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1

CSU-FDA collaborative radiological health laboratory annual report 1979  

SciTech Connect

The Collaborative Radiological Health Laboratory was established in 1962 by the Division of Biological Effects, Bureau of Radiological Health, and the Department of Radiology and Radiation Biology, Colorado State University, to assess possible long-term effects in the beagle from low-level whole-body gamma irradiation. The first section of this annual report summarizes the current status of the long-term effects of irradiation during development in the beagle. The second section addresses studies of radiation-induced and spontaneous disease in the beagle. Cardiovascular disease has also been noted to be a significant clinical disease problem in the aging beagle. The third section describes the CRHL data processing system as it existed and the current changes being made. Several aspects of the methods and procedures available for statistical analysis of data are discussed.

Benjamin, S.A.

1981-01-01

2

Radiological standards and calibration laboratory capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national radiological standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE sites, and research programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site`s 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, and thermoluminescent and radiochromic dosimetry. The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, and a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentations, photon transfer standards and alpha, beta and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory. Photographs that accompany the text appear in the Appendix and are designated Figure A.1 through A.29.

Goles, R.W.

1995-01-01

3

Radiological standards and calibration laboratory capabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national radiological standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE sites, and research programs sponsored

Goles

1995-01-01

4

The health physics and radiological health handbook  

SciTech Connect

This handbook was conceived in order to fill the need of health physics practitioners, technicians, and students for an easy to use, practical handbook containing health physics and radiological health data. While briefer and more specific data sources are sources are available on single subject areas, as are multi-volume compendia, there is no current up-to-date compilation of information useful on a daily basis by the health physicist. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 16 chapters in this book.

Shleien, B. [ed.

1992-12-31

5

Bridging Radiology and Public Health: The Emerging Field of Radiologic Public Health Informatics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiology and public health have an emerging opportunity to collaborate, in which radiology's vast supply of imaging data can be integrated into public health information systems for epidemiologic assessments and responses to population health problems. Fueling the linkage of radiology and public health include (i) the transition from analog film to digital formats, enabling flexible use of radiologic data; (ii)

Daniel J. Mollura; John A. Carrino; Diane L. Matuszak; Zaruhi R. Mnatsakanyan; John Eng; Protagoras Cutchis; Steven M. Babin; Carol Sniegoski; Joseph S. Lombardo

2008-01-01

6

42 CFR 416.49 - Condition for coverage-Laboratory and radiologic services.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) AMBULATORY SURGICAL SERVICES Specific Conditions for Coverage § 416.49 Condition for coverageâLaboratory and radiologic services....

2012-10-01

7

Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report Tritium Research Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the specific radiological characterization information on Building 968, the Tritium Research Laboratory (TRL) Complex and Facility. We performed the characterization as outlined in its Radiological Characterization Plan. The Radiological Characterization and Final Facility Status Report (RC&FFSR) provides historic background information on each laboratory within the TRL complex as related to its original and present radiological condition. Along with the work outlined in the Radiological Characterization Plan (RCP), we performed a Radiological Soils Characterization, Radiological and Chemical Characterization of the Waste Water Hold-up System including all drains, and a Radiological Characterization of the Building 968 roof ventilation system. These characterizations will provide the basis for the Sandia National Laboratory, California (SNL/CA) Site Termination Survey .Plan, when appropriate.

Garcia, T.B.; Gorman, T.P.

1996-08-01

8

Radiological health aspects of uranium milling  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the operation of conventional and unconventional uranium milling processes, the potential for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation at the mill, methods for radiological safety, methods of evaluating occupational radiation exposures, and current government regulations for protecting workers and ensuring that standards for radiation protection are adhered to. In addition, a survey of current radiological health practices is summarized.

Fisher, D.R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

1983-05-01

9

Aerial Radiological Survey of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (Livermore, California).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An airborne radiological survey was conducted during August 1975 over several selected sites in the vicinity of Livermore, California. These sites included the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Sandia Livermore Laboratories, LLL Site 300, the Livermore Munic...

