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1

Rice University Environmental Health and Safety Laboratory-Specific Radiological Safety Training Attendance Record  

E-print Network

, notices, and EHS Radiation Safety Manual. [ ] Where radioactive material is used within the lab(sRice University Environmental Health and Safety Laboratory-Specific Radiological Safety Training. [ ] Review of written protocols involving radioactive material. [ ] Radiological safety considerations

Natelson, Douglas

2

Radiological Laboratory Utility Office Building The Radiological Laboratory Util-  

E-print Network

RLUOB Radiological Laboratory Utility Office Building The Radiological Laboratory Util- ity Office Research building. Capabilities RLUOB provides: · Nearly 20,000 square feet of radiological laboratory

3

Radiological Work Authorization Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

E-print Network

Radiological Work Authorization Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health and is not authorized by this Radiological Work Authorization (RWA). If work in fields greater than 100 mrem/h at 30 cm is necessary, a separate Radiological Work Permit (RWP) is required. Experiment Description (cont

Knowles, David William

4

Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory annual report 1983: health effects of prenatal and postnatal whole-body exposure to ionizing radiation in the beagle dog. Report for 1 January20 November 1983  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory was established in 1962 by the U.S. Public Health Service and Colorado State University for the purpose of determining in a carefully controlled animal experiment the life-time hazards associated with prenatal and early postnatal exposure to ionizing radiation. The CRHL study is designed to provide information that will facilitate the evaluation of risks to human

1985-01-01

5

CSU-FDA (Colorado State Univ. Food and Drug Administration) Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory. Annual report - 1982: health effects of prenatal and postnatal whole-body exposure to ionizing radiation in the beagle dog  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory was established in 1962 by the U.S. Public Health Service and Colorado State University for the purpose of determining in a carefully controlled animal experiment the life-time hazards associated with prenatal and early postnatal exposure to ionizing radiation. The CRHL study is designed to provide information that will facilitate the evaluation of risks to human

1984-01-01

6

Region VII radiological health issues  

SciTech Connect

This talk discusses three issues/concerns in the areas of radiological accidents and emergency planning: FEMA`s process for review and evaluation of emergency plans; recent directives from FEMA on retrospective dose for emergency workers; and federal and state coordination of radiological health activities for a nuclear incident.

McNutt, G.M. [Missouri Dept. of Health, Jefferson City, MO (United States)

1995-12-31

7

Bridging Radiology and Public Health: The Emerging Field of Radiologic Public Health Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiology and public health have an emerging opportunity to collaborate, in which radiology's vast supply of imaging data can be integrated into public health information systems for epidemiologic assessments and responses to population health problems. Fueling the linkage of radiology and public health include (i) the transition from analog film to digital formats, enabling flexible use of radiologic data; (ii)

Daniel J. Mollura; John A. Carrino; Diane L. Matuszak; Zaruhi R. Mnatsakanyan; John Eng; Protagoras Cutchis; Steven M. Babin; Carol Sniegoski; Joseph S. Lombardo

2008-01-01

8

Laboratory Demonstration of Radiological Decontamination Using Radpro  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the event of terrorist activity involving the explosive dispersion of radioactive materials (a 'dirty' bomb), a number of different types of surfaces and substrates, including concrete, granite, brick, cinder block, tile, asphalt, wood, glass, plastic, iron, and steel, may become radiologically contaminated. Incident cleanup is assumed to involve decontamination of these surfaces. Laboratory testing was conducted using samples of

P. Lear; R. Greene; J. Isham; R. Martin; C. Norton

2007-01-01

9

Radiological health aspects of uranium milling  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the operation of conventional and unconventional uranium milling processes, the potential for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation at the mill, methods for radiological safety, methods of evaluating occupational radiation exposures, and current government regulations for protecting workers and ensuring that standards for radiation protection are adhered to. In addition, a survey of current radiological health practices is summarized.

Fisher, D.R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

1983-05-01

10

Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report Tritium Research Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the specific radiological characterization information on Building 968, the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) Complex and Facility. We performed the characterization as outlined in its Radiological Characterization Plan. The Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report (RC&FFSR) provides historic background information on each laboratory within the TRL complex as related to its original and present radiological condition. Along with the work outlined in the Radiological Characterization Plan (RCP), we performed a Radiological Soils Characterization, Radiological and Chemical Characterization of the Waste Water Hold-up System including all drains, and a Radiological Characterization of the Building 968 roof ventilation system. These characterizations will provide the basis for the Sandia National Laboratory, California (SNL/CA) Site Termination Survey .Plan, when appropriate.

Garcia, T.B.; Gorman, T.P.

1996-08-01

11

Laboratory Demonstration of Radiological Decontamination Using Radpro  

SciTech Connect

In the event of terrorist activity involving the explosive dispersion of radioactive materials (a 'dirty' bomb), a number of different types of surfaces and substrates, including concrete, granite, brick, cinder block, tile, asphalt, wood, glass, plastic, iron, and steel, may become radiologically contaminated. Incident cleanup is assumed to involve decontamination of these surfaces. Laboratory testing was conducted using samples of concrete, ferrous metal, steel, aluminum, lead, tin, glass, lexan, vinyl, asphalt shingle, wood, and rubber surfaces. The surfaces were sprayed with Cs-137 or Co-60 solutions to simulate contamination. The entire surface area of the samples was surveyed using a Ludlum Model 2360 scaler/ratemeter with Ludlum Model 43-93-2 100 cm{sup 2} open area alpha/beta scintillation probe. The surfaces were then decontaminated using RadPro{sup R} chemical decontamination technology that is currently field proven and ready to deploy. The entire surface area of the samples was re-surveyed following decontamination. The RadPro{sup R} chemical decontamination technology was able to remove virtually all of the removable contamination and over 90% of the fixed contamination from these surfaces during the laboratory testing. (authors)

Lear, P.; Greene, R.; Isham, J. [Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Martin, R.; Norton, C. [Environmental Alternatives, Inc., Keene, NH (United States)

2007-07-01

12

Environmental Health & Safety Office of Radiological Safety  

E-print Network

Information: Department: Building: Room: Lab Phone: #12;Environmental Health & Safety Office of Radiological Supervisor I shall notify the Laser Safety Officer in writing of my intention to move my laser/laser lab or disposal of lasers in my lab(s). 8. I have read and understand the Georgia Tech Laser Safety Policy Manual

Houston, Paul L.

13

Radiological Control Manual Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Division  

E-print Network

Radiological Control Manual Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Division SLAC-I-720-0A05Z-001 and published by ESHQ Publishing Document Title: Radiological Control Manual Original Publication Date: 1;Radiological Control Manual Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS Publication Data

Wechsler, Risa H.

14

Radiation and Health Technology Laboratory Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE and commercial nuclear sites and research and characterization programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, thermoluminescent and radiochromic Dosimetry, and calibration of measurement and test equipment (M&TE). The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations and M&TE laboratories. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentation, photon and neutron transfer standards alpha, beta, and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site, and a wide variety of M&TE. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory.

Goles, Ronald W.; Johnson, Michelle Lynn; Piper, Roman K.; Peters, Jerry D.; Murphy, Mark K.; Mercado, Mike S.; Bihl, Donald E.; Lynch, Timothy P.

2003-07-15

15

A radiological and chemical investigation of the 7500 Area Contamination Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

A radiological and chemical investigation of the 7500 Area Contamination Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted intermittently from February 1992 through May 1992. The investigation was performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health and Safety Research Division of ORNL at the request of the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Operations Office and

J. K. Williams; R. D. Foley; P. F. Tiner; T. L. Hatmaker; M. S. Uziel; R. E. Swaja

1993-01-01

16

Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec’s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

Paul Guss, Robert Augdahl, Bill Nickels, Cassandra Zellers

2008-04-16

17

ORNL necessary and sufficient standards for environment, safety, and health. Final report of the Identification Team for other industrial, radiological, and non-radiological hazard facilities  

SciTech Connect

This Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) set of standards is for Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These facility classifications are based on a laboratory-wide approach to classify facilities by hazard category. An analysis of the hazards associated with the facilities at ORNL was conducted in 1993. To identify standards appropriate for these Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities, the activities conducted in these facilities were assessed, and the hazards associated with the activities were identified. A preliminary hazards list was distributed to all ORNL organizations. The hazards identified in prior hazard analyses are contained in the list, and a category of other was provided in each general hazard area. A workshop to assist organizations in properly completing the list was held. Completed hazard screening lists were compiled for each ORNL division, and a master list was compiled for all Other Industrial, Radiological Hazard, and Non-Radiological facilities and activities. The master list was compared against the results of prior hazard analyses by research and development and environment, safety, and health personnel to ensure completeness. This list, which served as a basis for identifying applicable environment, safety, and health standards, appears in Appendix A.

NONE

1998-07-01

18

78 FR 29140 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health Appeals Processes: Questions and Answers About 517A...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Radiological Health Appeals Processes: Questions and Answers About...Radiological Health (CDRH) Appeals Processes: Questions and Answers About...added by the FDA Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA), as those...Radiological Health Appeals Processes: Questions and Answers...

2013-05-17

19

Determination of actinides at the radiological and environmental sciences laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article briefly describes some of the techniques and procedures that have been developed at the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL) to determine the actinides in environmental and biological samples. Dried or ashed samples are totally decomposed in high temperature fusions or with an acid dissolution method. Actinides of interest are coprecipitated from the sample matrix with barium sulfate, cerium fluoride, or a combination of ferrous phosphate and calcium fluoride precipitations. The precipitates are dissolved in perchloric acid and extracted with bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP) or dissolved in acidic aluminum nitrate and extracted with Aliquat-336. Actinides in the stripped fractions are coprecipitated with 50 ?g of cerium as cerium fluoride, filtered onto membrane filters and counted by alpha spectrometry. The described procedures enable an experienced analyst to prepare sixteen 1 g soil or twelve 5 g faecal ash samples for alpha spectrometry in 14 to 16 working-hours.

Williams, R. L.; Grothaus, G. E.

1984-06-01

20

Radiological Control Manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

Not Available

1993-04-01

21

Animal Health Diagnostic Center Histology Immunohistochemistry Laboratory  

E-print Network

Animal Health Diagnostic Center Histology ­ Immunohistochemistry Laboratory Page 1 of 1 Document Antibodies Prepared/Reviewed by: Martin Slade, Technical Service Supervisor, Histology Laboratory Joy Cramer

Pawlowski, Wojtek

22

Public health aspects of nuclear and radiological incidents.  

PubMed

Radiological and nuclear incidents are low probability but very high risk events. Measures can be, and have been, implemented to limit or prevent the impact on the public. Preparedness, however, remains the key to minimizing morbidity and mortality. Incidents may be related to hospital-based mis-administration of radiation in interventional radiology or nuclear medicine, industrial or nuclear power plant accidents. Safety and security measures are in place to prevent or mitigate such events. Despite efforts to prevent them, terrorist-perpetrated incidents with, for example, a radiological dispersal device (RDD) are also possible. Due to a misunderstanding of, or lack of, formal education regarding things in this realm, there can be considerable anxiety, even fear, about radiation-related incidents. Multiple studies evaluating healthcare provider willingness to report to work rank radiation as the hazard that will keep the largest number of workers at home. Even incidents that do not constitute a disaster can spiral out of control quite rapidly, placing considerable demands on community resources. Our communities will face these threats in the future and it is the responsibility of physicians and allied healthcare personnel to be trained and ready to care for those affected. The scope of resources needed to prepare for and respond to such incidents is indeed vast. It encompasses the coordinated effort of first responders and physicians, the preparedness of national agencies involved in responding to such events, and individual community cooperation and solidarity. This article reviews the approach to the short- and long-term effects of a radiological or nuclear incident on an affected population, with a specific focus on the medical and public health issues. It also summarizes the strengths and weaknesses of our current ability to respond effectively and makes recommendations to improve these capabilities. PMID:25348384

Katz, Seth K; Parrillo, Steven J; Christensen, Doran; Glassman, Erik S; Gill, Kimberly B

2014-01-01

23

Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides technical support to the requesting federal agency such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Defense, the National Space and Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), or a state agency to address the radiological consequences of an event. These activities include measures to alleviate damage, loss, hardship, or suffering caused by the incident;

Paul Guss

2008-01-01

24

Imaging and radiology  

MedlinePLUS

Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Doctors that specialize in the interpretation ...

25

Health effects of SRS non-radiological air emissions  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the potential health effects of non radiological emissions to the air resulting from operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The scope of this study was limited to the 55 air contaminants for which the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has quantified risk by determining unit risk factors (excess cancer risks) and/or reference concentrations (deleterious non cancer risks). Potential health impacts have been assessed in relation to the maximally exposed individual. This is a hypothetical person who resides for a lifetime at the SRS boundary. The most recent (1994) quality assured SRS emissions data available were used. Estimated maximum site boundary concentrations of the air contaminants were calculated using air dispersion modeling and 24-hour and annual averaging times. For the emissions studied, the excess cancer risk was found to be less than the generally accepted risk level of 1 in 100,000 and, in most cases, was less than 1 in 1,000,000. Deleterious non cancer effects were also found to be very unlikely.

Stewart, J.

1997-06-16

26

Lobar Brain Hemorrhages and White Matter Changes: Clinical, Radiological and Laboratorial Profiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: White matter changes have several histopathologic correlates including cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical, laboratorial and neuroradiological profile of a CAA-related lobar hemorrhages case series. Methods: A cohort of 50 consecutive patients with cerebral lobar hemorrhages was studied and clinical, radiological data and ApoE polymorphisms were analyzed. White matter changes were

Luís F. Maia; Cristiana Vasconcelos; Susana Seixas; Rui Magalhães; Manuel Correia

2006-01-01

27

Environmental Health and Safety Environmental Health Laboratory Assessment  

E-print Network

, location, etc.) Proper PPE available and matched to hazards: Gloves Lab Coates Safety Glasses/Goggles Face are current Copy of lab safety procedures for handling radioactive materials is available in the lab. UsersEnvironmental Health and Safety Environmental Health Laboratory Assessment PI

28

A useful formula for the radiological calibration laboratory.  

PubMed

A useful technique for determining the relationships between irradiation position and air kerma or neutron dose equivalent rate is presented. The standard geometric model (1/r2) is expanded allowing the user to include curvature in the model caused by scattered radiation. This technique applies to clean irradiation geometries that are well modeled by the standard geometric model, high-scatter geometries encountered in well irradiators, and neutron irradiation fields used to calibrate health physics instruments and personnel dosimeters. The technique, with slight modification, is also useful for determining the quality of x-ray beams. The basic equations and the implementing Excel functions are listed. In addition, several examples are presented to demonstrate the application of the technique. PMID:15706147

Cummings, F M

2005-03-01

29

Radiological Control Manual. Revision 0, January 1993  

SciTech Connect

This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

Not Available

1993-04-01

30

Radiological survey support activities for the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the Engineering Support Division of the US Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office and in accordance with the programmatic overview/certification responsibilities of the Department of Energy Environmental and Safety Engineering Division, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group conducted a series of radiological measurements and tests at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor located in Ames, Iowa. These measurements and tests were conducted during 1980 and 1981 while the reactor building was being decontaminated and decommissioned for the purpose of returning the building to general use. The results of these evaluations are included in this report. Although the surface contamination within the reactor building could presumably be reduced to negligible levels, the potential for airborne contamination from tritiated water vapor remains. This vapor emmanates from contamination within the concrete of the building and should be monitored until such time as it is reduced to background levels. 2 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

1984-09-01

31

Physiology Laboratories Quantifying Gas Exchange in Health and Disease.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes two quantitatively-oriented physiology laboratories for veterinary students. The laboratory exercises incorporate the procedures of radiology and physical examination with measurement of pulmonary function. Specific laboratory objectives, procedures and equipment needed for diagnoses of the pathologies are listed. (ML)

Olson, L. E.

1985-01-01

32

Some specialized radiological safety considerations at Argonne National Laboratory's heavy ion research facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

An existing accelerator system at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been upgraded and is being extended to provide heavy ions with energies well above the nuclear binding energies (5-25 MeV\\/A). The final configuration of the system, called the Argonne Tandem-LINAC Accelerator System (ATLAS), is to become a user-oriented national facility for nuclear physics research. ATLAS will produce some specialized radiological

R. H. Cooke; R. A. Wynveen

1983-01-01

33

Surface radiological investigations at the proposed SWSA 7 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

A surface radiological investigation was conducted intermittently from June 1994 to June 1995 at the proposed site for Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 7. The stimulus for this survey was the observation in June 1992 of a man`s trousers became contaminated with {sup 9O}Sr while he was reviewing work on top of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cooling tower. Radiation surveys identified {sup 9O}Sr on the roofs of older buildings at the HFIR site. Since no {sup 9O}Sr was found on buildings built between 1988 and 1990, the {sup 9O}Sr was thought to have been deposited prior to 1988. Later in 1992, beta particles were identified on a bulldozer that had been used in a wooded area southwest of the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) Access Road. More recently in April 1995, {sup 9O}Sr particles were identified on the top side of ceiling tiles in the overhead area of a building in the HFIR Complex. Considering that the proposed SWSA 7 site was located between the HFIR complex and the HPRR Access Road, it was deemed prudent to investigate the possibility that beta particles might also be present at the SWSA 7 site. A possible explanation for the presence of these particles has been provided by long-time ORNL employees and retirees. Strontium-90 as the titanate was developed in the early 1960s as part of the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. Strontium titanate ({sup 90}SrTiO{sub 3}) was produced at the Fission Product Development Laboratory (Building 3517) in the ORNL main plant area. Waste from the process was loaded into a 1-in. lead-lined dumpster, which was transferred to SWSA 5 where it was dumped into a trench. Dumping allowed some articles to become airborne.

McKenzie, S.P.; Murray, M.E.; Uziel, M.S.

1995-08-01

34

Overview of Sandia National Laboratories and Khlopin Radium Institute collaborative radiological accident consequence analysis efforts  

SciTech Connect

In January, 1995 a collaborative effort to improve radiological consequence analysis methods and tools was initiated between the V.G. Khlopin Institute (KRI) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of the collaborative effort was to transfer SNL`s consequence analysis methods to KRI and identify opportunities for collaborative efforts to solve mutual problems relating to the safety of radiochemical facilities. A second purpose was to improve SNL`s consequence analysis methods by incorporating the radiological accident field experience of KRI scientists (e.g. the Chernobyl and Kyshtym accidents). The initial collaborative effort focused on the identification of: safety criteria that radiochemical facilities in Russia must meet; analyses/measures required to demonstrate that safety criteria have been met; and data required to complete the analyses/measures identified to demonstrate the safety basis of a facility.

Young, M.L.; Carlson, D.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lazarev, L.N.; Petrov, B.F.; Romanovskiy, V.N. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

1997-05-01

35

Columbia University Health Sciences Health & Safety Manual 2003 Laboratory Safety Section -Page 43  

E-print Network

Columbia University Health Sciences ­ Health & Safety Manual 2003 Laboratory Safety Section - Page;ColumbiaUniversityHealthSciences­Health&SafetyManual2003 LaboratorySafetySection-Page44 Attachment&ChemicalHygieneTraining(seescheduleviaEH&Swebsite) #12;Columbia University Health Sciences ­ Health & Safety Manual 2003 Laboratory Safety Section - Page

Jia, Songtao

36

[Telecommunications, health and radiology: potential synergies for the new millennium].  

PubMed

Healthcare telematics, or telemedicine, is a new methodology that applies the potentialities of telecommunications technologies to the needs of medicine, thereby greatly contributing to improving the management of clinical data and medical information for the benefit of the individual patient and the community at large. The fields of application of Telemedicine are becoming increasingly vast, and this gives rise to technical problems (interconnections) as well as professional, ethical, medico-legal and legal problems. The dissemination of Telemedicine will require changes to be made to the organisation and delivery of the medical/administrative services connected to the management of patient data, the remote provision of care, and the impact of Telemedicine itself (e.g. need to standardise the nomenclature for telemedicine services). In addition, it will also call for a careful analysis of costs and benefits for both healthcare providers and patients. One of the most interesting experiences in terms of impact is Teleradiology. This is neither a new discipline nor a (sub)specialty: the practice of Teleradiology must comply with the rules regulating any radiological medical act, the primary aim of which is to contribute to establishing - rapidly and accurately - a diagnosis that will affect treatment strategies. It may be anticipated that in some situations Teleradiology will significantly change the working practices of Radiology Specialists and Radiology Technicians. Because it is better to anticipate problems rather than wait for them to arise, our Scientific Society, which is always sensitive to emerging issues, intends to propose the following recommendations/guidelines for the use of Teleradiology in the common interest of the community and healthcare workers. The invitation to take part in the initiative proposed by the Italian Society of Medical Radiology (SIRM), the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine (AIMN) and the Italian Association of Neuroradiology (AINR) was received with great satisfaction and is proof that we are working towards common goals. As on other occasions, this was reflected in the excellent collaboration between the National Radiologists' Union (SNR), the Italian Association of Medical Physics (AIFM) and the National Federation of Radiology Technicians (F.N.C.TSRM) in drafting the document. The document aims to highlight the potentialities and limitations in the use of Teleradiology and to provide a set of recommendations/guidelines, which are not, however, to be intended as strict, absolute rules. Because this field is continually evolving both in structural and regulatory terms, and because it is very difficult to establish universal criteria to rigidly define behavioural models for implementing and managing Teleradiology-related activities (which in any case fall into the category of radiological medical acts), the recommendations/guidelines proposed necessarily have an informative rather than prescriptive nature. The document starts by defining the meaning of the following currently used terms: Teleconsultation; Telediagnosis; Teledidactics. It then goes on to analyse the following aspects of Teleradiology: Technological requirements; Qualifications and training of Medical Personnel; Qualifications, training and competences of Radiology Technicians. Based on the regulations in force in Italy, these recommendations are structured in terms of rationale and possible professional issues arising from the use of Teleradiology. A section is devoted to data security and confidentiality, including legal implications, an area which is currently evolving and being studied in Italy and abroad. Finally, the professional liabilities of all the healthcare providers involved in Teleradiology (imprudence, incompetence, negligence) are outlined, as well as the responsibilities related to the necessary maintenance of equipment. The aim of the document is to propose recommendations/guidelines for the correct use and validation of Teleradiology. The Scientific Societies SIRM-AIMN-AINR and the Academic Institu

Lagalla, R

2001-01-01

37

76 FR 45825 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health 510(k) Clearance Process; Institute of Medicine Report...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Radiological Health 510(k) Clearance Process; Institute of Medicine Report: ``Medical Devices and the Public's Health, The...Administration (FDA) is requesting comments on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report entitled: ``Medical Devices and the...

2011-08-01

38

Occupational Analysis: Hospital Radiologic Technologist. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an effort to meet the growing demand for skilled radiologic technologists and other supportive personnel educated through the associate degree level, a national survey was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project to determine the tasks performed by personnel in the field and lay the groundwork for development of…

Reeder, Glenn D.; And Others

39

Strategic planning and radiology practice management in the new health care environment.  

PubMed

Current comprehensive health care reform in the United States demands that policy makers, insurers, providers, and patients work in reshaping the health care system to deliver care that is both more affordable and of higher quality. A tectonic shift is under way that runs contrary to the traditional goal of radiology groups to perform and interpret large numbers of imaging examinations. In fact, radiology service requisitions now must be evaluated for their appropriateness, possibly resulting in a reduction in the number of imaging studies performed. To be successful, radiology groups will have to restructure their business practices and strategies to align with the emerging health care paradigm. This article outlines a four-stage strategic framework that has aided corporations in achieving their goals and that can be readily adapted and applied by radiologists. The four stages are (a) definition and articulation of a purpose, (b) clear definition of strategic goals, (c) prioritization of specific strategic enablers, and (d) implementation of processes for tracking progress and enabling continuous adaptation. The authors provide practical guidance for applying specific tools such as analyses of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (so-called SWOT analyses), prioritization matrices, and balanced scorecards to accomplish each stage. By adopting and applying these tools within the strategic framework outlined, radiology groups can position themselves to succeed in the evolving health care environment. (©)RSNA, 2015. PMID:25590401

Sharpe, Richard E; Mehta, Tejas S; Eisenberg, Ronald L; Kruskal, Jonathan B

2015-01-01

40

National Jewish Health  

MedlinePLUS

... Immunology Asthma Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema) Behavioral Health Behavioral Sleep Services Exercise Tolerance Food Allergy Respiratory Medicine Clinical Laboratories Radiology Nursing Make an Appointment Refer ...

41

The health care value transparency movement and its implications for radiology.  

PubMed

The US health care system is in the midst of disruptive changes intended to expand access, improve outcomes, and lower costs. As part of this movement, a growing number of stakeholders have advocated dramatically increasing consumer transparency into the quality and price of health care services. The authors review the general movement toward American health care value transparency within the public, private, and nonprofit sectors, with an emphasis on those initiatives most relevant to radiology. They conclude that radiology, along with other "ancillary services," has been a major focus of early efforts to enhance consumer price transparency. By contrast, radiology as a field remains in the "middle of the pack" with regard to quality transparency. There is thus the danger that radiology value transparency in its current form will stimulate primarily price-based competition, erode provider profit margins, and disincentivize quality. The authors conclude with suggested actions radiologists can take to ensure that a more optimal balance is struck between quality transparency and price transparency, one that will enable true value-based competition among radiologists rather than commoditization. PMID:25441483

Durand, Daniel J; Narayan, Anand K; Rybicki, Frank J; Burleson, Judy; Nagy, Paul; McGinty, Geraldine; Duszak, Richard

2015-01-01

42

Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory radiological control performance indicator report -- Second quarter, calendar year 1998  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a report and an analysis of the Radiological Control Program through the second quarter of Calendar Year 1998 (CY-98) for Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO). LMITCO is the prime contractor at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This Performance Indicator Report is provided in accordance with Article 133 of the INEEL Radiological Control Manual. The INEEL collective occupational radiation deep dose is 30.757 person-rem year to date, compared to a year to date goal of 47.0 person-rem. Overall, the site dose goal has been reduced. This is mainly due to work scope reductions at the Idaho Nuclear Technologies and Engineering Center (INTEC). However, due to unforeseen increases in shipments to the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, their goal has been raised to 9.60 person-rem to accommodate the increase in dose. The RWMC increase results in an increase to the LMITCO goal to 100.76f person-rem. The goal is not plotted in a linear fashion since work scope varies from quarter to quarter.

Hinckley, F.L.

1998-08-01

43

Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of transuranic wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document provides radiological, physical and chemical characterization data for transuranic radioactive wastes and transuranic radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program (PSPI). Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 139 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 39,380{sup 3} corresponding to a total mass of approximately 19,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats Plant generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

1994-03-01

44

Results of the independent radiological verification survey of the remedial action performed at the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio, (OXO001)  

SciTech Connect

Between October 1952 and February 1957, National Lead of Ohio (NLO), a primary contractor for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), subcontracted certain uranium machining operations to Alba Craft Laboratory, Incorporated, located at 10-14 West Rose Avenue, Oxford, Ohio. In 1992, personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) confirmed the presence of residual radioactive materials from the AEC-related operations in and around the facility in amounts exceeding the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Although the amount of uranium found on the property posed little health hazard if left undisturbed, the levels were sufficient to require remediation to bring radiological conditions into compliance with current guidelines, thus ensuring that the public and the environment are protected. A team from ORNL conducted a radiological verification survey of the former Alba Craft Laboratory property between December 1994 and February 1995. The survey was conducted at the request of DOE and included directly measured radiation levels, the collection and analysis of soil samples to determine concentrations of uranium and certain other radionuclides, and comparison of these data to the guidelines. This document reports the findings of this survey. The results of the independent verification survey of the former Alba Craft Laboratory property demonstrate that all contaminated areas have been remediated to radionuclide concentrations and activity levels below the applicable guideline limits set by DOE.

Kleinhans, K.R.; Murray, M.E.; Carrier, R.F.

1996-04-01

45

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radiological Environmental Surveillance Program 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes calendar year 1995 environmental surveillance activities of Environmental Monitoring and Water Resources of Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company, performed at the following Waste Management Facilities: the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility, the Mixed Waste Storage Facility, and tow surplus facilities. Results of the sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance Program, Site Environmental Surveillance Program, and the United States Geological Survey at these facilities are included in this report. The primary purposes of monitoring are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1995 environmental surveillance data with US DOE Derived Concentration Guides and with data form previous years.

Miles, M.; Wilhelmsen, R.N.; Borsella, B.W.; Wright, K.C.

1996-08-01

46

Health implications of radiological terrorism: Perspectives from Israel  

PubMed Central

September 11th events taught us, members of the medical community, that we need to prepared for the worst. Nuclear terror is no longer science fiction. Radiological weapons of mass terror come in three flavors: The first one is nuclear. Since 1992, there have been six known cases of highly enriched uranium or plutonium being intercepted by authorities as it passed in or out of the former Soviet Union. Constructing a nuclear fission weapon requires high-level expertise, substantial facilities, and lots of money. All three of which would be difficult, although not impossible, for a terrorist group to pull off without state support. However, terrorists could carry out potential mass destruction without sophisticated weaponry by targeting nuclear facilities using conventional bombs or hijacked aircrafts. Terror attacks could also carry out mass panic and radioactive contamination of people and environment by dispersal of radioactive materials with or without the use of conventional explosive devices. Most medical and para-medical personnel are not familiar with CBRN terror and radiation casualties. To lessen the impact of those potential attacks and provide care for the greatest number of potential survivors, the community as a whole – and the medical community in particular – must acquire the knowledge of the various signs and symptoms of exposure to irradiation and radioactive contamination as well as have a planned response once such an attack has occurred. Based on knowledge of radiation hazards, medical emergency planers should analyze the risks of each scenario, offer feasible solutions and translate them into internationally accepted plans that would be simple to carry out once such an attack took place. The planned response should be questioned and tested by drills. Those drills should check the triage, evacuation routes, decontamination posts, evacuation centers and receiving hospitals. It is crucial that the drill will consist of simulated casualties that will follow the evacuation route from point zero to the ED. Knowledge and exercise will reduce terror (fear) from radiation and help the community as a whole better cope with such an event. This article will review the general information of radiation types, their biological damage, clinical appearance and general concepts of nuclear event planning, focusing on medical response and focus on the Israeli perspective. PMID:19561972

Hagby, Moti; Goldberg, Avishay; Becker, Steven; Schwartz, Dagan; Bar-Dayan, Yaron

2009-01-01

47

Results of the radiological characterization survey of the Building 7819 Decontamination Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

A radiological characterization survey of the interior of the Building 7819 Decontamination Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted during July 1993. The interior of Building 7819 is grossly contaminated, and the contamination is highly transferable. Levels of alpha and beta contamination inside the building exceed ORNL guidelines for zoning as a Contamination Area. Gamma whole-body exposure rates

R. E. Rodriguez; K. S. Brown; D. E. Rice; R. C. Gosslee; V. P. Patania

1993-01-01

48

Environmental Health and Safety Fire and Life Safety Laboratory Assessment  

E-print Network

Environmental Health and Safety Fire and Life Safety Laboratory Assessment PI: ___________________________________________ Department: ________________________________ Lab Contact: ___________________________________ Lab Phone: _________________________________ Date: ______________________________________ Inspection Finding Categories: A. No items of safety

49

A radiological and chemical investigation of the 7500 Area Contamination Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

A radiological and chemical investigation of the 7500 Area Contamination Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted intermittently from February 1992 through May 1992. The investigation was performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health and Safety Research Division of ORNL at the request of the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Operations Office and the ORNL Environmental Restoration Program. Results of this investigation indicate that the source of radioactive contamination at the point of the contamination incident is from one of the underground abandoned lines. The contamination in soil is likely the result of residual contamination from years of waste transport and maintenance operations (e.g., replacement of degraded joints, upgrading or replacement of entire pipelines, and associated landscaping activities). However, because (1) there is currently an active LLW line positioned in the same subsurface trench with the abandoned lines and (2) the physical condition of the abandoned lines may be brittle, this inquiry could not determine which abandoned line was responsible for the subsurface contamination. Soil sampling at the location of the contamination incident and along the pipeline route was performed in a manner so as not to damage the active LLW line and abandoned lines. Recommendations for corrective actions are included.

Williams, J.K.; Foley, R.D.; Tiner, P.F.; Hatmaker, T.L.; Uziel, M.S.; Swaja, R.E.

1993-05-01

50

Active personal dosemeters in interventional radiology: tests in laboratory conditions and in hospitals.  

PubMed

The work package 3 of the ORAMED project, Collaborative Project (2008-11) supported by the European Commission within its seventh Framework Programme, is focused on the optimisation of the use of active personal dosemeters (APDs) in interventional radiology and cardiology (IR/IC). Indeed, a lack of appropriate APD devices is identified for these specific fields. Few devices can detect low-energy X rays (20-100 keV), and none of them are specifically designed for working in pulsed radiation fields. The work presented in this paper consists in studying the behaviour of some selected APDs deemed suitable for application in IR/IC. For this purpose, measurements under laboratory conditions, both with continuous and pulsed X-ray beams, and tests in real conditions on site in different European hospitals were performed. This study highlights the limitations of APDs for this application and the need of improving the APD technology so as to fulfil all needs in the IR/IC field. PMID:21186215

Clairand, I; Bordy, J-M; Daures, J; Debroas, J; Denozière, M; Donadille, L; Ginjaume, M; Itié, C; Koukorava, C; Krim, S; Lebacq, A-L; Martin, P; Struelens, L; Sans-Mercé, M; Tosic, M; Vanhavere, F

2011-03-01

51

World Health Organization Laboratory biosafety manual  

E-print Network

there is limited information 8 Risk assessment and genetically modified microorganisms 8 3. Basic laboratories. Laboratory animal facilities 28 Animal facility ­ Biosafety Level 1 29 Animal facility ­ Biosafety Level 2 29 Animal facility ­ Biosafety Level 3 30 Animal facility ­ Biosafety Level 4 31 Invertebrates 32 7

Maxwell, Bruce D.

52

Structural health monitoring activities at National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory have on-going programs to assess damage in structures and mechanical systems from changes in their dynamic characteristics. This paper provides a summary of how both institutes became involved with this technology, their experience in this field and the directions that their research in this area will be taking in the future.

Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); James, G.H.; Simmermacher, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-09-01

53

Critical review of the reactor-safety study radiological health effects model. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This review of the radiological health effects models originally presented in the Reactor Safety Study (RSS) and currently used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was undertaken to assist the NRC in determining whether or not to revise the models and to aid in the revision, if undertaken. The models as presented in the RSS and as implemented in the CRAC (Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences) Code are described and critiqued. The major elements analyzed are those concerning dosimetry, early effects, and late effects. The published comments on the models are summarized, as are the important findings since the publication of the RSS.

Cooper, D.W.; Evans, J.S.; Jacob, N.; Kase, K.R.; Maletskos, C.J.; Robertson, J.B.; Smith, D.G.

1983-03-01

54

Perspectives of public health laboratories in emerging infectious diseases  

PubMed Central

The world has experienced an increased incidence and transboundary spread of emerging infectious diseases over the last four decades. We divided emerging infectious diseases into four categories, with subcategories in categories 1 and 4. The categorization was based on the nature and characteristics of pathogens or infectious agents causing the emerging infections, which are directly related to the mechanisms and patterns of infectious disease emergence. The factors or combinations of factors contributing to the emergence of these pathogens vary within each category. We also classified public health laboratories into three types based on function, namely, research, reference and analytical diagnostic laboratories, with the last category being subclassified into primary (community-based) public health and clinical (medical) analytical diagnostic laboratories. The frontline/leading and/or supportive roles to be adopted by each type of public health laboratory for optimal performance to establish the correct etiological agents causing the diseases or outbreaks vary with respect to each category of emerging infectious diseases. We emphasize the need, especially for an outbreak investigation, to establish a harmonized and coordinated national public health laboratory system that integrates different categories of public health laboratories within a country and that is closely linked to the national public health delivery system and regional and international high-end laboratories.

Chua, Kaw Bing; Gubler, Duane J

2013-01-01

55

Using Interorganizational Partnerships to Strengthen Public Health Laboratory Systems  

PubMed Central

Due to the current economic environment, many local and state health departments are faced with budget reductions. Health department administrators and public health laboratory (PHL) directors need to assess strategies to ensure that their PHLs can provide the same level of service with decreased funds. Exploratory case studies of interorganizational partnerships among local PHLs in California were conducted to determine the impact on local PHL testing services and capacity. Our findings suggest that interorganizational forms of cooperation among local PHLs can help bolster laboratory capacity by capturing economies of scale, leveraging scarce resources, and ensuring access to affordable, timely, and quality laboratory testing services. Interorganizational partnerships will help local and state public health departments continue to maintain a strong and robust laboratory system that supports their role in communicable disease surveillance. PMID:23997305

Kimsey, Paul; Buehring, Gertrude

2013-01-01

56

Allied Health Chemistry Laboratory: Amino Acids, Insulin, Proteins, and Skin  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a laboratory experiment specifically designed for allied health students. The students construct molecular models of amino acids, extract amino acids from their skin with hot water, and chromatographically analyze the skin extract and hydrolyzed insulin. (MLH)

Dever, David F.

1975-01-01

57

Environmental Health and Safety Chemical Hygiene Laboratory Assessment  

E-print Network

Environmental Health and Safety Chemical Hygiene Laboratory Assessment PI of promptly. Work surfaces are free of contamination. Heavy objects are stored on lower shelves. Glassware are available and in use. Chemical Fume Hoods / Exhaust Points # Compliance Items: Category Item Comments

58

HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH PROGRAM: AN OVERVIEW SUMMARY  

EPA Science Inventory

The present Health Effects Research Laboratory (HERL) biotechnology program is an outgrowth of previously existing programs in microbial pesticide research and genetic toxicology research. In order to meet the recommendation issued during the Coolfont Conference, HERL presently m...

