Science.gov

Sample records for radiodiagnostic exposure time

  1. Bisamide bisthiol compounds useful for making technetium radiodiagnostic renal agents

    DOEpatents

    Davison, Alan; Brenner, David; Lister-James, John; Jones, Alun G.

    1987-06-16

    A radiodiagnostic bisamido-bisthio ligand useful for producing Tc-labelled radiodiagnostic renal agents is described. The ligand forms a complex with the radionuclide .sup.99m Tc suitable for administration as a radiopharmaceutical to obtain images of the kidney for diagnosis of kidney disfunction.

  2. Fast exposure time decision in multi-exposure HDR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Yongjie; Jin, Guang

    2012-10-01

    Currently available imaging and display system exists the problem of insufficient dynamic range, and the system cannot restore all the information for an high dynamic range (HDR) scene. The number of low dynamic range(LDR) image samples and fastness of exposure time decision impacts the real-time performance of the system dramatically. In order to realize a real-time HDR video acquisition system, this paper proposed a fast and robust method for exposure time selection in under and over exposure area which is based on system response function. The method utilized the monotony of the imaging system. According to this characteristic the exposure time is adjusted to an initial value to make the median value of the image equals to the middle value of the system output range; then adjust the exposure time to make the pixel value on two sides of histogram be the middle value of the system output range. Thus three low dynamic range images are acquired. Experiments show that the proposed method for adjusting the initial exposure time can converge in two iterations which is more fast and stable than average gray control method. As to the exposure time adjusting in under and over exposed area, the proposed method can use the dynamic range of the system more efficiently than fixed exposure time method.

  3. Technetium radiodiagnostic fatty acids derived from bisamide bisthiol ligands

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Alun G.; Lister-James, John; Davison, Alan

    1988-05-24

    A bisamide-bisthiol ligand containing fatty acid substituted thiol useful for producing Tc-labelled radiodiagnostic imaging agents is described. The ligand forms a complex with the radionuclide .sup.99m Tc suitable for administration as a radiopharmaceutical to obtain images of the heart for diagnosis of myocardial disfunction.

  4. Noise suppression by time exposure oscilloscope photography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huchital, G. S.; Young, M.

    1972-01-01

    We describe a simple and inexpensive means of enhancing repetitive signals obscured by noise with roughly equal amplitude. The signal and noise are displayed on an oscilloscope, and we perform a time average over many traces by time exposure photography. If the oscilloscope triggering is synchronous with the signal, the result is a significant suppression of the offending noise.

  5. Exposure influences expressive timing judgments in music.

    PubMed

    Honing, Henkjan; Ladinig, Olivia

    2009-02-01

    This study is concerned with the question whether, and to what extent, listeners' previous exposure to music in everyday life, and expertise as a result of formal musical training, play a role in making expressive timing judgments in music. This was investigated by using a Web-based listening experiment in which listeners with a wide range of musical backgrounds were asked to compare 2 recordings of the same composition (15 pairs, grouped in 3 musical genres), 1 of which was tempo-transformed (manipulating the expressive timing). The results show that expressive timing judgments are not so much influenced by expertise levels, as is suggested by the expertise hypothesis, but by exposure to a certain musical idiom, as is suggested by the exposure hypothesis. As such, the current study provides evidence for the idea that some musical capabilities are acquired through mere exposure to music, and that these abilities are more likely enhanced by active listening (exposure) than by formal musical training (expertise). PMID:19170488

  6. Time exposure of Gemini 10 launch.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The Gemini 10 spacecraft is launched from Complex 19 at 5:20 p.m., July 18, 1966. A time exposure creates the illusion of multiple rocker arms. Onboard are astronauts John W. Young and Michael Collins, command pilot and pilot, respectively.

  7. Exposure Influences Expressive Timing Judgments in Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honing, Henkjan; Ladinig, Olivia

    2009-01-01

    This study is concerned with the question whether, and to what extent, listeners' previous exposure to music in everyday life, and expertise as a result of formal musical training, play a role in making expressive timing judgments in music. This was investigated by using a Web-based listening experiment in which listeners with a wide range of…

  8. Exposure time calculation for spectral cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohaib, Ahmed; Robles-Kelly, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a method for automatic exposure time adjustment for multispectral and hyperspectral cameras. The method presented here is based upon a spectral power image. Here, we use the photopic response function due to its widespread usage in photography and psychophysics. Note that, however, the method presented here is quite general in nature and can employ a number of spectral sensitivity functions for the computation of the spectral power image. Making use of this spectral power image, the exposure time is then computed via iterative updates so as to minimize the squared error between a target image and the current spectral power yielded by the imager. This target image is recovered in a straightforward manner using histogram equalization and the Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage (CIE) photopic function. This, in turn, yields an automatic method devoid of calibration targets or additional inputs. We perform a stability and controllability analysis of our method using a state-space representation. We also show the applicability of the method for exposure time calculation on staring array and multicharge coupled device architecture cameras on real-world scenes.

  9. The WFIRST Galaxy Survey Exposure Time Calculator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirata, Christopher M.; Gehrels, Neil; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kruk, Jeffrey; Rhodes, Jason; Wang, Yun; Zoubian, Julien

    2013-01-01

    This document describes the exposure time calculator for the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) high-latitude survey. The calculator works in both imaging and spectroscopic modes. In addition to the standard ETC functions (e.g. background and SN determination), the calculator integrates over the galaxy population and forecasts the density and redshift distribution of galaxy shapes usable for weak lensing (in imaging mode) and the detected emission lines (in spectroscopic mode). The source code is made available for public use.

  10. Real time chemical exposure and risk monitor

    DOEpatents

    Thrall, Karla D.; Kenny, Donald V.; Endres, George W. R.; Sisk, Daniel R.

    1997-01-01

    The apparatus of the present invention is a combination of a breath interface and an external exposure dosimeter interface to a chemical analysis device, all controlled by an electronic processor for quantitatively analyzing chemical analysis data from both the breath interface and the external exposure dosimeter for determining internal tissue dose. The method of the present invention is a combination of steps of measuring an external dose, measuring breath content, then analyzing the external dose and breath content and determining internal tissue dose.

  11. Effects of Graduated Exposure with Feedback of Exposure Times on Snake Phobias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Horst G.; Costello, C. G.

    1975-01-01

    The subject-controlled graduated exposure of a snake with feedback of exposure times resulted in significantly less avoidance behaviors for snake-phobic subjects than for control snake-phobic subjects who did not receive therapy. (Author)

  12. MEASUREMENT AND DECOMPOSITION OF TOTAL EXPOSURE USING THE TOTAL-ISOLATED-BY-MICROENVIRONMENT-EXPOSURE (TIME) MONITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a new, highly compact and lightweight monitor that directly measures personal exposure resolved into four microenvironments. he device is the "Total-Isolated-by-Microenvironment-Exposure (TIME)" monitor. he monitor can identify electronically a subject's micr...

  13. Real time chemical exposure and risk monitor

    DOEpatents

    Thrall, K.D.; Kenny, D.V.; Endres, G.W.R.; Sisk, D.R.

    1997-07-08

    The apparatus of the present invention is a combination of a breath interface and an external exposure dosimeter interface to a chemical analysis device, all controlled by an electronic processor for quantitatively analyzing chemical analysis data from both the breath interface and the external exposure dosimeter for determining internal tissue dose. The method of the present invention is a combination of steps of measuring an external dose, measuring breath content, then analyzing the external dose and breath content and determining internal tissue dose. 7 figs.

  14. Time-activity relationships to VOC personal exposure factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Rufus D.; Schweizer, Christian; Llacqua, Vito; Lai, Hak Kan; Jantunen, Matti; Bayer-Oglesby, Lucy; Künzli, Nino

    Social and demographic factors have been found to play a significant role in differences between time-activity patterns of population subgroups. Since time-activity patterns largely influence personal exposure to compounds as individuals move across microenvironments, exposure subgroups within the population may be defined by factors that influence daily activity patterns. Socio-demographic and environmental factors that define time-activity subgroups also define quantifiable differences in VOC personal exposures to different sources and individual compounds in the Expolis study. Significant differences in exposures to traffic-related compounds ethylbenzene, m- and p-xylene and o-xylene were observed in relation to gender, number of children and living alone. Categorization of exposures further indicated time exposed to traffic at work and time in a car as important determinants. Increased exposures to decane, nonane and undecane were observed for males, housewives and self-employed. Categorization of exposures indicated exposure subgroups related to workshop use and living downtown. Higher exposures to 3-carene and α-pinene commonly found in household cleaning products and fragrances were associated with more children, while exposures to traffic compounds ethylbenzene, m- and p-xylene and o-xylene were reduced with more children. Considerable unexplained variation remained in categorization of exposures associated with home product use and fragrances, due to individual behavior and product choice. More targeted data collection methods in VOC exposure studies for these sources should be used. Living alone was associated with decreased exposures to 2-methyl-1-propanol and 1-butanol, and traffic-related compounds. Identification of these subgroups may help to reduce the large amount of unexplained variation in VOC exposure studies. Further they may help in assessing impacts of urban planning that result in changes in behavior of individuals, resulting in shifts in the patterns of exposure experienced by the population.

  15. [The use of radiodiagnostic apparatus as human radiation counters in large-scale radiation accidents].

    PubMed

    Zubovskiĭ, G A; Trushin, V I; Luchkov, A B; Smirnova, N K

    1990-12-01

    The problem of dosimetry of internal irradiation necessitates the use of human radiation counters (HRC). A state system of radiation safety should be based on a HRC stock in case of large-scale radiation accidents. Radiodiagnostic units can run in the HRC mode therefore they must be considered as an active reserve widely spread throughout the country. Radiodiagnostic devices can be used for control of the thyroid level of 131I and the whole-body content of a mixture of 134Cs and 137Cs. PMID:2266830

  16. Characterizing Determinants of Risk: Concentration, Duration, and Timing of Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ongoing challenge in human health risk assessment is to determine the best approach for characterizing the risk from real-world exposures. Three major determinants characterize exposure: concentration (how much), duration (the frequency and how long), and critical timing (whe...

  17. Influence of averaging time on the distribution of exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, R.C.; Selvin, S.; Francis, M.

    1986-06-01

    Personal exposures to toxic airborne agents in the work environment often are approximately log-normally distributed. While the arithmetic mean of these distributions is independent of the averaging time of the measurement in a stationary environment, this is not the case for the variance. In general, the variance decreases with increasing averaging time, but the rate of decrease depends upon the autocorrelation structure of the exposure time series. If the autocorrelation structure can be determined, a knowledge of the parameters of the distribution of exposures at one averaging time allows the estimation of those for any other averaging time. Regardless of the autocorrelation situation, these results suggest that current ACGIH guidelines for assessing short-term exposures need examination and may require modification.

  18. Effects of carbaryl on green frog (Rana clamitans) tadpoles: Timing of exposure versus multiple exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boone, M.D.; Bridges, C.M.

    2003-01-01

    The majority of studies on pesticide impacts have evaluated the effects of single exposures. However, multiple exposures to a pesticide may be more prevalent. The objective of our study was to determine how multiple exposures versus single exposure at different times during development affected survival to metamorphosis, tadpole survival, tadpole mass, and tadpole developmental stage of green frog (Rana clamitans) tadpoles reared at low and high density in outdoor cattle tank ponds. Tadpoles were exposed to carbaryl zero, one, two, or three times at 14-d intervals. We applied single doses of carbaryl at one of three times, specifically during early, mid, or late development. Overall, we found that multiple exposures had a greater impact than single exposures during development. More individuals reached metamorphosis in ponds exposed to multiple doses of carbaryl compared with controls, indicating that the presence of carbaryl stimulated metamorphosis. The presence of carbaryl in the aquatic environment also resulted in more developed tadpoles compared with controls. Tadpoles in control ponds did not reach metamorphosis and were less developed than individuals exposed to carbaryl; this effect indicates that, under ideal conditions, green frogs could overwinter in ponds so that greater size could be attained before metamorphosis in the following spring or summer. Our study demonstrated the importance of including realistic application procedures when evaluating the effects of a pesticide and that multiple exposures to a short-lived pesticide are more likely to affect an amphibian population.

  19. Camera add-on records time of exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, E. C.; Kassel, P. C., Jr.; Knight, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    Time photograph is taken and is permanently recorded on edge of exposure by compact electronics module that attaches to camera case. Single-chip timing circuit drives LED display, which is imaged on film plane. Normally blanked display is unblanked when shutter switch is activated.

  20. Bayesian modeling of time-varying and waning exposure effects.

    PubMed

    Dunson, David B; Chulada, Patricia; Arbes, Samuel J

    2003-03-01

    In epidemiologic studies, there is often interest in assessing the association between exposure history and disease incidence. For many diseases, incidence may depend not only on cumulative exposure, but also on the ages at which exposure occurred. This article proposes a flexible Bayesian approach for modeling age-varying and waning exposure effects. The Cox model is generalized to allow the hazard of disease to depend on an integral, across the exposed ages, of a piecewise polynomial function of age, multiplied by an exponential decay term. Linearity properties of the model facilitate posterior computation via a Gibbs sampler, which generalizes previous algorithms for Cox regression with time-dependent covariates. The approach is illustrated by an application to the study of protective effects of breastfeeding on incidence of childhood asthma. PMID:12762444

  1. Volatile dose and exposure time impact perception in neighboring plants.

    PubMed

    Girón-Calva, P Saraí; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Heil, Martin

    2012-02-01

    Volatiles emitted from stressed plants can induce resistance in healthy neighbors. It remains unknown, however, how plants perceive volatiles and convert them into internal signals. We exposed lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus L.) to different concentrations of either of two volatiles, nonanal and methyl salicylate (MeSA), over 6 or 24 h. Plant resistance to the bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, was increased significantly after exposure to a headspace with two concentrations of nonanal for 6 h, and the same pattern emerged after an exposure over 24 h. By contrast, exposure to a low concentration of MeSA over 6 h did not significantly reduce bacterial infections, whereas exposure to the same concentration over 24 h significantly enhanced resistance. The dose-response relation that was apparent after 6 h of MeSA exposure disappeared in the 24 h treatment, in which the three tested concentrations caused indistinguishable, high levels of resistance to P. syringae. A low concentration of a potentially resistance-enhancing volatile sufficed to cause resistance to pathogens in the receiver plant only after long exposure time. Plant-plant signaling appears to involve the accumulation of volatiles in the receiver. PMID:22327276

  2. Recovery of duckweed from time-varying exposure to atrazine.

    PubMed

    Brain, Richard A; Hosmer, Alan J; Desjardins, Debbie; Kendall, Timothy Z; Krueger, Henry O; Wall, Steven B

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the recovery of duckweed (Lemna gibba L. G3) after being removed from multiple duration exposures to the herbicide atrazine. Consequently, L. gibba were exposed under various scenarios to atrazine at nominal concentrations ranging from 5 to 160 µg/L and durations of 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 14 d under static-renewal test conditions. Exposures were followed by a recovery phase in untreated media for either 7 or 14 d. The 3-, 5-, 7-, 9-, and 14-d median effective concentration (EC50) values were >137, >137, 124, >77, and >75 µg/L, respectively, based on mean growth rate. No clear effect trends were apparent between exposure duration and the magnitude of effective concentrations (EC50s or EC10s). No phytocidal effects of chlorosis or necrosis were identified for any treatment scenario. Nearly all L. gibba plants transferred from treatment groups of different exposure scenarios to media without atrazine during the recovery phase had growth rates that demonstrated immediate recovery, indicating effects were phytostatic in nature and reversible. Only the 1- and 5-d exposure scenarios had growth rates indicating marginally prolonged recovery at the higher concentrations (160 µg/L; additionally, at 40 µg/L for the 5-d exposure). Time to recovery, therefore, was found to be largely independent of exposure duration except at the highest concentrations assessed. Based on growth rate by interval, all treatments demonstrated recovery by the final assessment interval (days 5-7), indicating complete recovery in all exposure scenarios by 7 d, consistent with the mode of action of atrazine. PMID:22431202

  3. Use of time to pregnancy to study environmental exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, D.D.; Wilcox, A.J.; Weinberg, C.R.

    1986-09-01

    There is need in reproductive epidemiology for sensitive and convenient screening tools that can be used to study environmental and occupational exposures. The measurement of fecundability (the probability of pregnancy in each cycle) by ascertaining how long it takes couples to conceive, may be useful for this purpose. Theoretically, exposures that interfere with any of the biologic processes involved in achieving pregnancy could lower fecundability among exposed men or women. To evaluate problems with collecting data on time to pregnancy, telephone interviews were conducted with nearly 700 pregnant women who reported having planned their pregnancies. Power curves were developed based on the distribution of time to pregnancy in the interviewed population. These curves indicate that relatively small sample sizes are sufficient for investigating an exposure. For example, the authors estimate that to detect a given 50% drop in mean fecundability with 80% power would require data from 55 exposed and 55 unexposed women who are pregnant. Disadvantages of using time to pregnancy as a reproductive endpoint include susceptibility to selection bias and need for data on several potential confounding variables. The next step in evaluating time to pregnancy as a reproductive endpoint is to apply it in studies of environmental or occupational exposures.

  4. Novel Monitor Paradigm for Real-Time Exposure Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Indira; Tsow, Francis; Tanwar, Kshitiz; Zhang, Lihua; Iglesias, Rodrigo A.; Chen, Cheng; Rai, Anant; Forzani, Erica S.; Tao, Nongjian (NJ)

    2013-01-01

    A wearable monitor that can reliably, accurately and continuously measure personal exposure levels of various toxicants would not only accelerate the current environmental and occupational health and safety studies, but also enable new studies that are not possible with the current monitoring technology. Developing such a monitor has been a difficult challenge, and requires innovative sensing science and creative engineering. We have developed, built and tested a wearable monitor for real-time detection of toxic hydrocarbons and acids in environment. The monitor is low-cost, accurate, and user-friendly. In addition, it can communicate wirelessly with a cell phone in which the monitoring results can be processed, displayed, stored and transmitted to a designated computer. We have validated the functions and performance of the monitor, and carried out field tests with workers involving waste management, fire overhaul, and floor-cleaning activities, as well as with first- and second-hand smokers. The averaged exposure levels are in agreement with those determined by the standard NIOSH methods. The monitor provides accurate and real-time exposure assessment for the workers involving different activities. The real-time and continuous monitoring capability makes it possible to correlate the exposure levels with different activities and changes in the microenvironments. The monitor provides unprecedented real-time information that will help advance occupational safety and environmental health studies. It may also be used to better protect workers from occupational overexposure to toxic molecules. PMID:20551996

  5. Developmental timing of perchlorate exposure alters threespine stickleback dermal bone.

    PubMed

    Furin, Christoff G; von Hippel, Frank A; Postlethwait, John; Buck, C Loren; Cresko, William A; O'Hara, Todd M

    2015-08-01

    Adequate levels of thyroid hormone are critical during development and metamorphosis, and for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. Perchlorate, a common contaminant of water sources, inhibits thyroid function in vertebrates. We utilized threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to determine if timing of perchlorate exposure during development impacts adult dermal skeletal phenotypes. Fish were exposed to water contaminated with perchlorate (30mg/L or 100mg/L) beginning at 0, 3, 7, 14, 21, 42, 154 or 305days post fertilization until sexual maturity at 1year of age. A reciprocal treatment moved stickleback from contaminated to clean water on the same schedule providing for different stages of initial exposure and different treatment durations. Perchlorate exposure caused concentration-dependent significant differences in growth for some bony traits. Continuous exposure initiated within the first 21days post fertilization had the greatest effects on skeletal traits. Exposure to perchlorate at this early stage can result in small traits or abnormal skeletal morphology of adult fish which could affect predator avoidance and survival. PMID:25753171

  6. TIME-INTEGRATED EXPOSURE MEASURES TO IMPROVE THE PREDICTIVE POWER OF EXPOSURE CLASSIFICATION FOR EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurate exposure classification tools are required to link exposure with health effects in epidemiological studies. Although long-term integrated exposure measurements are a critical component of exposure assessment, the ability to include these measurements into epidemiologic...

  7. Exposure time calculator for Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph: IGRINS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Huynh Anh N.; Pak, Soojong; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Kaplan, Kyle; Lee, Jae-Joon; Im, Myungshin; Seifahrt, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    We present an exposure-time calculator (ETC) for the Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph (IGRINS). The signal and noise values are calculated by taking into account the telluric background emission and absorption, the emission and transmission of the telescope and instrument optics, and the dark current and read noise of the infrared detector arrays. For the atmospheric transmission, we apply models based on the amount of precipitable water vapor along the line of sight to the target. The ETC produces the expected signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for each resolution element, given the exposure-time and number of exposures. In this paper, we compare the simulated continuum S/N for the early-type star HD 124683 and the late-type star GSS 32, and the simulated emission line S/N for the H2 rovibrational transitions from the Iris Nebula NGC 7023 with the observed IGRINS spectra. The simulated S/N from the ETC is overestimated by 40-50% for the sample continuum targets.

  8. ETC-42 Exposure Time Calculator: Evolution and New Functionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, A.; Meunier, J. C.; Surace, C.; Apostolakos, N.

    2015-09-01

    We developed at CeSAM (Centre de donnees Astrophysiques de Marseille) ETC-42, an Exposure Time Calculator compliant with Virtual Observatory standards. ETC-42 has been designed to facilitate the integration of new sites, instruments and sources by the user. It is not instrument-specific, but is based on generic XML input data. It is used in several project implementations (EUCLID, PFS, IRIS, WISH, EELTs) covering a wide wavelength range, from NIR to UV. The previous release has been optimized to achieve gain of computation time. New functionalities for automatic input parameterization have been added to target specific instrumental configuration and to give an increased level of user-friendliness. This article describes the new functionalities : fixtures, sdaptive optics, Fabry Perot implementation and two new builder tools to create Telescope transmission curves and sky brightness tables. And, in order to facilitate the integration to the Virtual Observatory environment, VO drag and drop functionality is now available.

  9. Inattentional blindness is influenced by exposure time not motion speed.

    PubMed

    Kreitz, Carina; Furley, Philip; Memmert, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Inattentional blindness is a striking phenomenon in which a salient object within the visual field goes unnoticed because it is unexpected, and attention is focused elsewhere. Several attributes of the unexpected object, such as size and animacy, have been shown to influence the probability of inattentional blindness. At present it is unclear whether or how the speed of a moving unexpected object influences inattentional blindness. We demonstrated that inattentional blindness rates are considerably lower if the unexpected object moves more slowly, suggesting that it is the mere exposure time of the object rather than a higher saliency potentially induced by higher speed that determines the likelihood of its detection. Alternative explanations could be ruled out: The effect is not based on a pop-out effect arising from different motion speeds in relation to the primary-task stimuli (Experiment 2), nor is it based on a higher saliency of slow-moving unexpected objects (Experiment 3). PMID:26031845

  10. Time-dependent propensity score for assessing the effect of vaccine exposure on pregnancy outcomes through pregnancy exposure cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ronghui; Luo, Yunjun; Glynn, Robert; Johnson, Diana; Jones, Kenneth L; Chambers, Christina

    2014-03-01

    Women are advised to be vaccinated for influenza during pregnancy and may receive vaccine at any time during their pregnancy. In observational studies evaluating vaccine safety in pregnancy, to account for such time-varying vaccine exposure, a time-dependent predictor can be used in a proportional hazards model setting for outcomes such as spontaneous abortion or preterm delivery. Also, due to the observational nature of pregnancy exposure cohort studies and relatively low event rates, propensity score (PS) methods are often used to adjust for potential confounders. Using Monte Carlo simulation experiments, we compare two different ways to model the PS for vaccine exposure: (1) logistic regression treating the exposure status as binary yes or no; (2) Cox regression treating time to exposure as time-to-event. Coverage probability of the nominal 95% confidence interval for the exposure effect is used as the main measure of performance. The performance of the logistic regression PS depends largely on how the exposure data is generated. In contrast, the Cox regression PS consistently performs well across the different data generating mechanisms that we have considered. In addition, the Cox regression PS allows adjusting for potential time-varying confounders such as season of the year or exposure to additional vaccines. The application of the Cox regression PS is illustrated using data from a recent study of the safety of pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine during pregnancy. PMID:24625623

  11. Assessing the Impact of Exposure Time and Incapacitation on Longitudinal Trajectories of Criminal Offending.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piquero, Alex; Blumstein, Alfred; Brame, Robert; Haapanen, Rudy; Mulvey, Edward P.; Nagin, Daniel S.

    2001-01-01

    Examined effect of accounting for exposure (incarceration) time on arrest rate of 272 paroled serious offenders followed through age 33. Analysis without exposure time adjustments suggested that over 92 percent exhibited highest arrest activity in late teens and early 20s. Adjusted for exposure time, about 72 percent showed a decline in arrest…

  12. [Solar time--the importance of standard time for the UV-exposure of the skin].

    PubMed

    Stick, Carsten

    2007-09-01

    Dermatologists recommend that people avoid exposure to the blazing sun around noontime. In most places in Europe there are considerable deviations between true solar time and standard time: Firstly, during summer the standard time in the European countries is set one hour ahead according to the summer time or daylight saving time. Secondly, in all countries of Western and Central Europe, except Great Britain, Ireland and Portugal, standard time uniformly is Central European Summer Time (CEST). Although this standard central European time zone refers to the longitude 15 degrees East of Greenwich, it is valid for all longitudes up to nearly about 9 degrees West of Greenwich. This leads to a maximum deviation between standard time and solar time of nearly 1 hour and 36 min. Thirdly, a comparably small time shift is due to the equation of time. It amounts up to a maximum of about six and a half minutes at the end of July. Altogether, the shift between standard time and true solar time adds up to about 2 h 40 min at the Spanish coast of the Atlantic Ocean, e.g. noon is not at 12:00 but rather at 2:40 p. m. (14:40 h CEST).A paradoxical situation results for British holiday-makers who go to Spain. Although they move to a more westerly geographical position they do not put back their clocks but set them one hour ahead, since they enter the CEST zone. The recommendations given by dermatologists to the people regarding their exposure to the sun should allow for these geographical and astronomical facts. PMID:17760900

  13. Making Time for Nature: Visual Exposure to Natural Environments Lengthens Subjective Time Perception and Reduces Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Meredith S.; Repke, Meredith A.; Nickerson, Norma P.; Conway, Lucian G.; Odum, Amy L.; Jordan, Kerry E.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity in delay discounting is associated with maladaptive behaviors such as overeating and drug and alcohol abuse. Researchers have recently noted that delay discounting, even when measured by a brief laboratory task, may be the best predictor of human health related behaviors (e.g., exercise) currently available. Identifying techniques to decrease impulsivity in delay discounting, therefore, could help improve decision-making on a global scale. Visual exposure to natural environments is one recent approach shown to decrease impulsive decision-making in a delay discounting task, although the mechanism driving this result is currently unknown. The present experiment was thus designed to evaluate not only whether visual exposure to natural (mountains, lakes) relative to built (buildings, cities) environments resulted in less impulsivity, but also whether this exposure influenced time perception. Participants were randomly assigned to either a natural environment condition or a built environment condition. Participants viewed photographs of either natural scenes or built scenes before and during a delay discounting task in which they made choices about receiving immediate or delayed hypothetical monetary outcomes. Participants also completed an interval bisection task in which natural or built stimuli were judged as relatively longer or shorter presentation durations. Following the delay discounting and interval bisection tasks, additional measures of time perception were administered, including how many minutes participants thought had passed during the session and a scale measurement of whether time "flew" or "dragged" during the session. Participants exposed to natural as opposed to built scenes were less impulsive and also reported longer subjective session times, although no differences across groups were revealed with the interval bisection task. These results are the first to suggest that decreased impulsivity from exposure to natural as opposed to built environments may be related to lengthened time perception. PMID:26558610

  14. Wide-field time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) microscopy with time resolution below the frame exposure time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Petrášek, Zdeněk; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    Fast frame rate CMOS cameras in combination with photon counting intensifiers can be used for fluorescence imaging with single photon sensitivity at kHz frame rates. We show here how the phosphor decay of the image intensifier can be exploited for accurate timing of photon arrival well below the camera exposure time. This is achieved by taking ratios of the intensity of the photon events in two subsequent frames, and effectively allows wide-field TCSPC. This technique was used for measuring decays of ruthenium compound Ru(dpp) with lifetimes as low as 1 μs with 18.5 μs frame exposure time, including in living HeLa cells, using around 0.1 μW excitation power. We speculate that by using an image intensifier with a faster phosphor decay to match a higher camera frame rate, photon arrival time measurements on the nanosecond time scale could well be possible.

  15. The time line method for assessing galloping exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, A.S.

    1982-08-01

    The design of double circuit transmission structures is often determined by the need to allow sufficient electrical clearance between phases under galloping span conditions. In the past such designs have been arrived at according to certain ''galloping ellipse'' criteria in which the ellipse geometry is based on mid-span sag. The new method, disclosed herein, starts with the statistical history of the weather in the particular region, as to wind, wind direction, temperature, and ice leading to an exposure rate (Hrs./Yr.) for the normal component of wind speed. These data are combined with estimates of galloping motion including amplitude dependence on wind speed, gusting, and frequency mis-match between galloping and horizontal (swinging) movement at mid-span. A comparison is included between untreated and treated spans, the latter having galloping control devices with only 50% amplitude reduction capability. A range of span lengths between 750 ft. (227M) and 1,500 ft. (454M) is considered. The new method, for the first time, provides a means to assess the benefits of alternative designs in quantitative terms.

  16. Retention of Idioms Following One-Time Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuterskiold, Christina; Van Lancker Sidtis, Diana

    2013-01-01

    This study explored retention of idioms and novel (i.e. newly created or grammatically generated) expressions in English-speaking girls following exposure only once during a conversation. Our hypothesis was that idioms, because of their inherent holistic, nonliteral and social characteristics, are acquired differently and more rapidly than novel

  17. Retention of Idioms Following One-Time Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuterskiold, Christina; Van Lancker Sidtis, Diana

    2013-01-01

    This study explored retention of idioms and novel (i.e. newly created or grammatically generated) expressions in English-speaking girls following exposure only once during a conversation. Our hypothesis was that idioms, because of their inherent holistic, nonliteral and social characteristics, are acquired differently and more rapidly than novel…

  18. Perinatal exposure to endocrine disruptors: sex, timing and behavioral endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Palanza, Paola; Nagel, Susan C; Parmigiani, Stefano; vom Saal, Frederick S

    2016-01-01

    Of the approximately 85,000 chemicals in use, 1000 have been identified as having the ability to disrupt normal endocrine function. Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) during critical period in brain differentiation (prenatal and neonatal life) via the mother can alter the course of the development of sexually dimorphic behaviors. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a very high volume chemical used in plastic, resins and other products, and virtually everyone examined has detectable BPA. BPA has estrogenic activity and is one of the most studied EDCs. We review evidence from studies in rodents using dose levels relevant to human exposure. BPA alters behavior and eliminates or in some cases reverses sexually dimorphic behaviors observed in unexposed animals. PMID:27019862

  19. Effect of methotrexate concentration and exposure time on mammalian cell survival in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Eichholtz, H.; Trott, K. R.

    1980-01-01

    Chinese hamster, HeLa and HAK cells were treated with methotrexate (MTX) to determine the dependence of its effect on drug concentration and exposure time. With a broad range of survival curves for Chinese hamster cells, cell survival is an exponential function of exposure time and a power function of drug concentration. The data allow a mathematical description to be made of the interdependence of MTX concentration and drug exposure in relation to cell survival. PMID:7370167

  20. The Timing of Exposure in Clinic-Based Treatment for Childhood Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gryczkowski, Michelle R.; Tiede, Michael S.; Dammann, Julie E.; Jacobsen, Amy Brown; Hale, Lisa R.; Whiteside, Stephen P. H.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examines treatment length and timing of exposure from two child anxiety disorders clinics. Data regarding symptoms and treatment characteristics for 28 youth were prospectively obtained through self, parent, and therapist report at each session. Information regarding length of treatment, timing of exposure initiation, and…

  1. A new real time filter for local exposure correction in panoramic radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Frosio, I.; Borghese, N. A.

    2006-09-15

    A new real time filter for local exposure correction in panoramic radiographs is presented here. The filter, called PaRSEC, allows eliminating the exposure artifacts, mainly introduced by Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) systems. These artifacts reduce the image readability and its diagnostic utility. The PaRSEC filter operates a local exposure equalization, based on a reliable estimate of the column mean gray level. Qualitative and quantitative results are reported for typical panoramic radiographs. They show a complete removal of the artifacts. The method compares favorably with other classical methods targeted to exposure correction.

  2. Duration and Timing of Exposure to Neighborhood Poverty and the Risk of Adolescent Parenthood

    PubMed Central

    Wodtke, Geoffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    Theory suggests that the impact of neighborhood poverty depends on both the duration and timing of exposure. Previous research, however, does not properly analyze the sequence of neighborhoods to which children are exposed throughout the early life course. This study investigates the effects of different longitudinal patterns of exposure to disadvantaged neighborhoods on the risk of adolescent parenthood. It follows a cohort of children in the PSID from age 4 to 19 and uses novel methods for time-varying exposures that overcome critical limitations of conventional regression when selection processes are dynamic. Results indicate that sustained exposure to poor neighborhoods substantially increases the risk of becoming a teen parent and that exposure to neighborhood poverty during adolescence may be more consequential than exposure earlier during childhood. PMID:23720166

  3. The design of a miniature personal exposure monitor for continuous real-time data acquisition in electromagnetic field exposure assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, N.H.; Conroy, T.J.; Wilson, B.W.

    1994-06-01

    The design of a small, light-weight personal exposure monitor suitable for use in EMF exposure assessment studies is nearing completion at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The monitor is designed to be non-obtrusive, battery operated, and able to continuously record extremely low-frequency (ELF) (1Ohz--500hz) magnetic-field data. It also captures high-frequency (500hz--1OMhz) transients that exceed a preset threshold, retaining the largest transients in memory. The monitor can record one or more days of data on a single easily replaceable, credit-card-size memory (PCMCIA). A battery charge will last a minimum of one day. Batteries are rechargeable and easily replaced. A data-compression algorithm is under development that will be tailored to the efficient compression of low-frequency EMF signals and will permit data to be logged for at least one day before swapping memory cards. The memory cards are readable by a base- station computer that can perform analysis of the data. The monitor is designed to accommodate four inputs supporting full-field sensors as well as a proposed ocular exposure measurement system. Our design effort has shown that a practical personal exposure monitor for EMF can be built based on current technology, continuous logging of real-time ELF waveforms is both feasible and practical, and such a device is appropriate for proposed EMF exposure studies.

  4. Population exposure to ultraviolet radiation in Finland 1920-1995: Exposure trends and a time-series analysis of exposure and cutaneous melanoma incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Kojo, Katja . E-mail: katja.kojo@uta.fi; Jansen, Christer T.; Nybom, Pia; Huurto, Laura; Laihia, Jarmo; Ilus, Taina; Auvinen, Anssi

    2006-05-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is the principal cause of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). However, the relation between CMM and UVR exposure is not clear. We present the trends of population exposure to UVR and conduct a time-series analysis of the relation between UVR exposure and incidence of CMM. Data on CMM incidence were obtained from the Finnish Cancer Registry. Clothing coverage of the body was scored from archival photographs and the proportion of uncovered skin was used as a measure of solar exposure. Information on the number of sunny resort holidays, duration of annual holidays, and sunscreen sales were obtained from various sources. Exposed skin area doubled from 1920 to 1985. The average duration of annual holidays increased 30-fold. The number of sunny resort holidays and the sales of sunscreens increased rapidly from 1980. CMM was most strongly associated with solar exposure of 5-19 years earlier. There is a considerable decrease in clothing coverage during the 20th century. UVR exposure preceding CMM occurrence 4 years or less does not appear relevant, whereas the period 5-19 years prior to CMM occurrence might be the most relevant period. However, findings of ecological studies may not be applicable at the individual level.

  5. The role of CO2 variability and exposure time for biological impacts of ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Emily C.; Munday, Philip L.; McNeil, Ben I.

    2013-09-01

    impacts of ocean acidification have mostly been studied using future levels of CO2 without consideration of natural variability or how this modulates both duration and magnitude of CO2 exposure. Here we combine results from laboratory studies on coral reef fish with diurnal in situ CO2 data from a shallow coral reef, to demonstrate how natural variability alters exposure times for marine organisms under increasingly high-CO2 conditions. Large in situ CO2 variability already results in exposure of coral reef fish to short-term CO2 levels higher than laboratory-derived critical CO2 levels (~600 µatm). However, we suggest that the in situ exposure time is presently insufficient to induce negative effects observed in laboratory studies. Our results suggest that both exposure time and the magnitude of CO2 levels will be important in determining the response of organisms to future ocean acidification, where both will increase markedly with future increases in CO2.

  6. EFFECTS OF THE DURATION AND TIMING OF DIETARY METHYL PARATHION EXPOSURE ON BOBWHITE REPRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two northern bobwhite (colinus virginianus) reproduction tests were conducted concurrently to evaluate how the duration and time of initiation of methyl parathion exposure affeCted dose-response relationships of reproductive parameters. n the long-term exposure test, pairs of adu...

  7. Effect of time-activity adjustment on exposure assessment for traffic-related ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    Lane, Kevin J; Levy, Jonathan I; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; Patton, Allison P; Durant, John L; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Zamore, Wig; Brugge, Doug

    2015-01-01

    Exposures to ultrafine particles (<100 nm, estimated as particle number concentration, PNC) differ from ambient concentrations because of the spatial and temporal variability of both PNC and people. Our goal was to evaluate the influence of time-activity adjustment on exposure assignment and associations with blood biomarkers for a near-highway population. A regression model based on mobile monitoring and spatial and temporal variables was used to generate hourly ambient residential PNC for a full year for a subset of participants (n=140) in the Community Assessment of Freeway Exposure and Health study. We modified the ambient estimates for each hour using personal estimates of hourly time spent in five micro-environments (inside home, outside home, at work, commuting, other) as well as particle infiltration. Time-activity adjusted (TAA)-PNC values differed from residential ambient annual average (RAA)-PNC, with lower exposures predicted for participants who spent more time away from home. Employment status and distance to highway had a differential effect on TAA-PNC. We found associations of RAA-PNC with high sensitivity C-reactive protein and Interleukin-6, although exposure-response functions were non-monotonic. TAA-PNC associations had larger effect estimates and linear exposure-response functions. Our findings suggest that time-activity adjustment improves exposure assessment for air pollutants that vary greatly in space and time. PMID:25827314

  8. Effect of time-activity adjustment on exposure assessment for traffic-related ultrafine particles

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Kevin J; Levy, Jonathan I; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; Patton, Allison P; Durant, John L; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Zamore, Wig; Brugge, Doug

    2015-01-01

    Exposures to ultrafine particles (<100 nm, estimated as particle number concentration, PNC) differ from ambient concentrations because of the spatial and temporal variability of both PNC and people. Our goal was to evaluate the influence of time-activity adjustment on exposure assignment and associations with blood biomarkers for a near-highway population. A regression model based on mobile monitoring and spatial and temporal variables was used to generate hourly ambient residential PNC for a full year for a subset of participants (n=140) in the Community Assessment of Freeway Exposure and Health study. We modified the ambient estimates for each hour using personal estimates of hourly time spent in five micro-environments (inside home, outside home, at work, commuting, other) as well as particle infiltration. Time-activity adjusted (TAA)-PNC values differed from residential ambient annual average (RAA)-PNC, with lower exposures predicted for participants who spent more time away from home. Employment status and distance to highway had a differential effect on TAA-PNC. We found associations of RAA-PNC with high sensitivity C-reactive protein and Interleukin-6, although exposure-response functions were non-monotonic. TAA-PNC associations had larger effect estimates and linear exposure-response functions. Our findings suggest that time-activity adjustment improves exposure assessment for air pollutants that vary greatly in space and time. PMID:25827314

  9. A network-based approach for estimating pedestrian journey-time exposure to air pollution.

    PubMed

    Davies, Gemma; Whyatt, J Duncan

    2014-07-01

    Individual exposure to air pollution depends not only upon pollution concentrations in the surrounding environment, but also on the volume of air inhaled, which is determined by an individual's physiology and activity level. This study focuses on journey-time exposure, using network analysis in a GIS environment to identify pedestrian routes between multiple origins and destinations throughout the city of Lancaster, North West England. For each segment of a detailed footpath network, exposure was calculated accounting for PM2.5 concentrations (estimated using an atmospheric dispersion model) and respiratory minute volume (varying between individuals and with slope). For each of the routes generated the cumulative exposure to PM2.5 was estimated, allowing for easy comparison between multiple routes. Significant variations in exposure were found between routes depending on their geography, as well as in response to variations in background concentrations and meteorology between days. Differences in physiological characteristics such as age or weight were also seen to impact journey-time exposure considerably. In addition to assessing exposure for a given route, the approach was used to identify alternative routes that minimised journey-time exposure. Exposure reduction potential varied considerably between days, with even subtle shifts in route location, such as to the opposite side of the road, showing significant benefits. The method presented is both flexible and scalable, allowing for the interactions between physiology, activity level, pollution concentration and journey duration to be explored. In enabling physiology and activity level to be integrated into exposure calculations a more comprehensive estimate of journey-time exposure can be made, which has potential to provide more realistic inputs for epidemiological studies. PMID:24704957

  10. RETRACTED ARTICLE: Time exposure acoustics in seismic exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aigbedion, I.; Egwebe, O.

    2006-09-01

    An analysis of a passive seismic method for subsurface imaging is presented in which ambient seismic noise is employed as the source of illumination of subsurface scatterers. The imaging algorithm can incorporate new data into the image in a recursive fashion which causes image background noise to diminish over time. Under the assumption of spatially-incoherent ambient noise, an analytical expression for the point-spread function of the imaging algorithm is derived. The point-spread function (PSF) characterizes the resolution of the image, which is a function of the receiving array length and the ambient bandwidth.

  11. Cognitive effects of radiation emitted by cellular phones: the influence of exposure side and time.

    PubMed

    Luria, Roy; Eliyahu, Ilan; Hareuveny, Ronen; Margaliot, Menachem; Meiran, Nachshon

    2009-04-01

    This study examined the time dependence effects of exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) emitted by standard GSM cellular phones on the cognitive functions of humans. A total of 48 healthy right-handed male subjects performed a spatial working memory task (that required either a left-hand or a right-hand response) while being exposed to one of two GSM phones placed at both sides of the head. The subjects were randomly divided into three groups. Each group was exposed to one of three exposure conditions: left-side of the head, right-side, or sham-exposure. The experiment consisted of 12 blocks of trials. Response times (RTs) and accuracy of the responses were recorded. It was found that the average RT of the right-hand responses under left-side exposure condition was significantly longer than those of the right-side and sham-exposure groups averaged together during the first two time blocks. These results confirmed the existence of an effect of exposure on RT, as well as the fact that exposure duration (together with the responding hand and the side of exposure) may play an important role in producing detectable RFR effects on performance. Differences in these parameters might be the reason for the failure of certain studies to detect or replicate RFR effects. PMID:19194860

  12. Accounting for Unobservable Exposure Time Bias When Using Medicare Prescription Drug Data

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Elizabeth A.; Schneider, Kathleen M; Chrischilles, Elizabeth; Brooks, John M

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence and correlates of unobservable medication exposure time, and to recommend approaches for minimizing bias, in studies using Medicare Part D data.. Sample 179,065 Medicare patients hospitalized for an AMI in 2007 or 2008. Methods We compared two methods for creating medication exposure observation periods using acute care discharge vs. post-acute care discharge dates. We examined options for increasing cohort sizes by requiring different thresholds for observable days, or by using as a covariate, in the observation period. We calculated the extent and health status correlates of unobserved Medicare Part D exposure time and examined its association with receipt of beta-blockers. Results 39% of patients had unobservable time during the 30 day exposure assessment period following acute care; they were significantly older, had more comorbidity and longer acute care stays, had worse 1-year survival, and were significantly less likely to be classified as beta-blocker users. Using the alternative exposure assessment window, only 29% of the sample had unobservable time, and differences between groups were less pronounced. Significant gains in sample size can be obtained by restricting or controlling for the number of observable days required in the exposure assessment period. Conclusions Unobservable exposure time is common among Medicare Part D beneficiaries, and they are often in worse health. To retain patients with unobservable exposure time, we recommend stratifying patients on receipt of post-acute facility-based care, calculating and using observable days as a covariate and, when appropriate, using the discharge date from contiguous post-acute facility care for beginning the exposure assessment period. PMID:24834364

  13. Judgment of facial expressions of emotion as a function of exposure time.

    PubMed

    Kirouac, G; Doré, F Y

    1984-08-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to study the accuracy of judgment of facial expressions of emotions that were displayed for very brief exposure times. Twenty university students were shown facial stimuli that were presented for durations ranging from 10 to 50 msec. The data showed that accuracy of judgment reached a fairly high level even at very brief exposure times and that human observers are especially competent to process very rapid changes in facial appearance. PMID:6493929

  14. Water age, exposure time, and local flushing time in semi-enclosed, tidal basins with negligible freshwater inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viero, Daniele Pietro; Defina, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of tidally flushed, semi-enclosed basins with negligible freshwater inflow, and under steady periodic flow conditions, three frequently used local transport time scales to quantify the efficiency of water renewal, namely water age, exposure time, and local flushing time are studied and compared to each other. In these environments, water renewal is strongly controlled by diffusion, and it is significantly affected by the return flow (i.e., the fraction of effluent water that returns into the basin on each flood tide). The definition of water age is here modified to account for the return flow, in analogy with exposure time and local flushing time. We consider approximate time scales, whose accuracy is analyzed, in order to overcome problems related to the size of the computational domain and to reduce the computational effort. A new approximate procedure is introduced to estimate water age, which is based on the water aging rate. Also, the concept of local flushing time as a relevant time scale is introduced. Under steady periodic conditions, we demonstrate that the local flushing time quantitatively corresponds to water age, and well approximates exposure time when the flow is dominated by diffusion. Since the effort required to compute water age and exposure time is greater than that required to compute the local flushing time, the present results can also have a practical interest in the assessment of water renewal efficiency of semi-enclosed water basins. The results of a modeling study, in which the lagoon of Venice is used as a benchmark, confirm the substantial quantitative equivalence between these three transport time scales in highly diffusive environments.

  15. Association of Light Exposure on Physical Activity and Sedentary Time in Young People

    PubMed Central

    Aggio, Daniel; Smith, Lee; Fisher, Abigail; Hamer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background: To investigate whether light exposure was associated with objectively measured physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviour in young people. Methods: Participants (n = 229, 46.7% female) were young people (mean 8.8 years [SD 2.2]) from the borough of Camden, UK. Daily sedentary time, moderate and vigorous PA (MVPA) and light exposure were measured using a tri-axial accelerometer with an ambient light sensor during the summer. Multiple linear regression models examined associations between average daily light exposure, sedentary time and time in MVPA. Models were repeated investigating weekdays and weekend days separately. Analyses were adjusted for pre-specified covariables, including age, sex, device wear time, ethnic group, school and body fat. Results: There were significant associations between average daily light exposure and time sedentary (? coefficient = ?11.2, 95% CI, ?19.0 to ?3.4) and in MVPA (? coefficient = 3.5, 95% CI, 1.2 to 5.9). Light exposure was significantly associated with weekend sedentary time (? coefficient = ?10.0, 95% CI, ?17.6, ?2.4), weekend MVPA (? coefficient = 3.7, 95% CI, 1.7, 5.7), weekday sedentary time (? coefficient = ?15.0, 95% CI, ?22.7 to ?7.2), but not weekday MVPA (? coefficient = 2.0, 95% CI, ?0.5 to 4.5). Conclusion: Average daily light exposure is positively associated with time in MVPA and negatively associated with sedentary time. Increasing daylight exposure may be a useful intervention strategy for promoting physical activity. PMID:25764057

  16. Time reducing exposure containing 18 fluorine flourodeoxyglucose master vial dispensing in hot lab: Omega technique.

    PubMed

    Rao, Vatturi Venkata Satya Prabhakar; Manthri, Ranadheer; Hemalatha, Pottumuthu; Kumar, Vuyyuru Navin; Azhar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Hot lab dispensing of large doses of 18 fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose in master vials supplied from the cyclotrons requires high degrees of skill to handle high doses. Presently practiced conventional method of fractionating from the inverted tiltable vial pig mounted on a metal frame has its own limitations such as increasing isotope handling times and exposure to the technologist. Innovative technique devised markedly improves the fractionating efficiency along with speed, precision, and reduced dose exposure. PMID:27095872

  17. Time reducing exposure containing 18 fluorine flourodeoxyglucose master vial dispensing in hot lab: Omega technique

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Vatturi Venkata Satya Prabhakar; Manthri, Ranadheer; Hemalatha, Pottumuthu; Kumar, Vuyyuru Navin; Azhar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Hot lab dispensing of large doses of 18 fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose in master vials supplied from the cyclotrons requires high degrees of skill to handle high doses. Presently practiced conventional method of fractionating from the inverted tiltable vial pig mounted on a metal frame has its own limitations such as increasing isotope handling times and exposure to the technologist. Innovative technique devised markedly improves the fractionating efficiency along with speed, precision, and reduced dose exposure.

  18. Research plan for establishing the effects of time varying noise exposures on community annoyance and acceptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsky, P. N.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a community noise survey to determine the effects of time varying noise exposures in residential communities is presented. Complex physical and human variables involved in the health and welfare effects of environmental noise and the number-level tradeoffs and time of day penalties are among the factors considered. Emphasis is placed on community reactions where noise exposures are equal in day or evening but differ in the night time, and the effects of ambient noise on more intense aircraft noise exposures. Thirteen different times of day and types of operation situations with exposed populations up to 8-10 miles from the airport are identified. A detailed personal interview questionnaire as well as specific instructions to interviewers are included.

  19. Statistical Properties of Longitudinal Time-Activity Data for Use in Human Exposure Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the longitudinal properties of the time spent in different locations and activities is important in characterizing human exposure to pollutants. The results of a four-season longitudinal time-activity diary study in eight working adults are presented, with the goal ...

  20. Investigating the American Time Use Survey from an Exposure Modeling Perspective

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes an evaluation of the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics' American Time Use Survey (ATUS) for potential use in modeling human exposures to environmental pollutants. The ATUS is a large, on-going, cross-sectional survey of where Americans spend time and what activ...

  1. Radiofrequency exposure in the French general population: band, time, location and activity variability.

    PubMed

    Viel, Jean-François; Cardis, Elisabeth; Moissonnier, Monika; de Seze, René; Hours, Martine

    2009-11-01

    Information on the exposure of individual persons to radiofrequency (RF) fields is scarce, although such data are crucial in order to develop a suitable exposure assessment method, and frame the hypothesis and design of future epidemiological studies. The main goal of this survey is to assess individual RF exposure on a population basis, while clarifying the relative contribution of different sources to the total exposure. A total of 377 randomly selected people were analyzed. Each participant was supplied with a personal exposure meter for 24-hour measurements (weekday), and kept a time-location-activity diary. Electric field strengths were recorded in 12 different RF bands every 13s. Summary statistics were calculated with the robust regression on order statistics method. Most of the time, recorded field strengths were not detectable with the exposure meter. Total field, cordless phones, WiFi-microwave, and FM transmitters stood apart with a proportion above the detection threshold of 46.6%, 17.2%, 14.1%, and 11.0%, respectively. The total field mean value was 0.201V/m, higher in urban areas, during daytime, among adults, and when moving. When focusing on specific channels, the highest mean exposure resulted from FM sources (0.044V/m), followed by WiFi-microwaves (0.038V/m), cordless phones (0.037V/m), and mobile phones (UMTS: 0.036V/m, UMTS: 0.037V/m). Various factors, however, contributed to a high variability in RF exposure assessment. These population-based estimates should therefore be confirmed by further surveys to better characterize the exposure situation in different microenvironments. PMID:19656570

  2. Time to pregnancy and occupational exposure to pesticides in fruit growers in The Netherlands.

    PubMed Central

    de Cock, J; Westveer, K; Heederik, D; te Velde, E; van Kooij, R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--Although pesticides are regularly used in agriculture, relatively little is known about possible adverse health effects, especially reproductive effects, due to occupational exposure. This explorative study investigates the relation between exposure of the fruit grower to pesticides and fecundability (probability of pregnancy) in a population of fruit growers. METHODS--The analysis is based on self reported data and includes 91 pregnancies during 1978-1990 of 43 couples. Cox' proportional hazards model was used to analyse time to pregnancy after correction for gravidity and consultation with a physician for fertility problems. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS--Application of pesticides solely by the owner was associated with a long time to pregnancy, resulting in a fecundability ratio of 0.46 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.28-0.77). Similarly a low spraying velocity (< or = 1.5 hectares/h) resulted in a fecundability ratio of 0.47 (95% CI 0.29-0.76) and is associated with the use of older spraying techniques and tractors without a cabin. These factors were assumed to cause high exposure, which was confirmed by exposure measurements in the field. The effect of high exposure was mainly apparent if the couple had intended to become pregnant in the period from March-November (fecundability ratio 0.42, 95% CI 0.20-0.92). This is the period in which pesticides are applied. Out of the spraying season the effect of a high exposure was absent (fecundability ratio 0.82, 95% CI 0.33-2.02). In the high exposure group 28% of the pregnancies had been preceded by consulting a physician because of fertility problems, compared with 8% in the low exposure group. These findings indicate that an adverse effect of exposure to pesticides on fecundability is likely. PMID:8000495

  3. Highly time-variable exposure to chemicals--toward an assessment strategy.

    PubMed

    Ashauer, Roman; Brown, Colin D

    2013-07-01

    Organisms in the environment experience fluctuating, pulsed, or intermittent exposure to pollutants. Accounting for effects of such exposures is an important challenge for environmental risk assessment, particularly given the simplified design of standard ecotoxicity tests. Dynamic simulation using toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic (TK-TD) models describes the processes that link exposure with effects in an organism and provides a basis for extrapolation to a range of exposure scenarios. In so doing, TK-TD modeling makes the risk assessment more robust and aids use and interpretation of experimental data. Toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic models are well-developed for predicting survival of individual organisms and are increasingly applied to sublethal endpoints. In the latter case particularly, linkage to individual-based models (IBMs) allows extrapolation to population level as well as accounting for differences in effects of toxicant exposure at different stages in the life cycle. Extrapolation between species remains an important constraint because there is currently no systematic understanding of species traits that cause differences in the relevant processes. Toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic models allow interrogation of exposure profiles to determine intrinsic toxicity potential rather than using absolute maximum concentrations or time-weighted averages as surrogates. A decision scheme is proposed to guide selection of risk assessment approaches using dose extrapolation based on Haber's Law, TK-TD models, and/or IBMs depending on the nature of toxic effect and timing in relation to life history. PMID:23564608

  4. Distinct neurobehavioral dysfunction based on the timing of developmental binge-like alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Sadrian, B; Lopez-Guzman, M; Wilson, D A; Saito, M

    2014-11-01

    Gestational exposure to alcohol can result in long-lasting behavioral deficiencies generally described as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). FASD-modeled rodent studies of acute ethanol exposure typically select one developmental window to simulate a specific context equivalent of human embryogenesis, and study consequences of ethanol exposure within that particular developmental epoch. Exposure timing is likely a large determinant in the neurobehavioral consequence of early ethanol exposure, as each brain region is variably susceptible to ethanol cytotoxicity and has unique sensitive periods in their development. We made a parallel comparison of the long-term effects of single-day binge ethanol at either embryonic day 8 (E8) or postnatal day 7 (P7) in male and female mice, and here demonstrate the differential long-term impacts on neuroanatomy, behavior and in vivo electrophysiology of two systems with very different developmental trajectories. The significant long-term differences in odor-evoked activity, local circuit inhibition, and spontaneous coherence between brain regions in the olfacto-hippocampal pathway that were found as a result of developmental ethanol exposure, varied based on insult timing. Long-term effects on cell proliferation and interneuron cell density were also found to vary by insult timing as well as by region. Finally, spatial memory performance and object exploration were affected in P7-exposed mice, but not E8-exposed mice. Our physiology and behavioral results are conceptually coherent with the neuroanatomical data attained from these same mice. Our results recognize both variable and shared effects of ethanol exposure timing on long-term circuit function and their supported behavior. PMID:25241068

  5. Distinct neurobehavioral dysfunction based on the timing of developmental binge-like alcohol exposure

    PubMed Central

    Sadrian, B; Lopez-Guzman, M; Wilson, DA; Saito, M

    2014-01-01

    Gestational exposure to alcohol can result in long-lasting behavioral deficiencies generally described as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). FASD-modeled rodent studies of acute ethanol exposure typically select one developmental window to simulate a specific context equivalent of human embryogenesis, and study consequences of ethanol exposure within that particular developmental epoch. Exposure timing is likely a large determinant in the neurobehavioral consequence of early ethanol exposure, as each brain region is variably susceptible to ethanol cytotoxicity and has unique sensitive periods in their development. We made a parallel comparison of the long-term effects of single-day binge ethanol at either embryonic day 8 (E8) or postnatal day 7 (P7) in male and female mice, and here demonstrate the differential long-term impacts on neuroanatomy, behavior and in vivo electrophysiology of two systems with very different developmental trajectories. The significant long-term differences in odor-evoked activity, local circuit inhibition, and spontaneous coherence between brain regions in the olfacto-hippocampal pathway that were found as a result of developmental ethanol exposure, varied based on insult timing. Long-term effects on cell proliferation and interneuron cell density were also found to vary by insult timing as well as by region. Finally, spatial memory performance was affected in P7-exposed mice, but not E8-exposed mice. Our physiology and behavioral results are conceptually coherent with the neuroanatomical data attained from these same mice. Our results recognize both variable and shared effects of ethanol exposure timing on long-term circuit function and their supported behavior. PMID:25241068

  6. A study of the effect of nonrandom sampling on the estimation of exposure variability using exposure-time series from the OSHA IMIS health inspection database

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, L.T.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of nonrandom sampling over time may have on the estimation of variability, namely the geometric standard deviation, using time series of personal exposure data.

  7. Chronic Ethanol Exposure Produces Time- and Brain Region-Dependent Changes in Gene Coexpression Networks

    PubMed Central

    Osterndorff-Kahanek, Elizabeth A.; Becker, Howard C.; Lopez, Marcelo F.; Farris, Sean P.; Tiwari, Gayatri R.; Nunez, Yury O.; Harris, R. Adron; Mayfield, R. Dayne

    2015-01-01

    Repeated ethanol exposure and withdrawal in mice increases voluntary drinking and represents an animal model of physical dependence. We examined time- and brain region-dependent changes in gene coexpression networks in amygdala (AMY), nucleus accumbens (NAC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and liver after four weekly cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapor exposure in C57BL/6J mice. Microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles at 0-, 8-, and 120-hours following the last ethanol exposure. Each brain region exhibited a large number of differentially expressed genes (2,000-3,000) at the 0- and 8-hour time points, but fewer changes were detected at the 120-hour time point (400-600). Within each region, there was little gene overlap across time (~20%). All brain regions were significantly enriched with differentially expressed immune-related genes at the 8-hour time point. Weighted gene correlation network analysis identified modules that were highly enriched with differentially expressed genes at the 0- and 8-hour time points with virtually no enrichment at 120 hours. Modules enriched for both ethanol-responsive and cell-specific genes were identified in each brain region. These results indicate that chronic alcohol exposure causes global ‘rewiring‘ of coexpression systems involving glial and immune signaling as well as neuronal genes. PMID:25803291

  8. Time Evolution of the Wettability of Supported Graphene under Ambient Air Exposure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The wettability of graphene is both fundamental and crucial for interfacing in most applications, but a detailed understanding of its time evolution remains elusive. Here we systematically investigate the wettability of metal-supported, chemical vapor deposited graphene films as a function of ambient air exposure time using water and various other test liquids with widely different surface tensions. The wettability of graphene is not constant, but varies with substrate interactions and air exposure time. The substrate interactions affect the initial graphene wettability, where, for instance, water contact angles of ∼85 and ∼61° were measured for Ni and Cu supported graphene, respectively, after just minutes of air exposure. Analysis of the surface free energy components indicates that the substrate interactions strongly influence the Lewis acid–base component of supported graphene, which is considerably weaker for Ni supported graphene than for Cu supported graphene, suggesting that the classical van der Waals interaction theory alone is insufficient to describe the wettability of graphene. For prolonged air exposure, the effect of physisorption of airborne contaminants becomes increasingly dominant, resulting in an increase of water contact angle that follows a universal linear-logarithmic relationship with exposure time, until saturating at a maximum value of 92–98°. The adsorbed contaminants render all supported graphene samples increasingly nonpolar, although their total surface free energy decreases only by 10–16% to about 37–41 mJ/m2. Our finding shows that failure to account for the air exposure time may lead to widely different wettability values and contradicting arguments about the wetting transparency of graphene. PMID:26900413

  9. Time-Based Measurement of Personal Mite Allergen Bioaerosol Exposure over 24 Hour Periods

    PubMed Central

    Tovey, Euan R.; Liu-Brennan, Damien; Garden, Frances L.; Oliver, Brian G.; Perzanowski, Matthew S.; Marks, Guy B.

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis are common in many countries. Globally the most common allergen associated with symptoms is produced by house dust mites. Although the bed has often been cited as the main site of exposure to mite allergens, surprisingly this has not yet been directly established by measurement due to a lack of suitable methods. Here we report on the development of novel methods to determine the pattern of personal exposure to mite allergen bioaerosols over 24-hour periods and applied this in a small field study using 10 normal adults. Air was sampled using a miniature time-based air-sampler of in-house design located close to the breathing zone of the participants, co-located with a miniature time-lapse camera. Airborne particles, drawn into the sampler at 2L/min via a narrow slot, were impacted onto the peripheral surface of a disk mounted on the hour-hand of either a 12 or 24 hour clock motor. The impaction surface was either an electret cloth, or an adhesive film; both novel for these purposes. Following a review of the time-lapse images, disks were post-hoc cut into subsamples corresponding to eight predetermined categories of indoor or outdoor location, extracted and analysed for mite allergen Der p 1 by an amplified ELISA. Allergen was detected in 57.2% of the total of 353 subsamples collected during 20 days of sampling. Exposure patterns varied over time. Higher concentrations of airborne mite allergen were typically measured in samples collected from domestic locations in the day and evening. Indoor domestic Der p 1 exposures accounted for 59.5% of total exposure, whereas total in-bed-asleep exposure, which varied 80 fold between individuals, accounted overall for 9.85% of total exposure, suggesting beds are not often the main site of exposure. This study establishes the feasibility of novel methods for determining the time-geography of personal exposure to many bioaerosols and identifies new areas for future technical development and clinical applications. PMID:27192200

  10. Effects of exposure time, material type, and granular pesticide on glove contamination.

    PubMed

    Guo, C; Stone, J; Stahr, H M; Shelley, M

    2001-11-01

    Chemical-resistant gloves are recommended for pesticide applicators to reduce their exposure to agricultural chemicals. In this research, three chemical-resistant glove materials-nitrile, neoprene, and barrier laminate-were studied in relation to contamination with granular terbufos and tefluthrin. Surfaces of specimens backed with alpha cellulose were contaminated with 300 mg of either granular terbufos or tefluthrin for 1-, 2-, 4-, 8-, 16-, and 24-h time periods in petri dishes in the laboratory. Residues were extracted using ethyl acetate for terbufos and iso-octane for tefluthrin in test tubes for 24 h. Analysis of extracts by gas chromatograph and statistical analysis of the data showed that contamination levels varied with the time of exposure, material type, and pesticide used. Pesticide was not detected in the alpha cellulose even after 24 h contamination time. A linear relationship was found between contamination level and exposure time for terbufos in the three materials, with longer exposure times causing higher contamination levels. Contamination of nitrile was significantly less than neoprene or barrier laminate. Exposed glove materials contained higher levels of contamination of terbufos than tefluthrin. PMID:11598792

  11. Latency and time-dependent exposure in a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Moulton, L H; Lê, M G

    1991-01-01

    Detailed historical data are elicited often from subjects in retrospective studies, yielding time-dependent measures of exposures. Investigation of a hypothesized period of latency can be made by examining disease/exposure relationships in multiple time windows, either along the age or time-before diagnosis axes. We suggest splitting the data into many time intervals and separately fitting regression models to the available data in each interval. Covariances between estimated coefficients from different intervals are empirically estimated, and used for assessing variability of specified functions of the time-specific coefficients. Alternative methods of interval formation and their consequences are discussed. We apply these methods to a French case-control study of oral contraceptive use and cervical cancer incidence, and compare the results to those of standard analyses. PMID:1890434

  12. Considerations for human exposure standards for fast-rise-time high-peak-power electromagnetic pulses.

    PubMed

    Merritt, J H; Kiel, J L; Hurt, W D

    1995-06-01

    Development of new emitter systems capable of producing high-peak-power electromagnetic pulses with very fast rise times and narrow pulse widths is continuing. Such directed energy weapons systems will be used in the future to defeat electronically vulnerable targets. Human exposures to these pulses can be expected during testing and operations. Development of these technologies for radar and communications purposes has the potential for wider environmental exposure, as well. Current IEEE C95.1-1991 human exposure guidelines do not specifically address these types of pulses, though limits are stated for pulsed emissions. The process for developing standards includes an evaluation of the relevant bioeffects data base. A recommendation has been made that human exposure to ultrashort electromagnetic pulses that engender electromagnetic transients, called precursor waves, should be avoided. Studies that purport to show the potential for tissue damage induced by such pulses were described. The studies cited in support of the recommendation were not relevant to the issues of tissue damage by propagated pulses. A number of investigations are cited in this review that directly address the biological effects of electromagnetic pulses. These studies have not shown evidence of tissue damage as a result of exposure to high-peak-power pulsed microwaves. It is our opinion that the current guidelines are sufficiently protective for human exposure to these pulses. PMID:7646411

  13. Power and sample size calculations for longitudinal studies comparing rates of change with a time-varying exposure

    PubMed Central

    Basagaña, X.; Spiegelman, D.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Existing study design formulas for longitudinal studies have assumed that the exposure is time-invariant. We derived sample size formulas for studies comparing rates of change by exposure when the exposure varies with time within a subject, focusing on observational studies where this variation is not controlled by the investigator. Two scenarios are considered, one assuming the effect of exposure on the response is acute and one assuming it is cumulative. We show that accurate calculations can often be obtained by providing the exposure prevalence at each time point and the intraclass correlation of exposure. When comparing rates of change, studies with a time-varying exposure are, in general, less efficient than studies with a time-invariant one. We provide a public access program to perform the calculations described in the paper (http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/faculty/spiegelman/optitxs.html). PMID:19899065

  14. Measures of patient radiation exposure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiography: Beyond fluoroscopy time

    PubMed Central

    Kachaamy, Toufic; Harrison, Edwyn; Pannala, Rahul; Pavlicek, William; Crowell, Michael D; Faigel, Douglas O

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether fluoroscope time is a good predictor of patient radiation exposure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. METHODS: This is a prospective observational study of consecutive patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in a tertiary care setting. Data related to radiation exposure were collected. The following measures were obtained: Fluoroscopy time (FT), dose area product (DAP) and dose at reference point (DOSERP). Coefficients of determination were calculated to analyze the correlation between FT, DAP and DOSRP. Agreement between FT and DAP/DOSRP was assessed using Bland Altman plots. RESULTS: Four hundred sixty-three data sets were obtained. Fluoroscopy time average was 7.3 min. Fluoroscopy related radiation accounted for 86% of the total DAP while acquisition films related radiation accounted for 14% of the DAP. For any given FT there are wide ranges of DAP and DOSERP and the variability in both increases as fluoroscopy time increases. The coefficient of determination (R2) on the non transformed data for DAP and DOSERP versus FT were respectively 0.416 and 0.554. While fluoroscopy use was the largest contributor to patient radiation exposure during endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP), there is a wide variability in DAP and DOSERP that is not accounted for by FT. DAP and DOSERP increase in variability as FT increases. This translates into poor accuracy of FT in predicting DAP and DOSERP at higher radiation doses. CONCLUSION: DAP and DOSERP in addition to FT should be adopted as new ERCP quality measures to estimate patient radiation exposure. PMID:25684958

  15. Early Adolescent Boys' Exposure to Internet Pornography: Relationships to Pubertal Timing, Sensation Seeking, and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyens, Ine; Vandenbosch, Laura; Eggermont, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that adolescents regularly use Internet pornography. This two-wave panel study aimed to test an integrative model in early adolescent boys (M[subscript age] = 14.10; N = 325) that (a) explains their exposure to Internet pornography by looking at relationships with pubertal timing and sensation seeking, and (b) explores…

  16. Effect of ceramic veneer opacity and exposure time on the polymerization efficiency of resin cements.

    PubMed

    Archegas, Luc Regina Panka; de Menezes Caldas, Danillo Biazzetto; Rached, rodrigo Nunes; Soares, Paulo; Souza, Evelise Machado

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the degree of conversion (DC), hardness (H), and modulus of elasticity (E) of a dual-cured resin cement, a light-cured resin cement, and a flowable resin cured through opaque or translucent ceramic with different exposure times. RelyX ARC (dual), RelyX Veneer (light-cured), and Filtek Z350 Flow resin specimens 0.5 mm thick were cured for 40, 80, and 120 seconds through 1-mm thick translucent or opaque feldspathic ceramic disks (n=10). The specimens were stored at 37C for 24 hours. Half of each specimen was used to test the DC and the other half to test H and E. The DC was determined in a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer in absorbance mode at peaks of 1638 cm(-1) and 1610 cm(-1). H and E were determined using nanoindentation with one loading cycle and a maximum load of 400 mN. The data were analyzed with three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), the Games-Howell test, and the Pearson correlation test (?=0.05). Statistically significant differences were found for all three factors (material, opacity, and exposure time), as well as interaction between them. The opaque ceramic resulted in lower DC, H, and E than the translucent ceramic for an exposure time of 40 seconds. An exposure time of 120 seconds resulted in a similar DC for all materials, irrespective of the opacity of the ceramic. Materials cured for 120 seconds had higher H and E than those cured for 40 seconds. The exposure time and opacity of the ceramic exerted an influence on the DC, H, and E of the materials evaluated. PMID:22313282

  17. BME Estimation of Residential Exposure to Ambient PM10 and Ozone at Multiple Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hwa-Lung; Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Christakos, George; Jerrett, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background Long-term human exposure to ambient pollutants can be an important contributing or etiologic factor of many chronic diseases. Spatiotemporal estimation (mapping) of long-term exposure at residential areas based on field observations recorded in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Air Quality System often suffer from missing data issues due to the scarce monitoring network across space and the inconsistent recording periods at different monitors. Objective We developed and compared two upscaling methods: UM1 (data aggregation followed by exposure estimation) and UM2 (exposure estimation followed by data aggregation) for the long-term PM10 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm) and ozone exposure estimations and applied them in multiple time scales to estimate PM and ozone exposures for the residential areas of the Health Effects of Air Pollution on Lupus (HEAPL) study. Method We used Bayesian maximum entropy (BME) analysis for the two upscaling methods. We performed spatiotemporal cross-validations at multiple time scales by UM1 and UM2 to assess the estimation accuracy across space and time. Results Compared with the kriging method, the integration of soft information by the BME method can effectively increase the estimation accuracy for both pollutants. The spatiotemporal distributions of estimation errors from UM1 and UM2 were similar. The cross-validation results indicated that UM2 is generally better than UM1 in exposure estimations at multiple time scales in terms of predictive accuracy and lack of bias. For yearly PM10 estimations, both approaches have comparable performance, but the implementation of UM1 is associated with much lower computation burden. Conclusion BME-based upscaling methods UM1 and UM2 can assimilate core and site-specific knowledge bases of different formats for long-term exposure estimation. This study shows that UM1 can perform reasonably well when the aggregation process does not alter the spatiotemporal structure of the original data set; otherwise, UM2 is preferable. PMID:19440491

  18. Development of reusable logic for determination of statin exposure-time from electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron W.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Broeckel, Ulrich; Hytopoulos, Vangelis; Cross, Deanna S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aim to quantify HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (statin) prescriber-intended exposure-time using a generalizable algorithm that interrogates data stored in the electronic health record (EHR). Materials and methods This study was conducted using the Marshfield Clinic (MC) Personalized Medicine Research Project (PMRP) a central Wisconsin-based population and biobank with, on average, 30 years of electronic health data available in the independently-developed MC Cattails MD EHR. Individuals with evidence of statin exposure were identified from the electronic records, and manual chart abstraction of all mentions of prescribed statins was completed. We then performed electronic chart abstraction of prescriber-intended exposure time for statins, using previously identified logic to capture pill-splitting events, normalizing dosages to atorvastatin-equivalent dose. Four models using iterative training sets were tested to capture statin end-dates. Calculated cumulative provider-intended exposures were compared to manually abstracted gold-standard measures of ordered statin prescriptions, and aggregate model results (totals) for training and validation populations were compared. The most successful model was the one with the smallest discordance between modeled and manually abstracted Atorvastatin 10 mg/year Equivalents (AEs). Results Of the approximately 20,000 patients enrolled in the PMRP, 6243 were identified with statin exposure during the study period (1997–2011), 59.8% of whom had been prescribed multiple statins over an average of approximately 11 years. When the best-fit algorithm was implemented and validated by manual chart review for the statin-ordered population, it was found to capture 95.9% of the correlation between calculated and expected statin provider-intended exposure time for a random validation set, and the best-fit model was able to predict intended statin exposure to within a standard deviation of 2.6 AEs, with a standard error of +0.23 AEs. Conclusion We demonstrate that normalized provider-intended statin exposure time can be estimated using a combination of structured clinical data sources, including a medications ordering system and a clinical appointment coordination system, supplemented with text data from clinical notes. PMID:24637142

  19. Full-color holographic diffuser using time-scheduled iterative exposure.

    PubMed

    Piao, Mei-Lan; Kwon, Ki-Chul; Kang, Hoon-Jong; Lee, Kwon-Yeon; Kim, Nam

    2015-06-01

    A compact wavelength multiplexing technique is proposed and experimentally investigated to improve the efficiency of a full-color holographic diffuser using photopolymer. The exposure responses of a monochromatic hologram and a three wavelength multiplexed hologram recorded in photopolymer film are presented. The time-scheduled exposure energies at wavelengths of 633, 532, and 473 nm were chosen to optimize the uniform diffraction efficiency of the wavelength multiplexed hologram. These three wavelength iterative sequences of exposures are applied to achieve a specific color balance for a multicolor holographic diffuser. The experimental results confirm that the fabrication method is well suited to the manufacture of holographic diffusers for full-color display applications. PMID:26192691

  20. Developmental timing of sodium perchlorate exposure alters angiogenesis, thyroid follicle proliferation and sexual maturation in stickleback.