W. J. Tipton

1977-01-01

10

Laboratory Demonstration of Radiological Decontamination Using Radpro  

SciTech Connect

In the event of terrorist activity involving the explosive dispersion of radioactive materials (a 'dirty' bomb), a number of different types of surfaces and substrates, including concrete, granite, brick, cinder block, tile, asphalt, wood, glass, plastic, iron, and steel, may become radiologically contaminated. Incident cleanup is assumed to involve decontamination of these surfaces. Laboratory testing was conducted using samples of concrete, ferrous metal, steel, aluminum, lead, tin, glass, lexan, vinyl, asphalt shingle, wood, and rubber surfaces. The surfaces were sprayed with Cs-137 or Co-60 solutions to simulate contamination. The entire surface area of the samples was surveyed using a Ludlum Model 2360 scaler/ratemeter with Ludlum Model 43-93-2 100 cm{sup 2} open area alpha/beta scintillation probe. The surfaces were then decontaminated using RadPro{sup R} chemical decontamination technology that is currently field proven and ready to deploy. The entire surface area of the samples was re-surveyed following decontamination. The RadPro{sup R} chemical decontamination technology was able to remove virtually all of the removable contamination and over 90% of the fixed contamination from these surfaces during the laboratory testing. (authors)

Lear, P.; Greene, R.; Isham, J. [Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Martin, R.; Norton, C. [Environmental Alternatives, Inc., Keene, NH (United States)

2007-07-01

11

Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides technical support to the requesting federal agency such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Defense, the National Space and Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), or a state agency to address the radiological consequences of an event. These activities include measures to alleviate damage, loss, hardship, or suffering caused by the incident; protect public health and safety; restore essential government services; and provide emergency assistance to those affected. Scheduled to launch in the fall of 2009, Mars Science Laboratory is part of NASA's Mars Exploration Program, a long-term effort of robotic exploration of the red planet. Mars Science Laboratory is a rover that will assess whether Mars ever was, or is still today, an environment able to support microbial life. In other words, its mission is to determine the planet's "habitability." The Mars Science Laboratory rover will carry a radioisotope power system that generates electricity from the heat of plutonium's radioactive decay. This power source gives the mission an operating lifespan on Mars' surface of a full Martian year (687 Earth days) or more, while also providing significantly greater mobility and operational flexibility, enhanced science payload capability, and exploration of a much larger range of latitudes and altitudes than was possible on previous missions to Mars. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the DOE in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. NSTec is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools NSTec has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform NSTec will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, NASA, state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

Paul Guss

2008-03-01

12

Development of a real-time radiological area monitoring network for emergency response at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

A real-time radiological sensor network for emergency response was developed and deployed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The real-time radiological area monitoring (RTRAM) network comprises 16 Geiger-Mueller sensors positioned on the LLNL Livermore site perimeter to continuously monitor for a radiological condition resulting from a terrorist threat to site security and the health and safety of LLNL personnel.

Nicholas A. Bertoldo; Steven L. Hunter; Ronald A. Fertig; Gary W. Laguna; Donald H. MacQueen

2005-01-01

13

Development of a Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring Network for Emergency Response at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

A real-time radiological sensor network for emergency response was developed and deployed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring (RTRAM) network is comprised of 16 Geiger-Mueller (GM) sensors positioned on the LLNL Livermore site perimeter to continuously monitor for a radiological condition resulting from a terrorist threat to site security and the health and safety

N Bertoldo; S Hunter; R Fertig; G Laguna; D MacQueen

2004-01-01

14

Radiological Laboratory, Utility, Office Building LEED Strategy & Achievement  

SciTech Connect

Missions that the Radiological Laboratory, utility, Office Building (RLUOB) supports are: (1) Nuclear Materials Handling, Processing, and Fabrication; (2) Stockpile Management; (3) Materials and Manufacturing Technologies; (4) Nonproliferation Programs; (5) Waste Management Activities - Environmental Programs; and (6) Materials Disposition. The key capabilities are actinide analytical chemistry and material characterization.

Seguin, Nicole R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-18

15

Radiology: \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

The core principles of digital radiology were well developed by the end of the 1980 s. During the following decade tremendous improvements in computer technology enabled realization of those principles at an affordable cost. In this decade work can focus on highly distributed radiology in the context of the integrated health care enterprise. Over the same period computer networking has evolved

Kevin M. Mcneill

2004-01-01

16

Radiation and Health Technology Laboratory Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE and commercial nuclear sites and research and characterization programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, thermoluminescent and radiochromic Dosimetry, and calibration of measurement and test equipment (M&TE). The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations and M&TE laboratories. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentation, photon and neutron transfer standards alpha, beta, and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site, and a wide variety of M&TE. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory.

Goles, Ronald W.; Johnson, Michelle Lynn; Piper, Roman K.; Peters, Jerry D.; Murphy, Mark K.; Mercado, Mike S.; Bihl, Donald E.; Lynch, Timothy P.

2003-07-15

17

Radiation and Health Technology Laboratory Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE and commercial nuclear sites and research and characterization programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, thermoluminescent and radiochromic Dosimetry, and calibration of measurement and test equipment (M&TE). The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations and M&TE laboratories. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentation, photon and neutron transfer standards alpha, beta, and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site, and a wide variety of M&TE. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory.