59

Building the Body: Active Learning Laboratories that Emphasize Practical Aspects of Anatomy and Integration with Radiology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes the development of active learning techniques to review anatomy material in the context of radiology. Explanations of how the curriculum was designed to integrate knowledge and reemphasize concepts in different contexts is explained.

Kitt Shaffer (Boston University Radiology)

2010-04-23

60

Responsible conduct of radiology research. Part V. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and research.  

PubMed

For the past 5 years, the regulatory environment for research involving humans has been turbulent, with criticism coming from the federal government, the academic community, and the press. The purpose of this series of articles is to explain the ethical and legal bases for responsible conduct of radiology research and the rules that an investigator must follow. The purpose of this fifth part of the series is to explain the requirements of the Privacy Rule, which is a component of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), as they relate to human research. Under the HIPAA Privacy Rule, researchers within covered entities must follow appropriate methods as they use or disclose protected health information (PHI). Investigators should know the conditions under which PHI may be accessed for research purposes (ie, with authorization or waiver of authorization, when only a limited data set is evaluated, if data have been de-identified, or in reviews preparatory to research). Furthermore, researchers should know which information, such as the Notice of Privacy Practices and the Accounting of Disclosures, must be provided to potential subjects, when appropriate. At the conclusion of this article, several scenarios related to various types of radiology research and related regulatory requirements are presented. PMID:16304095

Johnson, Matthew S; Gonzales, Marcia N; Bizila, Shelley

2005-12-01

61

Training and qualification of health and safety technicians at a national laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Over the last 30 years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has successfully implemented the concept of a multi-disciplined technician. LLNL Health and Safety Technicians have responsibilities in industrial hygiene, industrial safety, health physics, as well as fire, explosive, and criticality safety. One of the major benefits to this approach is the cost-effective use of workers who display an ownership of health and safety issues which is sometimes lacking when responsibilities are divided. Although LLNL has always promoted the concept of a multi-discipline technician, this concept is gaining interest within the Department of Energy (DOE) community. In November 1992, individuals from Oak Ridge Institute of Science and Education (ORISE) and RUST Geotech, joined by LLNL established a committee to address the issues of Health and Safety Technicians. In 1993, the DOE Office of Environmental, Safety and Health, in response to the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 91-6, stated DOE projects, particularly environmental restoration, typically present hazards other than radiation such as chemicals, explosives, complex construction activities, etc., which require additional expertise by Radiological Control Technicians. They followed with a commitment that a training guide would be issued. The trend in the last two decades has been toward greater specialization in the areas of health and safety. In contrast, the LLNL has moved toward a generalist approach integrating the once separate functions of the industrial hygiene and health physics technician into one function.

Egbert, W.F.; Trinoskey, P.A.

1994-10-01

62

Building the Body: Active Learning Laboratories that Emphasize Practical Aspects of Anatomy and Integration with Radiology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Active learning exercises were developed to allow advanced medical students to revisit and review anatomy in a clinically meaningful context. In our curriculum, students learn anatomy two to three years before they participate in the radiology clerkship. These educational exercises are designed to review anatomy content while highlighting its…

Zumwalt, Ann C.; Lufler, Rebecca S.; Monteiro, Joseph; Shaffer, Kitt

2010-01-01

63

Results of the radiological survey at the former Alba Craft Laboratory site properties, Oxford, Ohio (OXO001)  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the former Alba Craft Laboratory Site Properties, Oxford, Ohio. The survey was performed in July and September of 1992. The purpose of the survey was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, primarily [sup 238]U, from uranium machining operations conducted for National Lead of Ohio, a prime Atomic Energy Commission contractor. The survey included scan measurement of direct radiation levels inside and outside the former laboratory, outdoors on eight properties adjoining the former laboratory, and the city right-of-way adjacent to the surveyed properties. Radionuclide concentrations were determined in outdoor surface and subsurface soil samples taken from each property and the exterior of the laboratory. Fixed surface residual radioactivity was measured inside the laboratory and outside the building. Air samples were collected, direct exposure was measured, and samples were collected to measure transferable radioactivity inside the building. Results of the survey indicate areas where surface and soil contamination level s are above the DOE guidelines for uncontrolled areas.

Murray, M.E.; Brown, K.S.; Mathis, R.A.

1993-03-01

64

Public Health Preparedness and Response to Chemical and Radiological Incidents: Functions, Practices, and Areas for Future Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This 66 page report released in August 2009 looks into the world of public health emergency preparedness, and for those persons who work in the fields of emergency response policy, public health, or security studies, this work will be most timely. Authored by five researchers at the RAND Corporation this technical report looks into "the roles of the public health service in emergency preparedness and its response to chemical and radiological incidents." The report is divided into four chapters, two appendices, and a references section. As events like nuclear plant accidents, chemical terrorism, and other related occurrences can have tremendous implications for public health, the report is most valuable.

Latourrette, Tom

65

Results of the radiological survey at the ALCOA Research Laboratory, 600 Freeport Road, New Kensington, Pennsylvania (ANK001)  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the ALCOA Research Laboratory, 600 Freeport Road, New Kensington, Pennsylvania. The survey was performed on November 12, 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally [sup 238]U, as a result of work done for the Manhattan Engineer District in 1944. The survey included measurement of direct alpha and beta-gamma levels in the northeast comer of the basement of Building 29, and the collection of a debris sample from a floor drain for radionuclide analysis. The survey area was used for experimental canning of uranium slugs prior to production activities at the former New Kensington Works nearby.

Foley, R.D.; Brown, K.S.

1992-10-01

66

Local Health Department Planning for a Radiological Emergency: An Application of the AHP2 Tool to Emergency Preparedness Prioritization  

PubMed Central

Objective We tested the Analytical Hierarchy Process tool for its use in public health to identify potential gaps in emergency preparedness by local health departments (LHDs) in California and Hawaii during a radiological emergency. Methods We developed a dedicated tool called All-Hazards Preparedness Squared (AHP2) that can be used by those who are responsible for all-hazards preparedness planning and response to guide them while making strategic decisions both in preparing for and responding to a slow-moving incident while it is unfolding. The tool is an Internet-based survey that can be distributed among teams responsible for emergency preparedness and response. Twenty-eight participants from 16 LHDs in California and Hawaii responsible for coordinating preparedness and response in a radiological emergency participated in using the tool in 2013. We used the data to compare the perceived importance of different elements of preparedness among participants and identify gaps in preparedness of their organizations for meeting the challenges presented by a radiological incident. Results Clarity of information and transfer of information (to and from agency to public, state, and federal partners) were public health officials' dominant concerns while responding to an emergency. Participants also found that there were gaps in the adequacy of training and awareness of the chain of command during a radiological emergency. Conclusion This preliminary study indicates that the AHP2 tool could be used for decision making in all-hazards preparedness planning and response. PMID:25355985

McKallagat, Chris; Klebesadal, Amy

2014-01-01

67

HUMAN HEALTH RESEARCH IMPLEMENTATION PLAN, NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY  

EPA Science Inventory

The National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL), as part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Office of Research and Development (ORD), is responsible for conducting research to improve the risk assessment of chemicals for potential effects ...

68

Final annual site environmental report, calendar year 1997, for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR), University of California at Davis, California  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) describes DOE activities for the Environmental Restoration/Waste Management (ER/WM) Project at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) site at UC Davis California. The report provides information about the Site and its environmental monitoring operation throughout calendar year 1997 for both radiological and non-radiological parameters. This report also describes activities conducted during 1997 in support of the Site environmental restoration efforts, and information about the impact of these activities on the public and the environment.

NONE

1998-09-01

69

Assessment of radiological health implicat from ambient environment in the Muar district, Johor, Malaysia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study aims to obtain baseline data of environmental terrestrial radiation and to assess the corresponding health risk in the ambient environment in Muar District, Johor, Malaysia in view of the possible construction of nuclear power plant (NPP) in the future. The external gamma dose rate (GDR), measured using two portable survey meters, was 151 nGy h-1. The activity concentrations of 232Th, 226Ra, and 40K were determined using hyper pure germanium (HPGe) detector. The activity concentrations were varied from 11±1 to 583±18 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, 6±1 to 244±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, and 13±6 to 830±13 Bq kg-1 for 40K. Various types of water samples were analyzed using a Low Background Alpha Beta Series 5 XLB instrument at Nuclear Malaysia (NM). Gross alpha activity concentrations in tap water varied from 3±1 mBq L-1 to 34±6 mBq L-1 and gross beta activity concentrations varied from 58±5 mBq L-1 to 709±39 mBq L-1 which were lower than the recommended value by Interim National Water Quality Standards for Malaysia (INWQS) and World Health Organization (WHO, 1993). The radiological health which are the annual effective dose equivalent, the collective effective dose, radium equivalent activity and external hazard index 0.220 mSv, 0.526×102 man Sv y-1, 359 Bq kg-1 and 0.969, respectively. The results were comparable to internationally recommended values and discussed accordingly.

Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Alajerami, Yasser; Mhareb, Mohammad Hasan Abu; Aliyu, Abubakar Sadiq; Gabdo, Hamman Tukur; Garba, Nuraddeen Nasiru

2014-10-01

70

Decision-making and radiological protection at Three Mile Island: response of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare  

SciTech Connect

Decision-making by decision-makers during the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island all had to do in some way, and impacted on the public health and safety, the health and safety of the workers, and emergency preparedness and health care. This paper reviews the activities of only one federal agency during the accident, the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW), and its effectiveness in its role as the leading institution responsible for protecting the public health during the first accident in a nuclear power plant designed for the commerical generation of electricity in the United States. My comments are limited to only three acts dealing with radiological health and protection: the struggle for power and assertion of leadership in response to possible health consequences of the accident; the decisions to evacuate the area during the radiological emergency; and the use of potassium iodide as a means of protecting the public and the workers from the hazards of exposure to radioactive iodine released to the environment.

Fabrikant, J.I.

1982-02-01

71

Implementation of a DOD ELAP Conforming Quality System at a FUSRAP Site Field Temporary Radiological Screening Laboratory - 13500  

SciTech Connect

A case study is presented on specific program elements that supported the transition of a temporary field radiological screening lab to an accredited operation capable of meeting client quality objectives for definitive results data. The temporary field lab is located at the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Linde Site in Tonawanda, NY. The site is undergoing remediation under the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District, with Cabrera Services Inc. as the remediation contractor and operator of the on-site lab. Analysis methods employed in the on-site lab include gross counting of alpha and beta particle activity on swipes and air filters and gamma spectroscopy of soils and other solid samples. A discussion of key program elements and lessons learned may help other organizations considering pursuit of accreditation for on-site screening laboratories. (authors)

Winters, M.S.; McElheny, G. [Cabrera Services Inc. 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT (United States)] [Cabrera Services Inc. 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT (United States); Houston, L.M.; Masset, M.R.; Spector, H.L. [United States Army Corps of Engineers -1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY (United States)] [United States Army Corps of Engineers -1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY (United States)

2013-07-01

72

75 FR 384 - Event Problem Codes Web Site; Center for Devices and Radiological Health; Availability  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...FDA-2009-N-0576] Event Problem Codes Web Site; Center for Devices and Radiological...FDA) is announcing the availability of a Web site where the Center for Devices and Radiological...FDA is announcing the availability of a Web site that will make modifications to...

2010-01-05

73

EPA/OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT'S NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS LABORATORY'S ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR FOR HEALTH INTERNET SITE  

EPA Science Inventory

This Internet site provides information about the Office of Research and Development's National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory's Associate Director for Health (ADH) Internet site. The ADH is responsible for providing leadership for the health effects research program...

74

Tools for placing the radiological health hazard in perspective following a severe emergency at a light water reactor (LWR) or its spent fuel pool.  

PubMed

Experience from past nuclear and radiological emergencies shows that placing the radiological health hazard in perspective and having a definition of "safe" are required in order to prevent members of the public, those responsible for protecting the public (i.e., decision makers), and others from taking inappropriate and damaging actions that are not justified based on the radiological health hazard. The principle concerns of the public during a severe nuclear power plant or spent fuel pool emergency are "Am I safe?" and "What should I do to be safe?" However, these questions have not been answered to the satisfaction of the public, despite various protective actions being implemented to ensure their safety. Instead, calculated doses or various measured quantities (e.g., ambient dose rate or radionuclide concentrations) are used to describe the situation to the public without placing them into perspective in terms of the possible radiological health hazard, or if they have, it has been done incorrectly. This has contributed to members of the public taking actions that do more harm than good in the belief that they are protecting themselves. Based on established international guidance, this paper provides a definition of "safe" for the radiological health hazard for use in nuclear or radiological emergencies and a system for putting the radiological health hazard in perspective for quantities most commonly measured after a release resulting from a severe emergency at a light water reactor or its spent fuel pool. PMID:25437516

McKenna, Thomas; Welter, Phillip Vilar; Callen, Jessica; Martincic, Rafael; Dodd, Brian; Kutkov, Vladimir

2015-01-01

75

Results of the radiological and chemical characterization of surface impoundments 3539 and 3540 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

A radiological and chemical characterization survey of impoundments 3539 and 3540 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted during December 1997. Impoundments 3539 and 3540 are located in the Surface Impoundments Operable Unit (SIOU) of Waste Area Group 1. The investigation was performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Life Sciences Division of ORNL at

M. E. Murray; D. A. Rose; K. S. Brown; W. Winton; R. A. Dean; R. H. Coe

1998-01-01

76

Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim Site  

SciTech Connect

This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006), as well as several other published DQOs. The intent of this report is to determine the necessary steps required to ensure that radioactive emissions to the air from the Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) headquartered at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Sequim Marine Research Operations (Sequim Site) on Washington State’s Olympic Peninsula are managed in accordance with regulatory requirements and best practices. The Sequim Site was transitioned in October 2012 from private operation under Battelle Memorial Institute to an exclusive use contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office.

Barnett, J. M.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.

2012-12-27

77

Replacement of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Health Physics Instrumentation Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the replacement of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Health Physics Instrumentation Laboratory at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of this project is to replace the existing Health Physics Instrumentation Laboratory (HPIL) with a new facility to provide a safe environment for maintaining and calibrating radiation detection instruments used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The existing HPIL facility provides portable health physics monitoring instrumentation and direct reading dosimetry procurement, maintenance and calibration of radiation detection instruments, and research and development support-services to the INEL and others. However, the existing facility was not originally designed for laboratory activities and does not provide an adequate, safe environment for calibration activities. The EA examined the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and evaluated reasonable alternatives, including the no action alternative in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508). Based on the environmental analysis in the attached EA, the proposed action will not have a significant effect on the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and 40 CFR Parts 1508.18 and 1508.27. The selected action (the proposed alternative) is composed of the following elements, each described or evaluated in the attached EA on the pages referenced. The proposed action is expected to begin in 1997 and will be completed within three years: design and construction of a new facility at the Central Facility Area of the INEL; operation of the facility, including instrument receipt, inspections and repairs, precision testing and calibration, and storage and issuance. The selected action will result in no significant environmental impacts.

NONE

1995-05-01

78

Los Alamos National Laboratory's environmental surveillance and radiological emergency vehicle and the Co-60 incident  

SciTech Connect

A 4-wheel drive van has been outfitted at Los Alamos for environmental surveillance and radiological emergencies. The van's capabilities were described at this conference in 1982. The rapid gamma search and spectral analysis capabilities were utilized in conjunction with the cobalt-60 (/sup 60/Co) teletherapy source incident in Juarez, Mexico. Assistance was requested by the State of New Mexico (through DOE/Albuquerque Area Office) in January 1984 to perform initial in-situ isotopic identification of the contaminated steel that was first discovered in the United States by Los Alamos. The van's capabilities were again called upon in March 1984 to survey the New Mexico highways using the highly sensitive delta count rate monitoring system for /sup 60/Co pellets that may have been tracked into the state. This paper provides (1) setup and results of the surveys conducted with the van, (2) interactions with the press, and (3) an evaluation of the van's usefulness in such an emergency response. 2 references, 5 figures.

Van Etten, D.M.; Ahlquist, A.J.; Hansen, W.R.

1984-01-01

79

SOIL AND FILL LABORATORY SUPPORT - 1992 RADIOLOGICAL ANALYSES, FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of soil analysis laboratory work by the University of Florida in support of the Florida Radon Research Program (FRRP). nalyses were performed on soil and fill samples collected during 1992 by the FRRP Research House Program and the New House Evaluation Pr...

80

SOIL AND FILL LABORATORY SUPPORT - 1992 RADIOLOGICAL ANALYSES - FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of soil analysis laboratory work by the University of Florida in support of the Florida Radon Research Program (FRRP). Analyses were performed on soil and fill samples collected during 1992 by the FRRP Research House Program and the New House Evaluation P...

81

Radiological environmental monitoring report for Brookhaven National Laboratory 1967--1970  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was established in 1947 on the former Army Camp Upton site located in central Long Island, New York. From the very beginning, BNL has monitored the environment on and around the Laboratory site to assess the effects of its operations on the environment. This document summarizes the environmental data collected for the years 1967, 1968, 1969, and 1970. Thus, it fills a gap in the series of BNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1962. The data in this document reflect measurements for those four years of concentrations and/or amounts of airborne radioactivity, radioactivity in streams and ground water, and external radiation levels in the vicinity of BNL. Also included are estimates, made at that time, of BNL`s contribution to radioactivity in the environment. Among the major scientific facilities operated at BNL are the High Flux Beam Reactor, Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, and the 60-inch Cyclotron.

Meinhold, C.B.; Hull, A.P.

1998-10-01

82

Radiological control manual. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP.

Kloepping, R.

1996-05-01

83

www.ehs.psu.edu / 814-865-6391 Working In the Laboratory and Your Health  

E-print Network

and Your Health Many factors including stress and disease can affect a person's health. It is known however Hazards in the laboratory can affect a workers health if they are absorbed into the body. These hazards that some exposures to external factors in the home and workplace can affect health. Laboratory Hazards

Maroncelli, Mark

84

Amendments to the Center for Devices and Radiological Health federal performance standard for laser products.  

PubMed

Federal law requires that all laser products that are imported into or introduced into commerce in the United States comply with the performance standard published in the Code of Federal Regulations (CRF), Title 21, Parts 1040.10 and 1040.11, administered by the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), US Food and Drug Administration. Although it contains somewhat different requirements for hazard classification, engineering controls and labeling, the ANSI Z136.1 standard defers to the CDRH standard. The CDRH standard became effective in August, 1976 and was amended, in 1978 and also in 1985. In the early 1990s, US experts met to formulate an approach to bring the requirements of the CDRH standard and those of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard, IEC 825, into closer agreement in order to lower barriers to international trade and to remove any excessive compliance burdens on manufacturers. In 1993, the CDRH published, formally in the Federal Register and informally, a Notice of Intent to amend the CDRH standard. Responses to those notices have now been analyzed and informal draft amendments were distributed in 1996. This draft is now being prepared for formal issuance as a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking. Meanwhile, the IEC standard was amended in 1993 and republished as IEC 825-1; these amendments created considerable controversy since they resulted in over classification of the hazard of many products, especially light emitting diodes (LEDs) that have a large divergence and increased source dimensions. Additional amendments are now being developed to correct this problem. The CDRH has carefully monitored developments in the IEC and actively participated in its proceedings as a guide in developing its own proposal. This paper describes the major changes that are being proposed for the CDRH standard and presents some rationale for the major changes. The more significant changes include expansion of applicability to include LEDs, reduced emission durations for classification, revised measurement for hazard classification, reduced performance requirements for lower power visible radiation products, and revised requirements for medical products. PMID:10176360

Dennis, J E

1997-12-01

85

The Predictive Value of Selected Extrinsic and Intrinsic Indicators of Overall Job Satisfaction in Diagnostic Radiological Technology, Radiation Therapy, and Nuclear Medicine Technology Allied Health Faculty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Healthcare is the largest industry in the United States and 60 percent of its 14 million workers are in allied health jobs. The need to attract and retain allied health faculty is critical to preparing a competent workforce in healthcare. This study reports the results of a survey of 259 faculty members working in diagnostic radiologic technology,…

Beavers, Gregory S.

2010-01-01

86

Bioremediation of Petroleum and Radiological Contaminated Soils at the Savannah River Site: Laboratory to Field Scale Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the process of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations limited amounts of waste are generated containing petroleum, and radiological contaminated soils. Currently, this combination of radiological and petroleum contaminated waste does not have an immediate disposal route and is being stored in low activity vaults. SRS developed and implemented a successful plan for clean up of the petroleum portion of

Robin L. Brigmon

2004-01-01

87

Consolidated Imaging: Implementing a Regional Health Information Exchange System for Radiology in Southern Maine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The traditional, film-based radiology system presents serious limitations for patient care. These include forcing clinicians to make decisions based on information that is often less than optimal and making transfers of films and prior studies to other facilities more complicated than they need to be. Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) address these issues by allowing for acquisition, storage, display,

Stephenie Loux; Robert Coleman; Matthew Ralston; Andrew Coburn

88

RISKIND: A computer program for calculating radiological consequences and health risks from transportation of spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the technical details of RISIUND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the collective population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel. RISKIND is a user-friendly, semiinteractive program that can be run on an IBM or equivalent personal computer. The program language is FORTRAN-77. Several models are included in RISKIND that have been tailored to calculate the exposure to individuals under various incident-free and accident conditions. The incidentfree models assess exposures from both gamma and neutron radiation and can account for different cask designs. The accident models include accidental release, atmospheric transport, and the environmental pathways of radionuclides from spent fuels; these models also assess health risks to individuals and the collective population. The models are supported by databases that are specific to spent nuclear fuels and include a radionudide inventory and dose conversion factors.

Yuan, Y.C. [Square Y, Orchard Park, NY (United States); Chen, S.Y.; LePoire, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Rothman, R. [USDOE Idaho Field Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-02-01

89

21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A radiologic table is a...

2011-04-01

90

21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A radiologic table is a...

2014-04-01

91

21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A radiologic table is a...

2010-04-01

92

21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A radiologic table is a...

2012-04-01

93

21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A radiologic table is a...

2013-04-01

94

RISKIND: A computer program for calculating radiological consequences and health risks from transportation of spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the technical details of RISKIND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the collective population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel. RISKIND is a user-friendly, interactive program that can be run on an IBM or equivalent personal computer under the Windows{trademark} environment. Several models are included in RISKIND that have been tailored to calculate the exposure to individuals under various incident-free and accident conditions. The incident-free models assess exposures from both gamma and neutron radiation and can account for different cask designs. The accident models include accidental release, atmospheric transport, and the environmental pathways of radionuclides from spent fuels; these models also assess health risks to individuals and the collective population. The models are supported by databases that are specific to spent nuclear fuels and include a radionuclide inventory and dose conversion factors. In addition, the flexibility of the models allows them to be used for assessing any accidental release involving radioactive materials. The RISKIND code allows for user-specified accident scenarios as well as receptor locations under various exposure conditions, thereby facilitating the estimation of radiological consequences and health risks for individuals. Median (50% probability) and typical worst-case (less than 5% probability of being exceeded) doses and health consequences from potential accidental releases can be calculated by constructing a cumulative dose/probability distribution curve for a complete matrix of site joint-wind-frequency data. These consequence results, together with the estimated probability of the entire spectrum of potential accidents, form a comprehensive, probabilistic risk assessment of a spent nuclear fuel transportation accident.

Yuan, Y.C. [Square Y Consultants, Orchard Park, NY (US); Chen, S.Y.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (US)

1995-11-01

95

Page 1 of 3 Laboratory Safety and Environmental Health Assessment Program  

E-print Network

Page 1 of 3 Laboratory Safety and Environmental Health Assessment Program Principal Investigators responsibilities. This Laboratory Assessment Program identifies four processes to evaluate safety and environmental to modify an assessment checklist that best addresses specific safety and environmental compliance needs

96

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY - AN ANNUAL REPORT OF ACCOMPLISHMENTS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2000  

EPA Science Inventory

This Annual Report showcases some of the research activities of the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL) in various health and environmental effects research areas. The report is an indicator of the examples of progress and accomplishments that ...

97

76 FR 54777 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health 510(k) Clearance Process; Recommendations Proposed in...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Clearance Process; Recommendations Proposed in Institute of Medicine Report: ``Medical Devices and the Public's Health, The...workshop entitled ``Recommendations Proposed in Institute of Medicine Report: `Medical Devices and the Public's Health,...

2011-09-02

98

Carcinoma of unknown primary: key radiological issues from the recent National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines  

PubMed Central

Carcinoma of unknown primary origin (CUP) accounts for 3–5% of cancer cases and is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the UK. CUP management is challenging, partly owing to the heterogeneity of the condition and its presentation, but also owing to the lack of dedicated clinical services for these patients. The recent National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines on metastatic malignancy of unknown primary origin were developed to improve the co-ordination of diagnostic and clinical services at hospitals treating cancer patients in England and Wales, in particular by the setting up of CUP teams to manage these patients. Radiologists have a vital role in the diagnosis of these patients and should work closely with the CUP team to streamline the diagnostic pathway. This article summarises areas of the NICE guidelines relevant to radiology and discusses the radiological management of patients with CUP, including initial investigation, the importance of biopsy, the management of specific presentations, special investigations and organisational issues. PMID:22374278

Taylor, M B; Bromham, N R; Arnold, S E

2012-01-01

99

Radiological accidents potentially important to human health risk in the U.S. Department of Energy waste management program  

SciTech Connect

Human health risks as a consequence of potential radiological releases resulting from plausible accident scenarios constitute an important consideration in the US Department of Energy (DOE) national program to manage the treatment, storage, and disposal of wastes. As part of this program, the Office of Environmental Management (EM) is currently preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) that evaluates the risks that could result from managing five different waste types. This paper (1) briefly reviews the overall approach used to assess process and facility accidents for the EM PEIS; (2) summarizes the key inventory, storage, and treatment characteristics of the various DOE waste types important to the selection of accidents; (3) discusses in detail the key assumptions in modeling risk-dominant accidents; and (4) relates comparative source term results and sensitivities.

Mueller, C.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Nabelssi, B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Jackson, R. [Science Applications International Corp., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-03-01

100

Automated Identification of Patients with Pulmonary Nodules in an Integrated Health System Using Administrative Health Plan Data, Radiology Reports, and Natural Language Processing  

PubMed Central

Introduction Lung nodules are commonly encountered in clinical practice, yet little is known about their management in community settings. An automated method for identifying patients with lung nodules would greatly facilitate research in this area. Methods Using members of a large, community-based health plan in 2006–2010, we developed a method to identify patients with lung nodules by combining five diagnostic codes, four procedural codes and a natural language processing (NLP) algorithm that performed free text searches of radiology transcripts. An experienced pulmonologist reviewed a random sample of 116 radiology transcripts, providing a reference standard for the NLP algorithm. Results We identified 7,112 unique members as having one or more incident lung nodules using an automated method. The mean age was 65 (SD 14) years. There were slightly more women (54%) than men, and Hispanics and non-whites comprised 45% of the lung nodule cohort. Thirty-six percent were never smokers while 11% were current smokers. Fourteen percent were subsequently diagnosed with lung cancer. The sensitivity and specificity of the NLP algorithm for identifying the presence of lung nodule(s) were 96% and 86%, respectively, compared with clinician review. Among the true positive transcripts in the validation sample, only 35% were solitary and unaccompanied by one or more associated findings and 56% measured 8–30 mm in diameter. Conclusions A combination of diagnostic codes, procedural codes and an NLP algorithm for free text searching of radiology reports can accurately and efficiently identify patients with incident lung nodules, many of whom are subsequently diagnosed with lung cancer. PMID:22627647

Danforth, Kim N.; Early, Megan I.; Ngan, Sharon; Kosco, Anne E.; Zheng, Chengyi; Gould, Michael K.

2012-01-01

101

Manual of Basic Techniques for a Health Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Described are basic laboratory methods for diagnosing and investigating diseases of importance to developing countries. Intended primarily for the training of technicians who will work in peripheral laboratories, the manual is designed so that student laboratory assistants can be taught to use it with minimal supervision from a teacher. The…

World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

102

LABORATORY & RADIATION SAFETY Cornell University Department of Environmental Health & Safety  

E-print Network

hazard communication program for any workplace that uses hazardous chemicals. The OSHA "Laboratory for staff working in labs versus other spaces and what exactly defines a lab. The OSHA Hazard Communication: "Laboratory" means a facility where the "laboratory use of hazardous chemicals" occurs. It is a workplace

Pawlowski, Wojtek

103

Bioremediation of Petroleum and Radiological Contaminated Soils at the Savannah River Site: Laboratory to Field Scale Applications  

SciTech Connect

In the process of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations limited amounts of waste are generated containing petroleum, and radiological contaminated soils. Currently, this combination of radiological and petroleum contaminated waste does not have an immediate disposal route and is being stored in low activity vaults. SRS developed and implemented a successful plan for clean up of the petroleum portion of the soils in situ using simple, inexpensive, bioreactor technology. Treatment in a bioreactor removes the petroleum contamination from the soil without spreading radiological contamination to the environment. This bioreactor uses the bioventing process and bioaugmentation or the addition of the select hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. Oxygen is usually the initial rate-limiting factor in the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Using the bioventing process allowed control of the supply of nutrients and moisture based on petroleum contamination concentrations and soil type. The results of this work have proven to be a safe and cost-effective means of cleaning up low level radiological and petroleum-contaminated soil. Many of the other elements of the bioreactor design were developed or enhanced during the demonstration of a ''biopile'' to treat the soils beneath a Polish oil refinery's waste disposal lagoons. Aerobic microorganisms were isolated from the aged refinery's acidic sludge contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Twelve hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were isolated from the sludge. The predominant PAH degraders were tentatively identified as Achromobacter, Pseudomonas Burkholderia, and Sphingomonas spp. Several Ralstonia spp were also isolated that produce biosurfactants. Biosurfactants can enhance bioremediation by increasing the bioavailability of hydrophobic contaminants including hydrocarbons. The results indicated that the diversity of acid-tolerant PAH-degrading microorganisms in acidic oil wastes may be much greater than previously demonstrated and they have numerous applications to environmental restoration. Twelve of the isolates were subsequently added to the bioreactor to enhance bioremediation. In this study we showed that a bioreactor could be bioaugmented with select bacteria to enhance bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated soils under radiological conditions.

BRIGMON, ROBINL.

2004-06-07

104

76 FR 62072 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health; Standard Operating Procedures for Network of Experts...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Health; Standard Operating Procedures for Network of Experts; Request for Comments AGENCY...operating procedures (SOPs) for a new ``Network of Experts.'' The draft SOPs describe...of two draft SOPs, one entitled, ``Network of Experts--Expert Utilization...

2011-10-06

105

Improving newborn screening laboratory test ordering and result reporting using health information exchange  

Microsoft Academic Search

Capture, coding and communication of newborn screening (NBS) information represent a challenge for public health laboratories, health departments, hospitals, and ambulatory care practices. An increasing number of conditions targeted for screening and the complexity of interpretation contribute to a growing need for integrated information-management strategies. This makes NBS an important test of tools and architecture for electronic health information exchange

Stephen M Downs; Peter C van Dyck; Piero Rinaldo; Clement McDonald

106

Viewpoint paper: Improving newborn screening laboratory test ordering and result reporting using health information exchange  

Microsoft Academic Search

Capture, coding and communication of newborn screening (NBS) information represent a challenge for public health laboratories, health departments, hospitals, and ambulatory care practices. An increasing number of conditions targeted for screening and the complexity of interpretation contribute to a growing need for integrated information-management strategies. This makes NBS an important test of tools and architecture for electronic health information exchange

Stephen M. Downs; Peter C. van Dyck; Piero Rinaldo; Clement McDonald; R. Rodrey Howell; Alan Zuckerman; Gregory Downing

2010-01-01

107

Results of the radiological survey at the ALCOA Research Laboratory, 600 Freeport Road, New Kensington, Pennsylvania (ANK001). Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the ALCOA Research Laboratory, 600 Freeport Road, New Kensington, Pennsylvania. The survey was performed on November 12, 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 238}U, as a result of work done for the Manhattan Engineer District in 1944. The survey included measurement of direct alpha and beta-gamma levels in the northeast comer of the basement of Building 29, and the collection of a debris sample from a floor drain for radionuclide analysis. The survey area was used for experimental canning of uranium slugs prior to production activities at the former New Kensington Works nearby.

Foley, R.D.; Brown, K.S.

1992-10-01

108

Post-remedial-action radiological survey of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, Pennsylvania, October 1-8, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The post-remedial-action radiological assessment conducted by the ANL Radiological Survey Group in October 1981, following decommissioning and decontamination efforts by Westinghouse personnel, indicated that except for the Advanced Fuels Laboratory exhaust ductwork and north wall, the interior surfaces of the Plutonium Laboratory and associated areas within Building 7 and the Advanced Fuels Laboratory within Building 8 were below both the ANSI Draft Standard N13.12 and NRC Guideline criteria for acceptable surface contamination levels. Hence, with the exceptions noted above, the interior surfaces of those areas within Buildings 7 and 8 that were included in the assessment are suitable for unrestricted use. Air samples collected at the involved areas within Buildings 7 and 8 indicated that the radon, thoron, and progeny concentrations within the air were well below the limits prescribed by the US Surgeon General, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Department of Energy. The Building 7 drain lines are contaminated with uranium, plutonium, and americium. Radiochemical analysis of water and dirt/sludge samples collected from accessible Low-Bay, High-Bay, Shower Room, and Sodium laboratory drains revealed uranium, plutonium, and americium contaminants. The Building 7 drain lines hence are unsuitable for release for unrestricted use in their present condition. Low levels of enriched uranium, plutonium, and americium were detected in an environmental soil coring near Building 8, indicating release or spillage due to Advanced Reactors Division activities or Nuclear Fuel Division activities undr NRC licensure. /sup 60/Co contamination was detected within the Building 7 Shower Room and in soil corings from the environs of Building 7. All other radionuclide concentrations measured in soil corings and the storm sewer outfall sample collected from the environs about Buildings 7 and 8 were within the range of normally expected background concentrations.

Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

1984-01-01

109

Mental health consequences of chemical and radiologic emergencies: a systematic review.  

PubMed

This article reviews the literature pertaining to psychological impacts in the aftermath of technological disasters, focusing on the immediate psychological and mental health consequences emergency department physicians and first responders may encounter in the aftermath of such disasters. First receivers see a wide spectrum of psychological distress, including acute onset of psychiatric disorders, the exacerbation of existing psychological and psychiatric conditions, and widespread symptomatology even in the absence of a diagnosable disorder. The informal community support systems that exist after a natural disaster may not be available to communities affected by a technological disaster leading to a need for more formal mental health supportive services. PMID:25455669

MCCormick, Lisa C; Tajeu, Gabriel S; Klapow, Joshua

2015-02-01

110

Effect of the Duration Time of a Nuclear Accident on Radiological Health Consequences  

PubMed Central

This study aimed to quantify the effect of duration time of a nuclear accident on the radiation dose of a densely populated area and the resulting acute health effects. In the case of nuclear accidents, the total emissions of radioactive materials can be classified into several categories. Therefore, the release information is very important for the assessment of risk to the public. We confirmed that when the duration time of the emissions are prolonged to 7 hours, the concentrations of radioactive substances in the ambient air are reduced by 50% compared to that when the duration time of emission is one hour. This means that the risk evaluation using only the first wind direction of an accident is very conservative, so it has to be used as a screening level for the risk assessment. Furthermore, it is judged that the proper control of the emission time of a nuclear accident can minimize the health effects on residents. PMID:24619120

Jeong, Hyojoon; Park, Misun; Jeong, Haesun; Hwang, Wontae; Kim, Eunhan; Han, Moonhee

2014-01-01

111

Effect of the duration time of a nuclear accident on radiological health consequences.  

PubMed

This study aimed to quantify the effect of duration time of a nuclear accident on the radiation dose of a densely populated area and the resulting acute health effects. In the case of nuclear accidents, the total emissions of radioactive materials can be classified into several categories. Therefore, the release information is very important for the assessment of risk to the public. We confirmed that when the duration time of the emissions are prolonged to 7 hours, the concentrations of radioactive substances in the ambient air are reduced by 50% compared to that when the duration time of emission is one hour. This means that the risk evaluation using only the first wind direction of an accident is very conservative, so it has to be used as a screening level for the risk assessment. Furthermore, it is judged that the proper control of the emission time of a nuclear accident can minimize the health effects on residents. PMID:24619120

Jeong, Hyojoon; Park, Misun; Jeong, Haesun; Hwang, Wontae; Kim, Eunhan; Han, Moonhee

2014-03-01

112

A Laboratory for Humanities and the Health Professions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Georgetown University Health and Humanities Program is based on the concept of the university as a community concerned with the universe of knowledge. The interprofessional, interdisciplinary program serves the purposes of health professional education and enhances the quality of clinical treatment. (Author/SK)

Reich, Warren T.

1982-01-01

113

Radiological dose assessment for bounding accident scenarios at the Critical Experiment Facility, TA-18, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A computer modeling code, CRIT8, was written to allow prediction of the radiological doses to workers and members of the public resulting from these postulated maximum-effect accidents. The code accounts for the relationships of the initial parent radionuclide inventory at the time of the accident to the growth of radioactive daughter products, and considers the atmospheric conditions at time of release. The code then calculates a dose at chosen receptor locations for the sum of radionuclides produced as a result of the accident. Both criticality and non-criticality accidents are examined.

NONE

1991-09-01

114

Interventional Radiology healthcare.utah.edu/radiology  

E-print Network

Interventional Radiology healthcare.utah.edu/radiology Radiology What is Interventional Radiology? Interventional radiology involves radiologists treating disease with minimally invasive surgery. These surgeries are performed using radiologic images to guide small catheters. Because many of these procedures are safer

Feschotte, Cedric

115

78 FR 24154 - Notice of Availability of a National Animal Health Laboratory Network Reorganization Concept Paper  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Laboratory Network Reorganization Concept Paper AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...Inspection Service is making available a concept paper that describes a revised structure for...the nation's food animals. The concept paper we are making available for comment...