    PubMed

    Furin, Christoff G; von Hippel, Frank A; Postlethwait, John H; Buck, C Loren; Cresko, William A; O'Hara, Todd M

    2015-08-01

    Perchlorate, a common aquatic contaminant, is well known to disrupt homeostasis of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. This study utilizes the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) fish to determine if perchlorate exposure during certain windows of development has morphological effects on thyroid and gonads. Fish were moved from untreated water to perchlorate-contaminated water (30 and 100mg/L) starting at 0, 3, 7, 14, 21, 42, 154 and 305 days post fertilization until approximately one year old. A reciprocal treatment (fish in contaminated water switched to untreated water) was conducted on the same schedule. Perchlorate exposure increased angiogenesis and follicle proliferation in thyroid tissue, delayed gonadal maturity, and skewed sex ratios toward males; effects depended on concentration and timing of exposure. This study demonstrates that perchlorate exposure beginning during the first 42 days of development has profound effects on stickleback reproductive and thyroid tissues, and by implication can impact population dynamics. Long-term exposure studies that assess contaminant effects at various stages of development provide novel information to characterize risk to aquatic organisms, to facilitate management of resources, and to determine sensitive developmental windows for further study of underlying mechanisms. PMID:25865142

  1. Phase-shifting human circadian rhythms: influence of sleep timing, social contact and light exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, J. F.; Kronauer, R. E.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    1. Both the timing of behavioural events (activity, sleep and social interactions) and the environmental light-dark cycle have been reported to contribute to entrainment of human circadian rhythms to the 24 h day. Yet, the relative contribution of those putative behavioural synchronizers to that of light exposure remains unclear. 2. To investigate this, we inverted the schedule of rest, sedentary activity and social contact of thirty-two young men either with or without exposure to bright light. 3. On this inverted schedule, the endogenous component of the core temperature rhythm of subjects who were exposed to bright light showed a significant phase shift, demonstrating that they were adapting to the new schedule. In contrast, the core temperature rhythm of subjects who were not exposed to bright light moved on average 0.2 h later per day and after 10 days had not significantly adapted to the new schedule. 4. The direction of phase shift in the groups exposed to bright light was dependent on the time of bright light exposure, while control subjects drifted to a later hour regardless of the timing of their schedule of sleep timing, social contact and meals. 5. These results support the concept that the light-dark cycle is the most important synchronizer of the human circadian system. They suggest that inversion of the sleep-wake, rest-activity and social contact cycles provides relatively minimal drive for resetting the human circadian pacemaker. 6. These data indicate that interventions designed to phase shift human circadian rhythms for adjustment to time zone changes or altered work schedules should focus on properly timed light exposure.

  2. Exposure measurement error in time-series studies of air pollution: concepts and consequences.

    PubMed Central

    Zeger, S L; Thomas, D; Dominici, F; Samet, J M; Schwartz, J; Dockery, D; Cohen, A

    2000-01-01

    Misclassification of exposure is a well-recognized inherent limitation of epidemiologic studies of disease and the environment. For many agents of interest, exposures take place over time and in multiple locations; accurately estimating the relevant exposures for an individual participant in epidemiologic studies is often daunting, particularly within the limits set by feasibility, participant burden, and cost. Researchers have taken steps to deal with the consequences of measurement error by limiting the degree of error through a study's design, estimating the degree of error using a nested validation study, and by adjusting for measurement error in statistical analyses. In this paper, we address measurement error in observational studies of air pollution and health. Because measurement error may have substantial implications for interpreting epidemiologic studies on air pollution, particularly the time-series analyses, we developed a systematic conceptual formulation of the problem of measurement error in epidemiologic studies of air pollution and then considered the consequences within this formulation. When possible, we used available relevant data to make simple estimates of measurement error effects. This paper provides an overview of measurement errors in linear regression, distinguishing two extremes of a continuum-Berkson from classical type errors, and the univariate from the multivariate predictor case. We then propose one conceptual framework for the evaluation of measurement errors in the log-linear regression used for time-series studies of particulate air pollution and mortality and identify three main components of error. We present new simple analyses of data on exposures of particulate matter < 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter from the Particle Total Exposure Assessment Methodology Study. Finally, we summarize open questions regarding measurement error and suggest the kind of additional data necessary to address them. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10811568

  3. Intimate Partner Violence Exposure and Change in Women’s Physical Symptoms Over Time

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberg, Eve; Ganz, Michael L.; Williams, Corrine M.; McCloskey, Laura A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the change in women’s self-reported physical symptoms over 2 time points in relation to intimate partner violence (IPV) exposure. DESIGN Prospective interview study of 267 women recruited from 8 health care settings and surrounding communities in Metropolitan Boston. METHODS We created sums of somatic symptoms at 2 separate time points (a mean of 9.5 months apart) using items from a modified PHQ-15. A measure of symptom change was computed to measure the net change in symptoms over time. A negative score indicated reduction in total symptoms, or improvement. Exposure to IPV was measured at both time points. RESULTS Women who reported ongoing IPV across both time points experienced an increase in their overall physical symptoms compared to women with past abuse (p = .0054) and no abuse (p = .0006). In multivariate regression analysis, ongoing IPV at both time points was a statistically significant predictor of symptom change. This relationship persisted even after controlling for age, race, education, depression, self-report of co-morbid illness, and history of child abuse and prior sexual assault (p = .0076). CONCLUSIONS Women exposed to ongoing IPV report increased physical symptoms over time. Clinicians should consider the possibility of IPV in patients who remain persistently symptomatic over time in addition to employing more traditional means of detecting IPV. PMID:18043981

  4. Measurement of fluid properties using rapid-double-exposure and time-average holographic interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    The holographic recording of the time history of a flow feature in three dimensions is discussed. The use of diffuse illumination holographic interferometry or the three-dimensional visualization of flow features such as shock waves and turbulent eddies is described. The double-exposure and time-average methods are compared using the characteristic function and the results from a flow simulator. A time history requires a large hologram recording rate. Results of holographic cinematography of the shock waves in a flutter cascade are presented as an example. Future directions of this effort, including the availability and development of suitable lasers, are discussed. Previously announced in STAR as N84-21849

  5. Measurement of fluid properties using rapid-double-exposure and time-average holographic interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, A.J.

    1984-06-01

    The holographic recording of the time history of a flow feature in three dimensions is discussed. The use of diffuse illumination holographic interferometry or the three dimensional visualization of flow features such as shock waves and turbulent eddies is described. The double-exposure and time-average methods are compared using the characteristic function and the results from a flow simulator. A time history requires a large hologram recording rate. Results of holographic cinematography of the shock waves in a flutter cascade are presented as an example. Future directions of this effort, including the availability and development of suitable lasers, are discussed.

  6. Measurement of fluid properties using rapid-double-exposure and time-average holographic interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    The holographic recording of the time history of a flow feature in three dimensions is discussed. The use of diffuse illumination holographic interferometry or the three dimensional visualization of flow features such as shock waves and turbulent eddies is described. The double-exposure and time-average methods are compared using the characteristic function and the results from a flow simulator. A time history requires a large hologram recording rate. Results of holographic cinematography of the shock waves in a flutter cascade are presented as an example. Future directions of this effort, including the availability and development of suitable lasers, are discussed.

  7. In-situ real time measurements of net erosion rates of copper during hydrogen plasma exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesler, Leigh; Wright, Graham; Peterson, Ethan; Whyte, Dennis

    2013-10-01

    In order to properly understand the dynamics of net erosion/deposition in fusion reactors, such as tokamaks, a diagnostic measuring the real time rates of net erosion/deposition during plasma exposure is necessary. The DIONISOS experiment produces real time measurements of net erosion/deposition by using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) ion beam analysis simultaneously with plasma exposure from a helicon plasma source. This in-situ method improves on ex-situ weight loss measurements by allowing measurement of possible synergistic effects of high ion implantation rates and net erosion rate and by giving a real time response to changes in plasma parameters. Previous work has validated this new technique for measuring copper (Cu) erosion from helium (He) plasma ion bombardment. This technique is now extended to measure copper erosion due to deuterium and hydrogen plasma ion exposure. Targets used were a 1.5 μm Cu layer on an aluminum substrate. Cu layer thickness is tracked in real time using 1.2 MeV proton RBS. Measured erosion rates will be compared to results from literature and He erosion rates. Supported by US DoE award DE-SC00-02060.

  8. Breast cancer risk after occupational solvent exposure: the influence of timing and setting

    PubMed Central

    Ekenga, Christine C; Parks, Christine G.; D’Aloisio, Aimee A.; DeRoo, Lisa A.; Sandler, Dale P.

    2014-01-01

    Organic solvents are ubiquitous in occupational settings where they may contribute to risks for carcinogenesis. However, there is limited information on organic solvents as human breast carcinogens. We examined the relationship between occupational exposure to solvents and breast cancer in a prospective study of 47,661 women with an occupational history in the Sister Study cohort. Occupational solvent exposure was categorized using self-reported job-specific solvent use collected at baseline. Multivariable Cox regression analyses were used to assess breast cancer risk, adjusting for established breast cancer risk factors. A total of 1,798 women were diagnosed with breast cancer during follow-up, including 1,255 invasive cases. Overall, the risk of invasive breast cancer was not associated with lifetime exposure to solvents (HR: 1.04; 95% CI = 0.88–1.24). Parous women who worked with solvents prior to their first full-term birth had an increased risk of estrogen receptor-positive invasive breast cancer compared to women who never worked with solvents (HR: 1.39; 95% CI = 1.03–1.86). A significantly elevated risk for estrogen receptor-positive invasive breast cancer was associated with solvent exposure among clinical laboratory technologists and technicians (HR: 2.00; 95%CI: 1.07–3.73). Occupational exposure to solvents prior to first birth, a critical period of breast tissue differentiation, may result in increased vulnerability for breast cancer. Our findings suggest a need for future studies in this area to focus on exposure time windows and solvent types in different occupational settings. PMID:24879566

  9. Effects of exposure time during flight maneuvers on passenger subjective comfort rating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, V. J.

    1975-01-01

    The effects were investigated of length of exposure time to a flight maneuver environment on subjective passenger evaluation of ride comfort. Four statistical analysis tests were performed on ride comfort ratings obtained during one two-hour test flight wherein eleven test subjects were exposed to two identical programmed sequences of twenty four flight segments which covered a wide range of maneuver conditions. The results of the analysis indicate that, for over ninety five percent of the segments, there is no significant change in the test subjects comfort ratings of identical segments spaced one hour apart. These results are in contrast to those found in previous studies involving a vibration environment, rather than flight maneuver environment, where increased exposure-time was found to cause a degradation of ride comfort ratings.

  10. A single magnetic field exposure system for sequential investigation of real time and downstream cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Rao, Raj R; Kisaalita, William S

    2004-01-01

    To be able to correlate real time membrane potential or ion flux changes with further downstream gene transcription responses due to extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure, we devised an experimental system consisting of a pair of symmetric circular coils. This system can be used on an inverted microscope stage (real time signaling) as well as inside controlled environment incubators (gene transcription end points). The system includes a unique, custom made switch box for blinding the experimental staff and a power amplifier. We report herein the design and characterization of the system with respect to parameters considered important in in vitro ELF-EMF exposure studies, including linear magnetic field distribution, compensation for microscope objective lens interference, heating effects of the coils, and harmonic content of the signals. PMID:14696050

  11. Avoidance tests with earthworms and springtails: defining the minimum exposure time to observe a significant response.

    PubMed

    Natal-da-Luz, Tiago; Amorim, Mnica J B; Rmbke, Jrg; Sousa, Jos Paulo

    2008-10-01

    Based on the ability of organisms to avoid contaminated soils, avoidance tests have a great potential as early screening tools in lower tier levels of ERA schemes. Aiming at their standardization, the definition of the minimum exposure time necessary to observe an avoidance response to a contaminant is needed. To fill this gap, avoidance tests with earthworms (Eisenia andrei) and springtails (Folsomia candida), comparing distinct time periods (from 1-7 to 1-14 days, respectively), were performed using the artificial OECD soil and reference chemicals for each test organism. Results showed that for both organisms a clear response within 24 h of exposure can be obtained. This rapid response enhances the utility of the test for "on site" analysis to evaluate contaminated sites. PMID:18006058

  12. Motor Response Programming and Movement Time in Children with Heavy Prenatal Alcohol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Roger W.; Thomas, Jennifer D.; Levy, Susan S.; Riley, Edward P.

    2010-01-01

    The present experiment assessed motor response programming and movement time in children with histories of heavy prenatal alcohol exposure. Alcohol-exposed children between the ages of 7 and 17 years were classified into two groups: Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS: n = 9) and children with prenatal alcohol exposure (PEA: n = 19) but who did not have the defining characteristics of FAS. The FAS and PEA children were compared to non-alcohol exposed children (NC: n = 23) when completing two tasks: a simple reaction time task (RT alone condition) and a reaction plus movement task (RT + Move condition). The movement involved responding to an imperative stimulus signal and depressing three target buttons in a set sequence. Participants completed 24 trials each for the RT alone and RT + Move response conditions. Results indicated no significant differences in performance among FAS, PEA and NC groups during the RT alone condition. However, during the RT + Move condition, the FAS group produced significantly longer and more variable reaction times than either the PEA and NC groups, which produced comparable reaction times. The FAS group also produced significantly slower movement times when moving to all three targets, whereas movement time variability did not significantly differ as a function of group. The observed results indicate children with FAS experience deficits in response programming and movement time production. PMID:20598488

  13. Lysis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by high-intensity focused ultrasound as a function of exposure time.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Timothy A; Xu, Jin; Stessman, Dan J; Yao, Linxing; Spalding, Martin H; Wang, Tong

    2014-05-01

    Efficient lysis of microalgae for lipid extraction is an important concern when processing biofuels. Historically, ultrasound frequencies in the range of 10-40 kHz have been utilized for this task. However, greater efficiencies might be achievable if higher frequencies could be used. In our study, we evaluated the potential of using 1.1 MHz ultrasound to lyse microalgae for biofuel production while using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model organism. The ultrasound was generated using a spherically focused transducer with a focal length of 6.34 cm and an active diameter of 6.36 cm driven by 20 cycle sine-wave tone bursts at a pulse repetition frequency of 2 kHz (3.6% duty cycle). The time-average acoustic power output was 26.2 W while the spatial-peak-pulse-average intensity (ISPPA) for each tone burst was 41 kW/cm(2). The peak compressional and rarefactional pressures at the focus were 102 and 17 MPa, respectively. The exposure time was varied for the different cases in the experiments from 5s to 9 min and cell lysis was assessed by quantifying the percentage of protein and chlorophyll release into the supernate as well as the lipid extractability. Free radical generation and lipid oxidation for the different ultrasound exposures were also determined. We found that there was a statistically significant increase in lipid extractability for all of the exposures compared to the control. The longer exposures also completely fragmented the cells releasing almost all of the protein and chlorophyll into the supernate. The cavitation activity did not significantly increase lipid oxidation while there was a minor trend of increased free radical production with increased ultrasound exposure. PMID:24355286

  14. Timing and Duration of Drug Exposure Affects Outcomes of a Drug-Nutrient Interaction During Ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Binbing; Aziz, Caroline; Wojnarowicz, Chris; Olkowski, Andrew; Alcorn, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Significant drug-nutrient interactions are possible when drugs and nutrients share the same absorption and disposition mechanisms. During postnatal development, the outcomes of drug-nutrient interactions may change with postnatal age since these processes undergo ontogenesis through the postnatal period. Our study investigated the dependence of a significant drug-nutrient interaction (cefepime-carnitine) on the timing and duration of drug exposure relative to postnatal age. Rat pups were administered cefepime (5 mg/kg) twice daily subcutaneously according to different dosing schedules (postnatal day 1-4, 1-8, 8-11, 8-20, or 1-20). Cefepime significantly reduced serum and heart L-carnitine levels in postnatal day 1-4, 1-8 and 8-11 groups and caused severe degenerative changes in ventricular myocardium in these groups. Cefepime also altered the ontogeny of several key L-carnitine homeostasis pathways. The qualitative and quantitative changes in levels of hepatic γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase mRNA and activity, hepatic trimethyllysine hydroxlase mRNA, intestinal organic cation/carnitine transporter (Octn) mRNA, and renal Octn2 mRNA depended on when during postnatal development the cefepime exposure occurred and duration of exposure. Despite lower levels of heart L-carnitine in earlier postnatal groups, levels of carnitine palmitoyltransferase mRNA and activity, heart Octn2 mRNA and ATP levels in all treatment groups remained unchanged with cefepime exposure. However, changes in other high energy phosphate substrates were noted and reductions in the phosphocreatine/ATP ratio were found in rat pups with normal serum L-carnitine levels. In summary, our data suggest a significant drug-nutrient transport interaction in developing neonates, the nature of which depends on the timing and duration of exposure relative to postnatal age.

  15. Visualisation of blood and lymphatic vessels with increasing exposure time of the detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kalchenko, V V; Kuznetsov, Yu L; Meglinski, I V

    2013-07-31

    We describe the laser speckle contrast method for simultaneous noninvasive imaging of blood and lymphatic vessels of living organisms, based on increasing detector exposure time. In contrast to standard methods of fluorescent angiography, this technique of vascular bed imaging and lymphatic and blood vessel demarcation does not employ toxic fluorescent markers. The method is particularly promising with respect to the physiology of the cardiovascular system under in vivo conditions. (laser applications in biology and medicine)

  16. Visualisation of blood and lymphatic vessels with increasing exposure time of the detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, V. V.; Kuznetsov, Yu L.; Meglinski, I. V.

    2013-07-01

    We describe the laser speckle contrast method for simultaneous noninvasive imaging of blood and lymphatic vessels of living organisms, based on increasing detector exposure time. In contrast to standard methods of fluorescent angiography, this technique of vascular bed imaging and lymphatic and blood vessel demarcation does not employ toxic fluorescent markers. The method is particularly promising with respect to the physiology of the cardiovascular system under in vivo conditions.

  17. The Effect of Perfluorooctane Sulfonate, Exposure Time, and Chemical Mixtures on Methanogenic Community Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Patrick J; LaPara, Timothy M; Novak, Paige J

    2015-01-01

    A plethora of organic micropollutant mixtures are found in untreated municipal wastewater. Anaerobic digesters receive large loadings of hydrophobic micropollutants that sorb to wastewater biosolids. Despite micropollutants being pervasive as mixtures, little research is available to explain the impact that mixtures of compounds, as well as exposure time, have on microbial communities in anaerobic digesters. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was added to anaerobic enrichment cultures in both short-term (14 days) and long-term (140 days) studies to determine the impact of exposure time. Additionally, triclosan was added during the experiments to investigate the impact of mixtures on community structure and function. PFOS did not alter methane production in short-term studies, but in long-term studies, methane production increased, consistent with our hypothesis that PFOS may act as a metabolic uncoupler. The impact of triclosan on methane production was exacerbated when PFOS was already present in the anaerobic enrichment cultures. Triclosan also had greater impacts on microbial community structures in the bottles that had been exposed to PFOS long-term. These results demonstrate that both chemical mixtures and exposure time are important parameters to address when trying to define the impacts of micropollutants on anaerobic microbial communities. PMID:26462249

  18. Real-time measurement of dust in the workplace using video exposure monitoring: Farming to pharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, P. T.; Forth, A. R.; Clark, R. D. R.; Dowker, K. P.; Thorpe, A.

    2009-02-01

    Real-time, photometric, portable dust monitors have been employed for video exposure monitoring (VEM) to measure and highlight dust levels generated by work activities, illustrate dust control techniques, and demonstrate good practice. Two workplaces, presenting different challenges for measurement, were used to illustrate the capabilities of VEM: (a) poultry farming activities and (b) powder transfer operations in a pharmaceutical company. For the poultry farm work, the real-time monitors were calibrated with respect to the respirable and inhalable dust concentrations using cyclone and IOM reference samplers respectively. Different rankings of exposure for typical activities were found on the small farm studied here compared to previous exposure measurements at larger poultry farms: these were mainly attributed to the different scales of operation. Large variations in the ratios of respirable, inhalable and real-time monitor TWA concentrations of poultry farm dust for various activities were found. This has implications for the calibration of light-scattering dust monitors with respect to inhalable dust concentration. In the pharmaceutical application, the effectiveness of a curtain barrier for dust control when dispensing powder in a downflow booth was rapidly demonstrated.

  19. Effect of Deployment Time on Endotoxin and Allergen Exposure Assessment Using Electrostatic Dust Collectors

    PubMed Central

    Kilburg-Basnyat, Brita; Metwali, Nervana; Thorne, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    The electrostatic dust collector (EDC) is a passive dust sampling device for exposure assessment of airborne endotoxin and possibly allergens. EDCs consist of a non-conducting plastic folder holding two or four electrostatic cloths of defined area. The sampling time needed to achieve detectable and reproducible loading for bioaerosols has not been systematically evaluated. Thus, in 15 Iowa farm homes EDCs were deployed for 7-, 14-, and 28-day sampling periods to determine if endotoxin and allergens could be quantified and if loading rates were uniform over time, i.e. if loads doubled from 7 to 14 days or 14 to 28 days and quadrupled from 7 to 28 days. Loadings between left and right paired EDC cloths were not significantly different and were highly correlated for endotoxin, total protein, and cat (Fel d1), dog (Can f1), and mouse (Mus m1) allergens (P < 0.001). EDCs performed especially well for endotoxin sampling with close agreement between paired samples (Pearson r = 0.96, P < 0.001). Endotoxin loading of the EDCs doubled from 7- to 14-day deployments as hypothesized although the loading rate decreased from 14 to 28 days of sampling with only a 1.38-fold increase. Allergen exposure assessment using EDCs was overall less satisfactory. Although there was reasonable agreement between paired samples, only exposures to cat, dog, and mouse allergens were reliable and these only at the longer deployment times. PMID:25187036

  20. Effect of deployment time on endotoxin and allergen exposure assessment using electrostatic dust collectors.

    PubMed

    Kilburg-Basnyat, Brita; Metwali, Nervana; Thorne, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    The electrostatic dust collector (EDC) is a passive dust sampling device for exposure assessment of airborne endotoxin and possibly allergens. EDCs consist of a non-conducting plastic folder holding two or four electrostatic cloths of defined area. The sampling time needed to achieve detectable and reproducible loading for bioaerosols has not been systematically evaluated. Thus, in 15 Iowa farm homes EDCs were deployed for 7-, 14-, and 28-day sampling periods to determine if endotoxin and allergens could be quantified and if loading rates were uniform over time, i.e. if loads doubled from 7 to 14 days or 14 to 28 days and quadrupled from 7 to 28 days. Loadings between left and right paired EDC cloths were not significantly different and were highly correlated for endotoxin, total protein, and cat (Fel d1), dog (Can f1), and mouse (Mus m1) allergens (P < 0.001). EDCs performed especially well for endotoxin sampling with close agreement between paired samples (Pearson r = 0.96, P < 0.001). Endotoxin loading of the EDCs doubled from 7- to 14-day deployments as hypothesized although the loading rate decreased from 14 to 28 days of sampling with only a 1.38-fold increase. Allergen exposure assessment using EDCs was overall less satisfactory. Although there was reasonable agreement between paired samples, only exposures to cat, dog, and mouse allergens were reliable and these only at the longer deployment times. PMID:25187036

  1. The Effect of Perfluorooctane Sulfonate, Exposure Time, and Chemical Mixtures on Methanogenic Community Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Patrick J; LaPara, Timothy M; Novak, Paige J

    2015-01-01

    A plethora of organic micropollutant mixtures are found in untreated municipal wastewater. Anaerobic digesters receive large loadings of hydrophobic micropollutants that sorb to wastewater biosolids. Despite micropollutants being pervasive as mixtures, little research is available to explain the impact that mixtures of compounds, as well as exposure time, have on microbial communities in anaerobic digesters. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was added to anaerobic enrichment cultures in both short-term (14 days) and long-term (140 days) studies to determine the impact of exposure time. Additionally, triclosan was added during the experiments to investigate the impact of mixtures on community structure and function. PFOS did not alter methane production in short-term studies, but in long-term studies, methane production increased, consistent with our hypothesis that PFOS may act as a metabolic uncoupler. The impact of triclosan on methane production was exacerbated when PFOS was already present in the anaerobic enrichment cultures. Triclosan also had greater impacts on microbial community structures in the bottles that had been exposed to PFOS long-term. These results demonstrate that both chemical mixtures and exposure time are important parameters to address when trying to define the impacts of micropollutants on anaerobic microbial communities. PMID:26462249

  2. Exposure to chemical cocktails before or after conception – The effect of timing on ovarian development☆

    PubMed Central

    Bellingham, Michelle; Amezaga, Maria R.; Mandon-Pepin, Beatrice; Speers, Christopher J.B.; Kyle, Carol E.; Evans, Neil P.; Sharpe, Richard M.; Cotinot, Corinne; Rhind, Stewart M.; Fowler, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of female fetuses to environmental chemicals (ECs) during pregnancy results in a disturbed ovarian adult phenotype. We investigated the influence of pre- and/or post-conception exposure to low-level mixtures of ECs on the structure and function of the fetal ovine ovary. We examined ovarian morphology, expression of oocyte and granulosa cell-specific genes and proteome. Female fetuses were collected at day 110 of gestation, from dams exposed continuously until, and after mating, by grazing in pastures treated with sewage sludge as a fertiliser (TT) or in control fields treated with inorganic fertiliser (CC). In addition, in a cross-over design, fetal ovaries were collected from dams maintained on sludge pastures up to the time of mating but then transferred to control pastures (TC) and, reciprocally, those transferred from control to treated pastures at mating (CT). On examination, the proportion of type 1a follicles (activating primordial follicles) was significantly lower in animals from the CT groups compared with CC and TT groups (P < 0.05). Of the 23 ovarian gene transcripts studied, 14 were altered in the ovaries of exposed fetuses (CT, TC, and TT) relative to controls, with the largest number of changes observed in cross-exposure pattern groups (CT or TC). Continuous EC exposure (TT) produced fewer transcript alterations and only two genes (INHBA and GSN) presented differential profiles between CC and TT. Fetal ovarian proteome analysis (2-DE gels) showed, across all exposure groups, 86 differentially expressed protein spots compared to controls. Animals in the CT group exhibited the highest number (53) while TC and TT presented the same number of affected protein spots (42). Fetal ovarian proteins with altered expression included MVP (major vault protein) and several members of the heat-shock family (HSPA4L, HSP90AA1 and HSF1). The present findings indicate that continuous maternal EC exposure before and during gestation, are less deleterious for fetal ovarian development than a change in maternal EC exposure between pre and post-conception. The pathways by which the ovary responds to this chemical stress were common in TT, CT, TC exposed foetuses. In addition to the period of pregnancy, the pre-conception period appears also as crucial for conditioning long-term effects of EC exposure on ovarian development and primordial follicle reserve and hence future fertility. PMID:23791816

  3. The effect of short-time microwave exposures on Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto chicken meat portions

    PubMed Central

    Zeinali, Tayebeh; Jamshidi, Abdollah; Khanzadi, Saeid; Azizzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can be found throughout the environment and in many foods. It is associated primarily with meat and animal products. Listeria monocytogenes has become increasingly important as a food-borne pathogen. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of microwave (MW) treatment of chicken meat samples which were inoculated with L. monocytogenes. Drumettes of broiler carcasses were soaked in fully growth of L. monocytogenes in Brain-Heart Infusion broth. The swab samples were taken from the inoculated samples, after various times of radiation (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 sec), using a domestic MW oven at full power. Following exposures, viable counts and surface temperature measurements were performed. The bacterial counts were performed on Oxford agar. The results indicated that equal or longer than 60 sec exposures of chicken portions to MW heating which enhances the median surface temperature more than 74 ˚C could eliminate the superficial contamination of chicken meat with L. monocytogenes. Statistical analysis showed samples with equal or longer than 60 sec exposures to MW heating had significant decrease in population of inoculated bacteria compared with positive control group (p < 0.05). Pearson correlation showed a significant correlation between the bacterial population and temperature of samples due to MW exposure (p < 0.001, r = – 0.879 and r2 = 0.773). PMID:26261715

  4. The effect of short-time microwave exposures on Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto chicken meat portions.

    PubMed

    Zeinali, Tayebeh; Jamshidi, Abdollah; Khanzadi, Saeid; Azizzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can be found throughout the environment and in many foods. It is associated primarily with meat and animal products. Listeria monocytogenes has become increasingly important as a food-borne pathogen. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of microwave (MW) treatment of chicken meat samples which were inoculated with L. monocytogenes. Drumettes of broiler carcasses were soaked in fully growth of L. monocytogenes in Brain-Heart Infusion broth. The swab samples were taken from the inoculated samples, after various times of radiation (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 sec), using a domestic MW oven at full power. Following exposures, viable counts and surface temperature measurements were performed. The bacterial counts were performed on Oxford agar. The results indicated that equal or longer than 60 sec exposures of chicken portions to MW heating which enhances the median surface temperature more than 74 ˚C could eliminate the superficial contamination of chicken meat with L. monocytogenes. Statistical analysis showed samples with equal or longer than 60 sec exposures to MW heating had significant decrease in population of inoculated bacteria compared with positive control group (p < 0.05). Pearson correlation showed a significant correlation between the bacterial population and temperature of samples due to MW exposure (p < 0.001, r = - 0.879 and r (2) = 0.773). PMID:26261715

  5. Personal exposure to ultrafine particles: Two-level statistical modeling of background exposure and time-activity patterns during three seasons.

    PubMed

    Deffner, Veronika; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Maier, Verena; Pitz, Mike; Cyrys, Josef; Breitner, Susanne; Schneider, Alexandra; Gu, Jianwei; Geruschkat, Uta; Peters, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Personal exposure to air pollution is associated with time- and location-specific factors including indoor and outdoor air pollution, meteorology and time activities. Our investigation aims at the description and identification of factors determining personal exposure to particle number concentration (PNC) in everyday situations. Ten volunteers recorded their personal exposure to PNC and kept an activity diary in three different seasons besides stationary measurements of ambient air pollution and meteorology. Background exposure to PNC was modelled using the most predictive variables. In a second step, the effects of the activities were calculated adjusted for the background exposure. The average personal PNC level was highest in winter and was three times higher than the mean stationary PNC level while staying indoors and two times higher while staying outdoors. Personal indoor PNC levels were significantly increased during the use of candles, cooking and the occurrence of smell of food. High stationary outdoor PNC levels and low dew point temperatures were associated with increased personal outdoor PNC levels. Times spent in public transport were associated with lower personal PNC levels than other times spent in transportation. Personal PNC levels in everyday situations exhibited a large variability because of seasonal, microenvironment-specific and activity-specific influences. PMID:25407347

  6. Effect Modification of the Association of Cumulative Exposure and Cancer Risk by Intensity of Exposure and Time Since Exposure Cessation: A Flexible Method Applied to Cigarette Smoking and Lung Cancer in the SYNERGY Study

    PubMed Central

    Vlaanderen, Jelle; Portengen, Lützen; Schüz, Joachim; Olsson, Ann; Pesch, Beate; Kendzia, Benjamin; Stücker, Isabelle; Guida, Florence; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Consonni, Dario; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Siemiatycki, Jack; Merletti, Franco; Mirabelli, Dario; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Gustavsson, Per; Plato, Nils; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Tardón, Adonina; Zaridze, David; Field, John K.; 't Mannetje, Andrea; Pearce, Neil; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Stanescu Dumitru, Rodica; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Boffetta, Paolo; Forastiere, Francesco; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Peters, Susan; Brüning, Thomas; Kromhout, Hans; Straif, Kurt; Vermeulen, Roel

    2014-01-01

    The indiscriminate use of the cumulative exposure metric (the product of intensity and duration of exposure) might bias reported associations between exposure to hazardous agents and cancer risk. To assess the independent effects of duration and intensity of exposure on cancer risk, we explored effect modification of the association of cumulative exposure and cancer risk by intensity of exposure. We applied a flexible excess odds ratio model that is linear in cumulative exposure but potentially nonlinear in intensity of exposure to 15 case-control studies of cigarette smoking and lung cancer (1985–2009). Our model accommodated modification of the excess odds ratio per pack-year of cigarette smoking by time since smoking cessation among former smokers. We observed negative effect modification of the association of pack-years of cigarette smoking and lung cancer by intensity of cigarette smoke for persons who smoked more than 20–30 cigarettes per day. Patterns of effect modification were similar across individual studies and across major lung cancer subtypes. We observed strong negative effect modification by time since smoking cessation. Application of our method in this example of cigarette smoking and lung cancer demonstrated that reducing a complex exposure history to a metric such as cumulative exposure is too restrictive. PMID:24355332

  7. Demonstration of real-time monitoring of a photolithographic exposure process using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mowry, C.D.

    1998-02-01

    Silicon wafers are coated with photoresist and exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light in a laboratory to simulate typical conditions expected in an actual semiconductor manufacturing process tool. Air is drawn through the exposure chamber and analyzed using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI/MS). Species that evaporate or outgas from the wafer are thus detected. The purpose of such analyses is to determine the potential of CI/MS as a real-time process monitoring tool. Results demonstrate that CI/MS can remotely detect the products evolved before, during, and after wafer UV exposure; and that the quantity and type of products vary with the photoresist coated on the wafer. Such monitoring could provide semiconductor manufacturers benefits in quality control and process analysis. Tool and photoresist manufacturers could also realize benefits from this measurement technique with respect to new tool, method, or photoresist development. The benefits realized can lead to improved device yields and reduced product and development costs.

  8. Influence of exposure time on the biotransformation rate of benzo(a)anthracene in fish

    SciTech Connect

    Maagd, P.G.J. de; Poorte, J. de; Sijm, D.T.H.M.; Opperhuizen, A.

    1995-12-31

    Biotransformation of PAH can yield in the formation of carcinogenic metabolites, therefore, determining the rate at which metabolites are formed is of importance to risk assessment. Biotransformation rates can be affected by inducing agents, hormonal status, temperature etc. To determine if biotransformation rates of PAH are influenced by auto-induction, juvenile fathead minnows were exposed to benzo(a)anthracene in water for various exposure times. After exposure for 5, 10, 24, 72, 168 or 336 hours no significant differences between biotransformation rates were found. The variation within each biotransformation rate was less than 20%. From these findings it is concluded that auto-induction by benzo(a)anthracene does not occur in fathead minnow.

  9. Real-Time Aircraft Cosmic Ray Radiation Exposure Predictions from the NAIRAS Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, C. J.; Tobiska, W.; Kress, B. T.; Xu, X.

    2012-12-01

    The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) is a prototype operational model for predicting commercial aircraft radiation exposure from galactic and solar cosmic rays. NAIRAS predictions are currently streaming live from the project's public website, and the exposure rate nowcast is also available on the SpaceWx smartphone app for iPhone, IPad, and Android. Cosmic rays are the primary source of human exposure to high linear energy transfer radiation at aircraft altitudes, which increases the risk of cancer and other adverse health effects. Thus, the NAIRAS model addresses an important national need with broad societal, public health and economic benefits. There is also interest in extending NAIRAS to the LEO environment to address radiation hazard issues for the emerging commercial spaceflight industry. The processes responsible for the variability in the solar wind, interplanetary magnetic field, solar energetic particle spectrum, and the dynamical response of the magnetosphere to these space environment inputs, strongly influence the composition and energy distribution of the atmospheric ionizing radiation field. Real-time observations are required at a variety of locations within the geospace environment. The NAIRAS model is driven by real-time input data from ground-, atmospheric-, and space-based platforms. During the development of the NAIRAS model, new science questions and observational data gaps were identified that must be addressed in order to obtain a more reliable and robust operational model of atmospheric radiation exposure. The focus of this talk is to present the current capabilities of the NAIRAS model, discuss future developments in aviation radiation modeling and instrumentation, and propose strategies and methodologies of bridging known gaps in current modeling and observational capabilities.

  10. Wearable real-time direct reading naphthalene and VOC personal exposure monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hug, W. F.; Bhartia, R.; Reid, R. D.; Reid, M. R.; Oswal, P.; Lane, A. L.; Sijapati, K.; Sullivan, K.; Hulla, J. E.; Snawder, J.; Proctor, S. P.

    2012-06-01

    Naphthalene has been identified by the National Research Council as a serious health hazard for personnel working with jet fuels and oil-based sealants containing naphthalene. We are developing a family of miniature, self-contained, direct reading personal exposure monitors (PEMs) to detect, differentiate, quantify, and log naphthalene and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the breathing zone of the wearer or in the hands of an industrial hygienist with limits of detection in the low parts per billion (ppb) range. The VOC Dosimeter (VOCDos) described here is a PEM that provides real-time detection and data logging of exposure as well as accumulated dose, with alarms addressing long term and immediate exposure limits. We will describe the sensor, which employs optical methods with a unique excitation source and rapidly refreshable vapor concentrator. This paper addresses the rapidly increasing awareness of the health risks of inhaling jet fuel vapors by Department of Defense (DOD) personnel engaged in or around jet fueling operations. Naphthalene is a one to three percent component of the 5 billion gallons of jet fuels used annually by DOD. Naphthalene is also a component of many other petroleum products such as asphalt and other oil-based sealants. The DOD is the single largest user of petroleum fuels in the United States (20% of all petroleum fuel used). The VOCDos wearable sensor provides real-time detection and data logging of exposure as well as accumulated dose. We will describe the sensor, which employs endogenous fluorescence from VOCs accumulated on a unique, rapidly refreshable, patent-pending concentrator, excited by a unique deep ultraviolet excitation source.

  11. DNA methylation differences after exposure to prenatal famine are common and timing- and sex-specific

    PubMed Central

    Tobi, Elmar W.; Lumey, L.H.; Talens, Rudolf P.; Kremer, Dennis; Putter, Hein; Stein, Aryeh D.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Heijmans, Bastiaan T.

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal famine in humans has been associated with various later-life consequences, depending on the gestational timing of the insult and the sex of the exposed individual. Epigenetic mechanisms have been proposed to underlie these associations. Indeed, animal studies and our early human data on the imprinted IGF2 locus indicated a link between prenatal nutritional and DNA methylation. However, it remains unclear how common changes in DNA methylation are and whether they are sex- and timing-specific paralleling the later-life consequences of prenatal famine exposure. To this end, we investigated the methylation of 15 loci implicated in growth and metabolic disease in individuals who were prenatally exposed to a war-time famine in 194445. Methylation of INSIGF was lower among individuals who were periconceptionally exposed to the famine (n = 60) compared with their unexposed same-sex siblings (P = 2 10?5), whereas methylation of IL10, LEP, ABCA1, GNASAS and MEG3 was higher (all P < 10?3). A significant interaction with sex was observed for INSIGF, LEP and GNASAS. Next, methylation of eight representative loci was compared between 62 individuals exposed late in gestation and their unexposed siblings. Methylation was different for GNASAS (P = 1.1 10?7) and, in men, LEP (P = 0.017). Our data indicate that persistent changes in DNA methylation may be a common consequence of prenatal famine exposure and that these changes depend on the sex of the exposed individual and the gestational timing of the exposure. PMID:19656776

  12. Acute exposure to 2G phase shifts the rat circadian timing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Murakami, D. M.; Tandon, T.; Fuller, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    The circadian timing system (CTS) provides internal and external temporal coordination of an animal's physiology and behavior. In mammals, the generation and coordination of these circadian rhythms is controlled by a neural pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), located within the hypothalamus. The pacemaker is synchronized to the 24 hour day by time cures (zeitgebers) such as the light/dark cycle. When an animal is exposed to an environment without time cues, the circadian rhythms maintain internal temporal coordination, but exhibit a 'free-running' condition in which the period length is determined by the internal pacemaker. Maintenance of internal and external temporal coordination are critical for normal physiological and psychological function in human and non-human primates. Exposure to altered gravitational environments has been shown to affect the amplitude, mean, and timing of circadian rhythms in species ranging from unicellular organisms to man. However, it has not been determined whether altered gravitational fields have a direct effect on the neural pacemaker, or affect peripheral parameters. In previous studies, the ability of a stimulus to phase shift circadian rhythms was used to determine whether a stimulus has a direct effect on the neural pacemaker. The present experiment was performed in order to determine whether acute exposure to a hyperdynamic field could phase shift circadian rhythms.

  13. Evaluating multi-exposure speckle imaging estimates of absolute autocorrelation times.

    PubMed

    Kazmi, S M Shams; Wu, Rebecca K; Dunn, Andrew K

    2015-08-01

    Multi-exposure speckle imaging (MESI) is a camera-based flow-imaging technique for quantitative blood-flow monitoring by mapping the speckle-contrast dependence on camera exposure duration. The ability of laser speckle contrast imaging to measure the temporal dynamics of backscattered and interfering coherent fields, in terms of the accuracy of autocorrelation measurements, is a major unresolved issue in quantitative speckle flowmetry. MESI fits for a number of parameters including an estimate of the electric field autocorrelation decay time from the imaged speckles. We compare the MESI-determined correlation times in vitro and in vivo with accepted true values from direct temporal measurements acquired with a photon-counting photon-multiplier tube and an autocorrelator board. The correlation times estimated by MESI in vivo remain on average within 14±11% of those obtained from direct temporal autocorrelation measurements, demonstrating that MESI yields highly comparable statistics of the time-varying fields that can be useful for applications seeking not only quantitative blood flow dynamics but also absolute perfusion. PMID:26258378

  14. Power and sample size calculations for longitudinal studies estimating a main effect of a time-varying exposure

    PubMed Central

    Basagaña, Xavier; Liao, Xiaomei; Spiegelman, Donna

    2013-01-01

    Existing study design formulas for longitudinal studies assume that the exposure is time invariant or that it varies in a manner that is controlled by design. However, in observational studies, the investigator does not control how exposure varies within subjects over time. Typically, a large number of exposure patterns are observed, with differences in the number of exposed periods per participant and with changes in the cross-sectional mean of exposure over time. This article provides formulas for study design calculations that incorporate these features for studies with a continuous outcome and a time-varying exposure, for cases where the effect of exposure on the response is assumed to be constant over time. We show that incorrectly using the formulas for time-invariant exposure can produce substantial overestimation of the required sample size. It is shown that the exposure mean, variance and intraclass correlation are the only additional parameters needed for exact solutions for the required sample size, if compound symmetry of residuals can be assumed, or to a good approximation if residuals follow a damped exponential correlation structure. The methods are applied to several examples. A publicly available programme to perform the calculations is provided. PMID:20547587

  15. Gender differences in road traffic injury rate using time travelled as a measure of exposure.

    PubMed

    Santamariña-Rubio, Elena; Pérez, Katherine; Olabarria, Marta; Novoa, Ana M

    2014-04-01

    There is no consensus on whether the risk of road traffic injury is higher among men or among women. Comparison between studies is difficult mainly due to the different exposure measures used to estimate the risk. The measures of exposure to the risk of road traffic injury should be people's mobility measures, but frequently authors use other measures such population or vehicles mobility. We compare road traffic injury risk in men and women, by age, mode of transport and severity, using the time people spend travelling as the exposure measure, in Catalonia for the period 2004-2008. This is a cross-sectional study including all residents aged over 3 years. The road traffic injury rate was calculated using the number of people injured, from the Register of Accidents and Victims of the National Traffic Authority as numerator, and the person-hours travelled, from the 2006 Daily Mobility Survey carried out by the Catalan regional government, as denominator. Sex and age specific rates by mode of transport and severity were calculated, and Poisson regression models were fitted. Among child pedestrians and young drivers, males present higher risk of slight and severe injury, and in the oldest groups women present higher risk. The death rate is always higher in men. There exists interaction between sex and age in road traffic injury risk. Therefore, injury risk is higher among men in some age groups, and among women in other groups, but these age groups vary depending on mode of transport and severity. PMID:24384384

  16. Variability in electromagnetic field levels over time, and Monte-Carlo simulation of exposure parameters.

    PubMed

    Pachón-García, F T; Paniagua-Sánchez, J M; Rufo-Pérez, M; Jiménez-Barco, A

    2014-12-01

    This article analyses the electric field levels around medium-wave transmitters, delimiting the temporal variability of the levels received at a pre-established reception point. One extensively used dosimetric criterion is to consider historical levels of the field recorded over a certain period of time so as to provide an overall perspective of radio-frequency electric field exposure in a particular environment. This aspect is the focus of the present study, in which the measurements will be synthesised in the form of exposure coefficients. Two measurement campaigns were conducted: one short term (10 days) and the other long term (1 y). The short-term data were used to study which probability density functions best approximate the measured levels. The long-term data were used to compute the principal statistics that characterise the field values over a year. The data that form the focus of the study are the peak traces, since these are the most representative from the standpoint of exposure. The deviations found were around 6 % for short periods and 12 % for long periods. The information from the two campaigns was used to develop and implement a computer application based on the Monte Carlo method to simulate values of the field, allowing one to carry out robust statistics. PMID:24594905

  17. Radiation Exposure and Health Effects - is it Time to Reassess the Real Consequences?

    PubMed

    Thomas, G A; Symonds, P

    2016-04-01

    Our acceptance of exposure to radiation is somewhat schizophrenic. We accept that the use of high doses of radiation is still one of the most valuable weapons in our fight against cancer, and believe that bathing in radioactive spas is beneficial. On the other hand, as a species, we are fearful of exposure to man-made radiation as a result of accidents related to power generation, even though we understand that the doses are orders of magnitude lower than those we use everyday in medicine. The 70th anniversary of the detonation of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki was marked in 2015. The 30th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident will be marked in April 2016. March 2016 also sees the fifth anniversary of the accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant. Perhaps now is an opportune time to assess whether we are right to be fearful of the effects of low doses of radiation, or whether actions taken because of our fear of radiation actually cause a greater detriment to health than the direct effect of radiation exposure. PMID:26880062

  18. Detecting and Correcting Motion Blur from Images Shot with Channel-Dependent Exposure Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelgard, L.; Delaygue, E.; Brdif, M.; Vallet, B.

    2012-07-01

    This article describes a pipeline developed to automatically detect and correct motion blur due to the airplane motion in aerial images provided by a digital camera system with channel-dependent exposure times. Blurred images show anisotropy in their Fourier Transform coefficients that can be detected and estimated to recover the characteristics of the motion blur. To disambiguate the anisotropy produced by a motion blur from the possible spectral anisotropy produced by some periodic patterns present in a sharp image, we consider the phase difference of the Fourier Transform of two channel shot with different exposure times (i.e. with different blur extensions). This is possible because of the deep correlation between the three visible channels ensures phase coherence of the Fourier Transform coefficients in sharp images. In this context, considering the phase difference constitutes both a good detector and estimator of the motion blur parameters. In order to improve on this estimation, the phase difference is performed on local windows in the image where the channels are more correlated. The main lobe of the phase difference, where the phase difference between two channels is close to zero actually imitates an ellipse which axis ratio discriminates blur and which orientation and minor axis give respectively the orientation and the blur kernel extension of the long exposure-time channels. However, this approach is not robust to the presence in the phase difference of minor lobes due to phase sign inversions in the Fourier transform of the motion blur. They are removed by considering the polar representation of the phase difference. Based on the blur detection step, blur correction is eventually performed using two different approaches depending on the blur extension size: using either a simple frequency-based fusion for small blur or a semi blind iterative method for larger blur. The higher computing costs of the latter method make it only suitable for large motion blur, when the former method is not applicable.

  19. Time allocation shifts and pollutant exposure due to traffic congestion: an analysis using the national human activity pattern survey.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Batterman, Stuart A

    2009-10-15

    Traffic congestion increases air pollutant exposures of commuters and urban populations due to the increased time spent in traffic and the increased vehicular emissions that occur in congestion, especially "stop-and-go" traffic. Increased time in traffic also decreases time in other microenvironments, a trade-off that has not been considered in previous time activity pattern (TAP) analyses conducted for exposure assessment purposes. This research investigates changes in time allocations and exposures that result from traffic congestion. Time shifts were derived using data from the National Human Activity Pattern Survey (NHAPS), which was aggregated to nine microenvironments (six indoor locations, two outdoor locations and one transport location). After imputing missing values, handling outliers, and conducting other quality checks, these data were stratified by respondent age, employment status and period (weekday/weekend). Trade-offs or time-shift coefficients between time spent in vehicles and the eight other microenvironments were then estimated using robust regression. For children and retirees, congestion primarily reduced the time spent at home; for older children and working adults, congestion shifted the time spent at home as well as time in schools, public buildings, and other indoor environments. Changes in benzene and PM(2.5) exposure were estimated for the current average travel delay in the U.S. (9 min day(-1)) and other scenarios using the estimated time shifts coefficients, concentrations in key microenvironments derived from the literature, and a probabilistic analysis. Changes in exposures depended on the duration of the congestion and the pollutant. For example, a 30 min day(-1) travel delay was determined to account for 21+/-12% of current exposure to benzene and 14+/-8% of PM(2.5) exposure. The time allocation shifts and the dynamic approach to TAPs improve estimates of exposure impacts from congestion and other recurring events. PMID:19683333

  20. Juvenile Green Frog (Rana clamitans) Predatory Ability not Affected by Exposure to Carbaryl at Different Times During Larval Development

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Melanie J.; Kleinhenz, Peter; Boone, Michelle D.

    2011-01-01

    Larval exposure to pesticides can occur at different times during development, and can negatively impact amphibian fitness. We examined the effects of larval green frog (Rana clamitans) exposure to carbaryl at 2, 4, 8, or 16 weeks of development on juvenile predatory ability. We did not find evidence that predatory ability was affected by exposure to carbaryl, which suggests that carbaryl does not have latent effects on the predatory performance of green frogs in subsequent life stages. PMID:21462236

  1. Juvenile green frog (Rana clamitans) predatory ability not affected by exposure to carbaryl at different times during larval development.

    PubMed

    Davis, Melanie J; Kleinhenz, Peter; Boone, Michelle D

    2011-07-01

    Larval exposure to pesticides can occur at different times during development and can negatively impact amphibian fitness. We examined the effects of larval green frog (Rana clamitans) exposure to carbaryl at 2, 4, 8, or 16 weeks of development on juvenile predatory ability. We did not find evidence that predatory ability was affected by exposure to carbaryl, which suggests that carbaryl does not have latent effects on the predatory performance of green frogs in subsequent life stages. PMID:21462236

  2. Gene Expression-Based Dosimetry by Dose and Time in Mice Following Acute Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, James D.; Divine, George W.; Grever, William E.; Thomas, Robert A.; Joiner, Michael C.; Smolinski, Joseph M.; Auner, Gregory W.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and reliable methods for performing biological dosimetry are of paramount importance in the event of a large-scale nuclear event. Traditional dosimetry approaches lack the requisite rapid assessment capability, ease of use, portability and low cost, which are factors needed for triaging a large number of victims. Here we describe the results of experiments in which mice were acutely exposed to 60Co gamma rays at doses of 0 (control) to 10 Gy. Blood was obtained from irradiated mice 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 days after exposure. mRNA expression levels of 106 selected genes were obtained by reverse-transcription real time PCR. Stepwise regression of dose received against individual gene transcript expression levels provided optimal dosimetry at each time point. The results indicate that only 4–7 different gene transcripts are needed to explain ≥ 0.69 of the variance (R2), and that receiver-operator characteristics, a measure of sensitivity and specificity, of ≥ 0.93 for these statistical models were achieved at each time point. These models provide an excellent description of the relationship between the actual and predicted doses up to 6 Gy. At doses of 8 and 10 Gy there appears to be saturation of the radiation-response signals with a corresponding diminution of accuracy. These results suggest that similar analyses in humans may be advantageous for use in a field-portable device designed to assess exposures in mass casualty situations. PMID:24358280

  3. Space Weathering Effects in Lunar Soils: The Roles of Surface Exposure Time and Bulk Chemical Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Shouliang; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2011-01-01

    Space weathering effects on lunar soil grains result from both radiation-damaged and deposited layers on grain surfaces. Typically, solar wind irradiation forms an amorphous layer on regolith silicate grains, and induces the formation of surficial metallic Fe in Fe-bearing minerals [1,2]. Impacts into the lunar regolith generate high temperature melts and vapor. The vapor component is largely deposited on the surfaces of lunar soil grains [3] as is a fraction of the melt [4, this work]. Both the vapor-deposits and the deposited melt typically contain nanophase Fe metal particles (npFe0) as abundant inclusions. The development of these rims and the abundance of the npFe0 in lunar regolith, and thus the optical properties, vary with the soil mineralogy and the length of time the soil grains have been exposed to space weathering effects [5]. In this study, we used the density of solar flare particle tracks in soil grains to estimate exposure times for individual grains and then perform nanometer-scale characterization of the rims using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The work involved study of lunar soil samples with different mineralogy (mare vs. highland) and different exposure times (mature vs. immature).

  4. Gene expression-based dosimetry by dose and time in mice following acute radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Tucker, James D; Divine, George W; Grever, William E; Thomas, Robert A; Joiner, Michael C; Smolinski, Joseph M; Auner, Gregory W

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and reliable methods for performing biological dosimetry are of paramount importance in the event of a large-scale nuclear event. Traditional dosimetry approaches lack the requisite rapid assessment capability, ease of use, portability and low cost, which are factors needed for triaging a large number of victims. Here we describe the results of experiments in which mice were acutely exposed to (60)Co gamma rays at doses of 0 (control) to 10 Gy. Blood was obtained from irradiated mice 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 days after exposure. mRNA expression levels of 106 selected genes were obtained by reverse-transcription real time PCR. Stepwise regression of dose received against individual gene transcript expression levels provided optimal dosimetry at each time point. The results indicate that only 4-7 different gene transcripts are needed to explain ≥ 0.69 of the variance (R(2)), and that receiver-operator characteristics, a measure of sensitivity and specificity, of ≥ 0.93 for these statistical models were achieved at each time point. These models provide an excellent description of the relationship between the actual and predicted doses up to 6 Gy. At doses of 8 and 10 Gy there appears to be saturation of the radiation-response signals with a corresponding diminution of accuracy. These results suggest that similar analyses in humans may be advantageous for use in a field-portable device designed to assess exposures in mass casualty situations. PMID:24358280

  5. Non parametric denoising methods based on wavelets: Application to electron microscopy images in low exposure time

    SciTech Connect

    Soumia, Sid Ahmed; Messali, Zoubeida; Ouahabi, Abdeldjalil; Trepout, Sylvain E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr Messaoudi, Cedric E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr Marco, Sergio E-mail: cedric.messaoudi@curie.fr

    2015-01-13

    The 3D reconstruction of the Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and Energy Filtering TEM images (EFTEM) hampered by the noisy nature of these images, so that their alignment becomes so difficult. This noise refers to the collision between the frozen hydrated biological samples and the electrons beam, where the specimen is exposed to the radiation with a high exposure time. This sensitivity to the electrons beam led specialists to obtain the specimen projection images at very low exposure time, which resulting the emergence of a new problem, an extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This paper investigates the problem of TEM images denoising when they are acquired at very low exposure time. So, our main objective is to enhance the quality of TEM images to improve the alignment process which will in turn improve the three dimensional tomography reconstructions. We have done multiple tests on special TEM images acquired at different exposure time 0.5s, 0.2s, 0.1s and 1s (i.e. with different values of SNR)) and equipped by Golding beads for helping us in the assessment step. We herein, propose a structure to combine multiple noisy copies of the TEM images. The structure is based on four different denoising methods, to combine the multiple noisy TEM images copies. Namely, the four different methods are Soft, the Hard as Wavelet-Thresholding methods, Bilateral Filter as a non-linear technique able to maintain the edges neatly, and the Bayesian approach in the wavelet domain, in which context modeling is used to estimate the parameter for each coefficient. To ensure getting a high signal-to-noise ratio, we have guaranteed that we are using the appropriate wavelet family at the appropriate level. So we have chosen âĂIJsym8âĂİ wavelet at level 3 as the most appropriate parameter. Whereas, for the bilateral filtering many tests are done in order to determine the proper filter parameters represented by the size of the filter, the range parameter and the spatial parameter respectively. The experiments reported in this paper demonstrate the performance of the Bilateral Filtering and the Bayesian approaches in terms of improving the SNRout and the image quality. Taken together, these results suggest that the Bayesian process has a potential to outperform all the used methods, where in the multiple noisy copies structure it gave us the best SNRout without change of the golden beads diameter. The Bayesian approach yielded enhanced average image without needing a huge amount of copies.

  6. Sociality and Sickness: Have Cytokines Evolved to Serve Social Functions beyond Times of Pathogen Exposure?

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Michael B.; Deak, Terrence; Schiml, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    During pathogen exposure or some forms of stress, proinflammatory processes induce an array of motivated and behavioral adjustments termed “sickness behaviors”. Although withdrawal from social interactions is a commonly observed sickness behavior, the relation between social behavior and sickness is much more complex. Sickness can suppress or stimulate social behavior. Sickness can serve as a social cue. Stressors that are social in nature can induce sickness behaviors, and sickness behavior can be readily suppressed by meaningful social stimuli. The nature, context, and timing of these effects together suggest that cytokine-induced behavior may play a role in mediating social interactions in various non-pathological conditions. PMID:24184399

  7. Non parametric denoising methods based on wavelets: Application to electron microscopy images in low exposure time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumia, Sid Ahmed; Messali, Zoubeida; Ouahabi, Abdeldjalil; Trepout, Sylvain; Messaoudi, Cedric; Marco, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The 3D reconstruction of the Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM) and Energy Filtering TEM images (EFTEM) hampered by the noisy nature of these images, so that their alignment becomes so difficult. This noise refers to the collision between the frozen hydrated biological samples and the electrons beam, where the specimen is exposed to the radiation with a high exposure time. This sensitivity to the electrons beam led specialists to obtain the specimen projection images at very low exposure time, which resulting the emergence of a new problem, an extremely low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This paper investigates the problem of TEM images denoising when they are acquired at very low exposure time. So, our main objective is to enhance the quality of TEM images to improve the alignment process which will in turn improve the three dimensional tomography reconstructions. We have done multiple tests on special TEM images acquired at different exposure time 0.5s, 0.2s, 0.1s and 1s (i.e. with different values of SNR)) and equipped by Golding beads for helping us in the assessment step. We herein, propose a structure to combine multiple noisy copies of the TEM images. The structure is based on four different denoising methods, to combine the multiple noisy TEM images copies. Namely, the four different methods are Soft, the Hard as Wavelet-Thresholding methods, Bilateral Filter as a non-linear technique able to maintain the edges neatly, and the Bayesian approach in the wavelet domain, in which context modeling is used to estimate the parameter for each coefficient. To ensure getting a high signal-to-noise ratio, we have guaranteed that we are using the appropriate wavelet family at the appropriate level. So we have chosen âĂIJsym8âĂİ wavelet at level 3 as the most appropriate parameter. Whereas, for the bilateral filtering many tests are done in order to determine the proper filter parameters represented by the size of the filter, the range parameter and the spatial parameter respectively. The experiments reported in this paper demonstrate the performance of the Bilateral Filtering and the Bayesian approaches in terms of improving the SNRout and the image quality. Taken together, these results suggest that the Bayesian process has a potential to outperform all the used methods, where in the multiple noisy copies structure it gave us the best SNRout without change of the golden beads diameter. The Bayesian approach yielded enhanced average image without needing a huge amount of copies.

  8. Permethrin exposure from fabric-treated military uniforms under different wear-time scenarios.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Susan P; Maule, Alexis L; Heaton, Kristin J; Adam, Gina E

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the project was to ascertain whether urinary biomarkers of permethrin exposure are detected after wearing post-tailored, fabric-treated military uniforms under two different wear-time exposure scenarios. Study A occurred over 3.5 days and involved six participants wearing treated uniforms continuously for 30-32 h. Urine collection occurred at scheduled time points before, during, and after wearing the uniform. Study B, conducted over 19 days, included 11 participants wearing treated uniforms for 3 consecutive days, 8 h each day (with urine collection before, during, and after wear). Urinary biomarkers of permethrin (3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA), cis- 2,2-(dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (cDCCA), trans- 2,2-(dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (tDCCA)) were detected during and after wear. Biomarker detection generally occurred over the 10- to 12-h period after putting on the uniform and subsided 24 h following uniform removal (in both Study A and B scenarios). Those wearing permethrin-treated uniforms under the longer wear-time scenario (Study A) excreted significantly higher cumulative mean levels compared with those in Study B (3.29 times higher for 3PBA and 2.23 times higher for the sum of c/tDCCA (P≤0.001)). Findings suggest that wearing permethrin-treated clothing does increase absorbed, internal dose levels of permethrin above population levels and is significantly related to wear-time duration. PMID:24104061

  9. Influence of paternal exposure to oil and oil products on time to pregnancy and spontaneous abortions.

    PubMed

    Bull, N; Riise, T; Moen, B E

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of exposure to oil and oil products among men on the time taken for their wives to conceive and on the incidence of spontaneous abortion among them. A cross-sectional study was performed by posting questionnaires to 1,269 men employed as offshore mechanics, offshore operators, offshore drilling personnel, car mechanics (the 'exposed' occupations) and carpenters ('unexposed'). The married men were asked to give a separate questionnaire to their wives for details about their pregnancies. The time elapsed between the beginning of coitus without contraception and the wife becoming pregnant (time to pregnancy) was analyzed with Cox regression analysis by calculating fecundability ratios for the pregnancies for the men exposed to oil and oil products as compared with the men who were not exposed. Spontaneous abortions were analyzed with logistic regression by calculating odds ratios for the pregnancies in which the men were exposed vs. not exposed. A total of 741 (58%) men returned the questionnaires. A total of 301 pregnancies were analyzed for time taken to conceive and 580 for spontaneous abortion. The results were adjusted for variables that could significantly influence conception time (previous infections of the reproductive system and coffee drinking) or the incidence of spontaneous abortion (mother's age, parity and smoking). The outcomes between the exposed and unexposed pregnancies showed no significant differences. Car mechanics had a lower fecundability ratio before 1992 than after 1992. Paternal exposure to hydrocarbons in the occupations studied did not seem to have had a major influence on time to conception or the incidence of spontaneous abortion among the wives of the men exposed to oil products. PMID:10628044

  10. Exploratory study on a statistical method to analyse time resolved data obtained during nanomaterial exposure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerc, F.; Njiki-Menga, G.-H.; Witschger, O.

    2013-04-01

    Most of the measurement strategies that are suggested at the international level to assess workplace exposure to nanomaterials rely on devices measuring, in real time, airborne particles concentrations (according different metrics). Since none of the instruments to measure aerosols can distinguish a particle of interest to the background aerosol, the statistical analysis of time resolved data requires special attention. So far, very few approaches have been used for statistical analysis in the literature. This ranges from simple qualitative analysis of graphs to the implementation of more complex statistical models. To date, there is still no consensus on a particular approach and the current period is always looking for an appropriate and robust method. In this context, this exploratory study investigates a statistical method to analyse time resolved data based on a Bayesian probabilistic approach. To investigate and illustrate the use of the this statistical method, particle number concentration data from a workplace study that investigated the potential for exposure via inhalation from cleanout operations by sandpapering of a reactor producing nanocomposite thin films have been used. In this workplace study, the background issue has been addressed through the near-field and far-field approaches and several size integrated and time resolved devices have been used. The analysis of the results presented here focuses only on data obtained with two handheld condensation particle counters. While one was measuring at the source of the released particles, the other one was measuring in parallel far-field. The Bayesian probabilistic approach allows a probabilistic modelling of data series, and the observed task is modelled in the form of probability distributions. The probability distributions issuing from time resolved data obtained at the source can be compared with the probability distributions issuing from the time resolved data obtained far-field, leading in a quantitative estimation of the airborne particles released at the source when the task is performed. Beyond obtained results, this exploratory study indicates that the analysis of the results requires specific experience in statistics.

  11. Time-averaged copper concentrations from continuous exposures predicts pulsed exposure toxicity to the marine diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum: Importance of uptake and elimination.

    PubMed

    Angel, Brad M; Simpson, Stuart L; Chariton, Anthony A; Stauber, Jenny L; Jolley, Dianne F

    2015-07-01

    Intermittent, fluctuating and pulsed contaminant discharges result in organisms receiving highly variable contaminant exposures. Current water quality guidelines are predominantly derived using data from continuous exposure toxicity tests, and most frequently applied by regulators with the assumption that concentrations from a single sampling event will provide a meaningful approach to assessing potential effects. This study investigated the effect of single and multiple (daily) dissolved copper pulses on the marine diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, including measurements of copper uptake and elimination to investigate the toxic mechanism. Copper pulses of between 0.5 and 24h and continuous exposures with equivalent 72-h time-averaged concentrations (TACs) resulted in similar biomass inhibition of P. tricornutum, with continuous exposures often being marginally more toxic. Rates of cell division generally recovered to control levels within 24h of the copper pulse removal. Upon resuspension in clean seawater, the extracellular copper per cell decreased rapidly, whereas the intracellular copper per cell decreased slowly. Negligible loss of copper from the total algal biomass indicated that P. tricornutum did not have an effective mechanism for eliminating copper from cells, rather the intracellular copper decreased as a result of dilution by cellular division as the algal growth rate recovered. The measurement of copper uptake after 72-h exposure and kinetics of elimination thereafter suggest that continuous exposures are marginally more toxic to P. tricornutum than pulsed copper exposures with equivalent TACs because slow internalization and saturation of algal membrane transport sites results in less copper uptake into pulse-exposed cells than continuously-exposed cells coupled with dilution of internalized copper via cellular division in the post-exposure period. In the case of P. tricornutum, the results indicate that water quality guidelines for copper based on continuous exposure will be conservative when applied to short-term discharges. PMID:25911575

  12. REAL-TIME MODELING AND MEASUREMENT OF MOBILE SOURCE POLLUTANT CONCENTRATIONS FOR ESTIMATING HUMAN EXPOSURES IN COMMUNITIES NEAR ROADWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is pursuing a project to improve the methodology for real-time site specific modeling of human exposure to pollutants from motor vehicles. The overall project goal is to deve...

