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1

Radioisotope production linac  

SciTech Connect

A 70-MeV proton beam would open a new family of medical radioisotopes (including the important /sup 123/I) to wide application. A 70-MeV, 500-..mu..A linac is described, based on recent innovations in accelerator technology. It would be 27.3 m long, cost approx. $6 million, and the cost of power deposited in the radioisotope-production target is comparable to existing cyclotrons. By operating the rf-power system to its full capability, the same accelerator is capable of producing a 1140-..mu..A beam, and the cost per beam watt on the target is less than half that of comparable cyclotrons. The technology to build such a linac is in a mature stage of developmnt, ready for use by industry.

Stovall, J.E.; Hansborough, L.D.; O'Brien, H.A.

1981-01-01

2

BEST medical radioisotope production cyclotrons  

SciTech Connect

Best Cyclotron Systems Inc (BCSI) is currently developing 14 MeV, 25 MeV, 35MeV and 70MeV cyclotrons for radioisotope production and research applications as well as the entire spectrum of targets and nuclear synthesis modules for the production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and radiation therapy isotopes. The company is a subsidiary of Best Medical International, renowned in the field of medical instrumentation and radiation therapy. All cyclotrons have external negative hydrogen ion sources, four radial sectors with two dees in opposite valleys, cryogenic vacuum system and simultaneous beam extraction on opposite lines. The beam intensity ranges from 400 {mu}A to 1000 {mu}A, depending on the cyclotron energy and application.

Sabaiduc, Vasile; Milton, Bruce; Suthanthiran, Krishnan; Johnson, Richard R. [Best Cyclotron Systems Inc., 7-8765 Ash Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6P 6T3 (Canada); Gelbart, W. Z. [Advanced System Designs Inc., 5295 Bear Bay Road, Garden Bay, BC, V0N 1S1 (Canada)

2013-04-19

3

Radioisotope Production for Medical and Physics Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radioisotopes are critical to the science and technology base of the US. Discoveries and applications made as a result of the availability of radioisotopes span widely from medicine, biology, physics, chemistry and homeland security. The clinical use of radioisotopes for medical diagnosis is the largest sector of use, with about 16 million procedures a year in the US. The use of ^99Mo/^99mTc generator and ^18F make up the majority, but ^201Tl, ^123I, ^111In, and ^67Ga are also used routinely to perform imaging of organ function. Application of radioisotopes for therapy is dominated by use of ^131I for thyroid malignancies, ^90Y for some solid tumors, and ^89Sr for bone cancer, but production of several more exotic species such as ^225Ac and ^211At are of significant current research interest. In physics ^225Ra is of interest for CP violation studies, and the actinides ^242Am, ^249Bk, and ^254Es are needed as targets for experiments to create superheavy elements. Large amounts of ^252Cf are needed as a fission source for the CARIBU experiment at ANL. The process of radioisotope production is multidisciplinary. Nuclear physics input based on nuclear reaction excitation function data is needed to choose an optimum target/projectile in order to maximize desired isotope production and minimize unwanted byproducts. Mechanical engineering is needed to address issues of target heating, induced mechanical stress and material compatibility of target and claddings. Radiochemists are involved as well since chemical separation to purify the desired final radioisotope product from the bulk target and impurities is also usually necessary. Most neutron rich species are produced at a few government and university reactors. Other radioisotopes are produced in cyclotrons in the commercial sector, university/hospital based facilities, and larger devices at the DOE labs. The landscape of US facilities, the techniques involved, and current supply challenges will be reviewed.

Mausner, Leonard

2012-10-01

4

Alternate Applications of Fusion - Production of Radioisotopes  

SciTech Connect

A major effort to find near-term, non-electric applications of fusion energy has shown that the production of radioisotopes is attractive. The use of the D{sup 3}He fusion reaction to produce Positron Emission Tomography (PET) isotopes is described. An Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device is particularly well suited to produce low levels of high-energy (14.7 MeV) protons, which in turn, can produce short-lived PET isotopes. The IEC device at University of Wisconsin has been modified to investigate the potential of this process to be commercially attractive.

Kulcinski, G.L.; Weidner, J.; Cipiti, B.; Ashley, R.P.; Santarius, J.F.; Murali, S.K.; Piefer, G.; Radel, R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

2003-09-15

5

Actinium radioisotope products of enhanced purity  

DOEpatents

A product includes actinium-225 (225Ac) and less than about 1 microgram (.mu.g) of iron (Fe) per millicurie (mCi) of actinium-225. The product may have a radioisotopic purity of greater than about 99.99 atomic percent (at %) actinium-225 and daughter isotopes of actinium-225, and may be formed by a method that includes providing a radioisotope mixture solution comprising at least one of uranium-233 (233U) and thorium-229 (229Th), extracting the at least one of uranium-233 and thorium-229 into an organic phase, substantially continuously contacting the organic phase with an aqueous phase, substantially continuously extracting actinium-225 into the aqueous phase, and purifying the actinium-225 from the aqueous phase. In some embodiments, the product may include less than about 1 nanogram (ng) of iron per millicurie (mCi) of actinium-225, and may include less than about 1 microgram (.mu.g) each of magnesium (Mg), Chromium (Cr), and manganese (Mn) per millicurie (mCi) of actinium-225.

Meikrantz, David Herbert; Todd, Terry Allen; Tranter, Troy Joseph; Horwitz, E. Philip

2010-06-15

6

Safety evaluation for regulatory management of Australian radioisotope production facilities.  

PubMed

This paper describes the approach of Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) in the regulatory management of Radioisotope Production facilities in Australia. ARPANSA is the regulatory authority for commonwealth entities operating nuclear installations including Radioisotope Production facilities. In assessing the application for operating nuclear installations the ARPANSA assessors prepare a Safety Evaluation Report, which is a recommendation to the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of ARPANSA whether to issue a licence to site, construct, operate and decommission facilities. In particular, the CEO must take into account international best practice in radiation protection and nuclear safety when making licence decisions. PMID:19285422

Sarkar, S

2009-01-01

7

Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes  

SciTech Connect

The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schenter, R.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-11-01

8

78 FR 15009 - Consideration of Withdrawal From Commercial Production and Distribution of the Radioisotope...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...and Distribution of the Radioisotope Germanium-68 AGENCY: Office of Science, Department...produces and distributes the radioisotope germanium-68. DOE is seeking comment and information...commercial production and distribution of germanium-68, based upon private industry...

2013-03-08

9

Reactor production and processing of radioisotopes for therapeutic applications in nuclear medicine  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear reactors continue to play an important role in providing radioisotopes for nuclear medicine. Many reactor-produced radioisotopes are ``neutron rich`` and decay by beta-emission and are thus of interest for therapeutic applications. This talk discusses the production and processing of a variety of reactor-produced radioisotopes of current interest, including those produced by the single neutron capture process, double neutron capture and those available from beta-decay of reactorproduced radioisotopes. Generators prepared from reactorproduced radioisotopes are of particular interest since repeated elution inexpensively provides many patient doses. The development of the alumina-based W-188/Re-188 generator system is discussed in detail.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Mirzadeh, S.; Beets, A.L.

1995-02-01

10

Lightweight Radioisotope Heater Unit (LWRHU) production for the Cassini mission  

SciTech Connect

The Lightweight Radioisotope Heater Unit (LWRHU) is a {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fueled heat source designed to provide a thermal watt of power for space missions. The LWRHU will be used to maintain the temperature of various components on the spacecraft at the required level. The heat source consists of a {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet, a Pt-30Rh capsule, a pyrolytic graphite insulator, and a woven graphite aeroshell assembly. Los Alamos has fabricated 180 heater units, which will be used on the Cassini mission. This report summarizes the specifications, fabrication processes, and production data for the heat sources fabricated at Los Alamos.

Rinehart, G.H.

1996-06-01

11

Radio-isotope production using laser Wakefield accelerators  

SciTech Connect

A 10 Hz, 10 TW solid state laser system has been used to produce electron beams suitable for radio-isotope production. The laser beam was focused using a 30 cm focal length f/6 off-axis parabola on a gas plume produced by a high pressure pulsed gas jet. Electrons were trapped and accelerated by high gradient wakefields excited in the ionized gas through the self-modulated laser wakefield instability. The electron beam was measured to contain excesses of 5 nC/bunch. A composite Pb/Cu target was used to convert the electron beam into gamma rays which subsequently produced radio-isotopes through (gamma, n) reactions. Isotope identification through gamma-ray spectroscopy and half-life time measurements demonstrated that Cu{sup 61} was produced which indicates that 20-25 MeV gamma rays were produced, and hence electrons with energies greater than 25-30 MeV. The production of high energy electrons was independently confirmed using a bending magnet spectrometer. The measured spectra had an exponential distribution with a 3 MeV width. The amount of activation was on the order of 2.5 uCi after 3 hours of operation at 1 Hz. Future experiments will aim at increasing this yield by post-accelerating the electron beam using a channel guided laser wakefield accelerator.

Leemans, W.P.; Rodgers, D.; Catravas, P.E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Fubiani, G.; Toth, C.; Esarey, E.; Shadwick, B.A.; Donahue, R.; Smith, A.; Reitsma, A.

2001-07-27

12

Boron  

MedlinePLUS

... mineral that is found in food and the environment. People take boron supplements as medicine. Boron is ... Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate. The effectiveness ratings for BORON are as follows:Preventing boron deficiency. ...

13

Target optimization for the photonuclear production of radioisotopes.  

PubMed

In this paper we discuss the optimum shape of a target for photonuclear production of radioisotopes using an electron linear accelerator. Different target geometries such as right cylinder, conical frustum, Gaussian volume of revolution and semi-ellipsoid have been considered for the production of (67)Cu via (68)Zn(?,p)(67)Cu photonuclear reaction. The specific activity (SA) of (67)Cu was simulated for each target shape. Optimum ratio of radius to height for cylindrical targets was found to be between 0.2 and 0.25 for target masses ranging from 20 g to 100 g. It was shown that while some unconventional target shapes, such as semi-elliptical volume of revolution, result in slightly higher specific activities than cylindrical targets, the advantage is not significant and is outweighed by the complexity of the target production and handling. Power deposition into the target was modeled and the trade-off between the maximization of (67)Cu yield and the minimization of target heating has been discussed. The (67)Cu case can easily be extended for production of many other isotopes. PMID:25497325

Howard, Sean; Starovoitova, Valeriia N

2015-02-01

14

Apparatus for the production of boron nitride nanotubes  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for the large scale production of boron nitride nanotubes comprising; a pressure chamber containing; a continuously fed boron containing target; a source of thermal energy preferably a focused laser beam; a cooled condenser; a source of pressurized nitrogen gas; and a mechanism for extracting boron nitride nanotubes that are condensed on or in the area of the cooled condenser from the pressure chamber.

Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin

2014-06-17

15

Boron modified molybdenum silicide and products  

DOEpatents

A boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is disclosed having the composition comprising about 80 to about 90 weight % Mo, about 10 to about 20 weight % Si, and about 0.1 to about 2 weight % B and a multiphase microstructure including Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} phase as at least one microstructural component effective to impart good high temperature creep resistance. The boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is fabricated into such products as electrical components, such as resistors and interconnects, that exhibit oxidation resistance to withstand high temperatures in service in air as a result of electrical power dissipation, electrical resistance heating elements that can withstand high temperatures in service in air and other oxygen-bearing atmospheres and can span greater distances than MoSi{sub 2} heating elements due to improved creep resistance, and high temperature structural members and other fabricated components that can withstand high temperatures in service in air or other oxygen-bearing atmospheres while retaining creep resistance associated with Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} for structural integrity. 7 figs.

Meyer, M.K.; Akinc, M.

1999-02-02

16

Boron modified molybdenum silicide and products  

DOEpatents

A boron-modified molybdenum silicide material having the composition comprising about 80 to about 90 weight % Mo, about 10 to about 20 weight % Si, and about 0.1 to about 2 weight % B and a multiphase microstructure including Mo.sub.5 Si.sub.3 phase as at least one microstructural component effective to impart good high temperature creep resistance. The boron-modified molybdenum silicide material is fabricated into such products as electrical components, such as resistors and interconnects, that exhibit oxidation resistance to withstand high temperatures in service in air as a result of electrical power dissipation, electrical resistance heating elements that can withstand high temperatures in service in air and other oxygen-bearing atmospheres and can span greater distances than MoSi.sub.2 heating elements due to improved creep resistance, and high temperature structural members and other fabricated components that can withstand high temperatures in service in air or other oxygen-bearing atmospheres while retaining creep resistance associated with Mo.sub.5 Si.sub.3 for structural integrity.

Meyer, Mitchell K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Akinc, Mufit (Ames, IA)

1999-02-02

17

Boron  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Boron is an essential micronutrient element required for plant growth. Boron deficiency is wide-spread in crop plants throughout the world especially in coarse-textured soils in humid areas. Boron toxicity can also occur, especially in arid regions under irrigation. Plants respond directly to the...

18

New developments in the experimental data for charged particle production of medical radioisotopes  

E-print Network

The goal of the present work is to give a review of developments achieved experimentally in the field of nuclear data for medically important radioisotopes in the last three years. The availability and precision of production related nuclear data is continuously improved mainly experimentally. This review emphasizes a couple of larger fields: the Mo/Tc generator problem and the generator isotopes in general, heavy alpha-emitters and the rare-earth elements. Other results in the field of medical radioisotope production are also listed.

Ditri, F; Takcs, S; Hermanne, A

2015-01-01

19

Production and supply of radioisotopes with high-energy particle accelerators current status and future directions  

SciTech Connect

Although the production of radioisotopes in reactors or in low to medium energy cyclotrons appears to be relatively well established, especially for those isotopes that are routinely used and have a commercial market, certain isotopes can either be made only in high-energy particle accelerators or their production is more cost effective when made this way. These facilities are extremely expensive to build and operate, and isotope production is, in general, either not cost-effective or is in conflict with their primary mandate or missions which involve physics research. Isotope production using high-energy accelerators in the US, therefore, has been only an intermittent and parasitic activity. However, since a number of isotopes produced at higher energies are emerging as being potentially useful for medical and other applications, there is a renewed concern about their availability in a continuous and reliable fashion. In the US, in particular, the various aspects of the prediction and availability of radioisotopes from high-energy accelerators are presently undergoing a detailed scrutiny and review by various scientific and professional organizations as well as the Government. A number of new factors has complicated the supply/demand equation. These include considerations of cost versus needs, reliability factors, mission orientation, research and educational components, and commercial viability. This paper will focus on the present status and projected needs of radioisotope production with high-energy accelerators in the US, and will compare and examine the existing infrastructure in other countries for this purpose.

Srivastava, S.C.; Mausner, L.F.

1994-03-01

20

Evaluation of neutron inelastic scattering for radioisotope production  

SciTech Connect

A systematic study of the production of {sup 117m}Sn, {sup 119m}Sn and {sup 195m}Pt in the hydraulic tube facility (HT) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has indicated that for all three cases the yields from neutron inelastic scattering were higher than those obtained from neutron capture reactions.

Mirzadeh, S.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Alexander, C.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-12-31

21

Student research with 400keV beams: 13N radioisotope production target development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The AN400 Van de Graaff accelerator at the Minnesota State University, Mankato, Applied Nuclear Science Lab has demonstrated utility as an accessible and versatile platform for student research. Despite the limits of low energy, the research team successfully developed projects with applications to the wider radioisotope production community. A target system has been developed for producing and extracting 13N by the 12C(d,n)13N reaction below 400keV. The system is both reusable and robust, with future applications to higher energy machines producing this important radioisotope for physiological imaging studies with Positron Emission Tomography. Up to 36(1)% of the 13N was extracted from the graphite matrix when 35 A current was externally applied to the graphite target while simultaneously flushing the target chamber with CO2 gas.

Fru, L. Che; Clymer, J.; Compton, N.; Cotter, J.; Dam, H.; Lesko, Z.; Pautzke, J.; Prokop, C.; Swanson, L.; Roberts, A. D.

2013-04-01

22

Student research with 400keV beams: {sup 13}N radioisotope production target development  

SciTech Connect

The AN400 Van de Graaff accelerator at the Minnesota State University, Mankato, Applied Nuclear Science Lab has demonstrated utility as an accessible and versatile platform for student research. Despite the limits of low energy, the research team successfully developed projects with applications to the wider radioisotope production community. A target system has been developed for producing and extracting {sup 13}N by the {sup 12}C(d,n){sup 13}N reaction below 400keV. The system is both reusable and robust, with future applications to higher energy machines producing this important radioisotope for physiological imaging studies with Positron Emission Tomography. Up to 36({+-}1)% of the {sup 13}N was extracted from the graphite matrix when 35 A current was externally applied to the graphite target while simultaneously flushing the target chamber with CO{sub 2} gas.

Fru, L. Che; Clymer, J.; Compton, N.; Cotter, J.; Dam, H.; Lesko, Z.; Pautzke, J.; Prokop, C.; Swanson, L.; Roberts, A. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Minnesota State University, Trafton Science Center N141, Mankato MN 56001 (United States)

2013-04-19

23

Production of radio-isotopes at North Shore Univ. Hospital  

SciTech Connect

The North Shore University Hospital Cyclotron/PET Facility houses a Scanditronix MC17F cyclotron and a SuperPETT 3000 camera. The cyclotron, produces extracted beams of 17.5 MeV protons or 8.5 MeV deuterons up to 80 microamps. It is equipped with a 6.5M beam line with a three port switching magnet (+30{degrees}, 0{degrees}, {minus}30{degrees}). The 0{degrees} port supports target chambers for the production of {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N, {sup 15}O, and {sup 18}F. {sup 18}F is produced by both the {sup 18}O(p,n){sup 18}F and the {sup 20}Ne(d,alpha){sup 18}F reactions, for fluoride ion and anhydrous F{sub 2}, respectively. Remotely operated semiautomatic processing systems are used for the production of {sup 11}C - labeling agents and permanent gases labeled with {sup 15}O. The two experimental beams lines (+30{degrees}, {minus}30{degrees}) are used for target development, notably the production of {sup 55}Co by bombardment of a highly enriched {sup 54}Fe target with deuterons.

Dahl, J.R. [North Shore Univ. Hospital, Manhasset, NY (United States)

1994-12-31

24

The real structure of crushing products of crystalline ?-rhombohedral boron  

Microsoft Academic Search

It was established, that depending on the methods of crushing to powder of crystalline ?-rhombohedral boron different phases can be produced: ?-rhombohedral boron and B6O suboxide after pounding, ?-tetragonal modification of boron and ?-rhombohedral boron with unregular strauture both in volume and in the superficial layers of particles after grinding. All these phases are present in powders produced by combined

D. L. Gabunia; T. Sh. Badzagua; M. K. Tsomaya; D. T. Lezhava; D. N. Avlokhashvili; N. T. Maisuradze; R. N. Dekanosidze

1991-01-01

25

Conceptual design of a new homogeneous reactor for medical radioisotope Mo-99/Tc-99m production  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To partly solve the global and regional shortages of Mo-99 supply, a conceptual design of a nitrate-fuel-solution based homogeneous reactor dedicated for Mo-99/Tc-99m medical radioisotope production is proposed. The modified LEU Cintichem process for Mo-99 extraction which has been licensed and demonstrated commercially for decades by BATAN is taken into account as a key design consideration. The design characteristics and main parameters are identified and the advantageous aspects are shown by comparing with the BATAN's existing Mo-99 supply chain which uses a heterogeneous reactor (RSG GAS multipurpose reactor).

Liem, Peng Hong; Tran, Hoai Nam; Sembiring, Tagor Malem; Arbie, Bakri

2014-09-01

26

Conceptual design of a new homogeneous reactor for medical radioisotope Mo-99/Tc-99m production  

SciTech Connect

To partly solve the global and regional shortages of Mo-99 supply, a conceptual design of a nitrate-fuel-solution based homogeneous reactor dedicated for Mo-99/Tc-99m medical radioisotope production is proposed. The modified LEU Cintichem process for Mo-99 extraction which has been licensed and demonstrated commercially for decades by BATAN is taken into account as a key design consideration. The design characteristics and main parameters are identified and the advantageous aspects are shown by comparing with the BATAN's existing Mo-99 supply chain which uses a heterogeneous reactor (RSG GAS multipurpose reactor)

Liem, Peng Hong [Nippon Advanced Information Service (NAIS Co., Inc.) Scientific Computational Division, 416 Muramatsu, Tokaimura, Ibaraki (Japan); Tran, Hoai Nam [Chalmers University of Technology, Dept. of Applied Physics, Div. of Nuclear Engineering, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Sembiring, Tagor Malem [National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Center for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety, Kawasan Puspiptek, Serpong, Tangerang Selatan, Banten (Indonesia); Arbie, Bakri [PT MOTAB Technology, Kedoya Elok Plaza Blok DA 12, Jl. Panjang, Kebun Jeruk, Jakarta Barat (Indonesia)

2014-09-30

27

Integrated rig for the production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressurized vapor-condenser method  

DOEpatents

An integrated production apparatus for production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressure vapor-condenser method. The apparatus comprises: a pressurized reaction chamber containing a continuously fed boron containing target having a boron target tip, a source of pressurized nitrogen and a moving belt condenser apparatus; a hutch chamber proximate the pressurized reaction chamber containing a target feed system and a laser beam and optics.

Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin C

2014-03-25

28

Integrated Rig for the Production of Boron Nitride Nanotubes via the Pressurized Vapor-Condenser Method  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An integrated production apparatus for production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressure vapor-condenser method. The apparatus comprises: a pressurized reaction chamber containing a continuously fed boron containing target having a boron target tip, a source of pressurized nitrogen and a moving belt condenser apparatus; a hutch chamber proximate the pressurized reaction chamber containing a target feed system and a laser beam and optics.

Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor)

2014-01-01

29

The real structure of crushing products of crystalline ?-rhombohedral boron  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It was established, that depending on the methods of crushing to powder of crystalline ?-rhombohedral boron different phases can be produced: ?-rhombohedral boron and B6O suboxide after pounding, ?-tetragonal modification of boron and ?-rhombohedral boron with unregular strauture both in volume and in the superficial layers of particles after grinding. All these phases are present in powders produced by combined process (pounding and grinding); their ratio depends on the duration of the process.

Gabunia, D. L.; Badzagua, T. Sh.; Tsomaya, M. K.; Lezhava, D. T.; Avlokhashvili, D. N.; Maisuradze, N. T.; Dekanosidze, R. N.

1991-07-01

30

ULTRASONIC AND RADIOGRAPHIC IMAGING OF NIOBIUM TARGET CAPSULES FOR RADIOISOTOPE PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

In the case of proton-irradiated radioisotope production, niobium target capsules containing gallium are exposed to intense radiation, thermally induced stress, for extended periods. The structural integrity of the target capsules is of crucial importance for containing the accelerator-produced radioisotopes and target material. The capsule window should be as thin and transparent to the proton beam as possible, and preferably should not become significantly activated under proton irradiation. In addition, the material for the capsule needs to be as defect-free as possible. Niobium encapsulated gallium targets have a history of unpredictable failure under intense irradiation with 100 MeV protons. This study illustrates the utility of non-destructive testing in order to detect defects that may result in mechanical failure of the capsules during irradiation. Prior to this work, it was not known if the gallium initially wets the niobium capsule that encapsulates it, and if it does, it is not known to what degree. However, the imaging techniques used in this work show that local areas of wetting do occur. We used ultrasonic images from various lots of niobium capsule material to assess the integrity of the capsules. Digital radiography is also used to detect any voids in the gallium that will tend to cause local heating in the capsules.

Bach, H. T.; Claytor, T. N.; Hunter, J. F.; Dozier, B. E.; Nortier, F. M.; Smith, D. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS J514, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Lenz, J. W. [John W. Lenz and Associates, 412 Muskingum Road, Waxahachie, TX 75165 (United States); Moddrell, C.; Smith, P. A. [P.A. Smith Concepts and Designs, 1475 Central Ave. Suite 250, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)

2009-03-03

31

Light Weight Radioisotopic Heater Unit (LWRHU) production for the Galileo Mission  

SciTech Connect

The Light Weight Radioisotopic Heater Unit (LWRHU) is a /sup 238/PuO/sub 2)minus/ fueled heat source designed to provide a thermal watt of power for space missions. The LWRHU will be used to maintain the temperature of various components on the spcaecraft at the required level. The heat source consists of a /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel pellet, a Pt-30Rh capsule, a pyrolytic graphite insulator, and a woven graphite aeroshell assembly. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has fabricated 134 heater units which will be used on the Galileo Mission. This report summarizes the specifications, fabrication processes, and production data for the heat sources fabricated at LANL. 4 figs., 15 tabs

Rinehart, G.H.

1988-04-01

32

Radio-isotope production scale-up at the University of Wisconsin  

SciTech Connect

Our intent has been to scale up our production capacity for a subset of the NSAC-I list of radioisotopes in jeopardy, so as to make a significant impact on the projected national needs for Cu-64, Zr-89, Y-86, Ga-66, Br-76, I-124 and other radioisotopes that offer promise as PET synthons. The work-flow and milestones in this project have been compressed into a single year (Aug 1, 2012- July 31, 2013). The grant budget was virtually dominated by the purchase of a pair of dual-mini-cells that have made the scale-up possible, now permitting the Curie-level processing of Cu-64 and Zr-89 with greatly reduced radiation exposure. Mile stones: 1. We doubled our production of Cu-64 and Zr-89 during the grant period, both for local use and out-bound distribution to ? 30 labs nationwide. This involved the dove-tailing of beam schedules of both our PETtrace and legacy RDS cyclotron. 2. Implemented improved chemical separation of Zr-89, Ga-66, Y-86 and Sc-44, with remote, semi-automated dissolution, trap-and-release separation under LabView control in the two dual-mini-cells provided by this DOE grant. A key advance was to fit the chemical stream with miniature radiation detectors to confirm the transfer operations. 3. Implemented improved shipping of radioisotopes (Cu-64, Zr-89, Tc-95m, and Ho-163) with approved DOT 7A boxes, with a much-improved FedEx shipping success compared to our previous steel drums. 4. Implemented broad range quantitative trace metal analysis, employing a new microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometer (Agilent 4200) capable of ppb sensitivity across the periodic table. This new instrument will prove essential in bringing our radiometals into FDA compliance needing CoAs for translational research in clinical trials. 5. Expanded our capabilities in target fabrication, with the purchase of a programmable 1600 oC inert gas tube furnace for the smelting of binary alloy target materials. A similar effort makes use of our RF induction furnace, allowing small scale metallurgy with greater control. This alloy feedstock was then used to electroplate cyclotron targets with elevated melting temperatures capable of withstanding higher beam currents. 6. Finished the beam-line developments needed for the irradiation of low-melting target materials (Se and Ga) now being used for the production of Br-76, and radioactive germanium (68, 69, 71Ge). Our planned development of I-124 production has been deferred, given the wide access from commercial suppliers. The passing of these milestones has been the subject of the previous quarterly reports. These signature accomplishments were made possible by the DOE support, and have strengthened the infrastructure at the University of Wisconsin, provided the training ground for a very talented graduate research assistant (Mr. Valdovinos) and more than doubled our out-shipments of Cu-64 and Zr-89.

Nickles, Robert Jerome [Univ of Wisconsin] [Univ of Wisconsin

2014-06-19

33

Electroextraction of boron from boron carbide scrap  

SciTech Connect

Studies were carried out to extract elemental boron from boron carbide scrap. The physicochemical nature of boron obtained through this process was examined by characterizing its chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size. The microstructural characteristics of the extracted boron powder were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopic examination of boron powder was also carried out to determine its crystalline form. Oxygen and carbon were found to be the major impurities in boron. Boron powder of purity ? 92 wt. % could be produced by the electroextraction process developed in this study. Optimized method could be used for the recovery of enriched boron ({sup 10}B > 20 at. %) from boron carbide scrap generated during the production of boron carbide. - Highlights: Recovery of {sup 10}B from nuclear grade boron carbide scrap Development of process flow sheet Physicochemical characterization of electroextracted boron Microscopic examination of electroextracted boron.

Jain, Ashish [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Anthonysamy, S., E-mail: sas@igcar.gov.in [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Ghosh, C. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Ravindran, T.R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Divakar, R.; Mohandas, E. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

2013-10-15

34

Boron  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that borate minerals and refined borates are used extensively for the manufacture of vitreous materials such as insulation and textile fiberglasses, borosilicate glass, and porcelain enamels and frits. In North America, these applications are estimated to account for over 54% of the borate consumption. Other substantial uses are in soaps and detergents, metallurgy, fire retardants, industrial biocides, agriculture, and various miscellaneous applications. Reported domestic borate consumption in 1990 was estimated by the U.S. Bureau of Mines to be 320 000 metric tons B{sub 2}O{sub 3} versus 354 000 metric tons B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in 1989. Consumption is projected to remain essentially static in 1991. Imports were estimated by the Bureau to be 50 000 metric tons B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in 1990. Exports of boric acid and refined borates were approximately 650 000 metric tons of product, a 15 000 metric ton increase from the 1989 level. This increase partially offsets the drop in the 1990 consumption level.

Cozen, L.F. (United States Borax and Chemical Corp., Los Angeles, CA (US))

1991-05-01

35

Improved Techniques Used at Brookhaven National Laboratory to Package and Dispose of Radioisotope Production Waste Lowers Worker Exposure  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the operations that generate Radioisotope Production Waste at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and the improved techniques used to handle and dispose of this waste. Historically, these wastes have produced high worker exposure during processing, packaging and disposal. The waste is made up of accelerator-produced nuclides of short to mid-length half-lives with a few longer-lived nuclides. However, because radiopharmaceutical research and treatment requires a constant supply of radioisotopes, the waste must be processed and disposed of in a timely manner. Since the waste cannot be stored for long periods of time to allow for adequate decay, engineering processes were implemented to safely handle the waste routinely and with ALARA principles in mind.

Sullivan, P.

2003-02-24

36

Use of boron waste as a fluxing agent in production of red mud brick  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study was directed towards determining the usability of clay and fine wastes (CW and FW) of boron from the concentrator plant in Kirka (Turkey) as a fluxing agent in production of red mud (RM) brick. Both laboratory studies on the characterization of materials and industrial-scale tests for production of bricks were carried out. CW and FW, which have similar

Taner Kavas

2006-01-01

37

Production of medical radioisotopes in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for cancer treatment and arterial restenosis therapy after PTCA  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) represents an important resource for the production of a wide variety of medical radioisotopes. In addition to serving as a key production site for californium-252 and other transuranic elements, important examples of therapeutic radioisotopes which are currently routinely produced in the HFIR for distribution include dysprosium-166 (parent of holmium-166), rhenium-186, tin-117m and tungsten-188 (parent of rhenium-188). The nine hydraulic tube (HT) positions in the central high flux region permit the insertion and removal of targets at any time during the operating cycle and have traditionally represented a major site for production of medical radioisotopes. To increase the irradiation capabilities of the HFIR, special target holders have recently been designed and fabricated which will be installed in the six Peripheral Target Positions (PTP), which are also located in the high flux region. These positions are only accessible during reactor refueling and will be used for long-term irradiations, such as required for the production of tin-117m and tungsten-188. Each of the PTP tubes will be capable of housing a maximum of eight HT targets, thus increasing the total maximum number of HT targets from the current nine, to a total of 57. In this paper the therapeutic use of reactor-produced radioisotopes for bone pain palliation and vascular brachytherapy and the therapeutic medical radioisotope production capabilities of the ORNL HFIR are briefly discussed.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Beets, A.L.; Mirzadeh, S.; Alexander, C.W.; Hobbs, R.L.

1998-06-01

38

Production of medical radioisotopes in the ORNL high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) for cancer treatment and arterial restenosis therapy after PICA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor ( HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory ( ORNL) represents an important resource for the production of a wide variety of medical radioisotopes. First beginning operation in 1965, the high thermal neutron flux (2.51015 neutrons/cm2/sec at 85 MW) and versatile target irradiation and handling facilities provide the opportunity for production of a wide variety of neutron-rich medical radioisotopes of current interest for therapy. In addition to serving as a key production site for californium-252 and other transuranic elements, important examples of therapeutic radioisotopes which are currently routinely produced in the HFIR for distribution include dysprosium-166 (parent of holmium-166), rhenium-186, tin-117 m and tungsten-188 (parent of rhenium-188). The nine hydraulic tube ( HT) positions in the central high flux region permit the insertion and removal of targets at any time during the operating cycle (22-24 days) and have traditionally represented a major site for production of medical radioisotopes. To increase the irradiation capabilities of the HFIR, special target holders have recently been designed and fabricated which will be installed in the six Peripheral Target Positions ( PTP), which are also located in the high flux region. These positions are only accessible during reactor refueling and will be used for long-term irradiations, such as required for the production of tin-117 m and tungsten-188. Each of the PTP tubes will be capable of housing a maximum of eight HT targets, thus increasing the total maximum number of HT targets from the current nine, to a total of 57. In this paper the therapeutic use of reactor-produced radioisotopes for bone pain palliation and vascular brachytherapy and the therapeutic medical radioisotope production capabilities of the ORNL HFIR are briefly discussed.

Knapp, F. F.; Beets, A. L.; Mirzadeh, S.; Alexander, C. W.; Hobbs, R. L.

1999-01-01

39

Production of medical radioisotopes in the ORNL high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) for cancer treatment and arterial restenosis therapy after PICA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) represents an important resource for the production of a wide variety of medical radioisotopes. First beginning operation in 1965, the high thermal neutron flux (2.51015 neutrons/cm2/sec at 85 MW) and versatile target irradiation and handling facilities provide the opportunity for production of a wide variety of neutron-rich medical radioisotopes of current interest for therapy. In addition to serving as a key production site for californium-252 and other transuranic elements, important examples of therapeutic radioisotopes which are currently routinely produced in the HFIR for distribution include dysprosium-166 (parent of holmium-166), rhenium-186, tin-117m and tungsten-188 (parent of rhenium-188). The nine hydraulic tube (HT) positions in the central high flux region permit the insertion and removal of targets at any time during the operating cycle (22 24 days) and have traditionally represented a major site for production of medical radioisotopes. To increase the irradiation capabilities of the HFIR, special target holders have recently been designed and fabricated which will be installed in the six Peripheral Target Positions (PTP), which are also located in the high flux region. These positions are only accessible during reactor refueling and will be used for long-term irradiations, such as required for the production of tin-117m and tungsten-188. Each of the PTP tubes will be capable of housing a maximum of eight HT targets, thus increasing the total maximum number of HT targets from the current nine, to a total of 57. In this paper the therapeutic use of reactor-produced radioisotopes for bone pain palliation and vascular brachytherapy and the therapeutic medical radioisotope production capabilities of the ORNL HFIR are briefly discussed.

Knapp, F. F.; Beets, A. L.; Mirzadeh, S.; Alexander, C. W.; Hobbs, R. L.

1999-01-01

40

Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power Systems Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2006 Through September 30, 2007  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Radioisotope Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Radioisotope Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2007. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

King, James F [ORNL

2008-04-01

41

Masters Thesis- Criticality Alarm System Design Guide with Accompanying Alarm System Development for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory in Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

A detailed instructional manual was created to guide criticality safety engineers through the process of designing a criticality alarm system (CAS) for Department of Energy (DOE) hazard class 1 and 2 facilities. Regulatory and technical requirements were both addressed. A list of design tasks and technical subtasks are thoroughly analyzed to provide concise direction for how to complete the analysis. An example of the application of the design methodology, the Criticality Alarm System developed for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory (RPL) of Richland, Washington is also included. The analysis for RPL utilizes the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 for establishing detector coverage in the facility. Significant improvements to the existing CAS were made that increase the reliability, transparency, and coverage of the system.

Greenfield, Bryce A.

2009-12-20

42

Modeling of Laser Vaporization and Plume Chemistry in a Boron Nitride Nanotube Production Rig  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flow in a pressurized, vapor condensation (PVC) boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) production rig is modeled. A laser provides a thermal energy source to the tip of a boron ber bundle in a high pressure nitrogen chamber causing a plume of boron-rich gas to rise. The buoyancy driven flow is modeled as a mixture of thermally perfect gases (B, B2, N, N2, BN) in either thermochemical equilibrium or chemical nonequilibrium assuming steady-state melt and vaporization from a 1 mm radius spot at the axis of an axisymmetric chamber. The simulation is intended to define the macroscopic thermochemical environment from which boron-rich species, including nanotubes, condense out of the plume. Simulations indicate a high temperature environment (T > 4400K) for elevated pressures within 1 mm of the surface sufficient to dissociate molecular nitrogen and form BN at the base of the plume. Modifications to Program LAURA, a finite-volume based solver for hypersonic flows including coupled radiation and ablation, are described to enable this simulation. Simulations indicate that high pressure synthesis conditions enable formation of BN vapor in the plume that may serve to enhance formation of exceptionally long nanotubes in the PVC process.

Gnoffo, Peter A.; Fay, Catharine C.

2012-01-01

43

Production of {sup 17}F, {sup 15}O and other radioisotopes for PET using a 3 MV electrostatic tandem accelerator  

SciTech Connect

Target systems for the production of positron emitting radioisotopes used for medical research with positron emission tomography (PET) are under development for a 3 MV electrostatic tandem accelerator (NEC 9SDH-2). This machine is intended primarily for the continuous production of short lived tracers labeled with {sup 15}O (t{sub 1/2}=122 s) or {sup 17}F (t{sub 1/2}=65 s) for determining regional cerebral blood flow in humans. Simple gas, liquid, and solid target systems are presented for the production of [{sup 15}O]H{sub 2}O (yield at saturation 13 mCi/{mu}A), [{sup 17}F]F{sub 2} (22 mCi/{mu}A), [{sup 17}F] fluoride (aq.) (12 mCi/{mu}A), [{sup 18}F]fluoride (aq.) (21 mCi/{mu}A), [{sup 13}N] in graphite (25 mCi/{mu}A), and [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} (2.3 mCi/{mu}A). Current limitations on single window targets for each production are discussed.

Roberts, A. D. [Medical Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Psychology Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Davidson, R. J. [Psychology Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Nickles, R. J. [Medical Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

1999-06-10

44

Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Tasks for October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2004. Production and production maintenance activities for flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

None listed

2005-06-01

45

Five Years of Cyclotron Radioisotope Production Experiences at the First PET-CT in Venezuela  

SciTech Connect

Five years operation of a compact cyclotron installed at PET-CT facility in Caracas, Venezuela is given. Production rate of {sup 18}F labeled FDG, operation and radiation monitoring experience are included. We conclude that {sup 18}FDG CT-PET is the most effective technique for patient diagnosis.

Colmenter, L.; Coelho, D.; Esteves, L. M.; Ruiz, N.; Morales, L.; Lugo, I. [Centro Diagnostico Docente, Las Mercedes, Caracas (Venezuela); Sajo-Bohus, L.; Liendo, J. A.; Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Seccion de Fisica Nuclear, Caracas (Venezuela); Castillo, J. [University of Applied Science of Aachen (Germany)

2007-10-26

46

Five Years of Cyclotron Radioisotope Production Experiences at the First PET-CT in Venezuela  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Five years operation of a compact cyclotron installed at PET-CT facility in Caracas, Venezuela is given. Production rate of 18F labeled FDG, operation and radiation monitoring experience are included. We conclude that 18FDG CT-PET is the most effective technique for patient diagnosis.

Colmenter, L.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Liendo, J. A.; Greaves, E. D.; Coelho, D.; Barros, H.; Castillo, J.; Esteves, L. M.; Ruiz, N.; Morales, L.; Lugo, I.

2007-10-01

47

Five Years of Cyclotron Radioisotope Production Experiences at the First PET-CT in Venezuela  

Microsoft Academic Search

Five years operation of a compact cyclotron installed at PET-CT facility in Caracas, Venezuela is given. Production rate of 18F labeled FDG, operation and radiation monitoring experience are included. We conclude that 18FDG CT-PET is the most effective technique for patient diagnosis.

L. Colmenter; L. Sajo-Bohus; J. A. Liendo; E. D. Greaves; D. Coelho; H. Barros; J. Castillo; L. M. Esteves; N. Ruiz; L. Morales; I. Lugo

2007-01-01

48

78 FR 1848 - Plutonium-238 Production for Radioisotope Power Systems for National Aeronautics and Space...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...of Pu-238 reserved for U.S. space missions was likely to be depleted...production of Pu-238 to support U.S. space exploration and national security missions...from Russia to meet near-term space mission requirements while...

2013-01-09

49

Synergistic methods for the production of high-strength and low-cost boron carbide  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Boron carbide (B4C) is a non-oxide ceramic in the same class of nonmetallic hard materials as silicon carbide and diamond. The high hardness, high elastic modulus and low density of B4C make it a nearly ideal material for personnel and vehicular armor. B4C plates formed via hot-pressing are currently issued to U.S. soldiers and have exhibited excellent performance; however, hot-pressed articles contain inherent processing defects and are limited to simple geometries such as low-curvature plates. Recent advances in the pressureless sintering of B4C have produced theoretically-dense and complex-shape articles that also exhibit superior ballistic performance. However, the cost of this material is currently high due to the powder shape, size, and size distribution that are required, which limits the economic feasibility of producing such a product. Additionally, the low fracture toughness of pure boron carbide may have resulted in historically lower transition velocities (the projectile velocity range at which armor begins to fail) than competing silicon carbide ceramics in high-velocity long-rod tungsten penetrator tests. Lower fracture toughness also limits multi-hit protection capability. Consequently, these requirements motivated research into methods for improving the densification and fracture toughness of inexpensive boron carbide composites that could result in the development of a superior armor material that would also be cost-competitive with other high-performance ceramics. The primary objective of this research was to study the effect of titanium and carbon additives on the sintering and mechanical properties of inexpensive B4C powders. The boron carbide powder examined in this study was a sub-micron (0.6 mum median particle size) boron carbide powder produced by H.C. Starck GmbH via a jet milling process. A carbon source in the form of phenolic resin, and titanium additives in the form of 32 nm and 0.9 mum TiO2 powders were selected. Parametric studies of sintering behavior were performed via high-temperature dilatometry in order to measure the in-situ sample contraction and thereby measure the influence of the additives and their amounts on the overall densification rate. Additionally, broad composition and sintering/post-HIPing studies followed by characterization and mechanical testing elucidated the effects of these additives on sample densification, microstructure de- velopment, and mechanical properties such as Vickers hardness and microindentation fracture toughness. Based upon this research, a process has been developed for the sintering of boron carbide that yielded end products with high relative densities (i.e., 100%, or theoretical density), microstructures with a fine (2-3 mum) grain size, and high Vickers microindentation hardness values. In addition to possessing these improved physical properties, the costs of producing this material were substantially lower (by a factor of 5 or more) than recently patented work on the pressureless sintering and post-HIPing of phase-pure boron carbide powder. This recently patented work developed out of our laboratory utilized an optimized powder distribution and yielded samples with high relative densities and high hardness values. The current work employed the use of titanium and carbon additives in specific ratios to activate the sintering of boron carbide powder possessing an approximately mono-modal particle size distribution. Upon heating to high temperatures, these additives produced fine-scale TiB2 and graphite inclusions that served to hinder grain growth and substantially improve overall sintered and post-HIPed densities when added in sufficient concentrations. The fine boron carbide grain size manifested as a result of these second phase inclusions caused a substantial increase in hardness; the highest hardness specimen yielded a hardness value (2884.5 kg/mm2) approaching that of phase-pure and theoretically-dense boron carbide (2939 kg/mm2). Additionally, the same high-hardness composition exhibited a noticeably higher fracture toughness (3.04 MPa

Wiley, Charles Schenck

2011-12-01

50

The real structure of crushing products of crystalline beta-rhombohedral boron  

Microsoft Academic Search

It was established, that depending on the methods of crushing to powder of crystalline beta-rhombohedral boron different phases can be produced: beta-rhombohedral boron and B6O suboxide after pounding, alpha-tetragonal modification of boron and beta-rhombohedral boron with unregular strauture both in volume and in the superficial layers of particles after grinding. All these phases are present in powders produced by combined

D. L. Gabunia; T. Sh. Badzagua; M. K. Tsomaya; D. T. Lezhava; D. N. Avlokhashvili; N. T. Maisuradze; R. N. Dekanosidze

1991-01-01

51

LANL Activities Supporting Electron Accelerator Production of 99Mo for NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes, LLC  

SciTech Connect

Summary of LANL FY12 Activities are: (1) Preparation, performance, and data analysis for the FY12 accelerator tests at ANL - (a) LANL designed and installed a closed-loop helium target cooling system at ANL for the FY12 accelerator tests, (b) Thermal test was performed on March 27, (c) 24 h production test to follow the accelerator upgrade at ANL; (2) Local target shielding design and OTR/IR recommendations - (a) Target dose rate and activation products were calculated with MCNPX, (b) {sup 206}Pb({gamma},2n){sup 204m}Pb vs {sup 204g}Pb branching ratio unpublished, will measure using the LANL microtron, (c) OTR system nearing final configuration, (d) IR prototype system demonstrated during the recent thermal test at ANL; (3) Target housing lifetime estimation - Target housing material specifications and design to be finalized following the thermal test, lifetime not believed to be an issue; and (4) Target cooling system reliability - Long duration system characterizations will begin following the thermal test.

Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelsey, Charles T. IV [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Woloshun, Keith A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holloway, Michael A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olivas, Eric R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dalmas, Dale A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Romero, Frank P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hurtle, Kenneth P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-11

52

ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT OF RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEMS MATERIALS PRODUCTION AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM TASKS FOR OCTOBER 1, 2010 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2011  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. These components were also produced for the Pluto New Horizons and Mars Science Lab missions launched in January 2006 and November 2011respectively. The ORNL has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for nearly four decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of RPS for fiscal year (FY) 2011. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new RPS. Work has also been initiated to establish fabrication capabilities for the Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Units.