2013-04-24

116

Occupational Health Hazards in the Interventional Laboratory: Time for a Safer Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document is a consensus statement by the major American societies of physicians who work in the interventional laboratory environment. It reviews available data on the prevalence of occupational health risks and summarizes ongoing epidemiologic studies designed to further elucidate these risks. Its purpose is to affirm that the interventional laboratory poses workplace hazards that must be acknowledged, better understood,

Lloyd W. Klein; Donald L. Miller; Stephen Balter; Warren Laskey; David Haines; Alexander Norbash; Matthew A. Mauro; James A. Goldstein

2010-01-01

117

E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division  

E-print Network

DESCRIPTION 1.1 SITE DESCRIPTION 1.1.1 Laboratory Operations The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National#12;#12;E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division: Carl Schwab Phone: (510) 486-4298 Site Information Operator: University of California Ernest Orlando

118

Daniel L. Rubin, MD, MS Assistant Professor of Radiology and  

E-print Network

Daniel L. Rubin, MD, MS Assistant Professor of Radiology and of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics Research) Laboratory of Quantitative Imaging Department of Radiology Stanford University School Fellowship Opportunity Department of Radiology and Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) Stanford University

Rubin, Daniel L.

119

Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2008 Site environmental report8-  

E-print Network

Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2008 Site environmental report8- DRAFT All Laboratory operations and the environment before their implementation. Radiological assessment of operations, experiments, and remediation projects are performed as necessary, to ensure that the overall radiological dose impact from

120

healthcare.utah.edu/radiology What is Ultrasound?  

E-print Network

healthcare.utah.edu/radiology Radiology What is Ultrasound? Ultrasound is a diagnostic medical of Utah Health Care University of Utah Health Care Radiology offers a full range of diagnostic imaging they are not only experts in radiology, but also experts of the brain, heart, women's health, the muscles and joints

Feschotte, Cedric

121

Objective assessment of stress levels and health status using routinely measured clinical laboratory parameters as biomarkers.  

PubMed

Observed stress intensity was estimated using a scoring system from 0-100. Health status was estimated using the readily available laboratory measurements of C-reactive protein, neutrophil count, and fasting plasma glucose. We found that the stress score determined was linked to patient health status. Further studies are indicated. PMID:21851309

Hui, Liu; Shijun, Li; Xinyu, Zhao; Yuai, Wang; Xiaoting, Xu

2011-09-01

122

Integrating environment, safety and health training at a national laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In a multi-purpose research laboratory, innovation and creativity are required to satisfy the training requirements for hazards to people and the environment. A climate that encourages excellence in research and enhances hazard minimization skills is created by combining technical expertise with instructional design talent.

Larson, D.R.

1993-01-01

123

Integrating environment, safety and health training at a national laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In a multi-purpose research laboratory, innovation and creativity are required to satisfy the training requirements for hazards to people and the environment. A climate that encourages excellence in research and enhances hazard minimization skills is created by combining technical expertise with instructional design talent.

Larson, D.R.

1993-03-01

124

Developing a Behavioral Health Screening Program for BSL-4 Laboratory Workers at the National Institutes of Health  

PubMed Central

The events and aftermath of September 11, 2001, accelerated a search for personnel reliability test measures to identify individuals who could pose a threat to our nation's security and safety. The creation and administration of a behavioral health screen for BSL-4 laboratory workers at the National Institutes of Health represents a pioneering effort to proactively build a BSL-4 safety culture promoting worker cohesiveness, trust, respect, and reliability with a balance of worker privacy and public safety. PMID:21361798

Wilson, Deborah E.

2011-01-01

125

Impact of laboratory accreditation on patient care and the health system.  

PubMed

Accreditation is emerging as a preferred framework for building quality medical laboratory systems in resource-limited settings. Despite the low numbers of laboratories accredited to date, accreditation has the potential to improve the quality of health care for patients through the reduction of testing errors and attendant decreases in inappropriate treatment. Accredited laboratories can become more accountable and less dependent on external support. Efforts made to achieve accreditation may also lead to improvements in the management of laboratory networks by focusing attention on areas of greatest need and accelerating improvement in areas such as supply chain, training, and instrument maintenance. Laboratory accreditation may also have a positive influence on performance in other areas of health care systems by allowing laboratories to demonstrate high standards of service delivery. Accreditation may, thus, provide an effective mechanism for health system improvement yielding long-term benefits in the quality, cost-effectiveness, and sustainability of public health programs. Further studies are needed to strengthen the evidence on the benefits of accreditation and to justify the resources needed to implement accreditation programs aimed at improving the performance of laboratory systems. PMID:20855635

Peter, Trevor F; Rotz, Philip D; Blair, Duncan H; Khine, Aye-Aye; Freeman, Richard R; Murtagh, Maurine M

2010-10-01

126

21 CFR 892.1830 - Radiologic patient cradle.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1830 Radiologic patient cradle. (a) Identification. A radiologic...

2014-04-01

127

21 CFR 892.1830 - Radiologic patient cradle.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1830 Radiologic patient cradle. (a) Identification. A radiologic...

2013-04-01

128

21 CFR 892.1830 - Radiologic patient cradle.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1830 Radiologic patient cradle. (a) Identification. A radiologic...

2010-04-01

129

21 CFR 892.1830 - Radiologic patient cradle.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1830 Radiologic patient cradle. (a) Identification. A radiologic...

2011-04-01

130

21 CFR 892.1830 - Radiologic patient cradle.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1830 Radiologic patient cradle. (a) Identification. A radiologic...

2012-04-01

131

Nutrition in industrial health at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The nutritional status of an individual plays a key role in the reduction and prevention of illness. This involves maintenance of ideal body weight by using a diet that economically optimizes nutrients. The achievement and maintenance of good health in the industrial population helps us to avoid resource losses. The ORNL nutritional counseling program's major emphasis is to correct and control diet related risk factors to cardiovascular disease.

Casey, B.J.

1981-01-01

132

Improving newborn screening laboratory test ordering and result reporting using health information exchange  

PubMed Central

Capture, coding and communication of newborn screening (NBS) information represent a challenge for public health laboratories, health departments, hospitals, and ambulatory care practices. An increasing number of conditions targeted for screening and the complexity of interpretation contribute to a growing need for integrated information-management strategies. This makes NBS an important test of tools and architecture for electronic health information exchange (HIE) in this convergence of individual patient care and population health activities. For this reason, the American Health Information Community undertook three tasks described in this paper. First, a newborn screening use case was established to facilitate standards harmonization for common terminology and interoperability specifications guiding HIE. Second, newborn screening coding and terminology were developed for integration into electronic HIE activities. Finally, clarification of privacy, security, and clinical laboratory regulatory requirements governing information exchange was provided, serving as a framework to establish pathways for improving screening program timeliness, effectiveness, and efficiency of quality patient care services. PMID:20064796

van Dyck, Peter C; Rinaldo, Piero; McDonald, Clement; Howell, R Rodrey; Zuckerman, Alan; Downing, Gregory

2010-01-01

133

Leveraging the laboratory response network model for the global health security agenda.  

PubMed

Promoting global health security as an international priority is a challenge; the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in its Global Health Security Agenda has articulated the importance of accelerating progress toward a world safe and secure from infectious disease threats. The goals are to (1) prevent and reduce the likelihood of outbreaks-natural, accidental, or intentional; (2) detect threats early to save lives; and (3) respond rapidly and effectively using multisectoral, international coordination and communication. Foundational to this agenda is the World Health Organization (WHO) Revised International Health Regulations (IHR) of 2005, which provide the legal framework for countries to strengthen their health systems in order to be able to respond to any public health emergency of international concern. This article proposes leveraging the distributed structure of the US-managed Laboratory Response Network for Biological Threats Preparedness (LRN-B) to develop the core capacity of laboratory testing and to fulfill the laboratory-strengthening component of the Global Health Security Agenda. The LRN model offers an effective mechanism to detect and respond to public health emergencies of international concern. PMID:25254916

Mangal, Chris N; Maryogo-Robinson, Lucy

2014-01-01

134

2015 Radiologic Sciences Program Admission Application Bachelor of Science, Diagnostic Radiology  

E-print Network

2015 Radiologic Sciences Program Admission Application Bachelor of Science, Diagnostic Radiology-Mail: _______________________________________________________________________ PLEASE NOTE: It is the APPLICANT'S responsibility to keep the Radiologic Sciences Department informed/Volunteer History: Dates Employer Position/Responsibilities Department of Radiologic Sciences Health Sciences

Barrash, Warren

135

The evaluation of the clinical, laboratory and the radiological findings of the fifty-five cases diagnosed with tuberculous, Brucellar and pyogenic spondylodiscitis  

PubMed Central

Objective: In this study, the evaluation of the clinical, laboratory and radiological findings belonging to 55 cases that were hospitalized in our clinic to be followed-up and were diagnosed with tuberculous, brucellar and pyogenic spondylodiscitis (SD) was aimed. Materials and Methods: The cases with SD were evaluated retrospectively. Hematological, serological, biochemical laboratory tests and imaging technics were used for diagnosis. Results: Of 55 cases aged ranging between 25 to 79, 33 (59%) were female. The cases with tuberculous SD (TBSD), brucellar SD (BSD) and pyogenic SD (PSD) were found in 24 (43%), 12 (21%) and in 19 (34%) patients. Erytrocyte sedimentation rate, increased C-reactive protein, and leucocytosis were present in 51 (91%), 22 (39%) and 8 (14%) cases. The number of the cases with history of previous surgery or trauma was 14 (25%). Diagnosis of TBSD was established by acid fast bacilli positiveness and Löwenstein Jensen culture positiveness, in two and seven patients, respectively. While all 12 cases with BSD had positive standard tube aglutination test, only 3 (25%) had hemoculture positivity. In PSDs, diagnosis was confirmed with culture positivity in 9 of 19 cases.Of the cases in our study, 89% responded to medical treatment while three required surgery and three died (5.5% and 5.5%, respectively). Conclusion: SD may develop secondary to infections or following spinal surgical procedures and traumas. Also, the importance of endemicity should be kept in mind, beside the helpful diagnostic findings while treatment regulation. PMID:22346185

Yasar, Kadriye; Pehlivanoglu, Filiz; Cicek, Gulten; Sengoz, Gonul

2012-01-01

136

Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Is Thioacetamide a Serious Health Hazard in Inorganic Chemistry Laboratories?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the potential health hazards of using thioacetamide in introductory courses where students are involved in qualitative inorganic analysis. Describes the chemical as possessing carcinogenic, hepatotoxic, and mutagenic properties. Cautions that thioacetamide has caused various biochemical changes in the liver, and recommends limited uses…

Elo, Hannu

1987-01-01

137

Radiology and Biomedical Engineering Radiology ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------  

E-print Network

programs in biomedical imaging, voxel-based or ROI-based analysis, information analysis and radiotherapyRadiology and Biomedical Engineering 22 Radiology). ·Diagnostic Radiology · Multi-row detector (up to 16 rows) helical computed tomography · MR imaging, MR

Miyashita, Yasushi

138

Improvement of Tuberculosis Laboratory Capacity on Pemba Island, Zanzibar: A Health Cooperation Project  

PubMed Central

Low-income countries with high Tuberculosis burden have few reference laboratories able to perform TB culture. In 2006, the Zanzibar National TB Control Programme planned to decentralize TB diagnostics. The Italian Cooperation Agency with the scientific support of the “L. Spallanzani” National Institute for Infectious Diseases sustained the project through the implementation of a TB reference laboratory in a low-income country with a high prevalence of TB. The implementation steps were: 1) TB laboratory design according to the WHO standards; 2) laboratory equipment and reagent supplies for microscopy, cultures, and identification; 3) on-the-job training of the local staff; 4) web- and telemedicine-based supervision. From April 2007 to December 2010, 921 sputum samples were received from 40 peripheral laboratories: 120 TB cases were diagnosed. Of all the smear-positive cases, 74.2% were culture-positive. During the year 2010, the smear positive to culture positive rate increased up to 100%. In March 20, 2010 the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare of Zanzibar officially recognized the Public Health Laboratory- Ivo de Carneri as the National TB Reference Laboratory for the Zanzibar Archipelago. An advanced TB laboratory can represent a low cost solution to strengthen the TB diagnosis, to provide capacity building and mid-term sustainability. PMID:22952891

Paglia, Maria G.; Bevilacqua, Nazario; Haji, Haji Said; Vairo, Francesco; Girardi, Enrico; Nicastri, Emanuele; Muhsin, Juma; Racalbuto, Vincenzo; Jiddawi, Mohammed S.; Ippolito, Giuseppe

2012-01-01

139

Audit of environmental monitoring and health physics laboratories at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories at the Department of Energy`s (Department) Savannah River Site are over 40 years old and are approaching the end of their useful lives. The managing and operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (Westinghouse), and the Savannah River Operations Office (Operations Office) proposed to build two new facilities to replace them. We conducted this audit to determine whether the construction of new laboratories was the most cost-effective alternative to accomplish the site`s environmental monitoring and health physics missions.

NONE

1997-10-24

140

Application of clinical laboratory measurements to issues of environmental health.  

PubMed

Monitoring of biochemical constituents in serum is an important component in revealing potential toxicity in humans and experimental animals due to exposure to a variety of xenobiotic agents. The relative toxicity of pure compounds, usually at large doses, has helped elucidate the mode of action of these compounds and their relative risk. However, most actual cases of environmental exposure present an extensive range of components and the potential for synergistic or inhibitory interactions. In this paper we review two such environmental cases: The Love Canal chemical dump site in Niagara Falls, NY, and the transformer fire at the State Office Building in Binghamton, NY. We focus on the clinical laboratory measurements obtained in these studies (including serum glucose, triglycerides, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, sodium and potassium), their usefulness, limitations, and application to such cases. Significant alterations in serum triglyceride and alanine aminotransferase levels were found in guinea pigs due to exposure to dioxins. These two tests were useful in estimating the 'equivalent' concentration of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in complex chemical mixtures. PMID:1572081

Rej, R; Silkworth, J B; DeCaprio, A P

1992-03-13

141

Legal Considerations in Cross-Jurisdictional Sharing of Public Health Laboratory Services  

PubMed Central

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Association of Public Health Laboratories initiated the Laboratory Efficiencies Initiative in 2011 to help address issues related to public health laboratory (PHL) capacity to perform critically needed tests and services. One approach to improving capacity and efficiency is sharing PHL services with other states or jurisdictions. Cross-jurisdictional sharing implicates numerous federal and state laws, including federal and state privacy laws, laboratory certifications, packaging and shipping requirements for laboratory specimens, and state laws regarding fees and revenue. While federal laws generally do not present insurmountable barriers to sharing PHL services, state laws vary greatly, even within the same region of the country. This article summarizes some of the potentially relevant federal and state legal issues related to cross-jurisdictional sharing. It is important that states interested in cross-jurisdictional sharing consider all relevant laws, potential conflicts of law, as well as inconsistencies with agreements already in place among health departments and laboratories. PMID:23997306

Penn, Matthew S.

2013-01-01

142

The Tanzania Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program: building and transforming the public health workforce.  

PubMed

The Tanzania Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (TFELTP) was established in 2008 as a partnership among the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW), Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, National Institute for Medical Research, and local and international partners. TFELTP was established to strengthen the capacity of MOHSW to conduct public health surveillance and response, manage national disease control and prevention programs, and to enhance public health laboratory support for surveillance, diagnosis, treatment and disease monitoring. TFELTP is a 2-year full-time training program with approximately 25% time spent in class, and 75% in the field. TFELTP offers two tracks leading to an MSc degree in either Applied Epidemiology or, Epidemiology and Laboratory Management. Since 2008, the program has enrolled a total of 33 trainees (23 males, 10 females). Of these, 11 were enrolled in 2008 and 100% graduated in 2010. All 11 graduates of cohort 1 are currently employed in public health positions within the country. Demand for the program as measured by the number of applicants has grown from 28 in 2008 to 56 in 2011. While training the public health leaders of the country, TFELTP has also provided essential service to the country in responding to high-profile disease outbreaks, and evaluating and improving its public health surveillance systems and diseases control programs. TFELTP was involved in the country assessment of the revised International Health Regulations (IHR) core capabilities, development of the Tanzania IHR plan, and incorporation of IHR into the revised Tanzania Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) guidelines. TFELTP is training a competent core group of public health leaders for Tanzania, as well as providing much needed service to the MOHSW in the areas of routine surveillance, outbreak detection and response, and disease program management. However, the immediate challenges that the program must address include development of a full range of in-country teaching capacity for the program, as well as a career path for graduates. PMID:22359697

Mmbuji, Peter; Mukanga, David; Mghamba, Janeth; Ahly, Mohamed; Mosha, Fausta; Azima, Simba; Senga, Sembuche; Moshiro, Candida; Semali, Innocent; Rolle, Italia; Wiktor, Stefan; McQueen, Suzzane; McElroy, Peter; Nsubuga, Peter

2011-01-01

143

Clinical Laboratory Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Education in the clinical laboratory sciences in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and…

Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

144

E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division  

E-print Network

: (510) 486-4298 Site Information Operator: University of California Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley, the birthplace of the cyclotron, was founded by the late Nobel laureate, Ernest Orlando Lawrence, in 1931#12;E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division

145

Summer 2012Protecting MU's Health, Safety, and the Environment Laboratory Safety Incidents  

E-print Network

that the Harran lab had a lack of adequate lab safety training and documentation, lack of effective hazard communication practices, and repeated failure to correct persistent safety violations within labs. On January 2 Laboratory Safety plays an important role at MU. As Environmental Health and Safety works to promote lab

Taylor, Jerry

146

An aerial radiological survey of Technical Areas 2, 21, and 53 and surroundings, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey of the entire Los Alamos National Laboratory was flown in September 1982. The data from a part of the survey, Technical Areas 2, 21, and 53, are presented here along with pertinent data from an October 1975 survey of limited areas of Los Alamos. The data from Technical Area 15, another part of the survey, will be published in another report. Contour maps of the gamma survey data show some Cs-137 activity in Los Alamos Canyon as well as in DP Canyon beside TA-21. Some Be-7, Sb-124, and Co-58 apparently exist in the canyon immediately below the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) ponds. Estimates on the Cs-137 inventory in the canyons range from 210 mCi to 1270 mCi. An exposure rate contour map at 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was constructed from the gamma data and overlaid on an aerial photograph and map of the area. The terrestrial exposure rates ranged from 6{mu}R/h to about 18{mu}R/h. 25 figs., 3 tabs.

Fritzsche, A.E.

1990-09-01

147

Use of Lean Response to Improve Pandemic Influenza Surge in Public Health Laboratories  

PubMed Central

A novel influenza A (H1N1) virus detected in April 2009 rapidly spread around the world. North American provincial and state laboratories have well-defined roles and responsibilities, including providing accurate, timely test results for patients and information for regional public health and other decision makers. We used the multidisciplinary response and rapid implementation of process changes based on Lean methods at the provincial public health laboratory in British Columbia, Canada, to improve laboratory surge capacity in the 2009 influenza pandemic. Observed and computer simulating evaluation results from rapid processes changes showed that use of Lean tools successfully expanded surge capacity, which enabled response to the 10-fold increase in testing demands. PMID:22257385

Chang, Yin; Prystajecky, Natalie; Petric, Martin; Mak, Annie; Abbott, Brendan; Paris, Benjamin; Decker, K.C.; Pittenger, Lauren; Guercio, Steven; Stott, Jeff; Miller, Joseph D.

2012-01-01

148

A Model Curriculum for Multiskilled Education in the Radiologic Sciences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains how multiskilled cross-trained health professionals provide cost-effective health care. Outlines a baccalaureate program in radiologic science with specialization in radiology therapy, medical sonography, or advanced imaging. (SK)

Jensen, Steven C.; Grey, Michael L.

1995-01-01

149

The development of an intelligent laboratory information system for a community health promotion centre.  

PubMed

This study aimed to develop an Intelligent Laboratory Information System (ILIS) for the community health promotion centre in Kwachun city to help process an increasing amount of laboratory test data in an efficient manner, and to support the clinical decision-making of public health doctors. A sample of 170 cases was used for validation of the system. Overall, the system correctly predicted 92.5% of the cases. This paper also analysed the economic feasibility of the ILIS based on the Information Economics approach. The results showed that the ILIS not only helps screen more people by increasing the capacity of a health promotion centre, but also brings in more revenue to the centre. PMID:12862409

Chae, Young Moon; Lim, Hwan-Sub; Lee, Ju Hon; Bae, Mi Young; Kim, Gyu Hyung

2002-01-01

150

Development of an intelligent laboratory information system for community health promotion center.  

PubMed

This study aimed to develop an Intelligent Laboratory Information System (ILIS) for the community health promotion center in Kwachun city to help process an increasing number of laboratory test data in an efficient manner, and to support the clinical decision-making of public health doctors. A sample of 170 cases was used for validation of the system. Overall, the system correctly predicted 92.5% of the cases. This paper also analyzed the economic feasibility of the ILIS based on the Information Economics approach. The results showed that the ILIS not only helps screen more people by increasing the capacity of a health promotion center, but also brings in more revenue to the center. PMID:11604775

Chae, Y M; Lim, H S; Lee, J H; Bae, M Y; Kim, G H; Bae, J H; Ahn, J O

2001-01-01

151

Chest radiology  

SciTech Connect

This review of chest radiology reexamines normal findings on plain chest radiographs, and presents a new plain film view for detecting metastases in the lungs, and describes new findings on acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Various chest radiologic procedures are examined. (KRM)

Austin, J.H.M.

1982-01-01

152

U.S. Radiologic Technologists (USRT) Cohort  

Cancer.gov

The U.S. Radiologic Technologists (USRT) Study is a collaborative effort between the University of Minnesota, the NCI, and the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). One of the key goals of the study is to understand how repeated occupational low-dose ionizing radiation exposures, such as those potentially experienced by radiologic technologists, are related to cancer and other health conditions.

153

Value of Laboratory Tests in Employer-Sponsored Health Risk Assessments for Newly Identifying Health Conditions: Analysis of 52,270 Participants  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundEmployer-sponsored health risk assessments (HRA) may include laboratory tests to provide evidence of disease and disease risks for common medical conditions. We evaluated the ability of HRA-laboratory testing to provide new disease-risk information to participants.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsWe performed a cross-sectional analysis of HRA-laboratory results for participating adult employees and their eligible spouses or their domestic partners, focusing on three common health

Harvey W. Kaufman; Fred R. Williams; Mouneer A. Odeh

2011-01-01

154

Assessment of laboratory logistics management information system practice for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in selected public health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Introduction Logistics management information system for health commodities remained poorly implemented in most of developing countries. To assess the status of laboratory logistics management information system for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in public health facilities in Addis Ababa. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from September 2010-January 2011 at selected public health facilities. A stratified random sampling method was used to include a total of 43 facilities which, were investigated through quantitative methods using structured questionnaires interviews. Focus group discussion with the designated supply chain managers and key informant interviews were conducted for the qualitative method. Results There exists a well-designed logistics system for laboratory commodities with trained pharmacy personnel, distributed standard LMIS formats and established inventory control procedures. However, majority of laboratory professionals were not trained in LMIS. Majority of the facilities (60.5%) were stocked out for at least one ART monitoring and TB laboratory reagents and the highest stock out rate was for chemistry reagents. Expired ART monitoring laboratory commodities were found in 25 (73.5%) of facilities. Fifty percent (50%) of the assessed hospitals and 54% of health centers were currently using stock/bin cards for all HIV/AIDS and TB laboratory commodities in main pharmacy store, among these only 25% and 20.8% of them were updated with accurate information matching with the physical count done at the time of visit for hospitals and health centers respectively. Conclusion Even though there exists a well designed laboratory LMIS, keeping quality stock/bin cards and LMIS reports were very low. Key ART monitoring laboratory commodities were stock out at many facilities at the day of visit and during the past six months. Based on findings, training of laboratory personnel's managing laboratory commodities and keeping accurate inventory control procedures were recommended. PMID:24106574

Desale, Adino; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Nigatu, Alemayehu

2013-01-01

155

Piloting Laboratory Quality System Management in Six Health Facilities in Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background Achieving accreditation in laboratories is a challenge in Nigeria like in most African countries. Nigeria adopted the World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa Stepwise Laboratory (Quality) Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (WHO/AFRO– SLIPTA) in 2010. We report on FHI360 effort and progress in piloting WHO-AFRO recognition and accreditation preparedness in six health facility laboratories in five different states of Nigeria. Method Laboratory assessments were conducted at baseline, follow up and exit using the WHO/AFRO– SLIPTA checklist. From the total percentage score obtained, the quality status of laboratories were classified using a zero to five star rating, based on the WHO/AFRO quality improvement stepwise approach. Major interventions include advocacy, capacity building, mentorship and quality improvement projects. Results At baseline audit, two of the laboratories attained 1- star while the remaining four were at 0- star. At follow up audit one lab was at 1- star, two at 3-star and three at 4-star. At exit audit, four labs were at 4- star, one at 3-star and one at 2-star rating. One laboratory dropped a ‘star’ at exit audit, while others consistently improved. The two weakest elements at baseline; internal audit (4%) and occurrence/incidence management (15%) improved significantly, with an exit score of 76% and 81% respectively. The elements facility and safety was the major strength across board throughout the audit exercise. Conclusion This effort resulted in measurable and positive impact on the laboratories. We recommend further improvement towards a formal international accreditation status and scale up of WHO/AFRO– SLIPTA implementation in Nigeria. PMID:25542022

Mbah, Henry; Ojo, Emmanuel; Ameh, James; Musuluma, Humphrey; Negedu-Momoh, Olubunmi Ruth; Jegede, Feyisayo; Ojo, Olufunmilayo; Uwakwe, Nkem; Ochei, Kingsley; Dada, Michael; Udah, Donald; Chiegil, Robert; Torpey, Kwasi

2014-01-01

156

The J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library and the Microcomputer Learning Laboratory.  

PubMed

Opened in 1985, the J. Otto Lottes Health Sciences Library at the University of Missouri-Columbia has adapted to changes in information technology by installing a fiber optic backbone, establishing local area networks and file servers with databases and software programs, establishing a microcomputer learning laboratory, and responding to the needs of a problem-based learning curriculum. The library works cooperatively with the Medical Informatics Group, which is housed in the library and runs the micro laboratory, to support student and faculty computing. PMID:7842663

Schmidt, D; Mitchell, J A

1994-09-01

157

Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2005 Site environmental report8-  

E-print Network

Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2005 Site environmental report8- Brookhaven National Laboratory routinely evaluates site operations to ensure that the radiological dose impact to members of the public contribute to radiological dose are reviewed for their environmental impacts. The potential radiological dose

158

Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2009 Site environmental report8-  

E-print Network

Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2009 Site environmental report8- DRAFT The Laboratory's routine and radiological dose impact to workers and the environment. Radiological assessments are also performed as necessary, to ensure that radiological dose impact from non- routine activities remain "As Low As Reasonably

159

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response; HHS Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise implementation plan for chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear threats. Notice.  

PubMed

The United States faces serious public health threats from the deliberate use of weapons of mass destruction (WMD)--chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN)--by hostile States or terrorists, and from naturally emerging infectious diseases that have a potential to cause illness on a scale that could adversely impact national security. Effective strategies to prevent, mitigate, and treat the consequences of CBRN threats is an integral component of our national security strategy. To that end, the United States must be able to rapidly develop, stockpile, and deploy effective medical countermeasures to protect the American people. The HHS Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise (PHEMCE) has taken a holistic, end-to-end approach that considers multiple aspects of the medical countermeasures mission including research, development, acquisition, storage, maintenance, deployment, and guidance for utilization. Phase one of this approach established the HHS PHEMCE Strategy for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Threats (HHS PHEMCE Strategy). The HHS PHEMCE Strategy, published in the Federal Register on March 20, 2007, described a framework of strategic policy goals and objectives for identifying medical countermeasure requirements and establishing priorities for medical countermeasure evaluation, development and acquisition. These strategic policy goals and objectives were used to establish the Four Pillars upon which this HHS Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise Implementation Plan (HHS PHEMCE Implementation Plan) is based. The HHS PHEMCE Implementation Plan considers the full spectrum of medical countermeasures-related activities, including research, development, acquisition, storage/maintenance, deployment, and utilization. The HHS PHEMCE Implementation Plan is consistent with the President's Biodefense for the 21st Century and is aligned with the National Strategy for Medical Countermeasures against Weapons of Mass Destruction. PMID:17520758

2007-04-23

160

Factors that elevate the internal radionuclide and chemical retention, dose and health risks to infants and children in a radiological-nuclear emergency.  

PubMed

The factors that influence the dose and risk to vulnerable population groups from exposure and internal uptake of chemicals are examined and, in particular, the radionuclides released in chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive events. The paper seeks to identify the areas that would benefit from further research. The intake and body burdens of carbon and calcium were assessed as surrogates for contaminants that either act like or bind to hydrocarbons (e.g. tritium and (14)C) or bone-seeking radionuclides (e.g. (90)Sr and (239)Pu). The shortest turnover times for such materials in the whole body were evaluated for the newborn: 11 d and 0.5 y for carbon and calcium, respectively. However, their biokinetic behaviour is complicated by a particularly high percentage of the gut-absorbed dietary intake of carbon (approximately 16%) and calcium (approximately 100%) that is incorporated into the soft tissue and skeleton of the growing neonate. The International Commission on Radiological Protection dose coefficients (Sv Bq(-1)) were examined for 14 radionuclides, including 9 of concern because of their potential use in radiological dispersal devices. The dose coefficients for a 3-month-old are greater than those for adults (2-56 times more for ingestion and 2-12 times for inhalation). The age-dependent dose and exposure assessment of contaminant intakes would improve by accounting for gender and growth where it is currently neglected. Health risk is evaluated as the product of the exposure and hazard factors, the latter being about 10-fold greater in infants than in adults. The exposure factor is also approximately 10-fold higher for ingestion by infants than by adults, and unity for inhalation varying with the contaminant. Qualitative and quantitative physiological and epidemiological evidence supports infants being more vulnerable to cancer and neurological deficit than older children. PMID:19460847

Richardson, Richard B

2009-06-01

161

External quality assessment of national public health laboratories in Africa, 2002–2009  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To describe findings from an external quality assessment programme involving laboratories in Africa that routinely investigate epidemic-prone diseases. Methods Beginning in 2002, the Regional Office for Africa of the World Health Organization (WHO) invited national public health laboratories and related facilities in Africa to participate in the programme. Three surveys comprising specimens and questionnaires associated with bacterial enteric diseases, bacterial meningitis, plague, tuberculosis and malaria were sent annually to test participants’ diagnostic proficiency. Identical surveys were sent to referee laboratories for quality control. Materials were prepared, packaged and shipped in accordance with standard protocols. Findings and reports were due within 30 days. Key methodological decisions and test results were categorized as acceptable or unacceptable on the basis of consensus feedback from referees, using established grading schemes. Findings Between 2002 and 2009, participation increased from 30 to 48 Member States of the WHO and from 39 to 78 laboratories. Each survey was returned by 64–93% of participants. Mean turnaround time was 25.9 days. For bacterial enteric diseases and meningitis components, bacterial identification was acceptable in 65% and 69% of challenges, respectively, but serotyping and antibiotic susceptibility testing and reporting were frequently unacceptable. Microscopy was acceptable for 73% of plague challenges. Tuberculosis microscopy was satisfactorily performed, with 87% of responses receiving acceptable scores. In the malaria component, 82% of responses received acceptable scores for species identification but only 51% of parasite quantitation scores were acceptable. Conclusion The external quality assessment programme consistently identified certain functional deficiencies requiring strengthening that were present in African public health microbiology laboratories. PMID:22461714

Perovic, Olga; Fensham, Vivian; McCarthy, Kerrigan; von Gottberg, Anne; de Gouveia, Linda; Poonsamy, Bhavani; Dini, Leigh; Rossouw, Jenny; Keddy, Karen; Alemu, Wondimagegnehu; Yahaya, Ali; Pierson, Antoine; Dolmazon, Virginie; Cognat, Sébastien; Ndihokubwayo, Jean Bosco

2012-01-01

162

Environmental Safety and Health Analytical Laboratory, Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas. Final Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) of the construction and operation of an Environmental Safety and Health (ES&H) Analytical Laboratory and subsequent demolition of the existing Analytical Chemistry Laboratory building at Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. In accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality requirements contained in 40 CFR 1500--1508.9, the Environmental Assessment examined the environmental impacts of the Proposed Action and discussed potential alternatives. Based on the analysis of impacts in the EA, conducting the proposed action, construction of an analytical laboratory and demolition of the existing facility, would not significantly effect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Council on Environmental Quality regulations in 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27.

NONE

1995-06-01

163

Occupational health hazards in the interventional laboratory: time for a safer environment.  

PubMed

This document is a consensus statement by the major American societies of physicians who work in the interventional laboratory environment. It reviews available data on the prevalence of occupational health risks and summarizes ongoing epidemiologic studies designed to further elucidate these risks. Its purpose is to affirm that the interventional laboratory poses workplace hazards that must be acknowledged, better understood, and mitigated to the greatest extent possible. Vigorous efforts are advocated to reduce these hazards. Interventional physicians and their professional societies, working together with industry, should strive toward minimizing operator radiation exposure, eliminating the need for personal protective apparel, and ending the orthopedic and ergonomic consequences of the interventional laboratory work environment. PMID:19062308

Klein, Lloyd W; Miller, Donald L; Balter, Stephen; Laskey, Warren; Haines, David; Norbash, Alexander; Mauro, Matthew A; Goldstein, James A

2009-02-01

164

Occupational health hazards in the interventional laboratory: time for a safer environment.  

PubMed

This document is a consensus statement by the major American societies of physicians who work in the interventional laboratory environment. It reviews available data on the prevalence of occupational health risks and summarizes ongoing epidemiologic studies designed to further elucidate these risks. Its purpose is to affirm that the interventional laboratory poses workplace hazards that must be acknowledged, better understood, and mitigated to the greatest extent possible. Vigorous efforts are advocated to reduce these hazards. Interventional physicians and their professional societies, working together with industry, should strive toward minimizing operator radiation exposure, eliminating the need for personal protective apparel, and ending the orthopedic and ergonomic consequences of the interventional laboratory work environment. PMID:19214981

Klein, Lloyd W; Miller, Donald L; Balter, Stephen; Laskey, Warren; Haines, David; Norbash, Alexander; Mauro, Matthew A; Goldstein, James A

2009-02-15

165

Occupational health hazards in the interventional laboratory: time for a safer environment.  

PubMed

This document is a consensus statement by the major American societies of physicians who work in the interventional laboratory environment. It reviews available data on the prevalence of occupational health risks and summarizes ongoing epidemiologic studies designed to further elucidate these risks. Its purpose is to affirm that the interventional laboratory poses workplace hazards that must be acknowledged, better understood, and mitigated to the greatest extent possible. Vigorous efforts are advocated to reduce these hazards. Interventional physicians and their professional societies, working together with industry, should strive toward minimizing operator radiation exposure, eliminating the need for personal protective apparel, and ending the orthopedic and ergonomic consequences of the interventional laboratory work environment. PMID:19560009

Klein, Lloyd W; Miller, Donald L; Balter, Stephen; Laskey, Warren; Haines, David; Norbash, Alexander; Mauro, Matthew A; Goldstein, James A

2009-07-01

166

Occupational health hazards in the interventional laboratory: time for a safer environment.  

PubMed

This document is a consensus statement by the major American societies of physicians who work in the interventional laboratory environment. It reviews available data on the prevalence of occupational health risks and summarizes ongoing epidemiologic studies designed to further elucidate these risks. Its purpose is to affirm that the interventional laboratory poses workplace hazards that must be acknowledged, better understood, and mitigated to the greatest extent possible. Vigorous efforts are advocated to reduce these hazards. Interventional physicians and their professional societies, working together with industry, should strive toward minimizing operator radiation exposure, eliminating the need for personal protective apparel, and ending the orthopedic and ergonomic consequences of the interventional laboratory work environment. PMID:19188321

Klein, Lloyd W; Miller, Donald L; Balter, Stephen; Laskey, Warren; Haines, David; Norbash, Alexander; Mauro, Matthew A; Goldstein, James A

2009-02-01

167

Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) University of California at Davis, California. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Site Environmental Report for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Site (the Site) includes 1996 environmental monitoring data for Site air, soil, ground water, surface water, storm water and ambient radiation. DOE operation of LEHR as a functioning research location ceased in 1989, after the completion of three decades of research on the health effects of low-level radiation exposure (primarily strontium-90 and radium-226), using beagles to simulate effects on human health. During 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted activities at the Site in support of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Environmental remediation and the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of Site buildings. Extensive environmental data were collected in 1996 to evaluate appropriate remedial actions for the Site.

NONE

1997-09-01

168

Radioactive Waste Management Complex low-level waste radiological performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of radioactive low-level waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This radiological performance assessment was conducted to evaluate compliance with applicable radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals inadvertently intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty and sensitivity analyses were performed. The results of the analyses indicate compliance with established radiological criteria and provide reasonable assurance that public health and safety will be protected.

Maheras, S.J.; Rood, A.S.; Magnuson, S.O.; Sussman, M.E.; Bhatt, R.N.

1994-04-01

169

Development of radiological profiles for U.S. Department of Energy low-level mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

Radiological profiles have been developed by Argonne National Laboratory for low-level mixed wastes (LLMWs) that are under the management of the US Department of Energy (DOE). These profiles have been used in the Office of Environmental Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EM PEIS) to support the analysis of environmental and health risks associated with the various waste management strategies. The radiological characterization of DOE LLMWs is generally inadequate and has made it difficult to develop a site- and waste-stream-dependent radiological profile for LLMWs. On the basis of the operational history of the DOE sites, a simple model was developed to generate site-dependent and waste-stream-independent radiological profiles for LLMWs. This paper briefly discusses the assumptions used in this model and the uncertainties in the results.