  13. The Impact of the Developmental Timing of Trauma Exposure on PTSD Symptoms and Psychosocial Functioning among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogle, Christin M.; Rubin, David C.; Siegler, Ilene C.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the impact of the developmental timing of trauma exposure on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and psychosocial functioning in a large sample of community-dwelling older adults (N = 1,995). Specifically, we investigated whether the negative consequences of exposure to traumatic events were greater for traumas…

  14. Dose, exposure time, and resolution in Serial X-ray Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Starodub, D; Rez, P; Hembree, G; Howells, M; Shapiro, D; Chapman, H N; Fromme, P; Schmidt, K; Weierstall, U; Doak, R B; Spence, J C

    2007-03-22

    Using detailed simulation and analytical models, the exposure time is estimated for serial crystallography, where hydrated laser-aligned proteins are sprayed across a continuous synchrotron beam. The resolution of X-ray diffraction microscopy is limited by the maximum dose that can be delivered prior to sample damage. In the proposed Serial Crystallography method, the damage problem is addressed by distributing the total dose over many identical hydrated macromolecules running continuously in a single-file train across a continuous X-ray beam, and resolution is then limited only by the available fluxes of molecules and X-rays. Orientation of the diffracting molecules is achieved by laser alignment. We evaluate the incident X-ray fluence (energy/area) required to obtain a given resolution from (1) an analytical model, giving the count rate at the maximum scattering angle for a model protein, (2) explicit simulation of diffraction patterns for a GroEL-GroES protein complex, and (3) the frequency cut off of the transfer function following iterative solution of the phase problem, and reconstruction of a density map in the projection approximation. These calculations include counting shot noise and multiple starts of the phasing algorithm. The results indicate the number of proteins needed within the beam at any instant for a given resolution and X-ray flux. We confirm an inverse fourth power dependence of exposure time on resolution, with important implications for all coherent X-ray imaging. We find that multiple single-file protein beams will be needed for sub-nanometer resolution on current third generation synchrotrons, but not on fourth generation designs, where reconstruction of secondary protein structure at a resolution of 7 {angstrom} should be possible with short (below 100 s) exposures.

  15. Time averaged transmitter power and exposure to electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base stations.

    PubMed

    Bürgi, Alfred; Scanferla, Damiano; Lehmann, Hugo

    2014-08-01

    Models for exposure assessment of high frequency electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base stations need the technical data of the base stations as input. One of these parameters, the Equivalent Radiated Power (ERP), is a time-varying quantity, depending on communication traffic. In order to determine temporal averages of the exposure, corresponding averages of the ERP have to be available. These can be determined as duty factors, the ratios of the time-averaged power to the maximum output power according to the transmitter setting. We determine duty factors for UMTS from the data of 37 base stations in the Swisscom network. The UMTS base stations sample contains sites from different regions of Switzerland and also different site types (rural/suburban/urban/hotspot). Averaged over all regions and site types, a UMTS duty factor for the 24 h-average is obtained, i.e., the average output power corresponds to about a third of the maximum power. We also give duty factors for GSM based on simple approximations and a lower limit for LTE estimated from the base load on the signalling channels. PMID:25105551

  16. Time Averaged Transmitter Power and Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields from Mobile Phone Base Stations

    PubMed Central

    Bürgi, Alfred; Scanferla, Damiano; Lehmann, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Models for exposure assessment of high frequency electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base stations need the technical data of the base stations as input. One of these parameters, the Equivalent Radiated Power (ERP), is a time-varying quantity, depending on communication traffic. In order to determine temporal averages of the exposure, corresponding averages of the ERP have to be available. These can be determined as duty factors, the ratios of the time-averaged power to the maximum output power according to the transmitter setting. We determine duty factors for UMTS from the data of 37 base stations in the Swisscom network. The UMTS base stations sample contains sites from different regions of Switzerland and also different site types (rural/suburban/urban/hotspot). Averaged over all regions and site types, a UMTS duty factor F ≈ 0.32 ± 0.08 for the 24 h-average is obtained, i.e., the average output power corresponds to about a third of the maximum power. We also give duty factors for GSM based on simple approximations and a lower limit for LTE estimated from the base load on the signalling channels. PMID:25105551

  17. Solar Ion Processing of Itokawa Grains: Constraints on Surface Exposure Times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Keller, L. P.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical TEM observations obtained to date reveal that a significant sub-population of grains returned from the surface of asteroid Itokawa have had their outer 30-100 nm processed by space weathering effects. Although the effects include some surface deposition of condensed impact vapor and isolated impact melt splashes, much of the width of the space weathered outer margins or "rims" on grains is derived from solar wind processing of the original host grain. Similar to what has long been reported for some lunar grains, the ion-processed rims on Itokawa grains exhibit varing degrees and depths of penetration of atomic-displacement ion damage, resulting in complete amorphization for some rims (particularly in plagioclase), or formation of highly defective but still crystalline structures in others (particularly in pyroxene and olivine). Possibly different from lunar grains, however, is the presence of isolated internal cavities or voids in Itokawa grain rims, which may be implantation "bubbles" due to accumulating implanted solar wind H and/or He. For a given mineral exposed at a particular set of long term solar wind conditions, the level of ion damage in a given grain rim, the depth of damage penetration represented by the rim width, and the formation or lack of formation of implantation bubbles can all be linked to the time spent by the grain in an uncovered state on the topmost, space-exposed, regolith surface. For the lunar case, we have previously shown that with reasonable assumptions about solar wind characteristics over time, a model can be developed to estimate this exposure time based on the width of amorphous rims on lunar grains. Here we report on an expansion of the model to cover exposure time information contained in the array of solar ion-induced features in Itokawa grains.

  18. Detailed Urinary Excretion Time Courses of Biomarkers of Exposure to Permethrin and Estimated Exposure in Workers of a Corn Production Farm in Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Ferland, Stéphanie; Côté, Jonathan; Ratelle, Mylène; Thuot, Ross; Bouchard, Michèle

    2015-11-01

    Permethrin is a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide widely used in agriculture. Farm workers are thus regularly exposed during spraying season. To help interpret routine biomonitoring results, a proper knowledge of the time courses of biomarkers of exposure is necessary. The kinetics of biomarkers of exposure to permethrin has recently been documented in volunteers exposed to permethrin under controlled conditions but there is a lack of detailed time profiles following real exposure conditions. This study aimed at obtaining data on the excretion time courses of permethrin metabolites in agricultural workers following typical exposure conditions in the field. Twelve workers exposed to permethrin were recruited from a corn production farm in the Montérégie, Quebec, Canada. They provided all their urine voided over a period of 3 days following the onset of a spraying episode of permethrin or work in a treated area. Three major metabolites of permethrin, trans- and cis- 3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-l-carboxylic acid metabolites (trans-DCCA, cis-DCCA), and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), were analyzed. For the applicator, a progressive rise in excretion values was observed with a single peak being reached 29h following the onset of the 3.5h exposure and ensuing elimination with a half-life of 6.4h for trans-DCCA and 8.7h for 3-PBA. In the other workers (supervisor and corn pickers), excretion profiles were generally more compatible with multiple entries in the treated area during the 3-day sampling period and rapid elimination between exposure episodes. In general, 3-PBA was found in slightly higher levels than trans-DCCA, except for the applicator and a harvester. For both trans-DCCA and 3-PBA in a given worker, excretion values expressed as creatinine-normalized concentrations were less variable than those expressed as excretion rates per kilogram body weight. Time-dependent variability in excretion values of workers confirms the need for serial urine sampling of at least two biomarkers of exposure, with minimally pre-exposure, end-of-shift sample the day of onset of exposure, and following morning void. PMID:26324827

  19. Effects of Low Level Lead Exposure on Associative Learning and Memory in the Rat: Influences of Sex and Developmental Timing Of Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, D.W.; Mettil, W.; Schneider, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Lead (Pb) exposure during development impairs a variety of cognitive, behavioral and neurochemical processes resulting in deficits in learning, memory, attention, impulsivity and executive function. Numerous studies have attempted to model this effect of Pb in rodents, with the majority of studies focusing on hippocampus-associated spatial learning and memory processes. Using a different paradigm, trace fear conditioning, a process requiring coordinated integration of both the medial prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus, we have assessed the effects of Pb exposure on associative learning and memory. The present study examined both female and male Long Evans rats exposed to three environmentally relevant levels of Pb (150 ppm, 375 ppm and 750 ppm) during different developmental periods: perinatal (PERI; gestation – postnatal day 21), early postnatal (EPN; postnatal days 1–21) and late postnatal (LPN; postnatal days 1–55). Testing began at postnatal day 55 and consisted of a single day of acquisition training, and three post training time points (1, 2 and 10 days) to assess memory consolidation and recall. All animals, regardless of sex, developmental window or level of Pb-exposure, successfully acquired conditioned-unconditioned stimulus association during training. However, there were significant effects of Pb-exposure on consolidation and memory recall at days 1–10 post training. In females, EPN and LPN exposure to 150 ppm Pb (but not PERI exposure) significantly impaired recall. In contrast, only PERI 150 ppm and 750 ppm-exposed males had significant recall deficits. These data suggest a complex interaction between sex, developmental window of exposure and Pb-exposure level on consolidation and recall of associative memories. PMID:26812500

  20. Effects of low level lead exposure on associative learning and memory in the rat: Influences of sex and developmental timing of exposure.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D W; Mettil, W; Schneider, J S

    2016-03-30

    Lead (Pb) exposure during development impairs a variety of cognitive, behavioral and neurochemical processes resulting in deficits in learning, memory, attention, impulsivity and executive function. Numerous studies have attempted to model this effect of Pb in rodents, with the majority of studies focusing on hippocampus-associated spatial learning and memory processes. Using a different paradigm, trace fear conditioning, a process requiring coordinated integration of both the medial prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus, we have assessed the effects of Pb exposure on associative learning and memory. The present study examined both female and male long evans rats exposed to three environmentally relevant levels of Pb (150ppm, 375ppm and 750ppm) during different developmental periods: perinatal (PERI; gestation-postnatal day 21), early postnatal (EPN; postnatal days 1-21) and late postnatal (LPN; postnatal days 1-55). Testing began at postnatal day 55 and consisted of a single day of acquisition training, and three post training time points (1, 2 and 10 days) to assess memory consolidation and recall. All animals, regardless of sex, developmental window or level of Pb-exposure, successfully acquired conditioned-unconditioned stimulus association during training. However, there were significant effects of Pb-exposure on consolidation and memory recall at days 1-10 post training. In females, EPN and LPN exposure to 150ppm Pb (but not PERI exposure) significantly impaired recall. In contrast, only PERI 150ppm and 750ppm-exposed males had significant recall deficits. These data suggest a complex interaction between sex, developmental window of exposure and Pb-exposure level on consolidation and recall of associative memories. PMID:26812500

  1. Change of Exposure Response over Time and Long-Term Risk of Silicosis among a Cohort of Chinese Pottery Workers

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi; Bochmann, Frank; Morfeld, Peter; Ulm, Kurt; Liu, Yuewei; Wang, Heijiao; Yang, Lei; Chen, Weihong

    2011-01-01

    An analysis was conducted on a cohort of Chinese pottery workers to estimate the exposure-response relationship between respirable crystalline silica dust exposure and the incidence of radiographically diagnosed silicosis, and to estimate the long-term risk of developing silicosis until the age of 65. The cohort comprised 3,250 employees with a median follow-up duration of around 37 years. Incident cases of silicosis were identified via silicosis registries (Chinese X-ray stage I, similar to International Labor Organisation classification scheme profusion category 1/1). Individual exposure to respirable crystalline silica dust was estimated based on over 100,000 historical dust measurements. The association between dust exposure, incidence and long-time risk of silicosis was quantified by Poisson regression analysis adjusted for age and smoking. The risk of silicosis depended not only on the cumulative respirable crystalline silica dust exposures, but also on the time-dependent respirable crystalline silica dust exposure pattern (long-term average concentration, highest annual concentration ever experienced and time since first exposure). A long-term “excess” risk of silicosis of approximately 1.5/1,000 was estimated among workers with all annual respirable crystalline silica dust concentration estimates less than 0.1 mg/m3, using the German measurement strategy. This study indicates the importance of proper consideration of exposure information in risk quantification in epidemiological studies. PMID:21845166

  2. Change of exposure response over time and long-term risk of silicosis among a cohort of Chinese pottery workers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Bochmann, Frank; Morfeld, Peter; Ulm, Kurt; Liu, Yuewei; Wang, Heijiao; Yang, Lei; Chen, Weihong

    2011-07-01

    An analysis was conducted on a cohort of Chinese pottery workers to estimate the exposure-response relationship between respirable crystalline silica dust exposure and the incidence of radiographically diagnosed silicosis, and to estimate the long-term risk of developing silicosis until the age of 65. The cohort comprised 3,250 employees with a median follow-up duration of around 37 years. Incident cases of silicosis were identified via silicosis registries (Chinese X-ray stage I, similar to International Labor Organisation classification scheme profusion category 1/1). Individual exposure to respirable crystalline silica dust was estimated based on over 100,000 historical dust measurements. The association between dust exposure, incidence and long-time risk of silicosis was quantified by Poisson regression analysis adjusted for age and smoking. The risk of silicosis depended not only on the cumulative respirable crystalline silica dust exposures, but also on the time-dependent respirable crystalline silica dust exposure pattern (long-term average concentration, highest annual concentration ever experienced and time since first exposure). A long-term "excess" risk of silicosis of approximately 1.5/1,000 was estimated among workers with all annual respirable crystalline silica dust concentration estimates less than 0.1 mg/m(3), using the German measurement strategy. This study indicates the importance of proper consideration of exposure information in risk quantification in epidemiological studies. PMID:21845166

  3. Validation of exposure time for discharge measurements made with two bottom-tracking acoustic doppler current profilers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, J.A.; Oberg, K.

    2008-01-01

    Previous work by Oberg and Mueller of the U.S. Geological Survey in 2007 concluded that exposure time (total time spent sampling the flow) is a critical factor in reducing measurement uncertainty. In a subsequent paper, Oberg and Mueller validated these conclusions using one set of data to show that the effect of exposure time on the uncertainty of the measured discharge is independent of stream width, depth, and range of boat speeds. Analysis of eight StreamPro acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements indicate that they fall within and show a similar trend to the Rio Grande ADCP data previously reported. Four special validation measurements were made for the purpose of verifying the conclusions of Oberg and Mueller regarding exposure time for Rio Grande and StreamPro ADCPs. Analysis of these measurements confirms that exposure time is a critical factor in reducing measurement uncertainty and is independent of stream width, depth, and range of boat speeds. Furthermore, it appears that the relation between measured discharge uncertainty and exposure time is similar for both Rio Grande and StreamPro ADCPs. These results are applicable to ADCPs that make use of broadband technology using bottom-tracking to obtain the boat velocity. Based on this work, a minimum of two transects should be collected with an exposure time for all transects greater than or equal to 720 seconds in order to achieve an uncertainty of ??5 percent when using bottom-tracking ADCPs. ?? 2008 IEEE.

  4. ROLE OF TIME AS A FACTOR IN THE TOXICITY OF CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS IN INTERMITTENT AND CONTINUOUS EXPOSURES. PART I. EFFECTS OF CONTINUOUS EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of fluctuation in levels of industrial air pollution linked to weather and other factors, a joint U.S.-Soviet research team studied differences in the effect of time in exposures of air-breathing animals to controlled varied concentrations of air pollutants. An experiment...

  5. ROLE OF TIME AS A FACTOR IN THE TOXICITY OF CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS IN INTERMITTENT AND CONTINUOUS EXPOSURES. PART II. EFFECTS OF INTERMITTENT EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of fluctuations in levels of industrial air pollution linked to weather and other factors, a joint U.S.-Soviet research team studied differences in the effect of time in exposures of air-breathing animals to controlled varied concentrations of air pollutants. An experimen...

  6. Color Stability of Enamel following Different Acid Etching and Color Exposure Times

    PubMed Central

    Jahanbin, Arezoo; Basafa, Mohammad; Moazzami, Mostafa; Basafa, Behnoush; Eslami, Neda

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different etching times on enamel color stability after immediate versus delayed exposure to colored artificial saliva (CAS). Materials and methods. Human first premolars were divided into five groups of twenty. A colorimeter was used according to the CIE system on the mid-buccal and mid-lingual surfaces to evaluate initial tooth color. Samples in group A remained unetched. In groups B to E, buccal and lingual surfaces were initially etched with phosphoric acid for 15 and 60 seconds, respectively. Then, the samples in groups A and C were immersed in colored artificial saliva (cola+saliva). In group B, the teeth were immersed in simple artificial saliva (AS). Samples in groups D and E were immersed in AS for 24 and 72 hours, respectively before being immersed in colored AS. The teeth were immersed for one month in each solution before color measurement. During the test period, the teeth were retrieved from the staining solution and stored in AS for five minutes. This was repeated 60 times. Color changes of buccal and lingual surfaces were calculated. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests were used for statistical analysis (α ≤0.05). Results. There were no significant differences between the groups in term of ΔE of buccal (P = 0.148) and lingual surfaces (P = 0.73). Conclusion. Extended time of etching did not result in significant enamel color change. Immediate and delayed exposure of etched enamel to staining solutions did not result in clinically detectable tooth color changes. PMID:25093048

  7. Reconciling Scratch Space Consumption, Exposure, and Volatility to Achieve Timely Staging of Job Input Data

    SciTech Connect

    Monti, Henri; Butt, Ali R; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S

    2010-04-01

    Innovative scientific applications and emerging dense data sources are creating a data deluge for high-end computing systems. Processing such large input data typically involves copying (or staging) onto the supercomputer's specialized high-speed storage, scratch space, for sustained high I/O throughput. The current practice of conservatively staging data as early as possible makes the data vulnerable to storage failures, which may entail re-staging and consequently reduced job throughput. To address this, we present a timely staging framework that uses a combination of job startup time predictions, user-specified intermediate nodes, and decentralized data delivery to coincide input data staging with job start-up. By delaying staging to when it is necessary, the exposure to failures and its effects can be reduced. Evaluation using both PlanetLab and simulations based on three years of Jaguar (No. 1 in Top500) job logs show as much as 85.9% reduction in staging times compared to direct transfers, 75.2% reduction in wait time on scratch, and 2.4% reduction in usage/hour.

  8. Ear swelling test by using laser speckle imaging with a long exposure time.

    PubMed

    Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Kuznetsov, Yuri; Preise, Dina; Meglinski, Igor; Harmelin, Alon

    2014-06-01

    Laser speckle imaging with long exposure time has been applied noninvasively to visualize the immediate reaction of cutaneous vessels in mice in response to a known primary irritant and potential allergen—methyl salicylate. The compound has been used topically on the surface of the pinna and the reaction of the vascular network was examined. We demonstrate that irritant-induced acute vascular reaction can be effectively and accurately detected by laser speckle imaging technique. The current approach holds a great promise for application in routine screening of the cutaneous vascular response induced by contact agents, screenings of mouse ear swelling test, and testing the allergenic potential of new synthetic materials and healthcare pharmaceutical products. PMID:24967913

  9. Human short-term exposure to electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones decreases computer-assisted visual reaction time.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, S M J; Rouintan, M S; Taeb, S; Dehghan, N; Ghaffarpanah, A A; Sadeghi, Z; Ghafouri, F

    2012-06-01

    The worldwide dramatic increase in mobile phone use has generated great concerns about the detrimental effects of microwave radiations emitted by these communication devices. Reaction time plays a critical role in performing tasks necessary to avoid hazards. As far as we know, this study is the first survey that reports decreased reaction time after exposure to electromagnetic fields generated by a high specific absorption rate mobile phone. It is also the first study in which previous history of mobile phone use is taken into account. The aim of this study was to assess both the acute and chronic effects of electromagnetic fields emitted by mobile phones on reaction time in university students. Visual reaction time (VRT) of young university students was recorded with a simple blind computer-assisted-VRT test, before and after a 10 min real/sham exposure to electromagnetic fields of mobile phones. Participants were 160 right-handed university students aged 18-31. To assess the effect of chronic exposures, the reaction time in sham-exposed phases were compared among low level, moderate and frequent users of mobile phones. The mean ± SD reaction time after real exposure and sham exposure were 286.78 ± 31.35 ms and 295.86 ± 32.17 ms (P < 0.001), respectively. The age of students did not significantly alter the reaction time either in talk or in standby mode. The reaction time either in talk or in standby mode was shorter in male students. The students' VRT was significantly affected by exposure to electromagnetic fields emitted by a mobile phone. It can be concluded that these exposures cause decreased reaction time, which may lead to a better response to different hazards. In this light, this phenomenon might decrease the chances of human errors and fatal accidents. PMID:22426673

  10. Time profiles and toxicokinetic parameters of key biomarkers of exposure to cypermethrin in orally exposed volunteers compared with previously available kinetic data following permethrin exposure.

    PubMed

    Ratelle, Mylène; Coté, Jonathan; Bouchard, Michèle

    2015-12-01

    Biomonitoring of pyrethroid exposure is largely conducted but human toxicokinetics has not been fully documented. This is essential for a proper interpretation of biomonitoring data. Time profiles and toxicokinetic parameters of key biomarkers of exposure to cypermethrin in orally exposed volunteers have been documented and compared with previously available kinetic data following permethrin dosing. Six volunteers ingested 0.1 mg kg(-1) bodyweight of cypermethrin acutely. The same volunteers were exposed to permethrin earlier. Blood samples were taken over 72 h after treatment and complete timed urine voids were collected over 84 h postdosing. Cis- and trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1-carboxylic acids (trans- and cis-DCCA) and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) metabolites, common to both cypermethrin and permethrin, were quantified. Blood and urinary time courses of all three metabolites were similar following cypermethrin and permethrin exposure. Plasma levels of metabolites reached peak values on average ≈ 5-7 h post-dosing; the elimination phase showed mean apparent half-lives (t½ ) for trans-DCCA, cis-DCCA and 3-PBA of 5.1, 6.9 and 9.2 h, respectively, following cypermethrin treatment as compared to 7.1, 6.2 and 6.5 h after permethrin dosing. Corresponding mean values obtained from urinary rate time courses were peak values at ≈ 9 h post-dosing and apparent elimination t½ of 6.3, 6.4 and 6.4 h for trans-DCCA, cis-DCCA and 3-PBA, respectively, following cypermethrin treatment as compared to 5.4, 4.5 and 5.7 h after permethrin dosing. These data confirm that the kinetics of cypermethrin is similar to that of permethrin in humans and that their common biomarkers of exposure may be used for an overall assessment of exposure. PMID:25772368

  11. EFFECT OF EXPOSURE TIME AND COPPER CONCENTRATION ON REPRODUCTION OF THE FATHEAD MINNOW ('PIMEPHALES PROMELES')

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three concurrent studies were conducted to determine the chronic effect of prespawning exposure to various concentrations of copper on fathead minnow reproduction. Copper was introduced into the three exposure systems to give 6-, 3-, and 0-months exposure prior to spawning. Presp...

  12. Exposure time of oral rabies vaccine baits relative to baiting density and raccoon population density.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, Bradley F; Seamans, Thomas W; White, Randolph J; Patton, Zachary J; Bush, Rachel M; Cepek, Jonathan D

    2004-04-01

    Oral rabies vaccination (ORV) baiting programs for control of raccoon (Procyon lotor) rabies in the USA have been conducted or are in progress in eight states east of the Mississippi River. However, data specific to the relationship between raccoon population density and the minimum density of baits necessary to significantly elevate rabies immunity are few. We used the 22-km2 US National Aeronautics and Space Administration Plum Brook Station (PBS) in Erie County, Ohio, USA, to evaluate the period of exposure for placebo vaccine baits placed at a density of 75 baits/km2 relative to raccoon population density. Our objectives were to 1) estimate raccoon population density within the fragmented forest, old-field, and industrial landscape at PBS: and 2) quantify the time that placebo, Merial RABORAL V-RG vaccine baits were available to raccoons. From August through November 2002 we surveyed raccoon use of PBS along 19.3 km of paved-road transects by using a forward-looking infrared camera mounted inside a vehicle. We used Distance 3.5 software to calculate a probability of detection function by which we estimated raccoon population density from transect data. Estimated population density on PBS decreased from August (33.4 raccoons/km2) through November (13.6 raccoons/km2), yielding a monthly mean of 24.5 raccoons/km2. We also quantified exposure time for ORV baits placed by hand on five 1-km2 grids on PBS from September through October. An average 82.7% (SD = 4.6) of baits were removed within 1 wk of placement. Given raccoon population density, estimates of bait removal and sachet condition, and assuming 22.9% nontarget take, the baiting density of 75/ km2 yielded an average of 3.3 baits consumed per raccoon and the sachet perforated. PMID:15362821

  13. GPS-based Microenvironment Tracker (MicroTrac) Model to Estimate Time-Location of Individuals for Air Pollution Exposure Assessments: Model Evaluation in Central North Carolina

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessment is the estimation of the time spent by individuals in various microenvironments (ME). Accounting for the time spent in different ME with different pollutant concentrations can reduce exposure misclassifications, while failure...

  14. Exposures to Synthetic Estrogens at Different Times During the Life, and Their Effect on Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    de Assis, Sonia; Warri, Anni

    2013-01-01

    Women are using estrogens for many purposes, such as to prevent pregnancy or miscarriage, or to treat menopausal symptoms. Estrogens also have been used to treat breast cancer which seems puzzling, since there is convincing evidence to support a link between high lifetime estrogen exposure and increased breast cancer risk. In this review, we discuss the findings that maternal exposure to the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol during pregnancy increases breast cancer risk in both exposed mothers and their daughters. In addition, we review data regarding the use of estrogens in oral contraceptives and as postmenopausal hormone therapy and discuss the opposing effects on breast cancer risk based upon timing of exposure. We place particular emphasis on studies investigating how maternal estrogenic exposures during pregnancy increase breast cancer risk among daughters. New data suggest that these exposures induce epigenetic modifications in the mammary gland and germ cells, thereby causing an inheritable increase in breast cancer risk for multiple generations. PMID:23392570

  15. Time-dependent Changes of Cadmium and Metallothionein after Short-term Exposure to Cadmium in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Mi Ran; Jeong, Sang-Hee; Cho, Myung Haing

    2010-01-01

    The time-dependent changes in cadmium (Cd) concentration were studied in Female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats during and after Cd exposure via drinking water (10 and 50 ppm) for 30 days. The cadmium concentration in muscle, liver, kidney, blood plasma, and urine, and the metallothionein concentration in blood plasma were determined every 10 days during exposure and every 7 days after exposure for 3 weeks. The muscle Cd concentration did not change during, and neither after, exposure. The liver Cd concentration increased from 1.4 to 3.3 (at 10 ppm) and from 6.1 to 10.1 folds (at 50 ppm) during exposure and remained higher than those of controls in both groups even during post-exposure period. The kidney Cd concentrations were 2.3 to 5.1 (at 10 ppm) and 4.9-14.0 folds (at 50 ppm) higher than those of controls during exposure and also remained elevated during the post-exposure period. Plasma Cd concentrations were not significantly different from those of controls in both groups. Urine Cd concentrations were more than 2 folds (at 10 ppm) and 6.5 to 12.6 folds (at 50 ppm) higher than those of controls but rapidly decreased over the 7 days of withdrawal. Blood plasma metallothionein concentrations were more than 2.4 folds (at 10 ppm) and 3.1 to 7.4 folds (at 50 ppm) , and they remained elevated till 7 days (10 ppm) and 14 days (at 50 ppm) after exposure. Our data support that Cd in urine could be a useful biomarker during Cd exposure period and metallothionein in blood plasma could be as a supportive biological marker for during and post Cd exposure. PMID:24278516

  16. Estimating the time interval between exposure to the World Trade Center disaster and incident diagnoses of obstructive airway disease.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Michelle S; Webber, Mayris P; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Weakley, Jessica; Liu, Xiaoxue; Ye, Fen; Cohen, Hillel W; Aldrich, Thomas K; Kelly, Kerry J; Nolan, Anna; Weiden, Michael D; Prezant, David J; Hall, Charles B

    2014-08-01

    Respiratory disorders are associated with occupational and environmental exposures. The latency period between exposure and disease onset remains uncertain. The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster presents a unique opportunity to describe the latency period for obstructive airway disease (OAD) diagnoses. This prospective cohort study of New York City firefighters compared the timing and incidence of physician-diagnosed OAD relative to WTC exposure. Exposure was categorized by WTC arrival time as high (on the morning of September 11, 2001), moderate (after noon on September 11, 2001, or on September 12, 2001), or low (during September 13-24, 2001). We modeled relative rates and 95% confidence intervals of OAD incidence by exposure over the first 5 years after September 11, 2001, estimating the times of change in the relative rate with change point models. We observed a change point at 15 months after September 11, 2001. Before 15 months, the relative rate for the high- versus low-exposure group was 3.96 (95% confidence interval: 2.51, 6.26) and thereafter, it was 1.76 (95% confidence interval: 1.26, 2.46). Incident OAD was associated with WTC exposure for at least 5 years after September 11, 2001. There were higher rates of new-onset OAD among the high-exposure group during the first 15 months and, to a lesser extent, throughout follow-up. This difference in relative rate by exposure occurred despite full and free access to health care for all WTC-exposed firefighters, demonstrating the persistence of WTC-associated OAD risk. PMID:24980522

  17. Estimating the Time Interval Between Exposure to the World Trade Center Disaster and Incident Diagnoses of Obstructive Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Michelle S.; Webber, Mayris P.; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Weakley, Jessica; Liu, Xiaoxue; Ye, Fen; Cohen, Hillel W.; Aldrich, Thomas K.; Kelly, Kerry J.; Nolan, Anna; Weiden, Michael D.; Prezant, David J.; Hall, Charles B.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory disorders are associated with occupational and environmental exposures. The latency period between exposure and disease onset remains uncertain. The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster presents a unique opportunity to describe the latency period for obstructive airway disease (OAD) diagnoses. This prospective cohort study of New York City firefighters compared the timing and incidence of physician-diagnosed OAD relative to WTC exposure. Exposure was categorized by WTC arrival time as high (on the morning of September 11, 2001), moderate (after noon on September 11, 2001, or on September 12, 2001), or low (during September 13–24, 2001). We modeled relative rates and 95% confidence intervals of OAD incidence by exposure over the first 5 years after September 11, 2001, estimating the times of change in the relative rate with change point models. We observed a change point at 15 months after September 11, 2001. Before 15 months, the relative rate for the high- versus low-exposure group was 3.96 (95% confidence interval: 2.51, 6.26) and thereafter, it was 1.76 (95% confidence interval: 1.26, 2.46). Incident OAD was associated with WTC exposure for at least 5 years after September 11, 2001. There were higher rates of new-onset OAD among the high-exposure group during the first 15 months and, to a lesser extent, throughout follow-up. This difference in relative rate by exposure occurred despite full and free access to health care for all WTC-exposed firefighters, demonstrating the persistence of WTC-associated OAD risk. PMID:24980522

  18. Effect of oxidant concentration, exposure time, and seed particles on secondary organic aerosol chemical composition and yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambe, A. T.; Chhabra, P. S.; Onasch, T. B.; Brune, W. H.; Hunter, J. F.; Kroll, J. H.; Cummings, M. J.; Brogan, J. F.; Parmar, Y.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kolb, C. E.; Davidovits, P.

    2015-03-01

    We performed a systematic intercomparison study of the chemistry and yields of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from OH oxidation of a common set of gas-phase precursors in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) continuous flow reactor and several environmental chambers. In the flow reactor, SOA precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2.0 × 108 to 2.2 × 1010 molec cm-3 over exposure times of 100 s. In the environmental chambers, precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2 × 106 to 2 × 107 molec cm-3 over exposure times of several hours. The OH concentration in the chamber experiments is close to that found in the atmosphere, but the integrated OH exposure in the flow reactor can simulate atmospheric exposure times of multiple days compared to chamber exposure times of only a day or so. In most cases, for a specific SOA type the most-oxidized chamber SOA and the least-oxidized flow reactor SOA have similar mass spectra, oxygen-to-carbon and hydrogen-to-carbon ratios, and carbon oxidation states at integrated OH exposures between approximately 1 × 1011 and 2 × 1011 molec cm-3 s, or about 1-2 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. This observation suggests that in the range of available OH exposure overlap for the flow reactor and chambers, SOA elemental composition as measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer is similar whether the precursor is exposed to low OH concentrations over long exposure times or high OH concentrations over short exposure times. This similarity in turn suggests that both in the flow reactor and in chambers, SOA chemical composition at low OH exposure is governed primarily by gas-phase OH oxidation of the precursors rather than heterogeneous oxidation of the condensed particles. In general, SOA yields measured in the flow reactor are lower than measured in chambers for the range of equivalent OH exposures that can be measured in both the flow reactor and chambers. The influence of sulfate seed particles on isoprene SOA yield measurements was examined in the flow reactor. The studies show that seed particles increase the yield of SOA produced in flow reactors by a factor of 3 to 5 and may also account in part for higher SOA yields obtained in the chambers, where seed particles are routinely used.

  19. Effect of oxidant concentration, exposure time, and seed particles on secondary organic aerosol chemical composition and yield

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lambe, A. T.; Chhabra, P. S.; Onasch, T. B.; Brune, W. H.; Hunter, J. F.; Kroll, J. H.; Cummings, M. J.; Brogan, J. F.; Parmar, Y.; Worsnop, D. R.; et al

    2015-03-18

    We performed a systematic intercomparison study of the chemistry and yields of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from OH oxidation of a common set of gas-phase precursors in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) continuous flow reactor and several environmental chambers. In the flow reactor, SOA precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2.0 × 108 to 2.2 × 1010 molec cm-3 over exposure times of 100 s. In the environmental chambers, precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2 × 106 to 2 × 107 molec cm-3 over exposure times of several hours. The OH concentration in themore » chamber experiments is close to that found in the atmosphere, but the integrated OH exposure in the flow reactor can simulate atmospheric exposure times of multiple days compared to chamber exposure times of only a day or so. In most cases, for a specific SOA type the most-oxidized chamber SOA and the least-oxidized flow reactor SOA have similar mass spectra, oxygen-to-carbon and hydrogen-to-carbon ratios, and carbon oxidation states at integrated OH exposures between approximately 1 × 1011 and 2 × 1011 molec cm-3 s, or about 1–2 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. This observation suggests that in the range of available OH exposure overlap for the flow reactor and chambers, SOA elemental composition as measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer is similar whether the precursor is exposed to low OH concentrations over long exposure times or high OH concentrations over short exposure times. This similarity in turn suggests that both in the flow reactor and in chambers, SOA chemical composition at low OH exposure is governed primarily by gas-phase OH oxidation of the precursors rather than heterogeneous oxidation of the condensed particles. In general, SOA yields measured in the flow reactor are lower than measured in chambers for the range of equivalent OH exposures that can be measured in both the flow reactor and chambers. The influence of sulfate seed particles on isoprene SOA yield measurements was examined in the flow reactor. The studies show that seed particles increase the yield of SOA produced in flow reactors by a factor of 3 to 5 and may also account in part for higher SOA yields obtained in the chambers, where seed particles are routinely used.« less

  20. Work-Time Exposure and Acute Injuries in Inshore Lobstermen of the Northeast United States.

    PubMed

    Fulmer, Scott; Buchholz, Bryan; Jenkins, Paul; Scribani, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to inform efforts to reduce risk for musculoskeletal disorders among commercial lobstermen by characterizing and quantifying injuries that occur to people while harvesting lobsters commercially in the Northeast United States. This study aimed to estimate a denominator of exposure to lobstering in full-time equivalents (FTE), to estimate a fatality rate, and to calculate incidence rates for acute injuries within the sample population. Captains were randomly selected from those licensed to fish in Maine and Massachusetts. Data on work exposure and injuries with rapid onset that occurred on the boat ("acute injuries") were collected using a survey, which was administered quarterly via phone or face-to-face interview with the captain. The quarterly survey assessed the number of weeks worked during the quarter, average crew size, number of trips per week, and average trip length in hours. In addition, this survey captured relevant information (body segment affected, type of injury, and whether treatment was received) on all acute injuries occurring during the quarter. FTE were estimated using fishermen days and fishermen hours. The annual FTE estimated using days was 2,557 and using hours was 2,855. As expected, the summer months (3rd quarter) had the highest FTE and the winter (1st quarter) the lowest FTE. Fall (4th quarter) and spring (2nd quarter) ranked second and third, respectively. The incidence rates for all injuries (49.7/100 FTE) and injuries requiring treatment (15.0/100 FTE) were much higher than those reported in other studies of fishing that used Coast Guard data. PMID:26788780

  1. Constraining the Timing of Neoglaciation: Moraine Exposure Ages from Baffin Island, Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crump, S. E.; Miller, G. H.

    2014-12-01

    A long-term Neoglacial cooling trend, beginning ~6 ka, is well documented across the Arctic and correlates with a monotonic decline in Northern Hemisphere summer insolation. However, paleoclimate proxy records point to decadal- to millennial-scale variability superimposed on overall cooling. This climate variability is reflected in the fluctuations of Arctic glaciers over the course of several millennia. The most recent Neoglacial advance, the Little Ice Age (LIA; ~1275-1850 AD), was generally more extensive than pre-LIA advances and thus destroyed most evidence of previous advances. As such, the timing and extent of earlier Neoglacial advances are not well constrained. However, several extant glaciers on Cumberland Peninsula, Baffin Island, are fronted by nested ice-cored moraine sequences in which multiple pre-LIA moraines are preserved. We have generated absolute ages on moraine sequences for Snow Creek and Throne Glaciers using 10Be in moraine boulders. Nine 10Be ages from the two most distal moraine crests at Snow Creek Glacier range from ~1.8 ka to ~5.7 ka, and twelve ages from the two most distal moraine crests at Throne Glacier range from ~1.1 ka to ~4.6 ka. The wide spread of exposure ages in these settings is likely due to the degradation of moraine ice cores and the disturbance of older moraines by younger readvances. Because these processes result in the exposure of new clasts on the moraine post-emplacement, the oldest ages in these datasets likely provide the best estimates for the earliest Neoglacial advances. These data also indicate that in some settings, early Neoglacial alpine glacier advances reached similar extents as their LIA maxima, possibly due to large ice-cored moraines impeding LIA advances. Glacier modeling efforts and complementary lacustrine sediment records will help to unravel the complex Neoglacial history in this region.

  2. Near Real-Time Earthquake Exposure and Damage Assessment: An Example from Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamer, Yavor; Çomoǧlu, Mustafa; Erdik, Mustafa

    2014-05-01

    Confined by infamous strike-slip North Anatolian Fault from the north and by the Hellenic subduction trench from the south Turkey is one of the most seismically active countries in Europe. Due this increased exposure and the fragility of the building stock Turkey is among the top countries exposed to earthquake hazard in terms of mortality and economic losses. In this study we focus recent and ongoing efforts to mitigate the earthquake risk in near real-time. We present actual results of recent earthquakes, such as the M6 event off-shore Antalya which occurred on 28 December 2013. Starting at the moment of detection, we obtain a preliminary ground motion intensity distribution based on epicenter and magnitude. Our real-time application is further enhanced by the integration of the SeisComp3 ground motion parameter estimation tool with the Earthquake Loss Estimation Routine (ELER). SeisComp3 provides the online station parameters which are then automatically incorporated into the ShakeMaps produced by ELER. The resulting ground motion distributions are used together with the building inventory to calculate expected number of buildings in various damage states. All these analysis are conducted in an automated fashion and are communicated within a few minutes of a triggering event. In our efforts to disseminate earthquake information to the general public we make extensive use of social networks such as Tweeter and collaborate with mobile phone operators.

  3. Time dependent wettability of graphite upon ambient exposure: The role of water adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Amadei, Carlo A.; Lai, Chia-Yun; Heskes, Daan; Chiesa, Matteo

    2014-08-28

    We report the temporal evolution of the wettability of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) exposed to environmental conditions. Macroscopic wettability is investigated by static and dynamic contact angles (SCA and DCA) obtaining values comparable to the ones presented in the literature. SCA increases from ∼68° to ∼90° during the first hour of exposure after cleaving, whereas DCA is characterized by longer-scale (24 h) time evolution. We interpret these results in light of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, which indicates that the evolution of the HOPG wettability is due to adsorption of molecules from the surrounding atmosphere. This hypothesis is further confirmed by nanoscopic observations obtained by atomic force microscope (AFM)-based force spectroscopy, which monitor the evolution of surface properties with a spatial resolution superior to macroscopic experiments. Moreover, we observe that the results of macro- and nanoscale measurements evolve in similar fashion with time and we propose a quantitative correlation between SCA and AFM measurements. Our results suggest that the cause of the transition in the wettability of HOPG is due to the adsorption of hydrocarbon contaminations and water molecules from the environment. This is corroborated by annealing the HOPG is vacuum conditions at 150°, allowing the desorption of molecules on the surface, and thus re-establishing the initial macro and nano surface properties. Our findings can be used in the interpretation of the wettability of more complicated systems derived from HOPG (i.e., graphene)

  4. Influence of developmental nicotine exposure on spike-timing precision and reliability in hypoglossal motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Gregory L.; Levine, Richard B.; Frazier, Amanda M.

    2014-01-01

    Smoothly graded muscle contractions depend in part on the precision and reliability of motoneuron action potential generation. Whether or not a motoneuron generates spikes precisely and reliably depends on both its intrinsic membrane properties and the nature of the synaptic input that it receives. Factors that perturb neuronal intrinsic properties and/or synaptic drive may compromise the temporal precision and the reliability of action potential generation. We have previously shown that developmental nicotine exposure (DNE) alters intrinsic properties and synaptic transmission in hypoglossal motoneurons (XIIMNs). Here we show that the effects of DNE also include alterations in spike-timing precision and reliability, and spike-frequency adaptation, in response to sinusoidal current injection. Current-clamp experiments in brainstem slices from neonatal rats show that DNE lowers the threshold for spike generation but increases the variability of spike-timing mechanisms. DNE is also associated with an increase in spike-frequency adaptation and reductions in both peak and steady-state firing rate in response to brief, square wave current injections. Taken together, our data indicate that DNE causes significant alterations in the input-output efficiency of XIIMNs. These alterations may play a role in the increased frequency of obstructive apneas and altered suckling strength and coordination observed in nicotine-exposed neonatal humans. PMID:25552642

  5. Influence of the Exposure Time after Removing of Covering Materials over Shading Tea Field on the Quality of Gyokuro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaida, Teruki; Yoshioka, Tetsuya; Nitabaru, Juichi; Nakazono, Kentaro; Kubota, Akira; Nariyama, Hideki

    We revealed the influences of the exposure time after removing of covering materials over shading tea field for making gyokuro on the quality of made tea. As the exposure time increased, the green color of the fresh leaves faded; their total amino acid and theanine contents reduced; and the concentration of dimethyl sulfide, a representative aromatic compound in gyokuro, decreased. In contrast, the catechin content increased. The overall quality of the tea was lowered. These results indicated it was necessary to plucking of tea shoots for short time after removing of covering materials over shading tea field.

  6. Kinetic Stability of MOF-5 in Humid Environments: Impact of Powder Densification, Humidity Level, and Exposure Time.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yang; Purewal, Justin; Yang, Jun; Xu, Chunchuan; Soltis, Rick; Warner, James; Veenstra, Mike; Gaab, Manuela; Mller, Ulrich; Siegel, Donald J

    2015-05-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are an emerging class of microporous, crystalline materials with potential applications in the capture, storage, and separation of gases. Of the many known MOFs, MOF-5 has attracted considerable attention because of its ability to store gaseous fuels at low pressure with high densities. Nevertheless, MOF-5 and several other MOFs exhibit limited stability upon exposure to reactive species such as water. The present study quantifies the impact of humid air exposure on the properties of MOF-5 as a function of exposure time, humidity level, and morphology (i.e., powders vs pellets). Properties examined include hydrogen storage capacity, surface area, and crystallinity. Water adsorption/desorption isotherms are measured using a gravimetric technique; the first uptake exhibits a type V isotherm with a sudden increase in uptake at ?50% relative humidity. For humidity levels below this threshold only minor degradation is observed for exposure times up to several hours, suggesting that MOF-5 is more stable than generally assumed under moderately humid conditions. In contrast, irreversible degradation occurs in a matter of minutes for exposures above the 50% threshold. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates that molecular and/or dissociated water is inserted into the skeletal framework after long exposure times. Densification into pellets can slow the degradation of MOF-5 significantly, and may present a pathway to enhance the stability of some MOFs. PMID:25865754

  7. Methods for collecting time/activity pattern information related to exposure to combustion products.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Natalie C G; Saenz de Tejada, Sandra

    2002-12-01

    Focus groups, surveys and questionnaires, diaries and observations can be used to gather information about people's exposure to a wide range of combustion products. Information about locations and durations of exposure, and sources of exposure can be obtained with these instruments. The types of instruments used must be fine tuned to meet the design characteristics of the community in which the study will be conducted. PMID:12492161

  8. Timing of Galectin-1 Exposure Differentially Modulates Nipah Virus Entry and Syncytium Formation in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Omai B.; Yun, Tatyana; Pernet, Olivier; Aguilar, Hector C.; Park, Arnold; Bowden, Thomas A.; Freiberg, Alexander N.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nipah virus (NiV) is a deadly emerging enveloped paramyxovirus that primarily targets human endothelial cells. Endothelial cells express the innate immune effector galectin-1 that we have previously shown can bind to specific N-glycans on the NiV envelope fusion glycoprotein (F). NiV-F mediates fusion of infected endothelial cells into syncytia, resulting in endothelial disruption and hemorrhage. Galectin-1 is an endogenous carbohydrate-binding protein that binds to specific glycans on NiV-F to reduce endothelial cell fusion, an effect that may reduce pathophysiologic sequelae of NiV infection. However, galectins play multiple roles in regulating host-pathogen interactions; for example, galectins can promote attachment of HIV to T cells and macrophages and attachment of HSV-1 to keratinocytes but can also inhibit influenza entry into airway epithelial cells. Using live Nipah virus, in the present study, we demonstrate that galectin-1 can enhance NiV attachment to and infection of primary human endothelial cells by bridging glycans on the viral envelope to host cell glycoproteins. In order to exhibit an enhancing effect, galectin-1 must be present during the initial phase of virus attachment; in contrast, addition of galectin-1 postinfection results in reduced production of progeny virus and syncytium formation. Thus, galectin-1 can have dual and opposing effects on NiV infection of human endothelial cells. While various roles for galectin family members in microbial-host interactions have been described, we report opposing effects of the same galectin family member on a specific virus, with the timing of exposure during the viral life cycle determining the outcome. IMPORTANCE Nipah virus is an emerging pathogen that targets endothelial cells lining blood vessels; the high mortality rate (up to 70%) in Nipah virus infections results from destruction of these cells and resulting catastrophic hemorrhage. Host factors that promote or prevent Nipah virus infection are not well understood. Endogenous human lectins, such as galectin-1, can function as pattern recognition receptors to reduce infection and initiate immune responses; however, lectins can also be exploited by microbes to enhance infection of host cells. We found that galectin-1, which is made by inflamed endothelial cells, can both promote Nipah virus infection of endothelial cells by “bridging” the virus to the cell, as well as reduce production of progeny virus and reduce endothelial cell fusion and damage, depending on timing of galectin-1 exposure. This is the first report of spatiotemporal opposing effects of a host lectin for a virus in one type of host cell. PMID:25505064

  9. Radiation Exposure Time during MBSS: Influence of Swallowing Impairment Severity, Medical Diagnosis, Clinician Experience, and Standardized Protocol Use

    PubMed Central

    Bonilha, Heather Shaw; Humphries, Kate; Blair, Julie; Hill, Elizabeth G; McGrattan, Katlyn; Carnes, Brittni; Huda, Walter; Martin-Harris, Bonnie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Guidelines and preventive measures have been established to limit radiation exposure time during modified barium swallow studies (MBSS) but multiple variables may influence exam duration. This study examines the influence of clinician experience, medical diagnosis category, swallowing impairment severity and use of a standardized protocol on fluoroscopy time. Methods A retrospective review was completed on 739 MBSSs performed on 612 patients (342 males/270 females; age range = 18 to 96 years) completed in one year at the Medical University of South Carolina with IRB approval. All studies were completed by speech-language pathologists trained in the data collection protocol, interpretation, and scoring of the MBSImP™©. Medical diagnosis category, swallowing impairment severity (MBSImP™© score), clinician experience, and fluoroscopy time were the variables recorded for analysis. Results Fluoroscopy time was not significantly associated with medical diagnosis category (p=0.10). The severity of the MBSImP©™ Oral Total and Pharyngeal Total resulted in statistically significant increases in fluoroscopy time (p<0.05). Studies by novice clinicians had longer exposure times when compared to experienced clinicians (p=0.037). Average radiation exposure time using the MBSImP©™ approach was 2.9 minutes, with a 95% confidence interval of 2.8 minutes to 3.0 minutes, which was well within the range of exposure times reported in the literature. Conclusions This study provides preliminary information regarding the impact of medical diagnosis category, swallowing impairment severity and clinician experience on fluoroscopy time. These findings also suggest that a thorough, standardized protocol for MBSSs did not cause unnecessary radiation exposure time during the MBSS. PMID:22692431

  10. Bayesian Algorithm Implementation in a Real Time Exposure Assessment Model on Benzene with Calculation of Associated Cancer Risks

    PubMed Central

    Sarigiannis, Dimosthenis A.; Karakitsios, Spyros P.; Gotti, Alberto; Papaloukas, Costas L.; Kassomenos, Pavlos A.; Pilidis, Georgios A.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the current study was the development of a reliable modeling platform to calculate in real time the personal exposure and the associated health risk for filling station employees evaluating current environmental parameters (traffic, meteorological and amount of fuel traded) determined by the appropriate sensor network. A set of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) was developed to predict benzene exposure pattern for the filling station employees. Furthermore, a Physiology Based Pharmaco-Kinetic (PBPK) risk assessment model was developed in order to calculate the lifetime probability distribution of leukemia to the employees, fed by data obtained by the ANN model. Bayesian algorithm was involved in crucial points of both model sub compartments. The application was evaluated in two filling stations (one urban and one rural). Among several algorithms available for the development of the ANN exposure model, Bayesian regularization provided the best results and seemed to be a promising technique for prediction of the exposure pattern of that occupational population group. On assessing the estimated leukemia risk under the scope of providing a distribution curve based on the exposure levels and the different susceptibility of the population, the Bayesian algorithm was a prerequisite of the Monte Carlo approach, which is integrated in the PBPK-based risk model. In conclusion, the modeling system described herein is capable of exploiting the information collected by the environmental sensors in order to estimate in real time the personal exposure and the resulting health risk for employees of gasoline filling stations. PMID:22399936

  11. Performance of a 512 x 512 Gated CMOS Imager with a 250 ps Exposure Time

    SciTech Connect

    Teruya, A T; Moody, J D; Hsing, W W; Brown, C G; Griffin, M; Mead, A S

    2012-10-01

    We describe the performance of a 512x512 gated CMOS read out integrated circuit (ROIC) with a 250 ps exposure time. A low-skew, H-tree trigger distribution system is used to locally generate individual pixel gates in each 8x8 neighborhood of the ROIC. The temporal width of the gate is voltage controlled and user selectable via a precision potentiometer. The gating implementation was first validated in optical tests of a 64x64 pixel prototype ROIC developed as a proof-of-concept during the early phases of the development program. The layout of the H-Tree addresses each quadrant of the ROIC independently and admits operation of the ROIC in two modes. If “common mode” triggering is used, the camera provides a single 512x512 image. If independent triggers are used, the camera can provide up to four 256x256 images with a frame separation set by the trigger intervals. The ROIC design includes small (sub-pixel) optical photodiode structures to allow test and characterization of the ROIC using optical sources prior to bump bonding. Reported test results were obtained using short pulse, second harmonic Ti:Sapphire laser systems operating at ~ 400 nm at sub-ps pulse widths.

  12. High-time resolution and size-segregated elemental composition in high-intensity pyrotechnic exposures.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Javier; Yubero, Eduardo; Nicolás, Jose F; Lucarelli, Franco; Nava, Silvia; Chiari, Massimo; Calzolai, Giulia

    2012-11-30

    Typical of festivals in Eastern Spain, mascletàs are high-intensity pyrotechnic events where thousands of firecrackers are burnt in an intense, rapid episode that generates short-lived heavy aerosol clouds. High temporal resolution and size distribution characterisation of aerosol components were performed to evaluate the effects of the brief (<30 min) and acute exposure on the spectators present. Very high concentrations of firework specific elements, especially in the fine fraction, were reached during mascletàs, with values of about 500 μg/m(3) for K and 300 μg/m(3) for Cl. Sr, Al, Mg, Ba, Cu, Co, Zn, and Pb concentration increase factors of more than 100 (1000 for Sr and Ba) were observed in the fine fraction with respect to background levels. Crustal origin elements, like Ca, Fe, Si, Ti, also showed an important concentration rise (~10 times above background levels) but this is due to dust resuspension by pyrotechnic explosions. The crustal components are mainly in the coarse mode (>90% elemental mass), between 2 and 3 μm. Most firework related metals are concentrated in the submicrometric region (>80%) with a trimodal size distribution. This may be interesting to epidemiologists given the toxic effects that such fine, metal-rich particles can have on human health. PMID:23026448

  13. Efficient space-time sampling with pixel-wise coded exposure for high-speed imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dengyu; Gu, Jinwei; Hitomi, Yasunobu; Gupta, Mohit; Mitsunaga, Tomoo; Nayar, Shree K

    2014-02-01

    Cameras face a fundamental trade-off between spatial and temporal resolution. Digital still cameras can capture images with high spatial resolution, but most high-speed video cameras have relatively low spatial resolution. It is hard to overcome this trade-off without incurring a significant increase in hardware costs. In this paper, we propose techniques for sampling, representing, and reconstructing the space-time volume to overcome this trade-off. Our approach has two important distinctions compared to previous works: 1) We achieve sparse representation of videos by learning an overcomplete dictionary on video patches, and 2) we adhere to practical hardware constraints on sampling schemes imposed by architectures of current image sensors, which means that our sampling function can be implemented on CMOS image sensors with modified control units in the future. We evaluate components of our approach, sampling function and sparse representation, by comparing them to several existing approaches. We also implement a prototype imaging system with pixel-wise coded exposure control using a liquid crystal on silicon device. System characteristics such as field of view and modulation transfer function are evaluated for our imaging system. Both simulations and experiments on a wide range of scenes show that our method can effectively reconstruct a video from a single coded image while maintaining high spatial resolution. PMID:24356347

  14. The timing of embryonic exposure to elevated temperature alters stress endocrinology in domestic chickens (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Wilsterman, Kathryn; Mast, Andrew D; Luu, Thuyvan H; Haussmann, Mark F

    2015-02-01

    Patterns of glucocorticoid (GC) release in response to stimuli vary both among individuals and within individuals across their lifetime. While much work has focused on how the prenatal steroid environment can affect GC release, relatively little is known about how environmental parameters, such as incubation temperature affect GCs. We tested the hypothesis that variation and timing of elevated incubation temperature within the thermoneutral zone can alter the pattern of GC release. We incubated domestic chicken eggs (Gallus domesticus) at the optimal incubation temperature (37.5 °C) or at a slightly higher temperature (+1.1 °C) either early, late, or throughout incubation. At three weeks post-hatch, all birds were (i) exposed to a capture-restraint stress to measure stress-induced GC release (naïve). Three days following the naïve stressor, birds were (ii) exposed to a heat challenge, which was followed the next day by a second capture-restraint stress (post-heat challenge). Regardless of treatment, birds had similar patterns of GC release following the naïve stress series. However, during the post-heat challenge stress series, birds incubated at optimal temperatures increased their peak GC release. In contrast, birds exposed to slightly elevated temperatures for any period of development failed to increase peak GC release, and their specific response varied with timing of exposure to the elevated incubation temperature. Our results demonstrate that subtle variation in the embryonic environment, such as elevated incubation temperature within the thermoneutral zone, can impact the pattern of GC release of offspring. Further work is needed to understand the mechanisms underlying these changes and the relationship between fitness and environmentally-altered phenotypes. PMID:25623149

  15. Exposure Time to Lethal Temperatures for Meloidogyne incognita Suppression and Its Implication for Soil Solarization.

    PubMed

    Wang, K-H; McSorley, R

    2008-03-01

    Meloidogyne incognita eggs or J2 were incubated in test tubes containing sand:peat mix and immersed in a water bath heated to 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44 and 45 degrees C for a series of time intervals. Controls were maintained at 22 degrees C. Nematodes surviving or hatching were collected from Baermann trays after three weeks of incubation. Regression analyses between percent survival or egg hatch and hours of heat treatment were performed for each temperature. Complete suppression of egg hatch required 389.8, 164.5, 32.9, 19.7 and 13.1 hours at 38, 39, 40, 41 and 42 degrees C, respectively. Complete killing of J2 required 47.9, 46.2, 17.5 and 13.8 hours at 39, 40, 41 and 42 degrees C, respectively. J2 were not completely killed at 38 degrees C within 40 hours of treatment, but were killed within one hour at 44 and 45 degrees C. Effect of temperature on nematode killing is not determined by heat units. Oscillating temperature between cool and warm did not interfere with the nematode suppressive effect by the heat treatment. Six-week solarization in the field during the summers of 2003 and 2004 in Florida accumulated heat exposure times in the top 15 cm of soil that surpassed levels required to kill M. incognita as determined in the water bath experiments. Although near zero M. incognita were detected right after solarization, the nematode population densities increased after a cycle of a susceptible pepper crop. Therefore, future research should address failure of solarization to kill nematodes in the deeper soil layers. PMID:19259512

  16. A Cohort study evaluation of maternal PCB exposure related to time to pregnancy in daughters

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) remain ubiquitous environmental contaminants. Developmental exposures are suspected to impact reproduction. Analysis of mixtures of PCBs may be problematic as components have a complex correlation structure, and along with limited sample sizes, standard regression strategies are problematic. We compared the results of a novel, empirical method to those based on categorization of PCB compounds by (1) hypothesized biological activity previously proposed and widely applied, and (2) degree of ortho- substitution (mono, di, tri), in a study of the relation of maternal serum PCBs and daughter’s time to pregnancy. Methods We measured PCBs in maternal serum samples collected in the early postpartum in 289 daughters in the Child Health and Development Studies birth cohort. We queried time to pregnancy in these daughters 28–31 years later. We applied a novel weighted quantile sum approach to find the bad-actor compounds in the PCB mixture found in maternal serum. The approach includes empirical estimation of the weights through a bootstrap step which accounts for the variation in the estimated weights. Results Bootstrap analyses indicated the dominant functionality groups associated with longer TTP were the dioxin-like, anti-estrogenic group (average weight, 22%) and PCBs not previously classified by biological activity (54%). In contrast, the unclassified PCBs were not important in the association with shorter TTP, where the anti-estrogenic groups and the PB-inducers group played a more important role (60% and 23%, respectively). The highly chlorinated PCBs (average weight, 89%) were mostly associated with longer TTP; in contrast, the degree of chlorination was less discriminating for shorter TTP. Finally, PCB 56 was associated with the strongest relationship with TTP with a weight of 47%. Conclusions Our empirical approach found some associations previously identified by two classification schemes, but also identified other bad actors. This empirical method can generate hypotheses about mixture effects and mechanisms and overcomes some of the limitations of standard regression techniques. PMID:23962309

  17. Variability of Sorafenib Toxicity and Exposure over Time: A Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ropert, Stanislas; Mir, Olivier; Coriat, Romain; Billemont, Bertrand; Tod, Michel; Cabanes, Laure; Franck, Nathalie; Blanchet, Benoit; Goldwasser, François

    2012-01-01

    Background. Sorafenib displays major interpatient pharmacokinetic variability. It is unknown whether the pharmacokinetics of sorafenib influence its toxicity. Methods. We analyzed the severity and kinetics of sorafenib-induced toxicities in unselected consecutive patients with cancer, as well as their relationship with biological, clinical, and pharmacokinetic parameters. Toxicity was recorded bimonthly. Sorafenib plasma concentrations were assessed by liquid chromatography. Results. For 83 patients (median age, 62 years; range, 21–84 years), median sorafenib 12-hour area under the curve (AUC0–12) was 52.8 mg · h/L (range: 11.8–199.6). A total of 51 patients (61%) experienced grade 3–4 toxicities, including hand-foot skin reactions (23%), asthenia (18%), and diarrhea (11%). Sorafenib AUC0–12 preceding grade 3–4 toxicities was significantly higher than that observed in the remaining population (61.9 mg · h/L vs. 53 mg · h/L). In 25 patients treated with fixed doses of sorafenib for the first 4 months, median dose-normalized AUC0–12 on day 120 was significantly lower than on day 15 (63 vs. 102 mg · h/L). The incidence of hypertension and hand-foot skin reactions significantly decreased over time. Conclusion. Sorafenib AUC0–12 decreases over time, similarly to the incidence of hypertension and hand-foot skin reactions. Monitoring of sorafenib plasma concentrations may help to prevent acute severe toxicities and detect patients with suboptimal exposure at disease progression. PMID:22752067

  18. Texture and satiation: the role of oro-sensory exposure time.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Cees

    2012-11-01

    One of the characteristics of the current obesogenic food supply is the large availability of foods that can be ingested quickly. Controlled nutrition intervention studies have shown that the ingestion of simple energy containing beverages, which are consumed very quickly, do not lead to a lower compensatory intake of other foods. One of the theories behind this observation is that calories that are ingested quickly are not well sensed by the sense of taste, and do not lead to an adequate satiety response. This idea is confirmed by the results of a series of studies, where we have shown that the low satiation/satiety response of beverages can be largely attributed to their short oral residence time. Prolonging the oro-sensory exposure time to foods leads to earlier meal termination and/or a higher satiety response. The low satiation/satiety response to simple energy containing beverages is congruent with the observation from studies on the cephalic phase response to foods, i.e. the physiological response to sensory signals. Energy containing beverages do not lead to an adequate cephalic phase response. Various recent studies showed that slower eating leads to higher levels of satiety hormones. These results are in line with the idea that the sense of taste is a nutrient sensor which informs the brain and the gut about the inflow of nutrients. The sense of taste has an important contribution to the satiating effect of foods. One of the challenges in future research is to see whether or not these proofs of principles can be applied in longer term studies with regular commercial foods. This may make our obesogenic food supply more satiating, and may lead to a lower energy intake. PMID:22609070

  19. Exposure Nomographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zissell, Ronald E.

    Correct exposure times may be determined from nomographs relating signal-to-noise ratio, exposure time, color, seeing, and magnitude. The equations needed to construct the nomographs are developed. Calibration techniques are discussed.

  20. Diesel engine exhaust and lung cancer mortality: time-related factors in exposure and risk.

    PubMed

    Moolgavkar, Suresh H; Chang, Ellen T; Luebeck, Georg; Lau, Edmund C; Watson, Heather N; Crump, Kenny S; Boffetta, Paolo; McClellan, Roger

    2015-04-01

    To develop a quantitative exposure-response relationship between concentrations and durations of inhaled diesel engine exhaust (DEE) and increases in lung cancer risks, we examined the role of temporal factors in modifying the estimated effects of exposure to DEE on lung cancer mortality and characterized risk by mine type in the Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study (DEMS) cohort, which followed 12,315 workers through December 1997. We analyzed the data using parametric functions based on concepts of multistage carcinogenesis to directly estimate the hazard functions associated with estimated exposure to a surrogate marker of DEE, respirable elemental carbon (REC). The REC-associated risk of lung cancer mortality in DEMS is driven by increased risk in only one of four mine types (limestone), with statistically significant heterogeneity by mine type and no significant exposure-response relationship after removal of the limestone mine workers. Temporal factors, such as duration of exposure, play an important role in determining the risk of lung cancer mortality following exposure to REC, and the relative risk declines after exposure to REC stops. There is evidence of effect modification of risk by attained age. The modifying impact of temporal factors and effect modification by age should be addressed in any quantitative risk assessment (QRA) of DEE. Until there is a better understanding of why the risk appears to be confined to a single mine type, data from DEMS cannot reliably be used for QRA. PMID:25683254

  1. Motoneuron axon pathfinding errors in zebrafish: Differential effects related to concentration and timing of nicotine exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Menelaou, Evdokia; Paul, Latoya T.; Perera, Surangi N.; Svoboda, Kurt R.

    2015-04-01

    Nicotine exposure during embryonic stages of development can affect many neurodevelopmental processes. In the developing zebrafish, exposure to nicotine was reported to cause axonal pathfinding errors in the later born secondary motoneurons (SMNs). These alterations in SMN axon morphology coincided with muscle degeneration at high nicotine concentrations (15–30 μM). Previous work showed that the paralytic mutant zebrafish known as sofa potato exhibited nicotine-induced effects onto SMN axons at these high concentrations but in the absence of any muscle deficits, indicating that pathfinding errors could occur independent of muscle effects. In this study, we used varying concentrations of nicotine at different developmental windows of exposure to specifically isolate its effects onto subpopulations of motoneuron axons. We found that nicotine exposure can affect SMN axon morphology in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations of nicotine, SMN axons exhibited pathfinding errors, in the absence of any nicotine-induced muscle abnormalities. Moreover, the nicotine exposure paradigms used affected the 3 subpopulations of SMN axons differently, but the dorsal projecting SMN axons were primarily affected. We then identified morphologically distinct pathfinding errors that best described the nicotine-induced effects on dorsal projecting SMN axons. To test whether SMN pathfinding was potentially influenced by alterations in the early born primary motoneuron (PMN), we performed dual labeling studies, where both PMN and SMN axons were simultaneously labeled with antibodies. We show that only a subset of the SMN axon pathfinding errors coincided with abnormal PMN axonal targeting in nicotine-exposed zebrafish. We conclude that nicotine exposure can exert differential effects depending on the levels of nicotine and developmental exposure window. - Highlights: • Embryonic nicotine exposure can specifically affect secondary motoneuron axons in a dose-dependent manner. • The nicotine-induced secondary motoneuron axonal pathfinding errors can occur independent of any muscle fiber alterations. • Nicotine exposure primarily affects dorsal projecting secondary motoneurons axons. • Nicotine-induced primary motoneuron axon pathfinding errors can influence secondary motoneuron axon morphology.

  2. The efficacy of protoporphyrin as a predictive biomarker for lead exposure in canvasback ducks: effect of sample storage time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Hohman, W.L.; Moore, J.L.; Smith, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    We used 363 blood samples collected from wild canvasback ducks (Aythya valisineria) at Catahoula Lake, Louisiana, U.S.A. to evaluate the effect of sample storage time on the efficacy of erythrocytic protoporphyrin as an indicator of lead exposure. The protoporphyrin concentration of each sample was determined by hematofluorometry within 5 min of blood collection and after refrigeration at 4 °C for 24 and 48 h. All samples were analyzed for lead by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Based on a blood lead concentration of ≥0.2 ppm wet weight as positive evidence for lead exposure, the protoporphyrin technique resulted in overall error rates of 29%, 20%, and 19% and false negative error rates of 47%, 29% and 25% when hematofluorometric determinations were made on blood at 5 min, 24 h, and 48 h, respectively. False positive error rates were less than 10% for all three measurement times. The accuracy of the 24-h erythrocytic protoporphyrin classification of blood samples as positive or negative for lead exposure was significantly greater than the 5-min classification, but no improvement in accuracy was gained when samples were tested at 48 h. The false negative errors were probably due, at least in part, to the lag time between lead exposure and the increase of blood protoporphyrin concentrations. False negatives resulted in an underestimation of the true number of canvasbacks exposed to lead, indicating that hematofluorometry provides a conservative estimate of lead exposure.

  3. Optimal combination of number of participants and number of repeated measurements in longitudinal studies with time-varying exposure

    PubMed Central

    Barrera-Gómez, Jose; Spiegelman, Donna; Basagaña, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    In the context of observational longitudinal studies, we explored the values of the number of participants and the number of repeated measurements that maximize the power to detect the hypothesized effect, given the total cost of the study. We considered two different models, one that assumes a transient effect of exposure and one that assumes a cumulative effect. Results were derived for a continuous response variable, whose covariance structure was assumed to be damped exponential, and a binary time-varying exposure. Under certain assumptions, we derived simple formulas for the approximate solution to the problem in the particular case in which the response covariance structure is assumed to be compound symmetry. Results showed the importance of the exposure intraclass correlation in determining the optimal combination of the number of participants and the number of repeated measurements, and therefore the optimized power. Thus, incorrectly assuming a time-invariant exposure leads to inefficient designs. We also analyzed the sensitivity of results to dropout, mis-specification of the response correlation structure, allowing a time-varying exposure prevalence and potential confounding impact. We illustrated some of these results in a real study. In addition, we provide software to perform all the calculations required to explore the combination of the number of participants and the number of repeated measurements. PMID:23740818

  4. Specific time of exposure during tadpole development influences biological effects of the insecticide carbaryl in green frogs (Lithobates clamitans).

    PubMed

    Boone, Michelle D; Hammond, S Austin; Veldhoen, Nik; Youngquist, Melissa; Helbing, Caren C

    2013-04-15

    The orchestration of anuran metamorphosis is initiated and integrated by thyroid hormones, which change dynamically during larval development and which may represent a target of disruption by environmental contaminants. Studies have found that some anurans experience increased rates of development when exposed to the insecticide carbaryl later in larval development, suggesting that this insecticide could affect thyroid hormone-associated biological pathways. However, the time in development when tadpoles are sensitive to insecticide exposure has not been clearly defined nor has the mechanism been tested. In two separate studies, we exposed recently hatched green frog (Lithobates clamitans) tadpoles to a single, three day carbaryl exposure in the laboratory at either 2, 4, 8, or 16 weeks post-hatching. We examined the impact of carbaryl exposure on mRNA abundance patterns in the brains of frogs following metamorphosis months after a single three day exposure (experiment 1) and in tadpole tails three days after exposure (experiment 2) using cDNA microarrays and quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analyses. For tadpoles reared through metamorphosis, we measured tadpole growth and development, as well as time to, mass at, and survival to metamorphosis. Although carbaryl did not significantly impact tadpole development, metamorphosis, or survival, clear exposure-related alterations in both tail and brain transcript levels were evident when tadpoles were exposed to carbaryl, particularly in tadpoles exposed at weeks 8 and 16 post-hatching, indicating both short-term and long-term alterations in mRNA expression. These results indicate that carbaryl can have long-lasting effects on brain development when exposure occurs at sensitive developmental stages, which may have implications for animal fitness and function later in the life cycle. PMID:23399446

  5. Using smartphones to collect time-activity data for long-term personal-level air pollution exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, Mark L; Rudra, Carole B; Yoo, Eun-Hye; Demirbas, Murat; Merriman, Joel; Nayak, Pramod; Crabtree-Ide, Christina; Szpiro, Adam A; Rudra, Atri; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Mu, Lina

    2014-11-26

    Because of the spatiotemporal variability of people and air pollutants within cities, it is important to account for a person's movements over time when estimating personal air pollution exposure. This study aimed to examine the feasibility of using smartphones to collect personal-level time-activity data. Using Skyhook Wireless's hybrid geolocation module, we developed "Apolux" (Air, Pollution, Exposure), an Android(TM) smartphone application designed to track participants' location in 5-min intervals for 3 months. From 42 participants, we compared Apolux data with contemporaneous data from two self-reported, 24-h time-activity diaries. About three-fourths of measurements were collected within 5 min of each other (mean=74.14%), and 79% of participants reporting constantly powered-on smartphones (n=38) had a daily average data collection frequency of <10 min. Apolux's degree of temporal resolution varied across manufacturers, mobile networks, and the time of day that data collection occurred. The discrepancy between diary points and corresponding Apolux data was 342.3 m (Euclidian distance) and varied across mobile networks. This study's high compliance and feasibility for data collection demonstrates the potential for integrating smartphone-based time-activity data into long-term and large-scale air pollution exposure studies.Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology advance online publication, 26 November 2014; doi:10.1038/jes.2014.78. PMID:25425137

  6. Exposure to time varying magnetic fields associated with magnetic resonance imaging reduces fentanyl-induced analgesia in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Teskey, G.C.; Prato, F.S.; Ossenkopp, K.P.; Kavaliers, M.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of exposure to clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on analgesia induced by the mu opiate agonist, fentanyl, was examined in mice. During the dark period, adult male mice were exposed for 23.2 min to the time-varying (0.6 T/sec) magnetic field (TVMF) component of the MRI procedure. Following this exposure, the analgesic potency of fentanyl citrate (0.1 mg/kg) was determined at 5, 10, 15, and 30 min post-injection, using a thermal test stimulus (hot-plate 50 degrees C). Exposure to the magnetic-field gradients attenuated the fentanyl-induced analgesia in a manner comparable to that previously observed with morphine. These results indicate that the time-varying magnetic fields associated with MRI have significant inhibitory effects on the analgesic effects of specific mu-opiate-directed ligands.

