Sample records for radioisotope production boron

  1. Radioisotope production targets and modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. R.; Erdman, K.; Gyles, W.; Burbee, J.; Manegoda, A.; Sabaiduc, V.; Kovac, B.; VanLier, E.; Wong, J.; Watt, R.; Wilson, J.; Zyuzin, A.

    2005-12-01

    We have experienced the need to supply full radioisotope production systems that incorporate the accelerator, the beam lines, the targets and the radiochemistry in a unified package. The key component improvements are higher beam currents, more robust production targets, and efficient radiosynthesis modules. This note describes the progress we have made to produce efficient, high yield systems.

  2. BEST medical radioisotope production cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sabaiduc, Vasile; Milton, Bruce; Suthanthiran, Krishnan; Johnson, Richard R. [Best Cyclotron Systems Inc., 7-8765 Ash Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6P 6T3 (Canada); Gelbart, W. Z. [Advanced System Designs Inc., 5295 Bear Bay Road, Garden Bay, BC, V0N 1S1 (Canada)

    2013-04-19

    Best Cyclotron Systems Inc (BCSI) is currently developing 14 MeV, 25 MeV, 35MeV and 70MeV cyclotrons for radioisotope production and research applications as well as the entire spectrum of targets and nuclear synthesis modules for the production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and radiation therapy isotopes. The company is a subsidiary of Best Medical International, renowned in the field of medical instrumentation and radiation therapy. All cyclotrons have external negative hydrogen ion sources, four radial sectors with two dees in opposite valleys, cryogenic vacuum system and simultaneous beam extraction on opposite lines. The beam intensity ranges from 400 {mu}A to 1000 {mu}A, depending on the cyclotron energy and application.

  3. BEST medical radioisotope production cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabaiduc, Vasile; Milton, Bruce; Suthanthiran, Krishnan; Gelbart, W. Z.; Johnson, Richard R.

    2013-04-01

    Best Cyclotron Systems Inc (BCSI) is currently developing 14 MeV, 25 MeV, 35MeV and 70MeV cyclotrons for radioisotope production and research applications as well as the entire spectrum of targets and nuclear synthesis modules for the production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and radiation therapy isotopes. The company is a subsidiary of Best Medical International, renowned in the field of medical instrumentation and radiation therapy. All cyclotrons have external negative hydrogen ion sources, four radial sectors with two dees in opposite valleys, cryogenic vacuum system and simultaneous beam extraction on opposite lines. The beam intensity ranges from 400 ?A to 1000 ?A, depending on the cyclotron energy and application [1].

  4. Medical radioisotope production - the Australian experience

    SciTech Connect

    Druce, M. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The Australian government, through its instrumentality, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO), owns and operates a 10-MW Dido-class research reactor at Lucas Heights on the southern outskirts of Sydney. This is the only operating nuclear reactor in Australia. It was built in 1958 and has a maximum flux of 1 x 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s. ANSTO also jointly owns and operates a 30-MeV IBA negative ion cyclotron at Camperdown in central Sydney, which began operation in 1992. ANSTO is predominantly a research organization; however, radioisotopes are commercially produced through Australian Radioisotopes (ARI), an ANSTO business entity. Seventy-four people are employed by ARI, which is a vertically integrated organization, i.e., everything from target preparation to sale of products is undertaken.

  5. Alternate Applications of Fusion - Production of Radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcinski, G.L.; Weidner, J.; Cipiti, B.; Ashley, R.P.; Santarius, J.F.; Murali, S.K.; Piefer, G.; Radel, R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

    2003-09-15

    A major effort to find near-term, non-electric applications of fusion energy has shown that the production of radioisotopes is attractive. The use of the D{sup 3}He fusion reaction to produce Positron Emission Tomography (PET) isotopes is described. An Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device is particularly well suited to produce low levels of high-energy (14.7 MeV) protons, which in turn, can produce short-lived PET isotopes. The IEC device at University of Wisconsin has been modified to investigate the potential of this process to be commercially attractive.

  6. Actinium radioisotope products of enhanced purity

    DOEpatents

    Meikrantz, David Herbert; Todd, Terry Allen; Tranter, Troy Joseph; Horwitz, E. Philip

    2010-06-15

    A product includes actinium-225 (.sup.225Ac) and less than about 1 microgram (.mu.g) of iron (Fe) per millicurie (mCi) of actinium-225. The product may have a radioisotopic purity of greater than about 99.99 atomic percent (at %) actinium-225 and daughter isotopes of actinium-225, and may be formed by a method that includes providing a radioisotope mixture solution comprising at least one of uranium-233 (.sup.233U) and thorium-229 (.sup.229Th), extracting the at least one of uranium-233 and thorium-229 into an organic phase, substantially continuously contacting the organic phase with an aqueous phase, substantially continuously extracting actinium-225 into the aqueous phase, and purifying the actinium-225 from the aqueous phase. In some embodiments, the product may include less than about 1 nanogram (ng) of iron per millicurie (mCi) of actinium-225, and may include less than about 1 microgram (.mu.g) each of magnesium (Mg), Chromium (Cr), and manganese (Mn) per millicurie (mCi) of actinium-225.

  7. Radioisotope production and management at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.D.; Aaron, W.S.; Alexander, C.W.; Bigelow, J.E.; Parks, J.T.; Tracy, J.G.; Wham, R.M.

    1994-09-01

    The production of radioisotopes has been one of the basic activities at Oak Ridge since the end of World War II. The importance of this work was best described by Alvin Weinberg, former Laboratory Director, when he wrote ``... If God has a golden book and writes down what it is that Oak Ridge National Laboratory did that had the biggest influence on science, I would guess that was the production and distribution of isotopes.`` Radioisotopes production continues to be an important aspect of Oak Ridge programs today and of those planned for the future. Past activities, current projects, and future plans and potentials will be described briefly in this paper. Also, some of the major issues facing the continued production of radioisotopes will be described. The scope of the program has always been primarily that of process development, followed by special batch-type productions, where no other supply exists. The technology developed has been available for adoption by US commercial corporations, and in cases where this has occurred, Oak Ridge has withdrawn as a supplier of the particular isotopes involved. One method of production that will not be described is that of target bombardment with an accelerator. This method was used at Oak Ridge prior to 1978 in the 86-inch Cyclotron. However, this method has not been used at Oak Ridge since then for radioisotope production, except as a research tool.

  8. Optimization of commercial scale photonuclear production of radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Bindu, K. C.; Harmon, Frank; Starovoitova, Valeriia N.; Stoner, Jon; Wells, Douglas P. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Idaho State University, 1500 Alvin Ricken Drive, Pocatello, ID 83201 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Photonuclear production of radioisotopes driven by bremsstrahlung photons using a linear electron accelerator in the suitable energy range is a promising method for producing radioisotopes. The photonuclear production method is capable of making radioisotopes more conveniently, cheaply and with much less radioactive waste compared to existing methods. Historically, photo-nuclear reactions have not been exploited for isotope production because of the low specific activity that is generally associated with this production process, although the technique is well-known to be capable of producing large quantities of certain radioisotopes. We describe an optimization technique for a set of parameters to maximize specific activity of the final product. This set includes the electron beam energy and current, the end station design (an integrated converter and target as well as cooling system), the purity of materials used, and the activation time. These parameters are mutually dependent and thus their optimization is not trivial. {sup 67}Cu photonuclear production via {sup 68}Zn({gamma}p){sup 67}Cu reaction was used as an example of such an optimization process.

  9. Production of radioisotopes in the ORNL 86-inch cyclotron

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Terry

    1981-01-01

    The radioisotope production facilities and programs of the 86-Inch Cyclotron are reviewed in this presentation. The 86-Inch Cyclotron is designed to accelerate protons to a maximum energy of 22 MeV for internal targets. These protons are used to bombard metals that are electroplated, potted or soldered to water-cooled plates. Additionally, metals and inorganic compounds are bombarded in water-cooled tube targets.

  10. Reactor production and processing of radioisotopes for therapeutic applications in nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Mirzadeh, S.; Beets, A.L.

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear reactors continue to play an important role in providing radioisotopes for nuclear medicine. Many reactor-produced radioisotopes are ``neutron rich`` and decay by beta-emission and are thus of interest for therapeutic applications. This talk discusses the production and processing of a variety of reactor-produced radioisotopes of current interest, including those produced by the single neutron capture process, double neutron capture and those available from beta-decay of reactorproduced radioisotopes. Generators prepared from reactorproduced radioisotopes are of particular interest since repeated elution inexpensively provides many patient doses. The development of the alumina-based W-188/Re-188 generator system is discussed in detail.

  11. Lightweight Radioisotope Heater Unit (LWRHU) production for the Cassini mission

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, G.H.

    1996-06-01

    The Lightweight Radioisotope Heater Unit (LWRHU) is a {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fueled heat source designed to provide a thermal watt of power for space missions. The LWRHU will be used to maintain the temperature of various components on the spacecraft at the required level. The heat source consists of a {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet, a Pt-30Rh capsule, a pyrolytic graphite insulator, and a woven graphite aeroshell assembly. Los Alamos has fabricated 180 heater units, which will be used on the Cassini mission. This report summarizes the specifications, fabrication processes, and production data for the heat sources fabricated at Los Alamos.

  12. BORON

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of boron chemical speciation is important in understanding bioavailability, excretion, and retention of boron derived from supplemental dietary sources. Undissociated boric acid is the predominant species of boron in most natural freshwater systems. Five antibiotics, one with apparent pote...

  13. Novel production techniques of radioisotopes using electron accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Daniel Robert

    Non-traditional radioisotope production techniques using a compact, high power linear electron accelerator have been demonstrated and characterized for the production of 18F, 47Sc, 147 Pm, and 99mTc from a variety of target candidates. These isotopes are used extensively in the medical field as diagnostic and therapy radioisotopes, as well as the space industry as RTG's. Primary focus was placed on 99mTc as it constitutes approximately 80% of all diagnostic procedures in the medical community that use radioactive tracers. It was also the prime focus due to recent events at the Chalk River nuclear reactor, which caused global shortages of this isotope a few years ago. A Varian K15 LINAC was first used to show proof of principle in Las Vegas. Various samples were then taken to the Idaho Accelerator Center where they were activated using an electron LINAC capable of electron energies from 4 to 25 MeV at a beam power of approximately 1 kW. Production rates, cross sections, and viability studies were then performed and conducted to assess the effectiveness of the candidate target and the maximum production rate for each radioisotope. Production rates for 18F from lithium fluoride salts were shown to be ideal at 21MeV, namely 1.7 Ci per kg of LiF salt, per kW of beam current, per 10 hour irradiation time. As the typical hospital consumption of 18F is around 500 mCi per day, it is clear that a large amount of 18F can be made from a small (300 gram) sample of LiF salt. However, since there is no current separation process for 18F from 19F, the viability of this technique is limited until a separations technique is developed. Furthermore, the calculated cross section for this reaction is in good agreement with literature, which supports the techniques for the isotopes mentioned below. Production rates for 47Sc from vanadium oxide targets were shown to be a maximum at 25 MeV with a production rate of 2 mCi per day, assuming a 2 kW beam and a 10 kg target. While this production rate would be able to support a research environment where a single patient per day would be addressed, it is unlikely that this method would produce enough material to support a large hospital. The production of 147Pm from europium oxide targets showed that due to the large spin state differences between 151Eu and 147Pm, a negligible amount of 147Pm can be created using the (gamma,alpha) process. The minimum detectable limit for these experiments, given this specific isotope, was 10 nCi. The (gamma, gamma') reaction was studied on 99mTc to determine the production rates and cross sections for this reaction. It was found that the average production rate between 12 and 25 MeV was approximately 3 uCi/(kg*kW). Given that a single patient dose of 99mTc is approximately 20 mCi, we find that we need many kilograms of technetium metal. This would produce toxic levels of technetium in the patient; therefore this method is not likely viable. It was also found, however, that the (n,n') reaction may play a significant role in the activation from ground state technetium to the metastable state. Finally, the (gamma, alpha) reaction that will produce 99m Tc from rhodium oxide targets was quantified from energies of 12 to 25 MeV. The production rate was found to be 64 and 113 mCi/(kg*kW*day) for 19 and 25 MeV, respectively. Given a 2 kW beam and a 2 kg target, we find this technique to be a feasible method to create 99mTc in a local setting using a LINAC. By using a fast separations technique, such as selective volatilization, a process in which technetium oxide is volatilized off of rhodium oxide in a carrier gas could provide a turn-key solution for entities looking to create this radioisotope on site. A cost-benefit analysis was performed and it was found that a system such as this could produce over $1M in revenue per year given a standard hospital usage of 40 patient doses per day.

  14. Apparatus for the production of boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin

    2014-06-17

    An apparatus for the large scale production of boron nitride nanotubes comprising; a pressure chamber containing; a continuously fed boron containing target; a source of thermal energy preferably a focused laser beam; a cooled condenser; a source of pressurized nitrogen gas; and a mechanism for extracting boron nitride nanotubes that are condensed on or in the area of the cooled condenser from the pressure chamber.

  15. Energy release properties of amorphous boron and boron-based propellant primary combustion products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Daolun; Liu, Jianzhong; Xiao, Jinwu; Xi, Jianfei; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Yanwei; Zhou, Junhu

    2015-07-01

    The microstructure of amorphous boron and the primary combustion products of boron-based fuel-rich propellant (hereafter referred to as primary combustion products) was analyzed by scanning electron microscope. Composition analysis of the primary combustion products was carried out by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The energy release properties of amorphous boron and the primary combustion products were comparatively studied by laser ignition experimental system and thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry. The primary combustion products contain B, C, Mg, Al, B4C, B13C2, BN, B2O3, NH4Cl, H2O, and so on. The energy release properties of primary combustion products are different from amorphous boron, significantly. The full-time spectral intensity of primary combustion products at a wavelength of 580 nm is ~2% lower than that of amorphous boron. The maximum spectral intensity of the former at full wave is ~5% higher than that of the latter. The ignition delay time of primary combustion products is ~150 ms shorter than that of amorphous boron, and the self-sustaining combustion time of the former is ~200 ms longer than that of the latter. The thermal oxidation process of amorphous boron involves water evaporation (weight loss) and boron oxidation (weight gain). The thermal oxidation process of primary combustion products involves two additional steps: NH4Cl decomposition (weight loss) and carbon oxidation (weight loss). CL-20 shows better combustion-supporting effect than KClO4 in both the laser ignition experiments and the thermal oxidation experiments.

  16. Production of anhydrous, crystalline boron oxide in fluidized bed reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Kocaku?ak; K. Akçay; T. Ayok; H. J. Koöro?lu; M. Koral; Ö. T. Sava?çi; R. Tolun

    1996-01-01

    Industrial production of boron oxide is via fusion of boric acid at 550–1000 °C. The glassy melt thus obtained is then cooled until solid; crushed, ground and then sieved to allow classification according to particle size and distribution. The melting of boric acid is both the most critical and costly stage of all these operations, because boron oxide is highly

  17. Radioisotope Productions for Medical Use with Accelerator Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, Futoshi; Nagai, Yasuki; Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Iwamoto, Osamu

    2014-09-01

    Various kinds of radioactive isotopes (RIs) are widely used in nuclear medicine for diagnostics and therapy. Since the RIs are not usually present in the nature, they must be produced by nuclear reactors and accelerators. For instance, 99mTc, which is the most common RI used in diagnosis, is mainly produced by fission of highly enriched 235U (HEU) in nuclear reactors. However, use of the HEU is unfavorable in terms of nuclear security. Therefore, many methods without 235U have been studied in order to produce RIs for medical use; for example, thermal neutron capture, gamma disintegration, and proton induced reactions. We also have proposed an alternative method using accelerator neutrons besides the above methods. Technique producing high intense accelerator neutron beam as much as 1015 n/s is being developed and RI productions with the accelerator neutron have been done recently. The major advantages of the use of accelerator neutron are followings. 1) A wide variety of carrier-added and carrier-free radioisotopes can be produced using the neutrons, because a charge exchange reaction of a sample nucleus has a sizable cross section of 50 to 500 mb. 2) High transparency of neutron allows us to use a large amount of sample to co-produce other RIs by putting other samples behind the main sample in the beam direction. In this talk, we will show the features of RI productions with accelerator neutron which we have ever investigated and found, along with numerical results of RI yields calculated with Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (JENDL-4.0).

  18. A radioisotope method of determining the apparent density of large refractory products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu. M. Galkin; N. V. Ustyugov; A. K. Purgin; A. B. Saulin; G. N. Evtifeeva

    1978-01-01

    Conclusions The surface ? densimeter makes possible the operational and sufficiently precise determination of the apparent density of large refractory products. Radioisotope quality control is included in the technical specifications of the production of silica and aluminosilicate refractory concrete blocks and panels.

  19. New developments in the experimental data for charged particle production of medical radioisotopes

    E-print Network

    Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present work is to give a review of developments achieved experimentally in the field of nuclear data for medically important radioisotopes in the last three years. The availability and precision of production related nuclear data is continuously improved mainly experimentally. This review emphasizes a couple of larger fields: the Mo/Tc generator problem and the generator isotopes in general, heavy alpha-emitters and the rare-earth elements. Other results in the field of medical radioisotope production are also listed.

  20. Possibilities for the production of radioisotopes for nuclear-medicine problems by means of photonuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhilavyan, L. Z., E-mail: dzhil@cpc.inr.ac.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Karev, A. I.; Raevsky, V. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Institute of Physics (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    For electrons of energy about 55 MeV that create an average current of about 40 Micro-Sign A, it is shown that the production of many of the radioisotopes important for nuclear medicine is possible in significant amounts.

  1. Radioisotope production in target fragmentation with high-energy heavy ions at HIMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, A.; Murae, T.; Kinoshita, N.; Kikunaga, H.; Ohki, T.; Shigekawa, M.; Kasamatsu, Y.; Shinohara, A.; Shibata, S.; Saito, T.

    2003-01-01

    In order to improve utilisation of the multitracer method, two aspects of the method were pursued in this study. The production of radioisotopes from target fragmentation of 197Au nuclei was performed with high-energetic heavy ions of 12C (180, 290, 400 MeV/u) and 40Ar (290, 650 MeV/u) at HIMAC facilities. The yields of products were measured by using a thick-target-thickcatcher method and off-line ?-ray spectrometry with Ge semiconductor detectors. Besides, a special apparatus for practice of the radioisotope production was designed in application of the tracers for separation of the products from target material with high efficiency and the target material and shape for the design was investigated in a trial examination.

  2. An on-line information system for radioisotope thermal generator production

    SciTech Connect

    Kiebel, G.R.; Wiemers, M.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, Mail Stop N1-42, Richland, Washington 99352 (US))

    1991-01-01

    An on-line production information system has been designed to support radioisotope thermal generator assembly and testing in a new facility being built at the Department of Energy Hanford Site in Washington State. This system is intended to make handling the large volumes of information associated with radioisotope thermal generator production and certification more efficient with less opportunity for error than traditional paper methods. It provides for tracking materials, implementing work procedures directly from computer terminals, and cross referencing among materials, procedures, and other documents related to production. This system will be implemented on a network of microcomputers using UNIX{sup TM} for its operating system. It has been designed to allow increased capabilities to be added as operating experience with the new facility dictates.

  3. Production and supply of radioisotopes with high-energy particle accelerators current status and future directions

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mausner, L.F.

    1994-03-01

    Although the production of radioisotopes in reactors or in low to medium energy cyclotrons appears to be relatively well established, especially for those isotopes that are routinely used and have a commercial market, certain isotopes can either be made only in high-energy particle accelerators or their production is more cost effective when made this way. These facilities are extremely expensive to build and operate, and isotope production is, in general, either not cost-effective or is in conflict with their primary mandate or missions which involve physics research. Isotope production using high-energy accelerators in the US, therefore, has been only an intermittent and parasitic activity. However, since a number of isotopes produced at higher energies are emerging as being potentially useful for medical and other applications, there is a renewed concern about their availability in a continuous and reliable fashion. In the US, in particular, the various aspects of the prediction and availability of radioisotopes from high-energy accelerators are presently undergoing a detailed scrutiny and review by various scientific and professional organizations as well as the Government. A number of new factors has complicated the supply/demand equation. These include considerations of cost versus needs, reliability factors, mission orientation, research and educational components, and commercial viability. This paper will focus on the present status and projected needs of radioisotope production with high-energy accelerators in the US, and will compare and examine the existing infrastructure in other countries for this purpose.

  4. A prototype on-line work procedure system for radioisotope thermoelectric generator production

    SciTech Connect

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1991-09-01

    An on-line system to manage work procedures is being developed to support radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) assembly and testing in a new production facility. This system implements production work procedures as interactive electronic documents executed at the work site with no intermediate printed form. It provides good control of the creation and application of work procedures and provides active assistance to the worker in performing them and in documenting the results. An extensive prototype of this system is being evaluated to ensure that it will have all the necessary features and that it will fit the user's needs and expectations. This effort has involved the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) operations organization and technology transfer between Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) and EG G Mound Applied Technologies Inc. (Mound) at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Mound Site. 1 ref.

  5. Recovery of boron of the sieve reject in the production of borax

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Recep Boncukcuo?lu; M. Muhtar Kocakerim; Erdem Kocada?istan; M. Tolga Yilmaz

    2003-01-01

    Boron ores are one of the most important underground richness of Turkey. Various boron compounds are produced from these ores. The most important one of them is borax. During the borax production process, a large quantity of the boron oxide (B2O3) is discharged by the trommel sieve waste (TSW). Also, this waste causes different environmental problems when it discharged directly

  6. Hospital-based proton linear accelerator for particle therapy and radioisotope production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    1991-05-01

    Taking advantage of recent advances in linear accelerator technology, it is possible for a hospital to use a 70 MeV proton linac for fast neutron therapy, boron neutron capture therapy, proton therapy for ocular melanomas, and production of radiopharmaceuticals. The linac can also inject protons into a synchrotron for proton therapy of deep-seated tumors. With 180 ?A average current, a single linac can support all these applications. This paper presents a conceptual design for a medical proton linac, switchyard, treatment rooms, and isotope production rooms. Special requirements for each application are outlined and a layout for sharing beam among the applications is suggested.

  7. A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrell, D.L.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE's Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford's MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford's calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

  8. A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrell, D.L. (Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, Mail Stop N1-42, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States))

    1993-01-15

    A shielded storage rack has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE's Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which processes and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGs. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford's MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford's calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

  9. A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrell, D.L.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE`s Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford`s MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford`s calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

  10. ULTRASONIC AND RADIOGRAPHIC IMAGING OF NIOBIUM TARGET CAPSULES FOR RADIOISOTOPE PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Bach, H. T.; Claytor, T. N.; Hunter, J. F.; Dozier, B. E.; Nortier, F. M.; Smith, D. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS J514, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Lenz, J. W. [John W. Lenz and Associates, 412 Muskingum Road, Waxahachie, TX 75165 (United States); Moddrell, C.; Smith, P. A. [P.A. Smith Concepts and Designs, 1475 Central Ave. Suite 250, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)

    2009-03-03

    In the case of proton-irradiated radioisotope production, niobium target capsules containing gallium are exposed to intense radiation, thermally induced stress, for extended periods. The structural integrity of the target capsules is of crucial importance for containing the accelerator-produced radioisotopes and target material. The capsule window should be as thin and transparent to the proton beam as possible, and preferably should not become significantly activated under proton irradiation. In addition, the material for the capsule needs to be as defect-free as possible. Niobium encapsulated gallium targets have a history of unpredictable failure under intense irradiation with 100 MeV protons. This study illustrates the utility of non-destructive testing in order to detect defects that may result in mechanical failure of the capsules during irradiation. Prior to this work, it was not known if the gallium initially wets the niobium capsule that encapsulates it, and if it does, it is not known to what degree. However, the imaging techniques used in this work show that local areas of wetting do occur. We used ultrasonic images from various lots of niobium capsule material to assess the integrity of the capsules. Digital radiography is also used to detect any voids in the gallium that will tend to cause local heating in the capsules.

  11. Specific radioactivity of neutron induced radioisotopes: assessment methods and application for medically useful 177Lu production as a case.

    PubMed

    Le, Van So

    2011-01-01

    The conventional reaction yield evaluation for radioisotope production is not sufficient to set up the optimal conditions for producing radionuclide products of the desired radiochemical quality. Alternatively, the specific radioactivity (SA) assessment, dealing with the relationship between the affecting factors and the inherent properties of the target and impurities, offers a way to optimally perform the irradiation for production of the best quality radioisotopes for various applications, especially for targeting radiopharmaceutical preparation. Neutron-capture characteristics, target impurity, side nuclear reactions, target burn-up and post-irradiation processing/cooling time are the main parameters affecting the SA of the radioisotope product. These parameters have been incorporated into the format of mathematical equations for the reaction yield and SA assessment. As a method demonstration, the SA assessment of 177Lu produced based on two different reactions, 176Lu (n,?)177Lu and 176Yb (n,?) 177Yb (?- decay) 177Lu, were performed. The irradiation time required for achieving a maximum yield and maximum SA value was evaluated for production based on the 176Lu (n,?)177Lu reaction. The effect of several factors (such as elemental Lu and isotopic impurities) on the 177Lu SA degradation was evaluated for production based on the 176Yb (n,?) 177Yb (?- decay) 177Lu reaction. The method of SA assessment of a mixture of several radioactive sources was developed for the radioisotope produced in a reactor from different targets. PMID:21248665

  12. Electroextraction of boron from boron carbide scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ashish [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Anthonysamy, S., E-mail: sas@igcar.gov.in [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Ghosh, C. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Ravindran, T.R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Divakar, R.; Mohandas, E. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India)

    2013-10-15

    Studies were carried out to extract elemental boron from boron carbide scrap. The physicochemical nature of boron obtained through this process was examined by characterizing its chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size. The microstructural characteristics of the extracted boron powder were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopic examination of boron powder was also carried out to determine its crystalline form. Oxygen and carbon were found to be the major impurities in boron. Boron powder of purity ? 92 wt. % could be produced by the electroextraction process developed in this study. Optimized method could be used for the recovery of enriched boron ({sup 10}B > 20 at. %) from boron carbide scrap generated during the production of boron carbide. - Highlights: • Recovery of {sup 10}B from nuclear grade boron carbide scrap • Development of process flow sheet • Physicochemical characterization of electroextracted boron • Microscopic examination of electroextracted boron.

  13. Boron

    SciTech Connect

    Cozen, L.F. (United States Borax and Chemical Corp., Los Angeles, CA (US))

    1991-05-01

    This paper reports that borate minerals and refined borates are used extensively for the manufacture of vitreous materials such as insulation and textile fiberglasses, borosilicate glass, and porcelain enamels and frits. In North America, these applications are estimated to account for over 54% of the borate consumption. Other substantial uses are in soaps and detergents, metallurgy, fire retardants, industrial biocides, agriculture, and various miscellaneous applications. Reported domestic borate consumption in 1990 was estimated by the U.S. Bureau of Mines to be 320 000 metric tons B{sub 2}O{sub 3} versus 354 000 metric tons B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in 1989. Consumption is projected to remain essentially static in 1991. Imports were estimated by the Bureau to be 50 000 metric tons B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in 1990. Exports of boric acid and refined borates were approximately 650 000 metric tons of product, a 15 000 metric ton increase from the 1989 level. This increase partially offsets the drop in the 1990 consumption level.

  14. Production of boron nitride materials with organosilicon polymer additions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. A. Mazaev; N. N. Kovalevskii; A. K. Tsapuk

    1978-01-01

    1.Bonding with an organosilicon polymer increases the strength and oxidation resistance of boron nitride, the extent of the improvement depending in a great measure on the nature of the solvent used.2.Use of an organosilicon binder leads to the formation of a material with a structure differing from that characteristic of boron nitride with an organic binder, which is evidence that

  15. Production and application of new complex boron-containing ferroalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, A. S.; Zayakin, O. V.; Akberdin, A. A.; Kontsevoi, Yu. V.

    2010-12-01

    Effect of microalloying with boron on the properties of steel is studied using a new complex silicon-, manganese-, and boron-containing FSMB ferroalloy. The mechanical properties and structure of steel alloyed with this ferroalloy are comparable to or even higher than those of steel alloyed with ferroboron.

  16. Radio-isotope production scale-up at the University of Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Nickles, Robert Jerome [Univ of Wisconsin] [Univ of Wisconsin

    2014-06-19

    Our intent has been to scale up our production capacity for a subset of the NSAC-I list of radioisotopes in jeopardy, so as to make a significant impact on the projected national needs for Cu-64, Zr-89, Y-86, Ga-66, Br-76, I-124 and other radioisotopes that offer promise as PET synthons. The work-flow and milestones in this project have been compressed into a single year (Aug 1, 2012- July 31, 2013). The grant budget was virtually dominated by the purchase of a pair of dual-mini-cells that have made the scale-up possible, now permitting the Curie-level processing of Cu-64 and Zr-89 with greatly reduced radiation exposure. Mile stones: 1. We doubled our production of Cu-64 and Zr-89 during the grant period, both for local use and out-bound distribution to ? 30 labs nationwide. This involved the dove-tailing of beam schedules of both our PETtrace and legacy RDS cyclotron. 2. Implemented improved chemical separation of Zr-89, Ga-66, Y-86 and Sc-44, with remote, semi-automated dissolution, trap-and-release separation under LabView control in the two dual-mini-cells provided by this DOE grant. A key advance was to fit the chemical stream with miniature radiation detectors to confirm the transfer operations. 3. Implemented improved shipping of radioisotopes (Cu-64, Zr-89, Tc-95m, and Ho-163) with approved DOT 7A boxes, with a much-improved FedEx shipping success compared to our previous steel drums. 4. Implemented broad range quantitative trace metal analysis, employing a new microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometer (Agilent 4200) capable of ppb sensitivity across the periodic table. This new instrument will prove essential in bringing our radiometals into FDA compliance needing CoA’s for translational research in clinical trials. 5. Expanded our capabilities in target fabrication, with the purchase of a programmable 1600 oC inert gas tube furnace for the smelting of binary alloy target materials. A similar effort makes use of our RF induction furnace, allowing small scale metallurgy with greater control. This alloy feedstock was then used to electroplate cyclotron targets with elevated melting temperatures capable of withstanding higher beam currents. 6. Finished the beam-line developments needed for the irradiation of low-melting target materials (Se and Ga) now being used for the production of Br-76, and radioactive germanium (68, 69, 71Ge). Our planned development of I-124 production has been deferred, given the wide access from commercial suppliers. The passing of these milestones has been the subject of the previous quarterly reports. These signature accomplishments were made possible by the DOE support, and have strengthened the infrastructure at the University of Wisconsin, provided the training ground for a very talented graduate research assistant (Mr. Valdovinos) and more than doubled our out-shipments of Cu-64 and Zr-89.

  17. 78 FR 1848 - Plutonium-238 Production for Radioisotope Power Systems for National Aeronautics and Space...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ...for Radioisotope Power Systems for National Aeronautics and Space Administration and National Security Missions AGENCY: Department...systems (RPSs) to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and national security...

  18. Operational readiness review plan for the radioisotope thermoelectric generator materials production tasks

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.H.; Martin, M.M.; Riggs, C.R.; Beatty, R.L.; Ohriner, E.K.; Escher, R.N.

    1990-04-19

    In October 1989, a US shuttle lifted off from Cape Kennedy carrying the spacecraft Galileo on its mission to Jupiter. In November 1990, a second spacecraft, Ulysses, will be launched from Cape Kennedy with a mission to study the polar regions of the sun. The prime source of power for both spacecraft is a series of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs), which use plutonium oxide (plutonia) as a heat source. Several of the key components in this power system are required to ensure the safety of both the public and the environment and were manufactured at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the 1980 to 1983 period. For these two missions, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), will provide an iridium-alloy component used to contain the plutonia heat source and a carbon-composite material that serves as a thermal insulator. ORNL alone will continue to fabricate the carbon-composite material. Because of the importance to DOE that Energy Systems deliver these high-quality components on time, performance of an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) of these manufacturing activities is necessary. Energy Systems Policy GP-24 entitled Operational Readiness Process'' describes the formal and comprehensive process by which appropriate Energy Systems activities are to be reviewed to ensure their readiness. This Energy System policy is aimed at reducing the risks associated with mission success and requires a management-approved readiness plan'' to be issued. This document is the readiness plan for the RTG materials production tasks. 6 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Boron reclamation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.M.

    1980-07-01

    A process to recover high purity /sup 10/B enriched crystalline boron powder from a polymeric matrix was developed on a laboratory basis and ultimately scaled up to production capacity. The process is based on controlled pyrolysis of boron-filled scrap followed by an acid leach and dry sieving operation to return the powder to the required purity and particle size specifications. Typically, the recovery rate of the crystalline powder is in excess of 98.5 percent, and some of the remaining boron is recovered in the form of boric acid. The minimum purity requirement of the recovered product is 98.6 percent total boron.

  20. Production of Medical Radioisotopes with High Specific Activity in Photonuclear Reactions with $?$ Beams of High Intensity and Large Brilliance

    E-print Network

    D. Habs; U. Köster

    2010-09-08

    We study the production of radioisotopes for nuclear medicine in $(\\gamma,x{\\rm n}+y{\\rm p})$ photonuclear reactions or ($\\gamma,\\gamma'$) photoexcitation reactions with high flux [($10^{13}-10^{15}$)$\\gamma$/s], small diameter $\\sim (100 \\, \\mu$m$)^2$ and small band width ($\\Delta E/E \\approx 10^{-3}-10^{-4}$) $\\gamma$ beams produced by Compton back-scattering of laser light from relativistic brilliant electron beams. We compare them to (ion,$x$n$ + y$p) reactions with (ion=p,d,$\\alpha$) from particle accelerators like cyclotrons and (n,$\\gamma$) or (n,f) reactions from nuclear reactors. For photonuclear reactions with a narrow $\\gamma$ beam the energy deposition in the target can be managed by using a stack of thin target foils or wires, hence avoiding direct stopping of the Compton and pair electrons (positrons). $(\\gamma,\\gamma')$ isomer production via specially selected $\\gamma$ cascades allows to produce high specific activity in multiple excitations, where no back-pumping of the isomer to the ground state occurs. We discuss in detail many specific radioisotopes for diagnostics and therapy applications. Photonuclear reactions with $\\gamma$ beams allow to produce certain radioisotopes, e.g. $^{47}$Sc, $^{44}$Ti, $^{67}$Cu, $^{103}$Pd, $^{117m}$Sn, $^{169}$Er, $^{195m}$Pt or $^{225}$Ac, with higher specific activity and/or more economically than with classical methods. This will open the way for completely new clinical applications of radioisotopes. For example $^{195m}$Pt could be used to verify the patient's response to chemotherapy with platinum compounds before a complete treatment is performed. Also innovative isotopes like $^{47}$Sc, $^{67}$Cu and $^{225}$Ac could be produced for the first time in sufficient quantities for large-scale application in targeted radionuclide therapy.

  1. Production by various methods of composite materials based on a hard metal with cubic boron nitride

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. D. Andreev; V. P. Bondarenko; A. M. Baranovskii; V. P. Pereyaslov; V. P. Kolomiets; I. V. Manzheleev; N. I. Chukhno

    1983-01-01

    During the production of the composite materials under consideration by orthodox sintering the cubic boron nitride and hard metal react with each other, with the formation of borides and appearance of porosity as a result of the evolution of gaseous reaction products, and the strength of the materials is therefore low. During hot pressing the reaction between the components of

  2. Production of medical radioisotopes with high specific activity in photonuclear reactions with ?-beams of high intensity and large brilliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Köster, U.

    2011-05-01

    We study the production of radioisotopes for nuclear medicine in ( ?, xn+ yp) photonuclear reactions or ( ?, ?') photoexcitation reactions with high-flux [(1013-1015) ?/s], small diameter ˜(100 ?m)2 and small bandwidth (? E/ E?10-3-10-4) ? beams produced by Compton back-scattering of laser light from relativistic brilliant electron beams. We compare them to (ion, xn+ yp) reactions with (ion = p,d, ?) from particle accelerators like cyclotrons and (n, ?) or (n,f) reactions from nuclear reactors. For photonuclear reactions with a narrow ?-beam the energy deposition in the target can be managed by using a stack of thin target foils or wires, hence avoiding direct stopping of the Compton and pair electrons (positrons). However, for ions with a strong atomic stopping only a fraction of less than 10-2 leads to nuclear reactions resulting in a target heating, which is at least 105 times larger per produced radioactive ion and often limits the achievable activity. In photonuclear reactions the well defined initial excitation energy of the compound nucleus leads to a small number of reaction channels and enables new combinations of target isotope and final radioisotope. The narrow bandwidth ? excitation may make use of the fine structure of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR) or fluctuations in ?-width leading to increased cross sections. Within a rather short period compared to the isotopic half-life, a target area of the order of (100 ?m)2 can be highly transmuted, resulting in a very high specific activity. ( ?, ?') isomer production via specially selected ? cascades allows to produce high specific activity in multiple excitations, where no back-pumping of the isomer to the ground state occurs. We discuss in detail many specific radioisotopes for diagnostics and therapy applications. Photonuclear reactions with ?-beams allow to produce certain radioisotopes, e.g. 47Sc, 44Ti, 67Cu, 103Pd, 117 m Sn, 169Er, 195 m Pt or 225Ac, with higher specific activity and/or more economically than with classical methods. This will open the door for completely new clinical applications of radioisotopes. For example 195 m Pt could be used to verify the patient's response to chemotherapy with platinum compounds before a complete treatment is performed. Also innovative isotopes like 47Sc, 67Cu and 225Ac could be produced for the first time in sufficient quantities for large-scale application in targeted radionuclide therapy.

  3. Production of medical radioisotopes in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for cancer treatment and arterial restenosis therapy after PTCA

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Beets, A.L.; Mirzadeh, S.; Alexander, C.W.; Hobbs, R.L.

    1998-06-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) represents an important resource for the production of a wide variety of medical radioisotopes. In addition to serving as a key production site for californium-252 and other transuranic elements, important examples of therapeutic radioisotopes which are currently routinely produced in the HFIR for distribution include dysprosium-166 (parent of holmium-166), rhenium-186, tin-117m and tungsten-188 (parent of rhenium-188). The nine hydraulic tube (HT) positions in the central high flux region permit the insertion and removal of targets at any time during the operating cycle and have traditionally represented a major site for production of medical radioisotopes. To increase the irradiation capabilities of the HFIR, special target holders have recently been designed and fabricated which will be installed in the six Peripheral Target Positions (PTP), which are also located in the high flux region. These positions are only accessible during reactor refueling and will be used for long-term irradiations, such as required for the production of tin-117m and tungsten-188. Each of the PTP tubes will be capable of housing a maximum of eight HT targets, thus increasing the total maximum number of HT targets from the current nine, to a total of 57. In this paper the therapeutic use of reactor-produced radioisotopes for bone pain palliation and vascular brachytherapy and the therapeutic medical radioisotope production capabilities of the ORNL HFIR are briefly discussed.

  4. Quarterly Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program tasks for April 2000 through June 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.P.

    2000-10-23

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems (OSDPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVSs) and weld shields (WSs). This quarterly report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from OSDPS for fiscal year (FY) 2000. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, clad vent sets (CVSs), and weld shields (WSs). In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of flight quality (FQ) components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for two new RPS. The last section is dedicated to studies of the potential for the production of 238Pu at ORNL.

  5. Quarterly Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program tasks for January 2000 through March 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.P.

    2000-08-18

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems (OSDPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides radioisotope Power Systems (BPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of .I 997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVSs) and weld shields (WSs). This quarterly report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from OSDPS for fiscal year (FY) 2000. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, clad vent sets (CVSs), and weld shields (WSs). In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of flight quality (FQ) components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for two new RPS. The last section is dedicated to studies of the potential for the production of 238Pu at OBNL.

  6. Production of granular boron oxide by calcination of ammonium tetraborate tetrahydrate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Halil Demir; Ömer ?ahin; Mehmet Sait ?zgi; Hasan F?ratoglu

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the thermal calcinations of ammonium tetraborate tetrahydrate (ATT) to boron oxide investigated in fluidized bed calcinatory. Single step calcinations of ATT in pure state gives a puffed product with very low bulk density and the calcination is incomplete since ATT particles completely agglomerate at temperature higher than 350°C. Effect of the temperature on the bulk density and

  7. Some Engineering Technological Aspects of Radioisotope and Labeled Compound Production in the U.S.S.R.; NEKOTRORYE TEKHNICHESKIE I TEKHNOLOGICHESKIE ASPEKTY PROIZVODSTVA RADIOAKTIVNYKH IZOTOPOV I MECHENYKH SOEDINENII V SSSR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. V. Bochkarev; E. E. Kulish; I. F. Tupitsin

    1959-01-01

    The basic engineering and technological aspects of radioisotope ; production by neutron irradiation in reactors are discussed. The mass production ; of labeled compounds from the available radioisotopes is based on laboratory ; methods. Examples of practical applications of basic technological methods both ; in isotope and labeled compound production are given. The remote control ; equipment used is described.

  8. Low-temperature synthesis of boron carbide powder from condensed boric acid–glycerin product

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masaki Kakiage; Naoki Tahara; Ikuo Yanase; Hidehiko Kobayashi

    2011-01-01

    Crystalline boron carbide (B4C) powder was synthesized by the carbothermal reduction of a condensed product formed from boric acid (H3BO3) and glycerin (C3H8O3). The condensed product was prepared by dehydration after directly mixing equimolar amounts of H3BO3 and glycerin, which was followed by pyrolysis in air to obtain a precursor powder from which the excess carbon had been eliminated. The

  9. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power Systems Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2006 Through September 30, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    King, James F [ORNL

    2008-04-01

    The Office of Radioisotope Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Radioisotope Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2007. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  10. Masters Thesis- Criticality Alarm System Design Guide with Accompanying Alarm System Development for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory in Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, Bryce A.

    2009-12-20

    A detailed instructional manual was created to guide criticality safety engineers through the process of designing a criticality alarm system (CAS) for Department of Energy (DOE) hazard class 1 and 2 facilities. Regulatory and technical requirements were both addressed. A list of design tasks and technical subtasks are thoroughly analyzed to provide concise direction for how to complete the analysis. An example of the application of the design methodology, the Criticality Alarm System developed for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory (RPL) of Richland, Washington is also included. The analysis for RPL utilizes the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 for establishing detector coverage in the facility. Significant improvements to the existing CAS were made that increase the reliability, transparency, and coverage of the system.

  11. Production of {sup 17}F, {sup 15}O and other radioisotopes for PET using a 3 MV electrostatic tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, A. D. [Medical Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Psychology Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Davidson, R. J. [Psychology Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Nickles, R. J. [Medical Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    1999-06-10

    Target systems for the production of positron emitting radioisotopes used for medical research with positron emission tomography (PET) are under development for a 3 MV electrostatic tandem accelerator (NEC 9SDH-2). This machine is intended primarily for the continuous production of short lived tracers labeled with {sup 15}O (t{sub 1/2}=122 s) or {sup 17}F (t{sub 1/2}=65 s) for determining regional cerebral blood flow in humans. Simple gas, liquid, and solid target systems are presented for the production of [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O (yield at saturation 13 mCi/{mu}A), [{sup 17}F]F{sub 2} (22 mCi/{mu}A), [{sup 17}F] fluoride (aq.) (12 mCi/{mu}A), [{sup 18}F]fluoride (aq.) (21 mCi/{mu}A), [{sup 13}N] in graphite (25 mCi/{mu}A), and [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} (2.3 mCi/{mu}A). Current limitations on single window targets for each production are discussed.

  12. Measurement of cosmogenic radioisotope production on water at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askins, Morgan

    2014-03-01

    The next generation of large water detectors, such as the kiloton-scale Water Cherenkov Monitor for Antineutrinos (WATCHMAN) and the megaton-scale Japanese Hyper-K project, aim to pursue a diverse physics program including low energy antineutrino physics. Muogenic backgrounds in water have been measured by the Superkamiokande collaboration, but for reactor and other low energy antineutrinos these backgrounds are only weakly constrained and may prove important for large water-based reactor-antineutrino detectors. The WATCHMAN collaboration has deployed a water Cherenkov detector to measure the rate of long-lived ?- n radioisotopes - 8He, 9Li, 11Li - produced by cosmic ray interactions in water. Our emphasis is on measuring those ?- n decay isotopes which mimic the positron-neutron signal from inverse beta decay of antineutrinos on protons. Our detector is a 2 ton cylindrical target of pure water doped with gadolinium for neutron identification, surrounded by a 1.4-meter thick pure water muon veto and neutron/gamma shield. Presented here are the preliminary results of data taken beginning July 2013 at the KURF mine in Virginia at a depth of approximately 300 meters water equivalent with intermittent periods of detector off time.

  13. Production of medical radioisotopes in the ORNL high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) for cancer treatment and arterial restenosis therapy after PICA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. F. Knapp; A. L. Beets; S. Mirzadeh; C. W. Alexander; R. L. Hobbs

    1999-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) represents an important resource for the production of a wide variety of medical radioisotopes. First beginning operation\\u000a in 1965, the high thermal neutron flux (2.5×1015 neutrons\\/cm2\\/sec at 85 MW) and versatile target irradiation and handling facilities provide the opportunity for production of a wide variety\\u000a of neutron-rich

  14. Beryllium and boron production in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaney, R. A.

    1993-05-01

    Studies of inhomogeneous primordial nucleosynthesis are once again generating some excitement. Rather than some new theoretical innovation, however, this new excitement arises from recent optical observations which indicate the presence of a relatively high Be abundance in the early galaxy. Although such observations are consistent with the predictions of simple inhomogeneous models, recent more sophisticated models predict Be yields which are orders of magnitude below detectable levels. We discuss here some of the caveats associated with Be production in the early universe, and argue that primordial Be yields consistent with recent observations remain a viable option. Since detectable yields of B (observable in the UV with the Hubble Space Telescope) are also predicted by inhomogeneous nucleosynthesis, primordial production of this isotope is also considered. The production of Be and B isotopes by GCR spallation is discussed, and we highlight possible means of discriminating between this more traditional mechanism and that of primordial production. We conclude that an observation of Be/B > 0.1 in the early galaxy would be a ``smoking gun'' of inhomogeneous big bang nucleosynthesis.

  15. Production of Medical Radioisotopes with High Specific Activity in Photonuclear Reactions with $\\gamma$ Beams of High Intensity and Large Brilliance

    E-print Network

    Habs, D

    2010-01-01

    We study the production of radioisotopes for nuclear medicine in $(\\gamma,x{\\rm n}+y{\\rm p})$ photonuclear reactions or ($\\gamma,\\gamma'$) photoexcitation reactions with high flux [($10^{13}-10^{15}$)$\\gamma$/s], small diameter $\\sim (100 \\, \\mu$m$)^2$ and small band width ($\\Delta E/E \\approx 10^{-3}-10^{-4}$) $\\gamma$ beams produced by Compton back-scattering of laser light from relativistic brilliant electron beams. We compare them to (ion,$x$n$ + y$p) reactions with (ion=p,d,$\\alpha$) from particle accelerators like cyclotrons and (n,$\\gamma$) or (n,f) reactions from nuclear reactors. For photonuclear reactions with a narrow $\\gamma$ beam the energy deposition in the target can be managed by using a stack of thin target foils or wires, hence avoiding direct stopping of the Compton and pair electrons (positrons). $(\\gamma,\\gamma')$ isomer production via specially selected $\\gamma$ cascades allows to produce high specific activity in multiple excitations, where no back-pumping of the isomer to the ground st...

  16. Study of components and statistical reaction mechanism in simulation of nuclear process for optimized production of 64Cu and 67Ga medical radioisotopes using TALYS, EMPIRE and LISE++ nuclear reaction and evaporation codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrabadi, M. N.; Sepiani, M.

    2015-03-01

    Production of medical radioisotopes is one of the most important tasks in the field of nuclear technology. These radioactive isotopes are mainly produced through variety nuclear process. In this research, excitation functions and nuclear reaction mechanisms are studied for simulation of production of these radioisotopes in the TALYS, EMPIRE & LISE++ reaction codes, then parameters and different models of nuclear level density as one of the most important components in statistical reaction models are adjusted for optimum production of desired radioactive yields.

  17. Tailoring medium energy proton beam to induce low energy nuclear reactions in (86)SrCl2 for production of PET radioisotope (86)Y.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Dmitri G; Mausner, Leonard F; Pile, Philip

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports results of experiments at Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) aiming to investigate effective production of positron emitting radioisotope (86)Y by the low energy (86)Sr(p,n) reaction. BLIP is a facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory designed for the proton irradiation of the targets for isotope production at high and intermediate proton energies. The proton beam is delivered by the Linear Accelerator (LINAC) whose incident energy is tunable from 200 to 66MeV in approximately 21MeV increments. The array was designed to ensure energy degradation from 66MeV down to less than 20MeV. Aluminum slabs were used to degrade the proton energy down to the required range. The production yield of (86)Y (1.2+/-0.1mCi (44.4+/-3.7) MBq/?Ah) and ratio of radioisotopic impurities was determined by assaying an aliquot of the irradiated (86)SrCl2 solution by gamma spectroscopy. The analysis of energy dependence of the (86)Y production yield and the ratios of radioisotopic impurities has been used to adjust degrader thickness. Experimental data showed substantial discrepancies in actual energy propagation compared to energy loss calculations. PMID:25813003

  18. Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2001 Through March 31, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    J. P. Moore, JPM

    2002-05-22

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2002. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

  19. Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of the Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for September 2000 through March 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.P.