Wilkins, B.D.; Meshkov, N.K.; Dolak, D.A.; Wang, Y.Y.

1995-03-01

170

MANAGEMENT POLICY FOR THE ASSURANCE OF RESEARCH QUALITY, HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY, RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NORTH CAROLINA  

EPA Science Inventory

The document presents policies, goals, and an organizational structure for the implementation of a management policy for the Quality Assurance program in the Health Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Directed toward functional managers, a system ...

171

Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programs in West Africa as a model for sustainable partnerships in animal and human health.  

PubMed

The concept of animal and human health experts working together toward a healthier world has been endorsed, but challenges remain in identifying concrete actions to move this one health concept from vision to action. In 2008, as a result of avian influenza outbreaks in West Africa, international donor support led to a unique opportunity to invest in Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programs (FELTPs) in the region that engaged the animal and human health sectors to strengthen the capacity for prevention and control of zoonotic diseases. The FELTPs mixed 25% to 35% classroom and 65% to 75% field-based training and service for cohorts of physicians, veterinarians, and laboratory scientists. They typically consisted of a 2-year course leading to a master's degree in field epidemiology and public health laboratory management for midlevel public health leaders and competency-based short courses for frontline public health surveillance workers. Trainees and graduates work in multidisciplinary teams to conduct surveillance, outbreak investigations, and epidemiological studies for disease control locally and across borders. Critical outcomes of these programs include development of a cadre of public health leaders with core skills in integrated disease surveillance, outbreak investigation, vaccination campaigns, laboratory diagnostic testing, and epidemiological studies that address priority public health problems. A key challenge exists in identifying ways to successfully scale up and transform this innovative donor-driven program into a sustainable multisectoral one health workforce capacity development model. PMID:22916854

Becker, Karen M; Ohuabunwo, Chima; Ndjakani, Yassa; Nguku, Patrick; Nsubuga, Peter; Mukanga, David; Wurapa, Frederick

2012-09-01

172

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1990 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health  

SciTech Connect

Part 5 of the 1990 Annual Report to the US Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Environmental Guidance, the Office of Environmental Compliance, the Office of Environmental Audit, the Office of National Environmental Policy Act Project Assistance, the Office of Nuclear Safety, the Office of Safety Compliance, and the Office of Policy and Standards. For each project, as identified by the Field Work Proposal, there is an article describing progress made during fiscal year 1990. Authors of these articles represent a broad spectrum of capabilities derived from five of the seven technical centers of the Laboratory, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the work.

Faust, L.G.; Moraski, R.V.; Selby, J.M.

1991-05-01

173

Audit of construction of an environmental, safety, and health analytical laboratory at the Pantex Plant  

SciTech Connect

This document is a report from the Office of the Inspector General, US DOE. The report evaluates the need for the construction of an Environmental, Safety, and Health Laboratory at the Pantex Plant and if this project is the most cost effective manner in which to meet mission needs. It was found that: (1) mission needs were being met with existing facilities, (2) required evaluations of alternatives were not performed, (3) decisions were made based on out-dated justifications, and (4) the expenditure of $8.4M was unnecessary. As a result, it was recommended that funded be suspended until the need is clearly established.

NONE

1995-10-01

174

Environmental audit of the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR)  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the environmental audit conducted at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, Environmental Restoration (LEHR-ER) Project at University of California-Davis (UCD), Davis, California. The scope of the audit at the LEHR-ER was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; surface water/drinking water; groundwater and soils/sediment/biota; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; inactive waste sites; radiation; quality assurance; and environmental management. Specifically assessed was the compliance of LEHR-ER operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; and best management practices (BMPs).

Not Available

1993-05-01

175

Educating medical laboratory technologists: revisiting our assumptions in the current economic and health-care environment.  

PubMed

Health care occupies a distinct niche in an economy struggling to recover from recession. Professions related to the care of patients are thought to be relatively resistant to downturns, and thus become attractive to students typically drawn to more lucrative pursuits. Currently, a higher profile for clinical laboratory technology among college students and those considering career change results in larger and better prepared applicant pools. However, after decades of contraction marked by closing of programs, prospective students encounter an educational system without the capacity or vigor to meet their needs. Here discussed are some principles and proposals to allow universities, partnering with health-care providers, government agencies, and other stake-holders to develop new programs, or reenergize existing ones to serve our students and patients. Principles include academic rigor in biomedical and clinical science, multiple points of entry for students, flexibility in format, cost effectiveness, career ladders and robust partnerships. PMID:23653802

Linder, Regina

2012-01-01

176

Medical response to a radiologic/nuclear event: integrated plan from the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, Department of Health and Human Services.  

PubMed

The end of the Cold War led to a reduced concern for a major nuclear event. However, the current threats from terrorism make a radiologic (dispersal or use of radioactive material) or nuclear (improvised nuclear device) event a possibility. The specter and enormousness of the catastrophe resulting from a state-sponsored nuclear attack and a sense of nihilism about the effectiveness of a response were such that there had been limited civilian medical response planning. Although the consequences of a radiologic dispersal device are substantial, and the detonation of a modest-sized (10 kiloton) improvised nuclear device is catastrophic, it is both possible and imperative that a medical response be planned. To meet this need, the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response in the Department of Health and Human Services, in collaboration within government and with nongovernment partners, has developed a scientifically based comprehensive planning framework and Web-based "just-in-time" medical response information called Radiation Event Medical Management (available at http://www.remm.nlm.gov). The response plan includes (1) underpinnings from basic radiation biology, (2) tailored medical responses, (3) delivery of medical countermeasures for postevent mitigation and treatment, (4) referral to expert centers for acute treatment, and (5) long-term follow-up. Although continuing to evolve and increase in scope and capacity, current response planning is sufficiently mature that planners and responders should be aware of the basic premises, tools, and resources available. An effective response will require coordination, communication, and cooperation at an unprecedented level. The logic behind and components of this response are presented to allow for active collaboration among emergency planners and responders and federal, state, local, and tribal governments. PMID:18387707

Coleman, C Norman; Hrdina, Chad; Bader, Judith L; Norwood, Ann; Hayhurst, Robert; Forsha, Joseph; Yeskey, Kevin; Knebel, Ann

2009-02-01

177

Health and Safety Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health

S. D. Van Hoesen; C. Jr. Clark; S. N. Burman; L. W. Manis; W. L. Barre

1993-01-01

178

21 CFR 892.1940 - Radiologic quality assurance instrument.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1940 Radiologic quality assurance instrument. (a) Identification....

2011-04-01

179

21 CFR 892.1940 - Radiologic quality assurance instrument.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1940 Radiologic quality assurance instrument. (a) Identification....

2014-04-01

180

21 CFR 892.1940 - Radiologic quality assurance instrument.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1940 Radiologic quality assurance instrument. (a) Identification....

2010-04-01

181

21 CFR 892.1940 - Radiologic quality assurance instrument.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1940 Radiologic quality assurance instrument. (a) Identification....

2013-04-01

182

21 CFR 892.1940 - Radiologic quality assurance instrument.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1940 Radiologic quality assurance instrument. (a) Identification....

2012-04-01

183

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, Davis, California  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis), conducted November 16 through 20, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the LEHR. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation, and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the LEHR and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the LEHR at UC Davis. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the LEHR Survey. 75 refs., 26 figs., 23 tabs.

Not Available

1988-03-01

184

RADBALL TECHNOLOGY TESTING IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HEALTH PHYSICS INSTRUMENT CALIBRATION LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

The United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a radiation-mapping device that can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. The device, known as RadBall{trademark}, consists of a colander-like outer collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The collimator has over two hundred small holes; thus, specific areas of the polymer sphere are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. The RadBallTM technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This paper summarizes the tests completed at SRNL Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL).

Farfan, E.

2010-07-08

185

RadBallTM Technology Testing in the Savannah River Site's Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The UK's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a radiation-mapping device that can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. The device, known as RadBallTM, consists of a colander-like outer collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The collimator has over two hundred small holes; thus, specific areas of the polymer sphere are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. The RadBallTM technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the UK and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This paper summarizes the tests completed at SRNL Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL).

Farfán, Eduardo B.; Foley, Trevor Q.; Jannik, G. Timothy; Harpring, Larry J.; Gordon, John R.; Blessing, Ronald; Rusty Coleman, J.; Holmes, Christopher J.; Oldham, Mark; Adamovics, John; Stanley, Steven J.

2010-11-01

186

The effect of for-profit laboratories on the accountability, integration, and cost of Canadian health care services  

PubMed Central

Abstract Canadian public health care systems pay for-profit corporations to provide essential medical laboratory services. This practice is a useful window on the effects of using for-profit corporations to provide publicly funded services. Because private corporations are substantially protected by law from the public disclosure of “confidential business information,” increased for-profit delivery has led to decreased transparency, thus impeding informed debate on how laboratory services are delivered. Using for-profit laboratories increases the cost of diagnostic testing and hinders the integration of health care services more generally. Two useful steps toward ending the for-profit provision of laboratory services would be to stop fee-for-service funding and to integrate all laboratory work within public administrative structures. PMID:23687532

Sutherland, Ross

2012-01-01

187

Data mining in radiology  

PubMed Central

Data mining facilitates the study of radiology data in various dimensions. It converts large patient image and text datasets into useful information that helps in improving patient care and provides informative reports. Data mining technology analyzes data within the Radiology Information System and Hospital Information System using specialized software which assesses relationships and agreement in available information. By using similar data analysis tools, radiologists can make informed decisions and predict the future outcome of a particular imaging finding. Data, information and knowledge are the components of data mining. Classes, Clusters, Associations, Sequential patterns, Classification, Prediction and Decision tree are the various types of data mining. Data mining has the potential to make delivery of health care affordable and ensure that the best imaging practices are followed. It is a tool for academic research. Data mining is considered to be ethically neutral, however concerns regarding privacy and legality exists which need to be addressed to ensure success of data mining. PMID:25024513

Kharat, Amit T; Singh, Amarjit; Kulkarni, Vilas M; Shah, Digish

2014-01-01

188

Radiology Anatomy Teaching Modules  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As more and more individuals elect to enter the various health science professions, there is an increased demand for teaching resources designed to keep students aware of basic skills and techniques. Created by the University of Washington, these radiology anatomy teaching modules are designed to supplement regular instruction and to serve as a reference resource for medical educators and students. Along the left side of the site visitors will find a muscle atlas, an online radiology guide, and the "Teaching Files" area. Further down the homepage, visitors will find the "Anatomy Teaching Modules" section. Here visitors can take advantage of modules that cover the basic radiographic anatomy of selected parts of the skeleton and related resources.

2007-01-01

189

Data mining in radiology.  

PubMed

Data mining facilitates the study of radiology data in various dimensions. It converts large patient image and text datasets into useful information that helps in improving patient care and provides informative reports. Data mining technology analyzes data within the Radiology Information System and Hospital Information System using specialized software which assesses relationships and agreement in available information. By using similar data analysis tools, radiologists can make informed decisions and predict the future outcome of a particular imaging finding. Data, information and knowledge are the components of data mining. Classes, Clusters, Associations, Sequential patterns, Classification, Prediction and Decision tree are the various types of data mining. Data mining has the potential to make delivery of health care affordable and ensure that the best imaging practices are followed. It is a tool for academic research. Data mining is considered to be ethically neutral, however concerns regarding privacy and legality exists which need to be addressed to ensure success of data mining. PMID:25024513

Kharat, Amit T; Singh, Amarjit; Kulkarni, Vilas M; Shah, Digish

2014-04-01

190

40 CFR 79.60 - Good laboratory practices (GLP) standards for inhalation exposure health effects testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...designed to avoid contamination of test fuel and additive...radiological, or chemical contamination of test systems and...the possibility of contamination, deterioration...shown. (iii) If a chemical or physical...

2013-07-01

191

40 CFR 79.60 - Good laboratory practices (GLP) standards for inhalation exposure health effects testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...designed to avoid contamination of test fuel and additive...radiological, or chemical contamination of test systems and...the possibility of contamination, deterioration...shown. (iii) If a chemical or physical...

2011-07-01

192

Health laboratories in the Tanga region of Tanzania: the quality of diagnostic services for malaria and other communicable diseases.  

PubMed

Although critical for good case management and the monitoring of health interventions, the health-laboratory services in sub-Saharan Africa are grossly compromised by poor infrastructures and a lack of trained personnel, essential reagents and other supplies. The availability and quality of diagnostic services in 37 health laboratories in three districts of the Tanga region of Tanzania have recently been assessed. The results of the survey, which involved interviews with health workers, observations and a documentary review, revealed that malaria accounted for >50% of admissions and out-patient visits. Most (92%) of the laboratories were carrying out malaria diagnosis and 89% were measuring haemoglobin concentrations but only one (3%) was conducting culture and sensitivity tests, and those only on urine and pus samples. Only 14 (17%) of the 84 people found working in the visited laboratories were laboratory technologists with a diploma certificate or higher qualification. Sixteen (43%) of the study laboratories each had five or fewer types of equipment and only seven (19%) had more than 11 types each. Although 11 (30%) of the laboratories reported that they conducted internal quality control, none had standard operating procedures (SOP) on display or evidence of such quality assurance. Although malaria was the main health problem, diagnostic services for malaria and other diseases were inadequate and of poor quality because of the limited human resources, poor equipment and shortage of supplies. If the health services in Tanga are not to be overwhelmed by the progressively increasing burden of HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis and other emerging and re-emerging diseases, more funding and appropriate policies to improve the availability and quality of the area's diagnostic services will clearly be required. PMID:19583914

Ishengoma, D R S; Rwegoshora, R T; Mdira, K Y; Kamugisha, M L; Anga, E O; Bygbjerg, I C; Rønn, A M; Magesa, S M

2009-07-01

193

[Assessment and control of health risk caused by the radiological accident at the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant].  

PubMed

The accident at the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on March 11, 2011, released a large amount of radioactive materials resulting in the radioactive contamination of a wide area of eastern Japan. Residents of the Fukushima prefecture experienced various unavoidable damages and fear of radiation effects on their health. A reliable communication of accurate risk assessment for residents is required as a countermeasure aimed at the reconstruction of Fukushima. Here, the current status of individual dose estimation and the issues relating to the radiation risk perception are discussed. PMID:24492213

Matsuda, Naoki; Morita, Naoko; Miura, Miwa

2014-01-01

194

Curricular Guidelines for Dental Auxiliary Radiology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

AADS curricular guidelines suggest objectives for these areas of dental auxiliary radiology: physical principles of X-radiation in dentistry, related radiobiological concepts, principles of radiologic health, radiographic technique, x-ray films and intensifying screens, factors contributing to film quality, darkroom, and normal variations in…

Journal of Dental Education, 1981

1981-01-01

195

Radiology Aide. Instructor Key [and] Student Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual can be used independently by students in secondary health occupations programs or by persons receiving on-the-job training in a radiology department. The manual includes an instructor's key that provides answers to the activity sheets and unit evaluations. The manual consists of the following five units: (1) orientation to radiology;…

Hartwein, Jon; Dunham, John

196

Tiger Team environment, safety, and health assessment of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, conducted from October 22 and November 30, 1990. The assessment was conducted by a tam comprised of environment, safety, and health (ES H) professional from the Department, its contractors, and consultants. The purpose of the ORNL Tiger Team Assessment is to provide the Secretary of Energy with concise information on: current ES H compliance status at the site and the vulnerabilities associated with that compliance status; root causes for noncompliance; and adequacy of DOE and site contractor ES H management programs. This information will assist DOE in determining patterns and trends in ES H compliance and probable root causes, and will provide guidance for management to take needed corrective actions.

Not Available

1990-11-01

197

RADIOLOGICAL & ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT GUIDANCE DOCUMENT  

E-print Network

RADIOLOGICAL & ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT GUIDANCE DOCUMENT: Minors in Research Laboratories or Animal Facilities Page 1 of 4 PURPOSE: The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for scientific or technical work which may be hazardous, including research, quality control, testing, teaching

Holland, Jeffrey

198

Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2006 Site environmental report8-  

E-print Network

Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2006 Site environmental report8- DRAFT Brookhaven National Laboratory routinely evaluates site operations and new projects to ensure that the overall radiological dose contribute to radiological dose are reviewed for their individual impacts on the people and environment

199

A strategy for health surveillance in laboratory animal workers exposed to high molecular weight allergens  

PubMed Central

Aims: To develop a health surveillance strategy with the use of diagnostic and prognostic prediction models to detect and predict occupational allergic diseases efficiently. Methods: Data from laboratory animal workers (n = 351) participating in an ongoing cohort study were used to develop diagnostic and prognostic models with logistic regression analyses. A diagnostic model was developed from questionnaire items, and exposure measurements to find predictors for the estimation of the probability of sensitisation to workplace allergens. With the resulting questionnaire model workers were divided into subgroups (high/low probability). A prognostic model was established in workers initially low sensitised using follow up data over a 2–3 year period. The accuracy of the models was evaluated by the concordance (c) statistic, and by comparison of the predicted and observed prevalence. Results: A diagnostic rule, containing five questionnaire items, identified workers with a high risk of sensitisation. These workers showed high rates of work related asthma, allergic symptoms, doctor's visit, and absenteeism. A prognostic rule based on four questionnaire items predicted workers at high risk of near future sensitisation with high rates of future (allergic) respiratory symptoms, and asthmatic attacks. Conclusion: The risk of (future) sensitisation and the severity of laboratory animal allergy can be predicted accurately with diagnostic and prognostic prediction models based on questionnaire items. Workers with an increased risk of future sensitisation also showed serious allergic symptoms at follow up. Workers with a low risk have a low risk of becoming diseased in the future. PMID:15377769

Meijer, E; Grobbee, D; Heederik, D

2004-01-01

200

Core Courses in Public Health Laboratory Science and Practice: Findings from 2006 and 2011 Surveys  

PubMed Central

Objectives We identified academic training courses or topics most important to the careers of U.S. public health, environmental, and agricultural laboratory (PHEAL) scientist-managers and directors, and determined what portions of the national PHEAL workforce completed these courses. Methods We conducted electronic national surveys in 2006 and 2011, and analyzed data using numerical ranking, Chi-square tests comparing rates, and Spearman's formula measuring rank correlation. Results In 2006, 40 of 50 PHEAL directors identified 56 course topics as either important, useful, or not needed for someone in their position. These course topics were then ranked to provide a list of 31 core courses. In 2011, 1,659 of approximately 5,555 PHEAL scientific and technical staff, using a subset of 25 core courses, evidenced higher core course completion rates associated with higher-level job classification, advanced academic degree, and age. The 2011 survey showed that 287 PHEAL scientist-managers and directors, on average, completed 37.7% (n=5/13) of leadership/managerial core courses and 51.7% (n=6/12) of scientific core courses. For 1,659 laboratorians in all scientific and technical classifications, core-subject completion rates were higher in local laboratories (42.8%, n=11/25) than in state (36.0%, n=9/25), federal (34.4%, n=9/25), and university (31.2%, n=8/25) laboratories. Conclusions There is a definable range of scientific, leadership, and managerial core courses needed by PHEAL scientist-managers and directors to function effectively in their positions. Potential PHEAL scientist-managers and directors need greater and continuing access to these courses, and academic and practice entities supporting development of this workforce should adopt curricula and core competencies aligned with these course topics. PMID:23997310

Beck, Angela J.; Boulton, Matthew L.; Kim, Deborah H.; Wichman, Michael D.; Luedtke, Patrick F.

2013-01-01

201

Impact of health information technology interventions to improve medication laboratory monitoring for ambulatory patients: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medication errors are a major source of morbidity and mortality. Inadequate laboratory monitoring of high-risk medications after initial prescription is a medical error that contributes to preventable adverse drug events. Health information technology (HIT)-based clinical decision support may improve patient safety by improving the laboratory monitoring of high-risk medications, but the effectiveness of such interventions is unclear. Therefore, the authors

Shira H. Fischer; Jennifer Tjia; Terry S. Field

2010-01-01

202

Learning Radiology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Learning Radiology website was conceived and created by Professor William Herring of the Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia. The site was started in June 2002, and now receives upwards of 12,000 visitors a day. Since the time the site was started, it has grown to include video podcasts, lectures from medical professionals, and interactive tutorials. The materials on the site are divided into seven topical areas, including Lectures, Notes, Images, Case of the Week Archive, and Quick Quizzes. In the Lectures area visitors can find talks on everything from bone tumors to the "ABCs of Heart Disease." Many of the talks are available in a variety of formats, including as pdf files and PowerPoint presentations. In the Notes area, visitors can read clear and concise summaries of over 45 topics, including Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm and Paget's Disease. Also, visitors can follow Learning Radiology via Twitter and take advantage of their interactive Museum of Modern Imaging, which includes fun and informative areas like the Hall of Hype and Roentgen's Room.

Herring, William

2012-05-11

203

//////////////////////////Radiology/////////////////////// Status Report  

E-print Network

//////////////////////////Radiology/////////////////////// Status Report 2011 #12;#12;Department of raDiology / StatuS report / 2011 Table of Contents A / OveTiviTy/////////////////////////////////////////41 Introduction: Research in Radiology ////////////////// 41 Research Funding

Haykin, Simon

204

Hospital management of mass radiological casualties : reassessing exposures from contaminated victims of an exploded radiological dispersal device (RDD).  

SciTech Connect

One of the key issues in the aftermath of an exploded radiological dispersal device from a terrorist event is that of the contaminated victim and the concern among healthcare providers for the harmful exposures they may receive in treating patients, especially if the patient has not been thoroughly decontaminated. This is critically important in the event of mass casualties from a nuclear or radiological incident because of the essential rapidity of acute medical decisions and that those who have life- or limb-threatening injuries may have treatment unduly delayed by a decontamination process that may be unnecessary for protecting the health and safety of the patient or the healthcare provider. To estimate potential contamination of those exposed in a radiological dispersal device event, results were used from explosive aerosolization tests of surrogate radionuclides detonated with high explosives at the Sandia National Laboratories. Computer modeling was also used to assess radiation dose rates to surgical personnel treating patients with blast injuries who are contaminated with any of a variety of common radionuclides. It is demonstrated that exceptional but plausible cases may require special precautions by the healthcare provider, even while managing life-threatening injuries of a contaminated victim from a radiological dispersal device event.

Ansari, Armin (National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA); Harper, Frederick Taylor; Smith, James M. (National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA)

2005-04-01

205

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1988 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health: Part 5, Environment, safety, health, and quality assurance  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the research programs now underway at Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratory in the areas of environmental safety, health, and quality assurance. Topics include internal irradiation, emergency plans, dose equivalents, risk assessment, dose equivalents, surveys, neutron dosimetry, and radiation accidents. (TEM)

Faust, L.G.; Pennell, W.T.; Selby, J.M.

1989-02-01

206

RADIOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY DEVELOPMENT/IMPROVEMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

The office is developing improved methodologies and guidance for evaluating human health risks associated with exposure to environmental radiological contaminants. These activities involve coordination with numerous federal agencies and the development and communication of vari...

207

Role Of The Bureau Of Radiological Health In Assessment Of Risks From Clinical Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Procedures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 1976 Medical Device Amendments to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act provide for the classification of a medical device intended for human use into one of three regulatory classes based on the extent of control necessary to ensure safety and effectiveness: Class I, General Controls; Class II, Performance Standards; Class III, Premarket Approval. Class III devices are those for which there is insufficient information available to ensure safety and effectiveness through General Controls and Performance Standards alone. New devices such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging systems fall under Class III because they were developed after the date of the law's enactment (28 May 1976). Investigational studies involving human subjects undertaken to develop safety and effectiveness data for a post-enactment Class III device come under the Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) Regulation (21 CFR 812). This regulation distinguishes between investigations of devices that pose a significant risk to the human subject and those that do not. A significant risk investigation "presents a potential for serious risk to the health, safety, or welfare of a subject." Procedures for obtaining an IDE differ if the device does or does not pose a significant risk. The sponsor of a clinical trial, and ultimately the Institutional Review Board (IRB), have the primary responsibility to determine whether a certain clinical use of the investigational device represents a significant risk to the subject of the investigation. A finding of significant risk does not mean that a device is too hazardous for clinical studies, but it does mean that a formal application for an IDE must be made to and approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) before a clinical trial can begin. If the device is deemed not to pose a significant risk, unless otherwise notified by FDA, the sponsor is not required to submit an IDE application to FDA. Instead, the sponsor and investigators must satisfy only certain abbreviated requirements including maintenance of certain records and reports. In addition, the sponsors must maintain IRB approval throughout the investigation, label the device in accordance with the IDE regulation, and ensure that the investigators obtain and document informed consent for each subject under their care.

Anderson, Mary P.; Athey, T. W.; Phillips, Robert A.

1982-12-01

208

Battlefield radiology  

PubMed Central

With the increasing tempo of military conflicts in the last decade, much has been learnt about imaging battlefield casualties in the acute setting. Ultrasound in the form of focused abdominal sonography in trauma (FAST) has proven invaluable in emergency triage of patients for immediate surgery. Multidetector CT allows accurate determination of battlefield trauma injuries. It permits the surgeons and anaesthetists to plan their interventions more thoroughly and to be made aware of clinically occult injuries. There are common injury patterns associated with blast injury, gunshot wounds and blunt trauma. While this body of knowledge is most applicable to the battlefield, there are parallels with peacetime radiology, particularly in terrorist attacks and industrial accidents. This pictorial review is based on the experiences of a UK radiologist deployed in Afghanistan in 2010. PMID:22806621

Graham, R N J

2012-01-01

209

EPA/OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT'S NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY/WESTERN ECOLOGY DIVISION INTERNET SITE  

EPA Science Inventory

The Western Ecology Division (WED) is one of four ecological effects divisions of the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory. The four divisions are distributed bio-geographically. WED's mission is 1) to provide EPA with national scientific leadership for t...

210

LABORATORY SAFETY CHECKLIST Department of Environment, Health and Safety v.1.9 July 2014 Page 1  

E-print Network

is posted in each lab listed on the permit. i. A copy of the CNSC (Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission) lab years. c) Persons working in the lab who are not radiation safety certified have read and signedLABORATORY SAFETY CHECKLIST Department of Environment, Health and Safety v.1.9 July 2014 Page 1

Machel, Hans

211

Project health and safety plan for the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) in the North and South Tank Farms (NTF and STF) at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by

Abston

1997-01-01

212

RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION EXPOSURE FACILITIES FOR BIO-EFFECTS RESEARCH AT THE HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY, RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NORTH CAROLINA  

EPA Science Inventory

The report describes the multi-user radiofrequency radiation exposure facilities for bio-effects research in use at the Health Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC. Four facilities are described: (1) a 100 MHz CW exposure system, (2) a 2450 MHz CW exposure syst...

213

Post-remediation action radiological report for Surface Impoundments C (3539) and D (3540) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

During August and September 1998, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC performed a remedial action within Impoundments 3539 and 3540 (Impoundments C and D, respectively) in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision (ROD) for the Surface Impoundments Operable Unit. The remedial action included removal of sediments and 0.1 ft of subimpoundment soil. A post-remedial action radiological survey was conducted to provide data to support the Bethel Valley ROD. Data was obtained from (1) a walkover survey for residual gamma radiation on the base of the impoundments, (2) smear surveys for transferable contamination on remaining riprap, and (3) representative sampling of subimpoundment soils. Walkover surveys identified no locations outside the impoundments with gamma exposure levels greater than three times background levels. Smear surveys detected no removable contamination above release limits as specified in 10 CFR 835, Appendix D. Subimpoundment soil samples quantified low levels of residual contamination.

NONE

1998-12-01

214

Health and Safety Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S&H) issues. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water This plan explains additional site-specific health and safety requirements such as Site Specific Hazards Evaluation Addendums (SSHEAs) to the Site Safety and Health Plan which should be used in concert with this plan and existing established procedures.

Van Hoesen, S.D.; Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Manis, L.W.; Barre, W.L. [Analysas Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1993-12-01

215

Environment, safety and health progress assessment of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The onsite assessment, which was conducted from November 9 through November 20, 1992, included a selective review of the ES&H management systems and programs with principal focus on the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs (DP); San Francisco Field Office (SF), including the Livermore Site Office (LSO); and the site contractor, the University of California. The purpose of the LLNL ES&H Progress Assessment is to provide the Secretary with an independent assessment of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to address ES&H issues and requirements. The assessment was not a comprehensive compliance assessment of ES&H activities. The point of reference for assessing programs at LLNL was, for the most part, the Tiger Team Assessment of LLNL, which was conducted from February 26 through April 5, 1990. The LLNL Progress Assessment was conducted by a team of 12 professionals from various DOE offices and their support contractors, with expertise in the areas of management, environment, safety, and health. The Progress Assessment Team concluded that LLNL management recognizes the importance that the Secretary of Energy places on ES&H excellence and has responded with improvements in all ES&H areas. Progress has been made in addressing the deficiencies identified in the 1990 Tiger Team Assessment. Although much remains to be done and concerns were noted in several areas, these concerns do not diminish the significance of the progress made since the 1990 Tiger Team Assessment.

Not Available

1992-11-01

216

Environment, safety and health progress assessment of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES H) Progress Assessment of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The onsite assessment, which was conducted from November 9 through November 20, 1992, included a selective review of the ES H management systems and programs with principal focus on the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs (DP); San Francisco Field Office (SF), including the Livermore Site Office (LSO); and the site contractor, the University of California. The purpose of the LLNL ES H Progress Assessment is to provide the Secretary with an independent assessment of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to address ES H issues and requirements. The assessment was not a comprehensive compliance assessment of ES H activities. The point of reference for assessing programs at LLNL was, for the most part, the Tiger Team Assessment of LLNL, which was conducted from February 26 through April 5, 1990. The LLNL Progress Assessment was conducted by a team of 12 professionals from various DOE offices and their support contractors, with expertise in the areas of management, environment, safety, and health. The Progress Assessment Team concluded that LLNL management recognizes the importance that the Secretary of Energy places on ES H excellence and has responded with improvements in all ES H areas. Progress has been made in addressing the deficiencies identified in the 1990 Tiger Team Assessment. Although much remains to be done and concerns were noted in several areas, these concerns do not diminish the significance of the progress made since the 1990 Tiger Team Assessment.

Not Available

1992-11-01

217

CSU-FDA collaborative radiological health laboratory annual report, 1980: health effects of prenatal and postnatal whole-body exposure to ionizing radiation in the beagle dog  

Microsoft Academic Search

A long-term study of the mortality, morbidity, and physiopathology of beagles exposed to a single dose of ionizing radiation during one of six stages of either prenatal or postnatal development. The results of this study will provide insight into the lifetime risks associated with prenatal and postnatal exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. This annual report describes the long-term

1982-01-01

218

A roadmap for academic health centers to establish good laboratory practice-compliant infrastructure.  

PubMed

Prior to human clinical trials, nonclinical safety and toxicology studies are required to demonstrate that a new product appears safe for human testing; these nonclinical studies are governed by good laboratory practice (GLP) regulations. As academic health centers (AHCs) embrace the charge to increase the translation of basic science research into clinical discoveries, researchers at these institutions increasingly will be conducting GLP-regulated nonclinical studies. Because the consequences for noncompliance are severe and many AHC researchers are unfamiliar with Food and Drug Administration regulations, the authors describe the regulatory requirements for conducting GLP research, including the strict documentation requirements, the necessary personnel training, the importance of study monitoring, and the critical role that compliance oversight plays in the process. They then explain the process that AHCs interested in conducting GLP studies should take before the start of their research program, including conducting a needs assessment and a gap analysis and selecting a model for GLP compliance. Finally, the authors identify and analyze several critical barriers to developing and implementing a GLP-compliant infrastructure at an AHC. Despite these challenges, the capacity to perform such research will help AHCs to build and maintain competitive research programs and to facilitate the successful translation of faculty-initiated research from nonclinical studies to first-in-human clinical trials. PMID:22373618

Adamo, Joan E; Bauer, Gerhard; Berro, Marlene; Burnett, Bruce K; Hartman, Karen A; Masiello, Lisa M; Moorman-White, Diane; Rubinstein, Eric P; Schuff, Kathryn G

2012-03-01

219

A Roadmap for Academic Health Centers to Establish Good Laboratory Practice-Compliant Infrastructure  

PubMed Central

Prior to human clinical trials, nonclinical safety and toxicology studies are required to demonstrate that a new product appears safe for human testing; these nonclinical studies are governed by good laboratory practice (GLP) regulations. As academic health centers (AHCs) embrace the charge to increase the translation of basic science research into clinical discoveries, researchers at these institutions increasingly will be conducting GLP-regulated nonclinical studies. Because the consequences for noncompliance are severe and many AHC researchers are unfamiliar with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations, the authors describe the regulatory requirements for conducting GLP research, including the strict documentation requirements, the necessary personnel training, the importance of study monitoring, and the critical role that compliance oversight plays in the process. They then explain the process that AHCs interested in conducting GLP studies should take prior to the start of their research program, including conducting a needs assessment and a gap analysis and selecting a model for GLP compliance. Finally, the authors identify and analyze several critical barriers to developing and implementing a GLP-compliant infrastructure at an AHC. Despite these challenges, the capacity to perform such research will help AHCs to build and maintain competitive research programs and to facilitate the successful translation of faculty-initiated research from nonclinical studies to first-in-human clinical trials. PMID:22373618

Adamo, Joan E.; Bauer, Gerhard; Berro, Marlene; Burnett, Bruce K.; Hartman, Karen A.; Masiello, Lisa M.; Moorman-White, Diane; Rubinstein, Eric P.; Schuff, Kathryn G.

2012-01-01

220

Conceptual Site Treatment Plan Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research Environmental Restoration Project  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Facilities Compliance Act (the Act) of 1992 waives sovereign immunity for federal facilities for fines and penalties under the provisions of the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act, state, interstate, and local hazardous and solid waste management requirements. However, for three years the Act delays the waiver for violations involving US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Act, however, requires that the DOE prepare a Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) for each of its sites that generate or store mixed wastes (MWs). The purpose of the CSTP is to present DOE`s preliminary evaluations of the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating a site`s MW. This CSTP presents the preliminary capacity and technology evaluation for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR). The five identified MW streams at LEHR are evaluated to the extent possible given available information. Only one MW stream is sufficiently well defined to permit a technology evaluation to be performed. Two other MW streams are in the process of being characterized so that an evaluation can be performed. The other two MW streams will be generated by the decommissioning of inactive facilities onsite within the next five years.

Chapman, T.E.

1993-10-01

221

MarketW atch The Value Of Health Care Information Exchange And Interoperability  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we assess the value of electronic health care information ex- change and interoperability (HIEI) between providers (hospitals and medical group prac- tices) and independent laboratories, radiology centers, pharmacies, payers, public health departments, and other providers. We have created an HIEI taxonomy and combined pub- lished evidence with expert opinion in a cost-benefit model. Fully standardized HIEI could

Jan Walker; Eric Pan; Douglas Johnston; Julia Adler-Milstein; David W. Bates; Blackford Middleton

2005-01-01

222

Current radiology. Volume 5  

SciTech Connect

This book contains 10 selections. They are: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional Vascular Radiology, Genitourinary Radiology, Skeletal Radiology, Digital Subtraction Angiography, Neuroradiology, Computed Tomographic Evaluation of Degenerative Diseases of the Lumbar Spine, The Lung, Otolaringology and Opthalmology, and Pediatric Radiology: Cranial, Facial, Cervical, Vertebral, and Appendicular.

Wilson, G.H.; Hanafee, W.N.

1984-01-01

223

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1987 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health: Part 5: Environment, safety, health, and quality assurance  

SciTech Connect

Part 5 of the 1987 Annual Report to the US Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Nuclear Safety, the Office of Environmental Guidance and Compliance, the Office of Environmental Audit, and the Office of National Environmental Policy Act Project Assistance. For each project, as identified by the Field Work Proposal, articles describe progress made during fiscal year 1987. Authors of these articles represent a broad spectrum of capabilities derived from five of the seven technical centers of the Laboratory, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the work.

Faust, L.G.; Steelman, B.L.; Selby, J.M.

1988-02-01

224

75 FR 50987 - Privacy Act System of Records; National Animal Health Laboratory Network (NAHLN)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...primary responsibility for an animal undergoing testing in a networked laboratory...officials, and owners of animals undergoing testing in a networked laboratory...primary responsibility for an animal undergoing testing in a networked...

2010-08-18

225

E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, & Safety Division  

E-print Network

Report (Subpart H of 40 CFR 61) Calendar Year 1998 Site Name: Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 06/09/99 #12;Section I. Facility Information Site Description: Laboratory Operations The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab

226

THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility  

E-print Network

THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY 1 The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility for Radiological Research (CRR). Using the mi- crobeam facility, 10% of the cells were irradiated through

227

The impact of the patient protection and affordable care act on radiology: beyond reimbursement.  

PubMed

The 2014 ACR Forum focused on the noneconomic implications of the Affordable Care Act on the field of radiology, with specific attention to the importance of the patient experience, the role of radiology in public and population health, and radiology's role in the effort to lower overall health care costs. The recommendations generated from the Forum seek to inform ACR leadership on the best strategies to pursue to best prepare the radiology community for the rapidly evolving health care landscape. PMID:25557569

Krishnaraj, Arun; Norbash, Alexander; Allen, Bibb; Ellenbogen, Paul H; Kazerooni, Ella A; Thorwarth, William; Weinreb, Jeffrey C

2015-01-01

228

Renewal of radiological equipment.  

