Science.gov

Sample records for radioinduced damage repair

  1. Repairing damaged platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.E.; Kwok, P.H.; Wang, S.S.

    1995-10-01

    This paper introduces a unique method for strengthening of platforms and replacing damaged members. Extending the life of existing infrastructure is approved means of decreasing cash expenditures for new platforms and facilities. Platforms can be affected by corrosion, overloading and fatigue. The renovation and repair of existing offshore installations is an important part of offshore engineering. The basis behind this paper is an April, 1993 incident in the Arabian Gulf. A vessel broke loose from its moorings in a severe storm and collided with a wellhead platform. The collision severely damaged the platform buckling seven major support members and cracking joints throughout the structure. In view of the significant damage, there was an urgent need to repair the structure to avoid any further damage from potentially sever winter storm conditions. Various means of repair and their associated costs were evaluated: traditional dry hyperbaric welding, adjacent platforms, grouted clamped connections, and mechanical pipe connectors. The repair was completed using an innovative combination of clamps and wet welding to attach external braces to the structure.

  2. Re-assessment of chronic radio-induced tissue damage in a rat hindlimb model

    PubMed Central

    PHULPIN, BÉRENGÈRE; DOLIVET, GILLES; MARIE, PIERRE-YVES; POUSSIER, SYLVAIN; GALLET, PATRICE; LEROUX, AGNÈS; GRAFF, PIERRE; GROUBACH, FREDERIQUE; BRAVETTI, PIERRE; MERLIN, JEAN-LOUIS; TRAN, NGUYEN

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is successfully used to treat neoplastic lesions, but may adversely affect normal tissues within the irradiated volume. However, additional clinical and para-clinical data are required for a comprehensive understanding of the pathogenesis of this damage. We assessed a rat model using clinical records and medical imaging to gain a better understanding of irradiation-induced tissue damage. The hindlimbs of the rats in this model were irradiated with a single dose of 30 or 50 Gy. Sequential analysis was based on observation records of stage and planar scintigraphy. Additional radiography, radiohistology and histology studies were performed to detect histological alterations. All animals developed acute and late effects, with an increased severity after a dose of 50 Gy. The bone uptake of 99mTc-HDP was significantly decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Histologically, significant tissue damage was observed. After the 50 Gy irradiation, the animals developed lesions characteristic of osteoradionecrosis (ORN). Radiographic and histological studies provided evidence of lytic bone lesions. Our rat model developed tissue damage characteristic of radiation injury after a single 30 Gy irradiation and tissue degeneration similar to that which occurs during human ORN after a 50 Gy irradiation. The development of this animal model is an essential step in exploring the pathogenesis of irradiation-induced tissue damage, and may be used to test the efficacy of new treatments. PMID:22993575

  3. DNA Damage and Repair in Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna; Gray, Kelly; Bennett, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage affecting both genomic and mitochondrial DNA is present in a variety of both inherited and acquired vascular diseases. Multiple cell types show persistent DNA damage and a range of lesions. In turn, DNA damage activates a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, many of which are activated in vascular disease. Such DNA repair mechanisms either stall the cell cycle to allow repair to occur or trigger apoptosis or cell senescence to prevent propagation of damaged DNA. Recent evidence has indicated that DNA damage occurs early, is progressive, and is sufficient to impair function of cells composing the vascular wall. The consequences of persistent genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, including inflammation, cell senescence, and apoptosis, are present in vascular disease. DNA damage can thus directly cause vascular disease, opening up new possibilities for both prevention and treatment. We review the evidence for and the causes, types, and consequences of DNA damage in vascular disease. PMID:26442438

  4. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis.

  5. DNA damage checkpoint, damage repair, and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Feng; Yu, Shan-Shan; Chen, Guan-Jun; Li, Yue-Zhong

    2006-05-01

    Genomic DNA is under constant attack from both endogenous and exogenous sources of DNA damaging agents. Without proper care, the ensuing DNA damages would lead to alteration of genomic structure thus affecting the faithful transmission of genetic information. During the process of evolution, organisms have acquired a series of mechanisms responding to and repairing DNA damage, thus assuring the maintenance of genome stability and faithful transmission of genetic information. DNA damage checkpoint is one such important mechanism by which, in the face of DNA damage, a cell can respond to amplified damage signals, either by actively halting the cell cycle until it ensures that critical processes such as DNA replication or mitosis are complete or by initiating apoptosis as a last resort. Over the last decade, complex hierarchical interactions between the key components like ATM/ATR in the checkpoint pathway and various other mediators, effectors including DNA damage repair proteins have begun to emerge. In the meantime, an intimate relationship between mechanisms of damage checkpoint pathway, DNA damage repair, and genome stability was also uncovered. Reviewed herein are the recent findings on both the mechanisms of activation of checkpoint pathways and their coordination with DNA damage repair machinery as well as their effect on genomic integrity. PMID:16722332

  6. Oxidative DNA Damage and Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Melis, Joost P.M.; Luijten, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative DNA damage is repaired by multiple, overlapping DNA repair pathways. Accumulating evidence supports the hypothesis that nucleotide excision repair (NER), besides base excision repair (BER), is also involved in neutralizing oxidative DNA damage. Recent Advances: NER includes two distinct sub-pathways: transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) and global genome repair (GG-NER). The CSA and CSB proteins initiate the onset of TC-NER. Recent findings show that not only CSB, but also CSA is involved in the repair of oxidative DNA lesions, in the nucleus as well as in mitochondria. The XPG protein is also of importance for the removal of oxidative DNA lesions, as it may enhance the initial step of BER. Substantial evidence exists that support a role for XPC in NER and BER. XPC deficiency not only results in decreased repair of oxidative lesions, but has also been linked to disturbed redox homeostasis. Critical Issues: The role of NER proteins in the regulation of the cellular response to oxidative (mitochondrial and nuclear) DNA damage may be the underlying mechanism of the pathology of accelerated aging in Cockayne syndrome patients, a driving force for internal cancer development in XP-A and XP-C patients, and a contributor to the mixed exhibited phenotypes of XP-G patients. Future Directions: Accumulating evidence indicates that DNA repair factors can be involved in multiple DNA repair pathways. However, the distinct detailed mechanism and consequences of these additional functions remain to be elucidated and can possibly shine a light on clinically related issues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2409–2419. PMID:23216312

  7. 49 CFR 1242.42 - Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administration, repair and maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits, other casualties and insurance... maintenance, machinery repair, equipment damaged, dismantling retired property, fringe benefits,...

  8. Chromatin Remodeling, DNA Damage Repair and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baohua; Yip, Raymond KH; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2012-01-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to a variety of environmental and endogenous conditions causing DNA damage, which is detected and repaired by conserved DNA repair pathways to maintain genomic integrity. Chromatin remodeling is critical in this process, as the organization of eukaryotic DNA into compact chromatin presents a natural barrier to all DNA-related events. Studies on human premature aging syndromes together with normal aging have suggested that accumulated damages might lead to exhaustion of resources that are required for physiological functions and thus accelerate aging. In this manuscript, combining the present understandings and latest findings, we focus mainly on discussing the role of chromatin remodeling in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and regulation of aging. PMID:23633913

  9. Repair of UV damage in Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    McCready, S; Marcello, L

    2003-06-01

    Halobacterium is one of the few known Archaea that tolerates high levels of sunlight in its natural environment. Photoreactivation is probably its most important strategy for surviving UV irradiation and we have shown that both of the major UV photoproducts, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and (6-4) photoproducts, can be very efficiently repaired by photoreactivation in this organism. There are two putative photolyase gene homologues in the published genome sequence of Halobacterium sp. NRC-1. We have made a mutant deleted in one of these, phr2, and confirmed that this gene codes for a CPD photolyase. (6-4) photoproducts are still photoreactivated in the mutant so we are currently establishing whether the other homologue, phr1, codes for a (6-4) photolyase. We have also demonstrated an excision repair capacity that operates in the absence of visible light but the nature of this pathway is not yet known. There is probably a bacteria-type excision-repair mechanism, since homologues of uvrA, uvrB, uvrC and uvrD have been identified in the Halobacterium genome. However, there are also homologues of eukaryotic nucleotide-excision-repair genes ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD3, RAD25 and RAD2 ) so there may be multiple repair mechanisms for UV damage in Halobacterium. PMID:12773185

  10. A progression of damage repair capability in self-repairing composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dry, Carolyn

    2014-04-01

    This paper covers several projects in which the author sought to determine the extent of damage against which self repair would be effective. So far no limits have been reached beyond those of the fiber/matrix itself. Starting with repair of barely visible damage in airplane wings consisting of graphite fiber/resin matrix composites progression was next to self repair of ballistic damage to vinyl ester walls and epoxy resin walls and finally blast damage self repair of walls and then blast and ballistic damage were combined.

  11. Complexities of the DNA Base Excision Repair Pathway for Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sankar; Boldogh, Istvan; Izumi, Tadahide; Hazra, Tapas K.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative damage represents the most significant insult to organisms because of continuous production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo. Oxidative damage in DNA, a critical target of ROS, is repaired primarily via the base excision repair (BER) pathway which appears to be the simplest among the three excision repair pathways. However, it is now evident that although BER can be carried with four or five enzymes in vitro, a large number of proteins, including some required for nucleotide excision repair (NER), are needed for in vivo repair of oxidative damage. Furthermore, BER in transcribed vs. nontranscribed DNA regions requires distinct sets of proteins, as in the case of NER. We propose an additional complexity in repair of replicating vs. nonreplicating DNA. Unlike DNA bulky adducts, the oxidized base lesions could be incorporated in the nascent DNA strand, repair of which may share components of the mismatch repair process. Distinct enzyme specificities are thus warranted for repair of lesions in the parental vs. nascent DNA strand. Repair synthesis may be carried out by DNA polymerase β or replicative polymerases δ and ε. Thus, multiple subpathways are needed for repairing oxidative DNA damage, and the pathway decision may require coordination of the successive steps in repair. Such coordination includes transfer of the product of a DNA glycosylase to AP-endonuclease, the next enzyme in the pathway. Interactions among proteins in the pathway may also reflect such coordination, characterization of which should help elucidate these subpathways and their in vivo regulation. PMID:11746753

  12. Compressive strength of damaged and repaired composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, Scott R.; He, Yi-Fei; Springer, George S.; Lee, Hung-Joo

    1992-01-01

    Tests were performed assessing the effectiveness of repair in restoring the mechanical properties of damaged, solid composite plates made either of Fiberite T300/976 graphite-epoxy, Fiberite IM7/977-2 graphite-toughened epoxy, or ICI APC-2 graphite-PEEK. The plate length, the layup and the amount of damage were also varied. Damage was introduced in the plates either by impacting them with a solid projectile or by applying a transverse static load. Some (75 percent) or all (100 percent) of the damaged zone was then cut out, and the plate was repaired by plugging and patching the hole. The effectiveness of the repair was evaluated by measuring the compressive strengths of undamaged plates, damaged plates with no cutout, damaged plates with a cutout, and repaired plates. The data at an intermediate stage of repair provide information on the effect of each repair step on the compressive strength. The results indicated that for the solid plates used in these tests, the repair methods used herein did not improve the compressive strength of already damaged plates.

  13. 6. 'ROCKFILLED CRIB 350 FEET LONG, REPAIRING DAMAGES CAUSED BY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. 'ROCK-FILLED CRIB 350 FEET LONG, REPAIRING DAMAGES CAUSED BY FLOODS DURING SEASON OF 1927 TO THE DRY GULCH CANAL HEADING.' 1928 - Irrigation Canals in the Uinta Basin, Duchesne, Duchesne County, UT

  14. DNA damage and repair in human skin in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Gange, R.W.; Freeman, S.E.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Understanding the molecular and cellular origins of sunlight-induced skin cancers in man requires knowledge of the damages inflicted on human skin during sunlight exposure, as well as the ability of cells in skin to repair or circumvent such damage. Although repair has been studied extensively in procaryotic and eucaryotic cells - including human cells in culture - there are important differences between repair by human skin cells in culture and human skin in situ: quantitative differences in rates of repair, as well as qualitative differences, including the presence or absence of repair mechanisms. Quantitation of DNA damage and repair in human skin required the development of new approaches for measuring damage at low levels in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNA. The method allows for analysis of multiple samples and the resulting data should be related to behavior of the DNA molecules by analytic expressions. Furthermore, it should be possible to assay a variety of lesions using the same methodology. The development of new analysis methods, new technology, and new biochemical probes for the study of DNA damage and repair are described. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  15. The repair of sub-lethal damage and the stimulated repair of potentially lethal damage in Saintpaulia.

    PubMed

    Leenhouts, H P; Sijsma, M J; Litwiniszyn, M; Chadwick, K H

    1981-10-01

    The repair of sublethal and potentially lethal damage in stationary resting epidermal cells of Saintpaulia has been investigated. Fractionation experiments reveal an efficient repair of sublethal damage with a half-life of 1.9 hours. No repair of potentially lethal damage was noted when cultivation of the leaves was delayed for 24 hours after irradiation. At delay times of 2, 3 and 4 days some repair of potentially lethal damage has been found. A small pre-dose given 24 hours before a challenging dose improved the cells' chance to regenerate and the improvement has been shown to be compatible with an improved repair of potentially lethal damage induced by X-rays and fast neutrons. It hs been shown that the stimulated repair process takes 12 to 24 hours to develop, is dependent on the size of the pre-dose, has single-hit dose kinetics, and an r.b.e. of 1 for neutrons. With delayed cultivation of 2 days the stimulated repair process leads to an alteration in the shape of the regeneration (survival)-dose relationship which increases the low dose r.b.e. for neutrons from 10 to 35. PMID:6975252

  16. Advanced Technology Composite Fuselage - Repair and Damage Assessment Supporting Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, B. W.; Bodine, J. B.; Dopker, B.; Finn, S. R.; Griess, K. H.; Hanson, C. T.; Harris, C. G.; Nelson, K. M.; Walker, T. H.; Kennedy, T. C.; Nahan, M. F.

    1997-01-01

    Under the NASA-sponsored contracts for Advanced Technology Composite Aircraft Structures (ATCAS) and Materials Development Omnibus Contract (MDOC), Boeing is studying the technologies associated with the application of composite materials to commercial transport fuselage structure. Included in the study is the incorporation of maintainability and repairability requirements of composite primary structure into the design. This contractor report describes activities performed to address maintenance issues in composite fuselage applications. A key aspect of the study was the development of a maintenance philosophy which included consideration of maintenance issues early in the design cycle, multiple repair options, and airline participation in design trades. Fuselage design evaluations considered trade-offs between structural weight, damage resistance/tolerance (repair frequency), and inspection burdens. Analysis methods were developed to assess structural residual strength in the presence of damage, and to evaluate repair design concepts. Repair designs were created with a focus on mechanically fastened concepts for skin/stringer structure and bonded concepts for sandwich structure. Both a large crown (skintstringer) and keel (sandwich) panel were repaired. A compression test of the keel panel indicated the demonstrated repairs recovered ultimate load capability. In conjunction with the design and manufacturing developments, inspection methods were investigated for their potential to evaluate damaged structure and verify the integrity of completed repairs.

  17. Connecting the Dots: From DNA Damage and Repair to Aging.

    PubMed

    Pan, Mei-Ren; Li, Kaiyi; Lin, Shiaw-Yih; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cells evolve a delicate system, the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, to monitor genomic integrity and to prevent the damage from both endogenous end exogenous insults. Emerging evidence suggests that aberrant DDR and deficient DNA repair are strongly associated with cancer and aging. Our understanding of the core program of DDR has made tremendous progress in the past two decades. However, the long list of the molecules involved in the DDR and DNA repair continues to grow and the roles of the new "dots" are under intensive investigation. Here, we review the connection between DDR and DNA repair and aging and discuss the potential mechanisms by which deficient DNA repair triggers systemic effects to promote physiological or pathological aging. PMID:27164092

  18. Connecting the Dots: From DNA Damage and Repair to Aging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Mei-Ren; Li, Kaiyi; Lin, Shiaw-Yih; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cells evolve a delicate system, the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, to monitor genomic integrity and to prevent the damage from both endogenous end exogenous insults. Emerging evidence suggests that aberrant DDR and deficient DNA repair are strongly associated with cancer and aging. Our understanding of the core program of DDR has made tremendous progress in the past two decades. However, the long list of the molecules involved in the DDR and DNA repair continues to grow and the roles of the new “dots” are under intensive investigation. Here, we review the connection between DDR and DNA repair and aging and discuss the potential mechanisms by which deficient DNA repair triggers systemic effects to promote physiological or pathological aging. PMID:27164092

  19. Repair of ultraviolet-light-induced damage

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    Studies are reviewed which present three major new findings in the photobiology of skin. First, detectable numbers of dimers are formed even at sub-erythymal doses. Second, excision of dimers is much more rapid than would be predicted from results obtained in cell culture. Third, comparison of the rates of excision and photoreactivation in skin indicates that in normal sunlight exposure, photoreactivation may well be the predominant repair pathway in skin. (ACR)

  20. DNA Damage Repair in the Context of Plant Chromatin1

    PubMed Central

    Donà, Mattia; Mittelsten Scheid, Ortrun

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of DNA molecules is constantly challenged. All organisms have developed mechanisms to detect and repair multiple types of DNA lesions. The basic principles of DNA damage repair (DDR) in prokaryotes and unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes are similar, but the association of DNA with nucleosomes in eukaryotic chromatin requires mechanisms that allow access of repair enzymes to the lesions. This is achieved by chromatin-remodeling factors, and their necessity for efficient DDR has recently been demonstrated for several organisms and repair pathways. Plants share many features of chromatin organization and DNA repair with fungi and animals, but they differ in other, important details, which are both interesting and relevant for our understanding of genome stability and genetic diversity. In this Update, we compare the knowledge of the role of chromatin and chromatin-modifying factors during DDR in plants with equivalent systems in yeast and humans. We emphasize plant-specific elements and discuss possible implications. PMID:26089404

  1. DNA Damage Repair in the Context of Plant Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Donà, Mattia; Mittelsten Scheid, Ortrun

    2015-08-01

    The integrity of DNA molecules is constantly challenged. All organisms have developed mechanisms to detect and repair multiple types of DNA lesions. The basic principles of DNA damage repair (DDR) in prokaryotes and unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes are similar, but the association of DNA with nucleosomes in eukaryotic chromatin requires mechanisms that allow access of repair enzymes to the lesions. This is achieved by chromatin-remodeling factors, and their necessity for efficient DDR has recently been demonstrated for several organisms and repair pathways. Plants share many features of chromatin organization and DNA repair with fungi and animals, but they differ in other, important details, which are both interesting and relevant for our understanding of genome stability and genetic diversity. In this Update, we compare the knowledge of the role of chromatin and chromatin-modifying factors during DDR in plants with equivalent systems in yeast and humans. We emphasize plant-specific elements and discuss possible implications. PMID:26089404

  2. Differential repair of UV damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Terleth, C; van Sluis, C A; van de Putte, P

    1989-01-01

    Preferential repair of UV-induced damage is a phenomenon by which mammalian cells might enhance their survival. This paper presents the first evidence that preferential repair occurs in the lower eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover an unique approach is reported to compare identical sequences present on the same chromosome and only differing in expression. We determined the removal of pyrimidine dimers from two identical alpha-mating type loci and we were able to show that the active MAT alpha locus is repaired preferentially to the inactive HML alpha locus. In a sir-3 mutant, in which both loci are active this preference is not observed. Images PMID:2664708

  3. The current state of eukaryotic DNA base damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Corbett, Anita H; Doetsch, Paul W

    2015-12-01

    DNA damage is a natural hazard of life. The most common DNA lesions are base, sugar, and single-strand break damage resulting from oxidation, alkylation, deamination, and spontaneous hydrolysis. If left unrepaired, such lesions can become fixed in the genome as permanent mutations. Thus, evolution has led to the creation of several highly conserved, partially redundant pathways to repair or mitigate the effects of DNA base damage. The biochemical mechanisms of these pathways have been well characterized and the impact of this work was recently highlighted by the selection of Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar and Paul Modrich as the recipients of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their seminal work in defining DNA repair pathways. However, how these repair pathways are regulated and interconnected is still being elucidated. This review focuses on the classical base excision repair and strand incision pathways in eukaryotes, considering both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans, and extends to some important questions and challenges facing the field of DNA base damage repair. PMID:26519467

  4. The current state of eukaryotic DNA base damage and repair

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Nicholas C.; Corbett, Anita H.; Doetsch, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage is a natural hazard of life. The most common DNA lesions are base, sugar, and single-strand break damage resulting from oxidation, alkylation, deamination, and spontaneous hydrolysis. If left unrepaired, such lesions can become fixed in the genome as permanent mutations. Thus, evolution has led to the creation of several highly conserved, partially redundant pathways to repair or mitigate the effects of DNA base damage. The biochemical mechanisms of these pathways have been well characterized and the impact of this work was recently highlighted by the selection of Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar and Paul Modrich as the recipients of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their seminal work in defining DNA repair pathways. However, how these repair pathways are regulated and interconnected is still being elucidated. This review focuses on the classical base excision repair and strand incision pathways in eukaryotes, considering both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans, and extends to some important questions and challenges facing the field of DNA base damage repair. PMID:26519467

  5. Glenn Refractory Adhesive for Bonding and Exterior Repair (GRABER) Developed for Repairing Shuttle Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.

    2005-01-01

    Advanced in-space repair technologies for reinforced carbon/carbon composite (RCC) thermal protection system (TPS) structures are critically needed for the space shuttle Return To Flight (RTF) efforts. These technologies are also critical for the repair and refurbishment of thermal protection system structures of future Crew Exploration Vehicles of space exploration programs. The Glenn Refractory Adhesive for Bonding and Exterior Repair (GRABER) material developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center has demonstrated capabilities for repair of small cracks and damage in RCC leading-edge material. The concept consists of preparing an adhesive paste of desired ceramic in a polymer/phenolic resin matrix with appropriate additives, such as surfactants, and then applying the paste into the damaged or cracked area of the RCC composite components with caulking guns. The adhesive paste cures at 100 to 120 C and transforms into a high-temperature ceramic during simulated vehicle reentry testing conditions.

  6. Biomarkers of oxidative damage to DNA and repair.

    PubMed

    Loft, Steffen; Høgh Danielsen, Pernille; Mikkelsen, Lone; Risom, Lotte; Forchhammer, Lykke; Møller, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Oxidative-stress-induced damage to DNA includes a multitude of lesions, many of which are mutagenic and have multiple roles in cancer and aging. Many lesions have been characterized by MS-based methods after extraction and digestion of DNA. These preparation steps may cause spurious base oxidation, which is less likely to occur with methods such as the comet assay, which are based on nicking of the DNA strand at modified bases, but offer less specificity. The European Standards Committee on Oxidative DNA Damage has concluded that the true levels of the most widely studied lesion, 8-oxodG (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine), in cellular DNA is between 0.5 and 5 lesions per 10(6) dG bases. Base excision repair of oxidative damage to DNA can be assessed by nicking assays based on oligonucleotides with lesions or the comet assay, by mRNA expression levels or, in the case of, e.g., OGG1 (8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1), responsible for repair of 8-oxodG, by genotyping. Products of repair in DNA or the nucleotide pool, such as 8-oxodG, excreted into the urine can be assessed by MS-based methods and generally reflects the rate of damage. Experimental and population-based studies indicate that many environmental factors, including particulate air pollution, cause oxidative damage to DNA, whereas diets rich in fruit and vegetables or antioxidant supplements may reduce the levels and enhance repair. Urinary excretion of 8-oxodG, genotype and expression of OGG1 have been associated with risk of cancer in cohort settings, whereas altered levels of damage, repair or urinary excretion in case-control settings may be a consequence rather than the cause of the disease. PMID:18793191

  7. DNA damage and repair after high LET radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Peter; Cucinotta, Francis; Anderson, Jennifer

    Predictions from biophysical models of interactions of radiation tracks with cellular DNA indicate that clustered DNA damage sites, defined as two or more lesions formed within one or two helical turns of the DNA by passage of a single radiation track, are formed in mammalian cells. These complex DNA damage sites are regarded as a signature of ionizing radiation exposure particularly as the likelihood of clustered damage sites arising endogenously is low. For instance, it was predicted from biophysical modelling that 30-40% of low LET-induced double strand breaks (DSB), a form of clustered damage, are complex with the yield increasing to >90% for high LET radiation, consistent with the reduced reparability of DSB with increasing ionization density of the radiation. The question arises whether the increased biological effects such as mutagenesis, carcinogenesis and lethality is in part related to DNA damage complexity and/or spatial distribution of the damage sites, which may lead to small DNA fragments. With particle radiation it is also important to consider not only delta-rays which may cause clustered damaged sites and may be highly mutagenic but the non-random spatial distribution of DSB which may lead to deletions. In this overview I will concentrate on the molecular aspects of the variation of the complexity of DNA damage on radiation quality and the challenges this complexity presents the DNA damage repair pathways. I will draw on data from micro-irradiations which indicate that the repair of DSBs by non-homologous end joining is highly regulated with pathway choice and kinetics of repair dependent on the chemical complexity of the DSB. In summary the aim is to emphasis the link between the spatial distribution of energy deposition events related to the track, the molecular products formed and the consequence of damage complexity contributing to biological effects and to present some of the outstanding molecular challenges with particle radiation.

  8. Exercise as Gene Therapy: BDNF and DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robin H; Nickerson, John M; Boatright, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage is a common feature of neurodegenerative illnesses, and the ability to repair DNA strand breaks and lesions is crucial for neuronal survival, reported by Jeppesen et al (Prog Neurobiol. 2011;94:166-200) and Shiwaku et al (Curr Mol Med. 2015;15:119-128). Interventions aimed at repairing these lesions, therefore, could be useful for preventing or delaying the progression of disease. One potential strategy for promoting DNA damage repair (DDR) is exercise. Although the role of exercise in DDR is not understood, there is increasing evidence that simple physical activity may impact clinical outcomes for neurodegeneration. Here, we discuss what is currently known about the molecular mechanisms of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and how these mechanisms might influence the DDR process. PMID:27488073

  9. p53 in the DNA-Damage-Repair Process.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ashley B; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The cells in the human body are continuously challenged by a variety of genotoxic attacks. Erroneous repair of the DNA can lead to mutations and chromosomal aberrations that can alter the functions of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes, thus causing cancer development. As a central tumor suppressor, p53 guards the genome by orchestrating a variety of DNA-damage-response (DDR) mechanisms. Already early in metazoan evolution, p53 started controlling the apoptotic demise of genomically compromised cells. p53 plays a prominent role as a facilitator of DNA repair by halting the cell cycle to allow time for the repair machineries to restore genome stability. In addition, p53 took on diverse roles to also directly impact the activity of various DNA-repair systems. It thus appears as if p53 is multitasking in providing protection from cancer development by maintaining genome stability. PMID:27048304

  10. UV Radiation Damage and Bacterial DNA Repair Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Guy, Daniel; Yarom, Ruth; Slesak, Michaela

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple hands-on laboratory procedure for high school students in studying both radiation damage and DNA repair systems in bacteria. The sensitivity to ultra-violet (UV) radiation of both "Escherichia coli" and "Serratia marcescens" is tested by radiating them for varying time periods. Two growth temperatures are used in…

  11. 75 FR 11734 - Damage Tolerance Data for Repairs and Alterations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ...The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is making minor technical changes to a final rule published in the Federal Register on December 12, 2007. That final rule required holders of design approvals to make damage tolerance data for repairs and alterations to fatigue critical airplane structure available to operators. After issuing the final rule, the FAA determined that further changes were......

  12. Circadian Modulation of 8-Oxoguanine DNA Damage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Manzella, Nicola; Bracci, Massimo; Strafella, Elisabetta; Staffolani, Sara; Ciarapica, Veronica; Copertaro, Alfredo; Rapisarda, Venerando; Ledda, Caterina; Amati, Monica; Valentino, Matteo; Tomasetti, Marco; Stevens, Richard G.; Santarelli, Lory

    2015-01-01

    The DNA base excision repair pathway is the main system involved in the removal of oxidative damage to DNA such as 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) primarily via the 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1). Our goal was to investigate whether the repair of 8-oxoG DNA damage follow a circadian rhythm. In a group of 15 healthy volunteers, we found a daily variation of Ogg1 expression and activity with higher levels in the morning compared to the evening hours. Consistent with this, we also found lower levels of 8-oxoG in morning hours compared to those in the evening hours. Lymphocytes exposed to oxidative damage to DNA at 8:00 AM display lower accumulation of 8-oxoG than lymphocytes exposed at 8:00 PM. Furthermore, altered levels of Ogg1 expression were also observed in a group of shift workers experiencing a deregulation of circadian clock genes compared to a control group. Moreover, BMAL1 knockdown fibroblasts with a deregulated molecular clock showed an abolishment of circadian variation of Ogg1 expression and an increase of OGG1 activity. Our results suggest that the circadian modulation of 8-oxoG DNA damage repair, according to a variation of Ogg1 expression, could render humans less susceptible to accumulate 8-oxoG DNA damage in the morning hours. PMID:26337123

  13. Circadian Modulation of 8-Oxoguanine DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Manzella, Nicola; Bracci, Massimo; Strafella, Elisabetta; Staffolani, Sara; Ciarapica, Veronica; Copertaro, Alfredo; Rapisarda, Venerando; Ledda, Caterina; Amati, Monica; Valentino, Matteo; Tomasetti, Marco; Stevens, Richard G; Santarelli, Lory

    2015-01-01

    The DNA base excision repair pathway is the main system involved in the removal of oxidative damage to DNA such as 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) primarily via the 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1). Our goal was to investigate whether the repair of 8-oxoG DNA damage follow a circadian rhythm. In a group of 15 healthy volunteers, we found a daily variation of Ogg1 expression and activity with higher levels in the morning compared to the evening hours. Consistent with this, we also found lower levels of 8-oxoG in morning hours compared to those in the evening hours. Lymphocytes exposed to oxidative damage to DNA at 8:00 AM display lower accumulation of 8-oxoG than lymphocytes exposed at 8:00 PM. Furthermore, altered levels of Ogg1 expression were also observed in a group of shift workers experiencing a deregulation of circadian clock genes compared to a control group. Moreover, BMAL1 knockdown fibroblasts with a deregulated molecular clock showed an abolishment of circadian variation of Ogg1 expression and an increase of OGG1 activity. Our results suggest that the circadian modulation of 8-oxoG DNA damage repair, according to a variation of Ogg1 expression, could render humans less susceptible to accumulate 8-oxoG DNA damage in the morning hours. PMID:26337123

  14. Simulated microgravity influenced the expression of DNA damage repair genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Jiawei, Liu; Wang, Ting

    2016-07-01

    Ionizing radiation and microgravity were considered to be the most important stress factors of space environmental the respective study of the biological effects of the radiation and microgravity carried out earlier, but the interaction of the effects of radiation with microgravity started later, and due to difference of the materials and methods the result of this experiment were not consistent. To further investigate the influence of microgravity on the expression of the radiation damage repair genes, the seed of Arabidopsis (Col) and its gravity-insensitive mutant (PIN2) were exposed to 0.1Gy of the dose of energetic carbon-ion beam radiation (LET = 30KeV / μm), and the germinated seed were than fixed in the 3D random positioning apparatus immediately for a 10-day simulated microgravity. By measuring the deflection angle of root tip and the changes of the expression of Ku70 and RAD51 protein, we investigated the impact of microgravity effect on radiation damage repair systems. The results shown that radiation, microgravity and microgravity with radiation could increase the angle of the root of the Col significantly, but no obvious effect on PIN2 type. The radiation could increase the expression of Ku70 significantly in both Col and PIN2, microgravity does not affect the expression, but the microgravity with radiation could decrease the expression of Ku70. This result shown that the microgravity could influence the radiation damage repair systems in molecular level. Moreover, our findings were important to understand the molecular mechanism of the impact of microgravity effect on radiation damage repair systems in vivo.

  15. Staged surgical repair for extensive cardiovascular damage by syphilis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toshiro; Yagi, Takeshi; Murakami, Masanori; Jinbo, Mitsutaka; Saito, Satoshi; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Takahiro; Kunichika, Hideki; Gohra, Hidenori

    2011-10-01

    A 45-year-old man had aortic regurgitation with a syphilitic true aneurysm of the ascending to transverse arch aorta and a descending aortic aneurysm from chronic Stanford type B aortic dissection. After antibiotic therapy, two-staged surgical repair was performed and there has been no evidence of recurrence in 12 months since the second stage. We describe the successful management of extensive cardiovascular syphilitic damage. PMID:21958803

  16. Kinetic Modeling of Damage Repair, Genome Instability, and Neoplastic Transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Robert D

    2007-03-17

    Inducible repair and pathway interactions may fundamentally alter the shape of dose-response curves because different mechanisms may be important under low- and high-dose exposure conditions. However, the significance of these phenomena for risk assessment purposes is an open question. This project developed new modeling tools to study the putative effects of DNA damage induction and repair on higher-level biological endpoints, including cell killing, neoplastic transformation and cancer. The project scope included (1) the development of new approaches to simulate the induction and base excision repair (BER) of DNA damage using Monte Carlo methods and (2) the integration of data from the Monte Carlo simulations with kinetic models for higher-level biological endpoints. Methods of calibrating and testing such multiscale biological simulations were developed. We also developed models to aid in the analysis and interpretation of data from experimental assays, such as the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) assay used to quantity the amount of DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation.

  17. Torin2 Suppresses Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, Durga; Pandita, Raj K; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Liu, Yan; Liu, Qingsong; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Hunt, Clayton R; Gray, Nathanael S; Minna, John D; Pandita, Tej K; Westover, Kenneth D

    2016-05-01

    Several classes of inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) have been developed based on its central role in sensing growth factor and nutrient levels to regulate cellular metabolism. However, its ATP-binding site closely resembles other phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family members, resulting in reactivity with these targets that may also be therapeutically useful. The ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor, Torin2, shows biochemical activity against the DNA repair-associated proteins ATM, ATR and DNA-PK, which raises the possibility that Torin2 and related compounds might radiosensitize cancerous tumors. In this study Torin2 was also found to enhance ionizing radiation-induced cell killing in conditions where ATM was dispensable, confirming the requirement for multiple PIKK targets. Moreover, Torin2 did not influence the initial appearance of γ-H2AX foci after irradiation but significantly delayed the disappearance of radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci, indicating a DNA repair defect. Torin2 increased the number of radiation-induced S-phase specific chromosome aberrations and reduced the frequency of radiation-induced CtIP and Rad51 foci formation, suggesting that Torin2 works by blocking homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA repair resulting in an S-phase specific DNA repair defect. Accordingly, Torin2 reduced HR-mediated repair of I-Sce1-induced DNA damage and contributed to replication fork stalling. We conclude that radiosensitization of tumor cells by Torin2 is associated with disrupting ATR- and ATM-dependent DNA damage responses. Our findings support the concept of developing combination cancer therapies that incorporate ionizing radiation therapy and Torin2 or compounds with similar properties. PMID:27135971

  18. Simulation of Self-Repair Process of Steels Damaged by Creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toi, Yutaka; Hirose, Satoshi

    The continuum damage mechanics is extended to cover the self-repair process as well as the damage process. The repair variable and its evolution equation are newly introduced to consider the repair process. In the constitutive modeling, the equation of creep based on kinematic/isotropic hardening theory is extended to take the effect of damage into account. The evolution equation of a repair variable is proposed, based on Dyson's equation of creep cavity growth. The validity of the proposed modeling is illustrated through the simulations for the self-repair process of two kinds of steels damaged by creep.

