Sample records for radiological health laboratory

  1. Radiological Work Authorization Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Knowles, David William

    Radiological Work Authorization Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health and is not authorized by this Radiological Work Authorization (RWA). If work in fields greater than 100 mrem/h at 30 cm is necessary, a separate Radiological Work Permit (RWP) is required. Experiment Description (cont

  2. Bookshelf on radiological health

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. G. Wilms; C. E. Moss

    1975-01-01

    This bookshelf is an attempt to list, categorize, and present details on ; the many varied sources of information available to personnel working in the ; field of radiological health. This particular bookshelf will not cover those ; sources listed in a previous publication (Bureau of Radiological Health Training ; Publication TP-198), but will concentrate on those sources published or

  3. CSU-FDA (Colorado State University-Federal Drug Administration) collaborative radiological health laboratory, 1981. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    The Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory (CRHL) was established in 1962 by the U.S. Public Health Service and Colorado State University for the purpose of determining in a carefully controlled experiment the lifetime hazards associated with prenatal and early postnatal exposure to ionizing radiation. The CRHL study is designed to provide information that will facilitate the evaluation of risks to humans from medical exposure during early development. The study is a long-term (lifespan) study of a moderately large and long-lived mammal exposed at one of several times during development to a relatively small and discrete dose of external radiation. Ages at irradiation selected for comparison reflect the primary concern with medical exposures during the developmental period. The basic experiment under this contract contains 1680 beagles that will be maintained and evaluated for most of their natural lives. Commitment of animals began in December 1967 and was completed in October 1972. This annual report summarizes the current status of the study for the reporting period of January 1 through December 31, 1981.

  4. The Health Physics and Radiological Health

    E-print Network

    The Health Physics and Radiological Health Handbook Revised Edition Edited by Bernard ShleienPoSURE AND SmELDING FROM EXTERNAL RADIATION 165 Table 6.1 Specific Gamma Ray Dose Constants for Selected Nuclides Important to Radiological Assessment and Protection (After Unger and Trubey ORNURSIC-45 1981

  5. Health physics and radiological health handbook

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Shleien; M. S. Terpilak

    1984-01-01

    This is a book review of The Health Physics and Radiological Health Handbook. The author discusses the highlights of this near-encyclopedic compendium on Health Physics. He stresses that in spite of an abundance of typographical errors, that it is a very good and complete reference tool.

  6. Radiological health training resources, 1979

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Munzer; K. G. Sauer

    1979-01-01

    The training collection maintained by the Division of Training and Medical Applications includes videocassettes, movies, and printed material. Titles are limited to radiological health subjects only and include a variety of topics ranging from basic fundamentals to historical perspectives to current state-of-the-art.

  7. Bridging Radiology and Public Health: The Emerging Field of Radiologic Public Health Informatics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel J. Mollura; John A. Carrino; Diane L. Matuszak; Zaruhi R. Mnatsakanyan; John Eng; Protagoras Cutchis; Steven M. Babin; Carol Sniegoski; Joseph S. Lombardo

    2008-01-01

    Radiology and public health have an emerging opportunity to collaborate, in which radiology's vast supply of imaging data can be integrated into public health information systems for epidemiologic assessments and responses to population health problems. Fueling the linkage of radiology and public health include (i) the transition from analog film to digital formats, enabling flexible use of radiologic data; (ii)

  8. University Curriculums and Fellowships in Radiological Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villforth, John C.

    This booklet describes the academic programs funded through the Radiological Health Training Grants Program. Graduate Programs for the training of radiological health specialists at 28 universities and undergraduate (two year and four year) radiological technical programs at seven institutions are described. Program descriptions include degree(s)…

  9. Laboratory Demonstration of Radiological Decontamination Using Radpro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Lear; R. Greene; J. Isham; R. Martin; C. Norton

    2007-01-01

    In the event of terrorist activity involving the explosive dispersion of radioactive materials (a 'dirty' bomb), a number of different types of surfaces and substrates, including concrete, granite, brick, cinder block, tile, asphalt, wood, glass, plastic, iron, and steel, may become radiologically contaminated. Incident cleanup is assumed to involve decontamination of these surfaces. Laboratory testing was conducted using samples of

  10. Cursory radiological assessment: Battelle Columbus Laboratory Decommissioning and Decontamination Project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. H. Smith; W. J. Munyon; G. D. Mosho; M. J. Robinet; R. A. Wynveen

    1988-01-01

    This document reports on the results obtained from a cursory radiological assessment of various properties at the Battelle Columbus Laboratory, Columbia, Ohio. The cursory radiological assessment is part of a preliminary investigation for the Battelle Columbus Laboratory Decommissioning and Decontamination Project. The radiological assessment of Battelle Columbus Laboratory's two sites included conducting interior and exterior building surveys and collecting and

  11. Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report Tritium Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, T.B.; Gorman, T.P.

    1996-08-01

    This document contains the specific radiological characterization information on Building 968, the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) Complex and Facility. We performed the characterization as outlined in its Radiological Characterization Plan. The Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report (RC&FFSR) provides historic background information on each laboratory within the TRL complex as related to its original and present radiological condition. Along with the work outlined in the Radiological Characterization Plan (RCP), we performed a Radiological Soils Characterization, Radiological and Chemical Characterization of the Waste Water Hold-up System including all drains, and a Radiological Characterization of the Building 968 roof ventilation system. These characterizations will provide the basis for the Sandia National Laboratory, California (SNL/CA) Site Termination Survey .Plan, when appropriate.

  12. Environmental Health and Safety Radiation Control and Radiological

    E-print Network

    Slatton, Clint

    Environmental Health and Safety Radiation Control and Radiological Services #12;· Course focuses) Radiation Control and Radiological Services University-wide radiation protection 3) Occupational of Personnel and Individual Responsibilities #12;Radiation Control and Radiological Services Department Contact

  13. Environmental Health & Safety Office of Radiological Safety

    E-print Network

    Houston, Paul L.

    Information: Department: Building: Room: Lab Phone: #12;Environmental Health & Safety Office of Radiological Supervisor I shall notify the Laser Safety Officer in writing of my intention to move my laser/laser lab or disposal of lasers in my lab(s). 8. I have read and understand the Georgia Tech Laser Safety Policy Manual

  14. The Correlated Lecture Laboratory Series in Diagnostic Radiological Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamel, David A.; And Others

    This series in diagnostic radiological physics has been designed to provide the physics background requisite for the proper conduct of medical diagnostic x-ray examinations. The basic goal of the series is to bridge physics theory and radiological practice, achieved by combining pertinent lecture material with laboratory exercises that illustrate…

  15. Proceedings of radiological health symposium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Doi; G. Holje; L. N. Loo; H. P. Chan

    1979-01-01

    Resolution (or sharpness) of radiographic screen-film systems influences the physical image quality of radiographs, and thereby the diagnositc accuracy and patient exposure. We use the modulation transfer function (MTF) to quantify the resolution property of screen-film systems. In our laboratory, the slit method and the digital Fourier transformation are used for measurements of the MTFs of screen-film systems. Recent measurements

  16. Radiological Control Manual Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Division

    E-print Network

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Radiological Control Manual Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Division SLAC-I-720-0A05Z-001 and published by ESHQ Publishing Document Title: Radiological Control Manual Original Publication Date: 1;Radiological Control Manual Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS Publication Data

  17. Postdoctoral Fellow: Biomass Cookstoves and Health The Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences

    E-print Network

    Birner, Thomas

    and Radiological Health Sciences at Colorado State University has an immediate opening for a post- doctoral://www.colostate.edu/visiting-campus.aspx. The Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, home to over 100 undergraduate Environmental

  18. Radiological Laboratory, Utility, Office Building LEED Strategy & Achievement

    SciTech Connect

    Seguin, Nicole R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-18

    Missions that the Radiological Laboratory, utility, Office Building (RLUOB) supports are: (1) Nuclear Materials Handling, Processing, and Fabrication; (2) Stockpile Management; (3) Materials and Manufacturing Technologies; (4) Nonproliferation Programs; (5) Waste Management Activities - Environmental Programs; and (6) Materials Disposition. The key capabilities are actinide analytical chemistry and material characterization.

  19. CENTER FOR DEVICES AND RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH (CDRH) DOCUMENT DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Center for Devices and Radiological Health has established advisory committees to provide independent, professional expertise and technical assistance on the development, safety and effectiveness, and regulation of medical devices and electronic products that produce radiatio...

  20. Radiological risk guidelines for nonreactor nuclear facilities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, D.E.; Ikenberry, T.A.

    1993-09-01

    Radiological risk evaluation guidelines for the public and workers have been developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) based upon the Nuclear Safety Policy of the US Department of Energy (DOE) established in Secretary of Energy Notice SEN-35-91. The DOE nuclear safety policy states that the general public shall be protected such that no individual bears significant additional risk to health and safety from the operation of a DOE nuclear facility above the risks to which members of the general population are normally exposed. The radiological risk evaluation guidelines developed at PNL are unique in that they are (1) based upon quantitative risk goals and (2) provide a consistent level of risk management. These guidelines are used to evaluate the risk from radiological accidents that may occur during research and development activities at PNL, and are not intended for evaluation of routine exposures. A safety analyst uses the,frequency of the potential accident and the radiological dose to a given receptor to determine if the accident consequences meet the objectives of the Nuclear Safety Policy. The radiological risk evaluation guidelines are an effective tool for assisting in the management of risk at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities. These guidelines (1) meet the nuclear safety policy of DOE, (2) establish a tool for managing risk at a consistent level within the defined constraints, and (3) set risk at an appropriate level, as compared with other risks encountered by the public and worker. Table S.1 summarizes the guidelines developed in this report.

  1. Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Guss, Robert Augdahl, Bill Nickels, Cassandra Zellers

    2008-04-16

    This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec’s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

  2. Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch

    SciTech Connect

    Paul P. Guss

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec’s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Space and Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

  3. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1996 Site Environmental Report Vol. I

    E-print Network

    2010-01-01

    Services Gerard Wong Radiological Health Branch 601 North 7Health Services William Lew Radiological Health Branch 2151Radiological and Analytical Measurements Laboratory Nuclear Science / Bevatron N/A N/A NW Environment, Health, &

  4. Metodologia Laboratorial: Controle de Qualidade em Radiologia (Odontologia) Methodology Laboratorial: Control of Quality Control in Radiology (Dentistry)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luiz Carlos PARDINI; Plauto Christopher; Aranha WATANABE; Solange Aparecida; Caldeira MONTEIRO

    The authors present pedagogical model of teaching and learning in Radiology (Dentistry) with emphasis on laboratory methodology. The main goal is to train the students to the skills and competencies for Higher Education (Methodology Laboratorial).

  5. Radiological Control Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  6. Safety and Health Topics: Laboratories

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-01-01

    A website created by the Occupational Safety and Health Adminstration (OSHA) highlighting standards, standard interpretations (official letters of interpretation of the standards), and national consensus standards related to occupational exposure to hazardous chemicals in laboratories.

  7. DECISION-MAKING AND RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION AT THREE MILE ISLAND: RESPONSE OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION AND WELFARE

    E-print Network

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01

    e n t . The Bureau of Radiological Health in the FDA,RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION AT THREE MILE ISLAND: RESPONSE OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH,RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION AT THREE MILE ISLAND RESPONSE OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH,

  8. GeoHealth Laboratory Research & Applications

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    tP GeoHealth Laboratory Research & Applications Te tai whenua o te hau ora GeoHealth Laboratory;GeoHealth Laboratory Research & Applications Te tai whenua o te hau ora 1 GIS Expertise & High Quality Intelligence NZ Charting our Health First Annual Report GeoHealth Laboratory Dept. of Geography University

  9. Preliminary overview of radiological data validation: Problems found in laboratory data

    SciTech Connect

    Wenrick, L.F. [Adjunct Laboratory Consulting Services, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    A significant amount of resources is expended during the remediation of environmental pollutants including high level radioactive waste. The remediation is the direct result of a real or perceived threat to human health and/or the environment. Because of the ramifications of making such decisions based on laboratory data, an assessment of data quality, commonly referred to as data validation has been incorporated into the investigatory process. Without data validation, investigators must assure that all data submitted by project laboratories is valid. With data validation investigators are provided with information as to data quality for use in the decision-making process. This presentation is a case study in which 276 samples (soils and aqueous) were submitted for independent third-party radiological data validation. The author has found that a large amount of data qualified shows a need for better laboratory quality control practices and careful evaluation by third-party data validation.

  10. Health care facility-based decontamination of victims exposed to chemical, biological, and radiological materials

    E-print Network

    Koenig, Kristi L MD

    2008-01-01

    Health care facility-based decontamination of victims exposed to chemical, biological, and radiologicalHealth care facility-based decontamination of victims exposed to chemical, biological, and radiologicalHealth care facility-based decontamination of victims exposed to chemical, biological, and radiological

  11. Radiological Emergency Response Health and Safety Manual

    SciTech Connect

    D. R. Bowman

    2001-05-01

    This manual was created to provide health and safety (H&S) guidance for emergency response operations. The manual is organized in sections that define each aspect of H and S Management for emergency responses. The sections are as follows: Responsibilities; Health Physics; Industrial Hygiene; Safety; Environmental Compliance; Medical; and Record Maintenance. Each section gives guidance on the types of training expected for managers and responders, safety processes and procedures to be followed when performing work, and what is expected of managers and participants. Also included are generic forms that will be used to facilitate or document activities during an emergency response. These ensure consistency in creating useful real-time and archival records and help to prevent the loss or omission of information.

  12. Role of the US public health service in radiological health: 1946-1969

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. G. Terrill; R. DeVore

    1982-01-01

    This report is a history of events involving radiological health activities of the U.S. Public Health Service from 1946 to 1969. It is organized chronologically and by activity. Records from the author's files, the Bureau library, Congressional records, and records of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy were all used in compiling the history. It includes information on exposure from

  13. Role of the U. S. Public Health Service in radiological health: 1946-1969

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. G. Terrill; R. DeVore

    1982-01-01

    This report is a history of events involving radiological health activities of the U.S. Public Health Service from 1946 to 1969. It is organized chronologically and by activity. Records from the author's files, the Bureau library, Congressional records, and records of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy were all used in compiling the history. It includes information on exposure from

  14. World Health Organization Laboratory biosafety manual

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    . Guidelines for laboratory/facility commissioning 33 8. Guidelines for laboratory/facility certification 36World Health Organization Geneva 2004 Laboratory biosafety manual Third edition #12;WHO Library Cataloguing-in-Publication Data World Health Organization. Laboratory biosafety manual. ­ 3rd ed. 1

  15. 78 FR 20928 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health: Health of Women Program; Public Workshop; Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ...FDA-2013-N-0329] Center for Devices and Radiological Health: Health of Women Program; Public Workshop; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food...Vital Framework for Protecting and Promoting Public Health,''...

  16. Radiological health training resources catalog, 1981. Biennial report Aug 79Aug 81

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chesemore

    1981-01-01

    Within the Bureau of Radiological Health, the Division of Training and Medical Applications is responsible for programs that provide training assistance to State and local radiological health agencies. Toward this end, the Division maintains an extensive collection of training materials that it makes available to borrowers on a free loan basis. In addition to their usefulness to State and local

  17. Int J Hyg Environ Health. Author manuscript Comparative assessing for radiological, chemical, and physical exposures

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Int J Hyg Environ Health. Author manuscript Page /1 15 Comparative assessing for radiological effects Introduction Uranium is known for its chemical and radiological toxicity after acute exposure. But there is little evidence on the adverse health effects and particularly on the carcinogenic potential

  18. A comparative study for radiological decontamination of laboratory fume hood materials.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Elizabeth; Sweet, Lucas; MacFarlan, Paul; McNamara, Bruce; Kerschner, Harrison

    2012-08-01

    The efficacy for radiological decontamination of the laboratory standard fume hood as constructed of stainless steel, compared to that of powder-coated carbon steel is described. While the chemical inertness of powder-coated surfaces is good, faced with everyday abrasion, aggressive inorganic solutions and vapors, and penetrating organics commonly employed in government laboratory fume hoods, radiological decontamination of powder-coated steel surfaces was found to be similar to those made of stainless steel for easily solubilized or digestible radionuclides. Plutonium was difficult to remove from stainless steel and powder-coated surfaces, especially after prolonged contact times. PMID:22739967

  19. Health effects of SRS non-radiological air emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.

    1997-06-16

    This report examines the potential health effects of non radiological emissions to the air resulting from operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The scope of this study was limited to the 55 air contaminants for which the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has quantified risk by determining unit risk factors (excess cancer risks) and/or reference concentrations (deleterious non cancer risks). Potential health impacts have been assessed in relation to the maximally exposed individual. This is a hypothetical person who resides for a lifetime at the SRS boundary. The most recent (1994) quality assured SRS emissions data available were used. Estimated maximum site boundary concentrations of the air contaminants were calculated using air dispersion modeling and 24-hour and annual averaging times. For the emissions studied, the excess cancer risk was found to be less than the generally accepted risk level of 1 in 100,000 and, in most cases, was less than 1 in 1,000,000. Deleterious non cancer effects were also found to be very unlikely.

  20. Radiological Laboratory Sample Analysis Guide for Incidents of National Significance ? Radionuclides in Air

    EPA Science Inventory

    [The document describes the likely analytical decision paths that would be made by personnel at a radioanalytical laboratory following a radiological or nuclear incident, such as that caused by a terrorist attack. EPA?s responsibilities, as outlined in the National Response Frame...

  1. Radiological safety at Argonne national laboratory's heavy ion research facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, R. H.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1985-05-01

    This paper discusses the radiological safety system to be employed at the Argonne tandem—linac accelerator system (ATLAS). The design parameters of ATLAS that affect safety have remained unchanged since ATLAS construction began in 1982. The specialized radiological safety considerations of ATLAS were discussed in 1982 [1]. This paper will present the details of the hardware, the administrative controls, and the radiation monitoring that will be in effect when beam is produced in April 1985. The experimental hall utilizing the maximum energy beam ( ˜ 27 MeV per nucleon) from the completed ATLAS has been partitioned with shielding blocks into its final configuration. Because scientists want access to some of the partitioned-off areas while beam is present in other areas, an interlock and logic system allowing such occupancy has been designed. The rationale and hardware of the system will be discussed. Since one of the potential radiation hazards is high-energy forward-directed neutrons from any location where the beam impinges (such as collimators, bending and focussing systems, experimental targets, and beam stops), radiation surveys and hazard assessments are necessary for the administrative controls that allow occupancy of various areas. Because of the various uses of ATLAS, neutrons (the dominant beam hazard) will be non-existent in some experiments and will be of energies ? 10 MeV for a few experiments. These conditions may exist at specific locations during beam preparation but may change rapidly when beam is finally delivered to an experimental area. Monitoring and assessing such time varying and geographically changing hazards will be a challenge since little data will be available on source terms until various beams are produced of sufficient intensity and energy to make measurements. How the operating division for ATLAS and the Argonne safety division are addressing this aspect through administrative controls will also be discussed.

  2. Radiological Control Manual. Revision 0, January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

  3. Report of state and local radiological health programs fiscal year 1980. Annual report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. I. Jr Vassar; R. A. Moats; V. A. Matthews

    1982-01-01

    This report is the twentieth of a series based on data provided by 54 State and local radiological health programs. The resources and activities of State and local radiological programs are presented and summarized from data provided as of June 30, 1980. Summary data are included for fiscal years 1978 through 1980. Resources include data on personnel, funds, and equipment.

  4. THE ROLE OF THE U.S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE IN STIMULATING STATE AND LOCAL RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH PROGRAMS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Russell I. Pierce; Roscoe H. Goeke

    1963-01-01

    Under the Constitution, the responsibility for health protection is ; vested in the States. Therefore, the role of the Public Health Service in ; stimulating state and local radiological health programs is limited to ; consultation, program planning, assignment of personnel to the state program, ; loan of equipment, training of personnel, and providing funds through a system of ;

  5. Radiological survey support activities for the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-09-01

    At the request of the Engineering Support Division of the US Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office and in accordance with the programmatic overview/certification responsibilities of the Department of Energy Environmental and Safety Engineering Division, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group conducted a series of radiological measurements and tests at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor located in Ames, Iowa. These measurements and tests were conducted during 1980 and 1981 while the reactor building was being decontaminated and decommissioned for the purpose of returning the building to general use. The results of these evaluations are included in this report. Although the surface contamination within the reactor building could presumably be reduced to negligible levels, the potential for airborne contamination from tritiated water vapor remains. This vapor emmanates from contamination within the concrete of the building and should be monitored until such time as it is reduced to background levels. 2 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

  6. A Useful Formula for the Radiological Calibration Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Cummings

    2005-03-01

    A useful technique for determining the relationships between irradiation position and air kerma or neutron dose equivalent rate is presented. The standard geometric model (1/r2) is expanded allowing the user to include curvature in the model caused by scattered radiation. This technique applies to clean irradiation geometries that are well modeled by the standard geometric model, high-scatter geometries encountered in well irradiators, and neutron irradiation fields used to calibrate health physics instruments and personnel dosimeters. The technique, with slight modification, is also useful for determining the quality of x-ray beams. The basic equations and the implementing Excel functions are listed. In addition, several examples are presented to demonstrate the application of the technique.

  7. Imaging informatics for consumer health: towards a radiology patient portal

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Corey W; McNamara, Mary; El-Saden, Suzie; Chen, Shawn; Taira, Ricky K; Bui, Alex A T

    2013-01-01

    Objective With the increased routine use of advanced imaging in clinical diagnosis and treatment, it has become imperative to provide patients with a means to view and understand their imaging studies. We illustrate the feasibility of a patient portal that automatically structures and integrates radiology reports with corresponding imaging studies according to several information orientations tailored for the layperson. Methods The imaging patient portal is composed of an image processing module for the creation of a timeline that illustrates the progression of disease, a natural language processing module to extract salient concepts from radiology reports (73% accuracy, F1 score of 0.67), and an interactive user interface navigable by an imaging findings list. The portal was developed as a Java-based web application and is demonstrated for patients with brain cancer. Results and discussion The system was exhibited at an international radiology conference to solicit feedback from a diverse group of healthcare professionals. There was wide support for educating patients about their imaging studies, and an appreciation for the informatics tools used to simplify images and reports for consumer interpretation. Primary concerns included the possibility of patients misunderstanding their results, as well as worries regarding accidental improper disclosure of medical information. Conclusions Radiologic imaging composes a significant amount of the evidence used to make diagnostic and treatment decisions, yet there are few tools for explaining this information to patients. The proposed radiology patient portal provides a framework for organizing radiologic results into several information orientations to support patient education. PMID:23739614

  8. STANFORD UNIVERSITY LABORATORY ANIMAL OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    3.16.05 STANFORD UNIVERSITY LABORATORY ANIMAL OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH PROGRAM Tuberculosis Symptom Questionnaire For use by personnel that have previously had a positive PPD skin test. Name (Print told by a health practitioner that your immune system is suppressed or compromised? No Yes Don't Know

  9. [Status and development prospects of radiological health in the Navy].

    PubMed

    Azarov, I I; Mosiagin, I G; Petreev, I V; Butakov, S S; Tsvetkov, S V; Shikalenko, F N

    2014-12-01

    More than 7.5 thousands of people work as military and civilian personnel and have an access to a lot of sources of ionizing radiation on ships and vessels, at coastal units and institutions of the Navy. This fact determines the importance of radiation safety and medical preventive measures on naval fleets. The article analyses the state of radiation-hygienic measures, outlines the conceptual basis for the development of radiation hygiene in the Navy. Substantiated reconstruction tasks effectiveness of health control and state sanitary and epidemiological supervision of radiation safety, provides information about the optimal set of instruments for radiation monitoring equipment radiobiological laboratories and centres of state sanitary and epidemiological supervision at various levels. PMID:25804083

  10. Environmental Health Facilities Experimental laboratories

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Amy L.

    , hazardous chemical storage cabinets, safety equipment, sinks, and cabinetry for glassware and chemicals, and a Nanopure® DiamondTM analytical ultra-pure water treatment system. Common facilities include two temperature-Van, which is designed for the off-site transport and use of laboratory instrumentation. Field measurement

  11. Surface radiological investigations at the proposed SWSA 7 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, S.P.; Murray, M.E.; Uziel, M.S.

    1995-08-01

    A surface radiological investigation was conducted intermittently from June 1994 to June 1995 at the proposed site for Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 7. The stimulus for this survey was the observation in June 1992 of a man`s trousers became contaminated with {sup 9O}Sr while he was reviewing work on top of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cooling tower. Radiation surveys identified {sup 9O}Sr on the roofs of older buildings at the HFIR site. Since no {sup 9O}Sr was found on buildings built between 1988 and 1990, the {sup 9O}Sr was thought to have been deposited prior to 1988. Later in 1992, beta particles were identified on a bulldozer that had been used in a wooded area southwest of the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) Access Road. More recently in April 1995, {sup 9O}Sr particles were identified on the top side of ceiling tiles in the overhead area of a building in the HFIR Complex. Considering that the proposed SWSA 7 site was located between the HFIR complex and the HPRR Access Road, it was deemed prudent to investigate the possibility that beta particles might also be present at the SWSA 7 site. A possible explanation for the presence of these particles has been provided by long-time ORNL employees and retirees. Strontium-90 as the titanate was developed in the early 1960s as part of the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. Strontium titanate ({sup 90}SrTiO{sub 3}) was produced at the Fission Product Development Laboratory (Building 3517) in the ORNL main plant area. Waste from the process was loaded into a 1-in. lead-lined dumpster, which was transferred to SWSA 5 where it was dumped into a trench. Dumping allowed some articles to become airborne.

  12. Health care facility-based decontamination of victims exposed to chemical, biological, and radiological materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kristi L. Koenig; Connie J. Boatright; John A. Hancock; Frank J. Denny; David S. Teeter; Christopher A. Kahn; Carl H. Schultz

    2008-01-01

    Since the US terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, concern regarding use of chemical, biological, or radiological weapons is heightened. Many victims of such an attack would present directly to health care facilities without first undergoing field decontamination. This article reviews basic tenets and recommendations for health care facility–based decontamination, including regulatory concerns, types of contaminants, comprehensive decontamination procedures (including

  13. The role of occupational health nurses in terrorist attacks employing radiological dispersal devices.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Suzanne Lobaton; Beaton, Randal D

    2009-03-01

    The potential for biological, chemical, radiological, or nuclear terrorism has been widely acknowledged since the events of September 11, 2001. Terrorists' use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD), or dirty bomb, is considered to be a threat for which Americans must prepare. Occupational health nurses must have the knowledge and skill set to plan for, respond to, and recover from a radiologic event potentially affecting significant numbers of first responders as well as businesses and their workers. This article describes the hazards related to RDDs and provides resources supporting occupational health nurses' roles in such events occurring near or at their workplaces. Occupational health nurses are prepared to assess and treat RDD causalities using current information to identify signs and symptoms of exposed and contaminated RDD victims. Decontamination, treatment, and recovery methods for workers and businesses affected by an RDD event are described. PMID:19338261

  14. 76 FR 45825 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health 510(k) Clearance Process; Institute of Medicine Report...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ...Radiological Health 510(k) Clearance Process; Institute of Medicine Report: ``Medical Devices and the Public's Health, The...Administration (FDA) is requesting comments on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report entitled: ``Medical Devices and the...

  15. Interventional radiology delivers high-value health care and is an imaging 3.0 vanguard.

    PubMed

    Charalel, Resmi A; McGinty, Geraldine; Brant-Zawadzki, Michael; Goodwin, Scott C; Khilnani, Neil M; Matsumoto, Alan H; Min, Robert J; Soares, Gregory M; Cook, Philip S

    2015-05-01

    Given the changing climate of health care and the imperative to add value, radiologists must join forces with the rest of medicine to deliver better patient care in a more cost-effective, evidence-based manner. For several decades, interventional radiology has added value to the health care system through innovation and the provision of alternative and effective minimally invasive treatments, which have decreased morbidity, mortality, and overall cost. The clinical practice of interventional radiology embodies many of the features of Imaging 3.0, the program recently launched by the ACR. We provide a review of some of the major contributions made by interventional radiology and offer general principles from that experience, which are applicable to all radiologists. PMID:25703699

  16. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Health and Safety Manual

    SciTech Connect

    FRMAC Health and Safety Working Group

    2012-03-20

    This manual is a tool to provide information to all responders and emergency planners and is suggested as a starting point for all organizations that provide personnel/assets for radiological emergency response. It defines the safety requirements for the protection of all emergency responders. The intent is to comply with appropriate regulations or provide an equal level of protection when the situation makes it necessary to deviate. In the event a situation arises which is not addressed in the manual, an appropriate management-level expert will define alternate requirements based on the specifics of the emergency situation. This manual is not intended to pertain to the general public.

  17. Radiological health training resources 1979. Report for September 1977August 1979

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. E. Munzer; K. G. Sauer

    1979-01-01

    In an effort to reach radiation control personnel and user groups in greater numbers than is possible through direct training methods, the Training Resources Center distributes many types of radiological health movies, videocassettes, and course listings. The training collection maintained by the Division of Training and Medical Applications includes videocassettes, movies, and printed material. Titles in this publication are limited

  18. Comparison Between Radiological and Chemical Health Risks Assessments: The Nord-Cotentin Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine Mercat-Rommens; Didier Louvat; Céline Duffa; Annie Sugier

    2005-01-01

    In 1997, the French Ministries of the Environment and Health commissioned a detailed radioecological analysis of the Nord-Cotentin region in response to public concern about radiological risks associated with local nuclear facilities. This work was entrusted to the Groupe Radioécologie Nord-Cotentin (GRNC), a working group of experts from various origins (industrial facilities operators, public institutions, monitoring agencies, public interest and

  19. Critical review of the reactor-safety study radiological health effects model. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. W. Cooper; J. S. Evans; N. Jacob; K. R. Kase; C. J. Maletskos; J. B. Robertson; D. G. Smith

    1983-01-01

    This review of the radiological health effects models originally presented in the Reactor Safety Study (RSS) and currently used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was undertaken to assist the NRC in determining whether or not to revise the models and to aid in the revision, if undertaken. The models as presented in the RSS and as implemented in

  20. 75 FR 384 - Event Problem Codes Web Site; Center for Devices and Radiological Health; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a Web site where the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) is posting updates to the problem codes used in conjunction with the medical device adverse event reports (MDR)...

  1. An In Situ Radiological Survey of Three Canyons at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Maurer

    1999-06-01

    An in situ radiological survey of Mortandad, Ten Site, and DP Canyons at the Los Alamos National Laboratory was conducted during August 19-30, 1996. The purpose of this survey was to measure the quantities of radionuclides that remain in the canyons from past laboratory operations. A total of 65 in situ measurements were conducted using high-resolution gamma radiation detectors at 1 meter above the ground. The measurements were obtained in the streambeds of the canyons beginning near the water-release points at the laboratories and extending to the ends of the canyons. Three man-made gamma-emitting radionuclides were detected in the canyons: americium-241 ({sup 241}Am), cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), and cobalt-60 ({sup 60}Co). Estimated contamination levels ranged from 13.3-290.4 picocuries per gram (pCi/g)for {sup 241}Am, 4.4-327.8 pCi/g for {sup 137}Cs, and 0.4-2.6 pCi/g for {sup 60}Co.

  2. Report of state and local radiological health programs, fiscal year 1979. Report for 1 January31 December 79

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. I. Jr. Vassar; R. A. Moats; V. E. Matthews

    1980-01-01

    This report is the nineteenth of a series based on data provided by 55 State and local radiological health programs. The resources and activities of State and local radiological programs are presented and summarized from data provided as of June 30, 1979. Summary data are included for fiscal years 1977 and 1979. Resources include data on personnel, funds, and equipment.

  3. Understanding radiologic and nuclear terrorism as public health...

    Science.gov Websites

    Manual NCBI News PubMed PubMed Central (PMC) PubMed Clinical Queries PubMed Health All Literature Resources... Proteins BioSystems BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool)...

  4. Results of the radiological characterization survey of the Building 7819 Decontamination Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. Rodriguez; K. S. Brown; D. E. Rice; R. C. Gosslee; V. P. Patania

    1993-01-01

    A radiological characterization survey of the interior of the Building 7819 Decontamination Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted during July 1993. The interior of Building 7819 is grossly contaminated, and the contamination is highly transferable. Levels of alpha and beta contamination inside the building exceed ORNL guidelines for zoning as a Contamination Area. Gamma whole-body exposure rates

  5. Public health laboratory systems development in East Africa through training in laboratory management and field epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Mosha, Fausta; Oundo, Joseph; Mukanga, David; Njenga, Kariuki; Nsubuga, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Laboratories are integral to the delivery of quality health care and for public health functions; however laboratory systems and services are often neglected in resource-poor settings such as the East African region. In order to sustainably strengthen national laboratory systems in resource-poor countries, there is a need to train laboratory personnel to work in clinical as well as public health laboratories. In 2004,Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, and South Sudan began training public health laboratory workers jointly with field epidemiologists in the Kenya Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (FELTP), and later through the Tanzania FELTP, as a strategy to strengthen public health laboratories. These programs train laboratory epidemiologists through a two-year public health leadership development course, and also offer various types of short course training for frontline staff. The FELTP laboratory graduates in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and South Sudan are working in their respective countries to strengthen public health laboratory systems while the short course participants provide a pool of frontline implementers with the capacity to support the lower tiers of health systems, as well as serve as surge capacity for the regions and the national level. Through training competent public health laboratory workers, the East African ministries of health, in collaboration with other regional partners and stakeholders are now engaged in developing and implementing a holistic approach that will guarantee an overall strengthening of the health system by using well-trained public health laboratory leaders to drive the process. Strengthening public health laboratory medicine in East Africa is critical to improve health-care systems. The experience with the FELTP model in East Africa is a step in the right direction towards ensuring a stronger role for the laboratory in public health. PMID:22359702

  6. Public health laboratory systems development in East Africa through training in laboratory management and field epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Mosha, Fausta; Oundo, Joseph; Mukanga, David; Njenga, Kariuki; Nsubuga, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Laboratories are integral to the delivery of quality health care and for public health functions; however laboratory systems and services are often neglected in resource-poor settings such as the East African region. In order to sustainably strengthen national laboratory systems in resource-poor countries, there is a need to train laboratory personnel to work in clinical as well as public health laboratories. In 2004,Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, and South Sudan began training public health laboratory workers jointly with field epidemiologists in the Kenya Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (FELTP), and later through the Tanzania FELTP, as a strategy to strengthen public health laboratories. These programs train laboratory epidemiologists through a two-year public health leadership development course, and also offer various types of short course training for frontline staff. The FELTP laboratory graduates in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and South Sudan are working in their respective countries to strengthen public health laboratory systems while the short course participants provide a pool of frontline implementers with the capacity to support the lower tiers of health systems, as well as serve as surge capacity for the regions and the national level. Through training competent public health laboratory workers, the East African ministries of health, in collaboration with other regional partners and stakeholders are now engaged in developing and implementing a holistic approach that will guarantee an overall strengthening of the health system by using well-trained public health laboratory leaders to drive the process. Strengthening public health laboratory medicine in East Africa is critical to improve health-care systems. The experience with the FELTP model in East Africa is a step in the right direction towards ensuring a stronger role for the laboratory in public health. PMID:22359702

  7. Health implications of radiological terrorism: Perspectives from Israel

    PubMed Central

    Hagby, Moti; Goldberg, Avishay; Becker, Steven; Schwartz, Dagan; Bar-Dayan, Yaron

    2009-01-01

    September 11th events taught us, members of the medical community, that we need to prepared for the worst. Nuclear terror is no longer science fiction. Radiological weapons of mass terror come in three flavors: The first one is nuclear. Since 1992, there have been six known cases of highly enriched uranium or plutonium being intercepted by authorities as it passed in or out of the former Soviet Union. Constructing a nuclear fission weapon requires high-level expertise, substantial facilities, and lots of money. All three of which would be difficult, although not impossible, for a terrorist group to pull off without state support. However, terrorists could carry out potential mass destruction without sophisticated weaponry by targeting nuclear facilities using conventional bombs or hijacked aircrafts. Terror attacks could also carry out mass panic and radioactive contamination of people and environment by dispersal of radioactive materials with or without the use of conventional explosive devices. Most medical and para-medical personnel are not familiar with CBRN terror and radiation casualties. To lessen the impact of those potential attacks and provide care for the greatest number of potential survivors, the community as a whole – and the medical community in particular – must acquire the knowledge of the various signs and symptoms of exposure to irradiation and radioactive contamination as well as have a planned response once such an attack has occurred. Based on knowledge of radiation hazards, medical emergency planers should analyze the risks of each scenario, offer feasible solutions and translate them into internationally accepted plans that would be simple to carry out once such an attack took place. The planned response should be questioned and tested by drills. Those drills should check the triage, evacuation routes, decontamination posts, evacuation centers and receiving hospitals. It is crucial that the drill will consist of simulated casualties that will follow the evacuation route from point zero to the ED. Knowledge and exercise will reduce terror (fear) from radiation and help the community as a whole better cope with such an event. This article will review the general information of radiation types, their biological damage, clinical appearance and general concepts of nuclear event planning, focusing on medical response and focus on the Israeli perspective. PMID:19561972

  8. #63 Cancer incidence in the u. s. radiologic technologists health study, 1983–1998

    Microsoft Academic Search

    AS Sigurdson; MM Doody; RS Rao; DM Freedman; BH Alexander; M Hauptmann; AK Mohan; S Yoshinaga; DA Hill; R Tarone; K Mabuchi; E Ron; Linet

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: Few studies have evaluated cancer risk associated with low-dose occupational ionizing radiation exposure to women. We present data on incident cancer risks among a predominantly (77%) female cohort of 73,963 U. S. radiologic technologists followed up from 1983 through 1998.METHODS: Cancer incidence information and data on work history, selected cancer risk factors, personal radiation exposure and other health outcomes

  9. FDA (food and drug administration) compliance program guidance manual (fy 84). Section 6. Radiological health

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    The FDA Compliance Program Guidance Manual provides a system for issuing and filing written program plans and instructions directed to Food and Drug Administration Field operations for project implementation. Section VI provides those chapters of the Compliance Program Guidance Manual which pertain to the area of radiological health. Some of the areas of coverage include laser standards; compliance testing of x-ray equipment, ultrasonic therapy devices, mercury vapor lamps, television receivers, and microwave ovens; radiation policy; and imported electronic products.

  10. A radiological and chemical investigation of the 7500 Area Contamination Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.K.; Foley, R.D.; Tiner, P.F.; Hatmaker, T.L.; Uziel, M.S.; Swaja, R.E.

    1993-05-01

    A radiological and chemical investigation of the 7500 Area Contamination Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted intermittently from February 1992 through May 1992. The investigation was performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health and Safety Research Division of ORNL at the request of the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Operations Office and the ORNL Environmental Restoration Program. Results of this investigation indicate that the source of radioactive contamination at the point of the contamination incident is from one of the underground abandoned lines. The contamination in soil is likely the result of residual contamination from years of waste transport and maintenance operations (e.g., replacement of degraded joints, upgrading or replacement of entire pipelines, and associated landscaping activities). However, because (1) there is currently an active LLW line positioned in the same subsurface trench with the abandoned lines and (2) the physical condition of the abandoned lines may be brittle, this inquiry could not determine which abandoned line was responsible for the subsurface contamination. Soil sampling at the location of the contamination incident and along the pipeline route was performed in a manner so as not to damage the active LLW line and abandoned lines. Recommendations for corrective actions are included.