PubMed

In this century, medical imaging is at the heart of medical practice. Besides providing fast and accurate diagnosis, advances in radiology equipment offer new and previously non-existing options for treatment guidance with quite low morbidity, resulting in the improvement of health outcomes and quality of life for the patients. Although rapid technological development created new medical imaging modalities and methods, the same progress speed resulted in accelerated technical and functional obsolescence of the same medical imaging equipment, consequently creating a need for renewal. Older equipment has a high risk of failures and breakdowns, which might cause delays in diagnosis and treatment of the patient, and safety problems both for the patient and the medical staff. The European Society of Radiology is promoting the use of up-to-date equipment, especially in the context of the EuroSafe Imaging Campaign, as the use of up-to-date equipment will improve quality and safety in medical imaging. Every healthcare institution or authority should have a plan for medical imaging equipment upgrade or renewal. This plan should look forward a minimum of 5 years, with annual updates. Teaching points • Radiological equipment has a definite life cycle span, resulting in unavoidable breakdown and decrease or loss of image quality which renders equipment useless after a certain time period.• Equipment older than 10 years is no longer state-of-the art equipment and replacement is essential. Operating costs of older equipment will be high when compared with new equipment, and sometimes maintenance will be impossible if no spare parts are available.• Older equipment has a high risk of failure and breakdown, causing delays in diagnosis and treatment of the patient and safety problems both for the patient and the medical staff.• Every healthcare institution or authority should have a plan for medical imaging equipment upgrade or replacement. This plan should look forward a minimum of 5 years, with annual updating. PMID:25230589

2014-10-01

229

Comparison of Epidemiological, Clinical, Laboratory and Radiological Features of Hospitalized Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients With Pulmonary Tuberculosis at Razi Hospital in Ahvaz  

PubMed Central

Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) due to suppressive effect on cellular immunity can impact on progression of tuberculosis (TB). Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of DM on the epidemiological, clinical and para clinical aspects of pulmonary TB. Patients and Methods: The information of 148 admitted pulmonary TB patients in infectious ward of Razi hospital in Ahvaz from 2009 to 2010 was extracted from their medical files. The patients were divided into two groups as TB with DM (n = 36) and TB without DM (n = 112). The related data on epidemiology, signs, symptoms, radiology and sputum smear examination in both groups were compared in SPSS 16 by using chi squared test. Results: The mean age of TB with DM patients was higher TB without DM patients (56.6 ± 12.7 vs. 44.8 ± 18.3; respectively, P = 0.006). Whereas cough, night sweating, fever and weigh loss was not statistically different, sputum, hemoptysis and dyspnea was more prominent in TB with DM (69.4%, 33.4%, 44.5% vs. 36.6%, 9.8%, 20.5%; P = 0.005, P = 0.001, P = 0.005, respectively). In chest x-ray, cavitation and reticulonodular pattern was more frequent in TB with DM (55.5%, 22.2% vs. 31.2%, 8% - P = 0.008, P = 0.02, respectively). The rate of sputum smear positivity in TB with DM and TB without DM was 66.6% and 47.3%, respectively (P = 0.03). Conclusions: According to the results of this study, in approach to every DM cases suffering of respiratory symptoms such as productive cough, hemoptysis and dyspnea in association with cavitation or miliary mottling in chest x-ray, pulmonary TB should be considered at the top of the differential diagnosis list. PMID:25485064

Alavi, Seyed Mohammad; Khoshkho, Mohammad Mehdi; Salmanzadeh, Shokrolah; Eghtesad, Mehdi

2014-01-01

230

Project health and safety plan for the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) in the North and South Tank Farms (NTF and STF) at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to health and safety (H and S) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all GAAT operations in the NTF and STF. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities identifies s part of the GAAT are initiated that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices in order to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air. This plan explains additional task-specific health and safety requirements such as the Site Safety and health Addendum and Activity Hazard Analysis, which should be used in concert with this plan and existing established procedures.

Abston, J.P.

1997-04-01

231

Health and safety plan for the Remedial Investigation and Site Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

This health and safety plan (HASP) was developed by the members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health Science Research Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This plan was prepared to ensure that health and safety related items for the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 Remedial Investigation (RI)\\/Feasibility Study and Site Investigation projects conform with

G. H. Cofer; V. L. Holt; G. W. Roupe

1993-01-01

232

Evidence-based Radiology: A New Approach to the Practice of Radiology1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Top ABSTRACT In this review, the principles of evidence-based health care and their application to radiology are discussed. Evidence-based health care involves the more formal integration of the best research evidence with clinical expertise and explicit acknowledgment of patient values in clinical decision making, as compared with conventional practice. Recently, many health care disciplines have adopted the principles and practice

Harald O. Stolberg

233

A Plan of Action for Selected Health Manpower; A Supplementary Manpower Report to Alabama Comprehensive Health Planning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fourteen categories of manpower, comprising 75 percent of the total health work force requiring formal training of six months or more in Alabama, are studied in this preliminary report. They are physicians, dentists, optometrists, pharmacists, medical technologists, certified laboratory assistants, sanitarians, medical records clerks, radiologic

Alabama State Dept. of Public Health, Montgomery. Comprehensive Health Planning Administration.

234

The Role of the Clinical Laboratory in the Future of Health Care: Lean Microbiology  

PubMed Central

This commentary will introduce lean concepts into the clinical microbiology laboratory. The practice of lean in the clinical microbiology laboratory can remove waste, increase efficiency, and reduce costs. Lean, Six Sigma, and other such management initiatives are useful tools and can provide dividends but must be accompanied by organizational leadership commitment to sustaining the lean culture in the laboratory setting and providing resources and time to work through the process. PMID:24574289

Samuel, Linoj

2014-01-01

235

The role of the clinical laboratory in the future of health care: lean microbiology.  

PubMed

This commentary will introduce lean concepts into the clinical microbiology laboratory. The practice of lean in the clinical microbiology laboratory can remove waste, increase efficiency, and reduce costs. Lean, Six Sigma, and other such management initiatives are useful tools and can provide dividends but must be accompanied by organizational leadership commitment to sustaining the lean culture in the laboratory setting and providing resources and time to work through the process. PMID:24574289

Samuel, Linoj; Novak-Weekley, Susan

2014-06-01

236

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Health and Safety Long-Range Plan: Fiscal years 1989--1995  

SciTech Connect

The health and safety of its personnel is the first concern of ORNL and its management. The ORNL Health and Safety Program has the responsibility for ensuring the health and safety of all individuals assigned to ORNL activities. This document outlines the principal aspects of the ORNL Health and Safety Long-Range Plan and provides a framework for management use in the future development of the health and safety program. Each section of this document is dedicated to one of the health and safety functions (i.e., health physics, industrial hygiene, occupational medicine, industrial safety, nuclear criticality safety, nuclear facility safety, transportation safety, fire protection, and emergency preparedness). Each section includes functional mission and objectives, program requirements and status, a summary of program needs, and program data and funding summary. Highlights of FY 1988 are included.

Not Available

1989-06-01

237

Radiological assistance program: Region I. Part I  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is to make DOE resources available and provide emergency assistance to state and local agencies in order to control radiological hazards, protect the public health and safety, and minimize the loss of property. This plan is an integral part of a nationwide program of radiological assistance established by the US DOE, and is implemented on a regional basis. The Brookhaven Area Office (BHO) Radiological Assistance Program is applicable to DOE Region I, which consists of the New England States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland and the District of Columbia. The BHO RAP-1 has been developed to: (a) ensure the availability of an effective radiological assistance capability to ensure the protection of persons and property; (b) provide guidelines to RAP-1 Team personnel for the evaluation of radiological incidents and implementation of corrective actions; (c) maintain liaison with other DOE installations, Federal, State and local organizations which may become involved in radiological assistance operations in Region I; and (d) encourage development of a local capability to cope with radiological incidents.

Musolino, S.V.; Kuehner, A.V.; Hull, A.P.

1985-07-15

238

National radiological emergency preparedness conference  

SciTech Connect

This conference focuses on the following major topics, presented in various written formats from speakers presentations: future of nuclear power and the problems of low-level radioactive waste storage; regulatory cooperation and reform in emergency planning; emergency management, monitoring and health assessment; standardization of exercise report form; social, political, economic, and agricultural concerns in emergency planning; organizational activities of the Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program; Emergency planning in Australia.

NONE

1995-12-31

239

The NIH Almanac -National Institutes of Health (NIH) Page 1 of 1 Begun as a one-room Laboratory of Hygiene in 1887, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) today is one of the world's foremost medical research centers. An  

E-print Network

The NIH Almanac - National Institutes of Health (NIH) Page 1 of 1 Begun as a one-room Laboratory specialists. The NIH Almanac is compiled and edited by the Office of Communications and Public Liaison, Online...Turning Discovery into Health" is a trademark of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The NIH Almanac

Levin, Judith G.

240

Environmental Health and Safety's Laboratory Safety Trainings Title of Training Description Required Training  

E-print Network

a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Finally the most critical aspect of the training is informing material or physical hazards. Yes, annually Your first laboratory safety training must be scheduled materials. Yes, annually Your first Right-to- Know training is included in the General Laboratory safety

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

241

International Data on Radiological Sources  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT The mission of radiological dispersal device (RDD) nuclear forensics is to identify the provenance of nuclear and radiological materials used in RDDs and to aid law enforcement in tracking nuclear materials and routes. The application of databases to radiological forensics is to match RDD source material to a source model in the database, provide guidance regarding a possible second device, and aid the FBI by providing a short list of manufacturers and distributors, and ultimately to the last legal owner of the source. The Argonne/Idaho National Laboratory RDD attribution database is a powerful technical tool in radiological forensics. The database (1267 unique vendors) includes all sealed sources and a device registered in the U.S., is complemented by data from the IAEA Catalogue, and is supported by rigorous in-lab characterization of selected sealed sources regarding physical form, radiochemical composition, and age-dating profiles. Close working relationships with global partners in the commercial sealed sources industry provide invaluable technical information and expertise in the development of signature profiles. These profiles are critical to the down-selection of potential candidates in either pre- or post- event RDD attribution. The down-selection process includes a match between an interdicted (or detonated) source and a model in the database linked to one or more manufacturers and distributors.

Martha Finck; Margaret Goldberg

2010-07-01

242

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health - Part 5: Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Assurance  

SciTech Connect

Part 5 of the 1989 Annual Report to the US Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Environmental Guidance and Compliance, the Office of Environmental Audit, the Office of National Environmental Policy Act Project Assistance, the Office of Nuclear Safety, the Office of Safety Compliance, and the Office of Policy and Standards. For each project, as identified by the Field Work Proposal, there is an article describing progress made during fiscal year 1989. Authors of these articles represent a broad spectrum of capabilities derived from five of the seven technical centers of the Laboratory, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the work. 35 refs., 1 fig.

Faust, L.G.; Doctor, P.G.; Selby, J.M.

1990-04-01

243

Laboratory Office Hours as Outreach in the Health Sciences: Better Research Skills for Better Careers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Medical librarianship is changing in health care environments. Since 1996, by which time the standards that determine how hospitals acquire accreditation changed, many hospitals have been acquiring accreditation without a qualified medical librarian on site. For that reason, it has become even more important that health care professionals,…

Prusin, Todd

2012-01-01

244

SURVEY RESEARCH LABORATORY UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO Conference on Health Survey Research Methods  

E-print Network

Survey Research Methods April 8­11, 2011 CALL FOR PAPERS The Tenth Conference on Health Survey Research Methods (CHSRM) will continue the series that began in 1975 to discuss new, innovative survey research methods that improve the quality of health survey data. The CHSRM will bring together researchers

Illinois at Chicago, University of

245

Arkansas: a leading laboratory for health care payment and delivery system reform.  

PubMed

As states' Medicaid programs continue to evolve from traditional fee-for-service to value-based health care delivery, there is growing recognition that systemwide multipayer approaches provide the market power needed to address the triple aim of improved patient care, improved health of populations, and reduced costs. Federal initiatives, such as the State Innovation Model grant program, make significant funds available for states seeking to transform their health care systems. In crafting their reform strategies, states can learn from early innovators. This issue brief focuses on one such state: Arkansas. Insights and lessons from the Arkansas Health Care Payment Improvement Initiative (AHCPII) suggest that progress is best gained through an inclusive, deliberative process facilitated by committed leadership, a shared agreement on root problems and opportunities for improvement, and a strategy grounded in the state's particular health care landscape. PMID:25204031

Bachrach, Deborah; du Pont, Lammot; Lipson, Mindy

2014-08-01

246

Health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment remediation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of the policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air.

Burman, S.N.; Uziel, M.S.

1995-12-01

247

Worker Safety and Health Issues Associated with the DOE Environmental Cleanup Program: Insights From the DOE Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public health Standards Steering Group  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public Health Standards Steering Group (or ''SSG'') was formed in 1990. It was felt then that ''risk'' could be an organizing principle for environmental cleanup and that risk-based cleanup standards could rationalize clean up work. The environmental remediation process puts workers engaged in cleanup activities at risk from hazardous materials and from the more usual hazards associated with construction activities. In a real sense, the site remediation process involves the transfer of a hypothetical risk to the environment and the public from isolated contamination into real risks to the workers engaged in the remediation activities. Late in its existence the SSG, primarily motivated by its LANL representative, Dr. Harry Ettinger, actively investigated issues associated with worker health and safety during environmental remediation activities. This paper summarizes the insights noted by the SSG. Most continue to be pertinent today.

M.C. Edelson; Samuel C. Morris; Joan M. Daisey

2001-03-01

248

40 CFR 79.60 - Good laboratory practices (GLP) standards for inhalation exposure health effects testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...facility management to perform the duties relating to quality assurance of the studies. Raw data means any laboratory worksheets, records, memoranda, notes, or exact copies thereof, that are the result of original observations and activities...

2012-07-01

249

40 CFR 79.60 - Good laboratory practices (GLP) standards for inhalation exposure health effects testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...facility management to perform the duties relating to quality assurance of the studies. Raw data means any laboratory worksheets, records, memoranda, notes, or exact copies thereof, that are the result of original observations and activities...

2014-07-01

250

Identifying and Managing the Health and Safety Hazards of Nanomaterials in Laboratories  

E-print Network

Ventilation (LEV), and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) should be used to protect researchers in laboratories from the hazards of nanomaterials. Finally, in order to accomplish the objective, this paper focuses on both developing a control methods...

Kim, Jin Sek

2014-08-06

251

Argonne National Laboratory Internal Appraisal Program environment, safety, health/quality assurance oversight  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory`s Internal Appraisal Program has developed a quality assurance team member training program. This program has been developed to provide training to non-quality assurance professionals. Upon successful completion of this training and approval of the Internal Appraisal Program Manager, these personnel are considered qualified to assist in the conduct of quality assurance assessments. The training program has been incorporated into a self-paced, computerized, training session.

Winner, G.L.; Siegfried, Y.S.; Forst, S.P.; Meshenberg, M.J.

1995-06-01

252

40 CFR 79.60 - Good laboratory practices (GLP) standards for inhalation exposure health effects testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...health precautions designed to avoid contamination of test fuel and additive/base fuel mixtures, test and reference substances, and test systems. (v) Personnel engaged in a study shall wear clothing appropriate for the duties they...

2010-07-01

253

September 2013 Laboratory Safety Manual Section 5 Employee Health and PPE  

E-print Network

and Safety Page 5-1 Section 5 - Employee Health and PPE Contents A. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND MEDICAL. Possible Over-Exposure..................................................................5-3 4. Medical Protection...........................................5-5 2. Apparel

Wilcock, William

254

Health hazard evaluation report HETA 84-419-1697, USGS Laboratory, Doraville, Georgia. [Benzene, methylene chloride, hexane, and acetone  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory, Doraville, Georgia requested an evaluation of physical complaints reported by employees to determine possible work related causes. Laboratory workers, in general, complained of physical symptoms which were irritative (rash, sore throat, nose or sinus irritation), neurological (numbness, muscle weakness) and nonspecific (dizziness, headache, emotional swings, insomnia, muscle aching, fatigue). Reported exposure to solvents such as benzene, methylene chloride, hexane and acetone were positively related with light headedness or dizziness, numbness, unexplained muscle weakness and muscle aching. Air sampling did not reveal any remarkable exposure to chemical contaminants. The authors conclude that no relationship could be established between chemical exposures and antinuclear antibody positivity. Exposure to chemicals measured by air sampling were below occupational health exposure limits.

Rondinelli, R.; Wilcox, T.; Roper, P.; Salisbury

1986-05-01

255

Manual Laboratorio de Microbiologia. Documento de trabajo Programa de Educacion en Ocupaciones de Salud (Microbiology Laboratory Manual. Curriculum Document. Program of Education in Health Occupations).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This laboratory manual on microbiology begins with an introduction relating the study of microorganisms to health occupations education and stressing the importance of teaching critical thinking. The introduction is followed by general instructions for the use of the manual and an illustration of hand washing procedures. The 13 laboratory

Puerto Rico State Dept. of Education, Hato Rey. Area for Vocational and Technical Education.

256

Biomedical Science, Unit III: The Circulatory System in Health and Science. The Heart and Blood Vessels; Blood and Its Properties; The Urinary Tract. Laboratory Manual. Revised Version, 1976.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This laboratory manual presents activities for a unit of science within the Biomedical Interdisciplinary Curriculum Project (BICP), a two-year interdisciplinary precollege curriculum aimed at preparing high school students for entry into college and vocational programs leading to a career in the health field. These twenty-five laboratory

Biomedical Interdisciplinary Curriculum Project, Berkeley, CA.

257

Potential health hazards for students exposed to formaldehyde in the gross anatomy laboratory.  

PubMed

Formaldehyde, which has been a well-established preservative for cadavers in the anatomy laboratory for years, has an odor that many anatomy students find unpleasant. Anatomy faculty and students, embalmers in funeral homes, histopathology laboratory workers, and other biological researchers are continually exposed to the toxic vapors of formaldehyde. The immediate effects of that agent are nausea, headache, and ocular irritation that causes tear overflow and a burning sensation in the throat. Long-term exposure to formaldehyde can cause contact dermatitis, congenital defects, and cancer. This article discusses the adverse effects of continual exposure to formaldehyde and formalin and suggests various measures that can eliminate or minimize that danger to staff and students in gross anatomy laboratories. PMID:22329207

Raja, Dewan S; Sultana, Bahar

2012-01-01

258

Radiological emergency: Malaysian preparedness and response.  

PubMed

Planning and preparation in advance for radiological emergencies can help to minimise potential public health and environmental threats if and when an actual emergency occurs. During the planning process, emergency response organisations think through how they would respond to each type of incident and the resources that will be needed. In Malaysia, planning, preparation for and response to radiological emergencies involve many parties. In the event of a radiological emergency and if it is considered a disaster, the National Security Council, the Atomic Energy Licensing Board and the Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) will work together with other federal agencies, state and local governments, first responders and international organisations to monitor the situation, contain the release, and clean up the contaminated site. Throughout the response, these agencies use their protective action guidelines. This paper discusses Malaysian preparedness for, and response to, any potential radiological emergency. PMID:21729940

Yusof, Mohd Abd Wahab; Ali, Hamrah Mohd

2011-07-01

259

TRAINING REQUIREMENTS FOR MNI LABORATORY PERSONNEL (version February, 2014) Principal Investigators are responsible for ensuring good occupational health and safety practices in their  

E-print Network

without prior biosafety training or experience. Safe Use of Biological Safety Cabinets is required are responsible for ensuring good occupational health and safety practices in their laboratories, including ensuring all personnel receive the proper training according to McGill Environmental Health and Safety

Shoubridge, Eric

260

Work plan and health and safety plan for Building 3019B underground storage tank at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the Underground Storage Tank Program at the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, this Health and Safety Plan has been developed for removal of the 110-gal leaded fuel underground storage tank (UST) located in the Building 3019B area at ORNL This Health and Safety Plan was developed by the Measurement Applications

S. N. Burman; K. S. Brown; D. C. Landguth

1992-01-01

261

Work plan and health and safety plan for Building 3019B underground storage tank at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the Underground Storage Tank Program at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, this Health and Safety Plan has been developed for removal of the 110-gal leaded fuel underground storage tank (UST) located in the Building 3019B area at ORNL This Health and Safety Plan was developed by the Measurement Applications

S. N. Burman; K. S. Brown; D. C. Landguth

1992-01-01

262

E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division  

E-print Network

Report for 2002 (in compliance with 40 CFR 61, Subpart H) May 27, 2003 Site Name: Ernest Orlando Lawrence-4298 Site Information Operator: University of California Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National.3 SOURCE DESCRIPTION 1.1 SITE DESCRIPTION 1.1.1 Laboratory Operations The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley

263

E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division  

E-print Network

Report (Subpart H of 40 CFR 61) Calendar Year 2001 Site Name: Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National DESCRIPTION 1.1 SITE DESCRIPTION 1.1.1 Laboratory Operations The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National, was founded by the late Nobel laureate, Ernest Orlando Lawrence, in 1931. Berkeley Lab operates facilities

264

Visiting Companies, Institutions and Laboratories 1 3M Health Care St. Paul, MN  

E-print Network

Boston, MA 3 ABIOMED, Inc. Danvers, MA 4 Advanced Instruments, Inc. Norwood, MA 5 AltraBio Lyon, France 6, NH 33 DelSys, Inc. Boston, MA 34 DePuy Spine, Inc. Raynham, MA 35 Draeger Medical Systems, IncReDx, Inc. Burlington, MA 52 Instrumentation Laboratory Bedford, MA #12;Visiting Companies, Institutions

265

Visiting Companies, Institutions and Laboratories 3M Health Care St. Paul, MN  

E-print Network

Boston, MA ABIOMED, Inc. Danvers, MA Advanced Instruments, Inc. Norwood, MA Altran Solutions Corporation Manchester, NH DelSys, Inc. Boston, MA DePuy Spine, Inc. Raynham, MA DocBox, Inc. Cambridge, MA Draeger Instrumentation Laboratory Bedford, MA Integra LifeSciences Burlington, MA iWorx Systems, Inc. Dover, NH

Vajda, Sandor

266

DEVELOPMENT OF THE U.S. EPA HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY FROZEN BLOOD CELL REPOSITORY PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

In previous efforts, we suggested that proper blood cell freezing and storage is necessary in longitudinal studies with reduced between tests error, for specimen sharing between laboratories and for convenient scheduling of assays. e continue to develop and upgrade programs for o...

267

Using electronic health record data to develop inpatient mortality predictive model: Acute Laboratory Risk of Mortality Score (ALaRMS)  

PubMed Central

Objective Using numeric laboratory data and administrative data from hospital electronic health record (EHR) systems, to develop an inpatient mortality predictive model. Methods Using EHR data of 1?428?824 adult discharges from 70 hospitals in 2006–2007, we developed the Acute Laboratory Risk of Mortality Score (ALaRMS) using age, gender, and initial laboratory values on admission as candidate variables. We then added administrative variables using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)'s clinical classification software (CCS) and comorbidity software (CS) as disease classification tools. We validated the model using 770?523 discharges in 2008. Results Mortality predictors with ORs >2.00 included age, deranged albumin, arterial pH, bands, blood urea nitrogen, oxygen partial pressure, platelets, pro-brain natriuretic peptide, troponin I, and white blood cell counts. The ALaRMS model c-statistic was 0.87. Adding the CCS and CS variables increased the c-statistic to 0.91. The relative contributions were 69% (ALaRMS), 25% (CCS), and 6% (CS). Furthermore, the integrated discrimination improvement statistic demonstrated a 127% (95% CI 122% to 133%) overall improvement when ALaRMS was added to CCS and CS variables. In contrast, only a 22% (CI 19% to 25%) improvement was seen when CCS and CS variables were added to ALaRMS. Conclusions EHR data can generate clinically plausible mortality predictive models with excellent discrimination. ALaRMS uses automated laboratory data widely available on admission, providing opportunities to aid real-time decision support. Models that incorporate laboratory and AHRQ's CCS and CS variables have utility for risk adjustment in retrospective outcome studies. PMID:24097807

Tabak, Ying P; Sun, Xiaowu; Nunez, Carlos M; Johannes, Richard S

2014-01-01

268

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Nuclear Medicine (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Nuclear Medicine (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-NMRT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 have earned an AAS degree in Radiologic Technology (30-31 semester credits of Radiologic Technology

Sheridan, Scott

269

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Nuclear Medicine (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Nuclear Medicine (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-NMRT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 have earned an AAS degree in Radiologic Technology (31-32 semester credits of Radiologic Technology

Sheridan, Scott

270

States as Policy Laboratories: Emulating Success in the Children's Health Insurance Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article illustrates the use of the directed dyad-year event history analysis to study policy diffusion, with an application to policy changes in the Children's Health Insurance Program from 1998-2001. This analysis reveals strong evidence that states with successful policies are more likely to be emulated than are those with failing policies. Evidence of success is especially relevant for policy

Craig Volden

2006-01-01

271

Connecticut Public Health Code. 19a-36-A25. Laboratories to register  

E-print Network

examination, determination or test performed on any sample of milk, cream, frozen dessert, milk product; (5) those used to determine the sanitary quality of any substance used as a food, or as an ingredient of food or as a container for food, or to determine whether or not such substance may be harmful to health

Oliver, Douglas L.

272

Degradative Enzymes from the Pharmacy or Health Food Store: Interesting Examples for Introductory Biology Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Degradative enzymes in over-the-counter products from pharmacies and health food stores provide good examples of biological catalysis. These include [beta]-galactosidase in Lactaid[TM], [alpha]-galactosidase in Beano[R], [alpha]-amylase and proteases in digestive aids, and proteases in contact lens cleaners. These enzymes can be studied…

Deutch, Charles E.

2007-01-01

273

Induction for Radiology Patients  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper represents the implementation of an inductive learning algorithm for patients of Radiology Department in Hacettepe University hospitals to discover the relationship between patient demographics information and time that patients spend during a specific radiology exam. ILA has been used for the implementation which generates rules and the results are evaluated by evaluation metrics. According to generated rules, some patients in different age groups or birthplaces may spend more time for the same radiology exam than the others.

Y?ld?r?m, P?nar; Tolun, Mehmet R.

274

Radiology systems architecture.  

PubMed

This article focuses on the software requirements for enterprise integration in radiology. The needs of a future radiology systems architecture are examined, both at a concrete functional level and at an abstract system-properties level. A component-based approach to software development is described and is validated in the context of each of the abstract system requirements for future radiology computing environments. PMID:8657878

Deibel, S R; Greenes, R A

1996-05-01

275

American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Oral Radiology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oral radiology curricular guidelines developed by the American Association of Dental Schools are provided. The guidelines describe minimal conditions under which a satisfactory educational experience can be offered. Principles of x-radiation, radiobiological concepts, radiological health, radiographic technique, radiographic quality, and darkroom…

Journal of Dental Education, 1980

1980-01-01

276

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007 Environment Report RL 02/08 Customer: Sellafield Beach Occupancy, 2007 Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science Lowestoft Laboratory to Seamill 12 4.2.1 Beach description 12 4.2.2 Activities 13 4.3 Seamill Lane to Coulderton and Nethertown 15

277

Machine learning and radiology.  

PubMed

In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M

2012-07-01

278

American College of Radiology  

MedlinePLUS

... enhance practice competency and improve br... Learn more RADAR - Genitourinary The ACR Radiology Assessment and Review (RADAR™) Genitourinary leverages the best learning technolo... Learn more ...

279

Machine Learning and Radiology  

PubMed Central

In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

2012-01-01

280

Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT8-1  

E-print Network

Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT8-1 DRAFT Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) routinely evaluates site operations to ensure that the radiological dose impact or potentially contribute to radiological dose are reviewed for their environmental impacts. The potential

281

Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT8-1  

E-print Network

Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT8-1 Brookhaven National Laboratory routinely assesses its operations to ensure that any potential radiological dose to the public, BNL workers radiological dose to the public is calculated as the maximum dose to a hypothetical Maximally Exposed

Homes, Christopher C.

282

Fixation of Radiological Contamination; International Collaborative Development  

SciTech Connect

A cooperative international project was conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) to integrate a capture coating with a high performance atomizing process. The initial results were promising, and lead to further trials. The somewhat longer testing and optimization process has resulted in a product that could be demonstrated in the field to reduce airborne radiological dust and contamination.

Rick Demmer

2013-03-01

283

Accelerators in our past, present, and future: A challenge to radiological protection in the twenty-first century  

SciTech Connect

The foundations of many of the subdisciplines of radiological protection laid in accelerator laboratories began with the invention of accelerators. This paper suggests that the discipline of accelerator radiological protection has played and will continue play a more significant part in our lives than is generally recognized. A brief review of some existing uses of accelerators by society is given, and a few probable future uses are described. These future applications will result in the exposure of accelerator (or {open_quotes}mixed{close_quotes}) radiation fields to an increased population. Consequently, what are perceived to be the rather specialized concerns of today`s accelerator health physicists will -- by necessity -- become of general interest to all health physicists.

Thomas, R.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). School of Public Health

1993-09-01

284

DOE standard: Radiological control  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

Not Available

1999-07-01

285

Radiological control criteria for materials considered for recycle and reuse  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting technical analyses to support the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Guidance, Air, Water, and Radiation Division (DOE/EH-232) in developing radiological control criteria for recycling or reuse of metals or equipment containing residual radioactive contamination from DOE operations. The criteria, framed as acceptable concentrations for release of materials for recycling or reuse, are risk-based and were developed through analysis of generic radiation exposure scenarios and pathways. The analysis includes evaluation of relevant radionuclides, potential mechanisms of exposure, and non-health-related impacts of residual radioactivity on electronics and film. The analysis considers 42 key radionuclides that DOE operations are known to generate and that may be contained in recycled or reused metals or equipment. Preliminary results are compared with similar results reported by the International Atomic Energy Agency, by radionuclide grouping.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Hill, R.L.; Aaberg, R.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Wallo, A. III [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Environmental Guidance

1994-11-01

286

Radiological Dispersion Devices: are we prepared?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Already before the events of September 11th 2001 concern was raised about the spread of orphan sources and their potential use in Radiological Dispersion Devices by terrorist groups. Although most of the simulated scenarios foresee a rather limited direct health impact on the population, the affected region would suffer from the indirect consequences such as social disruption, cleanup requirements and

Alain Sohier; Frank Hardeman

2006-01-01

287

Training Program 504 Radiologic Technology Training Program  

E-print Network

as a whole. Basic principles of radiation protection are introduced. The ethical and legal responsibilities-ray interactions, radioactivity, production of radionuclides, and health physics. #12;506 Radiologic Technology-detecting systems; description of different types of films, screens, darkroom design, computed and digital

Shihadeh, Alan

288

Dynamic active telepathology over National Health Laboratory service network, South Africa: feasibility study using Nikon Coolscope  

PubMed Central

Telepathology recently entered a new era with the introduction of digital microscopes combined with Internet technology. The microscope allows viewing real time of whole slide (macro) as well as different chosen fields in four different magnifications. Three Nikon Coolscope were installed in NHLS laboratories in Mthatha, East London and Port Elizabeth. All these microscopes are connected to NHLS server allowing real time viewing of the full slide at any time of the day using Internet browser. Viewing is possible from any PC connected to NHLS Intranet. The challenge was to be able to view slides from other than NHLS computers due to NHLS IT Department network security measures. This was solved by installing NHLS Virtual Private Network server. About 60 cases were viewed by pathologists in Cape Town (Stellenbosh University) and Pretoria (MEDUNSA). All users assessed the system as a helpful tool allowing easy access to cases needing consultation or second opinion. The quality of images was very good. Our experience with Nikon Coolscope is positive. It is an excellent tool for remote small histopathology departments lacking specialists in such areas as dermatopathology, oncology, and haematopathology. Further studies are needed especially in the scope of full utilization of the microscopes installed and impact on laboratory services. PMID:18673517

Banach, Lech; Stepien, Andrzej; Schneider, Johann; Wichrzycka-Lancaster, Elizabeth

2008-01-01

289

Pioneer Gastroenterological Radiology Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the middle third of the 20th century, Mount Sinai radiologists were able to describe and establish specific radiologic criteria for the diagnosis of many gastrointestinal diseases. They then delineated specific radiologic patterns to diagnose such diverse conditions as inflammatory bowel disease of the small bowel and colon, protein-losing disorders, vascular disease of the small bowel, benign and malignant tumors,

DANIEL MAKLANSKY

290

Radiological Defense. Textbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This textbook has been prepared under the direction of the Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DCPA) Staff College for use as a student reference manual in radiological defense (RADEF) courses. It provides much of the basic technical information necessary for a proper understanding of radiological defense and summarizes RADEF planning and expected…

Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

291

Making filmless radiology work  

Microsoft Academic Search

ESPITE 2 DECADES of optimistic and confident predictions that filmless radiology was imminent, the centennial commemoration of Wilhelm Roentgen's discovery of the x-ray will come and go this year with only a small number of radiology departments interpreting more than a small fraction of imaging studies using a computer workstation. The reasons for this undoubtedly representa combination of economic constraints,

Eliot L. Siegel; John N. Diaconis; Stephen Pomerantz; Robert Allman; Brian Briscoe

1995-01-01

292

Guidance for use of Radiology Devices and Radioactive Materials in Research Protocols  

E-print Network

Guidance for use of Radiology Devices and Radioactive Materials in Research Protocols Definition of the Society of Nuclear Medicine, or the stem set forth by the International Commission on Radiological a radiological hazards evaluation of the proposal, including potential for radiation dose to other health care

Puglisi, Joseph

293

2014 Radiologic Sciences Program Admission Application Bachelor of Science, Diagnostic Radiography  

E-print Network

2014 Radiologic Sciences Program Admission Application Bachelor of Science, Diagnostic Radiography-Mail: _______________________________________________________________________ PLEASE NOTE: It is the APPLICANT'S responsibility to keep the Radiologic Sciences Department informed/Volunteer History: Dates Employer Position/Responsibilities Department of Radiologic Sciences Health Sciences

Barrash, Warren

294

Radiological health review of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volumes 1 and 2. DOE/EIS-0026  

SciTech Connect

Purpose of the Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) is to conduct an independent technical evaluation of the potential radiation exposure to people from the proposed Federal radioactive Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, in order to protect the public health and safety and ensure that there is minimal environmental degradation. Analyses are conducted of reports issued by the US DOE and its contractors, other Federal agencies and other organizations, as they relate to the potential health, safety and environmental impacts from WIPP.

Not Available

1981-01-01

295

Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report is a health risk assessment that addresses continuous releases of tritium to the environment from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The NTLF contributes approximately 95% of all tritium releases from LBL. Transport and transformation models were used to determine the movement of tritium releases from the NRLF to the air, surface water, soils, and plants and to determine the subsequent doses to humans. These models were calibrated against environmental measurements of tritium levels in the vicinity of the NTLF and in the surrounding community. Risk levels were determined for human populations in each of these zones. Risk levels to both individuals and populations were calculated. In this report population risks and individual risks were calculated for three types of diseases--cancer, heritable genetic effects, and developmental and reproductive effects.

McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P.

1994-12-01

296

LIS–lnterlink—connecting laboratory information systems to remote primary health–care centres via the Internet  

PubMed Central

A pilot study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of using the Internet to securely deliver patient laboratory results, and the system has subsequently gone into routine use in Poland. The system went from design to pilot and then to live implementation within a four-month period, resulting in the LIS-Interlink software product. Test results are retrieved at regular intervals from the BioLinkTM LIS (Laboratory Information System), encrypted and transferred to a secure area on the Web server. The primary health-care centres dial into the Internet using a local-cell service provided by Polish Telecom (TP), obtain a TCP/IP address using the TP DHCP server, and perform HTTP ‘get’ and ‘post’ operations to obtain the files by secure handshaking. The data are then automatically inserted into a local SQL database (with optional printing of incoming reports)for cumulative reporting and searching functions. The local database is fully multi-user and can be accessed from different clinics within the centres by a variety of networking protocols. PMID:18924820

Clark, Barry; Wachowiak, Bartosz; Crawford, Ewan W.; Jakubowski, Zenon; Kabata, Janusz

1998-01-01

297

LIS-lnterlink-connecting laboratory information systems to remote primary health-care centres via the Internet.  

PubMed

A pilot study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of using the Internet to securely deliver patient laboratory results, and the system has subsequently gone into routine use in Poland. The system went from design to pilot and then to live implementation within a four-month period, resulting in the LIS-Interlink software product. Test results are retrieved at regular intervals from the BioLink(TM) LIS (Laboratory Information System), encrypted and transferred to a secure area on the Web server. The primary health-care centres dial into the Internet using a local-cell service provided by Polish Telecom (TP), obtain a TCP/IP address using the TP DHCP server, and perform HTTP 'get' and 'post' operations to obtain the files by secure handshaking. The data are then automatically inserted into a local SQL database (with optional printing of incoming reports)for cumulative reporting and searching functions. The local database is fully multi-user and can be accessed from different clinics within the centres by a variety of networking protocols. PMID:18924820

Clark, B; Wachowiak, B; Crawford, E W; Jakubowski, Z; Kabata, J

1998-01-01

298

Comparison of the radiological and chemical toxicity of lead  

SciTech Connect

This report estimates the worst-case radiological dose to an individual from ingested lead containing picocurie levels of radionuclides and then compares the calculated radiological health effects to the chemical toxic effects from that same lead. This comparison provides an estimate of the consequences of inadvertently recycling, in the commercial market, lead containing nominally undetectable concentrations of radionuclides. Quantitative expressions for the radiological and chemical toxicities of lead are based on concentrations of lead in the blood stream. The result shows that the chemical toxicity of lead is a greater health hazard, by orders of magnitude, than any probable companion radiation dose.

Beitel, G.A.; Mott, S.

1995-03-01

299

Bachelor of Science, Radiologic Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology Emphasis, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date  

E-print Network

Bachelor of Science, Radiologic Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology Emphasis, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date RADSCI 375 Radiologic Sciences Clinical Experience RADSCI 376 Radiologic Sciences Clinical Experience RADSCI 385 Radiologic Sciences Clinical Experience RADSCI 392 Radiologic Colloquium RADSCI 405 & RADSCI

Barrash, Warren

300

US DOE Radiological Assistance Program: personnel, equipment and resources  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is intended to provide emergency advice and assistance in the event of radiological incidents. Each of DOE's eight Regional Coordinating Offices in the US provide a 24-hour reporting and response capability. Specifically, the Brookhaven Area Office (BHO) is responsible for DOE's Region I, which includes the 11 northeastern states of the US. Although an inventory of dedicated equipment is assigned to BHO-RAP, it draws upon the resources of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for trained personnel in health physics and for other specialized personnel in both the day to day operation of the program and in the on-the-scene response to an incident. The organization of the BHO-RAP program and its response procedures are described in detail. An inventory and brief description of the contents of a variety of emergency equipment kits and of additional state-of-the-art instruments is included. The BHO-RAP guidelines and requirements for field operations are also indicated, as are other DOE resources upon which it can draw.