  19. Pathophysiology of Bronchoconstriction: Role of Oxidatively Damaged DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bacsi, Attila; Pan, Lang; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview on the present understanding of roles of oxidative DNA damage repair in cell signaling underlying bronchoconstriction common to, but not restricted to various forms of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Recent findings Bronchoconstriction is a tightening of smooth muscle surrounding the bronchi and bronchioles with consequent wheezing and shortness of breath. Key stimuli include air pollutants, viral infections, allergens, thermal and osmotic changes, and shear stress of mucosal epithelium, triggering a wide range of cellular, vascular and neural events. Although activation of nerve fibers, the role of G-proteins, protein kinases and Ca++, and molecular interaction within contracting filaments of muscle are well defined, the overarching mechanisms by which a wide range of stimuli initiate these events are not fully understood. Many, if not all, stimuli increase levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are signaling and oxidatively modifying macromolecules, including DNA. The primary ROS target in DNA is guanine, and 8-oxoguanine is one of the most abundant base lesions. It is repaired by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase1 (OGG1) during base excision repair processes. The product, free 8-oxoG base, is bound by OGG1 with high affinity, and the complex then functions as an activator of small GTPases, triggering pathways for inducing gene expression and contraction of intracellular filaments in mast and smooth muscle cells. Summary Oxidative DNA damage repair-mediated cell activation signaling result in gene expression that “primes” the mucosal epithelium and submucosal tissues to generate mediators of airway smooth muscle contractions. PMID:26694039

  20. Blade reliability collaborative : collection of defect, damage and repair data.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwill, Thomas D.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2013-04-01

    The Blade Reliability Collaborative (BRC) was started by the Wind Energy Technologies Department of Sandia National Laboratories and DOE in 2010 with the goal of gaining insight into planned and unplanned O&M issues associated with wind turbine blades. A significant part of BRC is the Blade Defect, Damage and Repair Survey task, which will gather data from blade manufacturers, service companies, operators and prior studies to determine details about the largest sources of blade unreliability. This report summarizes the initial findings from this work.

  1. DNA Mismatch Repair and Oxidative DNA Damage: Implications for Cancer Biology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, Gemma; Rashid, Sukaina; Martin, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Many components of the cell, including lipids, proteins and both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, are vulnerable to deleterious modifications caused by reactive oxygen species. If not repaired, oxidative DNA damage can lead to disease-causing mutations, such as in cancer. Base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair are the two DNA repair pathways believed to orchestrate the removal of oxidative lesions. However, recent findings suggest that the mismatch repair pathway may also be important for the response to oxidative DNA damage. This is particularly relevant in cancer where mismatch repair genes are frequently mutated or epigenetically silenced. In this review we explore how the regulation of oxidative DNA damage by mismatch repair proteins may impact on carcinogenesis. We discuss recent studies that identify potential new treatments for mismatch repair deficient tumours, which exploit this non-canonical role of mismatch repair using synthetic lethal targeting. PMID:25099886

  2. Pattern Learning, Damage and Repair within Biological Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, Theodore; Fitzgerald O'Neill, Kate; Shinbrot, Troy

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes damage to neural networks, potentially leading to disability or even death. Nearly one in ten of these patients die, and most of the remainder suffer from symptoms ranging from headaches and nausea to convulsions and paralysis. In vitro studies to develop treatments for TBI have limited in vivo applicability, and in vitro therapies have even proven to worsen the outcome of TBI patients. We propose that this disconnect between in vitro and in vivo outcomes may be associated with the fact that in vitro tests assess indirect measures of neuronal health, but do not investigate the actual function of neuronal networks. Therefore in this talk, we examine both in vitro and in silico neuronal networks that actually perform a function: pattern identification. We allow the networks to execute genetic, Hebbian, learning, and additionally, we examine the effects of damage and subsequent repair within our networks. We show that the length of repaired connections affects the overall pattern learning performance of the network and we propose therapies that may improve function following TBI in clinical settings.

  3. International congress on DNA damage and repair: Book of abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This document contains the abstracts of 105 papers presented at the Congress. Topics covered include the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair system, DNA repair in malignant transformations, defective DNA repair, and gene regulation. (TEM)

  4. DNA Damage, Homology-Directed Repair, and DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Angrisano, Tiziana; Morano, Annalisa; Lee, Bongyong; Pardo, Alba Di; Messina, Samantha; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Fusco, Alfredo; Santillo, Maria R; Muller, Mark T; Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Gottesman, Max E; Avvedimento, Enrico V

    2007-01-01

    To explore the link between DNA damage and gene silencing, we induced a DNA double-strand break in the genome of Hela or mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells using I-SceI restriction endonuclease. The I-SceI site lies within one copy of two inactivated tandem repeated green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes (DR-GFP). A total of 2%–4% of the cells generated a functional GFP by homology-directed repair (HR) and gene conversion. However, ~50% of these recombinants expressed GFP poorly. Silencing was rapid and associated with HR and DNA methylation of the recombinant gene, since it was prevented in Hela cells by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. ES cells deficient in DNA methyl transferase 1 yielded as many recombinants as wild-type cells, but most of these recombinants expressed GFP robustly. Half of the HR DNA molecules were de novo methylated, principally downstream to the double-strand break, and half were undermethylated relative to the uncut DNA. Methylation of the repaired gene was independent of the methylation status of the converting template. The methylation pattern of recombinant molecules derived from pools of cells carrying DR-GFP at different loci, or from an individual clone carrying DR-GFP at a single locus, was comparable. ClustalW analysis of the sequenced GFP molecules in Hela and ES cells distinguished recombinant and nonrecombinant DNA solely on the basis of their methylation profile and indicated that HR superimposed novel methylation profiles on top of the old patterns. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA analysis revealed that DNA methyl transferase 1 was bound specifically to HR GFP DNA and that methylation of the repaired segment contributed to the silencing of GFP expression. Taken together, our data support a mechanistic link between HR and DNA methylation and suggest that DNA methylation in eukaryotes marks homologous recombined segments. PMID:17616978

  5. SUMO-mediated regulation of DNA damage repair and responses

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Prabha; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    Sumoylation plays important roles during DNA damage repair and responses. Recent broad-scope and substrate-based studies have shed light on the regulation and significance of sumoylation during these processes. An emerging paradigm is that sumoylation of many DNA metabolism proteins is controlled by DNA engagement. Such “on-site modification” can explain low substrate modification levels and has important implications in sumoylation mechanisms and effects. New studies also suggest that sumoylation can regulate a process through an ensemble effect or via major substrates. Additionally, we describe new trends in the functional effects of sumoylation, such as bi-directional changes in biomolecule binding and multi-level coordination with other modifications. These emerging themes and models will stimulate our thinking and research in sumoylation and genome maintenance. PMID:25778614

  6. Repair of postirradiation damage to colorectum: a progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bricker, E.M.; Johnston, W.D.; Patwardhan, R.V.

    1981-05-01

    The results of 21 operations for repair of rectovaginal fistula and/or stricture secondary to irradiation for pelvic cancer are presented. The operations rely on the use of proximal nonirradiated colon with normal blood supply for effecting the repair. In patients having had a previous colostomy, it is possible to use the proximal end of the bypassed colon for this purpose. There is minimal dissection of the rectal ampulla and the presacral space is never entered. Continuity is established by anastomosis to the anterior rectal wall via an abdominal approach alone, or by a combined abdominovaginal or abdominoperineal approach. It has been found that nonirradiated colon of normal vascularity can be expected to heal to irradiated colon or rectum, thus making the extensive resections associated with correction of these abnormalities unnecessary. The functional result in 18 of 19 patients who underwent this procedure was satisfactory to excellent. One patient had a poor result because of partial rectal incontinence. Two operations out of the 21 were total failures and one of these patients died of complications secondary to irradiation damage to the small intestine. One patient has not yet had final colostomy closure. The results are considered promising enough to warrant continued trial.

  7. Shuttle/Centaur G-prime composite adapters damage tolerance/repair test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollars, Teresa A.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Shuttle/Centaur Composite Adapters Damage Tolerance/Repair Test program had as its goals the determination of probable and potentially critical defects or damages on the adapters' strength and stability, as well as the adequacy of repairs on significantly damaged areas and the generation of NDT data for the upgrading of acceptance criteria. Such rational accept/reject criteria and repair methods reduce both engineering liason costs and any unnecessary parts-scrapping. Successful 'damage tolerant' design ensures that degradations of strength and stability due to undetected defects or damage will not be catastrophic.

  8. Repair of uv damaged DNA: Genes and proteins of yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1992-04-01

    Our objectives are to determine the molecular mechanism of the incision step of excision repair of ultraviolet (UV) light damaged DNA in eukaryotic organisms, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, and to study the human homologs of yeast excision repair and postreplication repair proteins progress is described.

  9. Assessment of the role of DNA repair in damaged forensic samples.

    PubMed

    Ambers, Angie; Turnbough, Meredith; Benjamin, Robert; King, Jonathan; Budowle, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies on DNA damage and repair have involved in vitro laboratory procedures that induce a single type of lesion in naked templates. Although repair of singular, sequestered types of DNA damage has shown some success, forensic and ancient specimens likely contain a number of different types of lesions. This study sought to (1) develop protocols to damage DNA in its native state, (2) generate a pool of candidate samples for repair that more likely emulate authentic forensic samples, and (3) assess the ability of the PreCR(TM) Repair Mix to repair the resultant lesions. Complexed, native DNA is more difficult to damage than naked DNA. Modified procedures included the use of higher concentrations and longer exposure times. Three types of samples, those that demonstrated damage based on short tandem repeat (STR) profile signals, were selected for repair experiments: environmentally damaged bloodstains, bleach-damaged whole blood, and human skeletal remains. Results showed trends of improved performance of STR profiling of bleach-damaged DNA. However, the repair assay did not improve DNA profiles from environmentally damaged bloodstains or bone, and in some cases resulted in lower RFU values for STR alleles. The extensive spectrum of DNA damage and myriad combinations of lesions that can be present in forensic samples appears to pose a challenge for the in vitro PreCR(TM) assay. The data suggest that the use of PreCR in casework should be considered with caution due to the assay's varied results. PMID:24792635

  10. A radiation damage repair model for normal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Mike

    2008-07-01

    A cellular Monte Carlo model describing radiation damage and repair in normal epithelial tissues is presented. The deliberately simplified model includes cell cycling, cell motility and radiation damage response (cell cycle arrest and cell death) only. Results demonstrate that the model produces a stable equilibrium system for mean cell cycle times in the range 24-96 h. Simulated irradiation of these stable equilibrium systems produced a range of responses that are shown to be consistent with experimental and clinical observation, including (i) re-epithelialization of radiation-induced lesions by a mixture of cell migration into the wound and repopulation at the periphery; (ii) observed radiosensitivity that is quantitatively consistent with both rate of induction of irreparable DNA lesions and, independently, with the observed acute oral and pharyngeal mucosal reactions to radiotherapy; (iii) an observed time between irradiation and maximum toxicity that is consistent with experimental data for skin; (iv) quantitatively accurate predictions of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity; (v) Gomperzian repopulation for very small lesions (~2000 cells) and (vi) a linear rate of re-epithelialization of 5-10 µm h-1 for large lesions (>15 000 cells).

  11. The method of quartz damage recovery in the photomask repair process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namkung, Hoon; Kim, MunSik; Park, EuiSang; Jung, HoYong; Kim, SangPyo; Yim, DongGyu

    2015-07-01

    As the pattern size became gradually smaller, the defect detectability of the photomask inspection tool was more improved. For these reasons, we have to repair various defects more precisely. By improving the mask yield through the repair process, we can reduce the cost of mask fabrication. In this study, we studied the defect called quartz damage which distorts the AIMSTM (Arial Image Measurement System) intensity of the repaired pattern and causes the scrap of the photomask. The quartz damage is generally observed when the abnormal defects like particles were repaired in the poor repairing condition. The quartz damage occasionally results in repair errors and affects the AIMS intensity. Currently there is no clear solution for recovering the quartz damage. As a result, it is very difficult to get the high quality photomask if the quartz damage is generated on the photomask. Therefore, it is important to find a method of recovering the quartz damage for producing the high quality photomask. In this paper, we demonstrated that the quartz damage can be recovered through the TEOS (Tetraethoxysilane) gas deposition. Also we investigated the effect on the recovery of the quartz damage of various parameters such as the type and the depth of the quartz damage as well as the repair conditions of the TEOS gas deposition.

  12. Specificity of damage recognition and catalysis of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Osman, R; Fuxreiter, M; Luo, N

    2000-05-01

    A common feature of DNA repair enzymes is their ability to recognize the damage independently of sequence in which they are found. The presence of a flipped out base inserted into the protein in several DNA-enzyme complexes suggests a contribution to enzyme specificity. Molecular simulations of damaged DNA indicate that the damage produces changes in DNA structure and changes the dynamics of DNA bending. The reduced bending force constant can be used by the enzyme to induce DNA bending and facilitate base flipping. We show that a thymine dimer (TD) containing DNA requires less energy to bend, lowering the barrier for base flipping. On the other hand, bending in DNA with U-G mismatch is affected only by a small amount and flipping is not enhanced significantly. T4 endonuclease V (endoV), which recognizes TD, utilizes the reduced barrier for flipping as a specific recognition element. In uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG), which recognizes U-G mismatches, base flipping is not enhanced and recognition is encoded in a highly specific binding pocket for the flipped base. Simulations of UDG and endoV in complex with damaged DNA provide insight into the essential elements of the catalytic mechanism. Calculations of pKas of active site residues in endoV and endoV-DNA complex show that the pKa, of the N-terminus is reduced from 8.01 to 6.52 while that of Glu-23 increases from 1.52 to 7.82. Thus, the key catalytic residues are in their neutral form. The simulations also show that Glu-23 is also H-bonded to O4' of the 5'-TD enhancing the nucleophilic attack on Cl and that Arg-26 enhances the hydrolysis by electrostatic stabilization but does not participate in proton transfer. In the enzyme-substrate complex of UDG, the role of electrostatic stabilization is played by His-268, whose pKa increases to 7.1 from 4.9 in the free enzyme. The pKa of Asp-145, the other important catalytic residue, remains around 4.2 in the free enzyme and in the complex. Thus, it can not act as a proton

  13. Repair and misrepair of heavy-ion-induced chromosomal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, E.; Blakely, E.; Ivery, G.; Tobias, C.

    The premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique was used to investigate chromosomal damage, repair, and misrepair in the G1 phase of a human/hamster hybrid cell line that contains a single human chromosome. Plateau-phase cell cultures were exposed to either x-rays or a 425 MeV/u beam of neon ions near the Bragg peak where the LET is 183 keV/μm. An in situ hybridization technique coupled to fluorescent staining of PCC spreads confirmed the linearity of the dose response for initial chromatin breakage in the human chromosome to high doses (1600 cGy x-ray or 1062 cGy Ne). On Giemsa-stained slides, initial chromatin breakage in the total genome and the rejoining kinetics of these breaks were determined. As a measure of chromosomal misrepair, ring PCC aberrations were also scored. Ne ions were about 1.5 x more effective per unit dose compared to x-rays at producing the initially measured chromatin breakage. 90% of the x-ray-induced breaks rejoined in cells incubated at 37°C after exposure. In contrast, only 50% of Ne-ion-induced breaks rejoined. In the irradiated G1 cells, ring PCC aberrations increased with time apparently by first order kinetics after either x-ray or Ne exposures. However, far fewer rings formed in Ne-irradiated cells after a dose giving a comparable initial number of chromatin breaks. Following x-ray exposures, the yield of rings formed after long repair times (6 to 9 hrs) fit a quadratic dose-response curve. These results indicate quantitative and qualitative differences in the chromosomal lesions induced by low- and high-LET radiations.

  14. DNA damage by reactive species: Mechanisms, mutation and repair.

    PubMed

    Jena, N R

    2012-07-01

    DNA is continuously attacked by reactive species that can affect its structure and function severely. Structural modifications to DNA mainly arise from modifications in its bases that primarily occur due to their exposure to different reactive species. Apart from this, DNA strand break, inter- and intra-strand crosslinks and DNA-protein crosslinks can also affect the structure of DNA significantly. These structural modifications are involved in mutation, cancer and many other diseases. As it has the least oxidation potential among all the DNA bases, guanine is frequently attacked by reactive species, producing a plethora of lethal lesions. Fortunately, living cells are evolved with intelligent enzymes that continuously protect DNA from such damages. This review provides an overview of different guanine lesions formed due to reactions of guanine with different reactive species. Involvement of these lesions in inter- and intra-strand crosslinks, DNA-protein crosslinks and mutagenesis are discussed. How certain enzymes recognize and repair different guanine lesions in DNA are also presented. PMID:22750987

  15. In situ analysis of repair processes for oxidative DNA damage in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Li; Nakajima, Satoshi; Oohata, Yoshitsugu; Takao, Masashi; Okano, Satoshi; Masutani, Mitsuko; Wilson, Samuel H.; Yasui, Akira

    2004-09-01

    Oxidative DNA damage causes blocks and errors in transcription and replication, leading to cell death and genomic instability. Although repair mechanisms of the damage have been extensively analyzed in vitro, the actual in vivo repair processes remain largely unknown. Here, by irradiation with an UVA laser through a microscope lens, we have conditionally produced single-strand breaks and oxidative base damage at restricted nuclear regions of mammalian cells. We showed, in real time after irradiation by using antibodies and GFP-tagged proteins, rapid and ordered DNA repair processes of oxidative DNA damage in human cells. Furthermore, we characterized repair pathways by using repair-defective mammalian cells and found that DNA polymerase accumulated at single-strand breaks and oxidative base damage by means of its 31- and 8-kDa domains, respectively, and that XRCC1 is essential for both polymerase -dependent and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-dependent repair pathways of single-strand breaks. Thus, the repair of oxidative DNA damage is based on temporal and functional interactions among various proteins operating at the site of DNA damage in living cells.

  16. GENETIC AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND TOLERANCE PATHWAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26

    Radiation can damage cellular components, including DNA. Organisms have developed a panoply of means of dealing with DNA damage. Some repair paths have rather narrow substrate specificity (e.g. photolyases), which act on specific pyrimidine photoproducts in a specific type (e.g., DNA) and conformation (double-stranded B conformation) of nucleic acid. Others, for example, nucleotide excision repair, deal with larger classes of damages, in this case bulky adducts in DNA. A detailed discussion of DNA repair mechanisms is beyond the scope of this article, but one can be found in the excellent book of Friedberg et al. [1] for further detail. However, some DNA damages and paths for repair of those damages important for photobiology will be outlined below as a basis for the specific examples of genetic and molecular analysis that will be presented below.

  17. Nicotinamide enhances repair of ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage in primary melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Benjamin C; Surjana, Devita; Halliday, Gary M; Damian, Diona L

    2014-07-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Nicotinamide is a safe, widely available vitamin that reduces the immune suppressive effects of UV, enhances DNA repair in keratinocytes and has shown promise in the chemoprevention of non-melanoma skin cancer. Here, we report the effect of nicotinamide on DNA damage and repair in primary human melanocytes. Nicotinamide significantly enhanced the repair of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine) and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers induced by UV exposure. It also enhanced the repair of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine induced by the culture conditions in unirradiated melanocytes. A significant increase in the percentage of melanocytes undergoing unscheduled but not scheduled DNA synthesis was observed, confirming that nicotinamide enhances DNA repair in human melanocytes. In summary, nicotinamide, by enhancing DNA repair in melanocytes, is a potential agent for the chemoprevention of cutaneous melanoma. PMID:24798949

  18. Inhibition of excision-repair of ultraviolet damage in human cells by exposure to methyl methanesulfonate.

    PubMed

    Park, S D; Choi, K H; Hong, S W; Cleaver, J E

    1981-07-01

    Unscheduled DNA synthesis and excision of pyrimidine dimers in human cells exposed to ultraviolet let were inhibited by exposure to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, 1-2 mM), but repair of MMS damage was not inhibited by UV light. Because the pathways for excision of pyrimidine dimers and alkylation damage have previously been shown to be different, this observation implies a direct effect of alkylation on repair enzymes. We estimate that if inhibition is due to protein alkylation, the UV repair system must present an extremely large target to alkylation and may involve a complex of protein subunits in the order of 1 million daltons such that 1 or more alkylations occur per complex at the concentrations used. These results also indicate that the method of exposing cells to 2 DNA-damaging agents to determine whether they are repaired by common or different pathways can be quite unreliable because of other effects on the repair systems themselves. PMID:7196494

  19. 49 CFR 192.713 - Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.713 Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages. (a)...

  20. 49 CFR 192.713 - Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.713 Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages. (a)...

  1. 49 CFR 192.713 - Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.713 Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages. (a)...

  2. 49 CFR 192.713 - Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.713 Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages. (a)...

  3. 49 CFR 192.713 - Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Maintenance § 192.713 Transmission lines: Permanent field repair of imperfections and damages. (a)...

  4. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  5. Repair of cellular radiation damage in space under microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Pross, H D; Kiefer, J

    1999-07-01

    The influence of microgravity on the repair of x-ray-induced DNA double-strand breaks was studied in the temperature-conditional repair mutant rad54-3 of diploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were exposed on the ground and kept at a low temperature until microgravity conditions were achieved. In orbit, they were incubated at the permissive temperature to allow repair. Before re-entry they were again cooled down and kept at a low temperature until final analysis. The experiment, which was flown on the shuttle Atlantis on flight STS-76 (SMM-03), showed that repair of pre-formed DNA double-strand breaks in yeast is not impaired by microgravity. PMID:10461760

  6. DNA Damage Signalling and Repair Inhibitors: The Long-Sought-After Achilles’ Heel of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Velic, Denis; Couturier, Anthony M.; Ferreira, Maria Tedim; Rodrigue, Amélie; Poirier, Guy G.; Fleury, Fabrice; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    For decades, radiotherapy and chemotherapy were the two only approaches exploiting DNA repair processes to fight against cancer. Nowadays, cancer therapeutics can be a major challenge when it comes to seeking personalized targeted medicine that is both effective and selective to the malignancy. Over the last decade, the discovery of new targeted therapies against DNA damage signalling and repair has offered the possibility of therapeutic improvements in oncology. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of DNA damage signalling and repair inhibitors, their molecular and cellular effects, and future therapeutic use. PMID:26610585

  7. DNA Damage Signalling and Repair Inhibitors: The Long-Sought-After Achilles' Heel of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Velic, Denis; Couturier, Anthony M; Ferreira, Maria Tedim; Rodrigue, Amélie; Poirier, Guy G; Fleury, Fabrice; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    For decades, radiotherapy and chemotherapy were the two only approaches exploiting DNA repair processes to fight against cancer. Nowadays, cancer therapeutics can be a major challenge when it comes to seeking personalized targeted medicine that is both effective and selective to the malignancy. Over the last decade, the discovery of new targeted therapies against DNA damage signalling and repair has offered the possibility of therapeutic improvements in oncology. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of DNA damage signalling and repair inhibitors, their molecular and cellular effects, and future therapeutic use. PMID:26610585

  8. Brain capacity for repair of oxidatively damaged DNA and preservation of neuronal function.

    PubMed

    Englander, Ella W

    2008-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidative DNA damage in the human brain has been implicated in etiologies of post-traumatic and age-associated declines in neuronal function. In neurons, because of high metabolic rates and prolonged life span, exposure to free radicals is intense and risk for accumulation of damaged DNA is amplified. While data indicate that the brain is equipped to repair nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, it is unclear whether repair is executed by distinct subsets of the DNA-repair machinery. Likewise, there are no firm assessments of brain capacity for accurate DNA repair under normal and more so compromised conditions. Consequently, the scope of DNA repair in the brain and the impact of resolution of oxidative lesions on neuronal survival and function remain largely unknown. This review considers evidences for brain levels and activities of the base excision repair (BER) pathway in the context of newly available, comprehensive in situ hybridization analyses of genes encoding repair enzymes. These analyses suggest that not all subsets of BER are equally represented in the brain. Because BER is the major repair process for oxidatively damaged DNA, to what extent parsimonious BER may contribute to development of neuronal dysfunction and brain injury under compromised conditions, is discussed. PMID:18374390

  9. Repair of gamma-ray-induced DNA base damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Dobson, P.P.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1986-04-01

    The repair of DNA damage produced by /sup 137/Cs gamma irradiation was measured with a preparation from Micrococcus luteus containing DNA damage-specific endonucleases in combination with alkaline elution. The frequency of these endonuclease sensitive sites (ESS) was determined after 54 or 110 Gy of oxic irradiation in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts from complementation groups A, C, D, and G. Repair was rapid in all cell strains with greater than 50% repair after 1.5 h of repair incubation. At later repair times, 12-17 h, more ESS remained in XP than in normal cells. The frequency of excess ESS in XP cells was approximately 0.04 per 10(9) Da of DNA per Gy which was equivalent to 10% of the initial ESS produced. The removal of ESS was comparable in XP cells with normal radiosensitivity and XP3BR cells which have been reported to be moderately radiosensitive.

  10. Inhibition of DNA damage repair by artificial activation of PARP with siDNA.

    PubMed

    Croset, Amelie; Cordelières, Fabrice P; Berthault, Nathalie; Buhler, Cyril; Sun, Jian-Sheng; Quanz, Maria; Dutreix, Marie

    2013-08-01

    One of the major early steps of repair is the recruitment of repair proteins at the damage site, and this is coordinated by a cascade of modifications controlled by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinases and/or poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). We used short interfering DNA molecules mimicking double-strand breaks (called Dbait) or single-strand breaks (called Pbait) to promote DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and PARP activation. Dbait bound and induced both PARP and DNA-PK activities, whereas Pbait acts only on PARP. Therefore, comparative study of the two molecules allows analysis of the respective roles of the two signaling pathways: both recruit proteins involved in single-strand break repair (PARP, XRCC1 and PCNA) and prevent their recruitment at chromosomal damage. Dbait, but not Pbait, also inhibits recruitment of proteins involved in double-strand break repair (53BP1, NBS1, RAD51 and DNA-PK). By these ways, Pbait and Dbait disorganize DNA repair, thereby sensitizing cells to various treatments. Single-strand breaks repair inhibition depends on direct trapping of the main proteins on both molecules. Double-strand breaks repair inhibition may be indirect, resulting from the phosphorylation of double-strand breaks repair proteins and chromatin targets by activated DNA-PK. The DNA repair inhibition by both molecules is confirmed by their synthetic lethality with BRCA mutations. PMID:23761435

  11. Method of repairing surface damage to porous refractory substrates. [space shuttle orbiter tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecord, G. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A damaged porous refractory material coated with a glass coating is repaired by applying hydrolyzed tetraethyl orthosilicate to the damaged area and curing it. A pliable filler comprised of hydrolyzed tetraethyl orthosilicate and powdered refractory substrate is then applied to the area which is then heated.

  12. DNA damage and repair in mouse embryos following treatment transplacentally with methylnitrosourea and methylmethanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Jirakulsomchok, S.; Yielding, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Mouse embryos were labeled in vivo at 10 1/2-12 1/2 days of gestation with (/sup 3/H)-thymidine and subjected to DNA damage using x-ray, methylmethanesulfonate, or methylnitrosourea. DNA damage and its repair were assessed in specific cell preparations from embryos isolated at intervals thereafter using the highly sensitive method of nucleoid sedimentation, which evaluates the supercoiled state of the DNA. Repair of x-ray damage was demonstrated using trypsin-dispersed cells from whole embryos and from homogenized embryonic liver to show the validity of the analytical approach. The effects of the highly teratogenic methylnitrosourea and the much less teratogenic methylmethanesulfonate were compared in the targeted limb buds using equitoxic doses of the two alkylating agents. DNA supercoiling was fully restored after 24 hr in limb bud cells damaged with methylmethanesulfonate, while as much as 48 hr were required for full repair of methylnitrosourea damage. These results demonstrated the feasibility of studying DNA repair in embryonic tissues after damage in vivo and suggest that the potency of methylnitrosourea as a teratogen may be correlated with a prolonged period required for complete repair of DNA.

  13. Curcumin Triggers DNA Damage and Inhibits Expression of DNA Repair Proteins in Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ting, Chien-Yi; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Yu, Chien-Chih; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Liu, Yu-Chang; Chiang, I-Tsang

    2015-07-01

    The study goal was to evaluate the effects of curcumin on DNA damage and expression of DNA-repair proteins in human lung cancer. Thus, NCI-H460 cells were used to study the effects of curcumin on DNA damage and repair in vitro. We investigated curcumin induces DNA damage by comet the assay and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. The DNA damage/repair-related protein levels were examined and monitored by western blotting and confocal microscopy. Curcumin significantly increased the length of comet tails and DNA condensation in NCI-H460 cells. Curcumin reduced expression of DNA-repair proteins such as 14-3-3 protein sigma (14-3-3σ), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1), and mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1). Curcumin also increased phosphorylation of p53 and Histone H2A.X (S140) in the nuclei of NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, our findings indicated that curcumin triggered DNA damage and inhibited expression of DNA-repair-associated proteins in NCI-H460 cells. PMID:26124332

  14. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wryobek, Andrew J

    2008-02-21

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7- 1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomalaberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  15. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The post-meiotic phase of mouse spermatogenesis (spermiogenesis) is very sensitive to the genomic effects of environmental mutagens because as male germ cells form mature sperm they progressively lose the ability to repair DNA damage. We hypothesized that repeated exposures to mutagens during this repair-deficient phase result in the accumulation of heritable genomic damage in mouse sperm that leads to chromosomal aberrations in zygotes after fertilization. We used a combination of single or fractionated exposures to diepoxybutane (DEB), a component of tobacco smoke, to investigate how differential DNA repair efficiencies during the three weeks of spermiogenesis affected the accumulation of DEB-induced heritable damage in early spermatids (21-15 days before fertilization, dbf), late spermatids (14-8 dbf) and sperm (7-1 dbf). Analysis of chromosomal aberrations in zygotic metaphases using PAINT/DAPI showed that late spermatids and sperm are unable to repair DEB-induced DNA damage as demonstrated by significant increases (P<0.001) in the frequencies of zygotes with chromosomal aberrations. Comparisons between single and fractionated exposures suggested that the DNA repair-deficient window during late spermiogenesis may be less than two weeks in the mouse and that during this repair-deficient window there is accumulation of DNA damage in sperm. Finally, the dose-response study in sperm indicated a linear response for both single and repeated exposures. These findings show that the differential DNA repair capacity of post-meioitic male germ cells has a major impact on the risk of paternally transmitted heritable damage and suggest that chronic exposures that may occur in the weeks prior to fertilization because of occupational or lifestyle factors (i.e, smoking) can lead to an accumulation of genetic damage in sperm and result in heritable chromosomal aberrations of paternal origin.

  16. The activation of DNA damage detection and repair responses in cleavage-stage rat embryos by a damaged paternal genome.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Lisanne; Robaire, Bernard; Hales, Barbara F

    2012-06-01

    Male germ cell DNA damage, after exposure to radiation, exogenous chemicals, or chemotherapeutic agents, is a major cause of male infertility. DNA-damaged spermatozoa can fertilize oocytes; this is of concern because there is limited information on the capacity of early embryos to repair a damaged male genome or on the fate of these embryos if repair is inadequate. We hypothesized that the early activation of DNA damage response in the early embryo is a critical determinant of its fate. The objective of this study was to assess the DNA damage response and mitochondrial function as a measure of the energy supply for DNA repair and general health in cleavage-stage embryos sired by males chronically exposed to an anticancer alkylating agent, cyclophosphamide. Male rats were treated with saline or cyclophosphamide (6 mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks and mated to naturally cycling females. Pronuclear two- and eight-cell embryos were collected for immunofluorescence analysis of mitochondrial function and biomarkers of the DNA damage response: γH2AX foci, 53BP1 reactivity, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymer formation. Mitochondrial activities did not differ between embryos sired by control- and cyclophosphamide-exposed males. At the two-cell stage, there was no treatment-related increase in DNA double-strand breaks; by the eight-cell stage, a significant increase was noted, as indicated by increased medium and large γH2AX foci. This was accompanied by a dampened DNA repair response, detected as a decrease in the nuclear intensity of poly(ADP-ribose) polymers. The micronuclei formed in cyclophosphamide-sired embryos contained large γH2AX foci and enhanced poly(ADP-ribose) polymer and 53BP1 reactivity compared with their nuclear counterparts. Thus, paternal cyclophosphamide exposure activated a DNA damage response in cleavage-stage embryos. Furthermore, this damage response may be useful in assessing embryo quality and developmental competence. PMID:22454429

  17. Hurricane-damaged Gulf of Mexico pipeline repaired with cold forging

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, G. ); DeGruy, P. ); Avery, L. )

    1993-05-03

    Damage to Texaco Pipeline Inc.'s Eugene Island Pipeline System (EIPS) in last year's Hurricane Andrew prompted a complex repair project unique for the Gulf of Mexico. Damage, suffered when the anchor of a runaway semisubmersible drilling rig crashed into the 20-in. EPIS during the height of the storm, caused the pipeline to fail under pressure within 48 hr. after start-up following the storm. The paper describes the importance of the EIPS; system safety; Andrew's damage; locating the leak; repair options; the chosen system; mechanical bonding; end connectors and ball flanges; and diving operations.

