confined or unconfined have an affect on foam properties. The study reported here reviewed the application of polyurethane foam in RAM packagings and compared property values reported in the literature with published property values and test results for foam specimens taken from a prototype 9977 packaging. The study confirmed that, polyurethane foam behaves in a predictable and consistent manner and fully satisfies the functional requirements for impact absorption and thermal insulation.

  15. The in-gas-jet laser ion source: Resonance ionization spectroscopy of radioactive atoms in supersonic gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Ferrer, R.; Huyse, M.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.

    2013-02-01

    New approaches to perform efficient and selective step-wise resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) of radioactive atoms in different types of supersonic gas jets are proposed. This novel application results in a major expansion of the in-gas laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) method developed at KU Leuven. Implementation of resonance ionization in the supersonic gas jet allows to increase the spectral resolution by one order of magnitude in comparison with the currently performed in-gas-cell ionization spectroscopy. Properties of supersonic beams, obtained from the de Laval-, the spike-, and the free jet nozzles that are important for the reduction of the spectral line broadening mechanisms in cold and low density environments are discussed. Requirements for the laser radiation and for the vacuum pumping system are also examined. Finally, first results of high-resolution spectroscopy in the supersonic free jet are presented for the 327.4 nm 3d104s 2S1/2→ 3d104p 2P1/2 transition in the stable 63Cu isotope using an amplified single mode laser radiation.

  16. Current regulatory and licensing status for byproduct sources, facilities and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tingey, G.L.; Jensen, G.A.; Hazelton, R.F.

    1985-02-01

    Public use of nuclear byproducts, especially radioactive isotopes, will require approval by various regulatory agencies. Use of cesium-137 as an irradiation source for sterilizing medical products will require US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval. Two applications have been filed with NRC, and approval is expected soon. Widespread use of irradiation for food products depends on a favorable ruling by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A ruling is pending that would permit irradiation of fruits and vegetables up to 100 krad. NRC also controls the use of isotopes in remote power generators, but little regulatory action has been required in recent years. Recent development of radioluminescent (RL) lighting for runway lights has led to interest by commercial manufacturers. At the present time, a license has been issued to at least one manufacturer for sale of tritium-powered runway lights. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Current regulatory and licensing status for byproduct sources, facilities and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingey, G. L.; Jensen, G. A.; Hazelton, R. F.

    1985-02-01

    Public use of nuclear byproducts, especially radioactive isotopes, will require approval by various regulatory agencies. Use of cesium-137 as an irradiation source for sterilizing medical products will require US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval. Two applications have been filed with NRC, and approval is expected soon. Widespread use of irradiation for food products depends on a favorable ruling by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A ruling is pending that would permit irradiation of fruits and vegetables up to 100 krad. NRC also controls the use of isotopes in remote power generators, but little regulatory action has been required in recent years. Recent development of radioluminescent (RL) lighting for runway lights has led to interest by commercial manufacturers. At the present time, a license has been issued to at least one manufacturer for sale of tritium-powered runway lights.

  18. Potential power sources for high-temperature geothermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, R.A.; Dobranich, D

    1996-05-01

    The thermal response under geothermal-borehole conditions of a conventional thermal battery was evaluated for various designs by numerical simulations using a finite-element thermal model. This technology, which is based on molten salts, may be suitable as a power source for geothermal borehole applications for data logging. Several promising candidate electrolytes were identified for further study.

  19. Source of aersolized bacteria during land application of biosolids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land application of biosolids can lead to the generation of bioaerosols downwind of the operation, however bioaerosols can also potentially be associated with a number of other onsite sources including soil. The purpose of this study was to determine the diversity of bacterial communities associate...

  20. 40 CFR 61.180 - Applicability and designation of sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability and designation of sources. 61.180 Section 61.180 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standard for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From...

  1. Production, distribution and applications of californium-252 neutron sources.

    PubMed

    Martin, R C; Knauer, J B; Balo, P A

    2000-01-01

    The radioisotope 252Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6-yr half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10(11) neutrons s(-1). Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, land mines and unexploded military ordinance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 yr of experience and by US Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). DOE sells 252Cf to commercial reencapsulators domestically and internationally. Sealed 252Cf sources are also available for loan to agencies and subcontractors of the US government and to universities for educational, research and medical applications. The REDC has established the Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science to make its large inventory of 252Cf sources available to researchers for irradiations inside uncontaminated hot cells. Experiments at the CUF include a land mine detection system, neutron damage testing of solid-state detectors, irradiation of human cancer cells for boron neutron capture therapy experiments and irradiation of rice to induce genetic mutations. PMID:11003521

  2. The standardization methods of radioactive sources (125I, 131I, 99mTc, and 18F) for calibrating nuclear medicine equipment in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurdiyanto, G.; Candra, H.

    2016-03-01

    The standardization of radioactive sources (125I, 131I, 99mTc and 18F) to calibrate the nuclear medicine equipment had been carried out in PTKMR-BATAN. This is necessary because the radioactive sources used in the field of nuclear medicine has a very short half-life in other that to obtain a quality measurement results require special treatment. Besides that, the use of nuclear medicine techniques in Indonesia develop rapidly. All the radioactive sources were prepared by gravimetric methods. Standardization of 125I has been carried out by photon- photon coincidence methods, while the others have been carried out by gamma spectrometry methods. The standar sources are used to calibrate a Capintec CRC-7BT radionuclide calibrator. The results shows that calibration factor for Capintec CRC-7BT dose calibrator is 1,03; 1,02; 1,06; and 1,04 for 125I, 131I, 99mTc and 18F respectively, by about 5 to 6% of the expanded uncertainties.

  3. Receptor modeling application framework for particle source apportionment.

    PubMed

    Watson, John G; Zhu, Tan; Chow, Judith C; Engelbrecht, Johann; Fujita, Eric M; Wilson, William E

    2002-12-01

    Receptor models infer contributions from particulate matter (PM) source types using multivariate measurements of particle chemical and physical properties. Receptor models complement source models that estimate concentrations from emissions inventories and transport meteorology. Enrichment factor, chemical mass balance, multiple linear regression, eigenvector. edge detection, neural network, aerosol evolution, and aerosol equilibrium models have all been used to solve particulate air quality problems, and more than 500 citations of their theory and application document these uses. While elements, ions, and carbons were often used to apportion TSP, PM10, and PM2.5 among many source types, many of these components have been reduced in source emissions such that more complex measurements of carbon fractions, specific organic compounds, single particle characteristics, and isotopic abundances now need to be measured in source and receptor samples. Compliance monitoring networks are not usually designed to obtain data for the observables, locations, and time periods that allow receptor models to be applied. Measurements from existing networks can be used to form conceptual models that allow the needed monitoring network to be optimized. The framework for using receptor models to solve air quality problems consists of: (1) formulating a conceptual model; (2) identifying potential sources; (3) characterizing source emissions; (4) obtaining and analyzing ambient PM samples for major components and source markers; (5) confirming source types with multivariate receptor models; (6) quantifying source contributions with the chemical mass balance; (7) estimating profile changes and the limiting precursor gases for secondary aerosols; and (8) reconciling receptor modeling results with source models, emissions inventories, and receptor data analyses. PMID:12492167

  4. Remote sensing of chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere caused by the presence of radioactive ionization source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarchuk, Kirill; Tumanov, Mikhail; Karelin, Alexander

    During the years of the nuclear power industry, some large accidents occurred at the nuclear objects, and that caused enormous environmental contamination. The last accident at the Fucushima-1 power plant highlighted the need to review seriously the safety issues at the active power plants and to develop the new effective methods for remote detection and control over radioactive environmental contamination and over general geophysical situation in the areas. The main influence of the fission products on the environment is its ionisation, and therefore various detectable biological and physical processes that are caused by ions. Presence of an ionisation source within the area under study may cause significant changes of absolute humidity and, that is especially important, changes of the chemical potential of atmosphere vapours indicating presence of charged condensation centres. These effects may cause anomalies in the IR radiation emitted from the Earth surface and jumps in the chemical potentials of water vapours that may be observed by means of the satellite remote sensing by specialized equipment (works by Dimitar Ouzounov, Sergey Pulinets, e.a.). In the current study, the theoretical description is presented from positions of the molecular-kinetic condensation theory that shows significant changes of the absolute and relative humidity values in the near-earth air layer. The detailed calculations of the water vapours in atmosphere were carried out with use of detailed non-stationary kinetic model of moist atmosphere air. The processes of condensation and evaporation were effectively considered with use of reactions of neutral water molecules’ association under presence of a third particle, conversion of water molecules with an ion cluster to a more complicated cluster, and the relevant counter reactions’ splits of neutral and ion clusters.

  5. Sealed source and device design safety testing. Volume 5: Technical report on the findings of Task 4, Investigation of failed radioactive stainless steel troxler gauges

    SciTech Connect

    Benac, D.J.; Schick, W.R.

    1995-10-01

    This report covers the Task 4 activities for the Sealed Source and Device Safety testing program. SwRI was contracted to investigate failed radioactive stainless steel troxler gauges. SwRI`s task was to determine the cause of failure of the rods and the extent of the problem. SwRI concluded that the broken rod failed in a brittle manner due to a hard zone in the heat affected zone.

  6. Material for radioactive protection

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, R.S.; Boyer, N.W.

    A boron containing burn resistant, low-level radiation protection material useful, for example, as a liner for radioactive waste disposal and storage, a component for neutron absorber, and a shield for a neutron source is described. The material is basically composed of borax in the range of 25 to 50%, coal tar in the range of 25 to 37.5%, with the remainder being an epoxy resin mix. A preferred composition is 50% borax, 25% coal tar and 25% epoxy resin. The material is not susceptible to burning and is about 1/5 the cost of existing radiation protection material utilized in similar applications.

  7. Production, Distribution, and Applications of Californium-252 Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Balo, P.A.; Knauer, J.B.; Martin, R.C.

    1999-10-03

    reencapsulators domestically and internationally. Sealed {sup 252}Cf sources are also available for loan to agencies and subcontractors of the U.S. government and to universities for educational, research, and medical applications. The REDC has established the Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science to make its large inventory of {sup 252}Cf sources available to researchers for irradiations inside uncontaminated hot cells. Experiments at the CUF include a land mine detection system, neutron damage testing of solid-state detectors, irradiation of human cancer cells for boron neutron capture therapy experiments, and irradiation of rice to induce genetic mutations.

  8. Tutorial on fiber-based sources for biophotonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, James R.

    2016-06-01

    Fiber-based lasers and master oscillator power fiber amplifier configurations are described. These allow spectral versatility coupled with pulse width and pulse repetition rate selection in compact and efficient packages. This is enhanced through the use of nonlinear optical conversion in fibers and fiber-coupled nonlinear crystals, which can be integrated to provide all-fiber pump sources for diverse application. The advantages and disadvantages of sources based upon supercontinuum generation, stimulated Raman conversion, four-wave mixing, parametric generation and difference frequency generation, allowing spectral coverage from the UV to the mid-infrared, are considered.

  9. Polyethylene Naphthalate Scintillator: A Novel Detector for the Dosimetry of Radioactive Ophthalmic Applicators

    PubMed Central

    Flühs, Dirk; Flühs, Andrea; Ebenau, Melanie; Eichmann, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Background Dosimetric measurements in small radiation fields with large gradients, such as eye plaque dosimetry with β or low-energy photon emitters, require dosimetrically almost water-equivalent detectors with volumes of <1 mm3 and linear responses over several orders of magnitude. Polyvinyltoluene-based scintillators fulfil these conditions. Hence, they are a standard for such applications. However, they show disadvantages with regard to certain material properties and their dosimetric behaviour towards low-energy photons. Purpose, Materials and Methods Polyethylene naphthalate, recently recognized as a scintillator, offers chemical, physical and basic dosimetric properties superior to polyvinyltoluene. Its general applicability as a clinical dosimeter, however, has not been shown yet. To prove this applicability, extensive measurements at several clinical photon and electron radiation sources, ranging from ophthalmic plaques to a linear accelerator, were performed. Results For all radiation qualities under investigation, covering a wide range of dose rates, a linearity of the detector response to the dose was shown. Conclusion Polyethylene naphthalate proved to be a suitable detector material for the dosimetry of ophthalmic plaques, including low-energy photon emitters and other small radiation fields. Due to superior properties, it has the potential to replace polyvinyltoluene as the standard scintillator for such applications. PMID:27171681

  10. Sources of marine superoxide dismutases: Characteristics and applications.

    PubMed

    Zeinali, Farrokhzad; Homaei, Ahmad; Kamrani, Ehsan

    2015-08-01

    The ability of marine organism to cope with oxidative stress is one of the main factors that influence its survival in the marine environment, when senescence conditions prevail. The antioxidative defense system includes enzymatic and non-enzymatic components. Among the enzymatic system, superoxide dismutases are the first and most important of the antioxidant metalloenzymes. Four different types of metal centers have been detected in SODs, dividing this family into Cu/Zn, Ni, Mn and Fe-SODs. Its use was limited to non-drug applications in humans (include: cosmetic, food, agriculture, and chemical industries) and drug applications in animals. This paper is a review of the recent literatures on sources of marine SODs, the need for SOD and different applications in industry, covering the last decades. The most recent paper, patents and reviews on characterization and application are reviewed. PMID:26047895

  11. Silicon Ultra fast Cameras for electron and γ sources In Medical Applications: a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgheroni, A.; Badano, L.; Berst, D.; Bianchi, C.; Bol, J.; Caccia, M.; Cappellini, C.; Claus, G.; Colledani, C.; Conte, L.; Czermak, A.; Deptuch, G.; de Boer, W.; Domanski, K.; Dulinski, W.; Dulny, B.; Ferrando, O.; Grigoriev, E.; Grabiec, P.; Grodner, M.; Lorusso, R.; Jaroszewicz, B.; Jastrzab, M.; Jungermann, L.; Klatka, T.; Kociubinski, A.; Koziel, M.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharski, K.; Kuta, S.; Marczewski, J.; Mozzanica, A.; Niemec, H.; Novario, R.; Paolucci, L.; Popowski, Y.; Prest, M.; Przykutta, A.; Riester, J.-L.; Rovere, M.; Sapor, M.; Schweickert, H.; Sowicki, B.; Spanò, B.; Szelezniak, M.; Tomaszewski, D.; Zalewska, A.

    2006-01-01

    SUCIMA (Silicon Ultra fast Cameras for electron and γ sources In Medical Applications) is a project approved by the European Commission within the Fifth Framework Programme, with the primary goal of developing a real time dosimeter based on direct detection of ionising particles in a position sensitive Silicon sensor. The main applications of this device are imaging of intravascular brachytherapy radioactive sources with activities up to 3 GBq and real time monitoring of hadrontherapy beams. In order to perform a feasibility study, during the first two years a real time dosimeter has been engineered using Silicon microstrip detectors read out by an integrating dead-timeless front-end electronics. The prototypes have been qualified as relative dosimeter with respect to certified secondary standards; moreover, further measurements are on going in order to investigate the possibility to use the sensors as absolute dosimeters. Since the final device is supposed to provide a two dimensional image, two different Monolithic Active Pixel dosimeters have been designed and produced by the collaboration based on CMOS and Silicon On Insulator technologies. The main features of the two sensors are presented in this paper.

  12. Documentation generator application for MatLab source codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niton, B.; Pozniak, K. T.; Romaniuk, R. S.

    2011-06-01

    The UML, which is a complex system modeling and description technology, has recently been expanding its uses in the field of formalization and algorithmic approach to such systems like multiprocessor photonic, optoelectronic and advanced electronics carriers; distributed, multichannel measurement systems; optical networks, industrial electronics, novel R&D solutions. The paper describes a realization of an application for documenting MatLab source codes. There are presented own novel solution based on Doxygen program which is available on the free license, with accessible source code. The used supporting tools for parser building were Bison and Flex. There are presented the practical results of the documentation generator. The program was applied for exemplary MatLab codes. The documentation generator application is used for design of large optoelectronic and electronic measurement and control systems. The paper consists of three parts which describe the following components of the documentation generator for photonic and electronic systems: concept, MatLab application and VHDL application. This is part two which describes the MatLab application. MatLab is used for description of the measured phenomena.

  13. Operation and Applications of the Boron Cathodic Arc Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J. M.; Klepper, C. C.; Chivers, D. J.; Hazelton, R. C.; Freeman, J. H.

    2008-11-01

    The boron cathodic arc ion source has been developed with a view to several applications, particularly the problem of shallow junction doping in semiconductors. Research has included not only development and operation of the boron cathode, but other cathode materials as well. Applications have included a large deposition directed toward development of a neutron detector and another deposition for an orthopedic coating, as well as the shallow ion implantation function. Operational experience is described and information pertinent to commercial operation, extracted from these experiments, is presented.

  14. Operation and Applications of the Boron Cathodic Arc Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J. M.; Freeman, J. H.; Klepper, C. C.; Chivers, D. J.; Hazelton, R. C.

    2008-11-03

    The boron cathodic arc ion source has been developed with a view to several applications, particularly the problem of shallow junction doping in semiconductors. Research has included not only development and operation of the boron cathode, but other cathode materials as well. Applications have included a large deposition directed toward development of a neutron detector and another deposition for an orthopedic coating, as well as the shallow ion implantation function. Operational experience is described and information pertinent to commercial operation, extracted from these experiments, is presented.

  15. OVERVIEW OF MONO-ENERGETIC GAMMA-RAY SOURCES & APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Anderson, G G; Anderson, S G; Bayramian, A J; Betts, S M; Chu, T S; Cross, R R; Ebbers, C A; Fisher, S E; Gibson, D J; Ladran, A S; Marsh, R A; Messerly, M J; O'Neill, K L; Semenov, V A; Shverdin, M Y; Siders, C W; McNabb, D P; Barty, C P; Vlieks, A E; Jongewaard, E N; Tantawi, S G; Raubenheimer, T O

    2010-05-18

    Recent progress in accelerator physics and laser technology have enabled the development of a new class of tunable gamma-ray light sources based on Compton scattering between a high-brightness, relativistic electron beam and a high intensity laser pulse produced via chirped-pulse amplification (CPA). A precision, tunable Mono-Energetic Gamma-ray (MEGa-ray) source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac is currently under development and construction at LLNL. High-brightness, relativistic electron bunches produced by an X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC NAL will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped CPA laser pulse to generate tunable {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range via Compton scattering. This MEGa-ray source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence in various isotopes. Applications include homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source design, key parameters, and current status are presented, along with important applications, including nuclear resonance fluorescence. In conclusion, we have optimized the design of a high brightness Compton scattering gamma-ray source, specifically designed for NRF applications. Two different parameters sets have been considered: one where the number of photons scattered in a single shot reaches approximately 7.5 x 10{sup 8}, with a focal spot size around 8 {micro}m; in the second set, the spectral brightness is optimized by using a 20 {micro}m spot size, with 0.2% relative bandwidth.

  16. Application note : using open source schematic capture tools with Xyce.

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Thomas V.

    2013-08-01

    The development of the XyceTM Parallel Electronic Simulator has focused entirely on the creation of a fast, scalable simulation tool, and has not included any schematic capture or data visualization tools. This application note will describe how to use the open source schematic capture tool gschem and its associated netlist creation tool gnetlist to create basic circuit designs for Xyce, and how to access advanced features of Xyce that are not directly supported by either gschem or gnetlist.

  17. Recent Developments in Impact and Application to Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, I.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; Venturini, M.; Zholents, A.; Warnock, R.; /SLAC

    2008-02-13

    This paper discusses two recently added capabilities of the IMPACT suite that are relevant to modeling electron linacs, namely the new 1D coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) modeling capability and the integrated Green's function (IFG) algorithm for modeling high aspect ratio beams. In addition, we present initial results of application of the enhanced version of IMPACT-Z to high-fidelity modeling of the microbunching instability in a realistic light source lattice.

  18. Source inventory for Department of Energy solid low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities: What it means and how to get one of your own

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.A.

    1991-12-31

    In conducting a performance assessment for a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility, one of the important considerations for determining the source term, which is defined as the amount of radioactivity being released from the facility, is the quantity of radioactive material present. This quantity, which will be referred to as the source inventory, is generally estimated through a review of historical records and waste tracking systems at the LLW facility. In theory, estimating the total source inventory for Department of Energy (DOE) LLW disposal facilities should be possible by reviewing the national data base maintained for LLW operations, the Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS), or through the annual report that summarizes the SWIMS data, the Integrated Data Base (IDB) report. However, in practice, there are some difficulties in making this estimate. This is not unexpected, since the SWIMS and the IDB were not developed with the goal of developing a performance assessment source term in mind. The practical shortcomings using the existing data to develop a source term for DOE facilities will be discussed in this paper.

  19. Air-kerma strength determination of a miniature x-ray source for brachytherapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Stephen D.

    A miniature x-ray source has been developed by Xoft Inc. for high dose-rate brachytherapy treatments. The source is contained in a 5.4 mm diameter water-cooling catheter. The source voltage can be adjusted from 40 kV to 50 kV and the beam current is adjustable up to 300 muA. Electrons are accelerated toward a tungsten-coated anode to produce a lightly-filtered bremsstrahlung photon spectrum. The sources were initially used for early-stage breast cancer treatment using a balloon applicator. More recently, Xoft Inc. has developed vaginal and surface applicators. The miniature x-ray sources have been characterized using a modification of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 formalism normally used for radioactive brachytherapy sources. Primary measurements of air kerma were performed using free-air ionization chambers at the University of Wisconsin (UW) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The measurements at UW were used to calibrate a well-type ionization chamber for clinical verification of source strength. Accurate knowledge of the emitted photon spectrum was necessary to calculate the corrections required to determine air-kerma strength, defined in vacuo. Theoretical predictions of the photon spectrum were calculated using three separate Monte Carlo codes: MCNP5, EGSnrc, and PENELOPE. Each code used different implementations of the underlying radiological physics. Benchmark studies were performed to investigate these differences in detail. The most important variation among the codes was found to be the calculation of fluorescence photon production following electron-induced vacancies in the L shell of tungsten atoms. The low-energy tungsten L-shell fluorescence photons have little clinical significance at the treatment distance, but could have a large impact on air-kerma measurements. Calculated photon spectra were compared to spectra measured with high-purity germanium spectroscopy systems at both UW and

  20. Thermal-electric coupled-field finite element modeling and experimental testing of high-temperature ion sources for the production of radioactive ion beams.

    PubMed

    Manzolaro, M; Meneghetti, G; Andrighetto, A; Vivian, G; D'Agostini, F

    2016-02-01

    In isotope separation on line facilities the target system and the related ion source are two of the most critical components. In the context of the selective production of exotic species (SPES) project, a 40 MeV 200 μA proton beam directly impinges a uranium carbide target, generating approximately 10(13) fissions per second. The radioactive isotopes produced in this way are then directed to the ion source, where they can be ionized and finally accelerated to the subsequent areas of the facility. In this work both the surface ion source and the plasma ion source adopted for the SPES facility are presented and studied by means of numerical thermal-electric models. Then, numerical results are compared with temperature and electric potential difference measurements, and finally the main advantages of the proposed simulation approach are discussed. PMID:26932055

  1. Thermal-electric coupled-field finite element modeling and experimental testing of high-temperature ion sources for the production of radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzolaro, M.; Meneghetti, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Vivian, G.; D'Agostini, F.

    2016-02-01

    In isotope separation on line facilities the target system and the related ion source are two of the most critical components. In the context of the selective production of exotic species (SPES) project, a 40 MeV 200 μA proton beam directly impinges a uranium carbide target, generating approximately 1013 fissions per second. The radioactive isotopes produced in this way are then directed to the ion source, where they can be ionized and finally accelerated to the subsequent areas of the facility. In this work both the surface ion source and the plasma ion source adopted for the SPES facility are presented and studied by means of numerical thermal-electric models. Then, numerical results are compared with temperature and electric potential difference measurements, and finally the main advantages of the proposed simulation approach are discussed.

  2. Application of SO(4)(2-)/TiO2 solid superacid in decontaminating radioactive pollutants.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hong-Ling; Tan, Zhao-Yi; Liao, Yan-Tai; Feng, Yi-Jun

    2006-01-01

    Polyaniline doped with SO(4)(2-)/TiO(2) superacid shows good conductive ability. When used in a strippable coating film for decontaminating radioactive pollutants, the SO(4)(2-)/TiO(2) solid superacid replacing HCl exhibits higher electrical conductivity (7.01 s/cm) and a decontamination ratio higher than 97%. Coating and electrolyzing the film in solution or in dry medium were effective methods, the latter was more promising for decontaminating radioactive pollutants which were attached to the surface or within the body of equipments used in nuclear industry. PMID:16442674

  3. Application of the ASME code in designing containment vessels for packages used to transport radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Raske, D.T.; Wang, Z.

    1992-07-01

    The primary concern governing the design of shipping packages containing radioactive materials is public safety during transport. When these shipments are within the regulatory jurisdiction of the US Department of Energy, the recommended design criterion for the primary containment vessel is either Section III or Section VIII, Division 1, of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, depending on the activity of the contents. The objective of this paper is to discuss the design of a prototypic containment vessel representative of a packaging for the transport of high-level radioactive material.

  4. Workshop on scientific applications of short wavelength coherent light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, W.; Arthur, J.; Winick, H.

    1993-02-01

    This report contains paper on the following topics: A 2 to 4nm High Power FEL On the SLAC Linac; Atomic Physics with an X-ray Laser; High Resolution, Three Dimensional Soft X-ray Imaging; The Role of X-ray Induced Damage in Biological Micro-imaging; Prospects for X-ray Microscopy in Biology; Femtosecond Optical Pulses ; Research in Chemical Physics Surface Science, and Materials Science, with a Linear Accelerator Coherent Light Source; Application of 10 GeV Electron Driven X-ray Laser in Gamma-ray Laser Research; Non-Linear Optics, Fluorescence, Spectromicroscopy, Stimulated Desorption: We Need LCLS' Brightness and Time Scale; Application of High Intensity X-rays to Materials Synthesis and Processing; LCLS Optics: Selected Technological Issues and Scientific Opportunities; Possible Applications of an FEL for Materials Studies in the 60 eV to 200 eV Spectral Region.