King, James F [ORNL

2012-05-01

53

ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT OF RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEM MATERIALS PRODUCTION AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM TASKS FOR OCTOBER 1, 2004, THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2005  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2005. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

None

2005-09-30

54

Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Programs Tasks for October 1, 2005, through September 30, 2006  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2006. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

None

2006-09-30

55

Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technical Program Tasks for October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2006. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

None

2007-04-02

56

ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT OF RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEM MATERIALS PRODUCTION AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM TASKS FOR OCTOBER 1, 2005 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2006  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2006. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

King, James F [ORNL

2007-04-01

57

List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1983  

SciTech Connect

This document lists DOE's radioisotope production and distribution activities by its facilities at Argonne National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; Idaho Operations Office; Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Savannah River Plant; and UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. The information is divided into five sections: isotope suppliers, facility contacts, and isotopes or services supplied; lists of customers, suppliers and isotopes purchased; list of isotopes purchased cross-referenced to customer codes; geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers - FY 1983.

Baker, D.A.

1984-08-01

58

Method for separating boron isotopes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method of separating boron isotopes ¹°B and ¹¹B by laser-induced selective excitation and photodissociation of BCl molecules containing a particular boron isotope is described. The photodissociation products react with an appropriate chemical scavenger and the reaction products may readily be separated from undissociated BCl, thus effecting the desired separation of the boron isotopes.

Rockwood

1978-01-01

59

Method for separating boron isotopes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method of separating boron isotopes .sup.10 B and .sup.11 B by laser-induced selective excitation and photodissociation of BCl.sub.3 molecules containing a particular boron isotope. The photodissociation products react with an appropriate chemical scavenger and the reaction products may readily be separated from undissociated BCl.sub.3, thus effecting the desired separation of the boron isotopes.

Rockwood; Stephen D

1978-01-01

60

Cathodic reductive coupling of methyl cinnamate on boron-doped diamond electrodes and synthesis of new neolignan-type products  

PubMed Central

Summary The electroreduction reaction of methyl cinnamate on a boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode was investigated. The hydrodimer, dimethyl 3,4-diphenylhexanedioate (racemate/meso = 74:26), was obtained in 85% yield as the major product, along with small amounts of cyclic methyl 5-oxo-2,3-diphenylcyclopentane-1-carboxylate. Two new neolignan-type products were synthesized from the hydrodimer.

Kojima, Taiki; Obata, Rika; Saito, Tsuyoshi

2015-01-01

61

Neutron detection efficiency and capture product energy spectra of all-semiconducting-boron carbide and conversion-layer detectors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Solid-state neutron detectors based only on boron-rich semiconductor are of interest for their potential to provide the highest thermal neutron detection efficiencies of any solid-state neutron detectors. A simplified physical model is shown to generate capture product spectra that agree quantitatively with full-physics GEANT4 simulation. Using this model, comparisons are made between the ideal capture-product energy spectra of planar conversion

A. D. Harken; C. N. Lundstedt; E. E. Day; B. W. Robertson

2004-01-01

62

Effect of corrosion products (neodymium iron boron) on oral fibroblast proliferation.  

PubMed

The biological effects of the corrosion products of neodymium iron boron (Nd2Fe14B) magnets are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the types of corrosion product and to evaluate the effect of the corrosion products (CP) of Nd2Fe14B magnets on the proliferation of human oral mucosal fibroblasts. Uncoated Nd2Fe14B magnets were stored in saline at 37 degrees C for 6 months and the corrosion products collected. 100 microL of a cell suspension (human oral mucosal fibroblasts [14 x 10(4) cells/mL]) was aliquoted into 72 wells of a 96-well plate, the remaining plates receiving culture medium only. After 12 h incubation at 37 degrees C, each well then received 100 microL of either (A) culture medium, (B) 100% CP, (C) 50% CP, or (D) 0% CP. The plates were reincubated at 37 degrees C for a further 48, 96, or 144 h. Fibroblast proliferation was assessed using the methylene blue uptake/elution technique. The compounds in the corrosion product were examined using quantitative X-ray analysis. Statistical analysis (ANOVA, Bonferroni's test 0.05, SAS v 6.04), showed that at each time point, the cell numbers in groups B, C, and D were significantly lower than group A. Within groups B, C, and D no significant differences were found, despite the suggestion of a dose response effect. Fibroblast proliferation in the presence of corrosion products was significantly lower than with culture medium. Fibroblast proliferation did occur in the presence of 0, 50, and 100% CP. The actual corrosion products appeared to be salts of iron but 3.2% (+/- 0.6) of neodymium chloride (NdCl3) was found. PMID:7492811

Evans, R D; McDonald, F

1995-01-01

63

Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power Systems Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2006 Through September 30, 2007  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Office of Radioisotope Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet

James F

2008-01-01

64

Production of defects in hexagonal boron nitride monolayer under ion irradiation O. Lehtinen a,  

E-print Network

, Aalto University, P.O. Box 1100, FI-00076 Aalto, Finland a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received with sputtering yields of boron and nitrogen atoms. The presented results can be used for the optimization of ion], but alternating boron and nitrogen atoms substitute for carbon. While carbon atoms are covalently bonded

Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

65

Discussion of possible content of an IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) handbook/computer file for ''Data for Medical Radioisotope Production''  

SciTech Connect

Several possible approaches will be put forward in order to stimulate discussion and seek consensus on the relative emphasis and format of a proposed IAEA handbook and computer file for ''Data for Medical Radioisotope Production.'' An outline for possible chapters for non-nuclear physicists will be presented describing low, medium, and high energy reactions induced by light projectiles (e.g., n,p,..cap alpha..), by photons, and by heavy ions. Qualitative features would be described, typical experimental examples would be presented to illustrate each type of reaction, and examples would be presented of how well various computer codes would permit the calculation/prediction of the experimental results. We next solicit discussion of the desirability of the above, and of the format and means of compilation of a computer data file for isotope production. This should include format of experimental data, and also, whether a calculated file should be presented for production of particular isotopes from a ''most wanted'' list.

Blann, M.

1987-04-01

66

Determination of boron and lithium by recording the products from (n, alpha) reactions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Irradiation with thermal neutrons in the VVR-S reactor provides a nondestructive method for determining the presence of boron and lithium in solids. The charged particles produced in the reactions Li-6(n,alpha)H-3 and B-10(n,alpha)Li-7 were detected using CsI single crystal. For alpha-particle spectrometry in the boron determination, an ionization chamber (W and Sn electrodes, 99% Ar + 1% H2) was developed allowing both absolute and relative measurements. In determining boron in lithium-containing samples, both scintillation and ionization chambers are used. In determining lithium in minerals, the error was 1.5%, and the sensitivity 0.00005 wt.%. In the determination of boron in SiC with a concentration of boron approximately (3 plus or minus 2) the error given by the alpha-range uncertainty was 15%.

Lobanov, Y. M.; Zverev, B. P.; Simakhin, Y. F.; Usmanova, M. M.

1978-01-01

67

Process for making boron nitride using sodium cyanide and boron  

DOEpatents

This a very simple process for making boron nitride by mixing sodium cyanide and boron phosphate and heating the mixture in an inert atmosphere until a reaction takes place. The product is a white powder of boron nitride that can be used in applications that require compounds that are stable at high temperatures and that exhibit high electrical resistance.

Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1990-01-01

68

Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power Systems Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2007 Through September 30,2008  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides RPS for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of RPS for fiscal year (FY) 2008. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new RPS.

King, James F [ORNL

2009-04-01

69

Minerals Yearbook 1989: Boron  

Microsoft Academic Search

U.S. production and sales of boron minerals and chemicals decreased during the year. Domestically, glass fiber insulation was the largest use for borates, followed by sales to distributors, textile-grade glass fibers, and borosilicate glasses. California was the only domestic source of boron minerals. The United States continued to provide essentially all of its own supply while maintaining a strong position

Lyday

1990-01-01

70

Arabidopsis boron transporter for xylem loading  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boron deficiency hampers the productivity of 132 crops in more than 80 countries. Boron is essential in higher plants primarily for maintaining the integrity of cell walls and is also beneficial and might be essential in animals and in yeast. Understanding the molecular mechanism(s) of boron transport is crucial for alleviating boron deficiency. Here we describe the molecular identification of

Junpei Takano; Kyotaro Noguchi; Miho Yasumori; Masaharu Kobayashi; Zofia Gajdos; Kyoko Miwa; Hiroaki Hayashi; Tadakatsu Yoneyama; Toru Fujiwara

2002-01-01

71

Radioisotopes: Today's Applications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Radioisotopes are useful because of their three unique characteristics: (1) radiation emission; (2) predictable radioactive lives; and (3) the same chemical properties as the nonradioactive atoms of that element. Researchers are able to "order" a radioisotope with the right radiation, half-life, and chemical property to perform a given task with

Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

72

Melt production beneath Mt. Shasta from boron data in primitive melt inclusions.  

PubMed

Most arc magmas are thought to be generated by partial melting of the mantle wedge induced by infiltration of slab-derived fluids. However, partial melting of subducting oceanic crust has also been proposed to contribute to the melt generation process, especially when young and hot lithosphere is being subducted. The isotopic composition of boron measured in situ in olivine-hosted primitive melt inclusions in a basaltic andesite from Mt. Shasta, California, is characterized by large negative values that are also highly variable (delta(11)B = -21.3 to -0.9 per mil). The boron concentrations, from 0.7 to 1.6 parts per million, are lower than in most other arc lavas. The relation between concentration and isotopic composition of boron observed here supports a hypothesis that materials left after dehydration of the subducting slab may have contributed to the generation of basaltic andesite lavas at Mt. Shasta. PMID:11452119

Rose, E F; Shimizu, N; Layne, G D; Grove, T L

2001-07-13

73

Annual Technical Progress Report of the Radioisotope Power Systems Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2008 through September 30, 2009  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October

James F

2010-01-01

74

ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT OF RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEM MATERIALS PRODUCTION AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM TASKS FOR OCTOBER 1, 2005 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2006  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study

James F

2007-01-01

75

ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT OF RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEMS MATERIALS PRODUCTION AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM TASKS FOR OCTOBER 1, 2010 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2011  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to

James F

2012-01-01

76

Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2002 Through September 30, 2003  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study

2004-01-01

77

Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2004 Through September 30, 2005  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study

James F

2006-01-01

78

Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for April 1, 2002 Through September 20, 2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study

2002-01-01

79

Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2001 Through March 31, 2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study

J. P. Moore

2002-01-01

80

Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of the Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for September 2000 through March 2001  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study

2001-01-01

81

Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power Systems Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2007 Through September 30,2008  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Office of Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides RPS for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn.

James F

2009-01-01

82

(Data in thousand metric tons of boric oxide (B2O3) unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Data for boron production and consumption in 2008 in the United States were  

E-print Network

States in 2008 was glass and ceramics, 74%; soaps, detergents, and bleaches, 6%; agriculture, 3%; enamels and borosilicate production has driven a global demand for boron. A rapid increase in the manufacture

83

Jaguar Procedures for Detonation Behavior of Explosives Containing Boron  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Jaguar product library was expanded to include boron and boron containing products by analysis of Available Hugoniot and static volumetric data to obtain constants of the Murnaghan relationships for the components. Experimental melting points were also utilized to obtain the constants of the volumetric relationships for liquid boron and boron oxide. Detonation velocities for HMXboron mixtures calculated with these relationships using Jaguar are in closer agreement with literature values at high initial densities for inert (unreacted) boron than with the completely reacted metal. These results indicate that the boron does not react near the detonation front or that boron mixtures exhibit eigenvalue detonation behavior (as shown by some aluminized explosives), with higher detonation velocities at the initial points. Analyses of calorimetric measurements for RDXboron mixtures indicate that at high boron contents the formation of side products, including boron nitride and boron carbide, inhibits the detonation properties of the formulation.

Stiel, L. I.; Baker, E. L.; Capellos, C.

2009-12-01

84

Markets for reactor-produced non-fission radioisotopes  

SciTech Connect

Current market segments for reactor produced radioisotopes are developed and reported from a review of current literature. Specific radioisotopes studied in is report are the primarily selected from those with major medical or industrial markets, or those expected to have strongly emerging markets. Relative market sizes are indicated. Special emphasis is given to those radioisotopes that are best matched to production in high flux reactors such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory or the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A general bibliography of medical and industrial radioisotope applications, trends, and historical notes is included.

Bennett, R.G.

1995-01-01

85

Hydrogen-catalyzed, pilot-scale production of small-diameter boron nitride nanotubes and their macroscopic assemblies.  

PubMed

Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) exhibit a range of properties that are as compelling as those of carbon nanotubes (CNTs); however, very low production volumes have prevented the science and technology of BNNTs from evolving at even a fraction of the pace of CNTs. Here we report the high-yield production of small-diameter BNNTs from pure hexagonal boron nitride powder in an induction thermal plasma process. Few-walled, highly crystalline small-diameter BNNTs (?5 nm) are produced exclusively and at an unprecedentedly high rate approaching 20 g/h, without the need for metal catalysts. An exceptionally high cooling rate (?10(5) K/s) in the induction plasma provides a strong driving force for the abundant nucleation of small-sized B droplets, which are known as effective precursors for small-diameter BNNTs. It is also found that the addition of hydrogen to the reactant gases is crucial for achieving such high-quality, high-yield growth of BNNTs. In the plasma process, hydrogen inhibits the formation of N2 from N radicals and promotes the creation of B-N-H intermediate species, which provide faster chemical pathways to the re-formation of a h-BN-like phase in comparison to nitridation from N2. We also demonstrate the fabrication of macroscopic BNNT assemblies such as yarns, sheets, buckypapers, and transparent thin films at large scales. These findings represent a seminal milestone toward the exploitation of BNNTs in real-world applications. PMID:24807071

Kim, Keun Su; Kingston, Christopher T; Hrdina, Amy; Jakubinek, Michael B; Guan, Jingwen; Plunkett, Mark; Simard, Benoit

2014-06-24

86

List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1979  

SciTech Connect

The fifteenth edition of the radioisotope customer list was prepared at the request of the Division of Financial Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Department of Energy (DOE). This document lists DOE's radioisotope production and distribution activities by its facilities at Argonne National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory; Idaho Operations Office; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Mound Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Rocky Flats Area Office; Savannah River Laboratory; and UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. The information is divided into five sections: Isotope suppliers, facility, contracts and isotopes or services supplied; alphabetical list of customers, and isotopes purchased; alphabetical list of isotopes cross-referenced to customer numbers; geographical location of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers-FY 1979.

Burlison, J.S. (comp.)

1980-06-01

87

List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1980  

SciTech Connect

The sixteenth edition of the radioisotope customer list was prepared at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of energy Research, Department of Energy (DOE). This document lists DOE's radioisotope production and distribution activities by its facilities at Argonne National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboraory; Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory; Idaho Operations Office; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Mound Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Savannah River Laboratory; and UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. The information is divided into five sections: (1) isotope suppliers, facility, contracts and isotopes or services supplied; (2) alphabetical list of customers, and isotopes purchased; (3) alphabetical list of isotopes cross-referenced to customer numbers; (4) geographical location of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfers-FY 1980.

Burlison, J.S. (comp.)

1981-08-01

88

Experience utilizing a 3.7 MeV tandem cascade accelerator (TCA) for PET radioisotope production  

SciTech Connect

A 3.7 MeV TCA was installed at Washington University in the Spring of 1993 for evaluation as a PET isotope production accelerator. The accelerator was installed in a specially designed suite consisting of the accelerator room, a {open_quotes}hot lab{close_quotes} and a {open_quotes}cold lab{close_quotes}. The accelerator has been utilized routinely for PET isotope production since it`s installation. Although the major radionuclide produced utilizing the TCA is oxygen-15, techniques for the production of fluorine-18 and nitrogen-13 have been developed. The novel techniques used to produce usable quantities of these latter two isotopes will be discussed.

Welch, M.J.; Gaehle, G.; Dence, C.S. [Washington Univ. Medical School, St. Louis, MO (United States)] [and others

1994-12-31

89

Mass-production of boron nitride double-wall nanotubes and nanococoons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Various techniques including plasma-arc, laser ablation, and chemical vapor-phase synthesis have been employed to produce bulk amounts of non-carbon (such as boron nitride, BN) nanotubes with some success, but in general the yields are low. We describe a new high-yield plasma-arc method that easily and reliably produces macroscopic amounts of pure BN nanotubes. Interestingly, the method produces almost exclusively double-walled nanotubes; these in turn self-assemble into BN nanotube bundles or ropes. Our synthesis method also produces BN-coated crystalline nanoparticles, whose cores can be preferentially etched leaving behind hollow BN `nanococoons'.

Cumings, John; Zettl, A.

2000-01-01

90

Reducing Boron Toxicity by Microbial Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

While electricity is a clean source of energy, methods of electricity-production, such as the use of coal-fired power plants, often result in significant environmental damage. Coal-fired electrical power plants produce air pollution, while contaminating ground water and soils by build-up of boron, which enters surrounding areas through leachate. Increasingly high levels of boron in soils eventually overcome boron tolerance levels in plants and trees, resulting in toxicity. Formation of insoluble boron precipitates, mediated by mineral-precipitating bacteria, may sequester boron into more stable forms that are less available and toxic to vegetation. Results have provided evidence of microbially-facilitated sequestration of boron into insoluble mineral precipitates. Analyses of water samples taken from ponds with high boron concentrations showed that algae present contained 3-5 times more boron than contained in the water in the samples. Boron sequestration may also be facilitated by the incorporation of boron within algal cells. Experiments examining boron sequestration by algae are in progress. In bacterial experiments with added ferric citrate, the reduction of iron by the bacteria resulted in an ironcarbonate precipitate containing boron. An apparent color change showing the reduction of amorphous iron, as well as the precipitation of boron with iron, was more favorable at higher pH. Analysis of precipitates by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy revealed mineralogical composition and biologicallymediated accumulation of boron precipitates in test-tube experiments.

Hazen, T.; Phelps, T.J.

2002-01-01

91

Minerals Yearbook 1989: Boron  

SciTech Connect

U.S. production and sales of boron minerals and chemicals decreased during the year. Domestically, glass fiber insulation was the largest use for borates, followed by sales to distributors, textile-grade glass fibers, and borosilicate glasses. California was the only domestic source of boron minerals. The United States continued to provide essentially all of its own supply while maintaining a strong position as a source of sodium borate products and boric acid exported to foreign markets. Supplementary U.S. imports of Turkish calcium borate and calcium-sodium borate ores, borax, and boric acid, primarily for various glass uses, continued.

Lyday, P.A.

1990-08-01

92

Radioisotope dating with a cyclotron.  

PubMed

By considering radioisotope dating as a problem in trace element detection, and by using the cyclotron as a high-energy mass spectrometer for this purpose, we have shown that one can greatly increase the maximum age that can be determined while simultaneously reducing the size of the sample required. The cyclotron can be used to detect atoms or simple molecules that are present at the 10(-16) level or greater. For (14)C dating one should be able to go back 40,000 to 100,000 years with 1- to 100-mg carbon samples; for (10)Be dating, 10 to 30 million years with 1-mm(3) to 10-cm(3) rock samples; for tritium dating, 160 years with a 1-liter water sample. The feasibility of the technique has been demonstrated experimentally by measuring the tritium/deuterium ratio in a sample 24 years old. For samples many half-lives old, the fractional error in the age is small even if rates of production or deposition of the isotopes. Although cyclotrons are expensive to build, their operating costs are relatively low. If several samples are dated per hour the cost per date may not be substantially higher than it is today for decay dating. There are already more than 50 cyclotrons in operation which have the potential to do radioisotope dating, and their application to important problems of dating and trace element analysis should prove very fruitful. PMID:17837065

Muller, R A

1977-04-29

93

Taming Highly Charged Radioisotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The precise and accurate mass of short-lived radioisotopes is a very important parameter in physics. Contribution to the improvement of nuclear models, metrological standard fixing and tests of the unitarity of the Caibbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix are a few examples where the mass value plays a major role. TRIUMF's ion trap for atomic and nuclear physics (TITAN) is a unique facility of three online ion traps that enables the mass measurement of short-lived isotopes with high precision (10-8). At present TITAN's electron beam ion trap (EBIT) increases the charge state to increase the precision, but there is no facility to significantly reduce the energy spread introduced by the charge breeding process. The precision of the measured mass of radioisotopes is linearly dependent on the charge state while the energy spread of the charged radioisotopes affects the precision adversely. To boost the precision level of mass measurement at TITAN without loosing too many ions, a cooler Penning trap (CPET) is being developed. CPET is designed to use either positively (proton) or negatively (electron) charged particles to reduce the energy spread via sympathetic cooling. Off-line setup of CPET is complete. Details of the working principles and updates are presented

Chowdhury, Usman; Eberhardt, Benjamin; Jang, Fuluni; Schultz, Brad; Simon, Vanessa; Delheij, Paul; Dilling, Jens; Gwinner, Gerald

2012-10-01

94

High-Efficient Production of Boron Nitride Nanosheets via an Optimized Ball Milling Process for Lubrication in Oil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although tailored wet ball milling can be an efficient method to produce a large quantity of two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, milling parameters including milling speed, ball-to-powder ratio, milling ball size and milling agent, are important for optimization of exfoliation efficiency and production yield. In this report, we systematically investigate the effects of different milling parameters on the production of BN nanosheets with benzyl benzoate being used as the milling agent. It is found that small balls of 0.1-0.2 mm in diameter are much more effective in exfoliating BN particles to BN nanosheets. Under the optimum condition, the production yield can be as high as 13.8% and the BN nanosheets are 0.5-1.5 ?m in diameter and a few nanometers thick and of relative high crystallinity and chemical purity. The lubrication properties of the BN nanosheets in base oil have also been studied. The tribological tests show that the BN nanosheets can greatly reduce the friction coefficient and wear scar diameter of the base oil.

Deepika; Li, Lu Hua; Glushenkov, Alexey M.; Hait, Samik K.; Hodgson, Peter; Chen, Ying

2014-12-01

95

Radioisotopes as Political Instruments, 19461953  

PubMed Central

The development of nuclear piles, soon called reactors, in the Manhattan Project provided a new technology for manufacturing radioactive isotopes. Radioisotopes, unstable variants of chemical elements that give off detectable radiation upon decay, were available in small amounts for use in research and therapy before World War II. In 1946, the U.S. government began utilizing one of its first reactors, dubbed X-10 at Oak Ridge, as a production facility for radioisotopes available for purchase to civilian institutions. This program of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission was meant to exemplify the peacetime dividends of atomic energy. The numerous requests from scientists outside the United States, however, sparked a political debate about whether the Commission should or even could export radioisotopes. This controversy manifested the tension in U.S. politics between scientific internationalism as a tool of diplomacy, associated with the aims of the Marshall Plan, and the desire to safeguard the countrys atomic monopoly at all costs, linked to American anti-Communism. This essay examines the various ways in which radioisotopes were used as political instrumentsboth by the U.S. federal government in world affairs, and by critics of the civilian control of atomic energyin the early Cold War. PMID:20725612

Creager, Angela N. H.

2009-01-01

96

Radioisotopes as Political Instruments, 1946-1953.  

PubMed

The development of nuclear "piles," soon called reactors, in the Manhattan Project provided a new technology for manufacturing radioactive isotopes. Radioisotopes, unstable variants of chemical elements that give off detectable radiation upon decay, were available in small amounts for use in research and therapy before World War II. In 1946, the U.S. government began utilizing one of its first reactors, dubbed X-10 at Oak Ridge, as a production facility for radioisotopes available for purchase to civilian institutions. This program of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission was meant to exemplify the peacetime dividends of atomic energy. The numerous requests from scientists outside the United States, however, sparked a political debate about whether the Commission should or even could export radioisotopes. This controversy manifested the tension in U.S. politics between scientific internationalism as a tool of diplomacy, associated with the aims of the Marshall Plan, and the desire to safeguard the country's atomic monopoly at all costs, linked to American anti-Communism. This essay examines the various ways in which radioisotopes were used as political instruments-both by the U.S. federal government in world affairs, and by critics of the civilian control of atomic energy-in the early Cold War. PMID:20725612

Creager, Angela N H

2009-01-01

97

List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments FY 1978  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the document is to list DOE's radioisotopes production and distribution activities by its facilities at Argonne National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory; Idaho Operations Office; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Mound Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Savannah River Laboratory; and UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc.

Burlison, J.S.; Laidler, R.I. (comps.)

1979-05-01

98

JAGUAR Procedures for Detonation Behavior of Explosives Containing Boron  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The JAGUAR product library was expanded to include boron and boron containing products. Relationships of the Murnaghan form for molar volumes and derived properties were implemented in JAGUAR. Available Hugoniot and static volumertic data were analyzed to obtain constants of the Murnaghan relationship for solid boron, boron oxide, boron nitride, boron carbide, and boric acid. Experimental melting points were also utilized with optimization procedures to obtain the constants of the volumetric relationships for liquid boron and boron oxide. Detonation velocities for HMX - boron mixtures calculated with these relationships using JAGUAR are in closer agreement with literature values at high initial densities for inert (unreacted) boron than with the completely reacted metal. These results indicate that boron mixtures may exhibit eigenvalue detonation behavior, as observed by aluminized combined effects explosives, with higher detonation velocities than would be achieved by a classical Chapman-Jouguet detonation. Analyses of calorimetric measurements for RDX - boron mixtures indicate that at high boron contents the formation of side products, including boron nitride and boron carbide, inhibits the energy output obtained from the detonation of the formulation.

Stiel, Leonard; Baker, Ernest; Capellos, Christos

2009-06-01

99

Alternative Radioisotopes for Heat and Power Sources  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Production of 238Pu requires considerable facilities including a nuclear reactor and reprocessing plants that are very expensive to build and operate. Thus, a more economical alternative is very attractive to the industry. There are many alternative radioisotopes that exist but few that satisfy the criteria of performance, availability and cost to produce. Any alternative to 238Pu must exist in a chemical form that is compatible with the materials required to safely encapsulate the heat source at the high temperatures of operation and potential launch failure scenarios. The chemical form must also have suitable thermal properties to ensure maximum energy conversion efficiencies when integrated into radioisotope thermoelectric generators over the required mission durations. In addition, the radiation dose must be low enough for operators during production and not so prohibitive that excessive shielding mass is required on the space craft. This paper will focus on the preferred European alternative of 241Am, and the issues that will need to be addressed.

Tinsley, T.; Sarsfield, M.; Rice, T.

100

Increased Abundance of Proteins Involved in Phytosiderophore Production in Boron-Tolerant Barley1[C][W  

PubMed Central

Boron (B) phytotoxicity affects cereal-growing regions worldwide. Although B-tolerant barley (Hordeum vulgare) germplasm is available, molecules responsible for this tolerance mechanism have not been defined. We describe and use a new comparative proteomic technique, iTRAQ peptide tagging (iTRAQ), to compare the abundances of proteins from B-tolerant and -intolerant barley plants from a Clipper Sahara doubled-haploid population selected on the basis of a presence or absence of two B-tolerance quantitative trait loci. iTRAQ was used to identify three enzymes involved in siderophore production (Iron Deficiency Sensitive2 [IDS2], IDS3, and a methylthio-ribose kinase) as being elevated in abundance in the B-tolerant plants. Following from this result, we report a potential link between iron, B, and the siderophore hydroxymugineic acid. We believe that this study highlights the potency of the iTRAQ approach to better understand mechanisms of abiotic stress tolerance in cereals, particularly when applied in conjunction with bulked segregant analysis. PMID:17478636

Patterson, John; Ford, Kris; Cassin, Andrew; Natera, Siria; Bacic, Antony

2007-01-01

101

Short-lived fission product measurements from >0.1 MeV neutron-induced fission using boron carbide.  

SciTech Connect

A boron carbide shield was designed, custom fabricated, and used to create a fast fission energy neutron spectrum. The fissionable isotopes 233, 235, 238U, 237Np, and 239Pu were separately placed inside of this shield and irradiated under pulsed conditions at the Washington State University 1 MW TRIGA reactor. A unique set of fission product gamma spectra were collected at short times (4 minutes to 1 week) post-fission. Gamma spectra were collected on single-crystal high purity germanium detectors and on Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Direct Simultaneous Measurement (DSM) system composed of HPGe detectors connected in coincidence. This work defines the experimental methods used to produce and collect the gamma data, and demonstrates the validity of the measurements. It is important to fully document this information so the data can be used with high confidence for the advancement of nuclear science and non-proliferation applications. The gamma spectra collected in these and other experiments will be made publicly available at https://spcollab.pnl.gov/sites/gammadata or via the link at http://rdnsgroup.pnl.gov. A revised version of this publication will be posted with the data to make the experimental details available to those using the data.

Finn, Erin C.; Metz, Lori A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Pierson, Bruce D.; Friese, Judah I.; Kephart, Rosara F.; Kephart, Jeremy D.

2012-02-01

102

Radioisotope Power System Pool Concept  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for NASA deep space science missions have historically used static thermoelectric-based designs because they are highly reliable, and their radioisotope heat sources can be passively cooled throughout the mission life cycle. Recently, a significant effort to develop a dynamic RPS, the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), was conducted by NASA and the Department of Energy, because Stirling based designs offer energy conversion efficiencies four times higher than heritage thermoelectric designs; and the efficiency would proportionately reduce the amount of radioisotope fuel needed for the same power output. However, the long term reliability of a Stirling based design is a concern compared to thermoelectric designs, because for certain Stirling system architectures the radioisotope heat sources must be actively cooled via the dynamic operation of Stirling converters throughout the mission life cycle. To address this reliability concern, a new dynamic Stirling cycle RPS architecture is proposed called the RPS Pool Concept.

Rusick, Jeffrey J.; Bolotin, Gary S.

2015-01-01

103

Therapeutic clinical applications of reactor-produced radioisotopes  

SciTech Connect

One of the most rapidly growing areas of clinical nuclear medicine is the therapeutic use of radioisotopes for applications in oncology, rheumatology and, more recently, interventional cardiology. With the rapidly increasing development and evaluation of new agents, their introduction into clinical use, and commercialization, the availability of high levels of therapeutic reactor-produced neutron-rich radioisotopes is of increasing importance. The goals of this paper are to discuss the issues associated with optimization of the production and processing of reactor-produced radioisotopes for therapy, with special emphasis on {sup 188}W, and the optimization of the use of the {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator. In addition, other key examples of therapeutic radioisotopes of current interest and their specific clinical applications are discussed.

Knapp, F.F. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-12-01

104

Synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes by boron ink annealing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ball-milling and annealing is one effective method for the mass production of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). We report that the method has been modified to a boron (B) ink annealing method. In this new process, the nanosize ball-milled B particles are mixed with metal nitrate in ethanol to form an ink-like solution, and then the ink is annealed in nitrogen-containing

Lu Hua Li; Ying Chen; Alexey M. Glushenkov

2010-01-01

105

NASA: Radioisotope Power Systems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a multimedia overview of RPS (radioisotope power systems), a type of nuclear energy technology that uses heat to produce electricity for powering spacecraft. The heat is produced by the natural radioactive decay of plutonium-238. RPS systems have been in use for more than 50 years, and could continue to support missions to some of the most extreme environments in the solar system. Advantages of RPS include: continuous operation over long-duration space missions, largely independent of changes in sunlight, temperature, charged particle radiation, or surface conditions like thick clouds or dust. This resource is part of NASA's Solar System Exploration website. It includes videos, 3D interactive animations, illustrations, schematics of RPS components, and fact sheets about how the technology has been used in past missions.

106

Carbothermic formation of boron nitride  

Microsoft Academic Search

Formation of boron nitride by reaction of boric oxide with carbon and nitrogen was studied. It was found from the results of experiments conducted by holding B2O3-activated C mixtures under a flowing nitrogen atmosphere that formation of boron nitride was complete in 120 min at 1500C. After cleaning the reaction product from the ash of the activated carbon and from

A. Aydo?du; N. Sevin

2003-01-01

107

Direct current sputtering of boron from boron/boron mixtures  

DOEpatents

A method for coating a substrate with boron by sputtering includes lowering the electrical resistance of a boron-containing rod to allow electrical conduction in the rod; placing the boron-containing rod inside a vacuum chamber containing substrate material to be coated; applying an electrical potential between the boron target material and the vacuum chamber; countering a current avalanche that commences when the conduction heating rate exceeds the cooling rate, and until a steady equilibrium heating current is reached; and, coating the substrate material with boron by sputtering from the boron-containing rod. 2 figures.

Timberlake, J.R.; Manos, D.; Nartowitz, E.

1994-12-13

108

Cosmic ray models for early galactic lithium, beryllium, and boron production  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To better understand the early galactic production of Li, Be, and B by cosmic ray spallation and fusion reactions, the dependence of these production rates on cosmic ray models and model parameters is examined. The sensitivity of elemental and isotropic production to the cosmic ray pathlength magnitude and energy dependence, source spectrum spallation kinematics, and cross section uncertainties is studied. Changes in these model features, particularly those features related to confinement, are shown to alter the Be- and B-versus-Fe slopes from a naive quadratic relation. The implications of our results for the diffuse gamma-ray background are examined, and the role of chemical evolution and its relation to our results is noted. It is also noted that the unmeasured high energy behavior of alpha + alpha fusion can lead to effects as large as a factor of 2 in the resultant yields. Future data should enable Population II Li, Be, and B abundances to constrain cosmic ray models for the early Galaxy.

Fields, Brian D.; Olive, Keith A.; Schramm, David N.

1994-01-01

109

Cosmic-ray models for early Galactic Lithium, Beryllium, and Boron production  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

To understand better the early Galactic production of Li, Be, and B by comsmic-ray spallation and fusion reactions, the dependence of these production rates on cosmic-ray models and model parameters is examined. The sensitivity of elemental and isotopic production to the cosmic-ray path length magnitude and energy dependence, source spectrum, spallation kinematics, and cross section uncertainties is studied. Changes in these model features, particularly those features related to confinement, are shown to alter the Be- and B- versus-Fe slopes from a naive quadratic relation. The implications of our results for the diffuse gamma-ray background are examined, and the role of chemical evolution and its relation to our results is noted. It is also noted that the unmeasured high-energy behavior of alpha + alpha fusion can lead to effects as large as a factor of 2 in the resultant yields. Future data should enable Population II Li, Be, and B abundances to constrain cosmic-ray models for the early Galaxy.

Fields, Brian D.; Olive, Keith A.; Schramm, David N.

1994-01-01

110

Mineral resource of the month: boron  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The article offers information on the mineral, boron. Boron compounds, particularly borates, have more commercial applications than its elemental relative which is a metalloid. Making up the 90% of the borates that are used worldwide are colemanite, kernite, tincal, and ulexite. The main borate deposits are located in the Mojave Desert of the U.S., the Tethyan belt in southern Asia, and the Andean belt of South America. Underground and surface mining are being used in gathering boron compounds. INSETS: Fun facts;Boron production and consumption.

Crangle, Robert D., Jr.

2012-01-01

111

The all boron carbide diode neutron detector: Comparison with theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

A boron carbide diode detector, fabricated from two different polytypes of semiconducting boron carbide, will detect neutrons in reasonable agreement with theory. Small deviations from the model calculations occur due to the detection efficiencies of the 10B capture products Li plus ? sum signal differing somewhat from expectation in the thin diodes. The performance of the all boron carbide neutron

A. N. Caruso; P. A. Dowben; S. Balkir; Nathan Schemm; Kevin Osberg; R. W. Fairchild; Oscar Barrios Flores; Snjezana Balaz; A. D. Harken; B. W. Robertson; J. I. Brand

2006-01-01

112

Characterization of electrodeposited elemental boron  

SciTech Connect

Elemental boron was produced through electrowinning from potassium fluoroborate dissolved in a mixture of molten potassium fluoride and potassium chloride. The characteristics of the electrodeposited boron (raw boron) as well as the water and acid-leached product (processed boron) were studied. The chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size of the boron powders were investigated. The morphology of the deposits was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The chemical state of the matrix, as well as the impurity phases present in them, was established using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In order to interpret and understand the results obtained, a thermodynamic analysis was carried out. The gas-phase corrosion in the head space as well as the chemistry behind the leaching process were interpreted using this analysis. The ease of oxidation of these powders in air was investigated using differential thermal analysis (DTA) coupled with thermogravimetry (TG). From the results obtained in this study it was established that elemental boron powder with a purity of 95-99% could be produced using a high temperature molten salt electrowinning process. The major impurities were found to be oxygen, carbon, iron and nickel.

Jain, Ashish [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Anthonysamy, S. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India)], E-mail: sas@igcar.gov.in; Ananthasivan, K.; Ranganathan, R. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Mittal, Vinit; Narasimhan, S.V. [Water and Steam Chemistry Division, BARC (F), Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India)

2008-07-15

113

RADIOISOTOPES IN ANIMAL AND PLANT BIOLOGY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chapters are included on the fundamentals of nucleonics and ; radiation, radiation effects and isotope applications, radioisotopes in animal ; physiology and veterinary medicine, and radioisotopes in the plant kingdom. ; (D.E.B.);

O. F. F

1958-01-01

114

Boron nitride nanotubes  

DOEpatents

Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

Smith, Michael W. (Newport News, VA); Jordan, Kevin (Newport News, VA); Park, Cheol (Yorktown, VA)

2012-06-06

115

Radioisotopes for research on and control of mosquitos  

PubMed Central

Practical applications of radioactive isotopes in medicine, science, and industry have multiplied enormously during the past five years. In this paper, the author attempts to gather what is known about the use of radioactive isotopes in the research on malaria control. The development of the uranium pile for large-scale production of radioisotopes and technical progress in the making of reliable electronic equipment have greatly contributed to the application of radioactive tracers in biological research. The present knowledge of radioisotopes in mosquito and in insecticide research is discussed. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:13404435

Bruce-Chwatt, Leonard J.

1956-01-01

116

Realistic Specific Power Expectations for Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) are being considered for a wide range of future NASA space science and exploration missions. Generally, RPS offer the advantages of high reliability, long life, and predictable power production regardless of operating environment. Previous RPS, in the form of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG), have been used successfully on many NASA missions including Apollo, Viking, Voyager, and Galileo. NASA is currently evaluating design options for the next generation of RPS. Of particular interest is the use of advanced, higher efficiency power conversion to replace the previous thermoelectric devices. Higher efficiency reduces the quantity of radioisotope fuel and potentially improves the RPS specific power (watts per kilogram). Power conversion options include Segmented Thermoelectric (STE), Stirling, Brayton, and Thermophotovoltaic (TPV). This paper offers an analysis of the advanced 100 watt-class RPS options and provides credible projections for specific power. Based on the analysis presented, RPS specific power values greater than 10 W/kg appear unlikely.

Mason, Lee S.

2006-01-01

117

How to Handle Radioisotopes Safely.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This booklet is one in a series of instructional aids designed for use by elementary and secondary school science teachers. The various units and forms of radioactive materials used by teachers are first considered. Then, the quantities of radioisotopes that a person may possess without a license from the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) are

Sulcoski, John W.

118

(Data in thousand metric tons of boric oxide (B2O3) unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Two companies in southern California produced boron minerals, mostly sodium  

E-print Network

of the boron products consumed in the United States are manufactured domestically. To avoid disclosing company in 2010 was glass and ceramics, 78%; soaps, detergents, and bleaches, 4%; agriculture, 4%; enamels to shift slightly away from detergents and soaps towards glass and ceramics. Although borate consumption

119

Efficient boron nitride nanotube formation via combined laser-gas flow levitation  

SciTech Connect

A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z.

Whitney, R. Roy; Jordan, Kevin; Smith, Michael

2014-03-18

120

Efficient Boron Nitride Nanotube Formation via Combined Laser-Gas Flow Levitation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B(sub x)C(sub y)N(sub z) The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B(sub x)C(sub y)N(sub z).

Whitney, R. Roy (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor)

2014-01-01

121

Efficient Boron-Carbon-Nitrogen Nanotube Formation Via Combined Laser-Gas Flow Levitation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula BxCyNz.

Whitney, R. Roy (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor)

2015-01-01

122

Future Supply of Medical Radioisotopes for the UK Report 2014  

E-print Network

The UK has no research nuclear reactors and relies on the importation of 99Mo and other medical radioisotopes (e.g. Iodine-131) from overseas (excluding PET radioisotopes). The UK is therefore vulnerable not only to global shortages, but to problems with shipping and importation of the products. In this context Professor Erika Denton UK national Clinical Director for Diagnostics requested that the British Nuclear Medicine Society lead a working group with stakeholders including representatives from the Science & Technology Facilities Council (STFC) to prepare a report. The group had a first meeting on 10 April 2013 followed by a working group meeting with presentations on 9th September 2013 where the scope of the work required to produce a report was agreed. The objectives of the report are: to describe the status of the use of medical radioisotopes in the UK; to anticipate the potential impact of shortages for the UK; to assess potential alternative avenues of medical radioisotope production for the UK m...

Neilly, Brian; Ballinger, Jim; Buscombe, John; Clarke, Rob; Ellis, Beverley; Flux, Glenn; Fraser, Louise; Hall, Adrian; Owen, Hywel; Paterson, Audrey; Perkins, Alan; Scarsbrook, Andrew

2015-01-01

123

Transport of the radioisotopes iodine-131, cesium-134, and cesium-137 from the fallout following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear reactor into cheesemaking products  

SciTech Connect

The transport of radiation contamination from milk to products of the cheese making process has been studied. The concentration of radioactive iodine and cesium in samples of sheep milk and cheese (Gruyere) products was measured for 10 consecutive production d. Milk with concentration 100 Bq/L in each of the radionuclides /sup 131/I, /sup 134/Cs, and /sup 137/Cs cheese with concentration 82.2 +/- 3.9 Bq/kg in iodine and an average of 42.3 +/- 2.3 Bq/kg in the cesium isotopes is produced. The corresponding concentrations in cream extracted from the same milk are 26.7 +/- 2.8 Bq/kg (/sup 131/I) and 18.6 +/- 1.9 Bq/kg (/sup 134/Cs, /sup 137/Cs).

Assimakopoulos, P.A.; Ioannides, K.G.; Pak; Paradopoulou, C.V.

1987-07-01

124

Cross-sections for (p,x) reactions on natural chromium for the production of (52,52m,54)Mn radioisotopes.  

PubMed

The production of positron-emitting isotopes of manganese is potentially important for developing contrast agents for dual-modality positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging, as well as for in vivo imaging of the biodistribution and toxicity of manganese. The decay properties of (52)Mn make it an excellent candidate for these applications, and it can easily be produced by bombardment of a chromium target with protons or deuterons from a low-energy biomedical cyclotron. Several parameters that are essential to this mode of productiontarget thickness, beam energy, beam current, and bombardment timedepend heavily on the availability of reliable, reproducible cross-section data. This work contributes to the routine production of (52g)Mn for biomedical research by contributing experimental cross-sections for natural chromium ((nat)Cr) targets for the (nat)Cr(p,x)(52g)Mn reaction, as well as for the production of the radiocontaminants (52m,54)Mn. PMID:25497324

Wooten, A Lake; Lewis, Benjamin C; Lapi, Suzanne E

2015-02-01

125

Boron Hydrolysis at Moderate Temperatures: First Step to Solar Fuel Cycle for Transportation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boron hydrolysis reaction can be used for onboard production of hydrogen. Boron is a promising candidate because of its low mo- lecular weight and relatively high valence. The oxide product from this process can be reduced and the boron can be recovered using known technologies, e.g., chemically with magnesium or via elec- trolysis. In both routes solar energy can play

Irina Vishnevetsky; Michael Epstein; Tareq Abu-Hamed; Jacob Karni

2008-01-01

126

List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1985  

SciTech Connect

This document describes radioisotope distribution from DOE facilities to private firms including foreign and other DOE facilities. The information is divided into five sections: (1) isotope suppliers, facility contacts, and isotopes or services supplied; (2) customers, suppliers, and isotopes purchased; (3) isotopes purchased cross-referenced with customer numbers; (4) geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfer - FY 1985.

Baker, D.A.

1986-08-01

127

Open nanotubes of insulating boron nitride  

Microsoft Academic Search

Here we report on large arrays of exlusively open-ended multi-walled insulating boron nitride (BN) nanotubes synthesized through heating of carbon (C) nanotubes with metal oxides (CuO, MoO3, or PbO) and boron oxide (B2O3) in a flow of nitrogen. The BN tubes were assembled in bundles several micrometers long. The thermal and chemical stability of the product was found to be

Dmitri Golberg; Yoshio Bando; Keiji Kurashima; Tadao Sato

2001-01-01

128

Determination of vanillin in commercial food product by adsorptive stripping voltammetry using a boron-doped diamond electrode.  

PubMed

A method for the determination of food additive vanillin was developed by adsorptive stripping voltammetry. Its determination was carried out at the anodically pre-treated boron-doped diamond electrode in aqueous solutions. Using square-wave stripping mode, the compound yielded a well-defined voltammetric response in phosphate buffer, pH 2.5 at +1.14 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) (a pre-concentration step being carried out at open-circuit condition for 60s). A linear calibration graph was obtained in the concentration range of 0.5-15.0 ?g mL(-1) (3.310(-6)-9.810(-5) mol L(-1)) with a detection limit of 0.024 ?g mL(-1) (1.610(-7) mol L(-1)). As an example, the practical applicability of the proposed method was tested for the determination of this flavouring agent in commercial pudding powder of Keshkule (Turkish milk pudding with almond flour). PMID:23870896

Yard?m, Yavuz; Glcan, Mehmet; ?entrk, Zhre

2013-12-01

129

NASA's Planetary Science Program Support of Radioisotope  

E-print Network

6 #12;RPS Comparisons from a Mission Perspective Power & Waste Heat (Watts) Excess heat at 210º 500 1000 1500 2000 MMRTG ASRG Total Thermal Power Waste Heat Electric power = 1 GPHS block 7 #12 Inventory 4 #12;Radioisotope Power Systems · Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator ­ 8 Pu-238

Rathbun, Julie A.