  18. Development of a Remote External Repair Tool for Damaged or Defective Polyethylene Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth H. Green; Willie E. Rochefort; Nick Wannenmacher; John A. Clark; Kevin Harris

    2006-06-30

    Current procedures for repairing polyethylene (PE) gas pipe require excavation, isolation, and removal of the damaged section of pipe followed by fusing a new section of pipe into place. These techniques are costly and very disruptive. An alternative repair method was developed at Timberline Tool with support from Oregon State University (OSU) and funding by the U. S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL). This project was undertaken to design, develop and test a tool and method for repairing damaged PE pipe remotely and externally in situ without squeezing off the flow of gas, eliminating the need for large-scale excavations. Through an iterative design and development approach, a final engineered prototype was developed that utilizes a unique thermo-chemical and mechanical process to apply a permanent external patch to repair small nicks, gouges and punctures under line pressure. The project identified several technical challenges during the design and development process. The repair tool must be capable of being installed under live conditions and operate in an 18-inch keyhole. This would eliminate the need for extensive excavations thus reducing the cost of the repair. Initially, the tool must be able to control the leak by encapsulating the pipe and apply slight pressure at the site of damage. Finally, the repair method must be permanent at typical operating pressures. The overall results of the project have established a permanent external repair method for use on damaged PE gas pipe in a safe and cost-effective manner. The engineered prototype was subjected to comprehensive testing and evaluation to validate the performance. Using the new repair tool, samples of 4-inch PE pipe with simulated damage were successfully repaired under line pressure to the satisfaction of DOE/NETL and the following natural gas companies: Northwest Natural; Sempra Energy, Southwest Gas Corporation, Questar, and Nicor. However, initial results of

  19. Recombinational repair and restart of damaged replication forks.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Peter; Lloyd, Robert G

    2002-11-01

    Genome duplication necessarily involves the replication of imperfect DNA templates and, if left to their own devices, replication complexes regularly run into problems. The details of how cells overcome these replicative 'hiccups' are beginning to emerge, revealing a complex interplay between DNA replication, recombination and repair that ensures faithful passage of the genetic material from one generation to the next. PMID:12415303

  20. Indentation Damage and Crack Repair in Human Enamel*

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, C.; Arola, D.; Ossa, A.

    2013-01-01

    Tooth enamel is the hardest and most highly mineralized tissue in the human body. While there have been a number of studies aimed at understanding the hardness and crack growth resistance behavior of this tissue, no study has evaluated if cracks in this tissue undergo repair. In this investigation the crack repair characteristics of young human enamel were evaluated as a function of patient gender and as a function of the distance from the Dentin Enamel Junction (DEJ). Cracks were introduced via microindentation along the prism direction and evaluated as a function of time after the indentation. Microscopic observations indicated that the repair of cracks began immediately after crack initiation and reaches saturation after approximately 48 hours. During this process he crack length decreased up to 10% of the initial length, and the largest degree of reduction occurred in the deep enamel, nearest the DEJ. In addition, it was found that the degree of repair was significantly greater in the enamel of female patients. PMID:23541701

  1. Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription-coupled DNA Repair Abrogate the Impact of DNA Damage on Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Aditi; Burns, John A.; Gandolfi, Alberto; Chowdhury, Moinuddin A.; Cartularo, Laura; Berens, Christian; Geacintov, Nicholas E.; Scicchitano, David A.

    2016-01-01

    DNA adducts derived from carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and benzo[c]phenanthrene (B[c]Ph) impede replication and transcription, resulting in aberrant cell division and gene expression. Global nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) are among the DNA repair pathways that evolved to maintain genome integrity by removing DNA damage. The interplay between global NER and TCR in repairing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-derived DNA adducts (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N6-dA, which is subject to NER and blocks transcription in vitro, and (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N6-dA, which is a poor substrate for NER but also blocks transcription in vitro, was tested. The results show that both adducts inhibit transcription in human cells that lack both NER and TCR. The (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N6-dA lesion exhibited no detectable effect on transcription in cells proficient in NER but lacking TCR, indicating that NER can remove the lesion in the absence of TCR, which is consistent with in vitro data. In primary human cells lacking NER, (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N6-dA exhibited a deleterious effect on transcription that was less severe than in cells lacking both pathways, suggesting that TCR can repair the adduct but not as effectively as global NER. In contrast, (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N6-dA dramatically reduces transcript production in cells proficient in global NER but lacking TCR, indicating that TCR is necessary for the removal of this adduct, which is consistent with in vitro data showing that it is a poor substrate for NER. Hence, both global NER and TCR enhance the recovery of gene expression following DNA damage, and TCR plays an important role in removing DNA damage that is refractory to NER. PMID:26559971

  2. Repair of ionizing radiation DNA base damage in ataxia-telangiectasia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Kinsella, T.J.; Dobson, P.P.; Mitchell, J.B.

    1986-04-01

    Micrococcus luteus endonuclease sensitive sites were measured by alkaline elution in normal human and ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) fibroblasts after ionizing radiation. Due to the sensitivity of this assay, repair of base damage after 3 to 6 kilorads has been measured after oxic or hypoxic radiation. With 5.5 kilorads of oxic radiation, more than 50% of the base damage was removed after 1.5 h of repair incubation in all cells, including exr+ and exr- AT cells, and approximately 75% was removed by 4 h. After 3 or 4.5 kilorads of hypoxic X-irradiation, repair was equivalent in normal and exr- AT cells. This study included three exr- AT strains which have been reported to be deficient in the removal of gamma-ray base damage at higher doses. Since these strains repaired ionizing radiation base damage normally at lower doses, which are more relevant to survival, it is concluded that the X-ray hypersensitivity of AT cells is probably not related to the repair of base damage.

  3. The Involvement of DNA-Damage and -Repair Defects in Neurological Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Avanti; Wilson, David M.

    2008-01-01

    A genetic link between defects in DNA repair and neurological abnormalities has been well established through studies of inherited disorders such as ataxia telangiectasia and xeroderma pigmentosum. In this review, we present a comprehensive summary of the major types of DNA damage, the molecular pathways that function in their repair, and the connection between defective DNA-repair responses and specific neurological disease. Particular attention is given to describing the nature of the repair defect and its relationship to the manifestation of the associated neurological dysfunction. Finally, the review touches upon the role of oxidative stress, a leading precursor to DNA damage, in the development of certain neurodegenerative pathologies, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. PMID:18319069

  4. The Role of the COP9 Signalosome and Neddylation in DNA Damage Signaling and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Dudley; Dellaire, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of genomic integrity is an important process in organisms as failure to sense and repair damaged DNA can result in a variety of diseases. Eukaryotic cells have developed complex DNA repair response (DDR) mechanisms to accurately sense and repair damaged DNA. Post-translational modifications by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like proteins, such as SUMO and NEDD8, have roles in coordinating the progression of DDR. Proteins in the neddylation pathway have also been linked to regulating DDR. Of interest is the COP9 signalosome (CSN), a multi-subunit metalloprotease present in eukaryotes that removes NEDD8 from cullins and regulates the activity of cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases (CRLs). This in turn regulates the stability and turnover of a host of CRL-targeted proteins, some of which have established roles in DDR. This review will summarize the current knowledge on the role of the CSN and neddylation in DNA repair. PMID:26437438

  5. Impact of sperm DNA damage and oocyte-repairing capacity on trout development.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Díez, C; González-Rojo, S; Lombó, M; Herráez, M P

    2016-07-01

    Zygotic repair of paternal DNA is essential during embryo development. In spite of the interest devoted to sperm DNA damage, its combined effect with defect-repairing oocytes has not been analyzed. Modification of the breeding season is a common practice in aquaculture. This practice reduces developmental success and could affect the both factors: sperm DNA integrity and oocyte repair capacity. To evaluate the maternal role, we analyzed the progeny outcome after fertilizing in-season trout oocytes with untreated and with UV-irradiated sperm. We also analyzed the offspring obtained out of season with untreated sperm. The analysis of the number of lesions in 4 sperm nuclear genes revealed an increase of 1.22-11.18 lesions/10 kb in out-of-season sperm, similar to that obtained after sperm UV irradiation (400 µW/cm(2)5 min). Gene expression showed in out-of-season oocytes the overexpression of repair genes (ogg1, ung, lig3, rad1) and downregulation of tp53, indicating an enhanced repairing activity and reduced capacity to arrest development upon damage. The analysis of the progeny in out-of-season embryos revealed a similar profile tolerant to DNA damage, leading to a much lower apoptotic activity at organogenesis, lower hatching rates and increased rate of malformations. The effects were milder in descendants from in-season-irradiated sperm, showing an enhanced repairing activity at epibolia. Results point out the importance of the repairing machinery provided by the oocyte and show how susceptible it is to environmental changes. Transcripts related to DNA damage signalization and repair could be used as markers of oocyte quality. PMID:27071918

  6. Detection of DNA damages and repair in human culture cells with simulated space radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, S.; Nakano, T.; Endo, S.; Onizuka, T.; Kagawa, Y.; Fujitaka, K.; Ohnishi, K.; Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, T.

    1999-09-01

    DNA damages and its repair of cultured WI38 human fibroblast cells and T98G human glioblastoma cells were studied by exposing to carbon ion beams of HIMAC accelerator. The exposed cells were incubated at 37 °C for appropriate intervals and the damages were analyzed by alkaline comet assay and quantitative RT-PCR with p53 mRNA Highly inhomogeneous DNA damages were observed among the electrophoretic cell images of the comet assay. The degree of the damages was analyzed semi-quantitatively by using the Comet Index. The damaged fraction of WI38 cells was 85% immediately after 4 Gy (100 keV/μm) irradiation and decreased to 50% after 120 min. incubation indicating a repair of cell DNA. Time dependent p53 gene expression was also analyzed by the quantitative RT-PCR method.

  7. Vertebrate POLQ and POLβ Cooperate in Base Excision Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Michio; Kohzaki, Masaoki; Nakamura, Jun; Asagoshi, Kenjiro; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Hou, Esther; Prasad, Rajendra; Wilson, Samuel H.; Tano, Keizo; Yasui, Akira; Lan, Li; Seki, Mineaki; Wood, Richard D.; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Buerstedde, Jean-Marie; Hochegger, Helfrid; Okada, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Takeda, Shunichi

    2007-01-01

    Summary Base excision repair (BER) plays an essential role in protecting cells from mutagenic base damage caused by oxidative stress, hydrolysis, and environmental factors. POLQ is a DNA polymerase, which appears to be involved in translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) past base damage. We disrupted POLQ, and its homologs HEL308 and POLN in chicken DT40 cells, and also created polq/hel308 and polq/poln double mutants. We found that POLQ-deficient mutants exhibit hypersensitivity to oxidative base damage induced by H2O2, but not to UV or cisplatin. Surprisingly, this phenotype was synergistically increased by concomitant deletion of the major BER polymerase, POLβ. Moreover, extracts from a polq null mutant cell line show reduced BER activity, and POLQ, like POLβ, accumulated rapidly at sites of base damage. Accordingly, POLQ and POLβ share an overlapping function in the repair of oxidative base damage. Taken together, these results suggest a role for vertebrate POLQ in BER. PMID:17018297

  8. Nondestructive evaluation and characterization of damage and repair to continuous-fiber ceramic composite panels.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. G.; Petrak, D. R.; Pillai, T. A. K.; Deemer, C.; Ellingson, W. A.

    1998-04-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic matrix composites are currently being developed for a variety of high-temperature applications. Because of the high costs of making these components, minor damage incurred during manufacturing or operation must be rewired in order to extend the life of the components. In this study, five ceramic-grade Nicalon{trademark} fiber/SiNC-matrix composite panels were intentionally damaged with a pendulum-type impactor during an impact test. The damaged panels were then repaired at Dow Corning Corporation. Three nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods were used to study the characteristics of the panels after the damage and again after the panels were repaired. The NDE methods were X-ray radiography, infrared thermal imaging, and air-coupled ultrasound. The results showed that the impact test induced various types of damage in the panels. The NDE data that were obtained by the three NDE methods were correlated with each other.

  9. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry The Discovery of Essential Mechanisms that Repair DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Tomas; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2015 to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for their discoveries in fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair. This pioneering research described three different essential pathways that correct DNA damage, safeguard the integrity of the genetic code to ensure its accurate replication through generations, and allow proper cell division. Working independently of each other, Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar delineated the mechanisms of base excision repair, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair, respectively. These breakthroughs challenged and dismissed the early view that the DNA molecule was very stable, paving the way for the discovery of human hereditary diseases associated with distinct DNA repair deficiencies and a susceptibility to cancer. It also brought a deeper understanding of cancer as well as neurodegenerative or neurological diseases, and let to novel strategies to treat cancer. PMID:27183258

  10. TLR9 is important for protection against intestinal damage and for intestinal repair.

    PubMed

    Rose, William Alfred; Sakamoto, Kaori; Leifer, Cynthia Anne

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are innate receptors critical for host defense, and play a role in normal biological processes. For example, host DNA, a TLR9 ligand, stimulates epithelial repair following skin wounding. TLR signaling also plays a crucial role in regulating intestinal homeostasis. We therefore asked whether TLR9 is important for intestinal wound repair using a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced intestinal damage and repair model. We showed that TLR9-deficient mice are more susceptible to DSS, and exhibited delayed wound repair at both the clinical and histologic levels. TLR9-deficient mice showed reduced gene expression of hairy enhancer of split 1, an intestinal progenitor cell differentiation factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor, a growth factor important for epithelial cell restitution. Therefore, we conclude that TLR stimulation may play a normal role in regulating intestinal homeostasis and could potentially be a novel therapeutic target to enhance intestinal wound repair in inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:22893852

  11. Profiling DNA damage and repair capacity in sea urchin larvae and coelomocytes exposed to genotoxicants.

    PubMed

    Reinardy, Helena C; Bodnar, Andrea G

    2015-11-01

    The ability to protect the genome from harmful DNA damage is critical for maintaining genome stability and protecting against disease, including cancer. Many echinoderms, including sea urchins, are noted for the lack of neoplastic disease, but there are few studies investigating susceptibility to DNA damage and capacity for DNA repair in these animals. In this study, DNA damage was induced in adult sea urchin coelomocytes and larvae by exposure to a variety of genotoxicants [UV-C (0-3000 J/m(2)), hydrogen peroxide (0-10mM), bleomycin (0-300 µM) and methylmethanesulfonate (MMS, 0-30 mM)] and the capacity for repair was measured over a 24-h period of recovery. Larvae were more sensitive than coelomocytes, with higher levels of initial DNA damage (fast micromethod) for all genotoxicants except MMS and increased levels of mortality 24h following treatment for all genotoxicants. The larvae that survived were able to efficiently repair damage within 24-h recovery. The ability to repair DNA damage differed depending on treatments, but both larvae and coelomocytes were able to most efficiently repair H2O2-induced damage. Time profiles of expression of a panel of DNA repair genes (ddb1, ercc1, xpc, xrcc1, pcna, ogg1, parp1, parp2, ape, brca1, rad51, xrcc2, xrcc3, xrcc4, xrcc5, xrcc6 and gadd45), throughout the period of recovery, showed greater gene induction in coelomocytes compared with larvae, with particularly high expression of xrcc1, ercc1, parp2 and pcna. The heterogeneous response of larvae to DNA damage may reflect a strategy whereby a subset of the population is equipped to withstand acute genotoxic stress, while the ability of coelomocytes to resist and repair DNA damage confirm their significant role in protection against disease. Consideration of DNA repair capacity is critical for understanding effects of genotoxicants on organisms, in addition to shedding light on life strategies and disease susceptibility. PMID:26175033

  12. The DNA damage/repair cascade in glioblastoma cell lines after chemotherapeutic agent treatment.

    PubMed

    Annovazzi, Laura; Caldera, Valentina; Mellai, Marta; Riganti, Chiara; Battaglia, Luigi; Chirio, Daniela; Melcarne, Antonio; Schiffer, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic resistance in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has been linked to a subpopulation of cells with stem cell-like properties, the glioma stem cells (GSCs), responsible for cancer progression and recurrence. This study investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity of three chemotherapeutics, temozolomide (TMZ), doxorubicin (Dox) and paclitaxel (PTX) on glioma cell lines, by analyzing the molecular mechanisms leading to DNA repair and cell resistance, or to cell death. The drugs were tested on 16 GBM cell lines, grown as neurospheres (NS) or adherent cells (AC), by studying DNA damage occurrence by Comet assay, the expression by immunofluorescence and western blotting of checkpoint/repair molecules and apoptosis. The three drugs were able to provoke a genotoxic injury and to inhibit dose- and time-dependently cell proliferation, more evidently in AC than in NS. The first cell response to DNA damage was the activation of the damage sensors (p-ATM, p-53BP1, γ-H2AX), followed by repair effectors; the expression of checkpoint/repair molecules appeared higher in NS than in AC. The non-homologous repair pathway (NHEJ) seemed more involved than the homologous one (HR). Apoptosis occurred after long treatment times, but only a small percentage of cells in NS underwent death, even at high drug concentration, whereas most cells survived in a quiescent state and resumed proliferation after drug removal. In tumor specimens, checkpoint/repair proteins were constitutively expressed in GBMs, but not in low-grade gliomas. PMID:25892134

  13. Drosophila ATM and ATR have distinct activities in the regulation of meiotic DNA damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Eric F; Pedersen, Michael; Tiong, Stanley; White-Brown, Sanese K; Paul, Anshu; Campbell, Shelagh D; McKim, Kim S

    2011-10-31

    Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and ataxia telangiectasia-related (ATR) kinases are conserved regulators of cellular responses to double strand breaks (DSBs). During meiosis, however, the functions of these kinases in DSB repair and the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage checkpoint are unclear. In this paper, we show that ATM and ATR have unique roles in the repair of meiotic DSBs in Drosophila melanogaster. ATR mutant analysis indicated that it is required for checkpoint activity, whereas ATM may not be. Both kinases phosphorylate H2AV (γ-H2AV), and, using this as a reporter for ATM/ATR activity, we found that the DSB repair response is surprisingly dynamic at the site of DNA damage. γ-H2AV is continuously exchanged, requiring new phosphorylation at the break site until repair is completed. However, most surprising is that the number of γ-H2AV foci is dramatically increased in the absence of ATM, but not ATR, suggesting that the number of DSBs is increased. Thus, we conclude that ATM is primarily required for the meiotic DSB repair response, which includes functions in DNA damage repair and negative feedback control over the level of programmed DSBs during meiosis. PMID:22024169

  14. Both genetic and dietary factors underlie individual differences in DNA damage levels and DNA repair capacity.

    PubMed

    Slyskova, Jana; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Karlsen, Anette; Carlsen, Monica H; Novosadova, Vendula; Blomhoff, Rune; Vodicka, Pavel; Collins, Andrew R

    2014-04-01

    The interplay between dietary habits and individual genetic make-up is assumed to influence risk of cancer, via modulation of DNA integrity. Our aim was to characterize internal and external factors that underlie inter-individual variability in DNA damage and repair and to identify dietary habits beneficial for maintaining DNA integrity. Habitual diet was estimated in 340 healthy individuals using a food frequency questionnaire and biomarkers of antioxidant status were quantified in fasting blood samples. Markers of DNA integrity were represented by DNA strand breaks, oxidized purines, oxidized pyrimidines and a sum of all three as total DNA damage. DNA repair was characterized by genetic variants and functional activities of base and nucleotide excision repair pathways. Sex, fruit-based food consumption and XPG genotype were factors significantly associated with the level of DNA damage. DNA damage was higher in women (p=0.035). Fruit consumption was negatively associated with the number of all measured DNA lesions, and this effect was mediated mostly by β-cryptoxanthin and β-tocopherol (p<0.05). XPG 1104His homozygotes appeared more vulnerable to DNA damage accumulation (p=0.001). Sex and individual antioxidants were also associated with DNA repair capacity; both the base and nucleotide excision repairs were lower in women and the latter increased with higher plasma levels of ascorbic acid and α-carotene (p<0.05). We have determined genetic and dietary factors that modulate DNA integrity. We propose that the positive health effect of fruit intake is partially mediated via DNA damage suppression and a simultaneous increase in DNA repair capacity. PMID:24674629

  15. MicroRNAs in the DNA Damage/Repair Network and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tessitore, Alessandra; Cicciarelli, Germana; Del Vecchio, Filippo; Gaggiano, Agata; Verzella, Daniela; Fischietti, Mariafausta; Vecchiotti, Davide; Capece, Daria; Zazzeroni, Francesca; Alesse, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a multistep process characterized by various and different genetic lesions which cause the transformation of normal cells into tumor cells. To preserve the genomic integrity, eukaryotic cells need a complex DNA damage/repair response network of signaling pathways, involving many proteins, able to induce cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or DNA repair. Chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy are the most commonly used therapeutic approaches to manage cancer and act mainly through the induction of DNA damage. Impairment in the DNA repair proteins, which physiologically protect cells from persistent DNA injury, can affect the efficacy of cancer therapies. Recently, increasing evidence has suggested that microRNAs take actively part in the regulation of the DNA damage/repair network. MicroRNAs are endogenous short noncoding molecules able to regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Due to their activity, microRNAs play a role in many fundamental physiological and pathological processes. In this review we report and discuss the role of microRNAs in the DNA damage/repair and cancer. PMID:24616890

  16. MERIT40 facilitates BRCA1 localization and DNA damage repair

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lin; Huang, Jun; Chen, Junjie

    2009-01-01

    The product of breast cancer susceptibility gene 1, BRCA1, plays pivotal roles in the maintenance of genomic integrity. Mounting evidence indicates that BRCA1 associates with many proteins or protein complexes to regulate diverse processes important for the cellular response to DNA damage. One of these complexes, which mediates the accumulation of BRCA1 at sites of DNA breaks, involves the ubiquitin-binding motif (UIM)-containing protein RAP80, a coiled-coil domain protein CCDC98/Abraxas, and a deubiquitinating enzyme BRCC36. Here we describe the characterization of a novel component of this complex, MERIT40 (Mediator of Rap80 Interactions and Targeting 40 kd), which together with an adaptor protein BRE/BRCC45, enforces the BRCA1-dependent DNA damage response. MERIT40 is assembled into this RAP80/CCDC98-containing complex via its direct interaction with BRE/BRCC45. Importantly, MERIT40 regulates BRCA1 retention at DNA breaks and checkpoint function primarily via a role in maintaining the stability of BRE and this five-subunit protein complex at sites of DNA damage. Together, our study reveals that a stable complex containing MERIT40 acts early in DNA damage response and regulates damage-dependent BRCA1 localization. PMID:19261748

  17. Central Role of Ubiquitination in Genome Maintenance: DNA Replication and Damage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Soma; Saha, Tapas

    2012-01-01

    Faithful transmission of genetic information through generations ensures genomic stability and integrity. However, genetic alterations occur every now and then during the course of genome duplication. In order to repair these genetic defects and lesions, nature has devised several repair pathways which function promptly to prevent the cell from accumulating permanent mutations. These repair mechanisms seem to be significantly impacted by posttranslational modifications of proteins like phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Protein ubiquitination is emerging as a critical regulatory mechanism of DNA damage response. Non-proteolytic, proteasome-independent functions of ubiquitin involving monoubiquitination and polyubiquitination of DNA repair proteins contribute significantly to the signaling of DNA repair pathways. In this paper, we will particularly highlight the work on ubiquitin-mediated signaling in the repair processes involving the Fanconi anemia pathway, translesional synthesis, nucleotide excision repair, and repair of double-strand breaks. We will also discuss the role of ubiquitin ligases in regulating checkpoint mechanisms, the role of deubiquitinating enzymes, and the growing possibilities of therapeutic intervention in this ubiquitin-conjugation system.

  18. Glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, repair the damaged hair.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Kitagawa, Masaru; Yamamoto, Shuhei; Sogabe, Atsushi; Imura, Tomohiro; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Kitamoto, Dai

    2010-01-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), are produced from feedstock by the genus Pseudozyma, and are the most promising biosurfactants known due to its versatile interfacial and biochemical actions. In order to broaden the application in cosmetics, the hair care properties of MELs were investigated using damaged hair. On electron microscopic observation, the damaged hair was dramatically recovered with applying MEL-A and MEL-B. The tensile strength of the damaged hair increased by treatment with MEL-A (122.0 +/- 13.5 gf/p), MEL-B (119.4 +/- 7.6 gf/p) and ceramide (100.7 +/- 15.9 gf/p) compared with only lauryl glucoside (96.7 +/- 12.7 gf/p), indicating the advantage of MELs on hair care treatment. In addition, the average friction coefficient of the damaged hair was maintained after treatment with MEL-A (0.108 +/- 0.002), MEL-B (0.107 +/- 0.003) and the ceramide (0.111 +/- 0.003), although lauryl glucoside treatment increased the average friction coefficient (0.126 +/- 0.003). The increase of bending rigidity by treatment with lauryl glucoside (0.204 +/- 0.002) was prevented by treatment with MEL-A (0.129 +/- 0.002), MEL-B (0.176 +/- 0.003) and the ceramide (0.164 +/- 0.002). Consequently, MELs are proposed to be the new hair care ingredient, which are the highly useful agent for not only for the recovery of damaged hair but also for providing the smooth and flexible hair. PMID:20431244

  19. Repair of uv damaged DNA: Genes and proteins of yeast and human. Progress report, November 1, 1991--April 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1992-04-01

    Our objectives are to determine the molecular mechanism of the incision step of excision repair of ultraviolet (UV) light damaged DNA in eukaryotic organisms, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, and to study the human homologs of yeast excision repair and postreplication repair proteins progress is described.

  20. Structural and Mechanical Repair of Diffuse Damage in Cortical Bone in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Seref-Ferlengez, Zeynep; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Kennedy, Oran D.; Philemon, Claudy J.; Schaffler, Mitchell B.

    2014-01-01

    Physiological wear and tear causes bone microdamage at several hierarchical levels, and these have different biological consequences. Bone remodeling is widely held to be the mechanism by which bone microdamage is repaired. However, recent studies showed that unlike typical linear microcracks, small crack damage, the clusters of submicron-sized matrix cracks also known as diffuse damage (Dif.Dx), does not activate remodeling. Thus, the fate of diffuse damage in vivo is not known. To examine this, we induced selectively Dif.Dx in rat ulnae in vivo by using end-load ulnar bending creep model. Changes in damage content were assessed by histomorphometry and mechanical testing immediately after loading (i.e., acute loaded) or at 14 days after damage induction (i.e., survival ulnae). Dif.Dx area was markedly reduced over the 14-day survival period after loading (p<0.02). We did not observe any intracortical resorption and there was no increase in cortical bone area in survival ulnae. The reduction in whole bone stiffness in acute loaded ulnae was restored to baseline levels in survival ulnae (p>0.6). Microindentation studies showed that Dif.Dx caused a highly localized reduction in elastic modulus in diffuse damage regions of the ulnar cortex. Moduli in these previously damaged bone areas were restored to control values by 14 days after loading. Our current findings indicate that small crack damage in bone can be repaired without bone remodeling, and suggest that alternative repair mechanisms exist in bone to deal with submicron-sized matrix cracks. Those mechanisms are currently unknown and further investigations are needed to elucidate the mechanisms by which this direct repair occurs. PMID:25042459

  1. Structural and mechanical repair of diffuse damage in cortical bone in vivo.

    PubMed

    Seref-Ferlengez, Zeynep; Basta-Pljakic, Jelena; Kennedy, Oran D; Philemon, Claudy J; Schaffler, Mitchell B

    2014-12-01

    Physiological wear and tear causes bone microdamage at several hierarchical levels, and these have different biological consequences. Bone remodeling is widely held to be the mechanism by which bone microdamage is repaired. However, recent studies showed that unlike typical linear microcracks, small crack damage, the clusters of submicron-sized matrix cracks also known as diffuse damage (Dif.Dx), does not activate remodeling. Thus, the fate of diffuse damage in vivo is not known. To examine this, we induced selectively Dif.Dx in rat ulnae in vivo by using end-load ulnar bending creep model. Changes in damage content were assessed by histomorphometry and mechanical testing immediately after loading (ie, acute loaded) or at 14 days after damage induction (ie, survival ulnae). Dif.Dx area was markedly reduced over the 14-day survival period after loading (p < 0.02). We did not observe any intracortical resorption, and there was no increase in cortical bone area in survival ulnae. The reduction in whole bone stiffness in acute loaded ulnae was restored to baseline levels in survival ulnae (p > 0.6). Microindentation studies showed that Dif.Dx caused a highly localized reduction in elastic modulus in diffuse damage regions of the ulnar cortex. Moduli in these previously damaged bone areas were restored to control values by 14 days after loading. Our current findings indicate that small crack damage in bone can be repaired without bone remodeling, and they suggest that alternative repair mechanisms exist in bone to deal with submicron-sized matrix cracks. Those mechanisms are currently unknown and further investigations are needed to elucidate the mechanisms by which this direct repair occurs. PMID:25042459

  2. Recombinational Repair of DNA Damage in Escherichia coli and Bacteriophage λ

    PubMed Central

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    1999-01-01

    Although homologous recombination and DNA repair phenomena in bacteria were initially extensively studied without regard to any relationship between the two, it is now appreciated that DNA repair and homologous recombination are related through DNA replication. In Escherichia coli, two-strand DNA damage, generated mostly during replication on a template DNA containing one-strand damage, is repaired by recombination with a homologous intact duplex, usually the sister chromosome. The two major types of two-strand DNA lesions are channeled into two distinct pathways of recombinational repair: daughter-strand gaps are closed by the RecF pathway, while disintegrated replication forks are reestablished by the RecBCD pathway. The phage λ recombination system is simpler in that its major reaction is to link two double-stranded DNA ends by using overlapping homologous sequences. The remarkable progress in understanding the mechanisms of recombinational repair in E. coli over the last decade is due to the in vitro characterization of the activities of individual recombination proteins. Putting our knowledge about recombinational repair in the broader context of DNA replication will guide future experimentation. PMID:10585965

  3. Sublethal and potentially lethal damage repair on thermal neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, H.; Ichihashi, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Elkind, M.M. )

    1989-07-01

    Tonicity shock or caffeine postirradiation treatment makes evident fast-type potentially lethal damage (PLD). Caffeine expresses fast-type PLD more efficiently than tonicity shock in X-irradiated B-16 mouse melanoma cells, compared with V79 Chinese hamster cells. The survival curves of thermal neutrons for either V79 or B-16 cells exhibit no shoulder. Neither V79 nor B-16 cells show the sublethal damage (SLD) repair of thermal neutrons. Caffeine-sensitive fast-type PLD repairs exist in X-irradiated B-16 cells, as well as V79 cells. The fast-type PLD repair of B-16 cells exposed to thermal neutrons alone is rather less than that of X-irradiated cells. Furthermore, an extremely low level of fast-type PLD repair of B-16 cells with 10B1-paraboronophenylalanine (BPA) preincubation (20 hours) followed by thermal neutron irradiation indicated that 10B(n,alpha)7Li reaction effectively eradicates actively growing melanoma cells. The plateau-phase B-16 cells are well able to repair the slow-type PLD of X-rays. However, cells can not repair the slow-type PLD induced by thermal neutron irradiation with or without 10B1-BPA preincubation. These results suggest that thermal neutron capture therapy can effectively kill radioresistant melanoma cells in both proliferating and quiescent phases.

  4. DNA Damage and Repair in Schizophrenia and Autism: Implications for Cancer Comorbidity and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Markkanen, Enni; Meyer, Urs; Dianov, Grigory L

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are multi-factorial and multi-symptomatic psychiatric disorders, each affecting 0.5%-1% of the population worldwide. Both are characterized by impairments in cognitive functions, emotions and behaviour, and they undermine basic human processes of perception and judgment. Despite decades of extensive research, the aetiologies of schizophrenia and ASD are still poorly understood and remain a significant challenge to clinicians and scientists alike. Adding to this unsatisfactory situation, patients with schizophrenia or ASD often develop a variety of peripheral and systemic disturbances, one prominent example of which is cancer, which shows a direct (but sometimes inverse) comorbidity in people affected with schizophrenia and ASD. Cancer is a disease characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of cells, the molecular origin of which derives from mutations of a cell's DNA sequence. To counteract such mutations and repair damaged DNA, cells are equipped with intricate DNA repair pathways. Oxidative stress, oxidative DNA damage, and deficient repair of oxidative DNA lesions repair have been proposed to contribute to the development of schizophrenia and ASD. In this article, we summarize the current evidence of cancer comorbidity in these brain disorders and discuss the putative roles of oxidative stress, DNA damage and DNA repair in the aetiopathology of schizophrenia and ASD. PMID:27258260

  5. DNA Damage and Repair in Schizophrenia and Autism: Implications for Cancer Comorbidity and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Markkanen, Enni; Meyer, Urs; Dianov, Grigory L.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are multi-factorial and multi-symptomatic psychiatric disorders, each affecting 0.5%–1% of the population worldwide. Both are characterized by impairments in cognitive functions, emotions and behaviour, and they undermine basic human processes of perception and judgment. Despite decades of extensive research, the aetiologies of schizophrenia and ASD are still poorly understood and remain a significant challenge to clinicians and scientists alike. Adding to this unsatisfactory situation, patients with schizophrenia or ASD often develop a variety of peripheral and systemic disturbances, one prominent example of which is cancer, which shows a direct (but sometimes inverse) comorbidity in people affected with schizophrenia and ASD. Cancer is a disease characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of cells, the molecular origin of which derives from mutations of a cell’s DNA sequence. To counteract such mutations and repair damaged DNA, cells are equipped with intricate DNA repair pathways. Oxidative stress, oxidative DNA damage, and deficient repair of oxidative DNA lesions repair have been proposed to contribute to the development of schizophrenia and ASD. In this article, we summarize the current evidence of cancer comorbidity in these brain disorders and discuss the putative roles of oxidative stress, DNA damage and DNA repair in the aetiopathology of schizophrenia and ASD. PMID:27258260

  6. Low-Dose Formaldehyde Delays DNA Damage Recognition and DNA Excision Repair in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luch, Andreas; Frey, Flurina C. Clement; Meier, Regula; Fei, Jia; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recognition and excision processes that remove some of the most frequently inflicted DNA lesions. Methodology/Principal Findings The overall mobility of the DNA damage sensors UV-DDB (ultraviolet-damaged DNA-binding) and XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C) was analyzed by assessing real-time protein dynamics in the nucleus of cultured human cells exposed to non-cytotoxic (<100 μM) formaldehyde concentrations. The DNA lesion-specific recruitment of these damage sensors was tested by monitoring their accumulation at local irradiation spots. DNA repair activity was determined in host-cell reactivation assays and, more directly, by measuring the excision of DNA lesions from chromosomes. Taken together, these assays demonstrated that formaldehyde obstructs the rapid nuclear trafficking of DNA damage sensors and, consequently, slows down their relocation to DNA damage sites thus delaying the excision repair of target lesions. A concentration-dependent effect relationship established a threshold concentration of as low as 25 micromolar for the inhibition of DNA excision repair. Conclusions/Significance A main implication of the retarded repair activity is that low-dose formaldehyde may exert an adjuvant role in carcinogenesis by impeding the excision of multiple mutagenic base lesions. In view of this generally disruptive effect on DNA repair, we propose that formaldehyde exposures in the general population should be further decreased to help reducing cancer risks. PMID:24722772

  7. Self-repairing control for damaged robotic manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Eisler, G.R.; Robinett, R.D.; Dohrmann, C.R.; Driessen, B.J.

    1997-03-01

    Algorithms have been developed allowing operation of robotic systems under damaged conditions. Specific areas addressed were optimal sensor location, adaptive nonlinear control, fault-tolerant robot design, and dynamic path-planning. A seven-degree-of-freedom, hydraulic manipulator, with fault-tolerant joint design was also constructed and tested. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

  8. Induction and repair of HZE induced cytogenetic damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, A. L.; Bao, S.; Rithidech, K.; Chrisler, W. B.; Couch, L. A.; Braby, L. A.