  11. Laboratory Health and Safety Procedure -1 -Bishop's University Safety Policy

    E-print Network

    Laboratory Health and Safety Procedure - 1 - Bishop's University Safety Policy 1.03 Laboratory Health and Safety Procedure Approved Date: September 13, 2010 Revised: September 13, 2010 Prepared by: Health and Safety Committee 1. Preamble Bishop's University has a vital interest in preventing accidents

  12. Public Health Emergency Planning for Children in Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) Disasters

    PubMed Central

    Bartenfeld, Michael T.; Peacock, Georgina; Griese, Stephanie E.

    2015-01-01

    Children represent nearly a quarter of the US population, but their unique needs in chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) emergencies may not be well understood by public health and emergency management personnel or even clinicians. Children are different from adults physically, developmentally, and socially. These characteristics have implications for providing care in CBRN disasters, making resulting illness in children challenging to prevent, identify, and treat. This article discusses these distinct physical, developmental, and social traits and characteristics of children in the context of the science behind exposure to, health effects from, and treatment for the threat agents potentially present in CBRN incidents. PMID:25014894

  13. Health care facility-based decontamination of victims exposed to chemical, biological, and radiological materials.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Kristi L; Boatright, Connie J; Hancock, John A; Denny, Frank J; Teeter, David S; Kahn, Christopher A; Schultz, Carl H

    2008-01-01

    Since the US terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, concern regarding use of chemical, biological, or radiological weapons is heightened. Many victims of such an attack would present directly to health care facilities without first undergoing field decontamination. This article reviews basic tenets and recommendations for health care facility-based decontamination, including regulatory concerns, types of contaminants, comprehensive decontamination procedures (including crowd control, triage, removal of contaminated garments, cleaning of body contaminants, and management of contaminated materials and equipment), and a discussion of methods to achieve preparedness. PMID:18082785

  14. Columbia University Health Sciences Health & Safety Manual 2003 Laboratory Safety Section -Page 43

    E-print Network

    Jia, Songtao

    Columbia University Health Sciences ­ Health & Safety Manual 2003 Laboratory Safety Section - Page _________ *************************************************************************** Please complete and forward the attached pages to Environmental Health & Safety, Mailbox 8. Keep a copy;ColumbiaUniversityHealthSciences­Health&SafetyManual2003 LaboratorySafetySection-Page44 Attachment

  15. An aerial radiological survey of the Brookhaven National Laboratory and surrounding area, Upton, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey was performed from March 21 to March 24, 1990, over approximately a 65-square-kilometer (25-square-mile) area surrounding the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which is located at the center of Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. All gamma radiation data were collected flying east-west lines spaced 76 meters (250 feet) apart at an altitude of 46 meters (150 feet) above ground level (AGL). Count rates obtained from the aerial platform were converted to exposure rates at 1 meter above the ground. The typical terrestrial-plus-cosmic background exposure rate in the survey area ranged from 5 to 10 microroentgens per hour ([mu]R/h). The reported exposure rate values include an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.6 [mu]R/h. Ground-based measurements made two weeks later were compared to the aerial survey results. Pressurized ion chamber readings, soil samples, and in situ high purity germanium measurements were taken from 54 locations within the survey area. Exposure rate values obtained from these measurements were in general agreement with those obtained from the aerial data. A total of 16 areas of man-made radioactivity were identified within the survey boundary. The dominant man-made radioisotopes found were cesium-137, sodium-22, manganese-54, cobalt-58, and cobalt-60. The BNL was previously surveyed in June 1983 and May 1980. The results of the present survey are in good agreement with the results of the previous surveys.

  16. Aerial radiological survey of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Date of survey: 15 August11 September 1974

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jobst

    1976-01-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was conducted from 15 August through 11 September 1974. Thirty-nine NaI(Tl) detectors were used to measure gamma radiation from natural and man-made sources. The detedctors were mounted in a helicopter and flown at low altitudes (46m and 152m), and at low speeds (approximately 45m\\/sec). Nearly 4700 flight-line kilometers were

  17. Radiological risk assessment for the remote-handled transuranic waste storage options at Argonne National Laboratory - East

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jing-Jy Cheng; Halil Avci; Daniel Hecker; William Bray; Terri Bray; Christopher Grandy

    2002-01-01

    Interim storage of the remote-handled transuranic (RH\\/TRU) waste is needed at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E). Two on-site facilities, the northwest (NW) vaults in the 317 Area and the converted spent nuclear fuel pool in Building 331, were identified as potential storage locations through previous studies. To assist the decision making process of selecting a storage location, radiological risk assessments were

  18. A public health perspective on the U.S. response to the Fukushima radiological emergency.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, Robert C; Ansari, Armin J; Buzzell, Jennifer J; McCurley, M Carol; Miller, Charles W; Smith, James M; Evans, D Lynn

    2015-03-01

    On 11 March 2011, northern Japan was struck by first a magnitude 9.0 earthquake off the eastern coast and then by an ensuing tsunami. At the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), these twin disasters initiated a cascade of events that led to radionuclide releases. Radioactive material from Japan was subsequently transported to locations around the globe, including the U.S. The levels of radioactive material that arrived in the U.S. were never large enough to cause health effects, but the presence of this material in the environment was enough to require a response from the public health community. Events during the response illustrated some U.S. preparedness challenges that previously had been anticipated and others that were newly identified. Some of these challenges include the following: (1) Capacity, including radiation health experts, for monitoring potentially exposed people for radioactive contamination are limited and may not be adequate at the time of a large-scale radiological incident; (2) there is no public health authority to detain people contaminated with radioactive materials; (3) public health and medical capacities for response to radiation emergencies are limited; (4) public health communications regarding radiation emergencies can be improved to enhance public health response; (5) national and international exposure standards for radiation measurements (and units) and protective action guides lack uniformity; (6) access to radiation emergency monitoring data can be limited; and (7) the Strategic National Stockpile may not be currently prepared to meet the public health need for KI in the case of a surge in demand from a large-scale radiation emergency. Members of the public health community can draw on this experience to improve public health preparedness. PMID:25627948

  19. Radiological health assessment of natural radioactivity in the vicinity of Obajana cement factory, North Central Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Isinkaye, Omoniyi Matthew; Jibiri, Nnamdi N.; Olomide, Adebowale A.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in and around Obajana cement factory, North Central Nigeria have been carried out in this study to determine the activity levels of natural radionuclides in different environmental matrices in order to assess the radiological health hazards associated with the use of these matrices by the local population. A low-background Pb-shielded gamma spectroscopic counting assembly utilizing NaI (Tl) detector was employed for the measurements. The results show that sediment samples have the highest activity concentrations of all the radionuclides relative to soil, farmland soil, and rock samples. The radium equivalent activity and indoor gamma dose rates together with the corresponding annual effective indoor doses evaluated were found to be lower than their permissible limits. It suffices to say, that contrary to age-long fear of radiation risks to the population in the vicinity of the cement factory, no excessive radiological health hazards either indoors and/or outdoors is envisaged. Therefore, the environmental matrices around the factory could be used without any restrictions. PMID:26150688

  20. Health & Safety Information For Students in Teaching Laboratories

    E-print Network

    Krstic, Miroslav

    Health & Safety Information For Students in Teaching Laboratories Working with or around teaching animals and animal wastes can expose students to health and safety risks. The most common risk. If you have known allergy to the animal species in this class or if you have other health concerns about

  1. Environmental Health & Radiation Safety rev. 2/11 LABORATORY SAFETY

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Occupational Medicine 503-726-1021 Providence St. Vincent Med. Ctr. 503-216-7000 Infectious Disease ConsultantsEnvironmental Health & Radiation Safety rev. 2/11 LABORATORY SAFETY MANUAL #12;Oregon Health Services 503-494-4444 OHSU Public Safety 503-494-7744 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & RADIATION SAFETY OHSU Paging

  2. Dr. James Gee Associate Professor of Radiologic Science in Radiology

    E-print Network

    Zanibbi, Richard

    Dr. James Gee Associate Professor of Radiologic Science in Radiology Director, Penn Image Computing and Science Laboratory University of Pennsylvania James Gee, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Radiologic

  3. Perspectives of public health laboratories in emerging infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Kaw Bing; Gubler, Duane J

    2013-01-01

    The world has experienced an increased incidence and transboundary spread of emerging infectious diseases over the last four decades. We divided emerging infectious diseases into four categories, with subcategories in categories 1 and 4. The categorization was based on the nature and characteristics of pathogens or infectious agents causing the emerging infections, which are directly related to the mechanisms and patterns of infectious disease emergence. The factors or combinations of factors contributing to the emergence of these pathogens vary within each category. We also classified public health laboratories into three types based on function, namely, research, reference and analytical diagnostic laboratories, with the last category being subclassified into primary (community-based) public health and clinical (medical) analytical diagnostic laboratories. The frontline/leading and/or supportive roles to be adopted by each type of public health laboratory for optimal performance to establish the correct etiological agents causing the diseases or outbreaks vary with respect to each category of emerging infectious diseases. We emphasize the need, especially for an outbreak investigation, to establish a harmonized and coordinated national public health laboratory system that integrates different categories of public health laboratories within a country and that is closely linked to the national public health delivery system and regional and international high-end laboratories. PMID:26038473

  4. Structural health monitoring activities at National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); James, G.H.; Simmermacher, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory have on-going programs to assess damage in structures and mechanical systems from changes in their dynamic characteristics. This paper provides a summary of how both institutes became involved with this technology, their experience in this field and the directions that their research in this area will be taking in the future.

  5. Structural health monitoring activities at National Laboratories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles R. Farrar; Scott W. Doebling; George H. James; Todd Simmermacher

    1997-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory have on-going programs to assess damage in structures and mechanical systems from changes in their dynamic characteristics. This paper provides a summary of how both institutes became involved with this technology, their experience in this field and the directions that their research in this area will be taking in the future.

  6. Using Interorganizational Partnerships to Strengthen Public Health Laboratory Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kimsey, Paul; Buehring, Gertrude

    2013-01-01

    Due to the current economic environment, many local and state health departments are faced with budget reductions. Health department administrators and public health laboratory (PHL) directors need to assess strategies to ensure that their PHLs can provide the same level of service with decreased funds. Exploratory case studies of interorganizational partnerships among local PHLs in California were conducted to determine the impact on local PHL testing services and capacity. Our findings suggest that interorganizational forms of cooperation among local PHLs can help bolster laboratory capacity by capturing economies of scale, leveraging scarce resources, and ensuring access to affordable, timely, and quality laboratory testing services. Interorganizational partnerships will help local and state public health departments continue to maintain a strong and robust laboratory system that supports their role in communicable disease surveillance. PMID:23997305

  7. Allied Health Chemistry Laboratory: Amino Acids, Insulin, Proteins, and Skin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, David F.

    1975-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment specifically designed for allied health students. The students construct molecular models of amino acids, extract amino acids from their skin with hot water, and chromatographically analyze the skin extract and hydrolyzed insulin. (MLH)

  8. HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH PROGRAM: AN OVERVIEW SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present Health Effects Research Laboratory (HERL) biotechnology program is an outgrowth of previously existing programs in microbial pesticide research and genetic toxicology research. In order to meet the recommendation issued during the Coolfont Conference, HERL presently m...

  9. Health Care Delivery Meets Hospitality: A Pilot Study in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Steele, Joseph Rodgers; Jones, A Kyle; Clarke, Ryan K; Shoemaker, Stowe

    2015-06-01

    The patient experience has moved to the forefront of health care-delivery research. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Department of Diagnostic Radiology began collaborating in 2011 with the University of Houston Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management, and in 2013 with the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William F. Harrah College of Hotel Administration, to explore the application of service science to improving the patient experience. A collaborative pilot study was undertaken by these 3 institutions to identify and rank the specific needs and expectations of patients undergoing imaging procedures in the MD Anderson Department of Diagnostic Radiology. We first conducted interviews with patients, providers, and staff to identify factors perceived to affect the patient experience. Next, to confirm these factors and determine their relative importance, we surveyed more than 6,000 patients by e-mail. All factors considered important in the interviews were confirmed as important in the surveys. The surveys showed that the most important factors were acknowledgment of the patient's concerns, being treated with respect, and being treated like a person, not a "number"; these factors were more important than privacy, short waiting times, being able to meet with a radiologist, and being approached by a staff member versus having one's name called out in the waiting room. Our work shows that it is possible to identify and rank factors affecting patient satisfaction using techniques employed by the hospitality industry. Such factors can be used to measure and improve the patient experience. PMID:25533732

  10. RISKIND: A computer program for calculating radiological consequences and health risks from transportation of spent nuclear fuel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. C. Yuan; S. Y. Chen; D. J. LePoire; R. Rothman

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the technical details of RISIUND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the collective population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel. RISKIND is a user-friendly, semiinteractive program that can be run on an IBM or equivalent personal computer. The program language is FORTRAN-77. Several models

  11. Interim report on the National Bureau of Standards\\/Bureau of Radiological Health ⁶°Co teletherapy survey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Thompson; H. O. Wyckoff; C. G. Soares

    1978-01-01

    During the past three years the National Bureau of Standards and the Bureau of Radiological Health have been conducting a survey of ⁶°Co teletherapy facilities to determine their accuracy in exposing a phantom to a prescribed dose. As of May 1977, some 700 units were surveyed of the approximately 1000 which are licensed to administer therapy in the United States.

  12. A hospital CEO's perspective: radiology should lead the way in reforming health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    Radiology and medical imaging systems play a central role in most health care systems. As science and technology have advanced, the ability to medically image and diagnose anatomic and physiologic pathology has increased exponentially. This capability is identified as a necessary core competency of all "general hospitals" by the American Hospital Association. Medical imaging accounts for 7.5% of health care spending in the United States, with $175 billion spent annually. Accordingly, the facilities and the physicians who provide this patient care will be a central focus in the crusade for patient-centered, efficient, and transportable patient care. As the demand in hospitals and health care systems for quality, safety, and efficiency through IT and clinical systems improvement continues to accelerate, the demand for more systems that use best-practice support and discrete data results for incorporation into systems reporting initiatives will also accelerate and grow. Medical imaging and the radiologist's report are central to creating this integrated, patient-centric system with hospitals. Ancillary to the patient care component of the functional use of the data reporting systems is the ability to use the clinical reporting information efficiently to support or defend clinical decisions associated with hospital care and to provide an improved means by which required quality metrics are made available for ensuring safety and improving care in the future. PMID:23545085

  13. Health care projects at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald E. Hagge

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has four programs directly supporting the Clinton Administration's Health Care and National Information Infrastructure initiatives. An Idaho Medical Information Consortium was formed to leverage DOE and private sector resources to provide improved health care to rural regions. A DOE\\/INEL cooperative relationship with the Medical University of South Carolina was

  14. Results of the radiological survey at the ALCOA Research Laboratory, 600 Freeport Road, New Kensington, Pennsylvania (ANK001)

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, R.D.; Brown, K.S.

    1992-10-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the ALCOA Research Laboratory, 600 Freeport Road, New Kensington, Pennsylvania. The survey was performed on November 12, 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally [sup 238]U, as a result of work done for the Manhattan Engineer District in 1944. The survey included measurement of direct alpha and beta-gamma levels in the northeast comer of the basement of Building 29, and the collection of a debris sample from a floor drain for radionuclide analysis. The survey area was used for experimental canning of uranium slugs prior to production activities at the former New Kensington Works nearby.

  15. Local Health Department Planning for a Radiological Emergency: An Application of the AHP2 Tool to Emergency Preparedness Prioritization

    PubMed Central

    McKallagat, Chris; Klebesadal, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Objective We tested the Analytical Hierarchy Process tool for its use in public health to identify potential gaps in emergency preparedness by local health departments (LHDs) in California and Hawaii during a radiological emergency. Methods We developed a dedicated tool called All-Hazards Preparedness Squared (AHP2) that can be used by those who are responsible for all-hazards preparedness planning and response to guide them while making strategic decisions both in preparing for and responding to a slow-moving incident while it is unfolding. The tool is an Internet-based survey that can be distributed among teams responsible for emergency preparedness and response. Twenty-eight participants from 16 LHDs in California and Hawaii responsible for coordinating preparedness and response in a radiological emergency participated in using the tool in 2013. We used the data to compare the perceived importance of different elements of preparedness among participants and identify gaps in preparedness of their organizations for meeting the challenges presented by a radiological incident. Results Clarity of information and transfer of information (to and from agency to public, state, and federal partners) were public health officials' dominant concerns while responding to an emergency. Participants also found that there were gaps in the adequacy of training and awareness of the chain of command during a radiological emergency. Conclusion This preliminary study indicates that the AHP2 tool could be used for decision making in all-hazards preparedness planning and response. PMID:25355985

  16. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Director`s overview of research performed for DOE Office of Health And Environmental Research

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    A significant portion of the research undertaken at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is focused on the strategic programs of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER). These programs, which include Environmental Processes (Subsurface Science, Ecosystem Function and Response, and Atmospheric Chemistry), Global Change (Climate Change, Environmental Vulnerability, and Integrated Assessments), Biotechnology (Human Genome and Structural Biology), and Health (Health Effects and Medical Applications), have been established by OHER to support DOE business areas in science and technology and environmental quality. PNL uses a set of critical capabilities based on the Laboratory`s research facilities and the scientific and technological expertise of its staff to help OHER achieve its programmatic research goals. Integration of these capabilities across the Laboratory enables PNL to assemble multidisciplinary research teams that are highly effective in addressing the complex scientific and technical issues associated with OHER-sponsored research. PNL research efforts increasingly are focused on complex environmental and health problems that require multidisciplinary teams to address the multitude of time and spatial scales found in health and environmental research. PNL is currently engaged in research in the following areas for these OHER Divisions: Environmental Sciences -- atmospheric radiation monitoring, climate modeling, carbon cycle, atmospheric chemistry, ecological research, subsurface sciences, bioremediation, and environmental molecular sciences; Health Effects and Life Sciences -- cell/molecular biology, and biotechnology; Medical Applications and Biophysical Research -- analytical technology, and radiological and chemical physics. PNL`s contributions to OHER strategic research programs are described in this report.

  17. Implementation of a DOD ELAP Conforming Quality System at a FUSRAP Site Field Temporary Radiological Screening Laboratory - 13500

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, M.S.; McElheny, G. [Cabrera Services Inc. 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT (United States)] [Cabrera Services Inc. 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT (United States); Houston, L.M.; Masset, M.R.; Spector, H.L. [United States Army Corps of Engineers -1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY (United States)] [United States Army Corps of Engineers -1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A case study is presented on specific program elements that supported the transition of a temporary field radiological screening lab to an accredited operation capable of meeting client quality objectives for definitive results data. The temporary field lab is located at the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Linde Site in Tonawanda, NY. The site is undergoing remediation under the direction of the United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District, with Cabrera Services Inc. as the remediation contractor and operator of the on-site lab. Analysis methods employed in the on-site lab include gross counting of alpha and beta particle activity on swipes and air filters and gamma spectroscopy of soils and other solid samples. A discussion of key program elements and lessons learned may help other organizations considering pursuit of accreditation for on-site screening laboratories. (authors)

  18. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of low-level alpha contaminated wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

    1994-03-01

    This document provides radiological, physical, and chemical characterization data for low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program. Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 97 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 25,450 m 3 corresponding to a total mass of approximately 12,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats-generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

  19. Prevalence of Abnormal Radiological Findings in Health Care Workers with Latent Tuberculosis Infection and Correlations with T Cell Immune Response

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rajnish Joshi; Samir Patil; Shriprakash Kalantri; Kevin Schwartzman; Dick Menzies; Madhukar Pai; David Ojcius

    2007-01-01

    BackgroundMore than half of all health care workers (HCWs) in high TB-incidence, low and middle income countries are latently infected with tuberculosis (TB). We determined radiological lesions in a cohort of HCWs with latent TB infection (LTBI) in India, and determined their association with demographic, occupational and T-cell immune response variables.MethodologyWe obtained chest radiographs of HCWs who had undergone tuberculin

  20. Herbert M. Parker: Publications and other contributions to radiological and health physics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Kathren; R. W. Baalman; W. J. Bair

    1986-01-01

    For more than a half century, Herbert M. Parker was a leading force in radiological physics. This book brings together all of Parker's published and unpublished papers and is divided into six parts. The second edition is on his work in medical physics. The third part is on his contribution to the evolution of radiological units. The fourth and largest

  1. Herbert M. Parker: Publications and contributions to radiological and health physics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Kathren; R. W. Baalman; W. J. Bair

    1986-01-01

    For more than a half century, Herbert M. Parker was a leading force in radiological physics. As a scientist, he was codeveloper of a systematic dosimetry scheme for implant therapy and the innovative proposer of radiological units with unambiguous physical and biological bases. He made seminal contributions to the development of scientifically based radiation protection standards and, as an administrator

  2. HUMAN HEALTH RESEARCH IMPLEMENTATION PLAN, NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL), as part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Office of Research and Development (ORD), is responsible for conducting research to improve the risk assessment of chemicals for potential effects ...

  3. Occupational Health and Safety Program Laboratory Animal Resources

    E-print Network

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Occupational Health and Safety Program Laboratory Animal Resources Binghamton University State of Allergies to Animals Bloodborne Pathogens Safe and Humane Care and Handling of Animals Safe use of Chemicals in writing) Zoonotic diseases (relevant to the animal species you plan to work with while at Binghamton

  4. Radiological control manual. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kloepping, R.

    1996-05-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP.

  5. Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT8-1

    E-print Network

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT8-1 Brookhaven National Laboratory routinely assesses its operations to ensure that any potential radiological dose to the public, BNL workers adversely affect health and safety or contribute to dose are evaluated for mitigation. The potential

  6. Radiological environmental monitoring report for Brookhaven National Laboratory 1967--1970

    SciTech Connect

    Meinhold, C.B.; Hull, A.P.

    1998-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was established in 1947 on the former Army Camp Upton site located in central Long Island, New York. From the very beginning, BNL has monitored the environment on and around the Laboratory site to assess the effects of its operations on the environment. This document summarizes the environmental data collected for the years 1967, 1968, 1969, and 1970. Thus, it fills a gap in the series of BNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1962. The data in this document reflect measurements for those four years of concentrations and/or amounts of airborne radioactivity, radioactivity in streams and ground water, and external radiation levels in the vicinity of BNL. Also included are estimates, made at that time, of BNL`s contribution to radioactivity in the environment. Among the major scientific facilities operated at BNL are the High Flux Beam Reactor, Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, and the 60-inch Cyclotron.

  7. EPA/OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT'S NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS LABORATORY'S ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR FOR HEALTH INTERNET SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Internet site provides information about the Office of Research and Development's National Health and Environmental Effects Laboratory's Associate Director for Health (ADH) Internet site. The ADH is responsible for providing leadership for the health effects research program...

  8. Atypical rabies encephalitis in a six-year-old boy: clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings.

    PubMed

    Karande, Sunil; Muranjan, Mamta; Mani, Reeta Subramaniam; Anand, Ashwini Manoor; Amoghimath, Raghavendraswami; Sankhe, Shilpa; Belludi, Ashwin Yajaman; Madhusudana, Shampur Narayan

    2015-07-01

    A 6-year-old boy from India developed an atypical form of rabies following a stray dog bite and as a consequence of not receiving the standard World Health Organization recommended post-exposure prophylaxis for category III wounds. Serial rising rabies virus neutralizing antibody titres in serum and cerebrospinal fluid by rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test helped confirm the diagnosis of rabies. The child has survived for 4 months since the onset of illness, albeit with neurological sequelae. PMID:25975650

  9. RADIOLOGICAL EMISSIONS AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING FOR BROOKHAV EN NATIONAL LABORATORY, 1947 - 1961.

    SciTech Connect

    MEINHOLD,C.B.; MEINHOLD,A.F. (EDITED BY BOND,P.D.)

    2001-05-30

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has monitored its releases to the environment since its inception in 1947. From 1962 to 1966 and from 1971 to the present, annual reports,were published that recorded the emissions and releases to the environment from Laboratory operations. In 1998, a report was written to summarize the environmental data for the years 1967 to 1970. One of the purposes of the current report is to complete BNL's environmental history by covering the period from 1948 through 1961. The activities in 1947 were primarily organizational and there is no information on the use of radiation at the Laboratory before 1948. An additional objective of this report is to provide environmental data to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). The report does not provide an estimate of the doses associated with BNL operations. The report is comprised of two parts. The first part is a summary of emissions, releases, and environmental monitoring information including a discussion of the uncertainties in these data. Part two contains the detailed information on the approach taken to estimate the releases from the fuel cartridge failures at the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR). A series of appendices present more detailed information on these events in tabular form. The approach in this report is to be reasonable, conservative, (pessimistic), and transparent in estimating releases from fuel cartridge ruptures. Clearly, reactor stack monitoring records and more extensive records would have greatly improved this effort, but in accordance with Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) Appendix 0230 Annex C-9, many of the detailed records from this time were not retained.

  10. Replacement of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Health Physics Instrumentation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The DOE-Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the replacement of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Health Physics Instrumentation Laboratory at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of this project is to replace the existing Health Physics Instrumentation Laboratory (HPIL) with a new facility to provide a safe environment for maintaining and calibrating radiation detection instruments used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The existing HPIL facility provides portable health physics monitoring instrumentation and direct reading dosimetry procurement, maintenance and calibration of radiation detection instruments, and research and development support-services to the INEL and others. However, the existing facility was not originally designed for laboratory activities and does not provide an adequate, safe environment for calibration activities. The EA examined the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and evaluated reasonable alternatives, including the no action alternative in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508). Based on the environmental analysis in the attached EA, the proposed action will not have a significant effect on the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and 40 CFR Parts 1508.18 and 1508.27. The selected action (the proposed alternative) is composed of the following elements, each described or evaluated in the attached EA on the pages referenced. The proposed action is expected to begin in 1997 and will be completed within three years: design and construction of a new facility at the Central Facility Area of the INEL; operation of the facility, including instrument receipt, inspections and repairs, precision testing and calibration, and storage and issuance. The selected action will result in no significant environmental impacts.

  11. Metal recycling experience at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Reuse, release, and recycle of metals from radiological control areas``

    SciTech Connect

    Gogol, S.

    1997-11-01

    Approximately 15% of the Low-Level Waste (LLW) produced at Los Alamos consists of scrap metal equipment and materials. The majority of this material is produced by decommissioning and the modification of existing facilities. To reduce this waste stream, Department of Energy Headquarters, EM-77 Office, sponsored the Reuse, Recycle, and Release of Metals from Radiological Control Areas High Return on Investment (ROI) Project to implement recycle, reuse, and release of scrap metal at the laboratory. The goal of this project was to develop cost effective alternatives to LLW disposal of scrap metal and to avoid the disposal of 2,400 m{sup 3} of scrap metal. The ROI for this project was estimated at 948%. The ROI project was funded in March 1996 and is scheduled for completion by October 1997. At completion, a total of 2,400 m{sup 3} of LLW avoidance will have been accomplished and a facility to continue recycling activities will be operational. This paper will present the approach used to develop effective alternatives for scrap metal at Los Alamos and then discuss the tasks identified in the approach in detail. Current scrap metal inventory, waste projections, alternatives to LLW disposal, regulatory guidance, and efforts to institutionalize the alternatives to LLW disposal will be discussed in detail.

  12. The Predictive Value of Selected Extrinsic and Intrinsic Indicators of Overall Job Satisfaction in Diagnostic Radiological Technology, Radiation Therapy, and Nuclear Medicine Technology Allied Health Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beavers, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare is the largest industry in the United States and 60 percent of its 14 million workers are in allied health jobs. The need to attract and retain allied health faculty is critical to preparing a competent workforce in healthcare. This study reports the results of a survey of 259 faculty members working in diagnostic radiologic technology,…

  13. Pneumocystis pneumonia in patients with HIV infection: clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and radiological features.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takeshi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Iwamoto, Aikichi

    2007-02-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) remains the most common opportunistic infection in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Familiarity with the clinical features of PCP is crucial for prompt diagnosis, even if the patient is unaware of their HIV serostatus. We describe herein the clinical features of 34 episodes in 32 patients with AIDS-associated PCP and review the existing literature. As for symptoms, the frequency of fever, cough, and dyspnea was 74%, 74%, and 65%, respectively, and the complete triad was present in only 14 of the 34 episodes on first examination. Median duration from onset of symptoms until diagnosis was 3 weeks, and AIDS-associated PCP tended to take an insidious clinical course. Although laboratory findings were generally nonspecific, measurement of beta-D-glucan levels in the serum or plasma was highly useful in the diagnosis of PCP. All but 1 of the patients showed beta-D-glucan levels higher than the cutoff value (median, 147 pg/ml; range, 5-6920 pg/ml). Typical radiographic features of PCP are bilateral, symmetrical ground-glass opacities, but a wide variety of radiographic findings were observed. In our patients, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the lung showed ground-glass opacities sparing the lung periphery (41% of episodes) or displaying a mosaic pattern (29%), or being nearly homogeneous (24%), ground-glass opacities associated with air-space consolidation (21%), associated with cystic formation (21%), associated with linear-reticular opacities (18%), patchily and irregularly distributed (15%), associated with solitary or multiple nodules (9%), and associated with parenchymal cavity lesions (6%). PMID:17334722

  14. Radiology and Biomedical Engineering Radiology ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    E-print Network

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    Radiology and Biomedical Engineering 22 Radiology ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- http://www.ut-radiology.umin.jp/ We have been performing a variety of clinically oriented research). ·Diagnostic Radiology · Multi-row detector (up to 16 rows) helical computed tomography · MR imaging, MR

  15. RISKIND: A computer program for calculating radiological consequences and health risks from transportation of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Y.C. [Square Y, Orchard Park, NY (United States); Chen, S.Y.; LePoire, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Rothman, R. [USDOE Idaho Field Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1993-02-01

    This report presents the technical details of RISIUND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the collective population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel. RISKIND is a user-friendly, semiinteractive program that can be run on an IBM or equivalent personal computer. The program language is FORTRAN-77. Several models are included in RISKIND that have been tailored to calculate the exposure to individuals under various incident-free and accident conditions. The incidentfree models assess exposures from both gamma and neutron radiation and can account for different cask designs. The accident models include accidental release, atmospheric transport, and the environmental pathways of radionuclides from spent fuels; these models also assess health risks to individuals and the collective population. The models are supported by databases that are specific to spent nuclear fuels and include a radionudide inventory and dose conversion factors.

  16. Harvard Laboratory for Youth Mental Health, Summer Volunteer The Harvard Laboratory for Youth Mental Health (isites.harvard.edu/jweisz) is currently seeking Summer

    E-print Network

    Patel, Aniruddh D.

    Harvard Laboratory for Youth Mental Health, Summer Volunteer The Harvard Laboratory for Youth Mental Health (isites.harvard.edu/jweisz) is currently seeking Summer volunteer research assistants the Summer. Applicants should send the following to Nancy Lau, at nancylau@fas.harvard.edu: (1

  17. An e-health driven laboratory information system to support HIV treatment in Peru: Equity for laboratory personnel, health providers and people living with HIV

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia J García; Javier H Vargas; Patricia Caballero N; Javier Calle V; Angela M Bayer

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peru has a concentrated HIV epidemic with an estimated 76,000 people living with HIV (PLHIV). Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) expanded between 2004-2006 and the Peruvian National Institute of Health was named by the Ministry of Health as the institution responsible for carrying out testing to monitor the effectiveness of HAART. However, a national public health laboratory

  18. 78 FR 19711 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health: Experiential Learning Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ...medical device and health care facilities to participate...academia, and health care facilities. The areas...reliability testing of intensive airway pressure devices, care unit ventilator and...Clinical use of physical medicine devices....

  19. 76 FR 54777 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health 510(k) Clearance Process; Recommendations Proposed in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ...Clearance Process; Recommendations Proposed in Institute of Medicine Report: ``Medical Devices and the Public's Health, The...workshop entitled ``Recommendations Proposed in Institute of Medicine Report: `Medical Devices and the Public's Health,...

  20. 75 FR 4402 - Strengthening the Center for Devices and Radiological Health's 510(k) Review Process; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ...intended to meet two important public health goals: To make available to consumers...negative impact on achieving the two public health goals of the 510(k) program...than one predicate serves the public health goals of the 510(k)...

  1. Implementation of a quality management system in public health laboratories in the Republic of Georgia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brandy Greenhill

    2012-01-01

    Through a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute and CDC Laboratory Strengthening Department implemented quality management systems (QMS) into the two national public health laboratories in Tbilisi, Georgia. The QMS was based on CLSI's document Quality Management System: A Model for Laboratory Services; Approved Guideline and ISO 15189, Medical

  2. E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division

    E-print Network

    #12;E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Operation Office Information Office: U.S. Department of Energy Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is a multi-program national laboratory managed

  3. E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division

    E-print Network

    #12;#12;E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Address: MS 85B0198 One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 Contact....................................................................................................37 3.4 CERTIFICATION

  4. //////////////////////////Radiology/////////////////////// Status Report

    E-print Network

    Haykin, Simon

    ///////////////////////////////// 20 Awards and Honors /////////////////////////////////// 20 Recruitments and Departures of Diagnostic Imaging//////////////////////////////////////////////// 57 St. Joseph's Healthcare Department based at Hamilton Health Sciences and St Joseph's Healthcare and work in varied divisions; radiology

  5. An e-health driven laboratory information system to support HIV treatment in Peru: E-quity for laboratory personnel, health providers and people living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Peru has a concentrated HIV epidemic with an estimated 76,000 people living with HIV (PLHIV). Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) expanded between 2004-2006 and the Peruvian National Institute of Health was named by the Ministry of Health as the institution responsible for carrying out testing to monitor the effectiveness of HAART. However, a national public health laboratory information system did not exist. We describe the design and implementation of an e-health driven, web-based laboratory information system - NETLAB - to communicate laboratory results for monitoring HAART to laboratory personnel, health providers and PLHIV. Methods We carried out a needs assessment of the existing public health laboratory system, which included the generation and subsequent review of flowcharts of laboratory testing processes to generate better, more efficient streamlined processes, improving them and eliminating duplications. Next, we designed NETLAB as a modular system, integrating key security functions. The system was implemented and evaluated. Results The three main components of the NETLAB system, registration, reporting and education, began operating in early 2007. The number of PLHIV with recorded CD4 counts and viral loads increased by 1.5 times, to reach 18,907. Publication of test results with NETLAB took an average of 1 day, compared to a pre-NETLAB average of 60 days. NETLAB reached 2,037 users, including 944 PLHIV and 1,093 health providers, during its first year and a half. The percentage of overall PLHIV and health providers who were aware of NETLAB and had a NETLAB password has also increased substantially. Conclusion NETLAB is an effective laboratory management tool since it is directly integrated into the national laboratory system and streamlined existing processes at the local, regional and national levels. The system also represents the best possible source of timely laboratory information for health providers and PLHIV, allowing patients to access their own results and other helpful information about their health, extending the scope of HIV treatment beyond the health facility and providing a model for other countries to follow. The NETLAB system now includes 100 diseases of public health importance for which the Peruvian National Institute of Health and the network of public health laboratories provide testing and results. PMID:20003281

  6. Radiological\\/Health physics program assessement at Rocky Flats, the process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Psomas

    1996-01-01

    The Department of Energy, Rocky Flats Office, Safety and Health Group, Health Physics Team (HPT) is responsible for oversight of the Radiation Protection and Health Physics Program (RPHP) of the Integrating Management Contractor (IMC), Kaiser-Hill (K-H) operations at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). As of 1 January 1996 the Rocky Flats Plant employed 300 DOE and 4,300 contractor

  7. NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY - AN ANNUAL REPORT OF ACCOMPLISHMENTS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Annual Report showcases some of the research activities of the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL) in various health and environmental effects research areas. The report is an indicator of the examples of progress and accomplishments that ...

  8. Environmental, safety, and health plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This document outlines the environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) approach to be followed for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 10 at Oak at Ridge National Laboratory. This ES&H Plan addresses hazards associated with upcoming Operable Unit 3 field work activities and provides the program elements required to maintain minimal personnel exposures and to reduce the potential for environmental impacts during field operations. The hazards evaluation for WAG 10 is presented in Sect. 3. This section includes the potential radiological, chemical, and physical hazards that may be encountered. Previous sampling results suggest that the primary contaminants of concern will be radiological (cobalt-60, europium-154, americium-241, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239, cesium-134, cesium-137, and curium-244). External and internal exposures to radioactive materials will be minimized through engineering controls (e.g., ventilation, containment, isolation) and administrative controls (e.g., procedures, training, postings, protective clothing).

  9. Radiological health aspects of commercial uranium conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. A. Stoetzel; G. R. Hoenes; F. M. Cummings; W. D. McCormack

    1982-01-01

    Detailed information concerning occupational exposures, health physics practices, and regulatory procedures at commercial conversion, enrichment and fuel fabrication facilities is given. Sites visits were the primary source of information, which is divided into four sections. The first section discusses health physics practices that are common to the conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication phases of the commercial uranium industry. The next

  10. Laboratory manager's financial handbook. The laboratory's importance to the financial stability of a health-care organization.

    PubMed

    Travers, E M

    1996-01-01

    From a financial standpoint, one of the most valuable assets in the survival of a health-care organization is the clinical laboratory. Laboratory directors, managers, and supervisors have indicated their overwhelming need to understand finance, especially cost management, to CLMA and to the author at national meetings and workshops, Tremendous financial pressures are being applied in health-care organizations across the country. Two strategic factors in their successful move into the 21st century are more appropriate test utilization and cost control in the laboratory. PMID:10154382

  11. Results of the radiological survey at the ALCOA Research Laboratory, 600 Freeport Road, New Kensington, Pennsylvania (ANK001). Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, R.D.; Brown, K.S.

    1992-10-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at the ALCOA Research Laboratory, 600 Freeport Road, New Kensington, Pennsylvania. The survey was performed on November 12, 1991. The purpose of the survey was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 238}U, as a result of work done for the Manhattan Engineer District in 1944. The survey included measurement of direct alpha and beta-gamma levels in the northeast comer of the basement of Building 29, and the collection of a debris sample from a floor drain for radionuclide analysis. The survey area was used for experimental canning of uranium slugs prior to production activities at the former New Kensington Works nearby.

  12. Dose-Rate Dependence of High-Dose Health Effects in Humans from Photon Radiation with Application to Radiological Terrorism

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-01-14

    In 1981, as part of a symposium entitled ''The Control of Exposure of the Public to Ionizing Radiation in the Event of Accident or Attack,'' Lushbaugh, H?bner, and Fry published a paper examining ''radiation tolerance'' of various human health endpoints as a function of dose rate. This paper may not have received the notice it warrants. The health endpoints examined by Lushbaugh et al. were the lethal dose that will kill 50% of people within 60 days of exposure without medical care (LD50/60); severe bone marrow damage in healthy men; severe bone marrow damage in leukemia patients; temporary sterility (azoospermia); reduced male fertility; and late effects such as cancer. Their analysis was grounded in extensive clinical experience and anchored to a few selected data points, and based on the 1968 dose-rate dependence theory of J.L. Bateman. The Lushbaugh et al. paper did not give predictive equations for the relationships, although they were implied in the text, and the relationships were presented in a non-intuitive way. This work derives the parameters needed in Bateman's equation for each health endpoint, tabulates the results, and plots them in a more conventional manner on logarithmic scales. The results give a quantitative indication of how the human organism can tolerate more radiation dose when it is delivered at lower dose rates. For example, the LD50/60 increases from about 3 grays (300 rads) when given at very high dose rates to over 10 grays (1,000 rads) when given at much lower dose rates over periods of several months. The latter figure is borne out by the case of an individual who survived for at least 19 years after receiving doses in the range of 9 to 17 grays (900-1700 rads) over 106 days. The Lushbaugh et al. work shows the importance of sheltering when confronted with long-term exposure to radiological contamination such as would be expected from a radiological dispersion event, reactor accident, or ground-level nuclear explosion.