  7. Characterization of new eye drops with choline salicylate and assessment of their irritancy by in vitro short time exposure tests

    PubMed Central

    Wroblewska, Katarzyna; Kucinska, Małgorzata; Murias, Marek; Lulek, Janina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to examine the irritation potential of new eye drops containing 2% choline salicylate (CS) as an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and various polymers increasing eye drop viscosity (hydroxyethylcellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, methylcellulose, polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinylpyrrolidone). The standard method for assessing the potential of irritating substances has been the Draize rabbit eye test. However the European Centre for Validation of Alternative Methods and the Coordinating Committee for Validation of Alternative Methods recommend, short time exposure (STE) in vitro tests as an alternative method for assessing eye irritation. The eye irritation potential was determined using cytotoxicity test methods for rabbit corneal cell line (SIRC) after 5 min exposure. The viability of cells was determined using two cytotoxicity assays: MTT and Neutral Red Uptake. According to the irritation rankings for the short time exposure test, all tested eye drops are classified as non-irritating (cell viability >70%).

  8. Characterization of new eye drops with choline salicylate and assessment of their irritancy by in vitro short time exposure tests.

    PubMed

    Wroblewska, Katarzyna; Kucinska, Małgorzata; Murias, Marek; Lulek, Janina

    2015-09-01

    The aim of our study was to examine the irritation potential of new eye drops containing 2% choline salicylate (CS) as an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and various polymers increasing eye drop viscosity (hydroxyethylcellulose, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, methylcellulose, polyvinyl alcohol, polyvinylpyrrolidone). The standard method for assessing the potential of irritating substances has been the Draize rabbit eye test. However the European Centre for Validation of Alternative Methods and the Coordinating Committee for Validation of Alternative Methods recommend, short time exposure (STE) in vitro tests as an alternative method for assessing eye irritation. The eye irritation potential was determined using cytotoxicity test methods for rabbit corneal cell line (SIRC) after 5 min exposure. The viability of cells was determined using two cytotoxicity assays: MTT and Neutral Red Uptake. According to the irritation rankings for the short time exposure test, all tested eye drops are classified as non-irritating (cell viability >70%). PMID:27134543

  9. Assessing the effects of exposure timing on biomarker expression using 17beta-estradiol

    EPA Science Inventory

    Temporal and spatial variability in estrogenicity has been documented for many treated wastewater effluents with the consequences of this variability on the expression of biomarkers of endocrine disruption being largely unknown. Laboratory exposure studies usually utilize constan...

  10. Estrogens in the wrong place at the wrong time: Fetal BPA exposure and mammary cancer.

    PubMed

    Paulose, Tessie; Speroni, Lucia; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Soto, Ana M

    2015-07-01

    Iatrogenic gestational exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) induced alterations of the genital tract and predisposed individuals to develop clear cell carcinoma of the vagina as well as breast cancer later in life. Gestational exposure of rodents to a related compound, the xenoestrogen bisphenol-A (BPA) increases the propensity to develop mammary cancer during adulthood, long after cessation of exposure. Exposure to BPA during gestation induces morphological alterations in both the stroma and the epithelium of the fetal mammary gland at 18 days of age. We postulate that the primary target of BPA is the fetal stroma, the only mammary tissue expressing estrogen receptors during fetal life. BPA would then alter the reciprocal stroma-epithelial interactions that mediate mammogenesis. In addition to this direct effect on the mammary gland, BPA is postulated to affect the hypothalamus and thus in turn affect the regulation of mammotropic hormones at puberty and beyond. PMID:25277313

  11. BLOOD AND BRAIN CONCENTRATIONS OF BIFENTHRIN CORRELATE WITH DECREASED MOTOR ACTIVITY INDEPENDENT OF TIME OF EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pyrethroids are neurotoxic insecticides used in a variety of agricultural and household activities. Due to the phase-out of organophosphate pesticides, the use of pyrethroids has increased. The potential for human exposure to pyrethroids has prompted pharmacodynamic and pharmac...

  12. Environmental and occupational exposures to PAH in the Czech Republic: Personal exposure monitoring coupled with HPLC/time-programmed fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.W.; Hattaway, K.E.; Watts, R.R.; Lewtas, J.

    1994-12-31

    The US Environmental Protection Agency has collaborated with health researchers in the Czech Republic to determine polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposures for populations in highly polluted environments and in various occupations. These investigations used personal exposure monitors (PEMs) that were developed to allow separate and simultaneous collection of fine particles, vapor phase nicotine and vapor phase organics. Samples were extracted and analyzed for 16 priority PAHs by optimized HPLC coupled with time-programmed fluorescence detection. Nicotine analysis was performed using capillary gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus detection. Personal exposure monitoring periods of up to 24 continuous hours were conducted for: (1) Teplice and Prachatice policemen, who spent a major portion of their day outdoors; (2) open-pit coal miners; (3) health researchers working in a laboratory; and (4) coke oven workers. Total particle-bound PAHs ranged from 1.5 {micro}g/m{sup 3} for the health researchers to 52 {micro}g/m{sup 3} for the topside coke oven workers. Vapor phase PAH concentrations also varied greatly depending on occupation and ranged from 0.6 {micro}g/m{sup 3} for city policemen to 261 {micro}g/m{sup 3} for the coke oven workers. Carcinogenic PAHs, which were predominantly found associated with particular matter (> 90%), typically included benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, and benzo(a)pyrene.

  13. Time course of systemic oxidative stress and inflammatory response induced by an acute exposure to Residual Oil Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Marchini, T.; Magnani, N.D.; Paz, M.L.; Vanasco, V.; Tasat, D.; González Maglio, D.H.; and others

    2014-01-15

    It is suggested that systemic oxidative stress and inflammation play a central role in the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases associated with the exposure to particulate matter (PM). The aim of this work was to evaluate the time changes of systemic markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, after an acute exposure to Residual Oil Fly Ash (ROFA). Female Swiss mice were intranasally instilled with a ROFA suspension (1.0 mg/kg body weight) or saline solution, and plasma levels of oxidative damage markers [thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARSs) and protein carbonyls], antioxidant status [reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, ascorbic acid levels, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity], cytokines levels, and intravascular leukocyte activation were evaluated after 1, 3 or 5 h of exposure. Oxidative damage to lipids and decreased GSH/GSSG ratio were observed in ROFA-exposed mice as early as 1 h. Afterwards, increased protein oxidation, decreased ascorbic acid content and SOD activity were found in this group at 3 h. The onset of an adaptive response was observed at 5 h after the ROFA exposure, as indicated by decreased TBARS plasma content and increased SOD activity. The observed increase in oxidative damage to plasma macromolecules, together with systemic antioxidants depletion, may be a consequence of a systemic inflammatory response triggered by the ROFA exposure, since increased TNF-α and IL-6 plasma levels and polymorphonuclear leukocytes activation was found at every evaluated time point. These findings contribute to the understanding of the increase in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, in association with environmental PM inhalation. - Highlights: • An acute exposure to ROFA triggers the occurrence of systemic oxidative stress. • Changes in plasmatic oxidative stress markers appear as early as 1 h after exposure. • ROFA induces proinflammatory cytokines release and intravascular leukocyte activation. • PMN activation is a relevant source of reactive oxygen species in this model. • These findings may account for previously described cardiopulmonary alterations.

  14. Resilience and recovery: the effect of triclosan exposure timing during development, on the structure and function of river biofilm communities.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J R; Topp, E; Waiser, M J; Tumber, V; Roy, J; Swerhone, G D W; Leavitt, P; Paule, A; Korber, D R

    2015-04-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is a ubiquitous antibacterial agent found in soaps, scrubs, and consumer products. There is limited information on hazardous effects of TCS in the environment. Here, rotating annular reactors were used to cultivate river biofilm communities exposed to 1.8 μg l(-1) TCS with the timing and duration of exposure and recovery during development varied. Two major treatment regimens were employed: (i) biofilm development for 2, 4 or 6 weeks prior to TCS exposure and (ii) exposure of biofilms to TCS for 2, 4 or 6 weeks followed by recovery. Biofilms not exposed to TCS were used as a reference condition. Communities cultivated without and then exposed to TCS all exhibited reductions in algal biomass and significant (p<0.05) reductions in cyanobacterial biomass. No significant effects were observed on bacterial biomass. CLSM imaging of biofilms at 8 weeks revealed unique endpoints in terms of community architecture. Community composition was altered by any exposure to TCS, as indicated by significant shifts in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprints and exopolymer composition relative to the reference. Bacterial, algal and cyanobacterial components initially exposed to TCS were significantly different from those TCS-free at time zero. Pigment analyses suggested that significant changes in composition of algal and cyanobacterial populations occurred with TCS exposure. Bacterial thymidine incorporation rates were reduced by TCS exposure and carbon utilization spectra shifted in terms substrate metabolism. Direct counts of protozoans indicated that TCS was suppressive, whereas micrometazoan populations were, in some instances, stimulated. These results indicate that even a relatively brief exposure of a river biofilm community to relatively low levels of TCS alters both the trajectory and final community structure. Although some evidence of recovery was observed, removal of TCS did not result in a return to the unexposed reference condition. PMID:25731684

  15. Influence of calcium oxide level and time of exposure to sugarcane on in vitro and in situ digestion kinetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experiments were carried out to evaluate, using in vitro and in situ techniques, the effects of three inclusion levels of calcium oxide (0, 5, and 10 g/kg of sugarcane fresh matter) and four exposure times (0, 24, 48, and 72 h) of sugarcane to calcium oxide on the chemical composition and digestive ...

  16. The Timing of Prenatal Exposure to Maternal Cortisol and Psychosocial Stress Is Associated with Human Infant Cognitive Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elysia P.; Sandman, Curt A.

    2010-01-01

    The consequences of prenatal maternal stress for development were examined in 125 full-term infants at 3, 6, and 12 months of age. Maternal cortisol and psychological state were evaluated 5 times during pregnancy. Exposure to elevated concentrations of cortisol early in gestation was associated with a slower rate of development over the 1st year…

  17. The Timing of Prenatal Exposure to Maternal Cortisol and Psychosocial Stress Is Associated with Human Infant Cognitive Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elysia P.; Sandman, Curt A.

    2010-01-01

    The consequences of prenatal maternal stress for development were examined in 125 full-term infants at 3, 6, and 12 months of age. Maternal cortisol and psychological state were evaluated 5 times during pregnancy. Exposure to elevated concentrations of cortisol early in gestation was associated with a slower rate of development over the 1st year

  18. Development of the town data base: Estimates of exposure rates and times of fallout arrival near the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.B.; McArthur, R.D.; Hutchinson, S.W.

    1994-09-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project, the time of fallout arrival and the H+12 exposure rate were estimated for populated locations in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah that were affected by fallout from one or more nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. Estimates of exposure rate were derived from measured values recorded before and after each test by fallout monitors in the field. The estimate for a given location was obtained by retrieving from a data base all measurements made in the vicinity, decay-correcting them to H+12, and calculating an average. Estimates were also derived from maps produced after most events that show isopleths of exposure rate and time of fallout arrival. Both sets of isopleths on these maps were digitized, and kriging was used to interpolate values at the nodes of a 10-km grid covering the pattern. The values at any location within the grid were then estimated from the values at the surrounding grid nodes. Estimates of dispersion (standard deviation) were also calculated. The Town Data Base contains the estimates for all combinations of location and nuclear event for which the estimated mean H+12 exposure rate was greater than three times background. A listing of the data base is included as an appendix. The information was used by other project task groups to estimate the radiation dose that off-site populations and individuals may have received as a result of exposure to fallout from Nevada nuclear tests.

  19. A Pilot Study Characterizing Real Time Exposures to Particulate Matter and Carbon Monoxide from Cookstove Related Woodsmoke in Rural Peru

    PubMed Central

    Commodore, Adwoa A.; Hartinger, Stella M.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Mäusezahl, Daniel; Gil, Ana I.; Hall, Daniel B.; Aguilar-Villalobos, Manuel; Naeher, Luke P.

    2013-01-01

    Nearly half of the world’s population is exposed to household air pollution (HAP) due to long hours spent in close proximity to unvented cooking fires. We aimed to use PM2.5 and CO measurements to characterize exposure to cookstove generated woodsmoke in real time among control (n=10) and intervention (n=9) households in San Marcos, Cajamarca Region, Peru. Real time personal particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 µm (PM2.5), and personal and kitchen carbon monoxide (CO) samples were taken. Control households used a number of stoves including open fire and chimney stoves while intervention households used study-promoted chimney stoves. Measurements were categorized into lunch (9am – 1pm) and dinner (3pm – 7pm) periods, where applicable, to adjust for a wide range of sampling periods (2.8– 13.1hrs). During the 4-h time periods, mean personal PM2.5 exposures were correlated with personal CO exposures during lunch (r=0.67 p=0.024 n=11) and dinner (r=0.72 p=0.0011 n=17) in all study households. Personal PM2.5 exposures and kitchen CO concentrations were also correlated during lunch (r=0.76 p=0.018 n=9) and dinner (r=0.60 p=0.018 n=15). CO may be a useful indicator of PM during 4-h time scales measured in real time, particularly during high woodsmoke exposures, particularly during residential biomass cooking. PMID:24288452

  20. A Pilot Study Characterizing Real Time Exposures to Particulate Matter and Carbon Monoxide from Cookstove Related Woodsmoke in Rural Peru.

    PubMed

    Commodore, Adwoa A; Hartinger, Stella M; Lanata, Claudio F; Mäusezahl, Daniel; Gil, Ana I; Hall, Daniel B; Aguilar-Villalobos, Manuel; Naeher, Luke P

    2013-11-01

    Nearly half of the world's population is exposed to household air pollution (HAP) due to long hours spent in close proximity to unvented cooking fires. We aimed to use PM2.5 and CO measurements to characterize exposure to cookstove generated woodsmoke in real time among control (n=10) and intervention (n=9) households in San Marcos, Cajamarca Region, Peru. Real time personal particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 µm (PM2.5), and personal and kitchen carbon monoxide (CO) samples were taken. Control households used a number of stoves including open fire and chimney stoves while intervention households used study-promoted chimney stoves. Measurements were categorized into lunch (9am - 1pm) and dinner (3pm - 7pm) periods, where applicable, to adjust for a wide range of sampling periods (2.8- 13.1hrs). During the 4-h time periods, mean personal PM2.5 exposures were correlated with personal CO exposures during lunch (r=0.67 p=0.024 n=11) and dinner (r=0.72 p=0.0011 n=17) in all study households. Personal PM2.5 exposures and kitchen CO concentrations were also correlated during lunch (r=0.76 p=0.018 n=9) and dinner (r=0.60 p=0.018 n=15). CO may be a useful indicator of PM during 4-h time scales measured in real time, particularly during high woodsmoke exposures, particularly during residential biomass cooking. PMID:24288452

  1. A pilot study characterizing real time exposures to particulate matter and carbon monoxide from cookstove related woodsmoke in rural Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commodore, Adwoa A.; Hartinger, Stella M.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Mäusezahl, Daniel; Gil, Ana I.; Hall, Daniel B.; Aguilar-Villalobos, Manuel; Naeher, Luke P.

    2013-11-01

    Nearly half of the world's population is exposed to household air pollution (HAP) due to long hours spent in close proximity to unvented cooking fires. We aimed to use PM2.5 and CO measurements to characterize exposure to cookstove generated woodsmoke in real time among control (n = 10) and intervention (n = 9) households in San Marcos, Cajamarca Region, Peru. Real time personal particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5), and personal and kitchen carbon monoxide (CO) samples were taken. Control households used a number of stoves including open fire and chimney stoves while intervention households used study-promoted chimney stoves. Measurements were categorized into lunch (9 am-1 pm) and dinner (3 pm-7 pm) periods, where applicable, to adjust for a wide range of sampling periods (2.8-13.1 h). During the 4-h time periods, mean personal PM2.5 exposures were correlated with personal CO exposures during lunch (r = 0.67 p = 0.024 n = 11) and dinner (r = 0.72 p = 0.0011 n = 17) in all study households. Personal PM2.5 exposures and kitchen CO concentrations were also correlated during lunch (r = 0.76 p = 0.018 n = 9) and dinner (r = 0.60 p = 0.018 n = 15). CO may be a useful indicator of PM during 4-h time scales measured in real time, particularly during high woodsmoke exposures, particularly during residential biomass cooking.

  2. Quantifying risk over the life course - latency, age-related susceptibility, and other time-varying exposure metrics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Molin; Liao, Xiaomei; Laden, Francine; Spiegelman, Donna

    2016-06-15

    Identification of the latency period and age-related susceptibility, if any, is an important aspect of assessing risks of environmental, nutritional, and occupational exposures. We consider estimation and inference for latency and age-related susceptibility in relative risk and excess risk models. We focus on likelihood-based methods for point and interval estimation of the latency period and age-related windows of susceptibility coupled with several commonly considered exposure metrics. The method is illustrated in a study of the timing of the effects of constituents of air pollution on mortality in the Nurses' Health Study. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26750582

  3. Soundscape and Noise Exposure Monitoring in a Marine Protected Area Using Shipping Data and Time-Lapse Footage.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Nathan D; Pirotta, Enrico; Barton, Tim R; Thompson, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    We review recent work that developed new techniques for underwater noise assessment that integrate acoustic monitoring with automatic identification system (AIS) shipping data and time-lapse video, meteorological, and tidal data. Two sites were studied within the Moray Firth Special Area of Conservation (SAC) for bottlenose dolphins, where increased shipping traffic is expected from construction of offshore wind farms outside the SAC. Noise exposure varied markedly between the sites, and natural and anthropogenic contributions were characterized using multiple data sources. At one site, AIS-operating vessels accounted for total cumulative sound exposure (0.1-10 kHz), suggesting that noise modeling using the AIS would be feasible. PMID:26611022

  4. One-time screening to define the problem: Legionella exposure in an electric power company

    SciTech Connect

    Deubner, D.C.; MacCormack, J.N.; Kleeman, K.; Muhlbaier, L.H.

    1986-08-01

    An electric utility screened 1455 production employees for job exposure to Legionella pneumophila sources, illness history, and antibodies to L pneumophila serotypes I-IV. L pneumophila-associated illness outbreaks had occurred in a neighboring electric utility district; bacteria serocompatible with L pneumophila had been detected in all four plants participating in an environmental survey, and the company was concerned about the implications of these findings for their employees and the public living near power plants with large cooling towers. The survey revealed a prevalence of antibodies in employees consistent with general population surveys. Within the employee group, antibody titer was not associated with either reports of recent illness or work exposure to potential L pneumophila sources. Inability to detect a relationship between exposure to potential L pneumophila sources and specific antibody results was used to define L pneumophila as a historic nonproblem for this company and to rationally advise against the need for an ongoing screening program.

  5. Reduced exercise time in competitive simulations consequent to low level ozone exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Schelegle, E.S.; Adams, W.C.

    1986-08-01

    Ten highly trained endurance athletes were studied to determine the effects of exposure to low ozone (O/sub 3/) concentrations on simulated competitive endurance performance and associated physiological and subjective symptom responses. Each subject was randomly exposed to filtered air (FA), and to 0.12, 0.18, and 0.24 ppm O/sub 3/ while performing a 1 h competitive simulation protocol on a bicycle ergometer. Endurance performance was evaluated by the number of subjects unable to complete rides (last 30 min at an intense work load of approximately 86% VO/sub 2/max). All subjects completed the FA exposure, whereas one, five, and seven subjects did not complete the 0.12, 0.18, and 0.24 ppm O/sub 3/ exposures, respectively. Statistical analysis indicated a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in the inability of subjects to complete the competitive simulations with increasing O/sub 3/ concentration, including a significant difference between the 0.24 ppm O/sub 3/ and FA exposure. Significant decreases (P less than 0.05) were also observed following the 0.18 and 0.24 ppm O/sub 3/ exposures, respectively, in forced vital capacity (-7.8 and -9.9%), and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (-5.8 and -10.5%). No significant O/sub 3/ effect was observed for exercise respiratory metabolism or ventilatory pattern responses. However, the number of reported subjective symptoms increased significantly following the 0.18 and 0.24 ppm O/sub 3/ protocols. These data demonstrate significant decrements in simulated competitive endurance performance and in pulmonary function, with accompanying enhanced subjective symptoms, following exposure to low O/sub 3/ levels commonly observed in numerous metropolitan environments during the summer months.

  6. Stochastic modelling for biodosimetry: Predicting the chromosomal response to radiation at different time points after exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deperas-Standylo, Joanna; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Ritter, Sylvia

    2014-07-01

    Cytogenetic data accumulated from the experiments with peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to densely ionizing radiation clearly demonstrate that for particles with linear energy transfer (LET) >100 keV/ μm the derived relative biological effectiveness (RBE) will strongly depend on the time point chosen for the analysis. A reasonable prediction of radiation-induced chromosome damage and its distribution among cells can be achieved by exploiting Monte Carlo methodology along with the information about the radius of the penetrating ion-track and the LET of the ion beam. In order to examine the relationship between the track structure and the distribution of aberrations induced in human lymphocytes and to clarify the correlation between delays in the cell cycle progression and the aberration burden visible at the first post-irradiation mitosis, we have analyzed chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes exposed to Fe-ions with LET values of 335 keV/ μm and formulated a Monte Carlo model which reflects time-delay in mitosis of aberrant cells. Within the model the frequency distributions of aberrations among cells follow the pattern of local energy distribution and are well approximated by a time-dependent compound Poisson statistics. The cell-division cycle of undamaged and aberrant cells and chromosome aberrations are modelled as a renewal process represented by a random sum of (independent and identically distributed) random elements S N = ∑ N i=0 X i . Here N stands for the number of particle traversals of cell nucleus, each leading to a statistically independent formation of X i aberrations. The parameter N is itself a random variable and reflects the cell cycle delay of heavily damaged cells. The probability distribution of S N follows a general law for which the moment generating function satisfies the relation Φ S N = Φ N ( Φ X i ). Formulation of the Monte Carlo model which allows to predict expected fluxes of aberrant and non-aberrant cells has been based on several input information: (i) experimentally measured mitotic index in the population of irradiated cells; (ii) scored fraction of cells in first cell cycle; (iii) estimated average number of particle traversals per cell nucleus. By reconstructing the local dose distribution in the biological target, the relevant amount of lesions induced by ions is estimated from the biological effect induced by photons at the same dose level. Moreover, the total amount of aberrations induced within the entire population has been determined. For each subgroup of intact (non-hit) and aberrant cells the cell-division cycle has been analyzed reproducing correctly an expected correlation between mitotic delay and the number of aberrations carried by a cell. This observation is of particular importance for the proper estimation of the biological efficiency of ions and for the estimation of health risks associated with radiation exposure.

  7. Leisure time activities related to carcinogen exposure and lung cancer risk in never smokers. A case-control study

    SciTech Connect

    Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; García-Lavandeira, José Antonio; Torres-Durán, María; Prini-Guadalupe, Luciana; Parente-Lamelas, Isaura; Leiro-Fernández, Virginia; Montero-Martínez, Carmen; González-Barcala, Francisco Javier; Golpe-Gómez, Antonio; Martínez, Cristina; Castro-Añón, Olalla; Mejuto-Martí, María José; and others

    2014-07-15

    We aim to assess the relationship between leisure time activities related to exposure to carcinogenic substances and lung cancer risk in a hospital-based case-control study performed in never smokers. We included never smoking cases with anatomopathologically confirmed lung cancer and never smoking controls undergoing trivial surgery, at 8 Spanish hospitals. The study was conducted between January 2011 and June 2013. Participants were older than 30 and had no previous neoplasms. All were personally interviewed focusing on lifestyle, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, occupational history and leisure time activities (including duration of such activities). Results were analyzed through logistic regression and adjusted also by residential radon and education level. We included 513 never smokers, 191 cases and 322 controls. The OR for those performing the studied leisure time activities was 1.43 (95%CI 0.78–2.61). When we restricted the analysis to those performing do-it-yourself activities for more than 10 years the OR was 2.21 (95%CI 0.93–5.27). Environmental tobacco smoke exposure did not modify this association. The effect for the different lung cancer histological types was very close to significance for adenocarcinoma but only when these activities were performed for more than 10 years. We encourage health professionals to recommend protective measures for those individuals while performing these hobbies to reduce the risk of lung cancer. - Highlights: • Some leisure time activities are associated with the exposure to carcinogenic substances. • These activities are model-making, painting (artistic or not), furniture refinishing or wood working. • Few studies have assessed lung cancer risk due to these hobbies and none in never-smokers. • Leisure activities related to exposure to carcinogenic substances present higher lung cancer risk. • The risk is higher when these activities are performed for more than 10 years.

  8. Prenatal exposure to nicotine impairs performance of the 5-choice serial reaction time task in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Tomasz; Ilott, Nicholas; Brolese, Giovana; Bizarro, Lisiane; Asherson, Philip J E; Stolerman, Ian P

    2011-04-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with a wide variety of adverse reproductive outcomes, including increased infant mortality and decreased birth weight. Prenatal exposure to tobacco smoke, of which nicotine is a major teratogenic component, has also been linked to the acceleration of the risk for different psychiatric disorders, including conduct disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Whether this increased risk is influenced by the direct effects of gestational nicotine exposure on the developing fetus remains uncertain. In this study we provide experimental evidence for the effects of prenatal nicotine exposure on measures of attention and impulsivity in adult male rats. Offspring of females exposed during pregnancy to 0.06 mg/ml nicotine solution as the only source of water (daily consumption: 69.6±1.4 ml/kg; nicotine blood level: 96.0±31.9 ng/ml) had lower birth weight and delayed sensorimotor development measured by negative geotaxis, righting reflex, and grip strength. In the 5-choice serial reaction time test, adult rats showed increased numbers of anticipatory responses and omissions errors, more variable response times, and lower accuracy with evidence of delayed learning of the task demands when the 1 s stimulus duration was introduced. In contrast, prenatal nicotine exposure had no effect on exploratory locomotion or delay-discounting test. Prenatal nicotine exposure increased expression of the D5 dopamine receptor gene in the striatum, but did not change expression of other dopamine-related genes (DRD4, DAT1, NR4A2, and TH) in either the striatum or the prefrontal cortex. These data suggest a direct effect of prenatal nicotine exposure on important aspects of attention, inhibitory control, or learning later in life. PMID:21289608

  9. Prenatal Exposure to Nicotine Impairs Performance of the 5-Choice Serial Reaction Time Task in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Tomasz; Ilott, Nicholas; Brolese, Giovana; Bizarro, Lisiane; Asherson, Philip J E; Stolerman, Ian P

    2011-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with a wide variety of adverse reproductive outcomes, including increased infant mortality and decreased birth weight. Prenatal exposure to tobacco smoke, of which nicotine is a major teratogenic component, has also been linked to the acceleration of the risk for different psychiatric disorders, including conduct disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Whether this increased risk is influenced by the direct effects of gestational nicotine exposure on the developing fetus remains uncertain. In this study we provide experimental evidence for the effects of prenatal nicotine exposure on measures of attention and impulsivity in adult male rats. Offspring of females exposed during pregnancy to 0.06?mg/ml nicotine solution as the only source of water (daily consumption: 69.61.4?ml/kg; nicotine blood level: 96.031.9?ng/ml) had lower birth weight and delayed sensorimotor development measured by negative geotaxis, righting reflex, and grip strength. In the 5-choice serial reaction time test, adult rats showed increased numbers of anticipatory responses and omissions errors, more variable response times, and lower accuracy with evidence of delayed learning of the task demands when the 1?s stimulus duration was introduced. In contrast, prenatal nicotine exposure had no effect on exploratory locomotion or delay-discounting test. Prenatal nicotine exposure increased expression of the D5 dopamine receptor gene in the striatum, but did not change expression of other dopamine-related genes (DRD4, DAT1, NR4A2, and TH) in either the striatum or the prefrontal cortex. These data suggest a direct effect of prenatal nicotine exposure on important aspects of attention, inhibitory control, or learning later in life. PMID:21289608

  10. Relation of concentration and exposure time to the efficacy of niclosamide against larval sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholefield, R.J.; Bergstedt, R.A.; Bills, T.D.

    2003-01-01

    The efficacy of 2', 5-dichloro-4'-nitrosalicylanilide (niclosamide) at various concentrations and exposure times was tested against free-swimming larval sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) at 72°C and 17°C in Lake Huron water. Concentrations of niclosamide in test solutions ranged from 0.46 to 4.7 mg/L with pH 7.8 to 8.3, total alkalinity 78 to 88 mg/L as CaCO3, and total hardness 95 to 105 mg/L as CaCO3. In each test, six groups of larvae were exposed to a single concentration of niclosamide for times ranging from 30 s to 30 min. Exposure time was treated as the dose and, for each concentration tested, the exposure time necessary to kill 50 and 99.9% of larvae (ET50 and ET99.9) was determined. Linear regressions of the log10-transformed ET50 and ET99.9 on the log10- transformed niclosamide concentrations were significant at both temperatures with r2 ranging from 0.94 to 0.98. The predicted ET50 ranged from 58 sec to 21.7 min and the ET99.9 ranged from 2.5 to 43.5 min across the concentrations and temperatures tested. Niclosamide required a significantly longer time to kill larvae at 12°C than at 17°C.

  11. Task- and Time-Dependent Weighting Factors in a Retrospective Exposure Assessment of Chemical Laboratory Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Scott A. Henn, David F. Utterback, Kathleen M. Waters, Andrea M. Markey, William G. Tankersley

    2007-02-01

    Results are reported from a chemical exposure assessment that was conducted for a cohort mortality study of 6157 chemical laboratory workers employed between 1943 and 1998 at four Department of Energy sites in Oak Ridge, Tenn., and Aiken, S.C.

  12. Developing a Passive Time-Activity Triage System In support of Consumer Ingredient Exposure Prioritization

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical Hazard/toxicity assessment of chemicals relies on droves of chemical-biological data at the organism, tissue, cell, and biomolecular level of resolution. Big data in the context of exposure science relies on a comprehensive knowledge of societies and community activity ...

  13. TIME COURSE OF METAL LOSS IN LUMBRICULUS VARIEGATUS FOLLOWING SEDIMENT EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    After exposure for 21 d to sediment spiked with Cd, Pb, Cu, or Zn, oligochaetes held in clean water depurated metal rapidly over the first few hours, but much more slowly from 8 h up to 32 h. Results are consistent with previous work suggresting a 6-h depuration period as general...

  14. Do Time in Child Care and Peer Group Exposure Predict Poor Socioemotional Adjustment in Norway?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solheim, Elisabet; Wichstrm, Lars; Belsky, Jay; Berg-Nielsen, Turid Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Extensive exposure to nonparental child care during the first 4.5years of life has been demonstrated in some American studies to negatively affect children's socioemotional functioning. Data from 935 preschool children who averaged 54.9(SD=3.0) months of age, from Trondheim, Norway were used to examine whether such negative effects, would

  15. Developing a Passive Time-Activity Triage System In support of Consumer Ingredient Exposure Prioritization.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical Hazard/toxicity assessment of chemicals relies on droves of chemical-biological data at the organism, tissue, cell, and biomolecular level of resolution. Big data in the context of exposure science relies on a comprehensive knowledge of societies’ and community act...

  16. Developing a Passive Time-Activity Triage System In support of Consumer Ingredient Exposure Prioritization

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical Hazard/toxicity assessment of chemicals relies on droves of chemical-biological data at the organism, tissue, cell, and biomolecular level of resolution. Big data in the context of exposure science relies on a comprehensive knowledge of societies’ and community activity ...

  17. Estimating Regional Background Air Quality using Space/Time Ordinary Kriging to Support Exposure Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Local-scale dispersion models are increasingly being used to perform exposure assessments. These types of models, while able to characterize local-scale air quality at increasing spatial scale, however, lack the ability to include background concentration in their overall estimat...

  18. Survival time analysis of least killifish (Heterandria formosa) and mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) in acute exposures to endosulfan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Carriger, John F; Hoang, Tham C; Rand, Gary M

    2010-05-01

    Single-species flow-through toxicity tests were conducted to determine the times-to-death of two indigenous fish to South Florida--least killifish (Heterandria formosa) and mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis)--from acute exposure to endosulfan sulfate. Mortalities were recorded within 8-h periods from test initiation to termination at 96 h. The 96-h LC(50)s for least killifish and mosquitofish estimated using the trimmed-Spearman-Karber method were 2.0 and 2.3 microg/l, respectively. An accelerated failure time model was used to estimate times to death at selected concentrations. Data were fit to log-normal, log-logistic, and Weibull distributions. Acute toxicity data fit to the Weibull distribution produced a better relative fit than log-normal or log-logistic distributions for both toxicity tests. The survival-time profiles and associated statistics illustrate the benefit of considering exposure duration as well as concentration when predicting acute risk to species' populations. Both toxicity tests had similar outcomes from exposure to endosulfan sulfate, with least killifish being slightly more likely to die at lower concentrations and shorter time periods than mosquitofish. From the models generated by the toxicity tests, times-to-death for least killifish and mosquitofish were estimated for environmentally relevant concentrations of total endosulfan at a site of concern in South Florida. When the results from the current toxicity tests were compared to environmental concentrations from previous screening-level ecological risk assessments, the durations necessary to potentially kill 10% or more of the populations of the two native south Florida fish species were estimated to be 77 and 96 h for least killifish and mosquitofish, respectively. However, the exposure values included the alpha and beta isomers as well as endosulfan sulfate; therefore, an understanding of their toxicity might be important in understanding the survival dynamics of fish species in endosulfan sulfate-contaminated sites. PMID:19921326

  19. Night-time decibel hell: mapping noise exposure zones and individual annoyance ratings in an urban environment in ghana.

    PubMed

    Zakpala, Rachel N; Armah, Frederick Ato; Sackey, Brigid M; Pabi, Opoku

    2014-01-01

    Although accumulating evidence over the past thirty years indicates that noise is an environmental stressor in residential settings, much of the data emanated from studies in high-intensity, noise impact zones around airports or major roads. Little is known about religious noise, especially at night, which is increasingly a growing concern for both the general public and policy-makers in sub-Saharan Africa. Using geographical information systems (GIS), this study measured and mapped exposure to religious noise in a rapidly urbanising municipality in Ghana. Quantitative noise risk assessment was used to evaluate the risk of religious noise-induced hearing loss to residents in the exposed neighbourhoods. The results show that all neighbourhoods where churches were situated had at least one location with significant risk of noise-induced hearing loss. However, there was no statistically significant relationship between neighbourhoods where religious noise exposure was the highest and where noise annoyance was the highest. The magnitude of the noise values for night-time exposure is remarkable particularly given that excessive night-time noise exposure has the greatest detrimental effect on public health. There is the need to focus on vulnerable groups, sensitive hours of the night, and possible confounding with air pollution in order to wholly address this potential hazard. PMID:25136476

  20. Night-Time Decibel Hell: Mapping Noise Exposure Zones and Individual Annoyance Ratings in an Urban Environment in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Zakpala, Rachel N.; Armah, Frederick Ato; Sackey, Brigid M.; Pabi, Opoku

    2014-01-01

    Although accumulating evidence over the past thirty years indicates that noise is an environmental stressor in residential settings, much of the data emanated from studies in high-intensity, noise impact zones around airports or major roads. Little is known about religious noise, especially at night, which is increasingly a growing concern for both the general public and policy-makers in sub-Saharan Africa. Using geographical information systems (GIS), this study measured and mapped exposure to religious noise in a rapidly urbanising municipality in Ghana. Quantitative noise risk assessment was used to evaluate the risk of religious noise-induced hearing loss to residents in the exposed neighbourhoods. The results show that all neighbourhoods where churches were situated had at least one location with significant risk of noise-induced hearing loss. However, there was no statistically significant relationship between neighbourhoods where religious noise exposure was the highest and where noise annoyance was the highest. The magnitude of the noise values for night-time exposure is remarkable particularly given that excessive night-time noise exposure has the greatest detrimental effect on public health. There is the need to focus on vulnerable groups, sensitive hours of the night, and possible confounding with air pollution in order to wholly address this potential hazard. PMID:25136476

  1. Development and Seed Number in Indeterminate Soybean as Affected by Timing and Duration of Exposure to Long Photoperiods after Flowering

    PubMed Central

    Kantolic, Adriana G.; Slafer, Gustavo A.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Long photoperiods from flowering to maturity have been found to delay reproductive development in soybean (Glycine max) and to increase the number of seeds per unit land area. This study was aimed to evaluate whether sensitivity to photoperiod after flowering (a) is quantitatively related to the length of exposure to long days and (b) persists throughout the whole pod-setting period. It was also evaluated whether seed number was related to changes in the duration of post-flowering phenophases. Methods Two field experiments were conducted with an indeterminate cultivar of soybean of maturity group V. In expt 1, photoperiods 2 h longer than natural daylength were applied during different numbers of days from the beginning pod stage (R3) onwards, while in expt 2 these photoperiod extensions were imposed during 9 consecutive days starting at different times between R3 and R6 (full seed) stages. Key Results There was a quantitative response of development to the number of cycles with a long photoperiod. The exposure to long photoperiods from R3 to R5 (beginning of seed growth) increased the duration of R3–R6 regardless of the timing of exposure. The stages of development comprised in the R3–R6 phase were delayed by current as well as by previous exposure to long days. A positive relationship was found between seed number and the duration of R3–R6, irrespective of the timing and length of exposure to the long photoperiod. Conclusions Sensitivity to photoperiod remained high during the reproductive period and was highly and positively coupled with the processes of generation of yield. PMID:17452381

  2. German health-related environmental monitoring: assessing time trends of the general population's exposure to heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Becker, K; Schroeter-Kermani, C; Seiwert, M; Rüther, M; Conrad, A; Schulz, C; Wilhelm, M; Wittsiepe, J; Günsel, A; Dobler, L; Kolossa-Gehring, M

    2013-06-01

    The German system of a health-related environmental monitoring is based upon two instruments: The German Environmental Survey (GerES) and the Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB). The ESB is a tool to describe time trends of human exposure. Each year approx. 500 students from 4 sampling locations are analysed for their heavy metal contents in blood, blood plasma, and urine. GerES is a nationwide representative cross-sectional study that has been conducted four times up to now. Both instruments have been used to measure heavy metals over the last decades and thus provide complementary information. Both instruments are useful to describe time trends. However, combining the two has an added value, which is demonstrated for heavy metals for the first time in this paper. Major results and the changing importance of sources of exposure to heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Hg, Au, Pt, U and Ni) are shown. This leads to the following conclusion about the today's relevance of exposure in Germany. For the study participants of the city of Muenster, lead in whole blood decreased from about 70 μg/l in 1981 to levels below 15 μg/l in 2009. GerES data of young adults confirmed this time trend and GerES IV on children revealed the decreasing relevance of lead in outdoor air and in drinking water. The concentrations of mercury in urine decreased because in Germany it is no longer recommended to use amalgam fillings for children. However, GerES IV and ESB data also demonstrate that despite the decline of these heavy metals exposures to nickel and uranium originating from drinking water are still of importance. PMID:23410801

  3. Proposal of a novel evaluation index for the effects of shear stress and exposure time on hepatocyte damage.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Toshitaka; Obara, Hiromichi; Hsu, Huai-Che; Mizunuma, Hiroshi; Matsuno, Naoto; Enosawa, Shin

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to propose a novel evaluation index for the effects of shear stress level and exposure time on hepatocyte damage. Suspensions of rat hepatocytes (0.5mL) were subjected to shear stress from 1.2 to 3.1Pa for 10min (n=3) using a rheoscope. We counted living and dead cells in photographs taken at 1-min intervals using a digital camera attached to the microscope. Living and dead cells were distinguished using a Trypan blue exclusion test. Under each level of shear stress, at each 1-min time interval, we measured the viability [living-cell number (t)/countable cell number (t)] and the ratio of living cells [RLC: living-cell number (t)/countable cell number in the initial condition]. The effects of shear stress and exposure time on viability and RLC were assessed by multiple regression analysis. As expected, we observed an increase in the number of dead cells and little change in the number of living cells when shear stress was increased. The coefficient of determination (R (2)) to predict the effectiveness of viability and RLC indicated a low to moderate correlation. Viability correlated with shear stress and exposure time (p<0.001); however, RLC only correlated with exposure time of shear stress (p<0.001). In this test condition, viability was strongly related not to living-cell damage but to dead-cell damage. Therefore, we propose RLC as a novel and effective index for investigating the effect of shear stress on living hepatocytes. PMID:25833037

  4. Large-Scale Analysis of Acute Ethanol Exposure in Zebrafish Development: A Critical Time Window and Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shaukat; Champagne, Danielle L.; Alia, Alia; Richardson, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    Background In humans, ethanol exposure during pregnancy causes a spectrum of developmental defects (fetal alcohol syndrome or FAS). Individuals vary in phenotypic expression. Zebrafish embryos develop FAS-like features after ethanol exposure. In this study, we ask whether stage-specific effects of ethanol can be identified in the zebrafish, and if so, whether they allow the pinpointing of sensitive developmental mechanisms. We have therefore conducted the first large-scale (>1500 embryos) analysis of acute, stage-specific drug effects on zebrafish development, with a large panel of readouts. Methodology/Principal Findings Zebrafish embryos were raised in 96-well plates. Range-finding indicated that 10% ethanol for 1 h was suitable for an acute exposure regime. High-resolution magic-angle spinning proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that this produced a transient pulse of 0.86% concentration of ethanol in the embryo within the chorion. Survivors at 5 days postfertilisation were analysed. Phenotypes ranged from normal (resilient) to severely malformed. Ethanol exposure at early stages caused high mortality (≥88%). At later stages of exposure, mortality declined and malformations developed. Pharyngeal arch hypoplasia and behavioral impairment were most common after prim-6 and prim-16 exposure. By contrast, microphthalmia and growth retardation were stage-independent. Conclusions Our findings show that some ethanol effects are strongly stage-dependent. The phenotypes mimic key aspects of FAS including craniofacial abnormality, microphthalmia, growth retardation and behavioral impairment. We also identify a critical time window (prim-6 and prim-16) for ethanol sensitivity. Finally, our identification of a wide phenotypic spectrum is reminiscent of human FAS, and may provide a useful model for studying disease resilience. PMID:21625530

  5. Do Time in Child Care and Peer Group Exposure Predict Poor Socioemotional Adjustment in Norway?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solheim, Elisabet; Wichstrøm, Lars; Belsky, Jay; Berg-Nielsen, Turid Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Extensive exposure to nonparental child care during the first 4.5 years of life has been demonstrated in some American studies to negatively affect children's socioemotional functioning. Data from 935 preschool children who averaged 54.9 (SD = 3.0) months of age, from Trondheim, Norway were used to examine whether such negative effects, would…

  6. The Toxic Exposure Surveillance System (TESS): Risk assessment and real-time toxicovigilance across United States poison centers

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, William A.; Litovitz, Toby L. . E-mail: toby@poison.org; Belson, Martin G.; Kilbourne, Edwin

    2005-09-01

    The Toxic Exposure Surveillance System (TESS) is a uniform data set of US poison centers cases. Categories of information include the patient, the caller, the exposure, the substance(s), clinical toxicity, treatment, and medical outcome. The TESS database was initiated in 1985, and provides a baseline of more than 36.2 million cases through 2003. The database has been utilized for a number of safety evaluations. Consideration of the strengths and limitations of TESS data must be incorporated into data interpretation. Real-time toxicovigilance was initiated in 2003 with continuous uploading of new cases from all poison centers to a central database. Real-time toxicovigilance utilizing general and specific approaches is systematically run against TESS, further increasing the potential utility of poison center experiences as a means of early identification of potential public health threats.

  7. Rapid characterization of the ultraviolet induced fiber Bragg grating complex coupling coefficient as a function of irradiance and exposure time.

    PubMed

    Flockhart, Gordon M H; Cranch, Geoffrey A; Kirkendall, Clay K

    2007-12-01

    We report the application of optical frequency domain reflectometry and a discrete-layer-peeling inverse scattering algorithm to the spatial characterization of the UV induced complex coupling coefficient during fiber Bragg grating growth. The fiber grating is rapidly characterized using this technique to give irradiance dependent growth as a function of exposure time, thereby providing the complete characterization of the coupling coefficient in the form of a "growth surface," which is related to the fiber's photosensitivity. We compare measurements of fiber Bragg grating growth in SMF-28 when exposed to continuous wave 244 nm irradiation from 0 to 90 W cm(-2) for exposure times up to 3230 s with a selection of other fibers including high germanium concentration fiber and erbium doped fiber. PMID:18059662

  8. Effect of reduced exposure times on the cytotoxicity of resin luting cements cured by high-power led

    PubMed Central

    ERGUN, Gulfem; EGILMEZ, Ferhan; YILMAZ, Sukran

    2011-01-01

    Objective Applications of resin luting agents and high-power light-emitting diodes (LED) light-curing units (LCUs) have increased considerably over the last few years. However, it is not clear whether the effect of reduced exposure time on cytotoxicity of such products have adequate biocompatibility to meet clinical success. This study aimed at assessing the effect of reduced curing time of five resin luting cements (RLCs) polymerized by high-power LED curing unit on the viability of a cell of L-929 fibroblast cells. Material and Methods Disc-shaped samples were prepared in polytetrafluoroethylene moulds with cylindrical cavities. The samples were irradiated from the top through the ceramic discs and acetate strips using LED LCU for 20 s (50% of the manufacturer's recommended exposure time) and 40 s (100% exposure time). After curing, the samples were transferred into a culture medium for 24 h. The eluates were obtained and pipetted onto L-929 fibroblast cultures (3x104 per well) and incubated for evaluating after 24 h. Measurements were performed by dimethylthiazol diphenyltetrazolium assay. Statistical significance was determined by two-way ANOVA and two independent samples were compared by t-test. Results Results showed that eluates of most of the materials polymerized for 20 s (except Rely X Unicem and Illusion) reduced to a higher extent cell viability compared to samples of the same materials polymerized for 40 s. Illusion exhibited the least cytotoxicity for 20 s exposure time compared to the control (culture without samples) followed by Rely X Unicem and Rely X ARC (90.81%, 88.90%, and 83.11%, respectively). For Rely X ARC, Duolink and Lute-It 40 s exposure time was better (t=-1.262 p=0,276; t=-9.399 p=0.001; and t=-20.418 p<0.001, respectively). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that reduction of curing time significantly enhances the cytotoxicity of the studied resin cement materials, therefore compromising their clinical performance. PMID:21625748

  9. Estimating Benzene Exposure Level over Time and by Industry Type through a Review of Literature on Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Donguk; Choi, Sangjun; Ha, Kwonchul; Jung, Hyejung; Yoon, Chungsik; Koh, Dong-Hee; Ryu, Seunghun; Kim, Soogeun; Kang, Dongmug; Yoo, Kyemook

    2015-01-01

    The major purpose of this study is to construct a retrospective exposure assessment for benzene through a review of literature on Korea. Airborne benzene measurements reported in 34 articles were reviewed. A total of 15,729 individual measurements were compiled. Weighted arithmetic means [AM(w)] and their variance calculated across studies were summarized according to 5-year period intervals (prior to the 1970s through the 2010s) and industry type. Industries were classified according to Korea Standard Industrial Classification (KSIC) using information provided in the literature. We estimated quantitative retrospective exposure to benzene for each cell in the matrix through a combination of time and KSIC. Analysis of the AM(w) indicated reductions in exposure levels over time, regardless of industry, with mean levels prior to the 1980–1984 period of 50.4 ppm (n = 2,289), which dropped to 2.8 ppm (n = 305) in the 1990–1994 period, and to 0.1 ppm (n = 294) in the 1995–1999 period. There has been no improvement since the 2000s, when the AM(w) of 4.3 ppm (n = 6,211) for the 2005–2009 period and 4.5 ppm (n = 3,358) for the 2010–2013 period were estimated. A comparison by industry found no consistent patterns in the measurement results. Our estimated benzene measurements can be used to determine not only the possibility of retrospective exposure to benzene, but also to estimate the level of quantitative or semiquantitative retrospective exposure to benzene. PMID:26929825

  10. Time course of systemic oxidative stress and inflammatory response induced by an acute exposure to Residual Oil Fly Ash.

    PubMed

    Marchini, T; Magnani, N D; Paz, M L; Vanasco, V; Tasat, D; González Maglio, D H; Alvarez, S; Evelson, P A

    2014-01-15

    It is suggested that systemic oxidative stress and inflammation play a central role in the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases associated with the exposure to particulate matter (PM). The aim of this work was to evaluate the time changes of systemic markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, after an acute exposure to Residual Oil Fly Ash (ROFA). Female Swiss mice were intranasally instilled with a ROFA suspension (1.0mg/kg body weight) or saline solution, and plasma levels of oxidative damage markers [thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARSs) and protein carbonyls], antioxidant status [reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, ascorbic acid levels, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity], cytokines levels, and intravascular leukocyte activation were evaluated after 1, 3 or 5h of exposure. Oxidative damage to lipids and decreased GSH/GSSG ratio were observed in ROFA-exposed mice as early as 1h. Afterwards, increased protein oxidation, decreased ascorbic acid content and SOD activity were found in this group at 3h. The onset of an adaptive response was observed at 5h after the ROFA exposure, as indicated by decreased TBARS plasma content and increased SOD activity. The observed increase in oxidative damage to plasma macromolecules, together with systemic antioxidants depletion, may be a consequence of a systemic inflammatory response triggered by the ROFA exposure, since increased TNF-α and IL-6 plasma levels and polymorphonuclear leukocytes activation was found at every evaluated time point. These findings contribute to the understanding of the increase in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, in association with environmental PM inhalation. PMID:24321338

  11. Cadmium accumulation and toxicity in the unicellular alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata: Influence of metal-binding exudates and exposure time.

    PubMed

    Paquet, Nathalie; Lavoie, Michel; Maloney, Frédéric; Duval, Jérôme F L; Campbell, Peter G C; Fortin, Claude

    2015-07-01

    Predicting metal availability and toxicity for chronic (several hours or days) metal exposure scenarios, even for unicellular algae, is a major challenge to existing toxicity models. This is because several factors affecting metal uptake and toxicity, such as the release of metal-binding exudates, changes in the kinetics of metal uptake and toxicity over time, and algal physiological acclimation to internalized metals, are still poorly understood. The present study assessed the influence of these factors on Cd uptake and toxicity in laboratory batch cultures of the freshwater alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. To do so, changes in the free Cd(2+) concentrations caused by the release of metal-binding algal exudates were monitored, (109)Cd accumulation in algal cells was measured, and Cd-induced inhibition of algal growth as a function of exposure time (from 12 h to 96 h) was followed. Results indicate that metal-binding exudates may decrease the proportion of the free Cd(2+) ion in solution up to 2-fold, a decrease that affects Cd uptake and toxicity. Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata has the capacity to decrease net Cd uptake rate on short time scales (<24 h), but this reduction in the Cd uptake rate disappeared after 24 h, and Cd toxicity occurred at relatively high Cd concentrations in solution. These data illustrate some of the pitfalls of standard algal toxicity assays, which were designed for acute exposures, and suggest how robust chronic bioassays might be developed. PMID:25662885

  12. Leisure time activities related to carcinogen exposure and lung cancer risk in never smokers. A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; García-Lavandeira, José Antonio; Torres-Durán, María; Prini-Guadalupe, Luciana; Parente-Lamelas, Isaura; Leiro-Fernández, Virginia; Montero-Martínez, Carmen; González-Barcala, Francisco Javier; Golpe-Gómez, Antonio; Martínez, Cristina; Castro-Añón, Olalla; Mejuto-Martí, María José; Barros-Dios, Juan Miguel

    2014-07-01

    We aim to assess the relationship between leisure time activities related to exposure to carcinogenic substances and lung cancer risk in a hospital-based case-control study performed in never smokers. We included never smoking cases with anatomopathologically confirmed lung cancer and never smoking controls undergoing trivial surgery, at 8 Spanish hospitals. The study was conducted between January 2011 and June 2013. Participants were older than 30 and had no previous neoplasms. All were personally interviewed focusing on lifestyle, environmental tobacco smoke exposure, occupational history and leisure time activities (including duration of such activities). Results were analyzed through logistic regression and adjusted also by residential radon and education level. We included 513 never smokers, 191 cases and 322 controls. The OR for those performing the studied leisure time activities was 1.43 (95%CI 0.78-2.61). When we restricted the analysis to those performing do-it-yourself activities for more than 10 years the OR was 2.21 (95%CI 0.93-5.27). Environmental tobacco smoke exposure did not modify this association. The effect for the different lung cancer histological types was very close to significance for adenocarcinoma but only when these activities were performed for more than 10 years. We encourage health professionals to recommend protective measures for those individuals while performing these hobbies to reduce the risk of lung cancer. PMID:24742725

  13. Interdependence of initial cell density, drug concentration and exposure time revealed by real-time impedance spectroscopic cytotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Caviglia, C; Zr, K; Canepa, S; Carminati, M; Larsen, L B; Raiteri, R; Andresen, T L; Heiskanen, A; Emnus, J

    2015-05-21

    We investigated the combined effect of the initial cell density (12,500, 35,000, 75,000, and 100,000 cells cm(-2)) and concentration of the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin on HeLa cells by performing time-dependent cytotoxicity assays using real-time electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A correlation between the rate of cell death and the initial cell seeding density was found at 2.5 ?M doxorubicin concentration, whereas this was not observed at 5 or 100 ?M. By sensing the changes in the cell-substrate interaction using impedance spectroscopy under static conditions, the onset of cytotoxicity was observed 5 h earlier than when using a standard colorimetric end-point assay (MTS) which measures changes in the mitochondrial metabolism. Furthermore, with the MTS assay no cytotoxicity was observed after 15 h of incubation with 2.5 ?M doxorubicin, whereas the impedance showed at this time point cell viability that was below 25%. These results indicate that impedance detection reveals cytotoxic events undetectable when using the MTS assay, highlighting the importance of combining impedance detection with traditional drug toxicity assays towards a more in depth understanding of the effect of anti-cancer drugs on in vitro assays. Moreover, the detection of doxorubicin induced toxicity determined with impedance under static conditions proved to be 6 times faster than in perfusion culture. PMID:25868456

  14. Microstructural changes during long time service exposure of udimet 500 and nimonic 115

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koul, A. K.; Wallace, W.

    1983-02-01

    The effects of long term service exposure on the microstructure of Udimet 500 and Nimonic 115 turbine engine components has been studied. Sigma (σ) phase was detected in both alloys, and its formation could be predicted using critical electron vacancy concentrations computed by the revised method of Barrows and Newkirk and the experimental γ phase composition, γ' coarsening was quite pronounced in Nimonic 115 turbine blades and varied as a strong function of the temperature distribution along the blade airfoil, σ phase precipitation had no effect on γ' coarsening rates.

  15. Risk factors for asthma and timing of exposure among first generation Arab immigrants: a pilot effort to elucidate the role of exposure to risk factors over multiple life stages

    EPA Science Inventory

    Considerable controversy exists over the role of aero-allergens in asthma etiology. Some studies show increased risk with microbe and allergen exposure, while others show decreased risk. These discrepancies may be explained by timing of exposure. Previous research suggests that e...

  16. Experimental investigation of the effect of stiffness, exposure time and scan direction on the dimension of ultrasound histotripsy lesions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Bigelow, Timothy A

    2011-11-01

    Histotripsy uses high-intensity focused ultrasound to create energetic bubble clouds inside tissue to liquefy a region and has the advantages of higher contrast B-mode monitoring and sharp borders. This study experimentally investigated the effects of stiffness, exposure time and scan direction on the size of histotripsy-induced lesions in agar samples. A targeted region 0.45 cm wide (lateral) and 0.6 cm deep (axial) was scanned with the step sizes of 0.075 cm and 0.3 cm, respectively. The single-element spherically focused source (1.1 MHz, 6.34 cm focal length, f/1) had the peak compressional and rarefactional pressures of approximately 102 and 17 MPa. Pulses consisted of 20-cycle sine wave tone bursts with a burst period of 3 ms and exposure time of 15, 30 or 60 s. Also, both inward and outward scan direction were tested along the beam axis. The liquefied lesions generally had a larger size than the initially targeted region with larger sizes corresponding to softer agar and longer exposure. There was not a statistically significant difference in the lesion size with scan direction. PMID:21963031

  17. Post-Exposure Sleep Deprivation Facilitates Correctly Timed Interactions Between Glucocorticoid and Adrenergic Systems, which Attenuate Traumatic Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Shlomi; Kozlovsky, Nitsan; Matar, Michael A; Kaplan, Zeev; Zohar, Joseph; Cohen, Hagit

    2012-01-01

    Reliable evidence supports the role of sleep in learning and memory processes. In rodents, sleep deprivation (SD) negatively affects consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memories. As memory is integral to post-traumatic stress symptoms, the effects of post-exposure SD on various aspect of the response to stress in a controlled, prospective animal model of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were evaluated. Rats were deprived of sleep for 6?h throughout the first resting phase after predator scent stress exposure. Behaviors in the elevated plus-maze and acoustic startle response tests were assessed 7 days later, and served for classification into behavioral response groups. Freezing response to a trauma reminder was assessed on day 8. Urine samples were collected daily for corticosterone levels, and heart rate (HR) was also measured. Finally, the impact of manipulating the hypothalamuspituitaryadrenal axis and adrenergic activity before SD was assessed. Mifepristone (MIFE) and epinephrine (EPI) were administered systemically 10-min post-stress exposure and behavioral responses and response to trauma reminder were measured on days 78. Hippocampal expression of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) and morphological assessment of arborization and dendritic spines were subsequently evaluated. Post-exposure SD effectively ameliorated long-term, stress-induced, PTSD-like behavioral disruptions, reduced trauma reminder freezing responses, and decreased hippocampal expression of GR compared with exposed-untreated controls. Although urine corticosterone levels were significantly elevated 1?h after SD and the HR was attenuated, antagonizing GRs with MIFE or stimulation of adrenergic activity with EPI effectively abolished the effect of SD. MIFE- and EPI-treated animals clearly demonstrated significantly lower total dendritic length, fewer branches and lower spine density along dentate gyrus dendrites with increased levels of GR expression 8 days after exposure, as compared with exposed-SD animals. Intentional prevention of sleep in the early aftermath of stress exposure may well be beneficial in attenuating traumatic stress-related sequelae. Post-exposure SD may disrupt the consolidation of aversive or fearful memories by facilitating correctly timed interactions between glucocorticoid and adrenergic systems. PMID:22713910

  18. Damage to stomata and inhibition of photosynthesis by toxic pollutants in Pinus sylvestris needles as affected by the exposure time

    SciTech Connect

    Kaipiainen, L.K.; Sofronova, G.I.; Hari, P.

    1995-11-01

    The impact of persistent exposure of Pinus sylvestris L. trees of various ages to industrial emissions on stomata and photosynthesis of needles was studied in relation to the exposure time. The electron microscopic examination of the needles revealed an erosion of the epicuticular wax and damage to stomata, which increased with needle age until stomata were completely occluded by polymetallic dust. Pollutant particles wee found to contain S, Cl, Ca, K, Mg, Mn, Al, Ni, Fe, Cu, Co, Ti, and Zn. Photosynthetic rates were inhibited by 20-60%, depending on the needle age and tree condition. It is concluded that a nonuniformity in the toxicant distribution over the forest canopy and the age-dependent changes in the state of the cuticular wax layer are the most likely causes of variability in the extent to which individual trees were damaged by the toxicants.

  19. Effect of exposure time on corrosion resistance of prepassivated UNS S31603 SS in the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Acuiia, N.; Herniindet-Duque, G.

    1998-12-31

    The effect of exposure time, in the Gulf of Mexico, on the UNS S3 1603 stainless steel (SS) pitting corrosion resistance (PCR), was studied for 30 days using both open circuit potential (OCP) and potentiodynamic polarization (PP) techniques. Biofilm formation and corrosion attack were subsequently observed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was found that microorganisms colonizing the steel specimen`s surface during the first three days of testing, modified the OCP towards electropositive values, increasing the risk of pitting corrosion. It was also observed, that the SS specimens were most sensitive to pitting corrosion within the first fifteen days of exposure in seawater, decreasing this sensitivity during the last week, probably due to a decay in the biological activity and better behavior of the passive film.

  20. Posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and food addiction in women, by timing and type of trauma exposure

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Susan M; Flint, Alan J; Roberts, Andrea L; Agnew-Blais, Jessica; Koenen, Karestan C; Rich-Edwards, Janet W

    2015-01-01

    Importance Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) appears to increase obesity risk, but the pathways by which PTSD leads to weight gain are not known. Identification of the links between PTSD and obesogenic eating behaviors is necessary to clarify this pathway and inform development of obesity prevention strategies in PTSD-affected populations. Study objective To determine whether women with PTSD symptoms are more likely to report food addiction, a measure of perceived dependence on food, than women without PTSD symptoms. To determine whether age at PTSD symptom onset and type of trauma influence the PTSD food addiction association. Design, setting, and participants Cross-sectional analysis of 49,408 participants in the Nurses’ Health Study II (NHSII), a cohort comprised of female nurses who were aged 25–42 at 1989 recruitment from 14 US states. Exposure and outcome measures The NHSII ascertained lifetime trauma exposure and PTSD symptoms in 2008 and current food addiction in 2009. Food addiction was defined as ≥3 clinically significant symptoms on a modified version of the Yale Food Addiction Scale. Confounder-adjusted prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using modified Poisson regression. Results Roughly 80% of the study sample reported some type of trauma exposure, with 66% of the trauma-exposed reporting at least 1 lifetime PTSD symptom. Eight percent of the cohort met the criteria for food addiction. The prevalence of food addiction increased with number of lifetime PTSD symptoms, and women with the greatest number of PTSD symptoms (6–7 symptoms) had more than twice the prevalence of food addiction as women with neither PTSD symptoms nor trauma histories (PR=2.68; 95% CI: 2.41, 2.97). PTSD symptoms were more strongly related to food addiction when symptom onset occurred at an earlier age. The PTSD food addiction association did not differ substantially by trauma type. Conclusions and relevance PTSD symptoms were associated with increased food addiction prevalence in this cohort of women. Strategies to reduce obesity associated with PTSD may require psychological and behavioral interventions that address dependence on food and/or use of food to cope with distress. PMID:25230359

  1. Improvement of attention span and reaction time with hyperbaric oxygen treatment in patients with toxic injury due to mold exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ezra, N.; Dang, K.

    2010-01-01

    It is, by now, well established that mold toxins (mycotoxins) can cause significant adverse health effects. In this study, 15 subjects who developed an attention deficit disorder (ADD) and slowing of reaction time at the time of exposure to mold toxins were identified. Deficits in attention span and reaction time were documented not only by taking a careful history, but also by performing a Test of Variables of Attention (TOVA). The TOVA test provides an objective measure of these two variables. It was found that mold-exposed subjects show statistically significant decreases in attention span and significant increases in reaction time to stimuli compared to controls. After ten sessions of hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT), a statistically significant improvement was seen in both measures. This preliminary study suggests promising outcomes in treating mold-exposed patients with hyperbaric oxygen. PMID:20978814

  2. Effects of incubation humidity and hatching time on heat tolerance of neonatal chicks: growth performance after heat exposure.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, A M; Henken, A M; Van der Hel, W; Galal, A G; Abd-Elmoty, A K

    1991-07-01

    Three experiments were performed with 300 neonatal Hisex Brown layer chicks in each. The chicks hatched from eggs incubated at a relative humidity (RH) of 55 or 45%. Within each RH group, two groups were separated based on hatching time (early and late hatch groups). After hatch, 60 chicks served as controls. The other chicks were exposed to 35, 37, or 39 C for 48 h. After exposure, a 4-wk experimental growing period started at Day 2 of age. Chicks exposed to the experimental temperature regimens for 2 days had lower body weights at the end of exposure and grew less than controls during the 1st wk afterwards. At Day 2 of age, chicks hatched from eggs incubated at 45% RH had higher body weights than chicks hatched from eggs incubated at 55% RH. These chicks also had higher body weight gain in the 1st and 2nd wk following exposure to 39 C than chicks hatched from eggs incubated at 55% RH. Chicks hatching late were heavier at Day 2 than early-hatching ones, but body weight gain was similar. Chicks exposed to the experimental temperature regimens had lower rectal temperatures than controls at the end of the 1st and 2nd wk. Incubation RH, hatching time, and sex did not affect feed intake, feed conversion, or rectal temperature. After exposure to 39 C, fewer chicks that had hatched from eggs incubated at low RH died compared with chicks that had hatched from the 55% RH group. Early-hatching chicks had a significantly higher risk of dying than late-hatching ones. PMID:1886861

  3. Real time outdoor exposure testing of solar cell modules and component materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anagnostou, E.; Forestieri, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    Plastic samples, solar cell modules, and sub-modules were exposed at test sites in Florida, Arizona, Puerto Rico, and Cleveland, Ohio, in order to determine materials suitable for use in solar cell modules with a proposed 20-year lifetime. Various environments were encountered including subtropical, subtropical with a sea air atmosphere, desert, rain forest, normal urban, and urban-polluted. The samples were exposed for periods up to six months. Materials found not suitable were polyurethane, polyester, Kapton, Mylar, and UV-stabilized Lexan. Suitable materials were acrylic, FEP-A, and glass. The results of exposure of polyvinylidene fluoride were dependent on the specific formulation, but several types appear suitable. RTV silicone rubber (clear) appears to pick up and hold dirt both as a free film and as a potting medium for modules. The results indicate that dirt accumulation and cleanability are important factors in the selection of solar cell module covers and encapsulants.

  4. Differential gene expression profiling of mouse skin after sulfur mustard exposure: Extended time response and inhibitor effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gerecke, Donald R. Chen Minjun; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Gordon, Marion K.; Chang, Y.-C.; Tong Weida; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2009-01-15

    Sulfur mustard (HD, SM), is a chemical warfare agent that within hours causes extensive blistering at the dermal-epidermal junction of skin. To better understand the progression of SM-induced blistering, gene expression profiling for mouse skin was performed after a single high dose of SM exposure. Punch biopsies of mouse ears were collected at both early and late time periods following SM exposure (previous studies only considered early time periods). The biopsies were examined for pathological disturbances and the samples further assayed for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix microarray analysis system. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the differently expressed genes, performed with ArrayTrack showed clear separation of the various groups. Pathway analysis employing the KEGG library and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) indicated that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and hematopoietic cell lineage are common pathways affected at different time points. Gene ontology analysis identified the most significantly altered biological processes as the immune response, inflammatory response, and chemotaxis; these findings are consistent with other reported results for shorter time periods. Selected genes were chosen for RT-PCR verification and showed correlations in the general trends for the microarrays. Interleukin 1 beta was checked for biological analysis to confirm the presence of protein correlated to the corresponding microarray data. The impact of a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor I, against SM exposure was assessed. These results can help in understanding the molecular mechanism of SM-induced blistering, as well as to test the efficacy of different inhibitors.

  5. Differential gene expression profiling of mouse skin after sulfur mustard exposure: Extended time response and inhibitor effect

    PubMed Central

    Gerecke, Donald R.; Chen, Minjun; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Gordon, Marion K.; Chang, Yoke-Chen; Tong, Weida; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2011-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (HD, SM), is a chemical warfare agent that within hours causes extensive blistering at the dermal–epidermal junction of skin. To better understand the progression of SM-induced blistering, gene expression profiling for mouse skin was performed after a single high dose of SM exposure. Punch biopsies of mouse ears were collected at both early and late time periods following SM exposure (previous studies only considered early time periods). The biopsies were examined for pathological disturbances and the samples further assayed for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix microarray analysis system. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the differently expressed genes, performed with ArrayTrack showed clear separation of the various groups. Pathway analysis employing the KEGG library and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) indicated that cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and hematopoietic cell lineage are common pathways affected at different time points. Gene ontology analysis identified the most significantly altered biological processes as the immune response, inflammatory response, and chemotaxis; these findings are consistent with other reported results for shorter time periods. Selected genes were chosen for RT-PCR verification and showed correlations in the general trends for the microarrays. Interleukin 1 beta was checked for biological analysis to confirm the presence of protein correlated to the corresponding microarray data. The impact of a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor I, against SM exposure was assessed. These results can help in understanding the molecular mechanism of SM-induced blistering, as well as to test the efficacy of different inhibitors. PMID:18955075

  6. Differential gene expression profiling of mouse skin after sulfur mustard exposure: Extended time response and inhibitor effect.