Hull, A.P.; Kuehner, A.V.; Phillips, L.F.

1982-01-01

301

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Computed Tomography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Computed Tomography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-CTRT] Regional College Catalog Year Hours] Note: Students must have earned an AAS degree in Radiologic Technology (42 semester credits

Sheridan, Scott

302

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Radiation Therapy (with AAS Radiologic Technology)  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Radiation Therapy (with AAS Radiologic Technology) ­ Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-RTAA] Regional College Catalog Year Hours] Note: Students must have earned an AAS degree in Radiologic Technology (36 semester credits from

Sheridan, Scott

303

Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Safety and Health (S H) Subteam assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site. Four Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) Teams were assembled for this purpose by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety and Quality Assurance, Office of Safety Appraisals (OSA). Team No. 1 reviewed EG G Idaho, Inc. (EG G Idaho) and the Department of Energy Field Office, Idaho (ID) Fire Department. Team No. 2 reviewed Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). Team No. 3 reviewed selected contractors at the INEL; specifically, Morrison Knudsen-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC), Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI), Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL), and Rockwell-INEL. Team No. 4 provided an Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)-type compliance sitewide assessment of INEL. The S H Subteam assessment was performed concurrently with assessments conducted by Environmental and Management Subteams. Performance was appraised in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Medical Services, and Firearms Safety.

Not Available

1991-08-01

304

3.3 Diagnostic Radiology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '3.3 Diagnostic Radiology' of the Chapter '3 Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy' with the contents:

Kramer, H.-M.; Moores, B. M.; Stieve, F.-E.

305

Interventional Radiology of Male Varicocele: Current Status  

SciTech Connect

Varicocele is a fairly common condition in male individuals. Although a minor disease, it may cause infertility and testicular pain. Consequently, it has high health and social impact. Here we review the current status of interventional radiology of male varicocele. We describe the radiological anatomy of gonadal veins and the clinical aspects of male varicocele, particularly the physical examination, which includes a new clinical and ultrasound Doppler maneuver. The surgical and radiological treatment options are also described with the focus on retrograde and antegrade sclerotherapy, together with our long experience with these procedures. Last, we compare the outcomes, recurrence and persistence rates, complications, procedure time and cost-effectiveness of each method. It clearly emerges from this analysis that there is a need for randomized multicentre trials designed to compare the various surgical and percutaneous techniques, all of which are aimed at occlusion of the anterior pampiniform plexus.

Iaccarino, Vittorio, E-mail: vittorio.iaccarino@unina.it; Venetucci, Pietro [University of Naples 'Federico II', Diagnostic Imaging Department-Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, School of Medicine (Italy)

2012-12-15

306

Yale School of Medicine: Diagnostic Radiology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Like many health-care related fields, the area of diagnostic radiology is growing rapidly, and a number of educational institutions and professional organizations have been working on creating online resources to help those entering the field. The Department of Diagnostic Radiology at Yale University has created this resource, which functions as a thorough listing of web-based materials. Upon arriving at the site, visitors can scroll through a list of thematic materials, including radiology sites, departmental resources, and teaching file and image sites. Educators working in the field will find the teaching file sites particularly useful, as they include links to materials that can be used in the classroom. Additionally, educators may want to give this site to their students, as they can also make good use of it.

307

Yale School of Medicine: Diagnostic Radiology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Like many health-care related fields, the area of diagnostic radiology is growing rapidly, and a number of educational institutions and professional organizations have been working on creating online resources to help those entering the field. The Department of Diagnostic Radiology at Yale University has created this resource, which functions as a thorough listing of web-based materials. Upon arriving at the site, visitors can scroll through a list of thematic materials, including radiology sites, departmental resources, and teaching file and image sites. Educators working in the field will find the teaching file sites particularly useful, as they include links to materials that can be used in the classroom. Additionally, educators may want to give this site to their students, as they can also make good use of it.

2006-12-19

308

Society of Interventional Radiology  

Cancer.gov

March 15, 2008 12:00 AM - March 20, 2008 12:00 AM Washington Convention Center Washington, DC + Add to Outlook Calendar 33rd Annual Meeting Print This Page Society of Interventional Radiology News & Events

309

Interventional Radiology in Oncology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since its development as a sub-speciality within radiology, Interventional Radiology (IR) has played an increasingly important\\u000a role in caring for the patient with cancer. This role begins with initial diagnosis of cancer and involvement now extends\\u000a into minimally invasive treatment of malignancy alone or in combination with other treatment modalities. IR has established\\u000a a very important role in the management

O. J. O'Connor; J. M. Buckley; M. M. Maher

310

Radiological Findings in FXTAS  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In this chapter we review the radiological and structural brain findings associated with fragile X-associated tremor\\/ataxia\\u000a syndrome (FXTAS). We will review what is currently known about radiological signs of the disorder including both white matter\\u000a lesions and mild to severe cortical loss. We will also review brain–molecular relationships in FXTAS including associations\\u000a that have been observed between cortical and white

Susan M. Rivera; Glenn T. Stebbins; Jim Grigsby

311

Basic bone radiology  

SciTech Connect

This clinical book surveys the skeletal system as seen through radiological imaging. It emphasizing abnormalities, disease, and trauma, and includes vital information on bones, bone growth, and the cells involved in bone pathology. It covers many bone diseases and injuries which are rarely covered in medical texts, as well as descriptions of radiologic procedures that specifically relate to the skeleton. This edition includes many illustrations, information on MR imaging and CT scanning, and discussions of osteoporosis, dysplasias, and metabolic bone disease.

Griffiths, H.J.

1987-01-01

312

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1980 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental assessment, control, health and safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) 1980 annual report to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment describes research in environment, health, and safety conducted during fiscal year 1980. Part 5 includes technology assessments for natural gas, enhanced oil recovery, oil shale, uranium mining, magnetic fusion energy, solar energy, uranium enrichment and industrial energy utilization; regional analysis studies of environmental transport and community

R. W. Baalman; I. D. Hays

1981-01-01

313

Comprehensive work plan and health and safety plan for the 7500 Area Contamination Site sampling at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the Environmental Restoration Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, this plan has been developed for the environmental sampling efforts at the 7500 Area Contamination Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group (MAD) of the Health

S. N. Burman; D. C. Landguth; M. S. Uziel; T. L. Hatmaker; P. F. Tiner

1992-01-01

314

Environmental health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to

S. N. Burman; P. F. Tiner; R. C. Gosslee

1998-01-01

315

Comprehensive work plan and health and safety plan for the 7500 Area Contamination Site sampling at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the Environmental Restoration Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, this plan has been developed for the environmental sampling efforts at the 7500 Area Contamination Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group (MAD) of the Health

S. N. Burman; D. C. Landguth; M. S. Uziel; T. L. Hatmaker; P. F. Tiner

1992-01-01

316

Research and Innovation in Health and Related  

E-print Network

that are in high demand from students, such as travel, nutrition, women's health, and sexual health. Services and radiology services · STI and HIV testing · Transgender health care · Women's health care (pelvic exams

Sun, Yu

317

A TWO-STAGE MODEL OF RADIOLOGICAL INSPECTION: SPENDING TIME  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes a model that visually portrays radiological survey performance as basic parameters (surveyor efficiency and criteria, duration of pause, and probe speed) are varied; field and laboratory tests provided typical parameter values. The model is used to illustrate how practical constraints on the time allotted to the task can affect radiological inspection performance. Similar analyses are applicable to a variety of other tasks (airport baggage inspection, and certain types of non-destructive testing) with similar characteristics and constraints.

BROWN,W.S.

2000-07-30

318

Radiological Dispersion Devices and Basic Radiation Science  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Introductory physics courses present the basic concepts of radioactivity and an overview of nuclear physics that emphasizes the basic decay relationship and the various types of emitted radiation. Although this presentation provides insight into radiological science, it often fails to interest students to explore these concepts in a more rigorous manner. One reason for limited student interest is the failure to link the discussion to topics of current interest. The author has found that presenting this material with a link to radiological dispersion devices (RDDs), or dirty bombs, and their associated health effects provides added motivation for students. The events of Sept. 11, 2001, and periodic media focus on RDDs heighten student interest from both a scientific curiosity as well as a personal protection perspective. This article presents a framework for a more interesting discussion of the basics of radiation science and their associated health effects. The presentation can be integrated with existing radioactivity lectures or added as a supplementary or enrichment activity.

Bevelacqua, Joseph John

2010-05-01

319

Radiological impacts of phosphogypsum.  

PubMed

This study was carried out to assess the radiological impact of Syrian phosphogypsum (PG) piles in the compartments of the surrounding ecosystem. Estimating the distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides (i.e. (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb) in the raw materials, product and by-product of the Syrian phosphate fertilizer industry was essential. The data revealed that the concentrations of the radionuclides were enhanced in the treated phosphate ore. In PG, (226)Ra content had a mean activity of 318 Bq kg(-1). The uranium content in PG was low, ca. 33 Bq kg(-1), because uranium remained in the phosphoric acid produced. Over 80% of (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb present partitioned in PG. The presence of PG piles did not increase significantly the concentration of (222)Rn or gamma rays exposure dose in the area studied. The annual effective dose was only 0.082 mSv y(-1). The geometric mean of total suspended air particulates (TSP) ca. 85 ?g m(-3). The activity concentration of the radionuclides in filtrates and runoff waters were below the detection limits (ca. 0.15 mBq L(-1) for (238)U, 0.1 mBq L(-1) for (232)Th and 0.18 mBq L(-1) for both of (210)Po and (210)Pb); the concentration of the radionuclides in ground water samples and Qattina Lake were less than the permissible limits set for drinking water by the World Health Organisation, WHO, (10, 1 and 0.1 Bq L(-1) for (238)U, (232)Th and both of (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively). Eastern sites soil samples of PG piles recorded the highest activity concentrations, i.e. 26, 33, 28, 61 and 40 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively, due to the prevailing western and north-western wind in the area, but remained within the natural levels reported in Syrian soil (13-32 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, 24.9-62.2 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U and 10-32 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th). The impact of PG piles on plants varied upon the plant species. Higher concentrations of the radionuclides were recorded for grass in comparison to broad-leaved plants. Among the species that grow naturally on PG piles, Inula, Ecballium and Polygonium may be radionuclides accumulators. A determined effort is needed at a national level to achieve a common and coherent approach to regulate PG piles or to consider it a resource material rather than waste or residue. PMID:21530064

Al Attar, Lina; Al-Oudat, Mohammad; Kanakri, Salwa; Budeir, Youssef; Khalily, Hussam; Al Hamwi, Ahmad

2011-09-01

320

The WHO/PEPFAR collaboration to prepare an operations manual for HIV prevention, care, and treatment at primary health centers in high-prevalence, resource-constrained settings: defining laboratory services.  

PubMed

The expansion of HIV/AIDS care and treatment in resource-constrained countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, has generally developed in a top-down manner. Further expansion will involve primary health centers where human and other resources are limited. This article describes the World Health Organization/President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief collaboration formed to help scale up HIV services in primary health centers in high-prevalence, resource-constrained settings. It reviews the contents of the Operations Manual developed, with emphasis on the Laboratory Services chapter, which discusses essential laboratory services, both at the center and the district hospital level, laboratory safety, laboratory testing, specimen transport, how to set up a laboratory, human resources, equipment maintenance, training materials, and references. The chapter provides specific information on essential tests and generic job aids for them. It also includes annexes containing a list of laboratory supplies for the health center and sample forms. PMID:19461098

Spira, Thomas; Lindegren, Mary Lou; Ferris, Robert; Habiyambere, Vincent; Ellerbrock, Tedd

2009-06-01

321

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences-Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology)  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences- Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-HATS] Regional in radiologic technology; successfully completed the certification exam for the American Registry of Radiologic

Sheridan, Scott

322

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-MRHA] Regional in radiologic technology; successfully completed the certification exam for the American Registry of Radiologic

Sheridan, Scott

323

Bachelor of Science, Radiologic Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology Emphasis, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date  

E-print Network

Bachelor of Science, Radiologic Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology Emphasis, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date Medical and Surgical Diseases RADSCI 370 Junior Recitation and Integration RADSCI 375 Radiologic Sciences Clinical Experience RADSCI 376 Radiologic Sciences Clinical Experience RADSCI 385 Radiologic Sciences

Barrash, Warren

324

Westinghouse radiological containment guide  

SciTech Connect

This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste.

Aitken, S.B. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Brown, R.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Wilcox, D.P. [West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., West Valley, NY (United States)

1994-03-01

325

Radiological worker training  

SciTech Connect

This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

NONE

1998-10-01

326

Estimating Implementation and Operational Costs of an Integrated Tiered CD4 Service including Laboratory and Point of Care Testing in a Remote Health District in South Africa  

PubMed Central

Background An integrated tiered service delivery model (ITSDM) has been proposed to provide ‘full-coverage’ of CD4 services throughout South Africa. Five tiers are described, defined by testing volumes and number of referring health-facilities. These include: (1) Tier-1/decentralized point-of-care service (POC) in a single site; Tier-2/POC-hub servicing processing <30–40 samples from 8–10 health-clinics; Tier-3/Community laboratories servicing ?50 health-clinics, processing <150 samples/day; high-volume centralized laboratories (Tier-4 and Tier-5) processing <300 or >600 samples/day and serving >100 or >200 health-clinics, respectively. The objective of this study was to establish costs of existing and ITSDM-tiers 1, 2 and 3 in a remote, under-serviced district in South Africa. Methods Historical health-facility workload volumes from the Pixley-ka-Seme district, and the total volumes of CD4 tests performed by the adjacent district referral CD4 laboratories, linked to locations of all referring clinics and related laboratory-to-result turn-around time (LTR-TAT) data, were extracted from the NHLS Corporate-Data-Warehouse for the period April-2012 to March-2013. Tiers were costed separately (as a cost-per-result) including equipment, staffing, reagents and test consumable costs. A one-way sensitivity analyses provided for changes in reagent price, test volumes and personnel time. Results The lowest cost-per-result was noted for the existing laboratory-based Tiers- 4 and 5 ($6.24 and $5.37 respectively), but with related increased LTR-TAT of >24–48 hours. Full service coverage with TAT <6-hours could be achieved with placement of twenty-seven Tier-1/POC or eight Tier-2/POC-hubs, at a cost-per-result of $32.32 and $15.88 respectively. A single district Tier-3 laboratory also ensured ‘full service coverage’ and <24 hour LTR-TAT for the district at $7.42 per-test. Conclusion Implementing a single Tier-3/community laboratory to extend and improve delivery of services in Pixley-ka-Seme, with an estimated local ?12–24-hour LTR-TAT, is ?$2 more than existing referred services per-test, but 2–4 fold cheaper than implementing eight Tier-2/POC-hubs or providing twenty-seven Tier-1/POCT CD4 services. PMID:25517412

Cassim, Naseem; Coetzee, Lindi M.; Schnippel, Kathryn; Glencross, Deborah K.

2014-01-01

327

Ames Laboratory annual site environmental report, calendar year 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 1996. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring programs. Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies twelve buildings owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Laboratory also leases space in ISU owned buildings. Laboratory activities involve less than ten percent of the total chemical use and approximately one percent of the radioisotope use on the ISU campus. In 1996, the Office of Assurance and Assessment merged with the Environment, Safety and Health Group forming the Environment, Safety, Health and Assurance (ESH and A) office. In 1996, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of wastes under US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. Ames Laboratory submitted a Proposed Site Treatment Plan to EPA in December 1995. This plan complied with the Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA). It was approved by EPA in January 1996. The consent agreement/consent order was issued in February 1996. Pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs, implemented in 1990 and updated in 1994, continued through 1996. Included in these efforts were a waste white paper and green computer paper recycling program. Ames Laboratory also continued to recycle salvageable metal and used oil, and it recovered freon for recycling. All of the chemical and nearly all of the radiological legacy wastes were properly disposed by the end of 1996. Additional radiological legacy waste will be properly disposed during 1997.

NONE

1998-04-01

328

Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health: Part 5, Nuclear and operational safety  

SciTech Connect

Part 5 of the 1986 Annual Report to the Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Nuclear Safety, the Office of Operational Safety, and for the Office of Environmental Analysis. For each project, as identified by the Field Task Proposal/Agreement, articles describe progress made during fiscal year 1986. Authors of these articles represent a broad spectrum of capabilities derived from three of the seven research departments of the Laboratory, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the work.

Faust, L.G.; Kennedy, W.E.; Steelman, B.L.; Selby, J.M.

1987-02-01

329

Remote Sensing Laboratory - RSL  

SciTech Connect

One of the primary resources supporting homeland security is the Remote Sensing Laboratory, or RSL. The Laboratory creates advanced technologies for emergency response operations, radiological incident response, and other remote sensing activities. RSL emergency response teams are on call 24-hours a day, and maintain the capability to deploy domestically and internationally in response to threats involving the loss, theft, or release of nuclear or radioactive material. Such incidents might include Nuclear Power Plant accidents, terrorist incidents involving nuclear or radiological materials, NASA launches, and transportation accidents involving nuclear materials. Working with the US Department of Homeland Security, RSL personnel equip, maintain, and conduct training on the mobile detection deployment unit, to provide nuclear radiological security at major national events such as the super bowl, the Indianapolis 500, New Year's Eve celebrations, presidential inaugurations, international meetings and conferences, just about any event where large numbers of people will gather.

None

2014-11-06

330

Remote Sensing Laboratory - RSL  

ScienceCinema

One of the primary resources supporting homeland security is the Remote Sensing Laboratory, or RSL. The Laboratory creates advanced technologies for emergency response operations, radiological incident response, and other remote sensing activities. RSL emergency response teams are on call 24-hours a day, and maintain the capability to deploy domestically and internationally in response to threats involving the loss, theft, or release of nuclear or radioactive material. Such incidents might include Nuclear Power Plant accidents, terrorist incidents involving nuclear or radiological materials, NASA launches, and transportation accidents involving nuclear materials. Working with the US Department of Homeland Security, RSL personnel equip, maintain, and conduct training on the mobile detection deployment unit, to provide nuclear radiological security at major national events such as the super bowl, the Indianapolis 500, New Year's Eve celebrations, presidential inaugurations, international meetings and conferences, just about any event where large numbers of people will gather.

None

2015-01-09

331

Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation of the liquid low-level waste tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be used during the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) RI/FS project to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. The ES&H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Energy Systems to direct and control implementation of the project ES&H program. This report describes the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES&H program to individual task remedial investigations, project facilities, and other major tasks assigned to the project.

Not Available

1991-09-01

332

Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation of the liquid low-level waste tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be used during the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) RI/FS project to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. The ES H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Energy Systems to direct and control implementation of the project ES H program. This report describes the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES H program to individual task remedial investigations, project facilities, and other major tasks assigned to the project.

Not Available

1991-09-01

333

Work plan and health and safety plan for Building 3019B underground storage tank at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Underground Storage Tank Program at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, this Health and Safety Plan has been developed for removal of the 110-gal leaded fuel underground storage tank (UST) located in the Building 3019B area at ORNL This Health and Safety Plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at ORNL The major components of the plan follow: (1) A project description that gives the scope and objectives of the 110-gal tank removal project and assigns responsibilities, in addition to providing emergency information for situations occurring during field operations; (2) a health and safety plan in Sect. 15 for the Building 3019B UST activities, which describes general site hazards and particular hazards associated with specific tasks, personnel protection requirements and mandatory safety procedures; and (3) discussion of the proper form completion and reporting requirements during removal of the UST. This document addresses Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements in 29 CFR 1910.120 with respect to all aspects of health and safety involved in a UST removal. In addition, the plan follows the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) QAMS 005/80 (1980) format with the inclusion of the health and safety section (Sect. 15).

Burman, S.N.; Brown, K.S.; Landguth, D.C.

1992-08-01

334

Work plan and health and safety plan for Building 3019B underground storage tank at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Underground Storage Tank Program at the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, this Health and Safety Plan has been developed for removal of the 110-gal leaded fuel underground storage tank (UST) located in the Building 3019B area at ORNL This Health and Safety Plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at ORNL The major components of the plan follow: (1) A project description that gives the scope and objectives of the 110-gal tank removal project and assigns responsibilities, in addition to providing emergency information for situations occurring during field operations; (2) a health and safety plan in Sect. 15 for the Building 3019B UST activities, which describes general site hazards and particular hazards associated with specific tasks, personnel protection requirements and mandatory safety procedures; and (3) discussion of the proper form completion and reporting requirements during removal of the UST. This document addresses Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements in 29 CFR 1910.120 with respect to all aspects of health and safety involved in a UST removal. In addition, the plan follows the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) QAMS 005/80 (1980) format with the inclusion of the health and safety section (Sect. 15).

Burman, S.N.; Brown, K.S.; Landguth, D.C.

1992-08-01

335

Practical interventional radiology  

SciTech Connect

This book describes techniques employed in interventional radiology with emphasis on imaging leading to intervention. Includes the entire array of procedures available to the radiologist, discussing the indications, materials, technique, results, and complications for each. Covers the chest, abdomen, bone, pediatric considerations, and nursing care.

Von Sonnenberg, E.; Mueller, P.R.

1988-01-01

336

Radiological Defense Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Originally prepared for use as a student textbook in Radiological Defense (RADEF) courses, this manual provides the basic technical information necessary for an understanding of RADEF. It also briefly discusses the need for RADEF planning and expected postattack emergency operations. There are 14 chapters covering these major topics: introduction…

Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

337

Radiological Safety Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Written to be used concurrently with the U.S. Army's Radiological Safety Course, this publication discusses the causes, sources, and detection of nuclear radiation. In addition, the transportation and disposal of radioactive materials are covered. The report also deals with the safety precautions to be observed when working with lasers, microwave…

Army Ordnance Center and School, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.

338

Research Training in Radiology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Radiology today is a major clinical specialty of medicine in terms of the number and complexity of patient examinations, and the financial resources, physician manpower, and supporting personnel required for performing its functions. It reached its present status because it provides accurate methods of diagnosis for so many diseases. However, this…

National Inst. of General Medical Sciences (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

339

Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2009  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2009 2010 Environment Report RL 03/10 Cefas contract report C Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2009 C.J. Garrod, F.J. Clyne, J. Elliott and J.R. Tipple Peer reviewed by G, C. J., Clyne, F. C., Elliott, J., and Tipple, J.R., 2010. Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2009

340

Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2013  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2013 2014 Environment Report RL 03/14 Cefas contract report C6028 #12;This page has been intentionally left blank #12;Cefas Document Control Radiological Habits blank #12;Environment Report RL 03/14 Final report Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2013 C.J. Garrod

341

Radiological Habits Survey: Amersham, 2009  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Amersham, 2009 2010 Environment Report RL 04/10 Cefas contract report C Radiological Habits Survey: Amersham, 2009 F.J. Clyne, C.J. Garrod and J. Elliott Peer reviewed by G.J. Hunt.C., Garrod, C.J. and Elliott, J., 2010. Radiological Habits Survey: Amersham, 2009. RL 04/10. Cefas

342

Radiological Habits Survey: Devonport, 2011  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Devonport, 2011 2012 Environment Report RL 01/12 Cefas contract report Radiological Habits Survey: Devonport, 2011 F.J. Clyne, C.J. Garrod, V.E. Ly and P. Rumney Peer reviewed by G.J., Garrod, C.J., Ly, V.E. and Rumney, P., 2012. Radiological Habits Survey: Devonport, 2011. RL 01/12. Cefas

343

Radiological Habits Survey: Dungeness, 2010  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Dungeness, 2010 2011 Environment Report RL 11/11 Cefas contract report Radiological Habits Survey: Dungeness, 2010 F.J. Clyne, C.J. Garrod, V.E. Ly, P. Rumney and J. Elliott Peer: Clyne, F.C., Garrod, C.J., Ly, V.E., Rumney, P., and Elliott, J., 2011. Radiological Habits Survey

344

Radiological Habits Survey: Heysham, 2011  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Heysham, 2011 2012 Environment Report RL 02/12 Cefas contract report C Radiological Habits Survey: Heysham, 2011 C.J. Garrod, F.J. Clyne, V.E. Ly and P. Rumney Peer reviewed by G, C.J., Clyne, F.J., Ly, V.E. and Rumney, P., 2012. Radiological Habits Survey: Heysham, 2011. RL 02

345

Radiological Habits Survey: Derby, 2009  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Derby, 2009 2010 Environment Report RL 05/10 Cefas contract report C Radiological Habits Survey: Derby, 2009 J. Elliott, F.J. Clyne and C.J. Garrod Peer reviewed by G.J. Hunt., Clyne, F.C. and Garrod, C.J., 2010. Radiological Habits Survey: Derby, 2009. RL 05/10. Cefas, Lowestoft

346

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield, 2013  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield, 2013 2014 Environment Report RL 02/14 Cefas contract report C6028 #12;This page has been intentionally left blank #12; Cefas Document Control Radiological #12;This page has been intentionally left blank #12;Environment Report RL 02/14 Radiological Habits

347

Radiological Habits Survey: Sizewell, 2010  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Sizewell, 2010 2011 Environment Report RL 12/11 Cefas contract report C Radiological Habits Survey: Sizewell, 2010 C.J. Garrod, F.J. Clyne, P. Rumney, J. Elliott, C.A. Smedley and V, J., Smedley, C., and Ly, V.E., 2011. Radiological Habits Survey: Sizewell, 2010. RL 12/11. Cefas

348

Spatial distribution of free-of-charge pathology submissions to the California Animal Health and Food Safety laboratories during the exotic Newcastle outbreak in 2002-2003.  

PubMed

After the 1971-1973 outbreak of exotic Newcastle disease (END) in California, a free-of-charge diagnostic submission program was created for backyard poultry flocks. This program was implemented to improve disease surveillance in small poultry flocks. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial distribution of free-of-charge pathology submissions to the California Animal Health and Food Safety laboratories during the END outbreak in 2002-2003. Cases and controls were selected from within a 100-mile (161-km) radius of each of three laboratories, and their geographic distributions were evaluated. Global clustering of cases was significant around all three laboratories, with mixed results at the local clustering level and the only significant clustering at the focal level around the Davis laboratory with an observed to expected ratio of approximately 5. The area of influence for all three laboratories was about 20 miles (32 km). The significant clustering of cases around the laboratories indicates that more public information about the free-of-charge program could result in coverage of a larger portion of the population; however, the value of the information resulting from increased sampling should be considered relative to the additional cost of obtaining it. PMID:19431996

Soberano, Gustavo; Carpenter, A Tim E; Cardona, Carol; Charlton, Bruce

2009-03-01

349

Trends in radiologic NDT  

SciTech Connect

In this article, the author tries to look ahead to see what is coming in the field of nondestructive testing (NDT) using radiation methods. Radiological NDT has changed since gamma ray and x-ray inspection came into widespread use more than 50 years ago. Even the name has changed. Instead of referring to most radiation inspection approaches as radiography as one once did, the ''umbrella'' term is now radiology, as defined by ASTM, ''the science and application of x-rays, gamma rays, neutrons and other penetrating radiations.'' Radiography refers to film or film-like methods. Radioscopy refers to electronic methods ''that follow very closely the changes with time of the object being imaged.'' In addition, radiology includes tomography, backscatter, gaging, and a host of other radiation inspection methods. All of these techniques are likely to change as we move into the 21st century. The author's favorites as radiologic methods and applications that will see much greater use in this decade and the early part of the twenty-first century can be summarized as follows: (1) x-radioscopic digital systems for manufacturing cations and in-service inspections and process control applications; (2) computerized radiological systems, radiographic, radioscopic, tomographic, and laminographic with capability for data exchange, use with NDT workstations and fully automated systems; (3) small inspection volume, low-cost CT systems; (4) x-ray image detection systems based on microfocus/image magnification; (5) small format, high sensitivity x-ray cameras; (6) large area photoconductive x-ray cameras; and (7) high output and transportable radiation sources.

Berger, H. (Industrial Quality, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

1994-11-01

350

Brookhaven National Laboratory/ Photon Sciences Subject: Frequently Asked Questions about Occupational Health and Safety Management System (OHSAS 18001)  

E-print Network

Occupational Health and Safety Management System (OHSAS 18001) Number: PS-ESH-0060 Revision: 2 Effective: 6 Occupational Health and Safety Management System (OHSAS 18001) Background: Everyone benefits from having a safe of accomplishing this objective. Question 1 - What is an Occupational Safety and Health Management System

Homes, Christopher C.

351

Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Revision 1, Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be followed during the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. This ES&H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) to direct and control implementation of the project ES&H program. The subsections that follow describe the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES&H program to individual waste area grouping (WAG) remedial investigations. Hazardous work permits (HWPs) will be used to provide task-specific health and safety requirements.

Not Available

1993-05-01

352

An operational health physics quality assurance program  

SciTech Connect

DOE Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance, stipulates QA requirements for all DOE activities. This order is now codified as 10CFR830.120, Nuclear Safety Management, Quality Assurance Requirements, which is applicable to DOE nuclear facilities. A Quality Assurance Management Plan (QAMP) was developed by the Health Physics Operations Group (ESH-1) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of the ESH-1 QAMP is to ensure that operational radiation protection activities meet the criteria outlined in DOE Order 5700.6C, DOE-ER-STD-6001-92 and 10CFR830.120. The ten required elements are QA Program, Personal Training and Qualifications, Quality Improvement, Documents and Records, Work Processes, Design, Procurement, Inspection and Acceptance Testing, Management Assessment and Independent Assessment. The QAMP has been useful for the development of QAMPs at nuclear facilities and has helped ensure uniformity of institutional requirements where Health Physics services are deployed to facilities. To implement a subset of QAMP requirements, a Quality Assurance Self-Evaluation Program (QASE) was established. This program provides a novel self-audit mechanism for the formal identification and correction of non-conforming items related to Operational Health Physics. Additionally, the QASE is a useful management tool for Radiological Control Technician Supervisors and staff and provides a tracking mechanism for ongoing problem areas. Data have been Collected for two calendar years on a number of concerns that fall into four general categories: radiological posting and labeling, instrumentation, monitoring requirements, and radiological documents/records.

Costigan, S.A.; McAtee, J.L. III; Somers, W.M.; Huchton, R.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

1996-06-01

353

Measuring radiology's value in time saved.  

PubMed

Because radiology has historically not measured its added value to patient care and thus not communicated it in easily understood terms to all stakeholders, the specialty must correct this to prepare for the eventual transition from the current fee-for-service payment schedule to new value-based reimbursement systems. Given the increasing risk for marginalization, radiologists need to engage clinicians and managers to map the processes and associated costs of episodes of patient care to identify areas for providing and improving integrated diagnostic information and to measure the value thereof. In such time-driven, activity-based costing practices, radiologists should highlight how proper investments in the information generated by imaging and how radiologists' associated consultative and coordination of services can save greater resources downstream, especially in the nonrenewable resource of physician time, an increasingly scarce health care resource. Using physician time in the most efficient way will be a key element for decreasing health care costs at the aggregate level. Therefore, expressing radiology's contribution in terms of downstream physician time saved is a metric that can be easily understood by all stakeholders. In a conceptual framework centered on value, the specialty of radiology must focus more on its most important product, actionable information, rather than on imaging technologies themselves. Information, unlike imaging technologies, does not depreciate with time but rather increases in value the more it is used. PMID:23025865

Lee, Christoph I; Enzmann, Dieter R

2012-10-01

354

Radiological characterization survey results for Gaskill Hall, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio (OXO015)  

SciTech Connect

Between October 1952 and February 1957, National Lead of Ohio (NLO), a primary contractor for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), subcontracted certain uranium machining operations to Alba Craft Laboratory, Incorporated, located at 10-14 West Rose Avenue, Oxford, Ohio. In 1992, personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) confirmed the presence of residual radioactive materials from the AEC-related operations in and around the facility in amounts exceeding the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Although the amount of uranium found on the property posed little health hazard if left undisturbed, the levels were sufficient to require remediation to bring radiological conditions into compliance with current guidelines, thus ensuring that the public and the environment are protected. Because it was suspected that uranium may have been used in the past in the immediate vicinity of Alba Craft in a Miami University building a team from ORNL, performed a radiological characterization survey of that structure in January 1994. The survey was conducted at the request of DOE as a precautionary measure to ensure that no radioactive residuals were present at levels exceeding guidelines. The survey included the determination of directly measured radiation levels and the collection of smear samples to detect possible removable alpha and beta-gamma activity levels, and comparison of these data to the guidelines. Results of the survey showed that all measurements were below the applicable guideline limits set by DOE.

Kleinhans, K.R.; Murray, M.E.; Carrier, R.F.

1996-04-01

355

Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror  

SciTech Connect

Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

Hart, M

2002-11-08

356

Demystifying radiology information systems.  

PubMed

Selecting the right radiology information system (RIS) can be a difficult and tedious task for radiology managers. Sometimes the information systems department ends up selecting the RIS. As a radiology manager, you can help yourself and your department greatly by becoming more educated concerning the technology and terminology of radiology information systems. You can then participate in one of the most important decisions that will ever be made regarding your department. There is much confusion about the meanings of the terms interfaced and integrated. Two applications are generally considered integrated if they freely access and update each other's databases. Two applications are generally considered interfaced if they pass data to each other but don't directly access nor update the other's databases. Two more terms are centralized and decentralized. Centralized is the concept of "putting all of your eggs in one basket." Decentralization means you spread your resources out. The main difference between centralized and decentralized is that all components of a centralized system share the same fate (good or bad), while decentralized components operate independently and aren't affected directly by failures in another system. Another significant term relevant to RIS systems is HL7, which is a standardized data format that allows one application to pass data to another application in a format that the receiving application understands. RIS vendors generally fall in three categories: single-source vendors, multiproduct vendors and single-product vendors. Single-product vendors include best-of-breed vendors. No one approach is necessarily better than the others; which you choose will depend on your needs. When considering the purchase of an RIS system, there are important questions to ask yourself, the vendor and the vendors' customers as you gather information and prepare to make a decision. PMID:11151323

Swearingen, R

2000-01-01

357

Radiological manifestations of melioidosis.  

PubMed

Melioidosis is a serious infection that is associated with high mortality. It is due to a Gram-negative bacterium, Burkholderia pseudomallei which is an environmental saprophyte found in wet soils. Melioidosis is endemic to northern Australia and the Southeast Asia. However, there is now increasing number of reports of imported cases to regions where this infection has not been previously encountered. Almost any organ can be affected. Like many other conditions, radiological imaging is an integral part of the diagnostic workup of melioidosis. Awareness of the various radiological manifestations can help direct appropriate investigations to achieve early diagnosis and the initiation of appropriate treatment. Generally, there are no known characteristic features on imaging that can specifically differentiate melioidosis from other infections. However, the "honeycomb" appearance has been described to be characteristic for large melioidosis liver abscesses. Simultaneous involvement of various organs is also characteristics. To date, there are few data available on the radiological manifestations of melioidosis. The present pictorial essay describes melioidosis affecting the various organs. PMID:20103424

Lim, K S; Chong, V H

2010-01-01

358

2013 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike Lewis

2014-02-01

359

2011 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike Lewis

2012-02-01

360

2012 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01

361

Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) program : implementing physical security to protect large radioactive sources worldwide  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. Department of Energy's Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) Program strives to reduce the threat of a Radiological Dispersion Device (RDD) incident that could affect U.S. interests worldwide. Sandia National Laboratories supports the RTR program on many different levels. Sandia works directly with DOE to develop strategies, including the selection of countries to receive support and the identification of radioactive

Lowe; Daniel L

2004-01-01

362

200-UP-2 operable unit radiological surveys  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes and documents the results of the radiological surveys conducted from August 17 through December 16, 1993 over a partial area of the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, 200-W Area, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. In addition, this report explains the survey methodology of the Mobile Surface Contamination Monitor 11 (MSCM-II) and the Ultra Sonic Ranging And Data System (USRADS). The radiological survey of the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit was conducted by the Site Investigative Surveys/Environmental Restoration Health Physics Organization of the Westinghouse Hanford Company. The survey methodology for the majority of area was based on utilization of the MSCM-II or the USRADS for automated recording of the gross beta/gamma radiation levels at or near six (6) inches from the surface soil.

Wendling, M.A.

1994-04-30

363

Department of Environmental & Radiological Health Sciences  

E-print Network

clients with understanding and complying with industrial hygiene standards and regulations; evaluating communication skills and a current, valid motor vehicle license (or alternate means of personal transportation

364

7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...appropriate equipment to use field ready test kits. (vi) DNA probes. To conduct these tests, a laboratory must be equipped...electrophoresis and gel blotting equipment, and the reagents and DNA polymerases necessary to conduct the PCR. (3) Methods...

2014-01-01

365

7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...appropriate equipment to use field ready test kits. (vi) DNA probes. To conduct these tests, a laboratory must be equipped...electrophoresis and gel blotting equipment, and the reagents and DNA polymerases necessary to conduct the PCR. (3) Methods...

2010-01-01

366

7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...appropriate equipment to use field ready test kits. (vi) DNA probes. To conduct these tests, a laboratory must be equipped...electrophoresis and gel blotting equipment, and the reagents and DNA polymerases necessary to conduct the PCR. (3) Methods...

2012-01-01

367

7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...appropriate equipment to use field ready test kits. (vi) DNA probes. To conduct these tests, a laboratory must be equipped...electrophoresis and gel blotting equipment, and the reagents and DNA polymerases necessary to conduct the PCR. (3) Methods...