  13. Interventional Radiology healthcare.utah.edu/radiology

    E-print Network

    Feschotte, Cedric

    Interventional Radiology healthcare.utah.edu/radiology Radiology What is Interventional Radiology? Interventional radiology involves radiologists treating disease with minimally invasive surgery. These surgeries are performed using radiologic images to guide small catheters. Because many of these procedures are safer

  14. Post-remedial-action radiological survey of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, Pennsylvania, October 1-8, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The post-remedial-action radiological assessment conducted by the ANL Radiological Survey Group in October 1981, following decommissioning and decontamination efforts by Westinghouse personnel, indicated that except for the Advanced Fuels Laboratory exhaust ductwork and north wall, the interior surfaces of the Plutonium Laboratory and associated areas within Building 7 and the Advanced Fuels Laboratory within Building 8 were below both the ANSI Draft Standard N13.12 and NRC Guideline criteria for acceptable surface contamination levels. Hence, with the exceptions noted above, the interior surfaces of those areas within Buildings 7 and 8 that were included in the assessment are suitable for unrestricted use. Air samples collected at the involved areas within Buildings 7 and 8 indicated that the radon, thoron, and progeny concentrations within the air were well below the limits prescribed by the US Surgeon General, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Department of Energy. The Building 7 drain lines are contaminated with uranium, plutonium, and americium. Radiochemical analysis of water and dirt/sludge samples collected from accessible Low-Bay, High-Bay, Shower Room, and Sodium laboratory drains revealed uranium, plutonium, and americium contaminants. The Building 7 drain lines hence are unsuitable for release for unrestricted use in their present condition. Low levels of enriched uranium, plutonium, and americium were detected in an environmental soil coring near Building 8, indicating release or spillage due to Advanced Reactors Division activities or Nuclear Fuel Division activities undr NRC licensure. /sup 60/Co contamination was detected within the Building 7 Shower Room and in soil corings from the environs of Building 7. All other radionuclide concentrations measured in soil corings and the storm sewer outfall sample collected from the environs about Buildings 7 and 8 were within the range of normally expected background concentrations.

  15. Daniel L. Rubin, MD, MS Assistant Professor of Radiology and

    E-print Network

    Rubin, Daniel L.

    Daniel L. Rubin, MD, MS Assistant Professor of Radiology and of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics Research) Laboratory of Quantitative Imaging Department of Radiology Stanford University School Fellowship Opportunity Department of Radiology and Medicine (Biomedical Informatics) Stanford University

  16. Radiological health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Evans, J S; Moeller, D W

    1989-04-01

    Improved health effects models have been developed for assessing the early effects, late somatic effects and genetic effects that might result from low-LET radiation exposures to populations following a major accident in a nuclear power plant. All the models have been developed in such a way that the dynamics of population risks can be analyzed. Estimates of life years lost and the duration of illnesses were generated and a framework recommended for summarizing health impacts. Uncertainty is addressed by providing models for upper, central and lower estimates of most effects. The models are believed to be a significant improvement over the models used in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Safety Study, and they can easily be modified to reflect advances in scientific understanding of the health effects of ionizing radiation. PMID:2925380

  17. E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, & Safety Division

    E-print Network

    E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, & Safety Division Environmental Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Address: 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 Contractor Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 06/09/99 #12;Section I. Facility Information Site

  18. Online Radiology Images

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    These online radiology images are part of the MedPix database, which is offered as a public service by the departments of radiology and biomedical informatics at the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, Maryland. The target audience for the site is "physicians and nurses, allied health professionals, medical students, graduate nursing students and other post-graduate trainees." Visitors to the homepage will find much of the materials here contained within two sections: Anatomy and Teaching File. In the Anatomy area, visitors can read through a radiologic anatomy glossary and atlas, look over labeled brain scans, and also look at different radiology images of the chest. Moving on, the Teaching File area contains radiology tutorials, online seminars, and even mock exams. The collection here is voluminous, containing over 11,000 teaching file cases and over 54,000 images.

  19. Derivation of residual radioactive material guidelines for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research site

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, T.E.

    1993-11-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines were derived for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Environmental Restoration (ER) site in Davis, California. The guideline derivation was based on a dose limit of 100 mrem/yr. The US Department of Energy (DOE) residual radioactive material guideline computer code was used in this evaluation. This code implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines. Three potential site utilization scenarios were considered with the assumption that following ER action, the site will be used without radiological restrictions. The defined scenarios vary with regard to use of the site, time spent at the site, and sources of food consumed. The results of the evaluation indicate that the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr will not be exceeded, provided that the soil concentrations of these radionuclides at the LEHR site do not exceed the scenario-specific values calculated by this study. Except for the extent of the contaminated zone (which is very conservative), assumptions used are as site-specific as possible, given available information. The derived guidelines are single- radionuclide guidelines and are linearly proportional to the dose limit used in the calculations. In setting the actual residual soil contamination guides for the LEHR site, DOE will apply the as low as reasonably achievable policy to the decision-making process, along with other factors such as whether a particular scenario is reasonable and appropriate, as well as using site-specific inputs to computer models based on data not yet fully determined.

  20. Exposure pathways and health effects associated with chemical and radiological toxicity of natural uranium: a review.

    PubMed

    Brugge, Doug; de Lemos, Jamie L; Oldmixon, Beth

    2005-01-01

    Natural uranium exposure derives from the mining, milling, and processing of uranium ore, as well as from ingestion of groundwater that is naturally contaminated with uranium. Ingestion and inhalation are the primary routes of entry into the body. Absorption of uranium from the lungs or digestive track is typically low but can vary depending on compound specific solubility. From the blood, two-thirds of the uranium is excreted in urine over the first 24 hours and up to 80% to 90% of uranium deposited in the bone leaves the body within 1.5 years. The primary health outcomes of concern documented with respect to uranium are renal, developmental, reproductive, diminished bone growth, and DNA damage. The reported health effects derive from experimental animal studies and human epidemiology. The Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Level (LOAEL) derived from animal studies is 50 microg/m3 for inhalation and 60 ug/kg body weight/day for ingestion. The current respiratory standard of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), 50 microg/m3, affords no margin of safety. Considering the safety factors for species and individual variation, the ingestion LOAEL corresponds to the daily consumption set by the World Health Organization Drinking Water Standard at 2 microg/L. Based on economic considerations, the United States Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level is 30 microg/L. Further research is needed, with particular attention on the impact of uranium on indigenous populations, on routes of exposure in communities near uranium sites, on the combined exposures present at many uranium sites, on human developmental defects, and on health effects at or below established exposure standards. PMID:16342416

  1. Laboratory Safety Manual Office of Environment, Health and Safety

    E-print Network

    Jalali. Bahram

    are greatly reduced or eliminated when proper precautions and practices are observed in the laboratory Hygiene Plan 3. Laboratory Specific Standard Operating Procedures 4. Training Records 5. Inspection of chemical products handled in laboratories, it should not be assumed that the precautions and requirements

  2. Manual of Basic Techniques for a Health Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    Described are basic laboratory methods for diagnosing and investigating diseases of importance to developing countries. Intended primarily for the training of technicians who will work in peripheral laboratories, the manual is designed so that student laboratory assistants can be taught to use it with minimal supervision from a teacher. The…

  3. Effect of the Duration Time of a Nuclear Accident on Radiological Health Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyojoon; Park, Misun; Jeong, Haesun; Hwang, Wontae; Kim, Eunhan; Han, Moonhee

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the effect of duration time of a nuclear accident on the radiation dose of a densely populated area and the resulting acute health effects. In the case of nuclear accidents, the total emissions of radioactive materials can be classified into several categories. Therefore, the release information is very important for the assessment of risk to the public. We confirmed that when the duration time of the emissions are prolonged to 7 hours, the concentrations of radioactive substances in the ambient air are reduced by 50% compared to that when the duration time of emission is one hour. This means that the risk evaluation using only the first wind direction of an accident is very conservative, so it has to be used as a screening level for the risk assessment. Furthermore, it is judged that the proper control of the emission time of a nuclear accident can minimize the health effects on residents. PMID:24619120

  4. Effect of the duration time of a nuclear accident on radiological health consequences.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyojoon; Park, Misun; Jeong, Haesun; Hwang, Wontae; Kim, Eunhan; Han, Moonhee

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to quantify the effect of duration time of a nuclear accident on the radiation dose of a densely populated area and the resulting acute health effects. In the case of nuclear accidents, the total emissions of radioactive materials can be classified into several categories. Therefore, the release information is very important for the assessment of risk to the public. We confirmed that when the duration time of the emissions are prolonged to 7 hours, the concentrations of radioactive substances in the ambient air are reduced by 50% compared to that when the duration time of emission is one hour. This means that the risk evaluation using only the first wind direction of an accident is very conservative, so it has to be used as a screening level for the risk assessment. Furthermore, it is judged that the proper control of the emission time of a nuclear accident can minimize the health effects on residents. PMID:24619120

  5. Implementing a network for electronic surveillance reporting from public health reference laboratories: an international perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Bean, N. H.; Martin, S. M.

    2001-01-01

    Electronic data reporting from public health laboratories to a central site provides a mechanism for public health officials to rapidly identify problems and take action to prevent further spread of disease. However, implementation of reference laboratory systems is much more complex than simply adopting new technology, especially in international settings. We describe three major areas to be considered by international organizations for successful implementation of electronic reporting systems from public health reference laboratories: benefits of electronic reporting, planning for system implementation (e.g., support, resources, data analysis, country sovereignty), and components of system initiation (e.g., authority, disease definition, feedback, site selection, assessing readiness, problem resolution). Our experience with implementation of electronic public health laboratory data management and reporting systems in the United States and working with international organizations to initiate similar efforts demonstrates that successful reference laboratory reporting can be implemented if surveillance issues and components are planned. PMID:11747687

  6. Results of the radiological and chemical characterization of surface impoundments 3539 and 3540 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, M.E.; Rose, D.A.; Brown, K.S.; Winton, W.; Dean, R.A.; Coe, R.H. III

    1998-03-01

    A radiological and chemical characterization survey of impoundments 3539 and 3540 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted during December 1997. Impoundments 3539 and 3540 are located in the Surface Impoundments Operable Unit (SIOU) of Waste Area Group 1. The investigation was performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Life Sciences Division of ORNL at the request of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration. Sampling was conducted in order to quantify the presence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents, and other contaminants of interest in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation for the SIOU> The survey included collection of sediment/clay samples, quality control blank water samples and equipment rinsate samples for chemical and radiological analysis. Results show the samples contain traces of various organic, inorganic, and radioactive materials. Of particular interest are PCB values which demonstrate the impoundments are not regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act.

  7. 2015 Radiologic Sciences Program Admission Application Bachelor of Science, Diagnostic Radiology

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    2015 Radiologic Sciences Program Admission Application Bachelor of Science, Diagnostic Radiology-Mail: _______________________________________________________________________ PLEASE NOTE: It is the APPLICANT'S responsibility to keep the Radiologic Sciences Department informed/Volunteer History: Dates Employer Position/Responsibilities Department of Radiologic Sciences Health Sciences

  8. Needs analysis and project schedule for the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Health Physics Analysis Laboratory (HPAL) upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Rhea, T.A.; Rucker, T.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stafford, M.W. [NUS Corp., Aiken, SC (US)

    1990-09-28

    This report is a needs assessment and project schedule for the Health Physics Analysis Laboratory (HPAL) upgrade project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). After reviewing current and projected HPAL operations, two custom-developed laboratory information management systems (LIMS) for similar facilities were reviewed; four commercially available LIMS products were also evaluated. This project is motivated by new regulations for radiation protection and training and by increased emphasis on quality assurance (QA). HPAL data are used to: protect the health of radiation workers; document contamination levels for transportation of radioactive materials and for release of materials to the public for uncontrolled use; and verify compliance with environmental emission regulations. Phase 1 of the HPAL upgrade project concentrates on four types of counting instruments which support in excess of 90% of the sample workload at the existing central laboratories. Phase 2 is a refinement phase and also integrates summary-level databases on the central Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) VAX. Phase 3 incorporates additional instrument types and integrates satellite laboratories into the HPAL LIMS. Phase 1 will be a multi-year, multimillion dollar project. The temptation to approach the upgrade of the HPAL program in a piece meal fashion should be avoided. This is a major project, with clearly-defined goals and priorities, and should be approached as such. Major programmatic and operational impacts will be felt throughout HSE as a result of this upgrade, so effective coordination with key customer contacts will be critical.

  9. Update on progress in electronic reporting of laboratory results to public health agencies - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Emilie; Satre, John; Hurd-Kundeti, Glorietta; Liscek, Bonnie; Hall, C Jason; Pinner, Robert W; Conn, Laura; Zajac, Julie; Smallwood, Megan; Smith, Kaley

    2015-04-01

    Since 2010, CDC has provided resources from the Prevention and Public Health Fund of the Affordable Care Act to 57 state, local, and territorial health departments through the Epidemiology and Laboratory Capacity for Infectious Diseases cooperative agreement to assist with implementation of electronic laboratory reporting (ELR)* from clinical and public health laboratories to public health agencies. To update information from a previous report about the progress in implementing ELR in the United States, CDC examined regular communications between the agency and the 57 health departments during 2012-2014. The results indicated that, as of July 2014, 67% of the approximately 20 million laboratory reports received annually for notifiable conditions were received electronically, compared with 62% in July 2013. These electronic reports were received by 55 of the 57 jurisdictions and came from 3,269 (up from nearly 2,900 in July 2013) of approximately 10,600 reporting laboratories. The proportion of laboratory reports received electronically varied by jurisdiction. In 2014, compared with 2013, the number of jurisdictions receiving >75% of laboratory reports electronically was higher (21 versus 14), and the number of jurisdictions receiving <25% of reports electronically was lower (seven versus nine). National implementation of ELR continues to increase and appears it might reach 80% of total laboratory report volume by 2016. PMID:25837244

  10. Medical laboratory scientists are educated in the theoretical and practical aspects of laboratory medicine. As vital members of the health care team,

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    Medical laboratory scientists are educated in the theoretical and practical aspects of laboratory medicine. As vital members of the health care team, laboratory professionals provide information necessary for the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Medical laboratory science (MLS) is a challenging profession requiring

  11. 78 FR 24154 - Notice of Availability of a National Animal Health Laboratory Network Reorganization Concept Paper

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ...Laboratory Network Reorganization Concept Paper AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection...Inspection Service is making available a concept paper that describes a revised structure for...the nation's food animals. The concept paper we are making available for comment...

  12. Identifying and Managing the Health and Safety Hazards of Nanomaterials in Laboratories 

    E-print Network

    Kim, Jin Sek

    2014-08-06

    of nanomaterials results in unexpected impacts on humanity and the environment. Exposure to nanomaterials causes potential health and physical hazards to researchers handling nanomaterials in laboratories. In addition, specific standards and guidelines on the safe...

  13. Werner Steimle, MT(ASCP) OSU Student Health Services Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Tullos, Desiree

    Educational Background · Bachelors of Technology ­ Medical Laboratory Technology o Oregon Institute Of Technology Klamath Falls, OR Employment/Professional Background · 2007 ­ Current Staff Medical Technologist Albany General Hospital Albany, OR · 1972 ­ 1973 Medical Technology Internship St. Vincent Hospital

  14. E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division

    E-print Network

    E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division Environmental Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Address: One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 Contractor Report (Subpart H of 40 CFR 61) Calendar Year 2001 Site Name: Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National

  15. New York-Presbyterian Outpatient Laboratory Locations At the following facilities, the $150 copay for Lab and Radiology services is

    E-print Network

    Grishok, Alla

    New York-Presbyterian Outpatient Laboratory Locations At the following facilities, the $150 copay HOURS OF OPERATION Irving Pavilion, 14th Floor 161 Fort Washington New York, NY 10032 Monday-Friday, 7 facility) 161 Fort Washington New York, NY 10032 Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Saturday, 8 a.m. - 12 noon

  16. Learning Radiology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Herring, William

    This website is produced by William Herring, MD, who is the Vice-Chairman and Radiology Residency Program Director at the Albert Einstein Medical Center. Resources featured on the website include images, lectures, notes, as well as quizzes and flashcards. The lectures under the heading â??Medical Studentsâ? provide an overview of chest, bone, cardiac and GI radiology. These short lessons are intended for beginning students and those who are new to the field of radiology. Students can also test their diagnostic skills and knowledge gained from the lectures in the â??case of the weekâ? section. The wealth of radiology resources and its straightforward layout makes this website a perfect resource for medical students and professionals entering the fields of Radiologic Technology and Radiology.

  17. 75 FR 44273 - Radiological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...FDA-2010-N-0001] Radiological Devices Panel of the...Name of Committee: Radiological Devices Panel of the...Center for Devices and Radiological Health, 10903 New...

  18. College of Health Sciences CLS Clinical Laboratory Sciences

    E-print Network

    MacAdam, Keith

    complementary/alternative and allopathic medicine, based on the patient's individual needs and condition to complementary and alternative health care providers and the practices and beliefs of these practices as well

  19. Developing a behavioral health screening program for BSL-4 laboratory workers at the National Institutes of Health.

    PubMed

    Skvorc, Casey; Wilson, Deborah E

    2011-03-01

    The events and aftermath of September 11, 2001, accelerated a search for personnel reliability test measures to identify individuals who could pose a threat to our nation's security and safety. The creation and administration of a behavioral health screen for BSL-4 laboratory workers at the National Institutes of Health represents a pioneering effort to proactively build a BSL-4 safety culture promoting worker cohesiveness, trust, respect, and reliability with a balance of worker privacy and public safety. PMID:21361798

  20. Developing a Behavioral Health Screening Program for BSL-4 Laboratory Workers at the National Institutes of Health

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Deborah E.

    2011-01-01

    The events and aftermath of September 11, 2001, accelerated a search for personnel reliability test measures to identify individuals who could pose a threat to our nation's security and safety. The creation and administration of a behavioral health screen for BSL-4 laboratory workers at the National Institutes of Health represents a pioneering effort to proactively build a BSL-4 safety culture promoting worker cohesiveness, trust, respect, and reliability with a balance of worker privacy and public safety. PMID:21361798

  1. Integrating environment, safety and health training at a national laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.R.

    1993-03-01

    In a multi-purpose research laboratory, innovation and creativity are required to satisfy the training requirements for hazards to people and the environment. A climate that encourages excellence in research and enhances hazard minimization skills is created by combining technical expertise with instructional design talent.

  2. Integrating environment, safety and health training at a national laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    In a multi-purpose research laboratory, innovation and creativity are required to satisfy the training requirements for hazards to people and the environment. A climate that encourages excellence in research and enhances hazard minimization skills is created by combining technical expertise with instructional design talent.

  3. Radiological health risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtwey, D. Stuart

    1989-01-01

    The crew of a manned Mars mission will be unavoidably exposed to galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux. The Mars mission crew shielded by 2 g/sq cm Al could receive about 0.7 Sv in a 460-day mission at solar minimum. However, three-fourths of this dose-equivalent in free space is contributed by high LET heavy ions (Z 3 or greater) and target fragments with average Q of 10.3 and 20, respectively. Such high quality factors for these particles may be inappropriate. Moreover, in a 460-day mission, less than half of the nuclei in the body of an astronaut will have been traversed by a single heavy particle. The entire concept of absorbed dose/quality factors/dose-equivalents as applied to GCR must be reconsidered.

  4. Dosimetry in diagnostic radiology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmed Meghzifene; David R. Dance; Donald McLean; Hans-Michael Kramer

    2010-01-01

    Dosimetry is an area of increasing importance in diagnostic radiology. There is a realisation amongst health professionals that the radiation dose received by patients from modern X-ray examinations and procedures can be at a level of significance for the induction of cancer across a population, and in some unfortunate instances, in the acute damage to particular body organs such as

  5. Skeletal radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Bowerman, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The main emphasis of the chapter on skeletal radiology is CAT scanning and its use in the diagnosis of neoplasms. Other topics that are discussed include infections, arthritis, trauma, and metabolic and endocrine diseases as they relate to skeletal radiology. (KRM)

  6. Leveraging the laboratory response network model for the global health security agenda.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Chris N; Maryogo-Robinson, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    Promoting global health security as an international priority is a challenge; the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in its Global Health Security Agenda has articulated the importance of accelerating progress toward a world safe and secure from infectious disease threats. The goals are to (1) prevent and reduce the likelihood of outbreaks-natural, accidental, or intentional; (2) detect threats early to save lives; and (3) respond rapidly and effectively using multisectoral, international coordination and communication. Foundational to this agenda is the World Health Organization (WHO) Revised International Health Regulations (IHR) of 2005, which provide the legal framework for countries to strengthen their health systems in order to be able to respond to any public health emergency of international concern. This article proposes leveraging the distributed structure of the US-managed Laboratory Response Network for Biological Threats Preparedness (LRN-B) to develop the core capacity of laboratory testing and to fulfill the laboratory-strengthening component of the Global Health Security Agenda. The LRN model offers an effective mechanism to detect and respond to public health emergencies of international concern. PMID:25254916

  7. Radiology East North Radiology

    E-print Network

    Ford, James

    Endoscopy H1120 Bariatric WoundCare Trauma Liver/KidneyTrans Hepatology OccupationalHealth 6:30a-5:30p G. LPCH Audiology Clinic Ground Floor,Suite 10 Orthopaedic Surgery H.O.M.E.ApartmentsStanford IVF Program Blood Center Labs Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery/ Ear,Nose & Throat Psychiatry,Hoover: See

  8. Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2005 Site environmental report8-

    E-print Network

    Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2005 Site environmental report8- Brookhaven National Laboratory routinely evaluates site operations to ensure that the radiological dose impact to members of the public contribute to radiological dose are reviewed for their environmental impacts. The potential radiological dose

  9. Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2009 Site environmental report8-

    E-print Network

    Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2009 Site environmental report8- DRAFT The Laboratory's routine and radiological dose impact to workers and the environment. Radiological assessments are also performed as necessary, to ensure that radiological dose impact from non- routine activities remain "As Low As Reasonably

  10. Nutrition in industrial health at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    The nutritional status of an individual plays a key role in the reduction and prevention of illness. This involves maintenance of ideal body weight by using a diet that economically optimizes nutrients. The achievement and maintenance of good health in the industrial population helps us to avoid resource losses. The ORNL nutritional counseling program's major emphasis is to correct and control diet related risk factors to cardiovascular disease.

  11. UC DAVIS HEALTH SYSTEM LABORATORY PATIENT SERVICE CENTERS

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    FOR HEALTH *** 550 West Ranch View Road, Suite 1100 Rocklin, Ca 95765 Lab: (916) 295-5800 Fax: (916) 295 Clinic: (530) 888-7616 Lab: (530) 886-5988 Lab Fax: (530) 886-5989 7am - 11:45am Monday - Friday 1:30pm 95814 Clinic: (916) 442-1011 Lab: (916) 444-1430 Alternate fax (916) 444-8661 8am - 12:30pm Monday

  12. Radiological controls and worker and public health and safety: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Tew; M. E. Miles; D. Knuth; R. Boyd

    1981-01-01

    DOE has formed a Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee to assess the implications of the Report of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island that are applicable to DOE's nuclear reactor operations. Thirteen DOE nuclear reactors were reviewed by the Committee. This report was prepared to provide a measure of how the radiological control

  13. Confirmatory radiological survey of the BORAX-V turbine building Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, G.H.; Coleman, R.L.; Jensen, M.K.; Pierce, G.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Egidi, P.V.; Mather, S.K. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, Grand Junction, CO (United States)

    1993-07-01

    An independent assessment of the remediation of the BORAX-V (Boiling Water Reactor Experiment) turbine building at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho, was accomplished by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pollutant Assessments Group (ORNL/PAG). The purpose of the assessment was to confirm the site`s compliance with applicable Department of Energy guidelines. The assessment included reviews of both the decontamination and decommissioning Plan and data provided from the pre- and post-remedial action surveys and an independent verification survey of the facility. The independent verification survey included determination of background exposure rates and soil concentrations, beta-gamma and gamma radiation scans, smears for detection of removable contamination, and direct measurements for alpha and beta-gamma radiation activity on the basement and mezzanine floors and the building`s interior and exterior walls. Soil samples were taken, and beta-gamma and gamma radiation exposure rates were measured on areas adjacent to the building. Results of measurements on building surfaces at this facility were within established contamination guidelines except for elevated beta-gamma radiation levels located on three isolated areas of the basement floor. Following remediation of these areas, ORNL/PAG reviewed the remedial action contractor`s report and agreed that remediation was effective in removing the source of the elevated direct radiation. Results of all independent soil analyses for {sup 60}Co were below the detection limit. The highest {sup 137}Cs analysis result was 4.6 pCi/g; this value is below the INEL site-specific guideline of 10 pCi/g.

  14. LABORATORY SAFETY CHECKLIST Department of Environment, Health and Safety v.1.9 July 2014 Page 1

    E-print Network

    Machel, Hans

    LABORATORY SAFETY CHECKLIST Department of Environment, Health and Safety v.1.9 July 2014 Page 1) WHMIS Designate SPILL Designate TDG Designate CHEMATIX Designate A. Laboratory Signage laboratory doors have a Laboratory Hazard Sign indicating current emergency contact information and hazards

  15. Brookhaven National Laboratory/ Photon Sciences Subject: Frequently Asked Questions about Occupational Health and Safety Management System (OHSAS 18001)

    E-print Network

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Brookhaven National Laboratory/ Photon Sciences Subject: Frequently Asked Questions about, supervisors and safety staff. Question 5 ­What efforts does Photon Sciences make to reduce the risk of injury National Laboratory/ Photon Sciences Subject: Frequently Asked Questions about Occupational Health

  16. Decentralized molecular diagnostic testing plan for pandemic influenza in the Ontario Public Health Laboratory system.

    PubMed

    Drews, Steven J; Majury, Anna; Jamieson, Frances; Riley, Garth; Mazzulli, Tony; Low, Donald E

    2008-01-01

    The Ontario Public Health Laboratories system (OPHL) is in the midst of a six-year plan to implement molecular tools for pandemic influenza diagnostics in one central and three regional public health laboratories. This plan has been formulated as a consequence of: (1) experiences gained through severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and comments of the members of the Expert Panel on SARS and Infectious Disease Control (i.e., the Walker report); (2) a review of pandemic preparedness literature; (3) historical and epidemiologic discussions about previous pandemics; and (4) suggestions made by various pandemic working committees. The OPHL plan includes: (1) an aggressive restructuring of the overall molecular microbiology testing capacity of the OPHL; (2) the ability to shift influenza testing of samples between designated OPHL laboratories; and (3) the development of screening tools for pandemic influenza diagnostic tests. The authors believe that investing in increased molecular testing capacity for regional laboratories outside the greater Toronto area will be beneficial to the OPHL system whether or not an influenza pandemic occurs. Well-trained technologists and microbiologists, and the introduction of new technologies, will facilitate the development of a wide variety of molecular tests for other infectious diseases at public health laboratories geographically distant from Toronto, thus enhancing overall laboratory testing capacity in the province of Ontario. PMID:19009922

  17. EPA/OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT'S NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY/HUMAN STUDIES DIVISION INTERNET SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Studies Division conducts clinical and epidemiological research to improve the understanding of human health risks associated with environmental pollution. HSD is part of the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory within the Office of Research and...

  18. Radiological Terrorism

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch's (REB) Research Program on Radiological and Nuclear Threats is conducted in the framework of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases biodefense research initiative. Dosimetry studies are the largest component of the REB program.

  19. Assessment of physicians' knowledge and awareness about the hazards of radiological examinations on the health of their patients.

    PubMed

    Hamarsheh, A; Ahmead, M

    2012-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that physicians tend to underestimate the risks to patients of radiation exposure. This study in 2 Palestinian hospitals aimed to assess physicians' knowledge about the risks associated with the use of radiological examinations. A questionnaire answered by 163 physicians revealed many gaps in knowledge. Only one-third of physicians had received a radiation protection course during their undergraduate study or in the workplace. Few physicians were able to answer correctly many scientific, knowledge-based questions. For example, only 6.1% of the respondents were able to identify the ALARA principle and 98.2% did not know that there is no safe dose limit according to international recommendations. Physicians' practices in terms of frequency of use of routine X-rays and discussing the risks with patients were also poor. These results clearly indicate the need to increase Palestinian physicians' knowledge and awareness about the potential hazards associated with the use of radiological examinations. PMID:23057378

  20. RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH EFFECTS 20 YEARS AFTER THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT: DATA OF THE NATIONAL RADIATION AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REGISTRY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    VICTOR IVANOV; ANATOLY TSYB

    On the decree of the Russian Federation Government N 948 of 22 September 1993 the National Radiation and Epidemiological Registry\\u000a was established. This is a legal entity on the base of the Medical Radiological Research Center of Russian Academy of Medical\\u000a Sciences. Two main tasks were imposed upon the Registry: 1) objective estimation of radiation risks of cancer and non-cancer

  1. 8-1 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 8: RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT

    E-print Network

    Homes, Christopher C.

    8-1 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 8: RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT Brookhaven National Laboratory assessed the potential environmental radiological dose from scientific research activities for calendar year 2002. The radiological dose was calculated from ambient external sources, inhalation

  2. The Tanzania Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program: building and transforming the public health workforce.

    PubMed

    Mmbuji, Peter; Mukanga, David; Mghamba, Janeth; Ahly, Mohamed; Mosha, Fausta; Azima, Simba; Senga, Sembuche; Moshiro, Candida; Semali, Innocent; Rolle, Italia; Wiktor, Stefan; McQueen, Suzzane; McElroy, Peter; Nsubuga, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Tanzania Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (TFELTP) was established in 2008 as a partnership among the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW), Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, National Institute for Medical Research, and local and international partners. TFELTP was established to strengthen the capacity of MOHSW to conduct public health surveillance and response, manage national disease control and prevention programs, and to enhance public health laboratory support for surveillance, diagnosis, treatment and disease monitoring. TFELTP is a 2-year full-time training program with approximately 25% time spent in class, and 75% in the field. TFELTP offers two tracks leading to an MSc degree in either Applied Epidemiology or, Epidemiology and Laboratory Management. Since 2008, the program has enrolled a total of 33 trainees (23 males, 10 females). Of these, 11 were enrolled in 2008 and 100% graduated in 2010. All 11 graduates of cohort 1 are currently employed in public health positions within the country. Demand for the program as measured by the number of applicants has grown from 28 in 2008 to 56 in 2011. While training the public health leaders of the country, TFELTP has also provided essential service to the country in responding to high-profile disease outbreaks, and evaluating and improving its public health surveillance systems and diseases control programs. TFELTP was involved in the country assessment of the revised International Health Regulations (IHR) core capabilities, development of the Tanzania IHR plan, and incorporation of IHR into the revised Tanzania Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) guidelines. TFELTP is training a competent core group of public health leaders for Tanzania, as well as providing much needed service to the MOHSW in the areas of routine surveillance, outbreak detection and response, and disease program management. However, the immediate challenges that the program must address include development of a full range of in-country teaching capacity for the program, as well as a career path for graduates. PMID:22359697

  3. The Tanzania Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program: building and transforming the public health workforce

    PubMed Central

    Mmbuji, Peter; Mukanga, David; Mghamba, Janeth; Ahly, Mohamed; Mosha, Fausta; Azima, Simba; Senga, Sembuche; Moshiro, Candida; Semali, Innocent; Rolle, Italia; Wiktor, Stefan; McQueen, Suzzane; McElroy, Peter; Nsubuga, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The Tanzania Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (TFELTP) was established in 2008 as a partnership among the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW), Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, National Institute for Medical Research, and local and international partners. TFELTP was established to strengthen the capacity of MOHSW to conduct public health surveillance and response, manage national disease control and prevention programs, and to enhance public health laboratory support for surveillance, diagnosis, treatment and disease monitoring. TFELTP is a 2-year full-time training program with approximately 25% time spent in class, and 75% in the field. TFELTP offers two tracks leading to an MSc degree in either Applied Epidemiology or, Epidemiology and Laboratory Management. Since 2008, the program has enrolled a total of 33 trainees (23 males, 10 females). Of these, 11 were enrolled in 2008 and 100% graduated in 2010. All 11 graduates of cohort 1 are currently employed in public health positions within the country. Demand for the program as measured by the number of applicants has grown from 28 in 2008 to 56 in 2011. While training the public health leaders of the country, TFELTP has also provided essential service to the country in responding to high-profile disease outbreaks, and evaluating and improving its public health surveillance systems and diseases control programs. TFELTP was involved in the country assessment of the revised International Health Regulations (IHR) core capabilities, development of the Tanzania IHR plan, and incorporation of IHR into the revised Tanzania Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) guidelines. TFELTP is training a competent core group of public health leaders for Tanzania, as well as providing much needed service to the MOHSW in the areas of routine surveillance, outbreak detection and response, and disease program management. However, the immediate challenges that the program must address include development of a full range of in-country teaching capacity for the program, as well as a career path for graduates. PMID:22359697

  4. [Ethical issues in a market dispute between clinical laboratories and a health plan: case report].

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Malone Santos; de Brito, Ana Maria Guedes; Jeraldo, Verônica de Lourdes Sierpe; Pinheiro, Kariny Souza

    2011-01-01

    In Brazil the private health plans appear as an alternative to the public health assistance. This segment suffered great intensification in the seventies and eighties, culminating in the entry of large insurance company in the scenario of supplementary medicine. Quickly, the service providers associated with these insurance companies, consolidating them in the market and triggering a relationship of dependency. This article analyzed, in the form of a case report, a marketing dispute between clinical laboratories and a health plan, emphasizing the moral and ethical aspects involved in this episode. PMID:21503419

  5. Clinical Laboratory Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

    Education in the clinical laboratory sciences in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and…

  6. ORD/NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS LABORATORY'S RESEARCH PROGRAMS AND TOPICS INTERNET SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Internet site provides information on the research (by Research Area) conducted under the direction of the EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) at the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL). Information on all of NHEERL's Research Ar...

  7. Learning Laboratories for Unemployed, Out-of-School Youth. Health Education, Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Continuing Education Curriculum Development.

    The learning activities suggested in this publication supplement those found in the curriculum resource handbook "Learning Laboratories for Unemployed Out-of-School Youth." This phase of the program deals on a practical level with various health problems in short, achievable units. Activities keyed to the curriculum resource handbook and followed…

  8. A Study of the Clinical Laboratory Occupations. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Univ., Los Angeles. Div. of Vocational Education.

    The objectives of this study which was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project were: (1) to determine the percent of medical laboratory workers who perform a comprehensive list of tasks and procedures; (2) to evaluate this performance in terms of certification and specialty area; and (3) on the basis of these data, to make…

  9. Illegal Methamphetamine Drug Laboratories: A New Challenge for Environmental Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skeers, Vicki M.

    1992-01-01

    Reports on clandestine drug laboratories for manufacturing methamphetamine; the formation of an interagency steering committee to address the problem; and the role Environmental Health professionals need to play as the problem becomes more prevalent across the United States. Provides background information on methamphetamine characteristics and…

  10. Use of Lean Response to Improve Pandemic Influenza Surge in Public Health Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yin; Prystajecky, Natalie; Petric, Martin; Mak, Annie; Abbott, Brendan; Paris, Benjamin; Decker, K.C.; Pittenger, Lauren; Guercio, Steven; Stott, Jeff; Miller, Joseph D.

    2012-01-01

    A novel influenza A (H1N1) virus detected in April 2009 rapidly spread around the world. North American provincial and state laboratories have well-defined roles and responsibilities, including providing accurate, timely test results for patients and information for regional public health and other decision makers. We used the multidisciplinary response and rapid implementation of process changes based on Lean methods at the provincial public health laboratory in British Columbia, Canada, to improve laboratory surge capacity in the 2009 influenza pandemic. Observed and computer simulating evaluation results from rapid processes changes showed that use of Lean tools successfully expanded surge capacity, which enabled response to the 10-fold increase in testing demands. PMID:22257385

  11. Changes in the American health care system: crisis in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Conn, R B; Snyder, J W

    1997-11-01

    American medicine is undergoing unprecedented changes, and the resulting distortions are affecting the economics, organization and operations of all clinical laboratories. Professionals who work in these laboratories are facing administrative and economic pressures to reduce costs, to increase productivity, and to comply with proliferating new statutes and regulations. The medical 'cottage industry' in which the patient was the focus of the medical professionals' attention and endeavours is being replaced by the corporate management of many health care activities in which financial profits are being given first priority. Medical facilities, including clinical laboratories, are being bought and sold, being consolidated, or simply being closed. The clinical laboratories may be at the vortex of the maelstrom affecting American medicine. Cost pressures are encouraging further automation and retraining of laboratory staffs. If the leaders in laboratory medicine are unable to accomplish the necessary tasks to meet the new challenges, there inevitably is a non-medical, non-scientific financial manager at hand who is willing to define the changes and the desired outcome. Because of the rapidity of the changes taking place, it is not possible to predict with any confidence the modifications that will achieve a permanent status or the degree to which medical professionals will remain masters of their fates. The evolving health care system will become less costly, more technologically advanced, and a more challenging system in which to work. PMID:9469243

  12. Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2008 Site environmental report8-

    E-print Network

    Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2008 Site environmental report8- DRAFT All Laboratory operations, scientific experiments, and research projects are evaluated for safety and dose to workers projects are performed as necessary, to ensure that the overall radiological dose impact from

  13. Development of radiological profiles for U.S. Department of Energy low-level mixed wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, B.D.; Meshkov, N.K.; Dolak, D.A.; Wang, Y.Y.

    1995-03-01

    Radiological profiles have been developed by Argonne National Laboratory for low-level mixed wastes (LLMWs) that are under the management of the US Department of Energy (DOE). These profiles have been used in the Office of Environmental Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EM PEIS) to support the analysis of environmental and health risks associated with the various waste management strategies. The radiological characterization of DOE LLMWs is generally inadequate and has made it difficult to develop a site- and waste-stream-dependent radiological profile for LLMWs. On the basis of the operational history of the DOE sites, a simple model was developed to generate site-dependent and waste-stream-independent radiological profiles for LLMWs. This paper briefly discusses the assumptions used in this model and the uncertainties in the results.

  14. Radioactive Waste Management Complex low-level waste radiological performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Maheras, S.J.; Rood, A.S.; Magnuson, S.O.; Sussman, M.E.; Bhatt, R.N.

    1994-04-01

    This report documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of radioactive low-level waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This radiological performance assessment was conducted to evaluate compliance with applicable radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals inadvertently intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty and sensitivity analyses were performed. The results of the analyses indicate compliance with established radiological criteria and provide reasonable assurance that public health and safety will be protected.