    2001-05-22

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) and weld shields (WS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2001. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, CVS, and WS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials. or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

  20. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2002 Through September 30, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.F.

    2004-05-18

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2003. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

  1. Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for April 1, 2002 Through September 20, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.P.

    2002-12-03

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2002. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

  2. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Tasks for October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    None listed

    2005-06-01

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2004. Production and production maintenance activities for flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  3. Synergistic methods for the production of high-strength and low-cost boron carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, Charles Schenck

    2011-12-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a non-oxide ceramic in the same class of nonmetallic hard materials as silicon carbide and diamond. The high hardness, high elastic modulus and low density of B4C make it a nearly ideal material for personnel and vehicular armor. B4C plates formed via hot-pressing are currently issued to U.S. soldiers and have exhibited excellent performance; however, hot-pressed articles contain inherent processing defects and are limited to simple geometries such as low-curvature plates. Recent advances in the pressureless sintering of B4C have produced theoretically-dense and complex-shape articles that also exhibit superior ballistic performance. However, the cost of this material is currently high due to the powder shape, size, and size distribution that are required, which limits the economic feasibility of producing such a product. Additionally, the low fracture toughness of pure boron carbide may have resulted in historically lower transition velocities (the projectile velocity range at which armor begins to fail) than competing silicon carbide ceramics in high-velocity long-rod tungsten penetrator tests. Lower fracture toughness also limits multi-hit protection capability. Consequently, these requirements motivated research into methods for improving the densification and fracture toughness of inexpensive boron carbide composites that could result in the development of a superior armor material that would also be cost-competitive with other high-performance ceramics. The primary objective of this research was to study the effect of titanium and carbon additives on the sintering and mechanical properties of inexpensive B4C powders. The boron carbide powder examined in this study was a sub-micron (0.6 mum median particle size) boron carbide powder produced by H.C. Starck GmbH via a jet milling process. A carbon source in the form of phenolic resin, and titanium additives in the form of 32 nm and 0.9 mum TiO2 powders were selected. Parametric studies of sintering behavior were performed via high-temperature dilatometry in order to measure the in-situ sample contraction and thereby measure the influence of the additives and their amounts on the overall densification rate. Additionally, broad composition and sintering/post-HIPing studies followed by characterization and mechanical testing elucidated the effects of these additives on sample densification, microstructure de- velopment, and mechanical properties such as Vickers hardness and microindentation fracture toughness. Based upon this research, a process has been developed for the sintering of boron carbide that yielded end products with high relative densities (i.e., 100%, or theoretical density), microstructures with a fine (˜2-3 mum) grain size, and high Vickers microindentation hardness values. In addition to possessing these improved physical properties, the costs of producing this material were substantially lower (by a factor of 5 or more) than recently patented work on the pressureless sintering and post-HIPing of phase-pure boron carbide powder. This recently patented work developed out of our laboratory utilized an optimized powder distribution and yielded samples with high relative densities and high hardness values. The current work employed the use of titanium and carbon additives in specific ratios to activate the sintering of boron carbide powder possessing an approximately mono-modal particle size distribution. Upon heating to high temperatures, these additives produced fine-scale TiB2 and graphite inclusions that served to hinder grain growth and substantially improve overall sintered and post-HIPed densities when added in sufficient concentrations. The fine boron carbide grain size manifested as a result of these second phase inclusions caused a substantial increase in hardness; the highest hardness specimen yielded a hardness value (2884.5 kg/mm2) approaching that of phase-pure and theoretically-dense boron carbide (2939 kg/mm2). Additionally, the same high-hardness composition exhibited a noticeably higher fracture toughness (3.04 MPa

  4. Five Years of Cyclotron Radioisotope Production Experiences at the First PET-CT in Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Colmenter, L.; Coelho, D.; Esteves, L. M.; Ruiz, N.; Morales, L.; Lugo, I. [Centro Diagnostico Docente, Las Mercedes, Caracas (Venezuela); Sajo-Bohus, L.; Liendo, J. A.; Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Seccion de Fisica Nuclear, Caracas (Venezuela); Castillo, J. [University of Applied Science of Aachen (Germany)

    2007-10-26

    Five years operation of a compact cyclotron installed at PET-CT facility in Caracas, Venezuela is given. Production rate of {sup 18}F labeled FDG, operation and radiation monitoring experience are included. We conclude that {sup 18}FDG CT-PET is the most effective technique for patient diagnosis.

  5. Method for production of free-standing polycrystalline boron phosphide film

    DOEpatents

    Baughman, Richard J. (Albuquerque, NM); Ginley, David S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A process for producing a free-standing polycrystalline boron phosphide film comprises growing a film of boron phosphide in a vertical growth apparatus on a metal substrate. The metal substrate has a coefficient of thermal expansion sufficiently different from that of boron phosphide that the film separates cleanly from the substrate upon cooling thereof, and the substrate is preferably titanium. The invention also comprises a free-standing polycrystalline boron phosphide film for use in electronic device fabrication.

  6. Free-standing polycrystalline boron phosphide film and method for production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Baughman, R.J.; Ginley, D.S.

    1982-09-09

    A process for producing a free-standing polycrystalline boron phosphide film comprises growing a film of boron phosphide in a vertical growth apparatus on a metal substrate. The metal substrate has a coefficient of thermal expansion sufficiently different from that of boron phosphide that the film separates cleanly from the substrate upon cooling thereof, and the substrate is preferably titanium. The invention also comprises a free-standing polycrystalline boron phosphide film for use in electronic device fabrication.

  7. LANL Activities Supporting Electron Accelerator Production of 99Mo for NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes, LLC

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelsey, Charles T. IV [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Woloshun, Keith A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holloway, Michael A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olivas, Eric R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dalmas, Dale A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Romero, Frank P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hurtle, Kenneth P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-11

    Summary of LANL FY12 Activities are: (1) Preparation, performance, and data analysis for the FY12 accelerator tests at ANL - (a) LANL designed and installed a closed-loop helium target cooling system at ANL for the FY12 accelerator tests, (b) Thermal test was performed on March 27, (c) 24 h production test to follow the accelerator upgrade at ANL; (2) Local target shielding design and OTR/IR recommendations - (a) Target dose rate and activation products were calculated with MCNPX, (b) {sup 206}Pb({gamma},2n){sup 204m}Pb vs {sup 204g}Pb branching ratio unpublished, will measure using the LANL microtron, (c) OTR system nearing final configuration, (d) IR prototype system demonstrated during the recent thermal test at ANL; (3) Target housing lifetime estimation - Target housing material specifications and design to be finalized following the thermal test, lifetime not believed to be an issue; and (4) Target cooling system reliability - Long duration system characterizations will begin following the thermal test.

  8. Effects of admixture gas on the production of (18)F radioisotope in plasma focus devices.

    PubMed

    Talaei, Ahmad; Sadat Kiai, S M; Zaeem, A A

    2010-12-01

    In this article, the effect of admixture gas on the heating and cooling of pinched plasma directly related to the enhancement or reduction of (18)F production through the (16)O((3)He, p)(18)F is considered in the plasma focus devices. It is shown that by controlling the velocity of added Oxygen particles mixed with the working helium gas into the plasma focus chamber, one can increase the current and decrease the confinement time (plasma heating) or vice verse (plasma cooling). The highest level of nuclear activities of (18)F was found around 16% of the Oxygen admixture participation and was about 0.35 MBq in the conditions of 20 kJ, 0.1 Hz and after 2 min operating of Dena PF. However, in the same condition, but for the frequency of 1 Hz, the level of activity increased up to 3.4 MBq. PMID:20579896

  9. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Tasks for October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    None listed

    2006-08-03

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2005. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  10. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2004 Through September 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    King, James F [ORNL

    2006-06-01

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2005. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  11. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technical Program Tasks for October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2007-04-02

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2006. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  12. ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT OF RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEM MATERIALS PRODUCTION AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM TASKS FOR OCTOBER 1, 2005 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    King, James F [ORNL

    2007-04-01

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2006. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  13. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Programs Tasks for October 1, 2005, through September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    None

    2006-09-30

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2006. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  14. Optimal plasma process routes for boron nitride (BN) powder production from boric acid (H 3BO 3)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Života G. Kosti?; Predrag Lj. Stefanovi?; Pavle B. Pavlovi?; Dejan B. Cvetinovi?; Slobodan Šikmanovi?

    2000-01-01

    The results of equilibrium composition and total enthalpy computation in the temperature range of 1000 to 6000 K and at pressure of 1 bar, for the systems BOHN and BOCHN are presented in the paper. These data enable the determination, and optimization of mass, temperature and energy parameters of the process for ultrafine boron nitride powder production by the boric

  15. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.

    1984-08-01

    This document lists DOE's radioisotope production and distribution activities by its facilities at Argonne National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; Idaho Operations Office; Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Savannah River Plant; and UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. The information is divided into five sections: isotope suppliers, facility contacts, and isotopes or services supplied; lists of customers, suppliers and isotopes purchased; list of isotopes purchased cross-referenced to customer codes; geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers - FY 1983.

  16. BORON--1998 13.1 By Phyllis A. Lyday

    E-print Network

    BORON--1998 13.1 BORON By Phyllis A. Lyday Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Shantae, international data coordinator. Boron is produced domestically only in the State of California. Boron products. The United States and Turkey are the world's largest producers of boron. Boron is priced and sold

  17. Cathodic reductive coupling of methyl cinnamate on boron-doped diamond electrodes and synthesis of new neolignan-type products.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Taiki; Obata, Rika; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Einaga, Yasuaki; Nishiyama, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    The electroreduction reaction of methyl cinnamate on a boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode was investigated. The hydrodimer, dimethyl 3,4-diphenylhexanedioate (racemate/meso = 74:26), was obtained in 85% yield as the major product, along with small amounts of cyclic methyl 5-oxo-2,3-diphenylcyclopentane-1-carboxylate. Two new neolignan-type products were synthesized from the hydrodimer. PMID:25815070

  18. Determination of boron and lithium by recording the products from (n, alpha) reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobanov, Y. M.; Zverev, B. P.; Simakhin, Y. F.; Usmanova, M. M.

    1978-01-01

    Irradiation with thermal neutrons in the VVR-S reactor provides a nondestructive method for determining the presence of boron and lithium in solids. The charged particles produced in the reactions Li-6(n,alpha)H-3 and B-10(n,alpha)Li-7 were detected using CsI single crystal. For alpha-particle spectrometry in the boron determination, an ionization chamber (W and Sn electrodes, 99% Ar + 1% H2) was developed allowing both absolute and relative measurements. In determining boron in lithium-containing samples, both scintillation and ionization chambers are used. In determining lithium in minerals, the error was 1.5%, and the sensitivity 0.00005 wt.%. In the determination of boron in SiC with a concentration of boron approximately (3 plus or minus 2) the error given by the alpha-range uncertainty was 15%.

  19. Square?Wave Voltammetry Determination of Aspartame in Dietary Products Using a Boron?Doped Diamond Electrode

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roberta Antigo Medeiros; Adriana Evaristo de Carvalho

    2007-01-01

    The use of square?wave voltammetry in conjunction with a cathodically pretreated boron?doped diamond electrode for the analytical determination of aspartame in dietary products is described. In this determination, the samples were analyzed without previous treatment in a 0.5 mol l H2SO4 solution. A single oxidation peak at a potential of 1.6 V vs. Ag\\/AgCl (3.0 mol l KCl) with the characteristics of an irreversible reaction

  20. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power Systems Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2007 Through September 30,2008

    SciTech Connect

    King, James F [ORNL

    2009-04-01

    The Office of Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides RPS for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of RPS for fiscal year (FY) 2008. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new RPS.

  1. Production of multicharged iron ions by using pyrolytic boron nitride crucible and application to material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yushi; Tomida, Masashi; Ishii, Shigeyuki

    2004-05-01

    Multiply charged ions of iron are produced from solid material in a 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source by using a crucible made from pyrolytic boron-nitride (pBN) with several shields suppressing radiation. The evaporator is set on the geometrical axis. The multicharged ions are extracted from the opposite side of mirror end against the evaporator. Extraction voltage is normally 10 kV. The optimum conditions for production of multicharged iron ions are investigated experimentally. The ion beams can be provided to a newly constructed beam line for the ion irradiation of the substrate installed on the beam line. Multicharged iron ion beams have been utilized to form iron silicides and to enhance light catalytic performance of titanium-dioxide (TiO2) thin films. Formation of iron disilicide (?-FeSi2) has been identified, as well as enhancement of photocatalytic performance of the TiO2 thin films in the visible light region without degradation in the UV light region.

  2. Radioisotopic heat sources. Revision 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rohrmann

    1963-01-01

    For the radioisotopes with half-lives over a year, only eight appear to be obtainable in the foreseeable future. The fission products, strontium-90, cesium-137, and promethium-147, exist in wastes from reactor processing, diluted with enormous volumes of other elements and salts. Among those isotopes producible by irradiation of special target materials (cobalt-60, uranium-232, plutonium-238, and curium-244) cobalt-60, though easy to produce,

  3. Magnetron sputtered boron films

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for producing hardened surfaces, surfacing machine tools, etc. and for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z optical components, such as mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  4. Magnetron sputtered boron films

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1998-06-16

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for producing hardened surfaces, surfacing machine tools, etc. and for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z optical components, such as mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence. 8 figs.

  5. Minerals Yearbook, 1988. Boron

    SciTech Connect

    Lyday, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    U.S. production and sales of boron minerals and chemicals decreased during the year. Glass-fiber insulation was the largest use for borates, followed by sales to distributors, textile-grade glass fibers, and borosilicate glasses. California was the only domestic source of boron minerals. The report discusses the following: domestic data coverage; legislation and government programs; domestic production; comsumption and uses; prices; foreign trade; world capacity; world review--Argentina, Chile, France, Italy, Turkey, United Kingdom; Technology.

  6. Jaguar Procedures for Detonation Behavior of Explosives Containing Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiel, L. I.; Baker, E. L.; Capellos, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Jaguar product library was expanded to include boron and boron containing products by analysis of Available Hugoniot and static volumetric data to obtain constants of the Murnaghan relationships for the components. Experimental melting points were also utilized to obtain the constants of the volumetric relationships for liquid boron and boron oxide. Detonation velocities for HMX—boron mixtures calculated with these relationships using Jaguar are in closer agreement with literature values at high initial densities for inert (unreacted) boron than with the completely reacted metal. These results indicate that the boron does not react near the detonation front or that boron mixtures exhibit eigenvalue detonation behavior (as shown by some aluminized explosives), with higher detonation velocities at the initial points. Analyses of calorimetric measurements for RDX—boron mixtures indicate that at high boron contents the formation of side products, including boron nitride and boron carbide, inhibits the detonation properties of the formulation.

  7. Determination and production of an optimal neutron energy spectrum for boron neutron capture therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darren Leo Bleuel

    2003-01-01

    An accelerator-based neutron irradiation facility employing an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been proposed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In this dissertation, the properties of an ideal neutron beam for delivering a maximized dose to a glioblastoma multiforme tumor in a reasonable time while minimizing the dose to healthy tissue is examined. A variety

  8. Effect of boron application on seed production of New Zealand herbage legumes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. G. Sherrell

    1983-01-01

    Six rates of boron (B) were applied to 2 white clovers (Trifolium repens L.), alsike clover (Trifolium hybridum L.), 3 red clovers (Trifolium pratense L.), and lucerne (Medicago sativa L.) in the glasshouse on a soil which was known to be low in available B. None of the 7 cultivars produced seed without added B, and red clovers also did

  9. Determination and production of an optimal neutron energy spectrum for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleuel, Darren Leo

    An accelerator-based neutron irradiation facility employing an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been proposed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In this dissertation, the properties of an ideal neutron beam for delivering a maximized dose to a glioblastoma multiforme tumor in a reasonable time while minimizing the dose to healthy tissue is examined. A variety of materials, beam shaping assemblies, and neutron sources were considered to deliver a neutron spectrum as close to the calculated idealized spectrum as possible. Several optimization studies were performed to determine the best proton energy and moderator material to maximize the efficacy of an accelerator-based BNCT facility utilizing the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction as a neutron source. A new, faster method of performing such an optimization was developed, known as the "Ubertally" method, in which data from a single Monte Carlo simulation is reweighted to produce results for any neutron spatial, energy and angular source distribution. Results were confirmed experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88? cyclotron. Thermal fluxes in this experiment were found to be approximately 30% lower than expected, but the depth-dose profile was confirmed to within 8% maximum deviation. A final beam shaping assembly is then recommended. Utilizing a material known as Fluental as a moderating material, deep-seated tumor doses 50% higher than that delivered by clinical trials at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) are predicted. The final recommended design should contain a 37 cm thickness of Fluental(TM) moderator, a 1--2 cm gamma shield, an Al2O3 reflector, a V-shaped aluminum-backed or copper-backed source with heavy water cooling, and a 13 cm lithiated polyethylene delimiter. This design would be operated at 2.4 MeV proton energy at 20 mA to conduct treatments in less than an hour and a half. However, this design may be easily altered depending on the changing needs of the treatment facility. It is therefore concluded that production of an accelerator-based BNCT facility using an ESQ accelerator and a 7Li target is feasible and can produce a superior quality neutron beam.

  10. Anomalous heat and helium production using palladium-boron alloys in heavy water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melvin H. Miles; Kendall B. Johnson; M. Ashraf Imam

    1997-01-01

    Reproducibility continues to be the major problem in the controversial cold fusion area. The best reproducibility for excess power was obtained using palladium-boron (Pd-B) alloy materials supplied by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Washington DC, USA. Seven out of eight Pd-B cathodes produced excess power using D2O-LiOD solutions. The collection and analysis of the electrolysis gases from one Pd-B experiment

  11. Reducing Boron Toxicity by Microbial Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.; Phelps, T.J.

    2002-01-01

    While electricity is a clean source of energy, methods of electricity-production, such as the use of coal-fired power plants, often result in significant environmental damage. Coal-fired electrical power plants produce air pollution, while contaminating ground water and soils by build-up of boron, which enters surrounding areas through leachate. Increasingly high levels of boron in soils eventually overcome boron tolerance levels in plants and trees, resulting in toxicity. Formation of insoluble boron precipitates, mediated by mineral-precipitating bacteria, may sequester boron into more stable forms that are less available and toxic to vegetation. Results have provided evidence of microbially-facilitated sequestration of boron into insoluble mineral precipitates. Analyses of water samples taken from ponds with high boron concentrations showed that algae present contained 3-5 times more boron than contained in the water in the samples. Boron sequestration may also be facilitated by the incorporation of boron within algal cells. Experiments examining boron sequestration by algae are in progress. In bacterial experiments with added ferric citrate, the reduction of iron by the bacteria resulted in an ironcarbonate precipitate containing boron. An apparent color change showing the reduction of amorphous iron, as well as the precipitation of boron with iron, was more favorable at higher pH. Analysis of precipitates by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy revealed mineralogical composition and biologicallymediated accumulation of boron precipitates in test-tube experiments.

  12. Radioisotope thermoelectric generators for implanted pacemakers

    SciTech Connect

    Pustovalov, A.A.; Bovin, A.V.; Fedorets, V.I.; Shapovalov, V.P.

    1986-08-01

    This paper discusses the development and application of long-life lithium batteries and the problems associated with miniature radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RITEG) with service lives of 10 years or longer. On eof the main problems encountered when devising a radioisotope heat source (RHS) for an RITEG is to obtain biomedical /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ with a specific neutron yield of 3.10/sup 3/-4.10/sup 3/ (g /SUP ./ sec)/sup -1/, equivalent to metallic Pu 238, and with a content of gamma impurities sufficient to ensure a permissible exposure a permissible exposure does rate (EDR) of a mixture of neutron and gamma radiation. After carrying out the isotope exchange and purifying the initial sample of its gamma impurity elements, the authors obtain biomedical Pu 238 satisfying the indicated requirements king suitable for use in the power packs of medical devices. Taking the indicated specifications into account, the Ritm-1o and gamma radioisotope heat sources were designed, built, tested in models and under natural conditions, and then into production as radioisotope thermoelectric generators designed to power the electronic circuits of implanted pacemakers. The Ritm-MT and Gemma radioisotope thermoelectric generators described are basic units, which can be used as self-contained power supplies for electronic equipment with power requirements in the micromilliwatt range.

  13. Radioisotope powered light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, F. N.; Remini, W. C.

    1980-10-01

    The background and current status of the use of radioisotopes to excite phosphors to produce visible light are discussed. Current energy conservation needs provided the incentive for the development of illuminators for air field markers using both byproduct krypton-85 and processed tritium.

  14. Minerals Yearbook 1989: Boron

    SciTech Connect

    Lyday, P.A.

    1990-08-01

    U.S. production and sales of boron minerals and chemicals decreased during the year. Domestically, glass fiber insulation was the largest use for borates, followed by sales to distributors, textile-grade glass fibers, and borosilicate glasses. California was the only domestic source of boron minerals. The United States continued to provide essentially all of its own supply while maintaining a strong position as a source of sodium borate products and boric acid exported to foreign markets. Supplementary U.S. imports of Turkish calcium borate and calcium-sodium borate ores, borax, and boric acid, primarily for various glass uses, continued.

  15. Multistep phase-switch synthesis by using liquid-liquid partitioning of boronic acids: productive tags with an expanded repertoire of compatible reactions.

    PubMed

    Mothana, Sam; Grassot, Jean-Marie; Hall, Dennis G

    2010-04-01

    Tagging along: a system for phase-switch synthesis has been developed. The boronic acid functionality is used as a phase tag that complexes to sorbitol and facilitates compound transfer from an organic solvent to water at high pH. The phase tag can then be used in a productive reaction step to generate targeted products, thereby eliminating purification by silica gel chromatography. PMID:20146294

  16. High-Efficient Production of Boron Nitride Nanosheets via an Optimized Ball Milling Process for Lubrication in Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepika; Li, Lu Hua; Glushenkov, Alexey M.; Hait, Samik K.; Hodgson, Peter; Chen, Ying

    2014-12-01

    Although tailored wet ball milling can be an efficient method to produce a large quantity of two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, milling parameters including milling speed, ball-to-powder ratio, milling ball size and milling agent, are important for optimization of exfoliation efficiency and production yield. In this report, we systematically investigate the effects of different milling parameters on the production of BN nanosheets with benzyl benzoate being used as the milling agent. It is found that small balls of 0.1-0.2 mm in diameter are much more effective in exfoliating BN particles to BN nanosheets. Under the optimum condition, the production yield can be as high as 13.8% and the BN nanosheets are 0.5-1.5 ?m in diameter and a few nanometers thick and of relative high crystallinity and chemical purity. The lubrication properties of the BN nanosheets in base oil have also been studied. The tribological tests show that the BN nanosheets can greatly reduce the friction coefficient and wear scar diameter of the base oil.

  17. Boron geochemistry of mud volcano products and their significance for global B cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyhle, A.; Kopf, A.

    2003-04-01

    Mud volcanism is a global phenomenon in mostly convergent margin settings, whose nature has long been subject to scientific investigation. However, only recently its significance has been unravelled by quantitative studies in well-investigated submarine environments, like large accretionary complexes. The fluid flux through active mud volcanoes has been estimated to exceed that of the frontal accretionary prism (Kopf et al. 2001, EPSL 189), and may have done so in earlier earth history. We report results from a systematic B geochemical study of pore fluids, muds and clasts of onshore and offshore mud volcanoes all over the world (Kopf and Deyhle, 2002, Chem. Geol., 192). When tied into results from hydrothermal geochemical experiments in the laboratory (You et al. 1996, EPSL 140), the B geochemistry proofs to be a powerful tracer to estimate the depth of fluid and mud mobilization below ground. Boron adsorbed to clay minerals is preferably donated to the fluid when either tectonic stress (vertical and/or lateral compaction) or temperature increase. Here, we report variations in B content and B isotopes in mud volcano deposits as a result of different history of the material prior to extrusion. Results reflect the regional geology of the study areas, ranging from dewatering of undercompacted marine sediments in accretionary prisms (Barbados, Makran, Mediterranean Sea) to diagenetic reactions in mud volcanoes of orogenic belts (Malaysia, Pakistan, Georgia, Taman Peninsula, Western Alps). Boron shows maximum enrichment in the fluid phase (owing to desorption in the mud) when faulting roots deepest and deformation is strongest. Mud domes juxtaposing out-of-sequence faults in the Caucasus orogenic wedge show mud B contents 8x marine sediment and fluid B contents up to 25x seawater. Deep-seated, B-rich fluids liquefy clay-bearing strata to facilitate mud extrusion, allowing the clay to re-adsorb B in the process. B isotopic composition of the mud decreases with incipient stress and mobilization depth. Given the abundance and high discharge rates of mud volcanoes along subduction zones, this process generally affects chemical and fluid budgets in the subduction factory. Given the abundance and high discharge rates of mud volcanoes, it clearly has to be considered a major backflux mechanism in global B cycling from the lithosphere to the hydrosphere.

  18. Radioisotopes as Political Instruments, 1946-1953.

    PubMed

    Creager, Angela N H

    2009-01-01

    The development of nuclear "piles," soon called reactors, in the Manhattan Project provided a new technology for manufacturing radioactive isotopes. Radioisotopes, unstable variants of chemical elements that give off detectable radiation upon decay, were available in small amounts for use in research and therapy before World War II. In 1946, the U.S. government began utilizing one of its first reactors, dubbed X-10 at Oak Ridge, as a production facility for radioisotopes available for purchase to civilian institutions. This program of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission was meant to exemplify the peacetime dividends of atomic energy. The numerous requests from scientists outside the United States, however, sparked a political debate about whether the Commission should or even could export radioisotopes. This controversy manifested the tension in U.S. politics between scientific internationalism as a tool of diplomacy, associated with the aims of the Marshall Plan, and the desire to safeguard the country's atomic monopoly at all costs, linked to American anti-Communism. This essay examines the various ways in which radioisotopes were used as political instruments-both by the U.S. federal government in world affairs, and by critics of the civilian control of atomic energy-in the early Cold War. PMID:20725612

  19. JAGUAR Procedures for Detonation Behavior of Explosives Containing Boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiel, Leonard; Baker, Ernest; Capellos, Christos

    2009-06-01

    The JAGUAR product library was expanded to include boron and boron containing products. Relationships of the Murnaghan form for molar volumes and derived properties were implemented in JAGUAR. Available Hugoniot and static volumertic data were analyzed to obtain constants of the Murnaghan relationship for solid boron, boron oxide, boron nitride, boron carbide, and boric acid. Experimental melting points were also utilized with optimization procedures to obtain the constants of the volumetric relationships for liquid boron and boron oxide. Detonation velocities for HMX - boron mixtures calculated with these relationships using JAGUAR are in closer agreement with literature values at high initial densities for inert (unreacted) boron than with the completely reacted metal. These results indicate that boron mixtures may exhibit eigenvalue detonation behavior, as observed by aluminized combined effects explosives, with higher detonation velocities than would be achieved by a classical Chapman-Jouguet detonation. Analyses of calorimetric measurements for RDX - boron mixtures indicate that at high boron contents the formation of side products, including boron nitride and boron carbide, inhibits the energy output obtained from the detonation of the formulation.

  20. High-calcium coal combustion by-products: Engineering properties, ettringite formation, and potential application in solidification and stabilization of selenium and boron

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Docktor; K. E. Eylands; J. S. Thompson; D. J. Hassett

    1995-01-01

    Four high-calcium coal combustion by-products (two pulverized coal fly ashes (PCFA), a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) residue, and an atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) fly ash), were tested for engineering properties and ability to immobilize boron and selenium. These data are needed to explore high-volume utilization in engineered structures or in solidification\\/stabilization (S\\/S) technology. Strengths of cured pastes (91 days),

  1. Radioisotope powered light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Case, F. N.; Remini, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    Radioisotopes have been used for a number of years to excite phosphors to produce visible light. The advent of the nuclear age, however, made possible the preparation of radionuclides in larger quantities at relatively low prices, and with radiation properties that greatly expanded the potential applications for such lights. Current energy conservation needs and inflation leading to even higher costs for maintenance and capital equipment has provided the incentive for development of illuminators for air field markers using both byproduct krypton-85 and processed tritium. Background and current status of these developments are discussed.

  2. Alternative Radioisotopes for Heat and Power Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, T.; Sarsfield, M.; Rice, T.

    Production of 238Pu requires considerable facilities including a nuclear reactor and reprocessing plants that are very expensive to build and operate. Thus, a more economical alternative is very attractive to the industry. There are many alternative radioisotopes that exist but few that satisfy the criteria of performance, availability and cost to produce. Any alternative to 238Pu must exist in a chemical form that is compatible with the materials required to safely encapsulate the heat source at the high temperatures of operation and potential launch failure scenarios. The chemical form must also have suitable thermal properties to ensure maximum energy conversion efficiencies when integrated into radioisotope thermoelectric generators over the required mission durations. In addition, the radiation dose must be low enough for operators during production and not so prohibitive that excessive shielding mass is required on the space craft. This paper will focus on the preferred European alternative of 241Am, and the issues that will need to be addressed.

  3. Radioisotope Power System Pool Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusick, Jeffrey J.; Bolotin, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for NASA deep space science missions have historically used static thermoelectric-based designs because they are highly reliable, and their radioisotope heat sources can be passively cooled throughout the mission life cycle. Recently, a significant effort to develop a dynamic RPS, the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), was conducted by NASA and the Department of Energy, because Stirling based designs offer energy conversion efficiencies four times higher than heritage thermoelectric designs; and the efficiency would proportionately reduce the amount of radioisotope fuel needed for the same power output. However, the long term reliability of a Stirling based design is a concern compared to thermoelectric designs, because for certain Stirling system architectures the radioisotope heat sources must be actively cooled via the dynamic operation of Stirling converters throughout the mission life cycle. To address this reliability concern, a new dynamic Stirling cycle RPS architecture is proposed called the RPS Pool Concept.

  4. Producing carbon stripper foils containing boron

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, J. O. Jr. [ACF-Metals (Arizona Carbon Foil Co., Inc.), 2239 E. Kleindale Road, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2012-12-19

    Parameters being actively tested by the accelerator community for the purpose of extending carbon stripper foil lifetimes in fast ion beams include methods of deposition, parting agents, mounting techniques, support (fork) materials, and inclusion of alloying elements, particularly boron. Specialized production apparatus is required for either sequential deposition or co-deposition of boron in carbon foils. A dual-use vacuum evaporator for arc evaporation of carbon and electron-beam evaporation of boron and other materials has been built for such development. Production of both carbon and boron foils has begun and improvements are in progress.

  5. Therapeutic clinical applications of reactor-produced radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-01

    One of the most rapidly growing areas of clinical nuclear medicine is the therapeutic use of radioisotopes for applications in oncology, rheumatology and, more recently, interventional cardiology. With the rapidly increasing development and evaluation of new agents, their introduction into clinical use, and commercialization, the availability of high levels of therapeutic reactor-produced neutron-rich radioisotopes is of increasing importance. The goals of this paper are to discuss the issues associated with optimization of the production and processing of reactor-produced radioisotopes for therapy, with special emphasis on {sup 188}W, and the optimization of the use of the {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator. In addition, other key examples of therapeutic radioisotopes of current interest and their specific clinical applications are discussed.

  6. Direct current sputtering of boron from boron/boron mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Timberlake, J.R.; Manos, D.; Nartowitz, E.

    1994-12-13

    A method for coating a substrate with boron by sputtering includes lowering the electrical resistance of a boron-containing rod to allow electrical conduction in the rod; placing the boron-containing rod inside a vacuum chamber containing substrate material to be coated; applying an electrical potential between the boron target material and the vacuum chamber; countering a current avalanche that commences when the conduction heating rate exceeds the cooling rate, and until a steady equilibrium heating current is reached; and, coating the substrate material with boron by sputtering from the boron-containing rod. 2 figures.

  7. Radioisotope Space Power Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) were extensively used in past space missions with great success. An improved generation of RTGs employing a new lightweight, modular heat source is being built by the DOE for NASA launches in 1986. More advanced modular RTGs which promise power-to-weight ratios of over 8.8 watts(e)/kg (4 watts(e)/lb) are currently under development by the DOE and could be flight-ready within five years. Dynamic Isotope Power Systems (DIPS) which offer 18-20% conversion efficiencies were demonstrated by the DOE in ground tests. DIPS would be useful for several military missions requiring power in the low-kilowatt range. These systems could also be brought to flight readiness by the DOE following receipt of firm user requirements.

  8. NASA: Radioisotope Power Systems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-10-30

    This is a multimedia overview of RPS (radioisotope power systems), a type of nuclear energy technology that uses heat to produce electricity for powering spacecraft. The heat is produced by the natural radioactive decay of plutonium-238. RPS systems have been in use for more than 50 years, and could continue to support missions to some of the most extreme environments in the solar system. Advantages of RPS include: continuous operation over long-duration space missions, largely independent of changes in sunlight, temperature, charged particle radiation, or surface conditions like thick clouds or dust. This resource is part of NASA's Solar System Exploration website. It includes videos, 3D interactive animations, illustrations, schematics of RPS components, and fact sheets about how the technology has been used in past missions.

  9. Silicon Carbide Radioisotope Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, George C.

    2005-01-01

    The substantial radiation resistance and large bandgap of SiC semiconductor materials makes them an attractive candidate for application in a high efficiency, long life radioisotope battery. To evaluate their potential in this application, simulated batteries were constructed using SiC diodes and the alpha particle emitter Americium Am-241 or the beta particle emitter Promethium Pm-147. The Am-241 based battery showed high initial power output and an initial conversion efficiency of approximately 16%, but the power output decayed 52% in 500 hours due to radiation damage. In contrast the Pm-147 based battery showed a similar power output level and an initial conversion efficiency of approximately 0.6%, but no degradation was observed in 500 hours. However, the Pm-147 battery required approximately 1000 times the particle fluence as the Am-242 battery to achieve a similar power output. The advantages and disadvantages of each type of battery and suggestions for future improvements will be discussed.

  10. Boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors: investigation of urinary metabolites and oxidation products of sodium borocaptate by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gibson, C R; Staubus, A E; Barth, R F; Yang, W; Kleinholz, N M; Jones, R B; Green-Church, K; Tjarks, W; Soloway, A H

    2001-12-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on a nuclear capture reaction that occurs when boron-10, a stable isotope, is irradiated with low energy neutrons to produce high-energy alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. The purpose of the present study was to determine what urinary metabolites, if any, could be detected in patients with brain tumors who were given sodium borocaptate (BSH), a drug that has been used clinically for BNCT. BSH was infused intravenously over a 1-h time period at doses of 26.5, 44.1, or 88.2 mg/kg of body weight to patients with high-grade brain tumors. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has been used to investigate possible urinary metabolites of BSH. Chemical and instrument conditions were established to detect BSH and its possible metabolites in both positive and negative electrospray ionization modes. Using this methodology, boronated ions were found in patients' urine samples that appeared to be consistent with the following chemical structures: BSH sulfenic acid (BSOH), BSH sulfinic acid (BSO(2)H), BSH disulfide (BSSB), BSH thiosulfinate (BSOSB), and a BSH-S-cysteine conjugate (BSH-CYS). Although BSH has been used clinically for BNCT since the late 1960s, this is the first report of specific biotransformation products following administration to patients. Further studies will be required to determine both the biological significance of these metabolites and whether any of these accumulate in significant amounts in brain tumors. PMID:11717178

  11. Boron-carbon-silicon polymers and ceramic and a process for the production thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, Salvatore (inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta (inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process for the production of an organoborosilicon preceramic polymer. The polymer is prepared by the reaction of vinylsilane or vinlymethylsilanes (acetylene)silane or acetylene alkyl silanes and borane or borane derivatives. The prepolymer form is pyrolyzed to produce a ceramic article useful in high temperature (e.g., aerospace) or extreme environmental applications.

  12. Boron in Chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, P.; Goswami, J. N.; Krähenbühl, U.; Marti, K.

    2001-10-01

    Isotopic compositions and abundances of boron were measured in sixteen chondrules from seven chondrites by ion microprobe mass spectrometry. The chondrules are of the porphyritic, barred, and radial type and host meteorites include carbonaceous, ordinary, and enstatite chondrites. Boron abundances are generally low with average boron concentrations of between 80 and 500 ppb. These abundances are lower than those of bulk chondrites (0.35 to 1.2 ppm; Zhai et al., 1996), confirming earlier suggestions that boron is mostly contained in the matrix. No significant variation in the 11B/10B ratio is observed among these chondrules, outside our experimental error limits of several permil, and B-isotopic compositions agree with those reported for bulk chondrites. The lack of a significant isotope fractionation between chondrules and matrix implies that the low boron abundances are not the result of a Rayleigh fractionation during chondrule formation. Isotopic heterogeneities within individual chondrules are constrained to be < +/-20% at >95% confidence level at a spatial scale of 20-30 um, significantly lower than the value of about +/-40% previously reported for chondrules from carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites (Chaussidon and Robert, 1995, 1998). The observed B-isotopic homogeneity does not conflict with the presence of decay products from extinct 10Be, with (10Be/9Be)0 ~ 10-3, as was inferred for calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions. Extinct 10Be in chondrules would shift the abundance ratio 11B/10B at best by several permil because of their commonly observed low Be/B ratios (<2). The results show that potential B-isotopic heterogeneities in the solar nebula due to the presence of components with different B-isotopic signatures, such as boron produced by high-energy galactic cosmic rays (11B/10B ~ 2.5), or by the hypothetical low-energy particle irradiation (11B/10B ~ 3.5-11) or boron from type II supernovae (11B/10B >> 1), did not survive the chondrule formation processes to a measurable extent.

  13. Reaction between boron fibers and an aluminum matrix during the production of VKA-1 composite material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. M. Chubarov; K. I. Portnoi; S. E. Salibekov; I. V. Romanovich; B. V. Shchetanov; A. A. Mukaseev; A. V. Kondratenko; V. V. Sakharov

    1978-01-01

    1.In the manufacture of VKA-1 composite material the diffusion welding of the semifinished product is accompanied by the formation at the fiber\\/matrix interfaces of the AlB2 phase in the form of spherical inclusions at sites of Al2O3 film disintegration on the matrix foils.2.To each diffusion welding temperature there corresponds a certain period of time during which no AlB2 phase is

  14. Cosmic-ray models for early Galactic Lithium, Beryllium, and Boron production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Brian D.; Olive, Keith A.; Schramm, David N.

    1994-01-01

    To understand better the early Galactic production of Li, Be, and B by comsmic-ray spallation and fusion reactions, the dependence of these production rates on cosmic-ray models and model parameters is examined. The sensitivity of elemental and isotopic production to the cosmic-ray path length magnitude and energy dependence, source spectrum, spallation kinematics, and cross section uncertainties is studied. Changes in these model features, particularly those features related to confinement, are shown to alter the Be- and B- versus-Fe slopes from a naive quadratic relation. The implications of our results for the diffuse gamma-ray background are examined, and the role of chemical evolution and its relation to our results is noted. It is also noted that the unmeasured high-energy behavior of alpha + alpha fusion can lead to effects as large as a factor of 2 in the resultant yields. Future data should enable Population II Li, Be, and B abundances to constrain cosmic-ray models for the early Galaxy.

  15. Radioisotope powered AMTEC systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanenok, Joseph F., III; Sievers, Robert K.

    1994-11-01

    Alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) systems are being developed for high performance spacecraft power systems, including small, general purpose heat source (GPHS) powered systems. Several design concepts have been evaluated for the power range from 75 W to 1 kW. The specific power for these concepts has been found to be as high as 18-20 W/kg and 22 kW/m(exp 3). The projected area, including radiators, has been as low as 0.4 m(exp 2)/kW. AMTEC power systems are extremely attractive, relative to other current and projected power systems, because AMTEC offers high power density, low projected area, and low volume. Two AMTEC cell design types have been identified. A single-tube cell is already under development and a multitube cell design, to provide additional power system gains, has undergone proof-of-principle testing. Solar powered AMTEC (SAMTEC) systems are also being developed, and numerous terrestrial applications have been identified for which the same basic AMTEC cells being developed for radioisotope systems are also suitable.

  16. Radioisotope powered AMTEC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanenok, J.F. III; Sievers, R.K. [Advanced Modular Power Systems, Inc, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [Advanced Modular Power Systems, Inc, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) systems are being developed for high performance spacecraft power systems, including small, general purpose heat source (GPHS) powered systems. Several design concepts have been evaluated for the power range from 75 W to 1 kW. The specific power for these concepts has been found to be as high as 18-20 W/kg and 22 kW/m(exp 3). The projected area, including radiators, has been as low as 0.4 m(exp 2)/kW. AMTEC power systems are extremely attractive, relative to other current and projected power systems, because AMTEC offers high power density, low projected area, and low volume. Two AMTEC cell design types have been identified. A single-tube cell is already under development and a multitube cell design, to provide additional power system gains, has undergone proof-of-principle testing. Solar powered AMTEC (SAMTEC) systems are also being developed, and numerous terrestrial applications have been identified for which the same basic AMTEC cells being developed for radioisotope systems are also suitable. 35 refs.

  17. BORON UPTAKE AND DISTRIBUTION IN FIELD GROWN CITRUS TREES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rodrigo Marcelli Boaretto; José Antônio Quaggio; Dirceu Mattos Jr; Takashi Muraoka; Antonio Enedi Boaretto

    2011-01-01

    In low fertility tropical soils, boron (B) deficiency impairs fruit production. However, little information is available on the efficiency of nutrient application and use by trees. Therefore, this work verified the effects of soil and foliar applications of boron in a commercial citrus orchard. An experiment was conducted with fertigated 4-year-old ‘Valencia’ sweet orange trees on ‘Swingle’ citrumelo rootstock. Boron

  18. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  19. Boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W. (Newport News, VA); Jordan, Kevin (Newport News, VA); Park, Cheol (Yorktown, VA)

    2012-06-06

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  20. Computation and Analysis of the Global Distribution of the Radioxenon Isotope 133Xe based on Emissions from Nuclear Power Plants and Radioisotope Production Facilities and its Relevance for the Verification of the Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wotawa, Gerhard; Becker, Andreas; Kalinowski, Martin; Saey, Paul; Tuma, Matthias; Zähringer, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    Monitoring of radioactive noble gases, in particular xenon isotopes, is a crucial element of the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The capability of the noble gas network, which is currently under construction, to detect signals from a nuclear explosion critically depends on the background created by other sources. Therefore, the global distribution of these isotopes based on emissions and transport patterns needs to be understood. A significant xenon background exists in the reactor regions of North America, Europe and Asia. An emission inventory of the four relevant xenon isotopes has recently been created, which specifies source terms for each power plant. As the major emitters of xenon isotopes worldwide, a few medical radioisotope production facilities have been recently identified, in particular the facilities in Chalk River (Canada), Fleurus (Belgium), Pelindaba (South Africa) and Petten (Netherlands). Emissions from these sites are expected to exceed those of the other sources by orders of magnitude. In this study, emphasis is put on 133Xe, which is the most prevalent xenon isotope. First, based on the emissions known, the resulting 133Xe concentration levels at all noble gas stations of the final CTBT verification network were calculated and found to be consistent with observations. Second, it turned out that emissions from the radioisotope facilities can explain a number of observed peaks, meaning that atmospheric transport modelling is an important tool for the categorization of measurements. Third, it became evident that Nuclear Power Plant emissions are more difficult to treat in the models, since their temporal variation is high and not generally reported. Fourth, there are indications that the assumed annual emissions may be underestimated by factors of two to ten, while the general emission patterns seem to be well understood. Finally, it became evident that 133Xe sources mainly influence the sensitivity of the monitoring system in the mid-latitudes, where the network coverage is particularly good.

  1. Modular radioisotope AMTEC power system

    SciTech Connect

    Sievers, R.K.; Hunt, T.K.; Ivanenok, J.F.; Pantolin, J.E.; Butkiewicz, D.A. (Environmental Research Institute of Michigan, 4667 Freedom Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48108 (United States))

    1993-01-10

    The Alakli Metal Thermal to Electric Converter (AMTEC) technology is extremely amenable to a modular configuration. Several modular designs have been proposed for coupling to the radioisotope general purpose heat source (GPHS). Current AMTEC cell designs, producing approximately 5 W at over 20% efficiency, can be integrated into a radioisotope heated module that provides 10--28 per 250 W[sub th] GPHS. The mass of these modules is approximately 4 kg. The cell design used in this concept is under development. The first generation model has already been operated for one year. Smaller, higher efficiency cells are now being fabricated.

  2. Realistic Specific Power Expectations for Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.

    2006-01-01

    Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) are being considered for a wide range of future NASA space science and exploration missions. Generally, RPS offer the advantages of high reliability, long life, and predictable power production regardless of operating environment. Previous RPS, in the form of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG), have been used successfully on many NASA missions including Apollo, Viking, Voyager, and Galileo. NASA is currently evaluating design options for the next generation of RPS. Of particular interest is the use of advanced, higher efficiency power conversion to replace the previous thermoelectric devices. Higher efficiency reduces the quantity of radioisotope fuel and potentially improves the RPS specific power (watts per kilogram). Power conversion options include Segmented Thermoelectric (STE), Stirling, Brayton, and Thermophotovoltaic (TPV). This paper offers an analysis of the advanced 100 watt-class RPS options and provides credible projections for specific power. Based on the analysis presented, RPS specific power values greater than 10 W/kg appear unlikely.

  3. Cosmogenic radioisotopes in Gebel Kamil meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taricco, C.; Colombetti, P.; Bhandari, N.; Sinha, N.; Di Martino, M.; Vivaldo, G.

    2012-04-01

    Recently a small (45 m in diameter) and very young (< 5,000 years) impact crater was discovered in Egypt (Folco et al., 2010, 2011); it was generated by an iron meteorite named Gebel Kamil (Meteoritical Bulletin No. 98, Weisberg et al. 2010). During systematic searches, many specimens were found in the area surrounding the crater. We present the gamma-activity measurement of a 672 g fragment using a highly selective Ge-NaI spectrometer operating at Monte dei Cappuccini Laboratory (IFSI, INAF) in Torino, Italy. This apparatus allows to reveal the radioisotope activity generated by cosmic rays in the meteoroids as they travel through the interplanetary space before falling on the Earth. From the 26Al activity measurement and its depth production profiles, we infer (i) that the radius of the meteoroid should be about 1 m, constraining to 30-40 ton the range of pre-atmospheric mass previously proposed and (ii) that the fragment should have been located deeply inside the meteoroid, at a depth > 0.7 m. The 44Ti activity is under the detection threshold of the apparatus; using the depth production profiles of this radioisotope and its half-life T1/2 = 59.2 y, we deduce an upper limit to the date of fall.

  4. Nature of boron carbonitride I. Conditions of preparation of boron carbonitride

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Ya. Kosolapova; G. N. Makarenko; T. I. Serebryakova; É. V. Prilutskii; O. T. Khorpyakov; O. I. Chernysheva

    1971-01-01

    A study was made of the preparation of boron carbonitride by various techniques. It is shown that the method of synthesis from simple substances, involving nitriding boron and carbon black in a nitrogen atmosphere at temperatures of 1800–2000°C, yields a product corresponding, according to chemical analysis, to the composition BNC. Standard powder metallurgy techniques appear to be unsuitable for the

  5. Radiation hazard of iodine radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilenko, I.Ya.

    1988-04-01

    The biological effects of iodine radioisotopes on the thyroid and other endocrine glands as well as on organisms in general are reviewed. Injurious dose levels for humans, dogs, and rats are established both from experimental and actual data. Iodine radioisotope pathways and metabolism are evaluated along with cancer incidence and other pathological consequences for doses of /sup 131/I, /sup 132/I, /sup 133/I, /sup 135/I, /sup 125/I, and /sup 129/I. The interrelation of radioisotope half-life and activity with toxicity is assessed. The yield and activity of iodine radioisotopes for the fission of U/sup 235/ are indexed and the composition and relative content of iodine isotopes in the gaseous discharges of nuclear power plants are tabulated. Data are given on discharge ranges for Soviet and non-Soviet boiling water and pressurized water reactors and on the mean individual doses received by plant personnel. Environmental transport and concentration scenarios and consequences are discussed along with pharmacological measures for biological protection from radiation and toxic effects.

  6. Magnetron sputtered boron films and Ti/B multilayer structures

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1995-02-14

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence. 6 figs.

  7. Magnetron sputtered boron films and TI/B multilayer structures

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  8. Magnetron sputtered boron films and TI/B multilayer structures

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1993-04-20

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  9. Magnetron sputtered boron films and Ti/B multilayer structures

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  10. Efficient Boron-Carbon-Nitrogen Nanotube Formation Via Combined Laser-Gas Flow Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, R. Roy (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz.