Bihl, Donald E.; Lynch, Timothy P.; Murphy, Mark K.; Myers, Lynette E.; Piper, Roman K.; Rolph, James T.

2005-07-09

18

A health survey of radiologic technologists  

SciTech Connect

A health survey of more than 143,000 radiologic technologists is described. The population was identified from the 1982 computerized files of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists, which was established in 1926. Inactive members were traced to obtain current addresses or death notifications. More than 6000 technologists were reported to have died. For all registrants who were alive when located, a detailed 16-page questionnaire was sent, covering occupational histories, medical conditions, and other personal and lifestyle characteristics. Nonrespondents were contacted by telephone to complete an abbreviated questionnaire. More than 104,000 responses were obtained. Most technologists were female (76%), white (93%), and employed for an average of 12 years; 37% attended college, and approximately 50% never smoked cigarettes. Radiation exposure information was sought from employer records and commercial dosimetry companies. Technologists employed for the longest times had the highest estimated cumulative exposures, with approximately 9% with exposures greater than 5 cGy. There was a high correlation between cumulative occupational exposure and personal exposure to medical radiographs, related, in part, to the association of both factors with attained age. It is interesting that 10% of all technologists allowed others to practice taking radiographs on them during their training. Nearly 4% of the respondents reported having some type of cancer, mainly of the skin (1517), breast (665), and cervix (726). Prospective surveys will monitor cancer mortality rates through use of the National Death Index and cancer incidence through periodic mailings of questionnaires. This is the only occupational study of radiation employees who are primarily women and should provide new information on the possible risks associated with relatively low levels of exposure.

Boice, J.D. Jr.; Mandel, J.S.; Doody, M.M.; Yoder, R.C.; McGowan, R. (Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States))

1992-01-15

19

Radiation and Health Technology Laboratory Capabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE and commercial nuclear sites and

Donald E. Bihl; Timothy P. Lynch; Mark K. Murphy; Lynette E. Myers; Roman K. Piper; James T. Rolph

2005-01-01

20

Radiation and Health Technology Laboratory Capabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE and commercial nuclear sites and

Ronald W. Goles; Michelle Lynn Johnson; Roman K. Piper; Jerry D. Peters; Mark K. Murphy; Mike S. Mercado; Donald E. Bihl; Timothy P. Lynch

2003-01-01

21

Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec’s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Space and Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

Paul P. Guss

2008-04-01

22

Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec’s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

Paul Guss, Robert Augdahl, Bill Nickels, Cassandra Zellers

2008-04-16

23

CENTER FOR DEVICES AND RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH (CDRH) DOCUMENT DATABASE  

EPA Science Inventory

The Center for Devices and Radiological Health has established advisory committees to provide independent, professional expertise and technical assistance on the development, safety and effectiveness, and regulation of medical devices and electronic products that produce radiatio...

24

Safety and Health Topics: Laboratories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A website created by the Occupational Safety and Health Adminstration (OSHA) highlighting standards, standard interpretations (official letters of interpretation of the standards), and national consensus standards related to occupational exposure to hazardous chemicals in laboratories.

2011-01-01

25

Radiological Health Aspects of Uranium Milling.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the operation of conventional and unconventional uranium milling processes, the potential for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation at the mill, methods for radiological safety, methods of evaluating occupational radiation expo...

D. R. Fisher G. A. Stoetzel

1983-01-01

26

Bureau of Radiological Health Research Grants Program, Fiscal Year 1972.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The research grant activities described in this publication are funded by the Bureau of Radiological Health, FDA, and administered by the Bureau's Program Office. The aim of research grants is to support the Bureau's efforts to promote the health of man b...

E. H. Boeker T. J. O'Connell

1973-01-01

27

ORNL necessary and sufficient standards for environment, safety, and health. Final report of the Identification Team for other industrial, radiological, and non-radiological hazard facilities  

SciTech Connect

This Necessary and Sufficient (N and S) set of standards is for Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These facility classifications are based on a laboratory-wide approach to classify facilities by hazard category. An analysis of the hazards associated with the facilities at ORNL was conducted in 1993. To identify standards appropriate for these Other Industrial, Radiological, and Non-Radiological Hazard Facilities, the activities conducted in these facilities were assessed, and the hazards associated with the activities were identified. A preliminary hazards list was distributed to all ORNL organizations. The hazards identified in prior hazard analyses are contained in the list, and a category of other was provided in each general hazard area. A workshop to assist organizations in properly completing the list was held. Completed hazard screening lists were compiled for each ORNL division, and a master list was compiled for all Other Industrial, Radiological Hazard, and Non-Radiological facilities and activities. The master list was compared against the results of prior hazard analyses by research and development and environment, safety, and health personnel to ensure completeness. This list, which served as a basis for identifying applicable environment, safety, and health standards, appears in Appendix A.