  15. Training and Service in Public Health, Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training, 2008 – 2014

    PubMed Central

    Nguku, Patrick; Oyemakinde, Akin; Sabitu, Kabir; Olayinka, Adebola; Ajayi, Ikeoluwapo; Fawole, Olufunmilayo; Babirye, Rebecca; Gitta, Sheba; Mukanga, David; Waziri, Ndadilnasiya; Gidado, Saheed; Biya, Oladayo; Gana, Chinyere; Ajumobi, Olufemi; Abubakar, Aisha; Sani-Gwarzo, Nasir; Ngobua, Samuel; Oleribe, Obinna; Poggensee, Gabriele; Nsubuga, Peter; Nyager, Joseph; Nasidi, Abdulsalami

    2014-01-01

    The health workforce is one of the key building blocks for strengthening health systems. There is an alarming shortage of curative and preventive health care workers in developing countries many of which are in Africa. Africa resultantly records appalling health indices as a consequence of endemic and emerging health issues that are exacerbated by a lack of a public health workforce. In low-income countries, efforts to build public health surveillance and response systems have stalled, due in part, to the lack of epidemiologists and well-trained laboratorians. To strengthen public health systems in Africa, especially for disease surveillance and response, a number of countries have adopted a competency-based approach of training - Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (FELTP). The Nigeria FELTP was established in October 2008 as an inservice training program in field epidemiology, veterinary epidemiology and public health laboratory epidemiology and management. The first cohort of NFELTP residents began their training on 20th October 2008 and completed their training in December 2010. The program was scaled up in 2011 and it admitted 39 residents in its third cohort. The program has admitted residents in six annual cohorts since its inception admitting a total of 207 residents as of 2014 covering all the States. In addition the program has trained 595 health care workers in short courses. Since its inception, the program has responded to 133 suspected outbreaks ranging from environmental related outbreaks, vaccine preventable diseases, water and food borne, zoonoses, (including suspected viral hemorrhagic fevers) as well as neglected tropical diseases. With its emphasis on one health approach of solving public health issues the program has recruited physicians, veterinarians and laboratorians to work jointly on human, animal and environmental health issues. Residents have worked to identify risk factors of disease at the human animal interface for influenza, brucellosis, tick-borne relapsing fever, rabies, leptospirosis and zoonotic helminthic infections. The program has been involved in polio eradication efforts through its National Stop Transmission of Polio (NSTOP). The commencement of NFELTP was a novel approach to building sustainable epidemiological capacity to strengthen public health systems especially surveillance and response systems in Nigeria. Training and capacity building efforts should be tied to specific system strengthening and not viewed as an end to them. The approach of linking training and service provision may be an innovative approach towards addressing the numerous health challenges. PMID:25328621

  16. Piloting Laboratory Quality System Management in Six Health Facilities in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Mbah, Henry; Ojo, Emmanuel; Ameh, James; Musuluma, Humphrey; Negedu-Momoh, Olubunmi Ruth; Jegede, Feyisayo; Ojo, Olufunmilayo; Uwakwe, Nkem; Ochei, Kingsley; Dada, Michael; Udah, Donald; Chiegil, Robert; Torpey, Kwasi

    2014-01-01

    Background Achieving accreditation in laboratories is a challenge in Nigeria like in most African countries. Nigeria adopted the World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa Stepwise Laboratory (Quality) Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (WHO/AFRO– SLIPTA) in 2010. We report on FHI360 effort and progress in piloting WHO-AFRO recognition and accreditation preparedness in six health facility laboratories in five different states of Nigeria. Method Laboratory assessments were conducted at baseline, follow up and exit using the WHO/AFRO– SLIPTA checklist. From the total percentage score obtained, the quality status of laboratories were classified using a zero to five star rating, based on the WHO/AFRO quality improvement stepwise approach. Major interventions include advocacy, capacity building, mentorship and quality improvement projects. Results At baseline audit, two of the laboratories attained 1- star while the remaining four were at 0- star. At follow up audit one lab was at 1- star, two at 3-star and three at 4-star. At exit audit, four labs were at 4- star, one at 3-star and one at 2-star rating. One laboratory dropped a ‘star’ at exit audit, while others consistently improved. The two weakest elements at baseline; internal audit (4%) and occurrence/incidence management (15%) improved significantly, with an exit score of 76% and 81% respectively. The elements facility and safety was the major strength across board throughout the audit exercise. Conclusion This effort resulted in measurable and positive impact on the laboratories. We recommend further improvement towards a formal international accreditation status and scale up of WHO/AFRO– SLIPTA implementation in Nigeria. PMID:25542022

  17. Radiology's value chain.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Dieter R

    2012-04-01

    A diagnostic radiology value chain is constructed to define its main components, all of which are vulnerable to change, because digitization has caused disaggregation of the chain. Some components afford opportunities to improve productivity, some add value, while some face outsourcing to lower labor cost and to information technology substitutes, raising commoditization risks. Digital image information, because it can be competitive at smaller economies of scale, allows faster, differential rates of technological innovation of components, initiating a centralization-to-decentralization technology trend. Digitization, having triggered disaggregation of radiology's professional service model, may soon usher in an information business model. This means moving from a mind-set of "reading images" to an orientation of creating and organizing information for greater accuracy, faster speed, and lower cost in medical decision making. Information businesses view value chain investments differently than do small professional services. In the former model, producing a better business product will extend image interpretation beyond a radiologist's personal fund of knowledge to encompass expanding external imaging databases. A follow-on expansion with integration of image and molecular information into a report will offer new value in medical decision making. Improved interpretation plus new integration will enrich and diversify radiology's key service products, the report and consultation. A more robust, information-rich report derived from a "systems" and "computational" radiology approach will be facilitated by a transition from a professional service to an information business. Under health care reform, radiology will transition its emphasis from volume to greater value. Radiology's future brightens with the adoption of a philosophy of offering information rather than "reads" for decision making. Staunchly defending the status quo via turf wars is unlikely to constitute a forward-looking, competitive strategy. PMID:22438447

  18. Radiological containment handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to be used as a reference text. It is meant to be used by the working personnel as a guide for using temporary radiological containments. The installing group and health physics group may vary among organizations but responsibilities and duties will not change. It covers installation and inspection containments; working and operating guidelines; operating requirement; emergency procedures; and removal of containments.

  19. Digital radiology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1990-01-01

    Radiology is vital to the life-saving efforts of surgeons and other physicians, but precious time can be lost generating the images and transferring them to and from the operating room. Furthermore, hospitals are straining under the task of storing and managing the deluge of diagnostic films produced every year. A 300-bed hospital generates about 1 gigabyte (8 à 10⁹ bits)

  20. Dose-Rate Dependence of High-Dose Health Effects in Humans from Photon Radiation with Application to Radiological Terrorism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. J. Strom; Daniel J

    2005-01-01

    In 1981, as part of a symposium entitled ''The Control of Exposure of the Public to Ionizing Radiation in the Event of Accident or Attack,'' Lushbaugh, H?bner, and Fry published a paper examining ''radiation tolerance'' of various human health endpoints as a function of dose rate. This paper may not have received the notice it warrants. The health endpoints examined

  1. External quality assessment of national public health laboratories in Africa, 2002–2009

    PubMed Central

    Perovic, Olga; Fensham, Vivian; McCarthy, Kerrigan; von Gottberg, Anne; de Gouveia, Linda; Poonsamy, Bhavani; Dini, Leigh; Rossouw, Jenny; Keddy, Karen; Alemu, Wondimagegnehu; Yahaya, Ali; Pierson, Antoine; Dolmazon, Virginie; Cognat, Sébastien; Ndihokubwayo, Jean Bosco

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe findings from an external quality assessment programme involving laboratories in Africa that routinely investigate epidemic-prone diseases. Methods Beginning in 2002, the Regional Office for Africa of the World Health Organization (WHO) invited national public health laboratories and related facilities in Africa to participate in the programme. Three surveys comprising specimens and questionnaires associated with bacterial enteric diseases, bacterial meningitis, plague, tuberculosis and malaria were sent annually to test participants’ diagnostic proficiency. Identical surveys were sent to referee laboratories for quality control. Materials were prepared, packaged and shipped in accordance with standard protocols. Findings and reports were due within 30 days. Key methodological decisions and test results were categorized as acceptable or unacceptable on the basis of consensus feedback from referees, using established grading schemes. Findings Between 2002 and 2009, participation increased from 30 to 48 Member States of the WHO and from 39 to 78 laboratories. Each survey was returned by 64–93% of participants. Mean turnaround time was 25.9 days. For bacterial enteric diseases and meningitis components, bacterial identification was acceptable in 65% and 69% of challenges, respectively, but serotyping and antibiotic susceptibility testing and reporting were frequently unacceptable. Microscopy was acceptable for 73% of plague challenges. Tuberculosis microscopy was satisfactorily performed, with 87% of responses receiving acceptable scores. In the malaria component, 82% of responses received acceptable scores for species identification but only 51% of parasite quantitation scores were acceptable. Conclusion The external quality assessment programme consistently identified certain functional deficiencies requiring strengthening that were present in African public health microbiology laboratories. PMID:22461714

  2. Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare (OLAW) http://olaw.nih.gov National Institutes of Health

    E-print Network

    Baker, Chris I.

    Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare (OLAW) http://olaw.nih.gov National Institutes of Health RKL 1.A. olaw@od.nih.gov 301-496-7163 301-915-9481 Patricia A. Brown, V.M.D., M.S. Director brownp@od.nih.gov 301-496-7163 301-915-9481 Joan Ward Program Assistant (c) wardjoa@od.nih.gov 301-594-2506 301

  3. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This report provides a listing and brief description of experiments performed at RARAF during the May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993.

  4. Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) University of California at Davis, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Site (the Site) includes 1996 environmental monitoring data for Site air, soil, ground water, surface water, storm water and ambient radiation. DOE operation of LEHR as a functioning research location ceased in 1989, after the completion of three decades of research on the health effects of low-level radiation exposure (primarily strontium-90 and radium-226), using beagles to simulate effects on human health. During 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted activities at the Site in support of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Environmental remediation and the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of Site buildings. Extensive environmental data were collected in 1996 to evaluate appropriate remedial actions for the Site.

  5. Some specialized radiological-safety considerations at Argonne National Laboratory's Heavy Ion Research Facility (SAR, Shielding Design, Q. F. 's, HIRC)

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, R.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    The ATLAS facility at Argonne uses a tandem Van de Graaff, a booster linac, and the ATLAS linac to accelerate beams of heavy ions to energies of (5 to 25 MeV/A). The radiological hazards unique to this facility are considered along with safety considerations normally addressed at accelerators. (GHT)

  6. Muscle Atlas: Musculoskeletal Radiology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Not enough people know about the world of musculoskeletal radiology, but this site can address some of those glaring gaps in medical and physiological knowledge. Created by Doctor Michael Richardson at the University of Washington, this online muscle atlas covers the lower and upper extremity, and is primarily designed for use by health science professionals. The site also includes some teaching and instructional materials related to radiology. Visitors will note that the site contains a table of contents, and all of the major muscles are listed alphabetically, from the Adductor Brevis to the Vastus Medialis. Additionally, for each muscle, visitors can view a high-quality image of the related muscle groups and the function of each muscle in question.

  7. RADIOLOGICAL TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Provide laboratory-based radiological technical assistance as well as performing independent field studies regarding radiation measurement and data interpretation to achieve and promote high quality scientific practices and data addressing radioactive site contamination. Technic...

  8. Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2006 Site environmental report8-

    E-print Network

    Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2006 Site environmental report8- DRAFT Brookhaven National Laboratory routinely evaluates site operations and new projects to ensure that the overall radiological dose contribute to radiological dose are reviewed for their individual impacts on the people and environment

  9. EPA/OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT'S NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY/REPRODUCTIVE TOXICOLOGY DIVISION INTERNET SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Hhealth and Environmental Effect Research Laboratory's Reproductive Toxicology Division(RTD) brings together an unparalleled combination of expertise in teratogenesis and male and female reproductive toxicity to investigate the health effects of environmental contami...

  10. RADIOLOGICAL & ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT GUIDANCE DOCUMENT

    E-print Network

    Holland, Jeffrey

    RADIOLOGICAL & ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT GUIDANCE DOCUMENT: Minors in Research Laboratories or Animal Facilities Page 1 of 4 PURPOSE: The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for University faculty and staff wishing to offer educational opportunities in research labs or animal facilities

  11. Government leadership in addressing public health priorities: strides and delays in electronic laboratory reporting in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gluskin, Rebecca Tave; Mavinkurve, Maushumi; Varma, Jay K

    2014-03-01

    For nearly a decade, interest groups, from politicians to economists to physicians, have touted digitization of the nation's health information. One frequently mentioned benefit is the transmission of information electronically from laboratories to public health personnel, allowing them to rapidly analyze and act on these data. Switching from paper to electronic laboratory reports (ELRs) was thought to solve many public health surveillance issues, including workload, accuracy, and timeliness. However, barriers remain for both laboratories and public health agencies to realize the full benefits of ELRs. The New York City experience highlights several successes and challenges of electronic reporting and is supported by peer-reviewed literature. Lessons learned from ELR systems will benefit efforts to standardize electronic medical records reporting to health departments. PMID:24432922

  12. Informatics in radiology: Render: an online searchable radiology study repository.

    PubMed

    Dang, Pragya A; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Schultz, Thomas J; Graham, Steven A; Dreyer, Keith J

    2009-01-01

    Radiology departments are a rich source of information in the form of digital radiology reports and images obtained in patients with a wide spectrum of clinical conditions. A free text radiology report and image search application known as Render was created to allow users to find pertinent cases for a variety of purposes. Render is a radiology report and image repository that pools researchable information derived from multiple systems in near real time with use of (a) Health Level 7 links for radiology information system data, (b) periodic file transfers from the picture archiving and communication system, and (c) the results of natural language processing (NLP) analysis. Users can perform more structured and detailed searches with this application by combining different imaging and patient characteristics such as examination number; patient age, gender, and medical record number; and imaging modality. Use of NLP analysis allows a more effective search for reports with positive findings, resulting in the retrieval of more cases and terms having greater relevance. From the retrieved results, users can save images, bookmark examinations, and navigate to an external search engine such as Google. Render has applications in the fields of radiology education, research, and clinical decision support. PMID:19564253

  13. Pediatric radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, F.N.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review with 186 references of diagnostic pediatric radiology, a speciality restricted to an age group rather than to an organ system or technique of examination, is presented. In the present chapter topics follow the basic organ system divisions with discussions of special techniques within these divisions. The diagnosis of congenital malformations, infectious diseases and neoplasms are a few of the topics discussed for the head and neck region, the vertebrae, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal tract, the urinary tract, and the skeleton. (KRM)

  14. Hospital management of mass radiological casualties : reassessing exposures from contaminated victims of an exploded radiological dispersal device (RDD).

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, Armin (National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA); Harper, Frederick Taylor; Smith, James M. (National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA)

    2005-04-01

    One of the key issues in the aftermath of an exploded radiological dispersal device from a terrorist event is that of the contaminated victim and the concern among healthcare providers for the harmful exposures they may receive in treating patients, especially if the patient has not been thoroughly decontaminated. This is critically important in the event of mass casualties from a nuclear or radiological incident because of the essential rapidity of acute medical decisions and that those who have life- or limb-threatening injuries may have treatment unduly delayed by a decontamination process that may be unnecessary for protecting the health and safety of the patient or the healthcare provider. To estimate potential contamination of those exposed in a radiological dispersal device event, results were used from explosive aerosolization tests of surrogate radionuclides detonated with high explosives at the Sandia National Laboratories. Computer modeling was also used to assess radiation dose rates to surgical personnel treating patients with blast injuries who are contaminated with any of a variety of common radionuclides. It is demonstrated that exceptional but plausible cases may require special precautions by the healthcare provider, even while managing life-threatening injuries of a contaminated victim from a radiological dispersal device event.

  15. Analysis of containment performance and radiological consequences under severe accident conditions for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1994-01-01

    A severe accident study was conducted to evaluate conservatively scoped source terms and radiological consequences to support the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Conceptual Safety Analysis Report (CSAR). Three different types of severe accident scenarios were postulated with a view of evaluating conservatively scoped source terms. The first scenario evaluates maximum possible steaming loads and associated radionuclide transport, whereas the next scenario is geared towards evaluating conservative containment loads from releases of radionuclide vapors and aerosols with associated generation of combustible gases. The third scenario follows the prescriptions given by the 10 CFR 100 guidelines. It was included in the CSAR for demonstrating site-suitability characteristics of the ANS. Various containment configurations are considered for the study of thermal-hydraulic and radiological behaviors of the ANS containment. Severe accident mitigative design features such as the use of rupture disks were accounted for. This report describes the postulated severe accident scenarios, methodology for analysis, modeling assumptions, modeling of several severe accident phenomena, and evaluation of the resulting source term and radiological consequences.

  16. Environmental audit of the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This report documents the results of the environmental audit conducted at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, Environmental Restoration (LEHR-ER) Project at University of California-Davis (UCD), Davis, California. The scope of the audit at the LEHR-ER was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; surface water/drinking water; groundwater and soils/sediment/biota; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; inactive waste sites; radiation; quality assurance; and environmental management. Specifically assessed was the compliance of LEHR-ER operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; and best management practices (BMPs).

  17. Imaging and radiology

    MedlinePLUS

    Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... stress test Plain x-rays , which includes chest x-ray Positron emission tomography , also called PET imaging or a PET scan Ultrasound INTERVENTIONAL RADIOLOGY Interventional ...

  18. Methodological proposal for occupational health and safety actions in research laboratories with nanotechnologies activities.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Luís Renato Balbão; Amaral, Fernando Gonçalves

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnologies is a multidisciplinary set of techniques to manipulate matter on nanoscale level, more precisely particles below 100 nm whose characteristic due to small size is essentially different from those found in macro form materials. Regarding to these new properties of the materials there are knowledge gaps about the effects of these particles on human organism and the environment. Although it still being considered emerging technology it is growing increasingly fast as well as the number of products using nanotechnologies in some production level and so the number of researchers involved with the subject. Given this scenario and based on literature related, a comprehensive methodology for health and safety at work for researching laboratories with activities in nanotechnologies was developed, based on ILO structure guidelines for safety and health at work system on which a number of nanospecific recommendations were added to. The work intends to offer food for thought on controlling risks associated to nanotechnologies. PMID:22317200

  19. Learning Radiology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Herring, William

    2012-05-11

    The Learning Radiology website was conceived and created by Professor William Herring of the Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia. The site was started in June 2002, and now receives upwards of 12,000 visitors a day. Since the time the site was started, it has grown to include video podcasts, lectures from medical professionals, and interactive tutorials. The materials on the site are divided into seven topical areas, including Lectures, Notes, Images, Case of the Week Archive, and Quick Quizzes. In the Lectures area visitors can find talks on everything from bone tumors to the "ABCs of Heart Disease." Many of the talks are available in a variety of formats, including as pdf files and PowerPoint presentations. In the Notes area, visitors can read clear and concise summaries of over 45 topics, including Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm and Paget's Disease. Also, visitors can follow Learning Radiology via Twitter and take advantage of their interactive Museum of Modern Imaging, which includes fun and informative areas like the Hall of Hype and Roentgen's Room.

  20. Health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N.; Cipriano, D.J. Jr.; Uziel, M.S.; Kleinhans, K.R.; Tiner, P.F.

    1994-08-01

    This Programmatic Health and Safety plan (PHASP) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. This plan follows the format recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for remedial investigations and feasibility studies and that recommended by the EM40 Health and Safety Plan (HASP) Guidelines (DOE February 1994). This plan complies with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements found in 29 CFR 1910.120 and EM-40 guidelines for any activities dealing with hazardous waste operations and emergency response efforts and with OSHA requirements found in 29 CFR 1926.65. The policies and procedures in this plan apply to all Environmental Restoration sites and activities including employees of Energy Systems, subcontractors, and prime contractors performing work for the DOE ORNL ER Program. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices to minimize hazards to human health and safety and to the environment from event such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water.

  1. Evaluation of the proficiency of trained non-laboratory health staffs and laboratory technicians using a rapid and simple HIV antibody test

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Koum Kanal; Thai Leang Chou; Ly Sovann; Yasuo Morikawa; Yumi Mukoyama; Kazuhiro Kakimoto

    2005-01-01

    In Cambodia, nearly half of pregnant women attend antenatal care (ANC), which is an entry point of services for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). However, most of ANC services are provided in health centres or fields, where laboratory services by technicians are not available. In this study, those voluntary confidential counselling and testing (VCCT) counsellors involved in PMTCT

  2. The effect of for-profit laboratories on the accountability, integration, and cost of Canadian health care services.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Canadian public health care systems pay for-profit corporations to provide essential medical laboratory services. This practice is a useful window on the effects of using for-profit corporations to provide publicly funded services. Because private corporations are substantially protected by law from the public disclosure of "confidential business information," increased for-profit delivery has led to decreased transparency, thus impeding informed debate on how laboratory services are delivered. Using for-profit laboratories increases the cost of diagnostic testing and hinders the integration of health care services more generally. Two useful steps toward ending the for-profit provision of laboratory services would be to stop fee-for-service funding and to integrate all laboratory work within public administrative structures. PMID:23687532

  3. The effect of for-profit laboratories on the accountability, integration, and cost of Canadian health care services

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Canadian public health care systems pay for-profit corporations to provide essential medical laboratory services. This practice is a useful window on the effects of using for-profit corporations to provide publicly funded services. Because private corporations are substantially protected by law from the public disclosure of “confidential business information,” increased for-profit delivery has led to decreased transparency, thus impeding informed debate on how laboratory services are delivered. Using for-profit laboratories increases the cost of diagnostic testing and hinders the integration of health care services more generally. Two useful steps toward ending the for-profit provision of laboratory services would be to stop fee-for-service funding and to integrate all laboratory work within public administrative structures. PMID:23687532

  4. Conceptual damage-sensitive features for structural health monitoring: Laboratory and field demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catbas, F. Necati; Gul, Mustafa; Burkett, Jason L.

    2008-10-01

    The use of damage-sensitive features to evaluate structural condition or health is a very critical aspect of structural health monitoring. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential of two different damage-sensitive features for detecting damage. Different damage scenarios are simulated on a large-scale laboratory structure and a three-span highway bridge for demonstration. The features presented in this paper are the modal flexibility-based deflection and curvature both of which are obtained directly from dynamic properties. In the literature, flexibility associated with mode shapes and mode shapes curvatures have been mostly explored. In this study, multi-input-multi-output dynamic data are used to obtain modal flexibility, which is a close approximation to the actual flexibility. A main novelty is that the curvature is calculated from the deflected shapes using the modal flexibility as opposed to using modal vectors. In this paper, the theory of the methodology is explained and then experimental studies and results are presented. For the experimental studies, the laboratory specimen and the three-span bridge were gradually damaged. It is shown that both deflection and curvature are conceptual and physically meaningful features for damage detection and localization. The issues and the requirements for these features to perform successfully are also presented.

  5. 5 full-time faculty, 16 adjunct faculty and 31 affiliate faculty are in the Department of Radiologic Sciences.

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    of Radiologic Sciences. · The educational experience in Radiologic Sciences programs promotes health advocacy in undergraduate education in the Radiologic Sciences. Our Department of Radiologic Sciences is dedicated on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). The Diagnostic Medical Sonography Program is accredited through

  6. RADBALL TECHNOLOGY TESTING IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HEALTH PHYSICS INSTRUMENT CALIBRATION LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.

    2010-07-08

    The United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a radiation-mapping device that can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. The device, known as RadBall{trademark}, consists of a colander-like outer collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The collimator has over two hundred small holes; thus, specific areas of the polymer sphere are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. The RadBallTM technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This paper summarizes the tests completed at SRNL Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL).

  7. Quantitatively Plotting the Human Face for Multivariate Data Visualisation Illustrated by Health Assessments Using Laboratory Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Hongwei, Wang; Hui, Liu

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to describe a new data visualisation system by plotting the human face to observe the comprehensive effects of multivariate data. Methods. The Graphics Device Interface (GDI+) in the Visual Studio.NET development platform was used to write a program that enables facial image parameters to be recorded, such as cropping and rotation, and can generate a new facial image according to Z values from sets of normal data (Z > 3 was still counted as 3). The measured clinical laboratory parameters related to health status were obtained from senile people, glaucoma patients, and fatty liver patients to illustrate the facial data visualisation system. Results. When the eyes, nose, and mouth were rotated around their own axes at the same angle, the deformation effects were similar. The deformation effects for any abnormality of the eyes, nose, or mouth should be slightly higher than those for simultaneous abnormalities. The facial changes in the populations with different health statuses were significant compared with a control population. Conclusions. The comprehensive effects of multivariate may not equal the sum of each variable. The 3Z facial data visualisation system can effectively distinguish people with poor health status from healthy people. PMID:24454533

  8. BASELINE PARAMETER UPDATE FOR HUMAN HEALTH INPUT AND TRANSFER FACTORS FOR RADIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Coffield, T; Patricia Lee, P

    2007-01-31

    The purpose of this report is to update parameters utilized in Human Health Exposure calculations and Bioaccumulation Transfer Factors utilized at SRS for Performance Assessment modeling. The reason for the update is to utilize more recent information issued, validate information currently used and correct minor inconsistencies between modeling efforts performed in SRS contiguous areas of the heavy industrialized central site usage areas called the General Separations Area (GSA). SRS parameters utilized were compared to a number of other DOE facilities and generic national/global references to establish relevance of the parameters selected and/or verify the regional differences of the southeast USA. The parameters selected were specifically chosen to be expected values along with identifying a range for these values versus the overly conservative specification of parameters for estimating an annual dose to the maximum exposed individual (MEI). The end uses are to establish a standardized source for these parameters that is up to date with existing data and maintain it via review of any future issued national references to evaluate the need for changes as new information is released. These reviews are to be added to this document by revision.

  9. Role Of The Bureau Of Radiological Health In Assessment Of Risks From Clinical Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Mary P.; Athey, T. W.; Phillips, Robert A.

    1982-12-01

    The 1976 Medical Device Amendments to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act provide for the classification of a medical device intended for human use into one of three regulatory classes based on the extent of control necessary to ensure safety and effectiveness: Class I, General Controls; Class II, Performance Standards; Class III, Premarket Approval. Class III devices are those for which there is insufficient information available to ensure safety and effectiveness through General Controls and Performance Standards alone. New devices such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging systems fall under Class III because they were developed after the date of the law's enactment (28 May 1976). Investigational studies involving human subjects undertaken to develop safety and effectiveness data for a post-enactment Class III device come under the Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) Regulation (21 CFR 812). This regulation distinguishes between investigations of devices that pose a significant risk to the human subject and those that do not. A significant risk investigation "presents a potential for serious risk to the health, safety, or welfare of a subject." Procedures for obtaining an IDE differ if the device does or does not pose a significant risk. The sponsor of a clinical trial, and ultimately the Institutional Review Board (IRB), have the primary responsibility to determine whether a certain clinical use of the investigational device represents a significant risk to the subject of the investigation. A finding of significant risk does not mean that a device is too hazardous for clinical studies, but it does mean that a formal application for an IDE must be made to and approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) before a clinical trial can begin. If the device is deemed not to pose a significant risk, unless otherwise notified by FDA, the sponsor is not required to submit an IDE application to FDA. Instead, the sponsor and investigators must satisfy only certain abbreviated requirements including maintenance of certain records and reports. In addition, the sponsors must maintain IRB approval throughout the investigation, label the device in accordance with the IDE regulation, and ensure that the investigators obtain and document informed consent for each subject under their care.

  10. Radiological Characterization Technical Report on Californium-252 Sealed Source Transuranic Debris Waste for the Off-Site Source Recovery Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-04-24

    This document describes the development and approach for the radiological characterization of Cf-252 sealed sources for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The report combines information on the nuclear material content of each individual source (mass or activity and date of manufacture) with information and data on the radionuclide distributions within the originating nuclear material. This approach allows for complete and accurate characterization of the waste container without the need to take additional measurements. The radionuclide uncertainties, developed from acceptable knowledge (AK) information regarding the source material, are applied to the summed activities in the drum. The AK information used in the characterization of Cf-252 sealed sources has been qualified by the peer review process, which has been reviewed and accepted by the Environmental Protection Agency.

  11. Post-remediation action radiological report for Surface Impoundments C (3539) and D (3540) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    During August and September 1998, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC performed a remedial action within Impoundments 3539 and 3540 (Impoundments C and D, respectively) in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision (ROD) for the Surface Impoundments Operable Unit. The remedial action included removal of sediments and 0.1 ft of subimpoundment soil. A post-remedial action radiological survey was conducted to provide data to support the Bethel Valley ROD. Data was obtained from (1) a walkover survey for residual gamma radiation on the base of the impoundments, (2) smear surveys for transferable contamination on remaining riprap, and (3) representative sampling of subimpoundment soils. Walkover surveys identified no locations outside the impoundments with gamma exposure levels greater than three times background levels. Smear surveys detected no removable contamination above release limits as specified in 10 CFR 835, Appendix D. Subimpoundment soil samples quantified low levels of residual contamination.

  12. The impact of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on radiology: beyond reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Krishnaraj, Arun; Norbash, Alexander; Allen, Bibb; Ellenbogen, Paul H; Kazerooni, Ella A; Thorwarth, William; Weinreb, Jeffrey C

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 ACR Forum focused on the noneconomic implications of the Affordable Care Act on the field of radiology, with specific attention to the importance of the patient experience, the role of radiology in public and population health, and radiology's role in the effort to lower overall health care costs. The recommendations generated from the Forum seek to inform ACR leadership on the best strategies to pursue to best prepare the radiology community for the rapidly evolving health care landscape. PMID:25557569

  13. [Radiation exposure of health personnel and patients in the heart catheterization laboratory in during vascular brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Folkerts, K H; Franz, A; Kiefer, A; Hennersdorf, G

    2002-06-01

    Interventional radiological measures can lead to high radiation exposures for medical staff. In order to determine the radiation exposure to staff and patients, the resulting radiation exposures were directly measured for 52 measures at an cardiac catheterization laboratory with a new dosimetry system DIS (Direct Ion Storage). Beside the measurement of body dose behind the lead apron, measurements of radiation doses were performed in front of the lead apron and at the wrist of the physician. These measurements were taken as an approximation of the radiation exposure of the non-shielded body parts. The patients dose was estimated by placing a dosemeter close to the head of the patient and from the dose-area product. The mean value of body dose from 52 measurements for the physician behind the lead apron was 1.9 microSv per procedure with a range of 0-9 microSv. In front of the lead apron, a mean value of 53.9 microSv (3-233 microSv) per procedure was obtained. The mean value of partial body dose at the physician's wrist was determined to be 163.2 microSv (12-603 microSv) per procedure. It could be shown that measures combined with interventions lead to higher exposures compared with measures without interventions. For the medical technician, the mean value behind the lead apron was 3.9 microSv (0-58 microSv) per procedure. For the patient, a mean value of 800 microSv (119-8642 microSv) was measured close to the head. The mean dose to the skin of the patient at radiation entrance was determined to be 307 mGy (70-1190 mGy). From this data, the radiation dose per year for the physician performing 1000 measures, was determined to be 1.9 mSv/year. This is below the new dose limit of 20 mSv/year. Also the estimations for the dose to the eye lens and the hands of the physician show no conflicts with actual dose limits when obeying all radiation regulations. The results for vascular brachytherapy did not show significantly higher exposures, compared with conventional measures including interventions. PMID:12219698

  14. Radiological dispersion devices: are we prepared?

    PubMed

    Sohier, Alain; Hardeman, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Already before the events of September 11th 2001 concern was raised about the spread of orphan sources and their potential use in Radiological Dispersion Devices by terrorist groups. Although most of the simulated scenarios foresee a rather limited direct health impact on the population, the affected region would suffer from the indirect consequences such as social disruption, cleanup requirements and economic costs. The nature of such a radiological attack would anyway be different compared to conventional radiological accidents, basically because it can happen anywhere at any time. Part of the response resides in a general preparedness scheme incorporating attacks with Radiological Dispersion Devices. Training of different potential intervention teams is essential. The response would consist of a prioritised list of actions adapted to the circumstances. As the psychosocial dimension of the crisis could be worse than the purely radiological one, an adapted communication strategy with the public aspect would be a key issue. PMID:16111791

  15. AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Proctor, A.E.

    1997-06-09

    Measuring terrestrial gamma radiation from airborne platforms has proved to be a useful method for characterizing radiation levels over large areas. Over 300 aerial radiological surveys have been carried out over the past 25 years including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, commercial nuclear power plants, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program/Uranium Mine Tailing Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP/UMTRAP) sites, nuclear weapons test sites, contaminated industrial areas, and nuclear accident sites. This paper describes the aerial measurement technology currently in use by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) for routine environmental surveys and emergency response activities. Equipment, data-collection and -analysis methods, and examples of survey results are described.

  16. Tiger Team Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The purpose of the safety and health assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Within the safety and health programs at LANL, performance was assessed in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Explosives Safety, Natural Phenomena, and Medical Services.

  17. EPA/OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT'S NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY/WESTERN ECOLOGY DIVISION INTERNET SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Western Ecology Division (WED) is one of four ecological effects divisions of the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory. The four divisions are distributed bio-geographically. WED's mission is 1) to provide EPA with national scientific leadership for t...

  18. RESEARCH VOLUNTEER -Laboratory for Youth Mental Health Judge Baker Children's Center, Harvard Medical School/Department of Psychology, Harvard University

    E-print Network

    Patel, Aniruddh D.

    RESEARCH VOLUNTEER - Laboratory for Youth Mental Health Judge Baker Children's Center, Harvard Medical School/Department of Psychology, Harvard University Currently seeking part-time research, Harvard Medical School, and at William James Hall, Harvard University under the direction of John R. Weisz

  19. Project health and safety plan for the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abston

    1997-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) in the North and South Tank Farms (NTF and STF) at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by

  20. RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION EXPOSURE FACILITIES FOR BIO-EFFECTS RESEARCH AT THE HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY, RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NORTH CAROLINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the multi-user radiofrequency radiation exposure facilities for bio-effects research in use at the Health Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC. Four facilities are described: (1) a 100 MHz CW exposure system, (2) a 2450 MHz CW exposure syst...

  1. Use of a COâ pellet non-destructive cleaning system to decontaminate radiological waste and equipment in shielded hot cells at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bench

    1997-01-01

    This paper details how the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory modified and utilized a commercially available, solid carbon dioxide (COâ) pellet, non-destructive cleaning system to support the disposition and disposal of radioactive waste from shielded hot cells. Some waste materials and equipment accumulated in the shielded hot cells cannot be disposed directly because they are contaminated with transuranic materials (elements with

  2. Health and Safety Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoesen, S.D.; Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Manis, L.W.; Barre, W.L. [Analysas Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S&H) issues. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water This plan explains additional site-specific health and safety requirements such as Site Specific Hazards Evaluation Addendums (SSHEAs) to the Site Safety and Health Plan which should be used in concert with this plan and existing established procedures.

  3. Public health systems strengthening in Africa: the role of South Africa Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme.

    PubMed

    Kuonza, Lazarus; Tint, Khin San; Harris, Bernice; Nabukenya, Immaculate

    2011-01-01

    The South Africa Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme (SAFELTP) was created in 2006 after recognizing the need to build and sustain the country's human resource capacity in field (applied) epidemiology and public health practice. The programme was formed as a collaboration between the South Africa Department of Health (DoH), the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD), the National Health Laboratory Services (NHLS), the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the University of Pretoria. The primary goal of the programme was to produce field-trained epidemiologists equipped with knowledge and practical skills to effectively and efficiently address the public health priorities of South Africa. SAFELTP is a 2-year full-time training, consisting of a combination of classroom-based instruction (30%) and mentored field work (70%). The training places emphasis on public health surveillance, investigation of disease epidemics, public health laboratory practice and communication of epidemiologic information, among other aspects of epidemiology research. At completion, residents are awarded a Master of Public Health (MPH) degree from the University of Pretoria. Since its inception in 2006, 48 residents have enrolled onto the programme and 30 (62%) of them have completed the training. Over the past 5 years, the residents have conducted more than 92 outbreak investigations, 47 surveillance evaluations, 19 planned studies, analyzed 37 large databases and presented more than 56 papers at local and international conferences. In recognition of the high-quality work, at least five SAFELTP residents have received awards at various international scientific conferences during the 5 years. In conclusion, the South Africa FELTP is now fully established and making valuable contributions to the country's public health system, albeit with innumerable challenges. PMID:22359696

  4. Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research. Annual report, fiscal year 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    This is the 17th Annual Report of the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research. The current Laboratory program can be segregated into radiation studies and studies on fossil energy. This year's report includes status reports on the metabolism, dosimetry, and pathology of bone-seeking radiostrontium and radium in dogs. An interesting development is the apparent increase in bone tumor latency with decreasing skeletal dose and the influence of radiation quality on this endpoint. While /sup 226/Ra caused dose-related effects in the eye, /sup 90/Sr does not. Continual exposure to external irradiation almost always induces myeloid leukemia if the exposure begins in utero. These dogs are also resistant to lethal aplasia which is normally seen at intermediate dose rates in post natally irradiated animals. Studies on radiation effects on cells include marrow cells from irradiated animals as well as determination of responses of hematopoietic cells and their progenitors to radiation and other tests in vitro. Study of lymphocytes from preleukemic patients show interesting functional differences compared to normal values. New techniques were developed to reevaluate histocompatibility and response to stimulation. New information is being derived about acute and chronic irradiation effects on spermatogenesis. Studies in aerosol science include improved understanding of particle aerodynamic behavior and the determination of chemical constituents on and in coal fly ash particles. Nitro-organic compounds exhibit marked mutagenic activity following extraction and study of conventional and fluidized bed coal combustion. Metal transferrin kinetics and properties are under study as are toxic effects of vanadium, a major contaminant of fly ash.

  5. Professional Acceptance Of Electronic Images In Radiologic Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitlin, Joseph N.; Curtis, David J.; Kerlin, Barbara D.; Olmsted, William W.

    1983-05-01

    During the past four years, a large number of radiographic images have been interpreted in both film and video modes in an effort to determine the utility of digital/analogue systems in general practice. With the cooperation of the Department of Defense, the MITRE Corporation, and several university-based radiology departments, the Public Health Service has participated in laboratory experiments and a teleradiology field trial to meet this objective. During the field trial, 30 radiologists participated in the interpretation of more than 4,000 diagnostic x-ray examinations that were performed at distant clinics, digitized, and transmitted to a medical center for interpretation on video monitors. As part of the evaluation, all of the participating radiologists and the attending physicians at the clinics were queried regarding the teleradiology system, particularly with respect to the diagnostic quality of the electronic images. The original films for each of the 4,000 examinations were read independently, and the findings and impressions from each mode were compared to identify discrepancies. In addition, a sample of 530 cases was reviewed and interpreted by a consensus panel to measure the accuracy of findings and impressions of both film and video readings. The sample has been retained in an automated archive for future study at the National Center of Devices and Radiological Health facilities in Rockville, Maryland. The studies include a comparison of diagnostic findings and impressions from 1024 x 1024 matrices with those obtained from the 512 x 512 format used in the field trial. The archive also provides a database for determining the effect of data compression techniques on diagnostic interpretations and establishing the utility of image processing algorithms. The paper will include an analysis of the final results of the field trial and preliminary findings from the ongoing studies using the archive of cases at the National Center for Devices and Radiological Health. This paper was not available at the time of printing of the Proceedings.