  11. Efficient Boron Nitride Nanotube Formation via Combined Laser-Gas Flow Levitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, R. Roy (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B(sub x)C(sub y)N(sub z) The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B(sub x)C(sub y)N(sub z).

  12. Fabrication of boron articles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benton

    1976-01-01

    This invention is directed to the fabrication of boron articles by a powder metallurgical method wherein the articles are of a density close to the theoretical density of boron and are essentially crackfree. The method comprises the steps of admixing 1 to 10 weight percent carbon powder with amorphous boron powder, cold pressing the mixture and then hot pressing the

  13. Future Supply of Medical Radioisotopes for the UK Report 2014

    E-print Network

    Neilly, Brian; Ballinger, Jim; Buscombe, John; Clarke, Rob; Ellis, Beverley; Flux, Glenn; Fraser, Louise; Hall, Adrian; Owen, Hywel; Paterson, Audrey; Perkins, Alan; Scarsbrook, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The UK has no research nuclear reactors and relies on the importation of 99Mo and other medical radioisotopes (e.g. Iodine-131) from overseas (excluding PET radioisotopes). The UK is therefore vulnerable not only to global shortages, but to problems with shipping and importation of the products. In this context Professor Erika Denton UK national Clinical Director for Diagnostics requested that the British Nuclear Medicine Society lead a working group with stakeholders including representatives from the Science & Technology Facilities Council (STFC) to prepare a report. The group had a first meeting on 10 April 2013 followed by a working group meeting with presentations on 9th September 2013 where the scope of the work required to produce a report was agreed. The objectives of the report are: to describe the status of the use of medical radioisotopes in the UK; to anticipate the potential impact of shortages for the UK; to assess potential alternative avenues of medical radioisotope production for the UK m...

  14. Respiratory and eye irritation from boron oxide and boric acid dusts

    SciTech Connect

    Garabrant, D.H.; Bernstein, L.; Peters, J.M.; Smith, T.J.

    1984-08-01

    Boron oxide has been shown in animals to irritate the respiratory mucosa and conjuctiva. The present study was undertaken to determine whether exposures to boron oxide and its hydration product, boric acid, cau

  15. Respiratory and eye irritation from boron oxide and boric acid dusts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David H. Garabrant; Leslie Bernstein; John M. Peters; Thomas J. Smith

    1984-01-01

    Boron oxide has been shown in animals to irritate the respiratory mucosa and conjuctiva. The present study was undertaken to determine whether exposures to boron oxide and its hydration product, boric acid, cau

  16. Structure and reactivity of boron-ate complexes derived from primary and secondary boronic esters.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Kathryn; Berionni, Guillaume; Mayr, Herbert; Aggarwal, Varinder K

    2015-06-01

    Boron-ate complexes derived from primary and secondary boronic esters and aryllithiums have been isolated, and the kinetics of their reactions with carbenium ions studied. The second-order rate constants have been used to derive nucleophilicity parameters for the boron-ate complexes, revealing that nucleophilicity increased with (i) electron-donating aromatics on boron, (ii) neopentyl glycol over pinacol boronic esters, and (iii) 12-crown-4 ether. PMID:25973673

  17. Combustion synthesis of novel boron carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harini, R. Saai; Manikandan, E.; Anthonysamy, S.; Chandramouli, V.; Eswaramoorthy, D.

    2013-02-01

    The solid-state boron carbide is one of the hardest materials known, ranking third behind diamond and cubic boron nitride. Boron carbide (BxCx) enriched in the 10B isotope is used as a control rod material in the nuclear industry due to its high neutron absorption cross section and other favorable physico-chemical properties. Conventional methods of preparation of boron carbide are energy intensive processes accompanied by huge loss of boron. Attempts were made at IGCAR Kalpakkam to develop energy efficient and cost effective methods to prepare boron carbide. The products of the gel combustion and microwave synthesis experiments were characterized for phase purity by XRD. The carbide formation was ascertained using finger-print spectroscopy of FTIR. Samples of pyrolized/microwave heated powder were characterized for surface morphology using SEM. The present work shows the recent advances in understanding of structural and chemical variations in boron carbide and their influence on morphology, optical and vibrational property results discussed in details.

  18. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.A.

    1986-08-01

    This document describes radioisotope distribution from DOE facilities to private firms including foreign and other DOE facilities. The information is divided into five sections: (1) isotope suppliers, facility contacts, and isotopes or services supplied; (2) customers, suppliers, and isotopes purchased; (3) isotopes purchased cross-referenced with customer numbers; (4) geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfer - FY 1985.

  19. Properties of boron/boron-nitride multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A.F.; Wall, M.A.; Hayes, J.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Alexander, K.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Boron-Nitride films are of interest for their high hardness and wear resistance. Large intrinsic stresses and poor adhesion which often accompany high hardness materials can be moderated through the use of a layered structure. Alternate layers of boron (B) and boron-nitride (BN) are formed by modulating the composition of the sputter gas during deposition from a pure B target. The thin films are characterized with TEM to evaluate the microstructure and with nanoindentation to determine hardness. Layer pair spacing and continuity effects on hardness are evaluated for the B/BN films.

  20. Cross-sections for (p,x) reactions on natural chromium for the production of (52,52m,54)Mn radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Wooten, A Lake; Lewis, Benjamin C; Lapi, Suzanne E

    2015-02-01

    The production of positron-emitting isotopes of manganese is potentially important for developing contrast agents for dual-modality positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging, as well as for in vivo imaging of the biodistribution and toxicity of manganese. The decay properties of (52)Mn make it an excellent candidate for these applications, and it can easily be produced by bombardment of a chromium target with protons or deuterons from a low-energy biomedical cyclotron. Several parameters that are essential to this mode of production—target thickness, beam energy, beam current, and bombardment time—depend heavily on the availability of reliable, reproducible cross-section data. This work contributes to the routine production of (52g)Mn for biomedical research by contributing experimental cross-sections for natural chromium ((nat)Cr) targets for the (nat)Cr(p,x)(52g)Mn reaction, as well as for the production of the radiocontaminants (52m,54)Mn. PMID:25497324

  1. Fabrication route for the production of coplanar, diamond insulated, boron doped diamond macro- and microelectrodes of any geometry.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Maxim B; Bitziou, Eleni; Read, Tania L; Meng, Lingcong; Palmer, Nicola L; Mollart, Tim P; Newton, Mark E; Macpherson, Julie V

    2014-06-01

    Highly doped, boron doped diamond (BDD) is an electrode material with great potential, but the fabrication of suitable electrodes in a variety of different geometries both at the macro- and microscale, with an insulating material that does not compromise the material properties of the BDD, presents technical challenges. In this Technical Note, a novel solution to this problem is presented, resulting in the fabrication of coplanar macro- and microscale BDD electrodes, insulated by insulating diamond, at the single and multiple, individually addressable level. Using a laser micromachining approach, the required electrode(s) geometry is machined into an insulating diamond substrate, followed by overgrowth of high quality polycrystalline BDD (pBDD) and polishing to reveal approximately nanometer roughness, coplanar all-diamond structures. Electrical contacting is possible using both top and bottom contacts, where the latter are defined using the laser to produce non-diamond-carbon (NDC) in the vicinity of the back side of the BDD. We present the fabrication of individually addressable ring, band, and disk electrodes with minimum, reproducible controlled dimensions of 50 ?m (limited only by the laser system employed). The pBDD grown into the insulating diamond recesses is shown to be free from NDC and possesses excellent electrochemical properties, in terms of extended solvent windows, electrochemical reversibility, and capacitance. PMID:24814161

  2. Precipitation of Boron in Highly Boron-Doped Silicon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ichiro Mizushima; Yuichiro Mitani; Mitsuo Koike; Masahiko Yoshiki; Mitsuhiro Tomita; Sigeru Kambayashi

    1998-01-01

    The clustering of boron in highly boron-doped silicon and its influence on electrical deactivation are reported. Highly boron-doped crystalline silicon was fabricated as a starting material by solid phase epitaxy of boron-doped amorphous silicon films. Boron can be supersaturated in the crystallized samples annealed at a low temperature of about 600°C. A lot of precipitates, containing clustered boron, were observed

  3. Making Microscopic Cubes Of Boron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulkner, Joseph M.

    1993-01-01

    Production of finely divided cubes of boron involves vacuum-deposition technology and requires making of template. Template supports pattern of checkered squares 25 micrometers on side, which are etched 25 micrometers into template material. Template coasted uniformly with paralyene or some similar vacuum coating with low coefficient of adhesion. Intended application to solid rocket fuels, explosives, and pyrotechnics; process used for other applications, from manufacture of pharmaceuticals to processing of nuclear materials.

  4. Power from Radioisotopes, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corliss, William R.; Mead, Robert L.

    This 1971 revision deals with radioisotopes and their use in power generators. Early developments and applications for the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) and Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) are reviewed. Present uses in space and on earth are included. Uses in space are as power sources in various satellites and space…

  5. Radioisotopes and the Age of the Earth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Larry Vardiman; Steven A. Austin; John R. Baumgardner; Eugene F. Chaffin; Donald B. DeYoung; D. Russell Humphreys; Andrew A. Snelling

    2003-01-01

    RATE is an acronym applied to a research project investigating radioisotope dating sponsored by the Institute for Creation Research and the Creation Research Society. It stands for Radioisotopes and the Age of The Earth. This article summarizes the purpose, history, and intermediate findings of the RATE project five years into an eight-year effort. It reports on the latest status of

  6. Single step synthesis of nanostructured boron nitride for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bikramjeet; Singh, Paviter; Kumar, Manjeet; Thakur, Anup; Kumar, Akshay

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN) has been successfully synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction of Boric Acid (H3BO3). This method is a relatively low temperature synthesis route and it can be used for large scale production of nanostructured BN. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). XRD analysis confirmed the formation of single phase nanostructured Boron Nitride. SEM analysis showed that the particles are spherical in shape. DTA analysis showed that the phase is stable upto 900 °C and the material can be used for high temperature applications as well boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT).

  7. Nuclear model calculations on the production of {sup 125,123}Xe and {sup 133,131,129,128}Ba radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Aydin, A., E-mail: aaydin@kku.edu.tr; Pekdogan, H. [Kirikkale University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences (Turkey); Tel, E. [Osmaniye Korkut Ata University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences (Turkey); Kaplan, A. [Sueleyman Demirel University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences (Turkey)

    2012-03-15

    In this study, production rates of {sup 125,123}Xe and {sup 133,131,129,128}Ba medical isotopes produced by {sup 127}I(p, 3n){sup 125}Xe, {sup 127}I(p, 5n){sup 123}Xe, {sup 133}Cs(p, n){sup 133mg}Ba, {sup 133}Cs(p, 3n){sup 131mg}Ba, {sup 133}Cs(p, 5n){sup 129}Ba, and {sup 133}Cs(p, 6n){sup 128}Ba reactions have been investigated up to 100 MeV incident proton energy. The preequilibrium calculations involve the hybrid model, the geometry-dependent hybrid model and the cascade exciton model. The calculated results are compared with the experimental data taken from the literature.

  8. The prospects for composites based on boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naslain, R.

    1978-01-01

    The fabrication of boron filaments and the production of composite materials consisting of boron filaments and organic or metallic matrices are discussed. Problem involving the use of tungsten substrates in the filament fabrication process, the protection of boron fibers with diffusion barrier cladings, and the application of alloy additives in the matrix to lessen the effects of diffusion are considered. Data on the kinetics of the boron fiber/matrix interaction at high temperatures, and the influence of the fiber/matrix interaction on the mechanical properties of the composite are presented.

  9. Multilayer graded boron carbide-aluminum composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fuhong

    Boron carbide aluminum composites with multi-layer microstructure were developed by molten aluminum infiltration of boron carbide preforms. A centrifugal casting process was employed to obtain preforms with multiple graded layer structure, where particles were distributed gradually from fine particles on one side to coarse particles on the other side within each layer. A tape casting process was also developed. Uniform or stepwise multiple gradient layer structures were obtained by stacking like tapes or different tapes in repeated patterns. A narrow range of preform densities was obtained by varying the densification conditions according to green forms. It has been previously reported that boron carbide and aluminum can form many different reaction products and contact angles between boron carbide and aluminum vary with temperature and time. Minimizing the reaction products might lead to better performance of composites. This study found that spontaneous infiltration can be achieved in minutes under rough vacuum (<100 muTorr) at 1200°C or higher. The amounts of reaction products could be effectively suppressed by rapid spontaneous infiltration. A low-temperature infiltration (LTI) scheme was designed and full infiltration of boron carbide by aluminum at T < 1000°C was achieved. Reaction products obtained by LTI were significantly less then that in composites obtained by spontaneous infiltration. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the resulting layered composites were evaluated and correlated to microstructure.

  10. Hydrodynamics-assisted scalable production of boron nitride nanosheets and their application in improving oxygen-atom erosion resistance of polymeric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Min; Shen, Zhigang; Zhang, Wen; Zhu, Jinyang; Liu, Lei; Liang, Shuaishuai; Zhang, Xiaojing; Ma, Shulin

    2013-10-01

    Searching for a method for low-cost, easily manageable, and scalable production of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) and exploring their novel applications are highly important. For the first time we demonstrate that a novel and effective hydrodynamics method, which involves multiple exfoliation mechanisms and thus leads to much higher yield and efficiency, can realize large-scale production of BNNSs. The exfoliation mechanisms that multiple fluid dynamics events contribute towards normal and lateral exfoliation processes could be applied to other layered materials. Up to ~95% of the prepared BNNSs are less than 3.5 nm thick with a monolayer fraction of ~37%. Compared to the conventional sonication and ball milling-based methods, the hydrodynamics method has the advantages of possessing multiple efficient ways for exfoliating BN, being low-cost and environmentally-friendly, producing high quality BNNSs in high yield and efficiency, and achieving concentrated BNNSs dispersions even in mediocre solvents. It is also shown for the first time that BNNSs can be utilized as fillers to improve the oxygen-atom erosion resistance of epoxy composites which are widely used for spacecraft in low earth orbit (LEO) where atom oxygen abounds. An addition of only 0.5 wt% BNNSs can result in a 70% decrease in the mass loss of epoxy composites after atom oxygen exposure equivalent to 160 days in an orbit of ~300 km. Overall, the demonstrated hydrodynamics method shows great potential in large-scale production of BNNSs in industry in terms of yield, efficiency, and environmental friendliness; and the innovative application of BNNSs to enhancing oxygen-atom erosion resistance of polymeric composites in space may provide a novel route for designing light spacecraft in LEO.Searching for a method for low-cost, easily manageable, and scalable production of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) and exploring their novel applications are highly important. For the first time we demonstrate that a novel and effective hydrodynamics method, which involves multiple exfoliation mechanisms and thus leads to much higher yield and efficiency, can realize large-scale production of BNNSs. The exfoliation mechanisms that multiple fluid dynamics events contribute towards normal and lateral exfoliation processes could be applied to other layered materials. Up to ~95% of the prepared BNNSs are less than 3.5 nm thick with a monolayer fraction of ~37%. Compared to the conventional sonication and ball milling-based methods, the hydrodynamics method has the advantages of possessing multiple efficient ways for exfoliating BN, being low-cost and environmentally-friendly, producing high quality BNNSs in high yield and efficiency, and achieving concentrated BNNSs dispersions even in mediocre solvents. It is also shown for the first time that BNNSs can be utilized as fillers to improve the oxygen-atom erosion resistance of epoxy composites which are widely used for spacecraft in low earth orbit (LEO) where atom oxygen abounds. An addition of only 0.5 wt% BNNSs can result in a 70% decrease in the mass loss of epoxy composites after atom oxygen exposure equivalent to 160 days in an orbit of ~300 km. Overall, the demonstrated hydrodynamics method shows great potential in large-scale production of BNNSs in industry in terms of yield, efficiency, and environmental friendliness; and the innovative application of BNNSs to enhancing oxygen-atom erosion resistance of polymeric composites in space may provide a novel route for designing light spacecraft in LEO. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03714b

  11. Stability of composite materials based on boron and silicon nitrides and carbides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. B. Gutman; L. A. Mikhailov; V. G. Kaufman; T. V. Dubovik; V. K. Kazakov

    1968-01-01

    Tests on a number of refractory materials in molten borax with or without electrolysis have established that boron carbonitride exhibits the highest resistance to attack under these conditions. By employing boron carbonitride as lining material, it is possible to perform boronizing in a new, high-productivity electrolytic installation.

  12. Radioisotopes for radioimmunodetection (RAID) and radioimmunotherapy (RAIT)---current and new perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the availability and properties of radioisotopes for both radioimmunodiagnosis (RAID) and radioimmunotherapy (RAIT) are discussed. Examples are provided for radioisotopes available via direct production in nuclear reactors and accelerators or as daughters obtained from radionuclide generator systems whose parents are either reactor or accelerator produced. Important factors which must be considered for the use of a particular radioisotope include availability, the physical half-life and decay properties, and chemical versatility for protein attachment. Although both direct'' and indirect'' methods are available for attachment of radioisotopes to antibodies, this broad field of research is not reviewed in detail. Practical issues related to the availability and use of a variety of radionuclides are described. 47 refs., 5 tabs.

  13. Detectors for medical radioisotope imaging: demands and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, M. I.; Chepel, V.

    2004-10-01

    Radioisotope imaging is used to obtain information on biochemical processes in living organisms, being a tool of increasing importance for medical diagnosis. The improvement and expansion of these techniques depend on the progress attained in several areas, such as radionuclide production, radiopharmaceuticals, radiation detectors and image reconstruction algorithms. This review paper will be concerned only with the detector technology. We will review in general terms the present status of medical radioisotope imaging instrumentation with the emphasis put on the developments of high-resolution gamma cameras and PET detector systems for scinti-mammography and animal imaging. The present trend to combine two or more modalities in a single machine in order to obtain complementary information will also be considered.

  14. Miniature Radioisotope Thermoelectric Power Cubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Jagdish U.; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Caillat, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    Cube-shaped thermoelectric devices energized by a particles from radioactive decay of Cm-244 have been proposed as long-lived sources of power. These power cubes are intended especially for incorporation into electronic circuits that must operate in dark, extremely cold locations (e.g., polar locations or deep underwater on Earth, or in deep interplanetary space). Unlike conventional radioisotope thermoelectric generators used heretofore as central power sources in some spacecraft, the proposed power cubes would be small enough (volumes would range between 0.1 and 0.2 cm3) to play the roles of batteries that are parts of, and dedicated to, individual electronic-circuit packages. Unlike electrochemical batteries, these power cubes would perform well at low temperatures. They would also last much longer: given that the half-life of Cm-244 is 18 years, a power cube could remain adequate as a power source for years, depending on the power demand in its particular application.

  15. Radioisotope scanning in osseous sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1980-01-01

    Technetium-99m (/sup 99m/Tc)-labeled pyrophosphate or diphosphonate compounds and gallium-67 citrate (/sup 67/Ga) are two radionuclide scanning agents that are in widespread use in clinical practice. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate is used extensively for bone scanning to detect metastatic bone disease, benign bone tumors, osteomyelitis, benign hypertrophic osteoarthropathy, and Paget's disease. Only two reports describe abnormal /sup 99m/Tc/ pyrophosphate bone scans in four patients with osseous sarcoidosis. Gallium-67 scans are used primarily to localize neoplastic or inflammatory lesions anywhere in the body. In recent years /sup 67/Ga scans have also been used to detect the presence of both pulmonary and extrapulmonary sarcoidosis, but there are no reports describing abnormal uptake of gallium in patients with osseous sarcoidosis. This report describes experience with radioisotope scanning in two patients with osseous sarcoidosis.

  16. Boron Deficiency in Tea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. M. Chenery

    1958-01-01

    TEA must be the last commodity crop to show a need for boron. This is probably due to its low calcium requirement and to the fact that tea gardens are very rarely limed. The boron deficiency syndrome first appeared accidentally in a pot experiment testing five different soils for natural potassium uptake. All plants in two soils when they were

  17. High-calcium coal combustion by-products: Engineering properties, ettringite formation, and potential application in solidification and stabilization of selenium and boron

    SciTech Connect

    Solem-Tishmack, J.K.; McCarthy, G.J. [North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND (United States). Dept. of Chemistry] [North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Docktor, B.; Eylands, K.E.; Thompson, J.S.; Hassett, D.J. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center] [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

    1995-04-01

    Four high-calcium coal combustion by-products (two pulverized coal fly ashes (PCFA), a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) residue, and an atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) fly ash), were tested for engineering properties and ability to immobilize boron and selenium. These data are needed to explore high-volume utilization in engineered structure or in solidification/stabilization (S/S) technology. Strengths of cured pastes (91 days), varied from as much as 27 MPa (3,900 psi) for one of the PCFA specimens to 4.6 MPa (670 psi) for the FGD specimen. All of the coal by-product pastes developed more than the 0.34 MPa (50 psi) required for S/S applications. Ettringite formation is important to engineering properties and S/S mechanisms. XRD on plain specimens cured for 91 days indicated that the two PCFA pastes formed 5--6% ettringite, the FGD paste formed 22%, and the AFBC paste formed 32%. The hydrating PCFA pastes showed little expansion, the FGD paste contracted slightly, and the AFBC paste expanded by 2.9% over 91 days. Se and B were spiked into the mixing water as sodium selenite, selenate and borate, and for most pastes this had little effect on strength, workability, and expansion. Leaching of ground specimens (cured for 91 days) showed a generally positive correlation between the amount of ettringite formed and resistance to Se and B leaching. Se spiked as selenate was more readily leached than Se spiked as selenite. B showed a high level of fixation.

  18. Microwave sintering of boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Blake, R.D.; Katz, J.D.; Petrovic, J.J.; Sheinberg, H.

    1988-06-10

    A method for forming boron carbide into a particular shape and densifying the green boron carbide shape. Boron carbide in powder form is pressed into a green shape and then sintered, using a microwave oven, to obtain a dense boron carbide body. Densities of greater than 95% of theoretical density have been obtained. 1 tab.

  19. By Phyllis A. Lyday Boron is produced domestically only in the sufficient to prevent tortoise passage. Any these active ingredients are eligible for

    E-print Network

    1 BORON By Phyllis A. Lyday Boron is produced domestically only in the sufficient to prevent tortoise passage. Any these active ingredients are eligible for State of California. Boron products sold guidance on new pricing rules associated with producers of boron, changing positions from the Government

  20. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Lamar, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    This document describes radioisotope distribution from DOE facilities to private firms including foreign and other DOE facilities. The information is divided into five sections: (1)isotope suppliers, facility contact, and isotopes or services supplied; (2) customers, suppliers, and isotopes purchased; (3) isotopes purchased cross-referenced with customer numbers; (4) geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfers for fiscal year 1986.

  1. Stirling Convertor Technologies Being Developed for a Stirling Radioisotope Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieme, Lanny G.

    2003-01-01

    The Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Stirling Technology Company (STC), and the NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a high-efficiency Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) for NASA space science missions. The SRG is being developed for multimission use, including providing electric power for unmanned Mars rovers and deep space missions. On Mars, rovers with SRGs would be used for missions that might not be able to use photovoltaic power systems, such as exploration at high Martian latitudes and missions of long duration. The projected SRG system efficiency of 23 percent will reduce the required amount of radioisotope by a factor of 4 or more in comparison to currently used Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators. The Department of Energy recently named Lockheed Martin as the system integration contractor. Lockheed Martin has begun to develop the SRG engineering unit under contract to the Department of Energy, and has contract options to develop the qualification unit and the first flight units. The developers expect the SRG to produce about 114 Wdc at the beginning of mission, using two opposed Stirling convertors and two General Purpose Heat Source modules. STC previously developed the Stirling convertor under contract to the Department of Energy and is now providing further development as a subcontractor to Lockheed Martin. Glenn is conducting an in-house technology project to assist in developing the convertor for space qualification and mission implementation. A key milestone was recently reached with the accumulation of 12 000 hr of long-term aging on two types of neodymium-iron boron permanent magnets. These tests are characterizing any possible aging in the strength or demagnetization resistance of the magnets used in the linear alternator. Preparations are underway for a thermal/vacuum system demonstration and unattended operation during endurance testing of the 55-We Technology Demonstration Convertors. In addition, Glenn is developing a charging system for the convertors to ensure clean fills of the helium working fluid and to monitor levels of any possible contaminants at different test intervals. Possible oxidation effects depend on the level of any oxygen contamination-regenerator materials and displacer radiation shields are now being evaluated for possible oxidation effects.

  2. Generation of Radioisotopes with Accelerator Neutrons by Deuterons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Yasuki; Hashimoto, Kazuyuki; Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Saeki, Hideya; Motoishi, Shoji; Sato, Nozomi; Kawabata, Masako; Harada, Hideo; Kin, Tadahiro; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Sato, Tetsuya K.; Minato, Futoshi; Iwamoto, Osamu; Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Seki, Yohji; Yokoyama, Kenji; Shiina, Takehiko; Ohta, Akio; Takeuchi, Nobuhiro; Kawauchi, Yukimasa; Sato, Norihito; Yamabayashi, Hisamichi; Adachi, Yoshitsugu; Kikuchi, Yuji; Mitsumoto, Toshinori; Igarashi, Takashi

    2013-06-01

    A new system proposed for the generation of radioisotopes with accelerator neutrons by deuterons (GRAND) is described by mainly discussing the production of 99Mo used for nuclear medicine diagnosis. A prototype facility of this system consists of a cyclotron to produce intense accelerator neutrons from the \\text{natC(d,n) reaction with 40 MeV 2 mA deuteron beams, and a sublimation system to separate \\text{99mTc from an irradiated 100MoO3 sample. About 8.1 TBq/week of 99Mo is produced by repeating irradiation on an enriched 100Mo sample (251 g) with accelerator neutrons for two days three times. It meets about 10% of the 99Mo demand in Japan. The characteristic feature of the system lies in its capability to reliably produce a wide variety of high-quality, carrier-free, carrier-added radioisotopes with a minimum level of radioactive waste without using uranium. The system is compact in size, and easy to operate; therefore it could be used worldwide to produce radioisotopes for medical, research, and industrial applications.

  3. Radioisotope thermoelectric generators for implanted pacemakers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. A. Pustovalov; V. P. Shapovalov; A. V. Bovin; V. I. Fedorets

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and application of long-life lithium batteries and the problems associated with miniature radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RITEG) with service lives of 10 years or longer. On eof the main problems encountered when devising a radioisotope heat source (RHS) for an RITEG is to obtain biomedical ²³⁸PuOâ with a specific neutron yield of 3.10³-4.10³ (g \\/SUP .\\/

  4. Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems Segmented Thermoelectric Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caillat, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    Flight times are long; - Need power systems with >15 years life. Mass is at an absolute premium; - Need power systems with high specific power and scalability. 3 orders of magnitude reduction in solar irradiance from Earth to Pluto. Nuclear power sources preferable. The Overall objective is to develop low mass, high efficiency, low-cost Advanced Radioisotope Power System with double the Specific Power and Efficiency over state-of-the-art Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs).

  5. Radioisotopic control for baclofen pump catheter failure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F Le Breton; JC Daviet; J Monteil; J Vidal; M Munoz; P Dudognon; JY Salle

    2001-01-01

    Study design: Case report of Baclofen pump catheter failure investigated by radioisotope injection.Objectives: To report a safe and reliable method for evaluating catheter dysfunction.Setting: France.Methods: Single case report of failure of Baclofen pump investigated by radioisotope injection.Results: The injection demonstrated the block in the catheter. The catheter failure was not visualised by plain X-ray nor by filling the pump with

  6. Performance tuned radioisotope thermophotovoltaic space power system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. E. Horne; M. D. Morgan; S. B. Saban

    1998-01-01

    The trend in space exploration is to use many small, low-cost, special-purpose satellites instead of the large, high-cost, multipurpose satellites used in the past. As a result of this new trend, there is a need for lightweight, efficient, and compact radioisotope fueled electrical power generators. This paper presents an improved design for a radioisotope thermophotovoltaic (RTPV) space power system in

  7. Radioisotope Powered Electrostatic Microactuators and Electronics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Lai; Rajesh Duggirala; Steven Tin

    2007-01-01

    Radioisotope thin films, with their 1-100 MJ\\/cc energy densities and 1-100 year half lifetimes, are suitable for powering long lifetime autonomous microsystems. In this paper, we review the application of nickel-63 radioisotope thin-film fuels in long lifetime power generators, direct charging DC voltage generators, novel low voltage drop bridge rectifiers, and self-powered wake-up sensors. A broad tool kit of capabilities

  8. Boron-Based Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Ban, Hyun Seung; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    The use of the element boron, which is not generally observed in a living body, possesses a high potential for the discovery of new biological activity in pharmaceutical drug design. In this account, we describe our recent developments in boron-based drug design, including boronic acid containing protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, and tubulin polymerization inhibitors, and ortho-carborane-containing proteasome activators, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 inhibitors, and topoisomerase inhibitors. Furthermore, we applied a closo-dodecaborate as a water-soluble moiety as well as a boron-10 source for the design of boron carriers in boron neutron capture therapy, such as boronated porphyrins and boron lipids for a liposomal boron delivery system. PMID:25800654

  9. Chemical disposition of boron in animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Moseman, R F

    1994-11-01

    Elemental boron was isolated in 1808. It typically occurs in nature as borates hydrated with varying amounts of water. Important compounds are boric acid and borax. Boron compounds are also used in the production of metals, enamels, and glasses. In trace amounts, boron is essential for the growth of many plants, and is found in animal and human tissues at low concentrations. Poisoning in humans has been reported as the result of accidental ingestion or use of large amounts in the treatment of burns. Boron as boric acid is fairly rapidly absorbed and excreted from the body via urine. The half-life of boric acid in humans is on the order of 1 day. Boron does not appear to accumulate in soft tissues of animals, but does accumulate in bone. Normal levels of boron in soft tissues, urine, and blood generally range from less than 0.05 ppm to no more than 10 ppm. In poisoning incidents, the amount of boric acid in brain and liver tissue has been reported to be as high as 2000 ppm. Recent studies at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences have indicated that boron may contribute to reduced fertility in male rodents fed 9000 ppm of boric acid in feed. Within a few days, boron levels in blood and most soft tissues quickly reached a plateau of about 15 ppm. Boron in bone did not appear to plateau, reaching 47 ppm after 7 days on the diet. Cessation of exposure to dietary boron resulted in a rapid drop in bone boron.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7889870

  10. An introduction to boron: history, sources, uses, and chemistry.

    PubMed

    Woods, W G

    1994-11-01

    Following a brief overview of the terrestrial distribution of boron in rocks, soil, and water, the history of the discovery, early utilization, and geologic origin of borate minerals is summarized. Modern uses of borate-mineral concentrates, borax, boric acid, and other refined products include glass, fiberglass, washing products, alloys and metals, fertilizers, wood treatments, insecticides, and microbiocides. The chemistry of boron is reviewed from the point of view of its possible health effects. It is concluded that boron probably is complexed with hydroxylated species in biologic systems, and that inhibition and stimulation of enzyme and coenzymes are pivotal in its mode of action. PMID:7889881

  11. An introduction to boron: history, sources, uses, and chemistry.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, W G

    1994-01-01

    Following a brief overview of the terrestrial distribution of boron in rocks, soil, and water, the history of the discovery, early utilization, and geologic origin of borate minerals is summarized. Modern uses of borate-mineral concentrates, borax, boric acid, and other refined products include glass, fiberglass, washing products, alloys and metals, fertilizers, wood treatments, insecticides, and microbiocides. The chemistry of boron is reviewed from the point of view of its possible health effects. It is concluded that boron probably is complexed with hydroxylated species in biologic systems, and that inhibition and stimulation of enzyme and coenzymes are pivotal in its mode of action. Images Figure 1. PMID:7889881

  12. Boron and Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Munir Ozturk; Serdal Sakcali; Salih Gucel; Huseyin Tombuloglu

    \\u000a Boron is found naturally in the earth’s crust in the oxidized form as borax and colemanite, particularly in the oceans, sedimentary\\u000a rocks, coal, shale, and some soils. It is never found in the elemental form in nature possessing a complex chemistry similar\\u000a to that of silicon, with properties switching between metals and non-metals. Boron has become an important and strategic

  13. Boron Nutrition and Boron Application in Crops

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rodrigo Marcelli Boaretto; Takashi Muraoka; Maria Fernanda Giné; Antonio Enedi Boaretto

    The application of micronutrients in citrus plants has usually been done by foliar spraying. The citrus plants are exigent\\u000a in boron, zinc, manganese, iron and deficiency of these micronutrients is common in worldwide citriculture. In Brazilian citriculture,\\u000a the B and Zn deficiencies are most frequent (Quaggio et al. 2003). For this reason, these micronutrients are routinely applied\\u000a as foliar fertilizers

  14. Boron Nutrition and Boron Application in Crops

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Rashid; M. Masud Mahmood; E. Rafique; K. Farooq

    Deficiencies of boron (B) and zinc (Zn) are well established in many agronomic and horticultural crops grown in calcareous\\u000a soils of Pakistan (Rashid 2006). As crop responses to B as well as to Zn are appreciable and use of their fertilizers is highly\\u000a cost–effective, application of these micronutrients is now recommended in the country. The history of Zn use in

  15. ADVANCED RADIOISOTOPE HEAT SOURCE AND PROPULSION SYSTEMS FOR PLANETARY EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect

    R. C. O'Brien; S. D. Howe; J. E. Werner

    2010-09-01

    The exploration of planetary surfaces and atmospheres may be enhanced by increasing the range and mobility of a science platform. Fundamentally, power production and availability of resources are limiting factors that must be considered for all science and exploration missions. A novel power and propulsion system is considered and discussed with reference to a long-range Mars surface exploration mission with in-situ resource utilization. Significance to applications such as sample return missions is also considered. Key material selections for radioisotope encapsulation techniques are presented.

  16. Root-growth mechanism for single-walled boron nitride nanotubes in laser vaporization technique.

    SciTech Connect

    Arenal, R.; Stephan, O.; Cochon, J.-L.; Loiseau, A. (Materials Science Division); (ONERA-CNRS); (UMR CNRS); (ONERA)

    2007-12-26

    We present a detailed study of the growth mechanism of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes synthesized by laser vaporization, which is the unique route known to the synthesis of this kind of tube in high quantities. We have performed a nanometric chemical and structural characterization by transmission electron microscopy (high-resolution mode (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy) of the synthesis products. Different boron-based compounds and other impurities were identified in the raw synthesis products. The results obtained by the TEM analysis and from the synthesis parameters (temperature, boron, and nitrogen sources) combined with phase diagram analysis to provide identification of the fundamental factors determining the nanotube growth mechanism. Our experiments strongly support a root-growth model that involves the presence of a droplet of boron. This phenomenological model considers the solubility, solidification, and segregation phenomena of the elements present in this boron droplet. In this model, we distinguish three different steps as a function of the temperature: (1) formation of the liquid boron droplet from the decomposition of different boron compounds existing in the hexagonal boron nitride target, (2) reaction of these boron droplets with nitrogen gas present in the vaporization chamber and recombination of these elements to form boron nitride, and (3) incorporation of the nitrogen atoms at the root of the boron particle at active reacting sites that achieves the growth of the tube.

  17. Root-growth mechanism for single-walled boron nitride nanotubes in laser vaporization technique.

    PubMed

    Arenal, Raul; Stephan, Odile; Cochon, Jean-Lou; Loiseau, Annick

    2007-12-26

    We present a detailed study of the growth mechanism of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes synthesized by laser vaporization, which is the unique route known to the synthesis of this kind of tube in high quantities. We have performed a nanometric chemical and structural characterization by transmission electron microscopy (high-resolution mode (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy) of the synthesis products. Different boron-based compounds and other impurities were identified in the raw synthesis products. The results obtained by the TEM analysis and from the synthesis parameters (temperature, boron, and nitrogen sources) combined with phase diagram analysis to provide identification of the fundamental factors determining the nanotube growth mechanism. Our experiments strongly support a root-growth model that involves the presence of a droplet of boron. This phenomenological model considers the solubility, solidification, and segregation phenomena of the elements present in this boron droplet. In this model, we distinguish three different steps as a function of the temperature: (1) formation of the liquid boron droplet from the decomposition of different boron compounds existing in the hexagonal boron nitride target, (2) reaction of these boron droplets with nitrogen gas present in the vaporization chamber and recombination of these elements to form boron nitride, and (3) incorporation of the nitrogen atoms at the root of the boron particle at active reacting sites that achieves the growth of the tube. PMID:18052251

  18. NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems Program Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudzinski, Leonard A.; Hamley, John A.; McCallum, Peter W.; Sutliff, Thomas J.; Zakrajsek, June F.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program began formal implementation in December 2010. The RPS Program's goal is to make available RPS for the exploration of the solar system in environments where conventional solar or chemical power generation is impractical or impossible to meet mission needs. To meet this goal, the RPS Program manages investments in RPS system development and RPS technologies. The current keystone of the RPS Program is the development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). This generator will be about four times more efficient than the more traditional thermoelectric generators, while providing a similar amount of power. This paper provides the status of the RPS Program and its related projects. Opportunities for RPS generator development and targeted research into RPS component performance enhancements, as well as constraints dealing with the supply of radioisotope fuel, are also discussed in the context of the next ten years of planetary science mission plans.

  19. Boronated liposome development and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, M.F. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The boronated liposome development and evaluation effort consists of two separate tasks. The first is the development of new boron compounds and the synthesis of known boron species with BNCT potential. These compounds are then encapsulated within liposomes for the second task, biodistribution testing in tumor-bearing mice, which examines the potential for the liposomes and their contents to concentrate boron in cancerous tissues.

  20. Boron incorporation into mullite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesser, K. J.; Beran, A.; Voll, D.; Schneider, H.

    2008-03-01

    Boron-doped mullites were synthesized using aluminium nitrate-nonahydrate, tetraethoxysilane and boric acid in a sol gel process with subsequent annealing at 950 and 1300 °C for five hours. Two different bulk compositions with constant Al2O3 contents (60 and 70 mol%, respectively) and varying SiO2 plus B2O3 contents were investigated. X-ray powder diffraction analyses yielded a linear decrease of the lattice parameters with increasing bulk B2O3 content, which was interpreted as to be due to boron incorporation. Related to the increasing boron content, corresponding infrared spectra revealed a slight and continuous shift for most of the absorption bands. These data show that mullite is able to incorporate large amounts of boron into its structure (up to about 20 mol% B2O3 depending on the bulk composition of the starting materials). Infrared analyses suggest that boron is incorporated into the mullite structure in form of planar three-fold coordinated BO3 groups.

  1. Boron and lithium isotopic composition in chondrules from the mokoia meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, F.; Chaussidon, M.

    2003-04-01

    Introduction: Large Boron isotopic variations have been reported in individual chondrules from several meteorites [1, 2]. These variations were interpreted as resulting from the incomplete mixing of two isotopically distinct sources of Boron. Spallation is the only known nucleosynthetic process that can yield Boron in substantial amounts at the scale of the Universe. Therefore it has been proposed that the two sources observed in chondrules correspond to two different types of spallation reactions, namely at high and low energies. Indeed, in the case of Boron, the 11B/10B ratio is sensitive to the energy at which the spallation reaction takes place. Since this report of large B isotopic variations in chondrules, two observations have allowed to identify the natural conditions under which at least one of such spallation reactions may have taken place in the early solar system. First, X-ray observations of T-Tauri stars have revealed daily outbursts which mimic the present day solar activity during the emission of flares [3]. Second, the decay product (i.e. 10B) of the short lived radio-isotope 10Be was discovered in Calcium-Aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) [4]. This is an indication that spallation did occurr in the solar system, shortly (i.e. less than a few million years) before the formation of the CAIs. In addition the possible occurrence of 7Be in CAIs suggests that this duration can be as short as a few months [5]. Sampling and Results: In the 8 chondrules from Mokoia, the ?11B values range between -39±6.8 ppm and -0.6±7.8 ppm (2 sigma). In one Boron depleted area of one chondrule, the ?11B value was found to be as low as -68.5 ppm and -61.5 ppm (±29; 2 sigma). In one chondrule from Mokoia the ?11B values range between -33.7±5.4 ppm and -3.8±5.4 ppm. These data confirm with a resolution of ? ±6 ppm the presence of a significant Boron isotopic heterogeneity,.The ?^7Li were also measured along with the ^delta11B. They range from -53.7±2.4 and -0.15±1.6 ppm (2 sigma) in the 8 chondrules of the Mokoia meteorite. Therefore the heterogeneity in B has its counterpart for Li. Interpretation: A two end member mixing model members can be proposed : ?11B ?0 ppm and ?11B<= -70 ppm. The value of 0 ppm is still significantly different from the matrix value reported by [6] (+19.2 ppm) and thus the possible contamination of the chondrule by their surrounding matrix is highly unlikely. The second end member should have ?11B and ?^7Li values le-70 ppm and le-50 ppm, respectively, resulting from Li and B produced at high energy by spallation reactions (E >= 100 MeV/nucleon, ?11B =-375 ?^7Li = -830 ppm). References: [1] Chaussidon M., Robert F. (1995) Nature 374, 337-339. [2] Chaussidon M. and Robert F. (1998) Earth Planet Sci. Lett. 164, 577-589. [3] Montmerle T. (1999) MPE Report : Astronomy with Radioactivities, 225-236. [4] McKeegan K., Chaussidon M., Robert F. (2000) Science 289, 1334-1337. [5] Chaussidon M., Robert F. McKeegan K. (2002) Abst. 33th LPSC #1563 [6] Hoppe et al., (2001) MAPS, 36, 1331-1343. [7] Zhai M et al., (1996) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 60, 4877-4881.

  2. Radioisotope space power generators: Design concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsman, Tina; Simion, George

    The use of radioisotope power systems for space applications was a key part of some of the most ambitious astronautical undertakings of the United States. Nuclear power sources have provided the electrical energy for the NASA Pioneer, Viking, and Voyager missions as well as earlier earth orbital and Apollo missions. Recently developed, radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) will be used in future space missions, such as the Galileo Project (Jupiter study) and the International Solar Polar Mission. Present design concepts of RTGs and related dynamic isotope power systems (DIPS) are surveyed.

  3. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Janet; Hull, David; Gorican, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) are of significant interest to the scientific and technical communities for many of the same reasons that carbon nanotubes (CNT) have attracted wide attention. Both materials have potentially unique and important properties for structural and electronic applications. However of even more consequence than their similarities may be the complementary differences between carbon and boron nitride nanotubes While BNNT possess a very high modulus similar to CNT, they also possess superior chemical and thermal stability. Additionally, BNNT have more uniform electronic properties, with a uniform band gap of 5.5 eV while CNT vary from semi-conductive to highly conductive behavior. Boron nitride nanotubes have been synthesized both in the literature and at NASA Glenn Research Center, by a variety of methods such as chemical vapor deposition, arc discharge and reactive milling. Consistent large scale production of a reliable product has proven difficult. Progress in the reproducible synthesis of 1-2 gram sized batches of boron nitride nanotubes will be discussed as well as potential uses for this unique material.

  4. Boron addition to alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Coad, B. C.

    1985-08-20

    A process for addition of boron to an alloy which involves forming a melt of the alloy and a reactive metal, selected from the group consisting of aluminum, titanium, zirconium and mixtures thereof to the melt, maintaining the resulting reactive mixture in the molten state and reacting the boric oxide with the reactive metal to convert at least a portion of the boric oxide to boron which dissolves in the resulting melt, and to convert at least portion of the reactive metal to the reactive metal oxide, which oxide remains with the resulting melt, and pouring the resulting melt into a gas stream to form a first atomized powder which is subsequently remelted with further addition of boric oxide, re-atomized, and thus reprocessed to convert essentially all the reactive metal to metal oxide to produce a powdered alloy containing specified amounts of boron.

  5. Contributions and future of radioisotopes in medical, industrial and space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tingey, G.L.; Dix, G.P.; Wahlquist, E.J.

    1990-11-01

    There are 333 isotopes that have a half-life between 1 day and 100,000 years that have a wide variety of applications including public health, medicine,industrial technology, food technology and packaging, agriculture, energy supply, and national security. This paper provides an overview of some of the most extensive applications of radioisotopes including some observations of future uses. Examples are discussed that indicate that the use of radioisotopes is almost unlimited and will continue to grow. There is a growing need for future applications development and production. 12 refs., 1 tab. (BM)

  6. Modification of hot cells for general purpose heat source assembly at the radioisotope power systems facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carteret, Betty A.

    1992-01-01

    Eight existing, unused hot cells currently are being modified for use in the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) to assemble 238Pu-fueled heat sources for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). Four air atmosphere cells will be used for storage, decanning, and decontamination of the iridium-clad radioisotope fuel. The remaining four argon atmosphere cells will be used to assemble fuel and graphite components for production and packaging of general purpose heat source (GPHS) assembly modules, which provide heat to drive the thermoelectric conversion process in the generators. The hot cells will be equipped to perform remote and glovebox-type operations. They will provide shielding and contamination control measures to reduce worker radiation exposure to levels within current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Designs emphasize the Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) radiation protection policy.

  7. Modification of hot cells for general purpose heat source assembly at the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carteret, B. A.

    1991-09-01

    Eight existing, unused hot cells currently are being modified for use in the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) to assemble Pu-238 fueled heat sources for radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Four air atmosphere cells will be used for storage, decanning, and decontamination of the iridium-clad radioisotope fuel. The remaining four argon atmosphere cells will be used to assemble fuel and graphite components for production and packaging of general purpose heat source (GPHS) assembly modules, which provide heat to drive the thermoelectric conversion process in the generators. The hot cells will be equipped to perform remote and glovebox-type operations. They will provide shielding and contamination control measures to reduce worker radiation exposure to levels within current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Designs emphasize the Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) radiation protection policy.

  8. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, R.K.; Bystroff, R.I.; Miller, D.E.

    1986-08-27

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  9. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, Richard K. (Pleasanton, CA); Bystroff, Roman I. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Dale E. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  10. Safety monitoring system for radioisotope thermoelectric generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoltan, A.

    1973-01-01

    System alerts personnel of hazards which may develop while they are performing tests on radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Remedial action is initiated to minimize damage. Five operating conditions are monitored: hot junction temperature, cold junction temperature, thermal shroud coolant flow, vacuum in test chamber, and alpha radiation.

  11. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator licensed hardware package and certification tests

    SciTech Connect

    Goldmann, L.H.; Averette, H.S. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, M/S R3-86 or N1-32, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    1995-01-20

    This paper presents the Licensed Hardware package and the Certification Test portions of the Radioisitope Themoelectric Generator Transportation System. This package has been designed to meet those portions of the {ital Code} {ital of} {ital Federal} {ital Regulations} (10 CFR 71) relating to ``Type B`` shipments of radioactive materials. The licensed hardware is now in the U. S. Department of Energy licensing process that certifies the packaging`s integrity under accident conditions. The detailed information for the anticipated license is presented in the safety analysis report for packaging, which is now in process and undergoing necessary reviews. As part of the licensing process, a full-size Certification Test Article unit, which has modifications slightly different than the Licensed Hardware or production shipping units, is used for testing. Dimensional checks of the Certification Test Article were made at the manufacturing facility. Leak testing and drop testing were done at the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The hardware includes independent double containments to prevent the environmental spread of {sup 238}Pu, impact limiting devices to protect portions of the package from impacts, and thermal insulation to protect the seal areas from excess heat during accident conditions. The package also features electronic feed-throughs to monitor the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator`s temperature inside the containment during the shipment cycle. This package is designed to safely dissipate the typical 4,500 thermal watts produced in the largest Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators. The package also contains provisions to ensure leak tightness when radioactive materials, such as a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator for the Cassini Mission, planned for 1997 by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, are being prepared for shipment. (Abstract Truncated)

  12. Fabrication of boron sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A process for fabricating high density boron sputtering targets with sufficient mechanical strength to function reliably at typical magnetron sputtering power densities and at normal process parameters. The process involves the fabrication of a high density boron monolithe by hot isostatically compacting high purity (99.9%) boron powder, machining the boron monolithe into the final dimensions, and brazing the finished boron piece to a matching boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) piece, by placing aluminum foil there between and applying pressure and heat in a vacuum. An alternative is the application of aluminum metallization to the back of the boron monolithe by vacuum deposition. Also, a titanium based vacuum braze alloy can be used in place of the aluminum foil.

  13. Fabrication of boron sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

    1995-02-28

    A process is disclosed for fabricating high density boron sputtering targets with sufficient mechanical strength to function reliably at typical magnetron sputtering power densities and at normal process parameters. The process involves the fabrication of a high density boron monolithe by hot isostatically compacting high purity (99.9%) boron powder, machining the boron monolithe into the final dimensions, and brazing the finished boron piece to a matching boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) piece, by placing aluminum foil there between and applying pressure and heat in a vacuum. An alternative is the application of aluminum metallization to the back of the boron monolithe by vacuum deposition. Also, a titanium based vacuum braze alloy can be used in place of the aluminum foil. 7 figs.