NONE

1998-07-01

28

Radiological Control Manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

Not Available

1993-04-01

29

Radiological Emergency Response Health and Safety Manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual was created to provide health and safety (H&S) guidance for emergency response operations. The manual is organized in sections that define each aspect of H and S Management for emergency responses. The sections are as follows: Responsibilities; Health Physics; Industrial Hygiene; Safety; Environmental Compliance; Medical; and Record Maintenance. Each section gives guidance on the types of training expected for managers and responders, safety processes and procedures to be followed when performing work, and what is expected of managers and participants. Also included are generic forms that will be used to facilitate or document activities during an emergency response. These ensure consistency in creating useful real-time and archival records and help to prevent the loss or omission of information.

D. R. Bowman

2001-05-01

30

An aerial radiological survey of the Sandia National Laboratories and surrounding area  

Microsoft Academic Search

A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the Sandia National Laboratories and Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico, during March and April 1993. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at the site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. This survey includes the areas covered

Riedhauser

1994-01-01

31

The radiological services laboratory: Designed for the future  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new state of the art radiochemistry laboratory incorporating advanced design and environmental control elements has been constructed in Atlanta, Georgia. The design of the facility is oriented to the efficient production of analytical sample results which meet regulatory requirements while at the same time provides an atmosphere that is pleasurable for analysts and visitors alike. The laboratory building contains

T. L. Hardt; S. M. Schutt; K. S. Doran; D. L. Dihel; R. O. Lucas; T. K. Eifert

1992-01-01

32

Imaging and radiology  

MedlinePLUS

Interventional radiology; Diagnostic radiology; X-ray imaging ... DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY Diagnostic radiology helps health care professionals see structures inside your body. Using these images, the radiologist or ...

33

Surface radiological investigation of Trench 5 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

A surface radiological investigation of areas encompassing Trench 5 on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) was conducted from May 1990 through November 1990. This survey was led by the author, assisted by various members of the Measurement Applications and Development (MAD) group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the presence, nature, and extent of surface radiological contamination at Trench 5, the Homogeneous Reactor Experiment fuel wells, and surrounding areas. Based on the data obtained in the field, interim corrective measures were recommended to limit human exposure to radioactivity and to minimize insult to the environment. It should be stressed that this project was not intended to be a complete site characterization but rather to be a preliminary investigation into the potential contamination problem that might exist as a result of past operations at Trench 5.

Goff, D.D.

1991-08-01

34

Surface radiological investigations at the 0816 Site, Waste Area Grouping 13, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

A surface radiological investigation was conducted intermittently from July through September 1994 at the 0816 site, located within Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 13. The survey was performed by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group, Health Sciences Research Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the request of ORNL Site Environmental Restoration Program Facility Management. The purpose of the survey was to ascertain and document the surface radiological condition of the site subsequent to remedial action activities completed in May 1994. The survey was designed to determine whether any residual surface sod contamination in excess of 120 pCi/g {sup 137}Cs (Specified by the Interim Record of Decision) remained at the site.

Tiner, P.F.; Uziel, M.S.

1994-12-01

35

Radiological Laboratory Sample Analysis Guide for Incidents of National Significance â?? Radionuclides in Air  

EPA Science Inventory

[The document describes the likely analytical decision paths that would be made by personnel at a radioanalytical laboratory following a radiological or nuclear incident, such as that caused by a terrorist attack. EPAâ??s responsibilities, as outlined in the National Response Frame...

36

A Useful Formula for the Radiological Calibration Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A useful technique for determining the relationships between irradiation position and air kerma or neutron dose equivalent rate is presented. The standard geometric model (1/r2) is expanded allowing the user to include curvature in the model caused by scattered radiation. This technique applies to clean irradiation geometries that are well modeled by the standard geometric model, high-scatter geometries encountered in well irradiators, and neutron irradiation fields used to calibrate health physics instruments and personnel dosimeters. The technique, with slight modification, is also useful for determining the quality of x-ray beams. The basic equations and the implementing Excel functions are listed. In addition, several examples are presented to demonstrate the application of the technique.

Rick Cummings

2005-03-01

37

76 FR 6476 - Town Hall Discussion With the Director of the Center for Devices and Radiological Health and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Devices and Radiological Health and Other Senior Center...Management.'' The purpose of this public meeting...dialogue about issues of importance to FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) and to members of the public,...