    2001-01-01

    Wistar rats were exposed to high-mass, high energy (HZE) 56Fe particles (1000 GeV/AMU) using the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The animals were sacrificed at 1-5 hours or after a 30-day recovery period. The frequency of micronuclei in the tracheal and the deep lung epithelial cells were evaluated. The relative effectiveness of 56Fe, for the induction of initial chromosome damage in the form of micronuclei, was compared to damage produced in the same biological system exposed to other types of high and low-LET radiation. It was demonstrated that for animals sacrificed at short times after exposure, the tracheal and lung epithelial cells, the 56Fe particles were 3.3 and 1.3 times as effective as 60Co in production of micronuclei, respectively. The effectiveness was also compared to that for exposure to inhaled radon. With this comparison, the 56Fe exposure of the tracheal epithelial cells and the lung epithelial cells were only 0.18 and 0.20 times as effective as radon in the production of the initial cytogenetic damage. It was suggested that the low relative effectiveness was related to potential for 'wasted energy' from the core of the 56Fe particles. When the animals were sacrificed after 30 days, the slopes of the dose-response relationships, which reflect the remaining level of damage, decreased by a factor of 10 for both the tracheal and lung epithelial cells. In both cases, the slope of the dose-response lines were no longer significantly different from zero, and the r2 values were very high. Lung epithelial cells, isolated from the animals sacrificed hours after exposure, were maintained in culture, and the micronuclei frequency evaluated after 4 and 6 subcultures. These cells were harvested at 24 and 36 days after the exposure. There was no dose-response detected in these cultures and no signs of genomic instability at either sample time.

  9. UV-repair and mutagenesis in Azotobacter vinelandii. I. Repair of UV-induced damages.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, S; Chandra, A K

    1985-01-01

    UV-irradiated Azotobacter vinelandii OP cells were found to be sensitive to dark repair-inhibitors, like caffeine and acriflavine. Sensitivity to both the inhibitors started to decrease at a fast rate immediately following UV-irradiation, when incubated in Burk's broth in dark. Total insensitivity to caffeine was attained at a time that was approximately double the time of the corresponding ribonucleic acid synthesis-inhibition and less than one generation time of the unirradiated cells. Nearly at the same time the rate of loss of sensitivity to acriflavine became much slower and total insensitivity to acriflavine occurred after relatively prolonged incubation. The protein synthesis inhibitor, streptomycin, reduced UV-survival, but after a time lag. The organism did not show liquid holding recovery and its UV-survival was not affected by components of complex medium. It is proposed that A. vinelandii OP possesses at least two dark-repair pathways: pre replication (acts immediately after UV exposure and is faster) and post replication (delayed and slower) repair. The first one is inhibited by caffeine and acriflavine and the second by acriflavine and streptomycin. The latter therefore requires de novo protein synthesis after UV-irradiation and may be inducible. PMID:2412365

  10. Influence of XRCC1 Genetic Polymorphisms on Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sterpone, Silvia; Cozzi, Renata

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that ionizing radiation (IR) can damage DNA through a direct action, producing single- and double-strand breaks on DNA double helix, as well as an indirect effect by generating oxygen reactive species in the cells. Mammals have evolved several and distinct DNA repair pathways in order to maintain genomic stability and avoid tumour cell transformation. This review reports important data showing a huge interindividual variability on sensitivity to IR and in susceptibility to developing cancer; this variability is principally represented by genetic polymorphisms, that is, DNA repair gene polymorphisms. In particular we have focussed on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of XRCC1, a gene that encodes for a scaffold protein involved basically in Base Excision Repair (BER). In this paper we have reported and presented recent studies that show an influence of XRCC1 variants on DNA repair capacity and susceptibility to breast cancer. PMID:20798883

  11. Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E7 Oncoprotein Causes a Delay in Repair of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Wook; Nickel, Kwangok P.; Torres, Alexandra D.; Lee, Denis; Lambert, Paul F.; Kimple, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Patients with Human papillomavirus related (HPV+) head and neck cancers (HNCs) demonstrate improved clinical outcomes compared to traditional HPV negative (HPV−) HNC patients. We have recently shown that HPV+ HNC cells are more sensitive to radiation than HPV− HNC cells. However, roles of HPV oncogenes in regulating the response of DNA damage repair remain unknown. Material and Methods Using immortalized normal oral epithelial cell lines, HPV+ HNC derived cell lines, and HPV16 E7-transgenic mice we assessed the repair of DNA damage using γ-H2AX foci, single and split dose clonogenic survival assays, and immunoblot. The ability of E7 to modulate expression of proteins associated with DNA repair pathways was assessed by immunoblot. Results HPV16 E7 increased retention of γ-H2AX nuclear foci and significantly decreased sublethal DNA damage repair. While phospho-ATM, phospho-ATR, Ku70, and Ku80 expressions were not altered by E7, Rad51 was induced by E7. Correspondingly, HPV+ HNC cell lines showed retention of Rad51 after γ-radiation. Conclusions Our findings provide further understanding as to how HPV16 E7 manipulates cellular DNA damage responses that may underlie its oncogenic potential and influence the altered sensitivity to radiation seen in HPV+ HNC as compared to HPV− HNC. PMID:25216575

  12. DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A NATURAL BIO-DEFENSE MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A natural bio-defense mechanism
    Anuradha Mudipalli.

    Maintenance of genetic information, including the correct sequence of nucleotides in DNA, is essential for replication, gene expression, and protein synthesis. DNA lesions onto...

  13. 48 CFR 452.237-70 - Loss, Damage, Destruction or Repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Contractor or the Contractor's agents or employees. (b) For equipment furnished under this contract with... substantially as follows: Loss, Damage, Destruction or Repair (FEB 1988) (a) For equipment furnished under this... this contract shall be made by the Contractor and reimbursement, if any, shall be determined...

  14. 20 CFR 416.1151 - How we treat the repair or replacement of lost, damaged, or stolen resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How we treat the repair or replacement of lost, damaged, or stolen resources. 416.1151 Section 416.1151 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... treat the repair or replacement of lost, damaged, or stolen resources. (a) General rule. If a...

  15. Using redundancy to repair video damaged by network data loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanlin; Claypool, Mark

    1999-12-01

    With rapid progress in both computers and networks, real- time multimedia applications are now possible on the Internet. Sine the Internet was designed to support traditional applications, multimedia applications on the Internet often suffer from unacceptable delay, jitter and data loss. Among these, data loss often has the largest impact on quality. In this paper, we propose a new forward error correction technique for video that compensates for lost packets, while maintaining minimal delay. Our approach transmits a small, low-quality redundant frame after each full-quality primary frame. In the event the primary frame is lost, we display the low-quality frame, rather than display the previous frame or retransmit the primary frame. To evaluate our approach, we simulated the effect of network data loss on MPEG video clips and repaired the data loss by using redundancy frames. We conducted user studies that experimentally measured users' opinions on the quality of the video streams in the presence of data loss, both with and without our redundancy approach. In addition, we analyze the system overhead incurred by the redundancy. We find that video redundancy can greatly improve the perceptual quality of video in the presence of network data loss. The system overhead that redundancy introduces is dependent on the quality of the redundant frames, but a typical redundancy overhead will be approximately 10% that of the original frames.

  16. DNA damage and repair capacity in workers exposed to low concentrations of benzene.

    PubMed

    Lovreglio, Piero; Doria, Denise; Fracasso, Maria Enrica; Barbieri, Anna; Sabatini, Laura; Drago, Ignazio; Violante, Francesco S; Soleo, Leonardo

    2016-03-01

    DNA damage and cellular repair capacity were studied in 18 male fuel tanker drivers and 13 male filling-station attendants exposed to low and very low concentrations of benzene, respectively, and compared to 20 males with no occupational exposure (controls). Exposure to airborne benzene was measured using passive personal samplers, and internal doses were assayed through the biomarkers t,t-muconic acid, S-phenylmercapturic acid and urinary benzene. DNA damage was evaluated using tail intensity (TI) determined by the comet assay in peripheral lymphocytes. Urinary 7-hydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) was measured as a biomarker of oxidative damage. DNA repair kinetics were assessed using the comet assay in lymphocytes sampled 20 and 60 min post H2O2 exposure. Benzene exposure differed significantly between the drivers (median 246.3 µg/m(3)), attendants (median 13.8 µg/m(3)), and controls (median 4.1 µg/m(3)). There were no differences in TI and 8-oxodG among the three groups, or between smokers and non-smokers. DNA repair kinetics were similar among the drivers, attendants and controls, although the comet assay on H2 O2 -damaged lymphocytes after 60 min revealed significantly lower levels of TI only in drivers. The DNA repair process in smokers was similar to that observed in drivers. In conclusion, this study found no relationship between low levels of benzene exposure and DNA damage, although there was evidence that exposure interferes with DNA repair kinetics. The biological impact of this finding on the onset of genotoxic effects in exposed workers has still to be ascertained. PMID:26646167

  17. Solar UVB-induced DNA damage and photoenzymatic DNA repair in antarctic zooplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Malloy, K.D.; Holman, M.A.; Mitchell, D.

    1997-02-18

    The detrimental effects of elevated intensities of mid-UV radiation (UVB), a result of stratospheric ozone depletion during the austral spring, on the primary producers of the Antarctic marine ecosystem have been well documented. Here we report that natural populations of Antarctic zooplankton also sustain significant DNA damage [measured as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs)] during periods of increased UVB flux. This is the first direct evidence that increased solar UVB may result in damage to marine organisms other than primary producers in Antarctica. The extent of DNA damage in pelagic icefish eggs correlated with daily incident UVB irradiance, reflecting the difference between acquisition and repair of CPDs. Patterns of DNA damage in fish larvae did not correlated with daily UVB flux, possibly due to different depth distributions and/or different capacities for DNA repair. Clearance of CPDs by Antarctic fish and krill was mediated primarily by the photoenzymatic repair system. Although repair rates were large for all species evaluated, they were apparently inadequate to prevent the transient accumulation of substantial CPD burdens. The capacity for DNA repair in Antarctic organisms was highest in those species whose early life history stages occupy the water column during periods of ozone depletion (austral spring) and lowest in fish species whose eggs and larvae are abundant during winter. Although the potential reduction in fitness of Antarctic zooplankton resulting from DNA damage is unknown, we suggest that increased solar UV may reduce recruitment and adversely affect trophic transfer of productivity by affecting heterotrophic species as well as primary producers. 54 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Solar UVB-induced DNA damage and photoenzymatic DNA repair in antarctic zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Malloy, K D; Holman, M A; Mitchell, D; Detrich, H W

    1997-02-18

    The detrimental effects of elevated intensities of mid-UV radiation (UVB), a result of stratospheric ozone depletion during the austral spring, on the primary producers of the Antarctic marine ecosystem have been well documented. Here we report that natural populations of Antarctic zooplankton also sustain significant DNA damage [measured as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs)] during periods of increased UVB flux. This is the first direct evidence that increased solar UVB may result in damage to marine organisms other than primary producers in Antarctica. The extent of DNA damage in pelagic icefish eggs correlated with daily incident UVB irradiance, reflecting the difference between acquisition and repair of CPDs. Patterns of DNA damage in fish larvae did not correlate with daily UVB flux, possibly due to different depth distributions and/or different capacities for DNA repair. Clearance of CPDs by Antarctic fish and krill was mediated primarily by the photoenzymatic repair system. Although repair rates were large for all species evaluated, they were apparently inadequate to prevent the transient accumulation of substantial CPD burdens. The capacity for DNA repair in Antarctic organisms was highest in those species whose early life history stages occupy the water column during periods of ozone depletion (austral spring) and lowest in fish species whose eggs and larvae are abundant during winter. Although the potential reduction in fitness of Antarctic zooplankton resulting from DNA damage is unknown, we suggest that increased solar UV may reduce recruitment and adversely affect trophic transfer of productivity by affecting heterotrophic species as well as primary producers. PMID:9037040

  19. Repairing of N-mustard derivative BO-1055 induced DNA damage requires NER, HR, and MGMT-dependent DNA repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ching-Ying; Chou, Wen-Cheng; Wu, Chin-Chung; Wong, Teng-Song; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Lee, Te-Chang; Su, Tsann-Long; Wang, Hui-Chun

    2015-09-22

    Alkylating agents are frequently used as first-line chemotherapeutics for various newly diagnosed cancers. Disruption of genome integrity by such agents can lead to cell lethality if DNA lesions are not removed. Several DNA repair mechanisms participate in the recovery of mono- or bi-functional DNA alkylation. Thus, DNA repair capacity is correlated with the therapeutic response. Here, we assessed the function of novel water-soluble N-mustard BO-1055 (ureidomustin) in DNA damage response and repair mechanisms. As expected, BO-1055 induces ATM and ATR-mediated DNA damage response cascades, including downstream Chk1/Chk2 phosphorylation, S/G2 cell-cycle arrest, and cell death. Further investigation revealed that cell survival sensitivity to BO-1055 is comparable to that of mitomycin C. Both compounds require nucleotide excision repair and homologous recombination, but not non-homologous end-joining, to repair conventional cross-linking DNA damage. Interestingly and unlike mitomycin C and melphalan, MGMT activity was also observed in BO-1055 damage repair systems, which reflects the occurrence of O-alkyl DNA lesions. Combined treatment with ATM/ATR kinase inhibitors significantly increases BO-1055 sensitivity. Our study pinpoints that BO-1055 can be used for treating tumors that with deficient NER, HR, and MGMT DNA repair genes, or for synergistic therapy in tumors that DNA damage response have been suppressed. PMID:26208482

  20. Repairing of N-mustard derivative BO-1055 induced DNA damage requires NER, HR, and MGMT-dependent DNA repair mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chin-Chung; Wong, Teng-Song; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Lee, Te-Chang; Su, Tsann-Long; Wang, Hui-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Alkylating agents are frequently used as first-line chemotherapeutics for various newly diagnosed cancers. Disruption of genome integrity by such agents can lead to cell lethality if DNA lesions are not removed. Several DNA repair mechanisms participate in the recovery of mono- or bi-functional DNA alkylation. Thus, DNA repair capacity is correlated with the therapeutic response. Here, we assessed the function of novel water-soluble N-mustard BO-1055 (ureidomustin) in DNA damage response and repair mechanisms. As expected, BO-1055 induces ATM and ATR-mediated DNA damage response cascades, including downstream Chk1/Chk2 phosphorylation, S/G2 cell-cycle arrest, and cell death. Further investigation revealed that cell survival sensitivity to BO-1055 is comparable to that of mitomycin C. Both compounds require nucleotide excision repair and homologous recombination, but not non-homologous end-joining, to repair conventional cross-linking DNA damage. Interestingly and unlike mitomycin C and melphalan, MGMT activity was also observed in BO-1055 damage repair systems, which reflects the occurrence of O-alkyl DNA lesions. Combined treatment with ATM/ATR kinase inhibitors significantly increases BO-1055 sensitivity. Our study pinpoints that BO-1055 can be used for treating tumors that with deficient NER, HR, and MGMT DNA repair genes, or for synergistic therapy in tumors that DNA damage response have been suppressed. PMID:26208482

  1. Oxidative DNA damage background estimated by a system model of base excision repair

    SciTech Connect

    Sokhansanj, B A; Wilson, III, D M

    2004-05-13

    Human DNA can be damaged by natural metabolism through free radical production. It has been suggested that the equilibrium between innate damage and cellular DNA repair results in an oxidative DNA damage background that potentially contributes to disease and aging. Efforts to quantitatively characterize the human oxidative DNA damage background level based on measuring 8-oxoguanine lesions as a biomarker have led to estimates varying over 3-4 orders of magnitude, depending on the method of measurement. We applied a previously developed and validated quantitative pathway model of human DNA base excision repair, integrating experimentally determined endogenous damage rates and model parameters from multiple sources. Our estimates of at most 100 8-oxoguanine lesions per cell are consistent with the low end of data from biochemical and cell biology experiments, a result robust to model limitations and parameter variation. Our results show the power of quantitative system modeling to interpret composite experimental data and make biologically and physiologically relevant predictions for complex human DNA repair pathway mechanisms and capacity.

  2. DNA replication meets genetic exchange: Chromosomal damage and its repair by homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2001-01-01

    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Colloquium on the roles of homologous recombination in DNA replication are summarized. Current findings in experimental systems ranging from bacteriophages to mammalian cell lines substantiate the idea that homologous recombination is a system supporting DNA replication when either the template DNA is damaged or the replication machinery malfunctions. There are several lines of supporting evidence: (i) DNA replication aggravates preexisting DNA damage, which then blocks subsequent replication; (ii) replication forks abandoned by malfunctioning replisomes become prone to breakage; (iii) mutants with malfunctioning replisomes or with elevated levels of DNA damage depend on homologous recombination; and (iv) homologous recombination primes DNA replication in vivo and can restore replication fork structures in vitro. The mechanisms of recombinational repair in bacteriophage T4, Escherichia coli, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are compared. In vitro properties of the eukaryotic recombinases suggest a bigger role for single-strand annealing in the eukaryotic recombinational repair. PMID:11459990

  3. Myelin damage and repair in pathologic CNS: challenges and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Arsalan; Dyck, Scott M.; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    CNS repair. PMID:26283909

  4. Increased initial levels of chromosome damage and heterogeneous chromosome repair in ataxia telangiectasia heterozygote cells.

    PubMed

    Pandita, T K; Hittelman, W N

    1994-10-01

    Individuals heterozygous for ataxia telangiectasia (AT) appear clinically normal but have a 2-3-fold overall excess risk of cancer. Various approaches have been used to identify AT heterozygotes, however, the results are ambiguous. We recently reported that AT homozygotes exhibit more initial chromosome damage after irradiation than normal cells despite identical levels of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) as well as a reduced fast repair component at both the DNA and chromosome levels. To determine whether AT heterozygotes exhibit the AT or normal cellular phenotype, we compared four AT heterozygote lymphoblastoid cell lines with normal control and AT homozygote lymphoblastoid cells with regard to cell survival, initial levels of damage, and repair at the DNA and chromosome levels after gamma-irradiation in G1, S, and G2 phase (estimated by neutral DNA filter elution and premature chromosome condensation). There was no significant difference in survival, induction and repair of DNA DSBs, or chromosome repair between AT heterozygote and normal cells. In contrast, all four AT heterozygote cell lines showed increased levels of chromosome damage; G1 phase cells showed intermediate levels and G2 phase cells showed levels equivalent to the AT homozygote phenotype. These results suggest that premature chromosome condensation may be useful for detecting AT heterozygotes. PMID:7523872

  5. Silibinin enhances the repair of ultraviolet B-induced DNA damage by activating p53-dependent nucleotide excision repair mechanism in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Guillermo-Lagae, Ruth; Deep, Gagan; Ting, Harold; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-11-24

    Ultraviolet radiation B (UVB) is the main cause of DNA damage in epidermal cells; and if not repaired, this DNA damage leads to skin cancer. In earlier studies, we have reported that natural flavonolignan silibinin exerts strong chemopreventive efficacy against UVB-induced skin damage and carcinogenesis; however mechanistic studies are still being actively pursued. Here, we investigated the role of nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway in silibinin's efficacy to repair UVB-induced DNA damage. Normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) were exposed to UVB (1 mJ/cm2) with pre- or post- silibinin (100 μM) treatment, and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) formation/repair was measured. Results showed that post-UVB silibinin treatment accelerates DNA repair via activating the NER pathway including the expression of XPA (xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A), XPB, XPC, and XPG. In UVB exposed fibroblasts, silibinin treatment also increased p53 and GADD45α expression; the key regulators of the NER pathway and DNA repair. Consistently, post-UVB silibinin treatment increased the mRNA transcripts of XPA and GADD45α. Importantly, silibinin showed no effect on UVB-induced DNA damage repair in XPA- and XPB-deficient human dermal fibroblasts suggesting their key role in silibinin-mediated DNA damage repair. Moreover, in the presence of pifithrin-α, an inhibitor of p53, the DNA repair efficacy of silibinin was compromised associated with a reduction in XPA and GADD45α transcripts. Together, these findings suggest that silibinin's efficacy against UVB-induced photodamage is primarily by inhibiting NER and p53; and these findings further support silibinin's usage as a potential inexpensive, effective, and non-toxic agent for skin cancer chemoprevention. PMID:26447614

  6. Repair of UV damaged DNA, genes and proteins of yeast and human

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, L.

    1991-04-01

    Our objectives are to determine the molecular mechanism of the incision step of excision repair of ultraviolet (UV) light damaged DNA in eukaryotic organisms, using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, as well as studying the human homologs of yeast excision repair and postreplication repair proteins. In addition to its single-stranded DNA-dependent A TPase and DNA helicase activities, we have found that RAD3 protein also possesses DNA-RNA helicase activity, and that like RAD3, the Schizosaccharomyces pombe RAD3 homolog, rhp3{sup +}, is an essential gene. We have overexpressed the human RAD3 homolog, ERCC2, in yeast to facilitate its purification. The RAD10 protein was purified to homogeneity and shown to bind DNA. ERCC3y, the yeast homolog of the human ERCC-3/XP-B gene, has been sequenced and shown to be essential for viability. The Drosophila and human homologs of RAD6, required for postreplication repair and UV induced mutagenesis, were shown to complement the rad6 {Delta} mutation of yeast. Since defective DNA repair and enhanced neoplasia characterize several human genetic diseases, and repair proteins are highly conserved between yeast and man, a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms of DNA repir in yeast should provide a better understanding of the causes of carcinogenesis.

  7. Neuromuscular damage and repair after dry needling in mice.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Ares; Mayoral, Orlando; Monterde, Sonia; Santafé, Manel M

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Some dry needling treatments involve repetitive and rapid needle insertions into myofascial trigger points. This type of treatment causes muscle injury and can also damage nerve fibers. The aim of this study is to determine the injury caused by 15 repetitive punctures in the muscle and the intramuscular nerves in healthy mouse muscle and its ulterior regeneration. Methods. We repeatedly needled the levator auris longus muscle of mice, and then the muscles were processed with immunohistochemistry, methylene blue, and electron microscopy techniques. Results. Three hours after the dry needling procedure, the muscle fibers showed some signs of an inflammatory response, which progressed to greater intensity 24 hours after the procedure. Some inflammatory cells could still be seen when the muscle regeneration was almost complete seven days after the treatment. One day after the treatment, some changes in the distribution of receptors could be observed in the denervated postsynaptic component. Reinnervation was complete by the third day after the dry needling procedure. We also saw very fine axonal branches reinnervating all the postsynaptic components and some residual sprouts the same day. Conclusion. Repeated dry needling punctures in muscle do not perturb the different stages of muscle regeneration and reinnervation. PMID:23662122

  8. Beyond xeroderma pigmentosum: DNA damage and repair in an ecological context. A tribute to James E. Cleaver.

    PubMed

    Karentz, Deneb

    2015-01-01

    The ability to repair DNA is a ubiquitous characteristic of life on Earth and all organisms possess similar mechanisms for dealing with DNA damage, an indication of a very early evolutionary origin for repair processes. James E. Cleaver's career (initiated in the early 1960s) has been devoted to the study of mammalian ultraviolet radiation (UVR) photobiology, specifically the molecular genetics of xeroderma pigmentosum and other human diseases caused by defects in DNA damage recognition and repair. This work by Jim and others has influenced the study of DNA damage and repair in a variety of taxa. Today, the field of DNA repair is enhancing our understanding of not only how to treat and prevent human disease, but is providing insights on the evolutionary history of life on Earth and how natural populations are coping with UVR-induced DNA damage from anthropogenic changes in the environment such as ozone depletion. PMID:25395165

  9. DNA damage action spectroscopy and DNA repair in intact organisms: Alfalfa seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, B.M.; Quaite, F.E.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    Understanding the effects of UV, and increased levels of UV, on DNA in living organisms requires knowledge of both the frequency of damages induced by the quantities and quality (wavelength composition) of the damaging radiation, and of the capacity of the organisms to carry out efficient and accurate repair. The major levels of uncertainty in understanding the responses of intact organisms, both plant and animal, to UV indicates that we cannot assess accurately the impact of stratospheric ozone depletion without major increases in knowledge of DNA damage and repair. What repair paths does alfalfa use for dealing with UV damages? The rate of pyrimidine dimers induced at a low exposure of 280 nm radiation to alfalfa seedlings, was observed to be about 8 dimers/million bases. After UV exposure, the seedlings were kept in the dark or exposed to blue light filtered by a yellow. filter which excluded wavelengths shorter than about 405 nm. Seedlings so exposed carry out photorepair, but do not seem to remove dimers by excision.

  10. Theoretical versus Ex Vivo Assessment of Radiation Damage Repair: An Investigation in Normal Breast Tissue.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Martin A; Dhal, Bipina; Prunster, Janelle; McLaren, Sally; Zeps, Nikolajs; House, Michael; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank; Corica, Tammy; Saunders, Christobel; Joseph, David J

    2016-04-01

    In vivo validation of models of DNA damage repair will enable their use for optimizing clinical radiotherapy. In this study, a theoretical assessment was made of DNA double-strand break (DSB) induction in normal breast tissue after intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT), which is now an accepted form of adjuvant radiotherapy for selected patients with early breast cancer. DSB rates and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) were calculated as a function of dose, radiation quality and dose rate, each varying based on the applicator size used during IORT. The spectra of primary electrons in breast tissue adjacent to each applicator were calculated using measured X-ray spectra and Monte Carlo methods, and were used to inform a Monte Carlo damage simulation code. In the absence of repair, asymptotic RBE values (relative to (60)Co) were approximately 1.5. Beam-quality changes led to only minor variations in RBE among applicators, though differences in dose rate and overall dose delivery time led to larger variations and a rapid decrease in RBE. An experimental assessment of DSB induction was performed ex vivo using pre- and postirradiation tissue samples from patients receiving breast intraoperative radiation therapy. Relative DSB rates were assessed via γ-H2AX immunohistochemistry using proportional staining. Maximum-likelihood parameter estimation yielded a DSB repair halftime of 25.9 min (95% CI, 21.5-30.4 min), although the resulting model was not statistically distinguishable from one where there was no change in DSB yield among patients. Although the model yielded an in vivo repair halftime of the order of previous estimates for in vitro repair halftimes, we cannot conclude that it is valid in this context. This study highlights some of the uncertainties inherent in population analysis of ex vivo samples, and of the quantitative limitations of immunohistochemistry for assessment of DSB repair. PMID:27023258

  11. Repair work begins on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery after damage from hail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    United Space Alliance technician Don Pataky repairs hail- inflicted damage in the foam insulation on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery. The Shuttle was rolled back from Pad 39B to the Vehicle Assemby Building for repairs because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad. The work is expected to take two to three days, allowing Discovery to roll back to the pad late this week for launch of mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program. Liftoff will occur no earlier than May 27. STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-shared experiment.

  12. Repair work begins on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery after damage from hail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    United Space Alliance technician Don Pataky prepares to enter a tented area around the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery in order to repair hail-inflicted damage in the foam insulation. The Shuttle was rolled back from Pad 39B to the Vehicle Assemby Building for repairs because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad. The work is expected to take two to three days, allowing Discovery to roll back to the pad late this week for launch of mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program. Liftoff will occur no earlier than May 27. STS- 96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- shared experiment.

  13. Repair work continues on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery after damage from hail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), United Space Alliance technician Robert Williams sands the repaired areas near the top of Space Shuttle Discovery's external tank. Repairs were required for damage caused by hail during recent storms. Because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad, the Shuttle was rolled back from Pad 39B to the VAB. The work is expected to take two to three days, allowing Discovery to roll back to the pad late this week for launch of mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program. Liftoff will occur no earlier than May 27. STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-shared experiment.

  14. Revisiting DNA damage repair, p53-mediated apoptosis and cisplatin sensitivity in germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Francesca; Feldman, Darren R; Barchi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs), ie, seminomas and nonseminomas, account for 1% to 3% of all neoplasms in men. They are the most common cancer in young white males and are unique in their responsiveness to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. For this reason, TGCTs are considered a model for curative disease. However, up to now, the molecular mechanisms behind this exceptional responsiveness to DNA-damaging agents have remained unclear. A hypersensitive apoptotic response, as well as a reduction in the proficiency to repair cisplatin-induced DNA damage might account for this behavior. In this review, building on recent findings of p53-induced apoptosis and DNA-repair mechanisms in TGCTs, we will discuss the molecular bases that drive tumor sensitivity to cisplatin, emphasizing the new therapeutic approaches proposed to eventually constrain tumor recurrence, and target TGCTs which are unresponsive to standard therapies. PMID:23784838

  15. Increasing Melanoma—Too Many Skin Cell Damages or Too Few Repairs?

    PubMed Central

    Hallberg, Örjan; Johansson, Olle

    2013-01-01

    Skin melanoma rates have been increasing for a long time in many Western countries. The object of this study was to apply modern problem-solving theory normally used to clear industrial problems to search for roots and causes of this medical question. Increasing cancer rates can be due to too many cell damage incidents or to too few repairs. So far, it has been assumed that the melanoma epidemic mainly is caused by increasing sun tanning habits. In order to explore this problem in more detail, we used cancer statistics from several countries over time and space. Detailed analysis of data obtained and a model study to evaluate the effects from increased damages or decreased repairs clearly indicate that the main reason behind the melanoma problem is a disturbed immune system. The possibility to introduce efficient corrective actions is apparent. PMID:24310359

  16. Triplex technology in studies of DNA damage, DNA repair, and mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Anirban; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2012-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) can bind to the major groove of homopurine-homopyrimidine stretches of double-stranded DNA in a sequence-specific manner through Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding to form DNA triplexes. TFOs by themselves or conjugated to reactive molecules can be used to direct sequence-specific DNA damage, which in turn results in the induction of several DNA metabolic activities. Triplex technology is highly utilized as a tool to study gene regulation, molecular mechanisms of DNA repair, recombination, and mutagenesis. In addition, TFO targeting of specific genes has been exploited in the development of therapeutic strategies to modulate DNA structure and function. In this review, we discuss advances made in studies of DNA damage, DNA repair, recombination, and mutagenesis by using triplex technology to target specific DNA sequences. PMID:21501652

  17. Triplex technology in studies of DNA damage, DNA repair, and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Anirban; Vasquez, Karen M

    2011-08-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) can bind to the major groove of homopurine-homopyrimidine stretches of double-stranded DNA in a sequence-specific manner through Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding to form DNA triplexes. TFOs by themselves or conjugated to reactive molecules can be used to direct sequence-specific DNA damage, which in turn results in the induction of several DNA metabolic activities. Triplex technology is highly utilized as a tool to study gene regulation, molecular mechanisms of DNA repair, recombination, and mutagenesis. In addition, TFO targeting of specific genes has been exploited in the development of therapeutic strategies to modulate DNA structure and function. In this review, we discuss advances made in studies of DNA damage, DNA repair, recombination, and mutagenesis by using triplex technology to target specific DNA sequences. PMID:21501652

  18. Involvement of DNA polymerase beta in repairing oxidative damages induced by antitumor drug adriamycin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Shukun; Wu Mei; Zhang Zunzhen

    2010-08-01

    Adriamycin (ADM) is a widely used antineoplastic drug. However, the increasing cellular resistance has become a serious limitation to ADM clinical application. The most important mechanism related to ADM-induced cell death is oxidative DNA damage mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Base excision repair (BER) is a major pathway in the repair of DNA single strand break (SSB) and oxidized base. In this study, we firstly applied the murine embryo fibroblasts wild-type (pol {beta} +/+) and homozygous pol {beta} null cell (pol {beta} -/-) as a model to investigate ADM DNA-damaging effects and the molecular basis underlying these effects. Here, cellular sensitivity to ADM was examined using colorimetric assay and colony forming assay. ADM-induced cellular ROS level and the alteration of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured by commercial kits. Further, DNA strand break, chromosomal damage and gene mutation were assessed by comet assay, micronucleus test and hprt gene mutation assay, respectively. The results showed that pol {beta} -/- cells were more sensitive to ADM compared with pol {beta} +/+ cells and more severe SSB and chromosomal damage as well as higher hprt gene mutation frequency were observed in pol {beta} -/- cells. ROS level in pol {beta} -/- cells increased along with decreased activity of SOD. These results demonstrated that pol {beta} deficiency could enable ROS accumulation with SOD activity decrease, further elevate oxidative DNA damage, and subsequently result in SSB, chromosome cleavage as well as gene mutation, which may be partly responsible for the cytotoxicity of ADM and the hypersensitivity of pol {beta} -/- cells to ADM. These findings suggested that pol {beta} is vital for repairing oxidative damage induced by ADM.

  19. Overcoming Pluripotent Stem Cell Dependence on the Repair of Endogenous DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Chlon, Timothy M.; Ruiz-Torres, Sonya; Maag, Logan; Mayhew, Christopher N.; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A.; Davies, Stella M.; Mehta, Parinda; Myers, Kasiani C.; Wells, James M.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) maintain a low mutation frequency compared with somatic cell types at least in part by preferentially utilizing error-free homologous recombination (HR) for DNA repair. Many endogenous metabolites cause DNA interstrand crosslinks, which are repaired by the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway using HR. To determine the effect of failed repair of endogenous DNA lesions on PSC biology, we generated iPSCs harboring a conditional FA pathway. Upon FA pathway loss, iPSCs maintained pluripotency but underwent profound G2 arrest and apoptosis, whereas parental fibroblasts grew normally. Mechanistic studies revealed that G2-phase FA-deficient iPSCs possess large γH2AX-RAD51 foci indicative of accrued DNA damage, which correlated with activated DNA-damage signaling through CHK1. CHK1 inhibition specifically rescued the growth of FA-deficient iPSCs for prolonged culture periods, surprisingly without stimulating excessive karyotypic abnormalities. These studies reveal that PSCs possess hyperactive CHK1 signaling that restricts their self-renewal in the absence of error-free DNA repair. PMID:26771352

  20. Rotator Interval Lesion and Damaged Subscapularis Tendon Repair in a High School Baseball Player

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Tomoyuki; Ninomiya, Hiroki; Inui, Hiroaki; Komai, Masahiko; Nobuhara, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, a 16-year-old baseball pitcher visited Nobuhara Hospital complaining of shoulder pain and limited range of motion in his throwing shoulder. High signal intensity in the rotator interval (RI) area (ball sign), injured subscapularis tendon, and damage to both the superior and middle glenohumeral ligaments were identified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Repair of the RI lesion and partially damaged subscapularis tendon was performed in this pitcher. During surgery, an opened RI and dropping of the subscapularis tendon were observed. The RI was closed in a 90° externally rotated and abducted position. To reconfirm the exact repaired state of the patient, arthroscopic examination was performed from behind. However, suture points were not visible in the >30° externally rotated position, which indicates that the RI could not be correctly repaired with the arthroscopic procedure. One year after surgery, the patient obtained full function of the shoulder and returned to play at a national convention. Surgical repair of the RI lesion should be performed in exactly the correct position of the upper extremity. PMID:26618017

  1. Discovery of a Master Regulator of Injury and Healing: Tipping the Outcome from Damage toward Repair

    PubMed Central

    Brines, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Disease processes provoke a balancing act between tissue damage and repair. In the 1980s, the discovery that tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is a general mediator of disease-related injury led to the development of novel therapeutics to neutralize its activity. In contrast, identification of potential mediator(s) of tissue repair remained elusive. Studies performed over the last 15 years have documented that the type 1 cytokine erythropoietin (EPO), produced by cells within surrounding regions subjected to injury, acts as a master regulator, controlling both damage and repair. The transducer of these activities is the previously unrecognized innate repair receptor (IRR), which is comprised of the EPO receptor and β common receptor subunits. Notably, although proinflammatory cytokines upregulate the IRR, EPO and proinflammatory cytokines inhibit each other’s production, resulting in a relative underproduction of EPO. Although exogenous EPO attenuates disease activity in many preclinical models, its clinical utility is limited by serious hematopoietic and thrombotic adverse effects. To circumvent this problem, novel compounds engineered from the structure of EPO have been developed as selective ligands of the IRR. These compounds possess no hematopoietic activity, yet are fully tissue-protective and reparative. The lead molecule of this development effort (the 11–amino acid peptide ARA290) tips the balance toward healing in diverse preclinical models of disease and is currently under evaluation in advanced clinical trials as a disease-modifying agent in painful neuropathy and diabetes. PMID:25549226

  2. New approaches to DNA damage and repair: the ultraviolet light example

    SciTech Connect

    Haseltine, W.A.; Gordon, L.K.; Lindan, C.; Lippke, J.; Brash, D.; Lo, K.M.; Royer-Pokora, B.