  14. Boron Nutrition of Avocados

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. W. Whiley; I. E. Smith; B. N. Wolstenholme; J. B. Saranah

    1996-01-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for normal plant growth, but is deficient in many soils that support avocado cultivation. In avocado, deficiency symptoms include yellowing and deformation of leaves, thickening of nodal regions on branch es, loss of geotropism, reduced root growth, branch and trunk lesions, reduced pollen viability, and deformed and smaller fruit. Avocado trees are particularly recalcitrant in

  15. An Updated Comprehensive Risk Analysis for Radioisotopes Identified of High Risk to National Security in the Event of a Radiological Dispersion Device Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Alexandra R.

    An updated global survey of radioisotope production and distribution was completed and subjected to a revised "down-selection methodology" to determine those radioisotopes that should be classified as potential national security risks based on availability and key physical characteristics that could be exploited in a hypothetical radiological dispersion device. The potential at-risk radioisotopes then were used in a modeling software suite known as Turbo FRMAC, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, to characterize plausible contamination maps known as Protective Action Guideline Zone Maps. This software also was used to calculate the whole body dose equivalent for exposed individuals based on various dispersion parameters and scenarios. Derived Response Levels then were determined for each radioisotope using: 1) target doses to members of the public provided by the U.S. EPA, and 2) occupational dose limits provided by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The limiting Derived Response Level for each radioisotope also was determined.

  16. An overview of the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transporation System Program

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, J.C.

    1995-10-01

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) convert the heat generated by radioactive decay to electricity using thermocouples. RTGs have a long operating life, are reasonably lightweight, and require little or no maintenance once assembled and tested. These factors make RTGs particularly attractive for use in spacecraft However, because RTGs contain significant quantities of radioactive materials, normally plutonium-238 and its decay products, they must be transported in packages built in accordance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. The US Department of Energy assigned the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transportation System (RTGTS) Program to Westinghouse Hanford Company in 1988 to develop a system meeting the regulatory requirements. The program objective was to develop a transportation system that would fully comply with 10 CFR 71 while protecting RTGs from adverse environmental conditions during normal conditions of transport (e.g., shock and heat). The RTGTS is scheduled for completion in December 1996 and will be available to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations Cassini mission to Saturn in October 1997. This paper provides an overview of the RTGTS and discusses the hardware being produced. Additionally, various program management innovations mandated by recent ma or changes in the US Department of Energy structure and resources will be outlined.

  17. An overview of the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transportation System Program

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, J.C.; Becker, D.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) convert the heat generated by radioactive decay to electricity using thermocouples. RTGs have a long operating life, are reasonably lightweight, and require little or no maintenance once assembled and tested. These factors make RTGs particularly attractive for use in spacecraft. However, because RTGs contain significant quantities of radioactive materials, normally plutonium-238 and its decay products, they must be transported in packages built in accordance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. The U.S. Department of Energy assigned the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transportation System (RTGTS) Program to Westinghouse Hanford Company in 1988 to develop a system meeting the regulatory requirements. The program objective was to develop a transportation system that would fully comply with 10 CFR 71 while protecting RTGs from adverse environmental conditions during normal conditions of transport (e.g., shock and heat). The RTGTS is scheduled for completion in December 1996 and will be available to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration{close_quote}s Cassini mission to Saturn in October 1997. This paper provides an overview of the RTGTS and discusses the hardware being produced. Additionally, various program management innovations mandated by recent major changes in the U.S. Department of Energy structure and resources will be outlined. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Particle-beam accelerators for radiotherapy and radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, T.J.; Crandall, K.R.; Hamm, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    The philosophy used in developing the new PIGMI technology was that the parameters chosen for physics research machines are not necessarily the right ones for a dedicated therapy or radioisotope machine. In particular, the beam current and energy can be optimized, and the design should emphasize minimum size, simplicity and reliability of operation, and economy in capital and operating costs. A major part of achieving these goals lay in raising the operating frequency and voltage gradient of the accelerator, which shrinks the diameter and length of the components. Several other technical innovations resulted in major system improvements. One of these is a radically new type of accelerator structure named the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator. This allowed us to eliminate the large, complicated ion source used in previous ion accelerators, and to achieve a very high quality accelerated beam. Also, by using advanced permanent magnet materials to make the focusing elements, the system becomes much simpler. Other improvements have been made in all of the accelerator components and in the methods for operating them. These will be described, and design and costing information examples given for several possible therapy and radioisotope production machines.

  19. Boron-copper neutron absorbing material and method of preparation

    DOEpatents

    Wiencek, Thomas C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Domagala, Robert F. (Indian Head Park, IL); Thresh, Henry (Palos Hts., IL)

    1991-01-01

    A composite, copper clad neutron absorbing material is comprised of copper powder and boron powder enriched with boron 10. The boron 10 content can reach over 30 percent by volume, permitting a very high level of neutron absorption. The copper clad product is also capable of being reduced to a thickness of 0.05 to 0.06 inches and curved to a radius of 2 to 3 inches, and can resist temperatures of 900.degree. C. A method of preparing the material includes the steps of compacting a boron-copper powder mixture and placing it in a copper cladding, restraining the clad assembly in a steel frame while it is hot rolled at 900.degree. C. with cross rolling, and removing the steel frame and further rolling the clad assembly at 650.degree. C. An additional sheet of copper can be soldered onto the clad assembly so that the finished sheet can be cold formed into curved shapes.

  20. Boron isotopic compositions of some boron minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oi, Takao; Nomura, Masao; Musashi, Masaaki; Ossaka, Tomoko; Okamoto, Makoto; Kakihana, Hidetake

    1989-12-01

    Boron minerals that have different structural formulae but are supposed to have the same geologic origin have been collected and analyzed for the 11B /10B isotopic ratio. It has been reconfirmed that minerals of marine origin have higher 11B /10B ratios than those of nonmarine origin. It has been found that the sequence of decreasing 11B /10B values among the minerals with the same geologic origin is; borax, tincal, kernite (Na borates) > ulexite ( Na/Ca borate) > colemanite, iyoite, meyerhofferite (Ca borates). This sequence is explainable on the basis of the difference in crystal structure among the minerals. That is, minerals with higher BO 3/BO 4 ratios, (the ratio of the number of the BO 3 triangle units to the number of the BO 4 tetrahedron units in the structural formula of a mineral) have higher 11B /10B ratios.

  1. Boron: elementary challenge for experimenters and theoreticians.

    PubMed

    Albert, Barbara; Hillebrecht, Harald

    2009-01-01

    Many of the fundamental questions regarding the solid-state chemistry of boron are still unsolved, more than 200 years after its discovery. Recently, theoretical work on the existence and stability of known and new modifications of the element combined with high-pressure and high-temperature experiments have revealed new aspects. A lot has also happened over the last few years in the field of reactions between boron and main group elements. Binary compounds such as B(6)O, MgB(2), LiB(1-x), Na(3)B(20), and CaB(6) have caused much excitement, but the electron-precise, colorless boride carbides Li(2)B(12)C(2), LiB(13)C(2), and MgB(12)C(2) as well as the graphite analogue BeB(2)C(2) also deserve special attention. Physical properties such as hardness, superconductivity, neutron scattering length, and thermoelectricity have also made boron-rich compounds attractive to materials research and for applications. The greatest challenges to boron chemistry, however, are still the synthesis of monophasic products in macroscopic quantities and in the form of single crystals, the unequivocal identification and determination of crystal structures, and a thorough understanding of their electronic situation. Linked polyhedra are the dominating structural elements of the boron-rich compounds of the main group elements. In many cases, their structures can be derived from those that have been assigned to modifications of the element. Again, even these require a critical revision and discussion. PMID:19830749

  2. Impact of boron dilution accidents on low boron PWR safety

    SciTech Connect

    Papukchiev, A.; Liu, Y. [Dept. of Reactor Dynamics and Reactor Safety, Technical Univ. Munich, Walther Meissner-Str. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Schaefer, A. [ISaR Inst. for Safety and Reliability, Walther Meissner-Str. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    In conventional pressurized water reactor (PWR) designs, soluble boron is used for reactivity control over core fuel cycle. As an inadvertent reduction of the boron concentration during a boron dilution accident could introduce positive reactivity and have a negative impact on PWR safety, design changes to reduce boron concentration in the reactor coolant are of general interest. In the framework of an investigation into the feasibility of low boron design, a PWR core configuration based on fuel with higher gadolinium (Gd) load has been developed which permits to reduce the natural boron concentration at begin of cycle (BOC) to 518 ppm. For the assessment of the potential safety advantages, a boron dilution accident due to small break loss-of-coolant-accident (SBLOCA) has been simulated with the system code ATHLET for two PWR core designs: a low boron design and a standard core design. The results from the comparative analyses showed that the impact of the boron dilution accident on the new PWR design safety is significantly lower in comparison with the standard design. The new reactor design provided at least 4, 4% higher reactivity margin to recriticality during the whole accident which is equivalent to the negative reactivity worth of additional 63% of all control rods fully inserted in to the core. (authors)

  3. Crystalline Boron Nanoribbons: Synthesis and Characterization

    E-print Network

    to its electron-deficient nature.1-3 Extensive fundamental and ap- plied research of bulk boron and boron vapor transport method using boron and iodine as precursor,12,13 and also by laser ablation of a B

  4. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, Dennis E.

    2015-04-01

    Boron carbide ceramics have been particularly problematic in attempts to develop adequate constitutive model descriptions for purposes of analysis of dynamic response in the shock and impact environment. Dynamic strength properties of boron carbide ceramic differ uniquely from comparable ceramics. Furthermore, boron carbide is suspected, but not definitely shown, to undergoing polymorphic phase transformation under shock compression. In the present paper, shock-wave compression measurements conducted over the past 40 years are assessed for the purpose of achieving improved understanding of the dynamic equation of state and strength of boron carbide. In particular, attention is focused on the often ignored Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hugoniot measurements performed on porous sintered boron carbide ceramic. The LANL data are shown to exhibit two compression anomalies on the shock Hugoniot within the range of 20-60 GPa that may relate to crystallographic structure transitions. More recent molecular dynamics simulations on the compressibility of the boron carbide crystal lattice reveal compression transitions that bear similarities to the LANL Hugoniot results. The same Hugoniot data are complemented with dynamic isentropic compression data for boron carbide extracted from Hugoniot measurements on boron carbide and copper granular mixtures. Other Hugoniot measurements, however, performed on near-full-density boron carbide ceramic differ markedly from the LANL Hugoniot data. These later data exhibit markedly less compressibility and tend not to show comparable anomalies in compressibility. Alternative Hugoniot anomalies, however, are exhibited by the near-full-density data. Experimental uncertainty, Hugoniot strength, and phase transformation physics are all possible explanations for the observed discrepancies. It is reasoned that experimental uncertainty and Hugoniot strength are not likely explanations for the observed differences. The notable mechanistic difference in the processes of shock compression between the LANL data and that of the other studies is the markedly larger inelastic deformation and dissipation experienced in the shock event brought about by compaction of the substantially larger porosity LANL test ceramics. High-pressure diamond anvil cell experiments reveal extensive amorphization, reasoned to be a reversion product of a higher-pressure crystallographic phase, which is a consequence of application of both high pressure and shear deformation to the boron carbide crystal structure. A dependence of shock-induced high-pressure phase transformation in boron carbide on the extent of shear deformation experienced in the shock process offers a plausible explanation for the differences observed in the LANL Hugoniot data on porous ceramic and that of other shock data on near-full-density boron carbide.

  5. Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Life Certification Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusick, Jeffrey J.; Zampino, Edward

    2013-01-01

    An Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) power supply is being developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) in partnership with NASA for potential future deep space science missions. Unlike previous radioisotope power supplies for space exploration, such as the passive MMRTG used recently on the Mars Curiosity rover, the ASRG is an active dynamic power supply with moving Stirling engine mechanical components. Due to the long life requirement of 17 years and the dynamic nature of the Stirling engine, the ASRG project faced some unique challenges trying to establish full confidence that the power supply will function reliably over the mission life. These unique challenges resulted in the development of an overall life certification plan that emphasizes long-term Stirling engine test and inspection when analysis is not practical. The ASRG life certification plan developed is described.

  6. [An integrated control system for radioisotope facilities].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Y; Maeda, M; Takeshima, K; Kobayashi, H; Nishizawa, K; Takata, K

    1989-03-01

    The authors developed an integrated system for managing the safe use of radioisotope laboratory facilities, users' access to controlled areas, and the control of air-conditioners. This system consisted of a personal computer, an access controller, an eye retinal verifier, magnetic card readers, hand foot cloth monitors, video tape recorders and a fire alarm system. The access controller was set as the central unit to operate the whole system including 13 gates and air-conditioners. Under this program, only registered persons were permitted to enter the laboratories; the exact records on access were easily obtained; and electricity and fuel expenses were largely reduced. We expect that the system would facilitate the safe use of radioisotopes and the utilization of laboratory facilities. PMID:2740531

  7. Microfabricated radioisotope-powered active RFID transponder

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Tin; A. Lal

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a microfabricated 63Ni radioisotope-powered RFID transponder realized with a SAW (surface acoustic wave) device as the transmission frequency selector. The transponder is powered by a 1.5 milli-Ci 63Ni source which has a half-life of 100 years. We have achieved a 5mW, 10-¿s long, 100MHz carrier envelope, RF pulses which occur every 3 minutes, across a 50¿ load. The

  8. The polarographic microdetermination of boron 

    E-print Network

    Peacock, Dixon Williams

    1958-01-01

    LIBRARY A A M COLLEGE OF TEXAS THE POLAROGRAPHIC MICRODETERMINATION OF BORON By DIXON WILLIAMS PEACOCK A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment................................. vi Chapter I- a. Introduction........................ 1 b. Analytical Chemistry of Boron........ 4 c. Alternative Methods................. 11 d. Objects and Methods of This Study.... 15 Chapter II- Polarography in the Determination of Boron...

  9. NEW DIRECTIONS IN RADIOISOTOPE SPECTRUM IDENTIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Salaymeh, S.; Jeffcoat, R.

    2010-06-17

    Recent studies have found the performance of commercial handheld detectors with automatic RIID software to be less than acceptable. Previously, we have explored approaches rooted in speech processing such as cepstral features and information-theoretic measures. Scientific advances are often made when researchers identify mathematical or physical commonalities between different fields and are able to apply mature techniques or algorithms developed in one field to another field which shares some of the same challenges. The authors of this paper have identified similarities between the unsolved problems faced in gamma-spectroscopy for automated radioisotope identification and the challenges of the much larger body of research in speech processing. Our research has led to a probabilistic framework for describing and solving radioisotope identification problems. Many heuristic approaches to classification in current use, including for radioisotope classification, make implicit probabilistic assumptions which are not clear to the users and, if stated explicitly, might not be considered desirable. Our framework leads to a classification approach with demonstrable improvements using standard feature sets on proof-of-concept simulated and field-collected data.

  10. Boron nitride nanotubes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. G. Chopra; R. J. Luyken; K. Cherrey; V. H. Crespi; M. L. Cohen; S. G. Louie; A. Zettl

    1995-01-01

    The successful synthesis of pure boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is reported here. Multi-walled tubes with inner diameters on the order of 1 to 3 nanometers and with lengths up to 200 nanometers were produced in a carbon-free plasma discharge between a BN-packed tungsten rod and a cooled copper electrode. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy on individual tubes yielded B:N ratios of approximately

  11. Boron carbonitride nanojunctions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Guo; C. Y. Zhi; X. D. Bai; E. G. Wang

    2002-01-01

    Boron carbonitride (BCN) nanometric heterojunctions are controllably fabricated by bias-assisted hot-filament chemical vapor deposition with a pause-reactivation two-stage (PRTS) process. Tailored composition revulsion across the nanotube junction is obtained by simply varying the concentration of the gaseous precursor between the two stages of the PRTS process. The critical effect of the plasma power density in the reactivation process on continuous

  12. Speciation Control During Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Coupling of Haloaryl and Haloalkenyl MIDA Boronic Esters.

    PubMed

    Fyfe, James W B; Valverde, Elena; Seath, Ciaran P; Kennedy, Alan R; Redmond, Joanna M; Anderson, Niall A; Watson, Allan J B

    2015-06-01

    Boronic acid solution speciation can be controlled during the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling of haloaryl N-methyliminodiacetic acid (MIDA) boronic esters to enable the formal homologation of boronic acid derivatives. The reaction is contingent upon control of the basic biphase and is thermodynamically driven: temperature control provides highly chemoselective access to either BMIDA adducts at room temperature or boronic acid pinacol ester (BPin) products at elevated temperature. Control experiments and solubility analyses have provided some insight into the mechanistic operation of the formal homologation process. PMID:25959852

  13. Radioisotope Thin-Film Fueled Microfabricated Reciprocating Electromechanical Power Generator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rajesh Duggirala; Ronald G. Polcawich; Madan Dubey; Amit Lal

    2008-01-01

    A radioisotope power generator with a potential lifetime of decades is demonstrated by employing a 100.3-year half-lifetime 63Ni radioisotope thin-film source to electrostatically actuate and cause reciprocation in a microfabricated piezoelectric unimorph cantilever. The radioisotope direct-charged electrostatic actuation of the piezoelectric unimorph cantilever results in the conversion of radiation energy into mechanical energy stored in the strained unimorph cantilever. The

  14. Trapping Metastable Krypton Atoms for Radio-Isotope Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappala, Jake; Bailey, Kevin; Jiang, Wei; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; O'Connor, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a MOT of metastable krypton atoms achieving a loading rate of 1012 s-1 for the abundant isotope 84Kr. At the same time, the trap is capable of single atom detection of the rare isotopes 81Kr and 85Kr used for radio-isotope dating. Metastable atom production via gas discharge remains a major limit to trapping efficiency. We are exploring direct optical excitation methods to overcome this limit. This technique uses a krypton lamp to produce resonant 124 nm light and an 819 nm laser to drive the krypton from the ground state to the metastable level. These advancements would lead to a next generation ATTA instrument for 81Kr dating. Improved efficiency would open up new opportunities such as dating deep ice core samples. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DEAC02-06CH11357.

  15. Influence of biofouling on boron removal by nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Esther Huertas; Moshe Herzberg; Gideon Oron; Menachem Elimelech

    2008-01-01

    Excess of boron in water poses a problem due to adverse effects on crop production as well as human health and aquatic life. This study examined the influence of biofouling of NF and RO membrane on the performance of the membranes in removing boron from a synthetic wastewater effluent. Accelerated laboratory-scale biofouling experiments were carried out with commercial thin film

  16. Alkali-activated cementitous materials: Alternative matrices for the immobilisation of hazardous wastes Part I. Stabilisation of boron

    SciTech Connect

    Palomo, A.; Lopez dela Fuente, J.I

    2003-02-01

    Boron is a nonmetal element that is present in nature in many kinds of minerals and in a lot of industrial products of public use. The importance of this element lies in the fact that boron compounds are present in some water streams from nuclear power plants (Pressure Water Reactor [PWR]) and that the boron-soluble salts modify Portland cement hydration retarding setting and hardening, and negatively affecting its durability characteristics. Thus, the main objective of this research was to study the efficiency against boron of the solidification systems based on alkali-activated fly ashes. Results show that boron does not significantly alter the hardening process of the new matrices. The presence of boron hardly modifies mechanical strengths of activated fly ashes and additionally, boron leaching tests indicate that this stabilisation/solidification system is more effective than traditional ones.

  17. Boron isotopic compositions of some boron minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Oi, Takao; Musashi, Masaaki; Ossaka, Tomoko; Kakihana, Hidetake (Sophia Univ., Tokyo (Japan)); Nomura, Masao; Okamoto, Makoto (Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan))

    1989-12-01

    Boron minerals that have different structural formulae but are supposed to have the same geologic origin have been collected and analyzed for the {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B isotopic ratio. It has been reconfirmed that minerals of marine origin have higher {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B ratios than those of nonmarine origin. It has been found that the sequence of decreasing {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B values among the minerals with the same geologic origin is; borax, tincal, kernite (Na borates) > ulexite (Na/Ca borate) > colemanite, iyoite, meyerhofferite (Ca borates). This sequence is explainable on the basis of the difference in crystal structure among the minerals. That is, minerals with high BO{sub 3}/BO{sub 4} ratios, (the ratio of the number of the BO{sub 3} triangle units to the number of the BO{sub 4} tetrahedron units in the structural formula of a mineral) have higher {sup 11}B/{sup 10}B ratios.

  18. Formation of medical radioisotopes 111In, 117 m Sn, 124Sb, and 177Lu in photonuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danagulyan, A. S.; Hovhannisyan, G. H.; Bakhshiyan, T. M.; Avagyan, R. H.; Avetisyan, A. E.; Kerobyan, I. A.; Dallakyan, R. K.

    2015-06-01

    The possibility of the photonuclear production of radioisotopes 111In, 117 m Sn, 124Sb, and 177Lu is discussed. Reaction yields were measured by the gamma-activation method. The enriched tin isotopes 112, 118Sn and Te and HfO2 of natural isotopic composition were used as targets. The targets were irradiated at the linear electron accelerator of Alikhanian National Science Laboratory (Yerevan) at the energy of 40 MeV. The experimental results obtained in this way reveal that the yield and purity of radioisotopes 111In and 117 mSn are acceptable for their production via photonuclear reactions. Reactions proceeding on targets from Te and HfO2 of natural isotopic composition and leading to the formation of 124Sb and 177Lu have small yields and are hardly appropriate for the photoproduction of these radioisotopes even in the case of enriched targets.

  19. Process for producing boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Parrish, L.N.; Chase, C.C.

    1988-06-07

    A process for producing boron nitride is described which comprises mixing boron oxide, orthoboric acid and melamine to form a reaction composition which comprises from about 45 to about 50 weight percent, based on the weight of the reaction composition, of melamine and from about 50 to about 55 weight percent, based on the weight of the reaction composition, of a combination of boron oxide and orthoboric acid. The weight ratio of boron oxide to orthoboric acid is from about 3:1 to about 4:1; and heating the composition to temperature of about 700/sup 0/C to about 1200/sup 0/C under a non-oxidizing atmosphere to form boron nitride.

  20. High efficiency radioisotope thermophotovoltaic prototype generator

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, J.E.; Samaras, J.E.; Fraas, L.M.; Ewell, R. [JX Crystals, Inc., Issaquah, WA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    A radioisotope thermophotovoltaic generator space power system (RTPV) is lightweight, low-cost alternative to the present radioisotope thermoelectric generator system (RTG). The fabrication of such an RTPV generator has recently become feasible as the result of the invention of the GaSb infrared sensitive photovoltaic cell. Herein, the authors present the results of a parametric study of emitters and optical filters in conjuction with existing data on gallium antimonide cells. They compare a polished tungsten emitter with an Erbia selective emitter for use in combination with a simple dielectric filter and a gallium antimonide cell array. They find that the polished tungsten emitter is by itself a very selective emitter with low emissivity beyond 4 microns. Given a gallium antimonide cell and a tungsten emitter, a simple dielectric filter can be designed to transmit radiant energy below 1.7 microns and to reflect radiant energy between 1.7 and 4 microns back to the emitter. Because of the low long wavelength emissivity associated with the polished tungsten emitter, this simple dielectric filter then yields very respectable system performance. Also as a result of the longer wavelength fall-off in the tungsten emissivity curve, the radiation energy peak for a polished tungsten emitter operating at 1300 K shifts to shorter wavelengths relative to the blackbody spectrum so that the radiated energy peak falls right at the gallium antimonide cell bandedge. The result is that the response of the gallium antimonide cell is well matched to a polished tungsten emitter. The authors propose, therefore, to fabricate an operating prototype of a near term radioisotope thermophotovoltaic generator design consisting of a polished tungsten emitter, standard gallium antimonide cells, and a near-term dielectric filter.

  1. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rolf F. Barth; Albert H. Soloway; Ralph G. Fairchild

    1990-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) bring together two components that when kept separate have only minor effects on normal cells. The first component is a stable isotope of boron (boron 10) that can be concentrated in tumor cells. The second is a beam of low-energy neutrons that produces short-range radiation when absorbed, or captured, by the boron. The combination of

  2. High efficiency radioisotope thermophotovoltaic prototype generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, James E.; Samaras, John E.; Fraas, Lewis M.; Ewell, Richard

    1995-01-01

    A radioisotope thermophotovoltaic generator space power system (RTPV) is lightweight, low-cost alternative to the present radioisotope thermoelectric generator system (RTG). The fabrication of such an RTPV generator has recently become feasible as the result of the invention of the GaSb infrared sensitive photovoltaic cell. Herein, we present the results of a parametric study of emitters and optical filters in conjuction with existing data on gallium antimonide cells. We compare a polished tungsten emitter with an Erbia selective emitter for use in combination with a simple dielectric filter and a gallium antimonide cell array. We find that the polished tungsten emitter is by itself a very selective emitter with low emissivity beyond 4 microns. Given a gallium antimonide cell and a tungsten emitter, a simple dielectric filter can be designed to transmit radiant energy below 1.7 microns and to reflect radiant energy between 1.7 and 4 microns back to the emitter. Because of the low long wavelength emissivity associated with the polished tungsten emitter, this simple dielectric filter then yields very respectable system performance. Also as a result of the longer wavelength fall-off in the tungsten emissivity curve, the radiation energy peak for a polished tungsten emitter operating at 1300 K shifts to shorter wavelengths relative to the blackbody spectrum so that the radiated energy peak falls right at the gallium antimonide cell bandedge. The result is that the response of the gallium antimonide cell is well matched to a polished tungsten emitter. We propose, therefore, to fabricate an operating prototype of a near term radioisotope thermophotovoltaic generator design consisting of a polished tungsten emitter, standard gallium antimonide cells, and a near-term dielectric filter. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory will design and build the thermal cavity, and JX Crystals will fabricate the gallium antimonide cells, dielectric filters, and resultant receiver panels. With 250 Watts of heat input, we expect this prototype to produce over 300 Watts of electrical energy output for a system energy conversion efficiency of over 12%. This low risk, near term design provides advances relative to present radioisotope thermophotovoltaic generators and has the additional advantage of allowing component and system development and testing to begin immediately. Improved cells and filters can easily be incorporated in this baseline system if they should become available in the future.

  3. Cooling radioisotope thermoelectric generators in the Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) to be used on future spacecraft and launched by the Shuttle must be cooled from the time they are installed and enclosed until the spacecraft is deployed from the Shuttle. A special Cooling Kit maintains their temperature well below critical by circulating water through the coils soldered to them and through a heat exchanger that boils water and externally discharges the resulting steam. The RTG Cooling Kit, including its support frame, if fully charged with about 64 kg of evaporation water, will increase the Shuttle launch mass by about 200 kg.

  4. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transport trailer system

    SciTech Connect

    Ard, K.E.; King, D.A.; Leigh, H.; Satoh, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, MSIN N1-25, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    1995-01-20

    The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System, designated as System 100, comprises four major systems. The four major systems are designated as the Packaging System (System 120), Trailer System (System 140), Operations and Ancillary Equipment System (System 160), and Shipping and Receiving Facility Transport System (System 180). Packaging System (System 120), including the RTG packaging is licensed (regulatory) hardware; it is certified by the U.S. Department of Energy to be in accordance with Title 10, {ital Code} {ital of} {ital Federal} {ital Regulations}, Part 71 (10 CFR 71). System 140, System 160, and System 180 are nonlicensed (nonregulatory) hardware. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  5. Performance tuned radioisotope thermophotovoltaic space power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, W. E.; Morgan, M. D.; Saban, S. B.

    1998-01-01

    The trend in space exploration is to use many small, low-cost, special-purpose satellites instead of the large, high-cost, multipurpose satellites used in the past. As a result of this new trend, there is a need for lightweight, efficient, and compact radioisotope fueled electrical power generators. This paper presents an improved design for a radioisotope thermophotovoltaic (RTPV) space power system in the 10 W to 20 W class which promises up to 37.6 watts at 30.1% efficiency and 25 W/kg specific power. The RTPV power system concept has been studied and compared to radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) radioisotope, Stirling generators and alkali metal thermal electric conversion (AMTEC) generators (Schock, 1995). The studies indicate that RTPV has the potential to be the lightest weight, most efficient and most reliable of the three concepts. However, in spite of the efficiency and light weight, the size of the thermal radiator required to eliminate excess heat from the PV cells and the lack of actual system operational performance data are perceived as obstacles to RTPV acceptance for space applications. Between 1994 and 1997 EDTEK optimized the key converter components for an RTPV generator under Department of Energy (DOE) funding administered via subcontracts to Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC) and EG&G Mound Applied Technologies Laboratory (Horne, 1995). The optimized components included a resonant micromesh infrared bandpass filter, low-bandgap GaSb PV cells and cell arrays. Parametric data from these components were supplied to OSC who developed and analyzed the performance of 100 W, 20 W, and 10 W RTPV generators. These designs are described in references (Schock 1994, 1995 and 1996). Since the performance of each class of supply was roughly equivalent and simply scaled with size, this paper will consider the OSC 20 W design as a baseline. The baseline 20-W RTPV design was developed by Schock, et al of OSC and has been presented elsewhere. The baseline design, centered around components and measured parametric data developed by EDTEK, Inc., promised an overall thermal-to-electric system output of 23 W at a conversion efficiency of 19%, 1.92 kg system weight, and a specific power of 13.3 W/kg. The improved design reported herein promises up to 37.6 W at 30.1% efficiency, 1.5 kg system weight, up to 25 W/kg specific power, a six-fold reduction in thermal radiator size over the baseline design, as well as a lower isotope temperature for greater safety. The six-fold reduction in thermal radiator size removes one of the greatest obstacles to applying RTPV in space missions.

  6. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  7. Adjustable boron carbonitride nanotubes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Y. Zhi; J. D. Guo; X. D. Bai; E. G. Wang

    2002-01-01

    The adjustable photoluminescence (PL) and field electron emission (FEE) properties of boron carbonitride (B–C–N) nanotubes grown under well-controlled conditions are studied systematically. Large-scale highly aligned B–C–N nanotubes are synthesized directly on Ni substrates by the bias-assisted hot filament chemical vapor deposition method. Single-walled B–C–N nanotubes and nanometric B–C–N heterojunctions are obtained by the pulsed-arc-discharge technique and pause-reactivation two-stage process, respectively.

  8. Boron carbonitride nanojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J. D.; Zhi, C. Y.; Bai, X. D.; Wang, E. G.

    2002-01-01

    Boron carbonitride (BCN) nanometric heterojunctions are controllably fabricated by bias-assisted hot-filament chemical vapor deposition with a pause-reactivation two-stage (PRTS) process. Tailored composition revulsion across the nanotube junction is obtained by simply varying the concentration of the gaseous precursor between the two stages of the PRTS process. The critical effect of the plasma power density in the reactivation process on continuous growth of the nanotubes is realized and controlled, leading to successful synthesis of the Y-shaped BCN nanojunctions.

  9. Adjustable boron carbonitride nanotubes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Y. Zhi; J. D. Guo; X. D. Bai; E. G. Wang

    2002-01-01

    The adjustable photoluminescence (PL) and field electron emission (FEE) properties of boron carbonitride (B-C-N) nanotubes grown under well-controlled conditions are studied systematically. Large-scale highly aligned B-C-N nanotubes are synthesized directly on Ni substrates by the bias-assisted hot filament chemical vapor deposition method. Single-walled B-C-N nanotubes and nanometric B-C-N heterojunctions are obtained by the pulsed-arc-discharge technique and pause-reactivation two-stage process, respectively.

  10. Boron Diffusion In Silicon From Ultrafine Boron-Silicon Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Arunava; West, Gary A.; Donlan, Jeffrey P.

    1984-06-01

    A CO2 laser pyrolysis technique has been used to prepare ultrafine (< 0.1p diameter) boron-silicon powders with different boron concentrations. These powders have been used as a spin-on boron diffusion source for silicon wafers. The spin-on colloidal suspension is prepared by mixing the powder with a thermally degradable polymer binder, polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA), and an organic vehicle, cyclohexanone. Thin, uniform films are spun-on using a standard photoresist spinner. Two different procedures are followed in diffusing the boron from the boron-silicon powder. In the first process, the boron is diffused by heating the wafer in an argon ambient (1000-1260°C). The excess dopant layer is removed by oxidation (02) and subsequent etching (HF). In the second process, the powder is first converted to a borosilicate glass layer by oxidation, followed by diffusion in an argon ambient. Some experiments using commercially available boron nitride powder as a diffusion source are also discussed.

  11. Synthesis of ? - and ? Rhombohedral Boron Powders via Gas Phase Thermal Dissociation of Boron Trichloride by Hydrogen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Duygu A?ao?ullar?; Özge Balc?; ?sma?l Duman; M. Lütf? Öveço?lu

    2011-01-01

    The ?-rhombohedral and ?-rhombohedral crystal structures of pure elemental boron powders have been synthesized via gas phase thermal dissociation\\u000a of BCl3 by H2 on a quartz substrate. The parameters affecting the crystal structures of the final products and the process efficiency,\\u000a such as BCl3\\/H2 molar ratio (1\\/2 and 1\\/4) and reaction temperature (1173 K to 1373 K [900 °C to 1100 °C]), have been examined.

  12. Radioisotope thermophotovoltaic generator for space power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Loughin, S. [Lockheed Martin Astro Space, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Uppal, P. [Lockheed Martin Labs., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a conceptual approach for a radioisotope thermophotovoltaic (RTPV) generator based on a photovoltaic converter tuned to the General Purpose Heat Source -- the standard thermal source for space power applications such as Voyager, Galileo, Ulysses, and Cassini. Recent work suggests that the RTPV approach offers greater efficiency than the present thermoelectric technology. In this paper the authors discuss an approach based on photovoltaic devices made from a quaternary III-IV alloy, Ga{sub x}In{sub 1{minus}x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y}, with a tandem dielectric/plasma filter. The Ga{sub x}In{sub 1{minus}x}As{sub y}Sb{sub 1{minus}y} devices have been fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy, and are lattice-matched to GaSb substrates. The quality of the quaternary alloys, evaluated by x-ray diffraction and photoluminescence, is quite good. The authors obtain quantum efficiencies up to 78% with these quaternary alloys, indicative of excellent minority carrier device potential of these layers. For plasma filters the authors have used heavily-doped, thin layers of Si and obtain a sharp plasma resonance. Device performance data for these quaternary photovoltaic cells, including current, voltage, fill-factor; as well as filter performance data, including transmission, reflection and absorption are presented. The impact of these factors on system performance for a small radioisotope generator system is also discussed.

  13. Rhenium Radioisotopes for Therapeutic Radiopharmaceutical Development

    SciTech Connect

    Beets, A.L.; Knapp, F.F., Jr.; Kropp, J.; Lin, W.-Y.; Pinkert, J.; Wang, S.-Y.

    1999-01-18

    The availability of therapeutic radioisotopes at reasonable costs is important for applications in nuclear medicine, oncology and interventional cardiology, Rhenium-186 (Re-186) and rhenium-1 88 (Re-188) are two reactor-produced radioisotope which are attractive for a variety of therapeutic applications, Rhenium-186 has a half-life of 90 hours and decays with emission of a &particle with a maximum energy of 1.08 MeV and a 135 keV (9Yo) gamma which permits imaging. In contrast, Re- 188 has a much shorter half-life of 16.9 hours and emits a p-particle with a much higher energy of 2.12 MeV (Em=) and a 155 keV gamma photon (15Yo) for imaging. While Re-186 is unavailable from a generator system and must be directly produced in a nuclear reactor, Re-188 can also be directly produced in a reactor with high specific activity, but is more conveniently and cost-effectively available as carrier-free sodium perrhenate by saline elution of the alumina-based tungsten-188 (W1 88)/Re-l 88 generator system [1-2]. Since a comprehensive overviewofRe-186 and Re-188 therapeutic agents is beyond the scope of this &tended Abstrac4 the goal is to provide key examples of various agents currently in clinical use and those which are being developed for important clinical applications.

  14. Reliability Issues in Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ashwin R.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2004-01-01

    Stirling power conversion is a potential candidate for use in a Radioisotope Power System (RPS) for space science missions because it offers a multifold increase in the conversion efficiency of heat to electric power and reduced requirement of radioactive material. Reliability of an RPS that utilizes Stirling power conversion technology is important in order to ascertain long term successful performance. Owing to long life time requirement (14 years), it is difficult to perform long-term tests that encompass all the uncertainties involved in the design variables of components and subsystems comprising the RPS. The requirement for uninterrupted performance reliability and related issues are discussed, and some of the critical areas of concern are identified. An overview of the current on-going efforts to understand component life, design variables at the component and system levels, and related sources and nature of uncertainties are also discussed. Current status of the 110 watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) reliability efforts is described. Additionally, an approach showing the use of past experience on other successfully used power systems to develop a reliability plan for the SRG110 design is outlined.

  15. Assessment of radioisotope heaters for remote terrestrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uherka, Kenneth L.

    This paper examines the feasibility of using radioisotope byproducts for special heating applications at remote sites in Alaska and other cold regions. The investigation included assessment of candidate radioisotope materials for heater applications, identification of the most promising cold-region applications, evaluation of key technical issues and implementation constraints, and development of conceptual heater designs for candidate applications. Strontium-90 (Sr-90) was selected as the most viable fuel for radioisotopic heaters used in terrestrial applications. Opportunities for the application of radioisotopic heaters were determined through site visits to representative Alaskan installations. Candidate heater applications included water storage tanks, sludge digesters, sewage lagoons, water piping systems, well-head pumping stations, emergency shelters, and fuel storage tank deicers. Radio-isotopic heaters for freeze-up protection of water storage tanks and for enhancement of biological waste treatment processes at remote sites were selected as the most promising applications.

  16. Assessment of radioisotope heaters for remote terrestrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Uherka, K.L.

    1987-05-01

    This paper examines the feasibility of using radioisotope byproducts for special heating applications at remote sites in Alaska and other cold regions. The investigation included assessment of candidate radioisotope materials for heater applications, identification of the most promising cold region applications, evaluation of key technical issues and implementation constraints, and development of conceptual heater designs for candidate applications. Strontium-90 (Sr-90) was selected as the most viable fuel for radioisotopic heaters used in terrestrial applications. Opportunities for the application of radioisotopic heaters were determined through site visits to representative Alaska installations. Candidate heater applications included water storage tanks, sludge digesters, sewage lagoons, water piping systems, well-head pumping stations, emergency shelters, and fuel storage tank deicers. Radioisotopic heaters for water storage tank freeze-up protection and for enhancement of biological waste treatment processes at remote sites were selected as the most promising applications.

  17. General Electric PETtrace cyclotron as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosko, Andrey

    This research investigates the use of a PETtrace cyclotron produced by General Electric (GE) as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The GE PETtrace was chosen for this investigation because this type of cyclotron is popular among nuclear pharmacies and clinics in many countries; it is compact and reliable; it produces protons with energies high enough to produce neutrons with appropriate energy and fluence rate for BNCT and it does not require significant changes in design to provide neutrons. In particular, the standard PETtrace 18O target is considered. The cyclotron efficiency may be significantly increased if unused neutrons produced during radioisotopes production could be utilized for other medical modalities such as BNCT at the same time. The resulting dose from the radiation emitted from the target is evaluated using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP at several depths in a brain phantom for different scattering geometries. Four different moderating materials of various thicknesses were considered: light water, carbon, heavy water, arid Fluental(TM). The fluence rate tally was used to calculate photon and neutron dose, by applying fluence rate-to-dose conversion factors. Fifteen different geometries were considered and a 30-cm thick heavy water moderator was chosen as the most suitable for BNCT with the GE PETtrace cyclotron. According to the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) protocol, the maximum dose to the normal brain is set to 12.5 RBEGy, which for the conditions of using a heavy water moderator, assuming a 60 muA beam current, would be reached with a treatment time of 258 min. Results showed that using a PETtrace cyclotron in this configuration provides a therapeutic ratio of about 2.4 for depths up to 4 cm inside a brain phantom. Further increase of beam current proposed by GE should significantly improve the beam quality or the treatment time and allow treating tumors at greater depths.

  18. Boron isotope application for tracing sources of contamination in groundwater.

    E-print Network

    Kasher, Roni

    Boron isotope application for tracing sources of contamination in groundwater. Abstract: Boron isotope composition and concentration of sewage effluent and pristine and contaminated groundwater from. Anthropogenic boron in wastewater is isotopically distinct from natural boron in groundwater and thus can

  19. Boron carbonitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhi, C Y; Bai, X D; Wang, E G

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the design, synthesis, characterization, and properties of boron carbonitride nanotubes (BCN) is presented in this review. Distinctive structural and electronic properties are revealed in theoretical studies of the BCN nanotubes and compared with the properties of carbon nanotubes. In the experimental studies, BCN nanotubes have been synthesized by various techniques. For different purposes, controllable growth processes have been used to fabricate BCN nanotubes with novel structures, such as nanojunctions and filled nanotubes. Some interesting phenomena originating from the substitution of B and N atoms, such as the phase segregation, are considered theoretically and experimentally. Mainly the physical properties--field electron emission and photoluminescence--are discussed, which turn out to have potential applications in the industry. PMID:15112540

  20. Stereoselective Formation of Trisubstituted Vinyl Boronate Esters by the Acid-Mediated Elimination of ?-Hydroxyboronate Esters

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The copper-catalyzed diboration of ketones followed by an acid-catalyzed elimination leads to the formation of 1,1-disubstituted and trisubstituted vinyl boronate esters with moderate to good yields and selectivity. Addition of tosic acid to the crude diboration products provides the corresponding vinyl boronate esters upon elimination. The trisubstituted vinyl boronate esters are formed as the (Z)-olefin isomer, which was established by subjecting the products to a Suzuki–Miyaura coupling reaction to obtain alkenes of known geometry. PMID:24915498

  1. Screening The Aegilops-Triticum Group For Boron Tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron deficient and toxic soils pose a critical problem in wheat production on a world scale. Therefore, 79 accessions from 12 diverse wild wheat (Aegilops speltoides, Ae. longissima, Ae. sharonensis, Ae. bicornis, Ae. searsii, Ae. kotschyi, Ae. peregrina ssp. cylindrostachys, Ae. peregrina ssp. eu...

  2. Boron diffusion in silicon devices

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, Ajeet (Atlanta, GA); Kim, Dong Seop (Atlanta, GA); Nakayashiki, Kenta (Smyrna, GA); Rounsaville, Brian (Stockbridge, GA)

    2010-09-07

    Disclosed are various embodiments that include a process, an arrangement, and an apparatus for boron diffusion in a wafer. In one representative embodiment, a process is provided in which a boric oxide solution is applied to a surface of the wafer. Thereafter, the wafer is subjected to a fast heat ramp-up associated with a first heating cycle that results in a release of an amount of boron for diffusion into the wafer.

  3. Synthesis of Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Engineering Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurst, Janet; Hull, David; Gorican, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Boron Nitride nanotubes (BNNT) are of interest to the scientific and technical communities for many of the same reasons that carbon nanotubes (CNT) have attracted large amounts of attention. Both materials have potentially unique and significant properties which may have important structural and electronic applications in the future. However of even more interest than their similarities may be the differences between carbon and boron nanotubes. Whilt boron nitride nanotubes possess a very high modulus similaar to CNT, they are also more chemically and thermally inert. Additionally BNNT possess more uniform electronic properties, having a uniform band gap of approximately 5.5 eV while CNT vary from semi-conductin to conductor behavior. Boron Nitride nanotubes have been synthesized by a variety of methods such as chemical vapor deposition, arc discharge and reactive milling. Consistently producing a reliable product has proven difficult. Progress in synthesis of 1-2 gram sized batches of Boron Nitride nanotubes will be discussed as well as potential uses for this unique material.

  4. Renewable boron carbide coating in plasma shots of tokamak ?11-?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzhinskij, O. I.; Barsuk, V. A.; Otroshchenko, V. G.

    2009-06-01

    Experimental results on boronization in plasma shots of the tokamak T-11M are presented. Non-toxic and not explosive metacarborane C 2H 12B 10 was used in the boron deposition process. Experiments have been carried out in shots with parameters: toroidal field ˜1-1.2 ?, plasma current Ip = 70 ??, average shot duration tp ˜ 150 ms and electron density along the central chord ne ˜ 2.5 × 10 13 cm -3. As a result of experiment, a dense film of ˜0.2 microns thickness with good adhesion to a surface has formed on the reference specimens after 8 s boronization. After boronization the impurities in wall areas have been suppressed. High vacuum characteristics of the discharge chamber were stabilized. Working vacuum was reached without a preliminary induction heating and cleaning by a glow discharge, and stabilization of the plasma filament has improved. Shot duration without disruption at densities of ne = 1.3 × 10 13 ?m -3, Ip = 70 ?? was 350 ms and ne = 4.64 × 10 13 ?m -3, Ip = 70 ?? was 250 ms. High repeatability of experimental results has appeared. Developed technology opens an opportunity of practical production of renewable structured boron-carbon coatings with use of plasma shots in large-scale tokamaks, such as DIII-D, JET, JT-60 UP, ITER, DEMO.

  5. NASA Glenn Research Center Support of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Wong, Wayne A.

    2015-01-01

    A high-efficiency radioisotope power system was being developed for long-duration NASA space science missions. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) managed a flight contract with Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company to build Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators (ASRGs), with support from NASA Glenn Research Center. DOE initiated termination of that contract in late 2013, primarily due to budget constraints. Sunpower, Inc., held two parallel contracts to produce Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs), one with Lockheed Martin to produce ASC-F flight units, and one with Glenn for the production of ASC-E3 engineering unit "pathfinders" that are built to the flight design. In support of those contracts, Glenn provided testing, materials expertise, Government-furnished equipment, inspection capabilities, and related data products to Lockheed Martin and Sunpower. The technical support included material evaluations, component tests, convertor characterization, and technology transfer. Material evaluations and component tests were performed on various ASC components in order to assess potential life-limiting mechanisms and provide data for reliability models. Convertor level tests were conducted to characterize performance under operating conditions that are representative of various mission conditions. Despite termination of the ASRG flight development contract, NASA continues to recognize the importance of high-efficiency ASC power conversion for Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) and continues investment in the technology, including the continuation of the ASC-E3 contract. This paper describes key Government support for the ASRG project and future tests to be used to provide data for ongoing reliability assessments.

  6. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator reliability and safety

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.; Klein, J.

    1989-01-01

    There are numerous occasions when a planetary mission requires energy in remote areas of the solar system. Anytime power is required much beyond Mars or the Asteroid Belts, solar power is not an option. The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) was developed for such a mission requirement. It is a relatively small and lightweight power source that can produce power under adverse conditions. Just this type of source has become the backbone of the power system for far outer plant exploration. Voyagers I and II are utilizing RTGs, which will soon power the Galileo spacecraft to Jupiter and the Ulysses spacecraft to study the solar poles. The paper discusses RTG operation including thermoelectric design, converter design, general-purpose heat source; RTG reliability including design, testing, experience, and launch approval; and RTG safety issues and methods of ensuring safety.

  7. Performance tuned radioisotope thermophotovoltaic space power system

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, W.E.; Morgan, M.D.; Saban, S.B. [EDTEK, Inc., 7082 South 220th Street, Kent, Washington 98032-1910 (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The trend in space exploration is to use many small, low-cost, special-purpose satellites instead of the large, high-cost, multipurpose satellites used in the past. As a result of this new trend, there is a need for lightweight, efficient, and compact radioisotope fueled electrical power generators. This paper presents an improved design for a radioisotope thermophotovoltaic (RTPV) space power system in the 10 W to 20 W class which promises up to 37.6 watts at 30.1{percent} efficiency and 25 W/kg specific power. The RTPV power system concept has been studied and compared to radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) radioisotope, Stirling generators and alkali metal thermal electric conversion (AMTEC) generators (Schock, 1995). The studies indicate that RTPV has the potential to be the lightest weight, most efficient and most reliable of the three concepts. However, in spite of the efficiency and light weight, the size of the thermal radiator required to eliminate excess heat from the PV cells and the lack of actual system operational performance data are perceived as obstacles to RTPV acceptance for space applications. Between 1994 and 1997 EDTEK optimized the key converter components for an RTPV generator under Department of Energy (DOE) funding administered via subcontracts to Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC) and EG&G Mound Applied Technologies Laboratory (Horne, 1995). The optimized components included a resonant micromesh infrared bandpass filter, low-bandgap GaSb PV cells and cell arrays. Parametric data from these components were supplied to OSC who developed and analyzed the performance of 100 W, 20 W, and 10 W RTPV generators. These designs are described in references (Schock 1994, 1995 and 1996). Since the performance of each class of supply was roughly equivalent and simply scaled with size, this paper will consider the OSC 20 W design as a baseline. The baseline 20-W RTPV design was developed by Schock, et al of OSC and has been presented elsewhere. The baseline design, centered around components and measured parametric data developed by EDTEK, Inc., promised an overall thermal-to-electric system output of 23 W at a conversion efficiency of 19{percent}, 1.92 kg system weight, and a specific power of 13.3 W/kg. The improved design reported herein promises up to 37.6 W at 30.1{percent} efficiency, 1.5 kg system weight, up to 25 W/kg specific power, a six-fold reduction in thermal radiator size over the baseline design, as well as a lower isotope temperature for greater safety. The six-fold reduction in thermal radiator size removes one of the greatest obstacles to applying RTPV in space missions. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Induced radioisotopes in a linac treatment hall.