  5. Workshop on scientific applications of short wavelength coherent light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, W.; Arthur, J.; Winick, H.

    1993-02-01

    This report contains paper on the following topics: A 2 to 4nm High Power FEL On the SLAC Linac; Atomic Physics with an X-ray Laser; High Resolution, Three Dimensional Soft X-ray Imaging; The Role of X-ray Induced Damage in Biological Micro-imaging; Prospects for X-ray Microscopy in Biology; Femtosecond Optical Pulses?; Research in Chemical Physics Surface Science, and Materials Science, with a Linear Accelerator Coherent Light Source; Application of 10 GeV Electron Driven X-ray Laser in Gamma-ray Laser Research; Non-Linear Optics, Fluorescence, Spectromicroscopy, Stimulated Desorption: We Need LCLS` Brightness and Time Scale; Application of High Intensity X-rays to Materials Synthesis and Processing; LCLS Optics: Selected Technological Issues and Scientific Opportunities; Possible Applications of an FEL for Materials Studies in the 60 eV to 200 eV Spectral Region.

  6. Development and Evaluation of Rhenium-188-labeled Radioactive Stents for Restenosis Therapy and Development of Strategies for Radiolabeling Brachytherapy Sources with Palladium-103 CRADA FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F. F.

    1998-06-01

    This project involved collaboration between InnerDyne, Inc., and radiopharmaceutical research programs at ORNL and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which explored new strategies for the development and animal testing of radioactive rhenium-188-labeled implantable stent sources for the treatment of coronary restenosis after angioplasty and the development of chemical species radiolabeled with the palladium-103 radioisotope for the treatment of cancer. Rhenium-l 88 was made available for these studies from radioactive decay of tungsten-188 produced in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Stent activation and coating technology was developed and provided by InnerDyne, Inc., and stent radiolabeling technology and animal studies were conducted by InnerDyne staff in conjunction with investigators at BNL. Collaborative studies in animals were supported at sites by InnerDyne, Inc. New chemical methods for attaching the palladium-103 radioisotope to bifunctional chelate technologies were developed by investigators at ORNL.

  7. Development and Evaluation of Rhenium-188-labeled Radioactive Stents for Restenosis Therapy and Development of Strategies for Radiolabeling Brachytherapy Sources with Palladium-103

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F.

    2001-04-27

    This project involved collaboration between InnerDyne, Inc., and radiopharmaceutical research programs at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which explored new strategies for the development and animal testing of radioactive rhenium-188-labeled implantable stent sources for the treatment of coronary restenosis after angioplasty and the development of chemical species radiolabeled with the palladium-103 radioisotope for the treatment of cancer. Rhenium-188 was made available for these studies from radioactive decay of tungsten-188 produced in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Stent activation and coating technology was developed and provided by InnerDyne, Inc., and stent radiolabeling technology and animal studies were conducted by InnerDyne staff in conjunction with investigators at BNL. Collaborative studies in animals were supported at sites by InnerDyne, Inc. New chemical methods for attaching the palladium-103 radioisotope to bifunctional chelate technologies were developed by investigators at ORNL.

  8. Ultracompact/ultralow power electron cyclotron resonance ion source for multipurpose applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sortais, P.; Lamy, T.; Medard, J.; Angot, J.; Latrasse, L.; Thuillier, T.

    2010-02-15

    In order to drastically reduce the power consumption of a microwave ion source, we have studied some specific discharge cavity geometries in order to reduce the operating point below 1 W of microwave power (at 2.45 GHz). We show that it is possible to drive an electron cyclotron resonance ion source with a transmitter technology similar to those used for cellular phones. By the reduction in the size and of the required microwave power, we have developed a new type of ultralow cost ion sources. This microwave discharge system (called COMIC, for COmpact MIcrowave and Coaxial) can be used as a source of light, plasma or ions. We will show geometries of conductive cavities where it is possible, in a 20 mm diameter chamber, to reduce the ignition of the plasma below 100 mW and define typical operating points around 5 W. Inside a simple vacuum chamber it is easy to place the source and its extraction system anywhere and fully under vacuum. In that case, current densities from 0.1 to 10 mA/cm{sup 2} (Ar, extraction 4 mm, 1 mAe, 20 kV) have been observed. Preliminary measurements and calculations show the possibility, with a two electrodes system, to extract beams within a low emittance. The first application for these ion sources is the ion injection for charge breeding, surface analyzing system and surface treatment. For this purpose, a very small extraction hole is used (typically 3/10 mm for a 3 {mu}A extracted current with 2 W of HF power). Mass spectrum and emittance measurements will be presented. In these conditions, values down to 1 {pi} mm mrad at 15 kV (1{sigma}) are observed, thus very close to the ones currently observed for a surface ionization source. A major interest of this approach is the possibility to connect together several COMIC devices. We will introduce some new on-going developments such as sources for high voltage implantation platforms, fully quartz radioactive ion source at ISOLDE or large plasma generators for plasma immersion, broad or ribbon

  9. Application of FEPs analysis to identify research priorities relevant to the safety case for an Australian radioactive waste facility

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, T.E.; McGlinn, P.J.

    2007-07-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) has established a project to undertake research relevant to the safety case for the proposed Australian radioactive waste facility. This facility will comprise a store for intermediate level radioactive waste, and either a store or a near-surface repository for low-level waste. In order to identify the research priorities for this project, a structured analysis of the features, events and processes (FEPs) relevant to the performance of the facility was undertaken. This analysis was based on the list of 137 FEPs developed by the IAEA project on 'Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Disposal Facilities' (ISAM). A number of key research issues were identified, and some factors which differ in significance for the store, compared to the repository concept, were highlighted. For example, FEPs related to long-term groundwater transport of radionuclides are considered to be of less significance for a store than a repository. On the other hand, structural damage from severe weather, accident or human interference is more likely for a store. The FEPs analysis has enabled the scientific research skills required for the inter-disciplinary project team to be specified. The outcomes of the research will eventually be utilised in developing the design, and assessing the performance, of the future facility. It is anticipated that a more detailed application of the FEPs methodology will be undertaken to develop the safety case for the proposed radioactive waste management facility. (authors)

  10. 60-watt isotopic heat source for terrestrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brittain, W.M.

    1995-01-20

    A sealed isotopic heat source (IHS) with a nominal thermal inventory of 60 watts is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for use in remote terrestrial applications that require isotopic power for electrical power generation. Emphasis is on use in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and dynamic cycle power units. The selected IHS design incorporates technologies developed for prior space and terrestrial IHSs to minimize development cost and span time. A General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) Fueled Clad (FC), comprised of a plutonium-238 enriched pressed-plutonia pellet contained within a vented iridium clad, is the source for thermal energy. The GPHS FC technology was developed by DOE for use in space RTGs. The GPHS FC is, in turn, enclosed within a three-layer cladding system similar to that developed by DOE for earlier terrestrial heat sources. The cladding system provides for retention of the helium gas generated by the decay of the isotopic fuel and containment of the isotopic fuel under normal operating and accident conditions. Test hardware is currently being fabricated and safety demonstration testing is scheduled to be completed in early 1995. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  11. Design and application of an electromagnetic vibrator seismic source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, S.S.

    2006-01-01

    Vibrational seismic sources frequently provide a higher-frequency seismic wavelet (and therefore better resolution) than other sources, and can provide a superior signal-to-noise ratio in many settings. However, they are often prohibitively expensive for lower-budget shallow surveys. In order to address this problem, I designed and built a simple but effective vibrator source for about one thousand dollars. The "EMvibe" is an inexpensive electromagnetic vibrator that can be built with easy-to-machine parts and off-the-shelf electronics. It can repeatably produce pulse and frequency-sweep signals in the range of 5 to 650 Hz, and provides sufficient energy for recording at offsets up to 20 m. Analysis of frequency spectra show that the EMvibe provides a broader frequency range than the sledgehammer at offsets up to ??? 10 m in data collected at a site with soft sediments in the upper several meters. The EMvibe offers a high-resolution alternative to the sledgehammer for shallow surveys. It is well-suited to teaching applications, and to surveys requiring a precisely-repeatable source signature.

  12. RCRA Part B Permit Application for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory - Volume 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Pamela R. Cunningham

    1992-07-01

    This section of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Part B permit application describes the waste characteristics Of the transuranic (TRU) mixed wastes at the RWMC waste management units to be permitted: the Intermediate-Level Transuranic Storage Facility (ILTSF) and the Waste Storage Facility (WSF). The ILTSF is used to store radioactive remote-handled (RH) wastes. The WSF will be used to store radioactive contact-handled (CH) wastes. The Transuranic Storage Area (TSA) was established at the RWMC to provide interim storage of TRU waste. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A defines TRU waste as waste contaminated with alpha-emitting transuranium radionuclides with half-lives greater than 20 years in concentrations greater than 100 nanocuries per gram (nCi/g) o f waste material. The TSA serves generators both on and off the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The ILTSF is located at the TSA, and the WSF will be located there also. Most of the wastes managed at the TSA are mixed wastes, which are radioactive wastes regulated under the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) that also contain hazardous materials regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. These wastes include TRU mixed wastes and some low-level mixed wastes. Accordingly, the TSA is subject to the permitting requirements of RCRA and the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA). Prior to 1982, DOE orders defined TRU wastes as having transuranium radionuclides in concentrations greater than 10 nCi/g, The low-level mixed wastes managed at the TSA are those wastes with 10 to 100 nCi/g of TRU radionuclides that prior to 1982 were considered TRU waste.

  13. GISCube, an Open Source Web-based GIS Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boustani, M.; Mattmann, C. A.; Ramirez, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many Earth science projects and data systems being developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology (JPL) that require the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Three in particular are: (1) the JPL Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) that measures the amount of water being generated from snow melt in mountains; (2) the Regional Climate Model Evaluation System (RCMES) that compares climate model outputs with remote sensing datasets in the context of model evaluation and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and for the U.S. National Climate Assessment and; (3) the JPL Snow Server that produces a snow and ice climatology for the Western US and Alaska, for the U.S. National Climate Assessment. Each of these three examples and all other earth science projects are strongly in need of having GIS and geoprocessing capabilities to process, visualize, manage and store GeoSpatial data. Beside some open source GIS libraries and some software like ArcGIS there are comparatively few open source, web-based and easy to use application that are capable of doing GIS processing and visualization. To address this, we present GISCube, an open source web-based GIS application that can store, visualize and process GIS and GeoSpatial data. GISCube is powered by Geothon, an open source python GIS cookbook. Geothon has a variety of Geoprocessing tools such data conversion, processing, spatial analysis and data management tools. GISCube has the capability of supporting a variety of well known GIS data formats in both vector and raster formats, and the system is being expanded to support NASA's and scientific data formats such as netCDF and HDF files. In this talk, we demonstrate how Earth science and other projects can benefit by using GISCube and Geothon, its current goals and our future work in the area.

  14. Electrical-thermal-structural finite element simulation and experimental study of a plasma ion source for the production of radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzolaro, M.; Meneghetti, G.; Andrighetto, A.; Vivian, G.

    2016-03-01

    The production target and the ion source constitute the core of the selective production of exotic species (SPES) facility. In this complex experimental apparatus for the production of radioactive ion beams, a 40 MeV, 200 μA proton beam directly impinges a uranium carbide target, generating approximately 1013 fissions per second. The transfer line enables the unstable isotopes generated by the 238U fissions in the target to reach the ion source, where they can be ionized and finally accelerated to the subsequent areas of the facility. In this work, the plasma ion source currently adopted for the SPES facility is analyzed in detail by means of electrical, thermal, and structural numerical models. Next, theoretical results are compared with the electric potential difference, temperature, and displacement measurements. Experimental tests with stable ion beams are also presented and discussed.

  15. Electrical-thermal-structural finite element simulation and experimental study of a plasma ion source for the production of radioactive ion beams.

    PubMed

    Manzolaro, M; Meneghetti, G; Andrighetto, A; Vivian, G

    2016-03-01

    The production target and the ion source constitute the core of the selective production of exotic species (SPES) facility. In this complex experimental apparatus for the production of radioactive ion beams, a 40 MeV, 200 μA proton beam directly impinges a uranium carbide target, generating approximately 10(13) fissions per second. The transfer line enables the unstable isotopes generated by the (238)U fissions in the target to reach the ion source, where they can be ionized and finally accelerated to the subsequent areas of the facility. In this work, the plasma ion source currently adopted for the SPES facility is analyzed in detail by means of electrical, thermal, and structural numerical models. Next, theoretical results are compared with the electric potential difference, temperature, and displacement measurements. Experimental tests with stable ion beams are also presented and discussed. PMID:27036768

  16. Development programs in the United States of America for the application of cement-based grouts in radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect

    Dole, L.R.; Row, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews seven cement-based waste form development programs at six of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. These sites have developed a variety of processes that range from producing 25 mm (1 in.) diameter pellets in a glove box to producing 240 m (800 ft.) diameter grout sheets within the bedding planes of a deep shale formation. These successful applications of cement-based waste forms to the many radioactive waste streams from nuclear facilities bear witness to the flexibility and reliability of this class of materials. This paper also discusses the major issues regarding the application of cement-based waste forms to radioactive waste management problems. These issues are (1) leachability, (2) radiation stability, (3) thermal stability, (4) phase complexity of the matrix, and (5) effects of the waste stream composition. A cursory review of current research in each of these areas is given This paper also discusses future trends in cement-based waste form development and applications. 31 references, 11 figures.

  17. Guidance on the application of quality assurance for characterizing a low-level radioactive waste disposal site

    SciTech Connect

    Pittiglio, C.L. Jr.; Starmer, R.J.; Hedges, D.

    1990-10-01

    This document provides the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's staff guidance to an applicant on meeting the quality control (QC) requirements of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, Section 61.12 (10 CFR 61.12), for a low-level waste disposal facility. The QC requirements combined with the requirements for managerial controls and audits are the basis for developing a quality assurance (QA) program and for the guidance provided herein. QA guidance is specified for site characterization activities necessary to meet the performance objectives of 10 CFR Part 61 and to limit exposure to or the release of radioactivity. 1 tab.

  18. A study of radioactivity in modern stream gravels and its possible application as a prospecting method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chew, Randall T., III

    1955-01-01

    Traverses along some streams of the Colorado Plateau in areas known to contain minable uranium deposits show that anomalous radiation in the stream gravels can be detected with a suitable counter downstream from the deposits. The amount of radiation is influenced by the size of the uranium deposit, the size of the drainage area of the stream, the grain size of the sediments, and the lithology of the rocks over which the stream flows. The spacing of the stations where readings are taken is controlled by the size of the stream, and special readings are also taken directly downstream from important tributaries. An anomaly is empirically defined as a 10 percent rise over background. Radioactive material from large uranium deposits has been detected as much as 1 mile downstream. Radioactive material from smaller deposits is detachable over shorter distances. The method is slow but appears to be a useful prospecting tool under restricted conditions.

  19. 10 CFR 37.73 - Applicability of physical protection of category 1 and category 2 quantities of radioactive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... category 2 quantities of radioactive material during transit. 37.73 Section 37.73 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF CATEGORY 1 AND CATEGORY 2 QUANTITIES OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Physical... radioactive material during transit. (a) For shipments of category 1 quantities of radioactive material,...

  20. A Remote Radioactivity Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jona, Kemi; Vondracek, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Imagine a high school with very few experimental resources and limited budgets that prevent the purchase of even basic laboratory equipment. For example, many high schools do not have the means of experimentally studying radioactivity because they lack Geiger counters and/or good radioactive sources. This was the case at the first high school one…

  1. Marine Algae: a Source of Biomass for Biotechnological Applications.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Dagmar B; Connan, Solène

    2015-01-01

    Biomass derived from marine microalgae and macroalgae is globally recognized as a source of valuable chemical constituents with applications in the agri-horticultural sector (including animal feeds and health and plant stimulants), as human food and food ingredients as well as in the nutraceutical, cosmeceutical, and pharmaceutical industries. Algal biomass supply of sufficient quality and quantity however remains a concern with increasing environmental pressures conflicting with the growing demand. Recent attempts in supplying consistent, safe and environmentally acceptable biomass through cultivation of (macro- and micro-) algal biomass have concentrated on characterizing natural variability in bioactives, and optimizing cultivated materials through strain selection and hybridization, as well as breeding and, more recently, genetic improvements of biomass. Biotechnological tools including metabolomics, transcriptomics, and genomics have recently been extended to algae but, in comparison to microbial or plant biomass, still remain underdeveloped. Current progress in algal biotechnology is driven by an increased demand for new sources of biomass due to several global challenges, new discoveries and technologies available as well as an increased global awareness of the many applications of algae. Algal diversity and complexity provides significant potential provided that shortages in suitable and safe biomass can be met, and consumer demands are matched by commercial investment in product development. PMID:26108496

  2. LLNL's Precision Compton Scattering Light Source: Status & Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartemann, F. V.; Albert, F.; Anderson, S. G.; Bayramian, A. J.; Cross, R. R.; Ebbers, C. A.; Gibson, D. J.; Houck, T. L.; Marsh, R. A.; Messerly, M. J.; Shverdin, M. Y.; Wu, S. S.; Scarpetti, R. D.; Siders, C. W.; McNabb, D. P.; Bonanno, R. E.; Barty, C. P. J.; Adolphsen, C. E.; Chu, T. S.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Li, Z.; Tantawi, S. G.; Vlieks, A. E.; Wang, J. W.; Raubenheimer, T. O.

    2010-11-01

    A precision, tunable, monochromatic (< 0.4% rms spectral width) source driven by a compact, high-gradient X-band linac designed in collaboration with SLAC is under construction at LLNL. High-brightness (250 pC, 3.5 ps, 0.4 mm.mrad), relativistic electron bunches will interact with a Joule-class, 10 ps, diode-pumped laser pulse to generate tunable >=-rays in the 0.5-2.5 MeV photon energy range. This >=-ray source will be used to excite nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) in various isotopes, of interest for homeland security, stockpile science and surveillance, nuclear fuel assay, and waste imaging and assay. The source current status will be discussed, along with important applications, including NRF and in situ ps thermal measurements. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DoE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and funded by the DHS DNDO.

  3. Negative-ion source applications (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, J.

    2008-02-01

    In this paper heavy negative-ion sources which we developed and their applications for materials science are reviewed. Heavy negative ions can be effectively produced by the ejection of a sputtered atom through the optimally cesiated surface of target with a low work function. Then, enough continuous negative-ion currents for materials-science applications can be obtained. We developed several kinds of sputter-type heavy negative-ion sources such as neutral- and ionized-alkaline metal bombardment-type heavy negative-ion source and rf-plasma sputter type. In the case where a negative ion is irradiated on a material surface, surface charging seldom takes place because incoming negative charge of the negative ion is well balanced with outgoing negative charge of the released secondary electron. In the negative-ion implantation into an insulator or insulated conductive material, high precision implantation processing with charge-up free properties can be achieved. Negative-ion implantation technique, therefore, can be applied to the following novel material processing systems: the surface modification of micrometer-sized powders, the nanoparticle formation in an insulator for the quantum devices, and the nerve cell growth manipulation by precise control of the biocompatibility of polymer surface. When a negative ion with low kinetic energy approaches the solid surface, the kinetic energy causes the interatomic bonding (kinetic bonding), and formation of a metastable material is promoted. Carbon films with high constituent of sp3 bonding, therefore, can be formed by carbon negative-ion beam deposition.

  4. A Cascaded Magnetostrictive Vibration Source System for Underground Construction Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, S.; Polom, U.; Mikulla, S.; Krüger, K.; Giese, R.; Lüth, S.

    2009-04-01

    For underground construction seismic measurements can contribute knowledge to geology and relevant geotechnical parameters. Within the cooperative project OnSITE - Online Seismic Imaging System for Tunnel Excavation - a new seismic source is in development. The design of the seismic source takes into account the special requirements for such an application: high signal frequency (up to several kHz) to obtain resolution in the order of few meters (1-2 m), generation of repeatable signals at short time intervals to implement a large measuring point density, and a high signal/noise ratio. In the first step, two magnetostrictive actuators in similar fashion - custom-made by ETREMA Products, Inc. (USA) - were used for a cascaded seismic vibration source system. The bandwidth of the pilot signal for this vibration source system covers the range from 300 Hz up to 6 kHz. After principally testing the source system in the research and teaching mine Reiche Zeche in Freiberg (Germany), further field measurements at this test site showed a high-grade signal repeatability for frequencies above 600 Hz for the head signal and good signal repeatability in the near field (Hock et al. 2008). To avoid 1) feedback effects between vibrator and medium - causing resonance at certain frequencies, e.g. around 3000 Hz and around 5500 Hz - and 2) unwanted phase shifts between the two vibrator signals at frequencies above 3000 Hz, an signal excitation with an open loop control for amplitude and phase is necessary in combination with only one real-time processor for controlling both actuators. In a second step, a source system was constructed consisting of 2 nearly identical (90%) actuators - again custom-made by ETREMA Products, Inc. (USA) - which are approximately one third lighter than the actuators in the first prototype. This new prototype was applied for the first time during a seismic survey in the Piora adit (above the Gotthard base tunnel near Faido, CH) in November 2008 with success

  5. Smart Phone Applications as a Source of Information on Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Amritphale, Amod; Sawhney, Anshudha; Amritphale, Nupur; Dubey, Pradeep; Pandey, Ambarish

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Smartphone applications have been increasingly identified as a novel platform for dissemination of healthcare related information. However, there have been no studies done to evaluate the availability and content of stroke related apps. Purpose: This study aims to identify and analyze stroke-related applications available on the Apple iTunes and Android Google Play Store. Methods The Apple iTunes store and Android Google Play Store were searched for stroke-related applications on July 27, 2013 using keywords: stroke, brain attack, intracranial hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cerebral infarction. The content of the applications was analyzed by two independent investigators. Results A total of 93 relevant applications (46.2% android and 53.8% iPhone) were identified of which 47.3% were available free of cost. 92% of apps were identified as useful by users and over 60% had scientifically valid information. There is a significant participation of healthcare agencies in dissemination of stroke related information through apps with 47.3% apps being uploaded by them. Over half of all stroke related apps were aimed towards health care workers (51.6%), 75% of which could be utilized as bedside tools for patient care and remainder had information related to recent research advances. The difference in scientific validity between the apps aimed at general population versus healthcare professionals was statistically significant (P<0.01). There was no statistical association between cost of app and scientific validity or usefulness. Conclusions Smartphone apps are a significant source of information related to stroke. An increasing participation of healthcare agencies should be encouraged to promote dissemination of scientifically valid information. PMID:24949314

  6. Open source software engineering for geoscientific modeling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilke, L.; Rink, K.; Fischer, T.; Kolditz, O.

    2012-12-01

    OpenGeoSys (OGS) is a scientific open source project for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in porous and fractured media. The OGS software development community is distributed all over the world and people with different backgrounds are contributing code to a complex software system. The following points have to be addressed for successful software development: - Platform independent code - A unified build system - A version control system - A collaborative project web site - Continuous builds and testing - Providing binaries and documentation for end users OGS should run on a PC as well as on a computing cluster regardless of the operating system. Therefore the code should not include any platform specific feature or library. Instead open source and platform independent libraries like Qt for the graphical user interface or VTK for visualization algorithms are used. A source code management and version control system is a definite requirement for distributed software development. For this purpose Git is used, which enables developers to work on separate versions (branches) of the software and to merge those versions at some point to the official one. The version control system is integrated into an information and collaboration website based on a wiki system. The wiki is used for collecting information such as tutorials, application examples and case studies. Discussions take place in the OGS mailing list. To improve code stability and to verify code correctness a continuous build and testing system, based on the Jenkins Continuous Integration Server, has been established. This server is connected to the version control system and does the following on every code change: - Compiles (builds) the code on every supported platform (Linux, Windows, MacOS) - Runs a comprehensive test suite of over 120 benchmarks and verifies the results Runs software development related metrics on the code (like compiler warnings, code complexity

  7. A dose computation model for sup 241 Am vaginal applicators including the source-to-source shielding effects

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, R.; Park, C.H.; King, C.R.; Muench, P. )

    1990-09-01

    A dose computation model has been developed for the determination of dose distributions around vaginal plaque applicators containing encapsulated {sup 241}Am sources. Encapsulated sources of {sup 241}Am emit primarily 60-keV photons which have a half-value layer thickness of 1/8 mm of lead. This makes possible highly effective {ital in} {ital vivo} shielding of normal tissues at risk, by placing thin lead shields at appropriate places on the applicator. However, self-absorption of photons in the source material itself is intense, requiring bulky sources of about 1 cm diameter. These sources also produce considerable source-to-source shielding which must be taken into account in dose calculations. Our dose computation model for a single source employs three-dimensional integration of dose contributions from volume elements of the source including the effects of absorption and scattering of photons in the source material, titanium encapsulation, and water. An empirical correction to Berger's data on buildup factors of point, isotropic sources is made to account for the effects of anisotropic photon emission by cylindrical {sup 241}Am sources. The second part of our dose computation model takes into account source-to-source shielding effects on both primary and scattered photons for the vaginal plaque geometry. The results of the model have been verified for accuracy by comparisons with extensive dosimetry measurements using lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters.

  8. Development and properties of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) ion exchangers for radioactive waste applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Brown, N.E.