    PubMed

    Gerecke, Donald R; Chen, Minjun; Isukapalli, Sastry S; Gordon, Marion K; Chang, Yoke-Chen; Tong, Weida; Androulakis, Ioannis P; Georgopoulos, Panos G

    2009-01-15

    Sulfur mustard (HD, SM), is a chemical warfare agent that within hours causes extensive blistering at the dermal-epidermal junction of skin. To better understand the progression of SM-induced blistering, gene expression profiling for mouse skin was performed after a single high dose of SM exposure. Punch biopsies of mouse ears were collected at both early and late time periods following SM exposure (previous studies only considered early time periods). The biopsies were examined for pathological disturbances and the samples further assayed for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix microarray analysis system. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the differently expressed genes, performed with ArrayTrack showed clear separation of the various groups. Pathway analysis employing the KEGG library and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) indicated that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and hematopoietic cell lineage are common pathways affected at different time points. Gene ontology analysis identified the most significantly altered biological processes as the immune response, inflammatory response, and chemotaxis; these findings are consistent with other reported results for shorter time periods. Selected genes were chosen for RT-PCR verification and showed correlations in the general trends for the microarrays. Interleukin 1 beta was checked for biological analysis to confirm the presence of protein correlated to the corresponding microarray data. The impact of a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor I, against SM exposure was assessed. These results can help in understanding the molecular mechanism of SM-induced blistering, as well as to test the efficacy of different inhibitors. PMID:18955075

  7. Near-Real-Time Analysis of the Phenotypic Responses of Escherichia coli to 1-Butanol Exposure Using Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zu, Theresah N. K.; Athamneh, Ahmad I. M.; Wallace, Robert S.; Collakova, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to study the time course of phenotypic responses of Escherichia coli (DH5α) to 1-butanol exposure (1.2% [vol/vol]). Raman spectroscopy is of interest for bacterial phenotyping because it can be performed (i) in near real time, (ii) with minimal sample preparation (label-free), and (iii) with minimal spectral interference from water. Traditional off-line analytical methodologies were applied to both 1-butanol-treated and control cells to draw correlations with Raman data. Here, distinct sets of Raman bands are presented that characterize phenotypic traits of E. coli with maximized correlation to off-line measurements. In addition, the observed time course phenotypic responses of E. coli to 1.2% (vol/vol) 1-butanol exposure included the following: (i) decreased saturated fatty acids levels, (ii) retention of unsaturated fatty acids and low levels of cyclopropane fatty acids, (iii) increased membrane fluidity following the initial response of increased rigidity, and (iv) no changes in total protein content or protein-derived amino acid composition. For most phenotypic traits, correlation coefficients between Raman spectroscopy and traditional off-line analytical approaches exceeded 0.75, and major trends were captured. The results suggest that near-real-time Raman spectroscopy is suitable for approximating metabolic and physiological phenotyping of bacterial cells subjected to toxic environmental conditions. PMID:25157078

  8. Near-real-time analysis of the phenotypic responses of Escherichia coli to 1-butanol exposure using Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zu, Theresah N K; Athamneh, Ahmad I M; Wallace, Robert S; Collakova, Eva; Senger, Ryan S

    2014-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to study the time course of phenotypic responses of Escherichia coli (DH5α) to 1-butanol exposure (1.2% [vol/vol]). Raman spectroscopy is of interest for bacterial phenotyping because it can be performed (i) in near real time, (ii) with minimal sample preparation (label-free), and (iii) with minimal spectral interference from water. Traditional off-line analytical methodologies were applied to both 1-butanol-treated and control cells to draw correlations with Raman data. Here, distinct sets of Raman bands are presented that characterize phenotypic traits of E. coli with maximized correlation to off-line measurements. In addition, the observed time course phenotypic responses of E. coli to 1.2% (vol/vol) 1-butanol exposure included the following: (i) decreased saturated fatty acids levels, (ii) retention of unsaturated fatty acids and low levels of cyclopropane fatty acids, (iii) increased membrane fluidity following the initial response of increased rigidity, and (iv) no changes in total protein content or protein-derived amino acid composition. For most phenotypic traits, correlation coefficients between Raman spectroscopy and traditional off-line analytical approaches exceeded 0.75, and major trends were captured. The results suggest that near-real-time Raman spectroscopy is suitable for approximating metabolic and physiological phenotyping of bacterial cells subjected to toxic environmental conditions. PMID:25157078

  9. Germination response of MR 219 rice variety to different exposure times and periods of 2450 MHz microwave frequency.

    PubMed

    Talei, Daryush; Valdiani, Alireza; Maziah, Mahmood; Mohsenkhah, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Germination is a key process in plants' phenological cycles. Accelerating this process could lead to improvment of the seedling growth as well as the cultivation efficiency. To achieve this, the effect of microwave frequency on the germination of rice seeds was examined. The physiological feedbacks of the MR 219 rice variety in terms of seed germination rate (GR), germination percentage (GP), and mean germination time (MGT) were analyzed by exposing its seeds to 2450 MHz of microwave frequency for one, four, seven, and ten hours. It was revealed that exposing the seeds to the microwave frequency for 10 hours resulted in the highest GP. This treatment led to 100% of germination after three days with a mean germination time of 2.1 days. Although the other exposure times of microwave frequency caused the moderate effects on germination with a GP(a3) ranged from 93% to 98%, they failed to reduce the MGT(a3). The results showed that ten-hour exposure times of microwave frequency for six days significantly facilitated and improved the germination indices (primary shoot and root length). Therefore, the technique is expected to benefit the improvement of rice seed germination considering its simplicity and efficacy in increasing the germination percentage and rate as well as the primary shoot and root length without causing any environmental toxicity. PMID:24307869

  10. Does Occupational Exposure of Shahid Dastghieb International Airport Workers to Radiofrequency Radiation Affect Their Short Term Memory and Reaction Time?

    PubMed Central

    Jarideh, S.; Taeb, S.; Pishva, S. M.; Haghani, M.; Sina, S.; Mortazavi, S. A. R.; Hosseini, M. A.; Nematollahi, S.; Shokrpour, N.; Hassan Shahi, M.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Airport workers are continuously exposed to different levels of radiofrequency microwave (RF/MW) radiation emitted by radar equipments. Radars are extensively used in military and aviation industries. Over the past several years, our lab has focused on the health effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as cellular phones, mobile base stations, mobile phone jammers, laptop computers, radars, dentistry cavitrons and MRI. The main goal of this study was to investigate if occupational exposure of Shahid Dastghieb international airport workers to radiofrequency radiation affects their short term memory and reaction time. Methods Thirty two airport workers involved in duties at control and approach tower (21 males and 11 females), with the age range of 27-67 years old (mean age of 37.38), participated voluntary in this study. On the other hand, 29 workers (13 males, and 16 females) whose offices were in the city with no exposure history to radar systems were also participated in this study as the control group. The employees’ reaction time and short term memory were analyzed using a standard visual reaction time (VRT) test software and the modified Wechsler memory scale test, respectively. Results The mean± SD values for the reaction times of the airport employees (N=32) and the control group (N=29) were 0.45±0.12 sec and 0.46±0.17 sec, respectively.  Moreover, in the four subset tests; i.e. paired words, forward digit span, backward digit span and word recognition, the following points were obtained for the airport employees and the control group, respectively: (i) pair words test: 28.00±13.13 and 32.07±11.65, (ii) forward digit span: 8.38±1.40 and 9.03±1.32, (iii) backward digit span: 5.54±1.87 and 6.31±1.46, and (iv) word recognition: 5.73±2.36 and 6.50±1.93. These differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion The occupational exposure of the employees to the RF radiation in Shahid Dastghieb international airport does not have any significant detrimental effect on their reaction time as well as short term memory. PMID:26396970

  11. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN AMBIENT CONCENTRATION AND PERSONAL EXPOSURE (AMBIENT, NONAMBIENT, AND TOTAL) AND THEIR USE AS EXPOSURE SURROGATES IN PM COMMUNITY TIME SERIES EPIDEMIOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a result of a literature review use in preparation of the Exposure chapter for the 1996 Air Quality Criteria for Particulate Matter, NCEA staff begin a project to analyze the relationships between personal exposures (to ambient, nonambient and total) PM and ambient concentrati...

  12. A STUDY ON VISUAL LIMITATION OF AGE, NUMERICAL SIZE, AND EXPOSURE TIME WHILE USERS OPERATE MOBILE DEVICES.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Po-Chan

    2015-12-01

    Technological advances have driven the development of information technology (IT) products and communication using mobile devices has become a part of daily life. When using mobile devices, reading time and font size are important communication elements that significantly affect reading performance. However, studies of reading performance in older samples have mainly used printed material or computer monitors; this study examined the performance of users when reading text messages on the interfaces of mobile devices and described their visual limitations. Sixty-two participants took part in the experiment, which involved displaying different font sizes and exposure times. The younger group read 10-point font accurately, while the older group had much worse accuracy, even at 14 points. The younger group correctly read text messages displayed for 0.4 sec. above 80% of the time, while the older group's accuracy was severely impaired even when text was displayed for 1 sec. PMID:26654989

  13. Response of Vibrio fischeri to repeated exposures over time in an Online Toxicity Monitor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Online Toxicity Monitors have been developed to provide continuous, time-relevant information regarding water quality. These systems measure a physiological or behavioral response of a sentinel organism to changes water quality. One such system, the Microlan Toxcontrol, is base...

  14. Chaotic time series prediction for prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls in umbilical cord blood using the least squares SEATR model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xijin; Tang, Qian; Xia, Haiyue; Zhang, Yuling; Li, Weiqiu; Huo, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Chaotic time series prediction based on nonlinear systems showed a superior performance in prediction field. We studied prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by chaotic time series prediction using the least squares self-exciting threshold autoregressive (SEATR) model in umbilical cord blood in an electronic waste (e-waste) contaminated area. The specific prediction steps basing on the proposal methods for prenatal PCB exposure were put forward, and the proposed scheme’s validity was further verified by numerical simulation experiments. Experiment results show: 1) seven kinds of PCB congeners negatively correlate with five different indices for birth status: newborn weight, height, gestational age, Apgar score and anogenital distance; 2) prenatal PCB exposed group at greater risks compared to the reference group; 3) PCBs increasingly accumulated with time in newborns; and 4) the possibility of newborns suffering from related diseases in the future was greater. The desirable numerical simulation experiments results demonstrated the feasibility of applying mathematical model in the environmental toxicology field. PMID:27118260

  15. Comparison of time to PRRSv-stability and production losses between two exposure programs to control PRRSv in sow herds.

    PubMed

    Linhares, D C L; Cano, J P; Torremorell, M; Morrison, R B

    2014-09-01

    To control and eliminate porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSv) from breeding herds, some veterinarians adopt a strategy called load-close-expose which consists of interrupting replacement pig introduction for several months and exposing the pigs to a replicating PRRSv. This was a prospective quasi-experiment that followed 61 breeding herds acutely infected with PRRSv that adopted one of two exposure programs: modified-live virus (MLV) vaccine or live-resident virus inoculation (LVI). Treatment groups (load-close-expose with MLV or LVI) were compared for: (a) time-to-PRRSv stability (TTS), defined as time in weeks it took to produce PRRSv negative pigs at weaning; (b) the time-to-baseline production (TTBP), defined using statistical process control methods to represent time to recover to the number of pigs weaned per week that herds had prior to PRRSv-detection; and (c) the total production loss in terms of number of pigs weaned per week. TTS and TTBP were compared between treatments using survival analysis. Day 1 of the program was considered to be the day that treatment was administered. Sampling at herds consisted of bleeding 30 due-to-wean piglets on a monthly basis. Serum was tested for PRRSv RNA by RT-PCR. Herds in which PRRSv was not detected over a 90-day period were classified as reaching stability. Multivariate analysis using proportional hazards regression was performed adjusting the effect of treatment on TTBP and TTS to 'severity of PRRSv infection', 'number of whole-herd exposures', 'days from PRRSv-detection to intervention', 'prior PRRSv-infection status' and 'veterinary clinic associated with the herd'. Total loss was compared between groups using multivariate regression analysis adjusted by selected covariates. The median TTS among participating herds was 26.6 weeks (25th to 75th percentile, 21.6-33.0 weeks). The overall TTBP was 16.5 weeks (range 0-29 weeks). The magnitude of production losses following whole-herd exposure averaged 2217 pigs not weaned/1000 sows and was correlated with TTBP. Herds in the MLV group recovered production sooner and had less total loss than herds in the LVI group. TTBP and TTS were significantly shorter and the total loss was significantly less in herds assisted by a specific veterinary clinic and herds that were infected with PRRSv in the 3 years prior to the study. This study provided new metrics to assist veterinarians to decide between methods of exposure to control and eliminate PRRSv from breeding herds. PMID:24931129

  16. IMPLICATIONS OF USING AMBIENT PM CONCENTRATION AS A SURROGATE FOR PM EXPOSURE IN STATISTICAL AND EPIDEMIOLOGIC ANALYSES OF TIME SERIES DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The question What information may be obtained from a time-series regression of health effects on ambient PM concentration?, is of interest to exposure analysts and epidemiologists, especially since exposure analysts find low and frequently non-significant correlations betw...

  17. The Impact of Timing of Exposure to Violence on Violent Behavior in a High Poverty Sample of Inner City African American Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spano, Richard; Rivera, Craig; Bolland, John

    2006-01-01

    A growing body of research has linked exposure to violence to violent behavior, but few studies have examined the impact of the timing of exposure to violence on violent behavior among inner city, minority youth. Theoretical insights derived from developmental psychology and psychopathology (DPP) and Agnew's general strain theory (GST) give…

  18. Effect of nano-zinc oxide on nitrogenase activity in legumes: an interplay of concentration and exposure time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Praveen; Burman, Uday; Santra, P.

    2015-07-01

    Experiments were carried out to study the effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles (nano-ZnO) on nitrogenase activity in legumes. In the first experiment, nodulated roots of cluster bean, moth bean, green gram and cowpea were dipped in Hoagland solution containing 1.5 and 10 μg mL-1 of nano-ZnO for 24 h. Nitrogenase activity in cluster bean, green gram and cowpea roots increased after dipping in solution containing 1.5 μg mL-1 nano-ZnO, but decreased in roots dipped in solution containing 10 μg mL-1 nano-ZnO. However, in moth bean roots, nitrogenase activity decreased after dipping in solution containing either concentration of nano-ZnO. In the second experiment, nodulated roots of green gram were dipped in Hoagland solution containing 1, 4, 6, 8 and 10 μg mL-1 nano-ZnO for 6-30 h before estimating nitrogenase activity. Results showed that an interactive effect of nano-ZnO concentration and exposure time influenced nitrogenase activity. The possible reasons behind this effect have been discussed. A model [ A = 3.44 + 0.46 t - 0.01 t 2 - 0.002 tc 2 ( R 2 = 0.81)] involving linear and power components was developed to simulate the response of nitrogenase activity in green gram roots to the concentration and exposure time of nano-ZnO.

  19. Effect of time of exposure to environmental risk on the lung function of foundry workers: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos de Moraes, Mônica; Padula, Rosimeire Simprini; Bernardes, Rosane Andrea Bretas; Negreiros, Alexandher; Chiavegato, Luciana Dias

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This cross-sectional study aimed to compare foundry workers of the metallurgical industry with high and low exposure time and with a control group. [Subject and Methods] The workers were evaluated for pulmonary function and peak expiratory flow (PEF), respiratory symptoms, smoking habits, and physical activity level. Descriptive statistical analysis and ANOVA one-way test were used. [Results] The mean age was 33.9 ± 8.25 years (18-59), pulmonary function: FVC: 95 ± 18% of predicted, FEV1: 95.0 ± 15.8% of predicted, FEV1/FVC ratio of 0.82 ± 0.09, and PEF = 499.7 ± 118.5 l/min. Overall, 85.1% of workers were classified that physically active, 7.93% of workers reported respiratory symptoms, and 14.28% reported being smokers. There was no statistically significant difference between groups for the variables of lung function. [Conclusion] The pulmonary function is preserved in foundry workers independently of exposure time. PMID:27064981

  20. Effect of time of exposure to environmental risk on the lung function of foundry workers: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos de Moraes, Mônica; Padula, Rosimeire Simprini; Bernardes, Rosane Andrea Bretas; Negreiros, Alexandher; Chiavegato, Luciana Dias

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This cross-sectional study aimed to compare foundry workers of the metallurgical industry with high and low exposure time and with a control group. [Subject and Methods] The workers were evaluated for pulmonary function and peak expiratory flow (PEF), respiratory symptoms, smoking habits, and physical activity level. Descriptive statistical analysis and ANOVA one-way test were used. [Results] The mean age was 33.9 ± 8.25 years (18–59), pulmonary function: FVC: 95 ± 18% of predicted, FEV1: 95.0 ± 15.8% of predicted, FEV1/FVC ratio of 0.82 ± 0.09, and PEF = 499.7 ± 118.5 l/min. Overall, 85.1% of workers were classified that physically active, 7.93% of workers reported respiratory symptoms, and 14.28% reported being smokers. There was no statistically significant difference between groups for the variables of lung function. [Conclusion] The pulmonary function is preserved in foundry workers independently of exposure time. PMID:27064981

  1. Exposures to carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide and their mixtures: interrelationship between gas exposure concentration, time to incapacitation, carboxyhemoglobin and blood cyanide in rats.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, A K; Sanders, D C; Endecott, B R; Ritter, R M

    1995-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) are generated during aircraft interior fires in sufficient amounts to incapacitate cabin occupants. For typical post-crash and in-flight fires, minimum protection periods of 5 and 35 min, respectively, have been suggested for breathing devices to protect the occupants from smoke. Relationships of blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and cyanide (CN-) levels to incapacitation have not been well defined for these gases. Therefore, time to incapacitation (ti) and blood COHb and CN- at incapacitation were examined in rats exposed to CO (5706 ppm for 5-min ti; 1902 ppm for 35-min ti), HCN (184 ppm for 5-min ti; 64 ppm for 35-min ti) and their mixtures (equipotent concentrations of each gas that produced 5- and 35-min ti). Blood CO and HCN uptakes were evaluated at the two concentrations of each gas. With either gas, variation in ti was higher for the 35-min ti than the 5-min ti The COHb level reached a plateau prior to incapacitation at both CO concentrations, and COHb levels at the 5- and 35-min ti were different from each other. Blood CN- increased as a function of both HCN concentration and exposure time, but CN- at the 5-min ti was half of the 35-min ti CN- level. The HCN uptake at the high concentration was about three times that at the low concentration. In the high concentration CO-HCN mixture, ti was shortened from 5 to 2.6 min; COHb dropped from 81 to 55% and blood CN- from 2.3 to 1.1 microgram ml(-1). At the low-concentration CO-HCN mixture, where ti was reduced from 35 to 11.1 min, COHb decreased from 71 to 61% and blood CN- from 4.2 to 1.1 microgram ml(-1). Any alteration in the uptake of either gas by the presence of the other was minimal. Our findings suggest that specific levels of blood COHb and CN- cannot be correlated directly with the incapacitation onset and that postmortem blood COHb and CN- levels should be evaluated carefully in fire victims. PMID:8666718

  2. Dark exposure extends the integration window for spike-timing-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yatu; Huang, Shiyong; de Pasquale, Roberto; McGehrin, Kevin; Lee, Hey-Kyoung; Zhao, Kanxing; Kirkwood, Alfredo

    2012-10-24

    Metaplasticity, the adaptive changes of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) in response to fluctuations in neural activity is well documented in visual cortex, where dark rearing shifts the frequency threshold for the induction of LTP and LTD. Here we studied metaplasticity affecting spike-timing-dependent plasticity, in which the polarity of plasticity is determined not by the stimulation frequency, but by the temporal relationship between near-coincidental presynaptic and postsynaptic firing. We found that in mouse visual cortex the same regime of deprivation that restricts the frequency range for inducing rate-dependent LTD extends the integration window for inducing timing-dependent LTD, enabling LTD induction with random presynaptic and postsynaptic firing. Notably, the underlying mechanism for the changes in both rate-dependent and time-dependent LTD appears to be an increase of NR2b-containing NMDAR at the synapse. Thus, the rules of metaplasticity might manifest in opposite directions, depending on the plasticity-induction paradigms. PMID:23100424

  3. THE EXPOSURE PARADOX IN PARTICULATE MATTER COMMUNITY TIME-SERIES EPIDEMIOLOGY: CAN AMBIENT CONCENTRATIONS OF PM BE USED AS A SURROGATE FOR PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO PM ?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objective: Explain why epidemiologic studies find a statistically significant relationship between ambient concentrations of PM and health effects even though only a near-zero correlation is found between ambient concentrations of PM and personal exposures to PM. Method: Consider...

  4. Community variations in population exposure to near-field tsunami hazards as a function of pedestrian travel time to safety

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Nathan J.; Schmidtlein, Mathew C.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to characterize population exposure to near-field tsunami threats typically focus on quantifying the number and type of people in tsunami-hazard zones. To develop and prioritize effective risk-reduction strategies, emergency managers also need information on the potential for successful evacuations and how this evacuation potential varies among communities. To improve efforts to properly characterize and differentiate near-field tsunami threats among multiple communities, we assess community variations in population exposure to tsunamis as a function of pedestrian travel time to safety. We focus our efforts on the multiple coastal communities in Grays Harbor and Pacific Counties (State of Washington, USA), where a substantial resident and visitor population is threatened by near-field tsunamis related to a potential Cascadia subduction zone earthquake. Anisotropic, path-distance modeling is conducted to estimate travel times to safety and results are merged with various population data, including residents, employees, public venues, and dependent-care facilities. Results suggest that there is substantial variability among communities in the number of people that may have insufficient time to evacuate. Successful evacuations may be possible in some communities assuming slow-walking speeds, are plausible in others if travel speeds are increased, and are unlikely in another set of communities given the large distances and short time horizon. Emergency managers can use these results to prioritize the location and determine the most appropriate type of tsunami risk-reduction strategies, such as education and training in areas where evacuations are plausible and vertical-evacuation structures in areas where they are not.

  5. Ozone exposure and daily mortality in Mexico City: a time-series analysis.

    PubMed

    Loomis, D P; Borja-Aburto, V H; Bangdiwala, S I; Shy, C M

    1996-10-01

    Daily death counts in Mexico City were examined in relation to ambient ozone levels during 1990-1992 for the purpose of investigating the acute, irreversible effects of air pollution, with emphasis on ozone exposure. Air pollution data were obtained from nine monitoring stations operated by the Departamento del Distrito Federal. Mortality data were provided by the Instituto Nacional de Estadstica, Geografa, e Informtica. Increases in numbers of deaths were positively associated with elevated air pollution levels on the same day and on the previous day. The magnitude of the increases was small but statistically significant, after Poisson regression models were used to adjust for temperature and long-term trends. In models using data for a single pollutant, the "crude" ratio for total mortality associated with an increase of 100 parts per billion (ppb)* in one-hour maximum ozone concentration was 1.029 (95% CI 1.015, 1.044). A moving average of ozone showed a stronger association (rate ratio [RR] = 1.048, 95% CI 1.025, 1.070), and excess mortality (an increase in the number of deaths, relative to the average on days with low pollution levels) was more evident for persons over 65 years of age. Separate analyses of the effect of elevated ozone for different areas of the city showed similar results, but they were not statistically significant. Other pollutants also were related to mortality. The RR was 1.075 (95% CI 0.984, 1.062) per 100-ppb increase for sulfur dioxide and 1.049 (95% CI 1.030, 1.067) per 100 micrograms/m3 increase in total suspended particulates (TSP) when these pollutants were considered in separate models. However, when all three pollutants were considered simultaneously, only TSP remained associated with mortality, indicating excess mortality of 5% per 100 micrograms/m3 increase [RR = 1.052, 95% CI 1.034, 1.072]. The excess mortality associated with TSP is consistent with that observed in other cities in America and Europe. This study provides some evidence that ozone is associated with all-cause mortality and with mortality among the elderly after controlling for long-term cycles. However, ozone levels exhibited little or no effect on mortality rates when other air pollutants were considered simultaneously. Particulate matter appeared to be an important pollutant; it independently predicted changes in mortality. Nevertheless, because of the complexity and variability of the mixtures to which people are exposed, it is difficult to attribute the observed effects to a single pollutant. The technical feasibility and scientific validity of isolating the effect of single pollutants in such complex mixtures requires further research and careful consideration. Given the large population living in and exposed to ambient air pollution in Mexico City and other metropolises throughout the world, these small but significant associations of mortality with air pollution indices are of public health concern. PMID:8916289

  6. Timing of terminal Pleistocene deglaciation at high elevations in southern and central British Columbia constrained by 10Be exposure dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margold, Martin; Stroeven, Arjen P.; Clague, John J.; Heyman, Jakob

    2014-09-01

    The Cordilleran Ice Sheet (CIS) covered most of British Columbia and southern Yukon Territory at the local Last Glacial Maximum (lLGM) during Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 2. However, its subsequent demise is not well understood, particularly at high elevations east of its ocean-terminating margin. We present 10Be exposure ages from two high-elevation sites in southern and central British Columbia that help constrain the time of initial deglaciation at these sites. We sampled granodiorite erratics at elevations of 2126-2230 m a.s.l. in the Marble Range and 1608-1785 m a.s.l. in the Telkwa Range at the western margin of the Interior Plateau. The erratics at both sites are near ice-marginal meltwater channels that delineate the local ice surface slope and thus the configuration of the ice sheet during deglaciation. The locations of the erratics and their relations to meltwater channels ensure that the resulting 10Be ages date CIS deglaciation and not the retreat of local montane glaciers. Our sample sites emerged above the surface of the CIS as its divide migrated westward from the Interior Plateau to the axis of the Coast Mountains. Two of the four samples from the summit area of the Marble Range yielded apparent exposure ages of 14.0 0.7 and 15.2 0.8 ka. These ages are 1.8-3.0 ka younger than the well-established lLGM age of ca 17 ka for the Puget lobe of the CIS in Washington State; they are 1.7 ka younger than the lLGM age for the Puget lobe if a snow-shielding correction to their uncertainty-weighted mean age is applied. The other two samples yielded much older apparent exposure ages (20.6 1.4 and 33.0 1.5 ka), indicating the presence of inherited isotopes. Four samples collected from the summit area of the Telkwa Range in the Hazelton Mountains yielded well clustered apparent exposure ages of 10.1 0.6, 10.2 0.7, 10.4 0.5, and 11.5 1.1 ka. Significant present-day snow cover introduces a large uncertainty in the apparent exposure ages from this site. A snow-shielding correction based on present-day snow cover data increases the uncertainty-weighted mean exposure age of the Telkwa Range erratics to 12.4 0.7 ka, consistent with deglacial 14C ages from areas near sea level to the west. Our exposure ages show a thinning of the southern portion of the CIS shortly after the lLGM and persistence of a remnant mountain ice cap in the central Coast Mountains into the Younger Dryas Chronozone. Our data also show that the summit area of the Marble Range was ice-covered during the lLGM. The presence of an ice body of considerable dimension in north-central British Columbia until, or possibly even after, the Younger Dryas highlights the need for geomorphological and geochronological studies of the ice dispersal centre over the Skeena Mountains in northwest British Columbia and the need for better understanding of the response of the CIS to Lateglacial climate fluctuations.

  7. Positional error and time-activity patterns in near-highway proximity studies: an exposure misclassification analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The growing interest in research on the health effects of near-highway air pollutants requires an assessment of potential sources of error in exposure assignment techniques that rely on residential proximity to roadways. Methods We compared the amount of positional error in the geocoding process for three different data sources (parcels, TIGER and StreetMap USA) to a gold standard residential geocoding process that used ortho-photos, large multi-building parcel layouts or large multi-unit building floor plans. The potential effect of positional error for each geocoding method was assessed as part of a proximity to highway epidemiological study in the Boston area, using all participants with complete address information (N?=?703). Hourly time-activity data for the most recent workday/weekday and non-workday/weekend were collected to examine time spent in five different micro-environments (inside of home, outside of home, school/work, travel on highway, and other). Analysis included examination of whether time-activity patterns were differentially distributed either by proximity to highway or across demographic groups. Results Median positional error was significantly higher in street network geocoding (StreetMap USA?=?23 m; TIGER?=?22 m) than parcel geocoding (8 m). When restricted to multi-building parcels and large multi-unit building parcels, all three geocoding methods had substantial positional error (parcels?=?24 m; StreetMap USA?=?28 m; TIGER?=?37 m). Street network geocoding also differentially introduced greater amounts of positional error in the proximity to highway study in the 050 m proximity category. Time spent inside home on workdays/weekdays differed significantly by demographic variables (age, employment status, educational attainment, income and race). Time-activity patterns were also significantly different when stratified by proximity to highway, with those participants residing in the 050 m proximity category reporting significantly more time in the school/work micro-environment on workdays/weekdays than all other distance groups. Conclusions These findings indicate the potential for both differential and non-differential exposure misclassification due to geocoding error and time-activity patterns in studies of highway proximity. We also propose a multi-stage manual correction process to minimize positional error. Additional research is needed in other populations and geographic settings. PMID:24010639

  8. Time-location analysis for exposure assessment studies of children using a novel global positioning system instrument.

    PubMed

    Elgethun, Kai; Fenske, Richard A; Yost, Michael G; Palcisko, Gary J

    2003-01-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) technology is used widely for business and leisure activities and offers promise for human time-location studies to evaluate potential exposure to environmental contaminants. In this article we describe the development of a novel GPS instrument suitable for tracking the movements of young children. Eleven children in the Seattle area (2-8 years old) wore custom-designed data-logging GPS units integrated into clothing. Location data were transferred into geographic information systems software for map overlay, visualization, and tabular analysis. Data were grouped into five location categories (in vehicle, inside house, inside school, inside business, and outside) to determine time spent and percentage reception in each location. Additional experiments focused on spatial resolution, reception efficiency in typical environments, and sources of signal interference. Significant signal interference occurred only inside concrete/steel-frame buildings and inside a power substation. The GPS instruments provided adequate spatial resolution (typically about 2-3 m outdoors and 4-5 m indoors) to locate subjects within distinct microenvironments and distinguish a variety of human activities. Reception experiments showed that location could be tracked outside, proximal to buildings, and inside some buildings. Specific location information could identify movement in a single room inside a home, on a playground, or along a fence line. The instrument, worn in a vest or in bib overalls, was accepted by children and parents. Durability of the wiring was improved early in the study to correct breakage problems. The use of GPS technology offers a new level of accuracy for direct quantification of time-location activity patterns in exposure assessment studies. PMID:12515689

  9. Timing and intensity of exposure to interferon-γ critically determines the function of monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Kerkar, Sid P; Chinnasamy, Dhanalakshmi; Hadi, Neima; Melenhorst, Jan; Muranski, Pawel; Spyridonidis, Alexandros; Ito, Sawa; Weber, Gerrit; Yin, Fang; Hensel, Nancy; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Barrett, Austin John

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that inflammatory cytokines have a dualistic role in immunity. In this study, we sought to determine the direct effects of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) on the differentiation and maturation of human peripheral blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC). Here, we report that following differentiation of monocytes into moDC with granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4, IFN-γ induces moDC maturation and up-regulates the co-stimulatory markers CD80/CD86/CD95 and MHC Class I, enabling moDC to effectively generate antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses for multiple viral and tumour antigens. Early exposure of monocytes to high concentrations of IFN-γ during differentiation promotes the formation of macrophages. However, under low concentrations of IFN-γ, monocytes continue to differentiate into dendritic cells possessing a unique gene-expression profile, resulting in impairments in subsequent maturation by IFN-γ or lipopolysaccharide and an inability to generate effective antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses. These findings demonstrate that IFN-γ imparts differential programmes on moDC that shape the antigen-specific T-cell responses they induce. Timing and intensity of exposure to IFN-γ can therefore determine the functional capacity of moDC. PMID:24678989

  10. Time Profile of Cosmic Radiation Exposure During the EXPOSE-E Mission: The R3DE Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Horneck, Gerda; Häder, Donat-Peter; Schuster, Martin; Richter, Peter; Lebert, Michael; Demets, Rene

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this paper is to present the time profile of cosmic radiation exposure obtained by the Radiation Risk Radiometer-Dosimeter during the EXPOSE-E mission in the European Technology Exposure Facility on the International Space Station's Columbus module. Another aim is to make the obtained results available to other EXPOSE-E teams for use in their data analysis. Radiation Risk Radiometer-Dosimeter is a low-mass and small-dimension automatic device that measures solar radiation in four channels and cosmic ionizing radiation as well. The main results of the present study include the following: (1) three different radiation sources were detected and quantified—galactic cosmic rays (GCR), energetic protons from the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) region of the inner radiation belt, and energetic electrons from the outer radiation belt (ORB); (2) the highest daily averaged absorbed dose rate of 426 μGy d−1 came from SAA protons; (3) GCR delivered a much smaller daily absorbed dose rate of 91.1 μGy d−1, and the ORB source delivered only 8.6 μGy d−1. The analysis of the UV and temperature data is a subject of another article (Schuster et al., 2012). Key Words: Ionizing radiation—R3D—ISS. Astrobiology 12, 403–411. PMID:22680687

  11. Developmental Timing and Continuity of Exposure to Interparental Violence and Externalizing Behavior as Prospective Predictors of Dating Violence

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Angela J.; Englund, Michelle M.; Egeland, Byron

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the prospective pathways of children's exposure to interparental violence (EIPV) in early and middle childhood and externalizing behavior in middle childhood and adolescence as developmental predictors of dating violence perpetration and victimization at ages 23 and 26 years. Participants (N = 168) were drawn from a longitudinal study of low-income families. Path analyses examined whether timing or continuity of EIPV predicted dating violence and whether timing or continuity of externalizing behavior mediated these pathways. Results indicated that EIPV in early childhood directly predicted perpetration and victimization at age 23. There were significant indirect effects from EIPV to dating violence through externalizing behavior in adolescence and life stress at age 23. Independent of EIPV, externalizing behavior in middle childhood also predicted dating violence through externalizing behavior in adolescence and life stress at age 23, but this pathway stemmed from maltreatment. These results highlight that the timing of EIPV and both the timing and continuity of externalizing behavior are critical risks for the intergenerational transmission of dating violence. Findings support a developmental perspective that negative early experiences and children's externalizing behavior are powerful influences for dating violence in early adulthood. PMID:24229543

  12. A pooled analysis of smoking and colorectal cancer: timing of exposure and interactions with environmental factors

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jian; Hutter, Carolyn; Baron, John A.; Berndt, Sonja; Caan, Bette; Campbell, Peter T; Casey, Graham; Chan, Andrew T.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gallinger, Steven; Giovannucci, Edward; Harrison, Tabitha; Hayes, Richard; Hsu, Li; Jiao, Shuo; Lin, Yi; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly; Pflugeisen, Bethann; Phipps, Amanda I.; Rohan, Thomas; Schoen, Robert; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha; Stelling, Deanna; Thomas, Fridtjof; Warnick, Greg; White, Emily; Potter, John; Peters, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Background Considerable evidence suggests that cigarette smoking is associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer. What is unclear, however, is the impact of quitting smoking on risk attenuation and whether other risk factors for colorectal cancer modify this association. Methods We performed a pooled analysis of 8 studies, including 6,796 colorectal cancer cases and 7,770 controls to evaluate the association between cigarette smoking history and colorectal cancer risk, and to investigate potential effect modification by other risk factors. Results Current smokers (OR=1.26, 95% CI=1.11–1.43) and former smokers (OR=1.18, 95% CI=1.09–1.27), relative to never smokers, showed higher risks of colorectal cancer. Former smokers remained at higher colorectal cancer risk, relative to never smokers, for up to about 25 years after quitting. The impact of time since quitting varied by cancer subsite: the excess risk due to smoking decreased immediately after quitting for proximal colon and rectal cancer, but not until about 20 years post-quitting for distal colon cancer. Further, we observed borderline statistically significant additive interactions between smoking status and BMI (relative excess risk due to interaction [RERI]=0.15, 95% CI:−0.01–0.31, P=0.06) and significant additive interaction between smoking status and fruit consumption (RERI=0.16, 95% CI: 0.01–0.30, P=0.04). Conclusion Colorectal cancer risk remained increased for about 25 years after quitting smoking, and the pattern of decline in risk varied by cancer subsite. BMI and fruit intake modified the risk associated with smoking. Impact These results contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms through which smoking impacts colorectal cancer etiology. PMID:23001243

  13. Timing of androgen receptor disruption and estrogen exposure underlies a spectrum of congenital penile anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Armfield, Brooke A.; Cohn, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital penile anomalies (CPAs) are among the most common human birth defects. Reports of CPAs, which include hypospadias, chordee, micropenis, and ambiguous genitalia, have risen sharply in recent decades, but the causes of these malformations are rarely identified. Both genetic anomalies and environmental factors, such as antiandrogenic and estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), are suspected to cause CPAs; however, little is known about the temporal window(s) of sensitivity to EDCs, or the tissue-specific roles and downstream targets of the androgen receptor (AR) in external genitalia. Here, we show that the full spectrum of CPAs can be produced by disrupting AR at different developmental stages and in specific cell types in the mouse genital tubercle. Inactivation of AR during a narrow window of prenatal development results in hypospadias and chordee, whereas earlier disruptions cause ambiguous genitalia and later disruptions cause micropenis. The neonatal phase of penile development is controlled by the balance of AR to estrogen receptor α (ERα) activity; either inhibition of androgen or augmentation of estrogen signaling can induce micropenis. AR and ERα have opposite effects on cell division, apoptosis, and regulation of Hedgehog, fibroblast growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein, and Wnt signaling in the genital tubercle. We identify Indian hedgehog (Ihh) as a novel downstream target of AR in external genitalia and show that conditional deletion of Ihh inhibits penile masculinization. These studies reveal previously unidentified cellular and molecular mechanisms by which antiandrogenic and estrogenic signals induce penile malformations and demonstrate that the timing of endocrine disruption can determine the type of CPA. PMID:26598695

  14. Application of alternative spatiotemporal metrics of ambient air pollution exposure in a time-series epidemiological study in Atlanta

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure error in studies of ambient air pollution and health that use city-wide measures of exposure may be substantial for pollutants that exhibit spatiotemporal variability. Alternative spatiotemporal metrics of exposure for traffic-related and regional pollutants were applied...

  15. SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF METALLIC BRACKETS PHOTO-ACTIVATED WITH LIGHT-EMITTING DIODE (LED) AT DIFFERENT EXPOSURE TIMES

    PubMed Central

    Rgo, Emanuel Braga; Romano, Fbio Loureno

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic metallic brackets photo-activated with two different light-curing sources at different exposure times: halogen light (XL 1500, 3M ESPE) and LED light (Ortholux, 3M Unitek). Sixty bovine permanent lower incisors were inserted into PVC tubes containing plaster. The buccal surfaces were cleaned with pumice and water, and then etched with 37% phosphoric acid gel. The XT Primer bonding agent (3M Unitek) was applied to the enamel surfaces and the metallic pre-coated brackets (Transbond APC II system, 3M Unitek) were attached to upper central incisors. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups (n=15). In Group I (Control), halogen light was used for 40 seconds, while in Groups II, III, and IV were light-cured with LED light unit for 40, 10, and 5 seconds, respectively. The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37C for 24 hours. The brackets were submitted to shear bond strength test in universal testing machine (Instron) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Shear bond strength means (MPa) were 4.87 for Group I; 5.89 for Group II; 4.83 for Group III, and 4.39 for Group IV. Tukey's test detected no statistically significant differences among the groups regarding the shear bond strength (p>0.05). Neither of the types of light-curing sources or exposure times influenced the shear bond strength of metallic brackets. PMID:19089170

  16. Spectral (600-1050 nm) time exposures (99.6 μs) of a lightning stepped leader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Tom A.; Orville, Richard E.; Marshall, J. L.; Huggins, Kyle

    2011-06-01

    A cloud-to-ground lightning stepped leader has been recorded with a slitless spectrograph at a recording rate of 10,000 images per second at a distance of 0.6 km. Five sequential images of the leader spectra were recorded with an exposure (integration) time of 99.6 μs each over a spectral range from 600 to 1050 nm. These are the first stepped leader spectra covering the range 600 to 1050 nm. The last three spectra, obtained immediately before the return stroke, were analyzed at an altitude of between 108 and 122 m above a struck vehicle. The spectral emissions in the near infrared are dominated by neutral nitrogen and oxygen emissions, and Hα, with only a few emission lines from singly ionized nitrogen. A singly ionized nitrogen line at 661.1 nm is present in the first analyzed image, but not in the two subsequent images at the same height, which suggests a cooling of the channel. The emissions are integrated over a 99.6 μs exposure time and therefore show no evidence of stepping. The ensuing negative return stroke was detected by the National Lightning Detection Network and had an estimated peak current of -15.2 kA. One subsequent stroke was outside the field of view of the spectrograph. The flash occurred on 11 September 2009 near New Underwood, South Dakota, and the exact location of the first stroke is known because it struck a car traveling on Interstate 90. The stepped leader two-dimensional speed increased in the last four steps from 1.53 × 105 to 2.42 × 105 m/s with an average of 2.03 × 105 m/s.

  17. Bioaccumulation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins in sediment by oligochaetes: Influence of exposure pathway and contact time

    SciTech Connect

    Loonen, H.; Parsons, J.R.; Govers, H.A.J.; Muir, D.C.G.

    1997-07-01

    Oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) were exposed simultaneously to radiolabeled [{sup 3}H]2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and [{sup 14}C]octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (OCDD) in sediment for 28 d, in order to study accumulation processes of hydrophobic substances. Elimination was studied for a further 20 d. The uptake and elimination rate constants and the bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) were determined for TCDD and OCDD in the presence and absence of sediment (overlying water). Steady-state concentrations in oligochaetes were achieved for TCDD but not for OCDD over the 28-d exposure. Biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) after a 28-d exposure were 1.6 {+-} 0.27 for TCDD and 0.07 {+-} 0.02 for OCDD. Steady-state log BAF values (lipid based) for TCDD and OCDD in oligochaetes in the overlying water were 5.9 and 5.5 L/kg, respectively. The effect of incubation time between sediment and contaminants was investigated by repeating the accumulation study after a contact period of 21 months. BSAFs of sediment-sorbed TCDD and OCDD were 1.5 to 2-fold lower for the long contact time sediment. Based on comparison of predicted accumulation from pore water and observed accumulation by sediment-exposed oligochaetes, it was concluded that 1.4-fold greater accumulation occurred due to assimilation of TCDD and OCDD from ingested sediment. This additional accumulation in the presence of sediment, not accounted for by uptake only from pore waters, was consistent with literature data for other hydrophobic organochlorines.

  18. Assessment of radiopacity of restorative composite resins with various target distances and exposure times and a modified aluminum step wedge

    PubMed Central

    Poorsattar Bejeh Mir, Morvarid

    2012-01-01

    Purpose ANSI/ADA has established standards for adequate radiopacity. This study was aimed to assess the changes in radiopacity of composite resins according to various tube-target distances and exposure times. Materials and Methods Five 1-mm thick samples of Filtek P60 and Clearfil composite resins were prepared and exposed with six tube-target distance/exposure time setups (i.e., 40 cm, 0.2 seconds; 30 cm, 0.2 seconds; 30 cm, 0.16 seconds, 30 cm, 0.12 seconds; 15 cm, 0.2 seconds; 15 cm, 0.12 seconds) performing at 70 kVp and 7 mA along with a 12-step aluminum stepwedge (1 mm incremental steps) using a PSP digital sensor. Thereafter, the radiopacities measured with Digora for Windows software 2.5 were converted to absorbencies (i.e., A=-log (1-G/255)), where A is the absorbency and G is the measured gray scale). Furthermore, the linear regression model of aluminum thickness and absorbency was developed and used to convert the radiopacity of dental materials to the equivalent aluminum thickness. In addition, all calculations were compared with those obtained from a modified 3-step stepwedge (i.e., using data for the 2nd, 5th, and 8th steps). Results The radiopacities of the composite resins differed significantly with various setups (p<0.001) and between the materials (p<0.001). The best predicted model was obtained for the 30 cm 0.2 seconds setup (R2=0.999). Data from the reduced modified stepwedge was remarkable and comparable with the 12-step stepwedge. Conclusion Within the limits of the present study, our findings support that various setups might influence the radiopacity of dental materials on digital radiographs. PMID:23071966

  19. Close-range blast exposure is associated with altered functional connectivity in Veterans independent of concussion symptoms at time of exposure.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Meghan E; Lindemer, Emily R; Fonda, Jennifer R; Milberg, William P; McGlinchey, Regina E; Salat, David H

    2015-03-01

    Although there is emerging data on the effects of blast-related concussion (or mTBI) on cognition, the effects of blast exposure itself on the brain have only recently been explored. Toward this end, we examine functional connectivity to the posterior cingulate cortex, a primary region within the default mode network (DMN), in a cohort of 134 Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans characterized for a range of common military-associated comorbidities. Exposure to a blast at close range (<10 meters) was associated with decreased connectivity of bilateral primary somatosensory and motor cortices, and these changes were not different from those seen in participants with blast-related mTBI. These results remained significant when clinical factors such as sleep quality, chronic pain, or post traumatic stress disorder were included in the statistical model. In contrast, differences in functional connectivity based on concussion history and blast exposures at greater distances were not apparent. Despite the limitations of a study of this nature (e.g., assessments long removed from injury, self-reported blast history), these data demonstrate that blast exposure per se, which is prevalent among those who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, may be an important consideration in Veterans' health. It further offers a clinical guideline for determining which blasts (namely, those within 10 meters) are likely to lead to long-term health concerns and may be more accurate than using concussion symptoms alone. PMID:25366378

  20. Impact of Dilution and Polymerization on Cytotoxicity of Dentin Adhesives to Human Gingival Fibroblasts: Early Exposure Time

    PubMed Central

    Banava, Sepideh; Najibfard, Kaveh; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Ostad, Naser

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dilution and curing methods of an etch-and-rinse adhesive and a self-etching primer from the same manufacturer at early exposure time on cytotoxicity of primary human gingival fibroblasts. Materials and methods. Primary human gingival fibroblasts were exposed to different dilutions of Adper Single Bond (ASB) and Adper Prompt L-Pop (APL) (3M ESPE, USA). They were evaluated in unpolymerized mode for 20 s, 5 min and 24 h and in polymerized mode for 24 h and 48 h. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using three cytotoxic tests (MTT, cell counting and DNA condensation). Data was analyzed by a one-way ANOVA and Post Hoc Tukey HSD test. Results. Cytotoxicity tests revealed that unpolymerized APL was more cytotoxic compared to ASB after 20 s (P<0.05). By increasing the time to 5 min and 24 h, ASB was more cytotoxic than APL with lower dilutions. Polymerized ASB was more toxic than APL. Conclusion. Both adhesives were cytotoxic in different dilutions, times and curing modes. Cytotoxicity of the unpolymerized self-etching primer (APL) was more than etch-and-rinse adhesive (ASB) in 20 s, which is important clinically and dentists should be aware of the harmful effects and try to minimize it by curing and rinsing soon after composite resin insertion. ASB was more cytotoxic at 5 min and 24h. PMID:26697147

  1. Peripubertal Caffeine Exposure Impairs Longitudinal Bone Growth in Immature Male Rats in a Dose- and Time-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Young; Choi, Yuri; Kim, Jisook; Choi, Hyeonhae; Shin, Jiwon; Roh, Jaesook

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the dose- and time-dependent effects of caffeine consumption throughout puberty in peripubertal rats. A total of 85 male SD rats were randomly divided into four groups: control and caffeine-fed groups with 20, 60, or 120 mg/kg/day through oral gavage for 10, 20, 30, or 40 days. Caffeine decreased body weight gain and food consumption in a dose- and time-dependent manner, accompanied by a reduction in muscle and body fat. In addition, it caused a shortening and lightening of leg bones and spinal column. The total height of the growth plate decreased sharply at 40 days in the controls, but not in the caffeine-fed groups, and the height of hypertrophic zone in the caffeine-fed groups was lower than in the control. Caffeine increased the height of the secondary spongiosa, whereas parameters related to bone formation, such as bone area ratio, thickness and number of trabeculae, and bone perimeter, were significantly reduced. Furthermore, serum levels of IGF-1, estradiol, and testosterone were also reduced by the dose of caffeine exposure. Our results demonstrate that caffeine consumption can dose- and time-dependently inhibit longitudinal bone growth in immature male rats, possibly by blocking the physiologic changes in body composition and hormones relevant to bone growth. PMID:26495862

  2. Integrating Time-Varying and Ecological Exposures into Multivariate Analyses of Hospital-Acquired Infection Risk Factors: A Review and Demonstration.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kevin A; Daneman, Nick; Stevens, Vanessa W; Zhang, Yue; Greene, Tom H; Samore, Matthew H; Arora, Paul

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVES Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) develop rapidly after brief and transient exposures, and ecological exposures are central to their etiology. However, many studies of HAIs risk do not correctly account for the timing of outcomes relative to exposures, and they ignore ecological factors. We aimed to describe statistical practice in the most cited HAI literature as it relates to these issues, and to demonstrate how to implement models that can be used to account for them. METHODS We conducted a literature search to identify 8 frequently cited articles having primary outcomes that were incident HAIs, were based on individual-level data, and used multivariate statistical methods. Next, using an inpatient cohort of incident Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), we compared 3 valid strategies for assessing risk factors for incident infection: a cohort study with time-fixed exposures, a cohort study with time-varying exposures, and a case-control study with time-varying exposures. RESULTS Of the 8 studies identified in the literature scan, 3 did not adjust for time-at-risk, 6 did not assess the timing of exposures in a time-window prior to outcome ascertainment, 6 did not include ecological covariates, and 6 did not account for the clustering of outcomes in time and space. Our 3 modeling strategies yielded similar risk-factor estimates for CDI risk. CONCLUSIONS Several common statistical methods can be used to augment standard regression methods to improve the identification of HAI risk factors. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2016;37(4):411-419. PMID:26880280

  3. Time course of microbiologic outcome and gene expression in Candida albicans during and following in vitro and in vivo exposure to fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Lepak, A; Nett, J; Lincoln, L; Marchillo, K; Andes, D

    2006-04-01

    Pharmacodynamics (PD) considers the relationship between drug exposure and effect. The two factors that have been used to distinguish the PD behaviors of antimicrobials are the impact of concentration on the extent of organism killing and the duration of persistent microbiologic suppression (postantibiotic effect). The goals of these studies were (i) to examine the relationship between antimicrobial PD and gene expression and (ii) to gain insight into the mechanism of fluconazole effects persisting following exposure. Microarrays were used to estimate the transcriptional response of Candida albicans to a supra-MIC F exposure over time in vitro. Fluconazole at four times the MIC was added to a log-phase C. albicans culture, and cells were collected to determine viable growth and for microarray analyses. We identified differential expression of 18% of all genes for at least one of the time points. More genes were upregulated (n=1,053 [16%]) than downregulated (174 [3%]). Of genes with known function that were upregulated during exposure, most were related to plasma membrane/cell wall synthesis (18%), stress responses (7%), and metabolism (6%). The categories of downregulated genes during exposure included protein synthesis (15%), DNA synthesis/repair (7%), and transport (7%) genes. The majority of genes identified at the postexposure time points were from the protein (17%) and DNA (7%) synthesis categories. In subsequent studies, three genes (CDR1, CDR2, and ERG11) were examined in greater detail (more concentration and time points) following fluconazole exposure in vitro and in vivo. Expression levels from the in vitro and in vivo studies were congruent. CDR1 and CDR2 transcripts were reduced during in vitro fluconazole exposure and during supra-MIC exposure in vivo. However, in the postexposure period, the mRNA abundance of both pumps increased. ERG11 expression increased during exposure and fell in the postexposure period. The expression of the three genes responded in a dose-dependent manner. In sum, the microarray data obtained during and following fluconazole exposure identified genes both known and unknown to be affected by this drug class. The expanded in vitro and in vivo expression data set underscores the importance of considering the time course of exposure in pharmacogenomic investigations. PMID:16569846

  4. Modelling personal exposure to particulate air pollution: an assessment of time-integrated activity modelling, Monte Carlo simulation & artificial neural network approaches.

    PubMed

    McCreddin, A; Alam, M S; McNabola, A

    2015-01-01

    An experimental assessment of personal exposure to PM10 in 59 office workers was carried out in Dublin, Ireland. 255 samples of 24-h personal exposure were collected in real time over a 28 month period. A series of modelling techniques were subsequently assessed for their ability to predict 24-h personal exposure to PM10. Artificial neural network modelling, Monte Carlo simulation and time-activity based models were developed and compared. The results of the investigation showed that using the Monte Carlo technique to randomly select concentrations from statistical distributions of exposure concentrations in typical microenvironments encountered by office workers produced the most accurate results, based on 3 statistical measures of model performance. The Monte Carlo simulation technique was also shown to have the greatest potential utility over the other techniques, in terms of predicting personal exposure without the need for further monitoring data. Over the 28 month period only a very weak correlation was found between background air quality and personal exposure measurements, highlighting the need for accurate models of personal exposure in epidemiological studies. PMID:25260856

  5. A quantitative comparison of mechanical blood damage parameters in rotary ventricular assist devices: shear stress, exposure time and hemolysis index.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Katharine H; Zhang, Tao; Taskin, M Ertan; Griffith, Bartley P; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2012-08-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) have already helped many patients with heart failure but have the potential to assist more patients if current problems with blood damage (hemolysis, platelet activation, thrombosis and emboli, and destruction of the von Willebrand factor (vWf)) can be eliminated. A step towards this goal is better understanding of the relationships between shear stress, exposure time, and blood damage and, from there, the development of numerical models for the different types of blood damage to enable the design of improved VADs. In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to calculate the hemodynamics in three clinical VADs and two investigational VADs and the shear stress, residence time, and hemolysis were investigated. A new scalar transport model for hemolysis was developed. The results were compared with in vitro measurements of the pressure head in each VAD and the hemolysis index in two VADs. A comparative analysis of the blood damage related fluid dynamic parameters and hemolysis index was performed among the VADs. Compared to the centrifugal VADs, the axial VADs had: higher mean scalar shear stress (sss); a wider range of sss, with larger maxima and larger percentage volumes at both low and high sss; and longer residence times at very high sss. The hemolysis predictions were in agreement with the experiments and showed that the axial VADs had a higher hemolysis index. The increased hemolysis in axial VADs compared to centrifugal VADs is a direct result of their higher shear stresses and longer residence times. Since platelet activation and destruction of the vWf also require high shear stresses, the flow conditions inside axial VADs are likely to result in more of these types of blood damage compared with centrifugal VADs. PMID:22938355

  6. The solar UV exposure time required for vitamin D3 synthesis in the human body estimated by numerical simulation and observation in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Miyauchi, Masaatsu; Hirai, Chizuko

    2013-04-01

    After the discovery of Antarctic ozone hole, the negative effect of exposure of human body to harmful solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is widely known. However, there is positive effect of exposure to UV radiation, i.e., vitamin D synthesis. Although the importance of solar UV radiation for vitamin D3 synthesis in the human body is well known, the solar exposure time required to prevent vitamin D deficiency has not been well determined. This study attempted to identify the time of solar exposure required for vitamin D3 synthesis in the body by season, time of day, and geographic location (Sapporo, Tsukuba, and Naha, in Japan) using both numerical simulations and observations. According to the numerical simulation for Tsukuba at noon in July under a cloudless sky, 2.3 min of solar exposure are required to produce 5.5 μg vitamin D3 per 600 cm2 skin. This quantity of vitamin D represents the recommended intake for an adult by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, and the 2010 Japanese Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs). In contrast, it took 49.5 min to produce the same amount of vitamin D3 at Sapporo in the northern part of Japan in December, at noon under a cloudless sky. The necessary exposure time varied considerably with the time of the day. For Tsukuba at noon in December, 14.5 min were required, but at 09:00 68.7 min were required and at 15:00 175.8 min were required for the same meteorological conditions. Naha receives high levels of UV radiation allowing vitamin D3 synthesis almost throughout the year. According to our results, we are further developing an index to quantify the necessary time of UV radiation exposure to produce required amount of vitamin D3 from a UV radiation data.

  7. Adult asthma and traffic exposure at residential address, workplace address, and self-reported daily time outdoor in traffic: A two-stage case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most epidemiologic studies use traffic at residential address as a surrogate for total traffic exposure when investigating effects of traffic on respiratory health. This study used GIS (Geographical Information Systems) to estimate traffic exposure, not only on residential, but also on workplace address, in addition to survey questions on time spent in traffic during commuting or other daily activities. The aim was to investigate 1) if there is an association between traffic exposure and prevalence of adult asthma and asthma symptoms, and 2) if so, does this association become stronger using more complete traffic exposure information. Methods This study was conducted in two stages: A first cross-sectional survey in Southern Sweden 2004 (n = 24819, 18-80 years, response rate 59%) was followed by a case-control study in 2005 to obtain more detailed exposure and confounder information (n = 2856, asthmatics and controls (1:3), 86% response rate). In the first survey, only residential address was known. In the second survey, questions about workplace addresses and daily time spent in traffic were also included. Residential and workplace addresses were geocoded and linked with GIS to road data and dispersion modelled outdoor concentrations of NOx (annual mean, 250 × 250 m resolution). Results Living within 50 m of a road (measured by GIS) with traffic intensity of >10 cars/minute (compared with no road within this distance) was associated with an increased prevalence of asthma, (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = (1.1-2.8), and with asthma symptoms last 12 months. No statistically significant effects were seen for traffic exposure at workplace address, daily time spent in traffic, or commuting time to work, after adjustment for confounders. A combined total exposure estimate did not give a stronger association with asthma prevalence or asthma symptoms. Conclusions Traffic exposure at close proximity to residential address showed association with asthma prevalence and asthma symptoms last 12 months, among adults in southern Sweden. The associations were not stronger when accounting for total traffic exposure. This could reflect exposure misclassfication at workplace address and for other daily time in traffic, but also that residential address remains the main determinant for traffic exposure among adults. PMID:21092159

  8. Straight Metalworking Fluids and All-Cause and Cardiovascular Mortality Analyzed by Using G-Estimation of an Accelerated Failure Time Model With Quantitative Exposure: Methods and Interpretations.

    PubMed

    Picciotto, Sally; Ljungman, Petter L; Eisen, Ellen A

    2016-04-01

    Straight metalworking fluids have been linked to cardiovascular mortality in analyses using binary exposure metrics, accounting for healthy worker survivor bias by using g-estimation of accelerated failure time models. A cohort of 38,666 Michigan autoworkers was followed (1941-1994) for mortality from all causes and ischemic heart disease. The structural model chosen here, using continuous exposure, assumes that increasing exposure from 0 to 1 mg/m(3) in any single year would decrease survival time by a fixed amount. Under that assumption, banning the fluids would have saved an estimated total of 8,468 (slope-based 95% confidence interval: 2,262, 28,563) person-years of life in this cohort. On average, 3.04 (slope-based 95% confidence interval: 0.02, 25.98) years of life could have been saved for each exposed worker who died from ischemic heart disease. Estimates were sensitive to both model specification for predicting exposure (multinomial or logistic regression) and characterization of exposure as binary or continuous in the structural model. Our results provide evidence supporting the hypothesis of a detrimental relationship between straight metalworking fluids and mortality, particularly from ischemic heart disease, as well as an instructive example of the challenges in obtaining and interpreting results from accelerated failure time models using a continuous exposure in the presence of competing risks. PMID:26968943

  9. Limitations Placed on the Time Coverage, Isoplanatic Patch Size and Exposure Time for Solar Observations Using Image Selection Procedures in the Presence of Telescope Aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, J. M.; Rimmele, T. R.

    1996-12-01

    Image selection, adaptive optics and post-facto image restoration methods are all techniques being used for diffraction limited imaging with ground-based solar and stellar telescopes. Often these techniques are used in a hybrid form like e.g. the application of adaptive optics and/or post-facto image restoration in combination with already good images obtained by image selection in periods of good seeing. Fried (JOSA 56, 1372, 1966), Hecquet and Coupinot (J. Optics/Paris 16, 21, 1985) and Beckers ("Solar and Stellar Granulation", Kluwer, Rutten & Severino Eds, 55, 1988) already discussed the usefulness of image selection, or the "Lucky Observer" mode, for high resolution imaging. All assumed perfect telescope optics. In case of moderate telescope aberrations image selection can still lead to diffraction limited imaging but only when the atmospheric wavefront aberration happens to compensate that of the telescope. In this "Very Lucky Observer" mode the probability of obtaining a good image is reduced over the un-aberrated case, as are the size of the isoplanatic patch and the exposure time. We describe an analysis of these effects for varying telescope aberrations. These result in a strong case for the removal of telescope aberrations either by initial implementation or by the use of slow active optics.

  10. Time trends in musculoskeletal disorders attributed to work exposures in Ontario using three independent data sources, 2004–2011

    PubMed Central

    Mustard, Cameron A; Chambers, Andrea; Ibrahim, Selahadin; Etches, Jacob; Smith, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are the leading cause of work disability in the developed economies. The objective of this study was to describe trends in the incidence of MSDs attributed to work exposures in Ontario over the period 2004–2011. Methods An observational study of work-related morbidity obtained from three independent sources for a complete population of approximately six million occupationally active adults aged 15–64 in the largest Canadian province. We implemented a conceptually concordant case definition for work-related non-traumatic MSDs in three population-based data sources: emergency department encounter records, lost-time workers’ compensation claims and representative samples of Ontario workers participating in consecutive waves of a national health interview survey. Results Over the 8-year observation period, the annual per cent change (APC) in the incidence of work-related MSDs was −3.4% (95% CI −4.9% to −1.9%) in emergency departments’ administrative records, −7.2% (−8.5% to −5.8%) in lost-time workers’ compensation claims and −5.3% (−7.2% to −3.5%) among participants in the national health interview survey. Corresponding APC measures for all other work-related conditions were −5.4% (−6.6% to −4.2%), −6.0% (−6.7% to −5.3%) and −5.3% (−7.8% to −2.8%), respectively. Incidence rate declines were substantial in the economic recession following the 2008 global financial crisis. Conclusions The three independent population-based data sources used in this study documented an important reduction in the incidence of work-related morbidity attributed to non-traumatic MSDs. The results of this study are consistent with an interpretation that the burden of non-traumatic MSDs arising from work exposures is declining among working-age adults. PMID:25311003

  11. Correlation between pulsed electromagnetic fields exposure time and cell proliferation increase in human osteosarcoma cell lines and human normal osteoblast cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    De Mattei, M; Caruso, A; Traina, G C; Pezzetti, F; Baroni, T; Sollazzo, V

    1999-01-01

    We have exposed cultured bone cells to a pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) for different times to find the minimal exposure time necessary to stimulate an increase of DNA synthesis. We used two different human osteosarcoma cell lines, TE-85 and MG-63, and human normal osteoblast cell (NHOC) obtained from surgical bone specimens. The cells were placed in multiwell plates and set in a tissue culture incubator between a pair of Helmoltz coils powered by a pulse generator (1.3-ms pulse, repeated at 75 Hz) for different periods of time. [3H]Thymidine incorporation was used to evaluate cell proliferation. The two osteosarcoma cell lines increase their thymidine incorporation when exposed to a PEMF for at least 30 min, both in a medium containing 10% fetal calf serum and in a serum-free medium. NHOC are known to increase their cell proliferation when exposed to PEMF but only if cultured in the presence of 10% fetal calf serum. In this experimental condition, three of the four cell lineages studied required at least 9 h of PEMF exposure to increase their DNA synthesis, whereas one cell lineage increased its cell proliferation after 6 h of PEMF exposure. Our observations confirm the hypothesis that the proliferative responses of NHOC and human osteosarcoma cell lines to PEMF exposure are quite different. Moreover, NHOC required minimal exposure times to PEMF to increase their cell proliferation, similar to that needed to stimulate bone formation in vivo. PMID:10194560

  12. THE TIME-COURSE AND SENSITIVITY OF MUCONIC ACID AS A BIOMARKER FOR HUMAN ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE TO BENZENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Preliminary results are presented that show the effect of an increased benzene exposure on the urinary elimination of trans,trans-muconic acid (MA) for an adult male. These results were generated from a controlled exposure experiment where by an individual was exposed to benzene ...

  13. Using Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and temperature data to generate time-activity classifications for estimating personal exposure in air monitoring studies: an automated method

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Personal exposure studies of air pollution generally use self-reported diaries to capture individuals time-activity data. Enhancements in the accuracy, size, memory and battery life of personal Global Positioning Systems (GPS) units have allowed for higher resolution tracking of study participants locations. Improved time-activity classifications combined with personal continuous air pollution sampling can improve assessments of location-related air pollution exposures for health studies. Methods Data was collected using a GPS and personal temperature from 54 children with asthma living in Montreal, Canada, who participated in a 10-day personal air pollution exposure study. A method was developed that incorporated personal temperature data and then matched a participants position against available spatial data (i.e., road networks) to generate time-activity categories. The diary-based and GPS-generated time-activity categories were compared and combined with continuous personal PM2.5 data to assess the impact of exposure misclassification when using diary-based methods. Results There was good agreement between the automated method and the diary method; however, the automated method (means: outdoors?=?5.1%, indoors other =9.8%) estimated less time spent in some locations compared to the diary method (outdoors?=?6.7%, indoors other?=?14.4%). Agreement statistics (AC1?=?0.778) suggest good agreement between methods over all location categories. However, location categories (Outdoors and Transit) where less time is spent show greater disagreement: e.g., mean time Indoors Other using the time-activity diary was 14.4% compared to 9.8% using the automated method. While mean daily time In Transit was relatively consistent between the methods, the mean daily exposure to PM2.5 while In Transit was 15.9?g/m3 using the automated method compared to 6.8?g/m3 using the daily diary. Conclusions Mean times spent in different locations as categorized by a GPS-based method were comparable to those from a time-activity diary, but there were differences in estimates of exposure to PM2.5 from the two methods. An automated GPS-based time-activity method will reduce participant burden, potentially providing more accurate and unbiased assessments of location. Combined with continuous air measurements, the higher resolution GPS data could present a different and more accurate picture of personal exposures to air pollution. PMID:24885722

  14. Monitoring of trace element atmospheric deposition using dry and wet moss bags: accumulation capacity versus exposure time.