    1982-01-01

    DNA fragments of defined sequence are used as probes to study DNA damage and repair. The case of ultraviolet light is presented and includes the following: (a) Description of the distribution of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers within defined DNA sequences. Considerations of the effect of neighboring base composition, dose rate, and double- or single-stranded property of the DNA are discussed. (b) Dissection of the anatomy of the incision event and subsequent repair steps. A three-step incision model for repair of cyclobutane dimers by the Micrococcus luteus repair enzymes will be presented. The steps are (1) recognition of the lesion and N-glycosylase scission, (2) cleavage of the phosphodiester bond 3' to the newly created apyrimidinic site, and (3) scission of the apyrimidinic sugar on the 5' side. (c) Use of human alphoid sequences as indicators of DNA damage in intact human cells. (d) Biological significance of a novel ultraviolet light-induced photoproduct. This photoproduct occurs at pyrimidine-cytosine sequences and may have a significant biological role.

  3. DNA Damage Response and DNA Repair in Skeletal Myocytes From a Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Fayzullina, Saniya; Martin, Lee J

    2016-09-01

    We studied DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair capacities of skeletal muscle cells from a mouse model of infantile spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) caused by loss-of-function mutation of survival of motor neuron (Smn). Primary myocyte cultures derived from skeletal muscle satellite cells of neonatal control and mutant SMN mice had similar myotube length, myonuclei, satellite cell marker Pax7 and differentiated myotube marker myosin, and acetylcholine receptor clustering. DNA damage was induced in differentiated skeletal myotubes by γ-irradiation, etoposide, and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Unexposed control and SMA myotubes had stable genome integrity. After γ-irradiation and etoposide, myotubes repaired most DNA damage equally. Control and mutant myotubes exposed to MMS exhibited equivalent DNA damage without repair. Control and SMA myotube nuclei contained DDR proteins phospho-p53 and phospho-H2AX foci that, with DNA damage, dispersed and then re-formed similarly after recovery. We conclude that mouse primary satellite cell-derived myotubes effectively respond to and repair DNA strand-breaks, while DNA alkylation repair is underrepresented. Morphological differentiation, genome stability, genome sensor, and DNA strand-break repair potential are preserved in mouse SMA myocytes; thus, reduced SMN does not interfere with myocyte differentiation, genome integrity, and DNA repair, and faulty DNA repair is unlikely pathogenic in SMA. PMID:27452406

  4. SUMOylation of xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein regulates DNA damage recognition during nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Akita, Masaki; Tak, Yon-Soo; Shimura, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Syota; Okuda-Shimizu, Yuki; Shimizu, Yuichiro; Nishi, Ryotaro; Saitoh, Hisato; Iwai, Shigenori; Mori, Toshio; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Sakai, Wataru; Hanaoka, Fumio; Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein complex is a key factor that detects DNA damage and initiates nucleotide excision repair (NER) in mammalian cells. Although biochemical and structural studies have elucidated the interaction of XPC with damaged DNA, the mechanism of its regulation in vivo remains to be understood in more details. Here, we show that the XPC protein undergoes modification by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) proteins and the lack of this modification compromises the repair of UV-induced DNA photolesions. In the absence of SUMOylation, XPC is normally recruited to the sites with photolesions, but then immobilized profoundly by the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) complex. Since the absence of UV-DDB alleviates the NER defect caused by impaired SUMOylation of XPC, we propose that this modification is critical for functional interactions of XPC with UV-DDB, which facilitate the efficient damage handover between the two damage recognition factors and subsequent initiation of NER. PMID:26042670

  5. DNA Damage and Repair in Plants under Ultraviolet and Ionizing Radiations

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Sarvajeet S.; Gill, Ritu; Jha, Manoranjan; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-01-01

    Being sessile, plants are continuously exposed to DNA-damaging agents present in the environment such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiations (IR). Sunlight acts as an energy source for photosynthetic plants; hence, avoidance of UV radiations (namely, UV-A, 315–400 nm; UV-B, 280–315 nm; and UV-C, <280 nm) is unpreventable. DNA in particular strongly absorbs UV-B; therefore, it is the most important target for UV-B induced damage. On the other hand, IR causes water radiolysis, which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and causes radiogenic damage to important cellular components. However, to maintain genomic integrity under UV/IR exposure, plants make use of several DNA repair mechanisms. In the light of recent breakthrough, the current minireview (a) introduces UV/IR and overviews UV/IR-mediated DNA damage products and (b) critically discusses the biochemistry and genetics of major pathways responsible for the repair of UV/IR-accrued DNA damage. The outcome of the discussion may be helpful in devising future research in the current context. PMID:25729769

  6. Autophagy confers DNA damage repair pathways to protect the hematopoietic system from nuclear radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Weiwei; Yuan, Na; Wang, Zhen; Cao, Yan; Fang, Yixuan; Li, Xin; Xu, Fei; Song, Lin; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Han; Yan, Lili; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Suping; Wang, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is essentially a metabolic process, but its in vivo role in nuclear radioprotection remains unexplored. We observed that ex vivo autophagy activation reversed the proliferation inhibition, apoptosis, and DNA damage in irradiated hematopoietic cells. In vivo autophagy activation improved bone marrow cellularity following nuclear radiation exposure. In contrast, defective autophagy in the hematopoietic conditional mouse model worsened the hematopoietic injury, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and DNA damage caused by nuclear radiation exposure. Strikingly, in vivo defective autophagy caused an absence or reduction in regulatory proteins critical to both homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA damage repair pathways, as well as a failure to induce these proteins in response to nuclear radiation. In contrast, in vivo autophagy activation increased most of these proteins in hematopoietic cells. DNA damage assays confirmed the role of in vivo autophagy in the resolution of double-stranded DNA breaks in total bone marrow cells as well as bone marrow stem and progenitor cells upon whole body irradiation. Hence, autophagy protects the hematopoietic system against nuclear radiation injury by conferring and intensifying the HR and NHEJ DNA damage repair pathways and by removing ROS and inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:26197097

  7. Repaired shell damage in the commercial scallop Zygochlamys patagonica (King & Broderip, 1832), Argentine Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schejter, Laura; Bremec, Claudia

    2007-08-01

    We present an overview of repaired shell damage in the scallop Zygochlamys patagonica in the commercial beds of the Argentine Sea. Presence of scars was registered in 11 962 scallops, ranging from 20 to 90 mm total height, from the fishing grounds in 2003 and also in 1995 (pre-fishery condition). Values of percentage of scarring (presence) were variable in all areas. Samples collected in 1995 showed the highest percentage of scars. As the highest records of scarring were registered in pre-fishery conditions, it is not possible to regard these marks as absolute indicators of anthropogenic disturbance caused by trawling activities. Moderate and severe damage was mostly recorded in individuals of commercial size (≥ 55 mm). This indicates not only the fragility of smaller scallops, but also the accumulation of damage in older specimens, probably more resistant to damage because of their thicker shells. The selective removal of commercial individuals could explain in part our results that indicate a higher percentage of repaired shell damage in 1995, when the average size of the population was also higher. Future investigations are needed to assess effects of scarring at different shell sizes (ages) and relate these to levels of survival in Patagonian scallops thrown back into the sea during processing on board.

  8. HERC2 coordinates ubiquitin-dependent assembly of DNA repair factors on damaged chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Rendtlew Danielsen, Jannie; Fugger, Kasper; Gromova, Irina; Nerstedt, Annika; Lukas, Claudia; Bartek, Jiri; Lukas, Jiri; Mailand, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory ubiquitylation is emerging as an important mechanism to protect genome integrity in cells exposed to DNA damage. However, the spectrum of known ubiquitin regulators of the DNA damage response (DDR) is limited and their functional interplay is poorly understood. Here, we identify HERC2 as a factor that regulates ubiquitin-dependent retention of repair proteins on damaged chromosomes. In response to ionising radiation (IR), HERC2 forms a complex with RNF8, a ubiquitin ligase involved in the DDR. The HERC2-RNF8 interaction requires IR-inducible phosphorylation of HERC2 at Thr 4827, which in turn binds to the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain of RNF8. Mechanistically, we provide evidence that HERC2 facilitates assembly of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ubc13 with RNF8, thereby promoting DNA damage-induced formation of Lys 63-linked ubiquitin chains. We also show that HERC2 interacts with, and maintains the levels of, RNF168, another ubiquitin ligase operating downstream of RNF8 (Refs 7, 8). Consequently, knockdown of HERC2 abrogates ubiquitin-dependent retention of repair factors such as 53BP1, RAP80 and BRCA1. Together with the increased radiosensitivity of HERC2-depleted cells, these results uncover a regulatory layer in the orchestration of protein interactions on damaged chromosomes and they underscore the role of ubiquitin-mediated signalling in genome maintenance. PMID:20023648

  9. Rhein Inhibits AlkB Repair Enzymes and Sensitizes Cells to Methylated DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Huang, Yue; Liu, Xichun; Gan, Jianhua; Chen, Hao; Yang, Cai-Guang

    2016-05-20

    The AlkB repair enzymes, including Escherichia coli AlkB and two human homologues, ALKBH2 and ALKBH3, are iron(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that efficiently repair N(1)-methyladenine and N(3)-methylcytosine methylated DNA damages. The development of small molecule inhibitors of these enzymes has seen less success. Here we have characterized a previously discovered natural product rhein and tested its ability to inhibit AlkB repair enzymes in vitro and to sensitize cells to methyl methane sulfonate that mainly produces N(1)-methyladenine and N(3)-methylcytosine lesions. Our investigation of the mechanism of rhein inhibition reveals that rhein binds to AlkB repair enzymes in vitro and promotes thermal stability in vivo In addition, we have determined a new structural complex of rhein bound to AlkB, which shows that rhein binds to a different part of the active site in AlkB than it binds to in fat mass and obesity-associated protein (FTO). With the support of these observations, we put forth the hypothesis that AlkB repair enzymes would be effective pharmacological targets for cancer treatment. PMID:27015802

  10. Modeling Damage Complexity-Dependent Non-Homologous End-Joining Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongfeng; Reynolds, Pamela; O'Neill, Peter; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the dominant DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway and involves several repair proteins such as Ku, DNA-PKcs, and XRCC4. It has been experimentally shown that the choice of NHEJ proteins is determined by the complexity of DSB. In this paper, we built a mathematical model, based on published data, to study how NHEJ depends on the damage complexity. Under an appropriate set of parameters obtained by minimization technique, we can simulate the kinetics of foci track formation in fluorescently tagged mammalian cells, Ku80-EGFP and DNA-PKcs-YFP for simple and complex DSB repair, respectively, in good agreement with the published experimental data, supporting the notion that simple DSB undergo fast repair in a Ku-dependent, DNA-PKcs-independent manner, while complex DSB repair requires additional DNA-PKcs for end processing, resulting in its slow repair, additionally resulting in slower release rate of Ku and the joining rate of complex DNA ends. Based on the numerous experimental descriptions, we investigated several models to describe the kinetics for complex DSB repair. An important prediction of our model is that the rejoining of complex DSBs is through a process of synapsis formation, similar to a second order reaction between ends, rather than first order break filling/joining. The synapsis formation (SF) model allows for diffusion of ends before the synapsis formation, which is precluded in the first order model by the rapid coupling of ends. Therefore, the SF model also predicts the higher number of chromosomal aberrations observed with high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation due to the higher proportion of complex DSBs compared to low LET radiation, and an increased probability of misrejoin following diffusion before the synapsis is formed, while the first order model does not provide a mechanism for the increased effectiveness in chromosomal aberrations observed. PMID:24520318

  11. Modeling damage complexity-dependent non-homologous end-joining repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfeng; Reynolds, Pamela; O'Neill, Peter; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2014-01-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the dominant DNA double strand break (DSB) repair pathway and involves several repair proteins such as Ku, DNA-PKcs, and XRCC4. It has been experimentally shown that the choice of NHEJ proteins is determined by the complexity of DSB. In this paper, we built a mathematical model, based on published data, to study how NHEJ depends on the damage complexity. Under an appropriate set of parameters obtained by minimization technique, we can simulate the kinetics of foci track formation in fluorescently tagged mammalian cells, Ku80-EGFP and DNA-PKcs-YFP for simple and complex DSB repair, respectively, in good agreement with the published experimental data, supporting the notion that simple DSB undergo fast repair in a Ku-dependent, DNA-PKcs-independent manner, while complex DSB repair requires additional DNA-PKcs for end processing, resulting in its slow repair, additionally resulting in slower release rate of Ku and the joining rate of complex DNA ends. Based on the numerous experimental descriptions, we investigated several models to describe the kinetics for complex DSB repair. An important prediction of our model is that the rejoining of complex DSBs is through a process of synapsis formation, similar to a second order reaction between ends, rather than first order break filling/joining. The synapsis formation (SF) model allows for diffusion of ends before the synapsis formation, which is precluded in the first order model by the rapid coupling of ends. Therefore, the SF model also predicts the higher number of chromosomal aberrations observed with high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation due to the higher proportion of complex DSBs compared to low LET radiation, and an increased probability of misrejoin following diffusion before the synapsis is formed, while the first order model does not provide a mechanism for the increased effectiveness in chromosomal aberrations observed. PMID:24520318

  12. DNA polymerase beta-catalyzed-PCNA independent long patch base excision repair synthesis: a mechanism for repair of oxidatively damaged DNA ends in post-mitotic brain.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Englander, Ella W

    2008-11-01

    Oxidative DNA damage incidental to normal respiratory metabolism poses a particular threat to genomes of highly metabolic-long lived cells. We show that post-mitotic brain has capacity to repair oxidatively damaged DNA ends, which are targets of the long patch (LP) base excision repair (BER) subpathway. LP-BER relies, in part, on proteins associated with DNA replication, including proliferating cell nuclear antigen and is inherent to proliferating cells. Nonetheless, repair products are generated with brain extracts, albeit at slow rates, in the case of 5'-DNA ends modeled with tetrahydrofuran (THF). THF at this position is refractory to DNA polymerase beta 5'-deoxyribose 5-phosphate lyase activity and drives repair into the LP-BER subpathway. Comparison of repair of 5'-THF-blocked termini in the post-mitotic rat brain and proliferative intestinal mucosa, revealed that in mucosa, resolution of damaged 5'-termini is accompanied by formation of larger repair products. In contrast, adducts targeted by the single nucleotide BER are proficiently repaired with both extracts. Our findings reveal mechanistic differences in BER processes selective for the brain versus proliferative tissues. The differences highlight the physiological relevance of the recently proposed 'Hit and Run' mechanism of alternating cleavage/synthesis steps, in the proliferating cell nuclear antigen-independent LP-BER process. PMID:18752643

  13. Repair of Alkylation Damage in Eukaryotic Chromatin Depends on Searching Ability of Alkyladenine DNA Glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaru; O'Brien, Patrick J

    2015-11-20

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) initiates the base excision repair pathway by excising alkylated and deaminated purine lesions. In vitro biochemical experiments demonstrate that AAG uses facilitated diffusion to efficiently search DNA to find rare sites of damage and suggest that electrostatic interactions are critical to the searching process. However, it remains an open question whether DNA searching limits the rate of DNA repair in vivo. We constructed AAG mutants with altered searching ability and measured their ability to protect yeast from alkylation damage in order to address this question. Each of the conserved arginine and lysine residues that are near the DNA binding interface were mutated, and the functional impacts were evaluated using kinetic and thermodynamic analysis. These mutations do not perturb catalysis of N-glycosidic bond cleavage, but they decrease the ability to capture rare lesion sites. Nonspecific and specific DNA binding properties are closely correlated, suggesting that the electrostatic interactions observed in the specific recognition complex are similarly important for DNA searching complexes. The ability of the mutant proteins to complement repair-deficient yeast cells is positively correlated with the ability of the proteins to search DNA in vitro, suggesting that cellular resistance to DNA alkylation is governed by the ability to find and efficiently capture cytotoxic lesions. It appears that chromosomal access is not restricted and toxic sites of alkylation damage are readily accessible to a searching protein. PMID:26317160

  14. Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy myoblasts efficiently repair moderate levels of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bou Saada, Yara; Dib, Carla; Dmitriev, Petr; Hamade, Aline; Carnac, Gilles; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila; Lipinski, Marc; Vassetzky, Yegor S

    2016-04-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is a progressive muscular dystrophy linked to a deletion of a subset of D4Z4 macrosatellite repeats accompanied by a chromatin relaxation of the D4Z4 array on chromosome 4q. In vitro, FSHD primary myoblasts show altered expression of oxidative-related genes and are more susceptible to oxidative stress. Double homeobox 4 (DUX4) gene, encoded within each D4Z4 unit, is normally transcriptionally silenced but is found aberrantly expressed in skeletal muscles of FSHD patients. Its expression leads to a deregulation of DUX4 target genes including those implicated in redox balance. Here, we assessed DNA repair efficiency of oxidative DNA damage in FSHD myoblasts and DUX4-transfected myoblasts. We have shown that the DNA repair activity is altered neither in FSHD myoblasts nor in immortalized human myoblasts transiently expressing DUX4. DNA damage caused by moderate doses of an oxidant is efficiently repaired while FSHD myoblasts exposed for 24 h to high levels of oxidative stress accumulated more DNA damage than normal myoblasts, suggesting that FSHD myoblasts remain more vulnerable to oxidative stress at high doses of oxidants. PMID:26860865

  15. DNA damage and repair in white blood cells at occupational exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, R. T.; Zaharieva, E. K.; Rupova, I. M.; Acheva, A. R.; Nikolov, V. N.

    2008-02-01

    : The present work was aimed at finding appropriate biomarkers applicable in molecular epidemiological surveys of occupationally exposed individuals and/or population in order to prove low dose effects. Blood samples were taken from NPP workers, in the 'strict regimen' area (exposed group) and from the administration staff (control group). The spontaneous and induced (exposed to a challenge dose of 2,0 Gy gamma irradiation) DNA repair synthesis in leucocytes, the level of DNA damage by single cell gel-electrophoresis in lymphocytes and the concentration of malonedialdehyde in blood serum, were analyzed. A significant decrease of potentially lethal damage in leucocytes as well as reduction of DNA double strand breaks level in lymphocytes of persons with 'mean annual dose' lower or equal to 5 mSv/a was found, compared to the control group. A higher repair capacity corresponding to elevated protein synthesis after a challenging dose of 2,0 Gy gamma rays and a significant decrease in the level of oxidative stress in the blood plasma were established in persons from the same group. The present investigation showed that annual doses not higher than twice the natural radiation background exert positive effects on DNA damage and repair, increase cellular resistance and decrease oxidative stress.

  16. Enhanced nucleotide excision repair capacity in lung cancer cells by preconditioning with DNA-damaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Ye; Park, Jeong-Min; Yi, Joo Mi; Leem, Sun-Hee; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of tumor cells for nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a major determinant of the efficacy of and resistance to DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics, such as cisplatin. Here, we demonstrate that using lesion-specific monoclonal antibodies, NER capacity is enhanced in human lung cancer cells after preconditioning with DNA-damaging agents. Preconditioning of cells with a nonlethal dose of UV radiation facilitated the kinetics of subsequent cisplatin repair and vice versa. Dual-incision assay confirmed that the enhanced NER capacity was sustained for 2 days. Checkpoint activation by ATR kinase and expression of NER factors were not altered significantly by the preconditioning, whereas association of XPA, the rate-limiting factor in NER, with chromatin was accelerated. In preconditioned cells, SIRT1 expression was increased, and this resulted in a decrease in acetylated XPA. Inhibition of SIRT1 abrogated the preconditioning-induced predominant XPA binding to DNA lesions. Taking these data together, we conclude that upregulated NER capacity in preconditioned lung cancer cells is caused partly by an increased level of SIRT1, which modulates XPA sensitivity to DNA damage. This study provides some insights into the molecular mechanism of chemoresistance through acquisition of enhanced DNA repair capacity in cancer cells. PMID:26317794

  17. Comparative DNA Damage and Repair in Echinoderm Coelomocytes Exposed to Genotoxicants

    PubMed Central

    El-Bibany, Ameena H.; Bodnar, Andrea G.; Reinardy, Helena C.

    2014-01-01

    The capacity to withstand and repair DNA damage differs among species and plays a role in determining an organism's resistance to genotoxicity, life history, and susceptibility to disease. Environmental stressors that affect organisms at the genetic level are of particular concern in ecotoxicology due to the potential for chronic effects and trans-generational impacts on populations. Echinoderms are valuable organisms to study the relationship between DNA repair and resistance to genotoxic stress due to their history and use as ecotoxicological models, little evidence of senescence, and few reported cases of neoplasia. Coelomocytes (immune cells) have been proposed to serve as sensitive bioindicators of environmental stress and are often used to assess genotoxicity; however, little is known about how coelomocytes from different echinoderm species respond to genotoxic stress. In this study, DNA damage was assessed (by Fast Micromethod) in coelomocytes of four echinoderm species (sea urchins Lytechinus variegatus, Echinometra lucunter lucunter, and Tripneustes ventricosus, and a sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus) after acute exposure to H2O2 (0–100 mM) and UV-C (0–9999 J/m2), and DNA repair was analyzed over a 24-hour period of recovery. Results show that coelomocytes from all four echinoderm species have the capacity to repair both UV-C and H2O2-induced DNA damage; however, there were differences in repair capacity between species. At 24 hours following exposure to the highest concentration of H2O2 (100 mM) and highest dose of UV-C (9999 J/m2) cell viability remained high (>94.6±1.2%) but DNA repair ranged from 18.2±9.2% to 70.8±16.0% for H2O2 and 8.4±3.2% to 79.8±9.0% for UV-C exposure. Species-specific differences in genotoxic susceptibility and capacity for DNA repair are important to consider when evaluating ecogenotoxicological model organisms and assessing overall impacts of genotoxicants in the environment. PMID:25229547

  18. [Prevention of radio-induced cancers].

    PubMed

    Cosset, J-M; Chargari, C; Demoor, C; Giraud, P; Helfre, S; Mornex, F; Mazal, A

    2016-09-01

    The article deals with the prevention of cancers only directly related to therapeutic radiation which are distinguished from "secondary cancer". The consideration of the risk of radiation-induced cancers after radiation therapy, although it is fortunately rare events, has become indispensable today. With a review of the literature, are detailed the various involved parameters. The age of the irradiated patient is one of the main parameters. The impact of the dose is also discussed based on the model used, and based on clinical data. Other parameters defining a radiation treatment are discussed one after the other: field with the example of Hodgkin's disease, the type of radiation and the participation of secondary neutrons, spreading and splitting. All these parameters are discussed according to each organ whose sensitivity is different. The article concludes with a list of recommendations to reduce the risk of radio-induced cancers. Even with the advent of conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulation, the modulated volume arctherapy, and the development of specific machinery for the extra-cranial stereotactic, the radiation therapist must consider this risk and use of reasonable and justified control imaging. Although they constitute a small percentage of cancers that occur secondarily after a first malignant tumor, radiation-induced cancers, can not and must not be concealed or ignored and justify regular monitoring over the long term, precisely adapted on the described parameters. PMID:27523416

  19. Repair of DNA damage in mammalian cells after treatment with UV and dimethyl sulphate: discrimination between nucleotide and base excision repair by their temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Hjertvik, M; Erixon, K; Ahnström, G

    1998-03-01

    significant amount involved in repair of DNA damage induced by a methylating agent. PMID:9637237

  20. DNA damage and repair in plants – from models to crops

    PubMed Central

    Manova, Vasilissa; Gruszka, Damian

    2015-01-01

    The genomic integrity of every organism is constantly challenged by endogenous and exogenous DNA-damaging factors. Mutagenic agents cause reduced stability of plant genome and have a deleterious effect on development, and in the case of crop species lead to yield reduction. It is crucial for all organisms, including plants, to develop efficient mechanisms for maintenance of the genome integrity. DNA repair processes have been characterized in bacterial, fungal, and mammalian model systems. The description of these processes in plants, in contrast, was initiated relatively recently and has been focused largely on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Consequently, our knowledge about DNA repair in plant genomes - particularly in the genomes of crop plants - is by far more limited. However, the relatively small size of the Arabidopsis genome, its rapid life cycle and availability of various transformation methods make this species an attractive model for the study of eukaryotic DNA repair mechanisms and mutagenesis. Moreover, abnormalities in DNA repair which proved to be lethal for animal models are tolerated in plant genomes, although sensitivity to DNA damaging agents is retained. Due to the high conservation of DNA repair processes and factors mediating them among eukaryotes, genes and proteins that have been identified in model species may serve to identify homologous sequences in other species, including crop plants, in which these mechanisms are poorly understood. Crop breeding programs have provided remarkable advances in food quality and yield over the last century. Although the human population is predicted to “peak” by 2050, further advances in yield will be required to feed this population. Breeding requires genetic diversity. The biological impact of any mutagenic agent used for the creation of genetic diversity depends on the chemical nature of the induced lesions and on the efficiency and accuracy of their repair. More recent targeted mutagenesis

  1. Repair of DNA Damage Induced by the Cytidine Analog Zebularine Requires ATR and ATM in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Hsin; Finke, Andreas; Díaz, Mariana; Rozhon, Wilfried; Poppenberger, Brigitte; Baubec, Tuncay; Pecinka, Ales

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage repair is an essential cellular mechanism that maintains genome stability. Here, we show that the nonmethylable cytidine analog zebularine induces a DNA damage response in Arabidopsis thaliana, independent of changes in DNA methylation. In contrast to genotoxic agents that induce damage in a cell cycle stage-independent manner, zebularine induces damage specifically during strand synthesis in DNA replication. The signaling of this damage is mediated by additive activity of ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED AND RAD3-RELATED and ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED kinases, which cause postreplicative cell cycle arrest and increased endoreplication. The repair requires a functional STRUCTURAL MAINTENANCE OF CHROMOSOMES5 (SMC5)-SMC6 complex and is accomplished predominantly by synthesis-dependent strand-annealing homologous recombination. Here, we provide insight into the response mechanism for coping with the genotoxic effects of zebularine and identify several components of the zebularine-induced DNA damage repair pathway. PMID:26023162

  2. Assessment of genomic damage and repair on human lymphocytes by paint thinner in vitro.

    PubMed

    Londoño-Velasco, Elizabeth; Hidalgo-Cerón, Victor; Escobar-Hoyos, Luisa F; Hoyos-Giraldo, Luz Stella

    2014-05-01

    Paint thinners are organic-solvent complex mixtures frequently used by car painters around the world in industries and shops. Some studies have revealed the oxidative effect induced by thinner inhalation; however, its genotoxic effect is poorly studied. The aim of this study was to assess the cytotoxicity, genomic damage and DNA repair in vitro induced by commercial paint thinner 0.14 in human lymphocytes. Cytotoxicity was determined by cell-viability analysis with trypan blue after 4 h treatment with different thinner concentrations (0.025 to 1.2 µL/mL). Genomic damage was evaluated by means of the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE; pH > 13) in treated cultures after 1 h with three low-cytotoxic thinner concentrations (0.05, 0.1 and 0.2 µL/mL). In order to evaluate the genomic DNA repair, one set of SCGE slides was prepared immediately after treatment, and another one was prepared after 4 h of liquid-holding recovery. A significant level of cytotoxicity was observed over the entire concentration range of paint thinner in lymphocytes (F = 175.98; p ≤ 0.001). In the SCGE % tail DNA assessment, a significant increase of lymphocyte genomic damage was evidenced (F = 72.32; p < 0.001). In addition, we found a significant decrease in the % tail DNA in thinner-treated cells after liquid-holding recovery period (all p < 0.05), demonstrating that DNA primary lesions induced by low-cytotoxic thinner concentrations are efficiently repaired. In conclusion, thinner components induce cytotoxicity and genomic damage in human lymphocytes under the study conditions, possibly by oxidative and alkylative DNA damage. PMID:24236478

  3. DNA-Damage Foci to Detect and Characterize DNA Repair Alterations in Children Treated for Pediatric Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Mareike; Betten, Dominik; Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Rübe, Christian; Graf, Norbert; Rübe, Claudia E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In children diagnosed with cancer, we evaluated the DNA damage foci approach to identify patients with double-strand break (DSB) repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging radio- and chemotherapy. In one patient with Fanconi anemia (FA) suffering relapsing squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity we also characterized the repair defect in biopsies of skin, mucosa and tumor. Methods and Materials In children with histologically confirmed tumors or leukemias and healthy control-children DSB repair was investigated by counting γH2AX-, 53BP1- and pATM-foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after ex-vivo irradiation. This DSB repair capacity was correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses. For the FA patient the defective repair was also characterized in tissue biopsies by analyzing DNA damage response proteins by light and electron microscopy. Results Between tumor-children and healthy control-children we observed significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DNA repair. Only 1 out of 4 patients with grade-4 normal-tissue toxicities revealed an impaired DSB repair capacity. The defective DNA repair in FA patient was verified in irradiated blood lymphocytes as well as in non-irradiated mucosa and skin biopsies leading to an excessive accumulation of heterochromatin-associated DSBs in rapidly cycling cells. Conclusions Analyzing human tissues we show that DSB repair alterations predispose to cancer formation at younger ages and affect the susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. DNA damage foci analysis of blood and tissue samples allows one to detect and characterize DSB repair deficiencies and enables identification of patients at risk for high-grade toxicities. However, not all treatment-associated normal-tissue toxicities can be explained by DSB repair deficiencies. PMID:24637877

  4. SNF2H interacts with XRCC1 and is involved in repair of H2O2-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Yoshiko; Shimizu, Shinji; Yasuhira, Shinji; Horiuchi, Saburo

    2016-07-01

    The protein XRCC1 has no inherent enzymatic activity, and is believed to function in base excision repair as a dedicated scaffold component that coordinates other DNA repair factors. Repair foci clearly represent the recruitment and accumulation of DNA repair factors at sites of damage; however, uncertainties remain regarding their organization in the context of nuclear architecture and their biological significance. Here we identified the chromatin remodeling factor SNF2H/SMARCA5 as a novel binding partner of XRCC1, with their interaction dependent on the casein kinase 2-mediated constitutive phosphorylation of XRCC1. The proficiency of repairing H2O2-induced damage was strongly impaired by SNF2H knock-down, and similar impairment was observed with knock-down of both XRCC1 and SNF2H simultaneously, suggesting their role in a common repair pathway. Most SNF2H exists in the nuclear matrix fraction, forming salt extraction-resistant foci-like structures in unchallenged nuclei. Remarkably, damage-induced formation of both PAR and XRCC1 foci depended on SNF2H, and the PAR and XRCC1 foci co-localized with the SNF2H foci. We propose a model in which a base excision repair complex containing damaged chromatin is recruited to specific locations in the nuclear matrix for repair, with this recruitment mediated by XRCC1-SNF2H interaction. PMID:27268481

  5. 49 CFR 1242.36 - Machinery repair and equipment damaged (accounts XX-26-40 and XX-26-48).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Machinery repair and equipment damaged (accounts XX-26-40 and XX-26-48). 1242.36 Section 1242.36 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... FOR RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Equipment § 1242.36 Machinery repair and equipment...