    1997-04-01

    Crystalline silicotitanates (CSTs) are a new class of ion exchangers that were jointly invented by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories and Texas A&M University. One particular CST, known as TAM-5, is remarkable for its ability to separate parts-per-million concentrations of cesium from highly alkaline solutions (pH> 14) containing high sodium concentrations (>5M). It is also highly effective for removing cesium from neutral and acidic solutions, and for removing strontium from basic and neutral solutions. Cesium isotopes are fission products that account for a large portion of the radioactivity in waste streams generated during weapons material production. Tests performed at numerous locations with early lab-scale TAM-5 samples established the material as a leading candidate for treating radioactive waste volumes such as those found at the Hanford site in Washington. Thus Sandia developed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) partnership with UOP, a world leader in developing, commercializing, and supplying adsorbents and associated process technology to commercialize and further develop the material. CSTs are now commercially available from UOP in a powder (UOP IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-910 ion exchanger) and granular form suitable for column ion exchange operations (UOP IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-911 ion exchanger). These materials exhibit a high capacity for cesium in a wide variety of solutions of interest to the Department of Energy, and they are chemically, thermally, and radiation stable. They have performed well in tests at numerous sites with actual radioactive waste solutions, and are being demonstrated in the 100,000 liter Cesium Removal Demonstration taking place at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with Melton Valley Storage Tank waste. It has been estimated that applying CSTs to the Hanford cleanup alone will result in a savings of more than $300 million over baseline technologies.

  9. Review of laser-driven ion sources and their applications.

    PubMed

    Daido, Hiroyuki; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Pirozhkov, Alexander S

    2012-05-01

    For many years, laser-driven ion acceleration, mainly proton acceleration, has been proposed and a number of proof-of-principle experiments have been carried out with lasers whose pulse duration was in the nanosecond range. In the 1990s, ion acceleration in a relativistic plasma was demonstrated with ultra-short pulse lasers based on the chirped pulse amplification technique which can provide not only picosecond or femtosecond laser pulse duration, but simultaneously ultra-high peak power of terawatt to petawatt levels. Starting from the year 2000, several groups demonstrated low transverse emittance, tens of MeV proton beams with a conversion efficiency of up to several percent. The laser-accelerated particle beams have a duration of the order of a few picoseconds at the source, an ultra-high peak current and a broad energy spectrum, which make them suitable for many, including several unique, applications. This paper reviews, firstly, the historical background including the early laser-matter interaction studies on energetic ion acceleration relevant to inertial confinement fusion. Secondly, we describe several implemented and proposed mechanisms of proton and/or ion acceleration driven by ultra-short high-intensity lasers. We pay special attention to relatively simple models of several acceleration regimes. The models connect the laser, plasma and proton/ion beam parameters, predicting important features, such as energy spectral shape, optimum conditions and scalings under these conditions for maximum ion energy, conversion efficiency, etc. The models also suggest possible ways to manipulate the proton/ion beams by tailoring the target and irradiation conditions. Thirdly, we review experimental results on proton/ion acceleration, starting with the description of driving lasers. We list experimental results and show general trends of parameter dependences and compare them with the theoretical predictions and simulations. The fourth topic includes a review of

  10. Radioactive Threat Detection with Scattering Physics: A Model-Based Application

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; Chambers, D H; Breitfeller, E F; Guidry, B L; Verbeke, J M; Axelrod, M A; Sale, K E; Meyer, A M

    2010-01-21

    The detection of radioactive contraband is a critical problem in maintaining national security for any country. Emissions from threat materials challenge both detection and measurement technologies especially when concealed by various types of shielding complicating the transport physics significantly. The development of a model-based sequential Bayesian processor that captures both the underlying transport physics including scattering offers a physics-based approach to attack this challenging problem. It is shown that this processor can be used to develop an effective detection technique.

  11. Radiation resistant concrete for applications in nuclear power and radioactive waste industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnham, Steven Robert

    Elemental components of ordinary concrete contain a variety of metals and rare earth elements that are susceptible to neutron activation. This activation occurs by means of radiative capture, a neutron interaction that results in formation of radioisotopes such as Co-60, Eu-152, and Eu-154. Studies have shown that these three radioisotopes are responsible for the residual radioactivity found in nuclear power plant concrete reactor dome and shielding walls. Such concrete is classified as Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) and Very Low Level Waste (VLLW) by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standards and requires disposal at appropriate disposal sites. There are only three such sites in the USA, and every nuclear power plant will produce at the time of decommissioning approximately 1,500 tonnes of activated concrete classified as LLRW and VLLW. NAVA ALIGA (ancient word for a new stone) is a new concrete mixture developed mainly by research as presented in this thesis. The purpose of NAVA ALIGA is to satisfy IAEA clearance levels if used as a material for reactor dome, spent fuel pool, or radioactive waste canisters. NAVA ALIGA will never be activated above the IAEA clearance level after long-term exposure to neutron radiation when used as a material for reactor dome, spent fuel pool, and radioactive waste canisters. Components of NAVA ALIGA were identified using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ISP-MS) to determine trace element composition. In addition, it was tested for compressive strength and permeability, important for nuclear infrastructure. The studied mixture had a high water to cement ratio of 0.56, which likely resulted in the high measured permeability, yet the mixture also showed a compressive strength greater than 6 000 psi after 28 days. In addition to this experimental analysis, which goal was to develop a standard approach to define the concrete mixtures in satisfying the IAEA

  12. Feasibility of applications of microwave technology for nuclear power plant radioactive wastes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.R.; Woodle, A.S.

    1982-04-01

    A study into the feasibility of using microwave energy for drying of radioactive wastes is presented. A review of process techniques now in use and proposed is also included and the basics of microwave heating is discussed. A review of tests performed includes: 1. scoping testing; and 2. laboratory testing in batch and continuous feed modes. Finally, a preliminary design is presented for both a batch system and continuous feed system for processing a minimum of 5000 cu. ft. of ion exchange resin beads per year.

  13. Quantifying the impact of various radioactive background sources on germanium-76 zero-neutrino-double-beta-decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizouni, Katarina Leila

    The goal of searching for 0nubetabeta-decay is to probe an absolute neutrino mass scale suggested by the mass-splitting parameters observed by neutrino oscillation experiments. Furthermore, observation of 0nubetabeta-decay is an explicit instance of lepton-number non-conservation. To detect the rare events such as 0nubetabeta-decay, half-lives of the order of 10 25-1027 years have to be probed. Using an active detector with a large volume, such as hundreds of kilograms of HPGe in the case of MAJORANA, and taking efficient measures to mitigate background of cosmic and primordial origins are necessary for the success of a sensitive 0nubetabeta-decay experiment. One focus of the present research is the analysis of data from Cascades, a HPGe crystal array developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, WA, to determine an upper bound on primordial radiation levels in the cryostat constructed with electroformed copper similar to that electroformed for MAJORANA. It will be shown, however, that there are sources of background much more serious than cryostats in 76Ge experiments. Additionally, experimental applications of the Cascades detector were studied by predicting the sensitivity for a 0nuBB-decay experiment using GEANT4 simulations. Tellurium-130, an even-even nucleus that can undergo 0nubetabeta-decay to either the ground state or first 01+ excited state of 130Xe, was used as an example. The present work developed techniques that will be used for a number of measurements of betabeta-decay half-lives for decays to excited states of the daughter isotopes.

  14. Assessment of shielding analysis methods, codes, and data for spent fuel transport/storage applications. [Radiation dose rates from shielded spent fuels and high-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, C.V.; Broadhead, B.L.; Hermann, O.W.; Tang, J.S.; Cramer, S.N.; Gauthey, J.C.; Kirk, B.L.; Roussin, R.W.

    1988-07-01

    This report provides a preliminary assessment of the computational tools and existing methods used to obtain radiation dose rates from shielded spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Particular emphasis is placed on analysis tools and techniques applicable to facilities/equipment designed for the transport or storage of spent nuclear fuel or HLW. Applications to cask transport, storage, and facility handling are considered. The report reviews the analytic techniques for generating appropriate radiation sources, evaluating the radiation transport through the shield, and calculating the dose at a desired point or surface exterior to the shield. Discrete ordinates, Monte Carlo, and point kernel methods for evaluating radiation transport are reviewed, along with existing codes and data that utilize these methods. A literature survey was employed to select a cadre of codes and data libraries to be reviewed. The selection process was based on specific criteria presented in the report. Separate summaries were written for several codes (or family of codes) that provided information on the method of solution, limitations and advantages, availability, data access, ease of use, and known accuracy. For each data library, the summary covers the source of the data, applicability of these data, and known verification efforts. Finally, the report discusses the overall status of spent fuel shielding analysis techniques and attempts to illustrate areas where inaccuracy and/or uncertainty exist. The report notes the advantages and limitations of several analysis procedures and illustrates the importance of using adequate cross-section data sets. Additional work is recommended to enable final selection/validation of analysis tools that will best meet the US Department of Energy's requirements for use in developing a viable HLW management system. 188 refs., 16 figs., 27 tabs.

  15. Applicability of radioactive 99mTc-O4- magnetic fluid to nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Hee; Kim, Seong-Min; Kim, Keun-Ho; Kim, Chong-Oh

    2011-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized with solution of ferrous and ferric chlorides and ammonia water by sonochemical method. The hydrophilically radioactive magnetic fluids were prepared by labeling technetium pertechnetate (99mTc-O4-) and then adsorbing alginic acid on the magnetite particles. In order to measure some properties of the dispersed particles, the magnetic fluids were freezed down to -70 oC, and were dried in vacuum. The total size of the particles was about 15 nm with the core diameter of 12 nm and their superparamagnetic saturation magnetization was 63 emu/g for the core-shell of Fe3O4/Algin and 52 emu/g for that of Fe3O4/99mTc-O4-/Algin. The labeling of radioactive 99mTc-O4- to the magnetite particles was efficient to about 70 %. The fluid of magnetic particles on which the radioisotopic substance is labeled with such an efficiency level may be applied as a tracer for diagnosis in nuclear medicine.

  16. Nuclear chemistry research and spectroscopy with radioactive sources. Twenty-first annual progress report, February 1, 1985-January 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, R.W.

    1985-08-31

    The nuclear chemistry group in the School of Chemistry continues investigating the radioactive decay of nuclei far from stability under this DOE contract. These nuclei are produced with heavy ions from the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF) and studied on-line with the University Isotope Separator at Oak Ridge (UNISOR). Radioactive decay represents a unique method for the population of low-energy, low-spin structures in nuclei, and new phenomena which do not occur near stability can be explored. Our research encompasses three aspects of nuclear structure: (1) nuclear spectroscopy with detailed elelt, e elt, Xelt, etc., multiparameter coincidence spectrometry; (2) on-line laser hyperfine structure (hfs) and isotope shift measurements for the determination of nuclear quadrupole moments, nuclear spins, and changes in mean nuclear charge radii as a means of revealing systematic shape changes in nuclei; and (3) theoretical calculations of predictions of nuclear models for comparison with experimental level structures in nuclei studied at UNISOR. 20 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Applications of UThPb isotope systematics to the problems of radioactive waste disposal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckless, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    mobility can be obtained through the use of isotopic studies. Such information can be extremely important in the search for favorable hosts for containment of radioactive waste. Rocks such as the Go??temar Granite have undergone considerable rock-water interaction, most of which occurred ??? 400 Myr. ago and little in recent times. Thus a search for zones that have experienced only a little interaction with water may provide a misleading prediction as to the ability of such zones to shield radioactive wastes from the modern biosphere. From an isotopic point of view, an ideal candidate for evaluation as a host rock for radioactive wastes would have the following characteristics: (1) a high ratio (> 2) of radiogenic to common Pb in order to optimize precision of the results; (2) a simple two-stage geologic history so that results could be interpreted without multiple working hypotheses; and (3) an originally high percentage (> 50%) of labile U so that the results would be highly sensitive to even small amount of rock-water interaction. These characteristics should produce rocks with marked radioactive disequilibrium in surface samples. The disequilibrium should grade to radioactive equilibrium with increasing depth until zones in which water has not circulated are found. Extensive regions of such zones must exist because UThPb systematics of most analyzed granitoids demonstrate closed-system behavior for almost all of their history except for their recent history in the near-surface environment. ?? 1986.

  18. Remote sensing applications for diagnostics of the radioactive pollution of the ground surface and in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulinets, Sergey; Ouzounov, Dimitar; Boyarchuk, Kirill; Laverov, Nikolay

    2013-04-01

    Radioactive pollution due to its air ionization activity can drastically change the atmospheric boundary layer conductivity (what was experimentally proved during period of nuclear tests in atmosphere) and through the global electric circuit produce anomalous variations in atmosphere. As additional effect the ions created due to air ionization serve as centers of water vapor condensation and nucleation of aerosol-size particles. This process is accompanied by latent heat release. Both anomalies (ionospheric and thermal) can be controlled by remote sensing technique both from satellites (IR sensors and ionospheric probes) and from ground (GPS receivers, ground based ionosondes, VLF propagation sounding, ground measurements of the air temperature and humidity). We monitored the majority of transient events (Three-Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear power plant emergencies) and stationary sources such as Gabon natural nuclear reactor, sites of underground nuclear tests, etc. and were able to detect thermal anomalies and for majority of cases - the ionospheric anomalies as well. Immediately after the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan we started to continuously survey the long-wavelength energy flux (10-13 microns) measurable at top of the atmosphere from POES/NOAA/AVHRR polar orbit satellites. Our preliminary results show the presence of hot spots on the top of the atmosphere over the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) and due to their persistence over the same region they are most likely not of meteorological origin. On March 14 and 21 we detected a significant increase in radiation at the top of the atmosphere which also coincides with a reported radioactivity gas leaks from the FDNPP. After March 21 the intensity of energy flux in atmosphere started to decline, which has been confirmed by ground radiometer network. We were able to detect with ground based ionosonde the ionospheric anomaly associated with the largest radioactive release on March

  19. Application of Polymers for the Long-Term Storage and Disposal of Low- and Intermediate-Level Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bonin, Hugues W.; Walker, Michael W.; Bui, Van Tam

    2004-01-15

    Research carried out at the Royal Military College of Canada on the effects of mixed fields of radiation on high polymer adhesives and composite materials has shown that some polymers are quite resistant to radiation and could well serve in the fabrication of radioactive-waste disposal containers. A research program was launched to investigate the possibilities of using advanced polymers and polymer-based composites for high-level radioactive waste management on one hand and for intermediate- and low-level radioactive waste disposal on the other hand. Research was thus conducted in parallel on both fronts, and the findings for the later phase are presented. Thermoplastic polymers were studied for this application because they are superior materials, having the advantage over metals of not corroding and of displaying high resistance to chemical aggression. The experimental methods used in this research focused on determining the effects of radiation on the properties of the materials considered: polypropylene, nylon 66, polycarbonate, and polyurethane, with and without glass fiber reinforcement. The method involved submitting injection-molded tensile test bars to the mixed radiation field generated by the SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear reactor at the Royal Military College of Canada to accumulate doses ranging from 0.5 to 3.0 MGy. The physical, mechanical, and chemical effects of the various radiation doses on the materials were measured from density, tensile, differential scanning calorimetry, and scanning electron microscopy tests.For each polymer, the test results evidenced predominant cross-linking of the polymeric chains severed by radiation. This was evident from observed changes in the mechanical and chemical properties of the polymers, typical of cross-linking. The mechanical changes observed included an overall increase in density, an increase in Young's modulus, a decrease in strain at break, and only minor changes in strength. The chemical changes included

  20. Application of GIS technologies to monitor secondary radioactive contamination in the Delegen mountain massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipbeki, O.; Kabzhanova, G.; Kurmanova, G.; Alipbekova, Ch.

    2016-06-01

    The territory of the Degelen mountain massif is located within territory of the former Semipalatinsk nuclear test site and it is an area of ecological disaster. Currently there is a process of secondary radioactive contamination that is caused by geodynamic processes activated at the Degelen array, violation of underground hydrological cycles and as a consequence, water seepage into the tunnels. One of the methods of monitoring of geodynamic processes is the modern technology of geographic information systems (GIS), methods of satellite radar interferometry and high accuracy satellite navigation system in conjunction with radioecological methods. This paper discusses on the creation of a GIS-project for the Degelen array, facilitated by quality geospatial analysis of the situation and simulation of the phenomena, in order to maximize an objective assessment of the radiation situation in this protected area.

  1. APPLICATION OF POLYURETHANE FOAM FOR IMPACT ABSORPTION AND THERMAL INSULATION FOR GENERAL PURPOSE RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A; Glenn Abramczyk, G; Paul Blanton, P; Steve Bellamy, S; William Daugherty, W; Sharon Williamson, S

    2009-02-18

    Polyurethane foam has been employed in impact limiters for large radioactive materials packagings since the early 1980's. Its consistent crush response, controllable structural properties and excellent thermal insulating characteristics have made it attractive as replacement for the widely used cane fiberboard for smaller, drum size packagings. Accordingly, polyurethane foam was chosen for the overpack material for the 9977 and 9978 packagings. The study reported here was undertaken to provide data to support the analyses performed as part of the development of the 9977 and 9978, and compared property values reported in the literature with published property values and test results for foam specimens taken from a prototype 9977 packaging. The study confirmed that, polyurethane foam behaves in a predictable and consistent manner and fully satisfies the functional requirements for impact absorption and thermal insulation.

  2. Therapeutic applications of radioactive 131iodine: Procedures and incidents with capsules

    PubMed Central

    Al Aamri, Marwa; Ravichandran, Ramamoorthy; Binukumar, John Pichy; Al Balushi, Naima

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treatments for thyrotoxicosis and carcinoma thyroid are carried out by oral administration of radioactive iodine (131I) in the form of liquid or capsules. The liquid form of 131I has higher risk factors such as vapourization, spillage and need for management of higher activity wastes. Use of 131I in capsule form simplify procedures of handling compared to liquid form of 131I. The guidelines of safe handling and quality assurance aspects for therapeutic use 131I are well outlined by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reports. Aim: A few unusual incidents with I-131 capsules encountered in the past need to be highlighted from health physics point of view. Materials and Methods: In Royal Hospital, Oman, I-131 is imported in capsules, and the total activity handled/year steadily increased over 10 years. Discrete activities range from 185 MBq (5 mCi) up to 7.4 GBq (200 mCi). In four incidents deviations in standard operational procedures were recorded. Results: Nature of incidents is described as follows: (1) After assay of activity, the capsule was directly put in the lead container with missing of inner cap. (2) Patient poured water in the Perspex tube, when the capsule was handed over to her, making an emergency situation. (3) In 3 high activity capsules (2 nos 2.96 GBq, 1 no. 4.26 GBq), observed sticky behavior in capsule holder on the 2nd day post receipt, which were in order on the 1st day. (4) A capsule could not be swallowed by a patient, which was taken back from the mouth. Monitoring of patient later did not show residual ingested activity. Conclusions: The report documents some of the unusual incidents for information to other centers engaged in such radioactive administrations. PMID:27385885

  3. 40 CFR 74.16 - Application requirements for combustion sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... combustion source shall contain the following elements in a format prescribed by the Administrator: (1) Identification of the combustion source, including company name, plant name, plant site address, mailing address, description of the combustion source, and information and diagrams on the combustion source's...

  4. Electrodynamic radioactivity detector for microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, T. L.; Davis, E. J.; Jenkins, R. W., Jr.; McRae, D. D.

    1989-03-01

    A new technique for the measurement of the radioactive decay of single microparticles has been demonstrated. Although the experiments were made with droplets of order 20 μm in diameter, microparticles in the range 0.1-100 μm can be accommodated. An electrodynamic balance and combination light-scattering photometer were used to measure the charge-loss rate and size of a charged microsphere suspended in a laser beam by superposed ac and dc electrical fields. The charged particle undergoes charge loss in the partially ionized gas atmosphere which results from radioactive decay of 14C-tagged compounds, and the rate of charge loss is proportional to the rate of decay here. The charge on a particle was determined by measuring the dc voltage necessary to stably suspend the particle against gravity while simultaneously determining the droplet size by light-scattering techniques. The parameters which affect the operation of the electrodynamic balance as a radioactivity detector are examined, and the limits of its sensitivity are explored. Radioactivity levels as low as 120 pCi have been measured, and it appears that by reducing the background contamination inside our balance activity levels on the order of 10 pCi can be detected. This new technique has application in the measurement of activity levels and source discrimination of natural and man-made aerosols and smokes and is also useful for studies involving specifically labeled radio-chemical probes.

  5. Issues in the review of a license application for an above grade low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ringenberg, J.D.

    1993-03-01

    In December 1987, Nebraska was selected by the Central Interstate Compact (CIC) Commission as the host state for the construction of a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. After spending a year in the site screening process, the Compact`s developer, US Ecology, selected three sites for detailed site characterization. These sites were located in Nemaha, Nuckolls and Boyd Counties. One year later the Boyd County site was selected as the preferred site and additional site characterization studies were undertaken. On July 29, 1990, US Ecology submitted a license application to the Nebraska Department of Environmental Control (now Department of Environmental Quality-NDEQ). This paper will present issues that the NDEQ has dealt with since Nebraska`s selection as the host state for the CIC facility.

  6. 78 FR 56685 - SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission SourceGas Distribution LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on August 27, 2013, SourceGas Distribution LLC (SourceGas), 600 12th Street, Suite 300, Golden, Colorado 80401, filed in Docket No. CP13-540-000 an application pursuant to section 7(f) of the Natural Gas Act...

  7. Radioactive Standards Laboratory ININ as a reference laboratory in Mexico.

    PubMed

    GarcíaDíaz, O; MartínezAyala, L; HerreraValadez, L; TovarM, V; Karam, L

    2016-03-01

    The Radioactive Standards Laboratory of the National Institute of Nuclear Research is the National reference laboratory for the measurement of radioactivity in Mexico. It has a gamma-ray spectrometry system with a high-purity Ge-detector for measurements from 50 keV to 2000 keV, and develops standardized radioactive (beta-particle and gamma-ray emitting) sources in different geometries with uncertainties less than or equal to 5% for applications such as the calibration of radionuclide calibrators (clinically used dose calibrators), Ge-detectors and NaI(Tl) detectors. PMID:27358942

  8. Development of a Rotary Micro-filter for Radioactive Waste Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M.R.; Herman, D.T.; Fink, S.D.

    2008-07-01

    The processing rates of Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste decontamination processes are limited by the flow rate of the solid-liquid separation. The baseline process, using a 0.1 micron cross-flow filter, produces {approx}1.36 x 10{sup -5} m/s ({approx}0.02 gpm/ft{sup 2}) of filtrate under expected operating conditions. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) demonstrated significantly higher filter flux for actual waste samples using a small-scale rotary filter. With funding from the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Cleanup Technology, SRNL personnel are evaluating and developing the rotary micro-filter for radioactive service at SRS. The authors improved the design for the disks and filter unit to make them suitable for high-level radioactive service. They procured two units using the new design, tested them with simulated SRS wastes, and evaluated the operation of the units. Work to date provides the following conclusions and program status. - The authors modified the design of the filter disks to remove epoxy and Ryton{sup R}. The new design includes welding both stainless steel and ceramic coated stainless steel filter media to a stainless steel support plate. The welded disks were tested in the full-scale unit. They showed good reliability and met filtrate quality requirements. - The authors modified the design of the unit, making installation and removal easier. The new design uses a modular, one-piece filter stack that is removed simply by disassembly of a flange on the upper (inlet) side of the filter housing. All seals and rotary unions are contained within the removable stack. - While it is extremely difficult to predict the life of the seal, the vendor representative indicates a minimum of one year in present service conditions is reasonable. Changing the seal face material from silicon-carbide to a graphite-impregnated silicon-carbide is expected to double the life of the seal. Replacement of the current seal with an air seal could

  9. Vacuum arc with a distributed cathode spot as a plasma source for plasma separation of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirov, R. Kh.; Vorona, N. A.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Lizyakin, G. D.; Polishchuk, V. P.; Samoilov, I. S.; Smirnov, V. P.; Usmanov, R. A.; Yartsev, I. M.

    2015-10-01

    Results from experimental studies of a vacuum arc with a distributed cathode spot on the heated cathode are presented. Such an arc can be used as a plasma source for plasma separation of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. The experiments were performed with a gadolinium cathode, the properties of which are similar to those of an uranium arc cathode. The heat flux from the plasma to the cathode (and its volt equivalent) at discharge voltages of 4-15 V and discharge currents of 44-81 A, the radial distribution of the emission intensity of gadolinium atoms and singly charged ions in the arc channel at a voltage of 4.3 V, and the plasma electron temperature behind the anode were measured. The average charge of plasma ions at arc voltages of 3.5-8 V and a discharge current of 52 A and the average rate of gadolinium evaporation in the discharge were also determined.

  10. Vacuum arc with a distributed cathode spot as a plasma source for plasma separation of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Amirov, R. Kh. Vorona, N. A.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Lizyakin, G. D.; Polishchuk, V. P.; Samoilov, I. S.; Smirnov, V. P.; Usmanov, R. A.; Yartsev, I. M.

    2015-10-15

    Results from experimental studies of a vacuum arc with a distributed cathode spot on the heated cathode are presented. Such an arc can be used as a plasma source for plasma separation of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. The experiments were performed with a gadolinium cathode, the properties of which are similar to those of an uranium arc cathode. The heat flux from the plasma to the cathode (and its volt equivalent) at discharge voltages of 4-15 V and discharge currents of 44-81 A, the radial distribution of the emission intensity of gadolinium atoms and singly charged ions in the arc channel at a voltage of 4.3 V, and the plasma electron temperature behind the anode were measured. The average charge of plasma ions at arc voltages of 3.5-8 V and a discharge current of 52 A and the average rate of gadolinium evaporation in the discharge were also determined.