    PubMed

    Anicić, M; Tomasević, M; Tasić, M; Rajsić, S; Popović, A; Frontasyeva, M V; Lierhagen, S; Steinnes, E

    2009-11-15

    To clarify the peculiarities of trace element accumulation in moss bags technique (active biomonitoring), samples of the moss Sphagnum girgensohnii Rusow were exposed in bags with and without irrigation for 15 days up to 5 months consequently in the semi-urban area of Belgrade (Serbia) starting from July 2007. The accumulation capacity for 49 elements determined by ICP-MS in wet and dry moss bags was compared. The concentration of some elements, i.e. Al, V, Cr, Fe, Zn, As, Se, Sr, Pb, and Sm increased continuously with exposure time in both dry and wet moss bags, whereas concentration of Na, Cl, K, Mn, Rb, Cs, and Ta decreased. Irrigation of moss resulted in a higher accumulation capacity for most of the elements, especially for Cr, Zn, As, Se, Br, and Sr. Principal component analysis was performed on the datasets of element concentrations in wet and dry moss bags for source identification. Results of the factor analysis were similar but not identical in the two cases due to possible differences in element accumulation mechanisms. PMID:19541410

  15. Association Between Onchocerciasis and Epilepsy in the Itwara Hyperendemic Focus, West Uganda: Controlling for Time and Intensity of Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Christoph; Rubaale, Tom; Tukesiga, Ephraim; Kipp, Walter; Kabagambe, Geoffrey; Ojony, Joa Okech; Asaba, George

    2011-01-01

    In 38 pairs of epilepsy patients and controls matched for time and intensity of exposure to transmission of onchocerciasis, the presence of microfilariae in the skin of epilepsy patients was found insignificantly elevated compared with controls (odds ratio = 1.68; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.60–4.57; P = 0.31). This difference was more pronounced when detection of subcutaneous nodules was used as indication of infection with Onchocerca volvulus (odds ratio = 2.77; 95% CI = 0.92–8.33; P = 0.065). These findings from a patient group of limited size suggest that intensity of infection may play a substantial role in the development of onchocerciasis-associated epilepsy. Our results are in contrast to the results of two other independent studies from the identical endemic area; one case concluded a significant positive correlation between onchocerciasis and epilepsy, and the other case concluded a clearly negative correlation. Studies with a greater sample size are needed to confirm this possible relationship. PMID:21813839

  16. A week in the life of full-time office workers: work day and weekend light exposure in summer and winter.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Stephanie J; Molina, Thomas A; Burgess, Helen J

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the light exposure in full-time office workers, who spend much of their workdays indoors. We examined the 24-h light exposure patterns of 14 full-time office workers during a week in summer, and assessed their dim light melatonin onset (DLMO, a marker of circadian timing) at the end of the working week. Six workers repeated the study in winter. Season had little impact on the workers' schedules, as the timing of sleep, commute, and work did not vary by more than 30 min in the summer and winter. In both seasons, workers received significantly more morning light on workdays than weekends, due to earlier wake times and the morning commute. Evening light in the two hours before bedtime was consistently dim. The timing of the DLMO did not vary between season, and by the end of the working week, the workers slept at a normal circadian phase. PMID:25172304

  17. A Week in the Life of Full-Time Office Workers: Work Day and Weekend Light Exposure in Summer and Winter

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Stephanie J.; Molina, Thomas A.; Burgess, Helen J.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the light exposure in full-time office workers, who spend much of their workdays indoors. We examined the 24-hour light exposure patterns of 14 full-time office workers during a week in summer, and assessed their dim light melatonin onset (DLMO, a marker of circadian timing) at the end of the working week. Six workers repeated the study in winter. Season had little impact on the workers' schedules, as the timing of sleep, commute, and work did not vary by more than 30 minutes in the summer and winter. In both seasons, workers received significantly more morning light on workdays than weekends, due to earlier wake times and the morning commute. Evening light in the two hours before bedtime was consistently dim. The timing of the DLMO did not vary between season, and by the end of the working week, the workers slept at a normal circadian phase. PMID:25172304

  18. Arginine supplementation and exposure time affects polyamine and glucose metabolism in primary liver cells isolated from Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Synne Marte; Taylor, Richard; Holen, Elisabeth; Aksnes, Anders; Espe, Marit

    2014-05-01

    Arginine has been demonstrated to enhance glucose and lipid oxidation in mammals through activation of polyamine turnover. We aimed to investigate how arginine affects energy utilization through polyamine metabolism and whether this effect is time dependent. Primary liver cells were isolated from Atlantic salmon (2.2 kg body weight) fed diets containing 25.5 (low arginine, LA) or 36.1 (high arginine, HA) g arginine/kg dry matter for 12 weeks, to investigate the effect of long-term arginine supplementation. The cells were cultured for 24 h in L-15 medium to which either alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) or N (1),N (11)-diethylnorspermine (DENSPM) was added. Analysis of the medium by nuclear magnetic resonance revealed significant differences between the two dietary groups as well as between cells exposed to DFMO and DENSPM, with decreased glucose, fumarate and lactate concentrations in media of the HA cells. Liver cells from fish fed the HA diet had higher spermidine/spermine-N1-acetyltransferase protein abundance and lower adenosine triphosphate concentration as compared to the LA-fed fish, while gene expression was not affected by either diet or treatment. Primary liver cells isolated from salmon fed a commercial diet and cultured in L-15 media with or without arginine supplementation (1.82 or 3.63 mM) for 48 h, representing short-term effect of arginine supplementation, showed differential expression of genes for apoptosis and polyamine synthesis due to arginine supplementation or inhibition by DFMO. Overall, arginine concentration and exposure time affected energy metabolism and gene regulation more than inhibition or activation of key enzymes of polyamine metabolism, suggesting a polyamine-independent influence of arginine on cellular energy metabolism and survival. PMID:24500114

  19. Patterns and timing of sunlight exposure and risk of basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas of the skin – a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), comprised of basal (BCC) and squamous (SCC) cell carcinomas, is the most common cancer in Caucasians. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure is the most important environmental risk factor for NMSC. However, the precise relationship between UVR and the risk of NMSC is complex, and the relationship may differ by skin cancer type. Methods A case–control study was conducted among Florida residents to investigate measures of patterns (intermittent vs. continuous) and timing (childhood vs. adulthood) of sunlight exposure in BCC and SCC. Participants included 218 BCC and 169 SCC cases recruited from a university dermatology clinic and 316 controls with no history of skin or other cancers. Results A history of blistering sunburn (a measure of intermittent sunlight exposure) was associated with both BCC (OR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.27-3.03) and SCC (OR = 2.02, 95% CI = 1.22-3.33). Additionally, having a job in the sun for ≥3 months for 10 years or longer (a measure of continuous sunlight exposure) was also associated with both BCC and SCC in our study population. With the exception of younger age at first blistering sunburn, measures of younger age at sunlight exposure tended to be associated with SCC, but not BCC risk. Conclusions Results from the current study suggest that sunlight exposure is associated with both BCC and SCC risk regardless of the pattern in which the exposure was received (i.e. intermittent vs. continuous). The data also suggest that sunlight exposure at a younger age may be more important for SCC but not BCC, however additional studies are needed to further characterize sunlight exposure-response relationships in different types of NMSC. PMID:22994655

  20. The impact of missing data on analyses of a time-dependent exposure in a longitudinal cohort: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Missing data often cause problems in longitudinal cohort studies with repeated follow-up waves. Research in this area has focussed on analyses with missing data in repeated measures of the outcome, from which participants with missing exposure data are typically excluded. We performed a simulation study to compare complete-case analysis with Multiple imputation (MI) for dealing with missing data in an analysis of the association of waist circumference, measured at two waves, and the risk of colorectal cancer (a completely observed outcome). Methods We generated 1,000 datasets of 41,476 individuals with values of waist circumference at waves 1 and 2 and times to the events of colorectal cancer and death to resemble the distributions of the data from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. Three proportions of missing data (15, 30 and 50%) were imposed on waist circumference at wave 2 using three missing data mechanisms: Missing Completely at Random (MCAR), and a realistic and a more extreme covariate-dependent Missing at Random (MAR) scenarios. We assessed the impact of missing data on two epidemiological analyses: 1) the association between change in waist circumference between waves 1 and 2 and the risk of colorectal cancer, adjusted for waist circumference at wave 1; and 2) the association between waist circumference at wave 2 and the risk of colorectal cancer, not adjusted for waist circumference at wave 1. Results We observed very little bias for complete-case analysis or MI under all missing data scenarios, and the resulting coverage of interval estimates was near the nominal 95% level. MI showed gains in precision when waist circumference was included as a strong auxiliary variable in the imputation model. Conclusions This simulation study, based on data from a longitudinal cohort study, demonstrates that there is little gain in performing MI compared to a complete-case analysis in the presence of up to 50% missing data for the exposure of interest when the data are MCAR, or missing dependent on covariates. MI will result in some gain in precision if a strong auxiliary variable that is not in the analysis model is included in the imputation model. PMID:23947681

  1. A Time Series Study of Lophelia pertusa and Reef Megafauna Responses to Drill Cuttings Exposure on the Norwegian Margin

    PubMed Central

    Purser, Autun

    2015-01-01

    As hotspots of local biodiversity in the deep sea, preservation of cold-water coral reef communities is of great importance. In European waters the most extensive reefs are found at depths of 300 – 500 m on the continental margin. In Norwegian waters many of these reefs are located in areas of interest for oil and gas exploration and production. In this study drilling was carried out in the Morvin drill field in proximity to a number of small Lophelia pertusa coral reefs (closest reefs 100 m upstream and 350 m downstream of point of waste drill material release). In a novel monitoring study, ROV video surveys of 9 reefs were conducted prior, during, immediately after and >1 year after drilling operations. Behavior of coral polyps inhabiting reefs exposed to differing concentrations of drill cuttings and drilling fluids (waste drilling material) were compared. Levels of expected exposure to these waste materials were determined for each reef by modelling drill cutting transport following release, using accurate in-situ hydrodynamic data collected during the drilling period and drill cutting discharge data as parameters of a dispersal model. The presence / absence of associate reef species (Acesta excavata, Paragorgia arborea and Primnoa resedaeformis) were also determined from each survey video. There were no significant differences in Lophelia pertusa polyp behavior in corals modelled to have been exposed to pulses of >25 ppm drill cutting material and those modelled to be exposed to negligible concentrations of material. From the video data collected, there were no observed degradations of reef structure over time, nor reductions of associate fauna abundance, regardless of modelled exposure concentration at any of the surveyed reefs. This study focused exclusively on adult fauna, and did not assess the potential hazard posed by waste drilling material to coral or other larvae. Video data was collected by various ROV’s, using different camera and lighting setups throughout the survey campaign, making comparison of observations prior, during and post drilling problematic. A standardization of video monitoring in future monitoring campaigns is recommended. PMID:26218658

  2. A Time Series Study of Lophelia pertusa and Reef Megafauna Responses to Drill Cuttings Exposure on the Norwegian Margin.

    PubMed

    Purser, Autun

    2015-01-01

    As hotspots of local biodiversity in the deep sea, preservation of cold-water coral reef communities is of great importance. In European waters the most extensive reefs are found at depths of 300 - 500 m on the continental margin. In Norwegian waters many of these reefs are located in areas of interest for oil and gas exploration and production. In this study drilling was carried out in the Morvin drill field in proximity to a number of small Lophelia pertusa coral reefs (closest reefs 100 m upstream and 350 m downstream of point of waste drill material release). In a novel monitoring study, ROV video surveys of 9 reefs were conducted prior, during, immediately after and >1 year after drilling operations. Behavior of coral polyps inhabiting reefs exposed to differing concentrations of drill cuttings and drilling fluids (waste drilling material) were compared. Levels of expected exposure to these waste materials were determined for each reef by modelling drill cutting transport following release, using accurate in-situ hydrodynamic data collected during the drilling period and drill cutting discharge data as parameters of a dispersal model. The presence / absence of associate reef species (Acesta excavata, Paragorgia arborea and Primnoa resedaeformis) were also determined from each survey video. There were no significant differences in Lophelia pertusa polyp behavior in corals modelled to have been exposed to pulses of >25 ppm drill cutting material and those modelled to be exposed to negligible concentrations of material. From the video data collected, there were no observed degradations of reef structure over time, nor reductions of associate fauna abundance, regardless of modelled exposure concentration at any of the surveyed reefs. This study focused exclusively on adult fauna, and did not assess the potential hazard posed by waste drilling material to coral or other larvae. Video data was collected by various ROV's, using different camera and lighting setups throughout the survey campaign, making comparison of observations prior, during and post drilling problematic. A standardization of video monitoring in future monitoring campaigns is recommended. PMID:26218658

  3. Assessment of chronic effects of tebuconazole on survival, reproduction and growth of Daphnia magna after different exposure times.

    PubMed

    Sancho, E; Villarroel, M J; Ferrando, M D

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the fungicide tebuconazole (0.41, 0.52, 0.71 and 1.14mg/L) on survival, reproduction and growth of Daphnia magna organisms was monitored using 14 and 21 days exposure tests. A third experiment was performed by exposing D. magna to the fungicide for 14 days followed by 7 days of recovery (14+7). In order to test fungicide effects on D. magna, parameters as survival, mean whole body length, mean total number of neonates per female, mean number of broods per female, mean brood size per female, time to first brood/reproduction and intrinsic rate of natural increase (r) were used. Reproduction was seriously affected by tebuconazole. All tebuconazole concentrations tested affected the number of broods per female and day to first brood. At 14-days test, number of neonates per female and body size decreased by concentrations of tebuconazole higher than 0.52mg/L, whereas at 21-days test both parameters were affected at all the concentrations tested. Survival of the daphnids after 14 days fungicide exposure did not exhibited differences among experimental and control groups. In this experiment r value was reduced (in a 22%) when animals were exposed to concentrations of 0.71mg/L and 1.14mg/L. Survival of daphnids exposed during 21 days to 1.14mg/L declined, and the intrinsic rate of natural increase (r) decreased in a 30 % for tebuconazole concentrations higher than 0.41mg/L. Longevity of daphnids pre-exposed to tebuconazole for 14 days and 7 days in clean water did not show differences from control values and all of them survived the 21 days of the test. However, after 7 days in fungicide free medium animals were unable to restore control values for reproductive parameters and length. The maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC) was calculated using the r values as parameter of evaluation. MATC estimations were 0.61mg/L and 0.46mg/L for 14 and 21 days, respectively. Results showed that the number of neonates per female was the highest sensitive parameter to the effects of tebuconazole on D. magna. On the other hand, a recovery period of 7 days in a free toxicant medium would not be longer enough to reestablish normal reproduction parameters in pre-exposed tebuconazole daphnids. PMID:26436476

  4. Association analysis of toluene exposure time with high-throughput mRNA expressions and methylation patterns using in vivo samples.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ji Young; Yu, So Yeon; Kim, Seol Young; Ahn, Jeong Jin; Kim, Youngjoo; Kim, Gi Won; Son, Sang Wook; Park, Jong-Tae; Hwang, Seung Yong

    2016-04-01

    The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) resulting from outdoor air pollution can contribute to major public health problems. However, there has been limited research on the health effects in humans from the inhalation of VOCs. Therefore, this study conducted an in vivo analysis of the effects of toluene, one of the most commonly used chemicals in many industries, on gene expression and methylation over time using the high-throughput technique of microarray analysis. We separated participants into three groups (control, short-term exposure, and long-term exposure) to investigate the influence of toluene exposure time on gene expression. We then comprehensively analyzed and investigated the correlation between variations in gene expression and the occurrence of methylation. Twenty-six genes were upregulated and hypomethylated, while 32 genes were downregulated and hypermethylated. The pathways of these genes were confirmed to be associated with cell survival and the immune system. Based on our findings, these genes can help predict the effects of time-dependent exposure to toluene on human health. Thus, observations from our data may have implications for the identification of biomarkers of toluene exposure. PMID:26717081

  5. In-situ Real-Time Monitoring of Volatile Organic Compound Exposure and Heart Rate Variability for Patients with Multiple Chemical Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Mizukoshi, Atsushi; Kumagai, Kazukiyo; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Noguchi, Miyuki; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Kumano, Hiroaki; Sakabe, Kou; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    2015-10-01

    In-situ real-time monitoring of volatile organic compound (VOC) exposure and heart rate variability (HRV) were conducted for eight multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) patients using a VOC monitor, a Holter monitor, and a time-activity questionnaire for 24 h to identify the relationship between VOC exposure, biological effects, and subjective symptoms in actual life. The results revealed no significantly different parameters for averaged values such as VOC concentration, HF (high frequency), and LF (low frequency) to HF ratio compared with previous data from healthy subjects (Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2010, 7, 4127-4138). Significant negative correlations for four subjects were observed between HF and amounts of VOC change. These results suggest that some patients show inhibition of parasympathetic activities along with VOC exposure as observed in healthy subjects. Comparing the parameters during subjective symptoms and normal condition, VOC concentration and/or VOC change were high except for one subject. HF values were low for five subjects during subjective symptoms. Examining the time-series data for VOC exposure and HF of each subject showed that the subjective symptoms, VOC exposure, and HF seemed well related in some symptoms. Based on these characteristics, prevention measures of symptoms for each subject may be proposed. PMID:26445055

  6. In-situ Real-Time Monitoring of Volatile Organic Compound Exposure and Heart Rate Variability for Patients with Multiple Chemical Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Mizukoshi, Atsushi; Kumagai, Kazukiyo; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Noguchi, Miyuki; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Kumano, Hiroaki; Sakabe, Kou; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    In-situ real-time monitoring of volatile organic compound (VOC) exposure and heart rate variability (HRV) were conducted for eight multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) patients using a VOC monitor, a Holter monitor, and a time-activity questionnaire for 24 h to identify the relationship between VOC exposure, biological effects, and subjective symptoms in actual life. The results revealed no significantly different parameters for averaged values such as VOC concentration, HF (high frequency), and LF (low frequency) to HF ratio compared with previous data from healthy subjects (Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2010, 7, 4127–4138). Significant negative correlations for four subjects were observed between HF and amounts of VOC change. These results suggest that some patients show inhibition of parasympathetic activities along with VOC exposure as observed in healthy subjects. Comparing the parameters during subjective symptoms and normal condition, VOC concentration and/or VOC change were high except for one subject. HF values were low for five subjects during subjective symptoms. Examining the time-series data for VOC exposure and HF of each subject showed that the subjective symptoms, VOC exposure, and HF seemed well related in some symptoms. Based on these characteristics, prevention measures of symptoms for each subject may be proposed. PMID:26445055

  7. Air pollution and early deaths in the United States. Part II: Attribution of PM2.5 exposure to emissions species, time, location and sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedoussi, Irene C.; Barrett, Steven R. H.

    2014-12-01

    Combustion emissions constitute the largest source of anthropogenic emissions in the US, and lead to the degradation of air quality and human health. In Part I we computed the population fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure and number of early deaths caused by emissions from six major sectors: electric power generation, industry, commercial and residential activities, road transportation, marine transportation and rail transportation. In Part II we attribute exposure and early deaths to sectors, emissions species, time of emission, and location of emission. We apply a long-term adjoint sensitivity analysis and calculate the four dimensional sensitivities (time and space) of PM2.5 exposure with respect to each emissions species. Epidemiological evidence is used to relate increased population exposure to premature mortalities. This is the first regional application of the adjoint sensitivity analysis method to characterize long-term air pollution exposure. (A global scale application has been undertaken related to intercontinental pollution.) We find that for the electric power generation sector 75% of the attributable PM2.5 exposure is due to SO2 emissions, and 80% of the annual impacts are attributed to emissions from April to September. In the road transportation sector, 29% of PM2.5 exposure is due to NOx emissions and 33% is from ammonia (NH3), which is a result of emissions after-treatment technologies. We estimate that the benefit of reducing NH3 emissions from road transportation is ∼20 times that of NOx per unit mass. 75% of the road transportation ammonia impacts occur during the months October to March. We publicly release the sensitivity matrices computed, noting their potential use as a rapid air quality policy assessment tool.

  8. GPS-based microenvironment tracker (MicroTrac) model to estimate time-location of individuals for air pollution exposure assessments: model evaluation in central North Carolina.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Breen MS; Long TC; Schultz BD; Crooks J; Breen M; Langstaff JE; Isaacs KK; Tan YM; Williams RW; Cao Y; Geller AM; Devlin RB; Batterman SA; Buckley TJ

    2014-07-01

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessment is the estimation of the time spent by individuals in various microenvironments (ME). Accounting for the time spent in different ME with different pollutant concentrations can reduce exposure misclassifications, while failure to do so can add uncertainty and bias to risk estimates. In this study, a classification model, called MicroTrac, was developed to estimate time of day and duration spent in eight ME (indoors and outdoors at home, work, school; inside vehicles; other locations) from global positioning system (GPS) data and geocoded building boundaries. Based on a panel study, MicroTrac estimates were compared with 24-h diary data from nine participants, with corresponding GPS data and building boundaries of home, school, and work. MicroTrac correctly classified the ME for 99.5% of the daily time spent by the participants. The capability of MicroTrac could help to reduce the time-location uncertainty in air pollution exposure models and exposure metrics for individuals in health studies.

  9. GPS-based microenvironment tracker (MicroTrac) model to estimate time-location of individuals for air pollution exposure assessments: model evaluation in central North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael S; Long, Thomas C; Schultz, Bradley D; Crooks, James; Breen, Miyuki; Langstaff, John E; Isaacs, Kristin K; Tan, Yu-Mei; Williams, Ronald W; Cao, Ye; Geller, Andrew M; Devlin, Robert B; Batterman, Stuart A; Buckley, Timothy J

    2014-07-01

    A critical aspect of air pollution exposure assessment is the estimation of the time spent by individuals in various microenvironments (ME). Accounting for the time spent in different ME with different pollutant concentrations can reduce exposure misclassifications, while failure to do so can add uncertainty and bias to risk estimates. In this study, a classification model, called MicroTrac, was developed to estimate time of day and duration spent in eight ME (indoors and outdoors at home, work, school; inside vehicles; other locations) from global positioning system (GPS) data and geocoded building boundaries. Based on a panel study, MicroTrac estimates were compared with 24-h diary data from nine participants, with corresponding GPS data and building boundaries of home, school, and work. MicroTrac correctly classified the ME for 99.5% of the daily time spent by the participants. The capability of MicroTrac could help to reduce the time-location uncertainty in air pollution exposure models and exposure metrics for individuals in health studies. PMID:24619294

  10. Effect of Exposure Time and Organic Matter on Efficacy of Antimicrobial Compounds against Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Kalchayanand, Norasak; Koohmaraie, Mohammad; Wheeler, Tommy L

    2016-04-01

    Several antimicrobial compounds are in commercial meat processing plants for pathogen control on beef carcasses. However, the efficacy of the method used is influenced by a number of factors, such as spray pressure, temperature, type of chemical and concentration, exposure time, method of application, equipment design, and the stage in the process that the method is applied. The objective of this study was to evaluate effectiveness of time of exposure of various antimicrobial compounds against nine strains of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and four strains of Salmonella in aqueous antimicrobial solutions with and without organic matter. Non-O157 STEC, STEC O157:H7, and Salmonella were exposed to the following aqueous antimicrobial solutions with or without beef purge for 15, 30, 60, 120, 300, 600, and 1,800 s: (i) 2.5% lactic acid, (ii) 4.0% lactic acid, (iii) 2.5% Beefxide, (iv) 1% Aftec 3000, (v) 200 ppm of peracetic acid, (vi) 300 ppm of hypobromous acid, and (vii) water as a control. In general, increasing exposure time to antimicrobial compounds significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increased the effectiveness against pathogens tested. In aqueous antimicrobial solutions without organic matter, both peracetic acid and hypobromous acid were the most effective in inactivating populations of STEC and Salmonella, providing at least 5.0-log reductions with exposure for 15 s. However, in antimicrobials containing organic matter, 4.0% lactic acid was the most effective compound in reducing levels of STEC and Salmonella, providing 2- to 3-log reductions with exposure for 15 s. The results of this study indicated that organic matter and exposure time influenced the efficacy of antimicrobial compounds against pathogens, especially with oxidizer compounds. These factors should be considered when choosing an antimicrobial compound for an intervention. PMID:27052859

  11. Time-dependent effects of waterborne copper exposure influencing hepatic lipid deposition and metabolism in javelin goby Synechogobius hasta and their mechanism.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Chen, Qi-Liang; Luo, Zhi; Shi, Xi; Pan, Ya-Xiong; Song, Yu-Feng; Zhuo, Mei-Qin; Wu, Kun

    2014-10-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the time-course of waterborne chronic copper (Cu) exposure effects influencing hepatic lipid deposition and metabolism in javelin goby Synechogobius hasta and their mechanisms. S. hasta were exposed to four waterborne Cu concentrations (2 (control), 18, 38 and 55 μg Cu/l) for 60 days. Sampling occurred on day 30 and day 60, respectively. Survival decreased and hepatic Cu content increased with increasing Cu levels. On day 30, Cu exposure increased hepatic lipid content, viscerosomatic index (VSI) and hepatosomatic index (HSI), and activities of lipogenic enzymes (6PGD, G6PD, ME, ICDH and FAS) as well as the mRNA levels of 6PGD, G6PD, ME, FAS, ACCα, LPL, PPARγ and SREBP-1 in the liver. However, the mRNA levels of ATGL, HSL and PPARα declined following Cu exposure. On day 60, Cu exposure reduced hepatic lipid content, HSI, VSI, activities of G6PD, ME, ICDH and FAS, and the mRNA expression of 6PGD, G6PD, ME, FAS and SREBP-1, but increased mRNA expression of CPT 1, HSL and PPARα. The differential Pearson correlation between transcriptional changes of genes encoding transcription factors (PPARα, PPARγ and SREBP-1), and the activities and mRNA expression of enzymes involved in lipogenesis and lipolysis were observed on day 30 and day 60, respectively. Cu exposure for 30 days induced hepatic lipid accumulation by stimulating lipogenesis and inhibiting lipolysis. However, 60-day Cu exposure reduced hepatic lipid content by inhibiting lipogenesis and stimulating lipolysis. To our knowledge, for the first time, the present study provided experimental evidence that waterborne chronic Cu exposure differentially influenced genes involved in lipogenic and lipolytic metabolic pathway and the enzymes encoded in a duration-dependent manner in fish, and provided new insight into the relationship between metal toxicity and lipid metabolism. PMID:25087000

  12. Radiation Metabolomics. 2. Dose- and Time-Dependent Urinary Excretion of Deaminated Purines and Pyrimidines after Sublethal Gamma-Radiation Exposure in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tyburski, John B.; Patterson, Andrew D.; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Slavík, Josef; Fornace, Albert J.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Idle, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-radiation exposure of humans is a major public health concern as the threat of terrorism and potential hostile use of radiological devices increases worldwide. We report here the effects of sublethal γ-radiation exposure on the mouse urinary metabolome determined using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-coupled time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics. Five urinary biomarkers of sublethal radiation exposure that were statistically significantly elevated during the first 24 h after exposure to doses ranging from 1 to 3 Gy were unequivocally identified by tandem mass spectrometry. These are deaminated purine and pyrimidine derivatives, namely, thymidine, 2′-deoxyuridine, 2′-deoxyxanthosine, xanthine and xanthosine. Furthermore, the aminopyrimidine 2′-deoxycytidine appeared to display reduced urinary excretion at 2 and 3 Gy. The elevated biomarkers displayed a time-dependent excretion, peaking in urine at 8–12 h but returning to baseline by 36 h after exposure. It is proposed that 2′-deoxyuridine and 2′-deoxyxanthosine arise as a result of γ irradiation by nitrosative deamination of 2′-deoxycytidine and 2′-deoxyguanosine, respectively, and that this further leads to increased synthesis of thymidine, xanthine and xanthosine. The urinary excretion of deaminated purines and pyrimidines, at the expense of aminopurines and aminopyrimidines, appears to form the core of the urinary radiation metabolomic signature of mice exposed to sublethal doses of ionizing radiation. PMID:19580506

  13. Regularly scheduled, day-time, slow-onset 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure does not depress serum melatonin concentration in nonhuman primates

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.; Orr, J.L.; Reiter, R.J.; Barlow-Walden, L.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments conducted with laboratory rodents indicate that exposure to 60 Hz electric fields or magnetic fields can suppress nocturnal melatonin concentrations in pineal gland and blood. In three experiments employing three field-exposed and three sham-exposed nonhuman primates, each implanted with an indwelling venous cannula to allow repeated blood sampling, the authors studied the effects of either 6 kV/m and 50 {micro}T (0.5 G) or 30 kV/m and 100 {micro}T (1.0 G) on serum melatonin patterns. The fields were ramped on and off slowly, so that no transients occurred. Extensive quality control for the melatonin assay, computerized control and monitoring of field intensities, and consistent exposure protocols were used. No changes in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration resulted from 6 weeks of day-time exposure with slow field onset/offset and a highly regular exposure protocol. These results indicate that, under the conditions tested, day-time exposure to 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields in combination does not result in melatonin suppression in primates.

  14. REAL-TIME AND INTEGRATED MEASUREMENT OF POTENTIAL HUMAN EXPOSURE TO PARTICLE-BOUND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAHS) FROM AIRCRAFT EXHAUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time monitors and low-volume air samplers were used to measure the potential human exposure to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations during various flight-related and ground-support activities of C-130H aircraft at an Air National Guard base. Three...

  15. Effect of exposure time and organic matter on efficacy of antimicrobial compounds against Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia coli and Salmonella

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several antimicrobial compounds are in commercial meat processing plants for the purpose of pathogens control on beef carcasses. However, the efficacy of the method used is influenced by a number of factors such as spray pressure, temperature, type of chemical and concentration, exposure time, metho...

  16. INDOOR/OUTDOOR AEROSOL CONCENTRATION RATIOS DURING THE 1999 FRESNO PARTICULATE MATTER EXPOSURE STUDIES AS A FUNCTION OF SIZE, SEASON, AND TIME OF DAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1999 Fresno particulate matter exposure studies tools place in February (winter season) and April/May (spring season) for two periods of four weeks. During that time, near-continuous measurements of indoor and outdoor aerosol concentrations were made with a scanning mobilit...

  17. Antibacterial activity of oregano oil against antibiotic resistant Salmonella enterica on organic leafy greens at varying exposure times and storage temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of oregano oil on four organic leafy greens (iceberg and romaine lettuces and mature and baby spinaches) inoculated with Salmonella Newport as a function of treatment exposure times as well as storage temperatures. Leaf samples were wash...

  18. Development of the murine and human immune system: differential effects of immunotoxicants depend on time of exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Holladay, S D; Smialowicz, R J

    2000-01-01

    Fetal and early postnatal life represent critical periods in vertebrate immune system development. Disruption of such development by perinatal immunotoxic chemical exposure has been widely described in experimental animal models. The resultant inhibited postnatal immune responses in such animals are often more dramatic and persistent than those after exposure during adult life. Further, recent reports suggest that prenatal exposure to immunotoxicants may exacerbate postnatal aberrant immune responses (e.g., hypersensitivity disorders and autoimmune disease) in genetically predisposed rodents. Limited information is available regarding the possibility of inhibited postnatal immune capacity in humans as a result of developmental immunotoxicant exposure. The multifactorial nature of hypersensitivity and autoimmune responses will further complicate the elucidation of possible relationships between chemical exposure during ontogeny of the human immune system and immune-mediated disease later in life. Taken together, however, the available animal data suggest the potential for altered postnatal immune function in humans exposed to immunotoxicants (e.g., environmental chemicals and therapeutic agents) during fetal and/or early postnatal life. PMID:10852846

  19. Air pollution exposure during critical time periods in gestation and alterations in cord blood lymphocyte distribution: a cohort of livebirths

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Toxic exposures have been shown to influence maturation of the immune system during gestation. This study investigates the association between cord blood lymphocyte proportions and maternal exposure to air pollution during each gestational month. Methods Cord blood was analyzed using a FACSort flow cytometer to determine proportions of T lymphocytes (CD3+ cells and their subsets, CD4+ and CD8+), B lymphocytes (CD19+) and natural killer (NK) cells. Ambient air concentrations of 12 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and particulate matter < 2.5 micrometer in diameter (PM2.5) were measured using fixed site monitors. Arithmetic means of these pollutants, calculated for each gestational month, were used as exposure metrics. Data on covariates were obtained from medical records and questionnaires. Multivariable linear regression models were fitted to estimate associations between monthly PAH or PM2.5 and cord blood lymphocytes, adjusting for year of birth and district of residence and, in further models, gestational season and number of prior live births. Results The adjusted models show significant associations between PAHs or PM2.5 during early gestation and increases in CD3+ and CD4+ lymphocytes percentages and decreases in CD19+ and NK cell percentages in cord blood. In contrast, exposures during late gestation were associated with decreases in CD3+ and CD4+ fractions and increases in CD19+ and NK cell fractions. There was no significant association between alterations in lymphocyte distribution and air pollution exposure during the mid gestation. Conclusions PAHs and PM2.5 in ambient air may influence fetal immune development via shifts in cord blood lymphocytes distributions. Associations appear to differ by exposure in early versus late gestation. PMID:20678227

  20. Inhibition of Cancer Cell Growth by Exposure to a Specific Time-Varying Electromagnetic Field Involves T-Type Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Carly A.; Buckner, Alison L.; Koren, Stan A.; Persinger, Michael A.; Lafrenie, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) exposures affect many biological systems. The reproducibility of these effects is related to the intensity, duration, frequency, and pattern of the EMF. We have shown that exposure to a specific time-varying EMF can inhibit the growth of malignant cells. Thomas-EMF is a low-intensity, frequency-modulated (25-6 Hz) EMF pattern. Daily, 1 h, exposures to Thomas-EMF inhibited the growth of malignant cell lines including B16-BL6, MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and HeLa cells but did not affect the growth of non-malignant cells. Thomas-EMF also inhibited B16-BL6 cell proliferation in vivo. B16-BL6 cells implanted in syngeneic C57b mice and exposed daily to Thomas-EMF produced smaller tumours than in sham-treated controls. In vitro studies showed that exposure of malignant cells to Thomas-EMF for > 15 min promoted Ca2+ influx which could be blocked by inhibitors of voltage-gated T-type Ca2+ channels. Blocking Ca2+ uptake also blocked Thomas-EMF-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Exposure to Thomas-EMF delayed cell cycle progression and altered cyclin expression consistent with the decrease in cell proliferation. Non-malignant cells did not show any EMF-dependent changes in Ca2+ influx or cell growth. These data confirm that exposure to a specific EMF pattern can affect cellular processes and that exposure to Thomas-EMF may provide a potential anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25875081

  1. Inhibition of cancer cell growth by exposure to a specific time-varying electromagnetic field involves T-type calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Buckner, Carly A; Buckner, Alison L; Koren, Stan A; Persinger, Michael A; Lafrenie, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic field (EMF) exposures affect many biological systems. The reproducibility of these effects is related to the intensity, duration, frequency, and pattern of the EMF. We have shown that exposure to a specific time-varying EMF can inhibit the growth of malignant cells. Thomas-EMF is a low-intensity, frequency-modulated (25-6 Hz) EMF pattern. Daily, 1 h, exposures to Thomas-EMF inhibited the growth of malignant cell lines including B16-BL6, MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and HeLa cells but did not affect the growth of non-malignant cells. Thomas-EMF also inhibited B16-BL6 cell proliferation in vivo. B16-BL6 cells implanted in syngeneic C57b mice and exposed daily to Thomas-EMF produced smaller tumours than in sham-treated controls. In vitro studies showed that exposure of malignant cells to Thomas-EMF for > 15 min promoted Ca(2+) influx which could be blocked by inhibitors of voltage-gated T-type Ca(2+) channels. Blocking Ca(2+) uptake also blocked Thomas-EMF-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Exposure to Thomas-EMF delayed cell cycle progression and altered cyclin expression consistent with the decrease in cell proliferation. Non-malignant cells did not show any EMF-dependent changes in Ca(2+) influx or cell growth. These data confirm that exposure to a specific EMF pattern can affect cellular processes and that exposure to Thomas-EMF may provide a potential anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25875081

  2. Hypothetical Exposure Limits for Oil-Based Metalworking Fluids and Cardiovascular Mortality in a Cohort of Autoworkers: Structural Accelerated Failure Time Models in a Public Health Framework

    PubMed Central

    Picciotto, Sally; Peters, Annette; Eisen, Ellen A.

    2015-01-01

    Occupational exposure to aerosolized particles of oil-based metalworking fluid was recently linked to deaths from ischemic heart disease. The current recommended exposure limits might be insufficient. Studying cardiovascular mortality is challenging because symptoms can induce sicker workers to reduce their exposure, causing healthy-worker survivor bias. G-estimation of accelerated failure time models reduces this bias and permits comparison of multiple exposure interventions. Michigan autoworkers from the United AutoWorkers–General Motors cohort (n = 38,666) were followed from 1941 through 1994. Separate binary variables indicated whether annual exposure exceeded a series of potential limits. Separate g-estimation analyses for each limit yielded the total number of life-years that could have been saved among persons who died from specific cardiovascular causes by enforcing that exposure limit. Banning oil-based fluids would have saved an estimated 4,003 (95% confidence interval: 2,200, 5,807) life-years among those who died of ischemic heart disease. Estimates for cardiovascular disease overall, acute myocardial infarction, and cerebrovascular disease were 3,500 (95% confidence interval: 1,350, 5,651), 2,932 (95% confidence interval: 1,587, 4,277), and 917 (95% confidence interval: −80, 1,913) life-years, respectively. A limit of 0.01 mg/m3 would have had a similar impact on cerebrovascular disease but one only half as great on ischemic heart disease. Analyses suggest that limiting exposure to metalworking fluids could have saved many life-years lost to cardiovascular diseases in this cohort. PMID:25816818

  3. Measures of activity-based pedestrian exposure to the risk of vehicle-pedestrian collisions: space-time path vs. potential path tree methods.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shenjun; Loo, Becky P Y; Lam, Winnie W Y

    2015-02-01

    Research on the extent to which pedestrians are exposed to road collision risk is important to the improvement of pedestrian safety. As precise geographical information is often difficult and costly to collect, this study proposes a potential path tree method derived from time geography concepts in measuring pedestrian exposure. With negative binomial regression (NBR) and geographically weighted Poisson regression (GWPR) models, the proposed probabilistic two-anchor-point potential path tree (PPT) approach (including the equal and weighted PPT methods) are compared with the deterministic space-time path (STP) method. The results indicate that both STP and PPT methods are useful tools in measuring pedestrian exposure. While the STP method can save much time, the PPT methods outperform the STP method in explaining the underlying vehicle-pedestrian collision pattern. Further research efforts are needed to investigate the influence of walking speed and route choice. PMID:25555021

  4. “Estimating Regional Background Air Quality using Space/Time Ordinary Kriging to Support Exposure Studies”

    EPA Science Inventory

    Local-scale dispersion models are increasingly being used to perform exposure assessments. These types of models, while able to characterize local-scale air quality at increasing spatial scale, however, lack the ability to include background concentration in their overall estimat...

  5. Predicting Changes in PM Exposure Over Time at U.S. Trucking Terminals Using Structural Equation Modeling Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mary E.; Laden, Francine; Hart, Jaime E.; Garshick, Eric; Blicharz, Andrew; Smith, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzes the temporal variability of occupational and environmental exposures to fine particulate matter in the U.S. trucking industry and tests the predictive ability of a novel multilayer statistical approach to occupational exposure modeling using structural equation modeling (SEM) techniques. For these purposes, elemental carbon mass in PM<1 µm at six U.S. trucking terminals were measured twice during the same season up to 2 years apart, observing concentrations in the indoor loading dock (median EC: period 1 = 0.65 µg/m3; period 2 = 0.94 µg/m3 ) and outdoor background location (median EC: period 1 = 0.46 µg/m3 ; period 2 = 0.67 µg/m3 ), as well as in the truck cabs of local drivers while on the road (median EC: period 1=1.09 µg/m3 ; period 2 = 1.07 µg/m3 ). There was a general trend toward higher exposures during the second sampling trips; however, these differences were statistically significant in only a few cases and were largely attributable to changes in weather patterns (wind speed, precipitation, etc.). Once accounting for systematic prediction errors in background concentrations, the SEM approach provided a strong fit for work-related exposures in this occupational setting. PMID:19367483

  6. Identification of fipronil metabolites in rodents by time-of-flight mass spectrometry for application in a human exposure study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fipronil is a phenylpyrazole insecticide commonly used in residential and agricultural applications. To understand more about the potential risks associated with fipronil, dosed Long Evans rats were evaluated for metabolites to develop a set of biomarkers for use in human exposur...

  7. Significance of the changes occurring in the levels of interleukins, SOD and MDA in rat pulmonary tissue following exposure to different altitudes and exposure times

    PubMed Central

    YUHAI, GU; ZHEN, ZHAO

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the changes occurring in the levels of interleukin, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in rat lung tissue at different altitudes and times, and to determine the significance of such changes. A total of 88 Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups as follows: the control group [low altitude (LA), 1,500 m; n=8], the moderate altitude group (MA group, 2,260 m; n=40) and the high altitude group (HA group, 5,000 m; n=40). The moderate and high altitude groups were subdivided into the 1, 3, 7, 15 and 30 day groups (MA1, 3, 7, 15, 30 and HA1, 3, 7, 15, 30; n=8). The levels of interleukins (IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10) in the rat lung tissue were determined by ELISA. The WST-1 Cell Proliferation Assay kit and total bile acids assay were used to determine the activity levels of SOD and the content of MDA, respectively. Compared to the control group, the levels of IL-6/IL-8/IL-10 were higher in the MA1 group; however, no significant differences were observed between the other MA subgroups. In addition, no significant differences were detected in SOD activity and the MDA content in the MA subgroups. The levels of IL-6/IL-8 in all the HA subgroups were higher compared to those of the control group, and with the passing of time, the levels of IL-6/IL-8 decreased, but were still higher than those of the control group. However, the level of IL-10 decreased with the passing of time, and was lower in all the HA subgroups compared to the control group. With the passing of time, SOD activity decreased, and the MDA content gradually increased. On the whole, the findings of this study indicate that hypoxia due to high altitude induces lung inflammation and oxidative damage, which subsequently causes severe damage to lung tissue. PMID:26622414

  8. A real-time regional adaptive exposure method for saving dose-area product in x-ray fluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Burion, Steve; Speidel, Michael A.; Funk, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Reduction of radiation dose in x-ray imaging has been recognized as a high priority in the medical community. Here the authors show that a regional adaptive exposure method can reduce dose-area product (DAP) in x-ray fluoroscopy. The authors' method is particularly geared toward providing dose savings for the pediatric population. Methods: The scanning beam digital x-ray system uses a large-area x-ray source with 8000 focal spots in combination with a small photon-counting detector. An imaging frame is obtained by acquiring and reconstructing up to 8000 detector images, each viewing only a small portion of the patient. Regional adaptive exposure was implemented by varying the exposure of the detector images depending on the local opacity of the object. A family of phantoms ranging in size from infant to obese adult was imaged in anteroposterior view with and without adaptive exposure. The DAP delivered to each phantom was measured in each case, and noise performance was compared by generating noise arrays to represent regional noise in the images. These noise arrays were generated by dividing the image into regions of about 6 mm2, calculating the relative noise in each region, and placing the relative noise value of each region in a one-dimensional array (noise array) sorted from highest to lowest. Dose-area product savings were calculated as the difference between the ratio of DAP with adaptive exposure to DAP without adaptive exposure. The authors modified this value by a correction factor that matches the noise arrays where relative noise is the highest to report a final dose-area product savings. Results: The average dose-area product saving across the phantom family was (42 ± 8)% with the highest dose-area product saving in the child-sized phantom (50%) and the lowest in the phantom mimicking an obese adult (23%). Conclusions: Phantom measurements indicate that a regional adaptive exposure method can produce large DAP savings without compromising the noise performance in the image regions with highest noise. PMID:23635281

  9. A real-time regional adaptive exposure method for saving dose-area product in x-ray fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Burion, Steve; Funk, Tobias; Speidel, Michael A.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Reduction of radiation dose in x-ray imaging has been recognized as a high priority in the medical community. Here the authors show that a regional adaptive exposure method can reduce dose-area product (DAP) in x-ray fluoroscopy. The authors' method is particularly geared toward providing dose savings for the pediatric population. Methods: The scanning beam digital x-ray system uses a large-area x-ray source with 8000 focal spots in combination with a small photon-counting detector. An imaging frame is obtained by acquiring and reconstructing up to 8000 detector images, each viewing only a small portion of the patient. Regional adaptive exposure was implemented by varying the exposure of the detector images depending on the local opacity of the object. A family of phantoms ranging in size from infant to obese adult was imaged in anteroposterior view with and without adaptive exposure. The DAP delivered to each phantom was measured in each case, and noise performance was compared by generating noise arrays to represent regional noise in the images. These noise arrays were generated by dividing the image into regions of about 6 mm{sup 2}, calculating the relative noise in each region, and placing the relative noise value of each region in a one-dimensional array (noise array) sorted from highest to lowest. Dose-area product savings were calculated as the difference between the ratio of DAP with adaptive exposure to DAP without adaptive exposure. The authors modified this value by a correction factor that matches the noise arrays where relative noise is the highest to report a final dose-area product savings. Results: The average dose-area product saving across the phantom family was (42 {+-} 8)% with the highest dose-area product saving in the child-sized phantom (50%) and the lowest in the phantom mimicking an obese adult (23%). Conclusions: Phantom measurements indicate that a regional adaptive exposure method can produce large DAP savings without compromising the noise performance in the image regions with highest noise.

  10. Fetal alcohol exposure and temporal vulnerability regional differences in alcohol-induced microencephaly as a function of the timing of binge-like alcohol exposure during rat brain development.

    PubMed

    Maier, S E; Chen, W J; Miller, J A; West, J R

    1997-11-01

    In humans, microcephaly (small head for body size) is a common feature of fetal alcohol syndrome. An analogous measure, termed microencephaly (small brain for body size), can be used for evaluating the detrimental effects of the differential timing of alcohol exposure on brain development in animal model systems. Timed-pregnant rats were exposed to binge-like alcohol during either the first 10 days (first trimester equivalent) or second 10 days of gestation (second trimester equivalent), or the combination of first and second trimesters equivalent for prenatal treatments. Offspring from some of the animals exposed to alcohol during the combined first and second trimesters equivalent were raised artificially from postnatal day (P) 4 through P9 (part of the third trimester equivalent), and also received binge-like alcohol during this period, producing animals that were exposed to alcohol during all three trimesters equivalent. Offspring from untreated dams were also raised artificially and received alcohol only from P4 to P9, thus creating animals that were exposed to alcohol only during part of the third trimester equivalent. All pups were perfused on P10. Appropriate controls (nutritional and normally reared) were used for every alcohol treatment combination. Peak blood alcohol concentrations were not different among the treatment groups for a given sampling time. Significant somatic growth deficits occurred in offspring exposed to alcohol for the equivalent of all three trimesters, compared with offspring exposed to alcohol during other periods. Brain growth in offspring also was significantly affected by the timing of alcohol exposure. The whole brain, forebrain, and cerebellum to body weight ratios of pups exposed to alcohol during the third trimester had more significant brain growth deficits than pups in groups exposed to alcohol during other times of brain development. Although alcohol exposure during the third trimester had a significant detrimental impact on overall brain growth, significant differences in temporal vulnerability were also found for the brainstem to body weight ratios. Offspring of dams exposed to alcohol during the first trimester had the same magnitude of deficit as those exposed to alcohol during the third trimester, and those two groups were significantly deficient compared with the groups exposed to alcohol at other times, suggesting some differential vulnerability of this region to alcohol-induced injury at different times of development. This study is the first thorough examination of microencephaly and gross regional vulnerability of the developing brain as related to temporal factors of alcohol exposure in an animal model system, and the results support and expand on the findings of the available clinical literature. Furthermore, our results substantiate claims that the cessation of alcohol before the third trimester can lessen the severity of some alcohol-related birth deficits. PMID:9394113

  11. A CROSS-PROVINCE ANALYSIS OF URBAN AND RURAL INDOOR PM2.5 EXPOSURE IN CHINA USING TIME USE SURVEY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Yoko; Guo, Minna; Kurata, Gakuji; Matsuoka, Yuzuru

    In developing countries in Asia and other parts of the world, most energy sources used in the home are solid fuels such as coal and biomass (firewood, crop residue and animal dung). Particulate matter 2.5, consisting of particles with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 um or less, produced through combustion of these fuels inside the residence for cooking and heating has an adverse impact on people's health. We estimated PM2.5 exposure concentration in indoor microenvironment for each cohort of urban and rural area in ten provinces of China, using statistical data on time use survey and domestic energy consumption. The study found that, in each province, the exposure concentration in rural area was higher than in urban area, unemployed women between the ages of 60 and 64 had the highest estimate for exposure concentration at 3027 μg/m3. The study also found that the exposure concentration for individual cohorts in each province was greatly affected by people's use of time indoors, fuel consumption such as coal or biomass and floor space.

  12. A Perceptual Pathway to Bias: Interracial Exposure Reduces Abrupt Shifts in Real-Time Race Perception That Predict Mixed-Race Bias.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jonathan B; Pauker, Kristin; Sanchez, Diana T

    2016-04-01

    In two national samples, we examined the influence of interracial exposure in one's local environment on the dynamic process underlying race perception and its evaluative consequences. Using a mouse-tracking paradigm, we found in Study 1 that White individuals with low interracial exposure exhibited a unique effect of abrupt, unstable White-Black category shifting during real-time perception of mixed-race faces, consistent with predictions from a neural-dynamic model of social categorization and computational simulations. In Study 2, this shifting effect was replicated and shown to predict a trust bias against mixed-race individuals and to mediate the effect of low interracial exposure on that trust bias. Taken together, the findings demonstrate that interracial exposure shapes the dynamics through which racial categories activate and resolve during real-time perceptions, and these initial perceptual dynamics, in turn, may help drive evaluative biases against mixed-race individuals. Thus, lower-level perceptual aspects of encounters with racial ambiguity may serve as a foundation for mixed-race prejudice. PMID:26976082

  13. Naive Hypothesis Testing for Case Series Analysis with Time-Varying Exposure Onset Measurement Error: Inference for Infection-Cardiovascular Risk in Patients on Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Sandra M.; Dalrymple, Lorien S.; Şentürk, Damla

    2014-01-01

    Summary The case series method is useful in studying the relationship between time-varying exposures, such as infections, and acute events observed during the observation periods of individuals. It provides estimates of the relative incidences of events in risk periods (e.g., 30-day period after infections) relative to the baseline periods. When the times of exposure onsets are not known precisely, application of the case series model ignoring exposure onset measurement error leads to biased estimates. Bias-correction is necessary in order to understand the true directions and effect sizes associated with exposure risk periods, although uncorrected estimators have smaller variance. Thus, inference via hypothesis testing based on uncorrected test statistics, if valid, is potentially more powerful. Furthermore, the tests can be implemented in standard software and do not require additional auxiliary data. In this work, we examine the validity and power of naive hypothesis testing, based on applying the case series analysis to the imprecise data without correcting for the error. Based on simulation studies and theoretical calculations, we determine the validity and relative power of common hypothesis tests of interest in case series analysis. In particular, we illustrate that the tests for the global null hypothesis, the overall null hypotheses associated with all risk periods or all age effects are valid. However, tests of individual risk period parameters are not generally valid. Practical guidelines are provided and illustrated with data from patients on dialysis. PMID:23731166

  14. Reduction of Escherichia coli on surfaces of utensils and development of a predictive model as a function of concentration and exposure time of chlorine.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung-Bum; Kim, Seok-Won; Ha, Sang-Do

    2012-01-01

    Cross-contamination to fruit and vegetables can readily occur through contaminated surfaces; thus, there is a need to develop methods to inactivate microorganisms on the surfaces of various materials. The aim of this study was to develop methods to reduce the levels of Escherichia coli on the surfaces of various materials and to develop a predictive model as a function of chlorine concentration and exposure time. The reduction of E. coli on the surfaces of stainless steel, plastic, wood, rubber, glass, and ceramic at various chlorine concentrations (0-200 ppm) after a 0-5-min exposure was evaluated. The surface treatment at the maximum chlorine concentration (200 ppm) over a 5-min exposure reduced the E. coli contamination levels to 5.30, 5.18, 3.34, 4.69, 5.05, and 5.53 log CFU/cm(2) on the surfaces of stainless steel, plastic, wood, rubber, glass, and ceramic, respectively. Using these results, predictive models for the reduction of E. coli on surfaces of various materials using chlorine treatment were developed. Each model was significant (p<0.05) and defined as fit by the lack of fit and probability of normal residuals. It has measured the R(2) value to 0.9746. Therefore, the models presented in this study could be used to determine the minimum concentrations of chlorine and exposure times needed to control E. coli on the surfaces of various materials. PMID:21861704

  15. A geospatial time-aware web interface to deliver information about air pollution and exposure in a big city and its surroundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogliolo, M. P.; Contino, G.

    2014-11-01

    A GIS-based web-mapping system is presented, aimed at providing specialists, stakeholders and population with a simple, while scientifically rigorous, way to obtain information about people exposure to air pollution in the city of Rome (Italy). It combines a geo-spatial visualization with easy access to time dimension and to quantitative information. The study is part of the EXPAH (Population Exposure to PAHs) LIFE+ EC Project, which goal is to identify and quantify children and elderly people exposure to PM2.5-bound Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the atmosphere of Rome, and to assess the impact on human health. The core of the system is a GIS, which database contains data and results of the project research activity. They include daily indoor and outdoor ground measurements and daily maps from simulation modeling of atmospheric PAHs and PM2.5 concentration for the period June 2011-May 2012, and daily and average exposure maps. Datasets have been published as time-enabled standard OGC Web Map Services (WMS). A set of web mapping applications query the web services to produce a set of interactive and time-aware thematic maps. Finding effective ways to communicate risk for human health, and environmental determinants for it, is a topical and challenging task: the web mapping system presented is a prototype of a possible model to disseminate scientific results on these items, providing a sight into impacts of air pollution on people living and working in a big city, and shipping information about the overall exposure, its spatial pattern and levels at specific locations.

  16. Only Fathers Smoking Contributes the Most to Socioeconomic Inequalities: Changes in Socioeconomic Inequalities in Infants Exposure to Second Hand Smoke over Time in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Junko; Tabuchi, Takahiro; Shibanuma, Akira; Yasuoka, Junko; Nakamura, Masakazu; Jimba, Masamine

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to second hand smoke (SHS) is one of the major causes of premature death and disease among children. While socioeconomic inequalities exist for adult smoking, such evidence is limited for SHS exposure in children. Thus, this study examined changes over time in socioeconomic inequalities in infants SHS exposure in Japan. Methods This is a repeated cross-sectional study of 41,833 infants born in 2001 and 32,120 infants born in 2010 in Japan from nationally representative surveys using questionnaires. The prevalence of infants SHS exposure was determined and related to household income and parental education level. The magnitudes of income and educational inequalities in infants SHS exposure were estimated in 2001 and 2010 using both absolute and relative inequality indices. Results The prevalence of SHS exposure in infants declined from 2001 to 2010. The relative index of inequality increased from 0.85 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.80 to 0.89) to 1.47 (95% CI, 1.37 to 1.56) based on income and from 1.22 (95% CI, 1.17 to 1.26) to 2.09 (95% CI, 2.00 to 2.17) based on education. In contrast, the slope index of inequality decreased from 30.9 (95% CI, 29.3 to 32.6) to 20.1 (95% CI, 18.7 to 21.5) based on income and from 44.6 (95% CI, 43.1 to 46.2) to 28.7 (95% CI, 27.3 to 30.0) based on education. Having only a father who smoked indoors was a major contributor to absolute income inequality in infants SHS exposure in 2010, which increased in importance from 45.1% in 2001 to 67.0% in 2010. Conclusions The socioeconomic inequalities in infants second hand smoke exposure increased in relative terms but decreased in absolute terms from 2001 to 2010. Further efforts are needed to encourage parents to quit smoking and protect infants from second hand smoke exposure, especially in low socioeconomic households that include non-smoking mothers. PMID:26431400

  17. Changes in blood manganese concentration and MRI t1 relaxation time during 180 days of stainless steel welding-fume exposure in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jae Hyuck; Kim, Choong Yong; Yang, Seoung Oh; Khang, Hyun Soo; Cheong, Hae Kwan; Lee, Jong Seong; Song, Chang-Woo; Park, Jung Duck; Han, Jeong Hee; Chung, Yong Hyun; Choi, Byung Sun; Kwon, Il Hoon; Cho, Myung Haeng; Yu, Il Je

    2007-01-01

    Welders are at risk of being exposed to high concentrations of welding fumes and developing pneumoconiosis or other welding-fume exposure-related diseases. Among such diseases, manganism resulting from welding-fume exposure remains a controversial issue, as although the movement of manganese into specific brain regions has been established, the similar movement of manganese presented with other metals, such as welding fumes, has not been clearly demonstrated as being similar to that of manganese alone. Meanwhile, the competition between Mn and iron for iron transporters, such as transferrin and DMT-1, to the brain has also been implicated in the welding-fume exposure. Thus, the increased signal intensities in the basal ganglia, including the globus pallidus and subcortical frontal white matter, based on T1-weighted magnetic resonances in welders, require further examination as regards the correspondence with an increased manganese concentration. Accordingly, to investigate the movement of manganese after welding-fume exposure, 6 cynomolgus monkeys were acclimated for 1 mo and assigned to 3 dose groups: unexposed, low dose of (total suspended particulate [TSP] 31 mg/m3, 0.9 mg/m3 of Mn), and high dose of total suspended particulate (62 mg/m3 TSP, 1.95 mg/m3 of Mn). The primates were exposed to manual metal-arc stainless steel (MMA-SS) welding fumes for 2 h/day in an inhalation chamber system equipped with an automatic fume generator for 6 mo. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the basal ganglia were conducted before the initiation of exposure and thereafter every month. During the exposure, the blood chemistry was monitored every 2 wk and the concentrations of metal components in the blood were measured every 2 wk and compared with ambient manganese concentrations. The manganese concentrations in the blood did not show any significant increase until after 2 mo of exposure, and then reached a plateau after 90 days of exposure, showing that an exposure period of at least 60 days was required to build up the blood Mn concentration. Furthermore, as the blood Mn concentration continued to build, a continued decrease in the MRI T1 relaxation time in the basal ganglia was also detected. These data suggested that prolonged inhalation of welding fumes induces a high MRI T1 signal intensity with an elevation of the blood manganese level. The presence of a certain amount of iron or other metals, such as Cr and Ni, in the inhaled welding fumes via inhalation was not found to have a significant effect on the uptake of Mn into the brain or the induction of a high MRI T1 signal intensity. PMID:17127642

  18. Effects of brief cutaneous JP-8 jet fuel exposures on time course of gene expression in the epidermis.

    PubMed

    McDougal, James N; Garrett, Carol M; Amato, Carol M; Berberich, Steven J

    2007-02-01

    The jet fuel jet propulsion fuel 8 (JP-8) has been shown to cause an inflammatory response in the skin, which is characterized histologically by erythema, edema, and hyperplasia. Studies in laboratory animal skin and cultured keratinocytes have identified a variety of changes in protein levels related to inflammation, oxidative damage, apoptosis, and cellular growth. Most of these studies have focused on prolonged exposures and subsequent effects. In an attempt to understand the earliest responses of the skin to JP-8, we have investigated changes in gene expression in the epidermis for up to 8 h after a 1-h cutaneous exposure in rats. After exposure, we separated the epidermis from the rest of the skin with a cryotome and isolated total mRNA. Gene expression was studied with microarray techniques, and changes from sham treatments were analyzed and characterized. We found consistent twofold increases in gene expression of 27 transcripts at 1, 4, and 8 h after the beginning of the 1-h exposure that were related primarily to structural proteins, cell signaling, inflammatory mediators, growth factors, and enzymes. Analysis of pathways changed showed that several signaling pathways were increased at 1 h and that the most significant changes at 8 h were in metabolic pathways, many of which were downregulated. These results confirm and expand many of the previous molecular studies with JP-8. Based on the 1-h changes in gene expression, we hypothesize that the trigger of the JP-8-induced, epidermal stress response is a physical disruption of osmotic, oxidative, and membrane stability which activates gene expression in the signaling pathways and results in the inflammatory, apoptotic, and growth responses that have been previously identified. PMID:17085751

  19. Anxiety Sensitivity Among First-Time Fathers Moderates the Relationship Between Exposure to Stress During Birth and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zerach, Gadi; Magal, Ortal

    2016-05-01

    This longitudinal study examined posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anxiety symptoms among men attending the birth of their first offspring. Furthermore, we examined the moderating role of anxiety sensitivity (AS) and intolerance of uncertainty in the association between exposure to stress during birth and PTSD and anxiety symptoms. Participants were Israeli men (n = 171) who were assessed with self-report questionnaires during the third trimester of pregnancy (T1) and approximately a month following birth (T2). Results show that the rates of postnatal PTSD and anxiety symptoms were relatively low. Subjective exposure to stress during birth and AS predicted PTSD in T2, above and beyond other negative life events and PTSD in T1. In addition, AS moderated the relations between subjective exposure to stress during birth and PTSD symptoms. Pregnancy and childbirth professionals may benefit from the insight that men with high levels of AS might experience childbirth as a highly stressful situation with possible posttraumatic stress symptoms. PMID:26894317

  20. Time course of congener uptake and elimination in rats after short-term inhalation exposure to an airborne polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixture

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin; Adamcakova-Dodd, Andrea; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Hu, Dingfei; Kania-Korwel, Izabela; Hornbuckle, Keri C; Thorne, Peter S

    2012-01-01

    Despite the continued presence of PCBs in indoor and ambient air, few studies have investigated the inhalation route of exposure. While dietary exposure has declined, inhalation of the semi-volatile, lower-chlorinated PCBs has risen in importance. We measured the uptake, distribution and time course of elimination of inhaled PCB congeners to characterize the pulmonary route after short-term exposure. Vapor-phase PCBs were generated from Aroclor 1242 to a nose-only exposure system and characterized for congener levels and profiles. Rats were exposed via inhalation acutely (2.4 mg/m3 for 2 hr) or subacutely (8.2 mg/m3, 2 hr × 10 days), after which pulmonary immune responses and PCB tissue levels were measured. Animals acutely exposed were euthanized at 0, 1, 3, 6 and 12 hr post exposure to assess the time course of PCB uptake and elimination. Following rapid absorption and distribution, PCBs accumulated in adipose tissue, but decayed in other tissues with half-lives increasing in liver (5.6 hr) < lung (8.2 hr) < brain (8.5 hr) < blood (9.7 hr). PCB levels were similar in lung, liver and adipose tissue, lower in brain and lowest in blood. Inhalation of the airborne PCB mixture contributed significantly to the body burden of lower chlorinated congeners. Congeners detected in tissue were mostly ortho-substituted ranging from mono- to pentachlorobiphenyls. Selective uptake and elimination led to accumulation of a distinct congener spectrum in tissue. Minimal evidence of toxicity was observed. PMID:20698547

  1. Estimation of exposure to atmospheric pollutants during pregnancy integrating space-time activity and indoor air levels: Does it make a difference?

    PubMed

    Ouidir, Marion; Giorgis-Allemand, Lise; Lyon-Caen, Sarah; Morelli, Xavier; Cracowski, Claire; Pontet, Sabrina; Pin, Isabelle; Lepeule, Johanna; Siroux, Valérie; Slama, Rémy

    2015-11-01

    Studies of air pollution effects during pregnancy generally only consider exposure in the outdoor air at the home address. We aimed to compare exposure models differing in their ability to account for the spatial resolution of pollutants, space-time activity and indoor air pollution levels. We recruited 40 pregnant women in the Grenoble urban area, France, who carried a Global Positioning System (GPS) during up to 3 weeks; in a subgroup, indoor measurements of fine particles (PM2.5) were conducted at home (n=9) and personal exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was assessed using passive air samplers (n=10). Outdoor concentrations of NO2, and PM2.5 were estimated from a dispersion model with a fine spatial resolution. Women spent on average 16 h per day at home. Considering only outdoor levels, for estimates at the home address, the correlation between the estimate using the nearest background air monitoring station and the estimate from the dispersion model was high (r=0.93) for PM2.5 and moderate (r=0.67) for NO2. The model incorporating clean GPS data was less correlated with the estimate relying on raw GPS data (r=0.77) than the model ignoring space-time activity (r=0.93). PM2.5 outdoor levels were not to moderately correlated with estimates from the model incorporating indoor measurements and space-time activity (r=-0.10 to 0.47), while NO2 personal levels were not correlated with outdoor levels (r=-0.42 to 0.03). In this urban area, accounting for space-time activity little influenced exposure estimates; in a subgroup of subjects (n=9), incorporating indoor pollution levels seemed to strongly modify them. PMID:26300245

  2. Estimation of exposure to atmospheric pollutants during pregnancy integrating space-time activity and indoor air levels: does it make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Marion, OUIDIR; Lise, GIORGIS-ALLEMAND; Sarah, LYON-CAEN; Xavier, MORELLI; Claire, CRACOWSKI; Sabrina, PONTET; Isabelle, PIN; Johanna, LEPEULE; Valérie, SIROUX; Rémy, SLAMA

    2016-01-01

    Studies of air pollution effects during pregnancy generally only consider exposure in the outdoor air at the home address. We aimed to compare exposure models differing in their ability to account for the spatial resolution of pollutants, space-time activity and indoor air pollution levels. We recruited 40 pregnant women in the Grenoble urban area, France, who carried a Global Positioning System (GPS) during up to 3 weeks; in a subgroup, indoor measurements of fine particles (PM2.5) were conducted at home (n=9) and personal exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was assessed using passive air samplers (n=10). Outdoor concentrations of NO2, and PM2.5 were estimated from a dispersion model with a fine spatial resolution. Women spent on average 16 h per day at home. Considering only outdoor levels, for estimates at the home address, the correlation between the estimate using the nearest background air monitoring station and the estimate from the dispersion model was high (r=0.93) for PM2.5 and moderate (r=0.67) for NO2. The model incorporating clean GPS data was less correlated with the estimate relying on raw GPS data (r=0.77) than the model ignoring space-time activity (r=0.93). PM2.5 outdoor levels were not to moderately correlated with estimates from the model incorporating indoor measurements and space-time activity (r=−0.10 to 0.47), while NO2 personal levels were not correlated with outdoor levels (r=−0.42 to 0.03). In this urban area, accounting for space-time activity little influenced exposure estimates; in a subgroup of subjects (n=9), incorporating indoor pollution levels seemed to strongly modify them. PMID:26300245

  3. Exposure-age constraints on the extent, timing and rate of retreat of the last Irish Sea ice stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarroll, Danny; Stone, John O.; Ballantyne, Colin K.; Scourse, James D.; Fifield, L. Keith; Evans, David J. A.; Hiemstra, John F.

    2010-07-01

    We report 23 cosmogenic isotope exposure ages ( 10Be and 36Cl) relating to the maximum extent and deglaciation chronology of the Irish Sea Ice Stream (ISIS), which drained the SW sector of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet. These show that the ISIS failed to reach the Preseli Hills of North Pembrokeshire yet extended southwards to impinge on northern Isles of Scilly (50°N) during the last glacial maximum. Four samples from western Anglesey demonstrate deglaciation of the southern Irish Sea Basin by c. 20-18 ka, and two from the Llŷn Peninsula in northwest Wales, if valid, suggest deglaciation by c. 23-22 ka followed by gradual oscillatory northwards retreat of the ice margin for over 3000 years. An alternative interpretation of our data suggests that ice reached Scilly as late as 22-21 ka then retreated 450 km northwards within the following three millennia, possibly in response to sea level rise and/or intrinsic reorganisation within the last British-Irish Ice Sheet. Samples from upland source areas of the ISIS in NW England and SW Scotland produced exposure ages ≤14.3 ka, suggesting possible persistence of ice in such areas into the Lateglacial Interstade of 14.7-12.9 ka.

  4. Comparison of physiological changes in carp, Cyprinus carpio, induced by several pollutants at sublethal concentrations. I. The dependency on exposure time

    SciTech Connect

    Gluth, G.; Hanke, W.

    1985-04-01

    Carp were exposed to 10 different pollutants at sublethal concentrations for 6, 24, or 72 hr. Blood, liver, and white muscle samples were taken after the exposure time together with samples of control handled fish. Serum concentrations of glucose, cortisol protein, and cholesterol were determined. Similarly, the liver and muscle glycogen contents were measured. The effects of the following pollutants were examined: aldrin (100 micrograms/liter), atrazine (100 micrograms/liter), DDT (50 micrograms/liter), dieldrin (20 micrograms/liter), endrin (2 micrograms/liter), hexachlorbenzene (100 micrograms/liter), lindane (100 micrograms/liter), methanol (1 ml/liter), 4-N-phenol (100 micrograms/liter), toluene (100 microliters/liter). The rises in serum glucose and cortisol were the most frequent changes occurring after exposure to the pollutants. A decline in plasma protein and cholesterol content was also often observed. Liver glycogen concentration increased first in most cases and was reduced after longer exposure. Muscle glycogen was affected differently, sometimes reduced by exposure to the pollutants. The experimental design allows for the gradual increase in toxicity of the pollutants used regarding the applied concentrations. Furthermore, the aim of the paper is to evaluate the tests for proof of toxicity of those chemicals. The determination of serum glucose and cortisol levels can be proposed as mostly useful. The clearest changes in all parameters were found after treatment with 100 micrograms/liter atrazine and 50 micrograms/liter DDT. When serum glucose and cortisol concentrations were quickly elevated, signs for exhaustion could be seen after 72 hr of exposure.

  5. Subsidized childcare and child development in Colombia: effects of Hogares Comunitarios de Bienestar as a function of timing and length of exposure.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Raquel; Fernández, Camila

    2013-11-01

    Rigorous evidence regarding the impact of early care and education on children's development comes primarily from high-income nations. A few studies from Latin America and the Caribbean have identified benefits of conditional cash transfer and home visiting programs on children's development. However, there is still controversy around the impact and cost-effectiveness of childcare approaches. Further research is needed to understand how scaled-up childcare settings may support the development of low-income children in Latin America. To that end, the present study sought to identify the effects of exposure to a subsidized childcare program in Colombia on children's nutritional status, cognitive and socioemotional development. This community-based program, known as Hogares Comunitarios de Bienestar (HCB), serves 800 thousand low-income children under age 6, delivering home-based childcare, supplementary nutrition, and psychosocial stimulation. We analyzed data on 10,173 program beneficiary children (ages 3-6) collected in 2007. We compared beneficiary children who had been in the program for a long time with beneficiary children who had been in the program for a month or less, by age group, to estimate program exposure effects. We used a matching estimator to correct for self-selection into different exposure levels. Results indicated that cognitive development improved 0.15 to 0.3 of a standard deviation (SD) after at least 15 months of exposure for children between 3 and 6 years of age. Socioemotional skills improved 0.12 to 0.3 SD for children older than 3 after at least 15 months of program exposure. No significant gains were found for nutritional status. The estimated benefit-cost ratio ranged from 1.0 to 2.7, depending upon varying discount rates. Findings lend support for a potentially effective strategy to promote the development of low-income children in Colombia and other developing nations. PMID:23312302

  6. Cigarette smoke induced genotoxicity and respiratory tract pathology: evidence to support reduced exposure time and animal numbers in tobacco product testing.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Annette; Ordoñez, Patricia; Thorne, David; Walker, David; Camacho, Oscar M; Büttner, Ansgar; Dillon, Debbie; Meredith, Clive

    2016-06-01

    Many laboratories are working to develop in vitro models that will replace in vivo tests, but occasionally there remains a regulatory expectation of some in vivo testing. Historically, cigarettes have been tested in vivo for 90 days. Recently, methods to reduce and refine animal use have been explored. This study investigated the potential of reducing animal cigarette smoke (CS) exposure to 3 or 6 weeks, and the feasibility of separate lung lobes for histopathology or the Comet assay. Rats were exposed to sham air or CS (1 or 2 h) for 3 or 6 weeks. Respiratory tissues were processed for histopathological evaluation, and Alveolar type II cells (AEC II) isolated for the Comet assay. Blood was collected for Pig-a and micronucleus quantification. Histopathological analyses demonstrated exposure effects, which were generally dependent on CS dose (1 or 2 h, 5 days/week). Comet analysis identified that DNA damage increased in AEC II following 3 or 6 weeks CS exposure, and the level at 6 weeks was higher than 3 weeks. Pig-a mutation or micronucleus levels were not increased. In conclusion, this study showed that 3 weeks of CS exposure was sufficient to observe respiratory tract pathology and DNA damage in isolated AEC II. Differences between the 3 and 6 week data imply that DNA damage in the lung is cumulative. Reducing exposure time, plus analyzing separate lung lobes for DNA damage or histopathology, supports a strategy to reduce and refine animal use in tobacco product testing and is aligned to the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement). PMID:27160659

  7. Exposure levels due to WLAN devices in indoor environments corrected by a time-amplitude factor of distribution of the quasi-stochastic signals.

    PubMed

    Miclaus, Simona; Bechet, Paul; Stratakis, Dimitrios

    2014-12-01

    With the development of radiofrequency technology, radiating quasi-stochastic signals like the wireless local area networks (WLAN), a proper procedure of exposure level assessment is needed. No standardised procedure exists at the moment. While channel power measurement proved to overestimate the field strength, weighting techniques were proposed. The paper compares the exposure levels determined by three different procedures, two of them correcting the field level by weighting. Twenty-three experimental cases of WLAN traffic load are analysed in an indoor environment in controlled conditions. The results show the differences obtained when the duty cycle (DC) method is applied comparatively with the application of weighting based on an amplitude-time correction. Significant exposure level reductions of 52.6-79.2 % from the field determined by frequency domain method and of 36.5-72.8 % from the field determined by the DC weighting method were obtained by time-amplitude method. Specificities of weighting factors probability density functions were investigated and regression analysis was applied for a detailed characterisation of this procedure. PMID:24591729

  8. Time trends in incidence of cutaneous melanoma by detailed anatomical location and patterns of ultraviolet radiation exposure: a retrospective population-based study.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Daniela; Gillgren, Peter; Eloranta, Sandra; Olsson, Henrik; Gordon, Max; Hansson, Johan; Smedby, Karin E

    2015-08-01

    Given the wide public health implications of the melanoma epidemic, ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure patterns contributing to cutaneous melanoma development should be clearly identified. To describe time trends of anatomic sites of melanoma using a UVR exposure model based on clothing and sun habits, we reviewed the medical records of all patients diagnosed with primary invasive melanoma or melanoma in situ (MIS) during the years 1977-78, 1983-84, 1989-90, 1995-96, and 2000-01 (n=3058) in one healthcare region of Sweden. Age-standardized incidence rates and relative risks (RRs) of melanoma by calendar period were estimated for intermittent and chronic UVR exposure sites. From 1977-78 to 2000-01, the incidence rates of all melanomas at intermittent UVR exposure sites increased both among men (7.8-16.5/10 person-years) and among women (7.6-14.6/10 person-years), with a sex-adjusted and age-adjusted RR of 2.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.8-2.4, Ptrend<0.0001]. This increase was evident for both invasive melanoma and MIS. Melanoma at chronic sites increased among men from 1.7 to 2.3/10 person-years, and among women from 1.4 to 1.8/10 person-years, with a corresponding adjusted RR of 1.4 (95% CI 1.0-1.9, Ptrend=0.01), driven primarily by MIS. For melanomas at intermittent UVR exposure sites, the male sex was positively associated with central (core) areas (chest, back, neck, shoulders, thighs; RR 1.7, 95% CI 1.5-1.9), but negatively associated with peripheral areas (lateral arms, lower legs, dorsum of feet; RR 0.3, 95% CI 0.3-0.4), compared with the female sex. Sex-specific intermittent UVR exposure patterns drove the observed increase in melanoma incidence, whereas chronic UVR exposure contributed less. PMID:26050147

  9. Analysis of real-time variables affecting children's exposure to diesel-related pollutants during school bus commutes in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, Lisa D.; Kozawa, Kathleen; Behrentz, Eduardo; Winer, Arthur M.; Fitz, Dennis R.; Pankratz, David V.; Colome, Steven D.; Fruin, Scott A.