  6. Evaluation of DNA damage in COPD patients and its correlation with polymorphisms in repair genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated a potential link between genetic polymorphisms in genes XRCC1 (Arg399Gln), OGG1 (Ser326Cys), XRCC3 (Thr241Met), and XRCC4 (Ile401Thr) with the level of DNA damage and repair, accessed by comet and micronucleus test, in 51 COPD patients and 51 controls. Methods Peripheral blood was used to perform the alkaline and neutral comet assay; and genetic polymorphisms by PCR/RFLP. To assess the susceptibility to exogenous DNA damage, the cells were treated with methyl methanesulphonate for 1-h or 3-h. After 3-h treatment the % residual damage was calculated assuming the value of 1-h treatment as 100%. The cytogenetic damage was evaluated by buccal micronucleus cytome assay (BMCyt). Results COPD patients with the risk allele XRCC1 (Arg399Gln) and XRCC3 (Thr241Met) showed higher DNA damage by comet assay. The residual damage was higher for COPD with risk allele in the four genes. In COPD patients was showed negative correlation between BMCyt (binucleated, nuclear bud, condensed chromatin and karyorrhexic cells) with pulmonary function and some variant genotypes. Conclusion Our results suggest a possible association between variant genotypes in XRCC1 (Arg399Gln), OGG1 (Ser326Cys), XRCC3 (Thr241Met), and XRCC4 (Ile401Thr), DNA damage and progression of COPD. PMID:24053728

  7. A biophysical model of cell evolution after cytotoxic treatments: Damage, repair and cell response.

    PubMed

    Tomezak, M; Abbadie, C; Lartigau, E; Cleri, F

    2016-01-21

    We present a theoretical agent-based model of cell evolution under the action of cytotoxic treatments, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The major features of cell cycle and proliferation, cell damage and repair, and chemical diffusion are included. Cell evolution is based on a discrete Markov chain, with cells stepping along a sequence of discrete internal states from 'normal' to 'inactive'. Probabilistic laws are introduced for each type of event a cell can undergo during its life: duplication, arrest, senescence, damage, reparation, or death. We adjust the model parameters on a series of cell irradiation experiments, carried out in a clinical LINAC, in which the damage and repair kinetics of single- and double-strand breaks are followed. Two showcase applications of the model are then presented. In the first one, we reconstruct the cell survival curves from a number of published low- and high-dose irradiation experiments. We reobtain a very good description of the data without assuming the well-known linear-quadratic model, but instead including a variable DSB repair probability. The repair capability of the model spontaneously saturates to an exponential decay at increasingly high doses. As a second test, we attempt to simulate the two extreme possibilities of the so-called 'bystander' effect in radiotherapy: the 'local' effect versus a 'global' effect, respectively activated by the short-range or long-range diffusion of some factor, presumably secreted by the irradiated cells. Even with an oversimplified simulation, we could demonstrate a sizeable difference in the proliferation rate of non-irradiated cells, the proliferation acceleration being much larger for the global than the local effect, for relatively small fractions of irradiated cells in the colony. PMID:26549470

  8. The Polycomb Group Protein EZH2 Impairs DNA Damage Repair Gene Expression in Human Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwei; Nair, Sangeeta; Laknaur, Archana; Ismail, Nahed; Diamond, Michael P; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2016-03-01

    Uterine fibroids are benign, smooth muscle tumors that occur in approximately 70%-80% of women by age 50 yr. The cellular and molecular mechanism(s) by which uterine fibroids (UFs) develop are not fully understood. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that several genetic abnormalities, including deletions, rearrangements, translocations, as well as mutations, have been found in UFs. These genetic anomalies suggest that low DNA damage repair capacity may be involved in UF formation. The objective of this study was to determine whether expression levels of DNA damage repair-related genes were altered, and how they were regulated in the pathogenesis of UFs. Expression levels of DNA repair-related genes RAD51 and BRCA1 were deregulated in fibroid tissues as compared to adjacent myometrial tissues. Expression levels of chromatin protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) were higher in a subset of fibroids as compared to adjacent myometrial tissues by both immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Treatment with an inhibitor of EZH2 markedly increased expression levels of RAD51 and BRCA1 in fibroid cells and inhibited cell proliferation paired with cell cycle arrest. Restoring the expression of RAD51 and BRCA1 by treatment with EZH2 inhibitor was dependent on reducing the enrichment of trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 27 epigenetic mark in their promoter regions. This study reveals the important role of EZH2-regulated DNA damage-repair genes via histone methylation in fibroid biology, and may provide novel therapeutic targets for the medical treatment of women with symptomatic UFs. PMID:26888970

  9. An immunochemical approach to the study of DNA damage and repair

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, S.S. . Dept. of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics); Erlanger, B.F. . Dept. of Microbiology)

    1992-05-01

    The overall objective of this project has been to develop immunochemical methods to quantitate unique DNA base damages in order to facilitate studies on radiation-induced damage production and repair. Specifically, we have been using antibodies raised to damaged bases to quantitate unique lesions in model systems in order to evaluate their potential biological consequences. Our approach has been to synthesize modified nucleotides or nucleosides, conjugate them to protein carriers, and use the conjugates as immunogens in rabbits or to prepare monoclonal antibodies. We have been studying damages that are stable radiolysis products found in X-irradiated DNA and thus of potential biological consequence. Our aim is to build an in vitro and in vivo data base on the interactions between model DNA lesions and such cellular enzymes as DNA polymerases and repair endonucleases. Initial studies have focused on pyrimidine ring saturation products (thymine glycol.and dihydrothymine), products resulting from ring fragmentation or base loss (urea, {Beta}-ureidoisobutyric acid, abasic sites), 7-hydro-8-oxopurines, and more recently, cytosine radiolysis products. These modified bases serve as useful models for examining the potential lethal and/or mutagenic (carcinogenic) effects of the products of DNA radiolysis.

  10. Oxidative damage to RPA limits the nucleotide excision repair capacity of human cells

    PubMed Central

    Guven, Melisa; Brem, Reto; Macpherson, Peter; Peacock, Matthew; Karran, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) protects against sunlight-induced skin cancer. Defective NER is associated with photosensitivity and a high skin cancer incidence. Some clinical treatments that cause photosensitivity can also increase skin cancer risk. Among these, the immunosuppressant azathioprine and the fluoroquinolone antibiotics ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin, interact with UVA radiation to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that diminish NER capacity by causing protein damage. The RPA DNA binding protein plays a pivotal role in DNA metabolism and is an essential component of NER. The relationship between protein oxidation and NER inhibition was investigated in cultured human cells expressing different levels of RPA. We show here that RPA is limiting for NER and that oxidative damage to RPA compromises NER capability. Our findings reveal that cellular RPA is surprisingly vulnerable to oxidation and we identify oxidized forms of RPA that are associated with impaired NER. The vulnerability of NER to inhibition by oxidation provides a connection between cutaneous photosensitivity, protein damage and increased skin cancer risk. Our findings emphasize that damage to DNA repair proteins, as well as to DNA itself is likely to be an important contributor to skin cancer risk. PMID:26134950

  11. Spatio-temporal analysis of DNA damage repair using the X-ray microbeam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettino, G.; Ghita, M.; Prise, K. M.

    2010-10-01

    Cellular response to radiation damage is made by a complex network of pathways and feedback loops whose spatiotemporal organization is still unclear despite its decisive role in determining the fate of the damaged cell. The single-cell approach and the high spatial resolution offered by microbeams provide the perfect tool to study and quantify the dynamic processes associated with the induction and repair of DNA damage. The soft X-ray microbeam has been used to follow the development of radiation induced foci in live cells by monitoring their size and intensity as a function of dose and time using yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) tagging techniques. Preliminary data indicate a delayed and linear rising of the intensity signal indicating a slow kinetic for the accumulation of DNA repair protein 53BP1. A slow and limited foci diffusion has also been observed. Further investigations are required to assess whatever such diffusion is consistent with a random walk pattern or if it is the result of a more structured lesion processing phenomenon. In conclusion, our data indicates that the use of microbeams coupled to live cell microscopy represent a sophisticated approach for visualizing and quantifying the dynamics changes of DNA proteins at the damaged sites.

  12. The nucleotide excision repair system of Borrelia burgdorferi is the sole pathway involved in repair of DNA damage by UV light.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Pierre-Olivier; Chaconas, George

    2013-05-01

    To survive and avoid accumulation of mutations caused by DNA damage, the genomes of prokaryotes encode a variety of DNA repair pathways most well characterized in Escherichia coli. Some of these are required for the infectivity of various pathogens. In this study, the importance of 25 DNA repair/recombination genes for Borrelia burgdorferi survival to UV-induced DNA damage was assessed. In contrast to E. coli, where 15 of these genes have an effect on survival of UV irradiation, disruption of recombinational repair, transcription-coupled repair, methyl-directed mismatch correction, and repair of arrested replication fork pathways did not decrease survival of B. burgdorferi exposed to UV light. However, the disruption of the B. burgdorferi nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway (uvrA, uvrB, uvrC, and uvrD) resulted in a 10- to 1,000-fold increase in sensitivity to UV light. A functional NER pathway was also shown to be required for B. burgdorferi resistance to nitrosative damage. Finally, disruption of uvrA, uvrC, and uvrD had only a minor effect upon murine infection by increasing the time required for dissemination. PMID:23475971

  13. New Paradigms in the Repair of Oxidative Damage in Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Arijit; Yang, Chunying; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized bases in the mammalian genome, which are invariably mutagenic due to their mis-pairing property, are continuously induced by endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) and more abundantly after oxidative stress. Unlike bulky base adducts induced by UV and other environmental mutagens in the genome that block replicative DNA polymerases, oxidatively damaged bases such as 5-hydoxyuracil (5-OHU), produced by oxidative deamination of cytosine in the template strand, do not block replicative polymerases and thus need to be repaired prior to replication in order to prevent mutation. Following up our earlier studies, which showed that the Nei endonuclease VIII like 1 (NEIL1) DNA glycosylase, one of five base excision repair (BER)-initiating enzymes in mammalian cells, has enhanced expression during the S-phase and higher affinity for replication fork-mimicking single-stranded (ss) DNA substrates, we recently provided direct experimental evidence for NEIL1’s role in replicating template-strand repair. The key requirement for this event, which we named as the ‘cow-catcher’ mechanism of pre-replicative BER, is NEIL1’s non-productive binding (substrate binding without product formation) to the lesion base in ss DNA template to stall DNA synthesis, causing fork regression. Repair of the lesion in re-annealed duplex is then carried out by NEIL1 in association with the DNA replication proteins. NEIL1 (and other BER-initiating enzymes) also interact with several accessory and non-canonical proteins including the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP-U) and Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) as well as high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), whose precise roles in BER are still obscure. In this review, we have discussed the recent advances in our understanding of oxidative genome damage repair pathways with particular focus on the pre-replicative template strand repair and the role of scaffold factors like X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1

  14. Nrf2 facilitates repair of radiation induced DNA damage through homologous recombination repair pathway in a ROS independent manner in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Sundarraj; Pal, Debojyoti; Sandur, Santosh K

    2015-09-01

    Nrf2 is a redox sensitive transcription factor that is involved in the co-ordinated transcription of genes involved in redox homeostasis. But the role of Nrf2 in DNA repair is not investigated in detail. We have employed A549 and MCF7 cells to study the role of Nrf2 on DNA repair by inhibiting Nrf2 using all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) or by knock down approach prior to radiation exposure (4 Gy). DNA damage and repair analysis was studied by γH2AX foci formation and comet assay. Results suggested that the inhibition of Nrf2 in A549 or MCF7 cells led to significant slowdown in DNA repair as compared to respective radiation controls. The persistence of residual DNA damage even in the presence of free radical scavenger N-acetyl cysteine, suggested that the influence of Nrf2 on DNA repair was not linked to its antioxidant functions. Further, its influence on non-homologous end joining repair pathway was studied by inhibiting both Nrf2 and DNA-PK together. This led to synergistic reduction of survival fraction, indicating that Nrf2 may not be influencing the NHEJ pathway. To investigate the role of homologous recombination repair (HR) pathway, RAD51 foci formation was monitored. There was a significant reduction in the foci formation in cells treated with ATRA or shRNA against Nrf2 as compared to their respective radiation controls. Further, Nrf2 inhibition led to significant reduction in mRNA levels of RAD51. BLAST analysis was also performed on upstream regions of DNA repair genes to identify antioxidant response element and found that many repair genes that are involved in HR pathway may be regulated by Nrf2. Together, these results suggest the involvement of Nrf2 in DNA repair, a hitherto unknown function of Nrf2, putatively through its influence on HR pathway. PMID:26133502

  15. Anhydrobiosis-Associated Nuclear DNA Damage and Repair in the Sleeping Chironomid: Linkage with Radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    Vanyagina, Veronica; Malutina, Ludmila; Cornette, Richard; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kikawada, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Okuda, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Anhydrobiotic chironomid larvae can withstand prolonged complete desiccation as well as other external stresses including ionizing radiation. To understand the cross-tolerance mechanism, we have analyzed the structural changes in the nuclear DNA using transmission electron microscopy and DNA comet assays in relation to anhydrobiosis and radiation. We found that dehydration causes alterations in chromatin structure and a severe fragmentation of nuclear DNA in the cells of the larvae despite successful anhydrobiosis. Furthermore, while the larvae had restored physiological activity within an hour following rehydration, nuclear DNA restoration typically took 72 to 96 h. The DNA fragmentation level and the recovery of DNA integrity in the rehydrated larvae after anhydrobiosis were similar to those of hydrated larvae irradiated with 70 Gy of high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions (4He). In contrast, low-LET radiation (gamma-rays) of the same dose caused less initial damage to the larvae, and DNA was completely repaired within within 24 h. The expression of genes encoding the DNA repair enzymes occurred upon entering anhydrobiosis and exposure to high- and low-LET radiations, indicative of DNA damage that includes double-strand breaks and their subsequent repair. The expression of antioxidant enzymes-coding genes was also elevated in the anhydrobiotic and the gamma-ray-irradiated larvae that probably functions to reduce the negative effect of reactive oxygen species upon exposure to these stresses. Indeed the mature antioxidant proteins accumulated in the dry larvae and the total activity of antioxidants increased by a 3–4 fold in association with anhydrobiosis. We conclude that one of the factors explaining the relationship between radioresistance and the ability to undergo anhydrobiosis in the sleeping chironomid could be an adaptation to desiccation-inflicted nuclear DNA damage. There were also similarities in the molecular response of the larvae to damage caused by

  16. Dietary phytochemicals, HDAC inhibition, and DNA damage/repair defects in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Genomic instability is a common feature of cancer etiology. This provides an avenue for therapeutic intervention, since cancer cells are more susceptible than normal cells to DNA damaging agents. However, there is growing evidence that the epigenetic mechanisms that impact DNA methylation and histone status also contribute to genomic instability. The DNA damage response, for example, is modulated by the acetylation status of histone and non-histone proteins, and by the opposing activities of histone acetyltransferase and histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes. Many HDACs overexpressed in cancer cells have been implicated in protecting such cells from genotoxic insults. Thus, HDAC inhibitors, in addition to unsilencing tumor suppressor genes, also can silence DNA repair pathways, inactivate non-histone proteins that are required for DNA stability, and induce reactive oxygen species and DNA double-strand breaks. This review summarizes how dietary phytochemicals that affect the epigenome also can trigger DNA damage and repair mechanisms. Where such data is available, examples are cited from studies in vitro and in vivo of polyphenols, organosulfur/organoselenium compounds, indoles, sesquiterpene lactones, and miscellaneous agents such as anacardic acid. Finally, by virtue of their genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, cancer chemopreventive agents are being redefined as chemo- or radio-sensitizers. A sustained DNA damage response coupled with insufficient repair may be a pivotal mechanism for apoptosis induction in cancer cells exposed to dietary phytochemicals. Future research, including appropriate clinical investigation, should clarify these emerging concepts in the context of both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms dysregulated in cancer, and the pros and cons of specific dietary intervention strategies. PMID:22247744

  17. Anhydrobiosis-associated nuclear DNA damage and repair in the sleeping chironomid: linkage with radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Gusev, Oleg; Nakahara, Yuichi; Vanyagina, Veronica; Malutina, Ludmila; Cornette, Richard; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Kikawada, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Okuda, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Anhydrobiotic chironomid larvae can withstand prolonged complete desiccation as well as other external stresses including ionizing radiation. To understand the cross-tolerance mechanism, we have analyzed the structural changes in the nuclear DNA using transmission electron microscopy and DNA comet assays in relation to anhydrobiosis and radiation. We found that dehydration causes alterations in chromatin structure and a severe fragmentation of nuclear DNA in the cells of the larvae despite successful anhydrobiosis. Furthermore, while the larvae had restored physiological activity within an hour following rehydration, nuclear DNA restoration typically took 72 to 96 h. The DNA fragmentation level and the recovery of DNA integrity in the rehydrated larvae after anhydrobiosis were similar to those of hydrated larvae irradiated with 70 Gy of high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions ((4)He). In contrast, low-LET radiation (gamma-rays) of the same dose caused less initial damage to the larvae, and DNA was completely repaired within within 24 h. The expression of genes encoding the DNA repair enzymes occurred upon entering anhydrobiosis and exposure to high- and low-LET radiations, indicative of DNA damage that includes double-strand breaks and their subsequent repair. The expression of antioxidant enzymes-coding genes was also elevated in the anhydrobiotic and the gamma-ray-irradiated larvae that probably functions to reduce the negative effect of reactive oxygen species upon exposure to these stresses. Indeed the mature antioxidant proteins accumulated in the dry larvae and the total activity of antioxidants increased by a 3-4 fold in association with anhydrobiosis. We conclude that one of the factors explaining the relationship between radioresistance and the ability to undergo anhydrobiosis in the sleeping chironomid could be an adaptation to desiccation-inflicted nuclear DNA damage. There were also similarities in the molecular response of the larvae to damage caused by

  18. Manipulation of cellular DNA damage repair machinery facilitates propagation of human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Nicholas A; Galloway, Denise A

    2014-06-01

    In general, the interplay among viruses and DNA damage repair (DDR) pathways can be divided based on whether the interaction promotes or inhibits the viral lifecycle. The propagation of human papillomaviruses is both promoted and inhibited by DDR proteins. As a result, HPV proteins both activate repair pathways, such as the ATM and ATR pathways, and inhibit other pathways, most notably the p53 signaling pathway. Indeed, the role of HPV proteins, with regard to the DDR pathways, can be divided into two broad categories. The first set of viral proteins, HPV E1 and E2 activate a DNA damage response and recruit repair proteins to viral replication centers, where these proteins are likely usurped to replicate the viral genome. Because the activation of the DDR response typically elicits a cell cycle arrest that would impeded the viral lifecycle, the second set of HPV proteins, HPV E6 and E7, prevents the DDR response from pausing cell cycle progression or inducing apoptosis. This review provides a detailed account of the interactions among HPV proteins and DDR proteins that facilitate HPV propagation. PMID:24412279

  19. Having a direct look: Analysis of DNA damage and repair mechanisms by next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Bettina; Gartner, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Genetic information is under constant attack from endogenous and exogenous sources, and the use of model organisms has provided important frameworks to understand how genome stability is maintained and how various DNA lesions are repaired. The advance of high throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) provides new inroads for investigating mechanisms needed for genome maintenance. These emerging studies, which aim to link genetic toxicology and mechanistic analyses of DNA repair processes in vivo, rely on defining mutational signatures caused by faulty replication, endogenous DNA damaging metabolites, or exogenously applied genotoxins; the analysis of their nature, their frequency and distribution. In contrast to classical studies, where DNA repair deficiency is assessed by reduced cellular survival, the localization of DNA repair factors and their interdependence as well as limited analysis of single locus reporter assays, NGS based approaches reveal the direct, quantal imprint of mutagenesis genome-wide, at the DNA sequence level. As we will show, such investigations require the analysis of DNA derived from single genotoxin treated cells, or DNA from cell populations regularly passaged through single cell bottlenecks when naturally occurring mutation accumulation is investigated. We will argue that the life cycle of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, its genetic malleability combined with whole genome sequencing provides an exciting model system to conduct such analysis. PMID:25131498

  20. Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin enhances the antitumor efficacy of enediyne lidamycin in association with reduced DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Han, Fei-Fei; Li, Liang; Shang, Bo-Yang; Shao, Rong-Guang; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) leads to inappropriate processing of proteins involved in DNA damage repair pathways after DNA damage and may enhance tumor cell radio- and chemo-therapy sensitivity. To investigate the potentiation of antitumor efficacy of lidamycin (LDM), an enediyne agent by the Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin (GDM), and possible mechanisms, we have determined effects on ovarian cancer SKOV- 3, hepatoma Bel-7402 and HepG2 cells by MTT assay, apoptosis assay, and cell cycle analysis. DNA damage was investigated with H2AX C-terminal phosphorylation (γH2AX) assays. We found that GDM synergistically sensitized SKOV-3 and Bel-7402 cells to the enediyne LDM, and this was accompanied by increased apoptosis. GDM pretreatment resulted in a greater LDM-induced DNA damage and reduced DNA repair as compared with LDM alone. However, in HepG2 cells GDM did not show significant sensitizing effects both in MTT assay and in DNA damage repair. Abrogation of LDM-induced G2/M arrest by GDM was found in SKOV-3 but not in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, the expression of ATM, related to DNA damage repair responses, was also decreased by GDM in SKOV-3 and Bel-7402 cells but not in HepG2 cells. These results demonstrate that Hsp90 inhibitors may potentiate the antitumor efficacy of LDM, possibly by reducing the repair of LDM-induced DNA damage. PMID:25227788

  1. Repair work begins on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery after damage from hail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Standing inside a protective tent around the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), United Space Alliance technician Don Pataky repairs divots caused by hail storms. The Shuttle was rolled back from Pad 39B to the VAB for repairs because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad. The work is expected to take two to three days, allowing Discovery to roll back to the pad late this week for launch of mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program. Liftoff will occur no earlier than May 27. STS- 96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student- shared experiment.

  2. Repair work begins on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery after damage from hail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    United Space Alliance technician Don Pataky repairs one of the hail-created divots in the foam insulation on the external tank of Space Shuttle Discovery. The Shuttle was rolled back from Pad 39B to the Vehicle Assemby Building for repairs because access to all of the damaged areas was not possible at the pad. The work is expected to take two to three days, allowing Discovery to roll back to the pad late this week for launch of mission STS-96, the 94th launch in the Space Shuttle Program. Liftoff will occur no earlier than May 27. STS-96 is a logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-shared experiment.

  3. Brain-peripheral cell crosstalk in white matter damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Lo, Eng H

    2016-05-01

    White matter damage is an important part of cerebrovascular disease and may be a significant contributing factor in vascular mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction and dementia. It is well accepted that white matter homeostasis involves multifactorial interactions between all cells in the axon-glia-vascular unit. But more recently, it has been proposed that beyond cell-cell signaling within the brain per se, dynamic crosstalk between brain and systemic responses such as circulating immune cells and stem/progenitor cells may also be important. In this review, we explore the hypothesis that peripheral cells contribute to damage and repair after white matter damage. Depending on timing, phenotype and context, monocyte/macrophage can possess both detrimental and beneficial effects on oligodendrogenesis and white matter remodeling. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) can be activated after CNS injury and the response may also influence white matter repair process. These emerging findings support the hypothesis that peripheral-derived cells can be both detrimental or beneficial in white matter pathology in cerebrovascular disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia, edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26277436

  4. Space Transportation System (STS)-117 External Tank (ET)-124 Hail Damage Repair Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Timmy R.; Gentz, Steven J.; Barth, Timothy S.; Minute, Stephen A.; Flowers, Cody P.; Hamilton, David A.; Null, Cynthia H.; Schafer, Charles F.

    2009-01-01

    Severe thunderstorms with associated hail and high winds struck the STS-117 stack on February 26, 2007. Peak winds were recorded at 62 knots with hail sizes ranging from 0.3 inch to 0.8 inch in diameter. As a result of the storm, the North Carolina Foam Institute (NCFI) type 24-124 Thermal Protection System (TPS) foam on the liquid oxygen (LO2) ogive acreage incurred significant impact damage. The NCFI on the ET intertank and the liquid hydrogen (LH2) acreage sustained hail damage. The Polymer Development Laboratory (PDL)-1034 foam of the LO2 ice frost ramps (IFRs) and the Super-Lightweight Ablator (SLA) of the LO2 cable tray also suffered minor damage. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was asked to assess the technical feasibility of repairing the ET TPS, the reasonableness of conducting those repairs with the vehicle in a vertical, integrated configuration at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vehicle Assemble Building (VAB), and to address attendant human factors considerations including worker fatigue and the potential for error. The outcome of the assessment is recorded in this document.

  5. Molecular mechanisms of DNA damage recognition for mammalian nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2016-08-01

    For faithful DNA repair, it is crucial for cells to locate lesions precisely within the vast genome. In the mammalian global genomic nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, this difficult task is accomplished through multiple steps, in which the xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein complex plays a central role. XPC senses the presence of oscillating 'normal' bases in the DNA duplex, and its binding properties contribute to the extremely broad substrate specificity of NER. Unlike XPC, which acts as a versatile sensor of DNA helical distortion, the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) is more specialized, recognizing UV-induced photolesions and facilitating recruitment of XPC. Recent single-molecule analyses and structural studies have advanced our understanding of how UV-DDB finds its targets, particularly in the context of chromatin. After XPC binds DNA, it is necessary to verify the presence of damage in order to avoid potentially deleterious incisions at damage-free sites. Accumulating evidence suggests that XPA and the helicase activity of transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) cooperate to verify abnormalities in DNA chemistry. This chapter reviews recent findings about the mechanisms underlying the efficiency, versatility, and accuracy of NER. PMID:27264556

  6. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-01-18

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization. During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.

  7. DNA Damage Response Factors from Diverse Pathways, Including DNA Crosslink Repair, Mediate Alternative End Joining

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Sean M.; Yanez, Diana A.; Stark, Jeremy M.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative end joining (Alt-EJ) chromosomal break repair involves bypassing classical non-homologous end joining (c-NHEJ), and such repair causes mutations often with microhomology at the repair junction. Since the mediators of Alt-EJ are not well understood, we have sought to identify DNA damage response (DDR) factors important for this repair event. Using chromosomal break reporter assays, we surveyed an RNAi library targeting known DDR factors for siRNAs that cause a specific decrease in Alt-EJ, relative to an EJ event that is a composite of Alt-EJ and c-NHEJ (Distal-EJ between two tandem breaks). From this analysis, we identified several DDR factors that are specifically important for Alt-EJ relative to Distal-EJ. While these factors are from diverse pathways, we also found that most of them also promote homologous recombination (HR), including factors important for DNA crosslink repair, such as the Fanconi Anemia factor, FANCA. Since bypass of c-NHEJ is likely important for both Alt-EJ and HR, we disrupted the c-NHEJ factor Ku70 in Fanca-deficient mouse cells and found that Ku70 loss significantly diminishes the influence of Fanca on Alt-EJ. In contrast, an inhibitor of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) causes a decrease in Alt-EJ that is enhanced by Ku70 loss. Additionally, the helicase/nuclease DNA2 appears to have distinct effects from FANCA and PARP on both Alt-EJ, as well as end resection. Finally, we found that the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib, a cancer therapeutic that has been shown to disrupt FANC signaling, causes a significant reduction in both Alt-EJ and HR, relative to Distal-EJ, as well as a substantial loss of end resection. We suggest that several distinct DDR functions are important for Alt-EJ, which include promoting bypass of c-NHEJ and end resection. PMID:25629353

  8. Dictyostelium discoideum, a lower eukaryote model for the study of DNA repair: Implications for the role of DNA-damaging chemicals in the evolution of repair proficient cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deering, R. A.

    1994-10-01

    The evolution of the ability of living cells to cope with stress is crucial for the maintenance of their genetic integrity. Yet low levels of mutation must remain to allow adaptation to environmental changes. The cellular slime mold D. discoideum is a good system for studying molecular aspects of the repair of lethal and mutagenic damage to DNA by radiation and chemicals. The wild-type strains of this soil microorganism are extremely resistant to DNA damaging agents. In nature the amoeboid cells in their replicative stage feed on soil bacteria and are exposed to numerous DNA-damaging chemicals produced by various soil microorganisms. It is probable that the evolution of repair systems in this organism and perhaps in others is a consequence of the necessity to cope with chemical damage which also confers resistance to radiation.

  9. Dictyostelium discoideum, a lower eukaryote model for the study of DNA repair: implications for the role of DNA-damaging chemicals in the evolution of repair proficient cells.

    PubMed

    Deering, R A

    1994-10-01

    The evolution of the ability of living cells to cope with stress is crucial for the maintenance of their genetic integrity. Yet low levels of mutation must remain to allow adaptation to environmental changes. The cellular slime mold D. discoideum is a good system for studying molecular aspects of the repair of lethal and mutagenic damage to DNA by radiation and chemicals. The wild-type strains of this soil microorganism are extremely resistant to DNA damaging agents. In nature the amoeboid cells in their replicative stage feed on soil bacteria and are exposed to numerous DNA-damaging chemicals produced by various soil microorganisms. It is probable that the evolution of repair systems in this organism and perhaps in others is a consequence of the necessity to cope with chemical damage which also confers resistance to radiation. PMID:11539974

  10. DNA with Damage in Both Strands as Affinity Probes and Nucleotide Excision Repair Substrates.

    PubMed

    Lukyanchikova, N V; Petruseva, I O; Evdokimov, A N; Silnikov, V N; Lavrik, O I

    2016-03-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a multistep process of recognition and elimination of a wide spectrum of damages that cause significant distortions in DNA structure, such as UV-induced damage and bulky chemical adducts. A series of model DNAs containing new bulky fluoro-azidobenzoyl photoactive lesion dC(FAB) and well-recognized nonnucleoside lesions nFlu and nAnt have been designed and their interaction with repair proteins investigated. We demonstrate that modified DNA duplexes dC(FAB)/dG (probe I), dC(FAB)/nFlu+4 (probe II), and dC(FAB)/nFlu-3 (probe III) have increased (as compared to unmodified DNA, umDNA) structure-dependent affinity for XPC-HR23B (Kdum > KdI > KdII ≈ KdIII) and differentially crosslink to XPC and proteins of NER-competent extracts. The presence of dC(FAB) results in (i) decreased melting temperature (ΔTm = -3°C) and (ii) 12° DNA bending. The extended dC(FAB)/dG-DNA (137 bp) was demonstrated to be an effective NER substrate. Lack of correlation between the affinity to XPC-HR23B and substrate properties of the model DNA suggests a high impact of the verification stage on the overall NER process. In addition, DNAs containing closely positioned, well-recognized lesions in the complementary strands represent hardly repairable (dC(FAB)/nFlu+4, dC(FAB)/nFlu-3) or irreparable (nFlu/nFlu+4, nFlu/nFlu-3, nAnt/nFlu+4, nAnt/nFlu-3) structures. Our data provide evidence that the NER system of higher eukaryotes recognizes and eliminates damaged DNA fragments on a multi-criterion basis. PMID:27262196

  11. DNA damage and repair in oncogenic transformation by heavy ion radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T. C.; Mei, M.; George, K. A.; Craise, L. M.

    Energetic heavy ions are present in galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events. One of the most important late effects in risk assessment is carcinogenesis. We have studied the carcinogenic effects of heavy ions at the cellular and molecular levels and have obtained quantitative data on dose-response curves and on the repair of oncogenic lesions for heavy particles with various charges and energies. Studies with repair inhibitors and restriction endonucleases indicated that for oncogenic transformation DNA is the primary target. Results from heavy ion experiments showed that the cross section increased with LET and reached a maximum value of about 0.02 mum^2 at about 500 keV/mum. This limited size of cross section suggests that only a fraction of cellular genomic DNA is important in radiogenic transformation. Free radical scavengers, such as DMSO, do not give any effect on induction of oncogenic transformation by 600 MeV/u iron particles, suggesting most oncogenic damage induced by high-LET heavy ions is through direct action. Repair studies with stationary phase cells showed that the amount of reparable oncogenic lesions decreased with an increase of LET and that heavy ions with LET greater than 200 keV/mum produced only irreparable oncogenic damage. An enhancement effect for oncogenic transformation was observed in cells irradiated by low-dose-rate argon ions (400 MeV/u; 120 keV/mum). Chromosomal aberrations, such as translocation and deletion, but not sister chromatid exchange, are essential for heavy-ion-induced oncogenic transformation. The basic mechanism(s) of misrepair of DNA damage, which form oncogenic lesions, is unknown.

  12. DNA damage and repair in oncogenic transformation by heavy ion radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Mei, M.; George, K. A.; Craise, L. M.

    1996-01-01

    Energetic heavy ions are present in galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events. One of the most important late effects in risk assessment is carcinogenesis. We have studied the carcinogenic effects of heavy ions at the cellular and molecular levels and have obtained quantitative data on dose-response curves and on the repair of oncogenic lesions for heavy particles with various charges and energies. Studies with repair inhibitors and restriction endonucleases indicated that for oncogenic transformation DNA is the primary target. Results from heavy ion experiments showed that the cross section increased with LET and reached a maximum value of about 0.02 micrometer2 at about 500 keV/micrometer. This limited size of cross section suggests that only a fraction of cellular genomic DNA is important in radiogenic transformation. Free radical scavengers, such as DMSO, do not give any effect on induction of oncogenic transformation by 600 MeV/u iron particles, suggesting most oncogenic damage induced by high-LET heavy ions is through direct action. Repair studies with stationary phase cells showed that the amount of reparable oncogenic lesions decreased with an increase of LET and that heavy ions with LET greater than 200 keV/micrometer produced only irreparable oncogenic damage. An enhancement effect for oncogenic transformation was observed in cells irradiated by low-dose-rate argon ions (400 MeV/u; 120 keV/micrometer). Chromosomal aberrations, such as translocation and deletion, but not sister chromatid exchange, are essential for heavy-ion-induced oncogenic transformation. The basic mechanism(s) of misrepair of DNA damage, which form oncogenic lesions, is unknown.

  13. Stationary-Phase Persisters to Ofloxacin Sustain DNA Damage and Require Repair Systems Only during Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Völzing, Katherine G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic infections are a serious health care problem, and bacterial persisters have been implicated in infection reoccurrence. Progress toward finding antipersister therapies has been slow, in part because of knowledge gaps regarding the physiology of these rare phenotypic variants. Evidence shows that growth status is important for survival, as nongrowing cultures can have 100-fold more persisters than growing populations. However, additional factors are clearly important, as persisters remain rare even in nongrowing populations. What features, beyond growth inhibition, allow persisters to survive antibiotic stress while the majority of their kin succumb to it remains an open question. To investigate this, we used stationary phase as a model nongrowing environment to study Escherichia coli persistence to ofloxacin. Given that the prevailing model of persistence attributes survival to transient dormancy and antibiotic target inactivity, we anticipated that persisters would suffer less damage than their dying kin. However, using genetic mutants, flow cytometry, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and persistence assays, we discovered that nongrowing ofloxacin persisters experience antibiotic-induced damage that is indistinguishable from that of nonpersisters. Consistent with this, we found that these persisters required DNA repair for survival and that repair machinery was unnecessary until the posttreatment recovery period (after ofloxacin removal). These findings suggest that persistence to ofloxacin is not engendered solely by reduced antibiotic target corruption, demonstrate that what happens following antibiotic stress can be critical to the persistence phenotype, and support the notion that inhibition of DNA damage repair systems could be an effective strategy to eliminate fluoroquinolone persisters. PMID:26330511

  14. Role of the translationally controlled tumor protein in DNA damage sensing and repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; de Toledo, Sonia M; Pandey, Badri N; Guo, Guozheng; Pain, Debkumar; Li, Hong; Azzam, Edouard I

    2012-04-17

    The translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is essential for survival by mechanisms that as yet are incompletely defined. Here we describe an important role of TCTP in response to DNA damage. Upon exposure of normal human cells to low-dose γ rays, the TCTP protein level was greatly increased, with a significant enrichment in nuclei. TCTP up-regulation occurred in a manner dependent on ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and the DNA-dependent protein kinase and was associated with protective effects against DNA damage. In chromatin of irradiated cells, coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that TCTP forms a complex with ATM and γH2A.X, in agreement with its distinct localization with the foci of the DNA damage-marker proteins γH2A.X, 53BP1, and P-ATM. In cells lacking TCTP, repair of chromosomal damage induced by γ rays was compromised significantly. TCTP also was shown to interact with p53 and the DNA-binding subunits, Ku70 and Ku80, of DNA-dependent protein kinase. TCTP knockdown led to decreased levels of Ku70 and Ku80 in nuclei of irradiated cells and attenuated their DNA-binding activity. It also attenuated the radiation-induced G(1) delay but prolonged the G(2) delay. TCTP therefore may play a critical role in maintaining genomic integrity in response to DNA-damaging agents. PMID:22451927

  15. Elevated metals compromise repair of oxidative DNA damage via the base excision repair pathway: implications of pathologic iron overload in the brain on integrity of neuronal DNA.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Swiercz, Rafal; Englander, Ella W

    2009-09-01

    Tissue-specific iron content is tightly regulated to simultaneously satisfy specialized metabolic needs and avoid cytotoxicity. In the brain, disruption of iron homeostasis may occur in acute as well as progressive injuries associated with neuronal dysfunction and death. We hypothesized that adverse effects of disrupted metal homeostasis on brain function may involve impairment of DNA repair processes. Because in the brain, the base excision repair (BER) pathway is central for handling oxidatively damaged DNA, we investigated effects of elevated iron and zinc on key BER enzymes. In vitro DNA repair assays revealed inhibitory effects of metals on BER activities, including the incision of abasic sites, 5'-flap cleavage, gap filling DNA synthesis and ligation. Using the comet assay, we showed that while metals at concentrations which inhibit BER activities in in vitro assays, did not induce direct genomic damage in cultured primary neurons, they significantly delayed repair of genomic DNA damage induced by sublethal exposure to H(2)O(2). Thus, in the brain even a mild transient metal overload, may adversely affect the DNA repair capacity and thereby compromise genomic integrity and initiate long-term deleterious sequelae including neuronal dysfunction and death. PMID:19619136

  16. miR-638 suppresses DNA damage repair by targeting SMC1A expression in terminally differentiated cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Mingyang; Lin, Yi; Tang, Yunlan; Liu, Yi; Zhou, Weiwei; Li, Chuang; Sun, Guihong; Guo, Mingxiong

    2016-01-01

    The reduction of DNA damage repair capacity in terminally differentiated cells may be involved in sensitivity to cancer chemotherapy drugs; however, the underlying molecular mechanism is still not fully understood. Herein, we evaluated the role of miR-638 in the regulation of DNA damage repair in terminally differentiated cells. Our results show that miR-638 expression was up-regulated during cellular terminal differentiation and involved in mediating DNA damage repair processes. Results from a luciferase reporting experiment show that structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC)1A was a potential target of miR-638; this was verified by western blot assays during cell differentiation and DNA damage induction. Overexpression of miR-638 enhanced the sensitivity of cancer cells to cisplatin, thus reducing cell viability in response to chemotherapy drug treatment. Furthermore, miR-638 overexpression affected DNA damage repair processes by interfering with the recruitment of the DNA damage repair-related protein, γH2AX, to DNA break sites. These findings indicate that miR-638 might act as a sensitizer in cancer chemotherapy and accompany chemotherapy drugs to enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy and to improve the chance of recovery from cancer. PMID:27405111

  17. miR-638 suppresses DNA damage repair by targeting SMC1A expression in terminally differentiated cells.