2011-02-04

38

Radiological survey support activities for the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the Engineering Support Division of the US Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office and in accordance with the programmatic overview/certification responsibilities of the Department of Energy Environmental and Safety Engineering Division, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group conducted a series of radiological measurements and tests at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor located in Ames, Iowa. These measurements and tests were conducted during 1980 and 1981 while the reactor building was being decontaminated and decommissioned for the purpose of returning the building to general use. The results of these evaluations are included in this report. Although the surface contamination within the reactor building could presumably be reduced to negligible levels, the potential for airborne contamination from tritiated water vapor remains. This vapor emmanates from contamination within the concrete of the building and should be monitored until such time as it is reduced to background levels. 2 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

1984-09-01

39

Health effects of SRS non-radiological air emissions  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the potential health effects of non radiological emissions to the air resulting from operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The scope of this study was limited to the 55 air contaminants for which the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has quantified risk by determining unit risk factors (excess cancer risks) and/or reference concentrations (deleterious non cancer risks). Potential health impacts have been assessed in relation to the maximally exposed individual. This is a hypothetical person who resides for a lifetime at the SRS boundary. The most recent (1994) quality assured SRS emissions data available were used. Estimated maximum site boundary concentrations of the air contaminants were calculated using air dispersion modeling and 24-hour and annual averaging times. For the emissions studied, the excess cancer risk was found to be less than the generally accepted risk level of 1 in 100,000 and, in most cases, was less than 1 in 1,000,000. Deleterious non cancer effects were also found to be very unlikely.

Stewart, J.

1997-06-16

40

An aerial radiological survey of the Argonne National Laboratory and surrounding area, Argonne, Illinois  

Microsoft Academic Search

An aerial radiological survey was conducted during the period May 17 through May 26, 1989, over a 32-square-mile (83-square-kilometer) area surrounding the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) facilities located near Argonne, Illinois. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) with line spacings of 200 feet (61 meters). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure

Hoover

1994-01-01

41

An aerial radiological survey of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and surrounding area, Batavia, Illinois  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological gamma survey was conducted over the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory during 1 through 6 June 1989. Flight lines at 150-foot altitude and 250-foot line spacings assured nearly 100% coverage. The terrestrial exposure at about 6 {mu}R/h was nearly the same as that measured by the previous survey of this area (May 1977). Ten anomalous areas, mostly Na-22 and Mn-54, were detected within buildings and laboratories in the area. Although these locations have changed somewhat from the 1977 survey, the aerial data shows good agreement with the ground-based ion chamber and soil sample data. 7 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

Fritzsche, A.E.

1990-11-01

42

Surface radiological investigations at the proposed SWSA 7 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

A surface radiological investigation was conducted intermittently from June 1994 to June 1995 at the proposed site for Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 7. The stimulus for this survey was the observation in June 1992 of a man`s trousers became contaminated with {sup 9O}Sr while he was reviewing work on top of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cooling tower. Radiation surveys identified {sup 9O}Sr on the roofs of older buildings at the HFIR site. Since no {sup 9O}Sr was found on buildings built between 1988 and 1990, the {sup 9O}Sr was thought to have been deposited prior to 1988. Later in 1992, beta particles were identified on a bulldozer that had been used in a wooded area southwest of the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) Access Road. More recently in April 1995, {sup 9O}Sr particles were identified on the top side of ceiling tiles in the overhead area of a building in the HFIR Complex. Considering that the proposed SWSA 7 site was located between the HFIR complex and the HPRR Access Road, it was deemed prudent to investigate the possibility that beta particles might also be present at the SWSA 7 site. A possible explanation for the presence of these particles has been provided by long-time ORNL employees and retirees. Strontium-90 as the titanate was developed in the early 1960s as part of the Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. Strontium titanate ({sup 90}SrTiO{sub 3}) was produced at the Fission Product Development Laboratory (Building 3517) in the ORNL main plant area. Waste from the process was loaded into a 1-in. lead-lined dumpster, which was transferred to SWSA 5 where it was dumped into a trench. Dumping allowed some articles to become airborne.

McKenzie, S.P.; Murray, M.E.; Uziel, M.S.

1995-08-01

43

Aerial radiological survey of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and surrounding area, Batavia, Illinois. Date of survey: June 1989.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An aerial radiological gamma survey was conducted over the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory during 1 through 6 June 1989. Flight lines at 150-foot altitude and 250-foot line spacings assured nearly 100% coverage. The terrestrial exposure at about 6 (...