130

Power from Radioisotopes, Understanding the Atom Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This 1971 revision deals with radioisotopes and their use in power generators. Early developments and applications for the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) and Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) are reviewed. Present uses in space and on earth are included. Uses in space are as power sources in various satellites and space

Corliss, William R.; Mead, Robert L.

131

US Department of Energy radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1988  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this edition of the radioisotope customer list at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (ER-73), Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy (DOE). This is the 25th report in a series dating from 1964. This report covers DOE radioisotope sales and distribution activities by its facilities to domestic, foreign and other DOE facilities for FY 1988. The report is divided into five sections: radioisotope suppliers, facility contacts, and radioisotopes or services supplied; a list of customers, suppliers, and radioisotopes purchased; a list of radioisotopes purchased cross-referenced to customer numbers; geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers -- FY 1988. Radioisotopes not previously reported in this series of reports were argon-37, arsenic-72, arsenic-73, bismuth-207, gadolinium-151, rhenium-188, rhodium-101, selenium-72, xenon-123 and zirconium-88. The total value of DOE radioisotope sales for FY 1988 was $11.1 million, an increase of 3% from FY 1987.

Van Houten, N.C.

1989-06-01

132

Multilayer graded boron carbide-aluminum composites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Boron carbide aluminum composites with multi-layer microstructure were developed by molten aluminum infiltration of boron carbide preforms. A centrifugal casting process was employed to obtain preforms with multiple graded layer structure, where particles were distributed gradually from fine particles on one side to coarse particles on the other side within each layer. A tape casting process was also developed. Uniform or stepwise multiple gradient layer structures were obtained by stacking like tapes or different tapes in repeated patterns. A narrow range of preform densities was obtained by varying the densification conditions according to green forms. It has been previously reported that boron carbide and aluminum can form many different reaction products and contact angles between boron carbide and aluminum vary with temperature and time. Minimizing the reaction products might lead to better performance of composites. This study found that spontaneous infiltration can be achieved in minutes under rough vacuum (<100 muTorr) at 1200C or higher. The amounts of reaction products could be effectively suppressed by rapid spontaneous infiltration. A low-temperature infiltration (LTI) scheme was designed and full infiltration of boron carbide by aluminum at T < 1000C was achieved. Reaction products obtained by LTI were significantly less then that in composites obtained by spontaneous infiltration. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the resulting layered composites were evaluated and correlated to microstructure.

Zhang, Fuhong

133

Miniature Radioisotope Thermoelectric Power Cubes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cube-shaped thermoelectric devices energized by a particles from radioactive decay of Cm-244 have been proposed as long-lived sources of power. These power cubes are intended especially for incorporation into electronic circuits that must operate in dark, extremely cold locations (e.g., polar locations or deep underwater on Earth, or in deep interplanetary space). Unlike conventional radioisotope thermoelectric generators used heretofore as central power sources in some spacecraft, the proposed power cubes would be small enough (volumes would range between 0.1 and 0.2 cm3) to play the roles of batteries that are parts of, and dedicated to, individual electronic-circuit packages. Unlike electrochemical batteries, these power cubes would perform well at low temperatures. They would also last much longer: given that the half-life of Cm-244 is 18 years, a power cube could remain adequate as a power source for years, depending on the power demand in its particular application.

Patel, Jagdish U.; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Caillat, Thierry

2004-01-01

134

The structure of boron in boron fibres  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The structure of noncrystalline, chemically vapour-deposited boron fibres was investigated by computer modelling the experimentally obtained X-ray diffraction patterns. The diffraction patterns from the models were computed using the Debye scattering equation. The modelling was done utilizing the minimum nearest-neighbour distance, the density of the model, and the broadening and relative intensity of the various peaks as boundary conditions. The results suggest that the fibres consist of a continuous network of randomly oriented regions of local atomic order, about 2 nm in diameter, containing boron atoms arranged in icosahedra. Approximately half of these regions have a tetragonal structure and the remaining half a distorted rhombohedral structure. The model also indicates the presence of many partial icosahedra and loose atoms not associated with any icosahedra. The partial icosahedra and loose atoms indicated in the present model are in agreement with the relaxing sub-units which have been suggested to explain the anelastic behavior of fibre boron and the loosely bound boron atoms which have been postulated to explain the strengthening mechanism in boron fibres during thermal treatment.

Bhardwaj, J.; Krawitz, A. D.

1983-01-01

135

List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1986  

SciTech Connect

This document describes radioisotope distribution from DOE facilities to private firms including foreign and other DOE facilities. The information is divided into five sections: (1)isotope suppliers, facility contact, and isotopes or services supplied; (2) customers, suppliers, and isotopes purchased; (3) isotopes purchased cross-referenced with customer numbers; (4) geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfers for fiscal year 1986.

Lamar, D.A.

1987-10-01

136

List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1987  

SciTech Connect

This edition of the radioisotope customer list was prepared at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (ER-73), Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy (DOE). This document describes radioisotope distribution from DOE facilities to private firms, including foreign and other DOE facilities. The information is divided into five sections: 1) isotope suppliers, facility contact, and isotopes or services supplied; 2) customers, suppliers, and isotopes purchased; 3) isotopes purchased cross- referenced with customer numbers; 4) geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and 5) radioisotope sales and transfers for fiscal year 1987.

Lamar, D.A.; Van Houten, N.C.

1988-08-01

137

Polarized Proton Induced Exclusive Pion Production on BORON-10 and BERYLLIUM-9 for Incident Energies from 200 TO 260 Mev.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two sets of experiments for studying polarized proton induced exclusive pion production were performed at TRIUMF. The angular distributions of both the differential cross-sections and analyzing powers are presented for: ^{10}{rm B(vec p,}pi^+)^{11}{ rm B_{g.s., 2.12 MeV}}, ^9{rm Be(vec p,}pi ^+)^{10}{rm Be_ {g.s., 3.37 MeV}}, and ^9 {rm Be(vec p,}pi^+)^ {10}{rm C_{g.s., 3.34 MeV }} for incident proton energies between 200 and 260 MeV. The results indicate a number of new trends in pion production. The preference for populating high-spin final states (at least in these reactions) seems to be primarily a spin statistical weighting effect. The dependence of the shape of the angular distributions on incident proton energy is linked with the quantum numbers of the final state nucleus. Transitions to a final state that can be described as single-particle have a strong and similar energy dependence. In contrast transitions to the other states, those that cannot be described as having a single -particle nature show a weak energy dependence. The diffractive forward angle peaking which is common to most pion production differential cross-section distributions was found to have exponential slopes consistent with production radii of the single nucleon size rather than that of the nucleus. Finally, the results are compared to predictions of current theoretical models of pion production. Failures of these models are discussed and suggestions for improvements offered.

Ziegler, William Anthony

138

Microwave sintering of boron carbide  

DOEpatents

A method for forming boron carbide into a particular shape and densifying the green boron carbide shape. Boron carbide in powder form is pressed into a green shape and then sintered, using a microwave oven, to obtain a dense boron carbide body. Densities of greater than 95% of theoretical density have been obtained. 1 tab.

Blake, R.D.; Katz, J.D.; Petrovic, J.J.; Sheinberg, H.

1988-06-10

139

Branched polymeric media: boron-chelating resins from hyperbranched polyethylenimine.  

PubMed

Extraction of boron from aqueous solutions using selective resins is important in a variety of applications including desalination, ultrapure water production, and nuclear power generation. Today's commercial boron-selective resins are exclusively prepared by functionalization of styrene-divinylbenzene (STY-DVB) beads with N-methylglucamine to produce resins with boron-chelating groups. However, such boron-selective resins have a limited binding capacity with a maximum free base content of 0.7 eq/L, which corresponds to a sorption capacity of 1.16 0.03 mMol/g in aqueous solutions with equilibrium boron concentration of ?70 mM. In this article, we describe the synthesis and characterization of a new resin that can selectively extract boron from aqueous solutions. We show that branched polyethylenimine (PEI) beads obtained from an inverse suspension process can be reacted with glucono-1,5-D-lactone to afford a resin consisting of spherical beads with high density of boron-chelating groups. This resin has a sorption capacity of 1.93 0.04 mMol/g in aqueous solution with equilibrium boron concentration of ?70 mM, which is 66% percent larger than that of standard commercial STY-DVB resins. Our new boron-selective resin also shows excellent regeneration efficiency using a standard acid wash with a 1.0 M HCl solution followed by neutralization with a 0.1 M NaOH solution. PMID:22827255

Mishra, Himanshu; Yu, Changjun; Chen, Dennis P; Goddard, William A; Dalleska, Nathan F; Hoffmann, Michael R; Diallo, Mamadou S

2012-08-21

140

Stirling Convertor Technologies Being Developed for a Stirling Radioisotope Generator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Department of Energy, Lockheed Martin, Stirling Technology Company (STC), and the NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a high-efficiency Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) for NASA space science missions. The SRG is being developed for multimission use, including providing electric power for unmanned Mars rovers and deep space missions. On Mars, rovers with SRGs would be used for missions that might not be able to use photovoltaic power systems, such as exploration at high Martian latitudes and missions of long duration. The projected SRG system efficiency of 23 percent will reduce the required amount of radioisotope by a factor of 4 or more in comparison to currently used Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators. The Department of Energy recently named Lockheed Martin as the system integration contractor. Lockheed Martin has begun to develop the SRG engineering unit under contract to the Department of Energy, and has contract options to develop the qualification unit and the first flight units. The developers expect the SRG to produce about 114 Wdc at the beginning of mission, using two opposed Stirling convertors and two General Purpose Heat Source modules. STC previously developed the Stirling convertor under contract to the Department of Energy and is now providing further development as a subcontractor to Lockheed Martin. Glenn is conducting an in-house technology project to assist in developing the convertor for space qualification and mission implementation. A key milestone was recently reached with the accumulation of 12 000 hr of long-term aging on two types of neodymium-iron boron permanent magnets. These tests are characterizing any possible aging in the strength or demagnetization resistance of the magnets used in the linear alternator. Preparations are underway for a thermal/vacuum system demonstration and unattended operation during endurance testing of the 55-We Technology Demonstration Convertors. In addition, Glenn is developing a charging system for the convertors to ensure clean fills of the helium working fluid and to monitor levels of any possible contaminants at different test intervals. Possible oxidation effects depend on the level of any oxygen contamination-regenerator materials and displacer radiation shields are now being evaluated for possible oxidation effects.

Thieme, Lanny G.

2003-01-01

141

Radioisotope Powered Electrostatic Microactuators and Electronics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radioisotope thin films, with their 1-100 MJ\\/cc energy densities and 1-100 year half lifetimes, are suitable for powering long lifetime autonomous microsystems. In this paper, we review the application of nickel-63 radioisotope thin-film fuels in long lifetime power generators, direct charging DC voltage generators, novel low voltage drop bridge rectifiers, and self-powered wake-up sensors. A broad tool kit of capabilities

A. Lai; Rajesh Duggirala; Steven Tin

2007-01-01

142

Process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride  

DOEpatents

Disclosed is a process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride comprising the steps of: [A] preparing an intimate mixture of powdered boron oxide, a powdered metal selected from the group consisting of magnesium or aluminum, and a powdered metal azide; [B] igniting the mixture and bringing it to a temperature at which self-sustaining combustion occurs; [C] shocking the mixture at the end of the combustion thereof with a high pressure wave, thereby forming as a reaction product, wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride and occluded metal oxide; and, optionally [D] removing the occluded metal oxide from the reaction product. Also disclosed are reaction products made by the process described.

Holt, J. Birch (San Jose, CA); Kingman, deceased, Donald D. (late of Danville, CA); Bianchini, Gregory M. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01

143

Process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride  

DOEpatents

Disclosed is a process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride comprising the steps of: [A] preparing an intimate mixture of powdered boron oxide, a powdered metal selected from the group consisting of magnesium or aluminum, and a powdered metal azide; [B] igniting the mixture and bringing it to a temperature at which self-sustaining combustion occurs; [C] shocking the mixture at the end of the combustion thereof with a high pressure wave, thereby forming as a reaction product, wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride and occluded metal oxide; and, optionally [D] removing the occluded metal oxide from the reaction product. Also disclosed are reaction products made by the process described.

Holt, J.B.; Kingman, D.D.; Bianchini, G.M.

1992-04-28

144

Power flattening techniques for radioisotopic thermoelectric generators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of this program is the investigation of a novel means of reducing the potential ecologic hazards that may be associated with radioisotopic thermoelectric generators (RTG's). A number of short lived isotopes have lower toxicities and are more ecologically acceptable than the Plutonium 238 used at present. In addition, the shorter half lives significantly reduce the time period during which isotope encapsulation must be assured (approx. 10 half lives). The technical approach involves the use of a gas controlled heat pipe to maintain a nearly constant heat input to the thermoelectric converter in spite of the decay profile of a short live heat pipe-RTG system is expected to operate over at least two isotope half lives (4:1 turndown ratio), supplying a thermoelectric module with the heat required to generate one watt of electricity. The end product of the program is a proof of principle heat pipe demonstrating the desired heat transport and turndown capability. The program has three items of work: Survey of Technology Base; Design of Proof of Principle Heat Pipe; Heat Pipe Fabrication and Test.

Eastman, G. Y.

1984-03-01

145

Role of boron oxide in growth of boron nitride grains  

SciTech Connect

Grain growth in sintered hexagonal boron nitride ceramics hot-pressed from microcrystalline and crystalline powders was studied. Boron oxide released during sintering, especially from the microcrystalline powder, had a crucial effect on the size and orientation of boron nitride grains and on the mechanical properties of the ceramics. The extraction of boron oxide from the boron nitride grains with elemental boron and subsequent conversion to a refractory suboxide resulted in a substantial rise in the refractoriness, preventing the undesirable growth of boron nitride grains, and reducing their response to the uniaxial effect of the external pressure. The migration mechanism of boron oxide ill hot-pressed boron nitride was also confirmed by measurements of the oxygen distribution ill the ceramics.

Hubacek, Milan; Ueki, Masanori [Nippon Steel Corp., Kawasaki (Japan)

1996-12-31

146

Direct current sputtering of boron from boron/coron mixtures  

DOEpatents

A method for coating a substrate with boron by sputtering includes lowering the electrical resistance of a boron-containing rod to allow electrical conduction in the rod; placing the boron-containing rod inside a vacuum chamber containing substrate material to be coated; applying an electrical potential between the boron target material and the vacuum chamber; countering a current avalanche that commences when the conduction heating rate exceeds the cooling rate, and until a steady equilibrium heating current is reached; and, coating the substrate material with boron by sputtering from the boron-containing rod.

Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ); Manos, Dennis (Williamsburg, VA); Nartowitz, Ed (Edison, NJ)

1994-01-01

147

An introduction to boron: history, sources, uses, and chemistry.  

PubMed Central

Following a brief overview of the terrestrial distribution of boron in rocks, soil, and water, the history of the discovery, early utilization, and geologic origin of borate minerals is summarized. Modern uses of borate-mineral concentrates, borax, boric acid, and other refined products include glass, fiberglass, washing products, alloys and metals, fertilizers, wood treatments, insecticides, and microbiocides. The chemistry of boron is reviewed from the point of view of its possible health effects. It is concluded that boron probably is complexed with hydroxylated species in biologic systems, and that inhibition and stimulation of enzyme and coenzymes are pivotal in its mode of action. Images Figure 1. PMID:7889881

Woods, W G

1994-01-01

148

Chemical disposition of boron in animals and humans.  

PubMed Central

Elemental boron was isolated in 1808. It typically occurs in nature as borates hydrated with varying amounts of water. Important compounds are boric acid and borax. Boron compounds are also used in the production of metals, enamels, and glasses. In trace amounts, boron is essential for the growth of many plants, and is found in animal and human tissues at low concentrations. Poisoning in humans has been reported as the result of accidental ingestion or use of large amounts in the treatment of burns. Boron as boric acid is fairly rapidly absorbed and excreted from the body via urine. The half-life of boric acid in humans is on the order of 1 day. Boron does not appear to accumulate in soft tissues of animals, but does accumulate in bone. Normal levels of boron in soft tissues, urine, and blood generally range from less than 0.05 ppm to no more than 10 ppm. In poisoning incidents, the amount of boric acid in brain and liver tissue has been reported to be as high as 2000 ppm. Recent studies at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences have indicated that boron may contribute to reduced fertility in male rodents fed 9000 ppm of boric acid in feed. Within a few days, boron levels in blood and most soft tissues quickly reached a plateau of about 15 ppm. Boron in bone did not appear to plateau, reaching 47 ppm after 7 days on the diet. Cessation of exposure to dietary boron resulted in a rapid drop in bone boron.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7889870

Moseman, R F

1994-01-01

149

Boron and Plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Boron is found naturally in the earths crust in the oxidized form as borax and colemanite, particularly in the oceans, sedimentary\\u000a rocks, coal, shale, and some soils. It is never found in the elemental form in nature possessing a complex chemistry similar\\u000a to that of silicon, with properties switching between metals and non-metals. Boron has become an important and strategic

Munir Ozturk; Serdal Sakcali; Salih Gucel; Huseyin Tombuloglu

150

Processing of boron carbide  

Microsoft Academic Search

The processing of boron carbide powder including sintering optimization, green body optimization and sintering behavior of nano-sized boron carbide was investigated for the development of complex shaped body armor. Pressureless sintered B4C relative densities as high as 96.7% were obtained by optimizing the soak temperature, and holding at that temperature for the minimum time required to reach terminal density. Although

Namtae Cho

2006-01-01

151

Molecular Structure of boron  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Boron was founded in 1808 by Sir Humphry Davy and Gay-Lussac and Thenard. It occurs as orthoboric acid in volcanic spring waters and as borates in Boron and colematic. Some sources can also be found in the Mohave Desert. It is used when making glass to keep the glass from breaking under temperature stress. Also if combined with sodium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide it makes bleach.

2002-08-26

152

Boron distribution and the effect of lime on boron uptake by pansy, petunia, and gerbera plants  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Reports of boron (B) deficiency have become more prevalent in pansy (Viola wittrockiana), petunia (Petunia hybrida), and gerbera (Gerbera jamesonii) plug production. When symptoms are observed in production the presence and severity of symptoms have no pattern, symptomatic plants can be located a...

153

ADVANCED RADIOISOTOPE HEAT SOURCE AND PROPULSION SYSTEMS FOR PLANETARY EXPLORATION  

SciTech Connect

The exploration of planetary surfaces and atmospheres may be enhanced by increasing the range and mobility of a science platform. Fundamentally, power production and availability of resources are limiting factors that must be considered for all science and exploration missions. A novel power and propulsion system is considered and discussed with reference to a long-range Mars surface exploration mission with in-situ resource utilization. Significance to applications such as sample return missions is also considered. Key material selections for radioisotope encapsulation techniques are presented.

R. C. O'Brien; S. D. Howe; J. E. Werner

2010-09-01

154

RADIOISOTOPE INVENTORY FOR TSPA-SR  

SciTech Connect

The total system performance assessment for site recommendation (TSPA-SR), on Yucca Mountain, as a site (if suitable) for disposal of radioactive waste, consists of several models. The Waste Form Degradation Model (i.e, source term) of the TSPA-SR, in turn, consists of several components. The Inventory Component, discussed here, defines the inventory of 26 radioisotopes for three representative waste categories: (1) commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), (2) US Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), and (3) high-level waste (HLW). These three categories are contained and disposed of in two types of waste packages (WPs)--CSNF WPs and co-disposal WPs, with the latter containing both DSNF and HLW. Three topics are summarized in this paper: first, the transport of radioisotopes evaluated in the past; second, the development of the inventory for the two WP types; and third, the selection of the most important radioisotopes to track in TSPA-SR.

C. Leigh; R. Rechard

2001-01-30

155

NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems Program Status  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program began formal implementation in December 2010. The RPS Program's goal is to make available RPS for the exploration of the solar system in environments where conventional solar or chemical power generation is impractical or impossible to meet mission needs. To meet this goal, the RPS Program manages investments in RPS system development and RPS technologies. The current keystone of the RPS Program is the development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). This generator will be about four times more efficient than the more traditional thermoelectric generators, while providing a similar amount of power. This paper provides the status of the RPS Program and its related projects. Opportunities for RPS generator development and targeted research into RPS component performance enhancements, as well as constraints dealing with the supply of radioisotope fuel, are also discussed in the context of the next ten years of planetary science mission plans.

Dudzinski, Leonard A.; Hamley, John A.; McCallum, Peter W.; Sutliff, Thomas J.; Zakrajsek, June F.

2013-01-01

156

Root-growth mechanism for single-walled boron nitride nanotubes in laser vaporization technique.  

SciTech Connect

We present a detailed study of the growth mechanism of single-walled boron nitride nanotubes synthesized by laser vaporization, which is the unique route known to the synthesis of this kind of tube in high quantities. We have performed a nanometric chemical and structural characterization by transmission electron microscopy (high-resolution mode (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy) of the synthesis products. Different boron-based compounds and other impurities were identified in the raw synthesis products. The results obtained by the TEM analysis and from the synthesis parameters (temperature, boron, and nitrogen sources) combined with phase diagram analysis to provide identification of the fundamental factors determining the nanotube growth mechanism. Our experiments strongly support a root-growth model that involves the presence of a droplet of boron. This phenomenological model considers the solubility, solidification, and segregation phenomena of the elements present in this boron droplet. In this model, we distinguish three different steps as a function of the temperature: (1) formation of the liquid boron droplet from the decomposition of different boron compounds existing in the hexagonal boron nitride target, (2) reaction of these boron droplets with nitrogen gas present in the vaporization chamber and recombination of these elements to form boron nitride, and (3) incorporation of the nitrogen atoms at the root of the boron particle at active reacting sites that achieves the growth of the tube.

Arenal, R.; Stephan, O.; Cochon, J.-L.; Loiseau, A. (Materials Science Division); (ONERA-CNRS); (UMR CNRS); (ONERA)

2007-12-26

157

Contributions and future of radioisotopes in medical, industrial and space applications  

SciTech Connect

There are 333 isotopes that have a half-life between 1 day and 100,000 years that have a wide variety of applications including public health, medicine,industrial technology, food technology and packaging, agriculture, energy supply, and national security. This paper provides an overview of some of the most extensive applications of radioisotopes including some observations of future uses. Examples are discussed that indicate that the use of radioisotopes is almost unlimited and will continue to grow. There is a growing need for future applications development and production. 12 refs., 1 tab. (BM)

Tingey, G.L.; Dix, G.P.; Wahlquist, E.J.

1990-11-01

158

Boronate-Mediated Biologic Delivery  

PubMed Central

Inefficient cellular delivery limits the landscape of macromolecular drugs. Boronic acids readily form boronate esters with the 1,2- and 1,3-diols of saccharides, such as those that coat the surface of mammalian cells. Here pendant boronic acids are shown to enhance the cytosolic delivery of a protein toxin. Thus, boronates are a non-cationic carrier that can deliver a polar macromolecule into mammalian cells. PMID:22303837

Ellis, Gregory A.; Palte, Michael J.; Raines, Ronald T.

2012-01-01

159

Mineral of the month: boron  

USGS Publications Warehouse

What does boron have to do with baseball, apple pie, motherhood and Chevrolet? Boron minerals and chemicals are used in the tanning of leather baseballs and gloves; in micro-fertilizer to grow apples and in the glass and enamels of bakewares to cook apple pie; in boron detergents for soaking baby clothes and diapers; and in fiberglass parts for the Chevrolet Corvette.

Lyday, Phyllis A.

2005-01-01

160

The study of radioisotopes in presolar dust grains  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Presolar grains in primitive meteorites are characterized by large isotopic anomalies in essentially all the analyzed elements. Among these anomalies are excesses in the daughter isotopes of short-lived radioisotopes. These excesses indicate the incorporation of short-lived now extinct isotopes into the grains at the time of their formation. So far laboratory studies of presolar grains have established evidence for the initial presence of the isotopes 49V, 22Na, 44Ti, 41Ca, 99Tc, and 26Al. Evidence for these isotopes have been found in presolar silicon carbide, graphite, and oxide grains from supernovae ( 49V, 22Na, 44Ti, 41Ca, and 26Al) and AGB stars ( 41Ca, 99Tc, and 26Al). We analyzed presolar hibonite (CaAl 12O 19) grains, whose oxygen isotopic ratios indicate an origin in AGB stars, for their Al-Mg and Ca-K isotopic systems, determined the initial 26Al/ 27Al and 41Ca/ 40Ca ratios, and compared them with theoretical models of the production of these isotopes in AGB stars. Whereas the abundance of 41Ca, which is produced by neutron capture, agrees with the models, the abundance of 26Al, which is produced by proton capture, greatly exceeds theoretical predictions. The production of this radioisotope requires a process in addition to H shell burning, cool bottom processing.

Zinner, E.; Nittler, L. R.; Alexander, C. M. O.'D.; Gallino, R.

2006-10-01

161

Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Engineering Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) are of significant interest to the scientific and technical communities for many of the same reasons that carbon nanotubes (CNT) have attracted wide attention. Both materials have potentially unique and important properties for structural and electronic applications. However of even more consequence than their similarities may be the complementary differences between carbon and boron nitride nanotubes While BNNT possess a very high modulus similar to CNT, they also possess superior chemical and thermal stability. Additionally, BNNT have more uniform electronic properties, with a uniform band gap of 5.5 eV while CNT vary from semi-conductive to highly conductive behavior. Boron nitride nanotubes have been synthesized both in the literature and at NASA Glenn Research Center, by a variety of methods such as chemical vapor deposition, arc discharge and reactive milling. Consistent large scale production of a reliable product has proven difficult. Progress in the reproducible synthesis of 1-2 gram sized batches of boron nitride nanotubes will be discussed as well as potential uses for this unique material.

Hurst, Janet; Hull, David; Gorican, Daniel

2005-01-01

162

NASA Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology NRA Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The focus of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Development program is aimed at developing nuclear power and technologies that would improve the effectiveness of space science missions. The Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology (RPCT) NASA Research Announcement (NRA) is an important mechanism through which research and technology activities are supported in the Advanced Power Conversion Research and Technology project of the Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems Development program. The purpose of the RPCT NRA is to advance the development of radioisotope power conversion technologies to provide higher efficiencies and specific powers than existing systems. These advances would enable a factor of two to four decrease in the amount of fuel and a reduction of waste heat required to generate electrical power, and thus could result in more cost effective science missions for NASA. The RPCT NRA selected advanced RPS power conversion technology research and development proposals in the following three areas: innovative RPS power conversion research, RPS power conversion technology development in a nominal 100 W(sub e) scale; and, milliwatt/multi-watt RPS (mWRPS) power conversion research. Ten RPCT NRA contracts were awarded in 2003 in the areas of Brayton, Stirling, thermoelectric (TE), and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power conversion technologies. This paper will provide an overview of the RPCT NRA, a summary of the power conversion technologies approaches being pursued, and a brief digest of first year accomplishments.

Anderson, David J.

2005-01-01

163

NASA Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology NRA Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The focus of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Development program is aimed at developing nuclear power and technologies that would improve the effectiveness of space science missions. The Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology (RPCT) NASA Research Announcement (NRA) is an important mechanism through which research and technology activities are supported in the Advanced Power Conversion Research and Technology project of the Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems Development program. The purpose of the RPCT NRA is to advance the development of radioisotope power conversion technologies to provide higher efficiencies and specific powers than existing systems. These advances would enable a factor of 2 to 4 decrease in the amount of fuel and a reduction of waste heat required to generate electrical power, and thus could result in more cost effective science missions for NASA. The RPCT NRA selected advanced RPS power conversion technology research and development proposals in the following three areas: innovative RPS power conversion research, RPS power conversion technology development in a nominal 100We scale; and, milliwatt/multi-watt RPS (mWRPS) power conversion research. Ten RPCT NRA contracts were awarded in 2003 in the areas of Brayton, Stirling, thermoelectric (TE), and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power conversion technologies. This paper will provide an overview of the RPCT NRA, a summary of the power conversion technologies approaches being pursued, and a brief digest of first year accomplishments.

Anderson, David J.

2005-01-01

164

MARINE GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES WITH FALLOUT RADIOISOTOPES  

Microsoft Academic Search

The peaceful and military uses of atomic energy are resulting in the ; introduction to the world's oceans of new radioisotopes in significant amounts ; and of natural at rates different from those which have been previously obtained. ; In the Atlantic Ocean thus far significant additions have been made only by fall-; out at the surface. Measurements in this

V. T. Bowen; T. T. Sugihara

1958-01-01

165

Radioisotope thermal generator (RTG) power conditioner  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

New regulator: (a) permits operation with high-impedance radioisotope thermal generators at conversion efficiencies typically above 90%; (b) does not require input filtering; (c) eliminates current spiking; and (d) is simple, efficient, and reliable. Converter-charger pair could be adapted for other power levels by changing transistor, diode, capacitor bank, and inductor.

Stacey, W. S.

1974-01-01

166

Pharmacokinetics of core-polymerized, boron-conjugated micelles designed for boron neutron capture therapy for cancer.  

PubMed

Core-polymerized and boron-conjugated micelles (PM micelles) were prepared by free radical copolymerization of a PEG-b-PLA block copolymer bearing an acetal group and a methacryloyl group (acetal-PEG-b-PLA-MA), with 1-(4-vinylbenzyl)-closo-carborane (VB-carborane), and the utility of these micelles as a tumor-targeted boron delivery system was investigated for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Non-polymerized micelles (NPM micelles) that incorporated VB-carborane physically showed significant leakage of VB-carborane (ca. 50%) after 12 h incubation with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) at 37 C. On the other hand, no leakage from the PM micelles was observed even after 48 h of incubation. To clarify the pharmacokinetics of the micelles, (125)I (radioisotope)-labeled PM and NPM micelles were administered to colon-26 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice. The (125)I-labeled PM micelles showed prolonged blood circulation (area under the concentration curve (AUC): 943.4) than the (125)I-labeled NPM micelles (AUC: 495.1), whereas tumor accumulation was similar for both types of micelles (AUC(PM micelle): 249.6, AUC(NPM micelle): 201.1). In contrast, the tumor accumulation of boron species in the PM micelles (AUC: 268.6) was 7-fold higher than the NPM micelles (AUC: 37.1), determined by ICP-AES. Thermal neutron irradiation yielded tumor growth suppression in the tumor-bearing mice treated with the PM micelles without reduction in body weight. On the basis of these data, the PM micelles represent a promising approach to the creation of boron carrier for BNCT. PMID:22326646

Sumitani, Shogo; Oishi, Motoi; Yaguchi, Tatsuya; Murotani, Hiroki; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Suzuki, Minoru; Ono, Koji; Yanagie, Hironobu; Nagasaki, Yukio

2012-05-01

167

Boron Requirement in Cyanobacteria 1  

PubMed Central

The effect of boron on heterocystous and nonheterocystous dinitrogen fixing Cyanobacteria was examined. The absence of boron in culture media inhibited growth and nitrogenase activity in Nodularia sp., Chlorogloeopsis sp., and Nostoc sp. cultures. Examinations of boron-deficient cultures showed changes in heterocyst morphology. However, cultures of nonheterocystous Cyanobacteria, Gloeothece sp. and Plectonema sp., grown in the absence of boron did not show any alteration in growth or nitrogenase activity. These results suggest a requirement of boron only by heterocystous Cyanobacteria. A possible role for this element in the early evolution of photosynthetic organisms is proposed. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:16667889

Bonilla, Ildefonso; Garcia-Gonzlez, Mercedes; Mateo, Pilar

1990-01-01

168

Boron hydride polymer coated substrates  

DOEpatents

A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

Pearson, R.K.; Bystroff, R.I.; Miller, D.E.

1986-08-27

169

Properties of Boron Suboxide B13O2  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe for the first time a method for synthesis of boron suboxide under vacuum from a B2O3 + B mixture. We show that at 1420C, under vacuum a boron suboxide phase of composition B13O2 is formed. The product is a highly disperse powder which, according to electron microscopy and crystal optics analysis, consists of agglomerates of various sizes with

Alexei I. Kharlamov; Nadezhda V. Kirillova

2002-01-01

170

An Updated Comprehensive Risk Analysis for Radioisotopes Identified of High Risk to National Security in the Event of a Radiological Dispersion Device Scenario  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An updated global survey of radioisotope production and distribution was completed and subjected to a revised "down-selection methodology" to determine those radioisotopes that should be classified as potential national security risks based on availability and key physical characteristics that could be exploited in a hypothetical radiological dispersion device. The potential at-risk radioisotopes then were used in a modeling software suite known as Turbo FRMAC, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, to characterize plausible contamination maps known as Protective Action Guideline Zone Maps. This software also was used to calculate the whole body dose equivalent for exposed individuals based on various dispersion parameters and scenarios. Derived Response Levels then were determined for each radioisotope using: 1) target doses to members of the public provided by the U.S. EPA, and 2) occupational dose limits provided by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The limiting Derived Response Level for each radioisotope also was determined.

Robinson, Alexandra R.

171

Iridium-Catalyzed Allylic Amination Route to ?-Aminoboronates: Illustration of the Decisive Role of Boron Substituents  

PubMed Central

The development of a new route to ?-aminoboronates using an iridium-catalyzed allylic amination on boronated substrates is described. Unlike the boronate group, the trifluoroborato substituent was found to govern the regioselectivity exclusively in favor of branched products. The transformation of an allylic substitution product into an ?-aminoboronic ester in an efficient way validated the implementation of this approach. PMID:22350584

Touchet, Sabrina; Molander, Gary A.; Carboni, Bertrand; Bouillon, Alexandre

2012-01-01

172

Determination of phase stability of elemental boron.  

PubMed

Boron is an important element, used in applications from superhard materials to superconductors. Boron exists in several forms (allotropes) and, surprisingly, it was not known which form (? or ?) is stable at ambient conditions. Through experiment, we quantify the relative stability of ?-boron and ?-boron as a function of temperature. The ground-state energies of ?-boron and ?-boron are nearly identical. For all temperatures up to 2000?K, the complicated ?-boron structure is more stable than the simpler ?-boron structure at ambient pressure. Below 1000?K, ?-boron is entropically stabilized with respect to ?-boron owing to its partially occupied sites, whereas at higher temperatures ?-boron is enthalpically stabilized with respect to ?-boron. We show that ?-boron only becomes stable on application of pressure. PMID:25619645

White, Mary Anne; Cerqueira, Anthony B; Whitman, Catherine A; Johnson, Michel B; Ogitsu, Tadashi

2015-03-16

173

Plasma boron and the effects of boron supplementation in males.  

PubMed Central

Recently, a proliferation of athletic supplements has been marketed touting boron as an ergogenic aid capable of increasing testosterone. The effect of boron supplementation was investigated in male bodybuilders. Ten male bodybuilders (aged 20 to 26) were given a 2.5-mg boron supplement, while nine male bodybuilders (aged 21 to 27) were given a placebo for 7 weeks. Plasma total and free testosterone, plasma boron, lean body mass, and strength measurements were determined on day 1 and day 49 of the study. A microwave digestion procedure followed by inductively coupled argon plasma spectroscopy was used for boron determination. Twelve subjects had boron values at or above the detection limit with median value of 25 ng/ml (16 ng/ml lower quartile and 33 ng/ml upper quartile). Of the ten subjects receiving boron supplements, six had an increase in their plasma boron. Analysis of variance indicated no significant effect of boron supplementation on any of the other dependent variables. Both groups demonstrated significant increases in total testosterone (p < 0.01), lean body mass (p < 0.01), and one repetition maximum (RM) squat (p < 0.001) and one RM bench press (p < 0.01). The findings suggest that 7 weeks of bodybuilding can increase total testosterone, lean body mass, and strength in lesser-trained bodybuilders, but boron supplementation affects these variables not at all. PMID:7889885

Green, N R; Ferrando, A A

1994-01-01

174

An overview of the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transporation System Program  

SciTech Connect

Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) convert the heat generated by radioactive decay to electricity using thermocouples. RTGs have a long operating life, are reasonably lightweight, and require little or no maintenance once assembled and tested. These factors make RTGs particularly attractive for use in spacecraft However, because RTGs contain significant quantities of radioactive materials, normally plutonium-238 and its decay products, they must be transported in packages built in accordance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. The US Department of Energy assigned the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transportation System (RTGTS) Program to Westinghouse Hanford Company in 1988 to develop a system meeting the regulatory requirements. The program objective was to develop a transportation system that would fully comply with 10 CFR 71 while protecting RTGs from adverse environmental conditions during normal conditions of transport (e.g., shock and heat). The RTGTS is scheduled for completion in December 1996 and will be available to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations Cassini mission to Saturn in October 1997. This paper provides an overview of the RTGTS and discusses the hardware being produced. Additionally, various program management innovations mandated by recent ma or changes in the US Department of Energy structure and resources will be outlined.

McCoy, J.C.

1995-10-01

175

[Radioisotopic methods for studying cerebrospinal fluid shunts].  

PubMed

The article presents a general and critical review of the radio-isotopic methods for assessing the function of the surgical shunts of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The radio-isotope cisternography may indirectly demonstrate the function of the shunt by the postoperative modification of the eventual ventricular reflux and of the permeability of the subarachnoid spaces on the cerebral convexity. The methods of direct ventricular injection of the indicator permit a more direct assessment of the drainage, as based on a scintigraphy, or on the quantitative study of the cephalic radio-activity, or on the demonstration of radio-activityon a target-organ. The direct injection of a highly diffusible indicator in the valve allows a quantitative measurement of the flow of CSF in the shunt and brings morphological arguments for the localization of the eventual occlusion. The technical aspects of the latter method are critically discussed and illustrated by personal results. PMID:796747

Depresseux, J C; Stevenaert, A

1976-01-01

176

Boron suboxide: As hard as cubic boron nitride  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Vickers hardness of boron suboxide single crystals was measured using a diamond indentation method. Under a loading force of 0.98 N, our test gave an average Vickers hardness of 45 GPa. The average fracture toughness was measured as 4.5 MPa m1/2. We also measured the hardness of the cubic boron nitride and sapphire single crystals for comparison. The average measured hardness for boron suboxide was found to be very close to that of cubic boron nitride under the same loading force. Our results suggest that the boron suboxide could be a new superhard material for industrial applications, surpassed in hardness only by diamond and cubic boron nitride.

He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng; Daemen, L.; Qian, J.; Shen, T. D.; Zerda, T. W.

2002-07-01

177

Intercalibration of astronomical and radioisotopic time  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 40Ar\\/39Ar radioisotopic dating technique is one of the most precise and versatile methods available for dating events in Earth's history, but the accuracy of this method is limited by the accuracy with which the ages of neutron-fluence monitors (dating standards) are known. Calibrating the ages of standards by conventional means has proved difficult and contentious. The emerging astronomically calibrated

Paul R. Renne; Alan L. Deino; Robert C. Walter; Brent D. Turrin; Carl C. Swisher III; Tim A. Becker; Garniss H. Curtis; Warren D. Sharp; Abdur-Rahim Jaouni

1994-01-01

178

NEW DIRECTIONS IN RADIOISOTOPE SPECTRUM IDENTIFICATION  

SciTech Connect

Recent studies have found the performance of commercial handheld detectors with automatic RIID software to be less than acceptable. Previously, we have explored approaches rooted in speech processing such as cepstral features and information-theoretic measures. Scientific advances are often made when researchers identify mathematical or physical commonalities between different fields and are able to apply mature techniques or algorithms developed in one field to another field which shares some of the same challenges. The authors of this paper have identified similarities between the unsolved problems faced in gamma-spectroscopy for automated radioisotope identification and the challenges of the much larger body of research in speech processing. Our research has led to a probabilistic framework for describing and solving radioisotope identification problems. Many heuristic approaches to classification in current use, including for radioisotope classification, make implicit probabilistic assumptions which are not clear to the users and, if stated explicitly, might not be considered desirable. Our framework leads to a classification approach with demonstrable improvements using standard feature sets on proof-of-concept simulated and field-collected data.

Salaymeh, S.; Jeffcoat, R.

2010-06-17

179

Boron-copper neutron absorbing material and method of preparation  

DOEpatents

A composite, copper clad neutron absorbing material is comprised of copper powder and boron powder enriched with boron 10. The boron 10 content can reach over 30 percent by volume, permitting a very high level of neutron absorption. The copper clad product is also capable of being reduced to a thickness of 0.05 to 0.06 inches and curved to a radius of 2 to 3 inches, and can resist temperatures of 900.degree. C. A method of preparing the material includes the steps of compacting a boron-copper powder mixture and placing it in a copper cladding, restraining the clad assembly in a steel frame while it is hot rolled at 900.degree. C. with cross rolling, and removing the steel frame and further rolling the clad assembly at 650.degree. C. An additional sheet of copper can be soldered onto the clad assembly so that the finished sheet can be cold formed into curved shapes.

Wiencek, Thomas C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Domagala, Robert F. (Indian Head Park, IL); Thresh, Henry (Palos Hts., IL)

1991-01-01

180

Inelastic properties of boron oxides  

Microsoft Academic Search

Temperature dependence of internal friction and dynamic shear modulus for boron anhydride (B2O3) and boron suboxide (B6O) have been investigated at frequencies of 110 Hz and over the temperature range 80900 K. Absolute shear modulus for boron suboxide at 80 and 400 K was 0.9 and 0.85 GPa, respectively. Relaxation maximum of internal friction, accompanied with shear modulus defect had

M. Ch. Tushishvili; G. Sh. Darsavelidze; O. A. Tsagareishvili; I. A. Bairamashvili; J. Sh. Jobava

1991-01-01

181

Inelastic properties of boron oxides  

Microsoft Academic Search

Temperature dependence of internal friction and dynamic shear modulus for boron anhydride (B2O3) and boron suboxide (B6O) have been investigated at frequencies of 1-10 Hz and over the temperature range 80-900 K. Absolute shear modulus for boron suboxide at 80 and 400 K was 0.9 and 0.85 GPa, respectively. Relaxation maximum of internal friction, accompanied with shear modulus defect had

M. Ch. Tushishvili; G. Sh. Darsavelidze; O. A. Tsagareishvili; I. A. Bairamashvili; J. Sh. Jobava

1991-01-01

182

Boron nitride nanotubes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The successful synthesis of pure boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is reported here. Multi-walled tubes with inner diameters on the order of 1 to 3 nanometers and with lengths up to 200 nanometers were produced in a carbon-free plasma discharge between a BN-packed tungsten rod and a cooled copper electrode. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy on individual tubes yielded B:N ratios of approximately

N. G. Chopra; R. J. Luyken; K. Cherrey; V. H. Crespi; M. L. Cohen; S. G. Louie; A. Zettl

1995-01-01

183

Boron Nitride Nanomesh  

Microsoft Academic Search

A highly regular mesh of hexagonal boron nitride with a 3-nanometer periodicity and a 2-nanometer hole size was formed by self-assembly on a Rh(111) single crystalline surface. Two layers of mesh cover the surface uniformly after high-temperature exposure of the clean rhodium surface to borazine (HBNH)3. The two layers are offset in such a way as to expose a minimum

Martina Corso; Willi Auwrter; Matthias Muntwiler; Anna Tamai; Thomas Greber; Jrg Osterwalder

2004-01-01

184

Thermal conductivity of boron carbide-boron nitride composites  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports that because of their preferred orientation, the addition of boron nitride dispersions to hot-pressed boron carbide was found to result in a considerable degree of anisotropy in thermal conductivity of the resulting composite, indicated by an increase in the thermal conductivity perpendicular to the hot-pressing direction by as much as a factor of 3 at the highest

Robert Ruh; Kimberly Y. Donaldson; D. P. H. Hasselman

1992-01-01

185

Boron Nitride Nanotube Films Grown From Boron Ink Painting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The growth of nanotube films on various substrates and surfaces is vital for applications in nanoscale functional devices. We report a simple and versatile boron (B) ink painting method that enables high-density boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) films with any desired pattern to be grown on, and firmly attached to, different surfaces. In the method, special B ink is first painted,

Lu Hua Li; Ying Chen; Alexey M. Glushenkov

2010-01-01

186

Method of fabricating boron containing coatings  

DOEpatents

Hard coatings are fabricated from boron nitride, cubic boron nitride, and multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron is formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron and cubic boron nitride, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be discrete or of a blended or graded composition.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01

187

Method of fabricating boron containing coatings  

DOEpatents

Hard coatings are fabricated from boron nitride, cubic boron nitride, and multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron is formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron and cubic boron nitride, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be discrete or of a blended or graded composition. 3 figs.

Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

1999-04-27

188

Pyrolytic deposition of carbon films containing nitorgen and\\/or boron  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports carbon films containing nitrogen and\\/or boron prepared in a closed system by the pyrolysis of appropriate precursor materials. The decomposition products of the pyrolysis were identified and the resulting films were characterized by chemical and physical means. The electrical conductivity of the heteroatom-containing films is similar to that of pure amorphous carbon films. Boron nitride was present

Leon Maya; Lawrence A. Harris

1990-01-01

189

Incidence of boron deficiency in bedding plants caused by drought stress or abscicic acid application  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Growers have reported boron (B) deficiency in pansy (Viola wittrockiana) plug production, specifically in plugs grown in the high heat and humidity conditions of summer. Past studies have reported that soil moisture has an impact on boron availability. To simulate drought conditions, 'Dynamite Ye...