    Variables affecting children's exposure during school bus commutes were investigated using real-time measurements of black carbon (BC), particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PB-PAH) and nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) inside 3 conventional diesel school buses, a particle trap-outfitted (TO) diesel school bus and a compressed natural gas (CNG) school bus, while traveling along an urban Los Angeles Unified School District bus route. A video camera was mounted at the front of each bus to record roadway conditions ahead of the bus during each commute. The videotapes from 12 commutes, in conjunction with pollutant concentration time series, were used to determine the influence of variables such as vehicles being followed, bus type and roadway type on pollutant concentrations inside the bus. For all buses tested, the highest concentrations of BC, PB-PAH and NO 2 were observed when following a diesel school bus, especially if that bus was emitting visible exhaust. This result was important because other diesel school buses were responsible for the majority of the diesel vehicle encounters, primarily due to caravanning with each other when leaving a school at the same time. Compared with following a gasoline vehicle or no target, following a smoky diesel school bus yielded BC and PB-PAH concentrations inside the cabin 8 and 11 times higher, respectively, with windows open, and ˜1.8 times higher for both pollutants with windows closed. When other diesel vehicles were not present, pollutant concentrations were highest inside the conventional diesel buses and lowest inside the CNG bus, while the TO diesel bus exhibited intermediate concentrations. Differences in pollutant concentrations between buses were most pronounced with the bus windows closed, and were attributed to a combination of higher concentrations in the exhaust and higher exhaust gas intrusion rates for the conventional diesel buses. Conventional diesel school buses can have a double exposure impact on commuting children: first, exposures to the exhaust from other nearby diesel school buses and, second, exposure to the bus's own exhaust through "self-pollution".

  10. Timing of late Pleistocene glaciation in Mongolia: Surface exposure dating reveals a differentiated pattern of glacial forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pötsch, Steffen; Rother, Henrik; Lorenz, Sebastian; Walther, Michael; Lehmkuhl, Frank

    2015-04-01

    The focus of this study is on the geochronological and paleoclimatic characterization of Pleistocene glaciation in central (Khangai Mountains) and western (Turgen Mountains, Mongolian Altai) Mongolia. These two mountain ranges form a 700 km long SE-NW transect through Mongolia and allow assumptions of the temporal and causal dynamics of regional glaciation and their correlation to other mountain glacier records from Central and High Asia. In order to evaluate the Pleistocene glaciations in Mongolia we undertook geomorphological mapping and cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) surface exposure dating (10Be) in four valley systems located in the Khangai Mountains and Turgen Mountains. In total 46 glacial boulders and roche moutonnées were sampled, prepared and AMS measured to determine their 10Be surface exposure ages. Of these, 26 samples were obtained from the Khangai Mountains (three separate moraine sequences) and 20 samples were taken from the Turgen Mountains (one moraine sequence). Our results give evidence of major ice advances during early MIS-4 (74-71 ka) and MIS-2 (25-20 and 18- 17 ka) in both mountain ranges. However, in the Khangai Mountains of central Mongolia very significant ice advances also occurred during MIS-3 (37-32 ka), which exceeded the ice limits set during the MIS-2 glaciation. These results show that climatic conditions during phases of insolation minima characterized by extremely cold and dry conditions (MIS-4 and MIS-2) produced a favorable setting for major ice expansion in Mongolia. Yet, glacial accumulation in the Khangai Mountains also increased substantially in response to the cool-wet conditions of MIS-3, associated with a possibly greater-than-today input from winter precipitation. These records indicate that in addition to the thermally induced glaciations of MIS-4 and MIS-2, variations in atmospheric moisture supply are also capable of triggering large ice advances as observed during MIS-3. Taken together, this suggests that the role of atmospheric circulation and its significance for controlling regional precipitation results in a more differentiated pattern of late Pleistocene glaciation in Mongolia than previously recognized. Compared to other glacial records from High Asia, the observed patterns of past glaciations in Mongolia show similar results (i.e. ice maxima during interstadial wet phases) compared to monsoon influenced regions in southern Central Asia and NE-Tibet, while major expansion during insolation minima (MIS-4 and MIS-2) are more in tune with glacier responses known from western Central Asia and Siberia.

  11. Effects of long-time elevated temperature exposures on hot-isostatically-pressed power-metallurgy Udimet 700 alloys with reduced cobalt contents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, F. H.

    1984-01-01

    Because almost the entire U.S. consumption of cobalt depends on imports, this metal has been designated "strategic'. The role and effectiveness of cobalt is being evaluated in commercial nickel-base superalloys. Udiment 700 type alloys in which the cobalt content was reduced from the normal 17% down to 12.7%, 8.5%, 4.3%, and 0% were prepared by standard powder metallurgy techniques and hot isostatically pressed into billets. Mechanical testing and microstructural investigations were performed. The mechanical properties of alloys with reduced cobalt contents which were heat-treated identically were equal or better than those of the standard alloy, except that creep rates tended to increase as cobalt was reduced. The effects of long time exposures at 760 C on mechanical properties and at 760 C and 845 C on microstructures were determined. Decreased tensile properties and shorter rupture lives with increased creep rates were observed in alloy modifications. The exposures caused gamma prime particle coarsening and formation of sigma phase in the alloys with higher cobalt contents. Exposure at 845 C also reduced the amount of MC carbides.

  12. Shear-induced platelet receptor shedding by non-physiological high shear stress with short exposure time: glycoprotein Ibα and glycoprotein VI

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zengsheng; Mondal, Nandan K.; Ding, Jun; Gao, Jingya; Griffith, Bartley P.; Wu, Zhongjun J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The structural integrity of platelet receptors is essential for platelets to function normally in hemostasis and thrombosis in response to physiological and pathological stimuli. The aim of this study was to examine the shedding of two key platelet receptors, glycoprotein (GP) Ibα and GPVI, after exposed to the non-physiological high shear stress environment which commonly exists in blood contacting medical devices and stenotic blood vessels. Materials and Methods In this in vitro experiment, we exposed healthy donor blood in our specially designed blood shearing device to three high shear stress levels (150, 225, 300Pa) in combination with two short exposure time conditions (0.05 and 0.5 sec.). The expression and shedding of platelet GPIbα and GPVI receptors in the sheared blood samples were characterized using flow cytometry. The ability of platelet aggregation induced by ristocetin and collagen related to GPIbα and GPVI in the sheared blood samples, respectively, was evaluated by aggregometry. Results and Conclusions Compared to the normal blood, the surface expression of platelet GPIbα and GPVI in the sheared blood significantly decreased with increasing shear stress and exposure time. Moreover, the platelet aggregation induced by ristocetin and collagen reduced remarkably in a similar fashion. In summary non-physiological high shear stresses with short exposure time can induce shedding of platelet GPIbα and GPVI receptors, which may lead platelet dysfunction and influence the coagulation system. This study may provide a mechanistic insight into the platelet dysfunction and associated bleeding complication in patients supported by certain blood contacting medical devices. PMID:25677981

  13. Exposure-Based CBT for Older Adults After Fall Injury: Description of a Manualized, Time-Limited Intervention for Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Nimali; Sparks, Martha A.; Kato, Kaori; Wilbur, Kaitlyn; Ganz, Sandy B.; Chiaramonte, Gabrielle R.; Stevens, Bradford L.; Barie, Philip S.; Lachs, Mark S.; O’Dell, Michael; Evans, Arthur T.; Bruce, Martha L.; Difede, JoAnn

    2014-01-01

    Fall accidents among older adults can be devastating events that, in addition to their physical consequences, lead to disabling anxiety warranting the attention of mental health practitioners. This article presents “Back on My Feet,” an exposure-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) protocol that is designed for older adults with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), subthreshold PTSD, or fear of falling resulting from a traumatic fall. The protocol can be integrated into care once patients have been discharged from hospital or rehabilitation settings back to the community. Following a brief description of its development, the article presents a detailed account of the protocol, including patient evaluation and the components of the eight home-based sessions. The protocol addresses core symptoms of avoidance, physiological arousal/anxiety, and maladaptive thought patterns. Because older patients face different coping challenges from younger patients (for whom the majority of evidence-based CBT interventions have been developed), the discussion ends with limitations and special considerations for working with older, injured patients. The article offers a blueprint for mental health practitioners to address the needs of patients who may present with fall-related anxiety in primary care and other medical settings. Readers who wish to develop their expertise further can consult the online appendices, which include a clinician manual and patient workbook, as well as guidance on additional resources. PMID:25364226

  14. Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Circle, David

    2005-01-01

    When a teacher gives their time to a student, it is more significant to that student than anything else one could do for him or her. Music teachers deal with time all the time. Someone once said that "time is like money: we never have enough." This may seem true; however, time is not like money. One can make more money, but one cannot "make time."…

  15. Poor, Unsafe, and Overweight: The Role of Feeling Unsafe at School in Mediating the Association Among Poverty Exposure, Youth Screen Time, Physical Activity, and Weight Status.

    PubMed

    Côté-Lussier, Carolyn; Fitzpatrick, Caroline; Séguin, Louise; Barnett, Tracie A

    2015-07-01

    This study applied socioecological and cumulative risk exposure frameworks to test the hypotheses that 1) the experience of poverty is associated with feeling less safe at school, and 2) feeling less safe is associated with engaging in poorer weight-related behaviors, as well as an increased probability of being overweight or obese. Data were from the ongoing Québec Longitudinal Study of Child Development, initiated in 1998 with a population-based cohort of 2,120 Québec (Canada) infants 5 months of age and their parent or primary caregiver. Measures of youths' (age, 13 years) self-reported feelings of safety, screen time, physical activity, and objectively assessed not overweight/obese (70%), overweight (22%), and obese (8%) weight status were collected in 2011. Family poverty trajectory from birth was assessed by using latent growth modeling. As hypothesized, exposure to poverty was associated with feeling less safe at school and, in turn, with an increased probability of being overweight or obese. The association was most pronounced for youths who experienced chronic poverty. Compared with youths who experienced no poverty and felt unsafe, those who experienced chronic poverty and felt unsafe were nearly 18% more likely to be obese (9.2% vs. 11.2%). Although feeling unsafe was associated with screen time, screen time did not predict weight status. PMID:25921649

  16. Cumulative airport noise-exposure metrics: An assessment of evidence for time-of-day weightings. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, J.M.

    1989-11-01

    The differential impact of noise on residents at different times of day is examined in analyses of the original machine-readable data from ten community surveys and in detailed reviews of the published results from 20 additional surveys. Analyses are conducted using alternative community response measures and analysis techniques. The primary objective of these analyses is to determine the relative impact of noise during the daytime and nighttime by estimating the value of a time-day weighting in the adjusted energy model. Some support is found for nighttime and evening weightings, however, the estimates of these time-of-day weightings are found to be highly accurate. Examinations of the factors affecting this accuracy lead to the conclusion that studies of community response to noise will not provide a usefully accurate estimation of the time-of-day weighting parameter in the adjusted energy model. This report provides data on proportions of the United States population engaged in noise-sensitive activities at different times of day. The report reproduces all social survey results in which averages of nighttime response are plotted by nighttime noise levels. Analyses are conducted of the relationship between daytime and nighttime noise environments around United States airports.

  17. Real-time in situ electron spin resonance measurements on fungal spores of Penicillium digitatum during exposure of oxygen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kenji; Mizuno, Hiroko; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Tamiya, Kazuhiro; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi; Iseki, Sachiko; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2012-07-01

    We report the kinetic analysis of free radicals on fungal spores of Penicillium digitatum interacted with atomic oxygen generated plasma electric discharge using real time in situ electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. We have obtained information that the ESR signal from the spores was observed and preliminarily assignable to semiquinone radical with a g-value of around 2.004 and a line width of approximately 5G. The decay of the signal is possibly linked to the inactivation of the fungal spore. The real-time in situ ESR has proven to be a useful method to elucidate plasma-induced surface reactions on biological specimens.

  18. Experimental study on the survival of the water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms--Pontederiaceae) under different oil doses and times of exposure.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Aline; Piedade, Maria Teresa Fernandez

    2014-12-01

    In the last decades, petroleum activities have increased in the Brazilian Amazon where there is oil exploration on the Urucu River, a tributary of the Amazon River, about 600 km from the city of Manaus. Particularly, transportation via the Amazon River to reach the oil refinery in Manaus may compromise the integrity of the large floodplains that flank hundreds of kilometers of this major river. In the Amazon floodplains, plant growth and nutrient cycling are related to the flood pulse. When oil spills occur, floating oil on the water surface is dispersed through wind and wave action in the littoral region, thus affecting the vegetation of terrestrial and aquatic environments. If pollutants enter the system, they are absorbed by plants and distributed in the food chain via plant consumption, mortality, and decomposition. The effect of oil on the growth and survival of vegetation in these environments is virtually unknown. The water hyacinth [Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms] has a pantropical distribution but is native to the Amazon, often growing in high-density populations in the floodplains where it plays an important role as shelter and food source for aquatic and terrestrial biota. The species is well known for its high capacity to absorb and tolerate high levels of heavy metal ions. To study the survival and response of water hyacinth under six different oil doses, ranging from 0 to 150 ml l(-1), and five exposure times (1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 days), young individuals distributed in a completely randomized design experiment composed of vessels with a single individual each were followed over a 50-day period (30-day acclimatization, 20 days under oil treatments). Growth parameters, biomass, visual changes in the plants, and pH were recorded at 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 days. Increasing the time of oil exposure caused a decrease in biomass, ratio of live/dead biomass and length of leaves, and an increase in the number of dead leaves. Dose of oil and time of exposure are the most important factors controlling the effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on E. crassipes. Although the species is able to survive exposure to a moderate dose of oil, below 75 ml l(-1) for only 5 days, severe alterations in plant growth and high mortality were observed. Therefore, we conclude that Urucu oil heavily affects E. crassipes despite its known resistance to many pollutants. PMID:25017871

  19. Does developmental timing of exposure to child maltreatment predict memory performance in adulthood? Results from a large, population-based sample.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Erin C; Busso, Daniel S; Raffeld, Miriam R; Smoller, Jordan W; Nelson, Charles A; Doyle, Alysa E; Luk, Gigi

    2016-01-01

    Although maltreatment is a known risk factor for multiple adverse outcomes across the lifespan, its effects on cognitive development, especially memory, are poorly understood. Using data from a large, nationally representative sample of young adults (Add Health), we examined the effects of physical and sexual abuse on working and short-term memory in adulthood. We examined the association between exposure to maltreatment as well as its timing of first onset after adjusting for covariates. Of our sample, 16.50% of respondents were exposed to physical abuse and 4.36% to sexual abuse by age 17. An analysis comparing unexposed respondents to those exposed to physical or sexual abuse did not yield any significant differences in adult memory performance. However, two developmental time periods emerged as important for shaping memory following exposure to sexual abuse, but in opposite ways. Relative to non-exposed respondents, those exposed to sexual abuse during early childhood (ages 3-5), had better number recall and those first exposed during adolescence (ages 14-17) had worse number recall. However, other variables, including socioeconomic status, played a larger role (than maltreatment) on working and short-term memory. We conclude that a simple examination of "exposed" versus "unexposed" respondents may obscure potentially important within-group differences that are revealed by examining the effects of age at onset to maltreatment. PMID:26585216

  20. Impacts of the phenylpyrazole insecticide fipronil on larval fish: time-series gene transcription responses in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) following short-term exposure.

    PubMed

    Beggel, Sebastian; Werner, Inge; Connon, Richard E; Geist, Juergen P

    2012-06-01

    The utilization of molecular endpoints in ecotoxicology can provide rapid and valuable information on immediate organismal responses to chemical stressors and is increasingly used for mechanistic interpretation of effects at higher levels of biological organization. This study contributes knowledge on the sublethal effects of a commonly used insecticide, the phenylpyrazole fipronil, on larval fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), utilizing a quantitative transcriptomic approach. Immediately after 24h of exposure to fipronil concentrations of ≥31 μg.L(-1), highly significant changes in gene transcription were observed for aspartoacylase, metallothionein, glucocorticoid receptor, cytochrome P450 3A126 and vitellogenin. Different mechanisms of toxicity were apparent over the course of the experiment, with short-term responses indicating neurotoxic effects. After 6 days of recovery, endocrine effects were observed with vitellogenin being up-regulated 90-fold at 61 μg.L(-1) fipronil. Principal component analysis demonstrated a significant increase in gene transcription changes over time and during the recovery period. In conclusion, multiple mechanisms of action were observed in response to fipronil exposure, and unknown delayed effects would have been missed if transcriptomic responses had only been measured at a single time-point. These challenges can be overcome by the inclusion of multiple endpoints and delayed effects in experimental designs. PMID:22542256

  1. Time-dependent alterations in growth, photosynthetic pigments and enzymatic defense systems of submerged Ceratophyllum demersum during exposure to the cyanobacterial neurotoxin anatoxin-a.

    PubMed

    Ha, Mi-Hee; Pflugmacher, Stephan

    2013-08-15

    Recently, aquatic macrophytes have been considered as promising tools for eco-friendly water management with a low running cost. However, only little information is available thus far regarding the metabolic capacity of macrophytes for coping with cyanobacterial toxins (cyanotoxins) in the aquatic environment. Cyanotoxins have become emerging contaminants of great concern due to the high proliferation of cyanobacteria (cyanobacterial bloom) accelerated by eutrophication and climate change. Anatoxin-a, one of the common and major cyanotoxins, is suggested as a high priority water pollutant for regulatory consideration owing to its notoriously rapid mode of action as a neurotoxin. In this study, the time-course metabolic regulation of the submerged macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum (C. demersum) was investigated during exposure to anatoxin-a at an environmentally relevant concentration (15 μg/L). Biotransformation and antioxidative systems in C. demersum responded positively to anatoxin-a through the promoted synthesis of most of the involved enzymes within 8h. Maximum enzyme activities were exhibited after 24 or 48 h of exposure to anatoxin-a. However, an apparent decline in enzyme activities was also observed at longer exposure duration (168 and 336 h) in company with high steady-state levels of cell internal H₂O₂, which showed its highest level after 48 h. Meanwhile, irreversible inhibitory influence on chlorophyll content (vitality) was noticed, whereas the ratio of carotenoids to total chlorophyll was increased with the increase in exposure duration. Consequently, the reduction in growth (biomass) of C. demersum was observed in sub-chronic exposure to anatoxin-a (8 weeks). Overall results clearly indicate, on the one hand, that anatoxin-a causes negative allelopathic effects on the macrophyte by inducing oxidative stress. On the other hand, the macrophyte might have interactions with anatoxin-a, based on the prompt reaction of its enzymatic defense systems to the toxin. The result obtained from the present study could contribute to the improvement of basic knowledge about the ecological impact of anatoxin-a and the environmental fate of the toxin in the aquatic environment. PMID:23685387

  2. Effects of chlorimuron ethyl on terrestrial and wetland plants: Levels of, and time to recovery following sublethal exposure.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, David; Boutin, Céline; Allison, Jane E

    2013-01-01

    Current pesticide registration guidelines call for short-term testing of plants; long-term effects on vegetative parts and reproduction remain untested. The aims of our study were to determine level of recovery and recovery times for plants exposed to the sulfonylurea herbicide chlorimuron ethyl using data collected from single species, dose-response greenhouse experiments. The nine terrestrial and eight wetland species tested showed variable levels of recovery and recovery timeframes. Many species (six terrestrial and five wetland) were vegetatively stunted at sublethal doses and were reproductively impaired. Full recovery did not occur at all doses and maximum recovery times varied from 3 to 15 weeks in this controlled environment. In a complex community, affected species may be displaced by tolerant species, through interspecific competition, before they fully recover. It is plausible that individual populations could be diminished or eliminated through reduced seedbank inputs (annuals and perennials) and asexual reproduction (perennials). PMID:23137550

  3. A real time sorbent based air monitoring system for determining low level airborne exposure levels to Lewisite

    SciTech Connect

    Lattin, F.G.; Paul, D.G.; Jakubowski, E.M.

    1994-12-31

    The Real Time Analytical Platform (RTAP) is designed to provide mobile, real-time monitoring support to ensure protection of worker safety in areas where military unique compounds are used and stored, and at disposal sites. Quantitative analysis of low-level vapor concentrations in air is accomplished through sorbent-based collection with subsequent thermal desorption into a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a variety of detectors. The monitoring system is characterized by its sensitivity (ability to measure at low concentrations), selectivity (ability to filter out interferences), dynamic range and linearity, real time mode (versus methods requiring extensive sample preparation procedures), and ability to interface with complimentary GC detectors. This presentation describes an RTAP analytical method for analyzing lewisite, an arsenical compound, that consists of a GC screening technique with an Electron Capture Detector (ECD), and a confirmation technique using an Atomic Emission Detector (AED). Included in the presentation is a description of quality assurance objectives in the monitoring system, and an assessment of method accuracy, precision and detection levels.

  4. The Exposure Assessment in Current Time Study: Implementation, Feasibility, and Acceptability of Real-Time Data Collection in a Community Cohort of Illicit Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Gregory D.; Linas, Beth S.; Westergaard, Ryan P.; Piggott, Damani; Bollinger, Robert C.; Chang, Larry W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. We describe the study design and evaluate the implementation, feasibility, and acceptability of an ecological momentary assessment (EMA) study of illicit drug users. Design. Four sequential field trials targeting observation of 30 individuals followed for a four week period. Participants. Participants were recruited from an ongoing community-cohort of current or former injection drug users. Of 113 individuals enrolled, 109 completed study procedures during four trials conducted from November 2008 to May 2013. Methods. Hand-held electronic diaries used in the initial trials were transitioned to a smartphone platform for the final trial with identical data collection. Random-prompts delivered five times daily assessed participant location, activity, mood, and social context. Event-contingent data collection involved participant self-reports of illicit drug use and craving. Main Outcome Measures. Feasibility measures included participant retention, days of followup, random-prompt response rates, and device loss rate. Acceptability was evaluated from an end-of-trial questionnaire. Sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical, and trial characteristics were evaluated as correlates of weekly random-prompt response rates ≥80% using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations. Results. Study participants were a median of 48.5 years old, 90% African American, 52% male, and 59% HIV-infected with limited income and educational attainment. During a median followup of 28 days, 78% of 11,181 random-prompts delivered were answered (mean of 2.8 responses daily), while 2,798 participant-initiated events were reported (30% drug use events; 70% craving events). Self-reported acceptability to study procedures was uniformly favorable. Device loss was rare (only 1 lost device every 190 person-days of observation). Higher educational attainment was consistently associated with a higher response rate to random-prompts, while an association of HIV infection with lower response rates was not observed after accounting for differences in trial recruitment procedures. Conclusion. Near real-time EMA data collection in the field is feasible and acceptable among community-dwelling illicit drug users. These data provide the basis for future studies of EMA-informed interventions to prevent drug relapse and improve HIV treatment outcomes in this population. PMID:24307943

  5. Understanding existing exposure situations.

    PubMed

    Lecomte, J-F

    2016-06-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103 removed the distinction between practices and interventions, and introduced three types of exposure situation: existing, planned, and emergency. It also emphasised the optimisation principle in connection with individual dose restrictions for all controllable exposure situations. Existing exposure situations are those resulting from sources, natural or man-made, that already exist when a decision on control has to be taken. They have common features to be taken into account when implementing general recommendations, such as: the source may be difficult to control; all exposures cannot be anticipated; protective actions can only be implemented after characterisation of the exposure situation; time may be needed to reduce exposure below the reference level; levels of exposure are highly dependent on individual behaviour and present a wide spread of individual dose distribution; exposures at work may be adventitious and not considered as occupational exposure; there is generally no potential for accident; many stakeholders have to be involved; and many factors need to be considered. ICRP is currently developing a series of reports related to the practical implementation of Publication 103 to various existing exposure situations, including exposure from radon, exposure from cosmic radiation in aviation, exposure from processes using naturally occurring radioactive material, and exposure from contaminated sites due to past activities. PMID:26975365

  6. Exposure to hot and cold temperatures and ambulance attendances in Brisbane, Australia: a time-series study

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Lyle R; Connell, Des

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of hot and cold temperatures on ambulance attendances. Design An ecological time-series study. Setting and participants The study was conducted in Brisbane, Australia. The authors collected information on 783?935 daily ambulance attendances, along with data of associated meteorological variables and air pollutants, for the period of 20002007. Outcome measures The total number of ambulance attendances was examined, along with those related to cardiovascular, respiratory and other non-traumatic conditions. Generalised additive models were used to assess the relationship between daily mean temperature and the number of ambulance attendances. Results There were statistically significant relationships between mean temperature and ambulance attendances for all categories. Acute heat effects were found with a 1.17% (95% CI 0.86% to 1.48%) increase in total attendances for 1C increase above threshold (01?days lag). Cold effects were delayed and longer lasting with a 1.30% (0.87% to 1.73%) increase in total attendances for a 1C decrease below the threshold (215?days lag). Harvesting was observed following initial acute periods of heat effects but not for cold effects. Conclusions This study shows that both hot and cold temperatures led to increases in ambulance attendances for different medical conditions. Our findings support the notion that ambulance attendance records are a valid and timely source of data for use in the development of local weather/health early warning systems. PMID:22773538

  7. Effects of progestagen exposure duration on estrus synchronization and conception rates of crossbreed ewes undergoing fixed time artificial insemination

    PubMed Central

    Blaschi, Wanessa; Lunardelli, Paula A.; Marinho, Luciana S.R.; Max, Marilu C.; Santos, Gustavo M.G.; Silva-Santos, Katia C.; Melo-Sterza, Fabiana A.; Baldassarre, Hernan; Rigo, Thales R.

    2014-01-01

    Synchronization of estrus and ovulation are of paramount importance in modern livestock improvement programs. These methods are critical for assisted reproduction technologies, including artificial insemination and embryo transfer, that can increase productivity. In the current study, subcutaneous implants containing norgestomet were placed for long (14 days), medium (9 days), and short (5 days) periods of time in 70 crossbred ewes undergoing fixed-time artificial insemination. The resulting effects on estrus synchronization and conception rates were subsequently evaluated. Among the synchronized ewes, 85.7% (60/70) underwent estrus over a period of 72 h after progestagen treatment ceased. The shortest mean interval between withdrawal of the device and onset of estrus (34.2 ± 8.9 h) was observed in the G14 days of P4 group (p < 0.05). The conception rate of the G14 days of P4 group was statistically higher than that of the other groups (83.3% vs. 60.9% vs. 47.8%; p < 0.05). In conclusion, 14 days of norgestomet treatment produced higher conception rates and a greater number of pregnancies at the beginning of the breeding season. PMID:24962414

  8. Identification of genes differentially expressed in clams Ruditapes philippinarum in response to endosulfan after different exposure time.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yanxia; Pan, Luqing; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Na

    2013-03-01

    This study reports molecular biomarkers potentially associated with resistance or sensitivity to the impact of endosulfan in clams, Ruditapes philippinarum. Genomic analysis was made applying suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to identify genes up- and down-regulated in calms exposed to 0.5 μg/L endosulfan for 1d and 10d. Results obtained from the SSH library revealed 360 different sequences regulated by endosulfan, which correspond to nine major physiological functions. To validate the expression profiles from SSH, 13 genes regulated by endosulfan were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides information for the characterization of potential molecular biomarker that may be used in future environmental monitoring and to investigate the mechanisms of stress to endosulfan in clams/marine invertebrates. PMID:23290617

  9. Modeling time-dependent toxicity to aquatic organisms from pulsed exposure of PAHs in urban road runoff.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Ye, Youbin; Tong, Yindong; Ou, Langbo; Hu, Dan; Wang, Xuejun

    2011-02-01

    Understanding of the magnitude of urban runoff toxicity to aquatic organisms is important for effective management of runoff quality. In this paper, the aquatic toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in urban road runoff was evaluated through a damage assessment model. Mortality probability of the organisms representative in aquatic environment was calculated using the monitored PAHs concentration in road runoff. The result showed that the toxicity of runoff in spring was higher than those in summer. Analysis of the time-dependent toxicity of series of runoff water samples illustrated that the toxicity of runoff water in the final phase of a runoff event may be as high as those in the initial phase. Therefore, the storm runoff treatment systems or strategies designed for capture and treatment of the initial portion of runoff may be inappropriate for control of runoff toxicity. PMID:21093135

  10. Real-time automated measurement of Xenopus leavis tadpole behavior and behavioral responses following triphenyltin exposure using the multispecies freshwater biomonitor (MFB).

    PubMed

    Schriks, Merijn; van Hoorn, Melissa K; Faassen, Elisabeth J; van Dam, Joost W; Murk, Albertinka J

    2006-05-10

    The present study examines whether behavior of Xenopus laevis tadpoles, when measured with the multispecies freshwater biomonitor (MFB), can be a sensitive and practical parameter for quantification of behavioral effects induced by toxic compounds. The MFB system is capable of automated simultaneous recording and integration of different types of movement over time. Basic tadpole behavior was studied under standard ambient temperature and colder conditions. At lower temperatures the time spent on low frequency behavior such as swimming and ventilation decreased, while at higher frequency movements associated with subtle tail tip oscillations it increased. Changes in behavior were also studied during the process of metamorphosis when both the morphology and physiology of tadpoles change. In the course of metamorphosis the tadpoles decreased the time spent on swimming and increased tail tip oscillations, especially in the period shortly before and during metamorphic climax. Additional experiments were performed to investigate whether the MFB could be used to quantify behavioral effects of exposure to a toxic compound. A 48 h exposure to a sublethal concentration of 1.25 microg L(-1) triphenyltin (TPT) significantly increased low frequency behavior, whereas 5 microg L(-1) TPT significantly reduced this type of behavior while the number of periods of total inactivity increased. One week after transferring the animals to clean water, registered behavior of tadpoles in the highest TPT group (5 microg L(-1)) was normal again for this developmental stage. The results show that the MFB can be used as a new tool for automated registration of sublethal toxic effects on tadpole behavior including recovery. PMID:16488490

  11. Observations on dietary aluminum level, time duration exposure to dietary aluminum, and the influence of specific dietary blocking agents on tissue aluminum accumulation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Kettleson, K.C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to observe the association of dietary aluminum (Al) with tissue Al accumulation. Other objectives included: to determine if alginic acid (AA) and pectin (P) in the diet could inhibit Al accumulation in tissues, and to relate time of exposure of dietary Al to Al tissue accumulation. The first experiment was conducted with a test diet feeding period of 35 days in a factorial arrangement of treatments with 24 rats, six rats per treatment. The dietary treatments were: groups 0 and 1, no added dietary Al (Al < 20 ppm) with or without 5% AA; groups 2 and 3, 400 ppm additional dietary Al with or without 5% AA. Kidney tissue analyzed by neutron activation showed no significant Al accumulation, or influence of the blocking agent. The second experiment was conducted over two time intervals (phase I with 24 rats for 28 days, and phase II with 26 rats for 56 days) and was done with 7 different diets. The diets included a control (basal with no added Al or blocking agent), the basal with 425 or 640 ppm Al added, with 5% AA or 5% P added to each Al test level. The Al source for both experiments was aluminum dibasic acetate. Tissues collected and pooled for analyses by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy included bone, brain, and kidney. The addition of 425 ppm Al to the diets stimulated body weight gain by about 10% relative to the controls. The blocking agents suppressed Al-induced weight gain, although AA stimulated feed intake (P < 0.05). Trends in Al accumulation appeared to occur in bone and brain tissues associated with dietary Al; but independent of blocking agents and independent of time exposure to the dietary Al.

  12. Estimating Time-Varying PCB Exposures Using Person-Specific Predictions to Supplement Measured Values: A Comparison of Observed and Predicted Values in Two Cohorts of Norwegian Women

    PubMed Central

    Nøst, Therese Haugdahl; Breivik, Knut; Wania, Frank; Rylander, Charlotta; Odland, Jon Øyvind; Sandanger, Torkjel Manning

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies on the health effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) call for an understanding of past and present human exposure. Time-resolved mechanistic models may supplement information on concentrations in individuals obtained from measurements and/or statistical approaches if they can be shown to reproduce empirical data. Objectives Here, we evaluated the capability of one such mechanistic model to reproduce measured PCB concentrations in individual Norwegian women. We also assessed individual life-course concentrations. Methods Concentrations of four PCB congeners in pregnant (n = 310, sampled in 2007–2009) and postmenopausal (n = 244, 2005) women were compared with person-specific predictions obtained using CoZMoMAN, an emission-based environmental fate and human food-chain bioaccumulation model. Person-specific predictions were also made using statistical regression models including dietary and lifestyle variables and concentrations. Results CoZMoMAN accurately reproduced medians and ranges of measured concentrations in the two study groups. Furthermore, rank correlations between measurements and predictions from both CoZMoMAN and regression analyses were strong (Spearman’s r > 0.67). Precision in quartile assignments from predictions was strong overall as evaluated by weighted Cohen’s kappa (> 0.6). Simulations indicated large inter-individual differences in concentrations experienced in the past. Conclusions The mechanistic model reproduced all measurements of PCB concentrations within a factor of 10, and subject ranking and quartile assignments were overall largely consistent, although they were weak within each study group. Contamination histories for individuals predicted by CoZMoMAN revealed variation between study subjects, particularly in the timing of peak concentrations. Mechanistic models can provide individual PCB exposure metrics that could serve as valuable supplements to measurements. Citation Nøst TH, Breivik K, Wania F, Rylander C, Odland JØ, Sandanger TM. 2016. Estimating time-varying PCB exposures using person-specific predictions to supplement measured values: a comparison of observed and predicted values in two cohorts of Norwegian women. Environ Health Perspect 124:299–305; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409191 PMID:26186800

  13. Effect of concentration and exposure time on treatment efficacy against Varroa mites (Acari: Varroidae) during indoor winter fumigation of honey bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae) with formic acid.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Robyn M; Currie, Robert W

    2005-12-01

    The combination of the concentration of formic acid and the duration of fumigation (CT product) during indoor treatments of honey bee, Apis mellifera L., colonies to control the varroa mite, Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman, determines the efficacy of the treatment. Because high concentrations can cause queen mortality, we hypothesized that a high CT product given as a low concentration over a long exposure time rather than as a high concentration over a short exposure time would allow effective control of varroa mites without the detrimental effects on queens. The objective of this study was to assess different combinations of formic acid concentration and exposure time with similar CT products in controlling varroa mites while minimizing the effect on worker and queen honey bees. Treated colonies were exposed to a low, medium, or high concentration of formic acid until a mean CT product of 471 ppm*d in room air was realized. The treatments consisted of a long-term low concentration of 19 ppm for 27 d, a medium-term medium concentration of 42 ppm for 10 d, a short-term high concentration of 53 ppm for 9 d, and an untreated control. Both short-term high-concentration and medium-term medium-concentration fumigation with formic acid killed varroa mites, with averages of 93 and 83% mortality, respectively, but both treatments also were associated with an increase in mortality of worker bees, queen bees, or both. Long-term low-concentration fumigation had lower efficacy (60% varroa mite mortality), but it did not increase worker or queen bee mortality. This trend differed slightly in colonies from two different beekeepers. Varroa mite mean abundance was significantly decreased in all three acid treatments relative to the control. Daily worker mortality was significantly increased by the short-term high concentration treatment, which was reflected by a decrease in the size of the worker population, but not an increase in colony mortality. Queen mortality was significantly greater under the medium-term medium concentration and the short-term high concentration treatments than in controls. PMID:16539097

  14. Neonatal exposure to MK801 promotes prepulse-induced delay in startle response time in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Lyall, Amanda; Swanson, John; Liu, Chun; Blumenthal, Terry D.; Turner, Christopher P.

    2009-01-01

    The acoustic startle reflex in rats can be inhibited if a prepulse stimulus is presented just before the startle stimulus (prepulse inhibition; PPI). When postnatal day 7 (P7) rats are exposed to agents that block the NMDA receptor (NMDAR), robust apoptosis is observed within hours and is thought to be followed at later ages by a significant loss of PPI. To understand these observations further, we exposed rat pups to vehicle or the NMDAR antagonist MK801 (1 mg/kg) at P6, P8, and P10. We then examined animals for PPI at P28 and P56. Compared to vehicle controls, we found no evidence for PPI deficits in the MK801-treated group, although we did observe prepulse-induced delay in response time at P56 (but not at P28). In a parallel study, we also performed histological analysis of brain sections for evidence of the pro-apoptotic marker activated caspase-3, 8 hours after vehicle or MK801 injection into P6 animals. We found that there was a robust increase in this marker of cell death in the inferior colliculus of MK801 compared to vehicle treated animals. Thus, transient blockade of the NMDAR during the postnatal period not only promotes early apoptosis in a brain region critical for acoustic processing but also leads to auditory deficits at a later age, suggesting that injury-induced loss of collicular neurons leads to network reorganization in the auditory system that is progressive in nature. PMID:19565228

  15. [Open questions in the interpretation of daily time-series studies on air pollution and health. Part I: estimate of exposure].

    PubMed

    Lagorio, S

    2001-01-01

    This paper is a commentary to the MISA study (Meta-analysis of the Italian studies on short-term effects of air pollution). The interpretation of the relationships observed in the time-series analyses is not straightforward. I will review a number of open questions: the exposure estimates; the meaning of the daily mortality and hospitalisation rates, in terms of impact on life expectancy, incidence of specific diseases, exacerbation of pre-existing chronic diseases; the pattern of the estimated dose-response curves; the role of possible effect modifiers; the hypotheses about the underlying mechanisms. These interpretative problems often present overlapping aspects. Some of the pending answers are relevant for policy making. For editorial reasons this review is divided into two parts. This first paper focuses on the exposure estimates. The second part, to be published in the next issue of this journal, will deal with the meaning of the outcome variable, the shape of the dose-response curves, possible effect modifiers and underlying mechanisms. PMID:11789458

  16. A discrete-time analysis of the effects of more prolonged exposure to neighborhood poverty on the risk of smoking initiation by age 25.

    PubMed

    Kravitz-Wirtz, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that individuals who initiate smoking at younger ages are at increased risk for future tobacco dependence and continued use as well as for numerous smoking-attributable health problems. Identifying individual, household, and to a far lesser extent, contextual factors that predict early cigarette use has garnered considerable attention over the last several decades. However, the majority of scholarship in this area has been cross-sectional or conducted over relatively short windows of observation. Few studies have investigated the effects of more prolonged exposure to smoking-related risk factors, particularly neighborhood characteristics, from childhood through early adulthood. Using the 1970-2011 waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics merged with census data on respondents' neighborhoods, this study estimates a series of race-specific discrete-time marginal structural logit models for the risk of smoking initiation as a function of neighborhood poverty, as well as individual and household characteristics, from ages four through 25. Neighborhood selection bias is addressed using inverse-probability-of-treatment weights. Results indicate that more prolonged exposure to high (>20%) as opposed to low (<10%) poverty neighborhoods is associated with an increased risk of smoking onset by age 25, although consistent with prior literature, this effect is only evident among white and not nonwhite youth and young adults. PMID:26685707

  17. Time-course study of different innate immune mediators produced by UV-irradiated skin: comparative effects of short and daily versus a single harmful UV exposure.

    PubMed

    Cela, Eliana M; Friedrich, Adrian; Paz, Mariela L; Vanzulli, Silvia I; Leoni, Juliana; González Maglio, Daniel H

    2015-05-01

    The modulatory effects of solar UV radiation on the immune system have been widely studied. As the skin is the main target of UV radiation, our purpose was to compare the impact on skin innate immunity of two contrasting ways to be exposed to sunlight. Hairless mice were UV irradiated with a single high UV dose simulating a harmful exposure, or with repetitive low UV doses simulating short occasional daily exposures. Skin samples were taken at different times after UV irradiation to evaluate skin histology, inflammatory cell recruitment, epidermal T-cell population and the mitochondrial function of epidermal cells. The transcriptional profiles of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, antimicrobial peptides and Toll-like receptors were evaluated by RT-PCR and ELISA in tissue homogenates. Finally, a lymphangiography was performed to assess modification in the lymphatic vessel system. A single high UV dose produces a deep inflammatory state characterized by the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines that, in turn, induces the recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages into the irradiated area. On the other hand, repetitive low UV doses drive the skin to a photo-induced alert state in which there is no sign of inflammation, but the epithelium undergoes changes in thickness, the lymphatic circulation increases, and the transcription of antimicrobial peptides is induced. PMID:25438991

  18. Dose- and time-dependent gene expression alterations in prostate and colon cancer cells after in vitro exposure to carbon ion and X-irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Suetens, Annelies; Moreels, Marjan; Quintens, Roel; Soors, Els; Buset, Jasmine; Chiriotti, Sabina; Tabury, Kevin; Gregoire, Vincent; Baatout, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Hadrontherapy is an advanced form of radiotherapy that uses beams of charged particles (such as protons and carbon ions). Compared with conventional radiotherapy, the main advantages of carbon ion therapy are the precise absorbed dose localization, along with an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE). This high ballistic accuracy of particle beams deposits the maximal dose to the tumor, while damage to the surrounding healthy tissue is limited. Currently, hadrontherapy is being used for the treatment of specific types of cancer. Previous in vitro studies have shown that, under certain circumstances, exposure to charged particles may inhibit cell motility and migration. In the present study, we investigated the expression of four motility-related genes in prostate (PC3) and colon (Caco-2) cancer cell lines after exposure to different radiation types. Cells were irradiated with various absorbed doses (0, 0.5 and 2 Gy) of accelerated 13C-ions at the GANIL facility (Caen, France) or with X-rays. Clonogenic assays were performed to determine the RBE. RT-qPCR analysis showed dose- and time-dependent changes in the expression of CCDC88A, FN1, MYH9 and ROCK1 in both cell lines. However, whereas in PC3 cells the response to carbon ion irradiation was enhanced compared with X-irradiation, the effect was the opposite in Caco-2 cells, indicating cell-type–specific responses to the different radiation types. PMID:25190155

  19. Exposure to violence and psychological well-being over time in children affected by HIV/AIDS in South Africa and Malawi.

    PubMed

    Skeen, S; Macedo, A; Tomlinson, M; Hensels, I S; Sherr, L

    2016-03-01

    Many of the risk factors for violence against children are particularly prevalent in families and communities affected by HIV/AIDS. Yet, in sub-Saharan Africa, where HIV rates are high, efforts to prevent or address violence against children and its long-lasting effects are hampered by a lack of evidence. We assessed the relationship between violence exposure and mental health among HIV-affected children attending community-based organisations in South Africa (n = 834) and Malawi (n = 155, total sample n = 989) at baseline and 12-15-month follow-up. Exposure to violence in the home and in the community was high. HIV-negative children who lived with an HIV-positive person experienced most violence overall, followed by HIV-positive children. Children unaffected by HIV experienced least violence (all p < .05). Interpersonal violence in the home predicted child depression (β = 0.17, p < .001), trauma symptoms (β = 0.17, p < .001), lower self-esteem (β = -0.17, p < .001), and internalising and externalising behavioural problems (β = 0.07, p < .05), while exposure to community violence predicted trauma symptoms (β = 0.16, p < .001) and behavioural problems (β = 0.07, p < .05). Harsh physical discipline predicted lower self-esteem (β = -0.18, p < .001) and behavioural problems for children (β = 0.24, p < .001). Exposure to home (OR: 1.89, 95% CI: 1.23-2.85) and community violence predicted risk behaviour (OR: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.57-3.62). Over time, there was a decrease in depressed mood and problem behaviours, and an increase in self-esteem for children experiencing different types of violence at baseline. This may have been due to ongoing participation in the community-based programme. These data highlight the burden of violence in these communities and possibilities for programmes to include violence prevention to improve psychosocial well-being in HIV-affected children. PMID:27002770

  20. Exposure to violence and psychological well-being over time in children affected by HIV/AIDS in South Africa and Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Skeen, S.; Macedo, A.; Tomlinson, M.; Hensels, I. S.; Sherr, L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many of the risk factors for violence against children are particularly prevalent in families and communities affected by HIV/AIDS. Yet, in sub-Saharan Africa, where HIV rates are high, efforts to prevent or address violence against children and its long-lasting effects are hampered by a lack of evidence. We assessed the relationship between violence exposure and mental health among HIV-affected children attending community-based organisations in South Africa (n = 834) and Malawi (n = 155, total sample n = 989) at baseline and 12–15-month follow-up. Exposure to violence in the home and in the community was high. HIV-negative children who lived with an HIV-positive person experienced most violence overall, followed by HIV-positive children. Children unaffected by HIV experienced least violence (all p < .05). Interpersonal violence in the home predicted child depression (β = 0.17, p < .001), trauma symptoms (β = 0.17, p < .001), lower self-esteem (β = −0.17, p < .001), and internalising and externalising behavioural problems (β = 0.07, p < .05), while exposure to community violence predicted trauma symptoms (β = 0.16, p < .001) and behavioural problems (β = 0.07, p < .05). Harsh physical discipline predicted lower self-esteem (β = −0.18, p < .001) and behavioural problems for children (β = 0.24, p < .001). Exposure to home (OR: 1.89, 95% CI: 1.23–2.85) and community violence predicted risk behaviour (OR: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.57–3.62). Over time, there was a decrease in depressed mood and problem behaviours, and an increase in self-esteem for children experiencing different types of violence at baseline. This may have been due to ongoing participation in the community-based programme. These data highlight the burden of violence in these communities and possibilities for programmes to include violence prevention to improve psychosocial well-being in HIV-affected children. PMID:27002770

  1. Effects of Wi-Fi (2.45 GHz) Exposure on Apoptosis, Sperm Parameters and Testicular Histomorphometry in Rats: A Time Course Study

    PubMed Central

    Shokri, Saeed; Soltani, Aiob; Kazemi, Mahsa; Sardari, Dariush; Mofrad, Farshid Babapoor

    2015-01-01

    Objective In today’s world, 2.45-GHz radio-frequency radiation (RFR) from industrial, scientific, medical, military and domestic applications is the main part of indoor-outdoor electromagnetic field exposure. Long-term effects of 2.45-GHz Wi-Fi radiation on male reproductive system was not known completely. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the major cause of male infertility during short- and long-term exposure of Wi-Fi radiation. Materials and Methods This is an animal experimental study, which was conducted in the Department of Anatomical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Zanjan University of Medical Sciences, Zanjan, IRAN, from June to August 2014. Three-month-old male Wistar rats (n=27) were exposed to the 2.45 GHz radiation in a chamber with two Wi-Fi antennas on opposite walls. Animals were divided into the three following groups: I. control group (n=9) including healthy animals without any exposure to the antenna, II. 1-hour group (n=9) exposed to the 2.45 GHz Wi-Fi radiation for 1 hour per day during two months and III.7-hour group (n=9) exposed to the 2.45 GHz Wi-Fi radiation for 7 hours per day during 2 months. Sperm parameters, caspase-3 concentrations, histomorphometric changes of testis in addition to the apoptotic indexes were evaluated in the exposed and control animals. Results Both 1-hour and 7-hour groups showed a decrease in sperm parameters in a time dependent pattern. In parallel, the number of apoptosis-positive cells and caspase-3 activity increased in the seminiferous tubules of exposed rats. The seminal vesicle weight reduced significantly in both1-hour or 7-hour groups in comparison to the control group. Conclusion Regarding to the progressive privilege of 2.45 GHz wireless networks in our environment, we concluded that there should be a major concern regarding the timedependent exposure of whole-body to the higher frequencies of Wi-Fi networks existing in the vicinity of our living places. PMID:26199911

  2. 10Be exposure dating of onset and timing of Neoglacial glacier advances in the Ecrins massif, French Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, Melaine; Deline, Philip; Carcaillet, Julien

    2013-04-01

    Alpine glaciers are known to be highly sensitive to change in temperature and precipitation on decadal to centennial time scales. For two decades, numerous studies on Holocene climate revealed a period marked by abrupt cold reversals (e.g. 8.2 ka event) with increasing frequency and magnitude after the Holocene Climatic Optimum, during the so-called Neoglacial period (roughly the last 4 ka). State-of-the-art studies indicate that largest alpine glaciers failed to exceed their Little Ice Age (LIA) extent during these LIA Type-Events, unlike certain smaller glaciers. In the French Alps, very few investigations were conducted to date on Holocene glacier variability. Almost all studies focused on the most glacierized area: the Mont Blanc massif, where suitable organic remains to apply radiocarbon dating and dendrochronology are available. Other glacierized massifs are poorly studied, without any Holocene/Neoglacial glacier chronology up to now. Here, we present the results of a study focusing on six glacier forefields distributed in the Ecrins massif. Detailed geomorphological mapping and in-situ produced 10Be dating were carried on multi-crested so-called "LIA composite moraines". The targeted ridges are located in distal position with respect to late LIA drift in order to identify Holocene cold pulses that have led to (or slightly exceeded) LIA-like glacier extent. The 35 10Be ages obtained revealed that the onset of Neoglacial occurred at ~4.2 ka, and that at least two other advances were recorded at ~3.3 ka and ~0.85 ka. One site has yielded a nearly complete Neoglacial record as four discrete events have been dated. These results highlight the potential of lateral moraine ridge stratigraphy which could yield accurate record when sufficiently preserved, but also the different preservation of landforms along the glacier margin which could censor the record.

  3. Impairment of Rat Fetal Beta-Cell Development by Maternal Exposure to Dexamethasone during Different Time-Windows

    PubMed Central

    Dumortier, Olivier; Theys, Nicolas; Ahn, Marie-Thérèse; Remacle, Claude; Reusens, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Aim Glucocorticoids (GCs) take part in the direct control of cell lineage during the late phase of pancreas development when endocrine and exocrine cell differentiation occurs. However, other tissues such as the vasculature exert a critical role before that phase. This study aims to investigate the consequences of overexposure to exogenous glucocorticoids during different time-windows of gestation for the development of the fetal endocrine pancreas. Methods Pregnant Wistar rats received dexamethasone acetate in their drinking water (1 µg/ml) during the last week or throughout gestation. Fetuses and their pancreases were analyzed at day 15 and 21 of gestation. Morphometrical analysis was performed on pancreatic sections after immunohistochemistry techniques and insulin secretion was evaluated on fetal islets collected in vitro. Results Dexamethasone given the last week or throughout gestation reduced the beta-cell mass in 21-day-old fetuses by respectively 18% or 62%. This was accompanied by a defect in insulin secretion. The alpha-cell mass was reduced similarly. Neither islet vascularization nor beta-cell proliferation was affected when dexamethasone was administered during the last week, which was however the case when given throughout gestation. When given from the beginning of gestation, dexamethasone reduced the number of cells expressing the early marker of endocrine lineage neurogenin-3 when analyzed at 15 days of fetal age. Conclusions GCs reduce the beta- and alpha-cell mass by different mechanisms according to the stage of development during which the treatment was applied. In fetuses exposed to glucocorticoids the last week of gestation only, beta-cell mass is reduced due to impairment of beta-cell commitment, whereas in fetuses exposed throughout gestation, islet vascularization and lower beta-cell proliferation are involved as well, amplifying the reduction of the endocrine mass. PMID:21991320

  4. Time-Course of Changes in Inflammatory Response after Whole-Body Cryotherapy Multi Exposures following Severe Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Pournot, Hervé; Bieuzen, François; Louis, Julien; Fillard, Jean-Robert; Barbiche, Etienne; Hausswirth, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the present investigation was to analyze the effect of two different recovery modalities on classical markers of exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) and inflammation obtained after a simulated trail running race. Endurance trained males (n = 11) completed two experimental trials separated by 1 month in a randomized crossover design; one trial involved passive recovery (PAS), the other a specific whole body cryotherapy (WBC) for 96 h post-exercise (repeated each day). For each trial, subjects performed a 48 min running treadmill exercise followed by PAS or WBC. The Interleukin (IL) -1 (IL-1), IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), protein C-reactive (CRP) and white blood cells count were measured at rest, immediately post-exercise, and at 24, 48, 72, 96 h in post-exercise recovery. A significant time effect was observed to characterize an inflammatory state (Pre vs. Post) following the exercise bout in all conditions (p<0.05). Indeed, IL-1β (Post 1 h) and CRP (Post 24 h) levels decreased and IL-1ra (Post 1 h) increased following WBC when compared to PAS. In WBC condition (p<0.05), TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-6 remain unchanged compared to PAS condition. Overall, the results indicated that the WBC was effective in reducing the inflammatory process. These results may be explained by vasoconstriction at muscular level, and both the decrease in cytokines activity pro-inflammatory, and increase in cytokines anti-inflammatory. PMID:21829501

  5. Time-course of changes in inflammatory response after whole-body cryotherapy multi exposures following severe exercise.

    PubMed

    Pournot, Hervé; Bieuzen, François; Louis, Julien; Mounier, Rémi; Fillard, Jean-Robert; Barbiche, Etienne; Hausswirth, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the present investigation was to analyze the effect of two different recovery modalities on classical markers of exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) and inflammation obtained after a simulated trail running race. Endurance trained males (n = 11) completed two experimental trials separated by 1 month in a randomized crossover design; one trial involved passive recovery (PAS), the other a specific whole body cryotherapy (WBC) for 96 h post-exercise (repeated each day). For each trial, subjects performed a 48 min running treadmill exercise followed by PAS or WBC. The Interleukin (IL) -1 (IL-1), IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), protein C-reactive (CRP) and white blood cells count were measured at rest, immediately post-exercise, and at 24, 48, 72, 96 h in post-exercise recovery. A significant time effect was observed to characterize an inflammatory state (Pre vs. Post) following the exercise bout in all conditions (p<0.05). Indeed, IL-1β (Post 1 h) and CRP (Post 24 h) levels decreased and IL-1ra (Post 1 h) increased following WBC when compared to PAS. In WBC condition (p<0.05), TNF-α, IL-10 and IL-6 remain unchanged compared to PAS condition. Overall, the results indicated that the WBC was effective in reducing the inflammatory process. These results may be explained by vasoconstriction at muscular level, and both the decrease in cytokines activity pro-inflammatory, and increase in cytokines anti-inflammatory. PMID:21829501

  6. Time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2013-09-01

    The concept of time in the `clockwork' Newtonian world was irrelevant; and has generally been ignored until recently by several generations of physicists since the implementation of quantum mechanics. We will set aside the utility of time as a property relating to physical calculations of events relating to a metrics line element or as an aspect of the transformation of a particles motion/interaction in a coordinate system or in relation to thermodynamics etc., i.e. we will discard all the usual uses of time as a concept used to circularly define physical parameters in terms of other physical parameters; concentrating instead on time as an aspect of the fundamental cosmic topology of our virtual reality especially as it inseparably relates to the nature and role of the observer in natural science.

  7. Short-term sleep deprivation with nocturnal light exposure alters time-dependent glucagon-like peptide-1 and insulin secretion in male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Gil-Lozano, Manuel; Hunter, Paola M; Behan, Lucy-Ann; Gladanac, Bojana; Casper, Robert F; Brubaker, Patricia L

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal L cell is the principal source of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a major determinant of insulin release. Because GLP-1 secretion is regulated in a circadian manner in rodents, we investigated whether the activity of the human L cell is also time sensitive. Rhythmic fluctuations in the mRNA levels of canonical clock genes were found in the human NCI-H716 L cell model, which also showed a time-dependent pattern in their response to well-established secretagogues. A diurnal variation in GLP-1 responses to identical meals (850 kcal), served 12 h apart in the normal dark (2300) and light (1100) periods, was also observed in male volunteers maintained under standard sleep and light conditions. These findings suggest the existence of a daily pattern of activity in the human L cell. Moreover, we separately tested the short-term effects of sleep deprivation and nocturnal light exposure on basal and postprandial GLP-1, insulin, and glucose levels in the same volunteers. Sleep deprivation with nocturnal light exposure disrupted the melatonin and cortisol profiles and increased insulin resistance. Moreover, it also induced profound derangements in GLP-1 and insulin responses such that postprandial GLP-1 and insulin levels were markedly elevated and the normal variation in GLP-1 responses was abrogated. These alterations were not observed in sleep-deprived participants maintained under dark conditions, indicating a direct effect of light on the mechanisms that regulate glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, the metabolic abnormalities known to occur in shift workers may be related to the effects of irregular light-dark cycles on these glucoregulatory pathways. PMID:26530153

  8. Influence of time and exposure to air on radiographic contrast and relative film speed of three rapid dental film processing solutions.

    PubMed

    Matthee, M J; Seeliger, J E; Prinsloo, N J; Swart, N G

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of exposure to air and time on the radiographic contrast and relative film speed of three processing solutions. A modified aluminium step-wedge phantom was used to expose varying numbers of Kodak Ektaspeed films daily for periods up to 57 days. The radiographic contrast and relative film speed were determined each day using a digital densitometer. Data obtained were analysed statistically, using Duncan's Multiple Range Test, and a 3-Factor ANOVA. It was found that, for radiographic contrast, Insta-Neg gave the highest values, followed by Kolchem and Ultra-Neg. For relative film speed, Kolchem gave the highest values, followed by Insta-Neg and Ultra-Neg. Both radiographic contrast and relative film speed decreased with the passage of time. Processing solutions kept in closed containers continued to perform efficiently for a longer time than those in open containers. The useful period was found to exceed that which is usually recommended. PMID:9511608

  9. Use of microarray technology to assess the time course of liver stress response after confinement exposure in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata L.)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Selection programs for growth and stress traits in cultured fish are fundamental to the improvement of aquaculture production. The gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) is the main aquacultured species in the Mediterranean area and there is considerable interest in the genetic improvement of this species. With the aim of increasing the genomic resources in gilthead sea bream and identifying genes and mechanisms underlying the physiology of the stress response, we developed a cDNA microarray for gilthead sea bream that is enriched by suppression substractive hybridization with stress and immunorelevant genes. This microarray is used to analyze the dynamics of gilthead sea bream liver expression profile after confinement exposure. Results Groups of confined and control juvenile fish were sampled at 6, 24, 72 and 120 h post exposure. GeneSpring analyses identified 202 annotated genes that appeared differentially expressed at least at one sampling time (P < 0.05). Gene expression results were validated by quantitative PCR of 10 target genes, and K-means clustering of differently expressed genes identified four major temporal gene expression profiles. Set 1 encompassed a rapid metabolic readjustment with enhanced uptake and intracellular transport of fatty acids as metabolic fuels. Set 2 was associated with a wide variety of tissue repair and remodeling processes that were mostly mediated by the stress response of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Sets 3 and 4 encompassed the re-establishment of cellular homeostasis with increased intracellular trafficking and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), accompanied by a bidirectional regulation of the immune system and a general decline of ROS production. Conclusions Collectively, these findings show the complex nature of the adaptive stress response with a clear indication that the ER is an important control point for homeostatic adjustments. The study also identifies metabolic pathways which could be analyzed in greater detail to provide new insights regarding the transcriptional regulation of the stress response in fish. PMID:20307314

  10. Pathway and time-resolved benzo[a]pyrene toxicity on Hepa1c1c7 cells at toxic and subtoxic exposure.

    PubMed

    Kalkhof, Stefan; Dautel, Franziska; Loguercio, Salvatore; Baumann, Sven; Trump, Saskia; Jungnickel, Harald; Otto, Wolfgang; Rudzok, Susanne; Potratz, Sarah; Luch, Andreas; Lehmann, Irina; Beyer, Andreas; von Bergen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is an environmental contaminant mainly studied for its toxic/carcinogenic effects. For a comprehensive and pathway orientated mechanistic understanding of the effects directly triggered by a toxic (5 μM) or a subtoxic (50 nM) concentration of B[a]P or indirectly by its metabolites, we conducted time series experiments for up to 24 h to study the effects in murine hepatocytes. These cells rapidly take up and actively metabolize B[a]P, which was followed by quantitative analysis of the concentration of intracellular B[a]P and seven representative degradation products. Exposure with 5 μM B[a]P led to a maximal intracellular concentration of 1604 pmol/5 × 10(4) cells, leveling at 55 pmol/5 × 10(4) cells by the end of the time course. Changes in the global proteome (>1000 protein profiles) and metabolome (163 metabolites) were assessed in combination with B[a]P degradation. Abundance profiles of 236 (both concentrations), 190 (only 5 μM), and 150 (only 50 nM) proteins were found to be regulated in response to B[a]P in a time-dependent manner. At the endogenous metabolite level amino acids, acylcarnitines and glycerophospholipids were particularly affected by B[a]P. The comprehensive chemical, proteome and metabolomic data enabled the identification of effects on the pathway level in a time-resolved manner. So in addition to known alterations, also protein synthesis, lipid metabolism, and membrane dysfunction were identified as B[a]P specific effects. PMID:25362887

  11. Times of impacts that deliver samples of Vesta to Earth derived from ultrasensitive 81Kr-Kr cosmic ray exposure age analysis of Eucrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strashnov, I.; Bland, P. A.; Spurný, P.; Towner, M. C.; Gilmour, J. D.

    2013-04-01

    Concentrations and isotopic compositions of krypton have been measured in Eucrite falls using a new resonance ionization mass-spectrometer (RIMSKI). The high sensitivity of the apparatus allowed sample sizes to be reduced to 1-4 mg for 81Kr-Kr cosmic ray exposure age determination. 81Kr CRE ages have been determined for: Bereba, Bouvante, Ibitira, Juvinas, Millbillillie, Padvarninkai, Pasamonte and Stannern with precision comparable to those reported by other groups for analyses of >100 times larger samples. The 81Kr-Kr CRE ages of Lakangaon (25.3 ± 1.1 My) and Bunburra Rockhole (27.6 ± 1.4 My) have been determined for the first time. The 81Kr CRE ages of 16 out of 17 ordinary Eucrite falls can be grouped into clusters at 10.6 ± 0.4 Ma, 14.4 ± 0.6 My, 21.7 ± 0.4 My, 25.4 ± 0.4 My, 37.8 ± 0.6 My using an analysis based on the Akaike information criterion, which is well suited to addressing such issues. This shows that most of the meteorites originate from five collision events over the last ˜50 My, which is hard to reconcile with models requiring multiple fragmentation events between Vesta and Earth.

  12. Effect of long-time, elevated-temperature exposures to vacuum and lithium on the properties of a tantalum alloy, T-111

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzard, R. J.; Sheffler, K. D.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of long-term, elevated-temperature vacuum and lithium exposures on the mechanical properties of T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf) is determined. Exposure conditions were for 1000 hours at 980 or 1315 C, 5000 hours at 1315 C, and a duplex temperature exposure of 1000 hours at 980 C plus 4000 hours at 1040 C. The exposures resulted in reduced tensile and creep strengths of the T-111 in the 900 to 1100 C temperature range where a dynamic strain-age-strengthening mechanism is operative in this alloy. This strength reduction was attributed to the depletion of oxygen from solid solution in this alloy.

  13. Personal radiofrequency electromagnetic field measurements in The Netherlands: exposure level and variability for everyday activities, times of day and types of area.

    PubMed

    Bolte, John F B; Eikelboom, Tessa

    2012-11-01

    Knowledge of the exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields is necessary for epidemiological studies on possible health effects. The main goal of this study is to determine the exposure level and spatial and temporal variances during 39 everyday activities in 12 frequency bands used in mobile telecommunication and broadcasting. Therefore, 24 h measurements were gathered from 98 volunteers living in or near Amsterdam and Purmerend, The Netherlands. They carried an activity diary to be kept to the minute, a GPS logger sampling at an interval of 1 s, and an EME Spy exposimeter with a detection limit of 0.0066 mW/m(2) sampling at an interval of 10s in 12 frequency bands. The mean exposure over 24 h, excluding own mobile phone use, was 0.180 mW/m(2). During daytime exposure was about the same, but during night it was about half, and in the evening it was about twice as high. The main contribution to environmental exposure (calling by participant not included) is from calling with mobile phones (37.5%), from cordless DECT phones and their docking stations (31.7%), and from the base stations (12.7%). The exposure to mobile phone base stations increases with the percentage of urban ground use, which is an indication for high people density. In agreement, the highest mean exposure relates to the activities with high people density, such as travelling by public transport, visiting social events, pubs or shopping malls. Exposure at home depends mainly on exposure from people calling in the neighbourhood of the participant and thus on the number of persons in a household. In addition just the possession of DECT docking stations leads to exposure as most models transmit continuously in stand-by. Also wireless internet routers continuously transmit in the WiFi band. Though the highest exposure peaks in the WiFi band, up to 0.265 W/m(2), come from stray radiation of microwave ovens. The mean total exposure largely depends on phone calls of a high exposure level and short duration. These calls lead to potentially high contrasts as well in exposure levels between sessions of the same activity as between persons, thus posing a challenge for personal exposure prediction. PMID:22906414

  14. Results of time-resolved radiation exposure measurements made during U.S. shuttle missions with a tissue equivalent proportional counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golightly, M. J.; Hardy, A. C.; Hardy, K.

    1994-01-01

    Time resolved exposure measurements inside the crew compartment have been made during recent shuttle missions with the USAF Radiation Monitoring Equipment-III (RME-III), a portable four-channel tissue equivalent proportional counter. Results from the first six missions are presented and discussed. The missions had orbital inclinations ranging from 28 degrees to 57 degrees, and altitudes from 200-600km. Dose equivalent rates ranged from 40-5300 micro Sv/dy. The RME-III measurements are in good agreement with other dosimetry measurements made aboard the vehicle. Measurements indicate that medium- and high- Linear Energy Transfer (LET) particles contribute less than 2% of the particle fluence for all missions, but up to 50% of the dose equivalent, depending on the spacecraft's altitude and orbital inclination. Isa-dose rate contours have been developed from measurements made during the ST-28 mission. The drift rate of the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) is estimated to be 0.49 degrees W/yr and 0.12 degrees N/yr. The calculated trapped proton and Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) dose for the STS-28 mission were significantly lower than the measured values.

  15. Electronic platform for real-time multi-parametric analysis of cellular behavior post-exposure to single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Eldawud, Reem; Wagner, Alixandra; Dong, Chenbo; Rojansakul, Yon; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica

    2015-09-15

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) implementation in a variety of biomedical applications from bioimaging, to controlled drug delivery and cellular-directed alignment for muscle myofiber fabrication, has raised awareness of their potential toxicity. Nanotubes structural aspects which resemble asbestos, as well as their ability to induce cyto and genotoxicity upon interaction with biological systems by generating reactive oxygen species or inducing membrane damage, just to name a few, have led to focused efforts aimed to assess associated risks prior their user implementation. In this study, we employed a non-invasive and real-time electric cell impedance sensing (ECIS) platform to monitor behavior of lung epithelial cells upon exposure to a library of SWCNTs with user-defined physico-chemical properties. Using the natural sensitivity of the cells, we evaluated SWCNT-induced cellular changes in relation to cell attachment, cell-cell interactions and cell viability respectively. Our methods have the potential to lead to the development of standardized assays for risk assessment of other nanomaterials as well as risk differentiation based on the nanomaterials surface chemistry, purity and agglomeration state. PMID:25913448

  16. VITRIFICATION OF THAI NATIVE CATTLE OOCYTES: EFFECTS OF ETHYLENE GLYCOL CONCENTRATIONS AND EXPOSURE TIME, LINOLEIC ACID ALBUMIN AND CHOLESTEROL-LOADED METHYL-B-CYCLODEXTRIN.

    PubMed

    Chasombat, Jakkhaphan; Vongpralub, Thevin; Sirisathien, Saksiri; Phasuk, Yupin; Sonseeda, Pronjit

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to improve the oocyte vitrification procedure for preservation of Thai native cattle genetic resources. In Experiment I, oocytes were exposed to various doses (2%, 4% and 6%) of ethylene glycol (EG) in vitrification solution I (VS-I) for different equilibration times (10 or 20 min) before being exposed to VS-II and then subjected to vitrification. Experiment II was divided into two parts: (a) oocytes were matured in medium supplemented with linoleic acid albumin (LAA) (1% or 2%) and then vitrified; (b) matured oocytes were preincubated with cholesterol-loaded methyl-β-cyclodextrin (CLC) (1% or 2%) and then vitrified. Equilibration of oocytes by exposure to 6% EG in VS-I for 10 min (Experiment I), and in vitro maturation of immature oocytes in medium supplementation with 2% LAA (Experiment II) were the most effective methods; vitrified/thawed oocytes showed higher rates of survival and subsequent embryonic development compared with the other experimental groups. PMID:26510334

  17. MODEL DEVELOPMENT - EXPOSURE MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Humans are exposed to mixtures of chemicals from multiple pathways and routes. These exposures may result from a single event or may accumulate over time if multiple exposure events occur. The traditional approach of assessing risk from a single chemical and a single route of e...

  18. Urine pH, container composition, and exposure time influence adsorptive loss of 11-nor-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Jamerson, Matthew H; McCue, Joseph J; Klette, Kevin L

    2005-10-01

    11-nor-delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH) is the primary cannabinoid present in the urine of individuals who have used marijuana and is the target analyte identified at forensic urinalysis drug testing laboratories. The preparation, storage, transport, and processing of control materials for gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis of human urine specimens is critical to accurate compound identification and quantification. Previous studies have suggested that adsorptive loss of 11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH is influenced by container composition and storage temperature. In this study, urine solutions of 11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH (7.5, 15, 60, and 500 ng/mL) at three physiologically-relevant pHs (4.6, 6.5, and 8.4) were prepared and subjected to storage and processing in containers of different compositions (polypropylene and borosilicate glass). Analyte identification and quantification were achieved using tetramethylammonium hydroxide/iodomethane-based derivatization followed by GC separation and electron-impact MS. These analyses demonstrate that adsorptive loss of 11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH is a phenomenon found in acidic urine solutions and is relatively absent in urine solutions that are near-neutral or basic. Furthermore, the data indicate that the adsorptive loss of 11-nor-delta9-THC-COOH is dependent on solution-container exposure time and is similar between containers of two distinct compositions. These results suggest that for optimal analytical control performance, solution pH and control processing times are critical elements. PMID:16419391

  19. Biomarkers of exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Hern, S.C.; Quackenboss, J.J.

    1995-12-01

    As the risk paradigm gains acceptance in the scientific community for setting priorities and choosing cost-effective mitigation strategies, increasing emphasis is being placed upon understanding multimedia/multiroute/multipathway exposures. The use of biomarkers offers great potential to integrate all routes, media, and pathways of exposure so that scientifically defensible risk characterizations can be realized. Together with environmental or exposure measurements and questionnaire/activity data, these may help to evaluate completeness of exposure assessments for all relevant media and pathways and to characterize {open_quotes}highly exposed{close_quotes} population groups. Biomarkers of exposure are indicators of current or historical contact with an environmental agent, including the agent itself or its metabolites, depending on the biological media and time-constants for metabolism, storage, and excretion of specific chemicals. This paper will review historical use of biomarkers of exposure and explore their potential for future research, assessment, and control of environmental risks.