    PubMed

    Vega-Carrillo, Héctor René; de Leon-Martinez, Héctor Asael; Rivera-Perez, Esteban; Luis Benites-Rengifo, Jorge; Gallego, Eduardo; Lorente, Alfredo

    2015-08-01

    When linacs operate above 8MV an undesirable neutron field is produced whose spectrum has three main components: the direct spectrum due to those neutrons leaking out from the linac head, the scattered spectrum due to neutrons produced in the head that collides with the nuclei in the head losing energy and the third spectrum due to room-return effect. The third category of spectrum has mainly epithermal and thermal neutrons being constant at any location in the treatment hall. These neutrons induce activation in the linac components, the concrete walls and in the patient body. Here the induced radioisotopes have been identified in concrete samples located in the hall and in one of the wedges. The identification has been carried out using a gamma-ray spectrometer. PMID:25989748

  9. Magnetron sputtered boron films for increasing hardness of a metal surface

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-05-27

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for producing hardened surfaces, surfacing machine tools, etc. and for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z optical components, such as mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  10. Advanced Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology Research and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology program is developing next generation power conversion technologies that will enable future missions that have requirements that cannot be met by either the ubiquitous photovoltaic systems or by current Radioisotope Power System (RPS) technology. Performance goals of advanced radioisotope power systems include improvement over the state-of-practice General Purpose Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator by providing significantly higher efficiency to reduce the number of radioisotope fuel modules, and increase specific power (watts/kilogram). Other Advanced RPS goals include safety, long-life, reliability, scalability, multi-mission capability, resistance to radiation, and minimal interference with the scientific payload. NASA has awarded ten contracts in the technology areas of Brayton, Stirling, Thermoelectric, and Thermophotovoltaic power conversion including five development contracts that deal with more mature technologies and five research contracts. The Advanced RPS Systems Assessment Team includes members from NASA GRC, JPL, DOE and Orbital Sciences whose function is to review the technologies being developed under the ten Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology contracts and assess their relevance to NASA's future missions. Presented is an overview of the ten radioisotope power conversion technology contracts and NASA's Advanced RPS Systems Assessment Team.

  11. Future radioisotope power needs for missions to the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Mondt, J.F.; Underwood, M.L. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States); Nesmith, B.J. [DOE Headquarters, Germantown, MD (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.

    1997-12-31

    NASA and DOE plan a cooperative team effort with industry, government laboratories and universities to develop a near term, low cost, low power (100 watt electric class), low mass (<10 kg), advanced radioisotope space power source (ARPS) and in the process reduce the plutonium-related costs as well. The near term is focused on developing an advanced energy converter to use with the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS). The GPHS was developed and used for the current radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Advanced energy converter technologies are needed as a more efficient replacement for the existing thermoelectric converters so that the space radioisotope power source mass and cost can be reduced. a more advanced technology space radioisotope power system program is also planned that addresses a longer-term need. Twenty first century robotic scientific information missions to the outer planets and beyond are planned to be accomplished with microspacecraft which may demand safe, even more compact, lower-power, lower-mass radioisotope power sources than those which can be achieved as a result of the near term efforts. The longer-term program focuses not only on converter technology but also on lower power, more compact radioisotope heat source technology and smaller, lower mass radioisotope heater units for second generation microspacecraft. This more ambitious, longer time-horizon focus necessarily occurs at this time on the technology R and D level rather than at the system technology level.

  12. Status of the NASA Stirling Radioisotope Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2007-01-01

    Free-piston Stirling power conversion has been considered a candidate for radioisotope power systems for space for more than a decade. Prior to the free-piston Stirling architecture, systems were designed with kinematic Stirling engines that used linkages and rotary alternators to convert heat to electricity. These systems were able to achieve long life by lightly loading the linkages; however, the live was nonetheless limited. When the free-piston configuration was initially proposed, it was thought to be attractive due to the relatively high conversion efficiency, acceptable mass, and the potential for long life and high reliability based on wear-free operation. These features have consistently been recognized by teams that have studied technology options for radioisotope space power systems. Since free-piston Stirling power conversion was first considered for space power applications, there have been major advances in three general areas of development: hardware that has demonstrated long-life and reliability, the success achieved by Stirling cryocoolers in space, and the overall developmental maturity of the technology for both space and terrestrial applications. Based on these advances, free-piston Stirling convertors are currently being developed for space power, and for a number of terrestrial applications. They commonly operate with the power, efficiency, life, and reliability as intended, and much of the development now centers on system integration. This paper will summarize the accomplishments of free-piston Stirling power conversion technology over the past decade, review the status of development with regard to space power, and discuss the challenges that remain.

  13. Azomethine H colorimetric method for determining dissolved boron in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, R.R.; Erdmann, D.E.

    1979-01-01

    An automated colorimetric method for determining dissolved boron in water is described. The boron is complexed with azomethine H, which is readily available as the condensation product of H acid (8-amino-1-naphthol-3,6-disulfonic acid) and salicylaldehyde. The absorbance of the yellow complex formed is then measured colorimetrically at 410 nm. Interference effects from other dissolved species are minimized by the addition of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA); however, iron, zinc, and bicarbonate interfere at concentrations above 400 ??g/L, 2000 ??g/L, and 200 mg/L, respectively. The bicarbonate interference can be eliminated by careful acidification of the sample with concentrated HCl to a pH between 5 and 6. Thirty samples per hour can be routinely analyzed over the range of from 10 to 400 ??g/L, boron.

  14. Report on audit of funding for advanced radioisotope power systems

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-10-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s (Department) Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems Program maintains the sole national capability and facilities to produce radioisotope power systems for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Department of Defense, and other Federal agencies. Projects are conducted with these agencies in accordance with written agreements and are dependent on cost sharing by the user agencies. For the past seven years the program emphasis has been on providing power systems for NASA`s Cassini mission to Saturn, which was launched earlier this month. We initiated this audit to determine whether the Department received proper reimbursement from NASA for the radioisotope power systems produced.

  15. Radioisotope Reduction Using Solar Power for Outer Planetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fincannon, James

    2008-01-01

    Radioisotope power systems have historically been (and still are) the power system of choice from a mass and size perspective for outer planetary missions. High demand for and limited availability of radioisotope fuel has made it necessary to investigate alternatives to this option. Low mass, high efficiency solar power systems have the potential for use at low outer planetary temperatures and illumination levels. This paper documents the impacts of using solar power systems instead of radioisotope power for all or part of the power needs of outer planetary spacecraft and illustrates the potential fuel savings of such an approach.

  16. Nuclear energy in the service of biomedicine: the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's radioisotope program, 1946-1950.

    PubMed

    Creager, Angela N H

    2006-01-01

    The widespread adoption of radioisotopes as tools in biomedical research and therapy became one of the major consequences of the "physicists' war" for postwar life science. Scientists in the Manhattan Project, as part of their efforts to advocate for civilian uses of atomic energy after the war, proposed using infrastructure from the wartime bomb project to develop a government-run radioisotope distribution program. After the Atomic Energy Bill was passed and before the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was formally established, the Manhattan Project began shipping isotopes from Oak Ridge. Scientists and physicians put these reactor-produced isotopes to many of the same uses that had been pioneered with cyclotron-generated radioisotopes in the 1930s and early 1940s. The majority of early AEC shipments were radioiodine and radiophosphorus, employed to evaluate thyroid function, diagnose medical disorders, and irradiate tumors. Both researchers and politicians lauded radioisotopes publicly for their potential in curing diseases, particularly cancer. However, isotopes proved less successful than anticipated in treating cancer and more successful in medical diagnostics. On the research side, reactor-generated radioisotopes equipped biologists with new tools to trace molecular transformations from metabolic pathways to ecosystems. The U.S. government's production and promotion of isotopes stimulated their consumption by scientists and physicians (both domestic and abroad), such that in the postwar period isotopes became routine elements of laboratory and clinical use. In the early postwar years, radioisotopes signified the government's commitment to harness the atom for peace, particularly through contributions to biology, medicine, and agriculture. PMID:17575955

  17. A new boron impregnation technique of wood by vapor boron of boric acid to reduce leaching boron from wood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ergun Baysal; Mustafa Kemal Yalinkilic

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to reveal impregnation ability and to enhance leaching resistance of boron from borate-treated wood. Vapor boron treatment was applied in compressed and uncompressed states at high temperatures such as 180 and 200°C for 6, 8 and 15 min. Following ten-cycle leaching periods, amounts of boron leached from vapor boron treated wood was measured by ion chromatography. According

  18. Selective Formation of ortho-Aminobenzylamines by the Copper-Catalyzed Amination of Benzylamine Boronate Esters.

    PubMed

    McGarry, Kathryn A; Duenas, Alexi A; Clark, Timothy B

    2015-07-17

    The copper-catalyzed coupling between benzylamino boronate esters and aryl amines has been investigated. Formation of ortho-aminobenzylamines was achieved under oxidative conditions in the presence of copper(II) acetate. The major side product of the transformation is the homocoupling of the aryl boronate ester. The formation of the desired diamines was found to be improved in the absence of base, increasing selectivity over the homocoupled product. Both electron-donating and electron-withdrawing substituents are tolerated on both the boronate ester substrate and the aniline coupling partner under the reaction conditions. The presence of the adjacent benzylamine moiety appears to enhance the reactivity of the boronate ester and influence the resulting product distribution, likely by affecting the competing rates of transmetalation in the catalytic cycles. PMID:26067569

  19. Decreasing the leachibility of boron wood preservatives 

    E-print Network

    Gezer, Engin Derya

    1996-01-01

    The use of boron in wood preservatives has been growing since the 1930s, primarily in various boric acid/borax mixtures. Boron preservatives have several advantages for application as wood preservatives including a broad spectrum of activity...

  20. A power conditioning system for radioisotope thermoelectric generator energy sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The use of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) as the primary source of energy in unmanned spacecraft is discussed. RTG output control, power conditioning system requirements, the electrical design, and circuit performance are also discussed.

  1. Determining Molar Combining Ratios Using Radioisotopes--A Student Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, Jerry A.

    1976-01-01

    Outlines an experimental procedure in which an iodine radioisotope is used to determine molar combining ratios of lead and silver with the iodine. Tables and graphs show the definitive results that should be attainable. (CP)

  2. Thermal Model Predictions of Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen J.; Fabanich, William Anthony; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation describes the capabilities of three-dimensional thermal power model of advanced stirling radioisotope generator (ASRG). The performance of the ASRG is presented for different scenario, such as Venus flyby with or without the auxiliary cooling system.

  3. Synthesis of ?- and ?-Rhombohedral Boron Powders via Gas Phase Thermal Dissociation of Boron Trichloride by Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A?ao?ullar?, Duygu; Balc?, Özge; Duman, Ismail; Öveço?lu, M. Lütfi

    2011-06-01

    The ?-rhombohedral and ?-rhombohedral crystal structures of pure elemental boron powders have been synthesized via gas phase thermal dissociation of BCl3 by H2 on a quartz substrate. The parameters affecting the crystal structures of the final products and the process efficiency, such as BCl3/H2 molar ratio (1/2 and 1/4) and reaction temperature (1173 K to 1373 K [900 °C to 1100 °C]), have been examined. The experimental apparatus of original design has enabled boron powders to be obtained at temperatures lower than those in the literature. The surface/powder separation problem encountered previously with different substrate materials has been avoided. Boron powders have been synthesized with a minimum purity of 99.99 pct after repeated HF leaching. The qualitative analysis of exhaust gases has been conducted using a Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FTIR). The synthesized powders have been characterized using an X-ray powder diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. The results of the reactions have been compared with equilibrium predictions performed using the FactSage 6.2 (Center for Research in Computational Thermochemistry, Montreal, Canada) thermochemical software.

  4. Radioisotope-powered cardiac pacemaker program. Clinical studies of the nuclear pacemaker model NU-5. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Beginning in February, 1970, the Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) undertook a program to design, develop and manufacture a radioisotope powered cardiac pacemaker system. The scope of technical work was specified to be: establish system, component, and process cost reduction goals using the prototype Radioisotope Powered Cardiac Pacemaker (RCP) design and develop production techniques to achieve these cost reduction objectives; fabricate radioisotope powered fueled prototype cardiac pacemakers (RCP's) on a pilot production basis; conduct liaison with a Government-designated fueling facility for purposes of defining fueling requirements, fabrication and encapsulation procedures, safety design criteria and quality control and inspection requirements; develop and implement Quality Assurance and Reliability Programs; conduct performance, acceptance, lifetime and reliability tests of fueled RCP's in the laboratory; conduct liaison with the National Institutes of Health and with Government specified medical research institutions selected for the purpose of undertaking clinical evaluation of the RCP in humans; monitor and evaluate, on a continuing basis, all test data; and perform necessary safety analyses and tests. Pacemaker designs were developed and quality assurance and manufacturing procedures established. Prototype pacemakers were fabricated. A total of 126 radioisotope powered units were implanted and have been followed clinically for approximately seven years. Four (4) of these units have failed. Eighty-three (83) units remain implanted and satisfactorily operational. An overall failure rate of less than the target 0.15% per month has been achieved.

  5. ADVANCED RADIOISOTOPE POWER SOURCE OPTIONS FOR PLUTO EXPRESS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark L. Underwood

    la the drive to reduce mass and cost, I'luto I;xpress is investigating using an advanced power conversion (cchnology in a small Radioisotope Power Source (RI'S) to deliver the rcquirccf mission power of 74 W(elcctric) at cad of mission. lJntil t})is year the baseline power source under consideration has been a Radioisotope Thcrmoclcctric Generator (RTG). This RIG would be a scaled

  6. CMOS compatible Multiple Power-Output MEMS Radioisotope ?-Power Generator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rajesh Duggirala; A. Lai; Ronald G. Polcawich; Madan Dubey

    2006-01-01

    The authors demonstrate a novel 6.6% high-efficiency CMOS compatible piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) thin-film based integrated ?-radioisotope-powered electro-mechanical power generator (IREMPG). the authors integrate silicon betavoltaics with radioisotope actuated piezoelectric unimorph converters to efficiently utilize both kinetic energy and charge of the emitted beta particles for electrical power generation. IREMPG has three output ports generating (1) a 2.8MHz pulse remotely

  7. Methods for boron delivery to mammalian tissue

    DOEpatents

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick (Encino, CA); Feaks, Debra A. (Los Angeles, CA); Shelly, Kenneth J. (Los Angeles, CA)

    2003-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy can be used to destroy tumors. This treatment modality is enhanced by delivering compounds to the tumor site where the compounds have high concentrations of boron, the boron compounds being encapsulated in the bilayer of a liposome or in the bilayer as well as the internal space of the liposomes. Preferred compounds, include carborane units with multiple boron atoms within the carborane cage structure. Liposomes with increased tumor specificity may also be used.

  8. Adjustable boron carbonitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, C. Y.; Guo, J. D.; Bai, X. D.; Wang, E. G.

    2002-04-01

    The adjustable photoluminescence (PL) and field electron emission (FEE) properties of boron carbonitride (B-C-N) nanotubes grown under well-controlled conditions are studied systematically. Large-scale highly aligned B-C-N nanotubes are synthesized directly on Ni substrates by the bias-assisted hot filament chemical vapor deposition method. Single-walled B-C-N nanotubes and nanometric B-C-N heterojunctions are obtained by the pulsed-arc-discharge technique and pause-reactivation two-stage process, respectively. It is found that the microstructures, orientations, and chemical compositions of the nanotubes can be controlled by varying growth parameters. The mechanism of the controllable growth is also investigated. Intense and stable PL from the nanotubes is observed in both blue-violet (photon energies 3.14-2.55 eV) and yellow-green bands (photon energies 2.13-2.34 eV) and the emission bands are adjusted by varying the compositions of the nanotubes. FEE properties are also studied and optimized by varying the B or N atomic concentrations in the nanotubes. All these results verify the controllability of the electronic band structure of the B-C-N nanotubes.

  9. In vitro determination of uptake, retention, distribution, biological efficacy, and toxicity of boronated compounds for neutron capture therapy: a comparison of porphyrins with sulfhydryl boron hydrides.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, R G; Kahl, S B; Laster, B H; Kalef-Ezra, J; Popenoe, E A

    1990-08-15

    A major problem remaining in the evaluation of boronated compounds for neutron capture therapy (NCT) is the need to know the intra- or extracellular microdistribution of boron. This is a consequence of the short range of the 10B(n,alpha)7Li reaction products (approximately 10 microns), such that biological efficacy is dependent upon intracellular distribution. In particular, if boron location is predominantly extracellular, a significant reduction in efficacy would be expected. The in vitro procedure described here was developed mainly to provide information regarding the intra- and extracellular location and concentration of boron. However, use of the technique also allows the measurement of compound uptake and retention (binding) and the determination of biological efficacy by the evaluation of survival curves obtained following irradiation with thermal neutrons. Comparison is made to results obtained with boric acid (H3(10)BO3) and to results calculated for various boron distributions. Concomitantly, an indication of compound toxicity can be obtained from the plating efficiency of unirradiated control cells. Currently, most investigators utilize in vivo systems for testing and evaluating boron uptake from various carrier molecules. Given the large number of boron compounds being synthesized and needing evaluation as to their usefulness for NCT, the in vitro technique described here is simple and advantageous for initial compound screening. In addition to sparing animal lives, it is both time and cost effective and utilizes much smaller quantities of test compound than are required for an in vivo assay. A boronated porphyrin (BOPP) evaluated by the above procedure shows an uptake and retention approximately 20 times that of sulfhydryl boron hydride monomer (BSH); the latter compound is currently being used clinically for NCT in Japan and is anticipated for use in clinical trials in the United States. If the advantages demonstrated by BOPP in these in vitro studies are validated in animal experiments, BOPP should be considered for clinical application. PMID:2379150

  10. Diffusion of boron in alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Zhang, S; He, X. [Univ. of Science and Technology, Beijing (China). Dept. of Material Physics] [Univ. of Science and Technology, Beijing (China). Dept. of Material Physics

    1995-04-01

    By means of particle tracking autoradiography (PTA), the diffusion coefficients of boron between 900 and 1,200 C were measured in 04MnNbB steel, 25MnTiB steel, Ni-B, Fe-30%Ni-B and Fe-3%Si-B alloys, and the frequency factor D{sub 0} and activation energy Q were obtained respectively. The experiment results indicated that there was an obvious difference between the present result and the result obtained by Busby (in 1953). It was found that the boron diffusivity in {gamma}-Fe increased as Ni was added. The diffusivity of boron in Fe-3%Si-B alloy with b.c.c. structure was much slower than one obtained by Busby in {alpha}-Fe (1954), which, however, was much faster than the results obtained in {gamma}-Fe (with f.c.c. structure). Based on the present data of boron diffusion coefficients, the mechanism of segregation of boron to grain boundaries is discussed.

  11. SUBMILLIMETER OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF HEXAGONAL BORON NITRIDE

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    SUBMILLIMETER OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF HEXAGONAL BORON NITRIDE A. J. Gatesman, R. H. Giles and J ABSTRACT The submillimeter optical properties of hot-pressed polycrystalline boron nitride on related materials. #12;INTRODUCTION Boron nitride (BN) has received considerable attention within the last

  12. NEW ADVANCES IN BORON SOIL CHEMISTRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron is an essential micronutrient element required for plant growth. Boron deficiency is wide-spread in crop plants throughout the world especially in coarse-textured soils in humid areas. Boron toxicity can also occur, especially in arid regions under irrigation. Plants respond directly to the...

  13. Radioisotope-based Nuclear Power Strategy for Exploration Systems Development

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, George R.; Houts, Michael G. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2006-01-20

    Nuclear power will play an important role in future exploration efforts. Its benefits pertain to practically all the different timeframes associated with the Exploration Vision, from robotic investigation of potential lunar landing sites to long-duration crewed missions on the lunar surface. However, the implementation of nuclear technology must follow a logical progression in capability that meets but does not overwhelm the power requirements for the missions in each exploration timeframe. It is likely that the surface power infrastructure, particularly for early missions, will be distributed in nature. Thus, nuclear sources will have to operate in concert with other types of power and energy storage systems, and must mesh well with the power architectures envisioned for each mission phase. Most importantly, they must demonstrate a clear advantage over other non-nuclear options (e.g., solar power, fuel cells) for their particular function. This paper describes a strategy that does this in the form of three sequential system developments. It begins with use of radioisotope generators currently under development, and applies the power conversion technology developed for these units to the design of a simple, robust reactor power system. The products from these development efforts would eventually serve as the foundation for application of nuclear power systems for exploration of Mars and beyond.

  14. Radioisotopic heater units warm an interplanetary spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Ferreira, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Engineering Technology Div.; Rinehart, G.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The Cassini orbiter and Huygens probe, which were successfully launched on October 15, 1997, constitute NASA`s last grand-scale interplanetary mission of this century. The mission, which consists of a four-year, close-up study of Saturn and its moons, begins in July 2004 with Cassini`s 60 orbits of Saturn and about 33 fly-bys of the large moon Titan. The Huygens probe will descend and land on Titan. Investigations will include Saturn`s atmosphere, its rings and its magnetosphere. The atmosphere and surface of Titan and other icy moons also will be characterized. Because of the great distance of Saturn from the sun, some of the instruments and equipment on both the orbiter and the probe require external heaters to maintain their temperature within normal operating ranges. These requirements are met by Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Units (LWRHUs) designed, fabricated and safety tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. An improved gas tungsten arc welding procedure lowered costs and decreased processing time for heat units for the Cassini spacecraft.

  15. Radioisotopic pulmonary lobectomy: feasibility study in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Llaurado, J.G.; Brewer, L.A. III; Elam, D.A.; Ing, S.J.; Raiszadeh, M.; Slater, J.M.; Hirst, A.E.; Zielinski, F.W. (Veterans Hospital, Loma Linda, CA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    In search for an alternate treatment for inoperable cancer of the lung in humans, we investigated the possibility that introduction of radioactive material into a selected lobe of the canine lung would effectively destroy that lobe without systemic effects or radiation injury to adjacent organs. Ten million ion exchange microspheres labeled with 740 MBq of phosphorus-32 ({sup 32}P) were injected through a catheter placed in a selected lobar branch of a pulmonary artery in 12 anesthetized dogs. Six additional dogs served as controls and received 10 million microspheres not labeled with {sup 32}P. Organs were harvested from 1 wk to 12 mo after injection and examined grossly and histologically. There was progressive organization and contraction of each necrosed {sup 32}P treated lobe which was reduced to a scarred remnant by 12 mo, whereas only minimal inflammatory changes occurred in controls. Of the {sup 32}P injected dose, 94% remained in injected lobe, 4%-5% in nontargeted lobes and less than 0.08% in blood. Radioactivity in liver, kidneys, spleen, heart, and bone marrow was less than 0.1% for each organ. Thus, large doses of radiation in the order of 1,500 Gy can be effectively delivered to a selected lobe to produce radioisotopic pulmonary lobectomy.

  16. Implanted artificial heart with radioisotope power source.

    PubMed

    Shumakov, V I; Griaznov, G M; Zhemchuzhnikov, G N; Kiselev, I M; Osipov, A P

    1983-02-01

    An atomic artificial heart for orthotopic implantation was developed with the following characteristics: volume, 1.2 L; weight, 1.5 kg; radioisotope power, 45 W; operating life, up to 5 years; hemodynamics, similar to natural hemodynamics. The artificial heart includes a thermal drive with systems for regulating power, feeding steam into the cylinders, return of the condensate to the steam generator, and delivery of power to the ventricles and heat container. The artificial heart is placed in an artificial pericardium partially filled with physiologic solution. It uses a steam engine with two operating cylinders that separately drive the left and right ventricles. There is no electronic control system in the proposed design. The operation of the heat engine is controlled, with preservation of autoregulation by the vascular system of the body. The separate drives for the ventricles is of primary importance as it provides for operation of the artificial heart through control of cardiac activity by venous return. Experimental testing on a hydromechanical bench demonstrated effective autoregulation. PMID:6838394

  17. Boron doping a semiconductor particle

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, G.D.; Reynolds, J.S.; Brown, L.K.

    1998-06-09

    A method of boron doping a semiconductor particle using boric acid to obtain a p-type doped particle. Either silicon spheres or silicon powder is mixed with a diluted solution of boric acid having a predetermined concentration. The spheres are dried, with the boron film then being driven into the sphere. A melt procedure mixes the driven boron uniformly throughout the sphere. In the case of silicon powder, the powder is metered out into piles and melted/fused with an optical furnace. Both processes obtain a p-type doped silicon sphere with desired resistivity. Boric acid is not a restricted chemical, is inexpensive, and does not pose any special shipping, handling, or disposal requirements. 2 figs.

  18. Boron doping a semiconductor particle

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Gary Don (18912 Ravenglen Ct., Dallas, TX 75287); Reynolds, Jeffrey Scott (703 Horizon, Murphy, TX 75094); Brown, Louanne Kay (2530 Poplar Tr., Garland, TX 75042)

    1998-06-09

    A method (10,30) of boron doping a semiconductor particle using boric acid to obtain a p-type doped particle. Either silicon spheres or silicon powder is mixed with a diluted solution of boric acid having a predetermined concentration. The spheres are dried (16), with the boron film then being driven (18) into the sphere. A melt procedure mixes the driven boron uniformly throughout the sphere. In the case of silicon powder, the powder is metered out (38) into piles and melted/fused (40) with an optical furnace. Both processes obtain a p-type doped silicon sphere with desired resistivity. Boric acid is not a restricted chemical, is inexpensive, and does not pose any special shipping, handling, or disposal requirements.

  19. [Citrus boron nutrient level and its impact factors in the Three Gorges Reservoir region of Chongqing, China].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Peng, Liang-Zhi; Chun, Chang-Pin; Jiang, Cai-Lun; Ling, Li-Li; Wang, Nan-Qi; Xing, Fei; Huang, Yi

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the level of boron nutrient in citrus and its impact factors, a total of 954 citrus leaf samples and 302 soil samples were collected from representative orchards in the 12 main citrus production counties in the Three Gorges Reservoir region of Chongqing to determine the boron content in citrus leaves, as well as the relationships between leaf boron content with soil available boron content, soil pH value, cultivar, rootstock and the age of tree. Results indicated that the leaf samples from 41.6% orchards (< 35 mg x kg(-1)) and the soil samples from 89.4% orchards (< 0.5 mg x kg(-1)) were boron insufficient. The correlation of leaf boron content and soil available boron content was not significant. The soil pH, cultivar, rootstock and the age of tree did affect the leaf boron content. The leaves from the orchards with soil pH of 4.5-6.4 demonstrated significantly higher boron contents than with the soil pH of 6.5-8.5. The leaf boron contents in the different cultivars was ranged as Satsuma mandarin > pomelo > valencia orange > sweet orange > tangor > navel orange. The citrus on trifoliate orange and sour pomelo rootstocks had significantly higher leaf boron contents than on Carrizo citrange and red tangerine rootstocks. Compared with the adult citrus trees (above 8 year-old), 6.6% more of leaf samples of younger trees (3 to 8 year-old) contained boron contents in the optimum range (35-100 mg x kg(-1)). PMID:25011290

  20. [Effect of NPK and B supply levels on boron uptake and biological properties of different genotypic oilseed rape].

    PubMed

    Lou, Y; Yang, Y

    2001-04-01

    Pot experiment was conducted to study the boron absorption by oilseed rape(Brassica napus), the mechanism of its resistance to boron deficiency, and the effect of boron deficiency on its biological properties under different NPK supply levels. The results indicated that under boron deficiency, increasing NPK supply aggravated boron deficiency symptoms, which led to the decrease of leaf area and its growth rate and nitrate reductase activity(NRA) and the increase of chlorophyll(a + b) content at seedling stage, and the decrease of the number of productive branches and pods of each plant and seed yield at maturity. It was suggested that the ratio of boron concentration in youngest open leaves(YOL) to youngest mature leaves(YML) at seedling stage could be an index to judge the boron mobility in plants of different genotypic oilseed rape. Boron mobility and its utilization efficiency were one of the important nutritional mechanisms responsible for the difference in response of different genotypic oilseed rapes to boron deficiency. PMID:11757364

  1. Influence of LOTUS concrete structure, boron-loaded sheets, and B[sub 4]C filter on the integral tritium production of a nature lithium graphite-reflected blanket and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Joneja, O.P.; Schneeberger, J.P. (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland)); Nargundkar, V.R. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India))

    1993-07-01

    Integral tritium production rate (TPR) measurements are important in comparisons of calculations to ascertain the suitability of computer codes and cross-section sets used in calculation. At the LOTUS facility, one of the objectives is to make measurements with different types of pure fusion and hybrid blankets and compare the results with calculations. Since the concrete cavity housing the blankets is small, it is of direct relevance to determine the influence of room-reflected neutrons on the integral TPR and, if possible, to reduce this effect by special absorbers. The effects on the TPR of a stainless steel-natural lithium-graphite-reflected blanket due to the concrete structure, B[sub 4]C filter, and boron-loaded sheets covering the assembly are studied. Calculations are performed by the MCNP Monte Carlo code. Since the room-returned component depends strongly on the composition of the concrete and, more-over, does not correspond to a real blanket situation, it is advisable to compare measurements with calculations for the region where such interference is minimal. A central region is identified for the purpose of comparison. In addition to calculations for a fully homogenized blanket, the important central blanket region is considered in the form of rods, and the remaining blanket as a homogeneous region, to assess the effect of neutron streaming on the TPR of the assembly. An experiment is done by irradiating several Li[sub 2]CO[sub 3] probes positioned in each tube so that the central region of interest is fully covered. The activity of the probes is measured by the standard liquid scintillation method, and the TPR for the entire region can be derived from the experimental reaction rate data. The complete details of the calculational model and the experimental procedure are provided. Good agreement is found between the calculated and experimental TPRs after accounting for various sources of errors. 14 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. The role of hydrothermal fluids in the production of subduction zone magmas: Evidence from siderophile and chalcophile trace elements and boron

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. D. Noll; H. E. Newsom; W. P. Leeman; J. G. Ryan

    1996-01-01

    In order to evaluate the processes responsible for the enrichments of certain siderophile\\/ chalcophile trace elements during the production of subduction-related magmas, representative lavas from seven subduction zones have been analyzed for Pb, As, Sb, Sn, W, Mo, Tl, Cu, and Zn by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), radiochemical epithermal neutron activation analysis (RENA), and atomic absorption (AA). The siderophile\\/chalcophile

  3. Process for recovering boron trifluoride from an impure gaseous boron trifluoride residue

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, F.E.; Schroeder, K.H.; Wagner, W.J.

    1990-07-24

    This patent describes a method for removing sulfur dioxide from a boron trifluoride stream. It comprises: condensing a gaseous boron trifluoride stream; distilling the condensed boron trifluoride stream to yield pure boron trifluoride and a liquid boron trifluoride residue wherein the liquid boron trifluoride residue comprises by weight: about 40 to about 95% boron trifluoride, about 5 to about 30% sulfur dioxide, about 0 to 19% sulfur trioxide, about 0 to about 0.2% silicon fluoride, about 0 to about 1.0% arsenic fluoride, and about 0 to about 0.1% antimony fluoride; vaporizing the liquid boron trifluoride residue; feeding the gaseous boron trifluoride residue into a mixture of boric and sulfuric acids; and removing the unabsorbed sulfur dioxide from the acid mixture.

  4. Thermionic properties of the molybdenum boron system

    SciTech Connect

    Storms, E.K.

    1980-01-01

    The thermionic work function has been measured as a function of composition within the various two phase regions between Mo and MoB/sub 2/. Values at the low boron and high boron phase boundaries for the various compounds were obtained by extrapolation. The following effective work functions were obtained: Mo/sub 2/B (low boron) = 3.08 eV; Mo/sub 2/B (high boron) = 3.63 eV; ..cap alpha..-MoB (low boron) = 3.38 eV; ..cap alpha..-MoB (high boron) = 4.30 eV; ..beta..-MoB (low boron) = 2.83 eV; ..beta..-MoB (high boron) = 3.92; Mo/sub 2/B/sub 3/ (low boron) = 4.65 eV; Mo/sub 2/B/sub 3/ (high boron) = 3.85 eV; and MoB/sub 2/ (low boron) = 3.52 eV. Because the composition range of these compounds is very narrow, the work function is very sensitive to the composition within the single phase regions.

  5. Reagent-controlled asymmetric homologation of boronic esters by enantioenriched main-group chiral carbenoids.

    PubMed

    Blakemore, Paul R; Marsden, Stephen P; Vater, Huw D

    2006-02-16

    [reaction: see text] Putative enantioenriched carbenoid species, (R)-1-chloro-2-phenylethylmagnesium chloride (9) and (S)-1-chloro-2-phenylethyllithium (26), generated in situ by sulfoxide ligand exchange from (-)-(R(S),R)-1-chloro-2-phenylethyl p-tolyl sulfoxide (8), effected the stereocontrolled homologation of boronic esters. sec-Alcohols derived from the product boronates by oxidation with basic hydrogen peroxide exhibited % ee closely approaching that of sulfoxide 8 in examples employing Li-carbenoid 26. PMID:16468764

  6. Combustion synthesis of Ni 3Al by SHS with boron additions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. L. Yeh; W. Y. Sung

    2005-01-01

    The preparation of Ni3Al intermetallic compound from elemental powder compacts with the addition of boron was conducted by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) in this study. Effects of the boron content, preheating temperature, and particle size of the reactants on the combustion characteristics, as well as on the composition and morphology of final products were studied. Experimental observation indicates that the

  7. Removal of boron from wastewater by the hydroxyapatite formation reaction using acceleration effect of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Eishi; Sasaki, Atsushi; Endo, Masatoshi

    2012-10-30

    The mechanism was discussed for the removal of boron by the hydroxyapatite (HAp) formation reaction using Ca(OH)(2) and (NH(4))(2)HPO(4) in room temperature. Time required to remove boron was 20 min by adding Ca(OH)(2) and (NH(4))(2)HPO(4) for the remaining boron to below 1mg/L. The removal rate of boron was controlled by the HAp precipitate formation and the presence of ammonia. From the XRD patterns and SEM images, HAp could be confirmed in the precipitate product. The reaction between borate ions and calcium hydroxide was accelerated by dehydration with ammonia; the borate-calcium hydroxide compound coprecipitated with resulting HAp. Although the removal of boron decreased in the presence of sulfate, phosphate, and aluminum, these effects could be prevented by adding excess Ca(OH)(2). Interference of fluoride ions was eliminated by adding Al(3+). Sodium alpha-olefin sulfonate was the most effective coagulant for HAp precipitation. The proposed boron removal method has several advantages about treating time and ability of boron removal. The method was successfully applied to the real hot spring wastewater. PMID:22981286

  8. Measured microdosimetric spectra and therapeutic potential of boron neutron capture enhancement of 252Cf brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, J; Kota, C; Maughan, R L

    2005-09-01

    Californium-252 is a neutron-emitting radioisotope used as a brachytherapy source for radioresistant tumors. Presented here are microdosimetric spectra measured as a function of simulated site diameter and distance from applicator tube 252Cf sources. These spectra were measured using miniature tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs). An investigation of the clinical potential of boron neutron capture (BNC) enhancement of 252Cf brachytherapy is also provided. The absorbed dose from the BNC reaction was measured using a boron-loaded miniature TEPC. Measured neutron, photon and BNC absorbed dose components are provided as a function of distance from the source. In general, the absorbed dose results show good agreement with results from other measurement techniques. A concomitant boost to 252Cf brachytherapy may be provided through the use of the BNC reaction. The potential magnitude of this BNC enhancement increases with increasing distance from the source and is capable of providing a therapeutic gain greater than 30% at a distance of 5 cm from the source, assuming currently achievable boron concentrations. PMID:16137204

  9. Reactions of boron with soils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sabine Goldberg

    1997-01-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, but the range between deficient and toxic B concentration is smaller than for any other nutrient element. Plants respond directly to the activity of B in soil solution and only indirectly to B adsorbed on soil constituents. Soil factors affecting availability of B to plants are: pH, texture, moisture, temperature, organic matter and

  10. Boron in plant cell walls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Toru Matoh

    1997-01-01

    Boron is an essential element for higher plants, yet the primary functions remain unclear. In intact tissues of higher plants, this element occurs as both water soluble and water insoluble forms. In this review, the intracellular localisation of B and possible function of B in cell walls of higher plants are discussed. The majority of the water soluble B seems

  11. Controlled boron doping of silicon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lin

    1986-01-01

    A method is described of making a semiconductor device by steps comprising doping a vertical surface of a silicon body with boron characterized in that the doping is accomplished by steps comprising: forming a layer of silicon dioxide on the vertical surface; forming a layer of silicon on the silicon dioxide on the vertical surface, and on a horizontal surface

  12. A detailed examination of boronic acid–diol complexation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Greg Springsteen; Binghe Wang

    2002-01-01

    Boronic acids bind with compounds containing diol moieties with high affinity through reversible boronate formation. However, the conditions that foster tight binding between the diol and the boronic acid are not well understood. Also, due to the multiple ionic states of both the boronic acid and boronate ester, the equilibrium constants reported in the literature have not always been strictly

  13. Lightweight Radiators Being Developed or Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Tew, Roy C.; Thieme, Lanny G.

    2001-01-01

    The thermodynamic heat-to-electric power conversion efficiency of Stirling systems is 3 to 5 times higher than that of thermoelectric converters. Hence for unmanned deep space probes, Stirling advanced radioisotope power systems (ARPS) could deliver up to 5 times as much power as radioisotope thermoelectric generators for the same amount of radioisotope, or they could require one-third to one-fifth as much isotope inventory for the same power output. However, Stirling power systems reject unconverted heat at much lower temperatures than radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Normally, this requires larger and heavier heat-rejection subsystems because of the greater radiator areas, which are proportional to the first power of the heat rejected and the fourth power of the absolute heat-rejection temperature, as specified by the Stefan-Boltzmann radiation heat transfer law. The development of directly coupled disk radiators using very high conductivity encapsulated thermopyrolitic graphite materials represents a significant advance in Stirling ARPS space heat-rejection subsystem technology. A conceptual Stirling ARPS with two engines coupled to a radioisotope general-purpose heat source (GPHS) is shown in the illustration.

  14. NASA's Advanced Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David J.; Sankovic, John; Wilt, David; Abelson, Robert D.; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (ARPS) project is developing the next generation of radioisotope power conversion technologies that will enable future missions that have requirements that cannot be met by either photovoltaic systems or by current radioisotope power systems (RPSs). Requirements of advanced RPSs include high efficiency and high specific power (watts/kilogram) in order to meet future mission requirements with less radioisotope fuel and lower mass so that these systems can meet requirements for a variety of future space applications, including continual operation surface missions, outer-planetary missions, and solar probe. These advances would enable a factor of 2 to 4 decrease in the amount of fuel required to generate electrical power. Advanced RPS development goals also include long-life, reliability, and scalability. This paper provides an update on the contractual efforts under the Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology (RPCT) NASA Research Announcement (NRA) for research and development of Stirling, thermoelectric, and thermophotovoltaic power conversion technologies. The paper summarizes the current RPCT NRA efforts with a brief description of the effort, a status and/or summary of the contractor's key accomplishments, a discussion of upcoming plans, and a discussion of relevant system-level benefits and implications. The paper also provides a general discussion of the benefits from the development of these advanced power conversion technologies and the eventual payoffs to future missions (discussing system benefits due to overall improvements in efficiency, specific power, etc.).

  15. NASA Radioisotope Power System Program - Technology and Flight Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Thomas J.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    2009-01-01

    NASA sometimes conducts robotic science missions to solar system destinations for which the most appropriate power source is derived from thermal-to-electrical energy conversion of nuclear decay of radioactive isotopes. Typically the use of a radioisotope power system (RPS) has been limited to medium and large-scale missions, with 26 U,S, missions having used radioisotope power since 1961. A research portfolio of ten selected technologies selected in 2003 has progressed to a point of maturity, such that one particular technology may he considered for future mission use: the Advanced Stirling Converter. The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator is a new power system in development based on this Stirling cycle dynamic power conversion technology. This system may be made available for smaller, Discovery-class NASA science missions. To assess possible uses of this new capability, NASA solicited and funded nine study teams to investigate unique opportunities for exploration of potential destinations for small Discovery-class missions. The influence of the results of these studies and the ongoing development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator system are discussed in the context of an integrated Radioisotope Power System program. Discussion of other and future technology investments and program opportunities are provided.

  16. Boron analysis and boron imaging in biological materials for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea Wittig; Jean Michel; Raymond L. Moss; Finn Stecher-Rasmussen; Heinrich F. Arlinghaus; Peter Bendel; Pier Luigi Mauri; Saverio Altieri; Ralf Hilger; Piero A. Salvadori; Luca Menichetti; Robert Zamenhof; Wolfgang A. G. Sauerwein

    2008-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is based on the ability of the stable isotope 10B to capture neutrons, which leads to a nuclear reaction producing an alpha- and a 7Li-particle, both having a high biological effectiveness and a very short range in tissue, being limited to approximately one cell diameter. This opens the possibility for a highly selective cancer therapy.

  17. High Efficiency Thermoelectric Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed; Saber, Hamed; Caillat, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    The work performed and whose results presented in this report is a joint effort between the University of New Mexico s Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies (ISNPS) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology. In addition to the development, design, and fabrication of skutterudites and skutterudites-based segmented unicouples this effort included conducting performance tests of these unicouples for hundreds of hours to verify theoretical predictions of the conversion efficiency. The performance predictions of these unicouples are obtained using 1-D and 3-D models developed for that purpose and for estimating the actual performance and side heat losses in the tests conducted at ISNPS. In addition to the performance tests, the development of the 1-D and 3-D models and the development of Advanced Radioisotope Power systems for Beginning-Of-Life (BOM) power of 108 We are carried out at ISNPS. The materials synthesis and fabrication of the unicouples are carried out at JPL. The research conducted at ISNPS is documented in chapters 2-5 and that conducted at JP, in documented in chapter 5. An important consideration in the design and optimization of segmented thermoelectric unicouples (STUs) is determining the relative lengths, cross-section areas, and the interfacial temperatures of the segments of the different materials in the n- and p-legs. These variables are determined using a genetic algorithm (GA) in conjunction with one-dimensional analytical model of STUs that is developed in chapter 2. Results indicated that when optimized for maximum conversion efficiency, the interfacial temperatures between various segments in a STU are close to those at the intersections of the Figure-Of-Merit (FOM), ZT, curves of the thermoelectric materials of the adjacent segments. When optimizing the STUs for maximum electrical power density, however, the interfacial temperatures are different from those at the intersections of the ZT curves, but close to those at the intersections the characteristic power, CP, curves of the thermoelectric materials of the adjacent segments (CP = T(sup 2)Zk and has a unit of W/m). Results also showed that the number of the segments in the n- and p-legs of the STUs optimized for maximum power density are generally fewer than when the same unicouples are optimized for maximum efficiency. These results are obtained using the 1-D optimization model of STUs that is detailed in chapter 2. A three-dimensional model of STUs is developed and incorporated into the ANSYS commercial software (chapter 3). The governing equations are solved, subject to the prescribed

  18. Modeling of boron species in the Falcon 17 and ISP-34 integral tests

    SciTech Connect

    Lazaridis, M.; Capitao, J.A.; Drossinos, Y. [Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre

    1996-09-01

    The RAFT computer code for aerosol formation and transport was modified to include boron species in its chemical database. The modification was necessary to calculate fission product transport and deposition in the FAL-17 and ISP-34 Falcon tests, where boric acid was injected. The experimental results suggest that the transport of cesium is modified in the presence of boron. The results obtained with the modified RAFT code are presented; they show good agreement with experimental results for cesium and partial agreement for boron deposition in the Falcon silica tube. The new version of the RAFT code predicts the same behavior for iodine deposition as the previous version, where boron species were not included.

  19. Defect behavior in electron-irradiated boron- and gallium-doped silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drevinsky, P. J.; Deangelis, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    Production and anneal of defects in electron-irradiated, float-zone silicon solar cells were studied by DLTS. In boron- and gallium-doped, n+-p cells, dominant defects were due to the divacancy, carbon interstitial, and carbon complex. Results suggest that the DLTS peak normally ascribed to carbon complexes also involves gallium. For gallium- and, to a lesser extent, boron-doped samples, damaged lifetime shows substantial recovery only when the carbon-complex peak has annealed out at 400 C. In boron-doped, n+-p-p+ cells, a minority carrier trap (E1) was also observed by DLTS in cells with a boron p+, but not in those with an aluminum p+ back. A level at Ev + 0.31 eV appeared upon 150 C annealing (E1 out) in both p+ back types of samples.

  20. Synthesis of vinyl boronates from aldehydes by a practical boron-Wittig reaction.

    PubMed

    Coombs, John R; Zhang, Liang; Morken, James P

    2015-04-01

    A highly stereoselective boron-Wittig reaction between stable and readily accessible 1,1-bis(pinacolboronates) and aldehydes furnishes a variety of synthetically useful di- and trisubstituted vinyl boronate esters. PMID:25799147

  1. Study of boron behaviour in two Spanish coal combustion power plants.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-González, Raquel; Cuesta, Aida Fuente; Córdoba, Patricia; Díaz-Somoano, Mercedes; Font, Oriol; López-Antón, M Antonia; Querol, Xavier; Martínez-Tarazona, M Rosa; Giménez, Antonio

    2011-10-01

    A full-scale field study was carried out at two Spanish coal-fired power plants equipped with electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurisation (FGD) systems to investigate the distribution of boron in coals, solid by-products, wastewater streams and flue gases. The results were obtained from the simultaneous sampling of solid, liquid and gaseous streams and their subsequent analysis in two different laboratories for purposes of comparison. Although the final aim of this study was to evaluate the partitioning of boron in a (co-)combustion power plant, special attention was paid to the analytical procedure for boron determination. A sample preparation procedure was optimised for coal and combustion by-products to overcome some specific shortcomings of the currently used acid digestion methods. In addition boron mass balances and removal efficiencies in ESP and FGD devices were calculated. Mass balance closures between 83 and 149% were obtained. During coal combustion, 95% of the incoming boron was collected in the fly ashes. The use of petroleum coke as co-combustible produced a decrease in the removal efficiency of the ESP (87%). Nevertheless, more than 90% of the remaining gaseous boron was eliminated via the FGD in the wastewater discharged from the scrubber, thereby causing environmental problems. PMID:21664037

  2. Procurement of a fully licensed radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, H.E.; Bearden, T.E.

    1990-10-01

    A fully licensed transportation system for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units is currently being designed and built. The system will comply with all applicable US Department of Transportation regulations without the use of a DOE Alternative.'' The US Department of Transportation has special double containment'' requirements for plutonium. The system packaging uses a doubly contained bell jar'' concept. A refrigerated trailer is used for cooling the high-heat payloads. The same packaging is used for both high- and low-heat payloads. The system is scheduled to be available for use by mid-1992. 4 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Procurement of a fully licensed radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, H.E.; Bearden, T.E. (Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, N1-42, Richland, Washington 99352 (US))

    1991-01-01

    A fully licensed transportation system for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units is currently being designed and built. The system will comply with all applicable U.S. Department of Transportation regulations without the use of a DOE Alternative.'' The U.S. Department of Transportation has special double containment'' requirements for plutonium. The system packaging uses a doubly contained bell jar'' concept. A refrigerated trailer is used for cooling the high-heat payloads. The same packaging is used for both high- and low-heat payloads. The system is scheduled to be available for use by mid-1992.