  11. Pediocins: The bacteriocins of Pediococci. Sources, production, properties and applications

    PubMed Central

    Papagianni, Maria; Anastasiadou, Sofia

    2009-01-01

    Class IIa bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria are small, cationic proteins with antilisterial activity. Within this class, the pediocins are those bacteriocins that share a highly conserved hydrophilic and charged N-terminal part harboring the consensus sequence -YGNGV- and a more variable hydrophobic and/or amphiphilic C-terminal part. Several pediocins have been isolated and characterized. Despite the structural similarities, their molecular weight varies, as well as their spectrum of antimicrobial activity. They exhibit important technological properties, e.g. thermostability and retaining of activity at a wide pH range, which along with the bactericidal action against Gram-positive food spoilage and pathogenic bacteria, make them an important class of biopreservatives. Much new information regarding the pediocins has emerged during the last years. In this review, we summarize and discuss all the available information regarding the sources of pediocins, the characteristics of their biosynthesis and production in fermentation systems, the characteristics of the known pediocin molecules, and their antibacterial action. The advances made by genetic engineering in improving the features of pediocins are also discussed, as well as their perspectives for future applications. PMID:19133115

  12. Pediocins: The bacteriocins of Pediococci. Sources, production, properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Papagianni, Maria; Anastasiadou, Sofia

    2009-01-01

    Class IIa bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria are small, cationic proteins with antilisterial activity. Within this class, the pediocins are those bacteriocins that share a highly conserved hydrophilic and charged N-terminal part harboring the consensus sequence -YGNGV- and a more variable hydrophobic and/or amphiphilic C-terminal part. Several pediocins have been isolated and characterized. Despite the structural similarities, their molecular weight varies, as well as their spectrum of antimicrobial activity. They exhibit important technological properties, e.g. thermostability and retaining of activity at a wide pH range, which along with the bactericidal action against Gram-positive food spoilage and pathogenic bacteria, make them an important class of biopreservatives. Much new information regarding the pediocins has emerged during the last years. In this review, we summarize and discuss all the available information regarding the sources of pediocins, the characteristics of their biosynthesis and production in fermentation systems, the characteristics of the known pediocin molecules, and their antibacterial action. The advances made by genetic engineering in improving the features of pediocins are also discussed, as well as their perspectives for future applications. PMID:19133115

  13. Cloud based, Open Source Software Application for Mitigating Herbicide Drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraswat, D.; Scott, B.

    2014-12-01

    The spread of herbicide resistant weeds has resulted in the need for clearly marked fields. In response to this need, the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service launched a program named Flag the Technology in 2011. This program uses color-coded flags as a visual alert of the herbicide trait technology within a farm field. The flag based program also serves to help avoid herbicide misapplication and prevent herbicide drift damage between fields with differing crop technologies. This program has been endorsed by Southern Weed Science Society of America and is attracting interest from across the USA, Canada, and Australia. However, flags have risk of misplacement or disappearance due to mischief or severe windstorms/thunderstorms, respectively. This presentation will discuss the design and development of a cloud-based, free application utilizing open-source technologies, called Flag the Technology Cloud (FTTCloud), for allowing agricultural stakeholders to color code their farm fields for indicating herbicide resistant technologies. The developed software utilizes modern web development practices, widely used design technologies, and basic geographic information system (GIS) based interactive interfaces for representing, color-coding, searching, and visualizing fields. This program has also been made compatible for a wider usability on different size devices- smartphones, tablets, desktops and laptops.

  14. Terahertz sources and detectors and their application to biological sensing.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Thomas W; Globus, Tatiana; Woolard, Dwight L; Hesler, Jeffrey L

    2004-02-15

    Terahertz spectroscopy has long been used as an important measurement tool in fields such as radio astronomy, physical chemistry, atmospheric studies and plasma research. More recently terahertz technology has been used to develop an exciting new technique to investigate the properties of a wide range of biological materials. Although much research remains before a full understanding of the interaction between biomaterials and terahertz radiation is developed, these initial studies have created a compelling case for further scientific study. Also, the potential development of practical tools to detect and identify biological materials such as biological-warfare agents and food contaminants, or of medical diagnostic tools, is driving the need for improved terahertz technology. In particular, improved terahertz sources and detectors that can be used in practical spectroscopy systems are needed. This paper overviews some of the recent measurements of the terahertz spectra of biomaterials and the ongoing efforts to create an all-solid-state technology suitable not only for improved scientific experiments but also for military and commercial applications. PMID:15306526

  15. Applications of plasma sources for nitric oxide medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilets, Victor; Shekhter, Anatoly; Pekshev, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has important roles in the function of many tissues and organs. Wound healing processes are always accompanying by the increase of nitric oxide concentration in wound tissue. These facts suggest a possible therapeutic use of various NO donors for the acceleration of the wound healing and treatment of other diseases. Our previous studies indicated that gaseous NO flow produced by air-plasma generators acts beneficially on the wound healing. This beneficial effect could be caused by the mechanism involving peroxynitrite as an intermediate. As a result of mobilization of various antioxidant reactions more endogenous NO molecules become available as signaling molecules. to regulate the metabolic processes in wound tissue. In this paper different air plasma sources generated therapeutic concentrations of NO are discussed. The concentration of NO and other therapeutically important gas products are estimated by thermodynamic simulation. Synergy effects of NO with other plasma components are discussed as a factor enhancing therapeutic results. Some new medical application of plasma devices are presented. Advanced Plasma Therapies Inc.

  16. Application of in-situ gamma spectrometry in the remediation of radioactively contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, C.; Yesso, J.D.; Danahy, R.J.; Cox, T.

    1999-06-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is a US Department of Energy site that is undergoing total remediation and closure. Most of the remediation effort entails massive excavation of soil for disposal, both offsite and onsite, at an engineered disposal facility. In-situ gamma spectrometry is routinely used to support soil excavation operations to accurately and quickly identify soil areas as being above or below regulatory remediation criteria. Two different in-situ gamma spectrometry systems are used. The first is a sodium iodide (NaI) detector mounted either on a tractor or a jogging stroller, depending on the terrain to be measured. The NaI system allows the collection of a gamma energy spectrum which can be analyzed to identify and quantify radioactive isotopes which are present within the detector`s viewing area. Each energy spectrum is tagged by location coordinates provided by an on-board global positioning system (GPS) to precisely locate elevated contamination areas. The second is a tripod-mounted, high purity germanium detector (HPGe) gamma spectrometry system that is functionally similar to the NaI system. The principal advantage of the HPGe is its superior resolution, which allows much more accurate identification and quantification of radionuclide contaminants in soils. In order to effectively utilize the data quality objective process with these systems, three quality assurance (QA) elements had to be performed.

  17. The application of magnetic gradiometry and electromagnetic induction at a former radioactive waste disposal site.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Dale Franklin

    2010-04-01

    A former radioactive waste disposal site is surveyed with two non-intrusive geophysical techniques, including magnetic gradiometry and electromagnetic induction. Data were gathered over the site by towing the geophysical equipment mounted to a non-electrically conductive and non-magnetic fibre-glass cart. Magnetic gradiometry, which detects the location of ferromagnetic material, including iron and steel, was used to map the existence of a previously unknown buried pipeline formerly used in the delivery of liquid waste to a number of surface disposal trenches and concrete vaults. The existence of a possible pipeline is reinforced by historical engineering drawing and photographs. The electromagnetic induction (EMI) technique was used to map areas of high and low electrical conductivity, which coincide with the magnetic gradiometry data. The EMI also provided information on areas of high electrical conductivity unrelated to a pipeline network. Both data sets demonstrate the usefulness of surface geophysical surveillance techniques to minimize the risk of exposure in the event of future remediation efforts. PMID:20124318

  18. Application of Prussian blue nanoparticles for the radioactive Cs decontamination in Fukushima region.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Durga; Kitajima, Akiko; Takahashi, Akira; Tanaka, Hisashi; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Hakuta, Yukiya; Yoshino, Kazunori; Funahashi, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Masaki; Osada, Mitsuo; Kawamoto, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Cs decontamination efficiencies of the composites of iron hexacyanoferrate nanoparticles were investigated in comparison with commercial Prussian blue and natural zeolite. In pure water solution, the adsorption rate varied with sizes. In ash extract, where Cs adsorbing ability of zeolite was sharply dropped due to its poor selectivity, the impact of coexisting ions was negligible for FeHCF. FeHCF-n11, having the finest primary and secondary particle size, resulted the highest distribution coefficient, which was comparable to the high efficiency analogues, CoHCF or NiHCF. This observation suggested the possibility of preparing the high performance FeHCF by particle size and composition adjustment. FeHCF nanoparticle in bead form was tested for the removal of radioactive Cs in pilot scale. Due to larger secondary particle size, pronounced effect of solution temperature on the Cs adsorption kinetics on FeHCF bead was observed. Adjusting the mass of the adsorbent for the given solution temperature is recommended for achieving high decontamination rate. PMID:26520683

  19. Application of PINS and GNAT to the assay of 55-gal containers of radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrke, R.J.; Aryaeinejad, R.; Watts, K.D.; Staples, D.R.; Akers, D.W.

    1994-03-01

    The Portable Isotropic Neutron Spectroscopy (PINS) and Gamma Neutron Assay Technique (GNAT) assay systems that were developed with funding from the office of Research and Development (NN20), were taken to the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) facility at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) and applied to the assay of surrogate and Rocky Flats Plant waste contained in 55-gal drums. PINS, a portable prompt {gamma} neutron activation analysis technique, was able to identify key elements in both the surrogate and real waste so that three-main waste categories: metal, combustible material, and cemented chlorinated sludge wastes could be identified. GNAT, a {gamma}, neutron assay technique for the identification and quantification of fissioning isotopes, was able to identify {sup 240}Pu in surrogate waste in which nine 1-g nuclear accident dosimeters were inserted. GNAT was also able to identify {sup 24O}Pu in real 55-gal waste drums containing 15- and 40-g of plutonium even in the presence of high activity concentrations of {sup 241}Am.

  20. Smectite dehydration and stability: Applications to radioactive waste isolation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Bish, D.L.

    1988-03-01

    Montmorillonite-beidellite smectites are present in amounts up to 50% in the rocks directly underlying the potential high-level radioactive waste repository horizon at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The thermal reactions of concern include reversible collapse/expansion of the smectite layers due to loss/gain of interlayer water;irreversible collapse due to loss of interlayer water and migration of interlayer cations into the 2:1 silicate layers;irreversible reduction of the osmotic swelling ability through reaction in a steam atmosphere;and inhomogeneous transformation of the smectite into an interstratified illite/smectite. Reversible collapse should be of minor importance because any thermally driven collapse will be reversed when water is introduced and temperatures go down. The amounts of smectite in the potential repository horizon itself are probably insufficient to give rise to rock strength problems due to reversible collapse. The irreversible reduction of somotic selling capacity in a steam environment may be significant in the rocks near the repository horizon. This effect on naturally occurring Na-rich smectites would probably increase permeabilitie shut would also provide for increased cation exchange by the smectite. 60 refs., 9 figs.

  1. Fabrication of high rate chromium getter sources for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gabbard, W.A.; Simpkins, J.E.; Mioduszewski, P.; Edmonds, P.H.

    1983-01-01

    Design and fabrication techniques are described for the manufacture of large-capacity chromium getter sources, analogous to the commercially available titanium getter source known as Ti-Ball, manufactured by Varian Associates.

  2. Application of enteric viruses for fecal pollution source tracking in environmental waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial source tracking (MST) tools are used to identify sources of fecal pollution for accurately assessing public health risk and implementing best management practices (BMPs). This review focuses on the potential of enteric viruses for MST applications. Following host infect...

  3. Application of dig-face monitoring during excavation of a radioactive plume

    SciTech Connect

    Josten, N.E.; Gehrke, R.; Stanley, R.; MacMahan, K.

    1996-11-01

    Dig-face characterization is a concept for improving the safety and efficiency of hazardous waste retrieval. A dig-face characterization system consists of onsite hardware for collecting detailed information on the changing chemical, radiological, and physical conditions in the subsurface during the entire course of a hazardous site excavation. The dig-face characterization concept originated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and has been under development there since 1992. During August 1995, a prototype dig-face system was taken to Mound Laboratory, Ohio, for a first attempt at monitoring a hazardous excavation. Mound Area 7 was the site of historical disposals of {sup 232}Th, {sup 227}Ac, and assorted debris. The dig-face characterization system was used to monitor a 20-ft x 20-ft x 5-ft-deep excavation aimed at removing {sup 227}Ac contaminated soils. Radiological, geophysical, and topographic sensors were scanned across the excavation dig-face at four successive depths as soil was removed in 1-ft to 2-ft lifts. The geophysical and topographic sensors located metallic debris and mapped the dig-face topography in great detail as the excavation advanced. The radiation sensors produced high-fidelity images showing the location of radioactive contaminants and clearly identified and delineated separate {sup 232}Th and {sup 227}Ac plumes. By combining the radiation data from all four levels, a three-dimensional image of the contamination plumes was developed. The radiation sensor data indicated that only a small portion of the excavated soil volume was contaminated. The spatial information produced by the dig-face system was used to direct the excavation activities into the area containing the {sup 227}Ac and to evaluate options for handling the separate {sup 232}Th plume.

  4. Radioactivity: A Natural Phenomenon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronneau, C.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is misinformation people have on the subject of radiation. The importance of comparing artificial source levels of radiation to natural levels is emphasized. Measurements of radioactivity, its consequences, and comparisons between the risks induced by radiation in the environment and from artificial sources are included. (KR)

  5. International radioactive material recycling challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Greeves, John T.; Lieberman, James

    2007-07-01

    The paper explores current examples of successful International radioactive recycling programs and also explores operational regulatory and political challenges that need to be considered for expanding international recycling world-wide. Most countries regulations are fully consistent with the International Atomic Agency (IAEA) Code of Practice on the International Transboundary Movement of Radioactive Material and the IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources. IAEA member States reported on the status of their efforts to control transboundary movement of radioactive material recently during the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management meeting in May 2006. (authors)

  6. Negative ion source development for fusion application (invited).

    PubMed

    Takeiri, Yasuhiko

    2010-02-01

    Giant negative ion sources, producing high-current of several tens amps with high energy of several hundreds keV to 1 MeV, are required for a neutral beam injector (NBI) in a fusion device. The giant negative ion sources are cesium-seeded plasma sources, in which the negative ions are produced on the cesium-covered surface. Their characteristic features are discussed with the views of large-volume plasma production, large-area beam acceleration, and high-voltage dc holding. The international thermonuclear experimental reactor NBI employs a 1 MeV-40 A of deuterium negative ion source, and intensive development programs for the rf-driven source plasma production and the multistage electrostatic acceleration are in progress, including the long pulse operation for 3600 s. Present status of the development, as well as the achievements of the giant negative ion sources in the working injectors, is also summarized. PMID:20192420

  7. Negative ion source development for fusion application (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Takeiri, Yasuhiko

    2010-02-15

    Giant negative ion sources, producing high-current of several tens amps with high energy of several hundreds keV to 1 MeV, are required for a neutral beam injector (NBI) in a fusion device. The giant negative ion sources are cesium-seeded plasma sources, in which the negative ions are produced on the cesium-covered surface. Their characteristic features are discussed with the views of large-volume plasma production, large-area beam acceleration, and high-voltage dc holding. The international thermonuclear experimental reactor NBI employs a 1 MeV-40 A of deuterium negative ion source, and intensive development programs for the rf-driven source plasma production and the multistage electrostatic acceleration are in progress, including the long pulse operation for 3600 s. Present status of the development, as well as the achievements of the giant negative ion sources in the working injectors, is also summarized.

  8. Proof-of-Principle Experiment for Compact, Energy Efficient Neutron Source: Enabling Technology for Radioactive Waste Transmutation or Sub-Critical Nuclear Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Roser, Thomas; Santarius, John

    2013-10-01

    A novel neutron source is proposed for radioactive waste transmutation or sub-critical nuclear reactors; it's based on injecting 125 keV deuterium beam through 1-inch tube filled with magnetized tritium plasma to generate 14 MeV D-T neutrons. T target thickness is chosen to slow the D ions to 75 keV. At the opposite end of the tube D ion energy is recovered. Each ion source and tube forms a module. Larger systems can be formed from multiple units. As a D beam propagates through T plasma, it is slowed down by plasma electrons, which are consequently heated. Electron temperature rises until heating is balanced by energy losses. Equilibrium electron temperature is the crucial parameter, since higher temperature, leads to lower drag on the ion beam; therefore, larger target thickness is needed to slow deuterons to 75 keV; with consequently higher neutron yield. A proof of principle experiment, to determine the equilibrium electron temperature, can be perform by injecting 62.5 keV hydrogen beam into hydrogen plasma target and measure the equilibrium electron temperature with Thomson scattering. To reduce electron equilibration with target ions, electron pre-heating can be done rather efficiently with 2.45 GHz microwaves. Supported by USDOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  9. Estimation of the time-dependent radioactive source-term from the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident using atmospheric transport modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoeppner, M.; Plastino, W.; Budano, A.; De Vincenzi, M.; Ruggieri, F.

    2012-04-01

    Several nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant have been severely damaged from the Tōhoku earthquake and the subsequent tsunami in March 2011. Due to the extremely difficult on-site situation it has been not been possible to directly determine the emissions of radioactive material. However, during the following days and weeks radionuclides of 137-Caesium and 131-Iodine (amongst others) were detected at monitoring stations throughout the world. Atmospheric transport models are able to simulate the worldwide dispersion of particles accordant to location, time and meteorological conditions following the release. The Lagrangian atmospheric transport model Flexpart is used by many authorities and has been proven to make valid predictions in this regard. The Flexpart software has first has been ported to a local cluster computer at the Grid Lab of INFN and Department of Physics of University of Roma Tre (Rome, Italy) and subsequently also to the European Mediterranean Grid (EUMEDGRID). Due to this computing power being available it has been possible to simulate the transport of particles originating from the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant site. Using the time series of the sampled concentration data and the assumption that the Fukushima accident was the only source of these radionuclides, it has been possible to estimate the time-dependent source-term for fourteen days following the accident using the atmospheric transport model. A reasonable agreement has been obtained between the modelling results and the estimated radionuclide release rates from the Fukushima accident.

  10. 36 CFR 223.190 - Sourcing area application procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... facilities; (3) Any other information the applicant may believe is appropriate to support approval of the... information provided in support of the application is true, complete, and accurate to the best of the... 18 U.S.C. 1001, that the information provided in support of this application, is true, complete,...

  11. Development of hollow anode penning ion source for laboratory application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, B. K.; Shyam, A.; Das, R.; Rao, A. D. P.

    2012-03-01

    The research work presented here focuses for the development of miniature penning type ion source. One hollow anode penning type ion source was developed in our laboratory. The size of the ion source is 38 mm diameter and 55 mm length. The ion source consists of two cathodes, a hollow anode and one piece of rare earth permanent magnet. The plasma was created in the plasma region between cathodes and the hollow anode. The J × B force in the region helps for efficient ionization of the gas even in the high vacuum region˜1×10 -5 Torr. The ions were extracted in the axial direction with help of the potential difference between the electrodes and the geometry of the extraction angle. The effect of the extraction electrode geometry for efficient extraction of the ions from the plasma region was examined. This ion source is a self extracted ion source. The self extracted phenomena reduce the cost and the size of the ion source. The extracted ion current was measured by a graphite probe. An ion current of more than 200 μA was observed at the probe placed 70 mm apart from the extraction electrode. In this paper, the structure of the ion source, effect of operating pressure, potential difference and the magnetic field on the extracted ion current is reported.

  12. RECENT APPLICATIONS OF SOURCE APPORTIONMENT METHODS AND RELATED NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Traditional receptor modeling studies have utilized factor analysis (like principal component analysis, PCA) and/or Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) to assess source influences. The limitations with these approaches is that PCA is qualitative and CMB requires the input of source pr...

  13. 40 CFR 63.100 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., recovery, or recycling operations at hazardous waste TSDF facilities requiring a permit under 40 CFR part... source. 63.100 Section 63.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...

  14. 40 CFR 63.100 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., recovery, or recycling operations at hazardous waste TSDF facilities requiring a permit under 40 CFR part... source. 63.100 Section 63.100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...

  15. Determination of radioactive elements and heavy metals in sediments and soil from domestic water sources in northern peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Bashir G; Jaafar, Mohammad Suhaimi; Abdul Rahman, Azhar; Ingawa, Farouk Abdulrasheed

    2012-08-01

    Soil serves as a major reservoir for contaminants as it posseses an ability to bind various chemicals together. To safeguard the members of the public from an unwanted exposure, studies were conducted on the sediments and soil from water bodies that form the major sources of domestic water supply in northern peninsular Malaysia for their trace element concentration levels. Neutron Activation Analysis, using Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1) located at the Centre for Energy Research and Training, Zaria, Nigeria was employed as the analytical tool. The elements identified in major quantities include Na, K, and Fe while As, Br, Cr, U, Th, Eu, Cs, Co, La, Sm, Yb, Sc, Zn, Rb, Ba, Lu, Hf, Ta, and Sb were also identified in trace quantities. Gamma spectroscopy was also employed to analyze some soil samples from the same area. The results indicated safe levels in terms of the radium equivalent activity, external hazard index as well as the mean external exposure dose rates from the soil. The overall screening of the domestic water sources with relatively high heavy metals concentration values in sediments and high activity concentration values in soil is strongly recommended as their accumulation overtime as a consequence of leaching into the water may be of health concern to the members of the public. PMID:21901308

  16. The Need for Confirmatory Experiments on the Radioactive Source Term from Potential Sabotage of Spent Nuclear Fuel Casks

    SciTech Connect

    PHILBIN, JEFFREY S.; HOOVER, MARK D.; NEWTON, GEORGE J.

    2002-04-01

    A technical review is presented of experiment activities and state of knowledge on air-borne, radiation source terms resulting from explosive sabotage attacks on spent reactor fuel subassemblies in shielded casks. Current assumptions about the behavior of irradiated fuel are largely based on a limited number of experimental results involving unirradiated, depleted uranium dioxide ''surrogate'' fuel. The behavior of irradiated nuclear fuel subjected to explosive conditions could be different from the behavior of the surrogate fuel, depending on the assumptions made by the evaluator. Available data indicate that these potential differences could result in errors, and possible orders-of-magnitude overestimates of aerosol dispersion and potential health effects from sabotage attacks. Furthermore, it is suggested that the current assumptions used in arriving at existing regulations for the transportation and storage of spent fuel in the U.S. are overly conservative. This, in turn, has led to potentially higher-than-needed operating expenses for those activities. A confirmatory experimental program is needed to develop a realistic correlation between source terms of irradiated fuel and unirradiated fuel. The motivations for performing the confirmatory experimental program are also presented.

  17. Development and application of Marinelli beaker standards for monitoring radioactivity in Dairy-Products by gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lavi, N; Alfassi, Z B

    2004-12-01

    Marinelli (reentrant) beakers are recommended for measurement of low-activity radioactive environmental samples, in both liquid and solid phase. The preparation of Marinelli beaker standards of milk powder containing 232ThO2 at secular equilibrium with its daughter radionuclides was studied. Standards were prepared by mixing of known amounts of solid ThO2 and milk powder. The densities of the standards were 0.5-0.7 kg dm(-3). Measurements of calibrated Marinelli beaker standards with HPGe detector showed that the energy dependence of the efficiency is similar to that of a point source, i.e. an almost linear dependence of log-efficiency vs. log-energy in the 200-2000 keV range, however the parabolic correlation fits better. The validity of these standards was checked by comparison with certified standard reference material IAEA-152-Milk powder containing radiocesium and radiopotassium. The results obtained were found to be in a good agreement with the published certified data. The limit of detection for the determination of radiocesium by gamma ray spectrometry under the prevailing experimental conditions is 0.03 Bq (i.e. 0.8 pCi), for samples of dairy products having lower densities of 0.7 kg dm(-1). PMID:15388145

  18. Radioactivity of Consumer Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David; Jokisch, Derek; Fulmer, Philip

    2006-11-01

    A variety of consumer products and household items contain varying amounts of radioactivity. Examples of these items include: FiestaWare and similar glazed china, salt substitute, bananas, brazil nuts, lantern mantles, smoke detectors and depression glass. Many of these items contain natural sources of radioactivity such as Uranium, Thorium, Radium and Potassium. A few contain man-made sources like Americium. This presentation will detail the sources and relative radioactivity of these items (including demonstrations). Further, measurements of the isotopic ratios of Uranium-235 and Uranium-238 in several pieces of china will be compared to historical uses of natural and depleted Uranium. Finally, the presenters will discuss radiation safety as it pertains to the use of these items.

  19. Application of a compact microwave ion source to radiocarbon analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, R. J.; Reden, K. F. von; Hayes, J. M.; Wills, J. S. C.

    1999-04-26

    The compact, high current, 2.45 GHz microwave-driven plasma ion source which was built for the Chalk River TASCC facility is presently being adapted for testing as a gas ion source for accelerator mass spectrometry, at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution accelerator mass spectrometer. The special requirements for producing carbon-ion beams from micromole quantities of carbon dioxide produced from environmental samples will be discussed. These samples will be introduced into the ion source by means of argon carrier gas and a silicon capillary injection system. Following the extraction of positive ions from the source, negative ion formation in a charge exchange vapor will effectively remove the argon from the carbon beam. Simultaneous injection of the three carbon isotopes into the accelerator is planned.

  20. Special Analysis for the Disposal of the Neutron Products Incorporated Sealed Source Waste Stream at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Shott, Gregory

    2014-08-31

    The purpose of this special analysis (SA) is to determine if the Neutron Products Incorporated (NPI) Sealed Sources waste stream (DRTK000000056, Revision 0) is suitable for disposal by shallow land burial (SLB) at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The NPI Sealed Sources waste stream consists of 850 60Co sealed sources (Duratek [DRTK] 2013). The NPI Sealed Sources waste stream requires a special analysis (SA) because the waste stream 60Co activity concentration exceeds the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Action Levels.