A. E. Fritzsche

1990-01-01

44

Physiology Laboratories Quantifying Gas Exchange in Health and Disease.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes two quantitatively-oriented physiology laboratories for veterinary students. The laboratory exercises incorporate the procedures of radiology and physical examination with measurement of pulmonary function. Specific laboratory objectives, procedures and equipment needed for diagnoses of the pathologies are listed. (ML)

Olson, L. E.

1985-01-01

45

Physiology Laboratories Quantifying Gas Exchange in Health and Disease.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes two quantitatively-oriented physiology laboratories for veterinary students. The laboratory exercises incorporate the procedures of radiology and physical examination with measurement of pulmonary function. Specific laboratory objectives, procedures and equipment needed for diagnoses of the pathologies are listed. (ML)|

Olson, L. E.

1985-01-01

46

Overview of Sandia National Laboratories and Khlopin Radium Institute collaborative radiological accident consequence analysis efforts  

SciTech Connect

In January, 1995 a collaborative effort to improve radiological consequence analysis methods and tools was initiated between the V.G. Khlopin Institute (KRI) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of the collaborative effort was to transfer SNL`s consequence analysis methods to KRI and identify opportunities for collaborative efforts to solve mutual problems relating to the safety of radiochemical facilities. A second purpose was to improve SNL`s consequence analysis methods by incorporating the radiological accident field experience of KRI scientists (e.g. the Chernobyl and Kyshtym accidents). The initial collaborative effort focused on the identification of: safety criteria that radiochemical facilities in Russia must meet; analyses/measures required to demonstrate that safety criteria have been met; and data required to complete the analyses/measures identified to demonstrate the safety basis of a facility.

Young, M.L.; Carlson, D.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lazarev, L.N.; Petrov, B.F.; Romanovskiy, V.N. [V.G. Khlopin Radium Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

1997-05-01

47

Radiological Control Manual. Revision 0, January 1993  

SciTech Connect

This manual has been prepared by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements, and clarifications to the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is based on the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, DOE Order 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers, and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The topics covered are (1) excellence in radiological control, (2) radiological standards, (3) conduct of radiological work, (4) radioactive materials, (5) radiological health support operations, (6) training and qualification, and (7) radiological records.

Not Available

1993-04-01

48

Radiological Health Risks from Accidents during Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuels.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Potential radiological health risks from severe accident scenarios during the transportation of spent nuclear fuels are estimated. These extremely low probability, but potentially credible, scenarios are characterized by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commis...

S. Y. Chen Y. C. Yuan

1988-01-01

49

Imaging informatics for consumer health: towards a radiology patient portal.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE: With the increased routine use of advanced imaging in clinical diagnosis and treatment, it has become imperative to provide patients with a means to view and understand their imaging studies. We illustrate the feasibility of a patient portal that automatically structures and integrates radiology reports with corresponding imaging studies according to several information orientations tailored for the layperson. METHODS: The imaging patient portal is composed of an image processing module for the creation of a timeline that illustrates the progression of disease, a natural language processing module to extract salient concepts from radiology reports (73% accuracy, F1 score of 0.67), and an interactive user interface navigable by an imaging findings list. The portal was developed as a Java-based web application and is demonstrated for patients with brain cancer. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The system was exhibited at an international radiology conference to solicit feedback from a diverse group of healthcare professionals. There was wide support for educating patients about their imaging studies, and an appreciation for the informatics tools used to simplify images and reports for consumer interpretation. Primary concerns included the possibility of patients misunderstanding their results, as well as worries regarding accidental improper disclosure of medical information. CONCLUSIONS: Radiologic imaging composes a significant amount of the evidence used to make diagnostic and treatment decisions, yet there are few tools for explaining this information to patients. The proposed radiology patient portal provides a framework for organizing radiologic results into several information orientations to support patient education. PMID:23739614

Arnold, Corey W; McNamara, Mary; El-Saden, Suzie; Chen, Shawn; Taira, Ricky K; Bui, Alex A T

2013-06-01

50

Aerial Radiological Survey of the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Surrounding Areas. Albuquerque, New Mexico.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A team from the U.S. Department of Energy's Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the Sandia National Laboratories/ New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico, during the months of...

T. J. Hendricks D. L. Prout

2001-01-01

51

Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory radiological control performance indicator report. First quarter -- calendar year 1998  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a report and an analysis of the Radiological Control Performance Indicators through the first Quarter of Calendar Year 1998 (CH-98) for Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO). LMITCO is the prime contractor at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This Performance Indicator Report is provided in accordance with Article 133 of the INEEL Radiological Control Manual. These indicators should be used by management as tools to focus priorities, attention, and adherence to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) practices. The INEEL collective occupational radiation deep dose is 12.426 person-rem year to date, compared to a quarterly goal of 16.2 person-rem. In comparison to last year, the site dose goal has been reduced mainly due to work scope reductions at the Idaho Nuclear Technologies and Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Due to unforeseen increases in shipments to the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, the authors anticipate additional dose increases and will reflect these changes in the next quarter report.