  4. Efficiency of Pm-147 direct charge radioisotope battery.

    PubMed

    Kavetskiy, A; Yakubova, G; Yousaf, S M; Bower, K; Robertson, J D; Garnov, A

    2011-05-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented here of the efficiency of direct charge radioisotope batteries based on the efficiency of the radioactive source, the system geometry, electrostatic repulsion of beta particles from the collector, the secondary electron emission, and backscattered beta particles from the collector. Efficiency of various design batteries using Pm-147 sources was experimentally measured and found to be in good agreement with calculations. The present approach can be used for predicting the efficiency for different designs of direct charge radioisotope batteries. PMID:21295487

  5. IMPROVEMENTS IN OR RELATING TO PRODUCTION OF RADIOISOTOPES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. Charlton; C. C. Evans

    1955-01-01

    Carbon 14 is prepared by neutron irradiation of nitrogen compounds ---; calcium, ammonium, and potassium nitrates have been used. Previous method of ; recovery was by bringing the nitrate into aqueous solution and acidifying it to ; release carbon dioxide and monoxide, which were then absorbed in caustic alkali. ; In the method described in this paptent, an irradiated nitride---preferably

  6. Effect of excess boron supply on accumulation of boron and nitrogen metabolism in groundnut plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. H. Gopal

    1971-01-01

    In both soil and sand cultures, a supply of 10 ppm boron to root medium was highly injurious to the groundnut (TMV-2) plants.\\u000a The boron-treated plants grown it sand cultures absorbed relatively much higher quantities of boron and the foliage manifested\\u000a chlorosis (yellowing) more quickly than in the boron-treated plants raised in soil cultures. In sand cultures, on the ninth

  7. Synthesis of alpha- and beta-Rhombohedral Boron Powders via Gas Phase Thermal Dissociation of Boron Trichloride by Hydrogen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Duygu Agaogullari; Özge Balci; Ismail Duman; M. Lütfi Öveçoglu

    2011-01-01

    The alpha-rhombohedral and beta-rhombohedral crystal structures of pure elemental boron powders have been synthesized via gas phase thermal dissociation of BCl3 by H2 on a quartz substrate. The parameters affecting the crystal structures of the final products and the process efficiency, such as BCl3\\/H2 molar ratio (1\\/2 and 1\\/4) and reaction temperature (1173 K to 1373 K [900 °C to

  8. Explorations of mechanisms regulating ectomycorrhizal colonization of boron-fertilized pine: Quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, H.E.; Reid, R.K.; Sword, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The studies explore two related hypotheses. The potential of boron and indole acetic acid to act synergistically to promote the flow of sucrose from the foliage to the roots is being assessed. Further the ability of boron fertilization to disrupt the production of phenols by the host is determined. Since phenols inhibit mycorrhizal colonization, it is reasoned that inhibition of phenol production should facilitate plant growth. (DT)

  9. Microprecipitation in boron-containing high-carbon steels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurence Lanier; Gérard Metauer; Mohamed Moukassi

    1994-01-01

    The dissolution and precipitation of boron have been studied in a high-carbon steel. Boron was found in different states: boron oxides, boron carbonitrides and iron-borocarbides Fe23(B,C)6. The dissolution of iron-borocarbides in austenite is complete at 1100 °C and precipitation along ? grain boundaries of this boron-bearing phase was observed after water-quenching from high austenitizing temperature. Therefore, boron precipitates along ?

  10. Computational study of boron nitride nanotube synthesis: How catalyst morphology stabilizes the boron nitride bond

    E-print Network

    Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

    Computational study of boron nitride nanotube synthesis: How catalyst morphology stabilizes the boron nitride bond S. Riikonen,1 A. S. Foster,1,2 A. V. Krasheninnikov,1,3 and R. M. Nieminen1,* 1 COMP methods for the growth of boron nitride nanotubes work much worse than for their carbon counterparts, we

  11. Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Of Boron Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes synthesis, properties, and applications of boron nitride. Especially in thin-film form. Boron nitride films useful as masks in x-ray lithography; as layers for passivation of high-speed microelectronic circuits; insulating films; hard, wear-resistant, protective films for optical components; lubricants; and radiation detectors. Present status of single-crystal growth of boron nitride indicates promising candidate for use in high-temperature semiconductor electronics.

  12. Toxic effects of boron on mallard reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, G.J.; Anders, V.P.

    1989-01-01

    Boron, a naturally occurring trace element generally considered environmentally innocuous, was documented to severely impair mallard reproduction. Boron is leached from irrigated agricultural soils and transported in drainage water that contaminates wetlands. Until now, only the selenium accumulated in aquatic food chains has been documented to pose a toxic hazard to wildlife in drainage water wetlands. Management of drainage water-contaminated environments must now also consider the adverse effects of boron, as well as the possible interactions of drainage water contaminants.

  13. New Advances in Boron Soil Chemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sabine Goldberg; Chunming Su

    Boron is an essential micronutrient element required for plant growth. Boron deficiency is wide-spread in crop plants throughout\\u000a the world especially in coarse-textured soils in humid areas. Boron toxicity can also occur, especially in arid regions under\\u000a irrigation. Plants respond directly to the B concentration in soil solution and only indirectly to the amount of B attached\\u000a to soil surfaces

  14. Boron Removal by Polymer-Assisted Ultrafiltration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bryan M. Smith; Paul Todd; Christopher N. Bowman

    1995-01-01

    Boron contamination of natural waters is a widespread environmental problem which lacks a cost-effective solution. Polymer-assisted ultrafiltration is a method of boron removal that is compatible with other water-treatment processes. This boron removal technique exploits the pH-dependent complexation between boric acid and a macromolecule containing vicinal diol groups to prevent boric acid from passing through an ultrafiltration membrane. The concentration

  15. Boron removal in RO seawater desalination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masahide Taniguchi; Yoshinari Fusaoka; Tsuyoshi Nishikawa; Masaru Kurihara

    2004-01-01

    In the seawater desalination field, the WHO requires that boron concentration in drinking water be below 0.5 mg\\/l, and this requirement has affected SWRO process design because of the difficulty in achieving such a low boron concentration. In order to overcome this problem, anew SWRO membrane element with higher boron-rejecting performance was developed. This new SWRO membrane element exhibits excellent

  16. A study of palladium thin-films for radioisotope storage in betavoltaic power sources designs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas E Adams

    2011-01-01

    A betavoltaic cell is a type of radioisotope power source where the energy of beta radiation is converted into electricity. The goal of the research is to design a novel thin-film material to store radioisotopes that exhibits consistent and optimal radiation emission efficiencies. To achieve the main goal, three tasks were performed: review the radioisotope power technology, evaluate the methods

  17. Modification of hot cells for general purpose heat source assembly at the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. A. Carteret

    1991-01-01

    Eight existing, unused hot cells currently are being modified for use in the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) to assemble Pu-238 fueled heat sources for radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Four air atmosphere cells will be used for storage, decanning, and decontamination of the iridium-clad radioisotope fuel. The remaining four argon atmosphere cells will be used to assemble fuel and graphite

  18. Boron-10 ABUNCL Active Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-07-09

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report provides results from testing of the active mode of the General Electric Reuter-Stokes Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) at Los Alamos National Laboratory using sources and fuel pins.

  19. Boron mullite: Formation and basic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lührs, Hanna, E-mail: hanna.luehrs@uni-bremen.de [Universität Bremen, FB 5 Geowissenschaften, Klagenfurter Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany)] [Universität Bremen, FB 5 Geowissenschaften, Klagenfurter Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Fischer, Reinhard X. [Universität Bremen, FB 5 Geowissenschaften, Klagenfurter Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany)] [Universität Bremen, FB 5 Geowissenschaften, Klagenfurter Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Schneider, Hartmut [Universität Bremen, FB 5 Geowissenschaften, Klagenfurter Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany) [Universität Bremen, FB 5 Geowissenschaften, Klagenfurter Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Universität Köln, Institut für Kristallographie, Greinstraße 6, D-50939 Kölm (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Decrease of B-mullite formation temperature with increasing boron content. ? Decrease of lattice parameters b and c with increasing boron content. ? Significant reduction of thermal expansion (?15%) due to incorporation of boron. ? Decomposition of B-mullite at 1400 °C, long-term stability at 800 °C. -- Abstract: A series of boron doped mullites (B-mullite) was prepared from single-phase gels with initial compositions based on a 1:1 isomorphous substitution of Si by B, starting from a 3:2 mullite composition (Al{sub 4.5}Si{sub 1.5}O{sub 9.75}). A high amount of boron (>10 mol.%) can be incorporated into the crystal structure of mullite where it most likely replaces Si. In situ phase formation of B-mullites was studied with high temperature X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis. A decrease of the formation temperature for B-mullite with increasing boron content was observed. With increasing boron content lattice parameters b and c significantly decrease, while no systematic evolution of a is observed. Long annealing at 1400 °C results in decomposition of B-mullite to boron free mullite and ?-alumina. At 800 °C B-mullite appears to be stable over a period of at least 12 days. The mean thermal expansion coefficient was reduced by 15% upon incorporation of boron which makes the material technologically interesting.

  20. Boron deposition from fused salts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.L.

    1980-08-01

    A partial evaluation of the feasibility of a process to electrodeposit pure coherent coatings of elemental boron from molten fluorides has been performed. The deposit produced was powdery and acicular, unless the fluoride melt was purified to have very low oxygen concentration. When the oxygen activity was reduced in the melt by addition of crystalline elemental boron, dense, amorphous boron deposit was produced. The boron deposits produced had cracks but were otherwise pure and dense and ranged up to 0.35 mm thick. Information derived during this project suggests that similar deposits might be obtained crack-free up to 1.00 mm thick by process modifications and improvements.

  1. Sputtered boron nitride films for graphene devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David L.; Keller, Mark W.; Shaw, Justin M.; Zhu, Zixu; Joshi, Saumil; Moddel, Garret

    2012-02-01

    For exfoliated graphene, hexagonal boron nitride substrates yield better transport properties than the more common SiO2 substrates. We deposited boron nitride films onto a variety of substrates using rf magnetron sputtering at substrate temperatures between 30 ^oC and 350 ^oC. The amount of amorphous and hexagonal phases depends on sputtering parameters and type of substrate. Regardless of crystallinity, the films are smooth and suitable for graphene exfoliation or transfer of graphene grown by CVD. We compare the roughness, optical contrast, mobility, and substrate-induced doping for graphene on amorphous boron nitride, hexagonal boron nitride, and SiO2.

  2. Technology development for a Stirling radioisotope power system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lanny G. Thieme; Songgang Qiu; Maurice A. White

    2000-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center and the Department of Energy are developing a Stirling convertor for an advanced radioisotope power system to provide spacecraft on-board electric power for NASA deep space missions. NASA Glenn is addressing key technology issues through the use of two NASA Phase II SBIRs with Stirling Technology Company (STC) of Kennewick, WA. Under the first SBIR, STC

  3. Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William G. Anderson; Calin Tarau

    2008-01-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling convertor provides this cooling. If the Stirling engine stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable

  4. Assembly of radioisotope power systems at Westinghouse Hanford Company

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, C.J.

    1990-04-01

    Long-term space flight requires reliable long-term power sources. For the purpose of supplying a constant supply of power in deep space, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator has proven to be a successful power source. Westinghouse Hanford Company is installing the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility which is located in the Fuels and Material Examination Facility on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, for assembling the generators. The radioisotope thermoelectric generator assembly process is base upon one developed at Mound Laboratory in Miamisburg, Ohio (presently operated by EG G Mound Applied Technologies). Westinghouse Hanford Company is modernizing the process to ensure the heat source assemblies are produced in a manner that maximizes operator safety and is consistent with today's environmental and operational safety standards. The facility is being prepared to assemble the generators required by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration missions for CRAF (Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby) in 1995 and Cassini, an investigation of Saturn and its moons, in 1996. The facility will also have the capability to assemble larger radioisotope power generators designed for dynamic power generation. 4 refs., 11 figs.

  5. Monte Carlo Radiation Analysis of a Spacecraft Radioisotope Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, M.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo statistical computer analysis was used to create neutron and photon radiation predictions for the General Purpose Heat Source Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS RTG). The GPHS RTG is being used on several NASA planetary missions. Analytical results were validated using measured health physics data.

  6. Enabling Solar System Exploration with Small Radioisotope Power Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. D. Abelson; T. S. Balint; H. Noravian; J. E. Randolph; C. Satter; G. R. Schmidt; J. H. Shirley

    2005-01-01

    The increased use of smaller spacecraft over the last decade, in combination with studies of potential science applications, has suggested that a wide range of low power missions and applications could be enabled by a new generation of conceptual small radioisotope power systems with power levels in the range of 20 mW to a few 10's of watts. Such systems

  7. Power performance of US space radioisotope thermoelectric generators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary L. Bennett; E. A. Skrabek

    1996-01-01

    Since 1961, the United States has flown 41 radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and one reactor to provide power for 25 space power systems. Thirty-eight of these nuclear power sources on 22 space systems are still in space or on other planetary bodies. This paper summarizes the design and power performance of each of the basic RTG types that have been

  8. An Advanced Turbo-Brayton Converter for Radioisotope Power Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark V. Zagarola; Michael G. Izenson; Jeffrey J. Breedlove; George M. O'Connor; Andrew C. Ketchum; Richard L. Jetley; James K. Simons

    2005-01-01

    Past work has shown that Brayton power converters are an attractive option for high power, long-duration space missions. More recently, Creare has shown that Brayton technology could be scaled with high efficiency and specific power to lower power levels suitable for radioisotope power conversion systems. Creare is currently leading the development of an advanced turbo-Brayton converter under NASA's Prometheus Program.

  9. Boron Carbides As Thermo-electric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles

    1988-01-01

    Report reviews recent theoretical and experimental research on thermoelectric materials. Recent work with narrow-band semiconductors demonstrated possibility of relatively high thermoelectric energy-conversion efficiencies in materials withstanding high temperatures needed to attain such efficiencies. Among promising semiconductors are boron-rich borides, especially boron carbides.

  10. Fabrication of boron-phosphide neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzsimmons, M.; Pynn, R.

    1997-07-01

    Boron phosphide is a potentially viable candidate for high neutron flux neutron detectors. The authors have explored chemical vapor deposition methods to produce such detectors and have not been able to produce good boron phosphide coatings on silicon carbide substrates. However, semi-conducting quality films have been produced. Further testing is required.

  11. Evolving patterns in boron cluster chemistry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark A. Fox; Ken Wade

    2003-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of our knowledge and understanding of the structures and bonding of boron cluster compounds, with particular reference to the evolving complementary roles localized bonding and molecular orbital treatments have played in providing simple rationalizations of their polyhedral molecules. INTRODUCTION: EARLY DEVEL OPMENTS The polyhedral patterns that characterize boron cluster chemistry have provided rich pickings for

  12. Boron and nitrogen implantation of steels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. T. Kern; K. C. Walter; A. J. Griffin; Y. Lu; M. Nastasi; W. K. Scarborough; J. R. Tesmer; S. Fayeulle

    1997-01-01

    Samples of four steels with varying chromium content were implanted with boron and seperately with nitrogen. Implantation energy was 75 keV in all cases. Implantation profiles were modeled using TRIM and determined experimentally by ion beam analysis. Boron ion sources leading to improved ion beams will be discussed. Material characterization included tribology and nano-indentation. Implanted materials showed improvements in wear

  13. The boron heterofullerenes C 59B and C 69B: generation, extraction, mass spectrometric and XPS characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhr, H.-J.; Nesper, R.; Schnyder, B.; Kötz, R.

    1996-02-01

    Boron heterofullerenes can be generated by arc evaporation of doped graphite rods in a modified fullerene reactor. According to mass spectrometric analysis only mono-substituted fullerenes like C 59B, C 69B and higher homologues can be extracted and enriched by the use of pyridine as the solvent. They are strong Lewis acids and undergo a decomposition reaction to boric acid with traces of oxygen. XPS analysis of the extracts reveals the boron in the fullerene cage to be in a higher oxidation state compared to ordinary boron-carbon compounds. The synthesis and extraction procedure opens a viable route for the macroscopic production of these compounds.

  14. The effect of copper on the crystallization of hexagonal boron nitride

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Milan Hubacek; Tadao Sato

    1997-01-01

    The crystallization process of hexagonal boron nitride in the presence of copper has been investigated. The positive effect of copper on the crystallinity of boron nitride was observed in the three studied systems of: nitrided boron, nitrided boron–carbon, and previously prepared turbostratic boron nitride. However, the presence of copper hindered the formation of boron carbonitride and produced graphite and boron

  15. Potential Applications for Radioisotope Power Systems in Support of Human Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.; Colozza, Anthony J.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Radioisotope power systems (RPS) for space applications have powered over 27 U.S. space systems, starting with Transit 4A and 4B in 1961, and more recently with the successful landing of the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity in August 2012. RPS enable missions with destinations far from the Sun with faint solar flux, on planetary surfaces with dense or dusty atmospheres, and at places with long eclipse periods where solar array sizes and energy storage mass become impractical. RPS could also provide an enabling capability in support of human exploration activities. It is envisioned that with the higher power needs of most human mission concepts, a high efficiency thermal-to-electric technology would be required such as the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope generator (ASRG). The ASRG should be capable of a four-fold improvement in efficiency over traditional thermoelectric RPS. While it may be impractical to use RPS as a main power source, many other applications could be considered, such as crewed pressurized rovers, in-situ resource production of propellants, back-up habitat power, drilling, any mobile or remote activity from the main base habitat, etc. This paper will identify potential applications and provide concepts that could be a practical extension of the current ASRG design in providing for robust and flexible use of RPS on human exploration missions.

  16. BORON--2000 14.1 By Phyllis A. Lyday

    E-print Network

    BORON--2000 14.1 BORON By Phyllis A. Lyday Domestic survey data and tables were prepared. Coleman, international data coordinator. Boron produced domestically during 2000 totaled 546,000 metric tons (t) of boron oxide valued at $557 million (table 1). The most common minerals of commercial

  17. Hydrocarbon analogues of boron clusters - planarity, aromaticity and antiaromaticity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hua-Jin Zhai; Boggavarapu Kiran; Jun Li; Lai-Sheng Wang

    2003-01-01

    An interesting feature of elemental boron and boron compounds is the occurrence of highly symmetric icosahedral clusters. The rich chemistry of boron is also dominated by three-dimensional cage structures. Despite its proximity to carbon in the periodic table, elemental boron clusters have been scarcely studied experimentally and their structures and chemical bonding have not been fully elucidated. Here we report

  18. Black Phosphorus Boron Nitride Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillgren, Nathaniel; Barlas, Yafis; Shi, Yanmeng; Yang, Jiawei; Taniguchi, Takashi; Lau, Chun Ning (Jeanie)

    2015-03-01

    There has been significant recent interest in black phosphorus as a candidate for future electronics applications, as it possesses both a layered-tunable band gap and a relatively high mobility (compared to other 2D candidates). However, black phosphorus' degradation in ambient conditions constitutes a major road block in future applications. As a potential solution for this problem we explore the effects of encapsulating black phosphorus between hexagonal boron nitride. We will present the effects of this heterostructure on both the stability and transport properties of thin black phosphorus devices.

  19. Boron Enrichment in Martian Clay

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242

  20. Californium-252: a remarkable versatile radioisotope

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Alexander, C.W.

    1995-10-10

    A product of the nuclear age, Californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) has found many applications in medicine, scientific research, industry, and nuclear science education. Californium-252 is unique as a neutron source in that it provides a highly concentrated flux and extremely reliable neutron spectrum from a very small assembly. During the past 40 years, {sup 252}Cf has been applied with great success to cancer therapy, neutron radiography of objects ranging from flowers to entire aircraft, startup sources for nuclear reactors, fission activation for quality analysis of all commercial nuclear fuel, and many other beneficial uses, some of which are now ready for further growth. Californium-252 is produced in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and processed in the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC), both of which are located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The REDC/HFIR facility is virtually the sole supplier of {sup 252}Cf in the western world and is the major supplier worldwide. Extensive exploitation of this product was made possible through the {sup 252}Cf Market Evaluation Program, sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) [then the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and later the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA)]. This program included training series, demonstration centers, seminars, and a liberal loan policy for fabricated sources. The Market Evaluation Program was instituted, in part, to determine if large-quantity production capability was required at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). Because of the nature of the product and the means by which it is produced, {sup 252}Cf can be produced only in government-owned facilities. It is evident at this time that the Oak Ridge research facility can meet present and projected near-term requirements. The production, shipment, and sales history of {sup 252}Cf from ORNL is summarized herein.

  1. CHARACTERISATION AND IMPLICATIONS OF THE BORON RICH LAYER RESULTING FROM OPEN-TUBE LIQUID SOURCE BBR3 BORON DIFFUSION PROCESSES

    E-print Network

    CHARACTERISATION AND IMPLICATIONS OF THE BORON RICH LAYER RESULTING FROM OPEN-TUBE LIQUID SOURCE BBR3 BORON DIFFUSION PROCESSES Michael Andreas Kessler, Tobias Ohrdes, Bettina Wolpensinger, Robert, Germany ABSTRACT Boron diffusion is commonly associated with the formation of an undesirable boron rich

  2. Safety status of space radioisotope and reactor power sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    The current overall safety criterion for both radioisotope and reactor power sources is containment or immobilization in the case of a reentry accident. In addition, reactors are designed to remain subcritical under conditions of land impact or water immersion. A very extensive safety test and analysis program was completed on the radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) in use on the Galileo spacecraft and planned for use on the Ulysses spacecraft. The results of this work show that the RTGs will pose little or no risk for any credible accident. The SP-100 space nuclear reactor program has begun addressing its safety criteria, and the design is planned to be such as to ensure meeting the various safety criteria. Preliminary mission risk analyses on SP-100 show the expected value population dose from postulated accidents on the reference mission to be very small. It is concluded that the current US nuclear power sources are the safest flown.

  3. Environmental assessment for radioisotope heat source fuel processing and fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) for radioisotope heat source fuel processing and fabrication involving existing facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) near Los Alamos, New Mexico. The proposed action is needed to provide Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) CRAF and Cassini Missions. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Emitted radiation characteristics of plutonium dioxide radioisotope thermoelectric generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gingo, P. J.; Steyn, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    The nuclear and emitted radiation characteristics of the radioisotope elements and impurities in commercial grade plutonium dioxide are presented in detail. The development of the methods of analysis are presented. Radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) of 1575, 3468 and 5679 thermal watts are characterized with respect to neutron and gamma photon source strength as well as spatial and number flux distribution. The results are presented as a function of detector position and light element contamination concentration for fuel age ranging from 'fresh' to 18 years. The data may be used to obtain results for given O-18 and Pu-236 concentrations. The neutron and gamma photon flux and dose calculations compare favorably with reported experimental values for SNAP-27.

  5. Solid state radioisotopic energy converter for space nuclear power

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.M. (IsoGen Radioisotopic Research Laboratory, 315 S. McLoughlin Blvd., Oregon City, Oregon 97045 (United States))

    1993-01-10

    Recent developments in materials technology now make it possible to fabricate nonthermal thin-film radioisotopic energy converters (REC) with a specific power of 24 W/kg and a 10 year working life at 5 to 10 watts. This creates applications never before possible, such as placing the power supply directly on integrated circuit chips. The efficiency of the REC is about 25% which is two to three times greater than the 6 to 8% capabilities of current thermoelectric systems. Radioisotopic energy converters have the potential to meet many future space power requirements for a wide variety of applications with less mass, better efficiency, and less total area than other power conversion options. These benefits result in significant dollar savings over the projected mission lifetime.

  6. Radioisotope Electric Propulsion for Fast Outer Planetary Orbiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven; Benson, Scott; Gefert, Leon; Patterson, Michael; Schreiber, Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    Recent interest in outer planetary targets by the Office of Space Science has spurred the search for technology options to enable relatively quick missions to outer planetary targets. Several options are being explored including solar electric propelled stages combined with aerocapture at the target and nuclear electric propulsion. Another option uses radioisotope powered electric thrusters to reach the outer planets. Past work looked at using this technology to provide faster flybys. A better use for this technology is for outer planet orbiters. Combined with medium class launch vehicles and a new direct trajectory these small, sub-kilowatt ion thrusters and Stirling radioisotope generators were found to allow missions as fast as 5 to 12 years for objects from Saturn to Pluto, respectively. Key to the development is light spacecraft and science payload technologies.

  7. Outer Planet Exploration with Advanced Radioisotope Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steven; Gefert, Leon; Patterson, Michael; Schreiber, Jeffrey; Benson, Scott; McAdams, Jim; Ostdiek, Paul

    2002-01-01

    In response to a request by the NASA Deep Space Exploration Technology Program, NASA Glenn Research Center conducted a study to identify advanced technology options to perform a Pluto/Kuiper mission without depending on a 2004 Jupiter Gravity Assist, but still arriving before 2020. A concept using a direct trajectory with small, sub-kilowatt ion thrusters and Stirling radioisotope power systems was shown to allow the same or smaller launch vehicle class as the chemical 2004 baseline and allow a launch slip and still flyby in the 2014 to 2020 timeframe. With this promising result the study was expanded to use a radioisotope power source for small electrically propelled orbiter spacecraft for outer planet targets such as Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto.

  8. Radioisotope power system options for future planetary missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockfield, Robert D.

    2001-02-01

    Like previous missions to the outer planets, future spacecraft missions such as Pluto/Kuiper Express, Europa Orbiter, and Solar Probe will require radioisotope power systems for their long voyages away from the Sun. Several candidate advanced power conversion technologies have been proposed that have been proposed that have higher power conversion efficiencies than the traditional thermoelectric generators, with the potential for reduced mass and reduced quantities of nuclear fuel required. Studies conducted by Lockheed Martin under the direction of the Department of Energy have included the development of system conceptual designs utilizing Alkali Metal to Electric Conversion (AMTEC) and Stirling power conversion. Generator concepts based on these conversion technologies are compared in this paper with an alternative Small RTG, based on the General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG). .

  9. Metal matrix composite fuel for space radioisotope energy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, H. R.; Ning, H.; Reece, M. J.; Ambrosi, R. M.; Bannister, N. P.; Stephenson, K.

    2013-02-01

    Radioisotope fuels produce heat that can be used for spacecraft thermal control or converted to electricity. They must retain integrity in the event of destruction or atmospheric entry of the parent spacecraft. Addition of a metal matrix to the actinide oxide could yield a more robust fuel form. Neodymium (III) oxide (Nd2O3) - niobium metal matrix composites were produced using Spark Plasma Sintering; Nd2O3 is a non-radioactive surrogate for americium (III) oxide (Am2O3). Two compositions, 70 and 50 wt% Nd2O3, were mechanically tested under equibiaxial (ring-on-ring) flexure according to ASTM C1499. The addition of the niobium matrix increased the mean flexural strength by a factor of about 2 compared to typical ceramic nuclear fuels, and significantly increased the Weibull modulus to over 20. These improved mechanical properties could result in reduced fuel dispersion in severe accidents and improved safety of space radioisotope power systems.

  10. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system subsystem 143 software development plan

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.A.

    1994-11-10

    This plan describes the activities to be performed and the controls to be applied to the process of specifying, developing, and qualifying the data acquisition software for the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System Subsystem 143 Instrumentation and Data Acquisition System (IDAS). This plan will serve as a software quality assurance plan, a verification and validation (V and V) plan, and a configuration management plan.

  11. MEMS Radioisotope-Powered Piezoelectric µ - Power Generator (RPG)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Duggirala; R. Polcawich; E. Zakar; M. Dubey; H. Li; A. Lal

    2006-01-01

    We present a microfabricated die-scale Radioisotope-powered Piezoelectric µ -power Generator (RPG) with nuclear to electrical conversion efficiency as high as 3.7%. The generator employs direct charging to convert radiated ?-particle kinetic energy into stored electromechanical energy in a piezoelectric unimorph, and piezoelectricity to convert the stored mechanical energy into extractable electrical energy. The generator goes through a charge-discharge-vibrate cycle, integrating

  12. Radioisotope Concentration in Lake Sediments of Maracaibo, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, A. Rangel; Viloria, T. [La Universidad del Zulia (Venezuela); Sajo-Bohus, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D.; Palacios, D. [Universidad Simon Bolivar (Venezuela)

    2007-10-26

    Maracaibo Lake is one of the most important water basing and oil producing regions in Venezuela. Changes in the local environment have been monitored for chemical pollution in the past. For this study we selected a set of sediment samples collected in the shore and analyzed for its radioisotope content. Results show the gamma emitting isotopes distribution. Isotopes concentrations have been determined within the natural K, Th and U families.

  13. Frequency Selective Surface Bandpass Filters Applied To Radioisotope Thermophotovoltaic Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, W. E.; Morgan, Mark D.; Horne, W. Paul; Sundaram, Vasan S.

    2005-02-01

    The application of frequency selective surface bandpass filters as spectral control devices in radioisotope thermophotovoltaic generators, RTPV, is discussed. A conceptual RTPV design for applying the filters in combination with GaSb TPV cells and a roughened tungsten emitter is presented. Measured component data is used with an analytical model to predict conversion efficiencies with different filter characteristics. The data and analyses indicate that system efficiencies up to 19% are achievable.

  14. Radioisotope Concentration in Lake Sediments of Maracaibo, Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, A. Rangel; Viloria, T.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D.; Palacios, D.

    2007-10-01

    Maracaibo Lake is one of the most important water basing and oil producing regions in Venezuela. Changes in the local environment have been monitored for chemical pollution in the past. For this study we selected a set of sediment samples collected in the shore and analyzed for its radioisotope content. Results show the gamma emitting isotopes distribution. Isotopes concentrations have been determined within the natural K, Th and U families.

  15. Radioisotope powered alkali metal thermoelectric converter design for space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, R. K.; Bankston, C. P.

    1988-01-01

    The design concept of an alkali-metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) for 15-30-percent-efficient conversion of heat from the General Purpose (radioisotope) Heat Source (GPHS) on spacecraft is presented. The basic physical principles of the conversion cycle are outlined; a theoretical model is derived; a modular design is described and illustrated with drawings; and the overall AMTEC/GPHS system design is characterized. Predicted performance data are presented in extensive tables and graphs and discussed in detail.

  16. Radioisotope AMTEC power system designs for spacecraft applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph F. Ivanenok; R. K. Sievers; Thomas K. Hunt; Greg A. Johnson

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe and compare small (two-module) and larger (16-module) AMTEC (alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter) radioisotope powered systems and describe the computer model developed to predict their performance. The high efficiency and static conversion process combined with minimized parasitic losses and operating temperatures that allow the use of current materials while still maintaining a competitive radiator area are found to

  17. An Advanced Turbo-Brayton Converter for Radioisotope Power Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark V. Zagarola; Michael G. Izenson; Jeffrey J. Breedlove; George M. O’Connor; Andrew C. Ketchum; Richard L. Jetley; James K. Simons

    2005-01-01

    Past work has shown that Brayton power converters are an attractive option for high power, long-duration space missions. More recently, Creare has shown that Brayton technology could be scaled with high efficiency and specific power to lower power levels suitable for radioisotope power conversion systems. Creare is currently leading the development of an advanced turbo-Brayton converter under NASA’s Prometheus Program.

  18. Plastic Gamma Sensors: An Application in Detection of Radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Mukhopadhyay

    2003-06-01

    A brief survey of plastic scintillators for various radiation measurement applications is presented here. The utility of plastic scintillators for practical applications such as gamma radiation monitoring, real-time radioisotope detection and screening is evaluated in laboratory and field measurements. This study also reports results of Monte Carlo-type predictive responses of common plastic scintillators in gamma and neutron radiation fields. Small-size plastic detectors are evaluated for static and dynamic gamma-ray detection sensitivity of selected radiation sources.

  19. PREFACE: The 16th International Symposium on Boron, Borides and Related Materials (ISBB 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takaho

    2009-07-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains invited and contributed peer-reviewed papers that were presented at the 16th International Symposium on Boron, Borides and Related Materials (ISBB 2008), which was held on 7-12 September 2008, at Kunibiki Messe, Matsue, Japan. This triennial symposium has a half-century long history starting from the 1st meeting in 1959 at Asbury Park, New Jersey. We were very pleased to organize ISBB 2008, which gathered chemists, physicists, materials scientists as well as diamond and high-pressure researchers. This meeting had a strong background in the boron-related Japanese research history, which includes the discovery of superconductivity in MgB2 and development of Nd-Fe-B hard magnets and of YB66 soft X-ray monochromator. The scope of ISBB 2008 spans both basic and applied interdisciplinary research that is centered on boron, borides and related materials, and the collection of articles defines the state of the art in research on these materials. The topics are centered on: 1. Preparation of new materials (single crystals, thin films, nanostructures, ceramics, etc) under normal or extreme conditions. 2. Crystal structure and chemical bonding (new crystal structures, nonstoichiometry, defects, clusters, quantum-chemical calculations). 3. Physical and chemical properties (band structure, phonon spectra, superconductivity; optical, electrical, magnetic, emissive, mechanical properties; phase diagrams, thermodynamics, catalytic activity, etc) in a wide range of temperatures and pressures. 4. Applications and prospects (thermoelectric converters, composites, ceramics, coatings, etc) There were a few discoveries of new materials, such as nanomaterials, and developments in applications. Many contributions were related to 4f heavy Fermion systems of rare-earth borides. Exotic mechanisms of magnetism and Kondo effects have been discussed, which may indicate another direction of development of boride. Two special sessions, 'Boron chemistry' and 'Superconductivity', were also held at the symposium. The session on Boron chemistry was planned to honor the scientific work in boron chemistry of Professor J Bauer on the occasion of his retirement. Many recent results were discussed in the session, and Professor Bauer himself introduced novel rare-earth-boron-carbon compounds RE10B7C10 (RE = Gd - Er) in his lecture. In the latter session, on the basis of recent discoveries of superconductivity in MgB2 and in ?-boron under high pressure, the superconductivity of boron and related materials was discussed and the superconductivity of boron-doped diamond was also addressed. More than 120 participants from 16 countries attended the ISBB 2008, and active presentations (22 invited, 33 oral and 68 posters) and discussions suggest that research on boron and borides is entering a new phase of development. This volume contains 46 articles from 52 submitted manuscripts. The reviewers were invited not only from symposium participants but also from specialists worldwide, and they did a great job of evaluating and commenting on the submitted manuscripts to maintain the highest quality standard of this volume. Recent discoveries of superconductivity in boron under high pressure, synthesis of a new allotrope of boron and of various boron and boride nanostructures will lead this highly interdisciplinary field of science, which will further grow and gain attention in terms of both basic and applied research. In this context, we are very much looking forward to the next symposium, which will be held in Istanbul, Turkey, in 2011, organized by Professor Onuralp Yucel, Istanbul Technical University. Turkey currently has the world highest share of borate production and is expected to be involved more in boron-related research. Acknowledgements We gratefully acknowledge the style improvement by Dr K Iakoubovskii, and sincerely thank Shimane Prefecture and Matsue City for their financial support. The symposium was also supported by Tokyo University of Science, Suwa and foundations including, the Kajima Foundat

  20. Boron-Loaded Silicone Rubber Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Z.W.; Maya, L.; Brown, G.M.; Sloop, F.V.Jr

    2003-05-12

    Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., demonstrated their properties under gamma/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown their response to thermal neutrons. This last work, however, provided an example of a silicone in which both the boron and the scintillator were contained in the rubber as solutes, a formulation which led to the precipitation of solids and sublimation of the boron component. In the present work we describe a scintillator in which the boron is chemically bonded to the siloxane and so avoids the problem of precipitation and loss of boron to sublimation. Material containing up to 18% boron, by weight, was prepared, mounted on photomultipliers, and exposed to both neutron and gamma fluxes. Pulse height spectra showing the neutron and photon response were obtained, and although the light output was found to be much poorer than from samples in which boron was dissolved, the higher boron concentrations enabled essentially 100% neutron absorption in only a few millimeters' thickness of rubber.

  1. Advanced radioisotope power source options for Pluto Express

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, M.L. [California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.

    1995-12-31

    In the drive to reduce mass and cost, Pluto Express is investigating using an advanced power conversion technology in a small Radioisotope Power Source (RPS) to deliver the required mission power of 74 W(electric) at end of mission. Until this year the baseline power source under consideration has been a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG). This RTG would be a scaled down GPHS RTG with an inventory of 6 General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) and a mass of 17.8 kg. High efficiency, advanced technology conversion options are being examined to lower the power source mass and to reduce the amount of radioisotope needed. Three technologies are being considered as the advanced converter technology: the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) converters, and Stirling Engines. Conceptual designs for each of these options have been prepared. Each converter would require only 2 GPHSs to provide the mission power and would have a mass of 6.1, 7.2, and 12.4 kg for AMTEC, TPV, and Stirling Engines respectively. This paper reviews the status of each technology and the projected performance of an advanced RPS based on each technology. Based on the projected performance and spacecraft integration issues, Pluto Express would prefer to use the AMTEC based RPS. However, in addition to technical performance, selection of a power technology will be based on many other factors.

  2. Radioisotope Electric Propulsion Centaur Orbiter Spacecraft Design Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oleson, Steve; McGuire, Melissa; Sarver-Verhey, Tim; Juergens, Jeff; Parkey, Tom; Dankanich, John; Fiehler, Doug; Gyekenyesi, John; Hemminger, Joseph; Gilland, Jim; Colozza, Tony; Packard, Tom; Nguyen, Thahn; Schmitz, Paul; Ostdiek, Paul; Gold, Rob; Lisse, Carey; Hibbits, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Radioisotope electric propulsion (REP) has been shown in past studies to enable missions to outerplanetary bodies including the orbiting of Centaur asteroids. Key to the feasibility for REP missions are long life, low power electric propulsion (EP) devices, low mass radioisotope power systems (RPS) and light spacecraft (S/C) components. In order to determine what are the key parameters for EP devices to perform these REP missions a design study was completed to design an REP S/C to orbit a Centaur in a New Frontiers cost cap. The design shows that an orbiter using several long lived (approximately 200 kg Xenon throughput), low power (approximately 700 W) Hall thrusters teamed with six (150 W each) Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators (ASRG) can deliver 60 kg of science instruments to a Centaur in 10 yr within the New Frontiers cost cap. Optimal specific impulses for the Hall thrusters were found to be around 2000 sec with thruster efficiencies over 40%. Not only can the REP S/C enable orbiting a Centaur (when compared to an all chemical mission only capable of flybys) but the additional power from the REP system can be reused to enhance science and simplify communications.

  3. Hafnium radioisotope recovery from irradiated tantalum

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, David J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01

    Hafnium is recovered from irradiated tantalum by: (a) contacting the irradiated tantalum with at least one acid to obtain a solution of dissolved tantalum; (b) combining an aqueous solution of a calcium compound with the solution of dissolved tantalum to obtain a third combined solution; (c) precipitating hafnium, lanthanide, and insoluble calcium complexes from the third combined solution to obtain a first precipitate; (d) contacting the first precipitate of hafnium, lanthanide and calcium complexes with at least one fluoride ion complexing agent to form a fourth solution; (e) selectively adsorbing lanthanides and calcium from the fourth solution by cationic exchange; (f) separating fluoride ion complexing agent product from hafnium in the fourth solution by adding an aqueous solution of ferric chloride to obtain a second precipitate containing the hafnium and iron; (g) dissolving the second precipitate containing the hafnium and iron in acid to obtain an acid solution of hafnium and iron; (h) selectively adsorbing the iron from the acid solution of hafnium and iron by anionic exchange; (i) drying the ion exchanged hafnium solution to obtain hafnium isotopes. Additionally, if needed to remove residue remaining after the product is dried, dissolution in acid followed by cation exchange, then anion exchange, is performed.

  4. Boronated DNA-binding compounds as potential agents for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Ellen L; Ziolkowski, Erin J; Coderre, Jeffrey A; Rendina, Louis M

    2007-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a binary cancer treatment that exploits the short range particles released from a nuclear fission reaction involving the non-radioactive 10B nucleus and low-energy (thermal) neutrons for the destruction of tumour cells. If boronated agents are targeted towards chromosomal DNA, the efficiency of BNCT is greatly enhanced. This article presents a concise review of DNA-binding compounds that have been functionalised with boron. PMID:17346220

  5. Electronic Properties of Boron-Nitride and Boron Carbonitride Nanotubes and Related Heterojunctions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xavier Blase; Helio Chacham

    We review in the present chapter the electronic and optical properties of hexagonal boron-nitride and hexagonal composite\\u000a boron carbonitride planar and nanotubular structures. We focus mainly on theoretical aspects, but illustrate in all situations\\u000a the link with existing experimental findings. In a first part, the ­insulating nature, and the band gap stability, of boron-nitride\\u000a nanotubes are shown to be related

  6. Real-time monitoring during transportation of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) using the radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system (RTGTS)

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, B.K. [EGG Mound Applied Technologies P.O. Box 3000 Miamisburg, Ohio45343-3000 (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) that will be used to support the Cassini mission will be transported in the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transportation System (RTGTS). To ensure that the RTGs will not be affected during transportation, all parameters that could adversely affect RTG{close_quote}s performance must be monitored. The Instrumentation and Data Acquisition System (IDAS) for the RTGTS displays, monitors, and records all critical packaging and trailer system parameters. The IDAS also monitors the package temperature control system, RTG package shock and vibration data, and diesel fuel levels for the diesel fuel tanks. The IDAS alarms if any of these parameters reach an out-of-limit condition. This paper discusses the real-time monitoring during transportation of the Cassini RTGs using the RTGTS IDAS. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Real-time monitoring during transportation of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) using the radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system (RTGTS)

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, Barry K. [EG and G Mound Applied Technologies P.O. Box 3000 Miamisburg, Ohio 45343-3000 (United States)

    1997-01-10

    The Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) that will be used to support the Cassini mission will be transported in the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transportation System (RTGTS). To ensure that the RTGs will not be affected during transportation, all parameters that could adversely affect RTG's performance must be monitored. The Instrumentation and Data Acquisition System (IDAS) for the RTGTS displays, monitors, and records all critical packaging and trailer system parameters. The IDAS also monitors the package temperature control system, RTG package shock and vibration data, and diesel fuel levels for the diesel fuel tanks. The IDAS alarms if any of these parameters reach an out-of-limit condition. This paper discusses the real-time monitoring during transportation of the Cassini RTGs using the RTGTS IDAS.

  8. Boron-10 Lined Proportional Counter Wall Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Siciliano, Edward R.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2012-05-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) is supporting the project 'Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology' at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube based system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report provides information about how variations in proportional counter radius and gas pressure in a typical coincident counter design might affect the observed signal from boron-lined tubes. A discussion comparing tubes to parallel plate counters is also included.

  9. Developments in boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes progress during the past year on maturing Boron-11 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methodology for noninvasive determination of BNCT agents (BSH) spatially in time. Three major areas are excerpted: (1) Boron-11 MRI of BSH distributions in a canine intracranial tumor model and the first human glioblastoma patient, (2) whole body Boron-11 MRI of BSH pharmacokinetics in a rat flank tumor model, and (3) penetration of gadolinium salts through the BBB as a function of tumor growth in the canine brain.

  10. Removal of Vanadium from Molten Aluminum—Part III. Analysis of Industrial Boron Treatment Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaliq, Abdul; Akbar Rhamdhani, Muhammad; Brooks, Geoffrey A.; Grandfield, John

    2014-04-01

    Transition metal impurities (V, Ti, Zr, and Cr) reduce the electrical conductivity of smelter grade aluminum. These impurities are removed in the form of their borides by reacting with added Al-B master alloys i.e., boron treatment. Although, boron treatment is widely used for the production of high purity aluminum alloys in casthouse the fundamental understanding is lacking and published industrial data are limited. In the current study, industrial trials on the removal of impurities were conducted at one of the high purity aluminum alloys producers in Australasia. Kinetics analysis revealed that the rate of reaction is controlled by the mass transfer of impurities in the bulk melt. The measured mass transfer coefficient ( k m) of V and Ti were 1.1 × 10-4 and 2.6 × 10-4 m/s respectively, in the naturally stirred molten aluminum. The rate of V and Ti removal was faster compared to Zr and Cr during the boron treatment of smelter grade aluminum. Mass balance analysis revealed that 70 wt pct of V and Ti combined as borides in the first hour of the total 12 hours of boron treatment process. The calculated amount of un-reacted B was approximately 25.5 wt pct of initial amount added that remained in the final alloy. There was no evidence of boride rings formation, although partially dissolved AlB12 particles were observed under scanning electron microscope. Finally, implications for industrial practice are discussed for the improvement of current boron treatment process that include changing the source of boron, multiple stage addition of boron and better stirring of the molten aluminum.

  11. Work Began on Contracts for Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology Research and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.

    2005-01-01

    NASA has had a history of successful space flight missions that depended on radioisotope-fueled power systems. These Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) converted the heat generated from the decay of radioisotope material into useful electrical power. An RPS is most attractive in applications where photovoltaics are not optimal, such as deep-space applications where the solar flux is too low or extended applications on planets such as Mars where the day/night cycle, settling of dust, and life requirements limit the usefulness of photovoltaics. NASA s Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology (RPCT) Program is developing next-generation power-conversion technologies that will enable future missions that have requirements that cannot be met by the two RPS flight systems currently being developed by the Department of Energy for NASA: the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator and the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG).

  12. Synthesis of boron nitride powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreissig, Dirk Horst

    2002-09-01

    In the materials science community there is much interest in the development of new, efficient approaches for preparing ceramic powders having properties or performance characteristics not found with powders produced by traditional metallurgical synthesis methods. In this regard, aerosol-based syntheses are finding general acceptance for the preparation of non-metal and metal oxide powders. In contrast, much less effort has been given to aerosol-type syntheses for non-oxide powders despite potentially useful benefits. This dissertation describes the application of two chemical systems in aerosol assisted vapor phase synthesis (AAVS) for the preparation of spherical morphology boron oxynitride, BNxOy, powders that are subsequently converted to spherical morphology boron nitride in a second nitridation step. Chapter 1 describes the AAVS synthesis of BNxOy powders using a reaction of an aqueous boric acid containing aerosol with ammonia at 1000°C. The effect of reactor tube material, total gas flow rate, ammonia concentration, boric acid concentration, and urea addition to the boric acid aerosol on the percent oxygen composition is described. The resulting BNxOy powders contain significant amounts of oxygen that require replacement in a second stage nitridation reaction at elevated temperature under ammonia. The influences of the reaction temperature profile, crucible geometry and transformation additive on final oxygen composition and powder crystallinity are described. Chapter 2 outlines the formation of BNxOy powders from an AAVS reaction between the boron precursor (MeO)3B and ammonia. The formation of the powders is studied as a function of total gas flow rate and ammonia concentration. In all cases the resulting powders contain lower levels of oxygen compared to powders produced from aqueous boric acid aerosols. The conversion of the BNxOy powders in the second stage nitridation reaction with ammonia is examined as a function of crucible geometry, temperature profile and ammonia flow rate. In support of this process, the molecular reaction between (MeO)3B and NH3 was reexamined. The adduct, (MeO)3B·NH3, was isolated and its molecular structure determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The results of these studies provide guidance for more detailed studies that should result in industrial scale synthesis of spherical morphology BN which currently is not formed by standard metallurgical syntheses. This new material has potential applications in several areas including the formation of BN loaded organic polymer composites.

  13. Design and simulation of MEMS based radioisotope converter with electrostatic capacitive energy conversion mechanism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Haisheng San; Zaijun Cheng; Zhiqiang Deng; Zhiwen Zhao; Yanfei Li; Xuyuan Chen

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design and simulation of electrostatic capacitive vibration-to-electricity energy conversion system based on radioisotope Ni 63 that produces low energy beta particles. The electrostatic capacitive energy conversion utilizes a variable capacitor to convert radioisotope energy into electrical energy by mechanical vibration as transformed intermediate. The MEMS capacitor is designed as a radioisotope actuated parallel-plate spring-mass-damping structure fabricated

  14. Modification of hot cells for general purpose heat source assembly at the radioisotope power systems facility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Betty A. Carteret

    1992-01-01

    Eight existing, unused hot cells currently are being modified for use in the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) to assemble 238Pu-fueled heat sources for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). Four air atmosphere cells will be used for storage, decanning, and decontamination of the iridium-clad radioisotope fuel. The remaining four argon atmosphere cells will be used to assemble fuel and graphite components

  15. A compendium of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system and recent programmatic changes

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.L.; McCoy, J.C.

    1996-03-01

    Because RTGs contain significant quantities of radioactive materials, usually plutonium-238 and its decay products, they must be transported in packages built in accordance with 10 CFR 71 (1994). To meet these regulatory requirements, US DOE commissioned Westinghouse Hanford Co. in 1988 to develop a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transportation System (RTGTS) that would fully comply while protecting RTGs from adverse environmental conditions during normal transport conditions (eg, mainly shock and heat). RTGTS is scheduled for completion Dec. 1996 and will be available to support NASA`s Cassini mission to Saturn in Oct. 1997. This paper provides an overview of the RTGTS project, discusses the hardware being produced, and summarizes various programmatic and management innovations required by recent changes at DOE.

  16. Calculated Energy Deposits from the Decay of Tritium and Other Radioisotopes Incorporated into Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bockrath, Richard; Person, Stanley; Funk, Fred

    1968-01-01

    Transmutation of the radioisotope tritium occurs with the production of a low energy electron, having a range in biological material similar to the dimensions of a bacterium. A computer program was written to determine the radiation dose distributions which may be expected within a bacterium as a result of tritium decay, when the isotope has been incorporated into specific regions of the bacterium. A nonspherical model bacterium was used, represented by a cylinder with hemispherical ends. The energy distributions resulting from a wide variety of simulated labeled regions were determined; the results suggested that the nuclear region of a bacterium receives on the average significantly different per decay doses, if the labeled regions were those conceivably produced by the incorporation of thymidine-3H, uracil-3H, or 3H-amino acids. Energy distributions in the model bacterium were also calculated for the decay of incorporated 14carbon, 35sulfur, and 32phosphorous. PMID:5678319

  17. Boron strengthening in FeAl

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, I.; Li, X.; Xiao, H.; Klein, O.; Nelson, C. [Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Thayer School of Engineering; Carleton, R.L.; George, E.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1998-11-01

    The effect of boron on the strength of B2-structured FeAl is considered as a function of composition, grain size and temperature. Boron does not affect the concentrations of antisite atoms or vacancies present, with the former increasing and the latter decreasing with increasing deviation from the stoichiometric composition. When vacancies are absent, the strength increase per at. % B per unit lattice strain, {Delta}{sigma}/({Delta}c x {epsilon}) increases with increasing aluminum concentration, but when vacancies are present (>45 at. % Al), {Delta}{sigma}/({Delta}c x {epsilon}) decreases again. Boron increases grain size strengthening in FeAl. B strengthening is roughly independent of temperature up to the yield strength peak but above the point, when diffusion-assisted deformation occurs, boron strengthening increases dramatically.