190

The mechanism for low temperature growth of vertically aligned boron nitride nanotubes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are well recognized as the candidate that will complement the uses of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in nanotechnology. However, high growth temperatures (>1100 ^oC), low production yield, and impurities have prevented effective synthesis and applications of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in the past ten years. For the first time, we have succeeded on the growth of pure

Jiesheng Wang; Ming Xie; Yoke Khin Yap

2006-01-01

191

Visceral radioisotopic lymphography of the testicle.  

PubMed

Scintigraphic studies made in 75 patients, respectively on 130 testicles with the aid of the organ radio-isotopic lymphography enabled to determine more exactly the location and the variety of the testicular lymph centers. It should be pointed out that in 58.5% of the patients the lymph centers are situated on the left of the middle line and only in 6.1% on the right. In some cases iliac lymph nodes were demonstrable. Attempts were made to use this method in investigation of the patients with malignant tumours of the testicles. PMID:50569

Karparov, M

1975-01-01

192

High efficiency radioisotope thermophotovoltaic prototype generator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A radioisotope thermophotovoltaic generator space power system (RTPV) is lightweight, low-cost alternative to the present radioisotope thermoelectric generator system (RTG). The fabrication of such an RTPV generator has recently become feasible as the result of the invention of the GaSb infrared sensitive photovoltaic cell. Herein, we present the results of a parametric study of emitters and optical filters in conjuction with existing data on gallium antimonide cells. We compare a polished tungsten emitter with an Erbia selective emitter for use in combination with a simple dielectric filter and a gallium antimonide cell array. We find that the polished tungsten emitter is by itself a very selective emitter with low emissivity beyond 4 microns. Given a gallium antimonide cell and a tungsten emitter, a simple dielectric filter can be designed to transmit radiant energy below 1.7 microns and to reflect radiant energy between 1.7 and 4 microns back to the emitter. Because of the low long wavelength emissivity associated with the polished tungsten emitter, this simple dielectric filter then yields very respectable system performance. Also as a result of the longer wavelength fall-off in the tungsten emissivity curve, the radiation energy peak for a polished tungsten emitter operating at 1300 K shifts to shorter wavelengths relative to the blackbody spectrum so that the radiated energy peak falls right at the gallium antimonide cell bandedge. The result is that the response of the gallium antimonide cell is well matched to a polished tungsten emitter. We propose, therefore, to fabricate an operating prototype of a near term radioisotope thermophotovoltaic generator design consisting of a polished tungsten emitter, standard gallium antimonide cells, and a near-term dielectric filter. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory will design and build the thermal cavity, and JX Crystals will fabricate the gallium antimonide cells, dielectric filters, and resultant receiver panels. With 250 Watts of heat input, we expect this prototype to produce over 300 Watts of electrical energy output for a system energy conversion efficiency of over 12%. This low risk, near term design provides advances relative to present radioisotope thermophotovoltaic generators and has the additional advantage of allowing component and system development and testing to begin immediately. Improved cells and filters can easily be incorporated in this baseline system if they should become available in the future.

Avery, James E.; Samaras, John E.; Fraas, Lewis M.; Ewell, Richard

1995-01-01

193

Medical Radioisotope Data Survey: 2002 Preliminary Results  

SciTech Connect

A limited, but accurate amount of detailed information about the radioactive isotopes used in the U.S. for medical procedures was collected from a local hospital and from a recent report on the U.S. Radiopharmaceutical Markets. These data included the total number of procedures, the specific types of procedures, the specific radioisotopes used in these procedures, and the dosage administered per procedure. The information from these sources was compiled, assessed, pruned, and then merged into a single, comprehensive and consistent set of results presented in this report. (PIET-43471-TM-197)

Siciliano, Edward R.

2004-06-23

194

Boron containing multilayer coatings and method of fabrication  

DOEpatents

Hard coatings are fabricated from multilayer boron/boron carbide, boron carbide/cubic boron nitride, and boron/boron nitride/boron carbide, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron and boron carbide used in forming the multilayers are formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/boron carbide, and boron carbide/cubic boron nitride is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron, cubic boron nitride or boron carbide, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be of a discrete or a blended or graded composition.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA)

1997-01-01

195

Kinetics of Boron Sorption and Desorption in Boron Thermal Regeneration System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boron is used in the primary coolant of pressurized water reactors in nuclear power generation for shim control. If boron concentration is decreased, fewer neutrons are adsorbed and more fission occurs. When boron concentration increases, less fission occurs. The boron concentration can be controlled by the use of ion-exchange resins operating in the Boron Thermal Regeneration System (BTRS). A better

JIDONG LOU; GARY L. FOUTCH; JUNG WON NA

2000-01-01

196

Radioisotope Reduction Using Solar Power for Outer Planetary Missions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radioisotope power systems have historically been (and still are) the power system of choice from a mass and size perspective for outer planetary missions. High demand for and limited availability of radioisotope fuel has made it necessary to investigate alternatives to this option. Low mass, high efficiency solar power systems have the potential for use at low outer planetary temperatures

James Fincannon

2008-01-01

197

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) bring together two components that when kept separate have only minor effects on normal cells. The first component is a stable isotope of boron (boron 10) that can be concentrated in tumor cells. The second is a beam of low-energy neutrons that produces short-range radiation when absorbed, or captured, by the boron. The combination of

Rolf F. Barth; Albert H. Soloway; Ralph G. Fairchild

1990-01-01

198

Rhenium Radioisotopes for Therapeutic Radiopharmaceutical Development  

SciTech Connect

The availability of therapeutic radioisotopes at reasonable costs is important for applications in nuclear medicine, oncology and interventional cardiology, Rhenium-186 (Re-186) and rhenium-1 88 (Re-188) are two reactor-produced radioisotope which are attractive for a variety of therapeutic applications, Rhenium-186 has a half-life of 90 hours and decays with emission of a &particle with a maximum energy of 1.08 MeV and a 135 keV (9Yo) gamma which permits imaging. In contrast, Re- 188 has a much shorter half-life of 16.9 hours and emits a p-particle with a much higher energy of 2.12 MeV (Em=) and a 155 keV gamma photon (15Yo) for imaging. While Re-186 is unavailable from a generator system and must be directly produced in a nuclear reactor, Re-188 can also be directly produced in a reactor with high specific activity, but is more conveniently and cost-effectively available as carrier-free sodium perrhenate by saline elution of the alumina-based tungsten-188 (W1 88)/Re-l 88 generator system [1-2]. Since a comprehensive overviewofRe-186 and Re-188 therapeutic agents is beyond the scope of this &tended Abstrac4 the goal is to provide key examples of various agents currently in clinical use and those which are being developed for important clinical applications.

Beets, A.L.; Knapp, F.F., Jr.; Kropp, J.; Lin, W.-Y.; Pinkert, J.; Wang, S.-Y.

1999-01-18

199

Reliability Issues in Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Stirling power conversion is a potential candidate for use in a Radioisotope Power System (RPS) for space science missions because it offers a multifold increase in the conversion efficiency of heat to electric power and reduced requirement of radioactive material. Reliability of an RPS that utilizes Stirling power conversion technology is important in order to ascertain long term successful performance. Owing to long life time requirement (14 years), it is difficult to perform long-term tests that encompass all the uncertainties involved in the design variables of components and subsystems comprising the RPS. The requirement for uninterrupted performance reliability and related issues are discussed, and some of the critical areas of concern are identified. An overview of the current on-going efforts to understand component life, design variables at the component and system levels, and related sources and nature of uncertainties are also discussed. Current status of the 110 watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) reliability efforts is described. Additionally, an approach showing the use of past experience on other successfully used power systems to develop a reliability plan for the SRG110 design is outlined.

Schreiber, Jeffrey; Shah, Ashwin

2005-01-01

200

Reliability Issues in Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Stirling power conversion is a potential candidate for use in a Radioisotope Power System (RPS) for space science missions because it offers a multifold increase in the conversion efficiency of heat to electric power and reduced requirement of radioactive material. Reliability of an RPS that utilizes Stirling power conversion technology is important in order to ascertain long term successful performance. Owing to long life time requirement (14 years), it is difficult to perform long-term tests that encompass all the uncertainties involved in the design variables of components and subsystems comprising the RPS. The requirement for uninterrupted performance reliability and related issues are discussed, and some of the critical areas of concern are identified. An overview of the current on-going efforts to understand component life, design variables at the component and system levels, and related sources and nature of uncertainties are also discussed. Current status of the 110 watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) reliability efforts is described. Additionally, an approach showing the use of past experience on other successfully used power systems to develop a reliability plan for the SRG110 design is outlined.

Shah, Ashwin R.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

2004-01-01

201

Radioisotopic studies of submarine hydrothermal vents  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The importance of mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems has been recognized for their role in the regulation of ocean and sediment chemistry, as well as for providing a chemosynthetic source of carbon which drives a unique population of animals found at hydrothermal vents. Despite the importance of these systems the rates, length, and depth scale of submarine hydrothermal processes are not precisely known because they are, for the most part, inaccessible to observational tools. We must therefore rely on indirect methods to quantify these processes. One way of investigating the rates, or timescales, of processes in a hydrothermal (or any natural) system is through the study and modeling of naturally occurring radioisotopes. Disequilibria among the naturally occurring radioactive decay series in vent fluids, associated mineral deposits, and overlying effluent plume have provided geochemical tools to investigate the rates of various processes occurring in submarine hydrothermal systems. Because the half-lives of the radioisotopes vary from days to many years, processes which encompass a wide range of spatial and temporal scales can be studied. This paper presents a review of methods that estimate the residence time of hydrothermal fluids in the ocean crust, establish the geochronology of seafloor sulfide deposits, investigate the rates of chemical reactions within hydrothermal effluent plumes, and derive the heat and mass flux from seafloor hydrothermal areas.

Kadko, David

1996-08-01

202

Boron nitride nanotubes  

SciTech Connect

The successful synthesis of pure boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is reported here. Multi-walled tubes with inner diameters on the order of 1 to 3 nanometers and with lengths up to 200 nanometers were produced in a carbon-free plasma discharge between a BN-packed tungsten rod and a cooled copper electrode. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy on individual tubes yielded B:N ratios of approximately 1, which is consistent with theoretical predictions of stable BN tube structures. 15 refs., 4 figs.

Chopra, N.G.; Luyken, R.J.; Cherrey, K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

1995-08-18

203

Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes  

DOEpatents

A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

2014-04-22

204

Assessment of radioisotope heaters for remote terrestrial applications  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the feasibility of using radioisotope byproducts for special heating applications at remote sites in Alaska and other cold regions. The investigation included assessment of candidate radioisotope materials for heater applications, identification of the most promising cold region applications, evaluation of key technical issues and implementation constraints, and development of conceptual heater designs for candidate applications. Strontium-90 (Sr-90) was selected as the most viable fuel for radioisotopic heaters used in terrestrial applications. Opportunities for the application of radioisotopic heaters were determined through site visits to representative Alaska installations. Candidate heater applications included water storage tanks, sludge digesters, sewage lagoons, water piping systems, well-head pumping stations, emergency shelters, and fuel storage tank deicers. Radioisotopic heaters for water storage tank freeze-up protection and for enhancement of biological waste treatment processes at remote sites were selected as the most promising applications.

Uherka, K.L.

1987-05-01

205

Semiconducting icosahedral boron arsenide crystal growth for neutron detection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Semiconducting icosahedral boron arsenide, B12As2, is an excellent candidate for neutron detectors, thermoelectric converters, and radioisotope batteries, for which high quality single crystals are required. Thus, the present study was undertaken to grow B12As2 crystals by precipitation from metal solutions (nickel) saturated with elemental boron (or B12As2 powder) and arsenic in a sealed quartz ampoule. B12As2 crystals of 10-15 mm were produced when a homogeneous mixture of the three elements was held at 1150 C for 48-72 h and slowly cooled (3.5 C/h). The crystals varied in color and transparency from black and opaque to clear and transparent. X-ray topography (XRT), and elemental analysis by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) confirmed that the crystals had the expected rhombohedral structure and chemical stoichiometry. The concentrations of residual impurities (nickel, carbon, etc.) were low, as measured by Raman spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Additionally, low etch-pit densities (4.4107 cm-2) were observed after etching in molten KOH at 500 C. Thus, the flux growth method is viable for growing large, high-quality B12As2 crystals.

Whiteley, C. E.; Zhang, Y.; Gong, Y.; Bakalova, S.; Mayo, A.; Edgar, J. H.; Kuball, M.

2011-03-01

206

Pre-concentration and measurement of low levels of gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes in coastal waters.  

PubMed

We describe extensive testing of a large-volume, high-speed water sampler for the concentration and measurement of radionuclides using high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The sampler processed hundreds to thousands of liters of natural waters with variable suspended sediment and salinity loads at flow rates of 10-201/min. Extraction of most radionuclides in the water column was accomplished through the combination of physical filtration down to 0.1 microm particle size and chemical separation of dissolved species on cellulose-based inorganic sorbent beds without recourse to complex, or hazardous chemistry. Performance and extraction efficiencies for suites of radioisotopes were determined in the laboratory and in the field with river and coastal ocean water samples. Extraction and recovery efficiencies are better than 90% for most fission and activation product radioisotopes. This methodology has broad application to the study of the distribution and fate of radioisotopes in coastal waterways. PMID:11573799

Bandong, B B; Volpe, A M; Esser, B K; Bianchini, G M

2001-11-01

207

Electrochemical incineration of omeprazole in neutral aqueous medium using a platinum or boron-doped diamond anode: degradation kinetics and oxidation products.  

PubMed

The electrochemical incineration of omeprazole, a widely prescribed gastrointestinal drug which is detected in natural waters, has been studied in a phosphate buffer of pH 7.0 by anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H(2)O(2) (AO-H(2)O(2)) operating at constant current density (j). The experiments were carried out in a cell equipped with either a Pt or a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and an air-diffusion cathode to continuously produce H(2)O(2). In these systems, organics are mainly oxidized by hydroxyl radicals formed at the Pt or BDD surface from water oxidation. A partial total organic carbon (TOC) abatement close to 78% for omeprazole was achieved by AO-H(2)O(2) with a BDD anode after consumption of 18 Ah L(-1) at 100 mA cm(-2), whereas the alternative use of Pt did not allow mineralizing the drug. However, the drug was totally removed using both anodes, although it decayed more rapidly using BDD. In this latter system, increasing j accelerated the degradation process, but lowering the mineralization current efficiency. Greater drug content also enhanced the degradation rate with higher mineralization degree and current efficiency. The kinetics for omeprazole decay always followed a pseudo-first-order reaction and its rate constant increased with increasing j and with decreasing its concentration. Seven heteroaromatic intermediates and four hydroxylated derivatives were detected by LC-MS, while nine short-linear carboxylic acids were identified and quantified by ion-exclusion HPLC. These acids were largely accumulated using Pt and rapidly removed using BDD, thus explaining the partial mineralization of omeprazole achieved by AO-H(2)O(2) with the latter anode. The release of inorganic ions such as NO(3)(-), NH(4)(+) and SO(4)(2-) was followed by ionic chromatography. A plausible reaction sequence for omeprazole mineralization involving all intermediates detected is proposed. PMID:23351432

Cavalcanti, Eliane Bezerra; Garcia-Segura, Sergi; Centellas, Francesc; Brillas, Enric

2013-04-01

208

General Electric PETtrace cyclotron as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research investigates the use of a PETtrace cyclotron produced by General Electric (GE) as a neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The GE PETtrace was chosen for this investigation because this type of cyclotron is popular among nuclear pharmacies and clinics in many countries; it is compact and reliable; it produces protons with energies high enough to produce neutrons with appropriate energy and fluence rate for BNCT and it does not require significant changes in design to provide neutrons. In particular, the standard PETtrace 18O target is considered. The cyclotron efficiency may be significantly increased if unused neutrons produced during radioisotopes production could be utilized for other medical modalities such as BNCT at the same time. The resulting dose from the radiation emitted from the target is evaluated using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP at several depths in a brain phantom for different scattering geometries. Four different moderating materials of various thicknesses were considered: light water, carbon, heavy water, arid Fluental(TM). The fluence rate tally was used to calculate photon and neutron dose, by applying fluence rate-to-dose conversion factors. Fifteen different geometries were considered and a 30-cm thick heavy water moderator was chosen as the most suitable for BNCT with the GE PETtrace cyclotron. According to the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) protocol, the maximum dose to the normal brain is set to 12.5 RBEGy, which for the conditions of using a heavy water moderator, assuming a 60 muA beam current, would be reached with a treatment time of 258 min. Results showed that using a PETtrace cyclotron in this configuration provides a therapeutic ratio of about 2.4 for depths up to 4 cm inside a brain phantom. Further increase of beam current proposed by GE should significantly improve the beam quality or the treatment time and allow treating tumors at greater depths.

Bosko, Andrey

209

Boron suboxide: As hard as cubic boron nitride  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Vickers hardness of boron suboxide single crystals was measured using a diamond indentation method. Under a loading force of 0.98 N, our test gave an average Vickers hardness of 45 GPa. The average fracture toughness was measured as 4.5 MPa m1\\/2. We also measured the hardness of the cubic boron nitride and sapphire single crystals for comparison. The average

Duanwei He; Yusheng Zhao; L. Daemen; J. Qian; T. D. Shen; T. W. Zerda

2002-01-01

210

Characterization of contaminated nuclear sites, facilities and materials: radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical manufacturers and suppliers. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing environmental protection standards for evaluating the risks and characterizing problems associated with disposal of radioactive wastes arising from decontamination and decommissioning DandD operations. Information on operations conducted at sites authorized to possess radioactive materials for the production and/or distribution of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals was compiled and evaluated. This information was used to project the types, nature, and volumes of wastes which are likely to be generated during decontamination and decommissioning at representative facilities and identifying special problems that may occur. Radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical manufacturers have been grouped together because decommissioning operations will be similar. Nuclear pharmacies were also evaluated because of their increasing numbers and their role as middlemen between manufacturers and users of radiopharmaceuticals. The majority of the radioactive waste will arise from the decontamination of the laboratories, rather than the disposal of components.

Not Available

1983-01-01

211

Status of the NASA Stirling Radioisotope Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Free-piston Stirling power conversion has been considered a candidate for radioisotope power systems for space for more than a decade. Prior to the free-piston Stirling architecture, systems were designed with kinematic Stirling engines that used linkages and rotary alternators to convert heat to electricity. These systems were able to achieve long life by lightly loading the linkages; however, the live was nonetheless limited. When the free-piston configuration was initially proposed, it was thought to be attractive due to the relatively high conversion efficiency, acceptable mass, and the potential for long life and high reliability based on wear-free operation. These features have consistently been recognized by teams that have studied technology options for radioisotope space power systems. Since free-piston Stirling power conversion was first considered for space power applications, there have been major advances in three general areas of development: hardware that has demonstrated long-life and reliability, the success achieved by Stirling cryocoolers in space, and the overall developmental maturity of the technology for both space and terrestrial applications. Based on these advances, free-piston Stirling convertors are currently being developed for space power, and for a number of terrestrial applications. They commonly operate with the power, efficiency, life, and reliability as intended, and much of the development now centers on system integration. This paper will summarize the accomplishments of free-piston Stirling power conversion technology over the past decade, review the status of development with regard to space power, and discuss the challenges that remain.

Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

2007-01-01

212

Advanced Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology Research and Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology program is developing next generation power conversion technologies that will enable future missions that have requirements that cannot be met by either the ubiquitous photovoltaic systems or by current Radioisotope Power System (RPS) technology. Performance goals of advanced radioisotope power systems include improvement over the state-of-practice General Purpose Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator by providing significantly higher efficiency to reduce the number of radioisotope fuel modules, and increase specific power (watts/kilogram). Other Advanced RPS goals include safety, long-life, reliability, scalability, multi-mission capability, resistance to radiation, and minimal interference with the scientific payload. NASA has awarded ten contracts in the technology areas of Brayton, Stirling, Thermoelectric, and Thermophotovoltaic power conversion including five development contracts that deal with more mature technologies and five research contracts. The Advanced RPS Systems Assessment Team includes members from NASA GRC, JPL, DOE and Orbital Sciences whose function is to review the technologies being developed under the ten Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology contracts and assess their relevance to NASA's future missions. Presented is an overview of the ten radioisotope power conversion technology contracts and NASA's Advanced RPS Systems Assessment Team.

Wong, Wayne A.

2004-01-01

213

BORON SYNTHESIS IN TYPE Ic SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the {nu}-process in an energetic Type Ic supernova (SN Ic) and the resultant productions of the light elements including boron and its stable isotopes. SN Ic is a very unique boron source because it can produce boron not only through spallation reactions as discussed in Nakamura and Shigeyama but also the {nu}-process. The {nu}-process is considered to occur in core-collapse supernovae and previous studies were limited to SNe II. Although the progenitor star of an SN Ic does not posses an He envelope so that {sup 7}Li production via the {nu}-process is unlikely, {sup 11}B can be produced in the C-rich layers. We demonstrate a hydrodynamic simulation of a SN Ic explosion and estimate the amounts of the light elements produced via the {nu}-process for the first time, and also the subsequent spallation reactions between the outermost layers of the compact SN Ic progenitor and the ambient medium. We find that the {nu}-process in the current SN Ic model produces a significant amount of {sup 11}B, which is diluted by {sup 10}B from spallation reactions to get closer to B isotopic ratios observed in meteorites. We also confirm that high-temperature {mu} and {tau} neutrinos and their anti-neutrinos, reasonably suggested from the compact structure of SN Ic progenitors, enhance the light-element production through the neutral current reactions, which may imply an important role of SNe Ic in the Galactic chemical evolution.

Nakamura, Ko; Kajino, Toshitaka [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); Yoshida, Takashi; Shigeyama, Toshikazu [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

2010-08-01

214

Nano boron nitride flatland.  

PubMed

Recent years have witnessed many breakthroughs in research on two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, among which is hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), a layered material with a regular network of BN hexagons. This review provides an insight into the marvellous nano BN flatland, beginning with a concise introduction to BN and its low-dimensional nanostructures, followed by an overview of the past and current state of research on 2D BN nanostructures. A comprehensive review of the structural characteristics and synthetic routes of BN monolayers, multilayers, nanomeshes, nanowaves, nanoflakes, nanosheets and nanoribbons is presented. In addition, electronic, optical, thermal, mechanical, magnetic, piezoelectric, catalytic, ecological, biological and wetting properties, applications and research perspectives for these novel 2D nanomaterials are discussed. PMID:24280706

Pakdel, Amir; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

2014-02-01

215

Radioisotope Reduction Using Solar Power for Outer Planetary Missions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radioisotope power systems have historically been (and still are) the power system of choice from a mass and size perspective for outer planetary missions. High demand for and limited availability of radioisotope fuel has made it necessary to investigate alternatives to this option. Low mass, high efficiency solar power systems have the potential for use at low outer planetary temperatures and illumination levels. This paper documents the impacts of using solar power systems instead of radioisotope power for all or part of the power needs of outer planetary spacecraft and illustrates the potential fuel savings of such an approach.

Fincannon, James

2008-01-01

216

BORON--1997 13.1 By Phyllis A. Lyday  

E-print Network

of California. Boron products sold on the market are produced from a surface mine, underground mines, in situ of Geology Gems & Minerals in September 1997 with the Hope Diamond in the spotlight. The Hope's deep blue is the unique trait of the dark blue diamond that phosphoresces orange-red in the dark after exposure

217

Screening The Aegilops-Triticum Group For Boron Tolerance  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Boron deficient and toxic soils pose a critical problem in wheat production on a world scale. Therefore, 79 accessions from 12 diverse wild wheat (Aegilops speltoides, Ae. longissima, Ae. sharonensis, Ae. bicornis, Ae. searsii, Ae. kotschyi, Ae. peregrina ssp. cylindrostachys, Ae. peregrina ssp. eu...

218

Processing of boron carbide  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The processing of boron carbide powder including sintering optimization, green body optimization and sintering behavior of nano-sized boron carbide was investigated for the development of complex shaped body armor. Pressureless sintered B4C relative densities as high as 96.7% were obtained by optimizing the soak temperature, and holding at that temperature for the minimum time required to reach terminal density. Although the relative densities of pressureless sintered specimens were lower than that of commercially produced hot-pressed B4C, their (Vickers) hardness values were comparable. For 4.45 cm dia. 1.35 cm height disk-shaped specimens, pressureless sintered to at least 93.0% relative density, post-hot isostatic pressing resulted in vast increases in relative densities (e.g. 100.0%) and hardness values significantly greater than that of commercially produced hot-pressed B 4C. The densification behavior of 20-40nm graphite-coated B4C nano-particles was studied using dilatometry, x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The higher than expected sintering onset from a nano-scale powder (1500C) was caused by remnant B2O3 not removed by methanol washing, keeping particles separated until volatilization, and the carbon coatings, which imposed particle to particle contact of a substance more refractory than B4C. Solid state sintering (1500-1850C) was followed by an arrest in contraction attributed to formation of eutectic liquid droplets of size more than 10X the original nano-particles. These droplets, induced to form well below known B4C-graphite eutectic temperatures by the high surface energy of nanoparticles, are interpreted to have quickly solidified to form a vast number of voids in particle packing, which in turn, impeded continued solid state sintering. Starting at 2200C, a permanent liquid phase formed which facilitated a rapid measured contraction by liquid phase sintering and/or compact slumping.

Cho, Namtae

219

Molecular Structure of Boron trifluoride  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Boron trifluoride has a trigonal pryamidal shape and dissolves in diethyl ether. Normally a gas, boron trifluoride is a hard and strong Lewis acid with a high affinity in displacement reactions and is therefore used mainly as a catalyst in alkylations, polymerizations and esterifications. It extracts bases bound to carbon and produces carbocations. Also it is used as a fumigant and in the magnesium industry because its anti-oxidant properties.

2002-08-15

220

Neutron detectors comprising boron powder  

DOEpatents

High-efficiency neutron detector substrate assemblies comprising a first conductive substrate, wherein a first side of the substrate is in direct contact with a first layer of a powder material comprising .sup.10boron, .sup.10boron carbide or combinations thereof, and wherein a conductive material is in proximity to the first layer of powder material; and processes of making said neutron detector substrate assemblies.

Wang, Zhehui; Morris, Christopher; Bacon, Jeffrey Darnell; Makela, Mark F; Spaulding, Randy Jay

2013-05-21

221

The Boron Solar Neutrino Experiment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neutrino excitation of the nuclear levels (NUEX) of 11B and charged-current (CC) excited inverse beta-decay of 11B to 11C, provide a double mode detection of solar nu's in a target of boron. Aspects of detector techniques and backgrounds in the Boron solar nu experiment, now under development, as well as its response to various non-standard nu scenarios are presented.

R. S. Raghavan

1987-01-01

222

Renewable boron carbide coating in plasma shots of tokamak ?11-?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experimental results on boronization in plasma shots of the tokamak T-11M are presented. Non-toxic and not explosive metacarborane C 2H 12B 10 was used in the boron deposition process. Experiments have been carried out in shots with parameters: toroidal field 1-1.2 ?, plasma current Ip = 70 ??, average shot duration tp 150 ms and electron density along the central chord ne 2.5 10 13 cm -3. As a result of experiment, a dense film of 0.2 microns thickness with good adhesion to a surface has formed on the reference specimens after 8 s boronization. After boronization the impurities in wall areas have been suppressed. High vacuum characteristics of the discharge chamber were stabilized. Working vacuum was reached without a preliminary induction heating and cleaning by a glow discharge, and stabilization of the plasma filament has improved. Shot duration without disruption at densities of ne = 1.3 10 13 ?m -3, Ip = 70 ?? was 350 ms and ne = 4.64 10 13 ?m -3, Ip = 70 ?? was 250 ms. High repeatability of experimental results has appeared. Developed technology opens an opportunity of practical production of renewable structured boron-carbon coatings with use of plasma shots in large-scale tokamaks, such as DIII-D, JET, JT-60 UP, ITER, DEMO.

Buzhinskij, O. I.; Barsuk, V. A.; Otroshchenko, V. G.

2009-06-01

223

Synthesis of Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Engineering Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Boron Nitride nanotubes (BNNT) are of interest to the scientific and technical communities for many of the same reasons that carbon nanotubes (CNT) have attracted large amounts of attention. Both materials have potentially unique and significant properties which may have important structural and electronic applications in the future. However of even more interest than their similarities may be the differences between carbon and boron nanotubes. Whilt boron nitride nanotubes possess a very high modulus similaar to CNT, they are also more chemically and thermally inert. Additionally BNNT possess more uniform electronic properties, having a uniform band gap of approximately 5.5 eV while CNT vary from semi-conductin to conductor behavior. Boron Nitride nanotubes have been synthesized by a variety of methods such as chemical vapor deposition, arc discharge and reactive milling. Consistently producing a reliable product has proven difficult. Progress in synthesis of 1-2 gram sized batches of Boron Nitride nanotubes will be discussed as well as potential uses for this unique material.

Hurst, Janet; Hull, David; Gorican, Dan

2005-01-01

224

Inelastic properties of boron oxides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Temperature dependence of internal friction and dynamic shear modulus for boron anhydride (B2O3) and boron suboxide (B6O) have been investigated at frequencies of 1-10 Hz and over the temperature range 80-900 K. Absolute shear modulus for boron suboxide at 80 and 400 K was 0.9 and 0.85 GPa, respectively. Relaxation maximum of internal friction, accompanied with shear modulus defect had activation energy of 0.8 eV, and frequency factor of 1.1012 s-1. Measruements of absolute values of boron suboxide shear modulus at various temperatures showed deviations from linear decrease above 670 K. In the internal friction spectrum at temperatures of 410 and 700 K the maxima of origin have been revealed. At temperatures of 595 and 650-700 K an intense maxima of internal friction and shear modulus defects were observed. Many of the relaxation and hysteretic processes have been discussed accounting on the possiblity of formation of point defects (oxygen vacancies, unbonded boron atoms), split dislocations and polysynthetic twins in the (001) rhombohedral planes, lowering down the local symmetry in the boron suboxide crystal structure.

Tushishvili, M. Ch.; Darsavelidze, G. Sh.; Tsagareishvili, O. A.; Bairamashvili, I. A.; Jobava, J. Sh.

1991-07-01

225

Azomethine H colorimetric method for determining dissolved boron in water  

USGS Publications Warehouse

An automated colorimetric method for determining dissolved boron in water is described. The boron is complexed with azomethine H, which is readily available as the condensation product of H acid (8-amino-1-naphthol-3,6-disulfonic acid) and salicylaldehyde. The absorbance of the yellow complex formed is then measured colorimetrically at 410 nm. Interference effects from other dissolved species are minimized by the addition of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA); however, iron, zinc, and bicarbonate interfere at concentrations above 400 ??g/L, 2000 ??g/L, and 200 mg/L, respectively. The bicarbonate interference can be eliminated by careful acidification of the sample with concentrated HCl to a pH between 5 and 6. Thirty samples per hour can be routinely analyzed over the range of from 10 to 400 ??g/L, boron.

Spencer, R.R.; Erdmann, D.E.

1979-01-01

226

Nuclear energy in the service of biomedicine: the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's radioisotope program, 1946-1950.  

PubMed

The widespread adoption of radioisotopes as tools in biomedical research and therapy became one of the major consequences of the "physicists' war" for postwar life science. Scientists in the Manhattan Project, as part of their efforts to advocate for civilian uses of atomic energy after the war, proposed using infrastructure from the wartime bomb project to develop a government-run radioisotope distribution program. After the Atomic Energy Bill was passed and before the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was formally established, the Manhattan Project began shipping isotopes from Oak Ridge. Scientists and physicians put these reactor-produced isotopes to many of the same uses that had been pioneered with cyclotron-generated radioisotopes in the 1930s and early 1940s. The majority of early AEC shipments were radioiodine and radiophosphorus, employed to evaluate thyroid function, diagnose medical disorders, and irradiate tumors. Both researchers and politicians lauded radioisotopes publicly for their potential in curing diseases, particularly cancer. However, isotopes proved less successful than anticipated in treating cancer and more successful in medical diagnostics. On the research side, reactor-generated radioisotopes equipped biologists with new tools to trace molecular transformations from metabolic pathways to ecosystems. The U.S. government's production and promotion of isotopes stimulated their consumption by scientists and physicians (both domestic and abroad), such that in the postwar period isotopes became routine elements of laboratory and clinical use. In the early postwar years, radioisotopes signified the government's commitment to harness the atom for peace, particularly through contributions to biology, medicine, and agriculture. PMID:17575955

Creager, Angela N H

2006-01-01

227

A power conditioning system for radioisotope thermoelectric generator energy sources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) as the primary source of energy in unmanned spacecraft is discussed. RTG output control, power conditioning system requirements, the electrical design, and circuit performance are also discussed.

Gillis, J. A., Jr.

1974-01-01

228

Thermal Model Predictions of Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Performance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This presentation describes the capabilities of three-dimensional thermal power model of advanced stirling radioisotope generator (ASRG). The performance of the ASRG is presented for different scenario, such as Venus flyby with or without the auxiliary cooling system.

Wang, Xiao-Yen J.; Fabanich, William Anthony; Schmitz, Paul C.

2014-01-01

229

Determining Molar Combining Ratios Using Radioisotopes--A Student Experiment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Outlines an experimental procedure in which an iodine radioisotope is used to determine molar combining ratios of lead and silver with the iodine. Tables and graphs show the definitive results that should be attainable. (CP)

Sears, Jerry A.

1976-01-01

230

A historical perspective on radioisotopic tracers in metabolism and biochemistry.  

PubMed

Radioisotopes are used routinely in the modern laboratory to trace and quantify a myriad of biochemical processes. The technique has a captivating history peppered with groundbreaking science and with more than its share of Nobel Prizes. The discovery of radioactivity at the end of the 19th century paved the way to understanding atomic structure and quickly led to the use of radioisotopes to trace the fate of molecules as they flowed through complex organic life. The 1940s saw the first radiotracer studies using homemade instrumentation and analytical techniques such as paper chromatography. This article follows the history of radioisotopic tracers from meager beginnings, through to the most recent applications. The author hopes that those researchers involved in radioisotopic tracer studies today will pause to remember the origins of the technique and those who pioneered this fascinating science. PMID:25826135

Lappin, Graham

2015-03-01

231

Radioisotope-powered cardiac pacemaker program. Clinical studies of the nuclear pacemaker model NU-5. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Beginning in February, 1970, the Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) undertook a program to design, develop and manufacture a radioisotope powered cardiac pacemaker system. The scope of technical work was specified to be: establish system, component, and process cost reduction goals using the prototype Radioisotope Powered Cardiac Pacemaker (RCP) design and develop production techniques to achieve these cost reduction objectives; fabricate radioisotope powered fueled prototype cardiac pacemakers (RCP's) on a pilot production basis; conduct liaison with a Government-designated fueling facility for purposes of defining fueling requirements, fabrication and encapsulation procedures, safety design criteria and quality control and inspection requirements; develop and implement Quality Assurance and Reliability Programs; conduct performance, acceptance, lifetime and reliability tests of fueled RCP's in the laboratory; conduct liaison with the National Institutes of Health and with Government specified medical research institutions selected for the purpose of undertaking clinical evaluation of the RCP in humans; monitor and evaluate, on a continuing basis, all test data; and perform necessary safety analyses and tests. Pacemaker designs were developed and quality assurance and manufacturing procedures established. Prototype pacemakers were fabricated. A total of 126 radioisotope powered units were implanted and have been followed clinically for approximately seven years. Four (4) of these units have failed. Eighty-three (83) units remain implanted and satisfactorily operational. An overall failure rate of less than the target 0.15% per month has been achieved.

Not Available

1980-06-01

232

Using an Authentic Radioisotope to Teach Half-Life  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Traditionally, nuclear chemistry appears in the last few chapters of chemistry textbooks and is not normally considered a mainstream topic. Yet nuclear chemistry is a very important topic that should be taught in all chemistry classrooms. Today's technology and equipment needed to perform lab work make it easier to teach nuclear science at the high school level. In this safe real-time activity, students use a radiation monitor, computer, and radioisotope generator to determine the half-life of a genuine radioisotope.

John Sebranek

2005-12-01

233

ADVANCED RADIOISOTOPE POWER SOURCE OPTIONS FOR PLUTO EXPRESS  

Microsoft Academic Search

la the drive to reduce mass and cost, I'luto I;xpress is investigating using an advanced power conversion (cchnology in a small Radioisotope Power Source (RI'S) to deliver the rcquirccf mission power of 74 W(elcctric) at cad of mission. lJntil t})is year the baseline power source under consideration has been a Radioisotope Thcrmoclcctric Generator (RTG). This RIG would be a scaled

Mark L. Underwood

234

A simple and selective method for the separation of Cu radioisotopes from nickel.  

PubMed

Separation of copper radioisotopes from a nickel target is normally performed using solvent extraction or anion exchange rather than using cationic exchange. A commonly held opinion is that cationic exchangers have very similar thermodynamic complexation constants for metallic ions with identical charges, therefore making the separation very difficult or impossible. The results presented in this article indicate that the selectivity of Chelex-100 (a cationic ion exchanger) for Cu radioisotope and Ni ions not only depends on the thermodynamic complexation constant in the resin but also markedly varies with the concentration of mobile H+. In our developed method, separation of copper radioisotopes from a nickel target was fulfilled in a column filled with Chelex-100 via controlling the HNO3 concentration of the eluent, and the separation is much more effective, simple and economical in comparison with the common method of anion exchange. For an irradiated nickel target with 650 mg Ni, after separation, the loss of Cu radioisotopes in the nickel portion was reduced from 30% to 0.33% of the total initial radioactivity and the nickel mixed into the radioactive products was reduced from 9.5 to 0.5 mg. This significant improvement will make subsequent labeling much easier and reduce consumption of chelating agents and other chemicals during labeling. If the labeled agent is used in human medical applications, the developed method will significantly decrease the uptake of Ni and chelating agents by patients, therefore reducing both the stress on human body associated with clearing the chemicals from blood and tissue and the risk of various types of acute and chronic disorder due to exposure to Ni. PMID:17045175

Fan, Xianfeng; Parker, David J; Smith, Mike D; Ingram, Andy; Yang, Zhufang; Seville, Jonathan P K

2006-10-01

235

Elementary Reactions of Boron Atoms with HydrocarbonssToward the Formation of Organo-Boron Compounds  

E-print Network

Boron Reactions 5112 2.3.1. Crossed Beam Machines with a Rotating QMS Detector 5113 2.3.2. Crossed BeamElementary Reactions of Boron Atoms with HydrocarbonssToward the Formation of Organo-Boron 96822 Received December 16, 2009 Contents 1. Introduction 5107 1.1. Organo-Boron Molecules in Combustion

Kaiser, Ralf I.

236

Synthesis and photocurrent of amorphous boron nanowires  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although theoretically feasible, synthesis of boron nanostructures is challenging due to the highly reactive nature, high melting and boiling points of boron. We have developed a thermal vapor transfer approach to synthesizing amorphous boron nanowire using a solid boron source. The amorphous nature and chemical composition of boron nanowires were characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. Optical properties and photoconduction of boron nanowires have not yet been reported. In our investigation, the amorphous boron nanowire showed much better optical and electrical properties than previously reported photo-response of crystalline boron nanobelts. When excited by a blue LED, the photo/dark current ratio (I/I0) is 1.5 and time constants in the order of tens of seconds. I/I0 is 1.17 using a green light.

Ge, Liehui; Lei, Sidong; Hart, Amelia H. C.; Gao, Guanhui; Jafry, Huma; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

2014-08-01

237

Boronated porhyrins and methods for their use  

DOEpatents

The present invention covers boronated porphyrins containing multiple carborane cages which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies such as boron neutron capture therapy and photodynamic therapy.

Miura, Michiko (Hampton Bays, NY); Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Southhold, NY)

1999-03-02

238

Boronated porhyrins and methods for their use  

DOEpatents

The present invention covers boronated porphyrins containing multiple carborane cages which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies such as boron neutron capture therapy and photodynamic therapy. 3 figs.

Miura, M.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Slatkin, D.N.

1999-03-02

239

Decreasing the leachibility of boron wood preservatives  

E-print Network

The use of boron in wood preservatives has been growing since the 1930s, primarily in various boric acid/borax mixtures. Boron preservatives have several advantages for application as wood preservatives including a broad spectrum of activity...

Gezer, Engin Derya

1996-01-01

240

Radioisotope-based Nuclear Power Strategy for Exploration Systems Development  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power will play an important role in future exploration efforts. Its benefits pertain to practically all the different timeframes associated with the Exploration Vision, from robotic investigation of potential lunar landing sites to long-duration crewed missions on the lunar surface. However, the implementation of nuclear technology must follow a logical progression in capability that meets but does not overwhelm the power requirements for the missions in each exploration timeframe. It is likely that the surface power infrastructure, particularly for early missions, will be distributed in nature. Thus, nuclear sources will have to operate in concert with other types of power and energy storage systems, and must mesh well with the power architectures envisioned for each mission phase. Most importantly, they must demonstrate a clear advantage over other non-nuclear options (e.g., solar power, fuel cells) for their particular function. This paper describes a strategy that does this in the form of three sequential system developments. It begins with use of radioisotope generators currently under development, and applies the power conversion technology developed for these units to the design of a simple, robust reactor power system. The products from these development efforts would eventually serve as the foundation for application of nuclear power systems for exploration of Mars and beyond.

Schmidt, George R.; Houts, Michael G. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

2006-01-20

241

Enantioselective Alkenylation of Aldehydes with Boronic Acids via the Synergistic Combination of Copper(II) and Amine Catalysis  

E-print Network

for reactions with -nucleophiles,3,4,10 could undergo productive and enantioselective coupling with nucleophilicEnantioselective Alkenylation of Aldehydes with Boronic Acids via the Synergistic Combination: The enantioselective -alkenylation of aldehydes has been accomplished using boronic acids via the synergistic

MacMillan, David W. C.

242

Reliability of Radioisotope Stirling Convertor Linear Alternator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Onboard radioisotope power systems being developed and planned for NASA s deep-space missions would require reliable design lifetimes of up to 14 years. Critical components and materials of Stirling convertors have been undergoing extensive testing and evaluation in support of a reliable performance for the specified life span. Of significant importance to the successful development of the Stirling convertor is the design of a lightweight and highly efficient linear alternator. Alternator performance could vary due to small deviations in the permanent magnet properties, operating temperature, and component geometries. Durability prediction and reliability of the alternator may be affected by these deviations from nominal design conditions. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the effect of these uncertainties in predicting the reliability of the linear alternator performance. This paper presents a study in which a reliability-based methodology is used to assess alternator performance. The response surface characterizing the induced open-circuit voltage performance is constructed using 3-D finite element magnetic analysis. Fast probability integration method is used to determine the probability of the desired performance and its sensitivity to the alternator design parameters.

Shah, Ashwin; Korovaichuk, Igor; Geng, Steven M.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

2006-01-01

243

Implanted artificial heart with radioisotope power source.  

PubMed

An atomic artificial heart for orthotopic implantation was developed with the following characteristics: volume, 1.2 L; weight, 1.5 kg; radioisotope power, 45 W; operating life, up to 5 years; hemodynamics, similar to natural hemodynamics. The artificial heart includes a thermal drive with systems for regulating power, feeding steam into the cylinders, return of the condensate to the steam generator, and delivery of power to the ventricles and heat container. The artificial heart is placed in an artificial pericardium partially filled with physiologic solution. It uses a steam engine with two operating cylinders that separately drive the left and right ventricles. There is no electronic control system in the proposed design. The operation of the heat engine is controlled, with preservation of autoregulation by the vascular system of the body. The separate drives for the ventricles is of primary importance as it provides for operation of the artificial heart through control of cardiac activity by venous return. Experimental testing on a hydromechanical bench demonstrated effective autoregulation. PMID:6838394

Shumakov, V I; Griaznov, G M; Zhemchuzhnikov, G N; Kiselev, I M; Osipov, A P

1983-02-01

244

Light-weight radioisotope heater impact tests  

SciTech Connect

The light-weight radioisotope heater unit (LWRHU) is a {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}-fueled heat source designed to provide one thermal watt in each of various locations on a spacecraft. Los Alamos National Laboratory designed, fabricated, and safety tested the LWRHU. The heat source consists of a hot-pressed {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet, a Pt-30Rh vented capsule, a pyrolytic graphite insulator, and a fineweave-pierced fabric graphite aeroshell assembly. To compare the performance of the LWRHUs fabricated for the Cassini mission with the performance of those fabricated for the Galileo mission, and to determine a failure threshold, two types of impact tests were conducted. A post-reentry impact test was performed on one of 180 flight-quality units produced for the Cassini mission and a series of sequential impact tests using simulant-fueled LWRHU capsules were conducted respectively. The results showed that deformation and fuel containment of the impacted Cassini LWRHU was similar to that of a previously tested Galileo LWRHU. Both units sustained minimal deformation of the aeroshell and fueled capsule; the fuel was entirely contained by the platinum capsule. Sequential impacting, in both end-on and side-on orientations, resulted in increased damage with each subsequent impact. Sequential impacting of the LWRHU appears to result in slightly greater damage than a single impact at the final impact velocity of 50 m/s.

Reimus, M.A.H.; Rinehart, G.H.; Herrera, A. [and others

1998-12-31

245

Radioisotopic pulmonary lobectomy: feasibility study in dogs.  