    PubMed

    He, Mingyang; Lin, Yi; Tang, Yunlan; Liu, Yi; Zhou, Weiwei; Li, Chuang; Sun, Guihong; Guo, Mingxiong

    2016-07-01

    The reduction of DNA damage repair capacity in terminally differentiated cells may be involved in sensitivity to cancer chemotherapy drugs; however, the underlying molecular mechanism is still not fully understood. Herein, we evaluated the role of miR-638 in the regulation of DNA damage repair in terminally differentiated cells. Our results show that miR-638 expression was up-regulated during cellular terminal differentiation and involved in mediating DNA damage repair processes. Results from a luciferase reporting experiment show that structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC)1A was a potential target of miR-638; this was verified by western blot assays during cell differentiation and DNA damage induction. Overexpression of miR-638 enhanced the sensitivity of cancer cells to cisplatin, thus reducing cell viability in response to chemotherapy drug treatment. Furthermore, miR-638 overexpression affected DNA damage repair processes by interfering with the recruitment of the DNA damage repair-related protein, γH2AX, to DNA break sites. These findings indicate that miR-638 might act as a sensitizer in cancer chemotherapy and accompany chemotherapy drugs to enhance chemotherapeutic efficacy and to improve the chance of recovery from cancer. PMID:27405111

  18. DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms and Their Relation With DNA Damage, DNA Repair, and Total Antioxidant Capacity in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Survivors.

    PubMed

    Dincer, Yildiz; Yüksel, Selin; Batar, Bahadir; Güven, Mehmet; Onaran, Ilhan; Celkan, Tiraje

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative stress and defective DNA repair are major contributory factors in the initiation and progression of carcinogenesis. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy cause oxidative DNA damage, consume antioxidant capacity, and impair DNA repair activity. These effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy may be contributory factors in the development of secondary malignancy in cancer survivors. Basal, H2O2-induced, and postrepair DNA damage; urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine level as a marker of oxidatively damaged DNA; and serum total antioxidant capacity were measured; XPD Lys751Gln, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, and XRCC1 Arg194Trp polymorphisms were analyzed in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors. Basal and H2O2-induced DNA damage were found to be higher in the ALL survivor group versus the control group, however, there was no significant difference between the other parameters. No association was found between the examined parameters and polymorphisms of XPD 751 and XRCC1 399 and both the groups. XRCC1 194Trp allele was found to be associated with a low level of postrepair DNA damage in the ALL survivors. In conclusion, basal DNA damage and susceptibility to oxidation are high in childhood ALL survivors. This situation which may easily lead to occurrence of a secondary cancer does not seem to be a result of deficient DNA repair. PMID:24577548

  19. Temperature dependency of the repair of sublethal damage in cultured fish cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mitani, H.; Egami, N.

    1984-01-01

    Established culture fish cells, CAF-MMMI, derived form the goldfish, Carassium auratus, were able to grow and form colonies over a temperature range from 20 to 33/sup 0/ C. While the growth rate of these cells was dependent on incubation temperature, colony formation had no effect on cell survival after ..gamma.. irradiation at high dose rates. The lethal effect of ..gamma.. rays was decreased at low dose rates at 20-33/sup 0/ C, but not at 6/sup 0/ C. Similarly, split-dose experiments showed that recovery from sublethal damage occurred at the higher temperatures, but not at 6/sup 0/ C. These data are consistent with the in vivo data on the effect of temperature on the radiosensitivity and repair of sublethal damage reported previously for live fish.

  20. Mutational Strand Asymmetries in Cancer Genomes Reveal Mechanisms of DNA Damage and Repair.

    PubMed

    Haradhvala, Nicholas J; Polak, Paz; Stojanov, Petar; Covington, Kyle R; Shinbrot, Eve; Hess, Julian M; Rheinbay, Esther; Kim, Jaegil; Maruvka, Yosef E; Braunstein, Lior Z; Kamburov, Atanas; Hanawalt, Philip C; Wheeler, David A; Koren, Amnon; Lawrence, Michael S; Getz, Gad

    2016-01-28

    Mutational processes constantly shape the somatic genome, leading to immunity, aging, cancer, and other diseases. When cancer is the outcome, we are afforded a glimpse into these processes by the clonal expansion of the malignant cell. Here, we characterize a less explored layer of the mutational landscape of cancer: mutational asymmetries between the two DNA strands. Analyzing whole-genome sequences of 590 tumors from 14 different cancer types, we reveal widespread asymmetries across mutagenic processes, with transcriptional ("T-class") asymmetry dominating UV-, smoking-, and liver-cancer-associated mutations and replicative ("R-class") asymmetry dominating POLE-, APOBEC-, and MSI-associated mutations. We report a striking phenomenon of transcription-coupled damage (TCD) on the non-transcribed DNA strand and provide evidence that APOBEC mutagenesis occurs on the lagging-strand template during DNA replication. As more genomes are sequenced, studying and classifying their asymmetries will illuminate the underlying biological mechanisms of DNA damage and repair. PMID:26806129

  1. Oxidative DNA damage and its repair in rat spleen following subchronic exposure to aniline

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Huaxian; Wang Jianling; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z.; Boor, Paul J.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2008-12-01

    The mechanisms by which aniline exposure elicits splenotoxic response, especially the tumorigenic response, are not well-understood. Splenotoxicity of aniline is associated with iron overload and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can cause oxidative damage to DNA, proteins and lipids (oxidative stress). 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is one of the most abundant oxidative DNA lesions resulting from ROS, and 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (OGG1), a specific DNA glycosylase/lyase enzyme, plays a key role in the removal of 8-OHdG adducts. This study focused on examining DNA damage (8-OHdG) and repair (OGG1) in the spleen in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. To achieve that, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subchronically exposed to aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water for 30 days), while controls received drinking water only. Aniline treatment led to a significant increase in splenic oxidative DNA damage, manifested as a 2.8-fold increase in 8-OHdG levels. DNA repair activity, measured as OGG1 base excision repair (BER) activity, increased by {approx} 1.3 fold in the nuclear protein extracts (NE) and {approx} 1.2 fold in the mitochondrial protein extracts (ME) of spleens from aniline-treated rats as compared to the controls. Real-time PCR analysis for OGG1 mRNA expression in the spleen revealed a 2-fold increase in expression in aniline-treated rats than the controls. Likewise, OGG1 protein expression in the NEs of spleens from aniline-treated rats was {approx} 1.5 fold higher, whereas in the MEs it was {approx} 1.3 fold higher than the controls. Aniline treatment also led to stronger immunostaining for both 8-OHdG and OGG1 in the spleens, confined to the red pulp areas. It is thus evident from our studies that aniline-induced oxidative stress is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage. The BER pathway was also activated, but not enough to prevent the accumulation of oxidative DNA damage (8-OHdG). Accumulation of

  2. Magnetic resonance techniques to quantify tissue damage, tissue repair, and functional cortical reorganization in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Filippi, M; Agosta, F

    2009-01-01

    A dramatic paradigm shift is taking place in our understanding of the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). An important contribution to such a shift has been made possible by the advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology, which allows structural damage to be quantified in the brains of patients with MS and to be followed over the course of the disease. Modern quantitative MR techniques have reshaped the picture of MS, leading to the definition of the so- called "axonal hypothesis" (i.e., changes in axonal metabolism, morphology, or density are important determinants of functional impairment in MS). Metrics derived from magnetization transfer and diffusion-weighted MRI enable us to quantify the extent of structural changes occurring within T2-visible lesions and normal-appearing tissues (including gray matter), with increased pathological specificity over conventional MRI to irreversible tissue damage; proton MR spectroscopy adds valuable pieces of information on the biochemical nature of such changes. Finally, functional MRI can provide new insights into the role of cortical adaptive changes in limiting the clinical consequences of MS-related irreversible structural damage. Our current understanding of the pathophysiology of MS is that this is not only a disease of the white matter, characterized by focal inflammatory lesions, but also a disease involving more subtle and diffuse damage throughout the white and gray matter. The inflammatory and neurodegenerative components of the disease process are present from the earliest observable phases of the disease, but appear to be, at least partially, dissociated. In addition, recovery and repair play an important role in the genesis of the clinical manifestations of the disease, involving both structural changes and plastic reorganization of the cortex. This new picture of MS has important implications in the context of treatment options, since it suggests that agents that protect against

  3. Telomere-related functions of yeast KU in the repair of bleomycin-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Tam, Angela T Y; Pike, Brietta L; Hammet, Andrew; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2007-06-01

    Bleomycins are small glycopeptide cancer chemotherapeutics that give rise to 3'-modified DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, DSBs are predominantly repaired by RAD52-dependent homologous recombination (HR) with some support by Yku70/Yku80 (KU)-dependent pathways. The main DSB repair function of KU is believed to be as part of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway, but KU also functions in a "chromosome healing" pathway that seals DSBs by de novo telomere addition. We report here that rad52Deltayku70Delta double mutants are considerably more bleomycin hypersensitive than rad52Deltalig4Delta cells that lack the NHEJ-specific DNA ligase 4. Moreover, the telomere-specific KU mutation yku80-135i also dramatically increases rad52Delta bleomycin hypersensitivity, almost to the level of rad52Deltayku80Delta. The results indicate that telomere-specific functions of KU play a more prominent role in the repair of bleomycin-induced damage than its NHEJ functions, which could have important clinical implications for bleomycin-based combination chemotherapies. PMID:17442269

  4. Essential roles of Jab1 in cell survival, spontaneous DNA damage and DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Tian, L; Peng, G; Parant, J M; Leventaki, V; Drakos, E; Zhang, Q; Parker-Thornburg, J; Shackleford, T J; Dai, H; Lin, S-Y; Lozano, G; Rassidakis, G Z; Claret, F X

    2010-11-18

    Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (JAB1) is a multifunctional protein that participates in the control of cell proliferation and the stability of multiple proteins. JAB1 overexpression has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human cancer. JAB1 regulates several key proteins and thereby produces varied effects on cell cycle progression, genome stability and cell survival. However, the biological significance of JAB1 activity in these cellular signaling pathways is unclear. Therefore, we developed mice that were deficient in Jab1 and analyzed the null embryos and heterozygous cells. This disruption of Jab1 in mice resulted in early embryonic lethality due to accelerated apoptosis. Loss of Jab1 expression sensitized both mouse primary embryonic fibroblasts and osteosarcoma cells to γ-radiation-induced apoptosis, with an increase in spontaneous DNA damage and homologous recombination (HR) defects, both of which correlated with reduced levels of the DNA repair protein Rad51 and elevated levels of p53. Furthermore, the accumulated p53 directly binds to Rad51 promoter, inhibits its activity and represents a major mechanism underlying the HR repair defect in Jab1-deficient cells. These results indicate that Jab1 is essential for efficient DNA repair and mechanistically link Jab1 to the maintenance of genome integrity and to cell survival. PMID:20802511

  5. DNA repair in cells sensitive and resistant to cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II): Host cell reactivation of damaged plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sheibani, N.; Jennerwein, M.M.; Eastman, A. )

    1989-04-04

    cis-Diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP) has a broad clinical application as an effective anticancer drug. However, development of resistance to the cytotoxic effects is a limiting factor. In an attempt to understand the mechanism of resistance, the authors have employed a host cell reactivation assay of DNA repair using a cis-DDP-damaged plasmid vector. The efficiency of DNA repair was assayed by measuring the activity of an enzyme coded for by the plasmid vector. The plasmid expression vector pRSV cat contains the bacterial gene coding for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in a configuration which permits expression in mammalian cells. The plasmid was transfected into repair-proficient and -deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells, and CAT activity was subsequently measured in cell lysates. In the repair-deficient cells, one cis-DDP adduct per cat gene was sufficient to eliminate expression. An equivalent inhibition of CAT expression in the repair-proficient cells did not occur until about 8 times the amount of damage was introduced into the plasmid. These results implicate DNA intrastrand cross-links as the lesions responsible for the inhibition of CAT expression. This assay was used to investigate the potential role of DNA repair in mediating cis-DDP resistance in murine leukemia L1210 cells. The assay readily detects the presence or absence of repair and confirms that these resistant L1210 cells have an enhanced capacity for repair of cis-DDP-induced intrastrand cross-links.

  6. DNA damage and repair in human peripheral blood lymphocytes following treatment with microcystin-LR.

    PubMed

    Lankoff, Anna; Krzowski, Łukasz; Głab, Joanna; Banasik, Anna; Lisowska, Halina; Kuszewski, Tomasz; Góźdź, Stanisław; Wójcik, Andrzej

    2004-04-11

    The purpose of this study was to find a possible explanation of the inconsistency of data regarding the genotoxicity of microcystin-LR (MC-LR). We compared the results of the comet assay with the results of the analysis of chromosome aberrations and apoptosis. In order to investigate the influence of MC-LR on DNA damage in human lymphocytes, cells were treated with MC-LR at different concentrations (1, 10 and 25 microg/ml) for 6, 12, 18 and 24 h. Analyses of Olive Tail Moment (OTM) as an indicator of DNA damage showed that MC-LR treatment induced DNA damage in a time-dependent manner, reaching its maximum after 18 h. The lowest values of OTM were observed after 24 h. MC-LR had no effect on the frequency of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes. Since some data available in the literature indicate that apoptosis may lead to overestimated or false positive results regarding the genotoxicity of mutagens in the comet assay, we measured the frequency of late apoptotic cells by use of the comet assay and the frequency of early apoptotic cells with the TUNEL method. The comet assay results revealed that the highest level of apoptosis was observed after 24 h and the lowest after 18 h. The comparison of the frequency of apoptotic cells determined by the comet assay with DNA damage (OTM) examined by the comet assay revealed a statistically significant, negative correlation. The TUNEL results showed that the frequency of apoptotic cells progressively increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The comparison of the frequency of apoptotic cells determined by TUNEL method with DNA damage (OTM) examined by the comet assay showed a significant positive correlation for lymphocytes treated with MC-LR for 6, 12 and 18 h. Therefore, our findings indicate that microcystin-LR-induced DNA damage observed in the comet assay may be related to the early stages of apoptosis due to cytotoxicity but not genotoxicity. In addition, we examined the DNA repair kinetics in lymphocytes

  7. Regulation of homologous recombinational repair by lamin B1 in radiation-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning-Ang; Sun, Jiying; Kono, Kazuteru; Horikoshi, Yasunori; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Tong, Xing; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Tashiro, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the major lethal lesion induced by ionizing radiation (IR). RAD51-dependent homologous recombination (HR) is one of the most important pathways in DSB repair and genome integrity maintenance. However, the mechanism of HR regulation by RAD51 remains unclear. To understand the mechanism of RAD51-dependent HR, we searched for interacting partners of RAD51 by a proteomics analysis and identified lamin B1 in human cells. Lamins are nuclear lamina proteins that play important roles in the structural organization of the nucleus and the regulation of chromosome functions. Immunoblotting analyses revealed that siRNA-mediated lamin B1 depletion repressed the DNA damage-dependent increase of RAD51 after IR. The repression was abolished by the proteasome inhibitor MG132, suggesting that lamin B1 stabilizes RAD51 by preventing proteasome-mediated degradation in cells with IR-induced DNA damage. We also showed that lamin B1 depletion repressed RAD51 focus formation and decreased the survival rates after IR. On the basis of these results, we propose that lamin B1 promotes DSB repair and cell survival by maintaining the RAD51 protein levels for HR upon DSB induction after IR. PMID:25733566

  8. A novel endonuclease that may be responsible for damaged DNA base repair in Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Miyako; Ishino, Sonoko; Yamagami, Takeshi; Egashira, Yuriko; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2015-01-01

    DNA is constantly damaged by endogenous and environmental influences. Deaminated adenine (hypoxanthine) tends to pair with cytosine and leads to the A:T→G:C transition mutation during DNA replication. Endonuclease V (EndoV) hydrolyzes the second phosphodiester bond 3′ from deoxyinosine in the DNA strand, and was considered to be responsible for hypoxanthine excision repair. However, the downstream pathway after EndoV cleavage remained unclear. The activity to cleave the phosphodiester bond 5′ from deoxyinosine was detected in a Pyrococcus furiosus cell extract. The protein encoded by PF1551, obtained from the mass spectrometry analysis of the purified fraction, exhibited the corresponding cleavage activity. A putative homolog from Thermococcus kodakarensis (TK0887) showed the same activity. Further biochemical analyses revealed that the purified PF1551 and TK0887 proteins recognize uracil, xanthine and the AP site, in addition to hypoxanthine. We named this endonuclease Endonuclease Q (EndoQ), as it may be involved in damaged base repair in the Thermococcals of Archaea. PMID:25694513

  9. Repair of clustered DNA damage caused by high LET radiation in human fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Lobrich, M.; Cooper, P. K.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated experimentally that DNA damage induced by high LET radiation in mammalian cells is non-randomly distributed along the DNA molecule in the form of clusters of various sizes. The sizes of such clusters range from a few base-pairs to at least 200 kilobase-pairs. The high biological efficiency of high LET radiation for induction of relevant biological endpoints is probably a consequence of this clustering, although the exact mechanisms by which the clustering affects the biological outcome is not known. We discuss here results for induction and repair of base damage, single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks for low and high LET radiations. These results are discussed in the context of clustering. Of particular interest is to determine how clustering at different scales affects overall rejoining and fidelity of rejoining of DNA double-strand breaks. However, existing methods for measuring repair of DNA strand breaks are unable to resolve breaks that are close together in a cluster. This causes problems in interpretation of current results from high LET radiation and will require new methods to be developed.

  10. Viral AlkB proteins repair RNA damage by oxidative demethylation

    PubMed Central

    van den Born, Erwin; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Bekkelund, Anders; Leihne, Vibeke; Koonin, Eugene V.; Dolja, Valerian V.; Falnes, Pål Ø.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial and mammalian AlkB proteins are iron(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that reverse methylation damage, such as 1-methyladenine and 3-methylcytosine, in RNA and DNA. An AlkB-domain is encoded by the genome of numerous single-stranded, plant-infecting RNA viruses, the majority of which belong to the Flexiviridae family. Our phylogenetic analysis of AlkB sequences suggests that a single plant virus might have acquired AlkB relatively recently, followed by horizontal dissemination among other viruses via recombination. Here, we describe the first functional characterization of AlkB proteins from three plant viruses. The viral AlkB proteins efficiently reactivated methylated bacteriophage genomes when expressed in Escherichia coli, and also displayed robust, iron(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent demethylase activity in vitro. Viral AlkB proteins preferred RNA over DNA substrates, and thus represent the first AlkBs with such substrate specificity. Our results suggest a role for viral AlkBs in maintaining the integrity of the viral RNA genome through repair of deleterious methylation damage, and support the notion that AlkB-mediated RNA repair is biologically relevant. PMID:18718927

  11. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D. )

    1991-07-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links.

  12. DNA damage induced by boron neutron capture therapy is partially repaired by DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Natsuko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Hirota, Yuki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Narabayashi, Masaru; Kinashi, Yuko; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ohnishi, Takeo; Ono, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a particle radiation therapy that involves the use of a thermal or epithermal neutron beam in combination with a boron ((10)B)-containing compound that specifically accumulates in tumor. (10)B captures neutrons and the resultant fission reaction produces an alpha ((4)He) particle and a recoiled lithium nucleus ((7)Li). These particles have the characteristics of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and therefore have marked biological effects. High-LET radiation is a potent inducer of DNA damage, specifically of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of DNA ligase IV, a key player in the non-homologous end-joining repair pathway, in the repair of BNCT-induced DSBs. We analyzed the cellular sensitivity of the mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines Lig4-/- p53-/- and Lig4+/+ p53-/- to irradiation using a thermal neutron beam in the presence or absence of (10)B-para-boronophenylalanine (BPA). The Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line had a higher sensitivity than the Lig4+/+ p53-/-cell line to irradiation with the beam alone or the beam in combination with BPA. In BNCT (with BPA), both cell lines exhibited a reduction of the 50 % survival dose (D 50) by a factor of 1.4 compared with gamma-ray and neutron mixed beam (without BPA). Although it was found that (10)B uptake was higher in the Lig4+/+ p53-/- than in the Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line, the latter showed higher sensitivity than the former, even when compared at an equivalent (10)B concentration. These results indicate that BNCT-induced DNA damage is partially repaired using DNA ligase IV. PMID:26573366

  13. Enzyme plus light therapy to repair DNA damage in ultraviolet-B-irradiated human skin

    PubMed Central

    Stege, Helger; Roza, Len; Vink, Arie A.; Grewe, Markus; Ruzicka, Thomas; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Krutmann, Jean

    2000-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UVB) (290–320 nm) radiation-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers within the DNA of epidermal cells are detrimental to human health by causing mutations and immunosuppressive effects that presumably contribute to photocarcinogenesis. Conventional photoprotection by sunscreens is exclusively prophylactic in nature and of no value once DNA damage has occurred. In this paper, we have therefore assessed whether it is possible to repair UVB radiation-induced DNA damage through topical application of the DNA-repair enzyme photolyase, derived from Anacystis nidulans, that specifically converts cyclobutane dimers into their original DNA structure after exposure to photoreactivating light. When a dose of UVB radiation sufficient to induce erythema was administered to the skin of healthy subjects, significant numbers of dimers were formed within epidermal cells. Topical application of photolyase-containing liposomes to UVB-irradiated skin and subsequent exposure to photoreactivating light decreased the number of UVB radiation-induced dimers by 40–45%. No reduction was observed if the liposomes were not filled with photolyase or if photoreactivating exposure preceded the application of filled liposomes. The UVB dose administered resulted in suppression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), a molecule required for immunity and inflammatory events in the epidermis. In addition, in subjects hypersensitive to nickel sulfate, elicitation of the hypersensitivity reaction in irradiated skin areas was prevented. Photolyase-induced dimer repair completely prevented these UVB radiation-induced immunosuppressive effects as well as erythema and sunburn-cell formation. These studies demonstrate that topical application of photolyase is effective in dimer reversal and thereby leads to immunoprotection. PMID:10660687

  14. ATR suppresses endogenous DNA damage and allows completion of homologous recombination repair.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam D; Sager, Brian W; Gorthi, Aparna; Tonapi, Sonal S; Brown, Eric J; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication fork stalling or collapse that arises from endogenous damage poses a serious threat to genome stability, but cells invoke an intricate signaling cascade referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR) to prevent such damage. The gene product ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) responds primarily to replication stress by regulating cell cycle checkpoint control, yet it's role in DNA repair, particularly homologous recombination (HR), remains unclear. This is of particular interest since HR is one way in which replication restart can occur in the presence of a stalled or collapsed fork. Hypomorphic mutations in human ATR cause the rare autosomal-recessive disease Seckel syndrome, and complete loss of Atr in mice leads to embryonic lethality. We recently adapted the in vivo murine pink-eyed unstable (pun) assay for measuring HR frequency to be able to investigate the role of essential genes on HR using a conditional Cre/loxP system. Our system allows for the unique opportunity to test the effect of ATR loss on HR in somatic cells under physiological conditions. Using this system, we provide evidence that retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells lacking ATR have decreased density with abnormal morphology, a decreased frequency of HR and an increased level of chromosomal damage. PMID:24675793

  15. Rapamycin‐induced autophagy sensitizes A549 cells to radiation associated with DNA damage repair inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Liu, Fen; Wang, Yong; Li, Donghai; Guo, Fei; Xu, Liyao; Zeng, Zhengguo; Zhong, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Autophagy has been reported to increase in cancer cells after radiation. However, it remains unknown whether increased autophagy as a result of radiation affects DNA damage repair and sensitizes cancer cells. In this study, the radiosensitization effect of rapamycin, a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor that induces autophagy, on human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells was investigated. Methods A549 cells were treated with different concentrations of rapamycin. Cell viability was evaluated by methyl‐thiazolyl‐tetrazolium assay. Survival fraction values of A549 cells after radiotherapy were detected by colony formation assay. Autophagosome was observed by a transmission electron microscope. Furthermore, Western blot was employed to examine alterations in autophagy protein LC3 and p62, DNA damage protein γ–H2AX, and DNA damage repair proteins Rad51, Ku70, and Ku80. Rad51, Ku70, and Ku80 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expression levels were examined by real‐time polymerase chain reaction. Results Rapamycin suppressed A549 cell proliferation in dose and time‐dependent manners. An inhibitory concentration (IC) 10 dose of rapamycin could induce autophagy in A549 cells. Rapamycin combined with radiation significantly decreased the colony forming ability of cells, compared with rapamycin or radiation alone. Rapamycin and radiation combined increased γ–H2AX expression levels and decreased Rad51 and Ku80 expression levels, compared with single regimens. However, rapamycin treatment did not induce any change in Rad51, Ku70, and Ku80 mRNA levels, regardless of radiation. Conclusions These findings indicate that increasing autophagy sensitizes lung cancer cells to radiation. PMID:27385978

  16. Modulation of oxidative DNA damage by repair enzymes XRCC1 and hOGG1.

    PubMed

    Rihs, Hans-Peter; Marczynski, Boleslaw; Lotz, Anne; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The influence of DNA repair gene polymorphisms (XRCC1: Arg194Trp, Arg280His, Arg399Gln; APE1: Asp148Glu; hOGG1: Ser326Cys) on oxidative DNA damage is controversial and was investigated in 214 German workers with occupational exposure to vapors and aerosols of bitumen,compared to 87 German construction workers without exposure, who were part of the Human Bitumen Study. Genotypes were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and actual smoking habits by a questionnaire and cotinine analysis. Oxidative DNA damage in white blood cells (WBC) collected pre- and postshift was measured as 8-oxodGuo adducts/10(6) dGuo by a hjigh-performance liquid chromatography electron capture detection (HPLC-ECD) method, followed by calculation of the difference between post- and preshift values (Δ8-oxodGuo/10(6) dGuo). The 214 bitumen exposed workers showed higher median Δ8-oxodGuo values than the 87 references. In the whole study group (n=301) there was a trend for increasing adduct values for XRCC1 Arg(GG)399Gln(AA) during a shift, especially in nonsmokers (n=108. Referents (n=87) displayed a similar trend for hOGG1 Ser(CC)326Cys(GG). In contrast, XRCC1 Arg(GG)280His(AA) showed a decrease of median Δ8-oxodGuo/10(6) dGuo values in workers with exposure to vapors and aerosols of bitumen (n=214), especially in smokers (n=145). XRCC1 Arg194Trp and APE1 Asp148Glu displayed no marked association with Δ8-oxodGuo levels. Data indicate that the combination of different variants in DNA damage repair enzymes may modulate the production of 8-oxoguanine adducts in WBC produced by xenobiotics during a shift. PMID:22686320

  17. A rapid, comprehensive system for assaying DNA repair activity and cytotoxic effects of DNA-damaging reagents.

    PubMed

    Jia, Nan; Nakazawa, Yuka; Guo, Chaowan; Shimada, Mayuko; Sethi, Mieran; Takahashi, Yoshito; Ueda, Hiroshi; Nagayama, Yuji; Ogi, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    DNA repair systems protect cells from genomic instability and carcinogenesis. Therefore, assays for measuring DNA repair activity are valuable, not only for clinical diagnoses of DNA repair deficiency disorders but also for basic research and anticancer drug development. Two commonly used assays are UDS (unscheduled DNA synthesis, requiring a precise measurement of an extremely small amount of repair DNA synthesis) and RRS (recovery of RNA synthesis after DNA damage). Both UDS and RRS are major endpoints for assessing the activity of nucleotide excision repair (NER), the most versatile DNA repair process. Conventional UDS and RRS assays are laborious and time-consuming, as they measure the incorporation of radiolabeled nucleosides associated with NER. Here we describe a comprehensive protocol for monitoring nonradioactive UDS and RRS by studying the incorporation of alkyne-conjugated nucleoside analogs followed by a fluorescent azide-coupling click-chemistry reaction. The system is also suitable for quick measurement of cell sensitivity to DNA-damaging reagents and for lentivirus-based complementation assays, which can be used to systematically determine the pathogenic genes associated with DNA repair deficiency disorders. A typical UDS or RRS assay using primary fibroblasts, including a virus complementation test, takes 1 week to complete. PMID:25474029

  18. Properties of damage-dependent DNA incision by nucleotide excision repair in human cell-free extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Calsou, P; Salles, B

    1994-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the primary mechanism for the removal of many lesions from DNA. This repair process can be broadly divided in two stages: first, incision at damaged sites and second, synthesis of new DNA to replace the oligonucleotide removed by excision. In order to dissect the repair mechanism, we have recently devised a method to analyze the incision reaction in vitro in the absence of repair synthesis (1). Damage-specific incisions take place in a repair reaction in which mammalian cell-free extracts are mixed with undamaged and damaged plasmids. Most of the incision events are accompanied by excision. Using this assay, we investigated here various parameters that specifically affect the level of damage-dependent incision activity by cell-free extracts in vitro. We have defined optimal conditions for the reaction and determined the kinetics of the incision with cell-free extracts from human cells. We present direct evidence that the incision step of NER is ATP-dependent. In addition, we observe that Mn2+ but no other divalent cation can substitute for Mg2+ in the incision reaction. Images PMID:7800483

  19. Structural performance of notch damaged steel beams repaired with composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Taly, Boshra

    2016-06-01

    An experimental program and an analytical model using ANSYS program were employed to estimate the structural performance of repaired damaged steel beams using fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials. The beams were artificially notched in the tension flanges at mid-spans and retrofitted by FRP flexible sheets on the tension flanges and the sheets were extended to cover parts of the beams webs with different heights. Eleven box steel beams, including one intact beam, one notch damaged beam and nine notches damaged beam and retrofitted with composite materials, were tested in two-point loading up to failure. The parameters considered were the FRP type (GFRP and CFRP) and number of layers. The results indicated that bonding CFRP sheets to both of the tension steel flange and part of the webs, instead of the tension flange only, enhances the ultimate load of the retrofitted beams, avoids the occurrence of the debonding and increases the beam ductility. Also the numerical models give acceptable results in comparison with the experimental results.

  20. Structural performance of notch damaged steel beams repaired with composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Taly, Boshra

    2016-03-01

    An experimental program and an analytical model using ANSYS program were employed to estimate the structural performance of repaired damaged steel beams using fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite materials. The beams were artificially notched in the tension flanges at mid-spans and retrofitted by FRP flexible sheets on the tension flanges and the sheets were extended to cover parts of the beams webs with different heights. Eleven box steel beams, including one intact beam, one notch damaged beam and nine notches damaged beam and retrofitted with composite materials, were tested in two-point loading up to failure. The parameters considered were the FRP type (GFRP and CFRP) and number of layers. The results indicated that bonding CFRP sheets to both of the tension steel flange and part of the webs, instead of the tension flange only, enhances the ultimate load of the retrofitted beams, avoids the occurrence of the debonding and increases the beam ductility. Also the numerical models give acceptable results in comparison with the experimental results.

  1. Review of spaceflight and hindlimb suspension unloading induced sarcomere damage and repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, D. A.; Thompson, J. L.; Krippendorf, B. B.; Slocum, G. R.

    1995-01-01

    Hindlimb suspension unloading (HSU) and spaceflight microgravity induce atrophy of the slow adductor longus muscle fibers which, following reloading, exhibit eccentric contraction (EC)-like lesions (abnormal widening of sarcomeres with A band disruption and excessively wavy, extracted Z lines). These lesions are similar morphologically to those produced in normal muscles after strenuous eccentric exercise. It appears that atrophic muscles exhibit increased susceptibility to eccentric damage because lesions are produced during nonstressful voluntary movements upon return to weightbearing. The EC-like lesions are absent in the unweighted conditions, but appear in HSU rats 15-60 minutes after reloading and in space-flown rates about 4 hrs after landing. By 12 hours, many EC-like lesioned sarcomeres are fully covered by longitudinal patches of Z line-like material which increases in density by 48 hours, producing the so-called "Z line streaming" morphology. In this case, Z line streaming is indicative of rapid repair of damaged sarcomeres rather than the onset of sarcomere breakdown. Immunoelectron microscopy is necessary to determine the composition of this dense material. By 9 days of reloading at 1 gravity, sarcomeres have regained normal structure, except for very rare persistence of faint Z patches. The morphological data indicate that Z patches serve at least two functions: 1) to permit contractile force to be transmitted across the damaged sarcomeres and 2) to provide a scaffold upon which sarcomeres are reconstructed in an active functional muscle.