Hinckley, F.L.

1998-05-01

52

An aerial radiological survey of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and surrounding area, Livermore, California  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over four areas in the California cities of Dublin, Livermore, and Tracy from 8 through 29 April 1986. Although a similar aerial survey had been previously conducted over Livermore and Tracy in 1975, this was the first such survey performed over the city of Dublin. The surveyed areas included the Camp Parks training facility in Dublin; the Las Positas Golf Course and the Livermore sewage treatment plant in west Livermore; the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) facilities in east Livermore; and the LLNL facilities at Site 300 located three miles southwest of the city of Tracy, California. Only naturally-occurring radiation was detected over the Camp Parks area in Dublin and over the golf course and sewage treatment plant in west Livermore. Man-made radionuclides were detected over the LLNL facilities in east Livermore and over Site 300. These man-made sources were typical of source storage and radiological activities conducted at the facilities. In areas where only naturally-occurring gamma emitters were detected, the observed range of activity was essentially the same in both the 1975 and 1986 surveys. 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1990-07-01

53

Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory radiological control performance indicator report. Third quarter, calendar year 1997  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a report and analysis of the Radiological Control Program through the third quarter of calendar year 1997 (CY-97) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) under the direction of Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO). This Performance Indicator Report is provided in accordance with Article 133 of the INEEL Radiological Control Manual. The INEEL collective occupational radiation exposure goal (deep dose) has been revised from 137 person-rem to 102.465 person-rem. Aggressive application of ALARA protective measures has resulted in a 66.834 person-rem deep dose compared to projected third quarter goal of 85.5 person-rem. Dose savings at the ICPP Tank Farm and rescheduling of some of the ROVER work account for most of the difference in the goal and actual dose year to date. Work at the ICPP Tank farm has resulted in about 14 rem dose savings. The RWMC has also reduced exposure by moving waste to new temporary storage facilities well ahead of schedule.

NONE

1997-11-01

54

An In Situ Radiological Survey of Three Canyons at the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

An in situ radiological survey of Mortandad, Ten Site, and DP Canyons at the Los Alamos National Laboratory was conducted during August 19-30, 1996. The purpose of this survey was to measure the quantities of radionuclides that remain in the canyons from past laboratory operations. A total of 65 in situ measurements were conducted using high-resolution gamma radiation detectors at 1 meter above the ground. The measurements were obtained in the streambeds of the canyons beginning near the water-release points at the laboratories and extending to the ends of the canyons. Three man-made gamma-emitting radionuclides were detected in the canyons: americium-241 ({sup 241}Am), cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), and cobalt-60 ({sup 60}Co). Estimated contamination levels ranged from 13.3-290.4 picocuries per gram (pCi/g)for {sup 241}Am, 4.4-327.8 pCi/g for {sup 137}Cs, and 0.4-2.6 pCi/g for {sup 60}Co.

R.J. Maurer

1999-06-01

55

Understanding radiologic and nuclear terrorism as public health threats: preparedness and response perspectives.  

PubMed

Terrorism dates back to antiquity, but our understanding of it as a public health threat is still in its nascent stages. Focusing on radiation and nuclear terrorism, we apply a public health perspective to explore relevant physical health and psychosocial impacts, the evolving national response infrastructure created to address terrorism, and the potential roles of nuclear medicine professionals in preparing for and responding to radiologic and nuclear terrorism. PMID:17015902

Barnett, Daniel J; Parker, Cindy L; Blodgett, David W; Wierzba, Rachel K; Links, Jonathan M

2006-10-01

56

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radiological Environmental Surveillance Program 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes calendar year 1995 environmental surveillance activities of Environmental Monitoring and Water Resources of Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company, performed at the following Waste Management Facilities: the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility, the Mixed Waste Storage Facility, and tow surplus facilities. Results of the sampling performed by the Radiological Environmental Surveillance Program, Site Environmental Surveillance Program, and the United States Geological Survey at these facilities are included in this report. The primary purposes of monitoring are to evaluate environmental conditions, to provide and interpret data, to verify compliance with applicable regulations or standards and to ensure protection of human health and the environment. This report compares 1995 environmental surveillance data with US DOE Derived Concentration Guides and with data form previous years.

Miles, M.; Wilhelmsen, R.N.; Borsella, B.W.; Wright, K.C.