  1. Rapid estimate of earthquake source duration: application to tsunami warning.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reymond, Dominique; Jamelot, Anthony; Hyvernaud, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    We present a method for estimating the source duration of the fault rupture, based on the high-frequency envelop of teleseismic P-Waves, inspired from the original work of (Ni et al., 2005). The main interest of the knowledge of this seismic parameter is to detect abnormal low velocity ruptures that are the characteristic of the so called 'tsunami-earthquake' (Kanamori, 1972). The validation of the results of source duration estimated by this method are compared with two other independent methods : the estimated duration obtained by the Wphase inversion (Kanamori and Rivera, 2008, Duputel et al., 2012) and the duration calculated by the SCARDEC process that determines the source time function (M. Vallée et al., 2011). The estimated source duration is also confronted to the slowness discriminant defined by Newman and Okal, 1998), that is calculated routinely for all earthquakes detected by our tsunami warning process (named PDFM2, Preliminary Determination of Focal Mechanism, (Clément and Reymond, 2014)). Concerning the point of view of operational tsunami warning, the numerical simulations of tsunami are deeply dependent on the source estimation: better is the source estimation, better will be the tsunami forecast. The source duration is not directly injected in the numerical simulations of tsunami, because the cinematic of the source is presently totally ignored (Jamelot and Reymond, 2015). But in the case of a tsunami-earthquake that occurs in the shallower part of the subduction zone, we have to consider a source in a medium of low rigidity modulus; consequently, for a given seismic moment, the source dimensions will be decreased while the slip distribution increased, like a 'compact' source (Okal, Hébert, 2007). Inversely, a rapid 'snappy' earthquake that has a poor tsunami excitation power, will be characterized by higher rigidity modulus, and will produce weaker displacement and lesser source dimensions than 'normal' earthquake. References: CLément, J

  2. LPP light source for actinic HVM inspection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollinger, Bob; Gambino, Nadia; Hudgins, Duane; Sanders, Alexander; Brandstätter, Markus; Abhari, Reza S.; Abreau, F.

    2015-03-01

    EUV sources with high brightness and stability are required for actinic photomask inspection. High availability and cleanliness after IF are additional stringent requirements. EUV lithography is only production ready, if these tools are available with HVM specifications. At the Laboratory for Energy Conversion, ETH Zurich, droplet-based EUV LPP sources have been designed, developed and tested at the system level for the last 8 years and has been commercialized by Adlyte AG. The most advanced facility, namely ALPS II, has been operated as a prototype source for hundreds of hours. In the present work, the EUV plasma is imaged with the help of a pinhole camera. The dimension of the plasma in the direction of the laser axis and the direction of the train equal 60 μm and 70 μm, respectively. The plasma is also imaged using an ICCD with an exposure time of 5 ns. The observed droplet plasma has a characteristic kidney shape. The ICCD is a valuable diagnostic as inspection tools require high pulse-to-pulse reproducibility that cannot be assessed to the full extend using a EUV pinhole camera. Various collector configurations, using either NI or GI, have been integrated into the source. The measurements of the emission characteristics at IF for a GI collector configuration reveal a Gaussian spot shape at IF and a pulse-to-pulse stability of 6.8 % (σ), which matches previous stabilities at the source level. The debris mitigation system employs a three layer strategy between the plasma and IF. Introducing a high momentum flow as a first layer of debris mitigation, the load of tin spots on the collector could be reduced by a factor of 9, hence a significant increase of source life-time is obtained. A quantification by Adlyte of IF cleanliness after 24 hours source operation revealed no relevant contamination with respect to the requirements for Blank Inspection Cleanliness after IF.

  3. Learning from Heterogeneous Data Sources: An Application in Spatial Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Breckels, Lisa M.; Holden, Sean B.; Wojnar, David; Mulvey, Claire M.; Christoforou, Andy; Groen, Arnoud; Trotter, Matthew W. B.; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Gatto, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Sub-cellular localisation of proteins is an essential post-translational regulatory mechanism that can be assayed using high-throughput mass spectrometry (MS). These MS-based spatial proteomics experiments enable us to pinpoint the sub-cellular distribution of thousands of proteins in a specific system under controlled conditions. Recent advances in high-throughput MS methods have yielded a plethora of experimental spatial proteomics data for the cell biology community. Yet, there are many third-party data sources, such as immunofluorescence microscopy or protein annotations and sequences, which represent a rich and vast source of complementary information. We present a unique transfer learning classification framework that utilises a nearest-neighbour or support vector machine system, to integrate heterogeneous data sources to considerably improve on the quantity and quality of sub-cellular protein assignment. We demonstrate the utility of our algorithms through evaluation of five experimental datasets, from four different species in conjunction with four different auxiliary data sources to classify proteins to tens of sub-cellular compartments with high generalisation accuracy. We further apply the method to an experiment on pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells to classify a set of previously unknown proteins, and validate our findings against a recent high resolution map of the mouse stem cell proteome. The methodology is distributed as part of the open-source Bioconductor pRoloc suite for spatial proteomics data analysis. PMID:27175778

  4. Cold atomic beam ion source for focused ion beam applications

    SciTech Connect

    Knuffman, B.; Steele, A. V.; McClelland, J. J.

    2013-07-28

    We report measurements and modeling of an ion source that is based on ionization of a laser-cooled atomic beam. We show a high brightness and a low energy spread, suitable for use in next-generation, high-resolution focused ion beam systems. Our measurements of total ion current as a function of ionization conditions support an analytical model that also predicts the cross-sectional current density and spatial distribution of ions created in the source. The model predicts a peak brightness of 2 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1} and an energy spread less than 0.34 eV. The model is also combined with Monte-Carlo simulations of the inter-ion Coulomb forces to show that the source can be operated at several picoamperes with a brightness above 1 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1}. We estimate that when combined with a conventional ion focusing column, an ion source with these properties could focus a 1 pA beam into a spot smaller than 1 nm. A total current greater than 5 nA was measured in a lower-brightness configuration of the ion source, demonstrating the possibility of a high current mode of operation.

  5. Learning from Heterogeneous Data Sources: An Application in Spatial Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Breckels, Lisa M; Holden, Sean B; Wojnar, David; Mulvey, Claire M; Christoforou, Andy; Groen, Arnoud; Trotter, Matthew W B; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Lilley, Kathryn S; Gatto, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    Sub-cellular localisation of proteins is an essential post-translational regulatory mechanism that can be assayed using high-throughput mass spectrometry (MS). These MS-based spatial proteomics experiments enable us to pinpoint the sub-cellular distribution of thousands of proteins in a specific system under controlled conditions. Recent advances in high-throughput MS methods have yielded a plethora of experimental spatial proteomics data for the cell biology community. Yet, there are many third-party data sources, such as immunofluorescence microscopy or protein annotations and sequences, which represent a rich and vast source of complementary information. We present a unique transfer learning classification framework that utilises a nearest-neighbour or support vector machine system, to integrate heterogeneous data sources to considerably improve on the quantity and quality of sub-cellular protein assignment. We demonstrate the utility of our algorithms through evaluation of five experimental datasets, from four different species in conjunction with four different auxiliary data sources to classify proteins to tens of sub-cellular compartments with high generalisation accuracy. We further apply the method to an experiment on pluripotent mouse embryonic stem cells to classify a set of previously unknown proteins, and validate our findings against a recent high resolution map of the mouse stem cell proteome. The methodology is distributed as part of the open-source Bioconductor pRoloc suite for spatial proteomics data analysis. PMID:27175778

  6. High-radiance LDP source for mask-inspection application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramoto, Yusuke; Santos, Bárbara; Mertens, Guido; Kops, Ralf; Kops, Margarete; von Wezyk, Alexander; Yabuta, Hironobu; Nagano, Akihisa; Shirai, Takahiro; Ashizawa, Noritaka; Nakamura, Kiyotada; Kasama, Kunihiko

    2015-03-01

    Actinic mask inspection manufactures are currently searching for high-radiance EUV sources for their tools. LDP source, which was previously used for lithography purposes, was found to be a good candidate as it can provide sufficient power and radiance. Introduction of new techniques, modified modules and fine tuning of operational conditions (discharge pulse energy, discharge frequency, laser) has brought radiance level to 180 W/mm2/sr at plasma or 145 W/mm2/sr as clean-photon. The source has been modified in such a way to improve modules reliability, lifetime and radiance stability even though there is still a room for further improvement. Size of the source system is much smaller than that of the lithography source. A debris mitigation system has been tested. Optical transmission was improved to 77 % and several 8-nm-thick Ru samples were exposed to evaluate contamination and erosion of optics. Preliminary results show low sputter and deposition rates, which supports sufficiently long lifetime of the optics.

  7. RAIS PDA Application

    SciTech Connect

    2004-10-06

    The Regulatory Authority Information System (RAIS) is a management tool for information related to the regulatory control of radioactive sealed sources developed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The RAIS PDA Application extends the functionality of the RAIS database by allowinig users to download radioactive sealed source data from the RAIS database to a portable PDA equipped with a barcode scanner. This allows users to verify radioactive sealed source data, gather radioactive sealed source audit information, and upload audit data to the RAIS database in the field. The application was developed for a tested on the Symbol Model SPT 1800 PDA with PalmOS version 4.1 and a built-in barcode scanner.

  8. Modeling a Hypothetical {sup 170}Tm Source for Brachytherapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Enger, Shirin A.; D'Amours, Michel; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To perform absorbed dose calculations based on Monte Carlo simulations for a hypothetical {sup 170}Tm source and to investigate the influence of encapsulating material on the energy spectrum of the emitted electrons and photons. Methods: GEANT4 Monte Carlo code version 9.2 patch 2 was used to simulate the decay process of {sup 170}Tm and to calculate the absorbed dose distribution using the GEANT4 Penelope physics models. A hypothetical {sup 170}Tm source based on the Flexisource brachytherapy design with the active core set as a pure thulium cylinder (length 3.5 mm and diameter 0.6 mm) and different cylindrical source encapsulations (length 5 mm and thickness 0.125 mm) constructed of titanium, stainless-steel, gold, or platinum were simulated. The radial dose function for the line source approximation was calculated following the TG-43U1 formalism for the stainless-steel encapsulation. Results: For the titanium and stainless-steel encapsulation, 94% of the total bremsstrahlung is produced inside the core, 4.8 and 5.5% in titanium and stainless-steel capsules, respectively, and less than 1% in water. For the gold capsule, 85% is produced inside the core, 14.2% inside the gold capsule, and a negligible amount (<1%) in water. Platinum encapsulation resulted in bremsstrahlung effects similar to those with the gold encapsulation. The range of the beta particles decreases by 1.1 mm with the stainless-steel encapsulation compared to the bare source but the tissue will still receive dose from the beta particles several millimeters from the source capsule. The gold and platinum capsules not only absorb most of the electrons but also attenuate low energy photons. The mean energy of the photons escaping the core and the stainless-steel capsule is 113 keV while for the gold and platinum the mean energy is 160 keV and 165 keV, respectively. Conclusions: A {sup 170}Tm source is primarily a bremsstrahlung source, with the majority of bremsstrahlung photons being

  9. WIRM: An Open Source Toolkit for Building Biomedical Web Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jakobovits, Rex M.; Rosse, Cornelius; Brinkley, James F.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes an innovative software toolkit that allows the creation of web applications that facilitate the acquisition, integration, and dissemination of multimedia biomedical data over the web, thereby reducing the cost of knowledge sharing. There is a lack of high-level web application development tools suitable for use by researchers, clinicians, and educators who are not skilled programmers. Our Web Interfacing Repository Manager (WIRM) is a software toolkit that reduces the complexity of building custom biomedical web applications. WIRM’s visual modeling tools enable domain experts to describe the structure of their knowledge, from which WIRM automatically generates full-featured, customizable content management systems. PMID:12386108

  10. Field evaporation ion source with possible application to electrostatic propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, V. G.

    1971-01-01

    Field evaporation of solid metal electrodes has been proposed as an ion source for an electrostatic propulsion device. The chief advantage over existing ion sources is the prospect of 100 percent fuel utilization efficiency. This advantage arises as a result of the elimination of the need for a gaseous precursor state for propellant ionization. The attainment of required high surface field strengths is achieved through field-induced extrusion of the electrode geometry at elevated temperatures. Contributions of both surface and bulk transport mechanisms are taken into account.

  11. A description of a wide beam saddle field ion source used for nuclear target applications

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.P.; Schiel, S.L.; Thomas, G.E.

    1997-07-01

    A description is given of a new, wide beam saddle field sputter source used for the preparation of targets applied in nuclear physics experiments. The ion source characteristics are presented and compared with published results obtained with other sources. Deposition rates acquired utilizing this source are given for a variety of target materials encountered in nuclear target production. New applications involving target thinning and ion milling are discussed.

  12. 40 CFR 61.160 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Glass Manufacturing Plants § 61.160 Applicability and designation... commercial arsenic as a raw material. This subpart does not apply to pot furnaces. (b) Rebricking is...

  13. 40 CFR 61.160 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Glass Manufacturing Plants § 61.160 Applicability and designation... commercial arsenic as a raw material. This subpart does not apply to pot furnaces. (b) Rebricking is...

  14. 40 CFR 61.160 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Glass Manufacturing Plants § 61.160 Applicability and designation... commercial arsenic as a raw material. This subpart does not apply to pot furnaces. (b) Rebricking is...

  15. 40 CFR 61.160 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Glass Manufacturing Plants § 61.160 Applicability and designation... commercial arsenic as a raw material. This subpart does not apply to pot furnaces. (b) Rebricking is...

  16. 40 CFR 61.160 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for Inorganic Arsenic Emissions From Glass Manufacturing Plants § 61.160 Applicability and designation... commercial arsenic as a raw material. This subpart does not apply to pot furnaces. (b) Rebricking is...

  17. Eichrom`s Diphonix{reg_sign} resin: Production-scale applications in radioactive waste treatment and iron control in copper electrowinning

    SciTech Connect

    Gula, M.J.; Chang, F.; Dreisinger, D.B.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1997-12-31

    Eichrom`s Diphonix{reg_sign} resin has been phased through synthetic scale-up, pilot testing, and production installation in radioactive waste treatment and hydrometallurgical applications. The geminal diphosphonic acid groups of Diphonix resin allow selective retention by cation-exchange and/or chelation. The resin is effective at low pH where sulfonic and carboxylic acid resins are ineffective. Diphonix resin has been used in nuclear facilities to reduce actinide concentrations in radioactive waste effluents and to reduce waste volumes. The high retention of iron(III) by Diphonix resin in acidic sulfate media has led to an installation capable of removing one ton of iron per day from a copper electrowinning stream. This iron control process diminishes cobalt losses in the electrowinning circuit and significantly reduces operating costs. The authors will discuss the development of these Diphonix resin applications.

  18. 40 CFR 63.460 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... source subject to this subpart, you are exempt from the obligation to obtain a permit under 40 CFR part 70 or 71, provided you are not required to obtain a permit under 40 CFR 70.3(a) or 71.3(a) for a... cleaning and/or drying agent. The concentration of these solvents may be determined using EPA test...

  19. 40 CFR 63.460 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... source subject to this subpart, you are exempt from the obligation to obtain a permit under 40 CFR part 70 or 71, provided you are not required to obtain a permit under 40 CFR 70.3(a) or 71.3(a) for a... cleaning and/or drying agent. The concentration of these solvents may be determined using EPA test...

  20. 40 CFR 61.110 - Applicability and designation of sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... (d) While the provisions of this subpart are effective, a source to which this subpart applies that is also subject to the provisions of 40 CFR part 60 only will be required to comply with the... operate in benzene service: pumps, compressors, pressure relief devices, sampling connection systems,...

  1. 40 CFR 61.110 - Applicability and designation of sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (d) While the provisions of this subpart are effective, a source to which this subpart applies that is also subject to the provisions of 40 CFR part 60 only will be required to comply with the... operate in benzene service: pumps, compressors, pressure relief devices, sampling connection systems,...

  2. 40 CFR 61.110 - Applicability and designation of sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... (d) While the provisions of this subpart are effective, a source to which this subpart applies that is also subject to the provisions of 40 CFR part 60 only will be required to comply with the... operate in benzene service: pumps, compressors, pressure relief devices, sampling connection systems,...

  3. 40 CFR 61.110 - Applicability and designation of sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... (d) While the provisions of this subpart are effective, a source to which this subpart applies that is also subject to the provisions of 40 CFR part 60 only will be required to comply with the... operate in benzene service: pumps, compressors, pressure relief devices, sampling connection systems,...

  4. 40 CFR 63.460 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... source subject to this subpart, you are exempt from the obligation to obtain a permit under 40 CFR part 70 or 71, provided you are not required to obtain a permit under 40 CFR 70.3(a) or 71.3(a) for a... cleaning machines, except solvent cleaning machines used in the manufacture and maintenance of...

  5. Using Fictional Sources in the Classroom: Applications from Cognitive Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Elizabeth J.; Butler, Andrew C.; Umanath, Sharda

    2012-01-01

    Fictional materials are commonly used in the classroom to teach course content. Both laboratory experiments and classroom demonstrations illustrate the benefits of using fiction to help students learn accurate information about the world. However, fictional sources often contain factually inaccurate content, making them a potent vehicle for…

  6. 36 CFR 223.190 - Sourcing area application procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 1990 (16 U.S.C. 620, et seq.), found at 7 CFR part 1, subpart M. (h) A final decision on a sourcing....S.C. 620, et seq.), found at 7 CFR part 1, subpart M. Persons submitting a comment must certify at... persons in the same local vicinity and the relative similarity of such purchasing patterns. (2) The...

  7. 36 CFR 223.190 - Sourcing area application procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 1990 (16 U.S.C. 620, et seq.), found at 7 CFR part 1, subpart M. (h) A final decision on a sourcing....S.C. 620, et seq.), found at 7 CFR part 1, subpart M. Persons submitting a comment must certify at... persons in the same local vicinity and the relative similarity of such purchasing patterns. (2) The...

  8. 40 CFR 63.460 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... source subject to this subpart, you are exempt from the obligation to obtain a permit under 40 CFR part 70 or 71, provided you are not required to obtain a permit under 40 CFR 70.3(a) or 71.3(a) for a... cold, and batch cold solvent cleaning machine that uses any solvent containing methylene chloride...

  9. 40 CFR 63.100 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., recovery, or recycling operations at hazardous waste TSDF facilities requiring a permit under 40 CFR part... (i)(3) and (i)(5) of this section to determine whether the vent(s) from a distillation unit is part of the source to which this subpart applies. (1) Where a distillation unit is dedicated to a...

  10. 40 CFR 63.100 - Applicability and designation of source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., recovery, or recycling operations at hazardous waste TSDF facilities requiring a permit under 40 CFR part... (i)(3) and (i)(5) of this section to determine whether the vent(s) from a distillation unit is part of the source to which this subpart applies. (1) Where a distillation unit is dedicated to a...

  11. Application of microarray technology for microbial source tracking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Typing of foodborne microorganisms for source tracking was radically improved with the implementation of molecular techniques. These assays were designed to detect genetic differences in lineages of foodborne organisms. Molecular techniques can detect the natural variability in the genome of a micro...

  12. SOURCE CONTROL BY HYDROLOGICAL ISOLATION: APPLICATION OF THE ANKENY MOAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treatment of NAPLs as source areas for plumes of contamination in ground water has proven problematic under certain regulatory programs. Under the EPA risk management paradigm, hydrological isolation of a fuel spill is a valid and acceptable alternative to treatment. A system o...

  13. ESTIMATION OF RADIOLYTIC GAS GENERATION RATE FOR CYLINDRICAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE PACKAGES - APPLICATION TO SPENT ION EXCHANGE RESIN CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, A.; Lewis, Brent J.

    2003-02-27

    Radioactive waste packages containing water and/or organic substances have the potential to radiolytically generate hydrogen and other combustible gases. Typically, the radiolytic gas generation rate is estimated from the energy deposition rate and the radiolytic gas yield. Estimation of the energy deposition rate must take into account the contributions from all radionuclides. While the contributions from non-gamma emitting radionuclides are relatively easy to estimate, an average geometry factor must be computed to determine the contribution from gamma emitters. Hitherto, no satisfactory method existed for estimating the geometry factors for a cylindrical package. In the present study, a formulation was developed taking into account the effect of photon buildup. A prototype code, called PC-CAGE, was developed to numerically solve the integrals involved. Based on the selected dimensions for a cylinder, the specified waste material, the photon energy of interest and a value for either the absorption or attenuation coefficient, the code outputs values for point and average geometry factors. These can then be used to estimate the internal dose rate to the material in the cylinder and hence to calculate the radiolytic gas generation rate. Besides the ability to estimate the rates of radiolytic gas generation, PC-CAGE can also estimate the dose received by the container material. This is based on values for the point geometry factors at the surface of the cylinder. PC-CAGE was used to calculate geometry factors for a number of cylindrical geometries. Estimates for the absorbed dose rate in container material were also obtained. The results for Ontario Power Generation's 3 m3 resin containers indicate that about 80% of the source gamma energy is deposited internally. In general, the fraction of gamma energy deposited internally depends on the dimensions of the cylinder, the material within it and the photon energy; the fraction deposited increases with increasing

  14. On the source inversion of fugitive surface layer releases. Part I. Model formulation and application to simple sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanfélix, V.; Escrig, A.; López-Lilao, A.; Celades, I.; Monfort, E.

    2015-05-01

    Source inversion by dispersion modelling of fugitive particulate matter (PM) emissions entails considerable difficulty. Fugitive PM sources are rarely steady or point sources. They occur near the ground, where there are high vertical gradients of wind velocity and potential temperature. To resolve the source from the background concentrations, measurements need to be conducted very close to the source. In this study, a dispersion model was developed that consists of numerically solving the pollutant transport equation, while incorporating the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. By using this numerical approach, in contrast to Gaussian dispersion models, wind shear effects and plume meandering were accounted for directly. A series of controlled experiments were conducted, in which the fugitive PM sources were parameterized as much as possible. The developed model was used to obtain operation-specific PM10 emission factors (EFs). This is the first of two articles describing the model and the field campaigns in which it was applied to determine the EFs. Part I describes the mathematical model and its application to two relatively simple sources.

  15. Application of electron linacs in medicine, food sterilization and synchrotron light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Duc-Tien

    1989-04-01

    A review of the state of the art and new trends in electron linac technology is given with emphasis on three particular applications: radiotherapy, food sterilization and synchrotron light sources. The requirements on linac performances that these applications call for, namely energy variation flexibility, high power, high energy and low cost, will open linacs to new applications to come.

  16. Dosimetric characterizations of GZP6 60Co high dose rate brachytherapy sources: application of superimposition method

    PubMed Central

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Mowlavi, Ali Asghar; Meigooni, Ali Soleimani

    2012-01-01

    Background Dosimetric characteristics of a high dose rate (HDR) GZP6 Co-60 brachytherapy source have been evaluated following American Association of Physicists in MedicineTask Group 43U1 (AAPM TG-43U1) recommendations for their clinical applications. Materials and methods MCNP-4C and MCNPX Monte Carlo codes were utilized to calculate dose rate constant, two dimensional (2D) dose distribution, radial dose function and 2D anisotropy function of the source. These parameters of this source are compared with the available data for Ralstron 60Co and microSelectron192Ir sources. Besides, a superimposition method was developed to extend the obtained results for the GZP6 source No. 3 to other GZP6 sources. Results The simulated value for dose rate constant for GZP6 source was 1.104±0.03 cGyh-1U-1. The graphical and tabulated radial dose function and 2D anisotropy function of this source are presented here. The results of these investigations show that the dosimetric parameters of GZP6 source are comparable to those for the Ralstron source. While dose rate constant for the two 60Co sources are similar to that for the microSelectron192Ir source, there are differences between radial dose function and anisotropy functions. Radial dose function of the 192Ir source is less steep than both 60Co source models. In addition, the 60Co sources are showing more isotropic dose distribution than the 192Ir source. Conclusions The superimposition method is applicable to produce dose distributions for other source arrangements from the dose distribution of a single source. The calculated dosimetric quantities of this new source can be introduced as input data to the GZP6 treatment planning system (TPS) and to validate the performance of the TPS. PMID:23077455

  17. Groundwater source technology application for an indoor water park

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.B.; Foster, G. Jr.; Hunt, A.W.

    1998-12-31

    Many groundwater source (geothermal) systems have been installed in commercial offices, schools, and hotels. The requirements of a water park involve, not only heating and cooling, but water heating and humidity control. The use of groundwater source technology allows the reuse of heat within the building and lower maintenance costs than a conventional system. By using groundwater as a heat exchange medium, significant energy savings are realized. By controlling water loop temperatures with either heat pumps or groundwater, energy savings can be increased further, depending on system load requirements. This paper documents the installation of a system in the Atlantic City area, identifies components and operating methodology, and provides operating cost comparisons with existing conventional water parks.

  18. Tapered monocapillary-optics for point source applications

    DOEpatents

    Hirsch, Gregory

    2000-01-01

    A glass or metal wire is precisely etched to form the paraboloidal or ellipsoidal shape of the final desired capillary optic. This shape is created by carefully controlling the withdrawal speed of the wire from an etchant bath. In the case of a complete ellipsoidal capillary, the etching operation is performed twice in opposite directions on adjacent wire segments. The etched wire undergoes a subsequent operation to create an extremely smooth surface. This surface is coated with a layer of material which is selected to maximize the reflectivity of the radiation. This reflective surface may be a single layer for wideband reflectivity, or a multilayer coating for optimizing the reflectivity in a narrower wavelength interval. The coated wire is built up with a reinforcing layer, typically by a plating operation. The initial wire is removed by either an etching procedure or mechanical force. Prior to removing the wire, the capillary is typically bonded to a support substrate. One option for attaching the wire to the substrate produces a monolithic structure by essentially burying it under a layer of plating which covers both the wire and the substrate. The capillary optic is used for efficiently collecting and redirecting the divergent radiation from a source which could be the anode of an x-ray tube, a plasma source, the fluorescent radiation from an electron microprobe, or some other source of radiation.

  19. Bayesian Inference for Source Reconstruction: A Real-World Application

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Eugene; Hoffman, Ian; Ungar, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    This paper applies a Bayesian probabilistic inferential methodology for the reconstruction of the location and emission rate from an actual contaminant source (emission from the Chalk River Laboratories medical isotope production facility) using a small number of activity concentration measurements of a noble gas (Xenon-133) obtained from three stations that form part of the International Monitoring System radionuclide network. The sampling of the resulting posterior distribution of the source parameters is undertaken using a very efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo technique that utilizes a multiple-try differential evolution adaptive Metropolis algorithm with an archive of past states. It is shown that the principal difficulty in the reconstruction lay in the correct specification of the model errors (both scale and structure) for use in the Bayesian inferential methodology. In this context, two different measurement models for incorporation of the model error of the predicted concentrations are considered. The performance of both of these measurement models with respect to their accuracy and precision in the recovery of the source parameters is compared and contrasted. PMID:27379292

  20. SimER: An advanced three-dimensional environmental risk assessment code for contaminated land and radioactive waste disposal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong, S.; Small, J.; Tahar, B.