  2. The mitochondria-targeted nitroxide JP4-039 augments potentially lethal irradiation damage repair.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Malolan S; Gupta, Kanika; Epperly, Michael W; Franicola, Darcy; Zhang, Xichen; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Hong; Tyurin, Vladimir A; Pierce, Joshua G; Kagan, Valerian E; Wipf, Peter; Kanai, Anthony J; Greenberger, Joel S

    2009-01-01

    It was unknown if a mitochondria-targeted nitroxide (JP4-039) could augment potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) of cells in quiescence. We evaluated 32D cl 3 murine hematopoietic progenitor cells which were irradiated and then either centrifuged to pellets (to simulate PLDR conditions) or left in exponential growth for 0, 24, 48 or 72 h. Pelleted cells demonstrated cell cycle arrest with a greater percentage in the G(1)-phase than did exponentially growing cells. Irradiation survival curves demonstrated a significant radiation damage mitigation effect of JP4-039 over untreated cells in cells pelleted for 24 h. No significant radiation mitigation was detected if drugs were added 48 or 72 h after irradiation. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrated a greater concentration of JP4-039 in mitochondria of 24 h-pelleted cells than in exponentially growing cells. These results establish a potential role of mitochondria-targeted nitroxide drugs as mitigators of radiation damage to quiescent cells including stem cells. PMID:19779106

  3. XPC is essential for nucleotide excision repair of zidovudine-induced DNA damage in human hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Qiangen; Beland, Frederick A.; Chang, Ching-Wei; Fang Jialong

    2011-03-01

    Zidovudine (3'-azido-3'-dexoythymidine, AZT), a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, can be incorporated into DNA and cause DNA damage. The mechanisms underlying the repair of AZT-induced DNA damage are unknown. To investigate the pathways involved in the recognition and repair of AZT-induced DNA damage, human hepatoma HepG2 cells were incubated with AZT for 2 weeks and the expression of DNA damage signaling pathways was determined using a pathway-based real-time PCR array. Compared to control cultures, damaged DNA binding and nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathways showed significantly increased gene expression. Further analysis indicated that AZT treatment increased the expression of genes associated with NER, including XPC, XPA, RPA1, GTF2H1, and ERCC1. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the protein levels of XPC and GTF2H1 were also significantly up-regulated. To explore further the function of XPC in the repair of AZT-induced DNA damage, XPC expression was stably knocked down by 71% using short hairpin RNA interference. In the XPC knocked-down cells, 100 {mu}M AZT treatment significantly increased [{sup 3}H]AZT incorporation into DNA, decreased the total number of viable cells, increased the release of lactate dehydrogenase, induced apoptosis, and caused a more extensive G2/M cell cycle arrest when compared to non-transfected HepG2 cells or HepG2 cells transfected with a scrambled short hairpin RNA sequence. Overall, these data indicate that XPC plays an essential role in the NER repair of AZT-induced DNA damage.

  4. Alpha-phellandrene-induced DNA damage and affect DNA repair protein expression in WEHI-3 murine leukemia cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Wu, Chih-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Although there are few reports regarding α-phellandrene (α-PA), a natural compound from Schinus molle L. essential oil, there is no report to show that α-PA induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression. Herein, we investigated the effects of α-PA on DNA damage and repair associated protein expression in murine leukemia cells. Flow cytometric assay was used to measure the effects of α-PA on total cell viability and the results indicated that α-PA induced cell death. Comet assay and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride staining were used for measuring DNA damage and condensation, respectively, and the results indicated that α-PA induced DNA damage and condensation in a concentration-dependent manner. DNA gel electrophoresis was used to examine the DNA damage and the results showed that α-PA induced DNA damage in WEHI-3 cells. Western blotting assay was used to measure the changes of DNA damage and repair associated protein expression and the results indicated that α-PA increased p-p53, p-H2A.X, 14-3-3-σ, and MDC1 protein expression but inhibited the protein of p53, MGMT, DNA-PK, and BRCA-1. PMID:24861204

  5. Complementation of DNA repair in xeroderma pigmentosum group A cell extracts by a protein with affinity for damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Robins, P; Jones, C J; Biggerstaff, M; Lindahl, T; Wood, R D

    1991-12-01

    Complementation group A of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) represents one of the most prevalent and serious forms of this cancer-prone disorder. Because of a marked defect in DNA excision repair, cells from individuals with XP-A are hypersensitive to the toxic and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light and many chemical agents. We report here the isolation of the XP-A DNA repair protein by complementation of cell extracts from a repair-defective human XP-A cell line. XP-A protein purified from calf thymus migrates on denaturing gel electrophoresis as a doublet of 40 and 42 kilodaltons. The XP-A protein binds preferentially to ultraviolet light-irradiated DNA, with a preference for damaged over nondamaged nucleotides of approximately 10(3). This strongly suggests that the XP-A protein plays a direct role in the recognition of and incision at lesions in DNA. We further show that this protein corresponds to the product encoded by a recently isolated gene that can restore excision repair to XP-A cells. Thus, excision repair of plasmid DNA by cell extracts sufficiently resembles genomic repair in cells to reveal accurately the repair defect in an inherited disease. The general approach described here can be extended to the identification and isolation of other human DNA repair proteins. PMID:1935910

  6. Complementation of DNA repair in xeroderma pigmentosum group A cell extracts by a protein with affinity for damaged DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Robins, P; Jones, C J; Biggerstaff, M; Lindahl, T; Wood, R D

    1991-01-01

    Complementation group A of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) represents one of the most prevalent and serious forms of this cancer-prone disorder. Because of a marked defect in DNA excision repair, cells from individuals with XP-A are hypersensitive to the toxic and mutagenic effects of ultraviolet light and many chemical agents. We report here the isolation of the XP-A DNA repair protein by complementation of cell extracts from a repair-defective human XP-A cell line. XP-A protein purified from calf thymus migrates on denaturing gel electrophoresis as a doublet of 40 and 42 kilodaltons. The XP-A protein binds preferentially to ultraviolet light-irradiated DNA, with a preference for damaged over nondamaged nucleotides of approximately 10(3). This strongly suggests that the XP-A protein plays a direct role in the recognition of and incision at lesions in DNA. We further show that this protein corresponds to the product encoded by a recently isolated gene that can restore excision repair to XP-A cells. Thus, excision repair of plasmid DNA by cell extracts sufficiently resembles genomic repair in cells to reveal accurately the repair defect in an inherited disease. The general approach described here can be extended to the identification and isolation of other human DNA repair proteins. Images PMID:1935910

  7. Human mismatch repair, drug-induced DNA damage, and secondary cancer.

    PubMed

    Karran, Peter; Offman, Judith; Bignami, Margherita

    2003-11-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is an important replication error avoidance mechanism that prevents mutation. The association of defective MMR with familial and sporadic gastrointestinal and endometrial cancer has been acknowledged for some years. More recently, it has become apparent that MMR defects are common in acute myeloid leukaemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (AML/MDS) that follows successful chemotherapy for a primary malignancy. Therapy-related haematological malignancies are often associated with treatment with alkylating agents. Their frequency is increasing and they now account for at least 10% of all AML cases. There is also evidence for an association between MMR deficient AML/MDS and immunosuppressive treatment with thiopurine drugs. Here we review how MMR interacts with alkylating agent and thiopurine-induced DNA damage and suggest possible ways in which MMR defects may arise in therapy-related AML/MDS. PMID:14726020

  8. Assessment of Damage to Nucleic Acids and Repair Machinery in Salmonella typhimurium Exposed to Chlorine

    PubMed Central

    Phe, M. H.; Hajj Chehade, M.; Guilloteau, H.; Merlin, C.; Block, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    Water disinfection is usually evaluated using mandatory methods based on cell culturability. However, such methods do not consider the potential of cells to recover, which should also be kept as low as possible. In this paper, we hypothesized that a successful disinfection is achieved only when the applied chlorine leads to both intracellular nucleic acid damage and strong alterations of the DNA repair machinery. Monitoring the SOS system responsiveness with a umuC’-‘lacZ reporter fusion, we found that the expression of this important cellular machinery was altered after the beginning of membrane permeabilization but prior to the total decline of both the cell culturability and the nucleic acid integrity as revealed by Sybr-II staining. Rapid measurement of such nucleic acid alterations by fluorochrome-based staining could be used as an alternative method for assessing the effectiveness of disinfection with chlorine. PMID:19936107

  9. Impact of Alternative DNA Structures on DNA Damage, DNA Repair, and Genetic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guliang; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive genomic sequences can adopt a number of alternative DNA structures that differ from the canonical B-form duplex (i.e. non-B DNA). These non-B DNA-forming sequences have been shown to have many important biological functions related to DNA metabolic processes; for example, they may have regulatory roles in DNA transcription and replication. In addition to these regulatory functions, non-B DNA can stimulate genetic instability in the presence or absence of DNA damage, via replication-dependent and/or replication-independent pathways. This review focuses on the interactions of non-B DNA conformations with DNA repair proteins and how these interactions impact genetic instability. PMID:24767258

  10. Inhibition of Topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1): DNA Damage Repair and Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Her, Chengtao

    2015-01-01

    Most chemotherapy regimens contain at least one DNA-damaging agent that preferentially affects the growth of cancer cells. This strategy takes advantage of the differences in cell proliferation between normal and cancer cells. Chemotherapeutic drugs are usually designed to target rapid-dividing cells because sustained proliferation is a common feature of cancer [1,2]. Rapid DNA replication is essential for highly proliferative cells, thus blocking of DNA replication will create numerous mutations and/or chromosome rearrangements—ultimately triggering cell death [3]. Along these lines, DNA topoisomerase inhibitors are of great interest because they help to maintain strand breaks generated by topoisomerases during replication. In this article, we discuss the characteristics of topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1) and its inhibitors, as well as the underlying DNA repair pathways and the use of TOP1 inhibitors in cancer therapy. PMID:26287259

  11. Shuttle Damage/Repair from the Perspective of Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition - Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; Berry, Scott A.; Merski, N. Ronald; Berger, Karen T.; Buck, Gregory M.; Liechty, Derek S.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2006-01-01

    An overview is provided of the experimental wind tunnel program conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center Aerothermodynamics Laboratory in support of an agency-wide effort to prepare the Shuttle Orbiter for Return-to-Flight. The effect of an isolated protuberance and an isolated rectangular cavity on hypersonic boundary layer transition onset on the windward surface of the Shuttle Orbiter has been experimentally characterized. These experimental studies were initiated to provide a protuberance and cavity effects database for developing hypersonic transition criteria to support on-orbit disposition of thermal protection system damage or repair. In addition, a synergistic experimental investigation was undertaken to assess the impact of an isolated mass-flow entrainment source (simulating pyrolysis/outgassing from a proposed tile repair material) on boundary layer transition. A brief review of the relevant literature regarding hypersonic boundary layer transition induced from cavities and localized mass addition from ablation is presented. Boundary layer transition results were obtained using 0.0075-scale Orbiter models with simulated tile damage (rectangular cavities) of varying length, width, and depth and simulated tile damage or repair (protuberances) of varying height. Cavity and mass addition effects were assessed at a fixed location (x/L = 0.3) along the model centerline in a region of near zero pressure gradient. Cavity length-to-depth ratio was systematically varied from 2.5 to 17.7 and length-to-width ratio of 1 to 8.5. Cavity depth-to-local boundary layer thickness ranged from 0.5 to 4.8. Protuberances were located at several sites along the centerline and port/starboard attachment lines along the chine and wing leading edge. Protuberance height-to-boundary layer thickness was varied from approximately 0.2 to 1.1. Global heat transfer images and heating distributions of the Orbiter windward surface using phosphor thermography were used to infer the

  12. Targeting Chk2 improves gastric cancer chemotherapy by impairing DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-González, A; Belda-Iniesta, C; Bargiela-Iparraguirre, J; Dominguez, G; García Alfonso, P; Perona, R; Sanchez-Perez, I

    2013-03-01

    Our results demonstrate that the addition of cisplatin after paclitaxel-induced mitotic arrest was more effective than individual treatment on gastric adenocarcinoma cells (MKN45). However, the treatment did not induce benefits in cells derived from lymph node metastasis (ST2957). Time-lapse microscopy revealed that cell death was caused by mitotic catastrophe and apoptosis induction, as the use of the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk decreased cell death. We propose that the molecular mechanism mediating this cell fate is a slippage suffered by these cells, given that our Western blot (WB) analysis revealed premature cyclin B degradation. This resulted in the cell exiting from mitosis without undergoing DNA damage repair, as demonstrated by the strong phosphorylation of H2AX. A comet assay indicated that DNA repair was impaired, and Western blotting showed that the Chk2 protein was degraded after sequential treatment (paclitaxel-cisplatin). Based on these results, the modulation of cell death during mitosis may be an effective strategy for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:23271172

  13. Imbalance between Endothelial Damage and Repair: A Gateway to Cardiovascular Disease in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is accelerated in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and it leads to excessive cardiovascular complications in these patients. Despite the improved awareness of cardiovascular disease and advent of clinical diagnostics, the process of atherogenesis in most patients remains clinically silent until symptoms and signs of cardiovascular complications develop. As evidence has demonstrated that vascular damage is already occurring before clinically overt cardiovascular disease develops in lupus patients, intervention at the preclinical stage of atherogenesis would be plausible. Indeed, endothelial dysfunction, one of the earliest steps of atherogenesis, has been demonstrated to occur in lupus patients even when they are naïve for cardiovascular disease. Currently known “endothelium-toxic” factors including type 1 interferon, proinflammatory cytokines, inflammatory cells, immune complexes, costimulatory molecules, neutrophils extracellular traps, lupus-related autoantibodies, oxidative stress, and dyslipidemia, coupled with the aberrant functions of the endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) which are crucial to vascular repair, likely tip the balance towards endothelial dysfunction and propensity to develop cardiovascular disease in lupus patients. In this review, altered physiology of the endothelium, factors leading to perturbed vascular repair contributed by lupus EPC and the impact of proatherogenic factors on the endothelium which potentially lead to atherosclerosis in lupus patients will be discussed. PMID:24790989

  14. Neuron Growth on Carbon Nanotube Thread Bio-Scaffolds for Repair of Central Nervous System Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, David; Pixley, Sarah; Schulz, Mark; Shanov, Vessilin

    2012-02-01

    Approximately 11,000 new spinal cord injuries occur each year. Repairing such central nervous system (CNS) damage has proven to be very difficult. We report on in vitro experiments using carbon nanotube (CNT) threads as a bio-scaffold for promoting CNS repair via directed neuron regrowth along the CNT material. Mouse brain neurospheres, containing neuronal stem cells, neurons and support glia, were observed to attach to and grow along laminin-coated CNT threads in vitro. However, due to their limited mobility, only neurospheres close to the threads attach. To increase cellular attachment to the threads, we exploit the fact that these cells can exhibit enhanced, directed migration along an externally applied electric field. Recent in vitro cell growth was carried out in chambers containing several parallel CNT threads with electrical connections extending out of the incubator so that a voltage applied across adjacent threads established an appropriate electric field. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy, Cyclic Voltammetry and dc and ac IV measurements were used to monitor cell growth and attachment as a function of applied electric field and time. Cell migration and attachment were also investigated using time lapse photography in a separate growth chamber mounted on the stage of an optical microscope.

  15. Three nth homologs are all required for efficient repair of spontaneous DNA damage in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xiaoting; Xu, Xin; Li, Mingfeng; Wang, Chao; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2012-05-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is a bacterium that can survive extreme DNA damage. To understand the role of endonuclease III (Nth) in oxidative repair and mutagenesis, we constructed nth single, double and triple mutants. The nth mutants showed no significant difference with wild type in both IR resistance and H(2)O(2) resistance. We characterized these strains with regard to mutation rates and mutation spectrum using the rpoB/Rif(r) system. The Rif(r) frequency of mutant MK1 (△dr0289) was twofold higher than that of wild type. The triple mutant of nth (ME3)generated a mutation frequency 34.4-fold, and a mutation rate 13.8-fold higher than the wild type. All strains demonstrated specific mutational hotspots. Each single mutant had higher spontaneous mutation frequency than wild type at base substitution (G:C → A:T). The mutational response was further increased in the double and triple mutants. The higher mutation rate and mutational response in ME3 suggested that the three nth homologs had non-overlapped and overlapped substrate spectrum in endogenous oxidative DNA repair. PMID:22527041

  16. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status.

    PubMed

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena; Lindegren, Sture; Jensen, Holger; Bäck, Tom; Swanpalmer, John; Elmroth, Kecke

    2014-07-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation and much less is known of high-LET irradiation. In this paper we investigated the DNA damage response and biological consequences to photons from Cobolt-60 ((60)Co) and alpha particles from (211)At in normal primary thyrocytes of different cell cycle status. For both radiation qualities the intensity levels of γH2AX decreased during the first 24h in both cycling and stationary cultures and complete repair was seen in all cultures but cycling cells exposed to (211)At. Compared to stationary cells alpha particles were more harmful for cycling cultures, an effect also seen at the pChk2 levels. Increasing ratios of micronuclei per cell nuclei were seen up to 1Gy (211)At. We found that primary thyrocytes were much more sensitive to alpha particle exposure compared with low-LET photons. Calculations of the relative biological effectiveness yielded higher RBE for cycling cells compared with stationary cultures at a modest level of damage, clearly demonstrating that cell cycle status influences the relative effectiveness of alpha particles. PMID:24769180

  17. ShaPINg Cell Fate Upon DNA Damage: Role of Pin1 Isomerase in DNA Damage-Induced Cell Death and Repair.

    PubMed

    Polonio-Vallon, Tilman; Krüger, Daniel; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2014-01-01

    The peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1 acts as a molecular timer in proline-directed Ser/Thr kinase signaling and shapes cellular responses based on recognition of phosphorylation marks and implementing conformational changes in its substrates. Accordingly, Pin1 has been linked to numerous phosphorylation-controlled signaling pathways and cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, Pin1 plays a pivotal role in DNA damage-triggered cell fate decisions. Whereas moderate DNA damage is balanced by DNA repair, cells confronted with massive genotoxic stress are eliminated by the induction of programed cell death or cellular senescence. In this review, we summarize and discuss the current knowledge on how Pin1 specifies cell fate through regulating key players of the apoptotic and the repair branch of the DNA-damage response. PMID:24982848

  18. How does pycnogenol® influence oxidative damage to DNA and its repair ability in elderly people?

    PubMed

    Dvořáková, M; Paduchová, Z; Muchová, J; Duračková, Z; Collins, A R

    2010-01-01

    Our purpose in this randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study was to find out the possible effect of a polyphenolic pine bark extract, Pycnogenol® (Pyc) on the level of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) as representative of oxidative damage to DNA and on the DNA repair ability of elderly people. According to our results, three months of Pyc administration had no effect on the level of oxidative damage to DNA or on repair ability, but we found a relationship between the level of 8-oxoG and repair ability of DNA in this group. To conclude, even if the positive effect of Pyc was not confirmed in the case of elderly people it is important to highlight the necessity of further investigations about the mechanisms of Pyc acting on different age groups. PMID:21189165

  19. HMGB1 facilitates repair of mitochondrial DNA damage and extends the lifespan of mutant ataxin-1 knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hikaru; Fujita, Kyota; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Chen, Xigui; Homma, Hidenori; Sasabe, Toshikazu; Shimizu, Jun; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Tamura, Takuya; Muramatsu, Shin-ichi; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Mutant ataxin-1 (Atxn1), which causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), binds to and impairs the function of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a crucial nuclear protein that regulates DNA architectural changes essential for DNA damage repair and transcription. In this study, we established that transgenic or virus vector-mediated complementation with HMGB1 ameliorates motor dysfunction and prolongs lifespan in mutant Atxn1 knock-in (Atxn1-KI) mice. We identified mitochondrial DNA damage repair by HMGB1 as a novel molecular basis for this effect, in addition to the mechanisms already associated with HMGB1 function, such as nuclear DNA damage repair and nuclear transcription. The dysfunction and the improvement of mitochondrial DNA damage repair functions are tightly associated with the exacerbation and rescue, respectively, of symptoms, supporting the involvement of mitochondrial DNA quality control by HMGB1 in SCA1 pathology. Moreover, we show that the rescue of Purkinje cell dendrites and dendritic spines by HMGB1 could be downstream effects. Although extracellular HMGB1 triggers inflammation mediated by Toll-like receptor and receptor for advanced glycation end products, upregulation of intracellular HMGB1 does not induce such side effects. Thus, viral delivery of HMGB1 is a candidate approach by which to modify the disease progression of SCA1 even after the onset. PMID:25510912

  20. Regenerative repair of damaged meniscus with autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Lee, Sang Hee

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are defined as pluripotent cells found in numerous human tissues, including bone marrow and adipose tissue. Such MSCs, isolated from bone marrow and adipose tissue, have been shown to differentiate into bone and cartilage, along with other types of tissues. Therefore, MSCs represent a promising new therapy in regenerative medicine. The initial treatment of meniscus tear of the knee is managed conservatively with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy. When such conservative treatment fails, an arthroscopic resection of the meniscus is necessary. However, the major drawback of the meniscectomy is an early onset of osteoarthritis. Therefore, an effective and noninvasive treatment for patients with continuous knee pain due to damaged meniscus has been sought. Here, we present a review, highlighting the possible regenerative mechanisms of damaged meniscus with MSCs (especially adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs)), along with a case of successful repair of torn meniscus with significant reduction of knee pain by percutaneous injection of autologous ASCs into an adult human knee. PMID:24592390

  1. Cell and gene therapy for arrhythmias: Repair of cardiac conduction damage

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yong-Fu

    2011-01-01

    Action potentials generated in the sinoatrial node (SAN) dominate the rhythm and rate of a healthy human heart. Subsequently, these action potentials propagate to the whole heart via its conduction system. Abnormalities of impulse generation and/or propagation in a heart can cause arrhythmias. For example, SAN dysfunction or conduction block of the atrioventricular node can lead to serious bradycardia which is currently treated with an implanted electronic pacemaker. On the other hand, conduction damage may cause reentrant tachyarrhythmias which are primarily treated pharmacologically or by medical device-based therapies, including defibrillation and tissue ablation. However, drug therapies sometimes may not be effective or are associated with serious side effects. Device-based therapies for cardiac arrhythmias, even with well developed technology, still face inadequacies, limitations, hardware complications, and other challenges. Therefore, scientists are actively seeking other alternatives for antiarrhythmic therapy. In particular, cells and genes used for repairing cardiac conduction damage/defect have been investigated in various studies both in vitro and in vivo. Despite the complexities of the excitation and conduction systems of the heart, cell and gene-based strategies provide novel alternatives for treatment or cure of cardiac arrhythmias. This review summarizes some highlights of recent research progress in this field. PMID:22783301

  2. Proteomic analysis of mismatch repair-mediated alkylating agent-induced DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mediating DNA damage-induced apoptosis is an important genome-maintenance function of the mismatch repair (MMR) system. Defects in MMR not only cause carcinogenesis, but also render cancer cells highly resistant to chemotherapeutics, including alkylating agents. To understand the mechanisms of MMR-mediated apoptosis and MMR-deficiency-caused drug resistance, we analyze a model alkylating agent (N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, MNNG)-induced changes in protein phosphorylation and abundance in two cell lines, the MMR-proficient TK6 and its derivative MMR-deficient MT1. Results Under an experimental condition that MNNG-induced apoptosis was only observed in MutSα-proficient (TK6), but not in MutSα-deficient (MT1) cells, quantitative analysis of the proteomic data revealed differential expression and phosphorylation of numerous individual proteins and clusters of protein kinase substrates, as well differential activation of response pathways/networks in MNNG-treated TK6 and MT1 cells. Many alterations in TK6 cells are in favor of turning on the apoptotic machinery, while many of those in MT1 cells are to promote cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis. Conclusions Our work provides novel molecular insights into the mechanism of MMR-mediated DNA damage-induced apoptosis. PMID:24330662

  3. Damage repair in CMSX-4 alloy without fatigue life reduction penalty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, Masakazu; Ohtera, Issei; Harada, Yoshio

    2004-02-01

    The microstructural changes in a single-crystal Ni-base superalloy, CMSX-4, that might occur during the processes of repair and recoating of hot section components for advanced gas turbines were studied. It is shown that the cellular γ/γ‧ microstructure is formed when the material is subjected to local plastic straining, followed by the reheat treatments during the course of damage recovery. The formation of cellular microstructure in the material led to the remarkably reduced fatigue strength. In order to reduce or prevent the preceding undesirable effect resulting from cellular microstructure, a new method based on applying overlay coating technique was developed. The method is based on an idea that the alloying elements that are depleted in base alloys could be supplemented via the overlay coating. An X alloy, which contains grain boundary strengthening elements, was selected and coated on the CMSX-4 with the cellular microstructure by low-pressure plasma spraying. The fatigue tests on the coated CMSX-4 specimens demonstrated the effectiveness of the method. The observations of the crack initiation site, the fatigue fracture mode, the crack density in the cellular transformed area, and the crack propagation morphologies near the prior interface strongly supported the validity of this approach. The method is expected to build a road to a so-called damage cure (or recovery) coating.

  4. CCAR2/DBC1 is required for Chk2-dependent KAP1 phosphorylation and repair of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Magni, Martina; Ruscica, Vincenzo; Restelli, Michela; Fontanella, Enrico; Buscemi, Giacomo; Zannini, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle and apoptosis regulator 2 (CCAR2, formerly known as DBC1) is a nuclear protein largely involved in DNA damage response, apoptosis, metabolism, chromatin structure and transcription regulation. Upon DNA lesions, CCAR2 is phosphorylated by the apical kinases ATM/ATR and this phosphorylation enhances CCAR2 binding to SIRT1, leading to SIRT1 inhibition, p53 acetylation and p53-dependent apoptosis. Recently, we found that also the checkpoint kinase Chk2 and the proteasome activator REGγ are required for efficient CCAR2-mediated inhibition of SIRT1 and induction of p53-dependent apoptosis. Here, we report that CCAR2 is required for the repair of heterochromatic DNA lesions, as cells knock-out for CCAR2 retain, at late time-points after genotoxic treatment, abnormal levels of DNA damage-associated nuclear foci, whose timely resolution is reinstated by HP1β depletion. Conversely, repair of DNA damages in euchromatin are not affected by CCAR2 absence. We also report that the impairment in heterochromatic DNA repair is caused by defective Chk2 activation, detectable in CCAR2 ablated cells, which finally impacts on the phosphorylation of the Chk2 substrate KAP1 that is required for the induction of heterochromatin relaxation and DNA repair. These studies further extend and confirm the role of CCAR2 in the DNA damage response and DNA repair and illustrate a new mechanism of Chk2 activity regulation. Moreover, the involvement of CCAR2 in the repair of heterochromatic DNA breaks suggests a new role for this protein in the maintenance of chromosomal stability, which is necessary to prevent cancer formation. PMID:26158765

  5. Quantifying clustered DNA damage induction and repair by gel electrophoresis, electronic imaging and number average length analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Bennett, Paula V.; Laval, Jacques; Sutherland, John C.; Gewirtz, A. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Assessing DNA damage induction, repair and consequences of such damages requires measurement of specific DNA lesions by methods that are independent of biological responses to such lesions. Lesions affecting one DNA strand (altered bases, abasic sites, single strand breaks (SSB)) as well as damages affecting both strands (clustered damages, double strand breaks) can be quantified by direct measurement of DNA using gel electrophoresis, gel imaging and number average length analysis. Damage frequencies as low as a few sites per gigabase pair (10(9)bp) can be quantified by this approach in about 50ng of non-radioactive DNA, and single molecule methods may allow such measurements in DNA from single cells. This review presents the theoretical basis, biochemical requirements and practical aspects of this approach, and shows examples of their applications in identification and quantitation of complex clustered damages.

  6. Oxidative stress-related DNA damage and homologous recombination repairing induced by N,N-dimethylformamide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cui; Yang, Jinhuan; Lu, Dezhao; Fan, Yongsheng; Zhao, Meirong; Li, Zhuoyu

    2016-07-01

    The intensified anthropogenic release of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) has been proven to have hepatotoxic effects. However, the potential mechanism for DMF-induced toxicity has rarely been investigated. Our research implicated that DMF induced a significantly dose-dependent increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HL-7702 human liver cells. Moreover, oxidative stress-related DNA damage, marked as 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, was increased 1.5-fold at 100 mmol l(-1) . The most severe DNA lesion (double-strand break, DSB), measured as the formation of γH2AX foci, was increased at/above 6.4 mmol l(-1) , and approximately 50% of cells underwent DSB at the peak induction. Subsequently, the DNA repair system triggered by molecules of RAD50 and MRE11A induced the homologous recombination (HR) pathway by upregulation of both gene and protein levels of RAD50, RAD51, XRCC2 and XRCC3 at 16 mmol l(-1) and was attenuated at 40 mmol l(-1) . Consequently, cellular death observed at 40 mmol l(-1) was exaggerated compared with exposure at 16 mmol l(-1) . Although the exact mechanism relying on the DMF-induced hepatotoxicity needs further clarification, oxidative stress and DNA damage involved in DSBs partially explain the reason for DMF-induced liver injury. Oxidative stress-induced DNA damage should be first considered during risk assessment on liver-targeted chemicals. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26387567

  7. Characterization of environmental chemicals with potential for DNA damage using isogenic DNA repair-deficient chicken DT40 cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kimiyo N.; Hirota, Kouji; Kono, Koichi; Takeda, Shunichi; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Austin, Christopher P.; Witt, Kristine L.; Tice, Raymond R.

    2012-01-01

    Included among the quantitative high throughput screens (qHTS) conducted in support of the U.S. Tox21 program are those being evaluated for the detection of genotoxic compounds. One such screen is based on the induction of increased cytotoxicity in 7 isogenic chicken DT40 cell lines deficient in DNA repair pathways compared to the parental DNA repair-proficient cell line. To characterize the utility of this approach for detecting genotoxic compounds and identifying the type(s) of DNA damage induced, we evaluated nine of 42 compounds identified as positive for differential cytotoxicity in qHTS (actinomycin D, adriamycin, alachlor, benzotrichloride, diglycidyl resorcinol ether, lovastatin, melphalan, trans-1,4-dichloro-2-butene, tris(2,3-epoxypropyl)isocyanurate) and one non-cytotoxic genotoxic compound (2-aminothiamine) for (1) clastogenicity in mutant and wild-type cells; (2) the comparative induction of γH2AX positive foci by melphalan; (3) the extent to which a 72-hr exposure duration increased assay sensitivity or specificity; (4) the use of 10 additional DT40 DNA repair-deficient cell lines to better analyze the type(s) of DNA damage induced; and (5) the involvement of reactive oxygen species in the induction of DNA damage. All compounds but lovastatin and 2-aminothiamine were more clastogenic in at least one DNA repair-deficient cell line than the wild-type cells. The differential responses across the various DNA repair-deficient cell lines provided information on the type(s) of DNA damage induced. The results demonstrate the utility of this DT40 screen for detecting genotoxic compounds, for characterizing the nature of the DNA damage, and potentially for analyzing mechanisms of mutagenesis. PMID:21538559

  8. A DNA2 Homolog Is Required for DNA Damage Repair, Cell Cycle Regulation, and Meristem Maintenance in Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Ning; Liu, Xiaomin; Gao, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Plant meristem cells divide and differentiate in a spatially and temporally regulated manner, ultimately giving rise to organs. In this study, we isolated the Arabidopsis jing he sheng 1 (jhs1) mutant, which exhibited retarded growth, an abnormal pattern of meristem cell division and differentiation, and morphological defects such as fasciation, an irregular arrangement of siliques, and short roots. We identified JHS1 as a homolog of human and yeast DNA Replication Helicase/Nuclease2, which is known to be involved in DNA replication and damage repair. JHS1 is strongly expressed in the meristem of Arabidopsis. The jhs1 mutant was sensitive to DNA damage stress and had an increased DNA damage response, including increased expression of genes involved in DNA damage repair and cell cycle regulation, and a higher frequency of homologous recombination. In the meristem of the mutant plants, cell cycle progression was delayed at the G2 or late S phase and genes essential for meristem maintenance were misregulated. These results suggest that JHS1 plays an important role in DNA replication and damage repair, meristem maintenance, and development in plants. PMID:26951435

  9. RCC1-dependent activation of Ran accelerates cell cycle and DNA repair, inhibiting DNA damage-induced cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Cekan, Pavol; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Pan, Yu; Tubman, Emily; Odde, David; Chen, Jin-Qiu; Herrmann, Michelle A; Kumar, Sheetal; Kalab, Petr

    2016-04-15

    The coordination of cell cycle progression with the repair of DNA damage supports the genomic integrity of dividing cells. The function of many factors involved in DNA damage response (DDR) and the cell cycle depends on their Ran GTPase-regulated nuclear-cytoplasmic transport (NCT). The loading of Ran with GTP, which is mediated by RCC1, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ran, is critical for NCT activity. However, the role of RCC1 or Ran⋅GTP in promoting cell proliferation or DDR is not clear. We show that RCC1 overexpression in normal cells increased cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and accelerated the cell cycle and DNA damage repair. As a result, normal cells overexpressing RCC1 evaded DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest and senescence, mimicking colorectal carcinoma cells with high endogenous RCC1 levels. The RCC1-induced inhibition of senescence required Ran and exportin 1 and involved the activation of importin β-dependent nuclear import of 53BP1, a large NCT cargo. Our results indicate that changes in the activity of the Ran⋅GTP-regulated NCT modulate the rate of the cell cycle and the efficiency of DNA repair. Through the essential role of RCC1 in regulation of cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and NCT, RCC1 expression enables the proliferation of cells that sustain DNA damage. PMID:26864624

  10. Yeast DNA-repair gene RAD14 encodes a zinc metalloprotein with affinity for ultraviolet-damaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Guzder, S.N.; Sung, P.; Prakash, S. ); Prakash, L. )

    1993-06-15

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers due to a defect in excision repair of UV light-damaged DNA. Of the seven XP complementation groups, A--G, group A represents a severe and frequent form of the disease. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD14 gene is a homolog of the XP-A correcting (XPAC) gene. Like XP-A cells, rad14-null mutants are defective in the incision step of excision repair of UV-damaged DNA. The authors have purified RAD14 protein to homogeneity from extract of a yeast strain genetically tailored to overexpress RAD14. As determined by atomic emission spectroscopy, RAD14 contains one zinc atom. They also show in vitro that RAD14 binds zinc but does not bind other divalent metal ions. In DNA mobility-shift assays, RAD14 binds specifically to UV-damaged DNA. Removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from damaged DNA by enzymatic photoreactivation has no effect on binding, strongly suggesting that RAD14 recognizes pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproduct sites. These findings indicate that RAD14 functions in damage recognition during excision repair. 37 refs., 4 figs.