2011-01-01

368

7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...appropriate equipment to use field ready test kits. (vi) DNA probes. To conduct these tests, a laboratory must be equipped...electrophoresis and gel blotting equipment, and the reagents and DNA polymerases necessary to conduct the PCR. (3) Methods...

2013-01-01

369

Impact of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games on demand for microbiology gastrointestinal diagnostic services at the Public Health Laboratory London.  

PubMed

Planning for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games at the Public Health Laboratory London was based on the requirement to meet potential increased demand with scalable capacity. The aim of this study was to determine the impact on demand for microbiology gastrointestinal diagnostic services during the Games period. Retrospective cross-sectional time-series data analysis was used to assess the number of gastrointestinal specimens received in the laboratory and the number of positive results. There was no increase in the number of gastrointestinal specimens received during the Games period, thus the Games had no impact on demand for microbiology gastrointestinal diagnostic services at the laboratory. There was a decrease in the number of public health specimens received for culture [incidence rate ratio = 0.34, 95% confidence interval (CI)?= 0.13-0.86, P = 0.02] and a decrease in the number of culture positive community specimens (odds ratio = 0.59, 95 % CI = 0.40-0.85, P = 0.005), suggesting a decrease in gastrointestinal illness during the Games period. As previous planning assumptions were not based on actual specimen activity, the results of this study may modify the extent of additional planning for microbiological services required for mass gatherings. PMID:24809387

Williams, K; Sinclair, C; McEwan, R; Fleet, K; Balasegaram, S; Manuel, R

2014-07-01

370

Interventional radiology for paediatric trauma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paediatric interventional radiology plays a cornerstone role in the management of paediatric trauma. In the acute setting,\\u000a interventional radiology techniques allow minimally invasive control of haemorrhage or re-establishment of blood flow. Percutaneous\\u000a stenting and drainage can allow disruptions in urinary or biliary systems to heal without the need for further surgery. Interventional\\u000a radiology techniques also have a significant role in

Manrita K. Sidhu; Mark J. Hogan; Dennis W. W. Shaw; Thomas Burdick

2009-01-01

371

Bachelor of Science, Radiologic Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology Emphasis, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date  

E-print Network

Bachelor of Science, Radiologic Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology Emphasis, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date Radiologic Sciences Clinical Experience RADSCI 300 Digital Radiography and Advanced Imaging Applications Information Technology In Radiologic Sciences RADSCI 350 Imaging Pathophysiology RADSCI 370 Junior Recitation

Barrash, Warren

372

Health Physics Instrumentation Museum Directory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This particular online collection from the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (a university consortium that oversees the Oak Ridge National Laboratory) contains over 1000 objects, many of which are on view at this site. The Health Physics Historical Instrumentation Museum Collection has been deemed the official repository for historical radiological instruments by the Health Physics Society, and at its essence, "chronicles the scientific and commercial history of radioactivity and radiation." This online collection is divided into sections that include atomic movie posters, radiation warning signs, radioluminescent items, ionization chambers, and electrometers. One of the more engaging sections details a number of items designed as radioactive quack cures, such as jars for adding radon to water, emanators for adding radon to water, and radium tablets and bath salts.

373

76 FR 72956 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Cancer Risk in U.S. Radiologic Technologists: Fourth...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...SERVICES National Institutes of Health Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Cancer Risk in U.S. Radiologic Technologists...procedures, and new or updated risk factors that may influence health risks. New occupational and...

2011-11-28

374

76 FR 58520 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Cancer Risk in U.S. Radiologic Technologists: Fourth Survey...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Cancer Risk in U.S. Radiologic Technologists...procedures, and new or updated risk factors that may influence health risks. New occupational and...

2011-09-21

375

Stanford Radiology LPCH Fast Pediatric MRI  

E-print Network

Stanford Radiology LPCH Fast Pediatric MRI Shreyas Vasanawala, MD/PhD Stanford University Lucile practice #12;Stanford Radiology LPCH #12;Stanford Radiology LPCH Current Solution INVASIVE LIMITS ACCESS #12;Stanford Radiology LPCH #12;Stanford Radiology LPCH Why is MRI lengthy? · Complex protocols

California at Berkeley, University of

376

Advantages and Limitations of Anticipating Laboratory Test Results from Regression- and Tree-Based Rules Derived from Electronic Health-Record Data  

PubMed Central

Laboratory testing is the single highest-volume medical activity, making it useful to ask how well one can anticipate whether a given test result will be high, low, or within the reference interval (“normal”). We analyzed 10 years of electronic health records—a total of 69.4 million blood tests—to see how well standard rule-mining techniques can anticipate test results based on patient age and gender, recent diagnoses, and recent laboratory test results. We evaluated rules according to their positive and negative predictive value (PPV and NPV) and area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve (ROC AUCs). Using a stringent cutoff of PPV and/or NPV?0.95, standard techniques yield few rules for sendout tests but several for in-house tests, mostly for repeat laboratory tests that are part of the complete blood count and basic metabolic panel. Most rules were clinically and pathophysiologically plausible, and several seemed clinically useful for informing pre-test probability of a given result. But overall, rules were unlikely to be able to function as a general substitute for actually ordering a test. Improving laboratory utilization will likely require different input data and/or alternative methods. PMID:24732572

Mohammad, Fahim; Theisen-Toupal, Jesse C.; Arnaout, Ramy

2014-01-01

377

Radiological Toolbox User's Manual  

SciTech Connect

A toolbox of radiological data has been assembled to provide users access to the physical, chemical, anatomical, physiological and mathematical data relevant to the radiation protection of workers and member of the public. The software runs on a PC and provides users, through a single graphical interface, quick access to contemporary data and the means to extract these data for further computations and analysis. The numerical data, for the most part, are stored within databases in SI units. However, the user can display and extract values using non-SI units. This is the first release of the toolbox which was developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Eckerman, KF

2004-07-01

378

NNSA/NV Consequence Management Capabilities for Radiological Emergency Response  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) provides an integrated Consequence Management (CM) response capability for the (NNSA) in the event of a radiological emergency. This encompasses planning, technical operations, and home team support. As the lead organization for CM planning and operations, NNSA/NV coordinates the response of the following assets during the planning and operational phases of a radiological accident or incident: (1) Predictive dispersion modeling through the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the High Consequence Assessment Group at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); (2) Regional radiological emergency assistance through the eight Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) regional response centers; (3) Medical advice and assistance through the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; (4) Aerial radiological mapping using the fixed-wing and rotor-wing aircraft of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS); (5) Consequence Management Planning Teams (CMPT) and Consequence Management Response Teams (CMRT) to provide CM field operations and command and control. Descriptions of the technical capabilities employed during planning and operations are given below for each of the elements comprising the integrated CM capability.

D. R. Bowman

2002-10-01

379

HOMOLOGOUS MEASURES OF COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN HUMAN INFANTS AND LABORATORY ANIMALS TO IDENTIFY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH RISKS TO CHILDREN  

EPA Science Inventory

The importance of including neurodevelopmental endpoints in environmental studies is clear. A validated measure of cognitive fucntion in human infants that also has a parallel test in laboratory animal studies will provide a valuable approach for largescale studies. Such a ho...

380

COMPARABLE MEASURES OF COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN HUMAN INFANTS AND LABORATORY ANIMALS TO IDENTIFY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH RISKS TO CHILDREN  

EPA Science Inventory

The importance of including neurodevelopmental end points in environmental studies is clear. A validated measure of cognitive function in human infants that also has a homologous or parallel test in laboratory animal studies will provide a valuable approach for large-scale studie...

381

Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many practical issues in medical ethics depend on an understanding of the concept of health. The main question is whether it is a purely descriptive or a partly evaluative or normative concept. After posing some puzzles about the concept, the views of C Boorse, who thinks it is descriptive, are discussed and difficulties are found for them. An evaluative treatment

R M Hare

1986-01-01

382

A Checklist to Improve Patient Safety in Interventional Radiology  

SciTech Connect

To develop a specific RADiological Patient Safety System (RADPASS) checklist for interventional radiology and to assess the effect of this checklist on health care processes of radiological interventions. On the basis of available literature and expert opinion, a prototype checklist was developed. The checklist was adapted on the basis of observation of daily practice in a tertiary referral centre and evaluation by users. To assess the effect of RADPASS, in a series of radiological interventions, all deviations from optimal care were registered before and after implementation of the checklist. In addition, the checklist and its use were evaluated by interviewing all users. The RADPASS checklist has two parts: A (Planning and Preparation) and B (Procedure). The latter part comprises checks just before starting a procedure (B1) and checks concerning the postprocedural care immediately after completion of the procedure (B2). Two cohorts of, respectively, 94 and 101 radiological interventions were observed; the mean percentage of deviations of the optimal process per intervention decreased from 24 % before implementation to 5 % after implementation (p < 0.001). Postponements and cancellations of interventions decreased from 10 % before implementation to 0 % after implementation. Most users agreed that the checklist was user-friendly and increased patient safety awareness and efficiency. The first validated patient safety checklist for interventional radiology was developed. The use of the RADPASS checklist reduced deviations from the optimal process by three quarters and was associated with less procedure postponements.

Koetser, Inge C. J. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands); Vries, Eefje N. de [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands); Delden, Otto M. van [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands); Smorenburg, Susanne M. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands); Boermeester, Marja A. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Surgery (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Lienden, Krijn P. van, E-mail: k.p.vanlienden@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)

2013-04-15

383

COMMENTARY/COMMENTAIRE The radiological consequences of the Chernobyl  

E-print Network

COMMENTARY/COMMENTAIRE The radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident The First­22 March 1996 Eric Voice Abstract: The human health consequences of the Chernobyl accident in 1986 have are discussed with particular focus on thyroid cancers and exposures to iodine-131. Key words: Chernobyl

Shlyakhter, Ilya

384

Dental Radiology I Student Guide [and Instructor Guide].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The dental radiology student and instructor guides provide instruction in the following units: (1) x-ray physics; (2) x-ray production; (3) radiation health and safety; (4) radiographic anatomy and pathology; (5) darkroom setup and chemistry; (6) bisecting angle technique; (7) paralleling technique; (8) full mouth survey technique--composition and…

Fox Valley Technical Coll., Appleton, WI.

385

Handbooks in radiology: Nuclear medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

This series of handbooks covers the basic facts, major concepts and highlights in seven radiological subspecialties. ''Nuclear Medicine'' is a review of the principles, procedures and clinical applications that every radiology resident and practicing general radiologist should know about nuclear medicine. Presented in an outline format it covers all of the organ systems that are imaged by nuclear medicine.

Datz

1988-01-01

386

Lung cancer screening: radiological aspects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lung Cancer Screening: Radiological Aspects Multiple lung cancer screening studies are currently being conducted to study whether lung cancer screening with Computed Tomography (CT) can decrease lung cancer mortality. This thesis addresses radiological methods that can increase efficacy and efficiency of lung cancer screening. Different imaging modalities were tested. Compared to CT, chest radiography (CXR) has the advantage of low

B. J. de Hoop

2010-01-01

387

A statistical dynamics approach to the study of human health data: Resolving population scale diurnal variation in laboratory data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Statistical physics and information theory is applied to the clinical chemistry measurements present in a patient database containing 2.5 million patients' data over a 20-year period. Despite the seemingly naive approach of aggregating all patients over all times (with respect to particular clinical chemistry measurements), both a diurnal signal in the decay of the time-delayed mutual information and the presence of two sub-populations with differing health are detected. This provides a proof in principle that the highly fragmented data in electronic health records has potential for being useful in defining disease and human phenotypes.

Albers, D. J.; Hripcsak, George

2010-02-01

388

Academic Radiology in the New Healthcare Delivery Environment  

PubMed Central

Ongoing concerns over the rising cost of health care are driving large-scale changes in the way that health care is practiced and reimbursed in the United States. To effectively implement and thrive within this new health care delivery environment, academic medical institutions will need to modify financial and business models and adapt institutional cultures. In this paper, we review the expected features of the new health care environment from the perspective of academic radiology departments. Our review will include background on Accountable Care Organizations, identify challenges associated with the new managed care model, and outline key strategies—including expanding the use of existing information technology infrastructure, promoting continued medical innovation, balancing academic research with clinical care, and exploring new roles for radiologists in efficient patient management—that will ensure continued success for academic radiology. PMID:24200477

Qayyum, Aliya; Yu, John-Paul J.; Kansagra, Akash P.; von Fischer, Nathaniel; Costa, Daniel; Heller, Matthew; Kantartzis, Stamatis; Plowman, R. Scooter; Itri, Jason

2014-01-01

389

Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1995. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions and effluents to the environment. Areas of known contamination are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies under the Inter Agency Agreement established by the Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency and the New York Department of Environmental Conservation. Except for identified areas of soil and groundwater contamination, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with the applicable environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment. Also, the data show that the environmental impacts at Brookhaven National Laboratory are minimal and pose no threat to the public nor to the environment. This report meets the requirements of Department of Energy Orders 5484.1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information reporting requirements and 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Programs.

Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.E.; Schroeder, G.L. [eds.] [and others

1996-12-01

390

The role of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) in the development of international standards for laboratory animal welfare  

Microsoft Academic Search

The World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) is a Paris-based inter-governmental body formed in 1924 with the objective of improving transparency and international collaboration in the control of serious epizootic animal diseases. At the time of publication the OIE has 170 Members. The formation in 1995 of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) saw the recognition of the OIE as the

Sarah Kahn

391

Veterinary Toxicology Veterinary toxicologists based in the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System and the  

E-print Network

Veterinary Toxicology Veterinary toxicologists based in the California Animal Health and Food up to 15,000 tests each year, the toxicology group has participated heavily in the diagnosis soil · Oleander poisoning in dairy cows ­among the top 5 toxicants of cattle, sheep, horses and goats

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

392

Using Task Data in Diagnostic Radiology. Research Report No. 8. Volume 2. Curriculum Objectives for Radiologic Technology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume is the result of the application of the Health Services Mobility Study (HSMS) curriculum design method in radiologic technology and is presented in conjunction with volume 1, which reports the task analysis results. Volume 2 contains job-related behavioral curriculum objectives for the aide, technician, and technologist levels in…

Gilpatrick, Eleanor; Gullion, Christina

393

Planning and preparedness for radiological emergencies at nuclear power stations  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Emergency Preparedness (REP) Program was created after the March 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power station. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) assists state and local governments in reviewing and evaluating state and local REP plans and preparedness for accidents at nuclear power plants, in partnership with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), which evaluates safety and emergency preparedness at the power stations themselves. Argonne National Laboratory provides support and technical assistance to FEMA in evaluating nuclear power plant emergency response exercises, radiological emergency plans, and preparedness.

Thomson, R.; Muzzarelli, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Decision and Information Sciences Div.

1996-05-01

394

Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services Annual Report for 2000  

SciTech Connect

During calendar year 2000, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed its customary radiological protection support services in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and the Hanford contractors. These services included: 1) external dosimetry, 2) internal dosimetry, 3) in vivo monitoring, 4) radiological records, 5) instrument calibration and evaluation, and 6) calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Each program summary describes the routine operations, program changes and improvements, program assessments, supporting technical studies, and professional activities.

Lynch, Timothy P.; Bihl, Donald E.; Johnson, Michelle L.; Maclellan, Jay A.; Piper, Roman K.

2001-05-07

395

The Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: A quality control program for radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analysis  

SciTech Connect

From 1979 to 1989, approximately 25,000 Post Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (PNMIRS) samples were collected, and over 71,400 radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed to establish the concentration of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Am, and plutonium isotopes in soil, vegetation, fish, and animals in the Northern Marshall Islands. While the Low Level Gamma Counting Facility (B379) in the Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division accounted for over 80% of all gamma spectroscopy analyses, approximately 4889 radiochemical and 5437 gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed on 4784 samples of soil, vegetation, terrestrial animal, and marine organisms by outside laboratories. Four laboratories were used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to perform the radiochemical analyses: Thermo Analytical Norcal, Richmond, California (TMA); Nuclear Energy Services, North Carolina State University (NCSU); Laboratory of Radiation Ecology, University of Washington (LRE); and Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division, LLNL, Livermore, California. Additionally, LRE and NCSU were used to perform gamma spectroscopy analyses. The analytical precision and accuracy were monitored by including blind duplicates and natural matrix standards in each group of samples analyzed. On the basis of reported analytical values for duplicates and standards, 88% of the gamma and 87% of the radiochemical analyses in this survey were accepted. By laboratory, 93% of the radiochemical analyses by TMA; 88% of the gamma-ray spectrometry and 100% of the radiochemistry analyses by NCSU; 89% of the gamma spectroscopy and 87% of the radiochemistry analyses by LRE; and 90% of the radiochemistry analyses performed by HEA`s radiochemistry department were accepted.

Kehl, S.R.; Mount, M.E.; Robison, W.L.

1995-09-01

396

Standardized radiological dose evaluations  

SciTech Connect

Following the end of the Cold War, the mission of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site changed from production of nuclear weapons to cleanup. Authorization baseis documents for the facilities, primarily the Final Safety Analysis Reports, are being replaced with new ones in which accident scenarios are sorted into coarse bins of consequence and frequency, similar to the approach of DOE-STD-3011-94. Because this binning does not require high precision, a standardized approach for radiological dose evaluations is taken for all the facilities at the site. This is done through a standard calculation ``template`` for use by all safety analysts preparing the new documents. This report describes this template and its use.

Peterson, V.L.; Stahlnecker, E.

1996-05-01

397

Radiological evaluation of erosions  

PubMed Central

1 The most reliable method for evaluating possible remission-inducing properties in a drug is to measure how well it prevents the appearance of new erosions in serial X-rays of the hands. 2 I have reviewed the literature on the development, over the last 25 years, of a standard method for quantitatively assessing the progress of erosions radiologically. 3 The only drugs thus far shown to be genuinely remission-inducing are cyclophosphamide, high-dose penicillamine, and (most consistently over several decades) gold-thiols, all drugs with life-threatening toxicity. 4 The search for a non-steroidal drug with remission-inducing properties is crucial in our efforts to find a safe drug to control the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:3620278

O'Brien, W. M.

1986-01-01

398

Abdominal hernias: Radiological features  

PubMed Central

Abdominal wall hernias are common diseases of the abdomen with a global incidence approximately 4%-5%. They are distinguished in external, diaphragmatic and internal hernias on the basis of their localisation. Groin hernias are the most common with a prevalence of 75%, followed by femoral (15%) and umbilical (8%). There is a higher prevalence in males (M:F, 8:1). Diagnosis is usually made on physical examination. However, clinical diagnosis may be difficult, especially in patients with obesity, pain or abdominal wall scarring. In these cases, abdominal imaging may be the first clue to the correct diagnosis and to confirm suspected complications. Different imaging modalities are used: conventional radiographs or barium studies, ultrasonography and Computed Tomography. Imaging modalities can aid in the differential diagnosis of palpable abdominal wall masses and can help to define hernial contents such as fatty tissue, bowel, other organs or fluid. This work focuses on the main radiological findings of abdominal herniations. PMID:21860678

Lassandro, Francesco; Iasiello, Francesca; Pizza, Nunzia Luisa; Valente, Tullio; Stefano, Maria Luisa Mangoni di Santo; Grassi, Roberto; Muto, Roberto

2011-01-01

399

Good Laboratory Practice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The principles of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) in conjunction with the principles of Total Quality Management (see chapter 6) ensure the quality and reliability of the laboratory results, which in turn help to ensure the protection of the environment and human health and safety. A step further is the accreditation of laboratories to ISO 17025 (see chapter 2) to perform specified activities.

Hadjicostas, Evsevios

400

RADRELAY RADIOLOGICAL DATA LINK DEVICE  

SciTech Connect

The RadRelay effort developed small, field appropriate, portable prototype devices that allow radiological spectra to be downloaded from field radiological detectors, like the identiFINDER-U, and transmitted to land based experts. This communications capability was designed for the U. S. Coast Guard (USCG) but is also applicable to the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) personnel working in remote locations. USCG Level II personnel currently use the identiFINDER-U Hand-Held Radioisotope ID Devices (HHRIID) to detect radiological materials during specific boarding operations. These devices will detect not only radiological emissions but will also evaluate those emissions against a table of known radiological spectra. The RadRelay has been developed to significantly improve the functionality of HHRIID, by providing the capability to download radiological spectra and then transmit them using satellite or cell phone technology. This remote wireless data transfer reduces the current lengthy delay often encountered between the shipboard detection of unknown radiological material and the evaluation of that data by technical and command personnel. That delay is reduced from hours to minutes and allows the field located personnel to remain on station during the inspection and evaluation process.

Harpring, L; Frank Heckendorn, F

2007-11-06

401

Health.  

PubMed Central

Many practical issues in medical ethics depend on an understanding of the concept of health. The main question is whether it is a purely descriptive or a partly evaluative or normative concept. After posing some puzzles about the concept, the views of C Boorse, who thinks it is descriptive, are discussed and difficulties are found for them. An evaluative treatment is then suggested, and used to shed light on some problems about mental illness and to compare and contrast it with physical illness and with political and other deviancies which are not illnesses. PMID:3806628

Hare, R M

1986-01-01

402

Use of a CO{sub 2} pellet non-destructive cleaning system to decontaminate radiological waste and equipment in shielded hot cells at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This paper details how the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory modified and utilized a commercially available, solid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) pellet, non-destructive cleaning system to support the disposition and disposal of radioactive waste from shielded hot cells. Some waste materials and equipment accumulated in the shielded hot cells cannot be disposed directly because they are contaminated with transuranic materials (elements with atomic numbers greater than that of uranium) above waste disposal site regulatory limits. A commercially available CO{sub 2} pellet non-destructive cleaning system was extensively modified for remote operation inside a shielded hot cell to remove the transuranic contaminants from the waste and equipment without generating any secondary waste in the process. The removed transuranic contaminants are simultaneously captured, consolidated, and retained for later disposal at a transuranic waste facility.

Bench, T.R.

1997-05-01

403

5.3 Applied Radiological Protection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '5.3 Applied Radiological Protection' of the Chapter '5 Medical Radiological Protection' with the contents:

Almén, A.; Valentin, J.

404

Toward Best Practices in Radiology Reporting1  

E-print Network

Toward Best Practices in Radiology Reporting1 CharlesE.Kahn,Jr,MD,MS CurtisL.Rubin,MD,MS The goals and current efforts of the Radiological Society of North America Radiology Reporting Committee, readability, and use- fulness of the radiology report and to advance the effi- ciency and effectiveness

Rubin, Daniel L.

405

Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime.

McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Health and Ecological Assessment Div.; Shan, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

1997-04-01

406

Environmental Tools and Radiological Assessment  

EPA Science Inventory

This presentation details two tools (SADA and FRAMES) available for use in environmental assessments of chemicals that can also be used for radiological assessments of the environment. Spatial Analysis and Decision Assistance (SADA) is a Windows freeware program that incorporate...

407

Radiation Shielding and Radiological Protection  

E-print Network

Radiation Shielding and Radiological Protection J. Kenneth Shultis Richard E. Faw Department@triad.rr.com Radiation Fields and Sources ................................................ . Radiation Field Variables........................................................... .. Direction and Solid Angle Conventions ......................................... .. Radiation Fluence

Shultis, J. Kenneth

408

Radiological Society of North America  

MedlinePLUS

... conditions and potential errors at imaging interpretation. Arterial Spin Labeling May Contribute to the Prediction of Cognitive ... RSNA News™ Career Connect™ Advertising Event Calendar Employment Terms of Use Contact Buyers Guide Copyright © 2014 Radiological ...

409

Introduction to radiological performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

A radiological performance assessment is conducted to provide reasonable assurance that performance objectives for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal will be met. Beginning in the early stages of development, a radiological performance assessment continues through the operational phase, and is instrumental in the postclosure of the facility. Fundamental differences exist in the regulation of commercial and defense LLW, but the radiological performance assessment process is essentially the same for both. The purpose of this document is to describe that process in a concise and straightforward manner. This document focuses on radiological performance assessment as it pertains to commercial LLW disposal, but is applicable to US Department of Energy sites as well. Included are discussions on performance objectives, site characterization, and how a performance assessment is conducted. A case study is used to illustrate how the process works as a whole. A bibliography is provided to assist in locating additional information.

Moss, G.

1995-02-01

410

The IR Radlex Project: An Interventional Radiology Lexicon--A Collaborative Project of the Radiological  

E-print Network

The IR Radlex Project: An Interventional Radiology Lexicon--A Collaborative Project of the Radiological Society of North America and the Society of Interventional Radiology Sanjoy Kundu, MD, FRCPC:xxx Abbreviations: ACR American College of Radiology, RSNA Radiological Society of North America AS images, imaging

Rubin, Daniel L.

411

Radiological emergency preparedness (REP) program  

SciTech Connect

This talk focuses on the accomplishments of Radiological Emergency Preparedness Program. Major topics include the following: strengthening the partnership between FEMA, the States, and the Industry; the Standard Exercise Report Format (SERF); Multi-year performance partnership agreement (MYPPA); new REP Program guidance; comprehensive exercise program; federal radiological emergency response plan (FRERP); international interest; REP user fee; implementation EPA PAGs and Dose Limits; Contamination monitoring standard for portal monitors; guidance documents and training.

Kwiatkowski, D.H. [Federal Emergency Management Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31

412

Radiology of congenital heart disease  

SciTech Connect

This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

Amplatz, K.

1986-01-01

413

Cardiac radiology: centenary review.  

PubMed

During the past century, cardiac imaging technologies have revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of acquired and congenital heart disease. Many important contributions to the field of cardiac imaging were initially reported in Radiology. The field developed from the early stages of cardiac imaging, including the use of coronary x-ray angiography and roentgen kymography, to nowadays the widely used echocardiographic, nuclear medicine, cardiac computed tomographic (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) applications. It is surprising how many of these techniques were not recognized for their potential during their early inception. Some techniques were described in the literature but required many years to enter the clinical arena and presently continue to expand in terms of clinical application. The application of various CT and MR contrast agents for the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia is a case in point, as the utility of contrast agents continues to expand the noninvasive characterization of myocardium. The history of cardiac imaging has included a continuous process of advances in our understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, along with advances in imaging technology that continue to the present day. PMID:25340434

de Roos, Albert; Higgins, Charles B

2014-11-01

414

Overview of neutron radiology  

SciTech Connect

Neutron radiography is a recognized method for nondestructive testing (NDT). It is one of eight established NDT methods offered for certification by ASNT. There are ASTM standards describing selected characteristics associated with neutron radiography, as discussed later in this session. Neutron radiography standards are proceeding in the international community (International Organization for Standardization, ISO). A primary advantage of using neutrons for radiologic inspection follows from the fact that the attenuation of thermal neutrons is very different from that of X-rays. A comparison of the attenuation of the elements for thermal neutrons (small dots) and 125 kV X-rays (solid line) is shown. As opposed to the increasing attenuation with increasing atomic number (Z) for X-rays, the neutron attenuation pattern is scattered. If there is a pattern for the neutrons, it tends to be the reverse of the X-ray case, namely, high neutron attenuation for light materials, such as hydrogen, lithium, and boron (H, Li, and B) and low attenuation for the heavy materials, such as lead, bismuth, and uranium (Pb, Bi, and U). The capability of thermal neutrons to image low-Z material, particularly hydrogen, in metal assemblies is in sharp contrast to that of X-rays. This opens up many practical inspection applications involving, for example, explosives, adhesives, corrosion, water intrusion, and hydriding of metals.

Berger, H. [Industrial Quality, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1993-12-31

415

Surgical Planning Laboratory Image Gallery  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Surgical Planning Laboratory of the Department of Radiology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School has a virtual treasure chest of visual anatomical information available at its web site. The SPL offers of series of over 60 MPEG movies on topics such as neurosurgery, multiple sclerosis, the brain, abdominal surgery, flow analysis, and thoracic surgery, among others.

416

The relationship of patient medical and laboratory characteristics to changes in functional health status in children and adolescents after the Fontan procedure.  

PubMed

Despite hypothesized concerns about deterioration beginning in adolescence, longitudinal data and associated factors regarding standardized assessment of physical functioning are not available for Fontan patients. Parents who participated in the Fontan Cross-Sectional Study completed the Child Health Questionnaire at 2 time points for 245 subjects ages 6-18 years. Associations between change in Physical Functioning Summary Score and baseline patient, medical, and laboratory characteristics (mean age 9.5 ± 1.7 years) and follow-up patient and medical characteristics (mean age 16.2 ± 1.6 years) were determined by regression analyses. During a mean of 6.7 ± 0.4 years, a small (not clinically important) but statistically significant decrease in score from 46.2 ± 11.7 to 44.5 ± 12.1 (p < 0.03) was noted. Subjects with higher baseline scores had a greater decrease in score (r = -0.48; p < 0.001). A multivariable model of patient and medical characteristics (R(2) = 0.11) showed that a greater decrease in score was significantly associated with interim development of asthma (n = 13; parameter estimate [PE] -6.6; p < 0.05) or other chronic respiratory, lung, or breathing problems (n = 13; PE -12.5; p < 0.001) and the presence of protein-losing enteropathy at any time (n = 12; PE -9.4; p = 0.006). Change in score was not significantly associated with baseline laboratory measures of exercise capacity and ventricular characteristics and function. Therefore, although physical functioning may be stable during adolescence for many Fontan patients, deterioration occurs in some in association with respiratory conditions and protein-losing enteropathy. Further longitudinal study is necessary to better understand the relationship between clinical morbidities and functional health status as these patients transition into adulthood. PMID:24264999

McCrindle, Brian W; Zak, Victor; Breitbart, Roger E; Mahony, Lynn; Shrader, Peter; Lai, Wyman W; Burns, Kristin M; Colan, Steven D; Williams, Richard V; Goldberg, David; Hill, Kevin D; Khaikin, Svetlana; Atz, Andrew M

2014-04-01

417

Radiological evaluation of colorectal anastomoses  

PubMed Central

Background and aims The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy, interobserver variability, timing and discordance with relaparotomy of postoperative radiological examination of colorectal anastomoses. Patient/methods From 2000 to 2005, 429 patients underwent an ileocolonic, colo-colonic, or colorectal anastomosis. Radiological examination of the anastomosis was not performed routinely, but only when there were clinically signs of leakage. Radiological imaging was reviewed by an independent radiologist and medical records were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical anastomotic leakage was the standard of reference and defined as leakage confirmed during relaparotomy, drainage of pus per anum or as an anastomotic defect identified at digital examination. Results Radiological evaluation of the anastomosis was performed in 91 patients (21%): CT in 27 patients, contrast radiography in 40, and both imaging modalities in 24 patients. The interobserver variability of CT and contrast radiography was 10% and 14%, respectively. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of imaging of the anastomosis was 65% and 73%, respectively. Anastomotic leakage was found in 11 of 21 patients (52%) who underwent relaparotomy despite negative imaging. Three of 36 patients (8%) with a diagnosis of anastomotic leakage based on radiological examination had an intact anastomosis at relaparotomy. Conclusion Radiological imaging of the anastomosis after colorectal surgery should be restrictively applied and interpreted with caution because of the high false-negative rate and the substantial interobserver variability. PMID:18560844

Doeksen, A.; Wüst, A. F. J.; Vrouenraets, B. C.; van Lanschot, J. J. B.; van Tets, W. F.

2008-01-01

418

Biological Treatment of Petroleum in Radiologically Contaminated Soil  

SciTech Connect

This chapter describes ex situ bioremediation of the petroleum portion of radiologically co-contaminated soils using microorganisms isolated from a waste site and innovative bioreactor technology. Microorganisms first isolated and screened in the laboratory for bioremediation of petroleum were eventually used to treat soils in a bioreactor. The bioreactor treated soils contaminated with over 20,000 mg/kg total petroleum hydrocarbon and reduced the levels to less than 100 mg/kg in 22 months. After treatment, the soils were permanently disposed as low-level radiological waste. The petroleum and radiologically contaminated soil (PRCS) bioreactor operated using bioventing to control the supply of oxygen (air) to the soil being treated. The system treated 3.67 tons of PCRS amended with weathered compost, ammonium nitrate, fertilizer, and water. In addition, a consortium of microbes (patent pending) isolated at the Savannah River National Laboratory from a petroleum-contaminated site was added to the PRCS system. During operation, degradation of petroleum waste was accounted for through monitoring of carbon dioxide levels in the system effluent. The project demonstrated that co-contaminated soils could be successfully treated through bioventing and bioaugmentation to remove petroleum contamination to levels below 100 mg/kg while protecting workers and the environment from radiological contamination.

BERRY, CHRISTOPHER

2005-11-14

419

Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1996. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and non-radiological emissions and effluents to the environment.

Schroeder, G.L.; Paquette, D.E.; Naidu, J.R.; Lee, R.J.; Briggs, S.L.K.

1998-01-01

420

Comprehensive work plan and health and safety plan for the 7500 Area Contamination Site sampling at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Environmental Restoration Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, this plan has been developed for the environmental sampling efforts at the 7500 Area Contamination Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group (MAD) of the Health and Safety Research Division of ORNL and will be implemented by ORNL/MAD. Major components of the plan include (1) a quality assurance project plan that describes the scope and objectives of ORNL/MAD activities at the 7500 Area Contamination Site, assigns responsibilities, and provides emergency information for contingencies that may arise during field operations; (2) sampling and analysis sections; (3) a site-specific health and safety section that describes general site hazards, hazards associated with specific tasks, personnel protection requirements, and mandatory safety procedures; (4) procedures and requirements for equipment decontamination and responsibilities for generated wastes, waste management, and contamination control; and (5) a discussion of form completion and reporting required to document activities at the 7500 Area Contamination Site.

Burman, S.N.; Landguth, D.C.; Uziel, M.S.; Hatmaker, T.L.; Tiner, P.F.

1992-05-01

421

Comprehensive work plan and health and safety plan for the 7500 Area Contamination Site sampling at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Environmental Restoration Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, this plan has been developed for the environmental sampling efforts at the 7500 Area Contamination Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group (MAD) of the Health and Safety Research Division of ORNL and will be implemented by ORNL/MAD. Major components of the plan include (1) a quality assurance project plan that describes the scope and objectives of ORNL/MAD activities at the 7500 Area Contamination Site, assigns responsibilities, and provides emergency information for contingencies that may arise during field operations; (2) sampling and analysis sections; (3) a site-specific health and safety section that describes general site hazards, hazards associated with specific tasks, personnel protection requirements, and mandatory safety procedures; (4) procedures and requirements for equipment decontamination and responsibilities for generated wastes, waste management, and contamination control; and (5) a discussion of form completion and reporting required to document activities at the 7500 Area Contamination Site.

Burman, S.N.; Landguth, D.C.; Uziel, M.S.; Hatmaker, T.L.; Tiner, P.F.

1992-05-01

422

Environmental assessment for the decommissioning and decontamination of contaminated facilities at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) was established in 1958 at its present location by the Atomic Energy Commission. Research at LEHR originally focused on the health effects from chronic exposures to radionuclides, primarily strontium 90 and radium 226, using beagles to simulate radiation effects on humans. In 1988, pursuant to a memorandum of agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California, DOE`s Office of Energy Research decided to close out the research program, shut down LEHR, and turn the facilities and site over to the University of California, Davis (UCD) after remediation. The decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of LEHR will be managed by the San Francisco Operations Office (SF) under DOE`s Environmental Restoration Program. This environmental assessment (EA) addresses the D&D of four site buildings and a tank trailer, and the removal of the on-site cobalt 60 (Co-60) source. Future activities at the site will include D&D of the Imhoff building and the outdoor dog pens, and may include remediation of underground tanks, and the landfill and radioactive disposal trenches. The remaining buildings on the LEHR site are not contaminated. The environmental impacts of the future activities cannot be determined at this time because the extent of contamination has not yet been ascertained. The impacts of these future activities (including the cumulative impacts of the future activities and those addressed in this EA) will be addressed in future National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation.

Not Available

1992-09-01

423

2000 RSNA annual oration in diagnostic radiology: The future of interventional radiology.  

PubMed

Origins in imaging, procedural emphasis, and dependence on innovation characterize interventional radiology, which will continue as the field of image-guided minimally invasive therapies. A steady supply of innovators will be needed. Current workforce shortages demand that this problem be addressed and in an ongoing fashion. Interventional radiology's major identity problem will require multiple corrective measures, including a name change. Diagnostic radiologists must fully embrace the concept of the dedicated interventionalist. Interspecialty turf battles will continue, especially with cardiologists and vascular surgeons. To advance the discipline, interventional radiologists must remain involved in cutting-edge therapies such as endograft repair of aortic aneurysms and carotid stent placement. As the population ages, interventionalists will experience a shift toward a greater emphasis on cancer treatment. Political agendas and public pressure will improve access to care and result in managed health care reforms. Academic centers will continue to witness a decline in time and resources available to pursue academic missions. The public outcry for accountability will result in systems changes aimed at reducing errors and process changes in the way physicians are trained, certified, and monitored. Evidence-based medicine will be the watchword of this century. Interventional radiology will maintain its role through development of methods for delivery of genes, gene products, and drugs to specific target sites; control of angiogenesis and other biologic processes; and noninvasive image-guided delivery of various forms of energy for ablation. PMID:11477226

Becker, G J

2001-08-01

424

Interactive, Computer-Based Training Program for Radiological Workers  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is redesigning its Computer-Based Training (CBT) program for radiological workers. The redesign represents a major effort to produce a single, highly interactive and flexible CBT program that will meet the training needs of a wide range of radiological workers--from researchers and x-ray operators to individuals working in tritium, uranium, plutonium, and accelerator facilities. The new CBT program addresses the broad diversity of backgrounds found at a national laboratory. When a training audience is homogeneous in terms of education level and type of work performed, it is difficult to duplicate the effectiveness of a flexible, technically competent instructor who can tailor a course to the express needs and concerns of a course's participants. Unfortunately, such homogeneity is rare. At LLNL, they have a diverse workforce engaged in a wide range of radiological activities, from the fairly common to the quite exotic. As a result, the Laboratory must offer a wide variety of radiological worker courses. These include a general contamination-control course in addition to radioactive-material-handling courses for both low-level laboratory (i.e., bench-top) activities as well as high-level work in tritium, uranium, and plutonium facilities. They also offer training courses for employees who work with radiation-generating devices--x-ray, accelerator, and E-beam operators, for instance. However, even with the number and variety of courses the Laboratory offers, they are constrained by the diversity of backgrounds (i.e., knowledge and experience) of those to be trained. Moreover, time constraints often preclude in-depth coverage of site- and/or task-specific details. In response to this situation, several years ago LLNL began moving toward computer-based training for radiological workers. Today, that CBT effort includes a general radiological safety course developed by the Department of Energy's Hanford facility and a contamination-control program developed by LLNL. A comprehensive study guide and a post-training practical exam supplement the CBT effort. The ''hands-on'' practical is particularly important in that it gives participants not only the opportunity to demonstrate what they've learned, but to ask questions about their individual work situations. The challenge is how to make the CBT program more facility- and task-specific while, at the same time, making the program more in tune with the education and/or experience levels of individual trainees. To that end, they have designed a CBT program, which they refer to as an ''onion''. That is, the course is layered, going from the general to the more and more specific.