  20. Time Trends of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Exposure in New York City from 2001 to 2012: Assessed by Repeat Air and Urine Samples

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyung Hwa; Liu, Bian; Lovinsky-Desir, Stephanie; Yan, Beizhan; Camann, David; Sjodin, Andreas; Li, Zheng; Perera, Frederica; Kinney, Patrick; Chillrud, Steven; Miller, Rachel L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposure to air pollutants including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and specifically pyrene from combustion of fuel oil, coal, traffic and indoor sources, has been associated with adverse respiratory health outcomes. However, time trends of airborne PAH and metabolite levels detected via repeat measures over time have not yet been characterized. We hypothesized that PAH levels, measured repeatedly from residential indoor and outdoor monitors, and children’s urinary concentrations of PAH metabolites, would decrease following policy interventions to reduce traffic-related air pollution. Methods Indoor PAH (particle- and gas-phase) were collected for two weeks prenatally (n=98), at age 5/6 years (n=397) and age 9/10 years (n=198) since 2001 and at all three age-points (n=27). Other traffic-related air pollutants (black carbon and PM2.5) were monitored indoors simultaneous with PAH monitoring at ages 5/6 (n=403) and 9/10 (n=257) between 2005 and 2012. One third of the homes were selected across seasons for outdoor PAH, BC and PM2.5 sampling. Using the same sampling method, ambient PAH, BC and PM2.5 also were monitored every two weeks at a central site between 2007 and 2012. PAH were analyzed as semivolatile PAH (e.g., pyrene; MW 178–206) and the sum of eight nonvolatile PAH (Σ8PAHnonvolatile; MW 228–278). A spot urine sample was collected from children at child ages 3, 5, 7 and 9 between 2001 and 2012 and analyzed for 10 PAH metabolites. Results Modest declines were detected in indoor BC and PM2.5 levels between 2005 and 2012 (Annual percent change [APC]=−2.08% [p=0.010] and −2.18% [p=0.059] for BC and PM2.5, respectively), while a trend of increasing pyrene levels was observed in indoor and outdoor samples, and at the central site during the comparable time periods (APC=4.81%, 3.77% and 7.90%, respectively; p<0.05 for all). No significant time trend was observed in indoor Σ8PAHnonvolatile levels between 2005 and 2012; however, significant opposite trends were detected when analyzed seasonally (APC=−8.06% [p<0.01], 3.87% [p<0.05] for nonheating and heating season, respectively). Similarly, heating season also affected the annual trends (2005–2012) of other air pollutants: the decreasing BC trend (in indoor/outdoor air) was observed only in the nonheating season, consistent with dominating traffic sources that decreased with time; the increasing pyrene trend was more apparent in the heating season. Outdoor PM2.5 levels persistently decreased over time across the seasons. With the analyses of data collected over a longer period of time (2001–2012), a decreasing trend was observed in pyrene (APC=−2.76%; p<0.01), mostly driven by measures from the nonheating season (APC=−3.54%; p<0.01). In contrast, levels of pyrene and naphthalene metabolites, 1-hydroxypyrene and 2-naphthol, increased from 2001 to 2012 (APC=6.29% and 7.90% for 1-hydroxypyrene and 2-naphthol, respectively; p<0.01 for both). Conclusions Multiple NYC legislative regulations targeting traffic-related air pollution may have led to decreases in Σ8PAHnonvolatile and BC, especially in the nonheating season. Despite the overall decrease in pyrene over the 2001–2012 periods, a rise in pyrene levels in recent years (2005–2012), that was particularly evident for measures collected during the heating season, and 2-naphthol, indicates the contribution of heating oil combustion and other indoor sources to airborne pyrene and urinary 2-naphthol. PMID:24709094

  1. Effects of Prenatal Exposure to a Low Dose Atrazine Metabolite Mixture on pubertal timing and prostrate Development of Male Long Evans Rats.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study examines the postnatal reproductive development of male rats following prenatal exposure to an atrazine metabolite mixture (AMM) consisting of the herbicide atrazine and its environmental metabolites diaminochlorotriazine, hydroxyatrazine, deethylatrazine, and d...

  2. The protective effect of a 17°C holding time on boar sperm plasma membrane fluidity after exposure to 5°C.

    PubMed

    Casas, I; Althouse, G C

    2013-02-01

    The holding time (HT) is the period during which an ejaculate, either in a raw or diluted state, is held at 17°C before further processing for cold-storage. In boars, the HT positively influences select sperm quality parameters of semen cooled from 15 to 5°C, a range in temperature during which plasma membrane remodeling occurs. Objective insight into the effect of HT on plasma membrane organization remains unknown. Therefore, the present work sought to elucidate if HT contributes to minimizing alterations in boar sperm plasma membrane fluidity at the initial step of the cooling process in a cryopreservation practice (holding at 5°C) and in relation with select sperm quality parameters. Nineteen ejaculates from five boars were collected and processed according to different treatments: T1) Fresh diluted semen, 0h at 17°C; T2) Fresh diluted semen, 24h at 17°C (HT); T3) Sperm from T1 in a lactose-egg yolk (LEY) extender, 3h at 5°C; T4) Sperm from T2 in LEY, 3h at 5°C; T5) Sperm from T1 in LEY, 24h at 5°C; T6) Sperm from T2 in LEY, 24h at 5°C. Sperm motility was assessed using CASA, and sperm plasma membrane integrity and fluidity were evaluated by flow cytometry with dual labeling (M540/YO-PRO®-1). Results demonstrated that the lack of exposure to a HT (T5) results in reduced sample motility compared to those having a HT (T6), with sperm exposed to HT exhibiting less plasma membrane fluidity. Collectively, these results provide empirical evidence that incorporation of a HT in semen processing protects boar sperm against cold injury through maintenance of lipid architecture of the plasma membrane. PMID:23219919

  3. Gut-Homing Conventional Plasmablasts and CD27− Plasmablasts Elicited after a Short Time of Exposure to an Oral Live-Attenuated Shigella Vaccine Candidate in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Toapanta, Franklin R.; Simon, Jakub K.; Barry, Eileen M.; Pasetti, Marcela F.; Levine, Myron M.; Kotloff, Karen L.; Sztein, Marcelo B.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no licensed Shigella vaccine; however, various promising live-attenuated vaccine candidates have emerged, including CVD1208S (ΔguaBA, Δset, Δsen S. flexneri 2a), which was shown to be safe and immunogenic in Phase 1 clinical trials. Here, we report the immune responses elicited in an outpatient Phase 2 clinical trial in which subjects were vaccinated with CVD 1208S. Oral immunization with CVD 1208S elicited high anti-S. flexneri 2a LPS and IpaB antibody responses as well as an acute plasmablast (PB) infiltration in peripheral blood 7 days after immunization. PB sorted based on their expression of homing molecules confirmed that cells expressing integrin α4β7 alone or in combination with CD62L were responsible for antibody production (as measured by ELISpot). Furthermore, using high-color flow-cytometry, on day 7 after immunization, we observed the appearance of conventional PB (CPB, CD19dim CD20− CD27+high CD38+high CD3−), as well as a PB population that did not express CD27 (CD27− PB; pre-plasmablasts). The pattern of individual or simultaneous expression of homing markers (integrin α4β7, CD62L, CXCR3, and CXCR4) suggested that CPB cells homed preferentially to the inflamed gut mucosa. In contrast, ~50% CD27− PB cells appear to home to yet to be identified peripheral lymphoid organs or were in a transition state preceding integrin α4β7 upregulation. In sum, these observations demonstrate that strong immune responses, including distinct PB subsets with the potential to home to the gut and other secondary lymphoid organs, can be elicited after a short time of exposure to a shigella oral vaccine. PMID:25191323

  4. Pathway-based approaches for assessment of real-time exposure to an estrogenic wastewater treatment plant effluent on fathead minnow reproduction.

    PubMed

    Cavallin, Jenna E; Jensen, Kathleen M; Kahl, Michael D; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Lee, Kathy E; Schroeder, Anthony L; Mayasich, Joe; Eid, Evan P; Nelson, Krysta R; Milsk, Rebecca Y; Blackwell, Brett R; Berninger, Jason P; LaLone, Carlie A; Blanksma, Chad; Jicha, Terri; Elonen, Colleen; Johnson, Rodney; Ankley, Gerald T

    2016-03-01

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents are known contributors of chemical mixtures into the environment. Of particular concern are endocrine-disrupting compounds, such as estrogens, which can affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis function in exposed organisms. The present study examined reproductive effects in fathead minnows exposed for 21 d to a historically estrogenic WWTP effluent. Fathead minnow breeding pairs were held in control water or 1 of 3 effluent concentrations (5%, 20%, and 100%) in a novel onsite, flow-through system providing real-time exposure. The authors examined molecular and biochemical endpoints representing key events along adverse outcome pathways linking estrogen receptor activation and other molecular initiating events to reproductive impairment. In addition, the authors used chemical analysis of the effluent to construct a chemical-gene interaction network to aid in targeted gene expression analyses and identifying potentially impacted biological pathways. Cumulative fecundity was significantly reduced in fish exposed to 100% effluent but increased in those exposed to 20% effluent, the approximate dilution factor in the receiving waters. Plasma vitellogenin concentrations in males increased in a dose-dependent manner with effluent concentration; however, male fertility was not impacted. Although in vitro analyses, analytical chemistry, and biomarker responses confirmed the effluent was estrogenic, estrogen receptor agonists were unlikely the primary driver of impaired reproduction. The results provide insights into the significance of pathway-based effects with regard to predicting adverse reproductive outcomes. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:702-716. Published 2015 by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US Government work, and as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America. PMID:26332155

  5. Comparison of secondary organic aerosol formed with an aerosol flow reactor and environmental reaction chambers: effect of oxidant concentration, exposure time and seed particles on chemical composition and yield

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lambe, A. T.; Chhabra, P. S.; Onasch, T. B.; Brune, W. H.; Hunter, J. F.; Kroll, J. H.; Cummings, M. J.; Brogan, J. F.; Parmar, Y.; Worsnop, D. R.; et al

    2014-12-02

    We performed a systematic intercomparison study of the chemistry and yields of SOA generated from OH oxidation of a common set of gas-phase precursors in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) continuous flow reactor and several environmental chambers. In the flow reactor, SOA precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2.0×108 to 2.2&times1010 molec cm-3 over exposure times of 100 s. In the environmental chambers, precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2×106 to 2×107 molec cm-3 over exposure times of several hours. The OH concentration in the chamber experiments is close to that found in the atmosphere, butmore » the integrated OH exposure in the flow reactor can simulate atmospheric exposure times of multiple days compared to chamber exposure times of only a day or so. A linear correlation analysis of the mass spectra (m=0.91–0.92, r2=0.93–0.94) and carbon oxidation state (m=1.1, r2=0.58) of SOA produced in the flow reactor and environmental chambers for OH exposures of approximately 1011 molec cm-3 s suggests that the composition of SOA produced in the flow reactor and chambers is the same within experimental accuracy as measured with an aerosol mass spectrometer. This similarity in turn suggests that both in the flow reactor and in chambers, SOA chemical composition at low OH exposure is governed primarily by gas-phase OH oxidation of the precursors, rather than heterogeneous oxidation of the condensed particles. In general, SOA yields measured in the flow reactor are lower than measured in chambers for the range of equivalent OH exposures that can be measured in both the flow reactor and chambers. The influence of sulfate seed particles on isoprene SOA yield measurements was examined in the flow reactor. The studies show that seed particles increase the yield of SOA produced in flow reactors by a factor of 3 to 5 and may also account in part for higher SOA yields obtained in the chambers, where seed particles are routinely used.« less

  6. Source identification of ambient PM 2.5 for inhalation exposure studies in Steubenville, Ohio using highly time-resolved measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, Masako; Keeler, Gerald J.; Kamal, Ali S.; Wagner, James G.; Harkema, Jack R.; Rohr, Annette C.

    2011-12-01

    Recent epidemiological and toxicological studies have suggested that short-term elevations of ambient fine particle mass concentrations (aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm, PM 2.5) can increase cardiac and pulmonary health risks. Thus, examining temporal variations of chemical changes in ambient PM 2.5 that could pose the greatest health risks and identifying its sources is critical so that the most toxic categories can be controlled. In this study we collected detailed air quality data in Steubenville, Ohio in August 2006 with the ultimate goal to evaluate associations between cardiovascular (CV) parameters measured in exposed laboratory animals and the chemical and elemental composition of PM 2.5. Current approaches using radiotelemetry to measure CV parameters in conscious laboratory animals are capable of collecting continuous recordings. To provide a robust and analogous dataset that can be better matched with CV responses, we have incorporated a highly time-resolved sampling method to characterize trace elements and thereby obtain more robust input data to determine potential emission sources. We applied positive matrix factorization (PMF) to trace element concentrations from 30-minute ambient PM 2.5 samples in Steubenville, Ohio, an area designated as a non-attainment area for the PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards by the Environmental Protection Agency. The average ambient PM 2.5 filter-based mass concentration during the 8-hour summer exposure study period was 26 ± 11 μg m -3. Results from PMF indicated that six major factors contributed to the ambient PM 2.5 mass during this time: coal combustion/secondary (39 ± 46%), mobile sources (12 ± 14%), metal coating/processing (10 ± 11%), iron and steel manufacturing (5 ± 5%), Pb factor (5 ± 8%), and incineration/smelting (1 ± 3%). The objectives of this paper are (1) to present chemical composition of ambient PM 2.5 and its potential emission sources in Steubenville; and (2) to evaluate the PMF modeling results using observed meteorological data. These semi-continuous sampling approaches to determine potential emission sources have significant advantages over similar analyses using samples averaged over 8-24 h, and are being utilized by our group to determine associations of PM with acute CV responses from animal inhalation toxicology field studies.

  7. HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT USING IMMUNOASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Exposure Research Laboratory-Las Vegas is developing analytical methods for human exposure assessment studies. Critical exposure studies generate a large number of samples which must be analyzed in a reliable, cost-effective and timely manner. TCP (3,5,6-trichlor...

  8. Methods for analyzing occupational cohort data with application to lung cancer in US uranium miners: Techniques for fitting and checking exposure-time-response models

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, J.; Whittemore, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    Two methods were used to examine how lung cancer death rates vary with cumulative exposures to radiation and tobacco among uranium miners. The two methods produced similar results when death rate ratios were taken to be the product of radiation and tobacco effects. The estimates were discrepant when death rate ratios were taken to be the sum of radiation and tobacco effects. Both methods indicated better fit for the multiplicative model. It may be that cumulative exposures are inappropriate measures of the effects of radiation and tobacco on lung cancer death rates, as well as for other pollutants where the assumption of cumulative dose is the basis for risk assessments.

  9. Different Patterns of Regional Purkinje Cell Loss in the Cerebellar Vermis as a Function of the Timing of Prenatal Ethanol Exposure in an Ovine Model

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Onkar B.; Lunde, Emilie R.; Washburn, Shannon E.; Chen, Wei-Jung A.; Goodlett, Charles R.; Cudd, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    Studies in rat models of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders have indicated that the cerebellum is particularly vulnerable to ethanol-induced Purkinje cell loss during the third trimester-equivalent, with striking regional differences in vulnerability in which early-maturing regions in the vermis show significantly more loss than the late-maturing regions. The current study tested the hypothesis that the sheep model will show similar regional differences in fetal cerebellar Purkinje cell loss when prenatal binge ethanol exposure is restricted to the prenatal period of brain development equivalent to the third trimester and also compared the pattern of loss to that produced by exposure during the first trimester-equivalent. Pregnant Suffolk sheep were assigned to four groups: first trimester-equivalent saline control group, first trimester-equivalent ethanol group (1.75 g/kg/day), third trimester-equivalent saline control group, and third trimester-equivalent ethanol group (1.75 g/kg/day). Ethanol was administered as an intravenous infusion on 3 consecutive days followed by a 4-day ethanol-free interval, to mimic a weekend binge drinking pattern. Animals from all four groups were sacrificed and fetal brains were harvested on gestation day 133. Fetal cerebellar Purkinje cell counts were performed in an early-maturing region (lobules I-X) and a late-maturing region (lobules VIc-VII) from mid-sagittal sections of the cerebellar vermis. As predicted, the third trimester-equivalent ethanol exposure caused a significant reduction in the fetal cerebellar Purkinje cell volume density and Purkinje cell number in the early-maturing region, but not in the late-maturing region. In contrast, the first trimester-equivalent ethanol exposure resulted in significant reductions in both the early and late-maturing regions. These data confirmed the previous findings in rat models that third trimester-equivalent prenatal ethanol exposure resulted in regionally-specific Purkinje cell loss in the early-maturing region of the vermis, and further demonstrated that first trimester ethanol exposure caused more generalized fetal cerebellar Purkinje cell loss, independent of the cerebellar vermal region. These findings support the idea that prenatal ethanol exposure in the first trimester interferes with the genesis of Purkinje cells in an unselective manner, whereas exposure during the third trimester selectively kills post-mitotic Purkinje cells in specific vermal regions during a vulnerable period of differentiation and synaptogenesis. PMID:23195754

  10. Real-time electronic-diary reports of cue exposure and mood in the hours before cocaine and heroin craving and use

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, David H.; Willner-Reid, Jessica; Vahabzadeh, Massoud; Mezghanni, Mustapha; Lin, Jia-Ling; Preston, Kenzie L.

    2010-01-01

    Context In Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA), participants electronically report their activities and moods in their daily environments in real time, enabling a truly prospective approach to the study of acute precipitants of behavioral events. EMA has greatly enhanced the study of tobacco addiction, but has rarely been attempted in individuals with cocaine or heroin addiction. Objective To prospectively monitor the acute daily-life precipitants of craving for, and use of, cocaine and heroin. Design Cohort study. Participants A volunteer sample of 114 cocaine- and heroin-abusing outpatients who were being treated with methadone provided EMA data on handheld computers for 14,918 person-days (mean 130.9 days per participant, range 6–189). Of those 114, a total of 102 (63 men, 39 women) provided acute pre-craving or pre-use data and were thus included in the present analyses. Main outcome measures Changes in reports of mood and exposure to 12 putative drug-use triggers at random intervals during the five hours preceding each self-reported episode of drug craving or use, analyzed via repeated-measures logistic regression (SAS GLIMMIX macro). Results During the five hours preceding cocaine use or heroin craving, most of the 12 putative triggers showed linear increases. Cocaine use was most robustly associated with increases in reports of “Saw Drug” (p<.0001), “Tempted to use out of the blue” (p<.0001), “Wanted to see what would happen if I used” (p<.0001), and “Good mood” (p<.0001). Heroin craving was most robustly associated with increases in reports of “Sad” (p=.0002) and “Angry” (p<.011). Cocaine craving and heroin use showed few reliable associations with any of the putative triggers assessed. Conclusions These findings confirm that polydrug-abusing individuals can provide behavioral data in their daily environments using handheld computers, and that those data can reveal orderly patterns, including prospectively detectable harbingers of craving and use, which may differ across drugs. PMID:19124692

  11. Relative-risk-estimate bias and loss of power in the Mantel test for trend resulting from the use of magnetic-field point-in-time (spot) measurements in epidemiological studies based on an ordinal exposure scale

    SciTech Connect

    Delpizzo, V.; Salzberg, M.R. )

    1992-01-01

    We assessed the merits of various point-in-time (spot) measurement protocols in case-control studies based on an ordinal exposure scale. After classifying a number of houses on the basis of prolonged monitoring of the ambient, extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic field, we determined the probability of misclassification for each spot measurement protocol. We calculated the effect of this misclassification on the relative risk estimates and on the Mantel test for trend. We found that classification based on a small group of point-in-time measurements allows an adequate estimate of the relative risk, although the statistical significance of the dose-response gradient may be seriously underestimated. However, the use of automated ambient-field monitors, which results in loss of information on spatial variability, can lead to similar consequences. Therefore, manually collected point-in-time measurements remain a viable option for exposure assessment.

  12. Altered gene expression by low-dose arsenic exposure in humans and cultured cardiomyocytes: Assessment by real-time PCR array

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water has become a great public health concern worldwide. Chronic arsenic exposure results in higher risk of skin, lung and bladder cancer, as well as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects o...

  13. Effects of prenatal exposure to a low dose atrazine metabolite mixture onpubertal timing and prostate development of male Long-Evans rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atrazine (ATR) is a chlorotriazine herbicide extensively used in the US and other countries. Studies examining the effects of adult or developmental ATR exposure on the mammary gland (MG) have used either the Sprague Dawley (SD) or Long-Evans (LE) rat, but no strain comparisons h...

  14. Effects of short time-course exposure to antiandrogen flutamide on steroidogenesis and gene expression in ovary of female fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the mechanisms through which antiandrogens disrupt reproduction in fish are not well-characterized, this work sought to identify genes and pathways affected by antiandrogen exposure, and to compare differentially expressed genes in the fathead minnow to those previously r...

  15. ATTENUATION OF STATISTICAL RELATIONSHIPS FROM PM COMMUNITY TIME-SERIES EPIDEMIOLOGY DUE TO USE OF COMBINED, RATHER THAN SEPARATE, INDICATORS OF EXPOSURE AND MORTALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Attenuation of the statistical relationships between PM and health outcomes may arise from 1) combining exposure indicators, e.g., PM10 instead of PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 or 2) from combining different types of mortality. The Phoenix, AZ data base on air quality offers an opportunity...

  16. ASSESSING ASTHMATIC CHILDREN'S EXPOSURES TO TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS AND THE POTENTIAL INHALED DOSES USING TIME ACTIVITY INFORMATION AND ENERGY EXPENDITURE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurately quantifying human exposures and the potential doses of various populations to environmental pollutants is critical for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to assess and manage human health risks. The Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study (TACS) was a pilot research stu...

  17. Radiation Risk from Chronic Low Dose-Rate Radiation Exposures: The Role of Life-Time Animal Studies - Workshop October 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Gayle Woloschak

    2009-12-16

    As a part of Radiation research conference, a workshop was held on life-long exposure studies conducted in the course of irradiation experiements done at Argonne National Laboratory between 1952-1992. A recent review article documents many of the issues discussed at that workshop.

  18. Environmental Exposures and Development

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    Structured Abstract Purpose of Review Summarize recent studies exploring the relationship between paternal and maternal environmental exposures to chemicals before, at the time of and after conception to adverse developmental outcomes including; preterm birth, death, structural and functional abnormalities and growth restriction. Recent Findings Recent studies have demonstrated that human pregnancy and development is vulnerable to environmental exposures of the father and mother to chemical, biological and physical agents. Exposures associated with adverse developmental outcomes include; air and water pollution, chemicals in foods, occupational exposures, agricultural chemicals, metals, persistent and volatile organics. Developmental endpoints which are linked with these exposures include; growth restriction, functional abnormalities, structural abnormalities, preterm delivery and death. Despite this general understanding we still have incomplete knowledge concerning most exposures and the biological interactions responsible for impaired development and preterm delivery. Summary While single genes and individual chemical exposures are responsible for some instances of adverse pregnancy outcome or developmental disease, gene-environment interactions are responsible for the majority. These gene-environment interactions may occur in the father, mother, placenta or fetus suggesting that critical attention be given to maternal and paternal exposures and gene expression as they relate to the mode of action of the putative developmental toxicant both prior to and during pregnancy. PMID:20216314

  19. Climatic and topographic controls on the style and timing of Late Quaternary glaciation throughout Tibet and the Himalaya defined by 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide surface exposure dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, L.A.; Finkel, R.C.; Barnard, P.L.; Haizhou, Ma; Asahi, K.; Caffee, M.W.; Derbyshire, E.

    2005-01-01

    Temporal and spatial changes in glacier cover throughout the Late Quaternary in Tibet and the bordering mountains are poorly defined because of the inaccessibility and vastness of the region, and the lack of numerical dating. To help reconstruct the timing and extent of glaciation throughout Tibet and the bordering mountains, we use geomorphic mapping and 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) surface dating in study areas in southeastern (Gonga Shan), southern (Karola Pass) and central (Western Nyainqentanggulha Shan and Tanggula Shan) Tibet, and we compare these with recently determined numerical chronologies in other parts of the plateau and its borderlands. Each of the study regions receives its precipitation mainly during the south Asian summer monsoon when it falls as snow at high altitudes. Gonga Shan receives the most precipitation (>2000 mm a-1) while, near the margins of monsoon influence, the Karola Pass receives moderate amounts of precipitation (500-600 mm a-1) and, in the interior of the plateau, little precipitation falls on the western Nyainqentanggulha Shan (???300 mm a -1) and the Tanggula Shan (400-700 mm a-1). The higher precipitation values for the Tanggula Shan are due to strong orographic effects. In each region, at least three sets of moraines and associated landforms are preserved, providing evidence for multiple glaciations. The 10Be CRN surface exposure dating shows that the formation of moraines in Gonga Shan occurred during the early-mid Holocene, Neoglacial and Little Ice Age, on the Karola Pass during the Lateglacial, Early Holocene and Neoglacial, in the Nyainqentanggulha Shan date during the early part of the last glacial cycle, global Last Glacial Maximum and Lateglacial, and on the Tanggula Shan during the penultimate glacial cycle and the early part of the last glacial cycle. The oldest moraine succession in each of these regions varies from the early Holocene (Gonga Shan), Lateglacial (Karola Pass), early Last Glacial (western Nyainqentanggulha Shan), and penultimate glacial cycle (Tanggula Shan). We believe that the regional patterns and timing of glaciation reflect temporal and spatial variability in the south Asian monsoon and, in particular, in regional precipitation gradients. In zones of greater aridity, the extent of glaciation has become increasingly restricted throughout the Late Quaternary leading to the preservation of old (???100 ka) glacial landforms. In contrast, in regions that are very strongly influenced by the monsoon (???1600 mm a-1), the preservation potential of pre-Lateglacial moraine successions is generally extremely poor. This is possibly because Lateglacial and Holocene glacial advances may have been more extensive than early glaciations and hence may have destroyed any landform or sedimentary evidence of earlier glaciations. Furthermore, the intense denudation, mainly by fluvial and mass movement processes, which characterize these wetter environments, results in rapid erosion and re-sedimentation of glacial and associated landforms, which also contributes to their poor preservation potential. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The effects of different intensities, frequencies and exposure times of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Bayır, Ece; Bilgi, Eyüp; Şendemir-Ürkmez, Aylin; Hameş-Kocabaş, E Esin

    2015-03-01

    The impact of different types of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli O157:H7 was investigated. The cultures of bacteria in broth media were exposed to sinusoidal homogenous ELF-EMF with 2 and 4 mT magnetic intensities. Each intensity for each bacteria was combined with three different frequencies (20, 40 and 50 Hz), and four different exposure times (1, 2, 4 and 6 h). A cell suspension of each experiment was diluted for the appropriate range and inoculated to Mueller-Hinton Agar (MHA) plates after exposure to ELF-EMF. The number of colony forming units (CFU) of both strains was obtained after incubation at 37 °C for 24 h. Data were statistically evaluated by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), statistical significance was described at p < 0.05 and data were compared with their non-exposed controls. Magnetic intensity, frequency and exposure time of ELF-EMFs changed the characteristic responses for both microorganisms. Samples exposed to ELF-EMF showed a statistically significant decrease compared to their controls in colony forming capability, especially at long exposure times. An exposure to 4 mT-20 Hz ELF-EMF of 6 h produced maximum inhibition of CFU compared to their controls for both microorganisms (95.2% for S. aureus and 85% for E. coli). PMID:24279632

  1. Advanced Exposure Metrics For Chemical Risk Analysis: Systems Biology and 'Omic-based Biomarkers for Exposure Reconstruction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Direct measurement of human exposure to environmental contaminants in real time (when the exposure is actually occurring) is rare and difficult to obtain. This frustrates both exposure assessments and investigations into the linkage between chemical exposure and human disease. ...

  2. Military Exposures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Freedom (Afghanistan) Iraq War (OIF/OND) Gulf War Vietnam War More Wars & Operations » Exposure Categories Chemicals (Agent ... W X Y Z Registry Evaluation A free medical assessment for possible health problems related to specific ...

  3. Exposure Time Calculations for Calibrating of Vega and G191-B2B in the Optical and Near-Infrared: Ground-based, Airborne, Balloon-based, and Rocket-borne Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, S.; Bohlin, R. C.; Deustua, S. E.; Kent, S. M.; Lampton, M. L.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S. L.; Richmond, M. W.; Smith, J. A.; Tucker, D. L.; Woodgate, B. E.; SNAP

    2004-12-01

    For SNAP to succeed the science program requires an accuracy in supernova color determination over the wavelength range 0.35-1.7 microns of 2% in the optical and 3% in the near infrared. We explore the possibility of the spectrophotometric calibration of standard stars for SNAP mission in the optical and near infrared using 5 different programs. It is important to understand the impact of different calibration programs in the estimated exposure time calculation and the estimated signal to noise (SNR). We have calculated the exposure time required for imaging and spectroscopic observations of spectrophotometric standard stars (Vega and HST standard G191-B2B) using SNAP detectors and filters at specified seeing, airmass, and sky conditions at either ground/space bases.

  4. Glutamatergic synapse protein composition of wild-type mice is sensitive to in utero MTHFR genotype and the timing of neonatal vigabatrin exposure.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Chava; Blumkin, Elinor; Melamed, Osnat; Golan, Hava M

    2015-10-01

    The enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate-reductase (MTHFR) is part of the homocysteine and folate metabolic pathways. In utero, Mthfr-deficient environment has been reported as a risk factor for neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and neural tube defects. Neonatal disruption of the GABAergic system is also associated with behavioral outcomes. The interaction between Mthfr deficiency and neonatal exposure to the GABA-potentiating drug vigabatrin (GVG) in mice alters anxiety, memory, and social behavior in a gender-dependent manner. In addition, a gender-dependent enhancement of proteins implicated in excitatory synapse plasticity in the cerebral cortex was shown. Here we show that in utero MTHFR deficiency is sufficient to alter the levels of glutamate receptor subunits GluR1, GluR2, and NR2B in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of adult offspring with a WT genotype. In addition, FMRP1, CAMKII α and γ, and NLG1 levels in WT offspring were vulnerable to the in utero genotype. These effects depend on brain region and the cellular compartment tested. The effect of in utero MTHFR deficiency varies with the age of neonatal GVG exposure to modify GluR1, NR2A, reelin, CAMKII α, and NLG1 levels. These changes in molecular composition of the glutamatergic synapse were associated with increased anxiety-like behavior. Complex, multifactorial disorders of the nervous system show significant association with several genetic and environmental factors. Our data exemplify the contribution of an in utero MTHFR-deficient environment and early exposure to an antiepileptic drug to the basal composition of the glutamatergic synapses. The robust effect is expected to alter synapse function and plasticity and the cortico-hippocampal circuitry. PMID:26235956

  5. On time variations of the intensity of galactic cosmic rays for the recent billion years from the data on exposure ages of iron meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    To ascertain probable variations of the intensity of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) for the recent billion years, the distribution of exposure ages T of iron meteorites has been analyzed. We considered all ~80 values of ages from the data by Voshage and Feldmann (1979), Voshage et al. (1983), and Voshage (1984), as well as a set of values obtained from the correction for eliminating the meteorites formed in a single collision. To correct the data, the Akaike information criterion was used. For the distributions of the phase values Ph = T/t-int( T/t), the dependence of the criterion χ 2 on the presumable period t in the exposure age variations was analyzed. For t ~ 400-500 Myr and, partly, for t ~ 150 Myr, the significant deviations of this criterion from the corresponding mean values were found. To clear up the influence of the GCR intensity variations on the age distribution, the numerical models were calculated with an account of the set of ages randomly distributed in the interval of 0-1000 Myr with the presumptive mean lifetime of iron meteorites in outer space τ = 700 Myr. It has been ascertained that, for variations with a period of t = 450 Myr, the distribution of exposure ages of the model set is similar to that found for iron meteorites. The obtained data suggest that the GCR intensity variations with a period of approximately 400-500 Myr have probably existed during the recent billion years. These variations may be caused by periodic passages of the Solar System through spiral arms of the Galaxy. It has been shown that the earlier discussed changes in the GCR intensity with a period of ~150 Myr (Shaviv, 2002; 2003; Scherer et al., 2006) are less defined.

  6. New Horizons in Enhancing the Proliferation and Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells Using Stimulatory Effects of the Short Time Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation.

    PubMed

    Eghlidospour, M; Mortazavi, S M J; Yousefi, F; Mortazavi, S A R

    2015-09-01

    Mobile phone use and wireless communication technology have grown explosively over the past decades. This rapid growth has caused widespread global concern about the potential detrimental effects of this technology on human health. Stem cells generate specialized cell types of the tissue in which they reside through normal differentiation pathways. Considering the undeniable importance of stem cells in modern medicine, numerous studies have been performed on the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on cellular processes such as: proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle and DNA repair processes. We have conducted extensive studies on beneficial (stimulatory) or detrimental biological effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as mobile phones, mobile phone base stations, mobile phone jammers, radar systems, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and dentistry cavitrons over the past years. In this article, recent studies on the biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation in the range of radiofrequency (RF) on some important features of stem cells such as their proliferation and differentiation are reviewed. Studies reviewed in this paper indicate that the stimulatory or inhibitory effects of RF radiation on the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells depend on various factors such as the biological systems, experiment conditions, the frequency and intensity of RF and the duration of exposure. PMID:26396965

  7. A Systems Biology Approach Reveals the Dose- and Time-Dependent Effect of Primary Human Airway Epithelium Tissue Culture After Exposure to Cigarette Smoke In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Carole; Gebel, Stephan; Poussin, Carine; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Sewer, Alain; Weisensee, Dirk; Hengstermann, Arnd; Ansari, Sam; Wagner, Sandra; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2015-01-01

    To establish a relevant in vitro model for systems toxicology-based mechanistic assessment of environmental stressors such as cigarette smoke (CS), we exposed human organotypic bronchial epithelial tissue cultures at the air liquid interface (ALI) to various CS doses. Previously, we compared in vitro gene expression changes with published human airway epithelia in vivo data to assess their similarities. Here, we present a follow-up evaluation of these in vitro transcriptomics data, using complementary computational approaches and an integrated mRNA–microRNA (miRNA) analysis. The main cellular pathways perturbed by CS exposure were related to stress responses (oxidative stress and xenobiotic metabolism), inflammation (inhibition of nuclear factor-κB and the interferon gamma-dependent pathway), and proliferation/differentiation. Within post-exposure periods up to 48 hours, a transient kinetic response was observed at lower CS doses, whereas higher doses resulted in more sustained responses. In conclusion, this systems toxicology approach has potential for product testing according to “21st Century Toxicology”. PMID:25788831

  8. Effects of prenatal exposure to a low dose atrazine metabolite mixture on pubertal timing and prostate development of male Long-Evans rats

    SciTech Connect

    Stanko, Jason; Enoch, Rolondo; Rayner, Jennifer L; Davis, Christine; Wolf, Douglas; Malarkey, David; Fenton, Suzanne

    2010-12-01

    The present study examines the postnatal reproductive development of male rats following prenatal exposure to an atrazine metabolite mixture (AMM) consisting of the herbicide atrazine and its environmental metabolites diaminochlorotriazine, hydroxyatrazine, deethylatrazine, and deisopropylatrazine. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were treated by gavage with 0.09, 0.87, or 8.73 mg AMM/kg body weight (BW), vehicle, or 100 mg ATR/kg BW positive control, on gestation days 15 19. Preputial separation was significantly delayed in 0.87 mg and 8.73 mg AMM-exposed males. AMM-exposed males demonstrated a significant treatment-related increase in incidence and severity of inflammation in the prostate on postnatal day (PND) 120. A dose-dependent increase in epididymal fat masses and prostate foci were grossly visible in AMM-exposed offspring. These results indicate that a short, late prenatal exposure to mixture of chlorotriazine metabolites can cause chronic prostatitis in male LE rats. The mode of action for these effects is presently unclear.

  9. New Horizons in Enhancing the Proliferation and Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells Using Stimulatory Effects of the Short Time Exposure to Radiofrequency Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Eghlidospour, M.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Yousefi, F.; Mortazavi, S. A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone use and wireless communication technology have grown explosively over the past decades. This rapid growth has caused widespread global concern about the potential detrimental effects of this technology on human health. Stem cells generate specialized cell types of the tissue in which they reside through normal differentiation pathways. Considering the undeniable importance of stem cells in modern medicine, numerous studies have been performed on the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on cellular processes such as: proliferation, differentiation, cell cycle and DNA repair processes. We have conducted extensive studies on beneficial (stimulatory) or detrimental biological effects of exposure to different sources of electromagnetic fields such as mobile phones, mobile phone base stations, mobile phone jammers, radar systems, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and dentistry cavitrons over the past years. In this article, recent studies on the biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation in the range of radiofrequency (RF) on some important features of stem cells such as their proliferation and differentiation are reviewed. Studies reviewed in this paper indicate that the stimulatory or inhibitory effects of RF radiation on the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells depend on various factors such as the biological systems, experiment conditions, the frequency and intensity of RF and the duration of exposure. PMID:26396965

  10. Acute exposure to Buenos Aires air particles (UAP-BA) induces local and systemic inflammatory response in middle-aged mice: A time course study.

    PubMed

    Orona, Nadia S; Ferraro, Sebastián A; Astort, Francisco; Morales, Celina; Brites, Fernando; Boero, Laura; Tiscornia, Gisela; Maglione, Guillermo A; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Yakisich, Sebastian; Tasat, Deborah R

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to air particulate matter (PM) is associated with increased cardiovascular morbimortality. However, PM doesn't affect equally to all people, being the old cohort the most susceptible and studied. We hypothesized that another specific life phase, the middle-aged subpopulation, may be negatively affected. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze in vivo the acute biological impact of two environmental particles, Urban Air Particles from Buenos Aires and Residual Oil Fly Ash, on the cardiorespiratory system of middle-aged mice, evaluating oxidative metabolism and inflammation. Both PM provoked a local and systemic inflammatory response, leading to a reduced alveolar area in the lung, an epicard inflammation in the heart, an increment of IL-6, and a reduction on PON 1 activity in serum of middle-aged animals. The positive correlation of local parameters with systemic markers of oxidative stress and inflammation could be responsible for associations of cardiovascular morbimortality in this subpopulation. PMID:26255684

  11. EXPOSURE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This proceedings chapter will discuss the state-of-the-science regarding the evaluation of exposure as it relates to water quality criteria (WQC), sediment quality guidelines (SQG), and wildlife criteria (WC). Throughout this discussion, attempts are made to identify the methods ...

  12. Criminal exposure.

    PubMed

    1999-08-01

    A 39-year-old man who had sex with a 16-year-old boy, was sentenced to five years in prison. The defendant pleaded guilty to statutory rape and criminal exposure to HIV. The boy discovered that the man was taking HIV medications, and the man subsequently disclosed his treatment after being arrested. PMID:11367003

  13. Toxicity of o,p′-DDE to medaka d-rR strain after a one-time embryonic exposure by in ovo nanoinjection: An early through juvenile life cycle assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Villalobos, Sergio A.; Papoulias, Diana M.; Pastva, Stephanie D.; Blankenship, Alan L.; Meadows, John C.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Giesy, John P.

    2003-01-01

    The toxicity of o,p???-DDE (1,1-dichloro-2-(p-chlorophenyl)-2-(o- chlorophenyl) ethylene) was evaluated in embryos of medaka (Oryzias latipes) following a one time exposure via nanoinjection. Medaka eggs (early gastrula) were injected with 0.5 nl of triolein (vehicle control) or 0.5 nl of 4 graded doses (0.0005-0.5 ng/egg) of o,p???-DDE in triolein. Embryos were allowed to develop, and fry were reared. Embryonic survival was monitored daily during the first 10 d until hatching and thereafter, on a weekly basis until day 59, at which time the fish were monitored for sexual maturity until day 107. In general, o,p???-DDE caused a dose- and time-dependent mortality. No changes in mortality were observed between the last two time points (day 38 and 59, respectively), and hence a 59 day-LD50 of 346 ng o,p???-DDE/egg was derived from the linear dose-response relationship. Prior to late stage death, only isolated cases of cardiovascular lesions and spinal deformities were observed, but were not dose-dependent. The lowest observable adverse effect level (LOAEL), based on upper 95% CI for regression line=0.0018 mg/kg, and the LOAEL based on exposure doses=0.5 mg/kg. Likewise, the no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) based on linear extrapolation to 100% survival=0.0000388 mg/kg, while the NOAEL based on exposure doses=0.05 mg/kg. The nanoinjection medaka model has potential in the study of hormonally active compounds in the environment. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Trace-metal and organic constituent concentrations in bed sediment at Big Base and Little Base Lakes, Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas—Comparisons to sediment-quality guidelines and indications for timing of exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Justus, B.G.; Hays, Phillip D.; Hart, Rheannon M.

    2015-01-01

    Regarding highest concentrations and associated timing of exposure, trace metals analyzed in the sediment core seem to indicate three fairly distinct exposure patterns. For 11 trace metals that had the highest concentration measured in the shallowest and most recently deposited sediment, the most likely explanation is recent exposure by anthropogenic activities. Most of the 11 trace metals with highest concentrations in shallow sediment are relatively innocuous; however, arsenic, copper, selenium, and zinc are among the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 126 priority pollutants. For three trace metals (cadmium, lead, and mercury), for which concentrations were highest in sediments that were 16–20 centimeters down the core, it is likely that a source associated with those contaminants during the period when those sediments were deposited, was reduced or eliminated. The eight remaining trace metals, for which concentrations were highest in sediments that were just below the prereservoir surface, likely had sources that were eliminated soon after lake construction or occurred at relatively high background concentrations in soils in the area around Little Rock Air Force Base.

  15. Time exposure studies on stress corrosion cracking of aluminum 2014-T6, aluminum 7075-T651, and titanium 6Al-4V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrell, J.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of a constant applied stress in crack initiation of aluminum 2014-T6, 7075-T651 and titanium 6A1-4V has been investigated. Aluminum c-ring specimens (1-inch diameter) and u-band titanium samples were exposed continuously to a 3.5% NaCl solution (pH 6) and organic fluids of ethyl, methyl, and iso-propyl alcohol (reagent purity). Corrosive action was observed to begin during the first and second day of constant exposure as evidenced by accumulation of hydrogen bubbles on the surface of stressed aluminum samples. However, a similar observation was not noted for titanium stressed specimens. Results of this investigation seems to suggest that aluminum 2014-T6, aluminum 7075-T651 are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in chloride solution (NaCl); while they (both alloys) seem to resist stress corrosion cracking in methyl alcohol, ethyl alcohol, iso-propyl alcohol, and demineralized distilled water. Titanium 6A1-4V showed some evidence of susceptibility to SCC in methanol, while no such susceptibility was exhibited in ethanol, iso-propyl alcohol and demineralized distilled water.

  16. Time exposure studies on stress corrosion cracking of aluminum 2014-T6, 2219-T87, 2014-T651, 7075-T651, and titanium 6Al-4V

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrell, J.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of a constant applied stress in crack initiation of aluminum 2014-T6, 2219-T87, 2014-T651, 7075-T651 and titanium 6Al-4V has been investigated. Aluminum c-ring specimens (1-inch diameter) and u-band titanium samples were exposed continuously to a 3.5% NaCl solution (pH 7) and organic fluids of ethyl, methyl, and iso-propyl alcohol (reagent purity), and demineralized distilled water. Corrosive action was observed to begin during the first and second day of constant exposure as evidenced by accumulation of hydrogen bubbles on the surface of stressed aluminum samples. However, titanium stressed specimens showed no reactions to its environment. Results of this investigation seems to suggest that aluminum 2014-T6, aluminum 7075-T651 and aluminum 2014-T651 are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in chloride solution (NaCl), while aluminum 2219-T87 seem to resist stress corrosion cracking in sodium chloride at three levels of stress (25%, 50%, and 75% Y.S.). In organic fluids of methyl, ethyl, and iso-propyl alcohol, 2014-T6 and 7075-T651 did not fail by SCC; but 2014-T651 was susceptible to SCC in methly alcohol, but resistant in ethyl alcohol, iso-propyl alcohol and demineralized distilled water.

  17. Saline drinking water in broiler and Leghorn chicks and the effect in broilers of increasing levels and age at time of exposure

    PubMed Central

    Mirsalimi, S. Mehdi; Julian, Richard J.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to assess the effect of increasing levels of salt and 5 g/L of salt (0.20% extra sodium) in the drinking water in broiler chickens at various ages up to five weeks of age and to compare the response of broiler chickens and White Leghorns to saline water (0.20% sodium). The effect was measured by the response of the right ventricle to pulmonary hypertension. The results indicated that broiler chickens under three weeks are more susceptible to saline water containing 0.20% sodium than those over three weeks of age, and that broilers given increasing levels of dietary salt may be more resistant to excess dietary salt than those that have had no previous exposure. The results also demonstrated that broiler chickens are more susceptible than White Leghorns to 0.20% extra dietary sodium in drinking water. We conclude that Leghorn chicks are more resistant to excess dietary sodium than broilers and that broilers become more resistant to saline water containing 0.20% sodium after three weeks of age. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:17424251

  18. Liquid sulfur mustard exposure.

    PubMed

    Newmark, Jonathan; Langer, Janice M; Capacio, Benedict; Barr, John; McIntosh, Roger G

    2007-02-01

    A 35-year-old active duty service member sustained a 6.5% body surface area burn as a result of exposure to the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard, which is the most severe mustard exposure of a U.S. military member since World War II that is known to us. New techniques were used to demonstrate the detectable persistence of mustard metabolites in the patient's blood for at least 41 days after exposure, validating these techniques for the first time for a human mustard patient; they were also used for the first time with human mustard blister fluid. The techniques extend eightfold the period of time that mustard exposure can be definitively diagnosed, compared with previous techniques. Although this patient's lesions were never life-threatening, he required 2 weeks of intensive burn care. He has been left with ongoing posttraumatic stress disorder and has had an incomplete dermatological recovery. In a major terrorist attack involving many patients exposed to sulfur mustard, care resources would be depleted quickly. PMID:17357776

  19. Occupational exposure in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mcrobbie, D W

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews occupational exposure in clinical MRI; it specifically considers units of exposure, basic physical interactions, health effects, guideline limits, dosimetry, results of exposure surveys, calculation of induced fields and the status of the European Physical Agents Directive. Electromagnetic field exposure in MRI from the static field B0, imaging gradients and radiofrequency transmission fields induces electric fields and currents in tissue, which are responsible for various acute sensory effects. The underlying theory and its application to the formulation of incident and induced field limits are presented. The recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Bundesministerium für Arbeit und Soziales and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers limits for incident field exposure are interpreted in a manner applicable to MRI. Field measurements show that exposure from movement within the B0 fringe field can exceed ICNIRP reference levels within 0.5 m of the bore entrance. Rate of change of field dB/dt from the imaging gradients is unlikely to exceed the new limits, although incident field limits can be exceeded for radiofrequency (RF) exposure within 0.2–0.5 m of the bore entrance. Dosimetric surveys of routine clinical practice show that staff are exposed to peak values of 42±24% of B0, with time-averaged exposures of 5.2±2.8 mT for magnets in the range 0.6–4 T. Exposure to time-varying fields arising from movement within the B0 fringe resulted in peak dB/dt of approximately 2 T s−1. Modelling of induced electric fields from the imaging gradients shows that ICNIRP-induced field limits are unlikely to be exceeded in most situations; however, movement through the static field may still present a problem. The likely application of the limits is discussed with respect to the reformulation of the European Union (EU) directive and its possible implications for MRI. PMID:22457400

  20. HUMAN EXPOSURE MODELING: CONCEPTS, METHODS, AND TOOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding human exposure is critical when estimating the occurrence of deleterious effects that could follow contact with environmental contaminants. For many pollutants, the intensity, duration, frequency, route, and timing of exposure is highly variable, particularly whe...

  1. The effects of free chlorine concentration, organic load, and exposure time on the inactivation of Salmonella, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and non-O157 STEC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the effects of free chlorine (FC) concentration, contact time, and organic load on the inactivation of Salmonella, E. coli O157:H7, and non-O157 STEC in suspension. Four strains each of Salmonella, E. coli O157:H7, or non-O157 STEC cells were inoculated separately or as a multi-...

  2. Criminal exposure.

    PubMed

    1999-09-01

    In August, an HIV-positive man plead guilty to sexually assaulting a 14-year-old boy. The sleeping boy awoke to find [name removed] sexually assaulting him, while watching a pornographic video. [Name removed] plead guilty to the assault with intent to rape a child. In addition, [name removed] received three counts of indecent assault and battery on a child, and exposure of pornographic material to a minor. [Name removed] will remain on probation for five years, although the prosecution had recommended sentencing [name removed] to four or five years in prison. The boy continues to be tested for HIV. PMID:11366904

  3. Influence of extended light exposure curing times on the degree of conversion of resin-based pit and fissure sealant materials

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, Nazish

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of present study was to evaluate extended curing times on the degree of conversion (DC) of filled and unfilled resin-based materials used as pit and fissure sealants. Materials and methods The materials examined were a flowable composite (Filtek Z350 XT Flowable) and a pit and fissure sealant (Clinpro Sealant). Thirty disks of each material were prepared. The 30 made of the flowable composite were divided into three groups (n=10 each) according to the three different curing times studied: 20s (group 1), 40s (group 2), and 60s (group 3). Similarly, the 30 disks made of the pit and fissure sealant were divided into three groups (n=10 each) according to the three different curing times: 20s (group 4), 40s (group 5), and 60s (group 6). After polymerization, the disks were removed from the mold and stored in dry, lightproof containers in an incubator at 37C for 24h. The DC was obtained using an Avatar 320 FTIR spectrometer. Then the data were analyzed using the KruskalWallis test and the Fishers least significant difference post hoc test for multiple comparisons (alpha=0.05). Results DC values for the flowable composite (Filtek Z350 XT) were higher (p=0.002) than those for the pit and fissure sealant (Clinpro Sealant). Group 2 and group 5 showed significantly higher DC values than group 1 and group 4, respectively. There was no difference between groups 2 and 3 or between groups 5 and 6 (p=2.93). Conclusion An extended curing time improves the DC to some extent for both materials. PMID:25382947

  4. Efficacy Analysis of a Script-based Guide for EVAR Execution: is it Possible to Reduce Patient Exposure to Contrast, Operative Time and Blood Loss even when Advanced Technologies are not Available?

    PubMed Central

    Molinari, Giovani José Dal Poggetto; Guillaumon, Ana Terezinha; Dalbem, Andréia Marques de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Despite the patient and medical staff exposure to radiation in endovascular aneurysm repair, the benefits of this abdominal aortic aneurysm type of surgical management are justfied by minor recovery time and hospitalization, as well as an option for patients not elected to conventional open repair. In this minimally invasive surgical aproach, time of procedure and radiation doses can be substantial - and the increasing frequency of these procedures and it's complexity have impelled vascular surgeons to face additional and successive risk to occupational radiation exposure. Meticulous study of the computed tomography angiography during the endovascular aneurysm repair preparation allows reduction of unnecessary radiation exposure, as also reduces consecutive image acquisition and contrast use (that may be related to renal overload in susceptible patients). Some studies have proposed strategies to optimize endovascular intervention to reduce contrast use and X-ray exposure. Although they might prove to be effective, they rely on use of additional specific and advanced equipment, available only in major centers. As an alternative to this expensive and restrict technology, it is presented a simpler technique through image manipulation on software OsiriX, aiming to reduce both exposures. OBJECTIVE To analyze the efficacy of the adoption of a study protocol and a script-based guide in preparation for endovascular aneurysm repair through verifying it's impact over the surgical procedure - as referred to intravascular contrast infuse, effects over renal function, blood loss and operatory time. METHODS A longitudinal prospective study from March 2014 through March 2015, where 30 performed endovascular aneurysm repair were compared to a historic control group. The planning for endovascular aneurysm repair through the patient's tomographic image manipulation in the prospective group was performed with OsiriX MD software. A script-based guide upon gathering detailed computed tomography angiography images was elaborated by the author and distributed to the performing surgical team for appreciation, instruction and pre operatory judgment. Based upon the script, the C-arm gantry angle was specifically corrected in each case of endovascular aneurysm repair, for image optimization and aneurysm's neck visualization. Arteriography was performed under digital subtraction angiography after catheters were positioned according to predicted level description in the referred guide. Statistical analysis were performed with a significance level of 5% (P value<0.05). RESULTS There was a statistically significant relationship between the two studied periods and the variables: contrast volume (284.5 vs. 31.8 mL), operative time (207.5 vs. 140.4 min.) and blood loss (798.1 vs. 204.4 mL), revealing that they are considerably larger in the historical control group than in the script guided current group. There was no difference related to the volume of contrast used in the two groups and the occurrence of renal impairment. CONCLUSION In the present paper it was possible to demonstrate the impact of the ability to manipulate digital formats of medical images without the need of sophisticated equipment, in adoption of a guide based on the compilation of informations collected with assistance of an accessible software performed on a personal computer. Although we could not prove relation to occurrence of renal impairment, there were direct results on reduction of intravascular contrast use, even as surgical time and blood loss, compared to a previous historical period. PMID:26934406

  5. [Health risk railroad noise - prognosis of potential health risks subsequent to night-time exposure to railroad noise in the German part of the Transversal Rotterdam Genova].

    PubMed

    Greiser, E

    2014-12-01

    Based on risk coefficients for cardiovascular and psychiatric disease derived from a case-control study in the vicinity of a major German airport, statistics on persons exposed to night-time railroad noise in the vicinity of the Rotterdam-Genova Transversal, and on health expenditure calculations by the Federal Statistical Office of Germany a prognosis on effects of railroad noise was performed. It resulted for 1 10-year period in nearly 75 000 excess cases of diseases, nearly 30 000 excess deaths and health expenditures of 3.8 billion euros. PMID:25525678

  6. Tryptophan dynamics in the exploration of micro-conformational changes of refolded ?-lactoglobulin after thermal exposure: a steady state and time-resolved fluorescence approach.

    PubMed

    Halder, Umesh C; Chakraborty, Jishnu; Das, Niloy; Bose, Sayantan

    2012-04-01

    Refolding intermediates of proteins, including molten globules, are likely to undergo dynamic conformational transitions. In this work, thermal unfolding and refolding of bovine ?-lactoglobulin (?-lg) have been revisited to encounter such intermediate states. Lower thermal range (< 80C) was selected to avoid irreversible aggregate formation. The gross kinetic refolding as monitored with the fluorophore, Trp19, was likely to be reversible but alteration in time resolved fluorescence parameters ruled out the possibility of micro-structural reversibility for the refolded partner. Time resolved fluorescence showed that the refolded protein still lacks some intact native conformation. Far-UV CD signals lack the signature of any secondary structural distortion in global structural context whereas near-UV CD signals were strongly indicative of perturbation in micro-structure surrounding the aromatic moieties which hardly revives after cooling. Steady state anisotropy results showed successfully the break-down of dimer to monomer form of ?-lg within 50C temperature range and augmentation in anisotropy up on further thermal stress reflected the reorganization of tryptophan residues into more restricted and rigid micro-environment as well as irreversible disulfide-linked dimer formation. Reliability of conformational reversibility in the thermal unfolding-refolding is still enigmatic on micro and global structural perspectives. Intermediate state prior to the completion of refolding of thermally exposed ?-lg was identified through fluorescence studies. PMID:22342029

  7. Activation and survival of immature neurons in the dentate gyrus with spatial memory is dependent on time of exposure to spatial learning and age of cells at examination.

    PubMed

    Epp, Jonathan R; Haack, Andrew K; Galea, Liisa A M

    2011-03-01

    Neurogenesis continues to occur throughout life in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and may be related to hippocampus-dependent learning. We have recently reported that there is an enhancement of neurogenesis in the hippocampus only when BrdU is administered 6 days prior to starting spatial training but not when training started either 1 day or 11 days following BrdU administration. In that study, all rats were perfused on day 16 after BrdU injection in order to compare cells of the same age (i.e. 16 day old cells) and thus the survival time after learning was different between groups. This study was designed to address whether the amount of time that passed following training could also contribute to the effects of spatial learning on hippocampal neurogenesis and whether there was differential new neuron activation in response to spatial learning that depended on the age of new cells at the time of spatial learning. Here we tested whether a survival period of 5 days following spatial learning at either 1-5, 6-10 or 11-15 days following BrdU administration would alter cell survival and/or activation of new neurons. Our results indicate that 5 days after training in the Morris water task cell survival is unaltered by training on days 1-5, increased by training at days 6-10 and decreased when training occurs on days 11-15. Furthermore spatial learners trained on days 6-10 or 11-15 show greater activation of new neurons compared to cue-trained rats during a probe trial 5 days after training. In addition, rats trained on the spatial task on days 11-15 had a greater number of activated new neurons compared to rats trained on the spatial task on days 6-10. These results suggest there is a gradual removal of older BrdU-labeled new neurons following spatial learning perhaps due to a competitive interaction with a population of younger BrdU-labeled new neurons. PMID:21216298

  8. Antioxidative response of the three macrophytes Ceratophyllum demersum, Egeria densa, and Hydrilla verticillata to a time dependent exposure of cell-free crude extracts containing three microcystins from cyanobacterial blooms of Lake Amatitlán, Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Romero-Oliva, Claudia Suseth; Contardo-Jara, Valeska; Pflugmacher, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    Microcystins (MCs) produced by cyanobacteria in natural environments are a potential risk to the integrity of ecosystems. In this study, the effects of cyanobacterial cell-free crude extracts from a Microcystis aeruginosa bloom containing three MC-congeners MC-LR, -RR, and -YR at environmental relevant concentrations of 49.3±2.9, 49.8±5.9, and 6.9±3.8μg/L, respectively, were evaluated on Ceratophyllum demersum (L.), Egeria densa (Planch.), and Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.). Effects on photosynthetic pigments (total chlorophyll (chl), chl a, chl b, and carotenoids), enzymatic defense led by catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) and glutathione reductase (GR), and biotransformation enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST) were measured after 1, 4, and 8h and after 1, 3, 7, and 14 days of exposure. Results show that in all exposed macrophytes, photosynthetic pigments were negatively affected. While chl a and total chl decreased with increasing exposure time, a parallel increase in chl b was observed after 8h. Concomitant increase of ∼5, 16, and 34% of antioxidant carotenoid concentration in exposed C. demersum, E. densa, and H. verticillata, respectively, was also displayed. Enzymatic antioxidant defense systems in all exposed macrophytes were initiated within the first hour of exposure. In exposed E. densa, highest values of CAT and GR activities were observed after 4 and 8h, respectively, while in exposed H. verticillata highest value of POD activity was observed after 8h. An early induction with a significant increase of biotransformation enzyme GST was observed in E. densa after 4h and in C. demersum and H. verticillata after 8h. These results are the first to show rapid induction of stress and further possible MC biotransformation (based on the activation of GST enzymatic activity included in MC metabolization during the biotransformation mechanism) in macrophytes exposed to crude extract containing a mixture of MCs. PMID:25889089

  9. Workers' exposure to isocyanates

    SciTech Connect

    Lesage, J.; Goyer, N.; Desjardins, F.; Vincent, J.Y.; Perrault, G. )

    1992-02-01

    A model of exposure to isocyanates, based on knowledge of industrial processes and starting materials and the results of industrial hygiene surveys, is proposed. This model of exposure suggests the concentration and physical form of airborne isocyanate monomers and oligomers. A new sampling and analytical system was developed that is capable of determining the physical and chemical characteristics of occupational exposure to a variety of aliphatic and aromatic isocyanates as required by the exposure model. The sampling system consisted of a dual-filter 37-mm cassette, in which the first filter captured aerosol phase contaminants and the second captured vapor phase isocyanates through derivatization with 9-(N-methylaminomethyl) anthracene (MAMA). Urea derivative recovery by the sampling system, isocyanate-MAMA reactivity, and linearity of the calibration curve were evaluated in the laboratory. The practicality of the system was evaluated during field trials. Sampling times are reduced to 15 min, and the detection limit for TDI, HDI, and MDI was 1.0 micrograms/m3. A partial validation of the new sampling system was performed for HDI vapor by comparison to a standard method in field trials and for TDI vapor in a controlled test atmosphere. The analytical system may also be used to measure the concentration of oligomeric isocyanates. Airborne concentrations of isocyanates were measured in two foam plants, nine paint shops, and two foundries to verify the usefulness of the model. Exposure in foam plants was predominantly to gaseous monomeric isocyanates. Exposure to oligomer isocyanates was higher than expected in paint shops. Both monomer and oligomer isocyanates were undetectable in foundries.

  10. Exposure to toxic environmental agents.

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    Reducing exposure to toxic environmental agents is a critical area of intervention for obstetricians, gynecologists, and other reproductive health care professionals. Patient exposure to toxic environmental chemicals and other stressors is ubiquitous, and preconception and prenatal exposure to toxic environmental agents can have a profound and lasting effect on reproductive health across the life course.Prenatal exposure to certain chemicals has been documented to increase the risk of cancer in childhood; adult male exposure to pesticides is linked to altered semen quality, sterility, and prostate cancer; and postnatal exposure to some pesticides can interfere with all developmental stages of reproductive function in adult females, including puberty, menstruation and ovulation, fertility and fecundity, and menopause. Many environmental factors harmful to reproductive health disproportionately affect vulnerable and underserved populations,which leaves some populations, including underserved women, more vulnerable to adverse reproductive health effects than other populations. The evidence that links exposure to toxic environmental agents and adverse reproductive and developmental health outcomes is sufficiently robust, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine join leading scientists and other clinical practitioners in calling for timely action to identify and reduce exposure to toxic environmental agents while addressing the consequences of such exposure. PMID:24070500

  11. Exposure to toxic environmental agents.

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    : Reducing exposure to toxic environmental agents is a critical area of intervention for obstetricians, gynecologists, and other reproductive health care professionals. Patient exposure to toxic environmental chemicals and other stressors is ubiquitous, and preconception and prenatal exposure to toxic environmental agents can have a profound and lasting effect on reproductive health across the life course. Prenatal exposure to certain chemicals has been documented to increase the risk of cancer in childhood; adult male exposure to pesticides is linked to altered semen quality, sterility, and prostate cancer; and postnatal exposure to some pesticides can interfere with all developmental stages of reproductive function in adult females, including puberty, menstruation and ovulation, fertility and fecundity, and menopause. Many environmental factors harmful to reproductive health disproportionately affect vulnerable and underserved populations, which leaves some populations, including underserved women, more vulnerable to adverse reproductive health effects than other populations. The evidence that links exposure to toxic environmental agents and adverse reproductive and developmental health outcomes is sufficiently robust, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine join leading scientists and other clinical practitioners in calling for timely action to identify and reduce exposure to toxic environmental agents while addressing the consequences of such exposure. PMID:24084567

  12. Evaluation of in vivo graphene oxide toxicity for Acheta domesticus in relation to nanomaterial purity and time passed from the exposure.

    PubMed

    Dziewięcka, Marta; Karpeta-Kaczmarek, Julia; Augustyniak, Maria; Majchrzycki, Łukasz; Augustyniak-Jabłokow, Maria A

    2016-03-15

    Graphene and its oxidized form-graphene oxide (GO) have become exceptionally popular in industry and medicine due to their unique properties. However, there are suspicions that GO can cause adverse effects. Therefore, comprehensive knowledge on its potential toxicity is essential. This research assesses the in vivo toxicity of pure and manganese ion contaminated GO, which were injected into the hemolymph of Acheta domesticus. The activity of catalase (CAT) and gluthiathione peroxidases (GSTPx) as well as heat shock protein (HSP 70) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels were measured at consecutive time points-1h, 24h, 48h and 72h after injection. Neither pure GO nor GO contaminated with manganese were neutral to the organism. The results proved the intensification of oxidative stress after GO injection, which was confirmed by increased enzyme activity. The organism seems to cope with this stress, especially in the first 24h after injection. In the following days, increasing HSP 70 levels were observed, which might suggest the synthesis of new proteins and the removal of old and damaged ones. With that in mind, the potential toxicity of the studied material, which could lead to serious and permanent damage to the organism, should still be taken into consideration. PMID:26642444

  13. Short-term exposure to fine and coarse particles and mortality: A multicity time-series study in East Asia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyewon; Honda, Yasushi; Hashizume, Masahiro; Guo, Yue Leon; Wu, Chang-Fu; Kan, Haidong; Jung, Kweon; Lim, Youn-Hee; Yi, Seungmuk; Kim, Ho

    2015-12-01

    Few studies on size-specific health effects of particulate matter have been conducted in Asia. We examined the association between both fine and coarse particles (PM2.5 and PM10-2.5) and mortality across 11 East Asian cities from 4 countries (Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and China). We performed a two-stage analysis: we generated city-specific estimates using a time-series analysis with a generalized additive model (Quasi-Poisson distribution), and estimated the overall effects by conducting a meta-analysis. Each 10-μg/m(3) increase in PM2.5 (lag01) was associated with an increase of 0.38% (95% confidence interval = 0.21%-0.55%) in all causes mortality, 0.96% (0.46%-1.46%) in cardiovascular mortality, and 1% (0.23%-1.78%) in respiratory mortality. Each 10-μg/m(3) increase in PM10-2.5 (lag01) was associated with cardiovascular mortality (0.69%, [0.05%-1.33%]), although this association attenuated after controlling for other pollutants, especially PM2.5. Increased mortality was associated with increasing PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 concentrations over 11 East Asian cities. PMID:26340298

  14. The development of cockle, a sheep pelt defect, in relation to size of infestation and time of exposure to Bovicola ovis, the sheep-biting louse.

    PubMed

    Heath, A C; Bishop, D M; Cole, D J; Pfeffer, A T

    1996-12-31

    Groups of ten louse-naive lambs were infested with one, ten or 100 female Bovicola ovis and killed 84 days later when an examination of their pelts was made to detect cockle. In a second experiment groups of ten lambs were infested with ten or 100 female B. ovis and groups of lambs were killed every fortnight up to 84 days post-infestation. The pelts were examined in order to detect the earliest time at which cockle could be detected following a louse infestation. Cockle is a nodular condition of the skin arising in response to infestation with B. ovis and is possibly a hypersensitivity on the part of some sheep to antigens of louse origin. In the first experiment cockle did not develop in lambs that had remained louse free or which had been initially infested with one louse. However, five of ten lambs that had been infested with ten lice and all lambs that had been infested with 100 lice developed cockle. In general cockle severity was positively related to the size of the terminal louse population. Group mean louse counts only slightly exceeded the initial infestation in the lambs infested with either ten or 100 lice, and were less than the initial infestation in lambs given only one louse. In the second experiment cockle was first seen 54 days post-infestation, but only in sheep infested initially with 100 lice. PMID:9017873

  15. Increasing the Time of Exposure to Aerosol Measles Vaccine Elicits an Immune Response Equivalent to That Seen in 9-Month-Old Mexican Children Given the Same Dose Subcutaneously

    PubMed Central

    García-León, Miguel Leonardo; Espinosa-Torres Torrija, Bogart; Hernández-Pérez, Brenda; Cardiel-Marmolejo, Lino E.; Beeler, Judy A.; Audet, Susette; Santos-Preciado, José Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Background. A 30-second aerosol measles vaccination successfully primes children 12 months of age and older but is poorly immunogenic when given to 9-month-old children. We examined the immune responses when increasing the duration to aerosol exposure in 9-month-olds. Methods. One hundred and thirteen healthy 9-month-old children from Mexico City were enrolled; 58 received aerosol EZ measles vaccine for 2.5 minutes and 55 subcutaneously. Measles-specific neutralizing antibodies and cellular responses were measured before and at 3 and 6 months postimmunization. Results. Adaptive immunity was induced in 97% after aerosol and 98% after subcutaneous administration. Seroconversion rates and GMCs were 95% and 373 mIU/mL (95% confidence interval [CI], 441–843) following aerosol vaccination and 91% and 306 mIU/mL (95% CI, 367–597) after subcutaneous administration at 3 months. The percentage of children with a measles-specific stimulation index ≥3 was 45% and 60% in the aerosol versus 55% and 59% in the subcutaneous group at 3 and 6 months, respectively. CD8 memory cell frequencies were higher in the aerosol group at 3 months compared with the subcutaneous group. Adverse reactions were comparable in both groups. Conclusions. Increasing exposure time to aerosol measles vaccine elicits immune responses that are comparable to those seen when an equivalent dose is administered by the subcutaneous route in 9-month-old infants. PMID:21742842

  16. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

  17. SOURCES AND PATHWAYS OF LEAD EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure is defined here as the amount of a substance that comes into contact with an absorbing surface during a specified period of time. The normal units of exposure are expressed as micrograms per day. The two components of exposure are the concentration of the substance in ...

  18. The influence of time of maternal exposure to 2,4,5,2 prime ,4 prime ,5 prime -hexachlorobiphenyl on its accumulation in their nursing offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Gallenberg, L.A.; Ring, B.J.; Vodicnik, M.J. )

    1990-06-01

    2,4,5,2',4',5'-Hexachlorobiphenyl (6-CB) is mobilized from rodent tissues during the lipid depletion associated with food restriction or lactation, the latter condition resulting in the substantial elimination of the maternal body burden of the chemical to nursing offspring. The present study was undertaken to determine whether the rate and/or magnitude of accumulation of 6-CB in nursing offspring differed with time following PCB administration to the maternal animal. Female ICR mice were administered two doses of 6-CB. Group I animals received (14C)-6-CB as weanlings (15-20 g) followed by unlabeled 6-CB 5 weeks later, after mating, on Day 1 of gestation. Group II received unlabeled 6-CB as weanlings and (14C)-6-CB on Day 1 of gestation. Thus, 14C identified the mobilization and elimination of either the first or the second dose of 6-CB in the treatment groups (I = (14C)-6-CB, 6-CB; II = 6-CB, (14C)-6-CB). Both groups of animals retained approximately 80% of the administered radiolabeled dose. The tissue distribution of (14C)-6-CB in group II as a percentage of the body burden was not different from that in group I as determined from maternal tissue concentrations on Day 14 of gestation. The percentage of the maternal body burden of (14C)-6-CB accumulated in suckling offspring of group II mothers was significantly greater than that in group I offspring on Day 1 (I, 2.