    2007-07-01

    SimER (Simulations of Environmental Risks) is a powerful performance assessment code developed to undertake assessments of both contaminated land and radioactive waste disposal. The code can undertake both deterministic and probabilistic calculations, and is fully compatible with all available best practice guidance and regulatory requirements. SimER represents the first time-dependent performance assessment code capable of providing a detailed representation of system evolution that is designed specifically to address issues found across UK nuclear sites. The code adopts flexible input language with build-in unit checking to model the whole system (i.e. near-field, geosphere and biosphere) in a single code thus avoiding the need for any time consuming data transfer and the often laborious interface between the different codes. This greatly speeds up the assessment process and has major quality assurance advantages. SimER thus provides a cost-effective tool for undertaking projects involving risk assessment from contaminated land assessments through to full post-closure safety cases and other work supporting key site endpoint decisions. A Windows version (v1.0) of the code was first released in June 2004. The code has subsequently been subject to further testing and development. In particular, Viewers have been developed to provide users with visual information to assist the development of SimER models, and output can now be produced in a format that can be used by the FieldView software to view the results and produce animation from the SimER calculations. More recently a Linux version of the code has been produced to extend coverage to the commonly used platform bases and offer an improved operating environment for probabilistic assessments. Results from the verification of the SimER code for a sample of test cases for both contaminated land and waste disposal applications are presented. (authors)

  1. 40 CFR 61.270 - Applicability and designation of sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... applicable provisions of 40 CFR part 60 subparts K, Ka, and Kb shall be required to comply only with the...—(1) Option to comply with part 65. Owners or operators may choose to comply with 40 CFR part 65... operators who choose to comply with 40 CFR part 65 are provided in 40 CFR 65.1. (2) Part 61, subpart...

  2. 40 CFR 61.270 - Applicability and designation of sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... applicable provisions of 40 CFR part 60 subparts K, Ka, and Kb shall be required to comply only with the...—(1) Option to comply with part 65. Owners or operators may choose to comply with 40 CFR part 65... operators who choose to comply with 40 CFR part 65 are provided in 40 CFR 65.1. (2) Part 61, subpart...

  3. 40 CFR 61.270 - Applicability and designation of sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... applicable provisions of 40 CFR part 60 subparts K, Ka, and Kb shall be required to comply only with the...—(1) Option to comply with part 65. Owners or operators may choose to comply with 40 CFR part 65... operators who choose to comply with 40 CFR part 65 are provided in 40 CFR 65.1. (2) Part 61, subpart...

  4. 40 CFR 61.270 - Applicability and designation of sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... applicable provisions of 40 CFR part 60 subparts K, Ka, and Kb shall be required to comply only with the...—(1) Option to comply with part 65. Owners or operators may choose to comply with 40 CFR part 65... operators who choose to comply with 40 CFR part 65 are provided in 40 CFR 65.1. (2) Part 61, subpart...

  5. 40 CFR 61.270 - Applicability and designation of sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... applicable provisions of 40 CFR part 60 subparts K, Ka, and Kb shall be required to comply only with the...—(1) Option to comply with part 65. Owners or operators may choose to comply with 40 CFR part 65... operators who choose to comply with 40 CFR part 65 are provided in 40 CFR 65.1. (2) Part 61, subpart...

  6. Agricultural Waste as Sources for Mercury Adsorbents in Gas Applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased emphasis on reduction of mercury emissions from coal fired electric power plants have resulted in environmental regulations that may in the future require application of activated carbons as mercury sorbents. The sorbents could be injected into the flue gas stream where it adsorbs the mer...

  7. An application of design knowledge captured from multiple sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Preston A.; Forbes, John H.

    1990-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope Operational Readiness Expert Safemode Investigation System (HSTORESIS) is a reusable knowledge base shell used to demonstrate the integration and application of design knowledge captured from multiple technical domains. The design of HSTORESIS is based on a partitioning of knowledge to maximize the potential for reuse of certain types of knowledge.

  8. Photochemical grid model implementation and application of VOC, NOx, and O3 source apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, R. H. F.; Baker, K. R.; Napelenok, S. L.; Tonnesen, G. S.

    2015-01-01

    For the purposes of developing optimal emissions control strategies, efficient approaches are needed to identify the major sources or groups of sources that contribute to elevated ozone (O3) concentrations. Source-based apportionment techniques implemented in photochemical grid models track sources through the physical and chemical processes important to the formation and transport of air pollutants. Photochemical model source apportionment has been used to track source impacts of specific sources, groups of sources (sectors), sources in specific geographic areas, and stratospheric and lateral boundary inflow on O3. The implementation and application of a source apportionment technique for O3 and its precursors, nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), for the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model are described here. The Integrated Source Apportionment Method (ISAM) O3 approach is a hybrid of source apportionment and source sensitivity in that O3 production is attributed to precursor sources based on O3 formation regime (e.g., for a NOx-sensitive regime, O3 is apportioned to participating NOx emissions). This implementation is illustrated by tracking multiple emissions source sectors and lateral boundary inflow. NOx, VOC, and O3 attribution to tracked sectors in the application are consistent with spatial and temporal patterns of precursor emissions. The O3 ISAM implementation is further evaluated through comparisons of apportioned ambient concentrations and deposition amounts with those derived from brute force zero-out scenarios, with correlation coefficients ranging between 0.58 and 0.99 depending on specific combination of target species and tracked precursor emissions. Low correlation coefficients occur for chemical regimes that have strong nonlinearity in O3 sensitivity, which demonstrates different functionalities between source apportionment and zero-out approaches, where appropriate use depends on whether source attribution or

  9. Ensemble-based simultaneous emission estimates and improved forecast of radioactive pollution from nuclear power plant accidents: application to ETEX tracer experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X L; Li, Q B; Su, G F; Yuan, M Q

    2015-04-01

    The accidental release of radioactive materials from nuclear power plant leads to radioactive pollution. We apply an augmented ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) with a chemical transport model to jointly estimate the emissions of Perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH), a tracer substitute for radionuclides, from a point source during the European Tracer Experiment, and to improve the forecast of its dispersion downwind. We perturb wind fields to account for meteorological uncertainties. We expand the state vector of PMCH concentrations through continuously adding an a priori emission rate for each succeeding assimilation cycle. We adopt a time-correlated red noise to simulate the temporal emission fluctuation. The improved EnKF system rapidly updates (and reduces) the excessively large initial first-guess emissions, thereby significantly improves subsequent forecasts (r = 0.83, p < 0.001). It retrieves 94% of the total PMCH released and substantially reduces transport error (>80% average reduction of the normalized mean square error). PMID:25647500

  10. Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma: Sources and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napartovich, A. P.

    2008-07-01

    Non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure is an inherently unstable object. Nature of discharge plasma instabilities and conditions for observation of uniform non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure in different environments will be discussed. Various discharge techniques have been developed, which could support uniform non-thermal plasma with parameters varied in a wide range. Time limitation by plasma instabilities can be overcome by shortening pulse length or by restriction of plasma plug residence time with a fast gas flow. Discharge instabilities leading to formation of filaments or sparks are provoked by a positive feedback between the electric field and plasma density, while the counteracting process is plasma and thermal diffusion. With gas pressure growth the size of plasma fluctuation, which could be stabilized by diffusion, diminishes. As a result, to have long lived uniform plasma one should miniaturize discharge. There exist a number of active methods to organize negative feedback between the electric field and plasma density in order to suppress or, at least, delay the instability. Among them are ballast resistors in combination with electrode sectioning, reactive ballast, electronic feedback, and dielectric barrier across the electric current. The last methods are relevant for ac discharges. In the lecture an overview will be given of different discharge techniques scalable in pressure up to one atmosphere. The interest in this topic is dictated by a potential economic benefit from numerous non-thermal plasma technologies. The spectrum of non-thermal plasma applications is continuously broadening. An incomplete list of known applications includes: plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition, etching, polymerization, gas-phase synthesis, protective coating deposition, toxic and harmful gas decomposition, destruction of warfare agents, electromagnetic wave shielding, polymer surface modifications, gas laser excitation, odor control, plasma assisted

  11. On the application of quantum transport theory to electron sources.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kevin L

    2003-01-01

    Electron sources (e.g., field emitter arrays, wide band-gap (WBG) semiconductor materials and coatings, carbon nanotubes, etc.) seek to exploit ballistic transport within the vacuum after emission from microfabricated structures. Regardless of kind, all sources strive to minimize the barrier to electron emission by engineering material properties (work function/electron affinity) or physical geometry (field enhancement) of the cathode. The unique capabilities of cold cathodes, such as instant ON/OFF performance, high brightness, high current density, large transconductance to capacitance ratio, cold emission, small size and/or low voltage operation characteristics, commend their use in several advanced devices when physical size, weight, power consumption, beam current, and pulse repletion frequency are important, e.g., RF power amplifier such as traveling wave tubes (TWTs) for radar and communications, electrodynamic tethers for satellite deboost/reboost, and electric propulsion systems such as Hall thrusters for small satellites. The theoretical program described herein is directed towards models to evaluate emission current from electron sources (in particular, emission from WBG and Spindt-type field emitter) in order to assess their utility, capabilities and performance characteristics. Modeling efforts particularly include: band bending, non-linear and resonant (Poole-Frenkel) potentials, the extension of one-dimensional theory to multi-dimensional structures, and emission site statistics due to variations in geometry and the presence of adsorbates. Two particular methodologies, namely, the modified Airy approach and metal-semiconductor statistical hyperbolic/ellipsoidal model, are described in detail in their present stage of development. PMID:12535543

  12. Sealed source and device design safety testing. Technical report on the findings of task 4. Investigation of a failed brachtherapy needle applicator

    SciTech Connect

    Lukezich, S.J.

    1997-05-01

    As a result of an incident in which a radioactive brachytherapy treatment source was temporarily unable to be retracted, an analysis was performed on the needle applicator used during the treatment. In this report, the results of laboratory evaluations of the physical, mechanical, and metallurgical condition of the subject applicator and two additional applicators are presented. A kink formed in the subject applicator during the incident. The laboratory investigation focused on identifying characteristics which would increase the susceptibility of an applicator to form a kink when subjected to bending loads. The results obtained during this investigation could not conclusively identify the cause of the kink. The subject applicator exhibited no unique features which would have made it particularly susceptible to forming a kink. The three applicators examined represent two methods of manufacturing. A number of characteristics inherent to the method used to manufacture the subject applicator which could lead to an increased susceptibility to the formation of a kink were observed. The use of an insertion device, such as the biopsy needle used during this incident, could also dramatically increase the likelihood of the formation of a kink if the applicator is subjected to bending loads. 33 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Exopolysaccharides enriched in rare sugars: bacterial sources, production, and applications

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Christophe; Alves, Vitor D.; Freitas, Filomena; Reis, Maria A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), produced by a wide range of bacteria, are high molecular weight biopolymers, presenting an extreme diversity in terms of chemical structure and composition. They may be used in many applications, depending on their chemical and physical properties. A rather unexplored aspect is the presence of rare sugars in the composition of some EPS. Rare sugars, such as rhamnose or fucose, may provide EPS with additional biological properties compared to those composed of more common sugar monomers. This review gives a brief overview of these specific EPS and their producing bacteria. Cultivation conditions are summarized, demonstrating their impact on the EPS composition, together with downstream processing. Finally, their use in different areas, including cosmetics, food products, pharmaceuticals, and biomedical applications, are discussed. PMID:25914689

  14. Solid-state Terahertz Sources for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiwald, Frank; Pearson, John C.; Ward, John S.; Schlecht, Erich; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Gill, John J.; Ferber, R.; Tsang, Raymond; Lin, Robert H.; Peralta, Alejandro; Finamore, B.; Chun, William W.; Baker, John J.; Dengler, Robert J.; Javadi, Hamid H.; Siegel, Peter H.; Mehdi, Imran

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the construction of solid-state frequency multiplier chains utilized far teraherz receiver applications such as the Herschel Space Observatory . Emphasis will he placed on the specific requirements to be met and challenges that were encountered. The availability of high power amplifiers at 100 GHz makes it possible to cascade frequency doublers and triplers with sufficient RF power to pump heterodyne receivers at THz frequencies. The environmental and mechanical constraints will be addressed as well as reliability issues.

  15. rf-driven ion sources for industrial applications (invited) (abstract)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-02-01

    The Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been developing rf-driven ion sources for the last two decades. These sources are being used to generate both positive and negative ion beams. Some of these sources are operating in particle accelerators such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge, while others are being employed in various industrial ion beam systems. There are four areas where the rf-driven ion sources are commonly used in industry. (1) In semiconductor manufacturing, rf-driven sources have found important applications in plasma etching, ion beam implantation, and ion beam lithography. (2) In material analysis and surface modification, miniature rf-ion sources can be found in focused ion beam systems. They can provide ion beams of essentially any element in the Periodic Table. The newly developed combined rf ion-electron beam unit improves greatly the performance of the secondary ion mass spectrometry tool. (3) For neutron production, rf ion source is a major component of compact, high flux D-D, D-T, or T-T neutron generators. These neutron sources are now being employed in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as well as in neutron imaging and material interrogation. (4) Large area rf-driven ion source will be used in an industrial design neutral beam diagnostic system for probing fusion plasmas. Such sources can be easily scaled to provide large ion beam current for future fusion reactor applications.

  16. Switchable radioactive neutron source device

    DOEpatents

    Stanford, G.S.; Rhodes, E.A.; Devolpi, A.; Boyar, R.E.

    1987-11-06

    This invention is a switchable neutron generating apparatus comprised of a pair of plates, the first plate having an alpha emitter section on it and the second plate having a target material portion on it which generates neutrons when its nuclei absorb an alpha particle. In operation, the alpha portion of the first plate is aligned with the neutron portion of the second plate to produce neutrons and brought out of alignment to cease production of neutrons. 3 figs.

  17. Switchable radioactive neutron source device

    DOEpatents

    Boyar, Robert E.; DeVolpi, Alexander; Stanford, George S.; Rhodes, Edgar A.

    1989-01-01

    This invention is a switchable neutron generating apparatus comprised of a pair of plates, the first plate having an alpha emitter section on it and the second plate having a target material portion on it which generates neutrons when its nuclei absorb an alpha particle. In operation, the alpha portion of the first plate is aligned with the neutron portion of the second plate to produce neutrons and brought out of alignment to cease production of neutrons.

  18. A compact high brightness laser synchrotron light source for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    1999-07-01

    The present high-brightness hard X-ray sources have been developed as third generation synchrotron light sources based on large high energy electron storage rings and magnetic undulators. Recently availability of compact terawatt lasers arouses a great interest in the use of lasers as undulators. The laser undulator concept makes it possible to construct an attractive compact synchrotron radiation source which has been proposed as a laser synchrotron light source. This paper proposes a compact laser synchrotron light source for mediacal applications, such as an intravenous coronary angiography and microbeam therapy.

  19. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2016-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2015. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes. PMID:27620100

  20. Radioactive Wastes.

    PubMed

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2015-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2014. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes. PMID:26420096

  1. ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS FOUND IN LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    R.H. Little, P.R. Maul, J.S.S. Penfoldag

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes and presents the findings from two studies undertaken for the European Commission to assess the long-term impact upon the environment and human health of non-radioactive contaminants found in various low level radioactive waste streams. The initial study investigated the application of safety assessment approaches developed for radioactive contaminants to the assessment of nonradioactive contaminants in low level radioactive waste. It demonstrated how disposal limits could be derived for a range of non-radioactive contaminants and generic disposal facilities. The follow-up study used the same approach but undertook more detailed, disposal system specific calculations, assessing the impacts of both the non-radioactive and radioactive contaminants. The calculations undertaken indicated that it is prudent to consider non-radioactive, as well as radioactive contaminants, when assessing the impacts of low level radioactive waste disposal. For some waste streams with relatively low concentrations of radionuclides, the potential post-closure disposal impacts from non-radioactive contaminants can be comparable with the potential radiological impacts. For such waste streams there is therefore an added incentive to explore options for recycling the materials involved wherever possible.

  2. Optics, Diagnostics and Applications for Fourth-Generation Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, A; Barbee, T; Bionta, R; Chapman, H; Ditmire, T; Dyer, G; Kuba, J; Jankowski, A; London, R; Ryutov, R; Shepherd, R; Shlyaptsev, V; Toor, A

    2003-02-05

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is a 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}-wavelength free-electron laser (FEL), proposed for the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre (SLAC). The photon output consists of high brightness, transversely coherent pulses with duration < 300 fs, together with a broad spontaneous spectrum with total power comparable to the coherent output. The output fluence, and pulse duration, pose special challenges for optical component and diagnostic designs. We first discuss the specific requirements for the initial scientific experiments, and our proposed solutions. We then describe the supporting research and development program that includes: (1) radiation field modeling, (2) experimental and theoretical material damage studies, (3) high resolution, high fluence-tolerant optical design, fabrication, and testing, (including material manufacturing), and (4) diagnostic design and testing.

  3. THz-wave parametric sources and imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Kodo

    2004-12-01

    We have studied the generation of terahertz (THz) waves by optical parametric processes based on laser light scattering from the polariton mode of nonlinear crystals. Using parametric oscillation of MgO-doped LiNbO3 crystal pumped by a nano-second Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, we have realized a widely tunable coherent THz-wave sources with a simple configuration. We have also developed a novel basic technology for THz imaging, which allows detection and identification of chemicals by introducing the component spatial pattern analysis. The spatial distributions of the chemicals were obtained from terahertz multispectral trasillumination images, using absorption spectra previously measured with a widely tunable THz-wave parametric oscillator. Further we have applied this technique to the detection and identification of illicit drugs concealed in envelopes. The samples we used were methamphetamine and MDMA, two of the most widely consumed illegal drugs in Japan, and aspirin as a reference.

  4. Filling the THz Gap - High Power Sources and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn Williams

    2006-02-01

    Electromagnetic waves centered at a frequency of 1 THz lie between photonics on the one hand and electronics on the other, and are very hard to generate and detect. However, since the THz part of the spectrum is energetically equivalent to many important physical, chemical and biological processes including superconducting gaps and protein dynamical processes, it is of great interest to facilitate experimental research in this region. This has stimulated major steps in the past decade for filling this gap in the usable spectrum. In this review paper we describe the evolution of a new generation of sources that boost the average power available in the THz region by more than a million-fold, making this region routinely accessible for the first time. This is achieved using two enhancement factors, namely relativistic electrons and super-radiance. We will also point to the scientific potential for discovery that is now enabled in this region.

  5. Beam simulation tools for GEANT4 (and neutrino source applications)

    SciTech Connect

    V.Daniel Elvira, Paul Lebrun and Panagiotis Spentzouris

    2002-12-03

    Geant4 is a tool kit developed by a collaboration of physicists and computer professionals in the High Energy Physics field for simulation of the passage of particles through matter. The motivation for the development of the Beam Tools is to extend the Geant4 applications to accelerator physics. Although there are many computer programs for beam physics simulations, Geant4 is ideal to model a beam going through material or a system with a beam line integrated to a complex detector. There are many examples in the current international High Energy Physics programs, such as studies related to a future Neutrino Factory, a Linear Collider, and a very Large Hadron Collider.

  6. Advanced tunable laser source for DoD applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cockroft, N.; Early, J.; Johnson, C.; Lester, C.; Quick, C.; Shimada, T.; Tiee, J.

    1996-06-01

    This is a final report of a two year project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project sought to develop a new solid- state laser transmitter that can be tuned over an exceptionally broad spectral range and integrated with LIDAR remote sensing systems for applications in species specific chemical sensing. Activities have included non-linear frequency conversion of tunable chromium doped LiSAF laser radiation to the ultraviolet and infrared spectral regions. This system is capable of the detection of chemical species previously unapproachable, as well as an improvement in detection sensitivity of 1-2 orders of magnitude for species currently studied.

  7. Application of disperion models for layered haze source apportionment

    SciTech Connect

    Latimer, D.A. )

    1988-01-01

    The phenomenon of layered haze, forms of visibility impairment, is of concern to the National Park Service, presumably because it may adversely affect the visual experience of visitors to national parks and wilderness areas.Because layered haze has been observed principally in the winter at locations such as Bryce Canyon and Mesa Verde national parks, which are adjacent to large , coal-fired power plants, it ahs been speculated that these plants may be large contributors to such haze. Although special studies have been carried out during the past two winters (1985-6 and 1986-87) specifically to study layered haze near Bryce Canyon, conclusive results as to the cause of and principal source contributors to wintertime layered haze have not yet been obtained. A critical question that remains to be answered regarding this wintertime layered haze is the relative contribution of the local power plant (Navajo) and other emissions from the populated areas (e.g. from coal- and wood-fired space heaters in the town of Page and on the Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations) compared to other more distant sources located throughout the Southwest. The authors discuss two different models designed in an attempt to place bounds in the relative impact of the Navajo Generating Station, based on different assumptions, to address the relative impact of the Navajo plant on winter layered haze. These calculations can only be considered bounding calculations at this time because of the significant uncertainties in atmospheric flow and dispersion conditions and plume chemistry; however, they may be useful in interpreting the results of on-going studies if the layered haze phenomenon.

  8. RAIS PDA Application

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-10-06

    The Regulatory Authority Information System (RAIS) is a management tool for information related to the regulatory control of radioactive sealed sources developed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The RAIS PDA Application extends the functionality of the RAIS database by allowinig users to download radioactive sealed source data from the RAIS database to a portable PDA equipped with a barcode scanner. This allows users to verify radioactive sealed source data, gather radioactive sealed sourcemore » audit information, and upload audit data to the RAIS database in the field. The application was developed for a tested on the Symbol Model SPT 1800 PDA with PalmOS version 4.1 and a built-in barcode scanner.« less

  9. Laccase: Microbial Sources, Production, Purification, and Potential Biotechnological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Shraddha; Shekher, Ravi; Sehgal, Simran; Kamthania, Mohit; Kumar, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    Laccase belongs to the blue multicopper oxidases and participates in cross-linking of monomers, degradation of polymers, and ring cleavage of aromatic compounds. It is widely distributed in higher plants and fungi. It is present in Ascomycetes, Deuteromycetes and Basidiomycetes and abundant in lignin-degrading white-rot fungi. It is also used in the synthesis of organic substance, where typical substrates are amines and phenols, the reaction products are dimers and oligomers derived from the coupling of reactive radical intermediates. In the recent years, these enzymes have gained application in the field of textile, pulp and paper, and food industry. Recently, it is also used in the design of biosensors, biofuel cells, as a medical diagnostics tool and bioremediation agent to clean up herbicides, pesticides and certain explosives in soil. Laccases have received attention of researchers in the last few decades due to their ability to oxidize both phenolic and nonphenolic lignin-related compounds as well as highly recalcitrant environmental pollutants. It has been identified as the principal enzyme associated with cuticular hardening in insects. Two main forms have been found: laccase-1 and laccase-2. This paper reviews the occurrence, mode of action, general properties, production, applications, and immobilization of laccases within different industrial fields. PMID:21755038

  10. Marine extremophiles: a source of hydrolases for biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Dalmaso, Gabriel Zamith Leal; Ferreira, Davis; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2015-04-01

    The marine environment covers almost three quarters of the planet and is where evolution took its first steps. Extremophile microorganisms are found in several extreme marine environments, such as hydrothermal vents, hot springs, salty lakes and deep-sea floors. The ability of these microorganisms to support extremes of temperature, salinity and pressure demonstrates their great potential for biotechnological processes. Hydrolases including amylases, cellulases, peptidases and lipases from hyperthermophiles, psychrophiles, halophiles and piezophiles have been investigated for these reasons. Extremozymes are adapted to work in harsh physical-chemical conditions and their use in various industrial applications such as the biofuel, pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and food industries has increased. The understanding of the specific factors that confer the ability to withstand extreme habitats on such enzymes has become a priority for their biotechnological use. The most studied marine extremophiles are prokaryotes and in this review, we present the most studied archaea and bacteria extremophiles and their hydrolases, and discuss their use for industrial applications. PMID:25854643

  11. Marine Extremophiles: A Source of Hydrolases for Biotechnological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Dalmaso, Gabriel Zamith Leal; Ferreira, Davis; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    The marine environment covers almost three quarters of the planet and is where evolution took its first steps. Extremophile microorganisms are found in several extreme marine environments, such as hydrothermal vents, hot springs, salty lakes and deep-sea floors. The ability of these microorganisms to support extremes of temperature, salinity and pressure demonstrates their great potential for biotechnological processes. Hydrolases including amylases, cellulases, peptidases and lipases from hyperthermophiles, psychrophiles, halophiles and piezophiles have been investigated for these reasons. Extremozymes are adapted to work in harsh physical-chemical conditions and their use in various industrial applications such as the biofuel, pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and food industries has increased. The understanding of the specific factors that confer the ability to withstand extreme habitats on such enzymes has become a priority for their biotechnological use. The most studied marine extremophiles are prokaryotes and in this review, we present the most studied archaea and bacteria extremophiles and their hydrolases, and discuss their use for industrial applications. PMID:25854643

  12. 40 CFR 63.1103 - Source category-specific applicability, definitions, and requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Source category-specific applicability, definitions, and requirements. 63.1103 Section 63.1103 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES...

  13. 40 CFR 63.1400 - Applicability and designation of affected sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability and designation of affected sources. 63.1400 Section 63.1400 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES National Emission Standards...

  14. 40 CFR 63.741 - Applicability and designation of affected sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability and designation of affected sources. 63.741 Section 63.741 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission...

  15. 40 CFR 63.1310 - Applicability and designation of affected sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicability and designation of affected sources. 63.1310 Section 63.1310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission...