Trinoskey, P.A.; Camacho, P.I.; Wells, L.

2000-01-18

425

Radiologic Technology Training Program  

E-print Network

as a whole. Basic principles of radiation protection are introduced. The ethical and legal responsibilities-ray interactions, radioactivity, production of radionuclides, and health physics. XR 105 Anatomy and Physiology-detecting systems; description of different types of films and screens, and darkroom design. XR 108 Image Production

Shihadeh, Alan

426

Radiology Aide. Instructor's Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This module was designed to assist educators in facilitating learning in health careers outside nursing. It may be used for classroom, on-the-job, or independent study. The module is oranized in 13 units. Each unit includes one or more lessons that contain the following components: scope of unit, unit objectives; student's information assignment,…

Hronek, Dennis

427

Laboratory evaluation of a prototype photochemical chamber designed to investigate the health effects of fresh and aged vehicular exhaust emissions  

PubMed Central

Laboratory experiments simulating atmospheric aging of motor vehicle exhaust emissions were conducted using a single vehicle and a photochemical chamber. A compact automobile was used as a source of emissions. The vehicle exhaust was diluted with ambient air to achieve carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations similar to those observed in an urban highway tunnel. With the car engine idling, it is expected that the CO concentration is a reasonable surrogate for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions. Varying the amount of dilution of the exhaust gas to produce different CO concentrations, allowed adjustment of the concentrations of VOCs in the chamber to optimize production of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) needed for animal toxicological exposures. Photochemical reactions in the chamber resulted in nitric oxide (NO) depletion, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) formation, ozone (O3) accumulation, and SOA formation. A stable SOA concentration of approximately 40 µg m?3 at a chamber mean residence time of 30 min was achieved. This relatively short mean residence time provided adequate chamber flow output for both particle characterization and animal exposures. The chamber was operated as a continuous flow reactor for animal toxicological tests. SOA mass generated from the car exhaust diluted with ambient air was almost entirely in the ultrafine mode. Chamber performance was improved by using different types of seed aerosol to provide a surface for condensation of semivolatile reaction products, thus increasing the yield of SOA. Toxicological studies using Sprague-Dawley rats found significant increases of in vivo chemiluminescence in lungs following exposure to SOA. PMID:21689011

Papapostolou, Vasileios; Lawrence, Joy E.; Diaz, Edgar A.; Wolfson, Jack M.; Ferguson, Stephen T.; Long, Mark S.; Godleski, John J.; Koutrakis, Petros

2013-01-01

428

Nuclear and Radiological Forensics and Attribution Overview  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Nuclear and Radiological Forensics and Attribution Program is to develop the technical capability for the nation to rapidly, accurately, and credibly attribute the origins and pathways of interdicted or collected materials, intact nuclear devices, and radiological dispersal devices. A robust attribution capability contributes to threat assessment, prevention, and deterrence of nuclear terrorism; it also supports the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in its investigative mission to prevent and respond to nuclear terrorism. Development of the capability involves two major elements: (1) the ability to collect evidence and make forensic measurements, and (2) the ability to interpret the forensic data. The Program leverages the existing capability throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory complex in a way that meets the requirements of the FBI and other government users. At the same time the capability is being developed, the Program also conducts investigations for a variety of sponsors using the current capability. The combination of operations and R&D in one program helps to ensure a strong linkage between the needs of the user community and the scientific development.

Smith, D K; Niemeyer, S

2005-11-04

429

Regulating the unknown: Managing the occupational health risks of nanomedical technologies and nanopharmaceuticals in the research laboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Novel technologies and their resultant products demand fresh ways of thinking about pre-market risk analysis and post-market surveillance. A regulatory framework that is responsive to emerging knowledge about the hazards of novel technologies offers repeatable and transparent processes and remains economically and socially feasible. Workers are an especially vulnerable population who are exposed to unknown hazards of novel technologies and serve often as unwitting sentinels of impending risks. This Grounded Theory-based case study identifies gaps in our current ability to regulate novel technologies so as to minimize occupational health risks and offers necessary modifications for an environment that is conducive to proper regulation. Nanopharmaceuticals and the nano-based technologies at their base are used by way of exemplar technologies that are currently taxing the ability of the regulatory system to provide adequate oversight. Ambiguities of definition, absence of a tracking system (of who is doing nanotechnology research), and the paucity of scientific evidence to support risk management efforts are among the findings of the study and need to be addressed as ameliorative steps toward an effective regulatory structure.

Ersin, Ozlem Hacer

430

LSU Biological Safety Inspection for BSL -2 Laboratories 1 Laboratory  

E-print Network

in biological safety cabinets or other physical containment equipment. Eating, drinking, smoking, handlingLSU Biological Safety Inspection for BSL - 2 Laboratories 1 Laboratory 2 Section Chief a Principle. Standard Biological Safety BSL-2 Laboratories Laboratory Safety Inspection Office of Occupational Health

Stephens, Jacqueline

431

Radiological survey results at Beverly Harbor, Beverly, Massachusetts (VB025)  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at Beverly Harbor, Beverly, Massachusetts. The survey was performed in may 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine if uranium from work performed under government contract at the former Ventron facility had migrated off-site to the harbor and neighboring areas. The survey included a surface gamma scan and the collection of soil and biological samples for radionuclide analyses.

Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

1992-08-01

432

Human performance in radiological survey scanning  

SciTech Connect

The probability of detecting residual contamination in the field using portable radiological survey instruments depends not only on the sensitivity of the instrumentation used in scanning, but also on the surveyor`s performance. This report provides a basis for taking human performance into account in determining the minimum level of activity detectable by scanning. A theoretical framework was developed (based on signal detection theory) which allows influences on surveyors to be anticipated and understood, and supports a quantitative assessment of performance. The performance of surveyors under controlled yet realistic field conditions was examined to gain insight into the task and to develop means of quantifying performance. Then, their performance was assessed under laboratory conditions to quantify more precisely their ability to make the required discriminations. The information was used to characterize surveyors` performance in the scanning task and to provide a basis for predicting levels of radioactivity that are likely to be detectable under various conditions by surveyors using portable survey instruments.

Brown, W.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Abelquist, E.W. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

1998-03-01

433

Radiological Work Planning and Procedure  

SciTech Connect

Each facility is tasked with maintaining personnel radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A continued effort is required to meet this goal by developing and implementing improvements to technical work documents (TWDs) and work performance. A review of selected TWDs from most facilities shows there is a need to incorporate more radiological control requirements into the TWD. The Radioactive Work Permit (RWP) provides a mechanism to place some of the requirements but does not provide all the information needed by the worker as he/she is accomplishing the steps of the TWD. Requiring the engineers, planners and procedure writers to put the radiological control requirements in the work steps would be very easy if all personnel had a strong background in radiological work planning and radiological controls. Unfortunately, many of these personnel do not have the background necessary to include these requirements without assistance by the Radiological Control organization at each facility. In addition, there seems to be confusion as to what should be and what should not be included in the TWD.

KURTZ, J.E.

2000-01-01

434

Social radiology: Where to now?  

PubMed Central

Radiology is a relatively high-cost and high-maintenance aspect of medicine. Expertise is constantly required, from acquisition to its use and quality assurance programmes. However, it is an integral part of healthcare practice, from disease diagnosis, surveillance and prevention to treatment monitoring. It is alarming that two thirds of the world is deficient in or lacks even basic diagnostic imaging. Developing and underdeveloped countries need help in improving medical imaging. Help is coming from various organisations, which are extending hands-on teaching and imparting knowledge, as well as training trainers to increase the pool of skilled practitioners in the use of imaging equipment and other aspects of radiology services. The scene for social radiology is changing and set to positively impact the world in the (near) future. PMID:22970065

Ho, ELM

2012-01-01

435

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 1, Waste streams and treatment technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

1992-09-01

436

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

1992-09-01

437

DRAFT - Design of Radiological Survey and Sampling to Support Title Transfer or Lease of Property on the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns, operates, and manages the buildings and land areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. As land and buildings are declared excess or underutilized, it is the intent of DOE to either transfer the title of or lease suitable property to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET) or other entities for public use. It is DOE's responsibility, in coordination with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 4, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), to ensure that the land, facilities, and personal property that are to have the title transferred or are to be leased are suitable for public use. Release of personal property must also meet site requirements and be approved by the DOE contractor responsible for site radiological control. The terms title transfer and lease in this document have unique meanings. Title transfer will result in release of ownership without any restriction or further control by DOE. Under lease conditions, the government retains ownership of the property along with the responsibility to oversee property utilization. This includes involvement in the lessee's health, safety, and radiological control plans and conduct of site inspections. It may also entail lease restrictions, such as limiting access to certain areas or prohibiting digging, drilling, or disturbing material under surface coatings. Survey and sampling requirements are generally more rigorous for title transfer than for lease. Because of the accelerated clean up process, there is an increasing emphasis on title transfers of facilities and land. The purpose of this document is to describe the radiological survey and sampling protocols that are being used for assessing the radiological conditions and characteristics of building and land areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation that contain space potentially available for title transfer or lease. After necessary surveys and sampling and laboratory analyses are completed, the data are analyzed and included in an Environmental Baseline Summary (EBS) report for title transfer or in a Baseline Environmental Analysis Report (BEAR) for lease. The data from the BEAR is then used in a Screening-Level Human Health Risk Assessment (SHHRA) or a risk calculation (RC) to assess the potential risks to future owners/occupants. If title is to be transferred, release criteria in the form of specific activity concentrations called Derived Concentration Guideline Levels (DCGLs) will be developed for the each property. The DCGLs are based on the risk model and are used with the data in the EBS to determine, with statistical confidence, that the release criteria for the property have been met. The goal of the survey and sampling efforts is to (1) document the baseline conditions of the property (real or personal) prior to title transfer or lease, (2) obtain enough information that an evaluation of radiological risks can be made, and (3) collect sufftcient data so that areas that contain minimal residual levels of radioactivity can be identified and, following radiological control procedures, be released from radiological control. (It should be noted that release from radiological control does not necessarily mean free release because DOE may maintain institutional control of the site after it is released from radiological control). To meet the goals of this document, a Data Quality Objective (DQO) process will be used to enhance data collection efficiency and assist with decision-making. The steps of the DQO process involve stating the problem, identifying the decision, identifying inputs to the decision, developing study boundaries, developing the decision rule, and optimizing the design. This document describes the DQOs chosen for surveys and sampling efforts performed for the purposes listed above. The previous version to this document focused on the requirements for radiological survey and sampling protocols that are be used for leasing. Because the primary focus at this time is on title transfer, th

Cusick L.T.

2002-09-25

438

Interventional Radiology in Liver Transplantation  

SciTech Connect

Radiology is a key specialty within a liver transplant program. Interventional techniques not only contribute to graft and recipient survival but also allow appropriate patient selection and ensure that recipients with severe liver decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma or portal hypertension are transplanted with the best chance of prolonged survival. Equally inappropriate selection for these techniques may adversely affect survival. Liver transplantation is a dynamic field of innovative surgical techniques with a requirement for interventional radiology to parallel these developments. This paper reviews the current practice within a major European center for adult and pediatric transplantation.

Karani, John B., E-mail: john.karani@kingsch.nhs.uk; Yu, Dominic F.Q.C.; Kane, Pauline A. [King's College Hospital (United Kingdom)

2005-04-15

439

Radiological evolution of relapsing polychondritis.  

PubMed

Relapsing Polychondritis (RP) is a systemic condition characterized by chronic, episodic inflammation, especially of cartilaginous and proteoglycan-rich structures. The etiology of this rare autoimmune disease is unknown, and so far, there is very little data available for non-Caucasians. RP presents with a constellation of non-specific inflammation, which sometimes appear in characteristic locations. Radiology is important in supporting the diagnosis, and this paper presents a case of a non-Caucasian patient monitored radiologically from early onset to the terminal stages. PMID:25075595

Ojemakinde, Oluwayemisi; Reddy, Threta; Previgliano, Carlos; Sangster, Guillermo; Wellikoff, Adam; Gonzalez-Toledo, Eduardo

2014-01-01

440

Carbon Characterization Laboratory Report  

SciTech Connect

The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Lab-C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. This laboratory was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite research and development activities. The CCL is designed to characterize and test carbon-based materials such as graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully prepared to measure material properties for nonirradiated carbon-based materials. Plans to establish the laboratory as a radiological facility within the next year are definitive. This laboratory will be modified to accommodate irradiated materials, after which it can be used to perform material property measurements on both irradiated and nonirradiated carbon-based material. Instruments, fixtures, and methods are in place for preirradiation measurements of bulk density, thermal diffusivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Young’s modulus, Shear modulus, Poisson ratio, and electrical resistivity. The measurement protocol consists of functional validation, calibration, and automated data acquisition.

David Swank; William Windes; D.C. Haggard; David Rohrbaugh; Karen Moore

2009-03-01

441

Radiological aspects of in situ uranium recovery  

SciTech Connect

In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium in situ leaching in situ recovery (ISL / ISR), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and may make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since 1975. Solution mining involves the pumping of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing and complexing agents into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant. Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which Radon gas is evolved in the process and the unique aspects of controlling solution flow patterns underground. An overview of the major aspects of the health physics and radiation protection programs that were developed at these facilities are discussed and contrasted to circumstances of the current generation and state of the art of Uranium ISR technologies and facilities. (authors)

BROWN, STEVEN H. [SHB INC., 7505 S. Xanthia Place, Centennial, Colorado (United States)

2007-07-01

442

Radiology failure mode and effect analysis: what is it?  

PubMed

Proactive prevention of medical errors is critical in medical practice. Root cause analysis (RCA) is a conventional method used to deal with errors that result in an adverse event. However, RCA has several limitations. An analytic method for health care risk management, health care failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), has been introduced relatively recently. Health care FMEA combines several existing analytic approaches into one simple tool with which to analyze a particular health care process, determine the risks associated with it, and develop corrective actions and outcome measures. The authors provide a brief history of health care FMEA, describe its validation process, and relate their experience with its use in a radiology department. PMID:19703888

Abujudeh, Hani H; Kaewlai, Rathachai

2009-08-01

443

42 CFR 482.26 - Condition of participation: Radiologic services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...radiologic services, particularly ionizing radiology procedures, must be free from hazards...radiologist must supervise the ionizing radiology services and must interpret only those...qualified by education and experience in radiology. (2) Only personnel...

2014-10-01

444

42 CFR 482.26 - Condition of participation: Radiologic services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...radiologic services, particularly ionizing radiology procedures, must be free from hazards...radiologist must supervise the ionizing radiology services and must interpret only those...qualified by education and experience in radiology. (2) Only personnel...

2011-10-01

445

42 CFR 482.26 - Condition of participation: Radiologic services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...radiologic services, particularly ionizing radiology procedures, must be free from hazards...radiologist must supervise the ionizing radiology services and must interpret only those...qualified by education and experience in radiology. (2) Only personnel...

2010-10-01

446

42 CFR 482.26 - Condition of participation: Radiologic services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...radiologic services, particularly ionizing radiology procedures, must be free from hazards...radiologist must supervise the ionizing radiology services and must interpret only those...qualified by education and experience in radiology. (2) Only personnel...

2012-10-01

447

42 CFR 482.26 - Condition of participation: Radiologic services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...radiologic services, particularly ionizing radiology procedures, must be free from hazards...radiologist must supervise the ionizing radiology services and must interpret only those...qualified by education and experience in radiology. (2) Only personnel...

2013-10-01

448

Dental Laboratory Technician.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units to the occupation of dental laboratory technician. The following skill areas…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

449

Medical Laboratory Technician.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of medical laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units specific to the occupation of medical laboratory technician. The following…

Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

450

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-MRRT] Regional College Catalog Year Hours] Note: Students must have earned an AAS degree in Radiologic Technology (43 semester credits

Sheridan, Scott

451

Roadmap: Radiologic Technology Radiology Department Management Technology Associate of Technical Study  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Technology ­ Radiology Department Management Technology ­ Associate. Coursework may be pursued at any Regional Campus, but students must be advised by the director of radiologic requirements, are on the basis of certification by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. BMRT

Sheridan, Scott

452

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-RTAS] Regional College to the Major: [62 Credit Hours] Note: Students must have earned an AAS degree in Radiologic Technology (38

Sheridan, Scott

453

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Nuclear Medicine (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology)  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Nuclear Medicine (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) ­ Bachelor of Radiologic Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-NMHO] Regional College Catalog Hours] Note: Students must have graduated from a hospital-based certificate program in radiologic

Sheridan, Scott

454

The Duke Wiki Radiology Research Protocol page Purpose of the Duke Wiki Radiology Research Protocol page  

E-print Network

The Duke Wiki Radiology Research Protocol page Purpose of the Duke Wiki Radiology Research Protocol that are being done using clinical imaging equipment in Duke Radiology. This information may be helpful if you the Radiology Research Protocol site. Let her know by email that your login has been recognized, provide her

455

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-MRRT] Regional College Catalog Year Hours] Note: Students must have earned an AAS degree in Radiologic Technology (69-71 semester credits

Sheridan, Scott

456

Radiology Conferences Radiology residents will meet with the chief pathology resident  

E-print Network

Radiology Conferences Radiology residents will meet with the chief pathology resident: 1 for whole slide scanning request 4. Provide 2-3 key radiology images in jpeg format to correspond · Radiology residents will provide jump drive for file transfer; transfer to iornkeys must be done in person

457

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Computed Tomography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Computed Tomography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-CTHA] Regional College Hours] Note: Students must have graduated from a hospital-based certificate program in radiologic

Sheridan, Scott

458

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Radiation Therapy (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Radiation Therapy ­ (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-RTHB] Regional College Catalog Hours] Note: Students must have graduated from a hospital-based certificate program in radiologic

Sheridan, Scott

459

OriginalresearchnNeuroradiology 560 radiology.rsna.org n Radiology: Volume 267: Number 2--May 2013  

E-print Network

OriginalresearchnNeuroradiology 560 radiology.rsna.org n Radiology: Volume 267: Number 2--May 2013 Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich (L.S., T.M., R.J.); Department of Radiology, University of Virginia.J.C.); Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Ill (P.M., V.K.); SAIC-Frederick Inc, Frederick

Rubin, Daniel L.

460

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-print Network

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-RTAS] Regional College Hours] Note: Students must have earned an AAS degree in Radiologic Technology (38 semester credits from

Sheridan, Scott

461

ANL-E Health Physics experience with D and D  

SciTech Connect

The Argonne National Laboratory--East (ANL-E) Health Physics Section provides direct and/or oversight support to various D&D projects at ANL-E. The health physics problems encountered have been challenging, primarily because they involved the potential for high internal exposures as well as actual high external exposures. The lessons learned are applicable to other radiological facilities. A number of D&D projects being conducted concurrently at ANL-E are described. The problems encountered are then categorized, and lessons learned and recommendations are provided. The main focus will be limited to the support and technical assistance provided by personnel from the ANL Health Physics Section during the course of the work activities.

Baker, S.I.; Mosho, G.D.; Munyon, W.J.; Murdoch, B.T.; Sholeen, C.M.; Shuman, J.P.

1996-04-01

462

ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY  

E-print Network

ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Environment, Health, and Safety Division of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Site Environmental Report for 2004 Volume I SEPTEMBER 2005 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

463

ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY  

E-print Network

ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Environment, Health, and Safety Division of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Site Environmental Report for 2004 Volume II SEPTEMBER 2005 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

464

Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Management Subteam conducted a management assessment of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) programs and their implementation of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The objectives of the assessment were to: (1) evaluate the effectiveness of existing management functions and processes in terms of ensuring environmental compliance, and the health and safety of workers and the general public; and (2) identify probable root causes for ES H findings and concerns. Organizations reviewed were DOE-Headquarters: DOE Field Offices, Chicago (CH) and Idaho (ID); Argonne Area Offices, East (AAO-E) and West (AAO-W); Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL); Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); EG G Idaho, Inc. (EG G); Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO); Rockwell-INEL; MK-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC); and Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI). The scope of the assessment covered the following ES H management issues: policies and procedures; roles, responsibilities, and authorities; management commitment; communication; staff development, training, and certification; recruitment; compliance management; conduct of operations; emergency planning and preparedness; quality assurance; self assessment; oversight activities; and cost plus award fee processes.

Not Available

1991-08-01

465

Coherent scatter in diagnostic radiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coherent scatter is often ignored in diagnostic radiology because its cross section is relatively small, and because it is assumed to be indistinguishable from primary radiation. Single-scatter calculations, however, show that coherently scattered photons diverge sufficiently from the primary ray to degrade image contrast, and that they account for a significant fraction of the total scattered energy fluence at the

P. C. Johns; M. J. Yaffe

1983-01-01

466

REDUCING NUCLEAR AND RADIOLOGICAL TERRORISM THREATS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Urgent actions are needed to prevent a nuclear or radiological 9\\/11. Terrorists are actively seeking nuclear weapons and Radiological Dispersal Devices (RDDs) and the materials to make them. There are scores of sites where the essential ingredients of nuclear weapons exist, in dozens of countries worldwide. There are thousands of sites worldwide where radiological materials exist. Many of these sites

Matthew Bunn; Tom Bielefeld

467

Osteopoikilosis: A radiological and pathological study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anatomico-pathological and radiological studies of osteopoikilosis were performed in two cases, one involving a femoral head, excised after a fracture of a femoral neck, in an elderly man and the other following biopsy of an iliac crest in a young woman. In both patients wide-spread radiological evidence of the disorder was present as an incidental finding. The radiological appearance of

R. Lagier; A. Mbakop; A. Bigler

1984-01-01

468

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2010  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2010 2011 Environment Report RL 13/11 Cefas contract Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2010 Shellfish consumption and intertidal occupancy review F, P., Smedley, C.A., and Ly, V.E., 2011. Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2010. RL 13

469

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2011  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2011 2012 Environment Report RL 05/12 Cefas contract Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2011 Shellfish consumption and intertidal occupancy review F., 2012. Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2011. RL 05/12. Cefas, Lowestoft A copy can

470

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2012  

E-print Network

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2012 2013 Environment Report RL 04a/13 Cefas Final report Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2012 Aquatic pathways review G.P. Papworth, C.J., Ly, V.E., and Dewar, A., 2013. Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2012. RL 04a/13

471

Radiological assessment of dredging application for  

E-print Network

Radiological assessment of dredging application for the port of Lancaster (2008) Cefas Environment 21/2008 RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF DREDGING APPLICATION FOR THE PORT OF LANCASTER (2008) The Centre Marine material disposal ­ Part II FEPA #12;2 RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF DREDGING APPLICATION

472

Radiological assessment of dredging application for  

E-print Network

Radiological assessment of dredging application for Oldbury power station (2009) Cefas Environment 14 /2009 RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF DREDGING APPLICATION FOR OLDBURY POWER STATION (2009) The Centre material disposal ­ Part II FEPA #12;2 RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF DREDGING APPLICATION FOR OLDBURY POWER

473

College of Medicine DR Diagnostic Radiology  

E-print Network

College of Medicine DR Diagnostic Radiology KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course RADIOLOGY. (1-3) With the advice and approval of his or her faculty adviser, the first-year student may choose approved electives offered by the Department of Diagnostic Radiology. The intent is to provide

MacAdam, Keith

474

Aquatic Microbiology Laboratory Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This laboratory manual presents information and techniques dealing with aquatic microbiology as it relates to environmental health science, sanitary engineering, and environmental microbiology. The contents are divided into three categories: (1) ecological and physiological considerations; (2) public health aspects; and (3)microbiology of water…

Cooper, Robert C.; And Others

475

The radiological assessment system for consequence analysis - RASCAL  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Assessment System for Consequence Analysis, Version 2.1 (RASCAL 2.1) has been developed for use during a response to radiological emergencies. The model estimates doses for comparison with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Protective Action Guides (PAGs) and thresholds for acute health effects. RASCAL was designed to be used by U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel who report to the site of a nuclear accident to conduct an independent evaluation of dose and consequence projections and personnel who conduct training and drills on emergency responses. It allows consideration of the dominant aspects of the source term, transport, dose, and consequences. RASCAL consists of three computational tools: ST-DOSE, FM-DOSE, and DECAY. ST-DOSE computes source term, atmospheric transport, and dose to man from accidental airborne releases of radionuclides. The source-term calculations are appropriate for accidents at U.S. power reactors. FM-DOSE computes doses from environmental concentrations of radionuclides in the air and on the ground. DECAY computes radiological decay and daughter in-growth. RASCAL 2.1 is a DOS application that can be run under Windows 3.1 and 95. RASCAL has been the starting point for other accident consequence models, notably INTERRAS, an international version of RASCAL, and HASCAL, an expansion of RASCAL that will model radiological, biological, and chemical accidents.

Sjoreen, A.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ramsdell, J.V. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Athey, G.F. [Athey Consulting, Charles Town, WV (United States)] [and others

1996-04-01

476

A reference standard-based quality assurance program for radiology.  

PubMed

The authors have developed a comprehensive radiology quality assurance (QA) program that evaluates radiology interpretations and procedures by comparing them with reference standards. Performance metrics are calculated and then compared with benchmarks or goals on the basis of published multicenter data and meta-analyses. Additional workload for physicians is kept to a minimum by having trained allied health staff members perform the comparisons of radiology reports with the reference standards. The performance metrics tracked by the QA program include the accuracy of CT colonography for detecting polyps, the false-negative rate for mammographic detection of breast cancer, the accuracy of CT angiography detection of coronary artery stenosis, the accuracy of meniscal tear detection on MRI, the accuracy of carotid artery stenosis detection on MR angiography, the accuracy of parathyroid adenoma detection by parathyroid scintigraphy, the success rate for obtaining cortical tissue on ultrasound-guided core biopsies of pelvic renal transplants, and the technical success rate for peripheral arterial angioplasty procedures. In contrast with peer-review programs, this reference standard-based QA program minimizes the possibilities of reviewer bias and erroneous second reviewer interpretations. The more objective assessment of performance afforded by the QA program will provide data that can easily be used for education and management conferences, research projects, and multicenter evaluations. Additionally, such performance data could be used by radiology departments to demonstrate their value over nonradiology competitors to referring clinicians, hospitals, patients, and third-party payers. PMID:20129274

Liu, Patrick T; Johnson, C Daniel; Miranda, Rafael; Patel, Maitray D; Phillips, Carrie J

2010-01-01

477

Radiological characterization of spent control rod assemblies  

SciTech Connect

This document represents the final report of an ongoing study to provide radiological characterizations, classifications, and assessments in support of the decommissioning of nuclear power stations. This report describes the results of non-destructive and laboratory radionuclide measurements, as well as waste classification assessments, of BWR and PWR spent control rod assemblies. The radionuclide inventories of these spent control rods were determined by three separate methodologies, including (1) direct assay techniques, (2) calculational techniques, and (3) by sampling and laboratory radiochemical analyses. For the BWR control rod blade (CRB) and PWR burnable poison rod assembly (BPRA), {sup 60}Co and {sup 63}Ni, present in the stainless steel cladding, were the most abundant neutron activation products. The most abundant radionuclide in the PWR rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) was {sup 108m}Ag (130 yr halflife) produced in the Ag-In-Cd alloy used as the neutron poison. This radionuclide will be the dominant contributor to the gamma dose rate for many hundreds of years. The results of the direct assay methods agree very well ({+-}10%) with the sampling/radiochemical measurements. The results of the calculational methods agreed fairly well with the empirical measurements for the BPRA, but often varied by a factor of 5 to 10 for the CRB and the RCCA assemblies. If concentration averaging and encapsulation, as allowed by 10CFR61.55, is performed, then each of the entire control assemblies would be classified as Class C low-level radioactive waste.

Lepel, E.A.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.; Pratt, S.L.; Haggard, D.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-10-01

478

Environmental Health Facilities Experimental laboratories  

E-print Network

includes chemical fume hoods and biosafety cabinets, standard bench space for at least 20 students of microgram quantities, an electron microscope suite with dark room, glassware washer, autoclaves, centrifuge

Stuart, Amy L.

479

Clinical, laboratory and health-related quality of life correlates of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Responder Index response: a post hoc analysis of the phase 3 belimumab trials  

PubMed Central

Objective Correlates of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) Responder Index (SRI) response with clinical trial end points were examined using pooled data from the Study of Belimumab in Subjects with SLE (BLISS) trials (N=1684). Methods Changes in clinical, laboratory and health-related quality of life measures from baseline at 52?weeks were compared between SRI responders (n=761) and non-responders (n=923). Results More SRI responders than non-responders had ?4-point (100% vs 3.8%) and ?7-point (40.3% vs 1.3%) Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus National Assessment-Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index reductions, no new British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) A and ?1 new B scores (91.9% vs 35.9%), and a 25% reduction in corticosteroid dose decrease of 25% from >7.5?mg/d to ?7.5?mg/d (25.5% vs 13.9%), and fewer had a corticosteroid increase from ?7.5 mg/d to >7.5?mg/d (4.1% vs 21.3%; all p<0.001). More responders than non-responders had improved organ domains: Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus National Assessment-Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (mean 1.45 vs 0.40), BILAG (2.00 vs 0.39), and greater improvement in Physician's Global Assessment (all p<0.001). Risks for developing any SLE flare or severe flare were reduced in responders by 42% and 87%, respectively (p<0.001). Responders reported greater improvements in Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form version 2 Physical and Mental Components and all domain scores, and Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue score compared with non-responders (all p<0.001). Conclusion Overall, SRI response in patients with active, autoantibody-positive SLE was associated with improvements in clinical, laboratory and patient-reported outcome measures, indicating that SRI response was associated with a global benefit. Trial registration number NCT00424476; NCT00410384. PMID:25396065

Furie, Richard; Petri, Michelle A; Strand, Vibeke; Gladman, Dafna D; Zhong, Z John; Freimuth, William W

2014-01-01

480

The Indiana laboratory system: focus on environmental laboratories.  

PubMed

The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) Laboratories are working to improve Indiana's state public health laboratory system. Environmental laboratories are key stakeholders in this system, but their needs have been largely unaddressed prior to this project. In an effort to identify and engage these laboratories, the ISDH Laboratories organized and hosted the First Annual Environmental Laboratories Meeting. The focus of this meeting was on water-testing laboratories throughout the state. Meeting objectives included issue identification, disaster recovery response, and communication efforts among system partners. Common concerns included the need for new technology and updated methods, analyst training, certification programs for analysts and sample collectors, electronic reporting, and regulation interpretation and inspection consistency. Now that these issues have been identified, they can be addressed through a combination of laboratory workgroups and collaboration with Indiana's regulatory agencies. Participants were overwhelmingly positive about the meeting's outcomes and were willing to help with future laboratory system improvement projects. PMID:23997304

Madlem, Jyl M; Hammes, Kara R; Matheson, Shelley R; Lovchik, Judith C

2013-01-01

481

The Indiana Laboratory System: Focus on Environmental Laboratories  

PubMed Central

The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) Laboratories are working to improve Indiana's state public health laboratory system. Environmental laboratories are key stakeholders in this system, but their needs have been largely unaddressed prior to this project. In an effort to identify and engage these laboratories, the ISDH Laboratories organized and hosted the First Annual Environmental Laboratories Meeting. The focus of this meeting was on water-testing laboratories throughout the state. Meeting objectives included issue identification, disaster recovery response, and communication efforts among system partners. Common concerns included the need for new technology and updated methods, analyst training, certification programs for analysts and sample collectors, electronic reporting, and regulation interpretation and inspection consistency. Now that these issues have been identified, they can be addressed through a combination of laboratory workgroups and collaboration with Indiana's regulatory agencies. Participants were overwhelmingly positive about the meeting's outcomes and were willing to help with future laboratory system improvement projects. PMID:23997304

Hammes, Kara R.; Matheson, Shelley R.; Lovchik, Judith C.

2013-01-01

482

Biomedical Science, Unit I: Respiration in Health and Medicine. Respiratory Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology; The Behavior of Gases; Introductory Chemistry; and Air Pollution. Laboratory Manual. Revised Version, 1975.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to accompany the student text on respiration, this manual presents instructions on the use of laboratory equipment and presents various experiments dealing with the concepts presented in the text. Thirty-nine laboratory activities are described. Laboratory activities are divided into several parts, each part covering a specific experiment…

Biomedical Interdisciplinary Curriculum Project, Berkeley, CA.

483

Simulation Technology Laboratory Building 970 hazards assessment document  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Simulation Technology Laboratory, Building 970. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distances at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the ERPG-2 and Early Severe Health Effects thresholds are 78 and 46 meters, respectively. The highest emergency classification is a Site Area Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is 100 meters.

Wood, C.L.; Starr, M.D.

1994-11-01

484

Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1988  

SciTech Connect

The report documents the performance of certain radiological protection sitewide services during calendar year (CY) 1988 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and contractor activities on the Hanford Site. The routine program for each service is discussed along with any significant program changes and tasks, investigations, and studies performed in support of each program. Other related activities such as publications, presentations, and memberships on standard or industry committees are also listed. The programs covered provide services in the areas of (1) internal dosimetry, (2) in vivo measurements, (3) external dosimetry, (4) instrument calibration and evaluation, (5) calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) (formerly the National Bureau of Standards), and (6) radiological records. 23 refs., 15 figs., 15 tabs.

Lyon, M.; Fix, J.J.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Leonowich, J.A.; Palmer, H.E.; Sula, M.J.

1989-06-01

485

A review of the radiological treatment  

SciTech Connect

The Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) was released by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for public comment on September 22, 1995. Prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Final WM PEIS is currently scheduled for release in late summer 1996. The Draft WM PEIS was published after about 3 years of effort to select and evaluated the best alternatives for treating, storing, and disposing of the 50-year legacy of radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes existing within the DOE complex. The evaluation examined the potential health and environmental impacts of integrated waste management alternatives for five categories of waste types at 54 DOE sites. A primary consideration as a potential source of human health impacts at all sites is that of radiological releases resulting from postulated accidents involving facilities used to treat radioactive wastes. This paper first provides a brief, updated summary of the approach used to define and perform treatment facility accident analyses in the Draft WM PEIS. It reviews the selection of dominant sequences for the major sites most affected by the preferred waste management alternatives and highlights the salient accident analysis results. Finally, it summarizes and addresses key public and state and federal agency comments relating to accident analysis that were received in the public comment process.

Mueller, C.J.; Folga, S.; Nabelssi, B.; Kohout, E.

1996-07-01

486

Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the human health and ecological risk assessment for the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) permit renewal for the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF). Volume 1 is the text of the risk assessment, and Volume 2 (provided on a compact disc) is the supporting modeling data. The EWTF is operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at Site 300, which is located in the foothills between the cities of Livermore and Tracy, approximately 17 miles east of Livermore and 8 miles southwest of Tracy. Figure 1 is a map of the San Francisco Bay Area, showing the location of Site 300 and other points of reference. One of the principal activities of Site 300 is to test what are known as 'high explosives' for nuclear weapons. These are the highly energetic materials that provide the force to drive fissionable material to criticality. LLNL scientists develop and test the explosives and the integrated non-nuclear components in support of the United States nuclear stockpile stewardship program as well as in support of conventional weapons and the aircraft, mining, oil exploration, and construction industries. Many Site 300 facilities are used in support of high explosives research. Some facilities are used in the chemical formulation of explosives; others are locations where explosive charges are mechanically pressed; others are locations where the materials are inspected radiographically for such defects as cracks and voids. Finally, some facilities are locations where the machined charges are assembled before they are sent to the onsite test firing facilities, and additional facilities are locations where materials are stored. Wastes generated from high-explosives research are treated by open burning (OB) and open detonation (OD). OB and OD treatments are necessary because they are the safest methods for treating explosives wastes generated at these facilities, and they eliminate the requirement for further handling and transportation that would be required if the wastes were treated off site.

Gallegos, G; Daniels, J; Wegrecki, A

2007-10-01

487

Results of the independent radiological verification survey of the remedial action performed at 525 S. Main Street, Oxford, Ohio, (OXO002)  

SciTech Connect

Between October 1952 and February 1957, National Lead of Ohio (NLO), a primary contractor for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), subcontracted certain uranium machining operations to Alba Craft Laboratory, Incorporated, located at 10-14 West Rose Avenue, Oxford, Ohio. In 1992, personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) confirmed the presence of residual radioactive materials from the AEC-related operations in and around the facility in amounts exceeding the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Above-guideline radiation levels were also found both indoors and outdoors at 525 S. Main Street, a private residential property in the immediate vicinity of the Alba Craft site. This document reports the findings at this private residence. Although the amount of uranium found on the properties posed little health hazard if left undisturbed, the levels were sufficient to require remediation to bring radiological cond