  6. C-1 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT APPENDIX C: RADIOLOGICAL DATA METHODOLOGIES

    E-print Network

    Homes, Christopher C.

    C-1 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT APPENDIX C: RADIOLOGICAL DATA METHODOLOGIES DOSE CALCULATION State Department of Health (NYSDOH 1996), which estimates the consumption rate at approximately 15 1996). RADIOLOGICAL DATA PROCESSING Radiation events occur in a random fashion

  7. Canadian Public Health Laboratory Network laboratory guidelines for the use of direct tests to detect syphilis in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Raymond SW; Morshed, Muhammad; Chernesky, Max A; Jayaraman, Gayatri C; Kadkhoda, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and/or its nucleic acid can be detected by various methods such as microscopy, rabbit infectivity test or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. The rabbit infectivity test for T. pallidum, although very sensitive, has been discontinued from most laboratories due to ethical issues related to the need for animal inoculation with live T. pallidum, the technically demanding procedure and long turnaround time for results, thus making it impractical for routine diagnostic use. Dark-field and phase-contrast microscopy are still useful at clinic- or hospital-based laboratories for near-bedside detection of T. pallidum in genital, skin or mucous lesions although their availability is decreasing. The lack of reliable and specific anti-T. pallidum antibodies and its inferior sensitivity to PCR may explain why the direct fluorescent antibody test for T. pallidum is not widely available for clinical use. Immunohistochemical staining for T. pallidum also depends on the availability of specific antibodies, and the method is only applicable for histopathological examination of biopsy and autopsy specimens necessitating an invasive specimen collection approach. With recent advances in molecular diagnostics, PCR is considered to be the most reliable, versatile and practical for laboratories to implement. In addition to being an objective and sensitive test for direct detection of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum DNA in skin and mucous membrane lesions, the resulting PCR amplicons from selected gene targets can be further characterized for antimicrobial (macrolide) susceptibility testing, strain typing and identification of T. pallidum subspecies. PMID:25798160

  8. Study of the comprehension of the scientific method by members of a university health research laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Burlamaque-Neto, A.C.; Santos, G.R.; Lisbôa, L.M.; Goldim, J.R.; Machado, C.L.B.; Matte, U.; Giugliani, R.

    2012-01-01

    In Brazil, scientific research is carried out mainly at universities, where professors coordinate research projects with the active participation of undergraduate and graduate students. However, there is no formal program for the teaching/learning of the scientific method. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the comprehension of the scientific method by students of health sciences who participate in scientific projects in an academic research laboratory. An observational descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using Edgar Morin complexity as theoretical reference. In a semi-structured interview, students were asked to solve an abstract logical puzzle - TanGram. The collected data were analyzed using the hermeneutic-dialectic analysis method proposed by Minayo and discussed in terms of the theoretical reference of complexity. The students' concept of the scientific method is limited to participation in projects, stressing the execution of practical procedures as opposed to scientific thinking. The solving of the TanGram puzzle revealed that the students had difficulties in understanding questions and activities focused on subjects and their processes. Objective answers, even when dealing with personal issues, were also reflected on the students' opinions about the characteristics of a successful researcher. Students' difficulties concerning these issues may affect their scientific performance and result in poorly designed experiments. This is a preliminary study that should be extended to other centers of scientific research. PMID:22249427

  9. Conceptual Site Treatment Plan Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research Environmental Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, T.E.

    1993-10-01

    The Federal Facilities Compliance Act (the Act) of 1992 waives sovereign immunity for federal facilities for fines and penalties under the provisions of the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act, state, interstate, and local hazardous and solid waste management requirements. However, for three years the Act delays the waiver for violations involving US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Act, however, requires that the DOE prepare a Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) for each of its sites that generate or store mixed wastes (MWs). The purpose of the CSTP is to present DOE`s preliminary evaluations of the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating a site`s MW. This CSTP presents the preliminary capacity and technology evaluation for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR). The five identified MW streams at LEHR are evaluated to the extent possible given available information. Only one MW stream is sufficiently well defined to permit a technology evaluation to be performed. Two other MW streams are in the process of being characterized so that an evaluation can be performed. The other two MW streams will be generated by the decommissioning of inactive facilities onsite within the next five years.

  10. A Roadmap for Academic Health Centers to Establish Good Laboratory Practice-Compliant Infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Adamo, Joan E.; Bauer, Gerhard; Berro, Marlene; Burnett, Bruce K.; Hartman, Karen A.; Masiello, Lisa M.; Moorman-White, Diane; Rubinstein, Eric P.; Schuff, Kathryn G.

    2012-01-01

    Prior to human clinical trials, nonclinical safety and toxicology studies are required to demonstrate that a new product appears safe for human testing; these nonclinical studies are governed by good laboratory practice (GLP) regulations. As academic health centers (AHCs) embrace the charge to increase the translation of basic science research into clinical discoveries, researchers at these institutions increasingly will be conducting GLP-regulated nonclinical studies. Because the consequences for noncompliance are severe and many AHC researchers are unfamiliar with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations, the authors describe the regulatory requirements for conducting GLP research, including the strict documentation requirements, the necessary personnel training, the importance of study monitoring, and the critical role that compliance oversight plays in the process. They then explain the process that AHCs interested in conducting GLP studies should take prior to the start of their research program, including conducting a needs assessment and a gap analysis and selecting a model for GLP compliance. Finally, the authors identify and analyze several critical barriers to developing and implementing a GLP-compliant infrastructure at an AHC. Despite these challenges, the capacity to perform such research will help AHCs to build and maintain competitive research programs and to facilitate the successful translation of faculty-initiated research from nonclinical studies to first-in-human clinical trials. PMID:22373618

  11. Value of Laboratory Tests in Employer-Sponsored Health Risk Assessments for Newly Identifying Health Conditions: Analysis of 52,270 Participants

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Harvey W.; Williams, Fred R.; Odeh, Mouneer A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Employer-sponsored health risk assessments (HRA) may include laboratory tests to provide evidence of disease and disease risks for common medical conditions. We evaluated the ability of HRA-laboratory testing to provide new disease-risk information to participants. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a cross-sectional analysis of HRA-laboratory results for participating adult employees and their eligible spouses or their domestic partners, focusing on three common health conditions: hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. HRA with laboratory results of 52,270 first-time participants were analyzed. Nearly all participants had access to health insurance coverage. Twenty-four percent (12,392) self-reported one or more of these medical conditions: 21.1% (11,017) self-identified as having hyperlipidemia, 4.7% (2,479) self-identified as having diabetes, and 0.7% (352) self-identified as having chronic kidney disease. Overall, 36% (n?=?18,540) of participants had laboratory evidence of at least one medical condition newly identified: 30.7% (16,032) had laboratory evidence of hyperlipidemia identified, 1.9% (984) had laboratory evidence of diabetes identified, and 5.5% (2,866) had laboratory evidence of chronic kidney disease identified. Of all participants with evidence of hyperlipidemia 59% (16,030 of 27,047), were newly identified through the HRA. Among those with evidence of diabetes 28% (984 of 3,463) were newly identified. The highest rate of newly identified disease risk was for chronic kidney disease: 89% (2,866 of 3,218) of participants with evidence of this condition had not self-reported it. Men (39%) were more likely than women (33%) to have at least one newly identified condition (p<0.0001). Among men, lower levels of educational achievement were associated with modestly higher rates of newly identified disease risk (p<0.0001); the association with educational achievement among women was unclear. Even among the youngest age range (20 to 29 year olds), nearly 1 in 4 participants (24%) had a newly identified risk for disease. Conclusions/Significance These results support the important role of employer-sponsored laboratory testing as an integral element of HRA for identifying evidence of previously undiagnosed common medical conditions in individuals of all working age ranges, regardless of educational level and gender. PMID:22163283

  12. Project health and safety plan for the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Abston, J.P.

    1997-04-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) in the North and South Tank Farms (NTF and STF) at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to health and safety (H and S) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all GAAT operations in the NTF and STF. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities identifies s part of the GAAT are initiated that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices in order to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air. This plan explains additional task-specific health and safety requirements such as the Site Safety and health Addendum and Activity Hazard Analysis, which should be used in concert with this plan and existing established procedures.

  13. Radiological emergency: Malaysian preparedness and response.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Mohd Abd Wahab; Ali, Hamrah Mohd

    2011-07-01

    Planning and preparation in advance for radiological emergencies can help to minimise potential public health and environmental threats if and when an actual emergency occurs. During the planning process, emergency response organisations think through how they would respond to each type of incident and the resources that will be needed. In Malaysia, planning, preparation for and response to radiological emergencies involve many parties. In the event of a radiological emergency and if it is considered a disaster, the National Security Council, the Atomic Energy Licensing Board and the Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) will work together with other federal agencies, state and local governments, first responders and international organisations to monitor the situation, contain the release, and clean up the contaminated site. Throughout the response, these agencies use their protective action guidelines. This paper discusses Malaysian preparedness for, and response to, any potential radiological emergency. PMID:21729940

  14. The power of hyphenated chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in public health laboratories.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, María; Portolés, Tania; Rúbies, Antoni; Muñoz, Eva; Muñoz, Gloria; Pineda, Laura; Serrahima, Eulalia; Sancho, Juan V; Centrich, Francesc; Hernández, Félix

    2012-05-30

    Laboratories devoted to the public health field have to face the analysis of a large number of organic contaminants/residues in many different types of samples. Analytical techniques applied in this field are normally focused on quantification of a limited number of analytes. At present, most of these techniques are based on gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Using these techniques only analyte-specific information is acquired, and many other compounds that might be present in the samples would be ignored. In this paper, we explore the potential of time-of-flight (TOF) MS hyphenated to GC or LC to provide additional information, highly useful in this field. Thus, all positives reported by standard reference targeted LC-MS/MS methods were unequivocally confirmed by LC-QTOF MS. Only 61% of positives reported by targeted GC-MS/MS could be confirmed by GC-TOF MS, which was due to its lower sensitivity as nonconfirmations corresponded to analytes that were present at very low concentrations. In addition, the use of TOF MS allowed searching for additional compounds in large-scope screening methodologies. In this way, different contaminants/residues not included in either LC or GC tandem MS analyses were detected. This was the case of the insecticide thiacloprid, the plant growth regulator paclobutrazol, the fungicide prochloraz, or the UV filter benzophenone, among others. Finally, elucidation of unknowns was another of the possibilities offered by TOF MS thanks to the accurate-mass full-acquisition data available when using this technique. PMID:22578112

  15. Evaluation of individually ventilated cage systems for laboratory rodents: occupational health aspects.

    PubMed

    Renström, A; Björing, G; Höglund, A U

    2001-01-01

    New ventilated caging systems for laboratory animals were compared with conventional caging regarding allergen distribution, ergonomic suitability, cage environment and animal welfare. This paper presents occupational health evaluations. Mice were placed in individually ventilated cage (IVC) systems, a ventilated cabinet, and in cages on open shelves (conventional husbandry). The IVC systems were studied at negative and positive airflow. Aeroallergens were sampled on filters (n = 204, including controls) in undisturbed rooms and during cage changing. Concentrations of mouse urinary allergen (Mus m 1) in filter eluates were measured using sandwich ELISA. An ergonomic evaluation was performed with measurement of traction forces. Staff exposure during cage changing was high in all systems, range 116-4430 ng Mus m 1/m3. In undisturbed animal rooms, allergen levels were orders of magnitude higher when using conventional caging compared with ventilated systems; P < 0.001. At positive pressure both IVCs leaked allergen (median Mus m 1 concentration was < 0.08 ng/m3 at negative, but 6.5 ng/m3 (IVC1) and 0.8 ng/m3 (IVC2S) at positive pressure). The IVC systems had ergonomic disadvantages compared with the conventional husbandry and the ventilated cabinet, for instance with cages in unsuitable working heights. Ventilated husbandry solutions reduce levels of airborne allergen substantially at negative pressure, but are ergonomically less suitable. To prevent allergen exposure during cage changing, we propose that this procedure should be performed under ventilated conditions. Producers and users must cooperate in optimizing animal caging systems for both animals and staff. PMID:11201287

  16. Radioactive Waste Management Complex low-level waste radiological performance assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. J. Maheras; A. S. Rood; S. O. Magnuson; M. E. Sussman; R. N. Bhatt

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of radioactive low-level waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This radiological performance assessment was conducted to evaluate compliance with applicable radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the

  17. Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT8-1

    E-print Network

    Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT8-1 DRAFT Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) routinely evaluates site operations to ensure that the radiological dose impact or potentially contribute to radiological dose are reviewed for their environmental impacts. The potential

  18. CHAPTER 9: RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT 1998 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT9-1

    E-print Network

    CHAPTER 9: RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT 1998 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT9-1 9C H A P T E R Radiological Dose Assessment This chapter discusses the potential radio- logical doses to offsite individuals: RADIOLOGICAL DOSE ASSESSMENT 9.1 EXTERNAL PENETRATING RADIATION MEASUREMENTS The Brookhaven National Laboratory

  19. Decontamination analysis of a radiologically contaminated site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. J. Tawil; D. L. Strenge

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of decontamination options at the NUWAZX-83 exercise site. Held in May 1983, the purpose of the exercise was to evaluate the ability of federal, state and local officials to respond to a radiological accident involving nuclear weapons. A computer program developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory was used to conduct the decontamination analysis. The program, called

  20. C-1 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Radiological Data Methodologies

    E-print Network

    Homes, Christopher C.

    C-1 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT APPENDIX C Radiological Data Methodologies DOSE CALCULATION by the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH), which estimates the consumption rate at approximately 15 Protection Agency Exposure Factors Handbook (EPA 1996). RADIOLOGICAL DATA PROCESSING Radiation events occur

  1. Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2007 Site environmental report8-

    E-print Network

    Radiological Dose Assessment 8 2007 Site environmental report8- DRAFT Brookhaven National that the overall radiological dose impact to members of the public, workers, visitors, and the environment is "As, and operational processes are evaluated for safety and health, dose risk, and environmental impacts. The potential

  2. RASCAL2.0A. Radiological Dose Assessment System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. L. Sjoreen; G. F. Athey; J. V. Ramsdell; T. J. McKeena

    1993-01-01

    RASCAL2.0A (Radiologic Assessment System for Consequence Analysis) has been developed for use during response to radiological emergencies. The model is designed to provide a rough comparison to EPA Protective Action Guidance and thresholds for acute health effects. RASCAL will be used by the NRC personnel who report to the site of a nuclear accident to conduct an independent evaluation of

  3. Fixation of Radiological Contamination; International Collaborative Development

    SciTech Connect

    Rick Demmer

    2013-03-01

    A cooperative international project was conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the United Kingdom’s National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) to integrate a capture coating with a high performance atomizing process. The initial results were promising, and lead to further trials. The somewhat longer testing and optimization process has resulted in a product that could be demonstrated in the field to reduce airborne radiological dust and contamination.

  4. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  5. Machine Learning and Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers. PMID:22465077

  6. Radiology: A Communications View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simen, David C.; Sherman, Andrew B.; Edelstein, Stephen A.

    1986-06-01

    A diagnostic radiology department can be viewed as an information processor. The inputs to this processor are orders for studies, clinical histories, and requests for consultation. These inputs are used in conjunction with the database of prior studies to produce the required outputs -- images and diagnostic reports. Automating information transport in this environment will reduce costs and speed up the flow of information, to the benefit of the hospital, radiologists, attending physicians, and patients. This paper describes a "model" radiology department in terms of its internal and external communications. Using this model we present requirements for a system to manage radiological image and text data - a Radiology Operations System.

  7. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Health and Safety Long-Range Plan: Fiscal years 1989--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The health and safety of its personnel is the first concern of ORNL and its management. The ORNL Health and Safety Program has the responsibility for ensuring the health and safety of all individuals assigned to ORNL activities. This document outlines the principal aspects of the ORNL Health and Safety Long-Range Plan and provides a framework for management use in the future development of the health and safety program. Each section of this document is dedicated to one of the health and safety functions (i.e., health physics, industrial hygiene, occupational medicine, industrial safety, nuclear criticality safety, nuclear facility safety, transportation safety, fire protection, and emergency preparedness). Each section includes functional mission and objectives, program requirements and status, a summary of program needs, and program data and funding summary. Highlights of FY 1988 are included.

  8. Policy and Procedural Guidelines for the Health and Safety of Workers in Virus Laboratories

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ALICE STARK

    1975-01-01

    Through the use of a (a) a questionnaire, designed to elicit background information, (b) a serological survey, designed to obtain a picture of virus dissemination, and (c) a library review, designed to gain insight into the area of virus laboratory problems, the state of hazard in animal virus laboratories at Yale was evaluated. On the basis of this evaluation, a

  9. Argonne National Laboratory Internal Appraisal Program environment, safety, health\\/quality assurance oversight

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. L. Winner; Y. S. Siegfried; S. P. Forst; M. J. Meshenberg

    1995-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory`s Internal Appraisal Program has developed a quality assurance team member training program. This program has been developed to provide training to non-quality assurance professionals. Upon successful completion of this training and approval of the Internal Appraisal Program Manager, these personnel are considered qualified to assist in the conduct of quality assurance assessments. The training program has been

  10. Accelerators in our past, present, and future: A challenge to radiological protection in the twenty-first century

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). School of Public Health

    1993-09-01

    The foundations of many of the subdisciplines of radiological protection laid in accelerator laboratories began with the invention of accelerators. This paper suggests that the discipline of accelerator radiological protection has played and will continue play a more significant part in our lives than is generally recognized. A brief review of some existing uses of accelerators by society is given, and a few probable future uses are described. These future applications will result in the exposure of accelerator (or {open_quotes}mixed{close_quotes}) radiation fields to an increased population. Consequently, what are perceived to be the rather specialized concerns of today`s accelerator health physicists will -- by necessity -- become of general interest to all health physicists.

  11. Guidance for use of Radiology Devices and Radioactive Materials in Research Protocols

    E-print Network

    Puglisi, Joseph

    Guidance for use of Radiology Devices and Radioactive Materials in Research Protocols Definition of the Society of Nuclear Medicine, or the stem set forth by the International Commission on Radiological a radiological hazards evaluation of the proposal, including potential for radiation dose to other health care

  12. 2014 Radiologic Sciences Program Admission Application Bachelor of Science, Diagnostic Radiography

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    2014 Radiologic Sciences Program Admission Application Bachelor of Science, Diagnostic Radiography-Mail: _______________________________________________________________________ PLEASE NOTE: It is the APPLICANT'S responsibility to keep the Radiologic Sciences Department informed/Volunteer History: Dates Employer Position/Responsibilities Department of Radiologic Sciences Health Sciences

  13. ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY & HEALTH DIVISION Chapter 2: Work Planning and Control

    E-print Network

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY & HEALTH DIVISION Chapter 2: Work Planning and Control SOP Authorization(S): Other Information or References: Complete following four sections if requesting a Radiological Work } # of workers performing radiological activity: _______ Expected duration of radiological activity in hours

  14. Health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment remediation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, S.N.; Uziel, M.S.

    1995-12-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of the policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air.

  15. Worker Safety and Health Issues Associated with the DOE Environmental Cleanup Program: Insights From the DOE Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public health Standards Steering Group

    SciTech Connect

    M.C. Edelson; Samuel C. Morris; Joan M. Daisey

    2001-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public Health Standards Steering Group (or ''SSG'') was formed in 1990. It was felt then that ''risk'' could be an organizing principle for environmental cleanup and that risk-based cleanup standards could rationalize clean up work. The environmental remediation process puts workers engaged in cleanup activities at risk from hazardous materials and from the more usual hazards associated with construction activities. In a real sense, the site remediation process involves the transfer of a hypothetical risk to the environment and the public from isolated contamination into real risks to the workers engaged in the remediation activities. Late in its existence the SSG, primarily motivated by its LANL representative, Dr. Harry Ettinger, actively investigated issues associated with worker health and safety during environmental remediation activities. This paper summarizes the insights noted by the SSG. Most continue to be pertinent today.

  16. Radiological Dispersion Devices: are we prepared?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alain Sohier; Frank Hardeman

    2006-01-01

    Already before the events of September 11th 2001 concern was raised about the spread of orphan sources and their potential use in Radiological Dispersion Devices by terrorist groups. Although most of the simulated scenarios foresee a rather limited direct health impact on the population, the affected region would suffer from the indirect consequences such as social disruption, cleanup requirements and

  17. Radiological Defense. Textbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This textbook has been prepared under the direction of the Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DCPA) Staff College for use as a student reference manual in radiological defense (RADEF) courses. It provides much of the basic technical information necessary for a proper understanding of radiological defense and summarizes RADEF planning and expected…

  18. Cost-benefit analysis in decision making for diagnostic radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Hilberg, A.W.

    1982-02-01

    This paper reviews certain current concepts and methods relating to benefit-risk analysis, in terms of economic costs and raidation risks to health, in relation to the benefits from diagnostic radiology in clinical medicine.

  19. Use of laboratory tests for immune biomarkers in environmental health studies concerned with exposure to indoor air pollutants.

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, R F

    1991-01-01

    The immune system is likely to be involved in some of the health effects caused by certain indoor air exposures, and immune biomarkers can help determine which exposures and health effects have important immune components. However, the lack of standardized laboratory tests for most human immune markers and the many confounding variables that can influence them makes interpretation of results for exposure and disease end points uncertain. This paper presents an overview of the immune system and the considerations involved in using tests for immune markers in clinical epidemiology studies, particularly those concerned with indoor air exposures. Careful study design, well-characterized laboratory methods, and rigorous documentation of exposure status are required to determine the predictive value of such tests. Clinical tests currently available for some immune markers could help identify and characterize both irritative and hypersensitivity reactions to indoor air pollutants. Newer tests developed in research settings might provide more incisive indicators of immune status that could help identify exposure, susceptibility, or preclinical disease states, but their methodologies must be refined and tested in multicenter studies before they can be used reliably in public health applications. PMID:1821385

  20. DOE standard: Radiological control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

  1. Laboratory Office Hours as Outreach in the Health Sciences: Better Research Skills for Better Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prusin, Todd

    2012-01-01

    Medical librarianship is changing in health care environments. Since 1996, by which time the standards that determine how hospitals acquire accreditation changed, many hospitals have been acquiring accreditation without a qualified medical librarian on site. For that reason, it has become even more important that health care professionals,…

  2. Some aspects on radiation protection in conventional and digital radiology in Romania.

    PubMed

    Milu, Constantin; Dumitrescu, Alina

    2008-01-01

    Since 1965, medical radiation exposure in the population of Romania has been evaluated by the Network of Radiation Hygiene Laboratories of the Ministry of Public Health, including 23 laboratories throughout the whole country; the network is co-ordinated by the Institute of Public Health Bucharest. In Romania, for a population of 22.5 million inhabitants, 465 X-ray examinations were reported during the last survey, the most frequent being chest examination. There was no specific reference to digital radiology. Digital radiology has been introduced only recently in Romania, and only some rough data on the situation can be presented. Siemens AG is now present in Romania with 23 installations, type SIEREGRAPH CF and AXIOM ICONOS. A digital image intensifier technique is used only for fluoroscopy, and radiography is performed using a conventional film/screen combination. The company Philips has nine installations for angiography, model INTEGRIS, and uses a computed radiography technique. Several direct digital radiography MULTISYSTEM SWISSRAY installations (about 40 units) are also available for adult and paediatric examinations. The Council Directive 97/43/EURATOM on health protection of individuals against dangers of ionising radiation in relation to medical exposure was fully transformed into Romanian legislation in 2002. PMID:18381334

  3. Argonne National Laboratory Internal Appraisal Program environment, safety, health/quality assurance oversight

    SciTech Connect

    Winner, G.L.; Siegfried, Y.S.; Forst, S.P.; Meshenberg, M.J.

    1995-06-01

    Argonne National Laboratory`s Internal Appraisal Program has developed a quality assurance team member training program. This program has been developed to provide training to non-quality assurance professionals. Upon successful completion of this training and approval of the Internal Appraisal Program Manager, these personnel are considered qualified to assist in the conduct of quality assurance assessments. The training program has been incorporated into a self-paced, computerized, training session.

  4. Arkansas: a leading laboratory for health care payment and delivery system reform.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, Deborah; du Pont, Lammot; Lipson, Mindy

    2014-08-01

    As states' Medicaid programs continue to evolve from traditional fee-for-service to value-based health care delivery, there is growing recognition that systemwide multipayer approaches provide the market power needed to address the triple aim of improved patient care, improved health of populations, and reduced costs. Federal initiatives, such as the State Innovation Model grant program, make significant funds available for states seeking to transform their health care systems. In crafting their reform strategies, states can learn from early innovators. This issue brief focuses on one such state: Arkansas. Insights and lessons from the Arkansas Health Care Payment Improvement Initiative (AHCPII) suggest that progress is best gained through an inclusive, deliberative process facilitated by committed leadership, a shared agreement on root problems and opportunities for improvement, and a strategy grounded in the state's particular health care landscape. PMID:25204031

  5. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 84-419-1697, USGS Laboratory, Doraville, Georgia. [Benzene, methylene chloride, hexane, and acetone

    SciTech Connect

    Rondinelli, R.; Wilcox, T.; Roper, P.; Salisbury

    1986-05-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory, Doraville, Georgia requested an evaluation of physical complaints reported by employees to determine possible work related causes. Laboratory workers, in general, complained of physical symptoms which were irritative (rash, sore throat, nose or sinus irritation), neurological (numbness, muscle weakness) and nonspecific (dizziness, headache, emotional swings, insomnia, muscle aching, fatigue). Reported exposure to solvents such as benzene, methylene chloride, hexane and acetone were positively related with light headedness or dizziness, numbness, unexplained muscle weakness and muscle aching. Air sampling did not reveal any remarkable exposure to chemical contaminants. The authors conclude that no relationship could be established between chemical exposures and antinuclear antibody positivity. Exposure to chemicals measured by air sampling were below occupational health exposure limits.

  6. Bachelor of Science, Radiologic Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology Emphasis, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Radiologic Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology Emphasis, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date RADSCI 375 Radiologic Sciences Clinical Experience RADSCI 376 Radiologic Sciences Clinical Experience RADSCI 385 Radiologic Sciences Clinical Experience RADSCI 392 Radiologic Colloquium RADSCI 405 & RADSCI

  7. Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Computed Tomography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Computed Tomography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-CTRT] Regional College Catalog Year Hours] Note: Students must have earned an AAS degree in Radiologic Technology (69-71 semester credits

  8. Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Computed Tomography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Computed Tomography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-CTRT] Regional College Catalog Year Hours] Note: Students must have earned an AAS degree in Radiologic Technology (42 semester credits

  9. 40 CFR 79.60 - Good laboratory practices (GLP) standards for inhalation exposure health effects testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...the study. Study means any experiment, at one or more test sites, in...health effects of that exposure in humans, other living organisms, or media...When relevant to the conduct of the experiment, to determine the solubility...

  10. 40 CFR 79.60 - Good laboratory practices (GLP) standards for inhalation exposure health effects testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...the study. Study means any experiment, at one or more test sites, in...health effects of that exposure in humans, other living organisms, or media...When relevant to the conduct of the experiment, to determine the solubility...

  11. 40 CFR 79.60 - Good laboratory practices (GLP) standards for inhalation exposure health effects testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...the study. Study means any experiment, at one or more test sites, in...health effects of that exposure in humans, other living organisms, or media...When relevant to the conduct of the experiment, to determine the solubility...

  12. 40 CFR 79.60 - Good laboratory practices (GLP) standards for inhalation exposure health effects testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...the study. Study means any experiment, at one or more test sites, in...health effects of that exposure in humans, other living organisms, or media...When relevant to the conduct of the experiment, to determine the solubility...

  13. 40 CFR 79.60 - Good laboratory practices (GLP) standards for inhalation exposure health effects testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...the study. Study means any experiment, at one or more test sites, in...health effects of that exposure in humans, other living organisms, or media...When relevant to the conduct of the experiment, to determine the solubility...

  14. The Environmental Science & Health Effects Program at the at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Douglas R.

    2000-08-20

    To conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources.

  15. First imported coccidioidomycosis in Turkey: A potential health risk for laboratory workers outside endemic areas?

    PubMed Central

    Kantarcioglu, A. Serda; Sandoval-Denis, M.; Aygun, Gokhan; Kiraz, Nuri; Akman, Canan; Apaydin, Hulya; Karaman, Emin; Guarro, Josep; de Hoog, G. Sybren; Gurel, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis caused by Coccidioides immitis or Coccidioides posadasii is endemic in arid climate zones in America, travel-related cases have been reported. We report the first documented case of coccidioidomycosis in Turkey, overviewing reported cases in Europe and underlying difficulties of differential diagnosis outside endemic regions. The patient was an otherwise healthy 41-year-old man who travelled endemic areas. Laboratory diagnosis was based on direct microscopy of two subsequent subcutaneous biopsy specimens and culture and confirmed molecularly. Laboratory personnel should become aware that BioSafety Level-3 organisms may become more frequent and widespread. PMID:24567896

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF THE U.S. EPA HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY FROZEN BLOOD CELL REPOSITORY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    In previous efforts, we suggested that proper blood cell freezing and storage is necessary in longitudinal studies with reduced between tests error, for specimen sharing between laboratories and for convenient scheduling of assays. e continue to develop and upgrade programs for o...

  17. E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division

    E-print Network

    Isotope Facility 64 Life Sciences Research 70 Environmental Energy Technology and Nuclear and Earth.3 SOURCE DESCRIPTION 1.1 SITE DESCRIPTION 1.1.1 Laboratory Operations The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley with an approved authorization or permit. A radiation work authorization is issued for long-term projects under

  18. Environmental Health and Safety Laboratory Preparation for Tropical Storms or Hurricanes

    E-print Network

    Natelson, Douglas

    the regulator and cap the cylinder stem. 12. Close the sash on all chemical fume hoods. 13. Make sure that all door. Update this information at: http://safety.rice.edu/Chemical_Safety/Laboratory_Door_Sign_Generator/. 2. Ensure all chemical and materials are marked with a waterproof marker. 3. Cap all chemicals

  19. Seropositivity to Toxoplasma infection in sheep samples submitted to Animal and Plant Health Agency laboratories between 2005 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, J P; Smith, R P

    2015-05-30

    Ovine serum samples submitted to Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) (formerly the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency) - Weybridge regional laboratories in England and Wales for diagnostic and monitoring purposes between 2005 and 2012 were investigated for possible spatial and temporal variations in seropositivity to Toxoplasma gondii infection. Of the 4354 samples tested by latex agglutination, 2361 (54.2 per cent) were seropositive. No correlation between seropositivity and climatic conditions was identified by mixed-effects modelling using meteorological data summaries. The proportion of seropositive samples collected during November was found to be significantly lower than those collected during other months and samples from the North West England and North Wales Regions had significantly lower odds of being positive. Spatial cluster analysis identified a significantly higher proportion of seropositive animals in East Anglia and the South, East and Midlands of England. Spatio-temporal cluster analysis detected a single significant cluster of seropositive animals dating from January 2006 to January 2011, which covered a large proportion of the farm locations. As well as confirming high overall levels of infection within the national flock, these findings also indicate possible temporal and regional variations in exposure of sheep to T. gondii. PMID:25888604

  20. Radiology: "killer app" for next generation networks?

    PubMed

    McNeill, Kevin M

    2004-03-01

    The core principles of digital radiology were well developed by the end of the 1980 s. During the following decade tremendous improvements in computer technology enabled realization of those principles at an affordable cost. In this decade work can focus on highly distributed radiology in the context of the integrated health care enterprise. Over the same period computer networking has evolved from a relatively obscure field used by a small number of researchers across low-speed serial links to a pervasive technology that affects nearly all facets of society. Development directions in network technology will ultimately provide end-to-end data paths with speeds that match or exceed the speeds of data paths within the local network and even within workstations. This article describes key developments in Next Generation Networks, potential obstacles, and scenarios in which digital radiology can become a "killer app" that helps to drive deployment of new network infrastructure. PMID:15255516

  1. Radiological health review of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volumes 1 and 2. DOE/EIS-0026

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Purpose of the Environmental Evaluation Group (EEG) is to conduct an independent technical evaluation of the potential radiation exposure to people from the proposed Federal radioactive Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, in order to protect the public health and safety and ensure that there is minimal environmental degradation. Analyses are conducted of reports issued by the US DOE and its contractors, other Federal agencies and other organizations, as they relate to the potential health, safety and environmental impacts from WIPP.

  2. Emergency radiological monitoring and analysis United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, D.J.

    1994-09-01

    The United States Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. Following a major radiological incident the FRERP authorizes the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). The FRMAC is established to coordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted states and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division is responsible for coordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis and quality assurance. This program includes: (1) Aerial Radiological Monitoring - Fixed Wing and Helicopter, (2) Field Monitoring and Sampling, (3) Radioanalysis - Mobile and Fixed Laboratories, (4) Radiation Detection Instrumentation - Calibration and Maintenance, (5) Environmental Dosimetry, and (6) An integrated program of Quality Assurance. To assure consistency, completeness and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures handbook is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets and operations of FRMAC monitoring and analysis and the content and preparation of this handbook.

  3. American College of Radiology

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Join or Renew Today ACR INFORMATICS Learn More LEADERSHIP TRAINING RLI Leadership Summit QUALITY & SAFETY ACR Accreditation July 06, 2015 ... and Course Calendar PQI Projects Practice Parameters Radiology Leadership Institute ® Rad-Path Correlation Resources for Radiologists Locate ...

  4. Computers in radiology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Santiago Medina; John M. Racadio; Howard A. Schwid

    2000-01-01

    Background. Awareness and preparedness to handle sedation, analgesia, and contrast-media complications are key in the daily radiology\\u000a practice. Objective. The purpose is to create a computerized simulator (PC-Windows-based) that uses a graphical interface to reproduce critical\\u000a incidents in pediatric and adult patients undergoing a wide spectrum of radiologic sedation, analgesia and contrast media\\u000a complications. Materials and methods. The computerized simulator

  5. Basic bone radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    This clinical book surveys the skeletal system as seen through radiological imaging. It emphasizing abnormalities, disease, and trauma, and includes vital information on bones, bone growth, and the cells involved in bone pathology. It covers many bone diseases and injuries which are rarely covered in medical texts, as well as descriptions of radiologic procedures that specifically relate to the skeleton. This edition includes many illustrations, information on MR imaging and CT scanning, and discussions of osteoporosis, dysplasias, and metabolic bone disease.

  6. Connecticut Public Health Code. 19a-36-A25. Laboratories to register

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    of sources of pollution, problems of sewage disposal or effectiveness of sewage treatment; (4) any treatment (3) those performed on sewage, sewage effluent or sewage sludge in connection with investigation of operators whose qualifications have been approved by the state department of health or of sewage treatment

  7. LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF ECOSYSTEM HEALTH USING Corophium volutator: CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENDPOINTS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jocelyne Hellou; Kerry Cheeseman; Elaine Desnoyers; Anette Gronlund; Dawn Johnston; Jim Leonard; Sarah Robertson; Sean Steller

    To determine marine environmental quality and ecosystem health, it is important to investigate the type, level and fingerprint of contaminants and the proportion available for uptake that could be linked to potential biological effects. The level of contaminants in different marine environmental compartments is determined by the presence of sources of contamination, their transport, and type or physical-chemical properties of

  8. Dalhousie University Biohazards Assessment Dalhousie University follows Health Canada's "Laboratory Biosafety

    E-print Network

    Brownstone, Rob

    section(s) of Part 2 as well as the following questions: On the basis of Public Health Agency of Canada prokaryotes, is it known to contribute to pathogenicity? yes no Do you intend to clone? Random segments? _________________________________________ C) Animal Cells Specify the cells for culturing: Human yes no Non-human primate yes no Non

  9. ASU-Mayo Clinic Imaging Informatics Laboratory (AMIIL) Data Mining and Health Informatics in

    E-print Network

    Li, Jing

    -scanner medical records · Real-time query and alarming Software system architecture Real-time query/reporting Real-time Pathologists Medical geneticists Radiologists Health Systems Engineers Focus Area I: Imaging centered data analytics for better diagnosis and treatment of cancer Focus Area II: Operational excellence, work flow

  10. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, Barbara J.; West, Stephanie G.; Jones, Olga G.; Kerr, Dorothy A.; Bieri, Rita A.; Sanderson, Nancy L.

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of the Safety and Health (S H) Subteam assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site. Four Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) Teams were assembled for this purpose by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety and Quality Assurance, Office of Safety Appraisals (OSA). Team No. 1 reviewed EG G Idaho, Inc. (EG G Idaho) and the Department of Energy Field Office, Idaho (ID) Fire Department. Team No. 2 reviewed Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). Team No. 3 reviewed selected contractors at the INEL; specifically, Morrison Knudsen-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC), Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI), Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL), and Rockwell-INEL. Team No. 4 provided an Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)-type compliance sitewide assessment of INEL. The S H Subteam assessment was performed concurrently with assessments conducted by Environmental and Management Subteams. Performance was appraised in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Medical Services, and Firearms Safety.

  11. Biological Risks and Laboratory-Acquired Infections: A Reality That Cannot be Ignored in Health Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Ana Cláudia; García Díez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Advances and research in biotechnology have applications over a wide range of areas, such as microbiology, medicine, the food industry, agriculture, genetically modified organisms, and nanotechnology, among others. However, research with pathogenic agents, such as virus, parasites, fungi, rickettsia, bacterial microorganisms, or genetic modified organisms, has generated concern because of their potential biological risk – not only for people, but also for the environment due to their unpredictable behavior. In addition, concern for biosafety is associated with the emergence of new diseases or re-emergence of diseases that were already under control. Biotechnology laboratories require biosafety measures designed to protect their staff, the population, and the environment, which may be exposed to hazardous organisms and materials. Laboratory staff training and education is essential, not only to acquire a good understanding about the direct handling of hazardous biological agents but also knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenicity, and human susceptibility to the biological materials used in research. Biological risk can be reduced and controlled by the correct application of internationally recognized procedures such as proper microbiological techniques, proper containment apparatus, adequate facilities, protective barriers, and special training and education of laboratory workers. To avoid occupational infections, knowledge about standardized microbiological procedures and techniques and the use of containment devices, facilities, and protective barriers is necessary. Training and education about the epidemiology, pathogenicity, and biohazards of the microorganisms involved may prevent or decrease the risk. In this way, the scientific community may benefit from the lessons learned in the past to anticipate future problems. PMID:25973418

  12. A TWO-STAGE MODEL OF RADIOLOGICAL INSPECTION: SPENDING TIME

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,W.S.

    2000-07-30

    The paper describes a model that visually portrays radiological survey performance as basic parameters (surveyor efficiency and criteria, duration of pause, and probe speed) are varied; field and laboratory tests provided typical parameter values. The model is used to illustrate how practical constraints on the time allotted to the task can affect radiological inspection performance. Similar analyses are applicable to a variety of other tasks (airport baggage inspection, and certain types of non-destructive testing) with similar characteristics and constraints.