  16. 40 CFR 63.680 - Applicability and designation of affected sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability and designation of affected sources. 63.680 Section 63.680 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission...

  17. 40 CFR 63.1310 - Applicability and designation of affected sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability and designation of affected sources. 63.1310 Section 63.1310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission...

  18. Leakage of radioactive particle systems from a synovial joint studied with a gamma camera. Its application to radiation synovectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, J.; Jones, A.G.; Davies, M.A.; Sledge, C.B.; Kramer, R.I.; Livni, E.

    1983-03-01

    We have determined rates of leakage of radioactivity from a rabbit synovial pouch in vivo for a number of particle systems of varying sizes and differing resistance to degradation. The estimates were made using a gamma scintillation camera and without killing the test animals. The lowest leakage at twenty-four hours was seen with inert carbonized microspheres and the highest rates were seen with surface-labeled particles of biodegradable denatured human serum albumin and with erythrocytes. The carbonized microspheres had no adverse long-term effects on the health of the animals' articular cartilage. Clinical Relevance: Results obtained with inert particles indicate that reducing the biodegradability of the particle or increasing its diameter, or both, reduces radioactivity losses from the knee joint. Large (twenty-five-micrometer-diameter) microspheres of human serum albumin incorporating the radioactivity and carbonized microspheres are suggested as potential carriers of isotopes for human radiation synovectomy.

  19. Report from the NSLS workshop: Sources and applications of high intensity uv-vuv light

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.D.; Hastings, J.B.

    1990-12-31

    A workshop was held to evaluate sources and applications of high intensity, ultra violet (UV) radiation for biological, chemical, and materials sciences. The proposed sources are a UV free electron laser (FEL) driven by a high brightness linac and undulators in long, straight sections of a specially designed low energy (400 MeV) storage ring. These two distinct types of sources will provide a broad range of scientific opportunities that were discussed in detail during the workshop.

  20. Report from the NSLS workshop: Sources and applications of high intensity uv-vuv light

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.D.; Hastings, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    A workshop was held to evaluate sources and applications of high intensity, ultra violet (UV) radiation for biological, chemical, and materials sciences. The proposed sources are a UV free electron laser (FEL) driven by a high brightness linac and undulators in long, straight sections of a specially designed low energy (400 MeV) storage ring. These two distinct types of sources will provide a broad range of scientific opportunities that were discussed in detail during the workshop.

  1. Radioactivity Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onega, Ronald J.

    1969-01-01

    Three problems in radioactive buildup and decay are presented and solved. Matrix algebra is used to solve the second problem. The third problem deals with flux depression and is solved by the use of differential equations. (LC)

  2. Simulated Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boettler, James L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the errors in the sugar-cube experiment related to radioactivity as described in Project Physics course. The discussion considers some of the steps overlooked in the experiment and generalizes the theory beyond the sugar-cube stage. (PS)

  3. Radioactivity of the Cooling Water

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wigner, E. P.

    1943-03-01

    The most important source of radioactivity at the exit manifold of the pile will be due to O{sup 19}, formed by neutron absorption of O{sup 18}. A recent measurement of Fermi and Weil permits to estimate that it will be safe to stay about 80 minutes daily close to the exit manifolds without any shield. Estimates are given for the radioactivities from other sources both in the neighborhood and farther away from the pile.

  4. Acoustic and visual remote sensing of barrels of radioactive waste: Application of civilian and military technology to environmental management of the oceans

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, H.A.; Chin, J.L.; Maher, N.M.; Chavez, P.S. Jr.; Ueber, E.; Van Peeters, W.; Curl, H.

    1995-04-01

    As part of an ongoing strategic research project to find barrels of radioactive waste off San Francisco, the U.S. Navy (USN), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary (GFNMS) pooled their expertise, resources, and technology to form a partnership to verify new computer enhancement techniques developed for detecting targets the size of 55 gallon barrels on sidescan sonar images. Between 1946 and 1970, approximately 47,800 large barrels and other containers of radioactive waste were dumped in the ocean west of San Francisco; the containers litter an area of the sea floor of at least 1400 km {sup 2} knows as the Farallon Island Radioactive Waste Dump. The exact location of the containers and the potential hazard the containers pose to the environment is unknown. The USGS developed computer techniques and contracted with private industry to enhance sidescan data, collected in cooperation with the GFNMS, to detect objects as small as 55 gallon steel barrels while conducting regional scale sidescan sonar surveys. Using a subset of the regional sonar survey, images were plotted over a 125 km {sub 2} area. The acoustic interpretations were verified visually using the USN DSV Sea Cliff and the unmanned Advanced Tethered Vehicle (ATV). Barrels and other physical features were found where image enhancement had indicated they would be found. The interagency cooperation among the USN, USGS, and GFNMS has led to develop a cost effective and time efficient method to locate the barrels of radioactive waste. This method has universal application for locating containers of hazardous waste over a regional scale in other ocean areas such as Boston Harbor and the Kara Sea in the Arctic. This successful application of military and civilian expertise and technology has provided scientific information to help formulate policy decisions that affect the environmental management and quality of the ocean.

  5. Safe radioisotope thermoelectric generators and heat sources for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, R. C.; Ambrosi, R. M.; Bannister, N. P.; Howe, S. D.; Atkinson, H. V.

    2008-07-01

    Several isotopes are examined as alternatives to 238Pu that is traditionally used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and heating units (RHUs). The radioisotopes discussed include 241Am, 208Po, 210Po, and 90Sr. The aim of this study is to facilitate the design of an RTG with a minimal radiation dose rate and mass including any required shielding. Applications of interest are primarily space and planetary exploration. In order to evaluate the properties of the alternative radioisotopes a Monte Carlo model was developed to examine the radiation protection aspect of the study. The thermodynamics of the power generation process is examined and possible materials for the housing and encapsulation of the radioisotopes are proposed. In this study we also present a historical review of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and the thermoelectric conversion mechanism in order to provide a direct comparison with the performance of our proposed alternative isotope systems.

  6. An Open Source Platform for Earth Science Research and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiatt, S. H.; Ganguly, S.; Melton, F. S.; Michaelis, A.; Milesi, C.; Nemani, R. R.; Votava, P.; Wang, W.; Zhang, G.; Nasa Ecological Forecasting Lab

    2010-12-01

    The Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS) at NASA-ARC's Ecological Forecasting Lab produces a suite of gridded data products in near real-time that are designed to enhance management decisions related to various environmental phenomenon, as well as to advance scientific understanding of these ecosystem processes. While these data hold tremendous potential value for a wide range of disciplines, the large nature of these datasets presents challenges in their analysis and distribution. Additionally, remote sensing data and their derivative ecological models rely on quality ground-based observations for evaluating and validating model outputs. The Ecological Forecasting Lab addresses these challenges by developing a web-based data gateway, leveraging a completely open source software stack. TOPS data is organized and made accessible via an OPeNDAP server. Toolkits such as GDAL and Matplotlib are used within a Python web server to generate dynamic views of TOPS data that can be incorporated into web applictions, providing a simple interface for visualizing spatial and/or temporal trends. In order to facilitate collection of ground observations for validating and enhancing ecological models, we have implemented a web portal that allows volunteers to visualize current ecological conditions and to submit their observations. Initially we use this system to assist research related to plant phenology, but we plan to extend the system to support other areas of research as well.

  7. Application of Open Source Technologies for Oceanographic Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T.; Gangl, M.; Quach, N. T.; Wilson, B. D.; Chang, G.; Armstrong, E. M.; Chin, T. M.; Greguska, F.

    2015-12-01

    NEXUS is a data-intensive analysis solution developed with a new approach for handling science data that enables large-scale data analysis by leveraging open source technologies such as Apache Cassandra, Apache Spark, Apache Solr, and Webification. NEXUS has been selected to provide on-the-fly time-series and histogram generation for the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission for Level 2 and Level 3 Active, Passive, and Active Passive products. It also provides an on-the-fly data subsetting capability. NEXUS is designed to scale horizontally, enabling it to handle massive amounts of data in parallel. It takes a new approach on managing time and geo-referenced array data by dividing data artifacts into chunks and stores them in an industry-standard, horizontally scaled NoSQL database. This approach enables the development of scalable data analysis services that can infuse and leverage the elastic computing infrastructure of the Cloud. It is equipped with a high-performance geospatial and indexed data search solution, coupled with a high-performance data Webification solution free from file I/O bottlenecks, as well as a high-performance, in-memory data analysis engine. In this talk, we will focus on the recently funded AIST 2014 project by using NEXUS as the core for oceanographic anomaly detection service and web portal. We call it, OceanXtremes

  8. Non-radioactive in situ Hybridization Protocol Applicable for Norway Spruce and a Range of Plant Species

    PubMed Central

    Karlgren, Anna; Carlsson, Jenny; Gyllenstrand, Niclas; Lagercrantz, Ulf; Sundström, Jens F.

    2009-01-01

    The high-throughput expression analysis technologies available today give scientists an overflow of expression profiles but their resolution in terms of tissue specific expression is limited because of problems in dissecting individual tissues. Expression data needs to be confirmed and complemented with expression patterns using e.g. in situ hybridization, a technique used to localize cell specific mRNA expression. The in situ hybridization method is laborious, time-consuming and often requires extensive optimization depending on species and tissue. In situ experiments are relatively more difficult to perform in woody species such as the conifer Norway spruce (Picea abies). Here we present a modified DIG in situ hybridization protocol, which is fast and applicable on a wide range of plant species including P. abies. With just a few adjustments, including altered RNase treatment and proteinase K concentration, we could use the protocol to study tissue specific expression of homologous genes in male reproductive organs of one gymnosperm and two angiosperm species; P. abies, Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus. The protocol worked equally well for the species and genes studied. AtAP3 and BnAP3 were observed in second and third whorl floral organs in A. thaliana and B. napus and DAL13 in microsporophylls of male cones from P. abies. For P. abies the proteinase K concentration, used to permeablize the tissues, had to be increased to 3 g/ml instead of 1 g/ml, possibly due to more compact tissues and higher levels of phenolics and polysaccharides. For all species the RNase treatment was removed due to reduced signal strength without a corresponding increase in specificity. By comparing tissue specific expression patterns of homologous genes from both flowering plants and a coniferous tree we demonstrate that the DIG in situ protocol presented here, with only minute adjustments, can be applied to a wide range of plant species. Hence, the protocol avoids both extensive

  9. Development of tunable Fabry-Perot spectral camera and light source for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaarre, M.; Kivi, S.; Panouillot, P. E.; Saari, H.; Mäkynen, J.; Sorri, I.; Juuti, M.

    2013-05-01

    VTT has developed a fast, tunable Fabry-Perot (FP) filter component and applied it in making small, lightweight spectral cameras and light sources. One application field where this novel technology is now tested is medical field. A demonstrator has been made to test the applicability of FP based spectral filtering in the imaging of retina in visible light wavelength area.

  10. Viewer Makes Radioactivity "Visible"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I.

    1983-01-01

    Battery operated viewer demonstrates feasibility of generating threedimensional visible light simulations of objects that emit X-ray or gamma rays. Ray paths are traced for two pinhold positions to show location of reconstructed image. Images formed by pinholes are converted to intensified visible-light images. Applications range from radioactivity contamination surveys to monitoring radioisotope absorption in tumors.

  11. A solar powered handheld plasma source for microbial decontamination applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Y.; Lynch, M. J.; Modic, M.; Whalley, R. D.; Walsh, J. L.

    2016-09-01

    A fully portable atmospheric pressure air plasma system is reported to be suitable for the microbial decontamination of both surfaces and liquids. The device operates in quiescent air, and includes an integrated battery which is charged from a solar cell and weighs less than 750 g, making it highly amenable for a wide variety of applications beyond the laboratory. Using particle imaging velocimetry to visualise air flows around the device, the geometric configuration of the plasma generating electrodes was enhanced to induce a gas flow on the order of 0.5 m s‑1 directed towards a sample placed downstream, thus improving the transport of plasma generated reactive species to the sample. The microbial decontamination efficiency of the system was assessed using potable water samples inoculated with common waterborne organisms Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The reduction in the number of microorganisms was found to be in the range of 2–8 log and was strongly dependent on the plasma generation conditions.

  12. Technology and applications of broad-beam ion sources used in sputtering. Part I. Ion source technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, H.R.; Cuomo, J.J.; Harper, J.M.E.

    1982-09-01

    The technology of broad-beam ion sources used in sputtering applications is reviewed. The most frequently used discharge chambers are described, together with procedures for predicting performance. A new, compact ion source is described. Ion acceleration is reviewed, with particular emphasis on recent low-energy techniques. Some of these techniques include three-grid, small-hole two-grid, and one-grid ion optics. A new material for fabrication of high-precision ion optics is silicon. Because no stresses are introduced with the etching techniques used, the finished grid can be held to very close tolerances. A recent innovation for sputtering applications is the use of Hall-current acceleration. This technique uses a magnetic field interacting with an electron current to provide the accelerating electric field, thereby avoiding the usual space-charge limit on ion current density that is associated with gridded optics. Electron emission is also reviewed, with new hollow cathodes promising improved lifetimes. The overall picture is one of greatly improved ion source capability, with particularly large improvements in low-energy ion current densities.

  13. Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part I. Electronic brachytherapy source

    PubMed Central

    Fulkerson, Regina K.; Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper will discuss the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources; Part II will discuss those used with HDR 192Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics including depth dose and surface dose distributions have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Existing dosimetry protocols available from the AAPM bookend the cross-over characteristics of a traditional brachytherapy source (as described by Task Group 43) being implemented as a low-energy superficial x-ray beam (as described by Task Group 61) as observed with the surface applicators of interest. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and 192Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the electronic brachytherapy sources were completed with an Attix Free-Air Chamber, as well as several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally, relative dose

  14. Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part I. Electronic brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Fulkerson, Regina K. Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR){sup 192}Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper will discuss the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources; Part II will discuss those used with HDR {sup 192}Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics including depth dose and surface dose distributions have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Existing dosimetry protocols available from the AAPM bookend the cross-over characteristics of a traditional brachytherapy source (as described by Task Group 43) being implemented as a low-energy superficial x-ray beam (as described by Task Group 61) as observed with the surface applicators of interest. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and{sup 192}Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the electronic brachytherapy sources were completed with an Attix Free-Air Chamber, as well as several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally

  15. Source Data Applicability Impacts on Epistemic Uncertainty for Launch Vehicle Fault Tree Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al Hassan, Mohammad; Novack, Steven D.; Ring, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Launch vehicle systems are designed and developed using both heritage and new hardware. Design modifications to the heritage hardware to fit new functional system requirements can impact the applicability of heritage reliability data. Risk estimates for newly designed systems must be developed from generic data sources such as commercially available reliability databases using reliability prediction methodologies, such as those addressed in MIL-HDBK-217F. Failure estimates must be converted from the generic environment to the specific operating environment of the system where it is used. In addition, some qualification of applicability for the data source to the current system should be made. Characterizing data applicability under these circumstances is crucial to developing model estimations that support confident decisions on design changes and trade studies. This paper will demonstrate a data-source applicability classification method for assigning uncertainty to a target vehicle based on the source and operating environment of the originating data. The source applicability is determined using heuristic guidelines while translation of operating environments is accomplished by applying statistical methods to MIL-HDK-217F tables. The paper will provide a case study example by translating Ground Benign (GB) and Ground Mobile (GM) to the Airborne Uninhabited Fighter (AUF) environment for three electronic components often found in space launch vehicle control systems. The classification method will be followed by uncertainty-importance routines to assess the need to for more applicable data to reduce uncertainty.

  16. Blurring the boundaries between ion sources: The application of the RILIS inside a FEBIAD type ion source at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day Goodacre, T.; Billowes, J.; Catherall, R.; Cocolios, T. E.; Crepieux, B.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Gaffney, L. P.; Giles, T.; Gottberg, A.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Mendonça, T. M.; Ramos, J. P.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Sels, S.; Sotty, C.; Stora, T.; Van Beveren, C.; Veinhard, M.

    2016-06-01

    For the first time, the laser resonance photo-ionization technique has been applied inside a FEBIAD-type ion source at an ISOL facility. This was achieved by combining the ISOLDE RILIS with the ISOLDE variant of the FEBIAD ion source (the VADIS) in a series of off-line and on-line tests at CERN. The immediate applications of these developments include the coupling of the RILIS with molten targets at ISOLDE and the introduction of two new modes of FEBIAD operation: an element selective RILIS mode and a RILIS + VADIS mode for increased efficiency compared to VADIS mode operation alone. This functionality has been demonstrated off-line for gallium and barium and on-line for mercury and cadmium. Following this work, the RILIS mode of operation was successfully applied on-line for the study of nuclear ground state and isomer properties of mercury isotopes by in-source resonance ionization laser spectroscopy. The results from the first studies of the new operational modes, of what has been termed the Versatile Arc Discharge and Laser Ion Source (VADLIS), are presented and possible directions for future developments are outlined.

  17. 49 CFR 175.705 - Radioactive contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radioactive contamination. 175.705 Section 175.705... Regulations Applicable According to Classification of Material § 175.705 Radioactive contamination. (a) A... (radioactive) materials that may have been released from their packagings. (b) When contamination is present...

  18. 49 CFR 175.705 - Radioactive contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radioactive contamination. 175.705 Section 175.705... Regulations Applicable According to Classification of Material § 175.705 Radioactive contamination. (a) A... (radioactive) materials that may have been released from their packagings. (b) When contamination is present...

  19. 49 CFR 175.705 - Radioactive contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radioactive contamination. 175.705 Section 175.705... Regulations Applicable According to Classification of Material § 175.705 Radioactive contamination. (a) A... (radioactive) materials that may have been released from their packagings. (b) When contamination is present...

  20. 49 CFR 175.705 - Radioactive contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radioactive contamination. 175.705 Section 175.705... Regulations Applicable According to Classification of Material § 175.705 Radioactive contamination. (a) A... (radioactive) materials that may have been released from their packagings. (b) When contamination is present...

  1. 49 CFR 175.705 - Radioactive contamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radioactive contamination. 175.705 Section 175.705... Regulations Applicable According to Classification of Material § 175.705 Radioactive contamination. (a) A... (radioactive) materials that may have been released from their packagings. (b) When contamination is present...

  2. X-Ray Scattering Applications Using Pulsed X-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, B.C.

    1999-05-23

    Pulsed x-ray sources have been used in transient structural phenomena investigations for over fifty years; however, until the advent of synchrotrons sources and the development of table-top picosecond lasers, general access to ligh temporal resolution x-ray diffraction was relatively limited. Advances in diffraction techniques, sample excitation schemes, and detector systems, in addition to IncEased access to pulsed sources, have ld tO what is now a diverse and growing array of pulsed-source measurement applications. A survey of time-resolved investigations using pulsed x-ray sources is presented and research opportunities using both present and planned pulsed x-ray sources are discussed.

  3. 40 CFR 191.21 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... TRANSURANIC RADIOACTIVE WASTES Environmental Standards for Ground-Water Protection § 191.21 Applicability. (a... activities subject to subpart B of this part; and (2) Radioactive contamination of underground sources of drinking water in the accessible environment as a result of such activities. (b) This subpart does...

  4. Recoil in vacuum for Te ions: Calibration, models, and applications to radioactive-beam g-factor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stuchbery, A. E.; Stone, N. J.

    2007-09-15

    In the light of new g factor results for the stable isotopes between {sup 122}Te and {sup 130}Te, the calibration and modeling of the recoil-in-vacuum (RIV) interaction for Te ions is reexamined, and the recent radioactive-beam g factor measurement on {sup 132}Te by the RIV technique is reevaluated. The implications for further RIV g-factor measurements in the {sup 132}Sn region are discussed.

  5. Use of electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source for nondestructive testing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T. S.

    2006-03-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) technique is being used for generating x rays in the low-energy region (<150keV). Recently, the source is used for the calibration of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) badges. In order to qualify the ECR x-ray source for imaging application, the source should give uniform flux over the area under study. Lead collimation arrangement is made to get uniform flux. The flux profile is measured using a teletector at different distance from the port and uniform field region of 10×10cm2 has been marked at 20cm from the x-ray exit port. A digital-to-analog converter (DAC) circuit pack is used for examining the source performance. The required dose for nondestructive testing examination has been estimated using a hospital x-ray machine and it is found to be 0.05mSv. Our source experimental parameters are tuned and the DAC circuit pack was exposed for nearly 7min to get the required dose value. The ECR x-ray source operating parameters are argon pressure: 10-5Torr, microwave power: 350W, and coil current: 0A. The effective energy of the x-ray spectrum is nearly 40keV. The x-ray images obtained from ECR x-ray source and hospital medical radiography machine are compared. It is found that the image obtained from ECR x-ray source is suitable for NDT application.

  6. Use of electron cyclotron resonance x-ray source for nondestructive testing application

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, R.; Selvakumaran, T.S.

    2006-03-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) technique is being used for generating x rays in the low-energy region (<150 keV). Recently, the source is used for the calibration of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) badges. In order to qualify the ECR x-ray source for imaging application, the source should give uniform flux over the area under study. Lead collimation arrangement is made to get uniform flux. The flux profile is measured using a teletector at different distance from the port and uniform field region of 10x10 cm{sup 2} has been marked at 20 cm from the x-ray exit port. A digital-to-analog converter (DAC) circuit pack is used for examining the source performance. The required dose for nondestructive testing examination has been estimated using a hospital x-ray machine and it is found to be 0.05 mSv. Our source experimental parameters are tuned and the DAC circuit pack was exposed for nearly 7 min to get the required dose value. The ECR x-ray source operating parameters are argon pressure: 10{sup -5} Torr, microwave power: 350 W, and coil current: 0 A. The effective energy of the x-ray spectrum is nearly 40 keV. The x-ray images obtained from ECR x-ray source and hospital medical radiography machine are compared. It is found that the image obtained from ECR x-ray source is suitable for NDT application.

  7. Inverse Compton γ-ray source for nuclear physics and related applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, P. G.; Litvinenko, V. N.; Madey, J. M. J.; Roberson, N. R.; Schreiber, E. C.; Straub, K. D.; Weeks, K. J.; Weller, H. R.; Wu, Y.

    1996-02-01

    The development of intense, short-wavelength FEL light sources has opened opportunities for new applications of high-energy Compton-backscattered photons. These applications range from medical imaging with X-rays to high energy physics with photon colliders. In this paper we discuss the practical aspects applications using polarized Compton backscattered γ-rays in the 5-150 MeV range from the Duke storage-ring-driven FEL. Such applications include: nuclear physics, cancer therapy, radiographic imaging, radiation effects testing, and positron production for material science studies.

  8. Shared and Distributed Memory Parallel Security Analysis of Large-Scale Source Code and Binary Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D; Barany, G; Panas, T

    2007-08-30

    Many forms of security analysis on large scale applications can be substantially automated but the size and complexity can exceed the time and memory available on conventional desktop computers. Most commercial tools are understandably focused on such conventional desktop resources. This paper presents research work on the parallelization of security analysis of both source code and binaries within our Compass tool, which is implemented using the ROSE source-to-source open compiler infrastructure. We have focused on both shared and distributed memory parallelization of the evaluation of rules implemented as checkers for a wide range of secure programming rules, applicable to desktop machines, networks of workstations and dedicated clusters. While Compass as a tool focuses on source code analysis and reports violations of an extensible set of rules, the binary analysis work uses the exact same infrastructure but is less well developed into an equivalent final tool.

  9. Optical Spectroscopy and Performance Tests with a Solid State Laser Ion Source at HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Gottwald, T.; Geppert, C.; Schwellnus, F.; Wies, K.; Wendt, K.; Liu, Yuan; Baktash, Cyrus; Beene, James R; Havener, Charles C; Krause, Herbert F; Schultz, David Robert; Stracener, Daniel W; Vane, C Randy; Kessler, T.; Tordoff, B.

    2008-01-01

    An ISOLDE-type hot-cavity laser ion source based on high-repetition-rate Ti:Sapphire lasers has been set up at the Holifield radioactive ion beam facility. To assess the feasibility of the all-solid-state laser system for applications at advanced radioactive ion beam facilities, spectroscopy and performance tests have been conducted with this source. The results of recent studies on excitation schemes, source efficiency, beam emittance and ion time structure are presented.

  10. 3-D localization of gamma ray sources with coded apertures for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaissas, I.; Papadimitropoulos, C.; Karafasoulis, K.; Potiriadis, C.; Lambropoulos, C. P.

    2015-09-01

    Several small gamma cameras for radioguided surgery using CdTe or CdZnTe have parallel or pinhole collimators. Coded aperture imaging is a well-known method for gamma ray source directional identification, applied in astrophysics mainly. The increase in efficiency due to the substitution of the collimators by the coded masks renders the method attractive for gamma probes used in radioguided surgery. We have constructed and operationally verified a setup consisting of two CdTe gamma cameras with Modified Uniform Redundant Array (MURA) coded aperture masks of rank 7 and 19 and a video camera. The 3-D position of point-like radioactive sources is estimated via triangulation using decoded images acquired by the gamma cameras. We have also developed code for both fast and detailed simulations and we have verified the agreement between experimental results and simulations. In this paper we present a simulation study for the spatial localization of two point sources using coded aperture masks with rank 7 and 19.

  11. Radioactive materials in recycled metals.

    PubMed

    Lubenau, J O; Yusko, J G

    1995-04-01

    In recent years, the metal recycling industry has become increasingly aware of an unwanted component in metal scrap--radioactive material. Worldwide, there have been 35 instances where radioactive sources were unintentionally smelted in the course of recycling metal scrap. In some cases contaminated metal consumer products were distributed internationally. In at least one case, serious radiation exposures of workers and the public occurred. Radioactive material appearing in metal scrap includes sources subject to licensing under the Atomic Energy Act and also naturally occurring radioactive material. U.S. mills that have smelted a radioactive source face costs resulting from decontamination, waste disposal, and lost profits that range from 7 to 23 million U.S. dollars for each event. To solve the problem, industry and the government have jointly undertaken initiatives to increase awareness of the problem within the metal recycling industry. Radiation monitoring of recycled metal scrap is being performed increasingly by mills and, to a lesser extent, by scrap processors. The monitoring does not, however, provide 100% protection. Improvements in regulatory oversight by the government could stimulate improved accounting and control of licensed sources. However, additional government effort in this area must be reconciled with competing priorities in radiation safety and budgetary constraints. The threat of radioactive material in recycled metal scrap will continue for the foreseeable future and, thus, poses regulatory policy challenges for both developed and developing nations. PMID:7883556

  12. Application of sorption heat pumps for increasing of new power sources efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, L.; Filatova, O.; Tsitovich, A.