PubMed

In search for an alternate treatment for inoperable cancer of the lung in humans, we investigated the possibility that introduction of radioactive material into a selected lobe of the canine lung would effectively destroy that lobe without systemic effects or radiation injury to adjacent organs. Ten million ion exchange microspheres labeled with 740 MBq of phosphorus-32 (32P) were injected through a catheter placed in a selected lobar branch of a pulmonary artery in 12 anesthetized dogs. Six additional dogs served as controls and received 10 million microspheres not labeled with 32P. Organs were harvested from 1 wk to 12 mo after injection and examined grossly and histologically. There was progressive organization and contraction of each necrosed 32P treated lobe which was reduced to a scarred remnant by 12 mo, whereas only minimal inflammatory changes occurred in controls. Of the 32P injected dose, 94% remained in injected lobe, 4%-5% in nontargeted lobes and less than 0.08% in blood. Radioactivity in liver, kidneys, spleen, heart, and bone marrow was less than 0.1% for each organ. Thus, large doses of radiation in the order of 1,500 Gy can be effectively delivered to a selected lobe to produce a "radioisotopic pulmonary lobectomy." PMID:2341894

Llaurado, J G; Brewer, L A; Elam, D A; Ing, S J; Raiszadeh, M; Slater, J M; Hirst, A E; Zielinski, F W

1990-05-01

246

Methods for boron delivery to mammalian tissue  

DOEpatents

Boron neutron capture therapy can be used to destroy tumors. This treatment modality is enhanced by delivering compounds to the tumor site where the compounds have high concentrations of boron, the boron compounds being encapsulated in the bilayer of a liposome or in the bilayer as well as the internal space of the liposomes. Preferred compounds, include carborane units with multiple boron atoms within the carborane cage structure. Liposomes with increased tumor specificity may also be used.

Hawthorne, M. Frederick (Encino, CA); Feaks, Debra A. (Los Angeles, CA); Shelly, Kenneth J. (Los Angeles, CA)

2003-01-01

247

Size dependent chemistry of boron and carbon cluster ions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reactions of boron cluster ions (B[sub n] [sup +], n = 1-14) with water are studied for collision energies from 0.1 to 10.0 eV. For clusters smaller than B[sub 7][sup +], there are a multitude of product channels. For larger clusters, the product distributions are dominated by a single channel: B[sub n-1]D[sup +] + DBO. Under multiple collision conditions, the

Hintz

1992-01-01

248

NEW ADVANCES IN BORON SOIL CHEMISTRY  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Boron is an essential micronutrient element required for plant growth. Boron deficiency is wide-spread in crop plants throughout the world especially in coarse-textured soils in humid areas. Boron toxicity can also occur, especially in arid regions under irrigation. Plants respond directly to the...

249

Mineral resource of the month: boron  

USGS Publications Warehouse

What does boron have to do with baseball, apple pie, motherhood and Chevrolet? Boron minerals and chemicals are used in the tanning of leather baseballs and gloves; in micro-fertilizer to grow apples and in the glass and enamels of bakewares to cook apple pie; in boron detergents for soaking baby clothes and diapers; and in fiberglass parts for the Chevrolet Corvette.

Lyday, Phyllis A.

2005-01-01

250

Boron carbide devices for neutron detection applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

The development of boron rich solid state neutron detectors has become a reality as a result of the development of a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method that results in the growth of semiconducting boron carbide films. Electrical and structural properties of semiconducting boron carbide films grown by this method have been characterized using x-ray, Raman and Resistivity. X-ray and

Ellen E. Day

2006-01-01

251

Graphene on hexagonal boron nitride  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The field of graphene research has developed rapidly since its first isolation by mechanical exfoliation in 2004. Due to the relativistic Dirac nature of its charge carriers, graphene is both a promising material for next-generation electronic devices and a convenient low-energy testbed for intrinsically high-energy physical phenomena. Both of these research branches require the facile fabrication of clean graphene devices so as not to obscure its intrinsic physical properties. Hexagonal boron nitride has emerged as a promising substrate for graphene devices as it is insulating, atomically flat and provides a clean charge environment for the graphene. Additionally, the interaction between graphene and boron nitride provides a path for the study of new physical phenomena not present in bare graphene devices. This review focuses on recent advancements in the study of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride devices from the perspective of scanning tunneling microscopy with highlights of some important results from electrical transport measurements.

Yankowitz, Matthew; Xue, Jiamin; LeRoy, B. J.

2014-07-01

252

First-Principles Investigation on Boron Nanostructures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

First-principles calculations based on density functional theory are employed to study and predict the properties of boron and Mg boride nanostructures. For boron nanostructures, two-dimensional boron sheets are found to be metallic and made of mixtures of triangles and hexagons which benefit from the balance of two-center bonding and three-center bonding. This unusual bonding in boron sheets results in a self-doping picture where adding atoms to the hexagon centers does not change the number of bonding states but merely increases the electron count. Boron sheets can be either flat or buckled depending on the ratio between hexagons and triangles. Formed by stacking two identical boron sheets, double-layered boron sheets can form interlayer bonds, and the most stable one is semiconducting. Built from single-layered boron sheets, single-walled boron nanotubes have smaller curvature energies than carbon nanotubes and undergo a metal-to-semiconductor transition once the diameter is smaller than 20 A. Optimal double-walled boron nanotubes with inter-walled bonds formed are metallic and always more stable than single-walled ones. For Mg boride nanostructures, certain Mg boride sheets prefer to curve themselves into nanotubes, which is explained via Mg-Mg interactions governed by the charge state of Mg. In addition, optimal Mg boride sheet structures are explored with a genetic algorithm. Phase diagrams for Mg boride sheet structures are constructed and stable phases under boron-rich environments are identified. Curvature effects on the phase diagram of Mg boride nanotubes are also discussed. As a natural extension to boron sheets, layered boron crystals based on boron sheets are then presented and are shown to be stable under high pressure. Finally, this thesis ends with an investigation of hydrogen-storage properties of pristine and metal doped boron nanostructures.

Tang, Hui

2011-12-01

253

Boron recovery, application and economic significance: A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boron compounds are widely used raw materials in various industries. However, high boron concentration in aqueous systems may be harmful to both humans and plants. Many treatment technologies have shown wide limitations in the removal of boron from wastewater and boronic wastes due to the complex boron chemistry. Boron exists as boric acid at pH9.2. Recovery of boron is one

Ezerie Henry Ezechi; Mohamed Hasnain Isa; Shamsul Rahman Kutty; Nasiman B. Sapari

2011-01-01

254

Evaluation of medical isotope production with the accelerator production of tritium (APT) facility  

SciTech Connect

The accelerator production of tritium (APT) facility, with its high beam current and high beam energy, would be an ideal supplier of radioisotopes for medical research, imaging, and therapy. By-product radioisotopes will be produced in the APT window and target cooling systems and in the tungsten target through spallation, neutron, and proton interactions. High intensity proton fluxes are potentially available at three different energies for the production of proton- rich radioisotopes. Isotope production targets can be inserted into the blanket for production of neutron-rich isotopes. Currently, the major production sources of radioisotopes are either aging or abroad, or both. The use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine is growing and changing, both in terms of the number of nuclear medicine procedures being performed and in the rapidly expanding range of procedures and radioisotopes used. A large and varied demand is forecast, and the APT would be an ideal facility to satisfy that demand.

Benjamin, R.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Frey, G.D.; McLean, D.C., Jr; Spicer, K.M.; Davis, S.E.; Baron, S.; Frysinger, J.R. [Medical Univ. of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Blanpied, G.; Adcock, D. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States)

1997-07-10

255

[Effect of NPK and B supply levels on boron uptake and biological properties of different genotypic oilseed rape].  

PubMed

Pot experiment was conducted to study the boron absorption by oilseed rape(Brassica napus), the mechanism of its resistance to boron deficiency, and the effect of boron deficiency on its biological properties under different NPK supply levels. The results indicated that under boron deficiency, increasing NPK supply aggravated boron deficiency symptoms, which led to the decrease of leaf area and its growth rate and nitrate reductase activity(NRA) and the increase of chlorophyll(a + b) content at seedling stage, and the decrease of the number of productive branches and pods of each plant and seed yield at maturity. It was suggested that the ratio of boron concentration in youngest open leaves(YOL) to youngest mature leaves(YML) at seedling stage could be an index to judge the boron mobility in plants of different genotypic oilseed rape. Boron mobility and its utilization efficiency were one of the important nutritional mechanisms responsible for the difference in response of different genotypic oilseed rapes to boron deficiency. PMID:11757364

Lou, Y; Yang, Y

2001-04-01

256

Boron-Rich Semiconducting Boron Carbide Neutron Detector  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data on the neutron detection capabilities of a variety of boron carbide\\/Si heterojunction diodes is presented. The pulse height spectra are compared with previously measured conversion layer devices and the variations in shape and position of the peaks are discussed.

Andrew D. Harken; Ellen E. Day; Brian W. Robertson; Shireen Adenwalla

2005-01-01

257

Boron-enhanced diffusion of boron from ultralow-energy boron implantation  

SciTech Connect

The authors have investigated the diffusion enhancement mechanism of BED (boron enhanced diffusion), wherein the boron diffusivity is enhanced three to four times over the equilibrium diffusivity at 1,050 C in the proximity of a silicon layer containing a high boron concentration. It is shown that BED is associated with the formation of a fine-grain polycrystalline silicon boride phase within an initially amorphous Si layer having a high B concentration. For 0.5 keV B{sup +}, the threshold implantation dose which leads to BED lies between 3 {times} 10{sup 14} and of 1 {times} 10{sup 15}/cm{sup {minus}2}. Formation of the shallowest possible junctions by 0.5 keV B{sup +} requires that the implant dose be kept lower than this threshold.

Agarwal, A.; Eaglesham, D.J.; Gossmann, H.J.; Pelaz, L.; Herner, S.B.; Jacobson, D.C. [Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, NJ (United States). Bell Labs.; Haynes, T.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Solid State Div.; Erokhin, Y.E. [Eaton Corp., Beverly, MA (United States)

1998-05-03

258

NASA Radioisotope Power System Program - Technology and Flight Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA sometimes conducts robotic science missions to solar system destinations for which the most appropriate power source is derived from thermal-to-electrical energy conversion of nuclear decay of radioactive isotopes. Typically the use of a radioisotope power system (RPS) has been limited to medium and large-scale missions, with 26 U,S, missions having used radioisotope power since 1961. A research portfolio of ten selected technologies selected in 2003 has progressed to a point of maturity, such that one particular technology may he considered for future mission use: the Advanced Stirling Converter. The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator is a new power system in development based on this Stirling cycle dynamic power conversion technology. This system may be made available for smaller, Discovery-class NASA science missions. To assess possible uses of this new capability, NASA solicited and funded nine study teams to investigate unique opportunities for exploration of potential destinations for small Discovery-class missions. The influence of the results of these studies and the ongoing development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator system are discussed in the context of an integrated Radioisotope Power System program. Discussion of other and future technology investments and program opportunities are provided.

Sutliff, Thomas J.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

2009-01-01

259

NASA's Advanced Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology Development Status  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (ARPS) project is developing the next generation of radioisotope power conversion technologies that will enable future missions that have requirements that cannot be met by either photovoltaic systems or by current radioisotope power systems (RPSs). Requirements of advanced RPSs include high efficiency and high specific power (watts/kilogram) in order to meet future mission requirements with less radioisotope fuel and lower mass so that these systems can meet requirements for a variety of future space applications, including continual operation surface missions, outer-planetary missions, and solar probe. These advances would enable a factor of 2 to 4 decrease in the amount of fuel required to generate electrical power. Advanced RPS development goals also include long-life, reliability, and scalability. This paper provides an update on the contractual efforts under the Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology (RPCT) NASA Research Announcement (NRA) for research and development of Stirling, thermoelectric, and thermophotovoltaic power conversion technologies. The paper summarizes the current RPCT NRA efforts with a brief description of the effort, a status and/or summary of the contractor's key accomplishments, a discussion of upcoming plans, and a discussion of relevant system-level benefits and implications. The paper also provides a general discussion of the benefits from the development of these advanced power conversion technologies and the eventual payoffs to future missions (discussing system benefits due to overall improvements in efficiency, specific power, etc.).

Anderson, David J.; Sankovic, John; Wilt, David; Abelson, Robert D.; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre

2007-01-01

260

Comparison of Barium and Amorphous Boron Pyrotechnics for Green Light Emission  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comparison of green light emission from both barium- and amorphous boronbased pyrotechnics is described. Emission spectra are shown for both the U.S. Army in-service M125A1 green star cluster formulation and an amorphous boronpotassium nitratebinder formulation. The main peaks of the emission spectra, average dominant wavelength, and average spectral purity of both formulations are given. The role that combustion products

Jay C. Poret; Jesse J. Sabatini

2013-01-01

261

Advanced crystal growth techniques with III-V boron compound semiconductors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Semiconducting icosahedral boron arsenide, B12As2, is an excellent candidate for neutron detectors and radioisotope batteries, for which high quality single crystals are required. Thus, the present study was undertaken to grow B12As2 crystals by precipitation from metal solutions (nickel) saturated with elemental boron and arsenic in a sealed quartz ampoule. B12As2 crystals of 8--10 mm were produced when a homogeneous mixture of the three elements was held at 1150 C for 48--72 hours and slowly cooled (3C/hr). The crystals varied in color and transparency from black and opaque to clear and transparent. X-ray topography (XRT), Raman spectroscopy, and defect selective etching confirmed that the crystals had the expected rhombohedral structure and a low density of defects (5x107 cm-2). The concentrations of residual impurities (nickel, carbon, etc) were found to be relatively high (1019 cm-3 for carbon) as measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and elemental analysis by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The boron arsenide crystals were found to have favorable electrical properties (? = 24.5 cm2 / Vs), but no interaction between a prototype detector and an alpha particle bombardment was observed. Thus, the flux growth method is viable for growing large B12As2 crystals, but the impurity concentrations remain a problem.

Whiteley, Clinton E.

2011-12-01

262

Measured microdosimetric spectra and therapeutic potential of boron neutron capture enhancement of 252Cf brachytherapy.  

PubMed

Californium-252 is a neutron-emitting radioisotope used as a brachytherapy source for radioresistant tumors. Presented here are microdosimetric spectra measured as a function of simulated site diameter and distance from applicator tube 252Cf sources. These spectra were measured using miniature tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs). An investigation of the clinical potential of boron neutron capture (BNC) enhancement of 252Cf brachytherapy is also provided. The absorbed dose from the BNC reaction was measured using a boron-loaded miniature TEPC. Measured neutron, photon and BNC absorbed dose components are provided as a function of distance from the source. In general, the absorbed dose results show good agreement with results from other measurement techniques. A concomitant boost to 252Cf brachytherapy may be provided through the use of the BNC reaction. The potential magnitude of this BNC enhancement increases with increasing distance from the source and is capable of providing a therapeutic gain greater than 30% at a distance of 5 cm from the source, assuming currently achievable boron concentrations. PMID:16137204

Burmeister, J; Kota, C; Maughan, R L

2005-09-01

263

Method of separating boron isotopes  

DOEpatents

A method of boron isotope enrichment involving the isotope preferential photolysis of (2-chloroethenyl)-dichloroborane as the feed material. The photolysis can readily by achieved with CO/sub 2/ laser radiation and using fluences significantly below those required to dissociate BCl/sub 3/.

Jensen, R.J.; Thorne, J.M.; Cluff, C.L.

1981-01-23

264

Method of separating boron isotopes  

DOEpatents

A method of boron isotope enrichment involving the isotope preferential photolysis of (2-chloroethenyl)dichloroborane as the feed material. The photolysis can readily be achieved with CO.sub.2 laser radiation and using fluences significantly below those required to dissociate BCl.sub.3.

Jensen, Reed J. (Los Alamos, NM); Thorne, James M. (Provo, UT); Cluff, Coran L. (Provo, UT); Hayes, John K. (Salt Lake City, UT)

1984-01-01

265

Structure of boron nitride nanotubes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The crystallographic structure of boron nitride nanotubes has been investigated. Various defects that may arise during nanotube synthesis are revealed by electron microscopy. Nanotubes with different numbers of walls and different diameters are modeled by molecular dynamics methods. Structural features of single-wall nanotubes are demonstrated. The causes of certain defects in multiwall nanotubes are indicated.

Buranova, Yu. S.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Blank, V. D.

2015-01-01

266

A facility to remotely assemble radioisotope thermoelectric generators  

SciTech Connect

Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) are electrical power sources that use heat from decaying radioisotopes to directly generate electrical power. The RTG assembly process is performed in an inert atmosphere inside a large glovebox, which is surrounded by radiation shielding to reduce exposure to neutron and gamma radiation from the radioisotope heat source. In the past, allowable dose rate limits have allowed direct, manual assembly methods; however, current dose rate limits require a thicker radiation shielding that makes direct, manual assembly infeasible. To minimize RTG assembly process modifications, telerobotic systems are being investigated to perform remote assembly tasks. Telerobotic systems duplicate human arm motion and incorporate force feedback sensitivity to handle objects and tools in a human-like manner. A telerobotic system with two arms and a three-dimensional (3-D) vision system can be used to perform remote RTG assembly tasks inside gloveboxes and cells using unmodified, normal hand tools.

Engstrom, J.W.; Goldmann, L.H.; Truitt, R.W.

1992-07-01

267

A facility to remotely assemble radioisotope thermoelectric generators  

SciTech Connect

Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) are electrical power sources that use heat from decaying radioisotopes to directly generate electrical power. The RTG assembly process is performed in an inert atmosphere inside a large glovebox, which is surrounded by radiation shielding to reduce exposure to neutron and gamma radiation from the radioisotope heat source. In the past, allowable dose rate limits have allowed direct, manual assembly methods; however, current dose rate limits require a thicker radiation shielding that makes direct, manual assembly infeasible. To minimize RTG assembly process modifications, telerobotic systems are being investigated to perform remote assembly tasks. Telerobotic systems duplicate human arm motion and incorporate force feedback sensitivity to handle objects and tools in a human-like manner. A telerobotic system with two arms and a three-dimensional (3-D) vision system can be used to perform remote RTG assembly tasks inside gloveboxes and cells using unmodified, normal hand tools.

Engstrom, J.W.; Goldmann, L.H.; Truitt, R.W. (Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, Mail Stop N1-42, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States))

1993-01-15

268

Hair radioactivity as a measure of exposure to radioisotopes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since many radioisotopes accumulate in hair, this tropism was investigated by comparing the radioactivity of shaved with plucked hair collected from rats at various time intervals up to 24 hrs after intravenous injection of the ecologically important radioisotopes, iodine-131, manganese-54, strontium-85, and zinc-65. The plucked hair includes the hair follicles where biochemical transformations are taking place. The data indicate a slight surge of each radioisotpe into the hair immediately after injection, a variation of content of each radionuclide in the hair, and a greater accumulation of radioactivity in plucked than in shaved hair. These results have application not only to hair as a measure of exposure to radioisotopes, but also to tissue damage and repair at the hair follicle.

Strain, W. H.; Pories, W. J.; Fratianne, R. B.; Flynn, A.

1972-01-01

269

LNS CATANIA PROJECT FOR THERAPY AND RADIOISOTOPE PRODUCTION  

Microsoft Academic Search

A superconducting cyclotron ables to delivering protons and light ions has been designed. It is a four sector compact superconducting cyclotron able to accelerate light ions with charge\\/mass ratio 0.5. Particles like H2 + can be accelerated and extracted by stripping, while other light ions like 12C6+ will be extracted by electrostatic deflectors. The magnetic circuit, the isochronous field, the

L. Calabretta; G. Cuttone; D. Rifuggiato

270

High Efficiency Thermoelectric Radioisotope Power Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The work performed and whose results presented in this report is a joint effort between the University of New Mexico s Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies (ISNPS) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology. In addition to the development, design, and fabrication of skutterudites and skutterudites-based segmented unicouples this effort included conducting performance tests of these unicouples for hundreds of hours to verify theoretical predictions of the conversion efficiency. The performance predictions of these unicouples are obtained using 1-D and 3-D models developed for that purpose and for estimating the actual performance and side heat losses in the tests conducted at ISNPS. In addition to the performance tests, the development of the 1-D and 3-D models and the development of Advanced Radioisotope Power systems for Beginning-Of-Life (BOM) power of 108 We are carried out at ISNPS. The materials synthesis and fabrication of the unicouples are carried out at JPL. The research conducted at ISNPS is documented in chapters 2-5 and that conducted at JP, in documented in chapter 5. An important consideration in the design and optimization of segmented thermoelectric unicouples (STUs) is determining the relative lengths, cross-section areas, and the interfacial temperatures of the segments of the different materials in the n- and p-legs. These variables are determined using a genetic algorithm (GA) in conjunction with one-dimensional analytical model of STUs that is developed in chapter 2. Results indicated that when optimized for maximum conversion efficiency, the interfacial temperatures between various segments in a STU are close to those at the intersections of the Figure-Of-Merit (FOM), ZT, curves of the thermoelectric materials of the adjacent segments. When optimizing the STUs for maximum electrical power density, however, the interfacial temperatures are different from those at the intersections of the ZT curves, but close to those at the intersections the characteristic power, CP, curves of the thermoelectric materials of the adjacent segments (CP = T(sup 2)Zk and has a unit of W/m). Results also showed that the number of the segments in the n- and p-legs of the STUs optimized for maximum power density are generally fewer than when the same unicouples are optimized for maximum efficiency. These results are obtained using the 1-D optimization model of STUs that is detailed in chapter 2. A three-dimensional model of STUs is developed and incorporated into the ANSYS commercial software (chapter 3). The governing equations are solved, subject to the prescribed

El-Genk, Mohamed; Saber, Hamed; Caillat, Thierry

2004-01-01

271

Determination of dispersion coefficients using radioisotope data in river environment.  

PubMed

A field tracer experiment using radioisotope (82)Br was performed to estimate the dispersion characteristics of pollutants in river environment. The dispersion coefficients in the longitudinal and transverse directions were determined by using the measured concentration of a radioisotope. Numerical models were applied to calculate the flow and concentration fields at the experimental site. Several numerical simulations were performed to investigate the effects of the numerical results according to variations of the dispersion coefficients. The calculated results for several runs were compared with the measured ones by using statistical methods. The calculated concentrations agreed well with the measured ones. PMID:19303788

Suh, K S; Kim, K C; Jung, S H; Lee, J Y

2009-01-01

272

Radioisotopic battery for long-life, buried autonomous power  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Indirect conversion radioisotopic batteries (ICRBs) are investigated for use as long-life power source for autonomous buried applications. As part of this work the optimum configuration of this class of battery has been experimentally investigated. An ICRB was buried at a depth of 90cm for two months during which time its voltage was monitored, with these results presented. The ICRB successfully demonstrated the buried operation of this class of battery and suggested that the power of the device halves at twice the half-life of the radioisotope used.

Walton, R.; Anthony, C.; Chapman, D.; Metje, N.; Ward, M.

2013-12-01

273

Small Radioisotope Power System at NASA Glenn Research Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In April 2009, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) formed an integrated product team (IPT) to develop a Small Radioisotope Power System (SRPS) utilizing a single Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) with passive balancer for possible use by the International Lunar Network (ILN) program. The ILN program is studying the feasibility of implementing a multiple node seismometer network to investigate the internal lunar structure. A single ASC produces approximately 80 W(sub e) and could potentially supply sufficient power for that application. The IPT consists of Sunpower, Inc., to provide the single ASC with balancer, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) to design an engineering model Single Convertor Controller (SCC) for an ASC with balancer, and NASA GRC to provide technical support to these tasks and to develop a simulated lunar lander test stand. A controller maintains stable operation of an ASC. It regulates the alternating current produced by the linear alternator of the convertor, provides a specified output voltage, and maintains operation at a steady piston amplitude and hot end temperature. JHU/APL also designed an ASC dynamic engine/alternator simulator to aid in the testing and troubleshooting of the SCC. This paper describes the requirements, design, and development of the SCC, including some of the key challenges and the solutions chosen to overcome those issues. In addition, it describes the plans to analyze the effectiveness of a passive balancer to minimize vibration from the ASC, characterize the effect of ASC vibration on a lunar lander, characterize the performance of the SCC, and integrate the single ASC, SCC, and lunar lander test stand to characterize performance of the overall system.

Dugala, Gina M.; Fraeman, Martin; Frankford, David P.; Duven, Dennis; Shamkovich, Andrei; Ambrose, Hollis; Meer, David W.

2012-01-01

274

Concept for a radioisotope powered dual mode lunar rover  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Over three decades ago, the Apollo missions manifestly demonstrated the value of a lunar rover to expand the exploration activities of lunar astronauts. The stated plan of the new Vision for Space Exploration to establish a permanent presence on the moon in the next decades gives new impetus to providing long range roving and exploration capability in support of the siting, construction, and maintenance of future human bases. The incorporation of radioisotope power systems and telerobotic capability in the design has the potential to significantly expand the capability of such a rover, allowing continuous operation during the full lunar day/night cycle, as well as enabling exploration in permanently shadowed regions that may be of interest to humans for the resources they may hold. This paper describes a concept that builds on earlier studies originated in the Apollo program for a Dual Mode (crewed and telerobotic) Lunar Roving Vehicle (DMLRV). The goal of this vehicle would be to provide a multipurpose infrastructure element and remote science platform for the exploration of the moon. The DMLRV would be essential for extending the productivity of human exploration crews, and would provide a unique capability for diverse long-range, long-duration science exploration between human visits. With minimal reconfiguration this vehicle could also provide the basic platform to support a range of site survey and preparation activities in anticipation of the establishment of a permanent human presence on the moon. A conceptual design is presented for the DMLRV, including discussion of mission architecture, vehicle performance, representative science payload accommodation, and equipment and crew radiation considerations.

Elliott, John O.; Schriener, Timothy M.; Coste, Keith

2006-01-01

275

Small Radioisotope Power System Testing at NASA Glenn Research Center  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In April 2009, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) formed an integrated product team (IPT) to develop a Small Radioisotope Power System (SRPS) utilizing a single Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) with passive balancer. A single ASC produces approximately 80 We making this system advantageous for small distributed lunar science stations. The IPT consists of Sunpower, Inc., to provide the single ASC with a passive balancer, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHUAPL) to design an engineering model Single Convertor Controller (SCC) for an ASC with a passive balancer, and NASA GRC to provide technical support to these tasks and to develop a simulated lunar lander test stand. The single ASC with a passive balancer, simulated lunar lander test stand, and SCC were delivered to GRC and were tested as a system. The testing sequence at GRC included SCC fault tolerance, integration, electromagnetic interference (EMI), vibration, and extended operation testing. The SCC fault tolerance test characterized the SCCs ability to handle various fault conditions, including high or low bus power consumption, total open load or short circuit, and replacing a failed SCC card while the backup maintains control of the ASC. The integrated test characterized the behavior of the system across a range of operating conditions, including variations in cold-end temperature and piston amplitude, including the emitted vibration to both the sensors on the lunar lander and the lunar surface. The EMI test characterized the AC and DC magnetic and electric fields emitted by the SCC and single ASC. The vibration test confirms the SCCs ability to control the single ASC during launch. The extended operation test allows data to be collected over a period of thousands of hours to obtain long term performance data of the ASC with a passive balancer and the SCC. This paper will discuss the results of each of these tests.

Dugala, Gina; Bell, Mark; Oriti, Salvatore; Fraeman, Martin; Frankford, David; Duven, Dennis

2013-01-01

276

First-principles studies of boron nanostructures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Boron is an 'electron deficient' element which has a rather fascinating chemical versatility. In the solid state, the elemental boron has neither a pure covalent nor a pure metallic character. As a result, its vast structural dimensionality and peculiar bonding features hold a unique place among other elements in the periodic table. In order to understand and properly describe these unusual bonding features, a detailed and systematic theoretical study is needed. In this work, I will show that some of the qualitative features of boron nanostructures, including clusters, sheets and nanotubes can easily be extracted from the results of first principles calculations based on density functional theory. Specifically, the size-dependent evolution of topological structures and bonding characteristics of boron clusters, Bn will be discussed. Based on the scenario observed in the boron clusters, the unique properties of boron sheets and boron nanotubes will be described. Moreover, the ballistic electron transport in single-walled boron nanotube relative to that of single-walled carbon nanotubes will be considered. It is expected that the theoretical results obtained in the present thesis will initiate further studies on boron nanostructures, which will be helpful in understanding, designing and realizing boron-based nanoscale devices.

Lau, Kah Chun

277

Boron analysis and boron imaging in biological materials for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is based on the ability of the stable isotope 10B to capture neutrons, which leads to a nuclear reaction producing an alpha- and a 7Li-particle, both having a high biological effectiveness and a very short range in tissue, being limited to approximately one cell diameter. This opens the possibility for a highly selective cancer therapy.

Andrea Wittig; Jean Michel; Raymond L. Moss; Finn Stecher-Rasmussen; Heinrich F. Arlinghaus; Peter Bendel; Pier Luigi Mauri; Saverio Altieri; Ralf Hilger; Piero A. Salvadori; Luca Menichetti; Robert Zamenhof; Wolfgang A. G. Sauerwein

2008-01-01

278

Promising applications of neodymium boron Iron magnets in electrical machines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neodymium Boron IronNdBFemagnets have high energy product with suitable magnetic and physical properties for applications in electrical machines. The design aspects of permanent magnet machines using NdBFe magnets are presented. The ranges of applica? tions cover both generators and motors up to 200 kW ratings. The exciting combination with micro? computers and power electronics makes the permanent magnet motors truly

M. A. Rahman; Gordon R. Slemon

1985-01-01

279

Radiobiological evaluation of new boron delivery agents for boron neutron capture therapy  

E-print Network

This thesis evaluates the radiobiological effectiveness of three new boron compounds namely a boronated porphyrin (BOPP) and two liposome formulations for neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The methodology utilizes in vitro ...

Chung, Yoonsun

2008-01-01

280

Molecular basis of adaptation to high soil boron in wheat landraces and elite cultivars.  

PubMed

Environmental constraints severely restrict crop yields in most production environments, and expanding the use of variation will underpin future progress in breeding. In semi-arid environments boron toxicity constrains productivity, and genetic improvement is the only effective strategy for addressing the problem. Wheat breeders have sought and used available genetic diversity from landraces to maintain yield in these environments; however, the identity of the genes at the major tolerance loci was unknown. Here we describe the identification of near-identical, root-specific boron transporter genes underlying the two major-effect quantitative trait loci for boron tolerance in wheat, Bo1 and Bo4 (ref. 2). We show that tolerance to a high concentration of boron is associated with multiple genomic changes including tetraploid introgression, dispersed gene duplication, and variation in gene structure and transcript level. An allelic series was identified from a panel of bread and durum wheat cultivars and landraces originating from diverse agronomic zones. Our results demonstrate that, during selection, breeders have matched functionally different boron tolerance alleles to specific environments. The characterization of boron tolerance in wheat illustrates the power of the new wheat genomic resources to define key adaptive processes that have underpinned crop improvement. PMID:25043042

Pallotta, Margaret; Schnurbusch, Thorsten; Hayes, Julie; Hay, Alison; Baumann, Ute; Paull, Jeff; Langridge, Peter; Sutton, Tim

2014-10-01

281

Study of boron behaviour in two Spanish coal combustion power plants.  

PubMed

A full-scale field study was carried out at two Spanish coal-fired power plants equipped with electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurisation (FGD) systems to investigate the distribution of boron in coals, solid by-products, wastewater streams and flue gases. The results were obtained from the simultaneous sampling of solid, liquid and gaseous streams and their subsequent analysis in two different laboratories for purposes of comparison. Although the final aim of this study was to evaluate the partitioning of boron in a (co-)combustion power plant, special attention was paid to the analytical procedure for boron determination. A sample preparation procedure was optimised for coal and combustion by-products to overcome some specific shortcomings of the currently used acid digestion methods. In addition boron mass balances and removal efficiencies in ESP and FGD devices were calculated. Mass balance closures between 83 and 149% were obtained. During coal combustion, 95% of the incoming boron was collected in the fly ashes. The use of petroleum coke as co-combustible produced a decrease in the removal efficiency of the ESP (87%). Nevertheless, more than 90% of the remaining gaseous boron was eliminated via the FGD in the wastewater discharged from the scrubber, thereby causing environmental problems. PMID:21664037

Ochoa-Gonzlez, Raquel; Cuesta, Aida Fuente; Crdoba, Patricia; Daz-Somoano, Mercedes; Font, Oriol; Lpez-Antn, M Antonia; Querol, Xavier; Martnez-Tarazona, M Rosa; Gimnez, Antonio

2011-10-01

282

Boron Nitride Nanotube Films Grown From Boron Ink Painting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The growth of nanotube films on various substrates and surfaces is vital for\\u000aapplications in nanoscale functional devices. We report a simple and versatile\\u000aboron (B) ink painting method that enables high-density boron nitride nanotube\\u000a(BNNT) films with any desired pattern to be grown on, and firmly attached to,\\u000adifferent surfaces. In the method, special B ink is first painted,

Lu Hua Li; Ying Chen; Alexey M. Glushenkov

2010-01-01

283

Explorations of mechanisms regulating ectomycorrhizal colonization of boron-fertilized pine: Quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1987  

SciTech Connect

The studies explore two related hypotheses. The potential of boron and indole acetic acid to act synergistically to promote the flow of sucrose from the foliage to the roots is being assessed. Further the ability of boron fertilization to disrupt the production of phenols by the host is determined. Since phenols inhibit mycorrhizal colonization, it is reasoned that inhibition of phenol production should facilitate plant growth. (DT)

Garrett, H.E.; Reid, R.K.; Sword, M.A.

1987-01-01

284

Radioisotopic express analysis of ash components in coal  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method of radioisotopic analysis of coal ash, permitting measurement with high accuracy (accuracy at the level of chemical analysis), has been developed. The method is based on simultaneous registration of the back scattered and penetrating gamma irradiation from the investigated medium.

Bochenin

1983-01-01

285

Initial boronization of PBX-M using ablation of solid boronized probes  

SciTech Connect

The initial boronization of PBX-M was performed using the sequential ablation of two types of solid target probes. Probe-1 in a mushroom shape consisted of a 10.7% boronized 2-D C-C composite containing 3.6 g of boron in a B{sub 4}C binder. Probe-2 in a rectangular shape consisted of an 86% boronized graphite felt composite containing 19.5 g of 40 {mu} boron particles. After boronization with Probe-1, the loop voltage during 1 MW neutral beam heated plasmas decreased 27% and volt-sec consumption decreased 20%. Strong peripheral spectral lines from low-Z elements decreased by factors of about 5. The central oxygen density decreased 15--20%. The total radiated power during neutral beam injection decreased by 43%. Probe-2 boronization exhibited improved operating conditions similar to Probe-1, but for some parameters, a smaller percentage change occurred due to the residual boron from the previous boronization using Probe-1. The ablation rates of both probes were consistent with front face temperatures at or slightly above the boron melting point. These results confirm the effectiveness of the solid target boronization (STB) technique as a real-time impurity control method for replenishing boron depositions without the use of hazardous borane compounds.

Kugel, H.W.; Hirooka, Y.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Khandagle, M. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Inst. of Plasma and Fusion Research; Timberlake, J.; Bell, R.; England, A.; Isler, R.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Takahashi, H.; Tighe, W.; von Goeler, S.; Post-Zwicker, A.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Jones, S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1993-05-01

286

Initial boronization of PBX-M using ablation of solid boronized probes  

SciTech Connect

The initial boronization of PBX-M was performed using the sequential ablation of two types of solid target probes. Probe-1 in a mushroom shape consisted of a 10.7% boronized 2-D C-C composite containing 3.6 g of boron in a B[sub 4]C binder. Probe-2 in a rectangular shape consisted of an 86% boronized graphite felt composite containing 19.5 g of 40 [mu] boron particles. After boronization with Probe-1, the loop voltage during 1 MW neutral beam heated plasmas decreased 27% and volt-sec consumption decreased 20%. Strong peripheral spectral lines from low-Z elements decreased by factors of about 5. The central oxygen density decreased 15--20%. The total radiated power during neutral beam injection decreased by 43%. Probe-2 boronization exhibited improved operating conditions similar to Probe-1, but for some parameters, a smaller percentage change occurred due to the residual boron from the previous boronization using Probe-1. The ablation rates of both probes were consistent with front face temperatures at or slightly above the boron melting point. These results confirm the effectiveness of the solid target boronization (STB) technique as a real-time impurity control method for replenishing boron depositions without the use of hazardous borane compounds.

Kugel, H.W.; Hirooka, Y.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Khandagle, M. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Inst. of Plasma and Fusion Research); Timberlake, J.; Bell, R.; England, A.; Isler, R.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Takahashi, H.; Tighe, W.; von Goeler, S.; Post-Zwicker, A.P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Jones, S. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States))

1993-05-01

287

Some physical properties of compacted specimens of highly dispersed boron carbide and boron suboxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

Structure, shear modulus and internal friction (IF) of compacted specimens of boron carbide and boron suboxide have been investigated. Microtwins and stacking faults were observed along the {100} plane systems of polycrystalline specimens of boron carbide. Electrical conductivity of the specimens was that of p-type. Concentration of holes varied from 1017 to 1019cm?3. The IF was measured in the temperature

Otar Tsagareishvili; David Lezhava; Mamuka Tushishvili; Levan Gabunia; Marina Antadze; Luiza Kekelidze; Teimuraz Dzigrashvili

2004-01-01

288

Synthesis, Properties, and Applications Of Boron Nitride  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Report describes synthesis, properties, and applications of boron nitride. Especially in thin-film form. Boron nitride films useful as masks in x-ray lithography; as layers for passivation of high-speed microelectronic circuits; insulating films; hard, wear-resistant, protective films for optical components; lubricants; and radiation detectors. Present status of single-crystal growth of boron nitride indicates promising candidate for use in high-temperature semiconductor electronics.

Pouch, John J.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

1993-01-01

289

Recoil-Implantation Of Multiple Radioisotopes Towards Wear Rate Measurements And Particle Tracing In Prosthetic Joints  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study demonstrates a new method of radioisotope labeling of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene inserts in prosthetic joints for wear studies. The radioisotopes 97Ru, 100Pd, 100Rh, and 101mRh are produced in fusion evaporation reactions induced by 12C ions in a 92Zr target foil. The fusion products recoil-implant into ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene plugs, machined to fit into the surface of the inserts. During laboratory simulations of the joint motion, a wear rate of the labeled polyethylene may be measured and the pathways of wear debris particles can be traced by detecting characteristic gamma-rays. The concentration profiles of the radioisotopes extend effectively uniformly from the polyethylene surface to a depth of about 4 ?m. The multiplicity of labeling and the use of several gamma-ray lines aids with avoiding systematic measurement uncertainties. Two polyethylene plugs were labeled and one was fitted into the surface of the tibial insert of a knee prosthesis, which had been worn in. Actuation over close to 100,000 cycles with a 900 N axial load and a 24 flexion angle removed (141)% of the gamma-ray activity from the plug. Most of this activity dispersed into the serum lubricant identifying this as the important debris pathway. Less than 1% activity was transferred to the femoral component of the prosthesis and the measured activity on the tibial tray was insignificant. Assuming uniform wear across the superior surface of the insert, a wear rate of (123) mm3/Megacycle was determined. This is consistent with wear rate measurements under similar conditions using other techniques.

Warner, Jacob A.; Smith, Paul N.; Scarvell, Jennifer M.; Gladkis, Laura; Timmers, Heiko

2011-06-01

290

Recoil-Implantation Of Multiple Radioisotopes Towards Wear Rate Measurements And Particle Tracing In Prosthetic Joints  

SciTech Connect

This study demonstrates a new method of radioisotope labeling of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene inserts in prosthetic joints for wear studies. The radioisotopes {sup 97}Ru, {sup 100}Pd, {sup 100}Rh, and {sup 101m}Rh are produced in fusion evaporation reactions induced by {sup 12}C ions in a {sup 92}Zr target foil. The fusion products recoil-implant into ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene plugs, machined to fit into the surface of the inserts. During laboratory simulations of the joint motion, a wear rate of the labeled polyethylene may be measured and the pathways of wear debris particles can be traced by detecting characteristic gamma-rays. The concentration profiles of the radioisotopes extend effectively uniformly from the polyethylene surface to a depth of about 4 {mu}m. The multiplicity of labeling and the use of several gamma-ray lines aids with avoiding systematic measurement uncertainties. Two polyethylene plugs were labeled and one was fitted into the surface of the tibial insert of a knee prosthesis, which had been worn in. Actuation over close to 100,000 cycles with a 900 N axial load and a 24 deg. flexion angle removed (14{+-}1)% of the gamma-ray activity from the plug. Most of this activity dispersed into the serum lubricant identifying this as the important debris pathway. Less than 1% activity was transferred to the femoral component of the prosthesis and the measured activity on the tibial tray was insignificant. Assuming uniform wear across the superior surface of the insert, a wear rate of (12{+-}3) mm{sup 3}/Megacycle was determined. This is consistent with wear rate measurements under similar conditions using other techniques.

Warner, Jacob A.; Timmers, Heiko [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, University of New South Wales at ADFA, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia); Smith, Paul N.; Scarvell, Jennifer M. [Trauma and Orthopaedic Research Unit, Canberra Hospital, PO BOX 11, Woden, ACT 2606 (Australia); Gladkis, Laura [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, University of New South Wales at ADFA, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia); Trauma and Orthopaedic Research Unit, Canberra Hospital, PO BOX 11, Woden, ACT 2606 (Australia)

2011-06-01

291

The Boron Efflux Transporter ROTTEN EAR Is Required for Maize Inflorescence Development and Fertility[C][W][OPEN  

PubMed Central

Although boron has a relatively low natural abundance, it is an essential plant micronutrient. Boron deficiencies cause major crop losses in several areas of the world, affecting reproduction and yield in diverse plant species. Despite the importance of boron in crop productivity, surprisingly little is known about its effects on developing reproductive organs. We isolated a maize (Zea mays) mutant, called rotten ear (rte), that shows distinct defects in vegetative and reproductive development, eventually causing widespread sterility in its inflorescences, the tassel and the ear. Positional cloning revealed that rte encodes a membrane-localized boron efflux transporter, co-orthologous to the Arabidopsis thaliana BOR1 protein. Depending on the availability of boron in the soil, rte plants show a wide range of phenotypic defects that can be fully rescued by supplementing the soil with exogenous boric acid, indicating that rte is crucial for boron transport into aerial tissues. rte is expressed in cells surrounding the xylem in both vegetative and reproductive tissues and is required for meristem activity and organ development. We show that low boron supply to the inflorescences results in widespread defects in cell and cell wall integrity, highlighting the structural importance of boron in the formation of fully fertile reproductive organs. PMID:25035400

Chatterjee, Mithu; Tabi, Zara; Galli, Mary; Malcomber, Simon; Buck, Amy; Muszynski, Michael; Gallavotti, Andrea

2014-01-01

292

Boron-10 ABUNCL Active Testing  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report provides results from testing of the active mode of the General Electric Reuter-Stokes Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) at Los Alamos National Laboratory using sources and fuel pins.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

2013-07-09

293

Boron nitride nanoribbons become metallic  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Boron nitride (BN) sheets can be grown on nickel substrates, similar to graphene, and BN domains coexist with graphene. The synthesis of zig-zag BN nanoribbons (zBNNRs) brings interesting possibilities regarding edge chemistry: since both boron and nitrogen atoms are exposed on each edge the functionality of the nanostructure is enriched. We report first principles calculations on the electronic properties of zBNNR nanoribbons with several types of functionalization. Sulfur and oxygen edge doping and topological one-dimensional defects are studied and the possibility of having half metallicity is also analysed. Sulfur and oxygen edge passivation converts zBNNRs into a metallic material which offers several possibilities for new applications in electronics, molecular sensing and spintronics.

Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; Huang, Jingsong; Terrones, Humberto; Sumpter, Bobby

2011-03-01

294

Self-doping in Boron Nanostructures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Boron nanotubes have attracted much attention since their first fabrication in experiments. Boron nanotubes with large radii (R >= 10 ) are predicted to be metallic with large densities of states at their Fermi energies, which may provide excellent conducting systems for one-dimensional electronics. In previous work [1], we have shown a class of stable boron sheets, composed of mixtures of triangular and hexagonal motifs, that are likely to be the precursors of boron nanotubes. These sheets are stabilized by a balance of 2-center and 3-center bonding. Here, using density functional theory and Maximally Localized Wannier Functions, we show that adding a boron atom to a boron sheet is equivalent to doping the boron sheet with all three valence electrons of the added atom. Based on this self-doping picture, we propose a simple counting scheme to construct stable boron nanostructures, e.g. from corresponding carbon ones. We also apply this knowledge to study Mg-doped boron sheets and discuss the possible stable structures of MgB2 nanotubes. [1] H. Tang, and S. Ismail-Beigi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 115501 (2007).

Tang, Hui; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

2009-03-01

295

Boron layer scintillation neutron detectors  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryNeutron detection with layers of crystalline powder mixtures of a boron compound and of a scintillator, used in connection\\u000a with a photomultiplier, has been studied. Efficiency of 6% for incident thermal neutrons and almost complete insensitivity\\u000a to ? and cosmic rays is reached. Detector's geometry approaches that of an infinitely thin sheet. Pulses may be shaped so\\u000a as to have

E. Gatti; E. Germagnoli; A. Persano; E. Zimmer

1952-01-01

296

Boron containing multilayer coatings and method of fabrication  

DOEpatents

Hard coatings are fabricated from multilayer boron/boron carbide, boron carbide/cubic boron nitride, and boron/boron nitride/boron carbide, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron and boron carbide used in forming the multilayers are formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/boron carbide, and boron carbide/cubic boron nitride is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron, cubic boron nitride or boron carbide, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be of a discrete or a blended or graded composition. 6 figs.

Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

1997-09-23

297

Method and system for radioisotope generation  

DOEpatents

A system and a process for producing selected isotopic daughter products from parent materials characterized by the steps of loading the parent material upon a sorbent having a functional group configured to selectively bind the parent material under designated conditions, generating the selected isotopic daughter products, and eluting said selected isotopic daughter products from the sorbent. In one embodiment, the process also includes the step of passing an eluent formed by the elution step through a second sorbent material that is configured to remove a preselected material from said eluent. In some applications a passage of the material through a third sorbent material after passage through the second sorbent material is also performed.

Toth, James J.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Fryxell, Glen E.; O'Hara, Matthew J.

2014-07-15

298

Magnetoresistance in Boron Carbide junctions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The properties of thin insulator layers are crucial to the performance of magnetic tunnel junctions. Commercial requirements are a device with a high tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) with low cost and high stability. At present the vast majority of barriers are made from amorphous Al2O3 and crystalline MgO. The TMR value depends not only on the spin-dependent electronic structure of the electrodes, but on the metal-insulator interface. Oxide-type barriers may suffer from local vacancies and other type of defects, resulting in oxygen diffusion, making the TMR value unstable with time. We present TMR results obtained on a non-oxide barrier, boron carbide (B10C2) for applications in magnetic tunnel junctions. This low Z inorganic material can be grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) without pinholes in the ultra thin film regime. PECVD grown boron carbide is an excellent dielectric with resistivities in the range of 10^7 ohm-cm, with a band gap that can be adjusted from 0.7 eV to 1.9 eV by altering the boron to carbon ratio and to band gap values well above 2.7 eV by adding phosphorus. This creates a unique opportunity for experimental study of a broad spectrum of phenomena, related to the dielectric properties of the barrier.

Day, Ellen; Sokolov, A.; Baruth, A.; Robertson, B. W.; Adenwalla, S.

2007-03-01

299

Simplifying the 45nm SDE Process with ClusterBoron and ClusterCarbon Implantation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The processes used to form an advanced PMOS SDE become increasing complex with each technology generation. Aggressive requirements for junction depth, sheet resistance and abruptness are difficult to satisfy with conventional technologies. The fundamental issues are the low productivity of implant systems at the required low boron implant energies and the diffusion rate of boron in silicon at the temperatures needed for activation. We propose an alternate process sequence with the goal of simplifying the process module by eliminating the Ge PAI implant and using a conventional spike anneal. Our approach is to utilize a ClusterCarbon implant to control boron diffusion, a ClusterBoron implant for high productivity at low process energy and a conventional spike anneal at moderate temperature. The ClusterCarbon implant uses the same ClusterIon source and related system as the ClusterBoron implant. This process combination provides a solution to the technology requirements using conventional production tools, high productivity and a simple, direct path to optimizing the SDE conditions.

Krull, Wade; Haslam, Brian; Horsky, Tom; Verheyden, Kurt; Funk, Klaus

2006-11-01

300

Synthesis of vertically aligned boron nitride nanosheets using CVD method  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: ? The synthesized boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) are vertically aligned and very thin. ? No electrical field is applied in the CVD process. ? The thin BNNSs show a low turn-on field of 6.5 V ?m{sup ?1} and emit strong UV light. -- Abstract: Boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) protruding from boron nitride (BN) films were synthesized on silicon substrates by chemical vapor deposition technique from a gas mixture of BCl{sub 3}NH{sub 3}H{sub 2}N{sub 2}. Parts of the as-grown nanosheets were vertically aligned on the BN films. The morphology and structure of the synthesized BNNSs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. The chemical composition was studied by energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Cathodoluminescence spectra revealed that the product emitted strong UV light with a broad band ranging from 250 to 400 nm. Field-emission characteristic of the product shows a low turn-on field of 6.5 V ?m{sup ?1}.

Zhang, Chao [State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, 27 Shandanan Road, Jinan 250100 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, 27 Shandanan Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Hao, Xiaopeng, E-mail: xphao@sdu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, 27 Shandanan Road, Jinan 250100 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, 27 Shandanan Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Wu, Yongzhong, E-mail: wuyz@sdu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, 27 Shandanan Road, Jinan 250100 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, 27 Shandanan Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Du, Miao [State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, 27 Shandanan Road, Jinan 250100 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, 27 Shandanan Road, Jinan 250100 (China)

2012-09-15

301

Ferrocenyl-substituted Schiff base complexes of boron: synthesis, structural, physico-chemical and biochemical aspects.  

PubMed

Biological important complexes of boron(III) derived from 1-acetylferrocenehydrazinecarboxamide (L1H), 1-acetylferrocenehydrazinecarbothioamide (L2H) and 1-acetylferrocene carbodithioic acid (L3H) have been prepared and investigated using a combination of microanalytical analysis, melting point, electronic, IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectral studies, cyclic voltammetry and X-ray powder diffraction studies. Boron isopropoxide interacts with the ligands in 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 molar ratios (boron:ligand) resulting in the formation of coloured products. On the basis of conductance and spectral evidences, tetrahedral structures for boron(III) complexes have been assigned. The ligands are coordinated to the boron(III) via the azomethine nitrogen atom and the thiolic sulfur atom/enolic oxygen atom. On the basis of X-ray powder diffraction study one of the representative boron complex was found to have orthorhombic lattice, having lattice parameters: a=9.9700, b=15.0000 and c=7.0000. Both the ligands and their complexes have been screened for their biological activity on several pathogenic fungi and bacteria and were found to possess appreciable fungicidal and bactericidal properties. Plant growth regulating activity of one of the ligand and its complexes has also been recorded on gram plant, and results have been discussed. PMID:21167770

Yadav, Sunita; Singh, R V

2011-01-01

302

Some physical properties of compacted specimens of highly dispersed boron carbide and boron suboxide  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Structure, shear modulus and internal friction (IF) of compacted specimens of boron carbide and boron suboxide have been investigated. Microtwins and stacking faults were observed along the {100} plane systems of polycrystalline specimens of boron carbide. Electrical conductivity of the specimens was that of p-type. Concentration of holes varied from 10 17 to 10 19 cm -3. The IF was measured in the temperature range 80-300 K. It was shown that the IF of boron carbide and that of boron suboxide were characterized with a set of similar relaxation processes. Mechanisms of the relaxation processes in boron carbide and boron suboxide are discussed in terms of the Hasiguti model of interaction between dislocations and point defects.

Tsagareishvili, Otar; Lezhava, David; Tushishvili, Mamuka; Gabunia, Levan; Antadze, Marina; Kekelidze, Luiza; Dzigrashvili, Teimuraz

2004-02-01

303

Computational studies on boron nitride and boron phosphide nanotubes: Density functional calculations of boron-11 electric field gradient tensors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have performed density functional theory (DFT) calculations employing BLYP exchange functional and 6-31 G * standard basis set by GAUSSIAN 98 package of program. The electronic structure properties of representative zigzag and armchair models of boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) and boron phosphide nanotube (BPNT) have been studied. The (6,0) and (4,4) structures have been optimized and the electric field gradient (EFG) tensors have been calculated at the sites of various boron-11 nuclei. The calculated EFG tensors have been converted to the equivalent experimental nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) parameters, quadrupole coupling constant and asymmetry parameter. The results revealed that the boron atoms at the edges of nanotubes play dominant roles in determining the electronic behaviors of BNNT and BPNT. The average of the calculated values of quadrupole coupling constants at the sites of boron-11 nuclei is in good agreement with experiments.

Mirzaei, Mahmoud; Giahi, Masoud

2010-03-01

304

Californium-252: a remarkable versatile radioisotope  

SciTech Connect

A product of the nuclear age, Californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) has found many applications in medicine, scientific research, industry, and nuclear science education. Californium-252 is unique as a neutron source in that it provides a highly concentrated flux and extremely reliable neutron spectrum from a very small assembly. During the past 40 years, {sup 252}Cf has been applied with great success to cancer therapy, neutron radiography of objects ranging from flowers to entire aircraft, startup sources for nuclear reactors, fission activation for quality analysis of all commercial nuclear fuel, and many other beneficial uses, some of which are now ready for further growth. Californium-252 is produced in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and processed in the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC), both of which are located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The REDC/HFIR facility is virtually the sole supplier of {sup 252}Cf in the western world and is the major supplier worldwide. Extensive exploitation of this product was made possible through the {sup 252}Cf Market Evaluation Program, sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) [then the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and later the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA)]. This program included training series, demonstration centers, seminars, and a liberal loan policy for fabricated sources. The Market Evaluation Program was instituted, in part, to determine if large-quantity production capability was required at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). Because of the nature of the product and the means by which it is produced, {sup 252}Cf can be produced only in government-owned facilities. It is evident at this time that the Oak Ridge research facility can meet present and projected near-term requirements. The production, shipment, and sales history of {sup 252}Cf from ORNL is summarized herein.

Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Alexander, C.W.

1995-10-10

305

Fabrication of boron-phosphide neutron detectors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boron phosphide is a potentially viable candidate for high neutron flux neutron detectors. The authors have explored chemical vapor deposition methods to produce such detectors and have not been able to produce good boron phosphide coatings on silicon carbide substrates. However, semi-conducting quality films have been produced. Further testing is required.

M. Fitzsimmons; R. Pynn

1997-01-01

306

Boron Combustion Characteristics in Ducted Rockets  

Microsoft Academic Search

A test program was performed with the objective of experimentally investigating the boron reaction characteristics in a ducted rocket by systematically varying the primary chamber conditions.In order to vary the primary chamber conditions a test device was used which burned boron powder and gaseous propellants (hydrogen or carbon monoxide, oxygen and nitrogen) in the primary motor. The reaction characteristics in

K. SCHADOW

1972-01-01

307

Phase evolution in boron nitride thin films  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boron nitride (BN) thin films were deposited on monocrystalline Si (100) wafers using electron beam evaporation of boron with simultaneous bombardment by nitrogen and argon ions. The effect of film thickness on the resultant BN phase was investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). These techniques revealed the consecutive deposition of an initial

D. J. Kester; K. S. Ailey; R. F. Davis; K. L. More

1993-01-01

308

Porphyrins for boron neutron capture therapy  

DOEpatents

Novel compounds for treatment of brain tumors in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy are disclosed. A method for preparing the compounds as well as pharmaceutical compositions containing said compounds are also disclosed. The compounds are water soluble, non-toxic and non-labile boronated porphyrins which show significant uptake and retention in tumors.

Miura, Michiko (Center Moriches, NY); Gabel, Detlef (Bremen, DE)

1990-01-01

309

Boron chemicals in diagnosis and therapeutics  

PubMed Central

Advances in the field of boron chemistry have expanded the application of boron from material use to medicine. Boron-based drugs represent a new class of molecules that possess several biomedical applications including use as imaging agents for both optical and nuclear imaging as well as therapeutic agents with anticancer, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal and other disease-specific activities. For example, bortezomib (Velcade), the only drug in clinical use with boron as an active element, was approved in 2003 as a proteasome inhibitor for the treatment of multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkins lymphoma. Several other boron-based compounds are in various phases of clinical trials, which illustrates the promise of this approach for medicinal chemists working in the area of boron chemistry. It is expected that in the near future, several boron-containing drugs should become available in the market with better efficacy and potency than existing drugs. This article discusses the current status of the development of boron-based compounds as diagnostic and therapeutic agents in humans. PMID:23617429

Das, Bhaskar C; Thapa, Pritam; Karki, Radha; Schinke, Caroline; Das, Sasmita; Kambhampati, Suman; Banerjee, Sushanta K; Van Veldhuizen, Peter; Verma, Amit; Weiss, Louis M; Evans, Todd

2013-01-01

310

Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping.  

PubMed

Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping. PMID:25427850

Proctor, J E; Bhakhri, V; Hao, R; Prior, T J; Scheler, T; Gregoryanz, E; Chhowalla, M; Giulani, F

2015-01-14

311

Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping.

Proctor, J. E.; Bhakhri, V.; Hao, R.; Prior, T. J.; Scheler, T.; Gregoryanz, E.; Chhowalla, M.; Giulani, F.

2015-01-01

312

A radioisotope-powered surface acoustic wave transponder  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We demonstrate a 63Ni radioisotope-powered pulse transponder that has a SAW (surface acoustic wave) device as the frequency transmission frequency selector. Because the frequency is determined by a SAW device, narrowband detection with an identical SAW device enables the possibility for a long-distance RF-link. The SAW transponders can be buried deep into structural constructs such as steel and concrete, where changing batteries or harvesting vibration or EM energy is not a reliable option. RF-released power to radioisotope- released power amplification is 108, even when regulatory safe amounts of 63Ni are used. Here we have achieved an 800 W pulse (315 MHz, 10 s pause) across a 50 ? load every 3 min, using a 1.5 milli-Ci 63Ni source.

Tin, S.; Lal, A.

2009-09-01

313

Process for radioisotope recovery and system for implementing same  

DOEpatents

A method of recovering daughter isotopes from a radioisotope mixture. The method comprises providing a radioisotope mixture solution comprising at least one parent isotope. The at least one parent isotope is extracted into an organic phase, which comprises an extractant and a solvent. The organic phase is substantially continuously contacted with an aqueous phase to extract at least one daughter isotope into the aqueous phase. The aqueous phase is separated from the organic phase, such as by using an annular centrifugal contactor. The at least one daughter isotope is purified from the aqueous phase, such as by ion exchange chromatography or extraction chromatography. The at least one daughter isotope may include actinium-225, radium-225, bismuth-213, or mixtures thereof. A liquid-liquid extraction system for recovering at least one daughter isotope from a source material is also disclosed.

Meikrantz, David H.; Todd, Terry A.; Tranter, Troy J.; Horwitz, E. Philip

2007-01-02

314

Process for radioisotope recovery and system for implementing same  

DOEpatents

A method of recovering daughter isotopes from a radioisotope mixture. The method comprises providing a radioisotope mixture solution comprising at least one parent isotope. The at least one parent isotope is extracted into an organic phase, which comprises an extractant and a solvent. The organic phase is substantially continuously contacted with an aqueous phase to extract at least one daughter isotope into the aqueous phase. The aqueous phase is separated from the organic phase, such as by using an annular centrifugal contactor. The at least one daughter isotope is purified from the aqueous phase, such as by ion exchange chromatography or extraction chromatography. The at least one daughter isotope may include actinium-225, radium-225, bismuth-213, or mixtures thereof. A liquid-liquid extraction system for recovering at least one daughter isotope from a source material is also disclosed.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

2009-10-06

315

Safety status of space radioisotope and reactor power sources  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The current overall safety criterion for both radioisotope and reactor power sources is containment or immobilization in the case of a reentry accident. In addition, reactors are designed to remain subcritical under conditions of land impact or water immersion. A very extensive safety test and analysis program was completed on the radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) in use on the Galileo spacecraft and planned for use on the Ulysses spacecraft. The results of this work show that the RTGs will pose little or no risk for any credible accident. The SP-100 space nuclear reactor program has begun addressing its safety criteria, and the design is planned to be such as to ensure meeting the various safety criteria. Preliminary mission risk analyses on SP-100 show the expected value population dose from postulated accidents on the reference mission to be very small. It is concluded that the current US nuclear power sources are the safest flown.

Bennett, Gary L.

1990-01-01

316

Outer Planet Exploration with Advanced Radioisotope Electric Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In response to a request by the NASA Deep Space Exploration Technology Program, NASA Glenn Research Center conducted a study to identify advanced technology options to perform a Pluto/Kuiper mission without depending on a 2004 Jupiter Gravity Assist, but still arriving before 2020. A concept using a direct trajectory with small, sub-kilowatt ion thrusters and Stirling radioisotope power systems was shown to allow the same or smaller launch vehicle class as the chemical 2004 baseline and allow a launch slip and still flyby in the 2014 to 2020 timeframe. With this promising result the study was expanded to use a radioisotope power source for small electrically propelled orbiter spacecraft for outer planet targets such as Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto.

Oleson, Steven; Gefert, Leon; Patterson, Michael; Schreiber, Jeffrey; Benson, Scott; McAdams, Jim; Ostdiek, Paul

2002-01-01

317

Radioisotope Electric Propulsion for Fast Outer Planetary Orbiters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Recent interest in outer planetary targets by the Office of Space Science has spurred the search for technology options to enable relatively quick missions to outer planetary targets. Several options are being explored including solar electric propelled stages combined with aerocapture at the target and nuclear electric propulsion. Another option uses radioisotope powered electric thrusters to reach the outer planets. Past work looked at using this technology to provide faster flybys. A better use for this technology is for outer planet orbiters. Combined with medium class launch vehicles and a new direct trajectory these small, sub-kilowatt ion thrusters and Stirling radioisotope generators were found to allow missions as fast as 5 to 12 years for objects from Saturn to Pluto, respectively. Key to the development is light spacecraft and science payload technologies.

Oleson, Steven; Benson, Scott; Gefert, Leon; Patterson, Michael; Schreiber, Jeffrey

2002-01-01

318

Emitted radiation characteristics of plutonium dioxide radioisotope thermoelectric generators  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The nuclear and emitted radiation characteristics of the radioisotope elements and impurities in commercial grade plutonium dioxide are presented in detail. The development of the methods of analysis are presented. Radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) of 1575, 3468 and 5679 thermal watts are characterized with respect to neutron and gamma photon source strength as well as spatial and number flux distribution. The results are presented as a function of detector position and light element contamination concentration for fuel age ranging from 'fresh' to 18 years. The data may be used to obtain results for given O-18 and Pu-236 concentrations. The neutron and gamma photon flux and dose calculations compare favorably with reported experimental values for SNAP-27.

Gingo, P. J.; Steyn, J. J.

1971-01-01

319

Boron adsorption induced magnetism in zigzag boron nitride nanotubes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we have studied the boron adsorption induced magnetism in zigzag boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) and BN hexagonal sheets (h-BN sheet) as well as the magnetic interaction between the B-induced magnetic moment by using the first principle spin-polarized density functional calculations. It is found that the adsorption of a single B adatom on the external surface of BNNTs and h-BN sheet can induce spontaneous magnetization in the B-BNNTs system with a local magnetic moment of 1.0?B per B adatom regardless of the tube diameter and the bonding between the B atom and the BNNTs/BN sheets. An analysis of orbital hybridization indicates that two valence electrons participate in the bonding and the remaining one electron of the B adatom are confined at the adsorption site and contribute to the magnetism accordingly. The magnetic interactions between the B-induced magnetic moments on BNNTs have been explored. The magnetic B-BNNTs may be experimentally accessible when the coverage of Bad adatoms adsorbed on the external surface of BNNTs is low.

Li, L. L.; Yang, S. Q.; Yang, X. J.; Xu, X. W.; Tang, C. C.

2012-08-01

320

Boron recovery from clay waste using Diaion CRB?02 resin  

Microsoft Academic Search

A two?step process for boron recovery from clay waste is proposed in the present work. The leachate obtained after the clay waste was leached with sulphuric acid solution was treated with Diaion CRB?02 a boron?specific resin for the separation of boron from the alkaline species in the leachate. The batch studies showed that a maximum boron recovery of about

?. K?pak; M. zdemir

2010-01-01

321

Radioisotope Concentration in Lake Sediments of Maracaibo, Venezuela  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Maracaibo Lake is one of the most important water basing and oil producing regions in Venezuela. Changes in the local environment have been monitored for chemical pollution in the past. For this study we selected a set of sediment samples collected in the shore and analyzed for its radioisotope content. Results show the gamma emitting isotopes distribution. Isotopes concentrations have been determined within the natural K, Th and U families.

Salas, A. Rangel; Viloria, T.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Barros, H.; Greaves, E. D.; Palacios, D.

2007-10-01

322

Plastic Gamma Sensors: An Application in Detection of Radioisotopes  

SciTech Connect

A brief survey of plastic scintillators for various radiation measurement applications is presented here. The utility of plastic scintillators for practical applications such as gamma radiation monitoring, real-time radioisotope detection and screening is evaluated in laboratory and field measurements. This study also reports results of Monte Carlo-type predictive responses of common plastic scintillators in gamma and neutron radiation fields. Small-size plastic detectors are evaluated for static and dynamic gamma-ray detection sensitivity of selected radiation sources.

S. Mukhopadhyay

2003-06-01

323

Modeling laterally-contacted nipi-diode radioisotope batteries  

Microsoft Academic Search

A framework for modeling the power generation of laterally-contacted n-type \\/ intrinsic \\/ p-type \\/ intrinsic (nipi) diodes coupled with an alpha-particle radioisotope source is developed. The framework consists of two main parts, the alpha-particle energy deposition profile (ADEP) and a lumped parameter equivalent circuit model describing the nipi device operation. Experimental measurements are used to verify the ADEP modeling

Cory D. Cress; Brian J. Landi; Ryne P. Raffaelle

2008-01-01

324

Radioisotope tracer study in a sludge hygienization research irradiator (SHRI)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A radioisotope tracer study has been carried out in a batch type sludge hygienization research irradiator with flow from top to bottom, the objective being to measure flow rate, circulation and mixing times and to investigate the hydrodynamic behaviour of the irradiator for identifying the cause(s) of malfunction. A stimulusresponse technique with NH824Br as a tracer was used to measure

H. J Pant; J Thn; R Zitn; B. C Bhatt

2001-01-01

325

Boron Enrichment in Martian Clay  

PubMed Central

We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242

Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J.

2013-01-01

326

Boron enrichment in martian clay.  

PubMed

We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration. PMID:23762242

Stephenson, James D; Hallis, Lydia J; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Freeland, Stephen J

2013-01-01

327

The polarographic microdetermination of boron  

E-print Network

. Furthermore, the techniques in these methods are long and tedious, and extensive alcoholic distillation introduces errors of undeterminable magnitude. The titration of boric acid using mannitol, as in Chapin's method, is based upon a reaction between boric...? plexes in which there is a tetrahedral boron atom are acidic. This is true in all of such di-diol complexes, as There seems to be little doubt that the enhancement of the acidic properties of boric acid is due to the di-diol complex (82). Mellon...

Peacock, Dixon Williams

1958-01-01

328

Experimental boron neutron capture therapy for melanoma: Systemic delivery of boron to melanotic and amelanotic melanoma  

SciTech Connect

The boron-containing melanin precursor analogue p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) has previously been shown to selectively deliver boron to pigmented murine melanomas when administered in a single intragastric dose. If boron neutron capture therapy is to become a clinically useful method of radiation therapy for human malignant melanoma, the boron carrier must be capable of delivering useful amounts of boron to remote tumor sites (metastases) and to poorly pigmented melanomas. The authors have now determined the ability of BPA to accumulate in several nonpigmented melanoma models including human melanoma xenografts in nude mice. The absolute amount of boron in the nonpigmented melanomas was about 50% of the observed in the pigmented counterparts but was still selectively concentrated in the tumor relative to normal tissues in amounts sufficient for effective neutron capture therapy. Single intragastric doses of BPA resulted in selective localization of boron in the amelanotic Greene melanoma carried in the anterior chamber of the rabbit eye and in a pigmented murine melanoma growing in the lungs. The ratio of the boron concentration in these tumors to the boron concentration in the immediately adjacent normal tissue was in the range of 3:1 to 4:1. These distribution studies support the proposal that boron neutron capture therapy may be useful as a regional therapy for malignant melanoma.

Coderre, J.A.; Glass, J.D.; Micca, P.; Greenberg, D. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Packer, S. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States) North Shore University Hospital Manhasset, NY (United States))

1990-01-01

329

Radioisotope Power: A Key Technology for Deep Space Explorations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Radioisotope Power System (RPS) generates power by converting the heat released from the nuclear decay of radioactive isotopes, such as Plutonium-238 (Pu-238), into electricity. First used in space by the U.S. in 1961, these devices have enabled some of the most challenging and exciting space missions in history, including the Pioneer and Voyager probes to the outer solar system; the Apollo lunar surface experiments; the Viking landers; the Ulysses polar orbital mission about the Sun; the Galileo mission to Jupiter; the Cassini mission orbiting Saturn; and the recently launched New Horizons mission to Pluto. Radioisotopes have also served as a versatile heat source for moderating equipment thermal environments on these and many other missions, including the Mars exploration rovers, Spirit and Opportunity. The key advantage of RPS is its ability to operate continuously, independent of orientation and distance relative to the Sun. Radioisotope systems are long-lived, rugged, compact, highly reliable, and relatively insensitive to radiation and other environmental effects. As such, they are ideally suited for missions involving long-lived, autonomous operations in the extreme conditions of space and other planetary bodies. This paper reviews the history of RPS for the U.S. space program. It also describes current development of a new Stirling cycle-based generator that will greatly expand the application of nuclear-powered missions in the future.

Schmidt, George R.; Sutliff, Thomas J.; Duddzinski, Leonard

2009-01-01

330

Radioisotope Electric Propulsion Centaur Orbiter Spacecraft Design Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Radioisotope electric propulsion (REP) has been shown in past studies to enable missions to outerplanetary bodies including the orbiting of Centaur asteroids. Key to the feasibility for REP missions are long life, low power electric propulsion (EP) devices, low mass radioisotope power systems (RPS) and light spacecraft (S/C) components. In order to determine what are the key parameters for EP devices to perform these REP missions a design study was completed to design an REP S/C to orbit a Centaur in a New Frontiers cost cap. The design shows that an orbiter using several long lived (approximately 200 kg Xenon throughput), low power (approximately 700 W) Hall thrusters teamed with six (150 W each) Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators (ASRG) can deliver 60 kg of science instruments to a Centaur in 10 yr within the New Frontiers cost cap. Optimal specific impulses for the Hall thrusters were found to be around 2000 sec with thruster efficiencies over 40%. Not only can the REP S/C enable orbiting a Centaur (when compared to an all chemical mission only capable of flybys) but the additional power from the REP system can be reused to enhance science and simplify communications.

Oleson, Steve; McGuire, Melissa; Sarver-Verhey, Tim; Juergens, Jeff; Parkey, Tom; Dankanich, John; Fiehler, Doug; Gyekenyesi, John; Hemminger, Joseph; Gilland, Jim; Colozza, Tony; Packard, Tom; Nguyen, Thahn; Schmitz, Paul; Ostdiek, Paul; Gold, Rob; Lisse, Carey; Hibbits, Karl

2009-01-01

331

Stimulus sensitive gel with radioisotope and methods of making  

DOEpatents

The present invention is a thermally reversible stimulus-sensitive gel or gelling copolymer radioisotope carrier that is a linear random copolymer of an [meth-]acrylamide derivative and a hydrophilic comonomer, wherein the linear random copolymer is in the form of a plurality of linear chains having a plurality of molecular weights greater than or equal to a minimum gelling molecular weight cutoff. Addition of a biodegradable backbone and/or a therapeutic agent imparts further utility. The method of the present invention for making a thermally reversible stimulus-sensitive gelling copolymer radionuclcide carrier has the steps of: (a) mixing a stimulus-sensitive reversible gelling copolymer with an aqueous solvent as a stimulus-sensitive reversible gelling solution; and (b) mixing a radioisotope with said stimulus-sensitive reversible gelling solution as said radioisotope carrier. The gel is enhanced by either combining it with a biodegradable backbone and/or a therapeutic agent in a gelling solution made by mixing the copolymer with an aqueous solvent.

Weller, Richard E.; Lind, Michael A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Gutowska, Anna; Campbell, Allison A.

2005-03-22

332

Stimulus sensitive gel with radioisotope and methods of making  

DOEpatents

The present invention is a thermally reversible stimulus-sensitive gel or gelling copolymer radioisotope carrier that is a linear random copolymer of an [meth]acrylamide derivative and a hydrophilic comonomer, wherein the linear random copolymer is in the form of a plurality of linear chains having a plurality of molecular weights greater than or equal to a minimum gelling molecular weight cutoff. Addition of a biodegradable backbone and/or a therapeutic agent imparts further utility. The method of the present invention for making a thermally reversible stimulus-sensitive gelling copolymer radionuclcide carrier has the steps of: (a) mixing a stimulus-sensitive reversible gelling copolymer with an aqueous solvent as a stimulus-sensitive reversible gelling solution; and (b) mixing a radioisotope with said stimulus-sensitive reversible gelling solution as said radioisotope carrier. The gel is enhanced by either combining it with a biodegradable backbone and/or a therapeutic agent in a gelling solution made by mixing the copolymer with an aqueous solvent.

Weller, Richard E. (Selah, WA) [Selah, WA; Lind, Michael A. (Kent, WA) [Kent, WA; Fisher, Darrell R. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Gutowska, Anna (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Campbell, Allison A. (Kennewick, WA) [Kennewick, WA

2001-10-02

333

Radioisotope Power: A Key Technology for Deep Space Exploration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Radioisotope Power System (RPS) generates power by converting the heat released from the nuclear decay of radioactive isotopes, such as Plutonium-238 (Pu-238), into electricity. First used in space by the U.S. in 1961, these devices have enabled some of the most challenging and exciting space missions in history, including the Pioneer and Voyager probes to the outer solar system; the Apollo lunar surface experiments; the Viking landers; the Ulysses polar orbital mission about the Sun; the Galileo mission to Jupiter; the Cassini mission orbiting Saturn; and the recently launched New Horizons mission to Pluto. Radioisotopes have also served as a versatile heat source for moderating equipment thermal environments on these and many other missions, including the Mars exploration rovers, Spirit and Opportunity. The key advantage of RPS is its ability to operate continuously, independent of orientation and distance relative to the Sun. Radioisotope systems are long-lived, rugged, compact, highly reliable, and relatively insensitive to radiation and other environmental effects. As such, they are ideally suited for missions involving long-lived, autonomous operations in the extreme conditions of space and other planetary bodies. This paper reviews the history of RPS for the U.S. space program. It also describes current development of a new Stirling cycle-based generator that will greatly expand the application of nuclear-powered missions in the future.

Schmidt, George; Sutliff, Tom; Dudzinski, Leonard

2008-01-01

334

Mechanism of boron uptake by hydrocalumite calcined at different temperatures.  

PubMed

Hydrocalumite (Ca-Al-layered double hydroxide (LDH)) was prepared and applied for the removal of borate. The properties of Ca-Al-LDH calcined at different temperatures were diverse, which affected the sorption density and mechanism of boron species. The sorption density increased with increase in calcined temperature and the sample calcined at 900C (Ca-Al-LDH-900) showed the maximum sorption density in this work. The solid residues after sorption were characterized by (11)B NMR, (27)Al NMR, SEM, and XRD to investigate the sorption mechanism. Dissolution-reprecipitation was the main mechanism for sorption of borate in Ca-Al-LDH. For Ca-Al-LDH calcined at 300 and 500C, regeneration occurred in a short time and the newly forming LDHs were decomposed to release Ca(2+) ions and formed ettringite with borate. Two stages occurred in the sorption of boron by Ca-Al-LDH calcined at 900C. In the first stage, boron species adsorbed on the alumina gel resulting from the hydration of calcined products. In this stage, borate was included as an interlayer anion into the newly forming LDHs in the following stage, and then immobilized as HBO3(2-) into the interlayer, most the LDHs. PMID:25661174

Qiu, Xinhong; Sasaki, Keiko; Takaki, Yu; Hirajima, Tsuyoshi; Ideta, Keiko; Miyawaki, Jin

2015-04-28

335

Hafnium radioisotope recovery from irradiated tantalum  

DOEpatents

Hafnium is recovered from irradiated tantalum by: (a) contacting the irradiated tantalum with at least one acid to obtain a solution of dissolved tantalum; (b) combining an aqueous solution of a calcium compound with the solution of dissolved tantalum to obtain a third combined solution; (c) precipitating hafnium, lanthanide, and insoluble calcium complexes from the third combined solution to obtain a first precipitate; (d) contacting the first precipitate of hafnium, lanthanide and calcium complexes with at least one fluoride ion complexing agent to form a fourth solution; (e) selectively adsorbing lanthanides and calcium from the fourth solution by cationic exchange; (f) separating fluoride ion complexing agent product from hafnium in the fourth solution by adding an aqueous solution of ferric chloride to obtain a second precipitate containing the hafnium and iron; (g) dissolving the second precipitate containing the hafnium and iron in acid to obtain an acid solution of hafnium and iron; (h) selectively adsorbing the iron from the acid solution of hafnium and iron by anionic exchange; (i) drying the ion exchanged hafnium solution to obtain hafnium isotopes. Additionally, if needed to remove residue remaining after the product is dried, dissolution in acid followed by cation exchange, then anion exchange, is performed.

Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, David J. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01

336

Boron-10 Lined Proportional Counter Model Validation  

SciTech Connect

The decreasing supply of 3He is stimulating a search for alternative neutron detectors; one potential 3He replacement is 10B-lined proportional counters. Simulations are being performed to predict the performance of systems designed with 10B-lined tubes. Boron-10-lined tubes are challenging to model accurately because the neutron capture material is not the same as the signal generating material. Thus, to simulate the efficiency, the neutron capture reaction products that escape the lining and enter the signal generating fill gas must be tracked. The tube lining thickness and composition are typically proprietary vendor information, and therefore add additional variables to the system simulation. The modeling methodologies used to predict the neutron detection efficiency of 10B-lined proportional counters were validated by comparing simulated to measured results. The measurements were made with a 252Cf source positioned at several distances from a moderated 2.54-cm diameter 10B-lined tube. Models were constructed of the experimental configurations using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX, which is capable of tracking the reaction products from the (n,10B) reaction. Several different lining thicknesses and compositions were simulated for comparison with the measured data. This paper presents the results of the evaluation of the experimental and simulated data, and a summary of how the different linings affect the performance of a coincidence counter configuration designed with 10B-lined proportional counters.

Lintereur, Azaree T.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Rogers, Jeremy L.; Siciliano, Edward R.

2012-11-18

337

Boron Nitride Nanoribbons Becomes Metallic  

SciTech Connect

Standard spin-polarized density functional theory calculations have been conducted to study the electronic structures and magnetic properties of O and S functionalized zigzag boron nitride nanoribbons (zBNNRs). Unlike the semiconducting and nonmagnetic H edge-terminated zBNNRs, the O edge-terminated zBNNRs have two energetically degenerate magnetic ground states with a ferrimagnetic character on the B edge, both of which are metallic. In contrast, the S edge-terminated zBNNRs are nonmagnetic albeit still metallic. An intriguing coexistence of two different Peierls-like distortions is observed for S edge-termination that manifests as a strong S dimerization at the B zigzag edge and a weak S trimerization at the N zigzag edge, dictated by the band fillings at the vicinity of the Fermi level. Nevertheless, metallicity is retained along the S wire on theNedge due to the partial filling of the band derived from the pz orbital of S. A second type of functionalization with O or S atoms embedded in the center of zBNNRs yields semiconducting features. Detailed examination of both types of functionalized zBNNRs reveals that the p orbitals on O or S play a crucial role in mediating the electronic structures of the ribbons.We suggest that O and S functionalization of zBNNRs may open new routes toward practical electronic devices based on boron nitride materials.

Huang, Jingsong [ORNL; Terrones Maldonado, Humberto [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Lopez-Benzanilla, Alejandro [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2011-01-01

338

Study of boron detection limit using the in-air PIGE set-up at LAMFI-USP  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The quantification of small amounts of boron in materials is of extreme importance in different areas of materials science. Boron is an important contaminant and also a silicon dopant in the semiconductor industry. Boron is also extensively used in nuclear power plants, either for neutron shielding or for safety control and boron is an essential nutrient for life, either vegetable or animal. The production of silicon solar cells, by refining metallurgical-grade silicon (MG-Si) requires the control and reduction of several silicon contaminants to very low concentration levels. Boron is one of the contaminants of solar-grade silicon (SG-Si) that must be controlled and quantified at sub-ppm levels. In the metallurgical purification, boron quantification is usually made by Inductive Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry, (ICP-MS) but the results need to be verified by an independent analytical method. In this work we present the results of the analysis of silicon samples by Particle Induced Gamma-Ray Emission (PIGE) aiming the quantification of low concentrations of boron. PIGE analysis was carried out using the in-air external beam line of the Laboratory for Materials Analysis with Ion Beans (LAMFI-USP) by the 10B ( p ,??(7Be nuclear reaction, and measuring the 429 keV ?-ray. The in-air PIGE measurements at LAMFI have a quantification limit of the order of 1016 at/cm2.

Moro, M. V.; Silva, T. F.; Trindade, G. F.; Added, N.; Tabacniks, M. H.

2014-11-01

339

PREFACE: The 16th International Symposium on Boron, Borides and Related Materials (ISBB 2008)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains invited and contributed peer-reviewed papers that were presented at the 16th International Symposium on Boron, Borides and Related Materials (ISBB 2008), which was held on 7-12 September 2008, at Kunibiki Messe, Matsue, Japan. This triennial symposium has a half-century long history starting from the 1st meeting in 1959 at Asbury Park, New Jersey. We were very pleased to organize ISBB 2008, which gathered chemists, physicists, materials scientists as well as diamond and high-pressure researchers. This meeting had a strong background in the boron-related Japanese research history, which includes the discovery of superconductivity in MgB2 and development of Nd-Fe-B hard magnets and of YB66 soft X-ray monochromator. The scope of ISBB 2008 spans both basic and applied interdisciplinary research that is centered on boron, borides and related materials, and the collection of articles defines the state of the art in research on these materials. The topics are centered on: 1. Preparation of new materials (single crystals, thin films, nanostructures, ceramics, etc) under normal or extreme conditions. 2. Crystal structure and chemical bonding (new crystal structures, nonstoichiometry, defects, clusters, quantum-chemical calculations). 3. Physical and chemical properties (band structure, phonon spectra, superconductivity; optical, electrical, magnetic, emissive, mechanical properties; phase diagrams, thermodynamics, catalytic activity, etc) in a wide range of temperatures and pressures. 4. Applications and prospects (thermoelectric converters, composites, ceramics, coatings, etc) There were a few discoveries of new materials, such as nanomaterials, and developments in applications. Many contributions were related to 4f heavy Fermion systems of rare-earth borides. Exotic mechanisms of magnetism and Kondo effects have been discussed, which may indicate another direction of development of boride. Two special sessions, 'Boron chemistry' and 'Superconductivity', were also held at the symposium. The session on Boron chemistry was planned to honor the scientific work in boron chemistry of Professor J Bauer on the occasion of his retirement. Many recent results were discussed in the session, and Professor Bauer himself introduced novel rare-earth-boron-carbon compounds RE10B7C10 (RE = Gd - Er) in his lecture. In the latter session, on the basis of recent discoveries of superconductivity in MgB2 and in ?-boron under high pressure, the superconductivity of boron and related materials was discussed and the superconductivity of boron-doped diamond was also addressed. More than 120 participants from 16 countries attended the ISBB 2008, and active presentations (22 invited, 33 oral and 68 posters) and discussions suggest that research on boron and borides is entering a new phase of development. This volume contains 46 articles from 52 submitted manuscripts. The reviewers were invited not only from symposium participants but also from specialists worldwide, and they did a great job of evaluating and commenting on the submitted manuscripts to maintain the highest quality standard of this volume. Recent discoveries of superconductivity in boron under high pressure, synthesis of a new allotrope of boron and of various boron and boride nanostructures will lead this highly interdisciplinary field of science, which will further grow and gain attention in terms of both basic and applied research. In this context, we are very much looking forward to the next symposium, which will be held in Istanbul, Turkey, in 2011, organized by Professor Onuralp Yucel, Istanbul Technical University. Turkey currently has the world highest share of borate production and is expected to be involved more in boron-related research. Acknowledgements We gratefully acknowledge the style improvement by Dr K Iakoubovskii, and sincerely thank Shimane Prefecture and Matsue City for their financial support. The symposium was also supported by Tokyo University of Science, Suwa and foundations including, the Kajima Foundat

Tanaka, Takaho

2009-07-01

340

Boron-Loaded Silicone Rubber Scintillators  

SciTech Connect

Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., demonstrated their properties under gamma/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown their response to thermal neutrons. This last work, however, provided an example of a silicone in which both the boron and the scintillator were contained in the rubber as solutes, a formulation which led to the precipitation of solids and sublimation of the boron component. In the present work we describe a scintillator in which the boron is chemically bonded to the siloxane and so avoids the problem of precipitation and loss of boron to sublimation. Material containing up to 18% boron, by weight, was prepared, mounted on photomultipliers, and exposed to both neutron and gamma fluxes. Pulse height spectra showing the neutron and photon response were obtained, and although the light output was found to be much poorer than from samples in which boron was dissolved, the higher boron concentrations enabled essentially 100% neutron absorption in only a few millimeters' thickness of rubber.

Bell, Z.W.; Maya, L.; Brown, G.M.; Sloop, F.V.Jr

2003-05-12

341

Properties of vacuum-evaporated boron films  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The work on the properties of thin boron films made by vacuum evaporation of elemental boron using an electron beam as the energy source is reported. The program aimed at characterizing the properties of vacuum evaporated films. The work was directed toward those variables considered to be important in affecting the tensile strength of the boron films. In general, the thickness of the films was less than 0.002 in. The temperature of the substrate on which the boron was condensed was found to be most important. Three distinctly different forms of boron deposit were produced. Although the transition temperature was not sharply defined, at substrate temperatures of less than approximately 600 deg C the boron deposits were amorphous to X-ray. If the substrate were highly polished, the deposits were black and mirror-like. For substrates with coefficients of thermal expansion close to that of boron, the deposits were then continuous and uncracked. The studies suggest that the potential continues to exist for film-type composites to have both high strength and high modulus.

Feakes, F.

1973-01-01

342

Work Began on Contracts for Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology Research and Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA has had a history of successful space flight missions that depended on radioisotope-fueled power systems. These Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) converted the heat generated from the decay of radioisotope material into useful electrical power. An RPS is most attractive in applications where photovoltaics are not optimal, such as deep-space applications where the solar flux is too low or extended applications on planets such as Mars where the day/night cycle, settling of dust, and life requirements limit the usefulness of photovoltaics. NASA s Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology (RPCT) Program is developing next-generation power-conversion technologies that will enable future missions that have requirements that cannot be met by the two RPS flight systems currently being developed by the Department of Energy for NASA: the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator and the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG).

Wong, Wayne A.

2005-01-01

343

Conditioning of Boron-Containing Low and Intermediate Level Liquid Radioactive Waste - 12041  

SciTech Connect

Improved cementation of low and intermediate level radioactive waste (ILW and LLW) aided by vortex electromagnetic treatment as well as silica addition was investigated. Positive effects including accelerated curing of boron-containing cement waste forms, improve end product quality, decreased product volume and reduced secondary LRW volume from equipment decontamination were established. These results established the possibility of boron-containing LRW cementation without the use of neutralizing alkaline additives that greatly increase the volume of the final product intended for long-term storage (burial). Physical (electromagnetic) treatment in a vortex mixer can change the state of LRW versus chemical treatment. By treating the liquid phase of cement solution only, instead of the whole solution, and using fine powder and nano-particles of ferric oxides instead of separable ferromagnetic cores for the activating agents the positive effect are obtained. VET for 1 to 3 minutes yields boron-containing LRW cemented products of satisfactory quality. Silica addition at 10 % by weight will accelerate curing and solidification and to decrease radionuclide leaching rates from boron-containing cement products. (authors)

Gorbunova, Olga A. [SUE SIA 'Radon', Moscow (Russian Federation); Kamaeva, Tatiana S. [Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-07-01

344

Feasibility of a boron loaded scintillation detector for dose measurements related to boron neutron capture therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The feasibility of the use of a boron loaded scintillation detector in a head phantom for boron neutron capture therapy dose estimates was evaluated. Several monoenergetic neutron groups were produced via the ^7Li(p,n)^7Be reaction in a metallic lithium target using the Van de Graaff accelerator at University of Massachusetts Lowell. The pulse-height spectra were taken from a natural boron loaded

Don-Soo Kim; James J. Egan; Gunter H. R. Kegel; David Desimone

2002-01-01

345

Separation of Boron from Geothermal Water Using a Boron Selective Macroporous Weak Base Anion Exchange Resin  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, batch and column mode tests were performed to evaluate the efficiency of boron removal from geothermal water containing 10-11mgB\\/L using Lewatit MK 51 which is a macroporous weak base anion exchange resin with polyhydroxyl groups showing a very high selectivity and capacity for boron. The optimum resin amount for boron removal from geothermal water was determined as

Idil Yilmaz-Ipek; Pelin Koseoglu; Umran Yuksel; Nazl? Yasar; Gzde Yolseven; Mithat Yuksel; Nalan Kabay

2010-01-01

346

Boron Nitride Nanoribbons: Synthesis and Future Directions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Boron Nitride Nanoribbons (BNNR) have been theorized to have many interesting electrical and magnetic properties and edge states, but these characteristics have not been experimentally verified due to challenges in synthesis and purification. We have produced BNNRs by longitudinally splitting boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) using potassium vapor as an intercalant. Due to the strong interactions between boron nitride sheets, separation of nanoribbons from their parent tubes is challenging. We have used various solvent systems to assist with separation of the ribbons with the goal of probing their properties.

Gibb, Ashley; Erikson, Kris; Sinitskii, Alex; Rousseas, Michael; Alem, Nasim; Tour, James; Zettl, Alex

2012-02-01

347

Boron-10 Lined Proportional Counter Wall Effects  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) is supporting the project 'Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology' at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube based system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report provides information about how variations in proportional counter radius and gas pressure in a typical coincident counter design might affect the observed signal from boron-lined tubes. A discussion comparing tubes to parallel plate counters is also included.

Siciliano, Edward R.; Kouzes, Richard T.

2012-05-01

348

Characterization of boron tolerant bacteria isolated from a fly ash dumping site for bacterial boron remediation.  