  13. Using a medical simulation center as an electronic health record usability laboratory.

    PubMed

    Landman, Adam B; Redden, Lisa; Neri, Pamela; Poole, Stephen; Horsky, Jan; Raja, Ali S; Pozner, Charles N; Schiff, Gordon; Poon, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    Usability testing is increasingly being recognized as a way to increase the usability and safety of health information technology (HIT). Medical simulation centers can serve as testing environments for HIT usability studies. We integrated the quality assurance version of our emergency department (ED) electronic health record (EHR) into our medical simulation center and piloted a clinical care scenario in which emergency medicine resident physicians evaluated a simulated ED patient and documented electronically using the ED EHR. Meticulous planning and close collaboration with expert simulation staff was important for designing test scenarios, pilot testing, and running the sessions. Similarly, working with information systems teams was important for integration of the EHR. Electronic tools are needed to facilitate entry of fictitious clinical results while the simulation scenario is unfolding. EHRs can be successfully integrated into existing simulation centers, which may provide realistic environments for usability testing, training, and evaluation of human-computer interactions. PMID:24249778

  14. Using a medical simulation center as an electronic health record usability laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Adam B; Redden, Lisa; Neri, Pamela; Poole, Stephen; Horsky, Jan; Raja, Ali S; Pozner, Charles N; Schiff, Gordon; Poon, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    Usability testing is increasingly being recognized as a way to increase the usability and safety of health information technology (HIT). Medical simulation centers can serve as testing environments for HIT usability studies. We integrated the quality assurance version of our emergency department (ED) electronic health record (EHR) into our medical simulation center and piloted a clinical care scenario in which emergency medicine resident physicians evaluated a simulated ED patient and documented electronically using the ED EHR. Meticulous planning and close collaboration with expert simulation staff was important for designing test scenarios, pilot testing, and running the sessions. Similarly, working with information systems teams was important for integration of the EHR. Electronic tools are needed to facilitate entry of fictitious clinical results while the simulation scenario is unfolding. EHRs can be successfully integrated into existing simulation centers, which may provide realistic environments for usability testing, training, and evaluation of human–computer interactions. PMID:24249778

  15. Bureau of Radiological Health. a look at Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) program to protect the American consumer from radiaton. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. C. Eccleston; M. H. Barnett

    1977-01-01

    The report provides a brief overview of the FDA's major regulatory and voluntary efforts in the area of radiation control, and examines the impact of the Agency's programs to eliminate unproductive radiation exposure to the American consumer. It concludes with a summary of present and future concerns about newly emerging radiation-emitting products and uses, and the potential public health problems

  16. Dynamic active telepathology over National Health Laboratory service network, South Africa: feasibility study using Nikon Coolscope

    PubMed Central

    Banach, Lech; Stepien, Andrzej; Schneider, Johann; Wichrzycka-Lancaster, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Telepathology recently entered a new era with the introduction of digital microscopes combined with Internet technology. The microscope allows viewing real time of whole slide (macro) as well as different chosen fields in four different magnifications. Three Nikon Coolscope were installed in NHLS laboratories in Mthatha, East London and Port Elizabeth. All these microscopes are connected to NHLS server allowing real time viewing of the full slide at any time of the day using Internet browser. Viewing is possible from any PC connected to NHLS Intranet. The challenge was to be able to view slides from other than NHLS computers due to NHLS IT Department network security measures. This was solved by installing NHLS Virtual Private Network server. About 60 cases were viewed by pathologists in Cape Town (Stellenbosh University) and Pretoria (MEDUNSA). All users assessed the system as a helpful tool allowing easy access to cases needing consultation or second opinion. The quality of images was very good. Our experience with Nikon Coolscope is positive. It is an excellent tool for remote small histopathology departments lacking specialists in such areas as dermatopathology, oncology, and haematopathology. Further studies are needed especially in the scope of full utilization of the microscopes installed and impact on laboratory services. PMID:18673517

  17. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P.

    1994-12-01

    This report is a health risk assessment that addresses continuous releases of tritium to the environment from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The NTLF contributes approximately 95% of all tritium releases from LBL. Transport and transformation models were used to determine the movement of tritium releases from the NRLF to the air, surface water, soils, and plants and to determine the subsequent doses to humans. These models were calibrated against environmental measurements of tritium levels in the vicinity of the NTLF and in the surrounding community. Risk levels were determined for human populations in each of these zones. Risk levels to both individuals and populations were calculated. In this report population risks and individual risks were calculated for three types of diseases--cancer, heritable genetic effects, and developmental and reproductive effects.

  18. Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences-Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology)

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences- Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-HATS] Regional in radiologic technology; successfully completed the certification exam for the American Registry of Radiologic

  19. Bachelor of Science, Radiologic Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology Emphasis, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Radiologic Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology Emphasis, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date Medical and Surgical Diseases RADSCI 370 Junior Recitation and Integration RADSCI 375 Radiologic Sciences Clinical Experience RADSCI 376 Radiologic Sciences Clinical Experience RADSCI 385 Radiologic Sciences

  20. Cost of presumptive source term Remedial Actions Laboratory for energy-related health research, University of California, Davis

    SciTech Connect

    Last, G.V.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Josephson, G.B.; Lanigan, D.C.; Liikala, T.L.; Newcomer, D.R.; Pearson, A.W.; Teel, S.S.

    1995-12-01

    A Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) is in progress at the Laboratory for Energy Related Health Research (LEHR) at the University of California, Davis. The purpose of the RI/FS is to gather sufficient information to support an informed risk management decision regarding the most appropriate remedial actions for impacted areas of the facility. In an effort to expedite remediation of the LEHR facility, the remedial project managers requested a more detailed evaluation of a selected set of remedial actions. In particular, they requested information on both characterization and remedial action costs. The US Department of Energy -- Oakland Office requested the assistance of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to prepare order-of-magnitude cost estimates for presumptive remedial actions being considered for the five source term operable units. The cost estimates presented in this report include characterization costs, capital costs, and annual operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. These cost estimates are intended to aid planning and direction of future environmental remediation efforts.

  1. Public health consequences of a false-positive laboratory test result for Brucella--Florida, Georgia, and Michigan, 2005.

    PubMed

    2008-06-01

    Human brucellosis, a nationally notifiable disease, is uncommon in the United States. Most human cases have occurred in returned travelers or immigrants from regions where brucellosis is endemic, or were acquired domestically from eating illegally imported, unpasteurized fresh cheeses. In January 2005, a woman aged 35 years who lived in Nassau County, Florida, received a diagnosis of brucellosis, based on results of a Brucella immunoglobulin M (IgM) enzyme immunoassay (EIA) performed in a commercial laboratory using analyte specific reagents (ASRs); this diagnosis prompted an investigation of dairy products in two other states. Subsequent confirmatory antibody testing by Brucella microagglutination test (BMAT) performed at CDC on the patient's serum was negative. The case did not meet the CDC/Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists' (CSTE) definition for a probable or confirmed brucellosis case, and the initial EIA result was determined to be a false positive. This report summarizes the case history, laboratory findings, and public health investigations. CDC recommends that Brucella serology testing only be performed using tests cleared or approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or validated under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) and shown to reliably detect the presence of Brucella infection. Results from these tests should be considered supportive evidence for recent infection only and interpreted in the context of a clinically compatible illness and exposure history. EIA is not considered a confirmatory Brucella antibody test; positive screening test results should be confirmed by Brucella-specific agglutination (i.e., BMAT or standard tube agglutination test) methods. PMID:18528317

  2. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1979 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental assessment, control, health, and safety

    SciTech Connect

    Baalman, R.W.; Dotson, C.W. (eds.)

    1980-02-01

    Part 5 of the 1979 Annual Report to the Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for the Environment presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Technology Impacts, the Office of Environmental Compliance and Overview, and the Office of Health and Environmental Research. The report is in four sections, corresponding to the program elements: technology impacts, environmental control engineering, operational and environmental compliance, and human health studies. In each section, articles describe progress made during FY 1979 on individual projects.

  3. Evaluation of a U.S. Public Health Laboratory Service for the Molecular Detection of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Yakrus, Mitchell A.; Metchock, Beverly; Starks, Angela M.

    2015-01-01

    Crucial to interrupting the spread of tuberculosis (TB) is prompt implementation of effective treatment regimens. We evaluated satisfaction, comfort with interpretation, and use of molecular results from a public health service provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for the molecular detection of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). An electronic survey instrument was used to collect information anonymously from U.S. Public Health Laboratories (PHL) that submitted at least one isolate of MTBC to CDC from September 2009 through February 2011. Over 97% of those responding expressed satisfaction with the turnaround time for receiving results. Twenty-six PHL (74%) reported molecular results to healthcare providers in less than two business days. When comparing the molecular results from CDC with their own phenotypic drug susceptibility testing, 50% of PHL observed discordance. No respondents found the molecular results difficult to interpret and 82% were comfortably discussing them with TB program officials and healthcare providers. Survey results indicate PHL were satisfied with CDC's ability to rapidly provide interpretable molecular results for isolates of MTBC submitted for determination of drug resistance. To develop educational materials and strategies for service improvement, reasons for discordant results and areas of confusion need to be identified. PMID:25793126

  4. Health assessment for Whitmoyer Laboratories, Jackson Township, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD003005014. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-11-17

    The Whitmoyer Laboratories 17.5-acre site is formerly an animal arsenical pharmaceutical manufacturing facility that operated from 1934 to 1984. In the early 1960s, approximately four million pounds of soluble arsenic wastes were placed into unlined lagoons. The environmental contamination on-site consists of arsenic and aniline in solid material in the concrete vault; arsenic, anile, 1,1-trichloroethane, and trans-1,2-dichloroethene in groundwater; arsenic in soil; and arsenic in surface water. Contamination off-site consists of arsenic, aniline, 1,1,1-trichloroethane in groundwater from an industrial well; arsenic in surface water; and arsenic in sediment. In addition, extensive sampling of domestic and industrial wells off-site has found arsenic, aniline, 1,2-dichloroethane, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and tetrachloroethylene. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via contaminated groundwater, surface water, sediment, soil, and possibly air.

  5. Health risk assessment for the Building 3001 Storage Canal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Chidambariah, V.; White, R.K.

    1991-12-01

    This human health risk assessment has been prepared for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The objectives of this risk assessment are to evaluate the alternatives for interim closure of the Building 3001 Storage Canal and to identify the potential health risk from an existing leak in the canal. The Building 3001 Storage Canal connects Buildings 3001 and 3019. The volume of water in the canal is monitored and kept constant at about 62,000 gal. The primary contaminants of the canal water are the radionuclides {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 90}Sr; a layer of sediment on the canal floor also contains radionuclides and metals. The prime medium of contaminant transport has been identified as groundwater. The primary route for occupational exposure at the canal is external exposure to gamma radiation from the canal water and the walls of the canal. Similarly, the primary exposure route at the 3042 sump is external exposure to gamma radiation from the groundwater and the walls of the sump. Based on the exposure rates in the radiation work permits (Appendix C) and assuming conservative occupational work periods, the annual radiation dose to workers is considerably less than the relevant dose limits. The potential risk to the public using the Clinch River was determined for three significant exposure pathways: ingestion of drinking water; ingestion of contaminated fish; and external exposure to contaminated sediments on the shoreline, the dominant exposure pathway.

  6. Westinghouse radiological containment guide

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, S.B. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Brown, R.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Wilcox, D.P. [West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., West Valley, NY (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This document provides uniform guidance for Westinghouse contractors on the implementation of radiological containments. This document reflects standard industry practices and is provided as a guide. The guidance presented herein is consistent with the requirements of the DOE Radiological Control Manual (DOE N 5480.6). This guidance should further serve to enable and encourage the use of containments for contamination control and to accomplish the following: Minimize personnel contamination; Prevent the spread of contamination; Minimize the required use of protective clothing and personal protective equipment; Minimize the generation of waste.

  7. Food Signs in Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mehboob; Al Damegh, Saleh

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Certain diseases show classic radiological signs that resemble various types of food items like fruits, meat, vegetables, eggs, bakery, grocery and confectionary items. In this article various food signs are discussed and correlated with the various food items in a pictorial way. The objective of this pictorial essay is to provide the information and learn the characteristic radiological signs resembling various food items. These food signs are easy to recognize and allows a confident diagnosis on the basis of imaging findings alone or can narrow down the differential diagnosis. PMID:21475464

  8. 324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

    2010-06-24

    This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

  9. Evaluation of individually ventilated cage systems for laboratory rodents: cage environment and animal health aspects.

    PubMed

    Höglund, A U; Renström, A

    2001-01-01

    The use of individually ventilated cage (IVC) systems has become an attractive housing regime of laboratory rodents. The benefits of IVC systems are, reportedly, a high degree of containment combined with relative ease of handling, and a high degree of protection from allergenes. In the present study we tested whether two IVC systems (BioZone VentiRack, IVC1 and Techniplast SealSafe, IVC2S), in which we held mature male NMRI mice, were constructed to maintain a constant differential pressure, positive or negative, during a prolonged period of time. We also measured ammonia (NH3) concentrations after about 2 weeks of use, and CO2 build-up during a 60 min simulated power failure situation. In addition, animal weight development and bite-wound frequency were recorded (Renström et al. 2000). From the present study it is concluded that the IVC1 air handling system provides a more uniform and balanced differential pressure than the IVC2S. Both systems effectively scavenge NH3 when bedding material is not soaked by urine. Although the IVCs are dependent on the continual function of the fans to work properly, it seems unlikely that CO2 concentrations increase to hazardous levels, as a result of a one hour power failure, with the type of cages used in this study. Differences in weight development and bite-wound occurrence were noted between the two IVC systems. Causes for these differences could not be established and need more investigation. PMID:11201288

  10. Airborne radiological sampling of Mount St. Helens plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, V.E.

    1981-04-01

    Particulate and gaseous samples for radiologial analyses were collected from the plumes created by eruptions of Mount St. Helens. The sampling aircraft and equipment used are routinely employed in aerial radiological surveillance at the Nevada Test Site by the Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada. An initial sample set was collected on April 4, 1980, during the period of recurring minor eruptions. Samples were collected again on May 19 and 20 following the major eruption of May 18. The Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Radiation Programs analyzed the samples for uranium and thorium isotopes, radium-226, lead-210, polonium-210, and radon-222. Other laboratories analyzed samples to determine particle size distribution and elemental composition. The only samples containing radioactivity above normal ambient levels were collected on May 20. Polonium-210 concentrations in the plume, determined from a sample collected between 5 and 30 km from the crater, were approximately an order of magnitude above background. Radon-222 concentrations in samples collected from the plume centerline at a distance of 15 km averaged approximately four times the average surface concentrations. The small increases in radioactivity would cause no observable adverse health effects.

  11. Radiologic technology educators and andragogy.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, M W; Simon-Galbraith, J A

    1984-01-01

    Radiologic technology educators are in constant contact with adult learners. However, the theoretical framework that radiologic educators use to guide their instruction may not be appropriate for adults. This article examines the assumptions of the standard instructional theory and the most modern approach to adult education-- andragogy . It also shows how these assumptions affect the adult learner in a radiologic education setting. PMID:6729091

  12. Radiological Habits Survey: Sizewell, 2010

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Sizewell, 2010 2011 Environment Report RL 12/11 Cefas contract report C Radiological Habits Survey: Sizewell, 2010 C.J. Garrod, F.J. Clyne, P. Rumney, J. Elliott, C.A. Smedley and V, J., Smedley, C., and Ly, V.E., 2011. Radiological Habits Survey: Sizewell, 2010. RL 12/11. Cefas

  13. Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2013

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2013 2014 Environment Report RL 03/14 Cefas contract report C6028 #12;This page has been intentionally left blank #12;Cefas Document Control Radiological Habits blank #12;Environment Report RL 03/14 Final report Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2013 C.J. Garrod

  14. Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2009

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2009 2010 Environment Report RL 03/10 Cefas contract report C Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2009 C.J. Garrod, F.J. Clyne, J. Elliott and J.R. Tipple Peer reviewed by G, C. J., Clyne, F. C., Elliott, J., and Tipple, J.R., 2010. Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2009

  15. Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield, 2013

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield, 2013 2014 Environment Report RL 02/14 Cefas contract report C6028 #12;This page has been intentionally left blank #12; Cefas Document Control Radiological #12;This page has been intentionally left blank #12;Environment Report RL 02/14 Radiological Habits

  16. Radiological Habits Survey: Dungeness, 2010

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Dungeness, 2010 2011 Environment Report RL 11/11 Cefas contract report Radiological Habits Survey: Dungeness, 2010 F.J. Clyne, C.J. Garrod, V.E. Ly, P. Rumney and J. Elliott Peer: Clyne, F.C., Garrod, C.J., Ly, V.E., Rumney, P., and Elliott, J., 2011. Radiological Habits Survey

  17. Radiological Habits Survey: Derby, 2009

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Derby, 2009 2010 Environment Report RL 05/10 Cefas contract report C Radiological Habits Survey: Derby, 2009 J. Elliott, F.J. Clyne and C.J. Garrod Peer reviewed by G.J. Hunt., Clyne, F.C. and Garrod, C.J., 2010. Radiological Habits Survey: Derby, 2009. RL 05/10. Cefas, Lowestoft

  18. Radiological Habits Survey: Heysham, 2011

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Heysham, 2011 2012 Environment Report RL 02/12 Cefas contract report C Radiological Habits Survey: Heysham, 2011 C.J. Garrod, F.J. Clyne, V.E. Ly and P. Rumney Peer reviewed by G, C.J., Clyne, F.J., Ly, V.E. and Rumney, P., 2012. Radiological Habits Survey: Heysham, 2011. RL 02

  19. Radiological Habits Survey: Devonport, 2011

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Devonport, 2011 2012 Environment Report RL 01/12 Cefas contract report Radiological Habits Survey: Devonport, 2011 F.J. Clyne, C.J. Garrod, V.E. Ly and P. Rumney Peer reviewed by G.J., Garrod, C.J., Ly, V.E. and Rumney, P., 2012. Radiological Habits Survey: Devonport, 2011. RL 01/12. Cefas

  20. Radiological Habits Survey: Amersham, 2009

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Amersham, 2009 2010 Environment Report RL 04/10 Cefas contract report C Radiological Habits Survey: Amersham, 2009 F.J. Clyne, C.J. Garrod and J. Elliott Peer reviewed by G.J. Hunt.C., Garrod, C.J. and Elliott, J., 2010. Radiological Habits Survey: Amersham, 2009. RL 04/10. Cefas

  1. Poul Erik Andersen's radiological work on Osteochondrodysplasias and interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Poul Erik

    2011-08-28

    Poul Erik Andersen is a Professor and Interventional Radiologist at the University of Southern Denmark, Odense and Odense University Hospital, Denmark. His innovative and expertise is primarily in vascular interventions where he has introduced and developed many procedures at Odense University Hospital. His significant experience and extensive scientific work has led to many posts in the Danish Society of Interventional Radiology, the European Society of Radiology and the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe, where he is a fellow and has passed the European Board of Interventional Radiology - The European qualification in Interventional Radiology. PMID:22022640

  2. Ames Laboratory annual site environmental report, calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 1996. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring programs. Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies twelve buildings owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Laboratory also leases space in ISU owned buildings. Laboratory activities involve less than ten percent of the total chemical use and approximately one percent of the radioisotope use on the ISU campus. In 1996, the Office of Assurance and Assessment merged with the Environment, Safety and Health Group forming the Environment, Safety, Health and Assurance (ESH and A) office. In 1996, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of wastes under US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. Ames Laboratory submitted a Proposed Site Treatment Plan to EPA in December 1995. This plan complied with the Federal Facilities Compliance Act (FFCA). It was approved by EPA in January 1996. The consent agreement/consent order was issued in February 1996. Pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs, implemented in 1990 and updated in 1994, continued through 1996. Included in these efforts were a waste white paper and green computer paper recycling program. Ames Laboratory also continued to recycle salvageable metal and used oil, and it recovered freon for recycling. All of the chemical and nearly all of the radiological legacy wastes were properly disposed by the end of 1996. Additional radiological legacy waste will be properly disposed during 1997.

  3. HOSPITAL RADIOLOGIC DECONTAMINATION CENTER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Karel; S. Ketyer

    1962-01-01

    In 1961 the Medical Division of the Union County Civil Defense and ; Disastor Control organization in cooperation with the Radiology Department of St. ; Elizabeth Hospital in Elizabeth, N. J., developed a Hospital Decontamination ; Center. In addition to being a decontamination center, St. Elizabeth Hospital ; has become a fallout monitor station for Union County. According to the

  4. Radiological perspectives in empyema

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan King; Anne Thomson

    2002-01-01

    Empyema is a common cause for hospital admission in children. For years, clinicians have relied on chest X-rays to aid diagnosis and monitor treatment. New imaging techniques, particularly ultrasound, have helped in planning the management of children with empyema. Other cross-sectional radiological investigations are useful in a small proportion of children with complicated disease. The mainstays of imaging in the

  5. Fundamentals of skeletal radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Helms, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    This book is a basic introduction to skeletal radiology and focuses on the commonly encountered conditions. Emphasis is on prioritization and proper use of imaging techniques in the diagnosis of skeletal disorders. It covers benign cystic and malignant lesions, osteosclerosis, the arthritides, metabolic bone disease, musculoskeletal CT and dysplasias.

  6. Radiology of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Freeny, P C

    1991-06-01

    This paper summarizes the major publications regarding imaging and intervention in pancreatic diseases from December 1989 through November 1990. This year, many of the most notable papers were published in the medical and surgical journals, reflecting that radiologic evaluation and intervention in patients with pancreatitis and pancreatic neoplasms are becoming standards of practice in many institutions. PMID:1859779

  7. Radiology in emergency medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, R.; Barsan, W.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book gives a discussion of radiologic modalities currently being used in emergency situations. Radiographs, echocardiographs, radionuclide scans and CT scans are systematically analyzed and evaluated to provide a step-by-step diagnostic process for emergency physicians to follow when a radiologist is not present.

  8. Radiological Defense Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Originally prepared for use as a student textbook in Radiological Defense (RADEF) courses, this manual provides the basic technical information necessary for an understanding of RADEF. It also briefly discusses the need for RADEF planning and expected postattack emergency operations. There are 14 chapters covering these major topics: introduction…

  9. Radiological Safety Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Army Ordnance Center and School, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.

    Written to be used concurrently with the U.S. Army's Radiological Safety Course, this publication discusses the causes, sources, and detection of nuclear radiation. In addition, the transportation and disposal of radioactive materials are covered. The report also deals with the safety precautions to be observed when working with lasers, microwave…

  10. Radiology Technician (AFSC 90370).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobczak, James

    This five-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for radiology technicians. Covered in the individual volumes are radiographic fundamentals (x-ray production; primary beams; exposure devices; film, film holders, and darkrooms; control of film quality; and environmental safety);…

  11. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health: Part 5, Nuclear and operational safety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. G. Faust; W. E. Kennedy; B. L. Steelman; J. M. Selby

    1987-01-01

    Part 5 of the 1986 Annual Report to the Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Nuclear Safety, the Office of Operational Safety, and for the Office of Environmental Analysis. For each project, as identified by the Field Task Proposal\\/Agreement, articles describe progress made during

  12. TRAINING REQUIREMENTS FOR MNI LABORATORY PERSONNEL (version February, 2014) Principal Investigators are responsible for ensuring good occupational health and safety practices in their

    E-print Network

    Shoubridge, Eric

    is online in the IT Knowledge Base. HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT & DISPOSAL TRAINING FOR LAB PERSONNEL Waste Management & Disposal Training for Laboratory Personnel | Environmental Health and Safety - Mc/research; contact the Chief MRI Research Coordinator, Andre Cormier (x3020). ANIMAL CARE ONLINE THEORY COURSE

  13. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1980 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental assessment, control, health and safety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. Baalman; I. D. Hays

    1981-01-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) 1980 annual report to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment describes research in environment, health, and safety conducted during fiscal year 1980. Part 5 includes technology assessments for natural gas, enhanced oil recovery, oil shale, uranium mining, magnetic fusion energy, solar energy, uranium enrichment and industrial energy utilization; regional analysis studies of environmental transport and community

  14. Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G Gallegos; J Daniels; A Wegrecki

    2007-01-01

    This document contains the human health and ecological risk assessment for the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) permit renewal for the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF). Volume 1 is the text of the risk assessment, and Volume 2 (provided on a compact disc) is the supporting modeling data. The EWTF is operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

  15. COORDINATING SYSTEMS-BASED ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE WITH EPIDEMIOLOGY AND LABORATORY ANALYSIS: A WATERBORNE OUTBREAK OF NORWALK-LIKE VIRUS IN THE BIG HORN MOUNTAINS OF WYOMING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: In February 2001, the Wyoming Department of Health received reports of cases of gastroenteritis among persons who had been snowmobiling in the Big Horn Mountains. Laboratory testing suggested that exposure to a Norwalk-like virus was responsible for the illness. ...

  16. Buprenorphine/Naloxone and Methadone Effects on Laboratory Indices of Liver Health: a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saxon, Andrew J.; Ling, Walter; Hillhouse, Maureen; Thomas, Christie; Hasson, Albert; Ang, Alfonso; Doraimani, Geetha; Tasissa, Gudaye; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Leimberger, Jeff; Bruce, R. Douglas; McCarthy, John; Wiest, Katharina; McLaughlin, Paul; Bilangi, Richard; Cohen, Allan; Woody, George; Jacobs, Petra

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP) and methadone (MET) are efficacious treatments for opioid dependence, although concerns about a link between BUP and drug-induced hepatitis have been raised. This study compares the effects of BUP and MET on liver health in opioid-dependent participants. METHODS This was a randomized controlled trial of 1269 opioid-dependent participants seeking treatment at 8 federally licensed opioid treatment programs and followed for up to 32 weeks between May 2006 and August 2010; 731 participants met “evaluable” criteria defined as completing 24 weeks of medication and providing at least 4 blood samples for transaminase testing. Participants were randomly assigned to receive BUP or MET for 24 weeks. Shift table analysis determined how many evaluable participants moved between categories of low and elevated transaminase levels. Predictors of moving from low to high transaminase levels were identified. RESULTS Changes in transaminase levels did not differ by medication condition. Baseline infection with hepatitis C or B was the only significant predictor of moving from low to elevated transaminase levels; 9 BUP and 15 MET participants showed extreme liver test elevations and were more likely than those without extreme elevations to have seroconverted to both hepatitis B and C during the study, or to use illicit drugs during the first 8 weeks of treatment. MET participants were retained longer in treatment than BUP participants. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrated no evidence of liver damage during the initial 6 months of treatment in either condition. Physicians can prescribe either medication without major concern for liver injury. PMID:22921476

  17. 2011 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Lewis

    2012-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  18. 2010 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advance Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect

    mike lewis

    2011-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  19. 2013 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  20. 2012 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    SciTech Connect

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  1. Microbiology for Radiologists: How to Minimize Infection Transmission in the Radiology Department.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Sobia K; Tragon, Tyson R; Fukui, Melanie B; Hartman, Matthew S; Hartman, Amy L

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of standardized infection control and prevention practices is increasingly relevant as modern radiology practice evolves into its more clinical role. Current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institutes of Health, and World Health Organization guidelines for the proper use of personal protective equipment, decontamination of reusable medical equipment, and appropriate management of bloodborne pathogen exposures will be reviewed. Standard precautions apply to all patients at all times and are the mainstay of infection control. Proper hand hygiene includes washing hands with soap and water when exposed to certain infectious particles, such as Clostridium difficile spores, which are not inactivated by alcohol-based hand rubs. The appropriate use of personal protective equipment in accordance with recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention includes wearing a surgical mask during lumbar puncture. Because radiologists may perform lumbar punctures for patients with prion disease, it is important to appreciate that incineration is the most effective method of inactivating prion proteins. However, there is currently no consensus recommendation on the decontamination of prion-contaminated reusable items associated with lumbar puncture, and institutional policies should be consulted for directed management. In the event of a needlestick injury, radiology staff must be able to quickly provide appropriate initial management and seek medical attention, including laboratory testing for bloodborne pathogens. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2015. PMID:26046943

  2. Radiology of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    David, V

    1999-01-01

    Radiology plays an integral role in the evaluation of patients with significant abdominal pain. The cross-sectional modalities (computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging) are widely used, but there is sometimes confusion about how to use each test appropriately. We review how each test is done, consider the strengths and weaknesses of each modality, and discuss how to use them in an intelligent, cost-effective manner. PMID:10795217

  3. Strategic thinking for radiology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald B. Schilling

    1997-01-01

    Summary  We have now analyzed the use and benefits of four Strategic Thinking Tools for Radiology: the Vision Statement, the High Five,\\u000a the Two-by-Two, and Real-Win-Worth. Additional tools will be provided during the tutorial. The tools provided above should\\u000a be considered as examples. They all contain the 10 benefits outlined earlier to varying degrees. It is extremely important\\u000a that the tools

  4. Strategic thinking for radiology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald B. Schilling

    1998-01-01

    Summary  We have now analyzed the use and benefits of four Strategic Thinking Tools for Radiology: the Vision Statement, the High Five,\\u000a the Two-by-Two, and Real-Win-Worth. Additional tools will be provided during the tutorial. The tools provided above should\\u000a be considered as examples. They all contain the 10 benefits outlined earlier to varying degrees. It is extremely important\\u000a that the tools

  5. Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M

    2002-11-08

    Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

  6. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center: Phase I Response

    SciTech Connect

    C. Riland; D. R. Bowman; R. Lambert; R. Tighe

    1999-09-30

    A Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is established in response to a Lead Federal Agency (LFA) or State request when a radiological emergency is anticipated or has occurred. The FRMAC coordinates the off-site monitoring, assessment, and analysis activities during such an emergency. The FRMAC response is divided into three phases. FRMAC Phase 1 is a rapid, initial-response capability that can interface with Federal or State officials and is designed for a quick response time and rapid radiological data collection and assessment. FRMAC Phase 1 products provide an initial characterization of the radiological situation and information on early health effects to officials responsible for making and implementing protective action decisions.

  7. Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare

    E-print Network

    Baker, Chris I.

    Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare National Institutes of Health PublicHealthService PolicyonHumane Care and Use of LaboratoryAnimals #12;Public Health Service Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals Revised August, 2002 #12;Preface This 2002 reprint of the Public Health Service (PHS) Policy

  8. Reengineering the radiology enterprise: a summary of the 2014 Intersociety Committee Summer Conference.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Gerald D; Allen, Bibb; Birzniek, Derek; Boland, Giles W; Brink, James A; Dreyer, Keith J; Khandheria, Paras; Kruskal, Jonathan B; Ricci, Peter; Seibert, J Anthony; Zane, Richard

    2015-03-01

    The current initiative to reform health care from both a quality and a cost perspective has already had a profound impact on the radiology enterprise. We have seen a decrease in the utilization of imaging studies, a reduction in reimbursement, a declining payer mix, shrinking incomes, a proliferation of performance indices, creation of radiology mega-groups, growth of national radiology companies, and increasing turf incursions. Our cheese is clearly on the move, and we must take action to reengineer the radiology enterprise. In keeping with general health care reform, we must be patient-centric, data driven, and outcome based. We must create a radiology enterprise that adheres to the value equation of providing the highest quality health care, for the lowest possible cost, for all citizens. PMID:25743920

  9. Surface radiological investigations at environmental research area 11, 137Cs- and 60Co-contaminated plots at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Uziel, M S; Tiner, P F; Williams, J K

    1993-02-01

    A surface radiological investigation at the {sup 137}Cs- and {sup 6O}Co-contaminated forest area (Chestnut Ridge east and west plots) was conducted from January 1992 through August 1992. Results of the survey revealed numerous spots and small areas of surface contamination that followed the original placement of feeders used for {sup 6O}Co- and {sup 137}Cs-labeled seeds in a 1969--1970 study. Surface gamma exposure rates reached 380 {mu}R/h at the east plot and 400 {mu}R/h at the west plot, but approximately one-half and one- third, respectively, of the identified anomalies did not exceed 39 {mu}R/h. Results of soil sample analyses demonstrated that {sup 137}Cs and {sup 6O}Co were responsible for the elevated radiation levels. Radionuclides were found below the surface at soil sample locations, in some cases at depths below 18 in. The same pattern of subsurface contamination may be present at other elevated surface spots at both plots. These survey results show that current radiological conditions at the site remain an environmental problem. Recommendations for corrective actions are included.

  10. Health and Safety Work Plan for Sampling Colloids in Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, J.D.; McCarthy, J.F.

    1994-01-01

    This Work Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan (SSHP) and the attached work plan are for the performance of the colloid project at WAG 5. The work will be conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) and associated ORNL environmental, safety, and health support groups. The purpose of this document is to establish health and safety guidelines to be followed by all personnel involved in conducting work for this project. The levels of protection and the procedures specified in this plan are based on the best information available from historical data and preliminary evaluations of the area. Therefore, these recommendations represent the minimum health and safety requirements to be observed by all personnel engaged in this project.

  11. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health: Part 5, Nuclear and operational safety

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, L.G.; Kennedy, W.E.; Steelman, B.L.; Selby, J.M.

    1987-02-01

    Part 5 of the 1986 Annual Report to the Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Nuclear Safety, the Office of Operational Safety, and for the Office of Environmental Analysis. For each project, as identified by the Field Task Proposal/Agreement, articles describe progress made during fiscal year 1986. Authors of these articles represent a broad spectrum of capabilities derived from three of the seven research departments of the Laboratory, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the work.

  12. Radiological Habits Survey: Chapelcross Liquid Effluent Pipeline, 2002

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Chapelcross Liquid Effluent Pipeline, 2002 Science commissioned Pipeline, 2002 The Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science Lowestoft Laboratory Pakefield OF SURVEY 5 2.1 Pipeline description 5 2.2 Occupancy 6 2.3 Gamma dose rate measurements 7 3 SURVEY FINDINGS

  13. Understanding Contamination; Twenty Years of Simulating Radiological Contamination

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emily Snyder; John Drake; Ryan James

    2012-01-01

    A wide variety of simulated contamination methods have been developed by researchers to reproducibly test radiological decontamination methods. Some twenty years ago a method of non-radioactive contamination simulation was proposed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that mimicked the character of radioactive cesium and zirconium contamination on stainless steel. It involved baking the contamination into the surface of the stainless

  14. Radiological assessment. A textbook on environmental dose analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Till, J.E.; Meyer, H.R. (eds.)

    1983-09-01

    Radiological assessment is the quantitative process of estimating the consequences to humans resulting from the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. It is a multidisciplinary subject requiring the expertise of a number of individuals in order to predict source terms, describe environmental transport, calculate internal and external dose, and extrapolate dose to health effects. Up to this time there has been available no comprehensive book describing, on a uniform and comprehensive level, the techniques and models used in radiological assessment. Radiological Assessment is based on material presented at the 1980 Health Physics Society Summer School held in Seattle, Washington. The material has been expanded and edited to make it comprehensive in scope and useful as a text. Topics covered include (1) source terms for nuclear facilities and Medical and Industrial sites; (2) transport of radionuclides in the atmosphere; (3) transport of radionuclides in surface waters; (4) transport of radionuclides in groundwater; (5) terrestrial and aquatic food chain pathways; (6) reference man; a system for internal dose calculations; (7) internal dosimetry; (8) external dosimetry; (9) models for special-case radionuclides; (10) calculation of health effects in irradiated populations; (11) evaluation of uncertainties in environmental radiological assessment models; (12) regulatory standards for environmental releases of radionuclides; (13) development of computer codes for radiological assessment; and (14) assessment of accidental releases of radionuclides.

  15. Bachelor of Science, Radiologic Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology Emphasis, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    Bachelor of Science, Radiologic Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology Emphasis, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date Radiologic Sciences Clinical Experience RADSCI 300 Digital Radiography and Advanced Imaging Applications Information Technology In Radiologic Sciences RADSCI 350 Imaging Pathophysiology RADSCI 370 Junior Recitation

  16. C-1 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 2000 APPENDIX C: RADIOLOGICAL DATA METHODOLOGIES

    E-print Network

    Homes, Christopher C.

    C-1 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 2000 APPENDIX C: RADIOLOGICAL DATA METHODOLOGIES APPENDIX C: Radiological Data Methodologies DOSE CALCULATION - ATMOSPHERIC RELEASE PATHWAY The effective dose equivalent in the Peconic River was based on a study done by the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH 1996), which

  17. C-1 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT APPENDIX C: RADIOLOGICAL DATA METHODOLOGIES

    E-print Network

    Homes, Christopher C.

    C-1 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT APPENDIX C: RADIOLOGICAL DATA METHODOLOGIES APPENDIX C Radiological Data Methodologies DOSE CALCULATION - ATMOSPHERIC RELEASE PATHWAY The effective dose equivalent- vidualengagedinrecreationalfishinginthe Peconic River was based on a study done by the NewYork State Department of Health (NYSDOH 1996

  18. Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation of the liquid low-level waste tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be used during the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) RI/FS project to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. The ES&H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Energy Systems to direct and control implementation of the project ES&H program. This report describes the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES&H program to individual task remedial investigations, project facilities, and other major tasks assigned to the project.

  19. Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation of the liquid low-level waste tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    DeFalco, S.; Kaiser, L. L.; May, L. E.

    1991-09-01

    The Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be used during the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) RI/FS project to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. The ES H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Energy Systems to direct and control implementation of the project ES H program. This report describes the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES H program to individual task remedial investigations, project facilities, and other major tasks assigned to the project.

  20. Epidemiologic and laboratory research on the potential human health effects from exposure to power frequency electric and magnetic fields. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, A.R.

    1993-08-01

    The report presents consensus views on the potential health effects from exposure to power frequency (50/60 Hz) electric and magnetic fields (EMFs). It includes a summary of the epidemiologic studies that bear most heavily on questions of cancer and exposure to 50/60-Hz fields, and treats the most important information from laboratory research on biological questions relevant to possible health effects of field exposure. It compares electric and magnetic field influences in terms of some biophysical and physical considerations and gives some examples of typical field exposures to the public. Finally, it indicates current approaches to regulatory policy.

  1. Job Analysis Techniques for Restructuring Health Manpower Education and Training in the Navy Medical Department. Attachment 9. Laboratory QPCB Task Sort for Medical Laboratory Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technomics, Inc., McLean, VA.

    This publication is Attachment 9 of a set of 16 computer listed QPCB task sorts, by career level, for the entire Hospital Corps and Dental Technician fields. Statistical data are presented in tabular form for a detailed listing of job duties in medical laboratory technology. (BT)

  2. Radiological Habits Survey, Torness 2001

    E-print Network

    #12;Radiological Habits Survey, Torness 2001 The Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture........................................................................................... 7 1.3 Dose limits and constraints

  3. Work plan and health and safety plan for Building 3019B underground storage tank at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, S.N.; Brown, K.S.; Landguth, D.C.

    1992-08-01

    As part of the Underground Storage Tank Program at the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, this Health and Safety Plan has been developed for removal of the 110-gal leaded fuel underground storage tank (UST) located in the Building 3019B area at ORNL This Health and Safety Plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at ORNL The major components of the plan follow: (1) A project description that gives the scope and objectives of the 110-gal tank removal project and assigns responsibilities, in addition to providing emergency information for situations occurring during field operations; (2) a health and safety plan in Sect. 15 for the Building 3019B UST activities, which describes general site hazards and particular hazards associated with specific tasks, personnel protection requirements and mandatory safety procedures; and (3) discussion of the proper form completion and reporting requirements during removal of the UST. This document addresses Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements in 29 CFR 1910.120 with respect to all aspects of health and safety involved in a UST removal. In addition, the plan follows the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) QAMS 005/80 (1980) format with the inclusion of the health and safety section (Sect. 15).

  4. Work plan and health and safety plan for Building 3019B underground storage tank at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, S.N.; Brown, K.S.; Landguth, D.C.