    2010-07-01

    In the 21st century the way to increase the efficiency of new sources of energy is directly related with extended exploration of renewable energy. This modern tendency ensures the fuel economy needs to be realized with nature protection. The increasing of new power sources efficiency (cogeneration, trigeneration systems, fuel cells, photovoltaic systems) can be performed by application of solid sorption heat pumps, regrigerators, heat and cold accumulators, heat transformers, natural gas and hydrogen storage systems and efficient heat exchangers.

  13. Radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, M.S.; Hickox, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    This paper provides a review of literature published in 1995 on the subject of radioactive wastes. Topics covered include: national programs; waste repositories; mixed wastes; decontamination and decommissioning; remedial actions and treatment; and environmental occurrence and transport of radionuclides. 155 refs.

  14. Radioactive Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaylock, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of radioactive waste disposal, covering publications of 1976-77. Some of the studies included are: (1) high-level and long-lived wastes, and (2) release and burial of low-level wastes. A list of 42 references is also presented. (HM)

  15. Joint Classification and Data Compression of multidimensional information sources - Application to ERTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, E. E.

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes a concept of Joint Classification and Data Compression of multidimensional information sources in the context of applications to Earth Resources Technology Satellites. The concept is used to define an Information Extraction System intended to remove data redundancy early in the sensor to user link in both classification and film interpretation applications. The approach uses cascaded partially supervised clustering to extract spectral intensity features from spatially local sources. Data compression is then used to efficiently represent spatial features within the spectral intensity feature map.

  16. Improved source path localisation in ring applicators and the clinical impact for gynecological brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Humer, Irene; Kirisits, Christian; Berger, Daniel; Trnková, Petra; Pötter, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The path of subsequent dwell positions of an afterloader source being moved through a ring applicator for cervix cancer brachytherapy deviates from an ideal circle and the position of marker wires. This can lead to deviations of several millimetres between real and assumed dwell positions for treatment planning with simplified source path models. The aim of this study was to test video- and autoradiography-based methods for source path determination, and to study the influence of dwell position accuracy on dose-volume histogram (DVH)-parameters. Material and methods Videos of the exact motion of the source wire through three different (r = 26, 30, 34 mm) computed tomography/magnetic resonance (CT/MR) compatible plastic ring applicators were recorded. Observed dwell positions covering the whole length of each applicators channel were used to adjust the circular source path model. The agreement of the true source positions derived from video analysis with those of the corrected circular source path was verified using autoradiography. The impact of an accurate source path definition on dose planning was analysed by simulating clinically relevant uncertainties in 10 clinical treatment plans. Results Depending on the ring size, source path diameters had to be increased by 0.5-1.0 mm in order to achieve acceptable maximum differences between observed and corrected dwell positions (1.3-2.0 mm). Autoradiography analysis showed a positional accuracy within ± 3 mm (extended standard deviation k = 2). For shifts of ± 2.5 mm for even all dwell positions, the systematic and random variation of the D2cm3 for bladder, rectum, and sigmoid was within 3%, while the impact on DVH uncertainties was much smaller for clinical target volume (CTV)HR and gross tumour volume (GTV). Conclusions It is strongly advised to verify the real source path for ring applicators during acceptance testing in order to assure accurate source path definition and dose planning. Autoradiography can

  17. A plasma-based non-intrusive point source for acoustic beamforming applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Zawodny, Nikolas S.; Bertolucci, Brandon; Li, Jian; Sheplak, Mark; Cattafesta, Louis N.

    2015-05-01

    A laser-generated plasma acoustic point source is used to directly measure the point spread function (PSF) of a microphone phased array. In beamforming analysis of microphone phased array data, the true acoustic field is convolved with the array's PSF. By directly measuring the PSF, corrections to the array analysis can be computed and applied. The acoustic source is measured in an open-jet aeroacoustic facility to evaluate the effects of sampling rate, microphone installation, source shift, reflections, shear layer refraction and model presence. Results show that measurements exhibit behavior consistent with theory with regard to source shift and shear layer refraction. Application of a measured PSF in beamforming analysis shows that the process provides an effective in situ method for array calibration both with and without flow and allows for corrections to incorporate reflections and scattering. The technique improves the agreement of beamforming results with the true spectrum of a known source, especially in the presence of reflections.

  18. Characteristics and potential applications of an ORNL microwave ECR multicusp plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    A new microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasma ion source that has two ECR plasma production regions and uses multicusp plasma confinement has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This source has been operated to produce uniform and dense plasma over large areas of 300 to 400 cm{sup 2} and could be scaled up to produce uniform plasma over 700 cm{sup 2} or larger. The plasma source has been operated with continuous argon gas feed and pulsed microwave power. The working gases used were argon, helium, hydrogen, and oxygen. The discharge initiation phenomena and plasma properties have been investigated and studied as functions of the discharge parameters. The discharge characteristics and a hypothetical discharge mechanism for this plasma source are described and discussed. Potential applications, including plasma and ion-beam sources for manufacturing advanced microelectronics, for space electric propulsion, and for fusion research, are discussed. 10 refs., 10 figs.

  19. Common characteristics of open source software development and applicability for drug discovery: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Innovation through an open source model has proven to be successful for software development. This success has led many to speculate if open source can be applied to other industries with similar success. We attempt to provide an understanding of open source software development characteristics for researchers, business leaders and government officials who may be interested in utilizing open source innovation in other contexts and with an emphasis on drug discovery. Methods A systematic review was performed by searching relevant, multidisciplinary databases to extract empirical research regarding the common characteristics and barriers of initiating and maintaining an open source software development project. Results Common characteristics to open source software development pertinent to open source drug discovery were extracted. The characteristics were then grouped into the areas of participant attraction, management of volunteers, control mechanisms, legal framework and physical constraints. Lastly, their applicability to drug discovery was examined. Conclusions We believe that the open source model is viable for drug discovery, although it is unlikely that it will exactly follow the form used in software development. Hybrids will likely develop that suit the unique characteristics of drug discovery. We suggest potential motivations for organizations to join an open source drug discovery project. We also examine specific differences between software and medicines, specifically how the need for laboratories and physical goods will impact the model as well as the effect of patents. PMID:21955914

  20. Free-form glass reflectors for non-trivial illumination applications with extended sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heßling, Thomas; Geyer, Ulf; Hellwig, Ansgar; Hübner, Marc C.

    2012-10-01

    The field of illumination optics has an increasing demand for free-form optics that produce arbitrary light distributions. In various applications an asymmetric, e.g. rectangular illumination can be beneficial, such as street lights, shop lights or architectural lighting. Yet there are only very few construction methods for free-form surfaces, especially using extended sources. One such method utilizes a manifold of conic sections to derive a source-target mapping for a particular source and target distribution. Although it relies on the assumption of a point source it can be adapted to work with real, extended sources. We implemented the algorithm to construct glass reflectors for almost arbitrary light distributions, either prescribed in the near- or far-field. Starting with a point source, an initial surface is optimized in a second process with a feedback loop to produce the desired result with the actual extended source. Our method is quite robust and was used to design for example an asymmetrical street light reflector. It was manufactured at Auer Lighting GmbH out of borosilicate glass. Measured target distributions are in excellent agreement with the simulations. These promising results show that this particular design method can be applied to real world applications. It is a powerful tool whenever a highly optimized reflector for a non-trivial illumination is required.

  1. Evaluating phosphorus loss from a Florida spodosol as affected by phosphorus-source application methods.

    PubMed

    Agyin-Birikorang, S; O'Connor, G A; Brinton, S R

    2008-01-01

    Incorporating applied phosphorus (P) sources can reduce P runoff losses and is a recommended best management practice. However, in soils with low P retention capacities, leaching can be a major mechanism for off-site P loss, and the P-source application method (surface or incorporation) may not significantly affect the total amount of off-site P loss. We utilized simulated rainfall protocols to investigate effects of P-source characteristics and application methods on the forms and amounts of P losses from six P sources, including five biosolids materials produced and/or marketed in Florida, and one inorganic fertilizer (triple superphosphate). A typical Florida Spodosol (Immokalee fine sand; sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Arenic Alaquods) was used for the study, to which the P sources were each applied at a rate of 224 kg P ha(-1) (approximately the P rate associated with N-based biosolids applications). The P sources were either surface-applied to the soil or incorporated into the soil to a depth of 5 cm. Amended soils were subjected to three simulated rainfall events, at 1-d intervals. Runoff and leachate were collected after each rainfall event and analyzed for P losses in the form of soluble reactive P (SRP), total dissolved P (TDP), total P (TP), and bioavailable P (BAP) (in runoff only). Cumulative masses (runoff + leachate for the three rainfall events) of P losses from all the P sources were similar, whether the amendments were surface-applied or incorporated into the soil. The solubility of the amendment, rather than application method, largely determines the P loss potential in poorly P-sorbing Florida Spodosols. PMID:18453437

  2. Improved determination of the position and activity of a radioactive point source inside a bulky medium using several detectors. The special case of a lung counter--a general view.

    PubMed

    Pelled, Omer; Bonardi, Mauro L; German, Uzi; Groppi, Flavia; Alfassi, Zeev B

    2007-02-01

    A method is described to locate a radioactive point source in a lung using a commercial array of lung detectors. The method takes advantage of the fact that modern commercial systems consist of several Ge detectors, each connected to a multi-channel analyzer, and the information from each detector can be analyzed separately. The system is calibrated with point sources placed in various locations in the lungs of a phantom. A vector method is presented for determining which of the calibration locations in the phantom is closest to the location of the unknown point source. It has been shown that the accuracy of the method increases with increasing number of the vector dimensions. A higher dimensionality can be achieved by analyzing counts of several gamma lines or by using more detectors. PMID:16928446

  3. Experiences in the field of radioactive materials seizures in the Czech Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Svoboda, Karel; Podlaha, Josef; Sir, David; Mudra, Josef

    2007-07-01

    In recent years, the amount of radioactive materials seizures (captured radioactive materials) has been rising. It was above all due to newly installed detection facilities that were able to check metallic scrap during its collection in scrap yards or on the entrance to iron-mills, checking municipal waste upon entrance to municipal disposal sites, even incineration plants, or through checking vehicles going through the borders of the Czech Republic. Most cases bore a relationship to secondary raw materials or they were connected to the application of machines and installations made from contaminated metallic materials. However, in accordance to our experience, the number of cases of seizures of materials and devices containing radioactive sources used in the public domain was lower, but not negligible, in the municipal storage yards or incineration plants. Atomic Act No. 18/1997 Coll. will apply to everybody who provides activities leading to exposure, mandatory assurance as high radiation safety as risk of the endangering of life, personal health and environment is as low as reasonably achievable in according to social and economic aspects. Hence, attention on the examination of all cases of the radioactive material seizure based on detection facilities alarm or reasonably grounds suspicion arising from the other information is important. Therefore, a service carried out by group of workers who ensure assessment of captured radioactive materials and eventual retrieval of radioactive sources from the municipal waste has come into existence in the Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc. This service has covered also transport, storage, processing and disposal of found radioactive sources. This service has arisen especially for municipal disposal sites, but later on even other companies took advantage of this service like incineration plants, the State Office for Nuclear Safety, etc. Our experience in the field of ensuring assessment of captured radioactive materials

  4. Application of low-background gamma-ray spectrometry to monitor radioactivity in the environment and food.

    PubMed

    Khan, A J; Semkow, T M; Beach, S E; Haines, D K; Bradt, C J; Bari, A; Syed, U-F; Torres, M; Marrantino, J; Kitto, M E; Menia, T; Fielman, E

    2014-08-01

    The results are described of an upgrade of the low-background gamma-ray spectrometry laboratory at New York State Department of Health by acquiring sensitivity to low-energy gamma rays. Tuning of the spectrometer and its low-energy response characteristics are described. The spectrometer has been applied to monitor the environment by measuring aerosols and water in New York State contaminated by the 2011 Fukushima accident plume. In addition, the spectrometer has been used to monitor radioactivity in food by performing a study of cesium in Florida milk. PMID:24836905

  5. A literature review of methods of analysis of organic analytes in radioactive wastes with an emphasis on sources from the United Kingdom

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, S.A.; Bean, R.M.

    1993-09-01

    This report, compiled by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), examines literature originating through the United Kingdom (UK) nuclear industry relating to the analyses of organic constituents of radioactive waste. Additionally, secondary references from the UK and other counties, including the United States, have been reviewed. The purpose of this literature review was to find analytical methods that would apply to the mixed-waste matrices found at Hanford.

  6. 40 CFR 63.640 - Applicability and designation of affected source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicability and designation of affected source. 63.640 Section 63.640 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... required by 40 CFR 61.357 of subpart FF; (vi) Reports and notifications required by § 63.428(b), (c),...

  7. 40 CFR 63.640 - Applicability and designation of affected source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 11 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability and designation of affected source. 63.640 Section 63.640 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... table 3 of this subpart; (v) Reports required by 40 CFR 61.357 of subpart FF; (vi) Reports...

  8. U.S. Government Electronic Data Sources for Global Marketing Decisions: An Evaluation and Classroom Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Vaughan C.; Tims, Betty J.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. government publishes considerable information applicable to business people interested in global marketing opportunities, much of which is available via the Internet and CD-ROMs. Evaluates the usefulness of four of the government's electronic sources of global marketing information (e.g., the World Fact Book), describing workshops using…

  9. Response of seed tocopherols in oilseed rape to nitrogen fertilizer sources and application rates* #

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Nazim; Li, Hui; Jiang, Yu-xiao; Jabeen, Zahra; Shamsi, Imran Haider; Ali, Essa; Jiang, Li-xi

    2014-01-01

    Tocopherols (Tocs) are vital scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and important seed oil quality indicators. Nitrogen (N) is one of the most important fertilizers in promoting biomass and grain yield in crop production. However, the effect of different sources and application rates of N on seed Toc contents in oilseed rape is poorly understood. In this study, pot trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of two sources of N fertilizer (urea and ammonium nitrate). Each source was applied to five oilseed rape genotypes (Zheshuang 72, Jiu-Er-1358, Zheshuang 758, Shiralee, and Pakola) at three different application rates (0.41 g/pot (N1), 0.81 g/pot (N2), and 1.20 g/pot (N3)). Results indicated that urea increased α-, γ-, and total Toc (T-Toc) more than did ammonium nitrate. N3 was proven as the most efficient application rate, which yielded high contents of γ-Toc and T-Toc. Highly significant correlations were observed between Toc isomers, T-Toc, and α-/γ-Toc ratio. These results clearly demonstrate that N sources and application rates significantly affect seed Toc contents in oilseed rape. PMID:24510711

  10. The Notes Program: A Hypertext Application for Writing from Source Texts. CECE Technical Report No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuwirth, Christine M.; And Others

    This paper discusses "Notes," a hypertext application program which was designed and implemented to investigate the effects of computers on the writing process generally, and in particular to experiment with tools to support the decisions writers make while acquiring and structuring knowledge taken from source texts. The paper outlines the…

  11. UAV using the open-source flight-control-system in the application of aerial survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ji-chen; Ru, Chen

    2015-12-01

    The aerial survey as one of the branches of the Space Information Technology system, has an important application in data acquisition of the earth's surface. In recent years, the trend of UVA (unmanned aerial vehicle) to replace traditional survey aircraft has become increasingly obvious with the progress of science and technology. At present, the price of the commercial UAV Flight Control System is higher, limiting the application of UVA. This paper mainly discusses the possibility that the open-source's flight-control-system take the place of the commercial one. Result is that the costs of UVA are reduced, and make the application more widely.

  12. Forensic applications of nitrogen and oxygen isotopes in tracing nitrate sources in urban environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silva, S.R.; Ging, P.B.; Lee, R.W.; Ebbert, J.C.; Tesoriero, A.J.; Inkpen, E.L.

    2002-01-01

    Ground and surface waters in urban areas are susceptible to nitrate contamination from septic systems, leaking sewer lines, and fertilizer applications. Source identification is a primary step toward a successful remediation plan in affected areas. In this respect, nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of nitrate, in conjunction with hydrologic data and water chemistry, have proven valuable in urban studies from Austin, Texas, and Tacoma, Washington. In Austin, stream water was sampled during stremflow and baseflow conditions to assess surface and subsurface sources of nitrate, respectively. In Tacoma, well waters were sampled in adjacent sewered and un-sewered areas to determine if locally high nitrate concentrations were caused by septic systems in the un-sewered areas. In both studies, sewage was identified as a nitrate source and mixing between sewage and other sources of nitrate was apparent. In addition to source identification, combined nitrogen and oxygen isotopes were important in determining the significance of denitrification, which can complicate source assessment by reducing nitrate concentrations and increasing ??15N values. The two studies illustrate the value of nitrogen and oxygen isotopes of nitrate for forensic applications in urban areas. ?? Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. on behalf of AEHS.

  13. Broadband light source for fiber-optic measurement system in spaceborne applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rößner, Max R.; Müller, Mathias S.; Buck, Thorbjörn C.; Koch, Alexander W.

    2012-01-01

    Measuring temperatures, mechanical loads and derived quantities precisely and reliably play an important role in spaceflight. With spacecraft becoming increasingly complex, upscaling of present telemetry techniques can become cumbersome. Additionally, there are entirely new sensory requirements, resulting from emerging technologies such as smart structures, active vibration damping and composite material health monitoring. It has been demonstrated in preceding studies that these measurements can be advantageously and efficiently carried out by means of fiber-optic systems. The most prominent fiber-optic strain and temperature sensor is the fiber Bragg grating. Typically, multiple fiber Bragg gratings are used to translate entire temperature and strain fields into an optical wavelength information. For the interrogation of these sensors, a broadband or scanning light source is required. Additional requirements with respect to the light source are high intensity and unpolarized illumination of the gratings. These constraints can be met by a light source that is based on amplified spontaneous emission in a rare-earth-doped fiber. In the presented work, a compact light source, adapted for measurement applications and targeted towards space applications, has been developed. The design of this light source is presented, as well as its implementation. The light source has been designed and tested for selected core aspects of space robustness and the results of these tests are summarized.

  14. Plasma Sources for Medical Applications - A Comparison of Spot Like Plasmas and Large Area Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-09-01

    Plasma applications in life science are currently emerging worldwide. Whereas today's commercially available plasma surgical technologies such as argon plasma coagulation (APC) or ablation are mainly based on lethal plasma effects on living systems, the newly emerging therapeutic applications will be based on selective, at least partially non-lethal, possibly stimulating plasma effects on living cells and tissue. Promising results could be obtained by different research groups worldwide revealing a huge potential for the application of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma in fields such as tissue engineering, healing of chronic wounds, treatment of skin diseases, tumor treatment based on specific induction of apoptotic processes, inhibition of biofilm formation and direct action on biofilms or treatment of dental diseases. The development of suitable and reliable plasma sources for the different therapies requires an in-depth knowledge of their physics, chemistry and parameters. Therefore much basic research still needs to be conducted to minimize risk and to provide a scientific fundament for new plasma-based medical therapies. It is essential to perform a comprehensive assessment of physical and biological experiments to clarify minimum standards for plasma sources for applications in life science and for comparison of different sources. One result is the DIN-SPEC 91315, which is now open for further improvements. This contribution intends to give an overview on the status of commercial cold plasma sources as well as cold plasma sources still under development for medical use. It will discuss needs, prospects and approaches for the characterization of plasmas from different points of view. Regarding the manageability in everyday medical life, atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJ) and dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) are of special interest. A comprehensive risk-benefit assessment including the state of the art of commercial sources for medical use

  15. Development of A phantom for ophthalmic beta source applicator quality control using TL dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, N. A.; da Rosa, L. A. R.; Braz, D.

    2015-11-01

    Concave eye applicators with 90Sr/90Y and 106Ru/106Rh beta ray sources are usually used in brachytherapy for the treatment of superficial intraocular tumors as uveal melanoma with thickness up to 5 mm. The calculation of the dose delivered to the eye is carried out based on the data present in the beta source calibration certificate. Therefore, it would be interesting to have a system that could evaluate that dose. In this work, an eye phantom to be used with 106Ru/106Rh betatherapy applicators was developed in solid water. This phantom can hold nine micro-cube thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters, TLD-100. The characteristics of the TL response of the dosimeters, namely reproducibility and individual sensitivity, were determined for a 60Co source. Using Monte Carlo code MCNPX, the dose to a water eye was determined at different depths. Exposing the eye phantom with TL dosimeters to the 106Ru/106Rh applicator, it is possible to assess calibration factors using the dose values obtained by Monte Carlo simulation to each depth. Using mean calibration factors, dose values obtained by TL dosimetry were compared to the data present in the applicators certificate. Mean differences for both applicators were lower than ±10%, maximum value 17% and minimum value 0.08%. Considering that the certificate values present an uncertainty of ±20%, the calibration procedure and the developed phantom are validated and can be applied.

  16. Characterization and application of a LED-driven integrating sphere source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Leibo; Georgieva, Elena M.; Butler, James J.; Cooper, John W.; Georgiev, Georgi T.; Smith, Gilbert R.

    2015-09-01

    A Light-Emitting Diode (LED)-driven integrating sphere light source has been fabricated and assembled in the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Code 618 Biospheric Sciences Laboratory's Calibration Facility. This light source is a 30.5 cm diameter integrating sphere lined with Spectralon. A set of four LEDs of different wavelengths are mounted on the integrating sphere's wall ports. A National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) characterized Si detector is mounted on a port to provide real-time monitoring data for reference. The measurement results presented here include the short-term and long-term stability and polarization characterization of the output from this LED-driven integrating sphere light source. As an initial application, this light source is used to characterize detector/pre-amplifier gain linearity in light detection systems. The measurement results will be presented and discussed.

  17. Potential applications of a new microwave ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) multicusp plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    A new microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasma ion source using two ECR plasma production regions and multicusp plasma confinement has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This source has been operated to produce uniform and dense plasmas over large areas of 300 to 400 cm{sup 2}. The plasma source has been operated with continuous argon gas feed and pulsed microwave power. The discharge initiation phenomena and plasma properties have been investigated and studied as functions of discharge parameters. Together with the discharge characteristics observed, a hypothetical discharge mechanism for this plasma source is reported and discussed. Potential applications, including plasma and ion-beam processing for manufacturing advanced microelectronics and for space electric propulsion, are discussed. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Simple and versatile long range swept source for optical coherence tomography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bräuer, Bastian; Lippok, Norman; Murdoch, Stuart G.; Vanholsbeeck, Frédérique

    2015-12-01

    We present a versatile long coherence length swept-source laser design for optical coherence tomography applications. This design consists of a polygonal spinning mirror and an optical gain chip in a modified Littman-Metcalf cavity. A narrowband intra-cavity filter is implemented through multiple passes off a diffraction grating set at grazing incidence. The key advantage of this design is that it can be readily adapted to any wavelength regions for which broadband gain chips are available. We demonstrate this by implementing sources at 1650 nm, 1550 nm, 1310 nm and 1050 nm. In particular, we present a 1310 nm swept source laser with 24 mm coherence length, 95 nm optical bandwidth, 2 kHz maximum sweep frequency and 7.5 mW average output power. These parameters make it a suitable source for the imaging of biological samples.

  19. Novel methods for improvement of a Penning ion source for neutron generator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, A.; Ji, Q.; Persaud, A.; Waldmann, O.; Schenkel, T.

    2012-02-15

    Penning ion source performance for neutron generator applications is characterized by the atomic ion fraction and beam current density, providing two paths by which source performance can be improved for increased neutron yields. We have fabricated a Penning ion source to investigate novel methods for improving source performance, including optimization of wall materials and electrode geometry, advanced magnetic confinement, and integration of field emitter arrays for electron injection. Effects of several electrode geometries on discharge characteristics and extracted ion current were studied. Additional magnetic confinement resulted in a factor of two increase in beam current density. First results indicate unchanged proton fraction and increased beam current density due to electron injection from carbon nanofiber arrays.

  20. A novel non-radioactive primase-pyrophosphatase activity assay and its application to the discovery of inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis primase DnaG.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Tapan; Resto-Roldán, Esteban; Sawyer, Sean K; Artsimovitch, Irina; Tsodikov, Oleg V

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial DNA primase DnaG synthesizes RNA primers required for chromosomal DNA replication. Biochemical assays measuring primase activity have been limited to monitoring formation of radioactively labelled primers because of the intrinsically low catalytic efficiency of DnaG. Furthermore, DnaG is prone to aggregation and proteolytic degradation. These factors have impeded discovery of DnaG inhibitors by high-throughput screening (HTS). In this study, we expressed and purified the previously uncharacterized primase DnaG from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb DnaG). By coupling the activity of Mtb DnaG to that of another essential enzyme, inorganic pyrophosphatase from M. tuberculosis (Mtb PPiase), we developed the first non-radioactive primase-pyrophosphatase assay. An extensive optimization of the assay enabled its efficient use in HTS (Z' = 0.7 in the 384-well format). HTS of 2560 small molecules to search for inhibitory compounds yielded several hits, including suramin, doxorubicin and ellagic acid. We demonstrate that these three compounds inhibit Mtb DnaG. Both suramin and doxorubicin are potent (low-µM) DNA- and nucleotide triphosphate-competitive priming inhibitors that interact with more than one site on Mtb DnaG. This novel assay should be applicable to other primases and inefficient DNA/RNA polymerases, facilitating their characterization and inhibitor discovery. PMID:23267008