  18. Boron dose determination for BNCT using Fricke and EPR dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Ciesielski, B. [Medical Academy, Gdansk (Poland). Dept. of Physics and Biophysics

    1995-02-01

    In Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) the dominant dose delivered to the tumor is due to {alpha} and {sup 7}Li charged particles resulting from a neutron capture by {sup 10}B and is referred to herein as the boron dose. Boron dose is directly attributable to the following two independent factors, one boron concentration and the neutron capture energy dependent cross section of boron, and two the energy spectrum of the neutrons that interact with boron. The neutron energy distribution at a given point is dictated by the incident neutron energy distribution, the depth in tissue, geometrical factors such as beam size and patient`s dimensions. To account for these factors can be accommodated by using Monte Carlo theoretical simulations. However, in conventional experimental BNCT dosimetry, e.g., using TLDs or ionization chambers, it is only possible to estimate the boron dose. To overcome some of the limitations in the conventional dosimetry, modifications in ferrous sulfate dosimetry (Fricke) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) dosimetry in alanine, enable to measure specifically boron dose in a mixed gamma neutron radiation fields. The boron dose, in either of the dosimeters, is obtained as a difference between measurements with boronated and unboronated dosimeters. Since boron participates directly in the measurements, the boron dosimetry reflects the true contribution, integral of the neutron energy spectrum with boron cross section, of the boron dose to the total dose. Both methods are well established and used extensively in dosimetry, they are presented briefly here.

  19. Novel boron nitride hollow nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Gang; Zou, Jin; Liu, Gang; Li, Feng; Wang, Yong; Wang, Lianzhou; Yuan, Xiao-Li; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Lu, Gao Qing

    2008-10-28

    Novel BN hollow nanoribbons (BNHNRs) were fabricated by a simple ZnS nanoribbon templating method. Such BNHNRs have a distinct structure and show unique optical properties, as demonstrated from Raman, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy, when compared with other forms of BN nanostructures. With high crystallinity, the BNHNRs exhibit an extraordinary ultraviolet CL emission at 5.33 eV. Such a property is highly advantageous for optoelectronic applications, particularly in the ultraviolet region, such as blue lasing and light emitting diodes. This templating method has also been extended to synthesize other hollow nanostructures such as boron carbonitride. This study represents a new methodology for fabricating hollow nanostructures with defined crystallinity and unique optical properties. PMID:19206466

  20. Boronline, a new generation of boron meter

    SciTech Connect

    Pirat, P. [Rolls-Royce Company, Meylan (France)

    2011-07-01

    Rolls-Royce is a global business providing integrated power systems for use on land, at sea and in the air. The Group has a balanced business portfolio with leading market positions - civil aerospace, defence aerospace, marine and energy Rolls-Royce understands the challenges of design, procurement, manufacture, operation and in-service support of nuclear reactor plants, with over 50 years of experience through the Royal Navy submarine programme. Rolls-Royce can therefore offer full product life-cycle management for new civil nuclear installations, as well as support to existing installations, including plant lifetime extensions. Rolls-Royce produced for 40 years, Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems of and associated services for nuclear reactors in Europe, including 58 French reactors and others situated in the United States and in others countries, such as China. Rolls-Royce equipped in this domain 200 nuclear reactors in 20 countries. Among all of its nuclear systems, Rolls Royce is presenting to the conference its new generation of on-line boron measurement system, so called Boronline. (authors)

  1. Boron thermal/epithermal neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The development of various particle beams for radiotherapy represents an attempt to improve dose distribution, and to provide high LET radiations which are less sensitive to ambient physical and radiobiological factors such as oxygen tension, cell cycle, and dose rate. In general, a compromise is necessary as effective RBE is reduced in order to spread the dose distribution over the anticipated tumor volume. The approach of delivering stable non-toxic isotopes to tumor, and then activating these atoms subsequently via an external radiation beam has mator advantages; problems associated with high uptake of these isotopes in competing cell pools are obviated, and the general tumor volume can be included in the treatment field of the activating beam. As long as the normal tissues supporting tumor show a low uptake of the isotope to be activated, and as long as the range of the reaction products is short, dose will be restricted to tumor, with a consequent high therapeutic ratio. Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) is generally carried out by activating boron-10 with low energy neutrons. The range of the high LET, low OER particles from the /sup 10/B(n, ..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction is approx. 10..mu.., or one cell diameter, a situation that is optimal for cell killing. Significant advantages may be gained by using the NCT procedure in conjunction with improved tissue penetration provided with epithermal or filtered beams, and new compounds showing physiological binding to tumor.

  2. Thermal neutron scintillators using unenriched boron nitride and zinc sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, J. E.; Cole, A. J.; Kirby, A.; Marsden, E.

    2015-06-01

    Thermal neutron detectors based on powdered zinc sulfide intimately mixed with a neutron capture compound have a history as long as scintillation technique itself. We show that using unenriched boron nitride powder, rather than the more commonly used enriched lithium fluoride, results in detection screens which produce less light but which are very considerably cheaper. Methods of fabricating large areas of this material are presented. The screens are intended for the production of large area low cost neutron detectors as a replacement for helium-3 proportional tubes.

  3. Mechanism of the electrochemical dehydrogenation of hexahydropyrimidine on a boron-doped diamond electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedenyapina, M. D.; Simakova, A. P.; Kuznetsov, V. V.; Makhova, N. N.; Vedenyapin, A. A.

    2015-04-01

    The electrochemical behavior of hexahydropyrimidine (HHP) on a boron-doped diamond electrode was studied. The obtained data were compared with the results of previous studies on the electrooxidation of HHP on platinum and gold electrodes. It was shown that different products can be obtained from one organic substance using different electrode materials.

  4. Effect of boron supplementation on semen quality estimates in mature boars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of dietary boron supplementation on sperm production and semen quality estimates in mature boars. Twelve crossbred boars (Landrace x Large White x Duroc x Hampshire) that were 2.5 +/- 0.2 years of age and 215 +/- 5 kg were randomly assigned to ...

  5. Molecular marker based characterization and genetic diversity of wheat genotypes in relation to boron efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron deficient soils pose a critical problem to wheat production in many areas of the world including Bangladesh and causes significant yield reduction. Therefore, in the present study, 21 diverse wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes collected from three different countries (Bangladesh, India, a...

  6. Atomic-scale dynamics of triangular hole growth in monolayer hexagonal boron nitride under electron irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Gyeong Hee; Park, Hyo Ju; Ryou, Junga; Park, Jinwoo; Lee, Jongyeong; Kim, Gwangwoo; Shin, Hyeon Suk; Bielawski, Christopher W; Ruoff, Rodney S; Hong, Suklyun; Lee, Zonghoon

    2015-06-28

    The production of holes by electron beam irradiation in hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), which has a lattice similar to that of graphene, is monitored over time using atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy. The holes appear to be initiated by the formation of a vacancy of boron and grow in a manner that retains an overall triangular shape. The hole growth process involves the formation of single chains of B and N atoms and is accompanied by the ejection of atoms and bundles of atoms along the hole edges, as well as atom migration. These observations are compared to density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:25960354

  7. Boron isotope systematics of marine sediments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tsuyoshi Ishikawa; Eizo Nakamura

    1993-01-01

    Boron contents and boron isotopic compositions were determined for modern and ancient (Permian to Miocene) marine sediments, including pelagic clay, calcareous ooze, siliceous ooze and neritic clay sediments. delta11B values of modern marine sediments range from -6.6 to +4.80\\/00. Isotopic variation is controlled by the simple mixing of four major constituents, detritus of continental origin, marine smectite, biogenic carbonates and

  8. Facile Synthesis of Ternary Boron Carbonitride Nanotubes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lijie Luo; Libin Mo; Zhangfa Tong; Yongjun Chen

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a novel and facile approach for the synthesis of ternary boron carbonitride (B–C–N) nanotubes was reported.\\u000a Growth occurred by heating simple starting materials of boron powder, zinc oxide powder, and ethanol absolute at 1150 °C under\\u000a a mixture gas flow of nitrogen and hydrogen. As substrate, commercial stainless steel foil with a typical thickness of 0.05 mm\\u000a played an

  9. Boron Nitride Composites By Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hugh O. Pierson

    1975-01-01

    Composites of boron nitride (BN) have been made by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of a BN matrix on a BN felt fiber substrate. Reactant gases were boron trifluoride and ammonia. The composites have a relatively high density (1.70 g\\/cm3), a crystallite size LC = 150 A and an interlayer spacing d002 = 3.35 A. Measurements of elastic modulus and

  10. Silicon carbide-coated boron fibers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luchen Hwan; Steven Suib; Francis Galasso

    1989-01-01

    A study of silicon carbide-coated boron fiber shows that it retained its room-temperature strength after being heated to 1000°C for 24 h in air. This fiber was consolidated successfully in a titanium matrix at 930°C without degradation, although previous results with another silicon carbide-coated boron fiber indicated that there might be a reaction problem at this temperature.

  11. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, E.L.

    1984-11-29

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  12. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, Edward L. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1985-01-01

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  13. Secret of formulating a selective etching or cleaning solution for boron nitride (BN) thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Wing C.

    2004-04-01

    Boron nitride thin film has a very unique characteristic of extremely high chemical inertness. Thus, it is a better hard mask than silicon nitride for aggressive etching solutions, such as the isotropic HF/HNO3/CH3COOH (or HNA) etchant for silicon. However, because of its high chemical inertness, it is also difficult to remove it. Plasma etching with Freon gases can etch the boron nitride film, but it is unselective to silicon, silicon dioxide or silicon nitride. Cleaning up the boron nitride film with plasma etching will usually leave a damaged or foggy surface. A special wet chemical solution has been developed for etching or cleaning boron nitride film selectively. It can etch boron nitride, but not the coatings or substrates of silicon, silicon nitride and silicon dioxide. It is a very strong oxidizing agent consisting of concentrated sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), but different from the common Piranha Etch. It may be even more interesting to understand the logic or secret behind of how to formulate a new selective etching solution. Various chemical and chemical engineering aspects were considered carefully in our development process. These included creating the right electrochemical potential for the etchant, ensuring large differences in chemical kinetics to make the reactions selective, providing proper mass transfer for removing the by products, etc.

  14. Boronization on NSTX using Deuterated Trimethylboron

    SciTech Connect

    W.R. Blanchard; R.C. Gernhardt; H.W. Kugel; P.H. LaMarche

    2002-01-28

    Boronization on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has proved to be quite beneficial with increases in confinement and density, and decreases in impurities observed in the plasma. The boron has been applied to the interior surfaces of NSTX, about every 2 to 3 weeks of plasma operation, by producing a glow discharge in the vacuum vessel using deuterated trimethylboron (TMB) in a 10% mixture with helium. Special NSTX requirements restricted the selection of the candidate boronization method to the use of deuterated boron compounds. Deuterated TMB met these requirements, but is a hazardous gas and special care in the execution of the boronization process is required. This paper describes the existing GDC, Gas Injection, and Torus Vacuum Pumping System hardware used for this process, the glow discharge process, and the automated control system that allows for remote operation to maximize both the safety and efficacy of applying the boron coating. The administrative requirements and the detailed procedure for the setup, operation and shutdown of the process are also described.

  15. Fluorescent sensors based on boronic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christopher R.; James, Tony D.

    1999-05-01

    Sensor systems have long been needed for detecting the presence in solution of certain chemically or biologically important species. Sensors are used in a wide range of applications from simple litmus paper that shows a single color change in acidic or basic environments to complex biological assays that use enzymes, antibodies and antigens to display binding events. With this work the use of boronic acids in the design and synthesis of sensors for saccharides (diols) will be presented. The fluorescent sensory systems rely on photoinduced electron transfer (PET) to modulate the observed fluorescence. When saccharides form cyclic boronate esters with boronic acids, the Lewis acidity of the boronic acid is enhanced and therefore the Lewis acid-base interaction between the boronic acid and a neighboring amine is strengthened. The strength of this acid-base interaction modulates the PET from the amine (acting as a quencher) to anthracene (acting as a fluorophore). These compounds show increased fluorescence at neutral pH through suppression of the PET from nitrogen to anthracene on saccharide binding. The general strategy for the development of saccharide selective systems will be discussed. The potential of the boronic acid based systems will be illustrated using the development of glucose and glucosamine selective fluorescent sensors as examples.

  16. Boosting activation of oxygen molecules on C60 fullerene by boron doping.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiao-Zhi; Zheng, Jia-Jia; Dang, Jing-Shuang; Zhao, Xiang

    2015-02-01

    The activation of oxygen molecules on boron-doped C60 fullerene (C59 B) and the subsequent water formation reaction are systematically investigated by using hybrid density functional calculations. Results indicate that C59 B shows a favorable ability to activate oxygen molecules both kinetically and thermodynamically. The oxygen molecule is first adsorbed on the boron atom, which is identified to be the most reactive site in C59 B for O2 adsorption because of its high positive charge and spin density. The adsorption structure C59 B?O2 can further isomerize to form two products with small reaction barriers. Water formation reactions upon these two structures are energetically favorable and suggest a four-electron mechanism for the oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by C59 B. This work provides a reliable theoretical insight into the catalytic properties of boron-doped fullerene, which is believed to be helpful to explore fullerene catalysts. PMID:25399745

  17. Radioisotope X-ray fluorescence and neutron activation analyses of the trace element concentrations of the rainbow trout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyuz, T.; Bassari, A.; Bolcal, C.; Sener, E.; Yildiz, M.; Kucer, R.; Kaplan, Z.; Dogan, G.; Akyuz, S.

    1999-01-01

    The muscles and livers of the ten rainbow trouts ( Oncorhynchus mykiss; N, 1752) obtained from Sapanca, Aquaculture Facility of Aquatic Products Faculty, The University of Istanbul (Turkey), have been analysed quantitatively for some minor elements using the radioisotope energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) methods. It was found that samples contain Na, K, Ca, Sc, Cs, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Au, La and Ce in different amounts. Comparison of the results with those of reference river fish samples indicated that agricultural rainbow trout samples from Sapanca region have higher Fe level.

  18. A Novel Method of Boron Delivery Using Sodium Iodide Symporter for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    PubMed Central

    KUMAR, Sanath; FREYTAG, Svend O.; BARTON, Kenneth N.; BURMEISTER, Jay; JOINER, Michael C.; SEDGHI, Bijan; MOVSAS, Benjamin; BINNS, Peter J.; KIM, Jae Ho; BROWN, Stephen L.

    2013-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) effectiveness depends on the preferential sequestration of boron in cancer cells relative to normal tissue cells. We present a novel strategy for sequestering boron using an adenovirus expressing the sodium iodide symporter (NIS). Human glioma grown subcutaneously in athymic mice and orthotopic rat brain tumors were transfected with NIS using a direct tumor injection of adenovirus. Boron bound as sodium tetrafluoroborate (NaBF4) was administered systemically several days after transfection. Tumors were excised hours later and assessed for boron concentration using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. In the human glioma transfected with NIS, boron concentration was more than 10 fold higher with 100 mg/kg of NaBF4, compared to tumor not transfected. In the orthotopic tumor model, the presence of NIS conferred almost 4 times the boron concentration in rat tumors transfected with human virus compared with contralateral normal brain not transfected. We conclude that adenovirus expressing NIS has the potential to be used as a novel boron delivery agent and should be explored for future clinical applications. PMID:20921830

  19. Boron-nitride and boron-carbonitride nanotubes: synthesis, characterization and theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raul Arenal; Xavier Blase; Annick Loiseau

    2010-01-01

    We present in this review a joint experimental and theoretical overview of the synthesis techniques and properties of boron-nitride (BN) and boron-carbonitride (BCN) nanotubes. While their tubular structure is similar to that of their carbon analogues, we show that their electronic properties are significantly different. BN tubes are wide band gap insulators while BCN systems can be semiconductors with a

  20. The effect of boron deficiency on gene expression and boron compartmentalization in sugarbeet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NIP5, BOR1, NIP6, and WRKY6 genes were investigated for their role in boron deficiency in sugar beet, each with a proposed role in boron use in model plant species. All genes showed evidence of polymorphism in fragment size and gene expression in the target genomic DNA and cDNA libraries, with no co...

  1. Boron site preference in ternary Ta and Nb boron silicides

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Atta U. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 42, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Nunes, Carlos A. [Escola de Engenharia de Lorena (EEL), Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Polo Urbo-Industrial Gleba AI-6, Caixa Postal 116, 12602-810 Lorena, SP (Brazil); Coelho, Gilberto C. [Escola de Engenharia de Lorena (EEL), Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Polo Urbo-Industrial Gleba AI-6, Caixa Postal 116, 12602-810 Lorena, SP (Brazil); Mestrado Profissional em Materiais, Centro Universitario de Volta Redonda, Av. Paulo Erlei Alves Abrantes 1325, 27240-560 Volta Redonda-RJ (Brazil); Suzuki, Paulo A. [Escola de Engenharia de Lorena (EEL), Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Polo Urbo-Industrial Gleba AI-6, Caixa Postal 116, 12602-810 Lorena, SP (Brazil); Grytsiv, Andriy [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 42, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Bourree, Francoise [Laboratoire L. Brillouin, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Giester, Gerald [Institute of Mineralogy and Crystallography, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse14, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Rogl, Peter F., E-mail: peter.franz.rogl@univie.ac.at [Institute of Physical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 42, A-1090 Wien (Austria)

    2012-06-15

    X-ray single crystal (XSC) and neutron powder diffraction data (NPD) were used to elucidate boron site preference for five ternary phases. Ta{sub 3}Si{sub 1-x}B{sub x} (x=0.112(4)) crystallizes with the Ti{sub 3}P-type (space group P4{sub 2}/n) with B-atoms sharing the 8g site with Si atoms. Ta{sub 5}Si{sub 3-x} (x=0.03(1); Cr{sub 5}B{sub 3}- type) crystallizes with space group I4/mcm, exhibiting a small amount of vacancies on the 4a site. Both, Ta{sub 5}(Si{sub 1-x}B{sub x}){sub 3}, x=0.568(3), and Nb{sub 5}(Si{sub 1-x}B{sub x}){sub 3}, x=0.59(2), are part of solid solutions of M{sub 5}Si{sub 3} with Cr{sub 5}B{sub 3}-type into the ternary M-Si-B systems (M=Nb or Ta) with B replacing Si on the 8h site. The D8{sub 8}-phase in the Nb-Si-B system crystallizes with the Ti{sub 5}Ga{sub 4}-type revealing the formula Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3}B{sub 1-x} (x=0.292(3)) with B partially filling the voids in the 2b site of the Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3} parent type. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structures of a series of compounds have been solved from X-ray single crystal diffractometry revealing details on the boron incorporation. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of a series of compounds have been solved by X-ray single crystal diffractometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ta{sub 3}(Si{sub 1-x}B{sub x}) (x=0.112) crystallizes with the Ti{sub 3}P-type, B and Si atoms randomly share the 8g site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structure of Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3}B{sub 1-x} (x=0.292; Ti{sub 5}Ga{sub 4}-type) was solved from NPD.

  2. Utilizing Radioisotope Power System Waste Heat for Spacecraft Thermal Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantano, David R.; Dottore, Frank; Geng, Steven M.; Schrieber, Jeffrey G.; Tobery, E. Wayne; Palko, Joseph L.

    2005-01-01

    One of the advantages of using a Radioisotope Power System (RPS) for deep space or planetary surface missions is the readily available waste heat, which can be used to maintain electronic components within a controlled temperature range, to warm propulsion tanks and mobility actuators, and to gasify liquid propellants. Previous missions using Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) dissipated a very large quantity of waste heat due to the relatively low efficiency of the thermoelectric conversion technology. The next generation RPSs, such as the 110-watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) will have much higher conversion efficiencies than their predecessors and therefore may require alternate approaches to transferring waste heat to the spacecraft. RTGs, with efficiencies of approx. 6 to 7% and 200 C housing surface temperatures, would need to use large and heavy radiator heat exchangers to transfer the waste heat to the internal spacecraft components. At the same time, sensitive spacecraft instruments must be shielded from the thermal radiation by using the heat exchangers or additional shields. The SRG110, with an efficiency around 22% and 50 C nominal housing surface temperature, can use the available waste heat more efficiently by more direct heat transfer methods such as heat pipes, thermal straps, or fluid loops. The lower temperatures allow the SRG110 much more flexibility to the spacecraft designers in configuring the generator without concern of overheating nearby scientific instruments, thereby eliminating the need for thermal shields. This paper will investigate using a high efficiency SRG110 for spacecraft thermal management and outline potential methods in several conceptual missions (Lunar Rover, Mars Rover, and Titan Lander) to illustrate the advantages with regard to ease of assembly, less complex interfaces, and overall mass savings.

  3. Radioisotope Stirling Generator Options for Pluto Fast Flyby Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    1993-10-01

    The preceding paper described conceptual designs and analytical results for five Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) options for the Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) mission, and the present paper describes three Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) options for the same mission. The RSG options are based on essentially the same radioisotope heat source modules used in previously flown RTGs and on designs and analyses of a 75-watt free-piston Stirling engine produced by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) for NASA's Lewis Research Center. The integrated system design options presented were generated in a Fairchild Space study sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Special Applications, in support of ongoing PFF mission and spacecraft studies that the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is conducting for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). That study's NASA-directed goal is to reduce the spacecraft mass from its baseline value of 166 kg to ~110 kg, which implies a mass goal of less than 10 kg for a power source able to deliver 69 watts(e) at the end of the 9.2-year mission. In general, the Stirling options were found to be lighter than the thermoelectric options described in the preceding paper. But they are less mature, requiring more development, and entailing greater programmatic risk. The Stirling power system mass ranged from 7.3 kg (well below the 10-kg goal) for a non-redundant system to 11.3 kg for a redundant system able to maintain full power if one of its engines fails. In fact, the latter system could deliver as much as 115 watts(e) if desired by the mission planners. There are 5 copies in the file.

  4. Development of Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Jack; Wood, J. Gary; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2007-01-01

    Under the joint sponsorship of the Department of Energy and NASA, a radioisotope power system utilizing Stirling power conversion technology is being developed for potential future space missions. The higher conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle compared with that of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) used in previous missions (Viking, Pioneer, Voyager, Galileo, Ulysses, Cassini, and New Horizons) offers the advantage of a four-fold reduction in PuO2 fuel, thereby saving cost and reducing radiation exposure to support personnel. With the advancement of state-of-the-art Stirling technology development under the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) project, the Stirling Radioisotope Generator program has evolved to incorporate the advanced Stirling convertor (ASC), provided by Sunpower, into an engineering unit. Due to the reduced envelope and lighter mass of the ASC compared to the previous Stirling convertor, the specific power of the flight generator is projected to increase from 3.5 to 7 We/kg, along with a 25 percent reduction in generator length. Modifications are being made to the ASC design to incorporate features for thermal, mechanical, and electrical integration with the engineering unit. These include the heat collector for hot end interface, cold-side flange for waste heat removal and structural attachment, and piston position sensor for ASC control and power factor correction. A single-fault tolerant, active power factor correction controller is used to synchronize the Stirling convertors, condition the electrical power from AC to DC, and to control the ASCs to maintain operation within temperature and piston stroke limits. Development activities at Sunpower and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are also being conducted on the ASC to demonstrate the capability for long life, high reliability, and flight qualification needed for use in future missions.

  5. Radioisotope Stirling Generator Options for Pluto Fast Flyby Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred

    2012-01-19

    The preceding paper described conceptual designs and analytical results for five Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) options for the Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) mission, and the present paper describes three Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) options for the same mission. The RSG options are based on essentially the same radioisotope heat source modules used in previously flown RTGs and on designs and analyses of a 75-watt free-piston Stirling engine produced by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) for NASA's Lewis Research Center. The integrated system design options presented were generated in a Fairchild Space study sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Special Applications, in support of ongoing PFF mission and spacecraft studies that the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is conducting for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). That study's NASA-directed goal is to reduce the spacecraft mass from its baseline value of 166 kg to ~110 kg, which implies a mass goal of less than 10 kg for a power source able to deliver 69 watts(e) at the end of the 9.2-year mission. In general, the Stirling options were found to be lighter than the thermoelectric options described in the preceding paper. But they are less mature, requiring more development, and entailing greater programmatic risk. The Stirling power system mass ranged from 7.3 kg (well below the 10-kg goal) for a non-redundant system to 11.3 kg for a redundant system able to maintain full power if one of its engines fails. In fact, the latter system could deliver as much as 115 watts(e) if desired by the mission planners. There are 2 copies in the file.

  6. Detection of bone disease in dogs by radioisotope scanning 

    E-print Network

    Morris, Earl Louis

    1971-01-01

    DETECTION OZ BONE DISEASE IN DOGS BY RADIOISOTOPE SCANNING A Thesis EARL LOUIS MORRIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8cM University in partial fulfillment of' the requirement for the degree of MASTER OP SCIENCE May 1971 Major... Subjeotc Veterinary Physiology DETECTION OP BONE DISEASE IN DOGS BY EULDIOISOTOPE SO~NING 4 Thesis EARL LOUIS MORRIS approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Hea of Depa tment Mem er Member Member May 1971 ABSTRACT Detection oi...

  7. Analytical predictions of RTG power degradation. [Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noon, E. L.; Raag, V.

    1979-01-01

    The DEGRA computer code that is based on a mathematical model which predicts performance and time-temperature dependent degradation of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator is discussed. The computer code has been used to predict performance and generator degradation for the selenide Ground Demonstration Unit (GDS-1) and the generator used in the Galileo Project. Results of parametric studies of load voltage vs generator output are examined as well as the I-V curve and the resulting predicted power vs voltage. The paper also discusses the increased capability features contained in DEGRA2 and future plans for expanding the computer code performance.

  8. Parametric System Model for a Stirling Radioisotope Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    A Parametric System Model (PSM) was created in order to explore conceptual designs, the impact of component changes and power level on the performance of the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). Using the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS approximately 250 Wth) modules as the thermal building block from which a SRG is conceptualized, trade studies are performed to understand the importance of individual component scaling on isotope usage. Mathematical relationships based on heat and power throughput, temperature, mass, and volume were developed for each of the required subsystems. The PSM uses these relationships to perform component- and system-level trades.

  9. Radioisotope bone scanning in a case of sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Cinti, D.C.; Hawkins, H.B.; Slavin, J.D. Jr.

    1985-03-01

    The application of radioisotope scanning to osseous involvement from systemic sarcoidosis has been infrequently described in the scientific literature. Most commonly, the small bones of the hands and feet are affected if sarcoidosis involves the skeleton. Nonetheless, there are also occasional manifestations of sarcoid in the skull, long bones, and vertebral bodies. This paper describes a case of sarcoid involving the lung parenchyma with multiple lesions in the skull and ribs demonstrated by bone scanning with Tc-99m MDP. Following treatment with steroids, the bone scan showed complete resolution of the rib lesions and almost complete resolution of the lesions in the calvarium.

  10. Ceramic silicon-boron-carbon fibers from organic silicon-boron-polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, Salvatore R. (inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Novel high strength ceramic fibers derived from boron, silicon, and carbon organic precursor polymers are discussed. The ceramic fibers are thermally stable up to and beyond 1200 C in air. The method of preparation of the boron-silicon-carbon fibers from a low oxygen content organosilicon boron precursor polymer of the general formula Si(R2)BR(sup 1) includes melt-spinning, crosslinking, and pyrolysis. Specifically, the crosslinked (or cured) precursor organic polymer fibers do not melt or deform during pyrolysis to form the silicon-boron-carbon ceramic fiber. These novel silicon-boron-carbon ceramic fibers are useful in high temperature applications because they retain tensile and other properties up to 1200 C, from 1200 to 1300 C, and in some cases higher than 1300 C.

  11. Femtosecond-laser-induced destruction of boron-nitride nanotubes and boron-nitride doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauerhenne, Bernd; Eschstruth, Nils; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S.; Garcia, Martin E.

    2013-11-01

    By means of first principles calculations we studied the intense femtosecond-laser excitation of several boron­ nitride nanotubes and a boron-nitride doped graphene layer up to irradiation levels where these structures disintegrate. We performed molecular dynamics simulations using our in-house Code for Highly excited Valence Electron Systems (CHIVES). For different boron-nitride nanotubes we determined the damage threshold in terms of the electronic temperature and the absorbed energy per atom. We found that all nanotubes studied were destroyed in the first 200 fs after an ultrafast laser excitation heating the electrons to 108 mHa (34103 K). Some tubes also disintegrated at lower electronic temperatures. For the boron-nitride doped graphene we found that at a laser-induced electronic temperature of 100 mHa (31577 K) bonds break and the boron-nitride dimer leaves the structure.

  12. Present status of boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, J; Sjöberg, S; Larsson, B S

    1992-01-01

    The neutron capture reaction 10B(1n,4He)7Li produces two energetic particles, 4He2+ and 7Li3+ that are strongly cell toxic. Due to the short range of these nuclear fragments (5-9 microns) mainly those cells that have bound or internalized a 10B-containing substance are growth-inactivated. The most critical and difficult step in an efficient boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is the tumour targeting. It is today possible to synthesize a large number of boron compounds and conjugate them to tumour-seeking macromolecules, such as monoclonal antibodies or different polypeptides. The boron-containing substances presently considered for therapy are sulfhydryl boron hydride (BSH) and boron-phenylalanine, (BPA) for the treatment of gliomas and malignant melanomas respectively. Other boronated compounds considered are ligands for receptor-amplified tumour cells, antibodies for tumour cells with specific antigens and thioureas for treatment of melanotic melanomas. The required boron concentration is given by the relative dose due to neutron capture in 10B and that of the competing capture reactions in nitrogen and hydrogen. Capture in nitrogen produces protons with a range of about 10-11 microns and this gives a radiation dose to all cells in the neutron activated area. Calculations show that the local concentration of 10B near the critical radiation target, DNA, must be higher than 10 ppm (10 micrograms/g). Increased emphasis will be put on the development of combinations of treatments that fulfil the requirements for attacking the microscopic spread of the tumour. PMID:1290630

  13. Potent and selective inhibitors of the proteasome: Dipeptidyl boronic acids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julian Adams; Mark Behnke; Shaowu Chen; Amy A. Cruickshank; Lawrence R. Dick; Louis Grenier; Janice M. Klunder; Yu-Ting Ma; Louis Plamondon; Ross L. Stein

    1998-01-01

    Potent and selective dipeptidyl boronic acid proteasome inhibitors are described. As compared to peptidyl aldehyde compounds, boronic acids in this series display dramatically enhanced potency. Compounds such as 15 are promising new therapeutics for treatment of cancer and inflammatory diseases.

  14. Fatigue of boron-aluminum composites bonds and joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    Study examines effects of boron filament diameter on bonds and joints in boron-aluminum composite. Data include static strength, fatigue, and dynamic moduli of elasticity. Manson-Coffin analyses and metallurgical and fracture surface evaluation were also performed.

  15. [Liposomal boron delivery system for neutron capture therapy].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2008-02-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary cancer treatment based on the nuclear reaction of two essentially nontoxic species, (10)B and thermal neutrons. High accumulation and selective delivery of boron into tumor tissue are the most important requirements to achieve efficient neutron capture therapy of cancers. This review focuses on the liposomal boron delivery system (BDS) as a recent promising approach that meets these requirements for BNCT. BDS involves two strategies: (1) encapsulation of boron in the aqueous core of liposomes and (2) accumulation of boron in the liposomal bilayer. Various boronated liposomes have been developed and significant boron accumulation into tumor tissue with high tumor/blood boron ratios has been achieved by BDS. PMID:18239367

  16. Doping and Raman Characterization of Boron and Phosphorus Atoms in

    E-print Network

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Doping and Raman Characterization of Boron and Phosphorus Atoms in Germanium Nanowires Naoki Fukata. The chemical bonding states and electrical activity of boron (B) and phosphorus (P) atoms in germanium

  17. Analysis, Optimization, and Assessment of Radioisotope Thermophotovoltaic System Design for an Illustrative Space Mission

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alfred Schock; Meera Mukunda; G. Summers

    1994-01-01

    A companion paper presented at this conference described the design of a Radioisotope Thermophotovoltaic (RTPV) Generator for an illustrative space mission (Pluto Fast Flyby). It presented a detailed design of an integrated system consisting of a radioisotope heat source, a thermophotovoltaic converter, and an optimized heat rejection system. The present paper describes the thermal, electrical, and structural analyses which led

  18. Radioisotope thermophotovoltaic system design and its application to an illustrative space mission

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Schock; V. Kumar

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes the results of a DOE-sponsored design study of a radioisotope thermophotovoltaic generator (RTPV), to complement similar studies of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) and Stirling Generators (RSGs) previously published by the author. Instead of conducting a generic study, it was decided to focus the design effort by directing it at a specific illustrative space mission, Pluto Fast Flyby

  19. Analysis, optimization, and assessment of radioisotope thermophotovoltaic system design for an illustrative space mission

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Schock; M. Mukunda; G. Summers

    1995-01-01

    A companion paper presented at this conference described the design of a Radioisotope Thermophotovoltaic (RTPV) Generator for an illustrative space mission (Pluto Fast Flyby). It presented a detailed design of an integrated system consisting of a radioisotope heat source, a thermophotovoltaic converter, and an optimized heat rejection system. The present paper describes the thermal, electrical, and structural analyses which led

  20. Future planetary missions potentially requiring Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondt, Jack F.; Nesmith, Bill J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the potential Radioisotope Power System, (RPS), technology requirements for future missions being planned for NASA's Solar System Exploration (SSE) theme. Many missions to the outer planets (Jupiter and beyond) require completion of the work on advanced radioisotope power systems (ARPS) now underway in NASA's Deep Space Systems Technology Program. The power levels for the ARPS can be divided into four classes. Forty to one hundred milliwatt-class provides both thermal and electric power for small in situ science laboratories on the surface of bodies in the solar system. One to two watt class for surface and aerobot science laboratories. Ten to twenty-watt class for micro satellites in orbit, surface science stations and aerobots. One hundred to two hundred watt class for orbiter science spacecraft, for drilling core samples, for powering subsurface hydrobots and cryobots on accessible bodies and for data handling and communicating data from small orbiters, surface laboratories, aerobots and hydrobots back to Earth. Using the most optimistic solar-based power system instead of advanced RPSs pushes the launch masses of these missions beyond the capability of affordable launch vehicles. Advanced RPS is also favored over solar power for obtaining comet samples on extended-duration missions. .

  1. Industrial radiation and radioisotope gauging techniques and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, R.P. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The radiation and radioisotope gauging industry in the United States has primarily followed a path of development solely by the private sector. It has remained highly proprietary in nature, which is opposite to the path taken by many other countries. In other countries radiation gauge development has been controlled in large part by government-sponsored research and development, which has spawned many more publications in the open literature. Historically, some of the leaders have been Great Britain, Poland, France, Russia, and Australia. This has possibly led to the misconception that the development of this technology is being dominated by countries outside the United States. This is not a healthy situation-it would be good to see our industry begin to publish more in the open literature and to sponsor more research at universities. In efforts to promote more open-literature publication, the American Nuclear Society (ANS) sponsored a topical meeting on Industrial Radiation and Radioisotope Measurement Applications (IRRMA) in 1988 that was held again in 1992.

  2. Sodium Variable Conductance Heat Pipe for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Walker, Kara

    2009-01-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling convertor provides this cooling. If the converter stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, and also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) has been designed to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor in an Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). When the Stirling convertor is turned off, the VCHP will activate when the temperatures rises 30 C above the setpoint temperature. A prototype VCHP with sodium as the working fluid was fabricated and tested in both gravity aided and against gravity conditions for a nominal heater head temperature of 790 C. The results show very good agreement with the predictions and validate the model. The gas front was located at the exit of the reservoir when heater head temperature was 790 C while cooling was ON, simulating an operating Advanced Stirling Converter (ASC). When cooling stopped, the temperature increased by 30 C, allowing the gas front to move past the radiator, which transferred the heat to the case. After resuming the cooling flow, the front returned at the initial location turning OFF the VCHP. The against gravity working conditions showed a colder reservoir and faster transients.

  3. Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Options for Pluto Fast Flyby Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schock, Alfred

    1994-07-01

    A small spacecraft design for the Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) mission is under study by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), for a possible launch as early as 1998. JPL's 1992 baseline design calls for a power source able to furnish an energy output of 3963 kWh and a power output of 69 Watts(e) at the end of the 9.2-year mission. Satisfying those demands is made difficult because NASA management has set a goal of reducing the spacecraft mass from a baseline value of 166 kg to ~110 kg, which implies a mass goal of less than 10 kg for the power source. To support the ongoing NASA/JPL studies, the Department of Energy's Office of Special Applications (DOE/OSA) commissioned Fairchild Space to prepare and analyze conceptual designs of radioisotope power systems for the PFF mission. Thus far, a total of eight options employing essentially the same radioisotope heat source modules were designed and subjected to thermal, electrical, structural, and mass analyses by Fairchild. Five of these - employing thermoelectric converters - are described in the present paper, and three - employing free-piston Stirling converters - are described in the companion paper presented next. The system masses of the thermoelectric options ranged from 19.3 kg to 10.2 kg. In general, the options requiring least development are the heaviest, and the lighter options require more development with greater programmatic risk.

  4. High Temperature Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarau, Calin; Walker, Kara L.; Anderson, William G.

    2009-01-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling convertor provides this cooling. If the Stirling convertor stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) is under development to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor. The status of the ongoing effort in developing this technology is presented in this paper. An earlier, preliminary design had a radiator outside the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) casing, used NaK as the working fluid, and had the reservoir located on the cold side adapter flange. The revised design has an internal radiator inside the casing, with the reservoir embedded inside the insulation. A large set of advantages are offered by this new design. In addition to reducing the overall size and mass of the VCHP, simplicity, compactness and easiness in assembling the VCHP with the ASRG are significantly enhanced. Also, the permanently elevated temperatures of the entire VCHP allows the change of the working fluid from a binary compound (NaK) to single compound (Na). The latter, by its properties, allows higher performance and further mass reduction of the system. Preliminary design and analysis shows an acceptable peak temperature of the ASRG case of 140 C while the heat losses caused by the addition of the VCHP are 1.8 W.

  5. The modification of polyurethane foams using new boroorganic polyols (II) polyurethane foams from boron-modified hydroxypropyl urea derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zarzyka, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    The work focuses on research related to determination of application possibility of new, ecofriendly boroorganic polyols in rigid polyurethane foams production. Polyols were obtained from hydroxypropyl urea derivatives esterified with boric acid and propylene carbonate. The influence of esterification type on properties of polyols and next on polyurethane foams properties was determined. Nitrogen and boron impacts on the foams' properties were discussed, for instance, on their physical, mechanical, and electric properties. Boron presence causes improvement of dimensional stability and thermal stability of polyurethane foams. They can be applied even at temperature 150 °C. Unfortunately, introducing boron in polyurethanes foams affects deterioration of their water absorption, which increases as compared to the foams that do not contain boron. However, presence of both boron and nitrogen determines the decrease of the foams combustibility. Main impact on the decrease combustibility of the obtained foams has nitrogen presence, but in case of proper boron and nitrogen ratio their synergic activity on the combustibility decrease can be easily seen. PMID:24587721

  6. The Modification of Polyurethane Foams Using New Boroorganic Polyols (II) Polyurethane Foams from Boron-Modified Hydroxypropyl Urea Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The work focuses on research related to determination of application possibility of new, ecofriendly boroorganic polyols in rigid polyurethane foams production. Polyols were obtained from hydroxypropyl urea derivatives esterified with boric acid and propylene carbonate. The influence of esterification type on properties of polyols and next on polyurethane foams properties was determined. Nitrogen and boron impacts on the foams' properties were discussed, for instance, on their physical, mechanical, and electric properties. Boron presence causes improvement of dimensional stability and thermal stability of polyurethane foams. They can be applied even at temperature 150°C. Unfortunately, introducing boron in polyurethanes foams affects deterioration of their water absorption, which increases as compared to the foams that do not contain boron. However, presence of both boron and nitrogen determines the decrease of the foams combustibility. Main impact on the decrease combustibility of the obtained foams has nitrogen presence, but in case of proper boron and nitrogen ratio their synergic activity on the combustibility decrease can be easily seen. PMID:24587721

  7. Role of Boron in Plant Growth and its Transport Mechanisms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kyoko Miwa; Toru Fujiwara

    \\u000a In the last decade, molecular understandings of boron transport and boron function in plants have greatly advanced. Crosslinking\\u000a of pectic polysaccharide rhamonogalacturonan-II (RG-II) via boron was shown to be essential for normal plant growth. Two types\\u000a of boron (B) transport molecules, BORs and NIPs, localized to plasma membrane were identified from Arabidopsis thaliana. BOR1 was identified as the first borate\\/boric

  8. Tersoff Potential Parameters for Simulating Cubic Boron Carbonitrides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katsuyuki Matsunaga; Craig Fisher; Hideaki Matsubara

    2000-01-01

    We have developed Tersoff potential parameters for boron in order to simulate cubic boron carbonitride systems by molecular dynamics. Combined with parameters for C and N available from the literature, our parameters are shown to reproduce the lattice parameters and bulk moduli of boron nitride and boron carbonitride (C0.33(BN)0.67) with good accuracy. By simulating several systems of formula (Cx(BN)1-x) over

  9. Polyethylene/Boron Composites for Radiation Shielding Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Courtney; Grulke, Eric [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Burgett, Eric; Hertel, Nolan [Neely Nuclear Research Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2008-01-21

    Multifunctional composites made with boron are absorbers of low energy nuetrons, and could be used for structural shielding materials. Polyethylene/boron carbide composites were fabricated using conventional polymer processing techniques, and were evaluated for mechanical and radiation shielding properties. Addition of neat boron carbide (powder and nanoparticles) to an injection molding grade HPDE showed superior mechanical properties compared to neat HDPE. Radiation shielding measurements of a 2 wt% boron carbide composite were improved over those of the neat polyethylene.

  10. Development of improved analytical procedures for boron purification: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, J.D.; Fossey, J.L.; Hinds, S.C.; Lantz, L.L.; Smith, R.E.

    1988-06-01

    Three new analytical methods for boron powder certification were developed and evaluated during this project. First, the boric acid content of the powder was determined by an acid-base titration method. Second, the moisture content of boron samples was measured with a moisture evolution analyzer. Third, boron powder samples were acid digested in a microwave oven. 11 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  11. Comprehensive Analysis of Chemical Bonding in Boron Clusters

    E-print Network

    Simons, Jack

    Comprehensive Analysis of Chemical Bonding in Boron Clusters DMITRY YU. ZUBAREV, ALEXANDER I a comprehensive analysis of chemical bonding in pure boron clusters. It is now established in joint experimental and theoretical studies that pure boron clusters are planar or quasi-planar at least up to twenty atoms

  12. One-dimensional boron nanostructures: Prediction, synthesis, characterizations, and applications

    E-print Network

    Gao, Hongjun

    One-dimensional boron nanostructures: Prediction, synthesis, characterizations, and applications January 2010, Accepted 24th March 2010 DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00051e One-dimensional (1D) boron nanostructures nanomaterials. In this article, we review the current progress that has been made on 1D boron nanostructures

  13. Atomic structure of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite doped with boron

    E-print Network

    Kwak, Juhyoun

    Atomic structure of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite doped with boron Eunkyung Kim, Ilwhan Oh 3 September 2001; accepted 3 September 2001 Abstract Boron-doped carbon was prepared by the high of the boron doping on the HOPG structure, several experimental tools were employed such as X-ray photoelectron

  14. Aspects ol the Estimation ol Physical Properties ol Boron Compounds

    E-print Network

    Simons, Jack

    CHAPTER 21 Aspects ol the Estimation ol Physical Properties ol Boron Compounds by the Use ol Species Containing Boron, Hydrogen, and Sometimes Carbon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 495 3. Estimation ot the Heats ot Vaporization ot Boron-Containing SpecieswithIHetero"-atoms 501 4. Estimation ot

  15. Boron isotopic composition and concentration in modern marine carbonates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. G. Hemming; G. N. Hanson

    1992-01-01

    The boron isotopic compositions and boron concentrations of selected modern marine carbonates were analysed by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry with a 2 reproducibility of standards and samples better than 0.7%. It was found that the boron isotopic compositions of modern marine carbonates fall within a relatively narrow range (+22.1 ± 3%. relative to NBS SRM951 boric acid standard) for

  16. Boron alloying in GaN Laurian Escalantia)

    E-print Network

    Hart, Gus

    Boron alloying in GaN Laurian Escalantia) and Gus L. W. Hart Department of Physics and Astronomy effects of adding up to 6% boron to zinc-blende GaN. We found that the band gap increases monotonically with boron incorporation, in agreement with experiment. A composition-independent band-gap bowing parameter

  17. Photoinduced doping in heterostructures of graphene and boron nitride

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Guangyu

    Photoinduced doping in heterostructures of graphene and boron nitride L. Ju1 , J. Velasco Jr1 , E in van der Waals heterostructures consisting of graphene and boron nitride layers. It enables flex- ible that this photoinduced doping maintains the high carrier mobility of the graphene/ boron nitride heterostructure, thus

  18. Effect of magnesium on the burning characteristics of boron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-zhong; Xi, Jian-fei; Yang, Wei-juan; Hu, You-rui; Zhang, Yan-wei; Wang, Yang; Zhou, Jun-hu

    2014-03-01

    Boron is an attractive fuel for propellants and explosives because of its high energy density. However, boron particles are difficult to combust because of inhibiting oxide layers that cover the particles. The use of magnesium as additives has been shown to promote boron oxidation. In this study, laser ignition facility and thermobalance were used to investigate the effect of magnesium on the burning characteristics of boron particles. The influences of magnesium addition on sample combustion flame, boron ignition delay time, boron combustion efficiency and initial temperature of boron oxidation. Results show that all Mg/B samples exhibit the same type of flame structure, i.e., a bright plume surrounded by green radiation which is interpreted as BO2 emission. The combustion flame intensity of a sample increases with the increasing magnesium content of boron particles. An increase in magnesium content results in a decrease and a subsequent increase in boron ignition delay time. (Mg/B)0.2 has a minimum ignition delay time of ~48 ms. Boron combustion efficiency increases with increasing magnesium addition. (Mg/B)0.5 shows a maximum boron combustion efficiency of ~64.2%. Magnesium addition decreases the initial temperature of boron oxidation.

  19. X-ray diffraction investigation of ultrafine boron nitride powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gurov, S.V.; Chukalin, V.I.; Rezchikova, T.V.; Torbov, V.J.; Troitskii, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an x-ray diffraction analysis of ultrafine boron nitride powders of different mean particle sizes. Diffraction spectra of the ultrafine boron nitride powders were obtained using a DRON-1 apparatus. The experimental facts are indicative of a turbostratic character of deformation of the hexagonal lattice of ultrafinely divided boron nitride.

  20. Growing Evidence for Human Health Benefits of Boron

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Forrest H. Nielsen; Susan L. Meacham

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence from a variety of experimental models shows that boron is a bioactive and beneficial (perhaps essential) element for humans. Reported beneficial actions of boron include arthritis alleviation or risk reduction, bone growth and maintenance, central nervous system function, cancer risk reduction, hormone facilitation, and immune response, inflammation, and oxidative stress modulation. The diverse effects of boron indicate that

  1. Dietary boron: possible roles in human and animal physiology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Boron is a bioactive element of low molecular weight. Since discovery of the first boron biomolecule, boromycin, in 1967, several other similar biomolecules are now well-characterized. Most recently described was a bacterial cell-to-cell communication signal that requires boron, autoinducer-II. Boro...

  2. Boron Removal in Seawater Desalination by Reverse Osmosis Membranes – the Impacts of Operating Conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Köseo?lu; N. Kabay; M. Yüksel; S. Sarp; Ö. Arar; M. Kitis

    \\u000a Production of drinking water through seawater desalination using reverse osmosis (RO) membranes is becoming increasingly attractive\\u000a especially in coastal areas with limited freshwater sources. However, one challenge in such conventional desalination RO plants\\u000a is the difficulty of meeting boron standards in product waters. Therefore, most of the current desalination plants employ\\u000a additional treatment steps including pH adjustment of feedwater, dilution

  3. Estimation of boron isotope ratios using high resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltsche, Helmar; Prattes, Karl; Zischka, Michael; Knapp, Günter

    2009-04-01

    In the production of 10B enriched steels, the production-recycling process needs to be closely monitored for inadvertent mix-up of materials with different B isotope levels. A quick and simple method for the estimation of boron isotope ratios in high alloyed steels using high resolution continuum source flame AAS (HR-CS-FAAS) was developed. On the 208.9 nm B line the wavelength of the peak absorption of 10B and 11B differs by 2.5 pm. The wavelength of the peak absorption of boron was determined by fitting a Gauss function through spectra simultaneously recorded by HR-CS-FAAS. It was shown that a linear correlation between the wavelength of the peak absorption and the isotope ratio exists and that this correlation is independent of the total boron concentration. Internal spectroscopic standards were used to compensate for monochromator drift and monochromator resolution changes. Accuracy and precision of the analyzed samples were thereby increased by a factor of up to 1.3. Three steel reference materials and one boric acid CRM, each certified for the boron isotope ratio were used to validate the procedure.