    1992-08-01

    As part of the Underground Storage Tank Program at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, this Health and Safety Plan has been developed for removal of the 110-gal leaded fuel underground storage tank (UST) located in the Building 3019B area at ORNL This Health and Safety Plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at ORNL The major components of the plan follow: (1) A project description that gives the scope and objectives of the 110-gal tank removal project and assigns responsibilities, in addition to providing emergency information for situations occurring during field operations; (2) a health and safety plan in Sect. 15 for the Building 3019B UST activities, which describes general site hazards and particular hazards associated with specific tasks, personnel protection requirements and mandatory safety procedures; and (3) discussion of the proper form completion and reporting requirements during removal of the UST. This document addresses Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements in 29 CFR 1910.120 with respect to all aspects of health and safety involved in a UST removal. In addition, the plan follows the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) QAMS 005/80 (1980) format with the inclusion of the health and safety section (Sect. 15).

  5. Public participation in radiological surveillance.

    PubMed

    Hanf, R W; Schreckhise, R G; Patton, G W; Poston, T M; Jaquish, R E

    1997-10-01

    In 1989, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed a program, for the U.S. Department of Energy, to involve local citizens in environmental surveillance at the Hanford Site. The Community-Operated Environmental Surveillance Program was patterned after similar community-involvement efforts at the Nevada Test Site and the Three Mile Island nuclear facility. Its purpose is to increase the flow of information to the public, thereby enhancing the public's awareness and understanding of surveillance activities. The program consists of two components: radiological air monitoring at nine offsite locations and agricultural product sampling at selected locations near the site. At each air-monitoring station, two local school teachers collect air particulate samples and operate equipment to monitor ambient radiation levels. Atmospheric tritium samples (as water vapor) are also collected at some locations. Four of the air-monitoring stations include large, colorful informational displays for public viewing. These displays provide details on station equipment, sample types, and sampling purposes. Instruments in the displays also monitor, record, and show real-time ambient radiation readings (measured with a pressurized ionization chamber) and meteorological conditions. Agricultural products, grown primarily by middle-school-aged students, are obtained from areas downwind of the site. Following analysis of these samples, environmental surveillance staff visit the schools to discuss the results with the students and their teachers. The data collected by these air and agricultural sampling efforts are summarized with other routinely collected sitewide surveillance data and reported annually in the Hanford Site environmental report. PMID:9314235

  6. 1995 AUR Hartman Centennial Lecture. Academic radiology: time for action.

    PubMed

    Maynard, C D

    1995-12-01

    To summarize, the 10 actions I believe we should take are as follows: 1. Protect our patient base by institutional involvement and selected departmental outreach programs. 2. Reorganize our faculties and gain their support to meet the changes that will occur as a result of health care reengineering. 3. Restructure our residency and fellowship programs to adapt positively to the needs of a new delivery system. 4. Take a stand on resident/fellow training, accreditation issues, and program length and composition. 5. Develop a national program to continue to attract the best medical students into radiology. 6. Get the information needed to provide the best estimate of work force requirements and work toward achieving the proper balance between supply and demand. 7. Support subspecialization in our field. Quality eventually will be an issue. 8. Support research training for faculty and make research important. 9. Continue to present our field as an exciting place to be, which it is. 10. Support the AUR, the SCARD, and the APDR as the collective voice for academic radiology. Finally, I would like to challenge the AUR, the SCARD, and the APDR to unite to become a strong force in academic radiology. Academic radiology now has no singular voice. Radiologists in private practice have the ACR, neuroradiologists have the ASNR, vascular-interventional radiologists have the SCVIR, nuclear medicine radiologists have the Society of Nuclear Medicine, ultrasonographers have the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine, and I can name many other important special interest groups within our field. No doubt, all these organizations share many of our common concerns and interests, but having an organization interested solely in the continued health of academic radiology is vital to our future and, because of the reengineering of the health care system, more important than ever. Academic radiology is in the unique position of being radiology's only supplier of human resources and research. We must make our voice heard on staff issues, training program changes, accreditation, certification, financing of graduate education, support for biomedical research, and all other matters important to our academic programs. Although we will be drawn into the delivery of managed care, we cannot afford to ignore our other two principal missions: education and research. If we do, all of radiology will suffer the consequences in years to come. So let's take up the challenge and make our three organizations a steady, consistent, rational but firm voice in the support of academic radiology. I believe that the future of radiology is bright, but we need to make it happen. Now is the time for action. Thank you for the invitation to present the Glen W. Hartman lecture. It is truly a great honor. PMID:9419689

  7. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Analytical Response

    SciTech Connect

    E.C. Nielsen

    2003-04-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local government s, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FRMAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant from the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. This paper addresses emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FRMAC operations.

  8. Smart Radiological Dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Kosslow, William J.; Bandzuch, Gregory S.

    2004-07-20

    A radiation dosimeter providing an indication of the dose of radiation to which the radiation sensor has been exposed. The dosimeter contains features enabling the monitoring and evaluating of radiological risks so that a user can concentrate on the task at hand. The dosimeter provides an audible alarm indication that a predetermined time period has elapsed, an audible alarm indication reminding the user to check the dosimeter indication periodically, an audible alarm indicating that a predetermined accumulated dose has been prematurely reached, and an audible alarm indication prior or to reaching the 3/4 scale point.

  9. Radiology of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Freeny, P C

    1992-06-01

    The techniques and applications of pancreatic imaging and interventional pancreatic radiology continued to expand in 1991. The most notable progress was the use of MR imaging for evaluation of the pancreas, particularly the investigation of contrast agents to produce enhancement of the pancreatic parenchyma. These agents offer considerable promise for the future of pancreatic MR imaging. The use of CT for detection and evaluation of complications of pancreatitis continued to grow and new investigations appeared that attempted to define the role of surgery vis-à-vis percutaneous and endoscopic interventional techniques. Finally, further understanding of cystic pancreatic neoplasms developed as the result of new investigations. PMID:1581134

  10. Small bowel radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Antes, G.; Eggemann, F.

    1987-01-01

    This book deals mainly with technique, experiences and results of the biphasic small bowel enema (enteroclysis) with barium and methyl cellulose. The method allows the evaluation of both morphology and function of the small bowel. The introduction describes the examination technique, basic patterns, interpretation and indications, while the atlas shows a broad spectrum of small bowel diseases (Crohn's disease, other inflammatory diseases, tumors, motility disorders, obstructions and malformations). The possibilities of small bowel radiology are demonstrated with reference to clinical findings and differential diagnoses.

  11. The Radiological Research Accelerator THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY

    E-print Network

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility #12;84 THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR transformation of an immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEP2D) using single doses of 150 keV/µm 4 made using single doses (0.6 Gy) of 5.9-MeV neutrons given at various intervals after mitotic shake

  12. Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Radiation Therapy (with AAS Radiologic Technology)

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Radiation Therapy (with AAS Radiologic Technology Social Sciences and domestic diversity; see note 1 US 10097 Destination Kent State: First Year Experience note 1; See Kent Core Summary Semester One: [15 Credit Hours] COMM 15000 Introduction to Human

  13. Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Radiation Therapy (with AAS Radiologic Technology)

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Radiation Therapy (with AAS Radiologic Technology Experience 1 Not required of transfer students with 25 credits; see note 1 Kent Core Requirements 6-8 See note 1; See Kent Core Summary Semester One: [18 Credit Hours] COMM 15000 Introduction to Human

  14. Best practice techniques for environmental radiological monitoring

    E-print Network

    Best practice techniques for environmental radiological monitoring Science Report ­ SC030308/SR SCHO0407BMNL-E-P #12;ii Science Report Best Practice Techniques for Environmental Radiological. S Dissemination Status: Publicly available Keywords: Radiological monitoring, Best Practice, Standards, Guidelines

  15. Reproduction of radiologic images on plain paper.

    PubMed

    Ibbott, G S; Zhang, Y; Mohiuddin, M; Adams, E

    1998-01-01

    Skyrocketing health care costs and pressures from managed care have combined to promote cost-cutting strategies in radiology and radiation oncology departments. A study was conducted to evaluate the use of a high-resolution laser printer for printing plain-paper images as substitutes for both original and duplicate radiologic film images. A variety of radiologic images were used to evaluate the image reproduction capabilities of the printer in terms of linearity, detail, and contrast. In many cases, printed images had a quality comparable to that of the original images. Six computed tomographic (CT) scans and six radiation therapy simulator radiographs were compared with printed reproductions by each of seven board-certified radiation oncologists, who rated the reproductions as acceptable for documentation, acceptable for diagnostic purposes (CT scans only), or unacceptable. Ninety-five percent of printed CT images and 90% of printed simulation images were rated acceptable for documentation. The quality of printed images of radiation therapy port films was not quantitatively measured but was improved by adjusting image contrast and brightness and using various image enhancement techniques. The use of printed images is less expensive than that of processed film and eliminates the environmental, time, storage, and delivery problems associated with film. Technologic advances in imaging, networking, and printing have made possible the inexpensive duplication of medical images. PMID:9599396

  16. 24.01.01.V1.05 RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY Supplements System Policy 24.01 and System Regulation 24.01.01

    E-print Network

    24.01.01.V1.05 RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY Supplements System Policy 24.01 and System Regulation 24.01.01 1 safe operating procedures and to avoid radiological accidents by developing adequate controls devices must obtain a permit from Radiological Safety of the Environmental Health and Safety Department

  17. Prepare Your School for Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Threats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sechena, Ruth

    2005-01-01

    Recent accidents highlight that chemical, biological, and radiological (CBR) agent exposure risk isn't just about terrorism. In this article, the author, a parent and public health physician, wrestles with the fact that total protection from CBRs is probably not feasible in her son's or in the majority of American schools. Capital investments, for…

  18. Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services Annual Report for 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Timothy P.; Bihl, Donald E.; Johnson, Michelle L.; Maclellan, Jay A.; Piper, Roman K.

    2001-05-07

    During calendar year 2000, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed its customary radiological protection support services in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and the Hanford contractors. These services included: 1) external dosimetry, 2) internal dosimetry, 3) in vivo monitoring, 4) radiological records, 5) instrument calibration and evaluation, and 6) calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Each program summary describes the routine operations, program changes and improvements, program assessments, supporting technical studies, and professional activities.

  19. Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services Annual Report for 1998

    SciTech Connect

    DE Bihl; JA MacLellan; ML Johnson; RK Piper; TP Lynch

    1999-05-14

    During calendar year (CY) 1998, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed its customary radiological protection support services in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations OffIce (RL) and the Hanford contractors. These services included: 1) external dosimetry, 2) internal dosimetry, 3) in vivo measurements, 4) radiological records, 5) instrument calibra- tion and evaluation, and 6) calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (MST). The services were provided under a number of projects as summarized here.

  20. Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Revision 1, Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, C. M.; El-Messidi, O. E.; Cowser, D. K.; Kannard, J. R.; Carvin, R. T.; Will, III, A. S.; Clark, Jr., C.; Garland, S. B.

    1993-05-01

    This Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be followed during the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. This ES&H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) to direct and control implementation of the project ES&H program. The subsections that follow describe the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES&H program to individual waste area grouping (WAG) remedial investigations. Hazardous work permits (HWPs) will be used to provide task-specific health and safety requirements.

  1. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY

    E-print Network

    THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY #12;115 THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATORV/µm using the track segment facility. Cells were treated with graded doses of NNK, a tobacco-specific nitrosamine, or arsenite and given a single particle dose of 0.25 Gy. The mutation rate at the S1 locus

  2. Academic Radiology in the New Healthcare Delivery Environment

    PubMed Central

    Qayyum, Aliya; Yu, John-Paul J.; Kansagra, Akash P.; von Fischer, Nathaniel; Costa, Daniel; Heller, Matthew; Kantartzis, Stamatis; Plowman, R. Scooter; Itri, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing concerns over the rising cost of health care are driving large-scale changes in the way that health care is practiced and reimbursed in the United States. To effectively implement and thrive within this new health care delivery environment, academic medical institutions will need to modify financial and business models and adapt institutional cultures. In this paper, we review the expected features of the new health care environment from the perspective of academic radiology departments. Our review will include background on Accountable Care Organizations, identify challenges associated with the new managed care model, and outline key strategies—including expanding the use of existing information technology infrastructure, promoting continued medical innovation, balancing academic research with clinical care, and exploring new roles for radiologists in efficient patient management—that will ensure continued success for academic radiology. PMID:24200477

  3. The yearbook of diagnostic radiology. 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains seven selections. They are: Neuroradiology; Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; The Thorax; The Abdomen; The Musculoskeletal System; Pediatric Radiology; and Radiation Physics.

  4. CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENTIST: GENETICS HAMILTON REGIONAL LABORATORY MEDICINE PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Michael

    CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENTIST: GENETICS HAMILTON REGIONAL LABORATORY MEDICINE PROGRAM AND MCMASTER in providing professional expertise for a large program serving the Central South region of Ontario Regional Laboratory Medicine Program (jointly administered by Hamilton Health Sciences and the St. Joseph

  5. Good Practice Recommendations in the Field of Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning for Health Related Research Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laboratory Design Notes, 1966

    1966-01-01

    A collection of laboratory design notes to set forth minimum criteria required in the design of basic medical research laboratory buildings. Recommendations contained are primarily concerned with features of design which affect quality of performance and future flexibility of facility systems. Subjects of economy and safety are discussed where…

  6. SearchHome Video News Images Health Education Topics Blogs Mobile Space Science Technology Health General Sci-Fi & Gaming Oddities International Business Education Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity

    E-print Network

    Nieh, James

    SearchHome Video News Images Health Education Topics Blogs Mobile Space Science Technology Health Intruders That A Food Source Will Be Defended July 8, 2014 5 Image Credit: matsilvan/Thinkstock.com [ Watch? This is the situation bees find themselves in quite often. Scientists believe that many animals, faced

  7. The quality movement or making radiology fun again.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, C Craig

    2015-08-01

    Quality can be seen as the link between what we do as radiologists and patient health. The radiology quality movement represents an opportunity for radiologists to have more direct influence on patient health, including the quality domains of safety, effectiveness, patient centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, and equitability. Focusing on quality allows emergency radiologists to extend outside of the confines of the reading room, thereby enhancing a rewarding and clinically relevant practice. PMID:25673290

  8. Revised 02/03/2012 _____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety _________ __________________

    E-print Network

    Eisen, Michael

    Revised 02/03/2012 _____________________________ Environment, Health, & Safety _________ __________________ Training Program EHS0473­ Radiological Worker II Course Syllabus Subject Category: Radiation Protection prior to commencing work in a CA, HCA, ARA, or HRA under any Radiological Work Authorization (RWA

  9. Radiology and the mobile device: Radiology in motion

    PubMed Central

    Panughpath, Sridhar G; Kalyanpur, Arjun

    2012-01-01

    The use of mobile devices is revolutionizing the way we communicate, interact, are entertained, and organize our lives. With healthcare in general and radiology in particular becoming increasingly digital, the use of such devices in radiologic practice is inevitable. This article reviews the current status of the use of mobile devices in the clinical practice of radiology, namely in emergency teleradiology. Technical parameters such as luminance and resolution are discussed. The article also discusses the benefits of such mobility vis-à-vis the current limitations of the technologies available. PMID:23833412

  10. [Digital library for archiving files of radiology and medical imaging].

    PubMed

    Duvauferrier, R; Rambeau, M; Moulène, F

    1993-01-01

    The Conseil des Enseignants de Radiologie de France in collaboration with the Ilab-TSI company and Schering laboratories has developed a computer programme allowing the storage and consultation of radiological teaching files. This programme, developed on Macintosh from standard Hypercard and Quicktime applications, allows, in consultation mode, the multicriteria search and visualisation of selected radiological files. In the author mode, new files can be included after digitalizing the author's own images or after obtaining images from another image library. This programme, which allows juxtaposition of digitalised radiological files, is designed to be extremely open and can be easily combined with other computer-assisted teaching or computer-assisted presentation applications. PMID:7509583

  11. Risk management in radiology departments.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Horea; Mankad, Kshitij; Lynch, Jeremy

    2015-06-28

    Medical imaging and interventional radiology sustained prompt changes in the last few years, mainly as a result of technology breakthroughs, rise in workload, deficit in workforce and globalization. Risk is considered to be the chance or possibility of incurring loss or of a negative event happening that may cause injury to patients or medical practitioners. There are various causes of risks leading to harm and injury in radiology departments, and it is one of the objectives of this paper to scrutinize some of the causes. This will drive to consideration of some of the approaches that are used in managing risks in radiology. This paper aims at investigating risk management in radiology, and this will be achieved through a thorough assessment of the risk control measures that are used in the radiology department. It has been observed that the major focus of risk management in such medical setting is to reduce and eliminate harm and injury to patients through integration of various medical precautions. The field of Radiology is rapidly evolving due to technology advances and the globalization of healthcare. This ongoing development will have a great impact on the level of quality of care and service delivery. Thus, risk management in radiology is essential in protecting the patients, radiologists, and the medical organization in terms of capital and widening of the reputation of the medical organization with the patients. PMID:26120383

  12. RADRELAY RADIOLOGICAL DATA LINK DEVICE

    SciTech Connect

    Harpring, L; Frank Heckendorn, F

    2007-11-06

    The RadRelay effort developed small, field appropriate, portable prototype devices that allow radiological spectra to be downloaded from field radiological detectors, like the identiFINDER-U, and transmitted to land based experts. This communications capability was designed for the U. S. Coast Guard (USCG) but is also applicable to the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) personnel working in remote locations. USCG Level II personnel currently use the identiFINDER-U Hand-Held Radioisotope ID Devices (HHRIID) to detect radiological materials during specific boarding operations. These devices will detect not only radiological emissions but will also evaluate those emissions against a table of known radiological spectra. The RadRelay has been developed to significantly improve the functionality of HHRIID, by providing the capability to download radiological spectra and then transmit them using satellite or cell phone technology. This remote wireless data transfer reduces the current lengthy delay often encountered between the shipboard detection of unknown radiological material and the evaluation of that data by technical and command personnel. That delay is reduced from hours to minutes and allows the field located personnel to remain on station during the inspection and evaluation process.

  13. Risk management in radiology departments

    PubMed Central

    Craciun, Horea; Mankad, Kshitij; Lynch, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging and interventional radiology sustained prompt changes in the last few years, mainly as a result of technology breakthroughs, rise in workload, deficit in workforce and globalization. Risk is considered to be the chance or possibility of incurring loss or of a negative event happening that may cause injury to patients or medical practitioners. There are various causes of risks leading to harm and injury in radiology departments, and it is one of the objectives of this paper to scrutinize some of the causes. This will drive to consideration of some of the approaches that are used in managing risks in radiology. This paper aims at investigating risk management in radiology, and this will be achieved through a thorough assessment of the risk control measures that are used in the radiology department. It has been observed that the major focus of risk management in such medical setting is to reduce and eliminate harm and injury to patients through integration of various medical precautions. The field of Radiology is rapidly evolving due to technology advances and the globalization of healthcare. This ongoing development will have a great impact on the level of quality of care and service delivery. Thus, risk management in radiology is essential in protecting the patients, radiologists, and the medical organization in terms of capital and widening of the reputation of the medical organization with the patients. PMID:26120383

  14. Environmental health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Burman, S.N.; Tiner, P.F.; Gosslee, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environmental protection and safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air.

  15. HAZWOPER work plan and site safety and health plan for the Alpha characterization project at the solid waste storage area 4 bathtubbing trench at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This work plan/site safety and health plan is for the alpha sampling project at the Solid Waste Storage Area 4 bathtubbing trench. The work will be conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Sciences Division and associated ORNL environmental, safety, and health support groups. This activity will fall under the scope of 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER). The purpose of this document is to establish health and safety guidelines to be followed by all personnel involved in conducting work for this project. Work will be conducted in accordance with requirements as stipulated in the ORNL HAZWOPER Program Manual and applicable ORNL; Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc.; and U.S. Department of Energy policies and procedures. The levels of protection and the procedures specified in this plan are based on the best information available from historical data and preliminary evaluations of the area. Therefore, these recommendations represent the minimum health and safety requirements to be observed by all personnel engaged in this project. Unforeseeable site conditions or changes in scope of work may warrant a reassessment of the stated protection levels and controls. All adjustments to the plan must have prior approval by the safety and health disciplines signing the original plan.

  16. National Center for Environmental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Environmental Public Health Tracking Network Radiation Studies Laboratory Sciences Biomonitoring Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals Laboratory Quality Assurance Newborn Screening Laboratory Bulletin Nutritional Indicators Research (e. ...

  17. Associate Principal Biostatistician Positions at Merck Research Laboratories Merck & Co Inc is a global health care leader with a diversified portfolio of prescription medicines, vaccines and consumer health

    E-print Network

    Carriquiry, Alicia

    is a global health care leader with a diversified portfolio of prescription medicines, vaccines and consumer leadership and support for related drug/vaccine projects in late development statistics. This position

  18. Toward Best Practices in Radiology Reporting1

    E-print Network

    Rubin, Daniel L.

    Toward Best Practices in Radiology Reporting1 CharlesE.Kahn,Jr,MD,MS CurtisL.Rubin,MD,MS The goals and current efforts of the Radiological Society of North America Radiology Reporting Committee, readability, and use- fulness of the radiology report and to advance the effi- ciency and effectiveness

  19. Informatics in radiology: RadiologyWiki.org: the free radiology resource that anyone can edit.

    PubMed

    Streeter, Jonathan L; Lu, Michael T; Rybicki, Frank J

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in online collaborative technologies such as Wikipedia (www.wikipedia.org) have demonstrated the potential usefulness of an online reference resource produced as the collective effort of many users. Although this type of resource has enjoyed success in the public arena, however, its value remains unproved in the academic community. RadiologyWiki (www.RadiologyWiki.org) was created to apply the technology and methods of collaborative authorship to create a dynamic online radiology educational resource. The World Wide Web site capitalizes on the core technology of Wikipedia, allowing individuals with little technical experience to easily create, categorize, and search for articles by using a standard Web browser. RadiologyWiki shows promise for applications in the field of radiology, although issues pertaining to copyright, peer review, and academic motivation must be overcome if it is to make a meaningful contribution in this context. Nevertheless, it is hoped that RadiologyWiki will develop into a free, simple, and rapid collaborative authorship tool for communication and education in radiology. PMID:17620476

  20. The IR Radlex Project: An Interventional Radiology Lexicon--A Collaborative Project of the Radiological

    E-print Network

    Rubin, Daniel L.

    The IR Radlex Project: An Interventional Radiology Lexicon--A Collaborative Project of the Radiological Society of North America and the Society of Interventional Radiology Sanjoy Kundu, MD, FRCPC:xxx Abbreviations: ACR American College of Radiology, RSNA Radiological Society of North America AS images, imaging

  1. Common Interventional Radiology Procedures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... catheters Vertebroplasty Women and vascular disease Women's health Social Media Facebook Twitter (SIRspecialists) YouTube RSS Feeds Radiation Safety ... Talking People Are Talking: Know Your Treatment Options! Social Media Connect With SIR Vision to Heal: SIR Blog ...

  2. The General Electric-Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Academic Fellowship (GERRAF). An industry-academic collaboration to improve clinical research in radiology.

    PubMed

    Hillman, B J; Fryback, D G; Holden, R W; McNeil, B J; Molitor, R M; Moss, A A; Peck, P V; Putman, C E; Thompson, W M

    1993-05-01

    The association of GE Medical Systems and the AUR represents a unique collaboration between academic radiology and industry that bears important potential for elevating the quality of clinical research in radiology and developing a cadre of high-quality radiologist researchers for the future. The establishment of the GERRAF is especially timely given the new imperatives of the rapidly changing health care environment, with its emphasis on expenditure reduction. The ultimate goals of GERRAF are to develop research leaders for radiology that will provide guidance for appropriate clinical practice, better train future researchers, and secure the role of radiologists in caring for patients. PMID:8496030

  3. Medical-legal issues in radiology: prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Potchen, E J; Potchen, J E; Bishop, L R; Snyder, K A

    1995-01-01

    Concerns about legal implications affect many decisions of the average radiologist, and physicians do not always appreciate the validity of these concerns. However, such concerns often influence radiologists' decisions more than is warranted. An improved understanding of the law and its ramifications may serve to prevent adverse legal effects found in the everyday practice of radiology. Legal issues influence radiology in many ways. Two important ways the law affects the practice of radiology relate to the business affairs of radiologists and to the radiologist's duty to perform to a standard of care. Legal issues relate to the business aspects of radiology through radiologists' relationship to their group practice and the radiology group's relation to the outside world. Radiology groups use legal services for issues such as employment contracts, hospital privileges, group relations, and bylaws. They make decisions with major legal implications when they establish their standard business practices. These decisions range from business procedures that ensure a timely delivery of service to the choice and implementation of quality assurance systems to how to ensure that patients are informed of the results of a radiologic examination. Legal matters affect many business decisions radiology groups make. Antitrust law is concerned about issues such as cost sharing, price sharing, mergers, acquisitions, and practice patterns. Laws limit the right to practice radiology. Billing practices, conflicts of interest, self-referral, right to refuse care, employment practices--all have substantial legal implications. These issues are a concern of every practicing radiologist. Changes in our health care system may cause new legal obligations. An appreciation of the relationship radiologists must have with payors and patients is increasingly important in preventing medical-legal problems. These additional duties and responsibilities occur when many physicians and the public at large seem to feel they are already overburdened with legal duties and responsibilities. A lack of familiarity with the legitimate relationship of the law to everyday life may greatly affect radiologists' job satisfaction. Many acts physicians perform in the practice of radiology have legal implications not often recognized by the practicing radiologist. This monograph seeks to enhance radiologists' understanding of some common and important legal issues related to their practice of medicine. We hope that this monograph will help radiologists appreciate the legal implications of their behavior. The opinions expressed in this monograph are those of the authors and should not be inferred to represent the official views of any government agency.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:7664570

  4. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1980 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental assessment, control, health and safety

    SciTech Connect

    Baalman, R.W.; Hays, I.D. (eds.)

    1981-02-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) 1980 annual report to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment describes research in environment, health, and safety conducted during fiscal year 1980. Part 5 includes technology assessments for natural gas, enhanced oil recovery, oil shale, uranium mining, magnetic fusion energy, solar energy, uranium enrichment and industrial energy utilization; regional analysis studies of environmental transport and community impacts; environmental and safety engineering for LNG, oil spills, LPG, shale oil waste waters, geothermal liquid waste disposal, compressed air energy storage, and nuclear/fusion fuel cycles; operational and environmental safety studies of decommissioning, environmental monitoring, personnel dosimetry, and analysis of criticality safety; health physics studies; and epidemiological studies. Also included are an author index, organization of PNL charts and distribution lists of the annual report, along with lists of presentations and publications. (DLS)

  5. School Science Laboratories. A Guide to Some Hazardous Substances. A Supplement to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Manual of Safety and Health Hazards in the School Science Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of State Science Supervisors, Washington, DC.

    The purpose of this document is to identify potentially hazardous substances that may be in use in many school laboratories and to provide an inventory of these substances so that science teachers may take the initiative in providing for the proper storage, handling, use, and if warranted, removal of hazardous materials. The document consists of…

  6. Radiological training for tritium facilities

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  7. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

  8. Radiological Features of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Samir; Shukla, Akash; Paunipagar, Bhawan

    2014-01-01

    Present article is a review of radiological features of hepatocellular carcinoma on various imaging modalities. With the advancement in imaging techniques, biopsy is rarely needed for diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), unlike other malignancies. Imaging is useful not only for diagnosis but also for surveillance, therapy and assessing response to treatment. The classical and the atypical radiological features of HCC have been described. PMID:25755613

  9. Interactive, Computer-Based Training Program for Radiological Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Trinoskey, P.A.; Camacho, P.I.; Wells, L.

    2000-01-18

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is redesigning its Computer-Based Training (CBT) program for radiological workers. The redesign represents a major effort to produce a single, highly interactive and flexible CBT program that will meet the training needs of a wide range of radiological workers--from researchers and x-ray operators to individuals working in tritium, uranium, plutonium, and accelerator facilities. The new CBT program addresses the broad diversity of backgrounds found at a national laboratory. When a training audience is homogeneous in terms of education level and type of work performed, it is difficult to duplicate the effectiveness of a flexible, technically competent instructor who can tailor a course to the express needs and concerns of a course's participants. Unfortunately, such homogeneity is rare. At LLNL, they have a diverse workforce engaged in a wide range of radiological activities, from the fairly common to the quite exotic. As a result, the Laboratory must offer a wide variety of radiological worker courses. These include a general contamination-control course in addition to radioactive-material-handling courses for both low-level laboratory (i.e., bench-top) activities as well as high-level work in tritium, uranium, and plutonium facilities. They also offer training courses for employees who work with radiation-generating devices--x-ray, accelerator, and E-beam operators, for instance. However, even with the number and variety of courses the Laboratory offers, they are constrained by the diversity of backgrounds (i.e., knowledge and experience) of those to be trained. Moreover, time constraints often preclude in-depth coverage of site- and/or task-specific details. In response to this situation, several years ago LLNL began moving toward computer-based training for radiological workers. Today, that CBT effort includes a general radiological safety course developed by the Department of Energy's Hanford facility and a contamination-control program developed by LLNL. A comprehensive study guide and a post-training practical exam supplement the CBT effort. The ''hands-on'' practical is particularly important in that it gives participants not only the opportunity to demonstrate what they've learned, but to ask questions about their individual work situations. The challenge is how to make the CBT program more facility- and task-specific while, at the same time, making the program more in tune with the education and/or experience levels of individual trainees. To that end, they have designed a CBT program, which they refer to as an ''onion''. That is, the course is layered, going from the general to the more and more specific.

  10. Medical toxicology and public health—update on research and activities at the centers for disease control and prevention, and the agency for toxic substances and disease registry: Introduction to the Laboratory Response Network-Chemical (LRN-C)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carl Skinner; Jerry Thomas; Rudolph Johnson; Robert Kobelski

    2009-01-01

    Summary  Medical toxicologists and PCCs should understand the operation of local, state, and federal public health infrastructure;\\u000a the capabilities of laboratories used; and recognize their own roles as a vital component of public health response. Phone\\u000a numbers for local health departments should be readily available in EDs and PCCs. PCC staff should also be aware of the LRN-C\\u000a and its sampling

  11. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

  12. 2000 RSNA annual oration in diagnostic radiology: The future of interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Becker, G J

    2001-08-01

    Origins in imaging, procedural emphasis, and dependence on innovation characterize interventional radiology, which will continue as the field of image-guided minimally invasive therapies. A steady supply of innovators will be needed. Current workforce shortages demand that this problem be addressed and in an ongoing fashion. Interventional radiology's major identity problem will require multiple corrective measures, including a name change. Diagnostic radiologists must fully embrace the concept of the dedicated interventionalist. Interspecialty turf battles will continue, especially with cardiologists and vascular surgeons. To advance the discipline, interventional radiologists must remain involved in cutting-edge therapies such as endograft repair of aortic aneurysms and carotid stent placement. As the population ages, interventionalists will experience a shift toward a greater emphasis on cancer treatment. Political agendas and public pressure will improve access to care and result in managed health care reforms. Academic centers will continue to witness a decline in time and resources available to pursue academic missions. The public outcry for accountability will result in systems changes aimed at reducing errors and process changes in the way physicians are trained, certified, and monitored. Evidence-based medicine will be the watchword of this century. Interventional radiology will maintain its role through development of methods for delivery of genes, gene products, and drugs to specific target sites; control of angiogenesis and other biologic processes; and noninvasive image-guided delivery of various forms of energy for ablation. PMID:11477226

  13. Good Laboratory Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjicostas, Evsevios

    The principles of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) in conjunction with the principles of Total Quality Management (see chapter 6) ensure the quality and reliability of the laboratory results, which in turn help to ensure the protection of the environment and human health and safety. A step further is the accreditation of laboratories to ISO 17025 (see chapter 2) to perform specified activities.

  14. Malignant melanoma in the Kaiser Foundation health plan of northern California: a comparison of incidence and measures of health care utilization between the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and surrounding health plan groups

    SciTech Connect

    Hiatt, R.A.; Fireman, B.

    1984-02-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that the increased incidence of malignant melanoma at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was due to a difference in the medical care received by LLNL employees compared to nonLLNL residents of the same geographic area. Utilizing records of the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan (KFHP) to which about half of the LLNL employees belong, we confirmed that the incidence of melanoma at LLNL was about three times that in the surrounding community (62.4/100,000 vs 20.9/100,000 in the members served by the Walnut Creek KFHP facility, p = 0.040. Furthermore, rates of biopsy for junctional, compound and dermal nevi were also higher among LLNL employees than the Walnut Creek membership. The melanoma rate among LLNL spouses was close to that of the employees themselves, but was based on only six cases. Rates among employees of the University of California at Davis, a group likely to be similar to LLNL employees in academic background and sun exposure, were not elevated compared to overall KFHP rates. In a comparison between LLNL employees without melanoma and comparable controls in the Walnut Creek membership, there was no clear difference in the number of visits for skin problems. However, LLNL employees had substantially more skin biopsies than the controls. After 1976 when the excess of melanoma at LLNL first received publicity, the difference in the mean number of biopsies was significantly greater (p = 0.048). We conclude that the sustained increase in melanoma incidence at LLNL is associated with an increased likelihood of being biopsied for pigmented skin lesions. This association may be because physicians caring for LLNL employees are more concerned about the potential malignancy of pigmented lesions.

  15. Use of a CO{sub 2} pellet non-destructive cleaning system to decontaminate radiological waste and equipment in shielded hot cells at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, T.R.

    1997-05-01

    This paper details how the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory modified and utilized a commercially available, solid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) pellet, non-destructive cleaning system to support the disposition and disposal of radioactive waste from shielded hot cells. Some waste materials and equipment accumulated in the shielded hot cells cannot be disposed directly because they are contaminated with transuranic materials (elements with atomic numbers greater than that of uranium) above waste disposal site regulatory limits. A commercially available CO{sub 2} pellet non-destructive cleaning system was extensively modified for remote operation inside a shielded hot cell to remove the transuranic contaminants from the waste and equipment without generating any secondary waste in the process. The removed transuranic contaminants are simultaneously captured, consolidated, and retained for later disposal at a transuranic waste facility.

  16. Radiological Control Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noblin, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Objectives of the manual are to (1) ensure compliance with requirements of AEC and governmental health agencies, (2) ensure against excessive and unnecessary exposure of personnel to harmful radiation, and (3) prevent contamination of equipment, materials, and environment with radioactive materials.

  17. A statistical dynamics approach to the study of human health data: Resolving population scale diurnal variation in laboratory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, D. J.; Hripcsak, George

    2010-02-01

    Statistical physics and information theory is applied to the clinical chemistry measurements present in a patient database containing 2.5 million patients' data over a 20-year period. Despite the seemingly naive approach of aggregating all patients over all times (with respect to particular clinical chemistry measurements), both a diurnal signal in the decay of the time-delayed mutual information and the presence of two sub-populations with differing health are detected. This provides a proof in principle that the highly fragmented data in electronic health records has potential for being useful in defining disease and human phenotypes.

  18. Development of e-Juba, a preliminary proof of concept unmanned aerial vehicle designed to facilitate the transportation of microbiological test samples from remote rural clinics to National Health Laboratory Service laboratories.

    PubMed

    Mendelow, B; Muir, P; Boshielo, B T; Robertson, J

    2007-11-01

    For students and academics within the field of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, it is readily apparent what an enormous professional contribution Professor Hendrik Koornhof has made to this critically important specialty, not only in Africa, but worldwide. For those outside of the specialty, his contributions as a thoroughly decent person and role model are no less evident. What emerges in both spheres is his clear commitment to the welfare of others, as opposed to himself. His modesty and self-effacing nature have endeared Hendrik to many generations of students, peers and others who have indeed been privileged to have benefited from knowing him and working with him. In his 50 years with the South African Institute for Medical Research, and subsequently with the National Health Laboratory Service, Hendrik Koornhof has been the ideal academic, who is not as concerned about receiving financial rewards, recognition, etc. as about contributing to scientific knowledge. Many of his contributions have been in guiding others by his words and his deeds, and as a result he has been rewarded in seeing the accomplishments of his students, many of whom have gone on to achieve greatness in diverse fields, both locally and abroad. As we reflect in this festschrift on Hendrik's many achievements over 80 years, we thank him for more than just his research and teaching contributions over half a century with the South African Institute for Medical Research and the National Health Laboratory Service. We thank him for showing us what a privilege it is to work in the world of academia. Although we are not microbiologists, we thank him for having inspired us with the will to address problems of service delivery in the fight against microbiological diseases, which constitute the overwhelming bulk of the burden of disease in the developing world, both in Africa and further afield. PMID:18250941

  19. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. E. McKone; K. P. Brand; C. Shan

    1997-01-01

    This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the

  20. Radiological Work Planning and Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    KURTZ, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Each facility is tasked with maintaining personnel radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). A continued effort is required to meet this goal by developing and implementing improvements to technical work documents (TWDs) and work performance. A review of selected TWDs from most facilities shows there is a need to incorporate more radiological control requirements into the TWD. The Radioactive Work Permit (RWP) provides a mechanism to place some of the requirements but does not provide all the information needed by the worker as he/she is accomplishing the steps of the TWD. Requiring the engineers, planners and procedure writers to put the radiological control requirements in the work steps would be very easy if all personnel had a strong background in radiological work planning and radiological controls. Unfortunately, many of these personnel do not have the background necessary to include these requirements without assistance by the Radiological Control organization at each facility. In addition, there seems to be confusion as to what should be and what should not be included in the TWD.

  1. DRAFT - Design of Radiological Survey and Sampling to Support Title Transfer or Lease of Property on the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Cusick L.T.