PubMed

Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, but can above certain concentrations be toxic to living organisms. A major environmental concern is the removal of boron from contaminated water and fly ash. For this purpose, the samples were collected from a fly ash dumping site, Nagasaki prefecture, Japan. The chemical characteristics and heavy metal concentration of the samples were performed by X-ray fluorescent analysis and leaching test. For bacterial analysis, samples were collected in sterile plastic sheets and isolation was carried out by serial dilution method. The boron tolerant isolates that showed values of maximum inhibitory concentration toward boron ranging from 100 to 260mM level were screened. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, the isolates were most closely related to the genera Bacillus, Lysinibacillus, Microbacterium and Ralstonia. The boron tolerance of these strains was also associated with resistant to several heavy metals, such as As (III), Cr (VI), Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni, Se (III) and Zn. Indeed, these strains were arsenic oxidizing bacteria confirmed by silver nitrate test. These strains exhibited their salt resistances ranging from 4 to 15% were determined in Trypticase soy agar medium. The boron tolerant strains were capable of removing 0.1-2.0 and 2.7-3.7mgl(-1) boron from the medium and fly ash at 168h. Thus, we have successfully identified the boron tolerant and removal bacteria from a fly ash dumping site for boron remediation. PMID:23212536

Edward Raja, Chellaiah; Omine, Kiyoshi

2013-08-01

349

USJ with ClusterBoron and ClusterCarbon co-implants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

ClusterBoron implantation can be used effectively to reduce boron energy while keeping the ClusterBoron energy at a higher level to facilitate better beam transport. With the availability of ClusterBoron species like B18Hx (referred as B18) and B36Hx (referred as B36) along with ClusterCarbon species like C16Hx (referred as C16), it is possible to optimize the dose and energy for both ClusterBoron and ClusterCarbon species to obtain abrupt ultra-low junction with enhanced boron activation. Cluster implant species (B18, B36 and C16) also provide self-amorphization leading to amorphous Si layer. Heavier cluster species show larger amorphous layer thickness than the lighter ones for identical implant conditions. In this study we studied the difference between B18 and B36 process with and without a clustercarbon process for 500 eV monomer equivalent boron energies at a dose of 1e15 atoms/cm2. The results show that both B18 and B36 process provide better Rs and junction characteristics. The main difference between these two cases is a lower sheet resistance with B36 process when compared to B18 by about 10%. At lower energy (<500 eV), the B36 process show between 20% to 30% lowers Rs than B18. Better self-amorphization with B36 than B18 is attributed to the lower Rs with B36. With good beam transport at lower energies, B36 offers a production worthy process taking into account the process advantage too.

Sekar, Karuppanan; Krull, Wade

2011-01-01

350

Borocaptate sodium: a potential boron delivery compound for boron neutron capture therapy evaluated in dogs with spontaneous intracranial tumors.  

PubMed Central

Borocaptate sodium (Na2B12H11SH) is a boron-carrying compound under consideration for use in boron neutron capture therapy. The biodistribution of boron from borocaptate sodium administration will partly determine boron neutron capture therapy efficacy and normal tissue radiation tolerance. The biodistribution of boron was determined in 30 dogs with spontaneous intracranial tumors at 2, 6, or 12 hr after intravenous borocaptate sodium infusion. Blood and tissue boron concentrations were measured using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Mean tumor boron concentration (mean +/- standard error) was 35.9 +/- 4.6 (n = 15), 22.5 +/- 6.0 (n = 9), and 7.0 +/- 1.1 micrograms of boron per g (n = 6) at 2, 6, and 12 hr, respectively, after borocaptate sodium infusion. Peritumor boron concentrations were elevated above that of normal brain in half of the dogs. Normal brain boron concentration (mean +/- standard error) was 4.0 +/- 0.5, 2.0 +/- 0.4, and 2.0 +/- 0.3 micrograms of boron per g at 2, 6, and 12 hr after infusion, respectively. Some cranial and systemic tissues, and blood, had high boron concentration relative to tumor tissue. Geometric dose sparing should partly offset these relatively high normal tissue and blood concentrations. Borocaptate sodium biodistribution is favorable because tumor boron concentrations of recommended magnitude for boron neutron capture therapy were obtained and there was a high tumor-to-normal brain boron concentration ratio. PMID:1465427

Kraft, S L; Gavin, P R; DeHaan, C E; Leathers, C W; Bauer, W F; Miller, D L; Dorn, R V

1992-01-01

351

Boron-doped diamond microdisc arrays: electrochemical characterisation and their use as a substrate for the production of microelectrode arrays of diverse metals (Ag, Au, Cu)via electrodeposition.  

PubMed

A novel boron-doped diamond (BDD) microelectrode array is characterised with electrochemical and atomic force microscopic techniques. The array consists of 40 micron-diameter sized BDD discs which are separated by 250 microns from their nearest neighbour in a hexagonal arrangement. The conducting discs can be electroplated to produce arrays of copper, silver or gold for analytical purposes in addition to operating as an array of BDD-microelectrodes. Proof-of-concept is shown for four separate examples; a gold plated array for arsenic detection, a copper plated array for nitrate analysis, a silver plated array for hydrogen peroxide monitoring and last, cathodic stripping voltammetry for lead at the bare BDD-array. PMID:16096678

Simm, Andrew O; Banks, Craig E; Ward-Jones, Sarah; Davies, Trevor J; Lawrence, Nathan S; Jones, Timothy G J; Jiang, Li; Compton, Richard G

2005-09-01

352

Boron-10 loaded inorganic shielding material  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Shielding material containing Boron 10 and gadoliunium for neutron absorption has been developed to reduce interference from low energy neutrons in measurement of fission neutron spectrum using Li-6 fast neutron spectrometer.

Baker, S. I.; Ryskiewicz, R. S.

1972-01-01

353

Boron thermal/epithermal neutron capture therapy  

SciTech Connect

The development of various particle beams for radiotherapy represents an attempt to improve dose distribution, and to provide high LET radiations which are less sensitive to ambient physical and radiobiological factors such as oxygen tension, cell cycle, and dose rate. In general, a compromise is necessary as effective RBE is reduced in order to spread the dose distribution over the anticipated tumor volume. The approach of delivering stable non-toxic isotopes to tumor, and then activating these atoms subsequently via an external radiation beam has mator advantages; problems associated with high uptake of these isotopes in competing cell pools are obviated, and the general tumor volume can be included in the treatment field of the activating beam. As long as the normal tissues supporting tumor show a low uptake of the isotope to be activated, and as long as the range of the reaction products is short, dose will be restricted to tumor, with a consequent high therapeutic ratio. Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) is generally carried out by activating boron-10 with low energy neutrons. The range of the high LET, low OER particles from the /sup 10/B(n, ..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction is approx. 10..mu.., or one cell diameter, a situation that is optimal for cell killing. Significant advantages may be gained by using the NCT procedure in conjunction with improved tissue penetration provided with epithermal or filtered beams, and new compounds showing physiological binding to tumor.

Fairchild, R.G.

1982-01-01

354

Boronline, a new generation of boron meter  

SciTech Connect

Rolls-Royce is a global business providing integrated power systems for use on land, at sea and in the air. The Group has a balanced business portfolio with leading market positions - civil aerospace, defence aerospace, marine and energy Rolls-Royce understands the challenges of design, procurement, manufacture, operation and in-service support of nuclear reactor plants, with over 50 years of experience through the Royal Navy submarine programme. Rolls-Royce can therefore offer full product life-cycle management for new civil nuclear installations, as well as support to existing installations, including plant lifetime extensions. Rolls-Royce produced for 40 years, Instrumentation and Control (I and C) systems of and associated services for nuclear reactors in Europe, including 58 French reactors and others situated in the United States and in others countries, such as China. Rolls-Royce equipped in this domain 200 nuclear reactors in 20 countries. Among all of its nuclear systems, Rolls Royce is presenting to the conference its new generation of on-line boron measurement system, so called Boronline. (authors)

Pirat, P. [Rolls-Royce Company, Meylan (France)

2011-07-01

355

Boron nitride nanotubes: nanoparticles functionalization and junction fabrication.  

PubMed

Adopting a wet chemistry method, Au and Fe3O4 nanoparticles were functionalized on boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) successfully for the first time. X-ray diffraction pattern and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the resultant products. Subsequently, a method was proposed to fabricate heterojunction structures based on the particle-functionalized BNNTs. As a demonstration, BNNT-carbon nanostructure, BNNT-ZnO and BNNT-Ga2O3 junctions were successfully fabricated using the functionalized particles as catalysts. PMID:17450790

Zhi, Chunyi; Bando, Yoshio; Shen, Guozhen; Tang, Chengchun; Golberg, Dmitri

2007-02-01

356

Molecular marker based characterization and genetic diversity of wheat genotypes in relation to boron efficiency  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Boron deficient soils pose a critical problem to wheat production in many areas of the world including Bangladesh and causes significant yield reduction. Therefore, in the present study, 21 diverse wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes collected from three different countries (Bangladesh, India, a...

357

Effect of boron supplementation on semen quality estimates in mature boars  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The objective of the study was to determine the effect of dietary boron supplementation on sperm production and semen quality estimates in mature boars. Twelve crossbred boars (Landrace x Large White x Duroc x Hampshire) that were 2.5 +/- 0.2 years of age and 215 +/- 5 kg were randomly assigned to ...

358

Mechanism of the electrochemical dehydrogenation of hexahydropyrimidine on a boron-doped diamond electrode  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The electrochemical behavior of hexahydropyrimidine (HHP) on a boron-doped diamond electrode was studied. The obtained data were compared with the results of previous studies on the electrooxidation of HHP on platinum and gold electrodes. It was shown that different products can be obtained from one organic substance using different electrode materials.

Vedenyapina, M. D.; Simakova, A. P.; Kuznetsov, V. V.; Makhova, N. N.; Vedenyapin, A. A.

2015-04-01

359

Water-assisted chemical vapor deposition synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and their photoluminescence property  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the efficient synthesis of boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is demonstrated. The replacement of metal oxide by water vapor could continuously generate intermediate boron oxide vapor and enhance the production of BN nanotubes. The nanotubes synthesized when an appropriate amount of water vapor was introduced had an average diameter of about 80 nm and lengths of several hundred ?m. The diameter and yield of nanotubes could be controlled by tuning the amount of water vapor. This simple water-assisted CVD approach paves a new path to the fabrication of BN nanotubes in large quantities.

Li, Juan; Li, Jianbao; Yin, Yanchun; Chen, Yongjun; Bi, Xiaofan

2013-09-01

360

Water-assisted chemical vapor deposition synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and their photoluminescence property.  

PubMed

A novel water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the efficient synthesis of boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is demonstrated. The replacement of metal oxide by water vapor could continuously generate intermediate boron oxide vapor and enhance the production of BN nanotubes. The nanotubes synthesized when an appropriate amount of water vapor was introduced had an average diameter of about 80 nm and lengths of several hundred ?m. The diameter and yield of nanotubes could be controlled by tuning the amount of water vapor. This simple water-assisted CVD approach paves a new path to the fabrication of BN nanotubes in large quantities. PMID:23958587

Li, Juan; Li, Jianbao; Yin, Yanchun; Chen, Yongjun; Bi, Xiaofan

2013-09-13

361

Radioisotope X-ray fluorescence and neutron activation analyses of the trace element concentrations of the rainbow trout  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The muscles and livers of the ten rainbow trouts ( Oncorhynchus mykiss; N, 1752) obtained from Sapanca, Aquaculture Facility of Aquatic Products Faculty, The University of Istanbul (Turkey), have been analysed quantitatively for some minor elements using the radioisotope energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) methods. It was found that samples contain Na, K, Ca, Sc, Cs, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Au, La and Ce in different amounts. Comparison of the results with those of reference river fish samples indicated that agricultural rainbow trout samples from Sapanca region have higher Fe level.

Akyuz, T.; Bassari, A.; Bolcal, C.; Sener, E.; Yildiz, M.; Kucer, R.; Kaplan, Z.; Dogan, G.; Akyuz, S.

1999-01-01

362

Radioisotope Stirling Generator Options for Pluto Fast Flyby Mission  

SciTech Connect

The preceding paper described conceptual designs and analytical results for five Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) options for the Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) mission, and the present paper describes three Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) options for the same mission. The RSG options are based on essentially the same radioisotope heat source modules used in previously flown RTGs and on designs and analyses of a 75-watt free-piston Stirling engine produced by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) for NASA's Lewis Research Center. The integrated system design options presented were generated in a Fairchild Space study sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Special Applications, in support of ongoing PFF mission and spacecraft studies that the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is conducting for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). That study's NASA-directed goal is to reduce the spacecraft mass from its baseline value of 166 kg to ~110 kg, which implies a mass goal of less than 10 kg for a power source able to deliver 69 watts(e) at the end of the 9.2-year mission. In general, the Stirling options were found to be lighter than the thermoelectric options described in the preceding paper. But they are less mature, requiring more development, and entailing greater programmatic risk. The Stirling power system mass ranged from 7.3 kg (well below the 10-kg goal) for a non-redundant system to 11.3 kg for a redundant system able to maintain full power if one of its engines fails. In fact, the latter system could deliver as much as 115 watts(e) if desired by the mission planners. There are 2 copies in the file.

Schock, Alfred

2012-01-19

363

Therapeutic aspects of radio-isotopes in hepatobiliary malignancy.  

PubMed

Liver tumours frequently present at a late stage and only a minority of patients are likely to benefit from resection or transplantation. Inoperable tumours carry a grave prognosis. External beam irradiation of the liver is dose-limited by the radiosensitivity of hepatocytes, particularly in the presence of cirrhosis, but internal radiation using radio-isotope sources can achieve more selective irradiation of the chosen field. Sealed sources are dose-limited by their effects on surrounding tissues, whereas with unsealed sources the dose of radio-isotope administered is limited by bone marrow suppression. Iridium-192 wires are most frequently employed as a sealed intracavitary source. They may be inserted surgically, transhepatically or endoscopically. Doses of up to 60 Gy can be delivered to a malignant biliary stricture without damage to the surrounding parenchyma. The incidence of cholangitis is low if treatment is administered after insertion of an endoprosthesis. Unsealed radio-isotope sources may be injected directly into the tumour, administered embolically via the hepatic artery in the form of microspheres or lipid droplets, or given via parenteral infusion attached to tumour-specific antibodies. Of these vehicles, the lipid agent Lipiodol appears to be the most effective and can deliver a potentially lethal dose of radiation to small tumours. Host reaction to the injected antibody remains a major drawback to the use of monoclonal antibodies as targeting agents. Iodine-131 is a beta- and gamma-emitter, producing a local tumoricidal effect and allowing accurate dosimetry by means of external scintigraphy. Yttrium-90 is a pure beta-emitter with a greater maximum beta energy and cytotoxic range; however, it is retained in bony tissues, resulting in a dose-related risk of marrow suppression. Bone absorption cannot be measured by external imaging owing to the absence of gamma emission. This lack of accurate dosimetry, coupled with the toxic side-effects of yttrium treatment, make iodine-131 the current isotope of choice. PMID:1655152

Novell, J R; Hilson, A; Hobbs, K E

1991-08-01

364

Utilizing Radioisotope Power System Waste Heat for Spacecraft Thermal Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One of the advantages of using a Radioisotope Power System (RPS) for deep space or planetary surface missions is the readily available waste heat, which can be used to maintain electronic components within a controlled temperature range, to warm propulsion tanks and mobility actuators, and to gasify liquid propellants. Previous missions using Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) dissipated a very large quantity of waste heat due to the relatively low efficiency of the thermoelectric conversion technology. The next generation RPSs, such as the 110-watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) will have much higher conversion efficiencies than their predecessors and therefore may require alternate approaches to transferring waste heat to the spacecraft. RTGs, with efficiencies of approx. 6 to 7% and 200 C housing surface temperatures, would need to use large and heavy radiator heat exchangers to transfer the waste heat to the internal spacecraft components. At the same time, sensitive spacecraft instruments must be shielded from the thermal radiation by using the heat exchangers or additional shields. The SRG110, with an efficiency around 22% and 50 C nominal housing surface temperature, can use the available waste heat more efficiently by more direct heat transfer methods such as heat pipes, thermal straps, or fluid loops. The lower temperatures allow the SRG110 much more flexibility to the spacecraft designers in configuring the generator without concern of overheating nearby scientific instruments, thereby eliminating the need for thermal shields. This paper will investigate using a high efficiency SRG110 for spacecraft thermal management and outline potential methods in several conceptual missions (Lunar Rover, Mars Rover, and Titan Lander) to illustrate the advantages with regard to ease of assembly, less complex interfaces, and overall mass savings.

Pantano, David R.; Dottore, Frank; Geng, Steven M.; Schrieber, Jeffrey G.; Tobery, E. Wayne; Palko, Joseph L.

2005-01-01

365

Development of Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator for Space Exploration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Under the joint sponsorship of the Department of Energy and NASA, a radioisotope power system utilizing Stirling power conversion technology is being developed for potential future space missions. The higher conversion efficiency of the Stirling cycle compared with that of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) used in previous missions (Viking, Pioneer, Voyager, Galileo, Ulysses, Cassini, and New Horizons) offers the advantage of a four-fold reduction in PuO2 fuel, thereby saving cost and reducing radiation exposure to support personnel. With the advancement of state-of-the-art Stirling technology development under the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) project, the Stirling Radioisotope Generator program has evolved to incorporate the advanced Stirling convertor (ASC), provided by Sunpower, into an engineering unit. Due to the reduced envelope and lighter mass of the ASC compared to the previous Stirling convertor, the specific power of the flight generator is projected to increase from 3.5 to 7 We/kg, along with a 25 percent reduction in generator length. Modifications are being made to the ASC design to incorporate features for thermal, mechanical, and electrical integration with the engineering unit. These include the heat collector for hot end interface, cold-side flange for waste heat removal and structural attachment, and piston position sensor for ASC control and power factor correction. A single-fault tolerant, active power factor correction controller is used to synchronize the Stirling convertors, condition the electrical power from AC to DC, and to control the ASCs to maintain operation within temperature and piston stroke limits. Development activities at Sunpower and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are also being conducted on the ASC to demonstrate the capability for long life, high reliability, and flight qualification needed for use in future missions.

Chan, Jack; Wood, J. Gary; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

2007-01-01

366

Radioisotope Stirling Generator Options for Pluto Fast Flyby Mission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The preceding paper (Schock 1994) described conceptual designs and analytical results for five Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) options for the Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) mission, and the present paper describes three Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) options for the same mission. The RSG options are based on essentially the same radioisotope heat source modules used in previously flown RTGs and on designs and analyses of a 75-Watt free-piston Stirling engine produced by Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) for NASA's Lewis Research Center. The integrated system design options presented were generated in a Fairchild Space study sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Special Applications, in support of ongoing PFF mission and spacecraft studies that the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is conducting for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). That study's NASA-directed goal is to reduce the spacecraft mass from its baseline value of 166 kg to -110 kg, which implies a mass goal of less than 10 kg for a power source able to deliver 69 Watts(e) at the end of the 9.2-year mission. In general, the Stirling options were found to be lighter than the thermoelectric options described in the preceding paper. But they are less mature, requiring more development, and entailing greater programmatic risk. The Stirling power system mass ranged from 7.3 kg (well below the 10-kg goal) for a non-redundant system to 11.3 kg for a redundant system able to maintain full power if one of its two engines fails. In fact, the latter system could deliver as much as 115 Watts(e) if desired by the mission planners.

Schock, Alfred

1994-07-01

367

Boron impregnation treatment of Eucalyptus grandis wood  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eucalyptus grandis is suitable for small timber purposes, but its wood is reported to be non-durable and difficult to treat. Boron compounds being diffusible, and the vacuum-pressure impregnation (VPI) method being more suitable for industrial-scale treatment, the possibility of boron impregnation of partially dry to green timber was investigated using a 6% boric acid equivalent (BAE) solution of boric acid

T. K. Dhamodaran; R. Gnanaharan

2007-01-01

368

Growth and modeling of boron carbide nanosprings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boron carbide nanosprings have been synthesized using the technique of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The nanosprings grow via the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy has determined that the nanosprings form from amorphous boron carbide nanowires. A model of the helical growth of the nanowires has been developed that is based on the work of the adhesion of the

Daqing Zhang; Yanko A. Kranov; David N. McIlroy; M. Grant Norton

2001-01-01

369

Hard and tough boron suboxide based composites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boron suboxide (B6O) powder was synthesized at temperatures of about 1400C from the reaction of amorphous boron powder with boric acid. The synthesized B6O powders were hot pressed at temperatures up to 1900C and at pressures of 50MPa. Additionally to pure B6O materials, composites with aluminium were prepared. The microstructure and properties of the sintered compacts were investigated. The addition

T. C. Shabalala; D. S. McLachlan; I. Sigalas; M. Herrmann

2008-01-01

370

Boron isotope systematics of marine sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boron contents and boron isotopic compositions were determined for modern and ancient (Permian to Miocene) marine sediments, including pelagic clay, calcareous ooze, siliceous ooze and neritic clay sediments. delta11B values of modern marine sediments range from -6.6 to +4.80\\/00. Isotopic variation is controlled by the simple mixing of four major constituents, detritus of continental origin, marine smectite, biogenic carbonates and

Tsuyoshi Ishikawa; Eizo Nakamura

1993-01-01

371

Boron-Loaded Liquid Scintillation Neutron Detectors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The general problems involved in constructing boron-loaded liquid scintillation neutron detectors are considered. The characteristics of particular counters which have been successfully used in neutron transmission measurements by the time-of-flight method are then described. The design of these counters was guided by the results of a Monte Carlo study of neutron capture in a boron-poisoned medium. This calculation gives the

Lowell M. Bollinger; George E. Thomas

1957-01-01

372

Semiconducting boron-rich neutron detectors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Semiconducting boron-rich boron-carbon alloys have been deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Heterojunction diodes made with 276nm thick nanocrystalline layers of these alloys have been used as real-time solid-state neutron detectors. Individual neutrons were detected and signals induced by gamma rays were determined to be insignificant. Linearity of detection was demonstrated over more than two orders of magnitude in flux.

Brian W. Robertson; Shireen Adenwalla; Andrew Harken; Peter Welsch; Jennifer I. Brand; John P. Claassen; Neil M. Boag; Peter A. Dowben

2002-01-01

373

Resistive all boron carbide neutron detectors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Semiconducting boron carbide is a promising material for true solid-state neutron detection [1]. An all boron carbide (BC) layer was deposited on sapphire (Al2O3) with sputtered Chrome\\/Gold electrical contacts. Resistance vs. temperature measurements indicate a T-3\\/2 dependence and a band gap of 0.17eV. X-ray diffraction measurements confirm the similarities in crystal structure of the films grown on Al2O3 and

Ellen Day; Manuel Diaz; Carolina Ilie; Shireen Adenwalla

2006-01-01

374

Boron Nitride Composites By Chemical Vapor Deposition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Composites of boron nitride (BN) have been made by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of a BN matrix on a BN felt fiber substrate. Reactant gases were boron trifluoride and ammonia. The composites have a relatively high density (1.70 g\\/cm3), a crystallite size LC = 150 A and an interlayer spacing d002 = 3.35 A. Measurements of elastic modulus and

Hugh O. Pierson

1975-01-01

375

Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide  

DOEpatents

An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

Duran, E.L.

1984-11-29

376

Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide  

DOEpatents

An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

Duran, Edward L. (Santa Fe, NM)

1985-01-01

377

Full-scale simulation of seawater reverse osmosis desalination processes for boron removal: Effect of membrane fouling.  

PubMed

The objective of this study is to further develop previously reported mechanistic predictive model that simulates boron removal in full-scale seawater reverse osmosis (RO) desalination processes to take into account the effect of membrane fouling. Decrease of boron removal and reduction in water production rate by membrane fouling due to enhanced concentration polarization were simulated as a decrease in solute mass transfer coefficient in boundary layer on membrane surface. Various design and operating options under fouling condition were examined including single- versus double-pass configurations, different number of RO elements per vessel, use of RO membranes with enhanced boron rejection, and pH adjustment. These options were quantitatively compared by normalizing the performance of the system in terms of E(min), the minimum energy costs per product water. Simulation results suggested that most viable options to enhance boron rejection among those tested in this study include: i) minimizing fouling, ii) exchanging the existing SWRO elements to boron-specific ones, and iii) increasing pH in the second pass. The model developed in this study is expected to help design and optimization of the RO processes to achieve the target boron removal at target water recovery under realistic conditions where membrane fouling occurs during operation. PMID:22578430

Park, Pyung-Kyu; Lee, Sangho; Cho, Jae-Seok; Kim, Jae-Hong

2012-08-01

378

Characterization of Boron Contamination in Fluorine Implantation using Boron Trifluoride as a Source Material  

SciTech Connect

Fluorine implantation process purity was considered on different types of high current implanters. It was found that implanters equipped with an indirectly heated cathode ion source show an enhanced deep boron contamination compared to a high current implanter using a cold RF-driven multicusp ion source when boron trifluoride is used for fluorine implantations. This contamination is directly related to the source technology and thus, should be considered potentially for any implanter design using hot cathode/hot filament ion source, independently of the manufacturer.The boron contamination results from the generation of double charged boron ions in the arc chamber and the subsequent charge exchange reaction to single charged boron ions taking place between the arc chamber and the extraction electrode. The generation of the double charged boron ions depends mostly on the source parameters, whereas the pressure in the region between the arc chamber and the extraction electrode is mostly responsible for the charge exchange from double charged to single charged ions. The apparent mass covers a wide range, starting at mass 11. A portion of boron ions with energies of (19/11) times higher than fluorine energy has the same magnetic rigidity as fluorine beam and cannot be separated by the analyzer magnet. The earlier described charge exchange effects between the extraction electrode and the entrance to the analyzer magnet, however, generates boron beam with a higher magnetic rigidity compared to fluorine beam and cannot cause boron contamination after mass-separation.The energetic boron contamination was studied as a function of the ion source parameters, such as gas flow, arc voltage, and source magnet settings, as well as analyzing magnet aperture resolution. This allows process optimization reducing boron contamination to the level acceptable for device performance.

Schmeide, Matthias [Infineon Technologies Dresden GmbH, Koenigsbruecker Str. 180, D-01099 Dresden (Germany); Kondratenko, Serguei [Axcelis Technologies, Inc., 108 Cherry Hill Dr., Beverly, MA (United States)

2011-01-07

379

Boron Stress Responsive MicroRNAs and Their Targets in Barley  

PubMed Central

Boron stress is an environmental factor affecting plant development and production. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been found to be involved in several plant processes such as growth regulation and stress responses. In this study, miRNAs associated with boron stress were identified and characterized in barley. miRNA profiles were also comparatively analyzed between root and leave samples. A total of 31 known and 3 new miRNAs were identified in barley; 25 of them were found to respond to boron treatment. Several miRNAs were expressed in a tissue specific manner; for example, miR156d, miR171a, miR397, and miR444a were only detected in leaves. Additionally, a total of 934 barley transcripts were found to be specifically targeted and degraded by miRNAs. In silico analysis of miRNA target genes demonstrated that many miRNA targets are conserved transcription factors such as Squamosa promoter-binding protein, Auxin response factor (ARF), and the MYB transcription factor family. A majority of these targets were responsible for plant growth and response to environmental changes. We also propose that some of the miRNAs in barley such as miRNA408 might play critical roles against boron exposure. In conclusion, barley may use several pathways and cellular processes targeted by miRNAs to cope with boron stress. PMID:23555702

Ozhuner, Esma; Eldem, Vahap; Ipek, Arif; Okay, Sezer; Sakcali, Serdal; Zhang, Baohong; Boke, Hatice; Unver, Turgay

2013-01-01

380

Potential rare earth free permanent magnet: interstitial boron doped FeCo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave method, we investigated the structural and the magnetic properties of boron doped FeCo. After fully relaxing the lattice structure, the interatomic distances between boron and Fe atoms were found to be greatly enhanced and the tetragonal distortion was realized due to this increased interatomic distance. Nonetheless, both the unit cell volume and the total magnetic moment of the tetragonally distorted FeCo structure were weakly suppressed compared with those of ideal bulk FeCo. We found a magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant of 0.8 MJ m-3 and this was mainly due to the tetragonal distortion induced by boron impurity, not from the hybridization effect with Fe or Co, because no essential change in the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant was found even without boron impurity in the lattice distorted system. Additionally, the estimated maximum energy product and coercive field were 100 MGOe and 745 kA m-1, respectively. These results may imply that the interstitial boron doped FeCo can be used for a potential rare earth free permanent magnet although those values are likely to be suppressed in real samples due to micromagnetic factors.

Khan, Imran; Hong, Jisang

2014-10-01

381

Radioisotope Thermophotovoltaic (RTPV) Power System for Space Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Thermophotovoltaic (RTV) energy conversion, coupled to the radioisotope powered General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is currently being developed by NASA. The goal of the program is to develop a 100 watt electrical power system with an efficient of 20%. Special control is the key element in obtaining an efficient system. Results presented show that excellent spectral control can be achieved so that reaching the goal of 20% efficiency is possible. Excellent spectral control is achieved by using a combination of selective emitters and optical filters and by eliminating radiation leakage from the optical cavity.

Chubb, Donald L.; Scheiman, David A.

2004-01-01

382

Analytical predictions of RTG power degradation. [Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The DEGRA computer code that is based on a mathematical model which predicts performance and time-temperature dependent degradation of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator is discussed. The computer code has been used to predict performance and generator degradation for the selenide Ground Demonstration Unit (GDS-1) and the generator used in the Galileo Project. Results of parametric studies of load voltage vs generator output are examined as well as the I-V curve and the resulting predicted power vs voltage. The paper also discusses the increased capability features contained in DEGRA2 and future plans for expanding the computer code performance.

Noon, E. L.; Raag, V.

1979-01-01

383

Boronization on NSTX using Deuterated Trimethylboron  

SciTech Connect

Boronization on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has proved to be quite beneficial with increases in confinement and density, and decreases in impurities observed in the plasma. The boron has been applied to the interior surfaces of NSTX, about every 2 to 3 weeks of plasma operation, by producing a glow discharge in the vacuum vessel using deuterated trimethylboron (TMB) in a 10% mixture with helium. Special NSTX requirements restricted the selection of the candidate boronization method to the use of deuterated boron compounds. Deuterated TMB met these requirements, but is a hazardous gas and special care in the execution of the boronization process is required. This paper describes the existing GDC, Gas Injection, and Torus Vacuum Pumping System hardware used for this process, the glow discharge process, and the automated control system that allows for remote operation to maximize both the safety and efficacy of applying the boron coating. The administrative requirements and the detailed procedure for the setup, operation and shutdown of the process are also described.

W.R. Blanchard; R.C. Gernhardt; H.W. Kugel; P.H. LaMarche

2002-01-28

384

CZT X-ray detectors obtained by the boron encapsulated vertical Bridgman method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, some of the authors showed that it is possible to grow CZT crystals by the boron oxide encapsulated vertical Bridgman method. The most important feature of the technique is that the crystal, during the growth, is fully encapsulated by a thin layer of liquid boron oxide, so that the crystal-crucible contact is prevented. The stress of the crucible to the crystal is strongly reduced also during the cooling, because the boron oxide layer is molten down to about 500C. A number of detectors have been prepared out of these crystals. The transport properties (?? product) have been studied by photoconductivity measurements as well as by determining the response to hard X-ray irradiation. The transport properties have been studied as a function of the indium content and of the position of the wafer which the detector was cut out.

Pavesi, M.; Zanichelli, M.; Gombia, E.; Mosca, R.; Marchini, L.; Zha, M.; Zappettini, A.; Caroli, E.; Auricchio, N.; Negri, B.

2007-09-01

385

Boosting activation of oxygen molecules on C60 fullerene by boron doping.  

PubMed

The activation of oxygen molecules on boron-doped C60 fullerene (C59 B) and the subsequent water formation reaction are systematically investigated by using hybrid density functional calculations. Results indicate that C59 B shows a favorable ability to activate oxygen molecules both kinetically and thermodynamically. The oxygen molecule is first adsorbed on the boron atom, which is identified to be the most reactive site in C59 B for O2 adsorption because of its high positive charge and spin density. The adsorption structure C59 B?O2 can further isomerize to form two products with small reaction barriers. Water formation reactions upon these two structures are energetically favorable and suggest a four-electron mechanism for the oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by C59 B. This work provides a reliable theoretical insight into the catalytic properties of boron-doped fullerene, which is believed to be helpful to explore fullerene catalysts. PMID:25399745

Li, Qiao-Zhi; Zheng, Jia-Jia; Dang, Jing-Shuang; Zhao, Xiang

2015-02-01

386

Development of magnetic resonance technology for noninvasive boron quantification  

SciTech Connect

Boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) were developed in support of the noninvasive boron quantification task of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) program. The hardware and software described in this report are modifications specific to a GE Signa{trademark} MRI system, release 3.X and are necessary for boron magnetic resonance operation. The technology developed in this task has been applied to obtaining animal pharmacokinetic data of boron compounds (drug time response) and the in-vivo localization of boron in animal tissue noninvasively. 9 refs., 21 figs.

Bradshaw, K.M.

1990-11-01

387

Boron Stress and Boron Tissue Distribution in Arbidopsis thaliana and Pelargonium X Hortorum  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The micronutrient boron is essential for plant growth and development. Deficient or excessive levels of this micronutrient result in the formation of growth defects that reduce yield in crop plants and result in discarding of horticultural plants. To study the responses of plants to altered boron ...

388

A Novel Method of Boron Delivery Using Sodium Iodide Symporter for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy  

PubMed Central

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) effectiveness depends on the preferential sequestration of boron in cancer cells relative to normal tissue cells. We present a novel strategy for sequestering boron using an adenovirus expressing the sodium iodide symporter (NIS). Human glioma grown subcutaneously in athymic mice and orthotopic rat brain tumors were transfected with NIS using a direct tumor injection of adenovirus. Boron bound as sodium tetrafluoroborate (NaBF4) was administered systemically several days after transfection. Tumors were excised hours later and assessed for boron concentration using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. In the human glioma transfected with NIS, boron concentration was more than 10 fold higher with 100 mg/kg of NaBF4, compared to tumor not transfected. In the orthotopic tumor model, the presence of NIS conferred almost 4 times the boron concentration in rat tumors transfected with human virus compared with contralateral normal brain not transfected. We conclude that adenovirus expressing NIS has the potential to be used as a novel boron delivery agent and should be explored for future clinical applications. PMID:20921830

KUMAR, Sanath; FREYTAG, Svend O.; BARTON, Kenneth N.; BURMEISTER, Jay; JOINER, Michael C.; SEDGHI, Bijan; MOVSAS, Benjamin; BINNS, Peter J.; KIM, Jae Ho; BROWN, Stephen L.

2013-01-01

389

Femtosecond-laser-induced destruction of boron-nitride nanotubes and boron-nitride doped graphene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By means of first principles calculations we studied the intense femtosecond-laser excitation of several boron nitride nanotubes and a boron-nitride doped graphene layer up to irradiation levels where these structures disintegrate. We performed molecular dynamics simulations using our in-house Code for Highly excited Valence Electron Systems (CHIVES). For different boron-nitride nanotubes we determined the damage threshold in terms of the electronic temperature and the absorbed energy per atom. We found that all nanotubes studied were destroyed in the first 200 fs after an ultrafast laser excitation heating the electrons to 108 mHa (34103 K). Some tubes also disintegrated at lower electronic temperatures. For the boron-nitride doped graphene we found that at a laser-induced electronic temperature of 100 mHa (31577 K) bonds break and the boron-nitride dimer leaves the structure.

Bauerhenne, Bernd; Eschstruth, Nils; Zijlstra, Eeuwe S.; Garcia, Martin E.

2013-11-01

390

Ceramic silicon-boron-carbon fibers from organic silicon-boron-polymers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Novel high strength ceramic fibers derived from boron, silicon, and carbon organic precursor polymers are discussed. The ceramic fibers are thermally stable up to and beyond 1200 C in air. The method of preparation of the boron-silicon-carbon fibers from a low oxygen content organosilicon boron precursor polymer of the general formula Si(R2)BR(sup 1) includes melt-spinning, crosslinking, and pyrolysis. Specifically, the crosslinked (or cured) precursor organic polymer fibers do not melt or deform during pyrolysis to form the silicon-boron-carbon ceramic fiber. These novel silicon-boron-carbon ceramic fibers are useful in high temperature applications because they retain tensile and other properties up to 1200 C, from 1200 to 1300 C, and in some cases higher than 1300 C.

Riccitiello, Salvatore R. (inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (inventor)

1993-01-01

391

Sodium Variable Conductance Heat Pipe for Radioisotope Stirling Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling convertor provides this cooling. If the converter stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, and also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) has been designed to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor in an Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). When the Stirling convertor is turned off, the VCHP will activate when the temperatures rises 30 C above the setpoint temperature. A prototype VCHP with sodium as the working fluid was fabricated and tested in both gravity aided and against gravity conditions for a nominal heater head temperature of 790 C. The results show very good agreement with the predictions and validate the model. The gas front was located at the exit of the reservoir when heater head temperature was 790 C while cooling was ON, simulating an operating Advanced Stirling Converter (ASC). When cooling stopped, the temperature increased by 30 C, allowing the gas front to move past the radiator, which transferred the heat to the case. After resuming the cooling flow, the front returned at the initial location turning OFF the VCHP. The against gravity working conditions showed a colder reservoir and faster transients.

Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Walker, Kara

2009-01-01

392

High Temperature Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling convertor provides this cooling. If the Stirling convertor stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) is under development to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor. The status of the ongoing effort in developing this technology is presented in this paper. An earlier, preliminary design had a radiator outside the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) casing, used NaK as the working fluid, and had the reservoir located on the cold side adapter flange. The revised design has an internal radiator inside the casing, with the reservoir embedded inside the insulation. A large set of advantages are offered by this new design. In addition to reducing the overall size and mass of the VCHP, simplicity, compactness and easiness in assembling the VCHP with the ASRG are significantly enhanced. Also, the permanently elevated temperatures of the entire VCHP allows the change of the working fluid from a binary compound (NaK) to single compound (Na). The latter, by its properties, allows higher performance and further mass reduction of the system. Preliminary design and analysis shows an acceptable peak temperature of the ASRG case of 140 C while the heat losses caused by the addition of the VCHP are 1.8 W.

Tarau, Calin; Walker, Kara L.; Anderson, William G.

2009-01-01

393

GRC Supporting Technology for NASA's Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

From 1999 to 2006, the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) supported a NASA project to develop a high-efficiency, nominal 110-We Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) for potential use on NASA missions. Lockheed Martin was selected as the System Integration Contractor for the SRG110, under contract to the Department of Energy (DOE). The potential applications included deep space missions, and Mars rovers. The project was redirected in 2006 to make use of the Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) that was being developed by Sunpower, Inc. under contract to GRC, which would reduce the mass of the generator and increase the power output. This change would approximately double the specific power and result in the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). The SRG110 supporting technology effort at GRC was replanned to support the integration of the Sunpower convertor and the ASRG. This paper describes the ASRG supporting technology effort at GRC and provides details of the contributions in some of the key areas. The GRC tasks include convertor extended-operation testing in air and in thermal vacuum environments, heater head life assessment, materials studies, permanent magnet characterization and aging tests, structural dynamics testing, electromagnetic interference and electromagnetic compatibility characterization, evaluation of organic materials, reliability studies, and analysis to support controller development.

Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Thieme, Lanny G.

2008-01-01

394

Utilizing Radioisotope Power Systems for Human Lunar Exploration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Vision for Space Exploration has a goal of sending crewed missions to the lunar surface as early as 2015 and no later than 2020. The use of nuclear power sources could aid in assisting crews in exploring the surface and performing In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) activities. Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) provide constant sources of electrical power and thermal energy for space applications. RPSs were carried on six of the crewed Apollo missions to power surface science packages, five of which still remain on the lunar surface. Future RPS designs may be able to play a more active role in supporting a long-term human presence. Due to its lower thermal and radiation output, the planned Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) appears particularly attractive for manned applications. The MCNPX particle transport code has been used to model the current SRG design to assess its use in proximity with astronauts operating on the surface. Concepts of mobility and ISRU infrastructure were modeled using MCNPX to analyze the impact of RPSs on crewed mobility systems. Strategies for lowering the radiation dose were studied to determine methods of shielding the crew from the RPSs.

Schreiner, Timothy M.

2005-01-01

395

Retention of Radium-225 and Its Daughter Radioisotopes in Bone  

SciTech Connect

The natural bone seeking tendency of Ra+2, similar to the other alkali metal ions, coupled with the short range high LET of -particle emissions are an ideal combination for localized therapy, and recently 11.4 d 223Ra has been studied for therapy of bone tumors in rats and humans [1,2]. Actinium-225 is also an attractive radioisotope for endo-radiotherapy in a single decay chain from 225Ac, over 26 MeV (~70% of total) is carried by four - particles ranging in energy from 5.7 to 8.4 MeV [3,4]. Although Ac+3 does not home naturally to bone (rather to liver) [5,6], its parent, 225Ra ( -, t1/2 = 15 d), can be used as an in vivo source for 225Ac. A pivotal question for the 225Ra/225Ac in vivo generator system is whether translocation of the daughter nuclei occurs prior to or following the uptake of 225Ra by the bone. In order to assess potential collateral damage to soft tissue organs it is essential to quantitate the extent to which 225Ac is retained in organs following the uptake of 225Ra. We have attempted to answer these questions by investigating the extent of translocation of 225Ac and 213Bi, two daughter radioisotopes of 225Ra, following retention of initially pure 225Ra in bone in normal mice.

Mirzadeh, Saed [ORNL; Garland, Marc A [ORNL; Kennel, Steve J [ORNL

2008-01-01

396

Technology Development for a Stirling Radioisotope Power System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA Glenn Research Center and the Department of Energy are developing a Stirling convertor for an advanced radioisotope power system to provide spacecraft on-board electric power for NASA deep space missions. NASA Glenn is addressing key technology issues through the use of two NASA Phase II SBIRs with Stirling Technology Company (STC) of Kennewick, WA. Under the first SBIR, STC demonstrated a synchronous connection of two thermodynamically independent free-piston Stirling convertors and a 40 to 50 fold reduction in vibrations compared to an unbalanced convertor. The second SBIR is for the development of an Adaptive Vibration Reduction System (AVRS) that will essentially eliminate vibrations over the mission lifetime, even in the unlikely event of a failed convertor. This paper presents the status and results for these two SBIR projects and also discusses a new NASA Glenn in-house project to provide supporting technology for the overall Stirling radioisotope power system development. Tasks for this new effort include convertor performance verification, controls development, heater head structural life assessment, magnet characterization and thermal aging tests, FEA analysis for a lightweight alternator concept, and demonstration of convertor operation under launch and orbit transfer load conditions.

Thieme, Lanny G.; Qiu, Songgang; White, Maurice A.

2000-01-01

397

Strontium iodide instrument development for gamma spectroscopy and radioisotope identification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Development of the Europium-doped Strontium Iodide scintillator, SrI2(Eu2+), has progressed significantly in recent years. SrI2(Eu2+) has excellent material properties for gamma ray spectroscopy: high light yield (<80,000 ph/MeV), excellent light yield proportionality, and high effective atomic number (Z = 49) for high photoelectric cross-section. High quality 1.5" and 2" diameter boules are now available due to rapid advances in SrI2(Eu) crystal growth. In these large SrI2(Eu) crystals, optical self-absorption by Eu2+ degrades the energy resolution as measured by analog electronics, but we mitigate this effect through on-the-fly correction of the scintillation pulses by digital readout electronics. Using this digital correction technique we have demonstrated energy resolution of 2.9% FWHM at 662 keV for a 4 in3 SrI2(Eu) crystal, over 2.6 inches long. Based on this digital readout technology, we have developed a detector prototype with greatly improved radioisotope identification capability compared to Sodium Iodide, NaI(Tl). The higher resolution of SrI2(Eu) yields a factor of 2 to 5 improvement in radioisotope identification (RIID) error rate compared to NaI(Tl).

Beck, P. R.; Cherepy, N. J.; Payne, S. A.; Swanberg, E. L.; Nelson, K. E.; Thelin, P. A.; Fisher, S. E.; Hunter, S.; Wihl, B. M.; Shah, K. S.; Hawrami, R.; Burger, A.; Boatner, L. A.; Momayezi, M.; Stevens, K. T.; Randles, M. H.; Solodovnikov, D.

2014-09-01

398

High Temperature Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling converter provides this cooling. If the Stirling engine stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) is under development to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling engine. The status of the ongoing effort in developing this technology is presented in this paper. An earlier, preliminary design had a radiator outside the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) casing, used NaK as the working fluid, and had the reservoir located on the cold side adapter flange. The revised design has an internal radiator inside the casing, with the reservoir embedded inside the insulation. A large set of advantages are offered by this new design. In addition to reducing the overall size and mass of the VCHP, simplicity, compactness and easiness in assembling the VCHP with the ASRG are significantly enhanced. Also, the permanently elevated temperatures of the entire VCHP allows the change of the working fluid from a binary compound (NaK) to single compound (Na). The latter, by its properties, allows higher performance and further mass reduction of the system. Preliminary design and analysis shows an acceptable peak temperature of the ASRG case of 140 C while the heat losses caused by the addition of the VCHP are 1.8 W.

Tarau, Calin; Walker, Kara L.; Anderson, William G.

2009-03-01

399

Radioisotope Electric Propulsion for Deep Space Sample Return  

SciTech Connect

The need to answer basic questions regarding the origin of the Solar System will motivate robotic sample return missions to destinations like Pluto, its satellite Charon, and objects in the Kuiper belt. To keep the mission duration short enough to be of interest, sample return from objects farther out in the Solar System requires increasingly higher return velocities. A sample return mission involves several complicated steps to reach an object and obtain a sample, but only the interplanetary return phase of the mission is addressed in this paper. Radioisotope electric propulsion is explored in this parametric study as a means to propel small, dedicated return vehicles for transferring kilogram-size samples from deep space to Earth. Return times for both Earth orbital rendezvous and faster, direct atmospheric re-entry trajectories are calculated for objects as far away as 100 AU. Chemical retro-rocket braking at Earth is compared to radioisotope electric propulsion but the limited deceleration capability of chemical rockets forces the return trajectories to be much slower.