  4. Certain features of the preparation of boron powders in x-ray diffraction investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Tsagareishvili, G.V.; Avlokhashvili, D.A.; Bairamashvili, I.A.; Dolidze, T.V.; Gabuniya, D.L.; Nakashidze, T.G.; Oganezov, K.A.; Tabutsidze, M.L.

    1985-05-01

    It is known that elemental boron is characterized by an increased reaction capacity toward oxygen. Boron powders oxidize especially intensely. Under real conditions, boron powders always contain a certain quantity of oxide phase (primarily in the form of B2O3), the quantity of which depends on their degree of dispersion, the method of production, and the storage conditions. In long exposure to air, as the result of its high hygroscopicity, boric anhydride reacts with particles of moisture, as the result of which orthoboric acid is formed. The mass absorption coefficient of x-rays by elemental boron is significantly lower than by its compounds (anhydride and acid). The presence on the surface of particles of boric anhydride and products of its hydration, the total quantity of which in the powder is large, cannot affect the result of x-ray diffraction investigations of the powders. In this work an investigation is made of the possibility of weakening this influence by preliminary treatment of the powders.

  5. Boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumors at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Joel, D.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Medical Dept.

    1996-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a bimodal form of radiation therapy for cancer. The first component of this treatment is the preferential localization of the stable isotope {sup 10}B in tumor cells by targeting with boronated compounds. The tumor and surrounding tissue is then irradiated with a neutron beam resulting in thermal neutron/{sup 10}B reactions ({sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li) resulting in the production of localized high LET radiation from alpha and {sup 7}Li particles. These products of the neutron capture reaction are very damaging to cells, but of short range so that the majority of the ionizing energy released is microscopically confined to the vicinity of the boron-containing compound. In principal it should be possible with BNCT to selectively destroy small nests or even single cancer cells located within normal tissue. It follows that the major improvements in this form of radiation therapy are going to come largely from the development of boron compounds with greater tumor selectivity, although there will certainly be advances made in neutron beam quality as well as the possible development of alternative sources of neutron beams, particularly accelerator-based epithermal neutron beams.

  6. Evaluation of Ground-Water and Boron Sources by Use of Boron Stable-Isotope Ratios, Tritium, and Selected Water-Chemistry Constituents near Beverly Shores, Northwestern Indiana, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buszka, Paul M.; Fitzpatrick, John A.; Watson, Lee R.; Kay, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    Concentrations of boron greater than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) 900 ?g/L removal action level (RAL) standard were detected in water sampled by the USEPA in 2004 from three domestic wells near Beverly Shores, Indiana. The RAL regulates only human-affected concentrations of a constituent. A lack of well logs and screened depth information precluded identification of whether water from sampled wells, and their boron sources, were from human-affected or natural sources in the surficial aquifer, or associated with a previously defined natural, confined aquifer source of boron from the subtill or basal sand aquifers. A geochemically-based classification of the source of boron in ground water could potentially determine the similarity of boron to known sources or mixtures between known sources, or classify whether the relative age of the ground water predated the potential sources of contamination. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the USEPA, investigated the use of a geochemical method that applied boron stable isotopes, and concentrations of boron, tritium, and other constituents to distinguish between natural and human-affected sources of boron in ground water and thereby determine if the RAL was applicable to the situation. Boron stable-isotope ratios and concentrations of boron in 17 ground-water samples and tritium concentrations in 9 ground-water samples collected in 2004 were used to identify geochemical differences between potential sources of boron in ground water near Beverly Shores, Indiana. Boron and d11B analyses for this investigation were made on unacidified samples to assure consistency of the result with unacidified analyses of d11B values from other investigations. Potential sources of boron included surficial-aquifer water affected by coal-combustion products (CCP) or domestic-wastewater, upward discharge of ground water from confined aquifers, and unaffected water from the surficial aquifer that was distant from human-affected boron sources. Boron concentrations in potential ground-water sources of boron were largest (15,700 to 24,400 ?g/L) in samples of CCP-affected surficial aquifer water from four wells at a CCP landfill and smallest (27 to 63 ?g/L) in three wells in the surficial aquifer that were distant from human-affected boron sources. Boron concentrations in water from the basal sand aquifer ranged from 656 ?g/L to 1,800 ?g/L. Boron concentrations in water from three domestic-wastewater-affected surficial aquifer wells ranged from 84 to 387 ?g/L. Among the representative ground-water samples, boron concentrations from all four samples of CCP-affected surficial aquifer water and four of five samples of water from the basal sand aquifer had concentrations greater than the RAL. A comparison of boron concentrations in acid-preserved and unacidified samples indicated that boron concentrations reported for this investigation may be from about 11 to 16 percent less than would be reported in a standard analysis of an acidified sample. The stable isotope boron-11 was most enriched in comparison to boron-10 in ground water from a confined aquifer, the basal sand aquifer (d11B, 24.6 to 34.0 per mil, five samples); it was most depleted in CCP-affected water from the surficial aquifer (d11B, 0.1 to 6.6 per mil, four samples). Domestic-wastewater-affected water from the surficial aquifer (d11B, 8.7 to 11.7 per mil, four samples) was enriched in boron-11, in comparison to individual samples of a borax detergent additive and a detergent with perborate bleach; it was intermediate in composition between basal sand aquifer water and CCP-affected water from the surficial aquifer. The similarity between a ground-water sample from the surficial aquifer and a hypothetical mixture of unaffected surficial aquifer and basal sand aquifer waters indicates the potential for long-term upward discharge of ground water into the surficial aquifer from one or more confined aquifers. Est

  7. Formation of cubic boron-nitride by the reactive sputter deposition of boron

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A.F.; Hayes, J.P.; Makowiecki, D.W.; McKeman, M.A.

    1997-03-01

    Boron-nitride films are synthesized by RF magnetron sputtering boron targets where the deposition parameters of gas pressure, flow and composition are varied along with substrate temperature and applied bias. The films are analyzed using Auger electron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, nanoindentation, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. These techniques provide characterization of film composition, crystalline structure, hardness and chemical bonding, respectively. Reactive, rf-sputtering process parameters are established which lead to the growth of crystalline BN phases. The deposition of stable and adherent boron nitride coatings consisting of the cubic phase requires 400 `C substrate heating and the application of a 300 V negative bias.

  8. Biological evaluation of boronated unnatural amino acids as new boron carriers.

    PubMed

    Kabalka, G W; Yao, M-L; Marepally, S R; Chandra, S

    2009-07-01

    There is a pressing need for new and more efficient boron delivery agents to tumor cells for use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A class of boronated unnatural cyclic amino acids has demonstrated a remarkable selectivity toward tumors in animal and cell culture models, far superior to currently used agents in clinical BNCT. One of these amino acids, 1-amino-3-boronocyclopentanecarboxylic acid (ABCPC), has shown a tumor to blood ratio of 8 and a tumor to normal brain ratio of nearly 21 in a melanoma bearing mouse model. This work represents further biological characterization of this compound for tumor targeting in an EMT6 murine mammary carcinoma mouse model and a T98G human glioblastoma cell line. Female BALB/c mice bearing EMT6 tumors were injected with the fructose complex form of racemic mixtures of cis and trans isomers of ABCPC in identical concentrations. Boron concentrations were measured in the tumor, blood, brain, skin, and liver tissues at 1, 3, and 5 h post-injection. These observations revealed a remarkable difference in racemic mixtures of cis and trans isomers in tumor targeting by boron. This implies that further separation of the L and D forms of this compound may enhance tumor targeting to an even higher degree than that provided by the racemic mixtures. Since the uptake measurements were made in homogenized tumor and normal tissues, little is known about the subcellular location of the boron arising from the various isomeric forms of the amino acid. To study subcellular delivery of boron from ABCPC in T98G human glioblastoma cells, we employed secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based technique of ion microscopy, which is capable of quantitatively imaging isotopic (elemental) gradients in cells and tissues at 500 nm spatial resolution. The T98G cells were exposed to the nutrient medium containing 100 ppm boron equivalent of a mixture of both L and D isomers of ABCPC in the form of a fructose complex for 1 h. Following this treatment, the cells were fast frozen, freeze-fractured, and freeze-dried for SIMS analysis. Within an hour of exposure, ABCPC provided partitioning of intracellular to extracellular boron of 3/1. SIMS imaging revealed that boron from ABCPC was distributed throughout the cell, including the nucleus. This level of boron delivery within an hour of exposure is superior to p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) and sodium borocaptate (BSH), which have been previously studied by SIMS in the same cell line. These encouraging observations provide compelling support for further isomeric separations of ABCPC into the D and L forms for enhanced tumor targeting and continued testing of these compounds as new boron carriers in BNCT. PMID:19398346

  9. Infiltration processing of boron carbide-, boron-, and boride-reactive metal cermets

    DOEpatents

    Halverson, Danny C. (Manteca, CA); Landingham, Richard L. (Livermore, CA)

    1988-01-01

    A chemical pretreatment method is used to produce boron carbide-, boron-, and boride-reactive metal composites by an infiltration process. The boron carbide or other starting constituents, in powder form, are immersed in various alcohols, or other chemical agents, to change the surface chemistry of the starting constituents. The chemically treated starting constituents are consolidated into a porous ceramic precursor which is then infiltrated by molten aluminum or other metal by heating to wetting conditions. Chemical treatment of the starting constituents allows infiltration to full density. The infiltrated precursor is further heat treated to produce a tailorable microstructure. The process at low cost produces composites with improved characteristics, including increased toughness, strength.

  10. A system to deposit boron films (boronization) in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Hodapp, T.R.; Jackson, G.L.; Phillips, J.; Holtrop, K.L.; Petersen, P.I. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)); Winter, J. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik)

    1991-09-01

    A system has been added to the D3-D tokamak to coat its plasma facing surfaces with a film of boron using diborane gas. The system includes special health and safety equipment for handling the diborane gas which is toxic and inflammable. The purpose of the boron film is to reduce the levels of impurity atoms in the D3-D plasmas. Experiments following the application of the boron film in D3-D have led to significant reductions in plasma impurity levels and the observation of a new, very high confinement regime. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Boron-10 Lined Proportional Counter Model Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2012-06-30

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) is supporting the project “Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology” at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube-based alternative system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report discusses the validation studies performed to establish the degree of accuracy of the computer modeling methods current used to simulate the response of boron-lined tubes. This is the precursor to developing models for the uranium neutron coincidence collar under Task 2 of this project.

  12. Development of an advanced boron injection tank

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Kaori; Yuasa, Tetsushi; Makihara, Yoshiaki; Okabe, Kazuharu; Ichioka, Takehiko [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Mitsubishi has developed a hybrid safety system. This is an optimum combination of active and passive safety systems that provides improved safety, higher reliability, and better economy. As one option of the passive safety systems, Mitsubishi is studying a passive boron injection system that uses an advanced boron injection tank (BIT). The boron injection system to be developed in this study is passive and does not use nitrogen gas as a driving force. These features realize the higher reliability and eliminate a bad influence of the nitrogen gas during natural circulation cooling in the reactor coolant system (RCS). The driving force of the boric acid water injection in our advanced BIT is the boiling and steam expansion due to the depressurization inside the tank. Mitsubishi carried out tests to verify that the injection mechanism of the advanced BIT is basically feasible.

  13. On the Mechanism of Boron Ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, D. G.; Dreizin, E. L.; Felder, W.; Vicenzi, E. P.

    1997-01-01

    Boron filaments were electrically heated in air and argon/oxygen mixtures while their resistance, temperature, and radiation at the wavelengths of BO and BO2 bands were monitored. The filaments 'burned' in two distinct stages. Samples of the filaments were quenched at different times before and during the burning and analyzed using electron microscopy. The beginning of the first stage combustion characterized by a local resistance minimum, a sharp spike in boron oxide radiation emission, and a rapid rise in temperature, occurred at 1500 +/- 70 deg. C, independent of pre-heating history and oxygen content (540%) in the gas environment. The data suggest that a phase transition occurs in the filaments at this temperature that triggers stage one combustion. Significant amounts of oxygen were found inside quenched filaments. Large spherical voids formed in the boron filaments during their second stage combustion which is interpreted to indicate a crucial role for the gas dissolution processes in the combustion scenario.

  14. Oxidation of boron carbide at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrück, Martin

    2005-02-01

    The oxidation kinetics of various types of boron carbides (pellets, powder) were investigated in the temperature range between 1073 and 1873 K. Oxidation rates were measured in transient and isothermal tests by means of mass spectrometric gas analysis. Oxidation of boron carbide is controlled by the formation of superficial liquid boron oxide and its loss due to the reaction with surplus steam to volatile boric acids and/or direct evaporation at temperatures above 1770 K. The overall reaction kinetics is paralinear. Linear oxidation kinetics established soon after the initiation of oxidation under the test conditions described in this report. Oxidation is strongly influenced by the thermohydraulic boundary conditions and in particular by the steam partial pressure and flow rate. On the other hand, the microstructure of the B 4C samples has a limited influence on oxidation. Very low amounts of methane were produced in these tests.

  15. Thermodynamics of boron in a silicon melt

    SciTech Connect

    Noguchi, Ryouji; Suzuki, Kichiya; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka; Sano, Nobuo (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Metallurgy)

    1994-12-01

    Many studies on refining metallurgical grade silicon for producing inexpensive solar cells have been conducted. However, they have not been successful in effectively removing boron, which is similar to silicon in physical property and decreases the photovoltaic efficiency of a solar cell. The activity coefficient of B in a Si melt and the interaction parameters of boron and nitrogen in molten silicon were determined by equilibrating solid BN and liquid Si in a nitrogen atmosphere from 1,723 to 1,923 K. The standard Gibbs free energy change of the nitrogen dissolution into silicon is also obtained. The activities of BO[sub 1.5] in the CaO-CaF[sub 2]-SiO[sub 2] and CaO-MgO-SiO[sub 2] systems are estimated in relation to the removal of boron from silicon by these fluxes.

  16. Accelerator-driven boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgecock, Rob

    2014-05-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is a binary treatment for certain types of cancer. It works by loading the cancerous cells with a boron-10 carrying compound. This isotope has a large cross-section for thermal neutrons, the reaction producing a lithium nucleus and alpha particle that kill the cell in which they are produced. Recent studies of the boron carrier compound indicate that the uptake process works best in particularly aggressive cancers. Most studied is glioblastoma multiforme and a trial using a combination of BNCT and X-ray radiotherapy has shown an increase of nearly a factor of two in mean survival over the state of the art. However, the main technical problem with BNCT remains producing a sufficient flux of neutrons for a reasonable treatment duration in a hospital environment. This paper discusses this issue.

  17. Production, distribution and applications of californium-252 neutron sources.

    PubMed

    Martin, R C; Knauer, J B; Balo, P A

    2000-01-01

    The radioisotope 252Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6-yr half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10(11) neutrons s(-1). Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, land mines and unexploded military ordinance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 yr of experience and by US Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). DOE sells 252Cf to commercial reencapsulators domestically and internationally. Sealed 252Cf sources are also available for loan to agencies and subcontractors of the US government and to universities for educational, research and medical applications. The REDC has established the Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science to make its large inventory of 252Cf sources available to researchers for irradiations inside uncontaminated hot cells. Experiments at the CUF include a land mine detection system, neutron damage testing of solid-state detectors, irradiation of human cancer cells for boron neutron capture therapy experiments and irradiation of rice to induce genetic mutations. PMID:11003521

  18. Boron tolerance and enhancement of boron toxicity by chloride ions in alkali sacaton during germination of Sporobolus airoides Torr

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Z. Hyder; Shamsa Yasmin

    1975-01-01

    Zusammenfassung Die Boron-Toleranz und ihre Interaktion mit anderen Ionen des Wachstummilieus in Alkali sacaton wurde während der Keimung untersucht. Die Keimung konnte bei einer Boron-Konzentration bis zu 500 ppm nicht beeinflusst werden. Nur Chlorid-Ionen förderten die Toxizität des Borons.

  19. FDG production and quality control at North Carolina Baptist Hospital Bowman Gray School of Medicine P.E.T. Center

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrenkaufer, R.E. [P.E.T. Center, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The PET Center at North Carolina Baptist Hospital-Bowman Gray School of Medicine has been in operation since January of 1992. The radioisotope, radiopharmaceutical production hardware are comprised of Siemens/CTI RDS 112, 11 MeV, negative ion (H{sup {minus}}) cyclotron and associated radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production equipment.

  20. Utilizing Radioisotope Power System Waste Heat for Spacecraft Thermal Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pantano, David R.; Dottore, Frank; Tobery, E. Wayne; Geng, Steven M.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Palko, Joseph L.

    2005-01-01

    An advantage of using a Radioisotope Power System (RPS) for deep space or planetary surface missions is the readily available waste heat, which can be used for a number of beneficial purposes including: maintaining electronic components within a controlled temperature range, warming propulsion tanks and mobility actuators, and maintaining liquid propellants above their freezing temperature. Previous missions using Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) dissipated large quantities of waste heat due to the low efficiency of the thermoelectric conversion technology. The next generation RPSs, such as the 110-Watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) will have higher conversion efficiencies, thereby rejecting less waste heat at a lower temperature and may require alternate approaches to transferring waste heat to the spacecraft. RTGs, with efficiencies of 6 to 7 percent, reject their waste heat at the relatively high heat rejection temperature of 200 C. This is an advantage when rejecting heat to space; however, transferring heat to the internal spacecraft components requires a large and heavy radiator heat exchanger. At the same time, sensitive spacecraft instruments must be shielded from the thermal radiation of the RTG. The SRG110, with an efficiency around 22 percent and 50 C nominal housing surface temperature, can readily transfer the available waste heat directly via heat pipes, thermal straps, or fluid loops. The lower temperatures associated with the SRG110 avoid the chances of overheating other scientific components, eliminating the need for thermal shields. This provides the spacecraft designers more flexibility when locating the generator for a specific mission. A common misconception with high-efficiency systems is that there is not enough waste heat for spacecraft thermal management. This paper will dispel this misconception and investigate the use of a high-efficiency SRG110 for spacecraft thermal management and outline potential methods of waste heat utilization in several conceptual missions (Lunar Rover, Mars Rover, and Titan Lander). The advantages associated with the SRG110 as they relate to ease of assembly, less complex interfaces, and overall mass savings for a spacecraft will be highlighted.

  1. Space radioisotope power source requirements update and technology status

    SciTech Connect

    Mondt, J.F.

    1998-07-01

    The requirements for a space advanced radioisotope power source are based on potential deep space missions being investigated for the NASA Advanced Space Systems Development Program. Since deep space missions have not been approved, updating requirements is a continuos parallel process of designing the spacecraft and the science instruments to accomplish the potential missions and developing the power source technology to meet changing requirements. There are at least two potential missions, Pluto/Kuiper Express and Europa Orbiter, which may require space advanced radioisotope power sources. The Europa Orbiter has been selected as the preferred first potential mission. However the final decision will depend on the technology readiness of all the subsystems and the project must be able to switch to Pluto Kuiper Express as the first mission as late as the beginning of fiscal year 2000. Therefore the requirements for the power source will cover both potential missions. As the deep space spacecraft design evolves to meet the science requirements and the Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric (AMTEC) technology matures the advanced radioisotope power source design requirements are updated The AMTEC technology developed to date uses stainless steel for the sodium containment material. The higher efficiency required for the space power system dictates that the AMTEC technology must operate at a higher temperature than possible with stainless steel. Therefore refractory materials have been selected as the baseline material for the AMTEC cell. These refractory materials are Nb1Zr for the hot side and Nb1Zr or Nb10Hf1Ti for the cold side. These materials were selected so the AMTEC cell can operate at 1150K to 1350K hot side temperature and 600K to 700K cold side temperature and meet the present power and mass requirements using four to six general purpose heat source modules as the heat source. The new containment materials and brazes will be evaluated as to lifetime, compatibility and performance with the AMTEC beta prime Alumina, the TiN electrodes, the sodium and the molybdenum current collectors. AMTEC cell components and cells will be built with the baseline containment materials and brazes and tested to determine the performance as a function of temperature. These containment materials will be also be tested with all the other AMTEC components to determine acceleration factors needed to predict AMTEC performance degradation and failure as a function of operating time at temperature.

  2. Boron removal by electrocoagulation and recovery.

    PubMed

    Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Ezechi, Ezerie Henry; Ahmed, Zubair; Magram, Saleh Faraj; Kutty, Shamsul Rahman Mohamed

    2014-03-15

    This work investigated the removal of boron from wastewater and its recovery by electrocoagulation and hydrothermal mineralization methods respectively. The experimental design was developed using Box-Behnken Model. An initial study was performed based on four preselected variables (pH, current density, concentration and time) using synthetic wastewater. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to evaluate the effect of process variables and their interaction on boron removal. The optimum conditions were obtained as pH 6.3, current density 17.4 mA/cm(2), and time 89 min. At these applied optimum conditions, 99.7% boron removal from an initial concentration of 10.4 mg/L was achieved. The process was effectively optimized by RSM with a desirability value of 1.0. The results showed that boron removal efficiency enhanced with increase in current density and treatment time. Removal efficiency also increased when pH was increased from 4 to 7 and subsequently decreased at pH 10. Adsorption kinetics study revealed that the reaction followed pseudo second order kinetic model; evidenced by high correlation and goodness of fit. Thermodynamics study showed that mechanism of boron adsorption was chemisorption and the reaction was endothermic in nature. Furthermore, the adsorption process was spontaneous as indicated by negative values of the adsorption free energy. Treatment of real produced water using electrocoagulation resulted in 98% boron removal. The hydrothermal mineralization study showed that borate minerals (Inyoite, Takadaite and Nifontovite) can be recovered as recyclable precipitate from electrocoagulation flocs of produced water. PMID:24412846

  3. Applicability of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as biosensors: Effect of biomolecular adsorption on the transport properties of carbon and boron

    E-print Network

    Pandey, Ravi

    Applicability of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as biosensors: Effect of biomolecular adsorption on the transport properties of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes Xiaoliang Zhong, Saikat;Applicability of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes as biosensors: Effect of biomolecular adsorption

  4. Boron aluminum crippling strength shows improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, O. R.; Bohlmann, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental program directed toward improving boron aluminum crippling strength. Laminate changes evaluated were larger filament diameter, improved processing, shape changes, adding steel-aluminum cross plies, reduced filament volume in corners, adding boron aluminum angle plies, and using titanium interleaves. Filament diameter and steel-aluminum cross plies have little effect on crippling. It is shown that better processing combined with appropriate shape changes improved crippling over 50 percent at both room temperature and 600 F. Tests also show that crippling improvements ranging from 20 to 40 percent are achieved using angle plies and titanium interleaves.

  5. Nonempirical simulations of boron interstitials in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundim, Kleber C.; Liubich, Vlad; Dorfman, Simon; Felsteiner, Joshua; Fuks, David; Borstel, Gunnar

    2001-08-01

    Formation of W-B solid solutions for different concentrations of boron is studied within nonempirical modeling. We consider ordering tendencies, study electronic structure and provide total energy calculations on the basis of coherent potential approximation. We also study an equilibrium structure of a lattice with ? 3<1 1 1> grain boundary in pure tungsten and in tungsten-based solid solution with boron additives. We used simulated annealing methods in atomistic simulations to obtain relaxed configurations of the lattice in the vicinity of grain boundary.

  6. Computational aspects of carbon and boron nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Carbon hexagonal nanotubes, boron triangular nanotubes and boron a-nanotubes are a few popular nano structures. Computational researchers look at these structures as graphs where each atom is a node and an atomic bond is an edge. While researchers are discussing the differences among the three nanotubes, we identify the topological and structural similarities among them. We show that the three nanotubes have the same maximum independent set and their matching ratios are independent of the number of columns. In addition, we illustrate that they also have similar underlying broadcasting spanning tree and identical communication behavior. PMID:21119566

  7. Electrophysical properties of pyrolytic boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Butenko, V.A.; Chernenko, V.P.; Lopatin, V.V.

    1985-03-01

    This paper discusses the results of an investigation into the bulk and surface resistivity, the dielectric constant, the tangent of the dielectric loss angle, and the electric strength of pyrolytic boron nitride at the 300 - 2300/sup 0/K range. The activation energies of the charge carriers have been determined in the regions of impurity and intrinsic conduction. (Pyrolytic boron nitride has recently found application as a high-temperature electrical-insulation material in powerful pulse lasers and in electronic devices and it may find application in thermonuclear reactors.)

  8. Phenylene bridged boron-nitrogen containing dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Pro?, Agnieszka; Baumgarten, Martin; Müllen, Klaus

    2010-10-01

    The synthesis and characterization of novel phenylene bridged boron-nitrogen containing ?-conjugated dendrimers N3B6 and N3B3, with peripheral boron atoms and 1,3,5-triaminobenzene moiety as a core, are presented. UV-vis absorption and emission measurements reveal that the optical properties of the resulting compounds can be controlled by changing the donor/acceptor ratio: a 1:1 ratio results in a more efficient charge transfer than the 1:2 ratio. This was proven by the red shift of the emission maxima and the stronger solvatochromic effect in N3B3 compared to N3B6. PMID:20822169

  9. Unexpected reconstruction of the ?-boron (111) surface.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang-Feng; Oganov, Artem R; Shao, Xi; Zhu, Qiang; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2014-10-24

    We report a novel reconstruction of the ?-boron (111) surface, discovered using ab initio evolutionary structure prediction, and show that this unexpected neat structure has a much lower energy than the recently proposed (111)-I(R,(a)) surface. In this reconstruction, all single interstitial boron atoms bridge neighboring B(12) icosahedra by polar covalent bonds, and this satisfies the electron counting rule, leading to the reconstruction-induced metal-semiconductor transition. The peculiar charge transfer between the interstitial atoms and the icosahedra plays an important role in stabilizing the surface. PMID:25379924

  10. Low pressure growth of cubic boron nitride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, Tiong P. (Inventor); Shing, Yuh-Han (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method for forming thin films of cubic boron nitride on substrates at low pressures and temperatures. A substrate is first coated with polycrystalline diamond to provide a uniform surface upon which cubic boron nitride can be deposited by chemical vapor deposition. The cubic boron nitride film is useful as a substitute for diamond coatings for a variety of applications in which diamond is not suitable. any tetragonal or hexagonal boron nitride. The cubic boron nitride produced in accordance with the preceding example is particularly well-suited for use as a coating for ultra hard tool bits and abrasives, especially those intended to use in cutting or otherwise fabricating iron.

  11. Boron Doping Carbon Structures Using Decaborane? A Theoretical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wexler, Carlos; Connolly, Matthew; Beckner, Matthew; Pfeifer, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Boron-doped carbon materials have been shown to improve hydrogen storage. Boron-doped activated carbons have been produced using a novel process involving the pyrolysis of a boron containing compound and subsequent high-temperature annealing. A model for the boron doping process based on a Langmuir isotherm is presented. A theoretical study of the interaction of the boron containing compound with the undoped carbon precursor will be presented. Ab-initio calculations of the potential energy surface and the Langmuir isotherm parameters derived from them are also presented. The theoretical study outlines the unique capabilities and limits of this doping procedure.

  12. Computer program for the transient analysis of radioisotope thermoelectric generators.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggers, P. E.; Ridihalgh, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program is described which represents a comprehensive analytical tool providing the capability for predicting the output power and temperature profile of an arbitrary radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) design in the presence of time-dependent operating conditions. The approach taken involves the merging of three existing computer programs - namely, an RTG weight optimization design program, a thermoelectric analysis program, and a nodal heat-transfer computer program. A total of seven transient conditions are included in the computer program as the principal transients affecting long- and short-term performance characteristics of RTGs. This computer program is unique in that it designs an optimum RTG, generates a thermal model or analog and performs heat-transfer analysis of the RTG under user-specified transient conditions.

  13. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator/thin fragment impact test

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M. A. H.; Hinckley, J. E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS-E502, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1998-01-15

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. This test was designed to provide information on the response of a loaded RTG to impact by a fragment similar to the type of fragment produced by breakup of the spacecraft propulsion module system (PMS). The results of this test indicated that impact of the RTG by a thin aluminum fragment traveling at 306 m/s may result in significant damage to the converter housing, failure of one fueled clad, and release of a small quantity of fuel.

  14. End-on radioisotope thermoelectric generator impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Hhinckley, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of [sup 238]Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. The first two RTG Impact Tests were designed to provide information on the response of a fully loaded RTG to end-on impact against a concrete target. The results of these tests indicated that at impact velocities up to 57 m/s the converter shell and internal components protect the GPHS capsules from excessive deformation. At higher velocities, some of the internal components of the RTG interact with the GPHS capsules to cause excessive localized deformation and failure.

  15. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator/thin fragment impact test

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.; Hinckley, J.E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS-E502, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. This test was designed to provide information on the response of a loaded RTG to impact by a fragment similar to the type of fragment produced by breakup of the spacecraft propulsion module system (PMS). The results of this test indicated that impact of the RTG by a thin aluminum fragment traveling at 306 m/s may result in significant damage to the converter housing, failure of one fueled clad, and release of a small quantity of fuel. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. End-on radioisotope thermoelectric generator impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.; Hinckley, J.E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory P.O. Box 1663, MS-E502 Los Alamos, New Mexico87545 (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. The first two RTG Impact Tests were designed to provide information on the response of a fully loaded RTG to end-on impact against a concrete target. The results of these tests indicated that at impact velocities up to 57 m/s the converter shell and internal components protect the GPHS capsules from excessive deformation. At higher velocities, some of the internal components of the RTG interact with the GPHS capsules to cause excessive localized deformation and failure. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator cooling in the Shuttle bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stimpson, L. D.; Levine, D. I.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes a Shuttle-integrated radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that consists primarily of a pump package and plumbing connected directly to the Shuttle payload heat exchanger. The RTG utilizes on-board water evaporative cooling capability, which is normally used for ascent, entry, and for supplementing the radiators. Attention is given to the RTG cooling concepts which include: (1) an active thermal cooling system (ATCS), where two Freon-21 loops operate simultaneously to transport heat from the Orbiter subsystem and payloads through liquid-to-liquid heat exchangers and pin-fin coldplates to four heat sinks, and (2) an atmosphere revitalization system (ARS) which provides for thermal, pressure, and contaminate control of the crew cabin and its equipment. The use of a payload heat exchanger to reduce weight, cost and complexity associated with an independent cooling system was investigated in detail.

  18. Particle-beam accelerators for radiotherapy and radioisotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, T. J., Jr.; Crandall, K. R.; Hamm, R. W.; Hansborough, L. D.; Hoeberling, R. F.; Jameson, R. A.; Knapp, E. A.; Mueller, D. W.; Potter, J. M.; Stokes, R. H.

    The philosophy used in developing the PIGMI (pion generator for medical irradiation) technology was that the parameters chosen for physics research machines are not necessarily the right ones for a dedicated therapy or radioisotope machine. In particular, the beam current and energy can be optimized, and the design should emphasize minimum size, simplicity and reliability of operation, and economy in capital and operating costs. A major part of achieving these goals lay in raising the operating frequency and voltage gradient of the accelerator, which shrinks the diameter and length of the components. Several other technical innovations resulted in major system improvements. One of these is a radically new type of accelerator structure named the radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. This allowed the elimination of the large, complicated ion source used in previous ion accelerators, and a very high quality accelerated beam. Also, by using advanced permanent magnet materials to make the focusing elements, the system becomes much simpler. Other improvements are described.

  19. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator/thin fragment impact test

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, M.A.H.; Hinckley, J.E.

    1998-12-31

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. This test was designed to provide information on the response of a loaded RTG to impact by a fragment similar to the type of fragment produced by breakup of the spacecraft propulsion module system (PMS). The results of this test indicated that impact of the RTG by a thin aluminum fragment traveling at 306 m/s may result in significant damage to the convertor housing, failure of one fueled clad, and release of a small quantity of fuel.

  20. Radioisotope-Powered Hopper Design for Europan Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekany, Justin; Guzman, Melissa; Jagadevan, Karthikeyan; McCulley, Jonathan; Shipley, Kevin; Howe, Steven

    2010-10-01

    NASA and ESA have prioritized an outer planet flagship mission to Jupiter and its four largest moons. The constant cycling of material from Europa's surface to the global ocean below allows the potential for organic life similar to the eco-systems surrounding geothermal vents on Earth. The Europa Hopper model utilizes a radioisotope core, in-situ materials and a subsurface ice probe in order to minimize mass and power needs. A hopping distance of 10km was chosen to maximize the surface area coverage of Europa and increasing the potential for organic sampling and geological imaging of Europa's surface. The hopper design has mid-range power and mass needs while maintaining a substantial instrumentation package in comparison to smaller, low-power competitive designs. This mission could provide vital information both on early solar system formation and the potential existence of organic life in the Jovian system.

  1. AMTEC radioisotope power system for the Pluto Express mission

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanenok, J.F. III; Sievers, R.K. [Advanced Modular Power Systems, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Converter (AMTEC) technology has made substantial advances in the last 3 years through design improvements and technical innovations. In 1993 programs began to produce an AMTEC cell specifically for the NASA Pluto Express Mission. A set of efficiency goals was established for this series of cells to be developed. According to this plan, cell {number_sign}8 would be 17% efficient but was actually 18% efficient. Achieving this goal, as well as design advances that allow the cell to be compact, has resulted in pushing the cell from an unexciting 2 W/kg and 2% efficiency to very attractive 40 W/kg and 18% measured efficiency. This paper will describe the design and predict the performance of a radioisotope powered AMTEC system for the Pluto Express mission.

  2. RTGs - The powering of Ulysses. [Radio-isotope Thermoelectric Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastal, E. F.; Campbell, R. W.

    1990-01-01

    The radio-isotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) for Ulysses' electronic supply is described noting that lack of sufficient sunlight renders usual solar cell power generation ineffective due to increased distance from sun. The history of the RTG in the U.S.A. is reviewed citing the first RTG launch in 1961 with an electrical output of 2.7 W and the improved Ulysses RTG, which provides 285 W at mission beginning and 250 W at mission end. The RTG concept is discussed including the most recent RTG technology developed by the DOE, the General Purpose Heat Source RTG (GPHS-RTG). The system relies upon heat generated by radioactive decay using radioactive plutonium-238, which is converted directly to energy using the Seebeck method.

  3. An Overview and Status of NASA's Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology NRA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David J.; Wong, Wayne A.; Tuttle, Karen L.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) development program is developing next generation radioisotope power conversion technologies that will enable future missions that have requirements that can not be met by either photovoltaic systems or by current Radioisotope Power System (RPS) technology. The Advanced Power Conversion Research and Technology project of the Advanced RPS development program is funding research and technology activities through the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) 02-OSS-01, "Research Opportunities in Space Science 2002" entitled "Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology" (RPCT), August 13, 2002. The objective of the RPCT NRA is to advance the development of radioisotope power conversion technologies to provide significant improvements over the state-of-practice General Purpose Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator by providing significantly higher efficiency to reduce the number of radioisotope fuel modules, and increase specific power (watts/kilogram). Other Advanced RPS goals include safety, long-life, reliability, scalability, multi-mission capability, resistance to radiation, and minimal interference with the scientific payload. Ten RPCT NRA contracts were awarded in 2003 in the areas of Brayton, Stirling, thermoelectric (TE), and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power conversion technologies. This paper will provide an overview of the RPCT NRA, and a brief summary of accomplishments over the first 18 months but focusing on advancements made over the last 6 months.

  4. Pathway of radioisotopes from land surface to sewage sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Helmut W.; Yokoo, Yoshiyuki

    2014-05-01

    Radioactive surface contaminations will only partially remain at the original location - a fraction of the inventory will take part in (mainly terrestrial and aquatic) environmental transport processes. The probably best known and most important process comprises the food chain. Besides, the translocation of dissolved and particle-bound radioisotopes with surface waters plays an important role. These processes can have the effect of displacing large radioisotope amounts over considerable distances and of creating new sinks and hot spots, as it is already known for sewage sludge. We are reporting on a combined modeling and experimental project concerning the transport of I-131 and Cs-134/Cs-137 FDNPP 2011 depositions in the Fukushima Prefecture. Well-documented experimental data sets are available for surface deposition and sewage sludge concentrations. The goal is to model the pathway in between, involving surface runoff, transport in the sewer system and processes in the sewage treatment plant. Watershed runoff and sewer transport will be treated with models developed recently by us in other projects. For sewage treatment processes a new model is currently being constructed. For comparison and further validation, historical data from Chernobyl depositions and tracer data from natural and artificial, e.g. medical, isotopes will be used. First results for 2011 data from Fukushima Prefecture will be presented. The benefits of the study are expected to be two-fold: on one hand, the abundant recent and historical data will help to develop and improve environmental transport models; on the other hand, both data and models will help in identifying the most critical points in the envisaged transport pathways in terms of radiation protection and waste management.

  5. INTRACORPOREAL HEAT DISSIPATION FROM A RADIOISOTOPE-POWERED ARTIFICIAL HEART

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Fred N.; Hagen, Kenneth G.; Whalen, Robert L.; Fuqua, John M.; Norman, John C.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of radioisotope-fueled circulatory support systems depends on the ability of the body to dissipate the reject heat from the power source driving the blood pump as well as to tolerate chronic intracorporeal radiation. Our studies have focused on the use of the circulating blood as a heat sink. Initial in vivo heat transfer studies utilized straight tube heat exchangers (electrically and radioisotope energized) to replace a segment of the descending aorta. More recent studies have used a left ventricular assist pump as a blood-cooled heat exchanger. This approach minimizes trauma, does not increase the area of prosthetic interface with the blood, and minimizes system volume. Heat rejected from the thermal engine (vapor or gas cycle) is transported from the nuclear power source in the abdomen to the pump in the thoracic cavity via hydraulic lines. Adjacent tissue is protected from the fuel capsule temperature (900 to 1200°F) by vacuum foil insulation and polyurethane foam. The in vivo thermal management problems have been studied using a simulated thermal system (STS) which approximates the heat rejection and thermal transport mechanisms of the nuclear circulatory support systems under development by NHLI. Electric heaters simulate the reject heat from the thermal engines. These studies have been essential in establishing the location, suspension, surgical procedures, and postoperative care for implanting prototype nuclear heart assist systems in calves. The pump has a thermal impedance of 0.12°C/watt. Analysis of the STS data in terms of an electrical analog model implies a heat transfer coefficient of 4.7 × 10?3 watt/cm2°C in the abdomen compared to a value of 14.9 × 10?3 watt/cm2°C from the heat exchanger plenum into the diaphragm. Images PMID:15215968

  6. Boron carbide as a target for the SPES project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradetti, S.; Carturan, S.; Biasetto, L.; Andrighetto, A.; Colombo, P.

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of the research on targets for the SPES project (Selective Production of Exotic Species), porous boron carbide (B4C) based materials were produced from the carbothermal reduction of boric acid and two different carbon sources, i.e. citric acid and phenolic resin. Samples composition and microstructural morphology were studied by means of X-ray diffraction spectrometry (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). The amount of total porosity was obtained from the comparison between the theoretical density and the measured bulk density. To better characterize the material microstructure, nitrogen physisorption measurements were performed in order to obtain data about the type of generated porosity and the specific surface area of the samples. Analysis performed on the samples show that after the final thermal treatment they are composed of boron carbide and residual free carbon, whose quantity is related to the processes involved in the two synthesis. Remarkable differences in the overall weight loss have been noticed for the two different reactions, resulting in different densities and pore size distributions, but in both cases similar values of specific surface area (SSA) were obtained.

  7. Process of Making Boron-Fiber Reinforced Composite Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Johnston, Norman J. (Inventor); Marchello, Joseph M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method for producing a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composition from powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and a linear array of boron fibers. The boron fibers are applied onto the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and then are processed within a processing component having an impregnation bar assembly. After passing through variable-dimension forming nip-rollers, the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with the boron fibers become a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite tape. A driving mechanism pulls the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with boron fibers through the processing line of the apparatus and a take-up spool collects the formed hybrid boron-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite tape.

  8. Evidence for rhombohedral boron nitride in cubic boron nitride films grown by ion-assisted deposition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Medlin; T. A. Friedmann; P. B. Mirkarimi; M. J. Mills; K. F. McCarty

    1994-01-01

    We present high-resolution transmission electron-microscopic observations of the [ital sp][sup 2]-bonded material that remains with the [ital sp][sup 3]-bonded cubic boron nitride (cBN) in films grown by ion-assisted deposition. These observations show regions of [ital sp][sup 2]-bonded material that are in a three-layer stacking configuration rather than the two-layer configuration of hexagonal boron nitride. Measurement of the lattice fringe angles

  9. Synthesis of boron suboxide from boron and boric acid under mild pressure and temperature conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaopeng Jiao; Hua Jin; Zhanhui Ding; Bin Yang; Fengguo Lu; Xudong Zhao; Xiaoyang Liu; Liping Peng

    2011-01-01

    Boron suboxide (B6O) was synthesized by reacting boron and boric acid (H3BO3) at pressures between 1 and 10GPa, and at temperatures between 1300 and 1400°C. The B6O samples prepared were icosahedral with diameters ranging from 20 to 300nm. Well-crystallized and icosahedral crystals with an average size of ?100nm can be obtained at milder reaction conditions (1GPa and 1300°C for 2h)

  10. Boron removal from drinking water with a boron selective resin: is the treatment really selective?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marie-Odile Simonnot; Christophe Castel; Miguel NicolaÏ; Christophe Rosin; Michel Sardin; Henri Jauffret

    2000-01-01

    Drinking water and even mineral water may contain boron until a few ppm and WHO has recommended a limit of 0.3mg boronl?1. The treatment by the resin Amberlite IRA743 seems to be the most convenient. Water deboronation with this resin has been revisited through laboratory column experiments, especially for low boron concentrations. Given that the resin bears weakly basic anion

  11. Boron Kedge XANES of boron oxides: tetrahedral B–O distances and near-surface alteration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. E. Fleet; X. Liu

    2001-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation boron K-edge XANES spectra collected in fluorescence yield mode are reported for monoclinic metaboric\\u000a acid [HBO2(II)], sinhalite (MgAlBO4), and a selection of boron oxides in which B is exclusively in trigonal coordination ([3]B). The anomalously high divergence of tetrahedral ([4]B–O) bond lengths in HBO2(II) and sinhalite is used to resolve fine structure at the [4]B K edge due

  12. Radioisotope electric propulsion of sciencecraft to the outer solar system and near-interstellar space

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, R.J.

    1998-08-01

    Recent results are presented in the study of radioisotope electric propulsion as a near-term technology for sending small robotic sciencecraft to the outer Solar System and near-interstellar space. Radioisotope electric propulsion (REP) systems are low-thrust, ion propulsion units based on radioisotope electric generators and ion thrusters. Powerplant specific masses are expected to be in the range of 100 to 200 kg/kW of thrust power. Planetary rendezvous missions to Pluto, fast missions to the heliopause (100 AU) with the capability to decelerate an orbiter for an extended science program and prestellar missions to the first gravitational lens focus of the Sun (550 AU) are investigated.

  13. Electron-beam processing of kilogram quantities of iridium for radioisotope thermoelectric generator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Huxford, T.J.; Ohriner, E.K.

    1992-12-31

    Iridium alloys are used as fuel-cladding materials in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Hardware produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been used in Voyagers I and 2, Galilee, and Ulysses spacecraft. An integral part of the production of iridium-sheet metal involves electron-beam (EB) processing. These processes include the degassing of powder-pressed compacts followed by multiple meltings in order to purify 500-g buttons of Ir-0.3% W alloy. Starting in 1972 and continuing into 1992, our laboratory EB processing was Performed (ca. 1970) in a 60-kW (20 kV at 3 A), two-gun system. In 1991, a new 150-kW EB gun facility was installed to complement the older unit. This paper describes how the newly installed system was qualified for production of RTG developmental work is discussed that will potentially improve the existing process by utilizing the capabilities of the new EB system.

  14. Electron-beam processing of kilogram quantities of iridium for radioisotope thermoelectric generator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Huxford, T.J.; Ohriner, E.K.

    1992-01-01

    Iridium alloys are used as fuel-cladding materials in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Hardware produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been used in Voyagers I and 2, Galilee, and Ulysses spacecraft. An integral part of the production of iridium-sheet metal involves electron-beam (EB) processing. These processes include the degassing of powder-pressed compacts followed by multiple meltings in order to purify 500-g buttons of Ir-0.3% W alloy. Starting in 1972 and continuing into 1992, our laboratory EB processing was Performed (ca. 1970) in a 60-kW (20 kV at 3 A), two-gun system. In 1991, a new 150-kW EB gun facility was installed to complement the older unit. This paper describes how the newly installed system was qualified for production of RTG developmental work is discussed that will potentially improve the existing process by utilizing the capabilities of the new EB system.

  15. Intrinsic ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Si, M. S.; Gao, Daqiang, E-mail: gaodq@lzu.edu.cn, E-mail: xueds@lzu.edu.cn; Yang, Dezheng; Peng, Yong; Zhang, Z. Y.; Xue, Desheng, E-mail: gaodq@lzu.edu.cn, E-mail: xueds@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Liu, Yushen [Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials and College of Physics and Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); Deng, Xiaohui [Department of Physics and Electronic Information Science, Hengyang Normal University, Hengyang 421008 (China); Zhang, G. P. [Department of Physics, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, Indiana 47809 (United States)

    2014-05-28

    Understanding the mechanism of ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which possess only s and p electrons in comparison with normal ferromagnets based on localized d or f electrons, is a current challenge. In this work, we report an experimental finding that the ferromagnetic coupling is an intrinsic property of hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets, which has never been reported before. Moreover, we further confirm it from ab initio calculations. We show that the measured ferromagnetism should be attributed to the localized ? states at edges, where the electron-electron interaction plays the role in this ferromagnetic ordering. More importantly, we demonstrate such edge-induced ferromagnetism causes a high Curie temperature well above room temperature. Our systematical work, including experimental measurements and theoretical confirmation, proves that such unusual room temperature ferromagnetism in hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets is edge-dependent, similar to widely reported graphene-based materials. It is believed that this work will open new perspectives for hexagonal boron nitride spintronic devices.

  16. Boron nitride solid state neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2004-04-27

    The present invention describes an apparatus useful for detecting neutrons, and particularly for detecting thermal neutrons, while remaining insensitive to gamma radiation. Neutrons are detected by direct measurement of current pulses produced by an interaction of the neutrons with hexagonal pyrolytic boron nitride.

  17. Investigating the Boron Requirement of Plants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohnsack, Charles W.

    1991-01-01

    This article describes a simple and rapid method for using summer squash to investigate born deficiency in plants. Author asserts that students are likely to feel challenged by laboratory exercises and projects that focus on the role boron plays in plant growth because it is an unresolved problem in biology. (PR)

  18. Novel Boron Based Multilayer Thermal Neutron Detector

    E-print Network

    M. SCHIEBER; O. KHAKHAN

    2010-06-09

    The detector contains four or more layers of natural Boron absorbing thermal neutrons. Thickness of a layer is 0.4 - 1.2 mg/cm2. The layers are deposited on one or on both sides of a metal surface used as contacts. Between the absorbing layers there are gas-filled gaps 3 - 6 mm thick. Electric field of 100 - 200 V/cm is applied to the gas-filled gaps. Natural Boron contains almost 20% of 10B isotope. When atoms of 10B capture a thermal neutron, nuclear reaction occurs, as a result of which two heavy particles - alpha particle and ion 7Li - from the thin absorber layer are emitted in opposing sides. One of the two particles penetrates into gas-filled gap between Boron layers and ionizes the gas. An impulse of electric current is created in the gas-filled gap actuated by the applied electric field. The impulse is registered by an electronic circuit. We have made and tested detectors containing from two to sixteen layers of natural Boron with an efficiency of thermal neutron registration from 2.9% to 12.5% accordingly.

  19. Physiological response of plants to low boron

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernie Dell; Longbin Huang

    1997-01-01

    This review focuses on physiological responses in higher plants to B deficiency at the whole plant and organ level. Plants respond to decreasing B supply in soil solutions by slowing down or ceasing growth. Boron deficiency inhibits root elongation through limiting cell enlargement and cell division in the growing zone of root tips. In the case of severe B deficiency,

  20. Axial residual stresses in boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The axial residual stress distribution as a function of radius was determined from the fiber surface to the core including the average residual stress in the core. Such measurements on boron on tungsten (B/W) fibers show that the residual stresses for 102, 142, 203, and 366 micron diameter fibers were similar, being compressive at the surface and changing monotonically to a region of tensile within the boron. At approximately 25 percent of the original radius, the stress reaches a maximum tensile stress of about 860 mn/sq.m and then decreases to a compressive stress near the tungsten boride core. Data were presented for 203 micron diameter B/W fibers that show annealing above 900 C reduces the residual stresses. A comparison between 102 micron diameter B/W and boron on carbon (b/C) shows that the residual stresses were similar in the outer regions of the fibers, but that large differences near and in the core were observed. The effects of these residual stresses on the fracture of boron fibers were discussed.