    2002-09-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns, operates, and manages the buildings and land areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. As land and buildings are declared excess or underutilized, it is the intent of DOE to either transfer the title of or lease suitable property to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET) or other entities for public use. It is DOE's responsibility, in coordination with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 4, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), to ensure that the land, facilities, and personal property that are to have the title transferred or are to be leased are suitable for public use. Release of personal property must also meet site requirements and be approved by the DOE contractor responsible for site radiological control. The terms title transfer and lease in this document have unique meanings. Title transfer will result in release of ownership without any restriction or further control by DOE. Under lease conditions, the government retains ownership of the property along with the responsibility to oversee property utilization. This includes involvement in the lessee's health, safety, and radiological control plans and conduct of site inspections. It may also entail lease restrictions, such as limiting access to certain areas or prohibiting digging, drilling, or disturbing material under surface coatings. Survey and sampling requirements are generally more rigorous for title transfer than for lease. Because of the accelerated clean up process, there is an increasing emphasis on title transfers of facilities and land. The purpose of this document is to describe the radiological survey and sampling protocols that are being used for assessing the radiological conditions and characteristics of building and land areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation that contain space potentially available for title transfer or lease. After necessary surveys and sampling and laboratory analyses are completed, the data are analyzed and included in an Environmental Baseline Summary (EBS) report for title transfer or in a Baseline Environmental Analysis Report (BEAR) for lease. The data from the BEAR is then used in a Screening-Level Human Health Risk Assessment (SHHRA) or a risk calculation (RC) to assess the potential risks to future owners/occupants. If title is to be transferred, release criteria in the form of specific activity concentrations called Derived Concentration Guideline Levels (DCGLs) will be developed for the each property. The DCGLs are based on the risk model and are used with the data in the EBS to determine, with statistical confidence, that the release criteria for the property have been met. The goal of the survey and sampling efforts is to (1) document the baseline conditions of the property (real or personal) prior to title transfer or lease, (2) obtain enough information that an evaluation of radiological risks can be made, and (3) collect sufftcient data so that areas that contain minimal residual levels of radioactivity can be identified and, following radiological control procedures, be released from radiological control. (It should be noted that release from radiological control does not necessarily mean free release because DOE may maintain institutional control of the site after it is released from radiological control). To meet the goals of this document, a Data Quality Objective (DQO) process will be used to enhance data collection efficiency and assist with decision-making. The steps of the DQO process involve stating the problem, identifying the decision, identifying inputs to the decision, developing study boundaries, developing the decision rule, and optimizing the design. This document describes the DQOs chosen for surveys and sampling efforts performed for the purposes listed above. The previous version to this document focused on the requirements for radiological survey and sampling protocols that are be used for leasing. Because the primary focus at this time is on title transfer, th

  2. Public health assessment for Jet Propulsion Laboratory (NASA), Pasadena, Los Angeles County, California, Region 9: CERCLIS number CA9800013030. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1999-08-05

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is located in Pasadena, California, northeast of Interstate 210. As a result of former site activities, chemicals, primarily volatile organic compounds (VOC) and perchlorate (a component of solid rocket fuel), used at JPL have been released to soil and groundwater. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) conducted site visits in 1997 to assess the potential for public health hazards. During these visits, ATSDR identified two pathways where people could potentially be exposed to site-related contaminants: (1) exposure to contaminated groundwater and (2) exposure to contaminated soil. ATSDR also identified the following primary community concerns: (1) future groundwater and drinking water quality and (2) increased incidence of Hodgkin`s disease. ATSDR determined that VOC-contaminated groundwater does not present a past, present, or future public health to JPL employees or nearby residents. ATSDR also determined that exposure, if any, to contaminated soils associated with the JPL site and in the Arroyo Secco near the JPL boundary is unlikely to cause either short-term or long-term adverse health effects to employees and the public.

  3. Health and safety plan for the Remedial Investigation and Site Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Cofer, G.H.; Holt, V.L.; Roupe, G.W.

    1993-11-01

    This health and safety plan (HASP) was developed by the members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health Science Research Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This plan was prepared to ensure that health and safety related items for the Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 Remedial Investigation (RI)/Feasibility Study and Site Investigation projects conform with the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.120 (April 18, 1992). The RI Plan calls for the characterization, monitoring, risk assessment, and identification of remedial needs and alternatives that have been structured and staged with short-term and long-term objectives. In early FY 1992, the WAG 2 RI was integrated with the ORNL Environmental Restoration (ER) Site Investigations program in order to achieve the complimentary objectives of the projects more effectively by providing an integrated basis of support. The combined effort was named the WAG 2 Remedial Investigation and Site Investigations Program (WAG 2 RI&SI). The Site Investigation activities are a series of monitoring efforts and directed investigations that support other ER activities by providing information about (1) watershed hydrogeology; (2) contaminants, pathways, and fluxes for groundwater at ORNL; (3) shallow subsurface areas that can act as secondary sources of contaminants; and (4) biological populations and contaminants in biota, in addition to other support and coordination activities.

  4. Reducing errors in radiology.

    PubMed

    Brusin, Joyce Helena

    2014-01-01

    Medical errors, even those that are relatively minor, can have serious consequences, such as misdiagnosis and longer and costlier hospital stays. Reducing errors requires all members of the health care clinical and administrative team to commit to the effort, and effective risk management addresses system-wide causes of errors. Errors often result from poor communication, inadequate training, chronic fatigue, and entrenched workplace hierarchies. Error reduction strategies support high-quality patient care, even in the most stressful and complex situations. PMID:25224086

  5. Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services Annual Report for 1999

    SciTech Connect

    TP Lynch; DE Bihl; ML Johnson; MA MacLellan; RK Piper

    2000-05-19

    During calendar year (CY) 1999, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed its customary radiological protection support services in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) and the Hanford contractors. These services included: (1) external dosimetry, (2) internal dosimetry, (3) in vivo measurements, (4) radiological records, (5) instrument calibration and evaluation, and (6) calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The services were provided under a number of programs as summarized here. Along with providing site-wide nuclear accident and environmental dosimetry capabilities, the Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) supports Hanford radiation protection programs by providing external radiation monitoring capabilities for all Hanford workers and visitors to help ensure their health and safety. Processing volumes decreased in CY 1999 relative to prior years for all types of dosimeters, with an overall decrease of 19%. During 1999, the HEDP passed the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) performance testing criteria in 15 different categories. HEDP computers and processors were tested and upgraded to become Year 2000 (Y2K) compliant. Several changes and improvements were made to enhance the interpretation of dosimeter results. The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (HIDP) provides for the assessment and documentation of occupational dose from intakes of radionuclides at the Hanford Site. Performance problems carried over from CY 1998 continued to plague the in vitro bioassay contractor. A new contract was awarded for the in vitro bioassay program. A new computer system was put into routine operation by the in vivo bioassay program. Several changes to HIDP protocols were made that were related to bioassay grace periods, using field data to characterize the amount of alpha activity present and using a new default particle size. The number of incidents and high routine investigations that required follow-up were lower compared with 1998. Also, the number of excreta analyses performed decreased compared with CY 1998. The In Vivo Monitoring Program for Hanford (formerly the Hanford Whole Body Counting Project) provides the in vivo counting services for Hanford Site radiation workers. New computer hardware and software were put into routine operation to acquire, analyze, and store the measurement data. The technical procedures were revamped to reflect operational changes implemented with the new computer system. The U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) accreditation was extended to include two additional categories. New detectors were purchased for wound counting applications. The 8,085 in vivo measurements performed in 1999 represent a 2% decrease from 1998. Several high-purity germanium detectors were repaired at the In Vivo Radioassay and Research Facility, thereby saving out-of-service time and money compared with returning the detectors to the vendor. There were 11 phantom loans made through the DOE Phantom Library in 1999, including 2 international loans.

  6. Thoracic radiologic manifestations of melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Burivong, Wanaporn; Wu, Xiaohua; Saenkote, Wipawadee; Stern, Eric J

    2012-01-01

    Melioidosis (Burkholderia pseudomallei) is a gram-negative bacterial infection that is highly endemic in Southeast Asia and Oceania. Pulmonary disease is the most common form of involvement. The clinical-radiologic thoracic manifestations of melioidosis can be classified as acute, subacute, subclinical, and chronic forms. Radiographic findings include nodular, alveolar, or mixed infiltration/consolidation with or without cavities. Pleural effusion, pneumothorax, and pericardial involvement can be seen. Melioidosis can easily be confused with other infections, especially tuberculosis. Suspicion of this disease in the proper clinical radiologic setting is important for early diagnosis and treatment. In this article, we provide a broad clinical overview of melioidosis, review the radiologic thoracic manifestations of melioidosis with appropriate clinical correlation, as well as compare and contrast the imaging findings of thoracic melioidosis with other similar pulmonary infections. PMID:23009770

  7. ARHP's Annual Reproductive Health Clinical Conference: a laboratory for innovative provider education that can lead to real practice change.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ellen; Turok, David

    2012-03-01

    For reproductive health professionals, a combination of clinical and social science, presented in a variety of credible, interactive formats and featuring some type of mentoring and longer-term evaluation and follow-up, provides the richest platform for learning. There is growing support in the literature for this approach to improve clinician knowledge, competence and practice. ARHP is incorporating new educational platforms for all of its programs, including the annual Reproductive Health Clinical Conference. ARHP leaders plan to continue in-depth evaluation and experimentation to work toward improved provider performance and the best possible patient outcomes. There is a strong need for more research to inform this promising area, but we are on the right track. PMID:22225839

  8. Patient Dose in Diagnostic Radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, Alain

    One of the basic principles, stated explicitly in Article 4 of the EC Council Directive 97/43 Euratom, is optimization. This means that all radiological examinations should be performed with a dose that is As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA principle applied to the protection of the patient) in order to obtain the required diagnostic information. Therefore, dose needs to be determined with the relationship between image quality and dose always kept in mind. In this paper, radiation quantities and units to report patient doses in diagnostic radiology will be identified.

  9. Economic analyses of radiological procedures: A methodological evaluation of the medical literature 1 The opinions, views and conclusions expressed in this article are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation or the Department of Veteran Affairs. 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Craig Blackmore; Wendy J Smith

    1998-01-01

    Objective: Increasing pressure to curb health care costs has led to considerable interest in economic analyses, including both cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analyses. Numerous economic analyses of radiological procedures have appeared in both the radiology and non-radiology literature. The objective of this study was to evaluate the methodological quality of economic analyses of radiological procedures published in the non-radiology medical literature

  10. 1995 Site environmental report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Shyr, L.J.; Duncan, D. [eds.] [eds.; Sanchez, R.

    1996-09-01

    This 1995 report contains data from routine radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring activities. Summaries of significant environmental compliance programs in progress, such as National Environmental Policy Act documentation, environmental permits, environmental restoration and various waste management programs at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are included.

  11. MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY AND HEALTH

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicolae Tudor Racoveanu

    Health Technology (HT) or Medical Technology is at present one of the important reasons of inequity in Health Care visible in our world as demonstrated very clearly by the UNSCEAR 2000. Data of this document demonstrate that less than 25% of the world population has reasonable access to diagnostic radiology and that situation is not improving but on the contrary,

  12. Health.

    PubMed Central

    Hare, R M

    1986-01-01

    Many practical issues in medical ethics depend on an understanding of the concept of health. The main question is whether it is a purely descriptive or a partly evaluative or normative concept. After posing some puzzles about the concept, the views of C Boorse, who thinks it is descriptive, are discussed and difficulties are found for them. An evaluative treatment is then suggested, and used to shed light on some problems about mental illness and to compare and contrast it with physical illness and with political and other deviancies which are not illnesses. PMID:3806628

  13. Radiological aspects of in situ uranium recovery

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN, STEVEN H. [SHB INC., 7505 S. Xanthia Place, Centennial, Colorado (United States)

    2007-07-01

    In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium in situ leaching in situ recovery (ISL / ISR), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and may make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since 1975. Solution mining involves the pumping of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing and complexing agents into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant. Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which Radon gas is evolved in the process and the unique aspects of controlling solution flow patterns underground. An overview of the major aspects of the health physics and radiation protection programs that were developed at these facilities are discussed and contrasted to circumstances of the current generation and state of the art of Uranium ISR technologies and facilities. (authors)

  14. OriginalresearchnNeuroradiology 560 radiology.rsna.org n Radiology: Volume 267: Number 2--May 2013

    E-print Network

    Rubin, Daniel L.

    OriginalresearchnNeuroradiology 560 radiology.rsna.org n Radiology: Volume 267: Number 2--May 2013 Ford Hospital, Detroit, Mich (L.S., T.M., R.J.); Department of Radiology, University of Virginia.J.C.); Department of Radiology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Ill (P.M., V.K.); SAIC-Frederick Inc, Frederick

  15. Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Radiation Therapy (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) -

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Radiation Therapy ­ (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-RTHB] Regional College Catalog Hours] Note: Students must have graduated from a hospital-based certificate program in radiologic

  16. Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Computed Tomography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) -

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Computed Tomography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-CTHA] Regional College Hours] Note: Students must have graduated from a hospital-based certificate program in radiologic

  17. Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-RTAS] Regional College to the Major: [62 Credit Hours] Note: Students must have earned an AAS degree in Radiologic Technology (38

  18. Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-MRRT] Regional College Catalog Year Hours] Note: Students must have earned an AAS degree in Radiologic Technology (43 semester credits

  19. Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-RTAS] Regional College Hours] Note: Students must have earned an AAS degree in Radiologic Technology (38 semester credits from

  20. Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-MRRT] Regional College Catalog Year Hours] Note: Students must have earned an AAS degree in Radiologic Technology (69-71 semester credits

  1. Health effects model for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis. Part I. Introduction, integration, and summary. Part II. Scientific basis for health effects models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. S. Evans; D. W. Moeller; D. W. Cooper

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of the radiological health effects of nuclear power plant accidents requires models for predicting early health effects, cancers and benign thyroid nodules, and genetic effects. Since the publication of the Reactor Safety Study, additional information on radiological health effects has become available. This report summarizes the efforts of a program designed to provide revised health effects models for nuclear

  2. Stanford Radiology LPCH Fast Pediatric MRI

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Stanford Radiology LPCH Fast Pediatric MRI Shreyas Vasanawala, MD/PhD Stanford University Lucile Radiology LPCH Single 4D scan Real-time stereoscopic rendering/navigation of data 8 minute scan gives same Radiology LPCH Thank you Par Lab Briefer, lighter, safer anesthesia for pediatric MRI #12;

  3. Workshop on radiological techniques in sedimentation

    E-print Network

    Workshop on radiological techniques in sedimentation studies: methods and applications Gary Hancock summarises the important issues raised during the 3 hour discussion period of the Workshop on "Radiological on radiological techniques in sedimentation studies V 235 chemical and biological changes in ecosystems

  4. Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2011

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2011 2012 Environment Report RL 05/12 Cefas contract Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2011 Shellfish consumption and intertidal occupancy review F., 2012. Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2011. RL 05/12. Cefas, Lowestoft A copy can

  5. Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2012

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2012 2013 Environment Report RL 04a/13 Cefas Final report Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2012 Aquatic pathways review G.P. Papworth, C.J., Ly, V.E., and Dewar, A., 2013. Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2012. RL 04a/13

  6. Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2010

    E-print Network

    Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2010 2011 Environment Report RL 13/11 Cefas contract Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2010 Shellfish consumption and intertidal occupancy review F, P., Smedley, C.A., and Ly, V.E., 2011. Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2010. RL 13

  7. Radiological assessment of dredging application for

    E-print Network

    generic radiological assessment procedure indicated that doses received were well below recommended limitsRadiological assessment of dredging application for the port of Lancaster (2008) Cefas Environment 21/2008 RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF DREDGING APPLICATION FOR THE PORT OF LANCASTER (2008) The Centre

  8. Radiological assessment of dredging application for

    E-print Network

    Sv/year (collective dose), respectively. Since the conservative generic radiological assessment procedure indicatedRadiological assessment of dredging application for Oldbury power station (2009) Cefas Environment 14 /2009 RADIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF DREDGING APPLICATION FOR OLDBURY POWER STATION (2009) The Centre

  9. 100-DR-1 radiological surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Naiknimbalkar, N.M.

    1994-01-28

    This report summarizes and documents the results of the radiological surveys conducted over the surface of the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. In addition, this report explains the survey methodology using the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS). The 100-DR-1 radiological survey field task consisted of two activities: characterization of the operable unit-specific background conditions and the radiological survey of the operable unit surface area. The survey methodology was based on utilization of USRADS for automated recording of the gross gamma radiation levels at or near 6 in. and at 3 ft from the surface soil. The purpose of the survey is to identify the location of unidentified subsurface radioactive material areas and any surface contamination associated with these areas. The radiological surveys were conducted using both a digital count rate meter with a NaI detector reporting in counts per minute (CPM) and a dose rate meter reporting micro-Roentgen per hour (uR) connected to a CHEMRAD Tennessee Corp. Series 2000 USRADS. The count rate meter was set for gross counting, i.e., Window ``out``. The window setting allows detection of low, intermediate, and high energy photons. The USRADS equipment is used to record the detector readings verses the location of the readings, generate a map of the survey area, and save the data on computer storage media.

  10. Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Health and Ecological Assessment Div.; Shan, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    1997-04-01

    This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime.

  11. Pitfalls in radiology informatics when deploying an enterprise solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsköld, L.; Wintell, M.; Lundberg, N.

    2010-03-01

    In the Region Vastra Gotaland (VGR), Sweden, sharing of data from 4 PACS system has been done through the Radiology Information Infrastructure that where deployed in 2007, and during 2008 and 2009 also including the information obtained from three different RIS systems installed in the region. The RIS information stored in the Radiology Information Infrastructure is Structured Reports (SR) objects that derivatives from the regional information model. In practice, the Enterprise solution now offers new ways of social collaboration through information sharing within a region. Interoperability was developed according to the IHE mission, i.e. applying standards such as digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM) and Health Level 7 (HL7) to address specific clinical communication needs and support optimal patient care. Applying standards and information has shown to be suitable for interoperability, but not appropriate for implementing social collaboration i.e. first and second opinion, as there is no user services related to the standards. The need for social interaction leads to a common negotiated interface and in contrary with interoperability the approach will be a common defined semantic model. Radiology informatics is the glue between the technical standards, information models,semantics, social ruleworks and regulations used within radiology and their customers to share information and services.

  12. Radiological/toxicological sabotage assessments at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, H.D.; Pascal, M.D.; Richardson, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes the methods being employed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to perform graded assessments of radiological and toxicological sabotage vulnerability at Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities. These assessments are conducted to ensure that effective measures are in place to prevent, mitigate, and respond to a potential sabotage event which may cause an airborne release of radiological/toxicological material, causing an adverse effect on the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. Department of Energy (DOE) Notice 5630.3A, {open_quotes}Protection of Departmental Facilities Against Radiological and Toxicological Sabotage,{close_quotes} and the associated April 1993 DOE-Headquarters guidance provide the requirements and outline an eight-step process for hazardous material evaluation. The process requires the integration of information from a variety of disciplines, including safety, safeguards and security, and emergency preparedness. This paper summarizes WSRC`s approach towards implementation of the DOE requirements, and explains the inter-relationships between the Radiological and Toxicological Assessments developed using this process, and facility Hazard Assessment Reports (HAs), Safety Analysis Reports (SARs), and Facility Vulnerability Assessments (VAs).

  13. Radiological characterization of spent control rod assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Lepel, E.A.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.; Pratt, S.L.; Haggard, D.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This document represents the final report of an ongoing study to provide radiological characterizations, classifications, and assessments in support of the decommissioning of nuclear power stations. This report describes the results of non-destructive and laboratory radionuclide measurements, as well as waste classification assessments, of BWR and PWR spent control rod assemblies. The radionuclide inventories of these spent control rods were determined by three separate methodologies, including (1) direct assay techniques, (2) calculational techniques, and (3) by sampling and laboratory radiochemical analyses. For the BWR control rod blade (CRB) and PWR burnable poison rod assembly (BPRA), {sup 60}Co and {sup 63}Ni, present in the stainless steel cladding, were the most abundant neutron activation products. The most abundant radionuclide in the PWR rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) was {sup 108m}Ag (130 yr halflife) produced in the Ag-In-Cd alloy used as the neutron poison. This radionuclide will be the dominant contributor to the gamma dose rate for many hundreds of years. The results of the direct assay methods agree very well ({+-}10%) with the sampling/radiochemical measurements. The results of the calculational methods agreed fairly well with the empirical measurements for the BPRA, but often varied by a factor of 5 to 10 for the CRB and the RCCA assemblies. If concentration averaging and encapsulation, as allowed by 10CFR61.55, is performed, then each of the entire control assemblies would be classified as Class C low-level radioactive waste.

  14. Environmental assessment for the decommissioning and decontamination of contaminated facilities at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research University of California, Davis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) was established in 1958 at its present location by the Atomic Energy Commission. Research at LEHR originally focused on the health effects from chronic exposures to radionuclides, primarily strontium 90 and radium 226, using beagles to simulate radiation effects on humans. In 1988, pursuant to a memorandum of agreement between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the University of California, DOE`s Office of Energy Research decided to close out the research program, shut down LEHR, and turn the facilities and site over to the University of California, Davis (UCD) after remediation. The decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of LEHR will be managed by the San Francisco Operations Office (SF) under DOE`s Environmental Restoration Program. This environmental assessment (EA) addresses the D&D of four site buildings and a tank trailer, and the removal of the on-site cobalt 60 (Co-60) source. Future activities at the site will include D&D of the Imhoff building and the outdoor dog pens, and may include remediation of underground tanks, and the landfill and radioactive disposal trenches. The remaining buildings on the LEHR site are not contaminated. The environmental impacts of the future activities cannot be determined at this time because the extent of contamination has not yet been ascertained. The impacts of these future activities (including the cumulative impacts of the future activities and those addressed in this EA) will be addressed in future National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documentation.

  15. The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This report provides a listing and brief description of experiments performed at RARAF during the May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993.

  16. Results of the radiological survey at 12 Frost Place, Albany, New York (AL178)

    SciTech Connect

    Espegren, M.L.; Marley, J.L.

    1987-12-01

    A number of properties in the Albany/Colonie area have been identified as being potentially contaminated with uranium originating from the former National Lead Company's uranium forming plant in Colonie, New York. Radiological surveys were performed at 27 properties by members of the Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July 13-July 26, 1986. The property at 12 Frost Place in Albany, New York was the subject of a radiological investigation initiated July 22, 1986. The residential property consists of a two-story frame house located on a rectangular lot. An asphalt driveway connects the house to the street. The lot included in the radiological survey was /approximately/13 m wide by 29 m deep. 13 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Predictive Radiological Background Distributions from Geochemical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, D.; Burnley, P. C.; Marsac, K.; Malchow, R.

    2014-12-01

    Gamma ray surveys are an important tool for both national security interests as well as industry in determininglocations of both anthropogenic radiological sources and natural occurrences of radiologic material. The purpose ofthis project is to predict the radiologic exposure rate of geologic materials by creating a model using publishedgeochemical data, geologic data, GIS software, and freely available remote sensing data sets. If K, U, and Thabundance values are known for a given geologic unit, the expected radiation exposure rate can be calculated. Oneof the primary challenges surrounding this project is that alluvial units are classified by age rather than rock type. Itis therefore important to determine sediment sources and estimate their relative contribution to alluvial units.ASTER data from the Terra satellite can differentiate between surface mineralogies and can aid us in calculating therelative percentage of sediment from each source and by extension the geochemical concentrations of challengingsurfaces such as alluvium. An additional problem is that U and Th do not directly contribute to the measuredradiation exposure rate. Instead, daughter isotopes of these radioelements emit detectable gamma rays and may nothave reached equilibrium in younger surfaces. U can take up to 1.5 Ma to come to equilibrium with its daughterisotopes while Th takes only about 40 years. Further modeling with software such as Monte Carlo N-ParticleTransport from Los Alamos National Laboratory, will help us correct for this disequilibrium in our models. Once the predicted exposure rate is calculated for a geologic unit, it can then be assigned to a geographic area basedon geologic and geomorphic trends. This prediction will be subtracted from data collected through aerial surveys,effectively ignoring geology, and allowing areas of interest to be narrowed down considerably. The study areasinclude the alluvium on the west shore of Lake Mohave and Government Wash north of Lake Mead. In both of theseareas, strategically located soil and rock samples have been collected and are awaiting geochemical analysis. This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with theU.S. Department of Energy. DOE/NV/25946--2117

  18. ARAC's radiological support of the Cassini Launch

    SciTech Connect

    Baskett, R. L.; Pace, J. C.

    1998-10-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was the U.S. Department of Energy atmospheric modeling resource used for the contingency of potential radiological releases during the launch of the Cassini mission. Having the ARAC system up and running was one of the launch criteria during the countdown. The ARAC Center at LLNL forecasted detailed weather conditions and delivered consequence assessments for potential accident scenarios to NASA before and during launch operations. A key aspect of ARAC's support was to acquire a variety of meteorological data for use in both forecast and real-time model calculations. ARAC acquired electronically two types of real-time observed meteorological data: 1) the set of on-site tower and profiler data via the Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS), and 2) routine regional airport observations delivered to the ARAC Center from the Air Force Weather Agency. We also used two forecasted data sources: 1) the U.S. Air Force 45th Weather Squadron at CCAS forecasted soundings for launch time, and 2) the Navy Operational Regional Atmospheric Prediction System (NORAPS) prognostic model which ARAC ran over the Cape. The NORAPS runs produced detailed 24-hr forecasts of 3-D wind fields. ARAC used default radiological accident source terms involving the potential destruction of Cassini?s Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) during 3 phases: 1) before the launch, 2) during the first 5 sec after ignition, and 3) from 5 to 143 sec after ignition. ARAC successfully developed and delivered dose and deposition plots at 24 hours, 3 hours, and 30 minutes before each of the launch windows.

  19. Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Edward S.; Keating, John J.

    1991-08-01

    The Management Subteam conducted a management assessment of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) programs and their implementation of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The objectives of the assessment were to: (1) evaluate the effectiveness of existing management functions and processes in terms of ensuring environmental compliance, and the health and safety of workers and the general public; and (2) identify probable root causes for ES H findings and concerns. Organizations reviewed were DOE-Headquarters: DOE Field Offices, Chicago (CH) and Idaho (ID); Argonne Area Offices, East (AAO-E) and West (AAO-W); Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL); Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); EG G Idaho, Inc. (EG G); Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO); Rockwell-INEL; MK-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC); and Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI). The scope of the assessment covered the following ES H management issues: policies and procedures; roles, responsibilities, and authorities; management commitment; communication; staff development, training, and certification; recruitment; compliance management; conduct of operations; emergency planning and preparedness; quality assurance; self assessment; oversight activities; and cost plus award fee processes.

  20. How serious is threat of radiological terrorism?

    PubMed

    Kuna, Pavel; Hon, Zdenik; Patodka, Jirí

    2009-01-01

    Radiological terrorism (radioterrorism) is the deliberate use of radiological weapons. These weapons use radioactive materials to disperse and emit ionizing radiation. There are two classes of radiological weapons--radiological dispersal devices (RDD) and radiation emission devices (RED). These weapons would no cause massive numbers of dead. In most radiological attack scenarios, only few people may die immediately or shortly after exposure to the ionizing radiation. Nevertheless, many people could develop cancer within several years to decade after the radiological weapon attack. Such attack might spur panic and result in high economic costs because of the need for decontamination and possible tearing down and reconstruction of contaminated structures. Thus, radiological weapons may be considered rather weapons of mass disruption than weapons threating of human life. PMID:20073419

  1. Environmental Health and Safety

    E-print Network

    Shoubridge, Eric

    Environmental Health and Safety Approved by Document No. Version Date Replaces Page EHS EHS). 1. INTRODUCTION I was informed of McGill's Health & Safety Policies, including: Laboratory Responsibilities Health & Safety Internal Responsibility System Personal Protective Equipment Policy Accident

  2. Carbon Characterization Laboratory Report

    SciTech Connect

    David Swank; William Windes; D.C. Haggard; David Rohrbaugh; Karen Moore

    2009-03-01

    The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Lab-C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. This laboratory was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite research and development activities. The CCL is designed to characterize and test carbon-based materials such as graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully prepared to measure material properties for nonirradiated carbon-based materials. Plans to establish the laboratory as a radiological facility within the next year are definitive. This laboratory will be modified to accommodate irradiated materials, after which it can be used to perform material property measurements on both irradiated and nonirradiated carbon-based material. Instruments, fixtures, and methods are in place for preirradiation measurements of bulk density, thermal diffusivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Young’s modulus, Shear modulus, Poisson ratio, and electrical resistivity. The measurement protocol consists of functional validation, calibration, and automated data acquisition.

  3. Site Safety and Health Plan (Phase 3) for the treatability study for in situ vitrification at Seepage Pit 1 in Waste Area Grouping 7, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, B.P.; Naney, M.T.

    1995-06-01

    This plan is to be implemented for Phase III ISV operations and post operations sampling. Two previous project phases involving site characterization have been completed and required their own site specific health and safety plans. Project activities will take place at Seepage Pit 1 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at ORNL, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Purpose of this document is to establish standard health and safety procedures for ORNL project personnel and contractor employees in performance of this work. Site activities shall be performed in accordance with Energy Systems safety and health policies and procedures, DOE orders, Occupational Safety and Health Administration Standards 29 CFR Part 1910 and 1926; applicable United States Environmental Protection Agency requirements; and consensus standards. Where the word ``shall`` is used, the provisions of this plan are mandatory. Specific requirements of regulations and orders have been incorporated into this plan in accordance with applicability. Included from 29 CFR are 1910.120 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response; 1910.146, Permit Required - Confined Space; 1910.1200, Hazard Communication; DOE Orders requirements of 5480.4, Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards; 5480.11, Radiation Protection; and N5480.6, Radiological Control Manual. In addition, guidance and policy will be followed as described in the Environmental Restoration Program Health and Safety Plan. The levels of personal protection and the procedures specified in this plan are based on the best information available from reference documents and site characterization data. Therefore, these recommendations represent the minimum health and safety requirements to be observed by all personnel engaged in this project.

  4. U.S. national response assets for radiological incidents.

    PubMed

    Remick, Alan L; Crapo, John L; Woodruff, Charles R

    2005-11-01

    The federal government has had the ability to respond to incidents of national significance for decades. Since 11 September 2001, there have been enhancements to existing federal assets and the creation of new federal assets. This presentation will provide an overview of the more significant federal assets. Pivotal to a response of national significance is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center, which organizes and coordinates federal agency monitoring activities during an emergency. DOE manages the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center during the emergency phase, and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) manages the response during the recovery phase once the emergency is terminated. EPA monitoring teams provide support during both the emergency and recovery phases of an emergency. Other DOE teams are available to respond to major nuclear power plant events, transportation accidents, or terrorism events involving the use of radiological materials, including the Radiological Assistance Program, the Aerial Measuring System, the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center, and the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site. For incidents involving a nuclear weapon, an improvised nuclear device, or a radiological dispersal device, DOE assets such as the Nuclear Emergency Support Team and the Accident Response Group could provide capabilities for weapon or device search, recovery, and removal. The Radiological Triage System harnesses the weapons scientists and engineers at the DOE national laboratories to provide gamma spectroscopy interpretation for agencies responding to an incident. In recent years, National Guard Weapons of Mass Destruction-Civil Support Teams have been created to support state and local response to terrorism events. The Civil Support Teams normally come under direct control of the state and can respond without requiring authorization from the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Changes brought about by the events of September 11 also extend to changing federal response policy and planning. Therefore, the Catastrophic Incident Response Annex to the National Response Plan is discussed. DoD also provides specifically designated radiological response capabilities that can be utilized within the guidelines of the National Response Plan. While optimally designed to support military missions, these resources also help provide for a well-equipped set of national assets to temporarily support and augment the local, state, and federal civil agencies that have primary authority and responsibility for domestic disaster assistance. The military's role in domestic emergencies is well defined in military regulations, as well as the national plan. PMID:16217190

  5. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Environment, Health, and Safety Division of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Site Environmental Report for 2004 Volume I SEPTEMBER 2005 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

  6. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division July Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Site Environmental Report for 2002 Volume I JULY 2003 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Prepared

  7. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environment, Health, and Safety Division July Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Site Environmental Report for 2002 Volume II July 2003 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Prepared

  8. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Environment, Health, and Safety Division of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;Site Environmental Report for 2004 Volume II SEPTEMBER 2005 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

  9. Radiological dose assessments in the northern Marshall Islands (1989--1991). Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L.C.; Meinhold, C.B.; Moorthy, A.R.; Clinton, J.H.; Kaplan, E.

    1991-11-01

    The Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) is located in the central Pacific Ocean about 3500 km southwest of Hawaii and 4500 km east of Manila, Philippines. It consists of 34 atolls and 2 coral islands, having a total land area of about 180 km{sup 2}, distributed over more than 2.5 {times} 10{sup 6} of ocean. Between 1946 and 1958 the United states conducted nuclear tests there: 43 at Enewetak and 23 at Bikini. Thirty-three years after the cessation of nuclear testing in the RMI, the impact of these operations on the health and radiological safety of the people living in or planning to return to their contaminated homelands is still an important concern. The present Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Marshall Islands Radiological Safety Program (MIRSP) began in 1987 with funding from the US Department of Energy (DOE). The objectives of the MIRSP are to determine the radionuclides present in the bodies of those people potentially exposed to residual radionuclide from weapon tests and fallout, and to assess their present and lifetime dose from external and internal sources. Field bioassay missions involving whole-body counting (WBC) and urine sample collection have, therefore, been important components of the program. WBC is used to measure {gamma}-emitters, such as {sup 40}K, {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs, present in individuals. Urine samples are used to measure {alpha} and {beta}-emitting nuclides such as {sup 239}Pu and {sup 90}Sr, that are undetectable by WBC routine methods.

  10. Interventional radiology in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Katsanos, Konstantinos; Ahmad, Farhan; Dourado, Renato; Sabharwal, Tarun; Adam, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Interventional radiological percutaneous procedures are becoming all the more important in the curative or palliative management of elderly frail patients with multiple underlying comorbidities. They may serve either as alternative primary minimally invasive therapies or adjuncts to traditional surgical treatments. The present report provides a concise review of the most important interventional radiological procedures with a special focus on the treatment of the primary debilitating pathologies of the elderly population. The authors elaborate on the scientific evidence and latest developments of thermoablation of solid organ malignancies, palliative stent placement for gastrointestinal tract cancer, airway stenting for tracheobronchial strictures, endovascular management of aortic and peripheral arterial vascular disease, and cement stabilization of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. The added benefits of high technical and clinical success coupled with lower procedural mortality and morbidity are highlighted. PMID:19503761

  11. An atlas of radiological anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, J.; Abrahams, P.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains a wealth of radiologic images of normal human anatomy; plain radiographs, contrast-enhanced radiographs, and computed tomography (CT) scans. There are 18 pages of magnetic resonance (MR) images, most on the brain and spinal cord, so that there are only two pages on MR imaging of the heart and two pages on abdominal and pelvic MR imaging. Twelve pages of ultrasound (US) images are included. This book has the radiologic image paired with an explanatory drawing; the image is on the left with a paragraph or two of text, and the drawing is on the right with legends. This book includes images of the brain and spinal cord obtained with arteriography, venography, myelography, encephalography, CT, and MR imaging.

  12. Evidence-based diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Dixon, A K

    1997-08-16

    The radiological community has a long track record of self-examination, starting well before evidence-based medicine came of age. It had to produce such evidence to prove the need for and win funds for its expensive gadgets. The assessment of new tests is easier than proving the value of well-established ones, and in scrutinising the evidence base for an imaging technique a balance must be struck between apparent (eg, diagnostic) benefit and real benefit to the patient. And even when there is a wealth of good evidence healthy debate continues. So radiology may be ahead of some other disciplines in considering the evidence for its daily practice. For example, where is the evidence for the routine clinical examination-and might the radiologist with a chest X-ray and abdominal ultrasound do better? PMID:9274596

  13. Radiologic management of musculoskeletal tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pettersson, H.; Springfield, D.S.; Enneking, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    The present book is written by a radiologist and two orthopedic surgeons with long experience in musculoskeletal tumors. It is based on modern pathologic and surgical principles, and from those principles the radiologic approach is discussed. The main questions ask what information can be gained by the different modalities, and which combination of modalities is the most profitable to determine the local behaviour of the tumor, diagnosis and local extent.

  14. Radiology of occupational chest disease

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A. (Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)); Kreel, L.

    1989-01-01

    Radiologic manifestations of occupational lung disease are summarized and classified in this book according to the ILO system. The interpretation of chest roentgenograms outlines the progression of each disease and is accompanied with clinically-oriented explanations. Some of the specific diseases covered include asbestosis, coal worker's pneumoconiosis, silicosis, non-mining inhalation of silica and silicates, beryllium induced disease, inhalation of organics and metallics, and occupationally induced asthma.

  15. Medical Laboratory Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of medical laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 18 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units specific to the occupation of medical laboratory technician. The following…

  16. Surface analysis for students in Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Rotberg, V.H.; Busby, J.; Toader, O.; Was, G.S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2003-08-26

    Students in Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences at the University of Michigan are required to learn about the various applications of radiation. Because of the broad applicability of accelerators to surface analysis, one of these courses includes a laboratory session on surface analysis techniques such as Rutherford Backscattering Analysis (RBS) and Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). In this laboratory session, the students determine the concentration of nitrogen atoms in various targets using RBS and NRA by way of the 14N(d,{alpha})12C reaction. The laboratory is conducted in a hands-on format in which the students conduct the experiment and take the data. This paper describes the approach to teaching the theory and experimental methods behind the techniques, the conduct of the experiment and the analysis of the data.

  17. Ground-water characterization field activities for 1995--1996 Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, University of California, Davis

    SciTech Connect

    Liikala, T.L.; Lanigan, D.C.; Last, G.V. [and others

    1996-05-01

    This report documents ground-water characterization field activities completed from August to December 1995 and in January 1996 at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) in Davis, California. The ground water at LEHR is one of several operable units under investigation by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this work was to further characterize the hydrogeology beneath the LEHR site, with the primary focus on ground water. The objectives were to estimate hydraulic properties for the two uppermost saturated hydrogeologic units (i.e., HSU-1 and HSU-2), and to determine distributions of contaminants of concern in these units. Activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives include well installation, geophysical logging, well development, ground-water sampling, slug testing, Westbay ground-water monitoring system installation, continuous water-level monitoring, Hydropunch installation, and surveying. Ground-water samples were collected from 61 Hydropunch locations. Analytical results from these locations and the wells indicate high chloroform concentrations trending from west/southwest to east/northeast in the lower portion of HSU-1 and in the upper and middle portions of HSU-2. The chloroform appears to originate near Landfill 2. Tritium was not found above the MCL in any of the well or Hydropunch samples. Hexavalent chromium was found at four locations with concentrations above the MCL in HSU-1 and at one location in HSU-2. One well in HSU-1 had a total chromium concentration above the MCL. Nitrate-nitrogen above the MCL was found at several Hydropunch locations in both HSU-1 and HSU-2.

  18. Bioengineering/Radiology 278: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Laboratory Winter 2012

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    imaging Motion artifact 4 RF pulses Design and test an RF pulse Spatial-Spectral Pulses 5 Echo Planar Imaging Echo Planar Imaging 6 Echo formation Spin echoes Gradient echoes Generate an interferogram Frequency dependence of balanced SSFP 7 Multidimensional pulses 2D pulse coding 2D pulses 8 RF Coils (b) RF

  19. Simulation Technology Laboratory Building 970 hazards assessment document

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, C.L.; Starr, M.D.

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Simulation Technology Laboratory, Building 970. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distances at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the ERPG-2 and Early Severe Health Effects thresholds are 78 and 46 meters, respectively. The highest emergency classification is a Site Area Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is 100 meters.

  20. Finding of no significant impact, decontamination and decommissioning of Battelle Columbus Laboratories in Columbus and West Jefferson, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This Environmental Assessment has been developed by the Department of Energy in accordance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the proposed decommissioning of contaminated areas at the Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, Ohio. The discussions in Section 1.0 provide general background information on the proposed action. Section 2.0 describes the existing radiological and non-radiological condition of the Battelle Columbus Laboratories. Section 3.0 identifies the alternatives considered for the proposed action and describes in detail the proposed decommissioning project. Section 4.0 evaluates the potential risks the project poses to human health and the environment. Section 5.0 presents the Department of Energy's proposed action. As a result of nuclear research and development activities conducted over a period of approximately 43 years performed for the Department of Energy, its predecessor agencies, and under commercial contracts, the 15 buildings became contaminated with varying amounts of radioactive material. The Department of Energy no longer has a need to utilize the facilities and is contractually obligate to remove that contamination such that they can be used by their owners without radiological restrictions. This Environmental Assessment for the Battelle Columbus Laboratories Decommissioning Project is consistent with the direction from the Secretary of Energy that public awareness and participation be considered in sensitive projects and is an appropriate document to determine action necessary to satisfy the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act. 30 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.