Noble, Robert J.; /SLAC

2009-07-14

400

Utilization of borogypsum as set retarder in Portland cement production  

Microsoft Academic Search

Boron ores are used in the production of various boron compounds such as boric acid, borax and boron oxide. Boric acid is produced by reacting colemanite(2CaO3B2O35H2O) with sulphuric acid and a large quantity of borogypsum is formed during this production. This waste causes various environmental problems when discharged directly to the environment. Portland cement is the most important material in

Recep Boncukcuo?lu; M. Tolga Y?lmaz; M. Muhtar Kocakerim; Vahdettin Tosuno?lu

2002-01-01

401

Method of manufacture of atomically thin boron nitride  

DOEpatents

The present invention provides a method of fabricating at least one single layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) suspending at least one multilayer boron nitride across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure. The present invention also provides a method of fabricating single layer hexagonal boron nitride. In an exemplary embodiment, the method includes (1) providing multilayer boron nitride suspended across a gap of a support structure and (2) performing a reactive ion etch upon the multilayer boron nitride to produce the single layer hexagonal boron nitride suspended across the gap of the support structure.

Zettl, Alexander K

2013-08-06

402

Pyrolytic decomposition of ammonia borane to boron nitride.  

PubMed

The thermal decomposition of ammonia borane was studied using a variety of methods to qualitatively identify gas and remnant solid phase species after thermal treatments up to 1500 C. At about 110 C, ammonia borane begins to decompose yielding H(2) as the major gas phase product. A two step decomposition process leading to a polymeric -[NH?BH](n)- species above 130 C is generally accepted. In this comprehensive study of decomposition pathways, we confirm the first two decomposition steps and identify a third process initiating at 1170 C which leads to a semicrystalline hexagonal phase boron nitride. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to identify the onset of the third step. Temperature programmed desorption-mass spectroscopy (TPD-MS) and vacuum line methods identify molecular aminoborane (H(2)N?BH(2)) as a species that can be released in appreciable quantities with the other major impurity, borazine. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to identify the chemical states present in the solid phase material after each stage of decomposition. The boron nitride product was examined for composition, structure, and morphology using scanning Auger microscopy (SAM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Thermogravimetric Analysis-Mass Spectroscopy (TGA-MS) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) were used to identify the onset temperature of the first two mass loss events. PMID:21182274

Frueh, Samuel; Kellett, Richard; Mallery, Carl; Molter, Trent; Willis, William S; King'ondu, Cecil; Suib, Steven L

2011-02-01

403

The Modification of Polyurethane Foams Using New Boroorganic Polyols (II) Polyurethane Foams from Boron-Modified Hydroxypropyl Urea Derivatives  

PubMed Central

The work focuses on research related to determination of application possibility of new, ecofriendly boroorganic polyols in rigid polyurethane foams production. Polyols were obtained from hydroxypropyl urea derivatives esterified with boric acid and propylene carbonate. The influence of esterification type on properties of polyols and next on polyurethane foams properties was determined. Nitrogen and boron impacts on the foams' properties were discussed, for instance, on their physical, mechanical, and electric properties. Boron presence causes improvement of dimensional stability and thermal stability of polyurethane foams. They can be applied even at temperature 150C. Unfortunately, introducing boron in polyurethanes foams affects deterioration of their water absorption, which increases as compared to the foams that do not contain boron. However, presence of both boron and nitrogen determines the decrease of the foams combustibility. Main impact on the decrease combustibility of the obtained foams has nitrogen presence, but in case of proper boron and nitrogen ratio their synergic activity on the combustibility decrease can be easily seen. PMID:24587721

2014-01-01

404

Production, distribution and applications of californium-252 neutron sources.  

PubMed

The radioisotope 252Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6-yr half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10(11) neutrons s(-1). Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, land mines and unexploded military ordinance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 yr of experience and by US Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). DOE sells 252Cf to commercial reencapsulators domestically and internationally. Sealed 252Cf sources are also available for loan to agencies and subcontractors of the US government and to universities for educational, research and medical applications. The REDC has established the Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science to make its large inventory of 252Cf sources available to researchers for irradiations inside uncontaminated hot cells. Experiments at the CUF include a land mine detection system, neutron damage testing of solid-state detectors, irradiation of human cancer cells for boron neutron capture therapy experiments and irradiation of rice to induce genetic mutations. PMID:11003521

Martin, R C; Knauer, J B; Balo, P A

2000-01-01

405

Energy from Boron and Non-nuclear Metallic Fuels  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aims to obtain the energy from elemental boron burning as solid fuel, which is synthesized from boron minerals, aluminum, iron, and their substances. To obtain the elemental boron from borax, first boric acid (H3BO3) was obtained from borax decahydrate by using HCl or H2SO4. The boric acid was converted to boron oxide by dehydration process. For reducing the

A. Demirbas

2008-01-01

406

Investigations on boron levels in drinking water sources in China  

Microsoft Academic Search

To evaluate boron contamination of public drinking water in China, both dissolved and total boron contents in 98 public drinking\\u000a water sources from 49 cities, 42 brands of bottled water samples from supermarkets in several cities, and 58 water samples\\u000a from boron industrial area were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Our experimental results\\u000a showed that boron existed in

Ren-ji Xu; Xiao-ru Xing; Qun-fang Zhou; Gui-bin Jiang; Fu-sheng Wei

2010-01-01

407

Polyethylene/Boron Composites for Radiation Shielding Applications  

SciTech Connect

Multifunctional composites made with boron are absorbers of low energy nuetrons, and could be used for structural shielding materials. Polyethylene/boron carbide composites were fabricated using conventional polymer processing techniques, and were evaluated for mechanical and radiation shielding properties. Addition of neat boron carbide (powder and nanoparticles) to an injection molding grade HPDE showed superior mechanical properties compared to neat HDPE. Radiation shielding measurements of a 2 wt% boron carbide composite were improved over those of the neat polyethylene.

Harrison, Courtney; Grulke, Eric [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Burgett, Eric; Hertel, Nolan [Neely Nuclear Research Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

2008-01-21

408

Boronization during the first plasma operation on EAST  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both ion cyclotron rf and glow discharge boronization have been successfully used for wall conditioning on EAST tokamak device. The whole process is monitored continuously by residual gas analyzer and film thickness monitor. These diagnostics provide detailed information about the boronization. High hydrogen inventory level observed after boronization maybe due to the boronization material used (C2B10H12). Ion cyclontron rf conditioning

H. Y. Wang; X. M. Wang; J. H. Wu; J. H. Li; Y. W. Yu; Y. Yang

2008-01-01

409

Characterization of boron carbide with an electron microprobe  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Within the framework of a study of heterogeneous materials (Matteudi et al., 1971: Matteudi and Verchery, 1972) thin deposits of boron carbide were characterized. Experiments using an electronic probe microanalyzer to analyze solid boron carbide or boron carbide in the form of thick deposits are described. Quantitative results on boron and carbon are very close to those obtained when applying the Monte Carlo-type correction calculations.

Matteudi, G.; Ruste, J.

1983-01-01

410

Structure and bulk modulus of high-strength boron compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

The structures and homogeneity ranges of BO{sub 1-x} and BS{sub 2-x} were studied using Rietveld analysis of powder X ray patterns. The oxygen content of boron suboxide decreases with temperature in the range 1250-1450°C. Stoichiometric boron suboxide cannot be prepared from amorphous or α-rh boron and BO at ambient pressure. Significantly higher pressures are required. The boron subsulfide was found

Lundstroem

1997-01-01

411

Boron toxicity in the rare serpentine plant, Streptanthus morrisonii.  

PubMed

The release of boron-laden mist from the cooling towers of some geothermal power stations in northern California potentially threatens nearby populations of the rare serpentine plant, Streptanthus morrisonii F. W. Hoffm. To assess the tolerance of S. morrisonii to high levels of boron, the effect of boron on leaf condition, life history, germination rate, growth rate, allocation and photosynthesis was measured on plants grown in a greenhouse. Relative to other species, S. morrisonii was tolerant of excess boron. On serpentine soil, mild to moderate toxicity symptoms (older leaves exhibiting chlorosis and necrosis, but few leaves killed) were apparent when the boron concentration in applied nutrient solutions was 240-650 microm. Severe toxicity symptoms (significant leaf loss, young leaves with toxicity symptoms) were apparent when the applied solution was over 1000 microm boron. Above 1000 microm boron, S. morrisonii appeared unable to complete its life cycle. On a tissue basis, boron toxicity was first observed when leaf boron content was 40-90 micromol g(-1) dry weight. In leaves with severe boron toxicity (> 35% injury), the boron content was generally above 130 micromol g(-1) dry weight. These levels were an order of magnitude above the tissue boron content of plants in the field. Prior to the onset of pronounced boron toxicity symptoms, growth rate, allocation patterns, and photosynthesis were unaffected by high boron. These results indicate that inhibition of growth and photosynthesis occurred because of a loss of viable tissue due to boron injury, rather than a progressive decline as leaf boron levels increased. PMID:15092365

Sage, R F; Ustin, S L; Manning, S J

1989-01-01

412

Polyethylene/Boron Composites for Radiation Shielding Applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multifunctional composites made with boron are absorbers of low energy nuetrons, and could be used for structural shielding materials. Polyethylene/boron carbide composites were fabricated using conventional polymer processing techniques, and were evaluated for mechanical and radiation shielding properties. Addition of neat boron carbide (powder and nanoparticles) to an injection molding grade HPDE showed superior mechanical properties compared to neat HDPE. Radiation shielding measurements of a 2 wt% boron carbide composite were improved over those of the neat polyethylene.

Harrison, Courtney; Burgett, Eric; Hertel, Nolan; Grulke, Eric

2008-01-01

413

Role of Boron in Plant Growth and its Transport Mechanisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In the last decade, molecular understandings of boron transport and boron function in plants have greatly advanced. Crosslinking\\u000a of pectic polysaccharide rhamonogalacturonan-II (RG-II) via boron was shown to be essential for normal plant growth. Two types\\u000a of boron (B) transport molecules, BORs and NIPs, localized to plasma membrane were identified from Arabidopsis thaliana. BOR1 was identified as the first borate\\/boric

Kyoko Miwa; Toru Fujiwara

414

Boron nitride nanotubes and nanosheets.  

PubMed

Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a layered material with a graphite-like structure in which planar networks of BN hexagons are regularly stacked. As the structural analogue of a carbon nanotube (CNT), a BN nanotube (BNNT) was first predicted in 1994; since then, it has become one of the most intriguing non-carbon nanotubes. Compared with metallic or semiconducting CNTs, a BNNT is an electrical insulator with a band gap of ca. 5 eV, basically independent of tube geometry. In addition, BNNTs possess a high chemical stability, excellent mechanical properties, and high thermal conductivity. The same advantages are likely applicable to a graphene analogue-a monatomic layer of a hexagonal BN. Such unique properties make BN nanotubes and nanosheets a promising nanomaterial in a variety of potential fields such as optoelectronic nanodevices, functional composites, hydrogen accumulators, electrically insulating substrates perfectly matching the CNT, and graphene lattices. This review gives an introduction to the rich BN nanotube/nanosheet field, including the latest achievements in the synthesis, structural analyses, and property evaluations, and presents the purpose and significance of this direction in the light of the general nanotube/nanosheet developments. PMID:20462272

Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio; Huang, Yang; Terao, Takeshi; Mitome, Masanori; Tang, Chengchun; Zhi, Chunyi

2010-06-22

415

Boron and nitrogen implantation of steels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Samples of four steels with varying chromium content were implanted with boron and seperately with nitrogen. Implantation energy was 75 keV in all cases. Implantation profiles were modeled using TRIM and determined experimentally by ion beam analysis. Boron ion sources leading to improved ion beams will be discussed. Material characterization included tribology and nano-indentation. Implanted materials showed improvements in wear resistance in all cases involving boron implantation, while nitrogen implantation resulted in improved wear resistance for three of the four materials. Reduced coefficients of friction were observed for boron implanted materials with a surface layer of amorphous carbon. The improvement of wear rate due to implantation and reduced coefficient of friction due to the carbon layer were independent results allowing for separate control of these properties. Nano-indentation results show an increase in the hardness of the implanted regions for two of the materials, 1018 and 304. Results of micro-structural analysis through grazing incidenceglancing angle X-ray diffraction showed iron-nitride formation and in one case chromium-nitride formation. Evidence of iron-boride compound formation in boron implanted materials has been seen.

Kern, K. T.; Walter, K. C.; Griffin, A. J., Jr.; Lu, Y.; Nastasi, M.; Scarborough, W. K.; Tesmer, J. R.; Fayeulle, S.

1997-05-01

416

Utilizing Radioisotope Power System Waste Heat for Spacecraft Thermal Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An advantage of using a Radioisotope Power System (RPS) for deep space or planetary surface missions is the readily available waste heat, which can be used for a number of beneficial purposes including: maintaining electronic components within a controlled temperature range, warming propulsion tanks and mobility actuators, and maintaining liquid propellants above their freezing temperature. Previous missions using Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) dissipated large quantities of waste heat due to the low efficiency of the thermoelectric conversion technology. The next generation RPSs, such as the 110-Watt Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) will have higher conversion efficiencies, thereby rejecting less waste heat at a lower temperature and may require alternate approaches to transferring waste heat to the spacecraft. RTGs, with efficiencies of 6 to 7 percent, reject their waste heat at the relatively high heat rejection temperature of 200 C. This is an advantage when rejecting heat to space; however, transferring heat to the internal spacecraft components requires a large and heavy radiator heat exchanger. At the same time, sensitive spacecraft instruments must be shielded from the thermal radiation of the RTG. The SRG110, with an efficiency around 22 percent and 50 C nominal housing surface temperature, can readily transfer the available waste heat directly via heat pipes, thermal straps, or fluid loops. The lower temperatures associated with the SRG110 avoid the chances of overheating other scientific components, eliminating the need for thermal shields. This provides the spacecraft designers more flexibility when locating the generator for a specific mission. A common misconception with high-efficiency systems is that there is not enough waste heat for spacecraft thermal management. This paper will dispel this misconception and investigate the use of a high-efficiency SRG110 for spacecraft thermal management and outline potential methods of waste heat utilization in several conceptual missions (Lunar Rover, Mars Rover, and Titan Lander). The advantages associated with the SRG110 as they relate to ease of assembly, less complex interfaces, and overall mass savings for a spacecraft will be highlighted.

Pantano, David R.; Dottore, Frank; Tobery, E. Wayne; Geng, Steven M.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.; Palko, Joseph L.

2005-01-01

417

Effect of magnesium on the burning characteristics of boron particles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Boron is an attractive fuel for propellants and explosives because of its high energy density. However, boron particles are difficult to combust because of inhibiting oxide layers that cover the particles. The use of magnesium as additives has been shown to promote boron oxidation. In this study, laser ignition facility and thermobalance were used to investigate the effect of magnesium on the burning characteristics of boron particles. The influences of magnesium addition on sample combustion flame, boron ignition delay time, boron combustion efficiency and initial temperature of boron oxidation. Results show that all Mg/B samples exhibit the same type of flame structure, i.e., a bright plume surrounded by green radiation which is interpreted as BO2 emission. The combustion flame intensity of a sample increases with the increasing magnesium content of boron particles. An increase in magnesium content results in a decrease and a subsequent increase in boron ignition delay time. (Mg/B)0.2 has a minimum ignition delay time of ~48 ms. Boron combustion efficiency increases with increasing magnesium addition. (Mg/B)0.5 shows a maximum boron combustion efficiency of ~64.2%. Magnesium addition decreases the initial temperature of boron oxidation.

Liu, Jian-zhong; Xi, Jian-fei; Yang, Wei-juan; Hu, You-rui; Zhang, Yan-wei; Wang, Yang; Zhou, Jun-hu

2014-03-01

418

Screening of Wheat Genotypes for Boron Efficiency in Bangladesh  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A number of Bangladeshi wheat genotypes (varieties and advanced lines) have been tested for boron efficiency through sand culture experiments over two years (2007-08 & 2008-09) against two Thai check varieties Fang 60 (boron efficient) and SW41 (boron inefficient). Performances of the genotypes ...

419

Synthesis and characterization of boron-doped carbons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two methods have been employed to prepare boron-doped carbon materials. One method utilized ion implantation to dope the surface region of vitreous carbon with up to 12 atomic % boron. The other method used CVD to prepare ~ 12 micron thick carbon coatings with various boron contents (0 to 15 atomic %). The quantitative compositional analysis of these materials was

William Cermignani; Thomas E. Paulson; Carina Onneby; Carlo G. Pantano

1995-01-01

420

Boron-containing amino carboxylic acid compounds and uses thereof  

DOEpatents

Novel compounds which are useful for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are disclosed. The compounds comprise a stable boron-containing group and an aminocycloalkane carboxylic acid group or a boronated acyclic hydrocarbon-linked amino carboxylic acid. Methods for synthesis of the compounds and for use of the compounds in BNCT are disclosed.

Kabalka, George W. (Knoxville, TN); Srivastava, Rajiv R. (Knoxville, TN)

2000-03-14

421

Boron nitride substrates for high-quality graphene electronics  

E-print Network

Boron nitride substrates for high-quality graphene electronics C. R. Dean1,2 *, A. F. Young3 , I with a suspended sample. Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is an appealing substrate, because it has an atom- ically, where similar surface effects continue to cause problems16­18 . Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) isan

Hone, James

422

Polyethylene\\/Boron Composites for Radiation Shielding Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multifunctional composites made with boron are absorbers of low energy nuetrons, and could be used for structural shielding materials. Polyethylene\\/boron carbide composites were fabricated using conventional polymer processing techniques, and were evaluated for mechanical and radiation shielding properties. Addition of neat boron carbide (powder and nanoparticles) to an injection molding grade HPDE showed superior mechanical properties compared to neat HDPE.

Courtney Harrison; Eric Burgett; Nolan Hertel; Eric Grulke

2008-01-01

423

0V Bias Neutron Detection of Boron-Carbon Films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development of boron rich solid state neutron detectors has recently become a reality due to the development of a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method that results in the growth of semiconducting boron carbide films [1]. Boron-carbide/silicon heterojunction diodes have been fabricated and shown to be real time, solid-state neutron detectors [2, 3]. Earlier devices demonstrated neutron detection but required an external bias. Initial experiments in self-biasing with these devices indicate that self-biased heterojunction diodes are also capable of neutron detection, the advantage of which is a lower noise peak. A well thermalized 5 Ci Pu-Be source is used which produces a thermal neutron flux of 13.6E3 n/sec on the small area(13 mm2) detector. Self-biased results display the characteristic pulse height spectra peaks associated with the neutron-10B capture interaction daughter products. The results are compared to externally biased and previously published results. This work is partially founded by the State of Nebraska and U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Nonproliferation Research and Engineering [NA-22] through Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. [1] Lee, S; Mazurowski, J; Ramsmeyer, G; Dowben, P; Journal of Applied Physics 72(10): 4925-4933 (1992) [2] Adenwalla, S; Welsch, P; Harken A; Brand, JI; Sezer, A; Robertson, BW; Applied Physics Letters 79(26): 4357-4359 (2001) [3] Robertson, BW; Adenwalla, S; Harken A; Welsch, P; Brand, JI; Dowben, PA; Claasen, JP; Applied Physics Letters 80(19): 3644-3646 (200

Day, Ellen; Adenwalla, Shireen

2004-03-01

424

Infiltration processing of boron carbide-, boron-, and boride-reactive metal cermets  

DOEpatents

A chemical pretreatment method is used to produce boron carbide-, boron-, and boride-reactive metal composites by an infiltration process. The boron carbide or other starting constituents, in powder form, are immersed in various alcohols, or other chemical agents, to change the surface chemistry of the starting constituents. The chemically treated starting constituents are consolidated into a porous ceramic precursor which is then infiltrated by molten aluminum or other metal by heating to wetting conditions. Chemical treatment of the starting constituents allows infiltration to full density. The infiltrated precursor is further heat treated to produce a tailorable microstructure. The process at low cost produces composites with improved characteristics, including increased toughness, strength.

Halverson, Danny C. (Manteca, CA); Landingham, Richard L. (Livermore, CA)

1988-01-01

425

A system to deposit boron films (boronization) in the DIII-D tokamak  

SciTech Connect

A system has been added to the D3-D tokamak to coat its plasma facing surfaces with a film of boron using diborane gas. The system includes special health and safety equipment for handling the diborane gas which is toxic and inflammable. The purpose of the boron film is to reduce the levels of impurity atoms in the D3-D plasmas. Experiments following the application of the boron film in D3-D have led to significant reductions in plasma impurity levels and the observation of a new, very high confinement regime. 9 refs., 1 fig.

Hodapp, T.R.; Jackson, G.L.; Phillips, J.; Holtrop, K.L.; Petersen, P.I. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)); Winter, J. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik)

1991-09-01

426

Directionality in the GammaTracker Handheld Radioisotope Identifier  

SciTech Connect

Several computationally simple methods are presented for determining the direction to one or more point sources using the GammaTracker handheld radioisotope identifier. GammaTracker will display a heading indicating the direction to one or more sources; no gamma-ray images will be displayed to the user. The details of each directionality method are presented and performance is compared using radiation transport simulations of gamma-ray point sources at varying activity levels on a natural background. All methods achieved sufficiently high pointing accuracy and precision in the tested scenarios, which included background-to-source ratios up to 10:1. The prospects for implementation in the GammaTracker firmware architecture are discussed.

Seifert, Carolyn E.; Myjak, Mitchell J.

2009-06-01

427

Tissue vitamin B-12 assay by a radioisotope dilution technique.  

PubMed

A method is described for the measurement of vitamin B-12 (B-12) in solid tissues by radioisotope dilution (RID) assay. The method is a modivication using double extraction of a serum B-12 RID assay which uses chicken serum as the B-12 binder. The method was developed and tested using human and bat liver specimens. Double extraction was shown to be more efficient than single extraction, and resulted in complete release of endogenous liver [57Co] B-12 administered to bats. Results using the RID assay in 16 humans and 17 bat liver specimens were compared with those obtained using the Lactobacillus leichmannii microbiological assay. Correlation was good, but the RID assay gave higher results using the microbiological assay appear to be due to inadequate extraction of B-12 from tissues. PMID:1100288

Van Tonder, S V; Metz, J; Green, R

1975-09-16

428

End-on radioisotope thermoelectric generator impact tests  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of [sup 238]Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. The first two RTG Impact Tests were designed to provide information on the response of a fully loaded RTG to end-on impact against a concrete target. The results of these tests indicated that at impact velocities up to 57 m/s the converter shell and internal components protect the GPHS capsules from excessive deformation. At higher velocities, some of the internal components of the RTG interact with the GPHS capsules to cause excessive localized deformation and failure.

Reimus, M.A.H.; Hhinckley, J.E.

1997-01-01

429

Development and Buildup of a Stirling Radioisotope Generator Electrical Simulator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper describes the development of a Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG) Simulator for use in a prototype lunar robotic rover. The SRG developed at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is a promising power source for the robotic exploration of the sunless areas of the moon. The simulator designed provides a power output similar to the SRG output of 5.7 A at 28 Vdc, while using ac wall power as the input power source. The designed electrical simulator provides rover developers the physical and electrical constraints of the SRG supporting parallel development of the SRG and rover. Parallel development allows the rover design team to embrace the SRG s unique constraints while development of the SRG is continued to a flight qualified version.

Prokop, Norman F.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Greer, Lawrence C.; Flatico, Joseph M.; Spina, Dan C.

2008-01-01

430

Testing to Characterize the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Engineering Unit  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), a high efficiency generator, is being considered for space missions. Lockheed Martin designed and fabricated an engineering unit (EU), the ASRG EU, under contract to the Department of Energy. This unit is currently undergoing extended operation testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center to generate performance data and validate life and reliability predictions for the generator and the Stirling convertors. It has also undergone performance tests to characterize generator operation while varying control parameters and system inputs. This paper summarizes and explains test results in the context of designing operating strategies for the generator during a space mission and notes expected differences between the EU performance and future generators.

Lewandowski, Edward; Schreiber, Jeffrey

2010-01-01

431

RTGs - The powering of Ulysses. [Radio-isotope Thermoelectric Generator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The radio-isotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) for Ulysses' electronic supply is described noting that lack of sufficient sunlight renders usual solar cell power generation ineffective due to increased distance from sun. The history of the RTG in the U.S.A. is reviewed citing the first RTG launch in 1961 with an electrical output of 2.7 W and the improved Ulysses RTG, which provides 285 W at mission beginning and 250 W at mission end. The RTG concept is discussed including the most recent RTG technology developed by the DOE, the General Purpose Heat Source RTG (GPHS-RTG). The system relies upon heat generated by radioactive decay using radioactive plutonium-238, which is converted directly to energy using the Seebeck method.

Mastal, E. F.; Campbell, R. W.

1990-01-01

432

Reliability Demonstration Approach for Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Developed for future space missions as a high-efficiency power system, the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) has a design life requirement of 14 yr in space following a potential storage of 3 yr after fueling. In general, the demonstration of long-life dynamic systems remains difficult in part due to the perception that the wearout of moving parts cannot be minimized, and associated failures are unpredictable. This paper shows a combination of systematic analytical methods, extensive experience gained from technology development, and well-planned tests can be used to ensure a high level reliability of ASRG. With this approach, all potential risks from each life phase of the system are evaluated and the mitigation adequately addressed. This paper also provides a summary of important test results obtained to date for ASRG and the planned effort for system-level extended operation.

Ha, CHuong; Zampino, Edward; Penswick, Barry; Spronz, Michael

2010-01-01

433

Carbon dioxide detection by boron nitride nanotubes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of gas molecule adsorption is investigated on the density of states of (9,0) zigzag boron nitride nanotube within a random tight-binding Hamiltonian model. The Green function approach and coherent potential approximation have been implemented. The results show that the adsorption of carbon dioxide gas molecules by boron atoms only leads to a donor type semiconductor while the adsorption by nitrogen atoms only leads to an acceptor. Since the gas molecules are adsorbed by both boron and nitrogen atoms, a reduction of the band gap is found. In all cases, increasing the gas concentration causes an increase in the height of the peaks in the band gap. This is due to an increasing charge carrier concentration induced by adsorbed gas molecules.

Mousavi, Hamze; Kurdestany, Jamshid Moradi; Bagheri, Mehran

2012-08-01

434

Boron-10 Lined Proportional Counter Model Validation  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube-based alternative system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report discusses the validation studies performed to establish the degree of accuracy of the computer modeling methods current used to simulate the response of boron-lined tubes. This is the precursor to developing models for the uranium neutron coincidence collar under Task 2 of this project.

Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Kouzes, Richard T.

2012-06-30

435

Accelerator-driven boron neutron capture therapy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is a binary treatment for certain types of cancer. It works by loading the cancerous cells with a boron-10 carrying compound. This isotope has a large cross-section for thermal neutrons, the reaction producing a lithium nucleus and alpha particle that kill the cell in which they are produced. Recent studies of the boron carrier compound indicate that the uptake process works best in particularly aggressive cancers. Most studied is glioblastoma multiforme and a trial using a combination of BNCT and X-ray radiotherapy has shown an increase of nearly a factor of two in mean survival over the state of the art. However, the main technical problem with BNCT remains producing a sufficient flux of neutrons for a reasonable treatment duration in a hospital environment. This paper discusses this issue.

Edgecock, Rob

2014-05-01

436

INTRACORPOREAL HEAT DISSIPATION FROM A RADIOISOTOPE-POWERED ARTIFICIAL HEART  

PubMed Central

The feasibility of radioisotope-fueled circulatory support systems depends on the ability of the body to dissipate the reject heat from the power source driving the blood pump as well as to tolerate chronic intracorporeal radiation. Our studies have focused on the use of the circulating blood as a heat sink. Initial in vivo heat transfer studies utilized straight tube heat exchangers (electrically and radioisotope energized) to replace a segment of the descending aorta. More recent studies have used a left ventricular assist pump as a blood-cooled heat exchanger. This approach minimizes trauma, does not increase the area of prosthetic interface with the blood, and minimizes system volume. Heat rejected from the thermal engine (vapor or gas cycle) is transported from the nuclear power source in the abdomen to the pump in the thoracic cavity via hydraulic lines. Adjacent tissue is protected from the fuel capsule temperature (900 to 1200F) by vacuum foil insulation and polyurethane foam. The in vivo thermal management problems have been studied using a simulated thermal system (STS) which approximates the heat rejection and thermal transport mechanisms of the nuclear circulatory support systems under development by NHLI. Electric heaters simulate the reject heat from the thermal engines. These studies have been essential in establishing the location, suspension, surgical procedures, and postoperative care for implanting prototype nuclear heart assist systems in calves. The pump has a thermal impedance of 0.12C/watt. Analysis of the STS data in terms of an electrical analog model implies a heat transfer coefficient of 4.7 10?3 watt/cm2C in the abdomen compared to a value of 14.9 10?3 watt/cm2C from the heat exchanger plenum into the diaphragm. Images PMID:15215968

Huffman, Fred N.; Hagen, Kenneth G.; Whalen, Robert L.; Fuqua, John M.; Norman, John C.

1974-01-01

437

Pathway of radioisotopes from land surface to sewage sludge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radioactive surface contaminations will only partially remain at the original location - a fraction of the inventory will take part in (mainly terrestrial and aquatic) environmental transport processes. The probably best known and most important process comprises the food chain. Besides, the translocation of dissolved and particle-bound radioisotopes with surface waters plays an important role. These processes can have the effect of displacing large radioisotope amounts over considerable distances and of creating new sinks and hot spots, as it is already known for sewage sludge. We are reporting on a combined modeling and experimental project concerning the transport of I-131 and Cs-134/Cs-137 FDNPP 2011 depositions in the Fukushima Prefecture. Well-documented experimental data sets are available for surface deposition and sewage sludge concentrations. The goal is to model the pathway in between, involving surface runoff, transport in the sewer system and processes in the sewage treatment plant. Watershed runoff and sewer transport will be treated with models developed recently by us in other projects. For sewage treatment processes a new model is currently being constructed. For comparison and further validation, historical data from Chernobyl depositions and tracer data from natural and artificial, e.g. medical, isotopes will be used. First results for 2011 data from Fukushima Prefecture will be presented. The benefits of the study are expected to be two-fold: on one hand, the abundant recent and historical data will help to develop and improve environmental transport models; on the other hand, both data and models will help in identifying the most critical points in the envisaged transport pathways in terms of radiation protection and waste management.

Fischer, Helmut W.; Yokoo, Yoshiyuki

2014-05-01

438

High Temperature Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems  

SciTech Connect

In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling converter provides this cooling. If the Stirling engine stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) is under development to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling engine. The status of the ongoing effort in developing this technology is presented in this paper. An earlier, preliminary design had a radiator outside the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) casing, used NaK as the working fluid, and had the reservoir located on the cold side adapter flange. The revised design has an internal radiator inside the casing, with the reservoir embedded inside the insulation. A large set of advantages are offered by this new design. In addition to reducing the overall size and mass of the VCHP, simplicity, compactness and easiness in assembling the VCHP with the ASRG are significantly enhanced. Also, the permanently elevated temperatures of the entire VCHP allows the change of the working fluid from a binary compound (NaK) to single compound (Na). The latter, by its properties, allows higher performance and further mass reduction of the system. Preliminary design and analysis shows an acceptable peak temperature of the ASRG case of 140 deg. C while the heat losses caused by the addition of the VCHP are 1.8 W.

Tarau, Calin; Walker, Kara L.; Anderson, William G. [Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. 1046 New Holland Ave. Lancaster, PA 17601 (United States)

2009-03-16

439

Variable Conductance Heat Pipes for Radioisotope Stirling Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the GPHS modules, to maintain the GPHS modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. Normally, the Stirling convertor provides this cooling. If the Stirling engine stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) was designed to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling engine. A VCHP was designed for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator, with a 850 C heater head temperature. The VCHP turns on with a ?T of 30 C, which is high enough to not risk standard ASRG operation but low enough to save most heater head life. This VCHP has a low mass, and low thermal losses for normal operation. In addition to the design, a proof-of-concept NaK VCHP was fabricated and tested. While NaK is normally not used in heat pipes, it has an advantage in that it is liquid at the reservoir operating temperature, while Na or K alone would freeze. The VCHP had two condensers, one simulating the heater head, and the other simulating the radiator. The experiments successfully demonstrated operation with the simulated heater head condenser off and on, while allowing the reservoir temperature to vary over 40 to 120 C, the maximum range expected. In agreement with previous NaK heat pipe tests, the evaporator ?T was roughly 70 C, due to distillation of the NaK in the evaporator.

Anderson, William G.; Tarau, Calin

2008-01-01

440

An Overview and Status of NASA's Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology NRA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) development program is developing next generation radioisotope power conversion technologies that will enable future missions that have requirements that can not be met by either photovoltaic systems or by current Radioisotope Power System (RPS) technology. The Advanced Power Conversion Research and Technology project of the Advanced RPS development program is funding research and technology activities through the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) 02-OSS-01, "Research Opportunities in Space Science 2002" entitled "Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology" (RPCT), August 13, 2002. The objective of the RPCT NRA is to advance the development of radioisotope power conversion technologies to provide significant improvements over the state-of-practice General Purpose Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator by providing significantly higher efficiency to reduce the number of radioisotope fuel modules, and increase specific power (watts/kilogram). Other Advanced RPS goals include safety, long-life, reliability, scalability, multi-mission capability, resistance to radiation, and minimal interference with the scientific payload. Ten RPCT NRA contracts were awarded in 2003 in the areas of Brayton, Stirling, thermoelectric (TE), and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power conversion technologies. This paper will provide an overview of the RPCT NRA, and a brief summary of accomplishments over the first 18 months but focusing on advancements made over the last 6 months.

Anderson, David J.; Wong, Wayne A.; Tuttle, Karen L.

2005-01-01

441

Boron removal by electrocoagulation and recovery.  

PubMed

This work investigated the removal of boron from wastewater and its recovery by electrocoagulation and hydrothermal mineralization methods respectively. The experimental design was developed using Box-Behnken Model. An initial study was performed based on four preselected variables (pH, current density, concentration and time) using synthetic wastewater. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to evaluate the effect of process variables and their interaction on boron removal. The optimum conditions were obtained as pH 6.3, current density 17.4mA/cm(2), and time 89min. At these applied optimum conditions, 99.7% boron removal from an initial concentration of 10.4mg/L was achieved. The process was effectively optimized by RSM with a desirability value of 1.0. The results showed that boron removal efficiency enhanced with increase in current density and treatment time. Removal efficiency also increased when pH was increased from 4 to 7 and subsequently decreased at pH 10. Adsorption kinetics study revealed that the reaction followed pseudo second order kinetic model; evidenced by high correlation and goodness of fit. Thermodynamics study showed that mechanism of boron adsorption was chemisorption and the reaction was endothermic in nature. Furthermore, the adsorption process was spontaneous as indicated by negative values of the adsorption free energy. Treatment of real produced water using electrocoagulation resulted in 98% boron removal. The hydrothermal mineralization study showed that borate minerals (Inyoite, Takadaite and Nifontovite) can be recovered as recyclable precipitate from electrocoagulation flocs of produced water. PMID:24412846

Isa, Mohamed Hasnain; Ezechi, Ezerie Henry; Ahmed, Zubair; Magram, Saleh Faraj; Kutty, Shamsul Rahman Mohamed

2014-03-15

442

Boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma.  

PubMed

Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) theoretically allows the preferential destruction of tumor cells while sparing the normal tissue, even if the cells have microscopically spread to the surrounding normal brain. The tumor cell-selective irradiation used in this method is dependent on the nuclear reaction between the stable isotope of boron ((10)B) and thermal neutrons, which release alpha and (7)Li particles within a limited path length (-9 microm) through the boron neutron capture reaction, (10)B(n,alpha)(7)Li. Recent clinical studies of BNCT have focused on high-grade glioma and cutaneous melanoma; however, cerebral metastasis of melanoma, anaplastic meningioma, head and neck tumor, and lung and liver metastasis have been investigated as potential candidates for BNCT. To date, more than 350 high-grade gliomas have been treated in BNCT facilities worldwide. Current clinical BNCT trials for glioblastoma (GBM) have used the epithermal beam at a medically optimized research reactor, and p-dihydroxyboryl-phenylalanine (BPA) and/or sulfhydryl borane Na(2)B(12)H(11)SH (BSH) as the boron delivery agent(s). The results from these rather small phase I/II trials for GBM appear to be encouraging, but prospective randomized clinical trials will be needed to confirm the efficacy of this theoretically promising modality. Improved tumor-targeting boron compounds and optimized administration methods, improved boron drug delivery systems, development of a hospital-based neutron source, and/or other combination modalities will enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of BNCT in the future. PMID:18313207

Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Nakai, Kei; Matsumura, Akira

2008-04-18

443

Boron nitride nanotubes for spintronics.  

PubMed

With the end of Moore's law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR) effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT), which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics. PMID:25248070

Dhungana, Kamal B; Pati, Ranjit

2014-01-01

444

Ultrahard nanotwinned cubic boron nitride.  

PubMed

Cubic boron nitride (cBN) is a well known superhard material that has a wide range of industrial applications. Nanostructuring of cBN is an effective way to improve its hardness by virtue of the Hall-Petch effect--the tendency for hardness to increase with decreasing grain size. Polycrystalline cBN materials are often synthesized by using the martensitic transformation of a graphite-like BN precursor, in which high pressures and temperatures lead to puckering of the BN layers. Such approaches have led to synthetic polycrystalline cBN having grain sizes as small as ?14?nm (refs 1, 2, 4, 5). Here we report the formation of cBN with a nanostructure dominated by fine twin domains of average thickness ?3.8?nm. This nanotwinned cBN was synthesized from specially prepared BN precursor nanoparticles possessing onion-like nested structures with intrinsically puckered BN layers and numerous stacking faults. The resulting nanotwinned cBN bulk samples are optically transparent with a striking combination of physical properties: an extremely high Vickers hardness (exceeding 100?GPa, the optimal hardness of synthetic diamond), a high oxidization temperature (?1,294?C) and a large fracture toughness (>12?MPa?m(1/2), well beyond the toughness of commercial cemented tungsten carbide, ?10?MPa?m(1/2)). We show that hardening of cBN is continuous with decreasing twin thickness down to the smallest sizes investigated, contrasting with the expected reverse Hall-Petch effect below a critical grain size or the twin thickness of ?10-15?nm found in metals and alloys. PMID:23325219

Tian, Yongjun; Xu, Bo; Yu, Dongli; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Yanbin; Jiang, Yingbing; Hu, Wentao; Tang, Chengchun; Gao, Yufei; Luo, Kun; Zhao, Zhisheng; Wang, Li-Min; Wen, Bin; He, Julong; Liu, Zhongyuan

2013-01-17

445

Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Spintronics  

PubMed Central

With the end of Moore's law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR) effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT), which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics. PMID:25248070

Dhungana, Kamal B.; Pati, Ranjit

2014-01-01

446

Titanium reinforced boron-polyimide composite  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Processing techniques for boron polyimide prepreg were developed whereby composites could be molded under vacuum bag pressure only. A post-cure cycle was developed which resulted in no loss in room temperature mechanical properties of the composite at any time during up to 16 hours at 650 F. A design utilizing laminated titanium foil was developed to achieve a smooth transition of load from the titanium attachment points into the boron-reinforced body of the structure. The box beam test article was subjected to combined bending and torsional loads while exposed to 650 F. Loads were applied incrementally until failure occurred at 83% design limit load.

Clark, G. A.; Clayton, K. I.

1969-01-01

447

Boron Nitride Nanotubes-Reinforced Glass Composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Boron nitride nanotubes of significant lengths were synthesized by reaction of boron with nitrogen. Barium calcium aluminosilicate glass composites reinforced with 4 weight percent of BN nanotubes were fabricated by hot pressing. Ambient-temperature flexure strength and fracture toughness of the glass-BN nanotube composites were determined. The strength and fracture toughness of the composite were higher by as much as 90 and 35 percent, respectively, than those of the unreinforced glass. Microscopic examination of the composite fracture surfaces showed pullout of the BN nanotubes. The preliminary results on the processing and improvement in mechanical properties of BN nanotube reinforced glass matrix composites are being reported here for the first time.

Bansal, Narottam; Hurst, Janet B.; Choi, Sung R.

2005-01-01

448

Unexpected Reconstruction of the ?-Boron (111) Surface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report a novel reconstruction of the ?-boron (111) surface, discovered using ab initio evolutionary structure prediction, and show that this unexpected neat structure has a much lower energy than the recently proposed (111)-IR ,(a) surface. In this reconstruction, all single interstitial boron atoms bridge neighboring B12 icosahedra by polar covalent bonds, and this satisfies the electron counting rule, leading to the reconstruction-induced metal-semiconductor transition. The peculiar charge transfer between the interstitial atoms and the icosahedra plays an important role in stabilizing the surface.

Zhou, Xiang-Feng; Oganov, Artem R.; Shao, Xi; Zhu, Qiang; Wang, Hui-Tian

2014-10-01

449

Thermal conductivity behavior of boron carbides  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbides is necessary to evaluate its potential for high temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. The thermal diffusivity of hot pressed boron carbide B/sub 1-x/C/sub x/ samples as a function of composition, temperature and temperature cycling was measured. These data in concert with density and specific heat data yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results in terms of a structural model to explain the electrical transport data and novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are discussed.

Wood, C.; Zoltan, A.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

1983-01-01

450

Boron Nitrides Properties, Synthesis and Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Boron nitride is a extraordinary topic in the area of materials science. Due to the special bonding behaviors of boron and\\u000a nitrogen the BN exists in many different structures. The well-defined crystallographic structures are hexagonal BN (h-BN),\\u000a rhombohedral BN (r-BN), wurtzitic BN (w-BN), and cubic BN (c-BN). Additionally, other crystalline and amorphous structures\\u000a exist. Exceptional is that there are still

R. Haubner; M. Wilhelm; R. Weissenbacher; B. Lux

2002-01-01

451

Picosecond laser structuration under high pressures: observation of boron nitride nanorods  

E-print Network

We report on picosecond UV-laser processing of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) at moderately high pressures above 500 bar. The main effect is specific to the ambient gas and laser pulse duration in the ablation regime: when samples are irradiated by 5 ps or 0.45 ps laser pulses in nitrogen gas environment, multiple nucleation of a new crystalline product - BN nanorods - takes place. This process is triggered on structural defects, which number density strongly decreases upon recrystallization. Non-linear photon absorption by adsorbed nitrogen molecules is suggested to mediate the nucleation-growth. High pressure is responsible for the confinement and strong backscattering of ablation products. A strong surface structuring also appears at longer 150-ps laser irradiation in similar experimental conditions. However, the transformed product in this case is amorphous strongly contaminated by boron suboxides BxOy.

Museur, Luc; Michel, Jean Pierre; Marine, Wladimir; Anglos, Demetrios; Fotakis, Costa; Kanaev, Andrei; 10.1063/1.3000457

2008-01-01

452

Picosecond laser structuration under high pressures: Observation of boron nitride nanorods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on picosecond UV-laser processing of hexagonal boron nitride (BN) at moderately high pressures above 500 bar. The main effect is specific to the ambient gas and laser pulse duration in the ablation regime: when samples are irradiated by 5 or 0.45 ps laser pulses in nitrogen gas environment, multiple nucleation of a new crystalline product-BN nanorods-takes place. This process is triggered on structural defects, which number density strongly decreases upon recrystallization. Nonlinear photon absorption by adsorbed nitrogen molecules is suggested to mediate the nucleation growth. High pressure is responsible for the confinement and strong backscattering of ablation products. A strong surface structuring also appears at longer 150 ps laser irradiation in similar experimental conditions. However, the transformed product in this case is amorphous strongly contaminated by boron suboxides BxOy.

Museur, Luc; Petitet, Jean-Pierre; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Marine, Wladimir; Anglos, Demetrios; Fotakis, Costas; Kanaev, Andrei V.

2008-11-01

453

Radioisotope electric propulsion of sciencecraft to the outer solar system and near-interstellar space  

SciTech Connect

Recent results are presented in the study of radioisotope electric propulsion as a near-term technology for sending small robotic sciencecraft to the outer Solar System and near-interstellar space. Radioisotope electric propulsion (REP) systems are low-thrust, ion propulsion units based on radioisotope electric generators and ion thrusters. Powerplant specific masses are expected to be in the range of 100 to 200 kg/kW of thrust power. Planetary rendezvous missions to Pluto, fast missions to the heliopause (100 AU) with the capability to decelerate an orbiter for an extended science program and prestellar missions to the first gravitational lens focus of the Sun (550 AU) are investigated.

Noble, R.J.

1998-08-01

454

Radioisotope generators for nuclear medicine based on Fajans adsorption on glass microspheres  

SciTech Connect

Several radioisotope generator systems exist in which the carrier-free daughter product would precipitate if present in macro amounts at pH levels at which the parent is soluble. Included among these are the {sup 68}Ge/{sup 68}Ga, {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y, and {sup 47}Ca/{sup 47}Sc pairs. This paper reveals that in these systems, chemical separation can be achieved by Fajans adsorption of the radiocolloidal daughter products onto surfaces such as activated glass microspheres at an appropriate pH. This is followed by washing to remove the parent solution and desorption of the daughter crop by acid washes. Investigation of the Ge/Ga and Sr/Y systems demonstrated that this solid-phase extraction method is erratic, but can give daughter yields as high at 89% with separation factors up to {approximately} 10,000 form parent isotope. T