1996-08-01

57

Public health laboratory systems development in East Africa through training in laboratory management and field epidemiology  

PubMed Central

Laboratories are integral to the delivery of quality health care and for public health functions; however laboratory systems and services are often neglected in resource-poor settings such as the East African region. In order to sustainably strengthen national laboratory systems in resource-poor countries, there is a need to train laboratory personnel to work in clinical as well as public health laboratories. In 2004,Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, and South Sudan began training public health laboratory workers jointly with field epidemiologists in the Kenya Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (FELTP), and later through the Tanzania FELTP, as a strategy to strengthen public health laboratories. These programs train laboratory epidemiologists through a two-year public health leadership development course, and also offer various types of short course training for frontline staff. The FELTP laboratory graduates in Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and South Sudan are working in their respective countries to strengthen public health laboratory systems while the short course participants provide a pool of frontline implementers with the capacity to support the lower tiers of health systems, as well as serve as surge capacity for the regions and the national level. Through training competent public health laboratory workers, the East African ministries of health, in collaboration with other regional partners and stakeholders are now engaged in developing and implementing a holistic approach that will guarantee an overall strengthening of the health system by using well-trained public health laboratory leaders to drive the process. Strengthening public health laboratory medicine in East Africa is critical to improve health-care systems. The experience with the FELTP model in East Africa is a step in the right direction towards ensuring a stronger role for the laboratory in public health.

Mosha, Fausta; Oundo, Joseph; Mukanga, David; Njenga, Kariuki; Nsubuga, Peter

2011-01-01

58

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Health and Safety Manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual is a tool to provide information to all responders and emergency planners and is suggested as a starting point for all organizations that provide personnel/assets for radiological emergency response. It defines the safety requirements for the protection of all emergency responders. The intent is to comply with appropriate regulations or provide an equal level of protection when the situation makes it necessary to deviate. In the event a situation arises which is not addressed in the manual, an appropriate management-level expert will define alternate requirements based on the specifics of the emergency situation. This manual is not intended to pertain to the general public.

FRMAC Health and Safety Working Group

2012-03-20

59

An aerial radiological survey of the Sandia National Laboratories and surrounding area  

SciTech Connect

A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an aerial radiological survey of the area surrounding the Sandia National Laboratories and Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico, during March and April 1993. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at the site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. This survey includes the areas covered by a previous survey in 1981. The results of the aerial survey show a background exposure rate which varies between 5 and 18 {mu}R/h plus an approximate 6 {mu}R/h contribution from cosmic rays. The major radioactive isotopes found in this survey were: potassium-40, thallium-208, bismuth-214, and actinium-228, which are all naturally-occurring isotopes, and cobalt-60, cesium-137, and excess amounts of thallium-208 and actinium-228, which are due to human actions in the survey area. In regions away from man-made activity, the exposure rates inferred from this survey`s gamma ray measurements agree almost exactly with the exposure rates inferred from the 1981 survey. In addition to the aerial measurements, another survey team conducted in situ and soil sample radiation measurements at three sites within the survey perimeter. These ground-based measurements agree with the aerial measurements within {+-} 5%.

Riedhauser, S.R.

1994-06-01

60

76 FR 13642 - Town Hall Discussion With the Director of the Center for Devices and Radiological Health and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...dialogue about issues of importance to FDA's Center...Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) and to members of the public, including...and discuss issues of importance to the public, including...device industry, health care...

2011-03-14

61

76 FR 41804 - Town Hall Discussion With the Director of the Center for Devices and Radiological Health and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...dialogue about issues of importance to FDA's Center...Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) and to members of the public, including...and discuss issues of importance to the public, including...device industry, health care...

2011-07-15

62

Allied Health Occupations II. Radiologic Technologist Aide Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by the radiologic team and to enable them to acquire some basic skills used in the X-ray department. Addressed in the individual units of the course…

Middletown Public Schools, CT.

63

Occupational Analysis: Hospital Radiologic Technologist. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an effort to meet the growing demand for skilled radiologic technologists and other supportive personnel educated through the associate degree level, a national survey was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project to determine the tasks performed by personnel in the field and lay the groundwork for development of…

Reeder, Glenn D.; And Others

64

Radiological Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Radiological sciences education in Kentucky and articulation within this field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and resource…

Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

65

Occupational Analysis: Hospital Radiologic Technologist. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In an effort to meet the growing demand for skilled radiologic technologists and other supportive personnel educated through the associate degree level, a national survey was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project to determine the tasks performed by personnel in the field and lay the groundwork for development of…

Reeder, Glenn D.; And Others

66

The future of radiology in the new health care paradigm: the Moreton Lecture.  

PubMed

Health care reform will catalyze a wave of experimentation with new forms of Medicare payment as well as reorganization of the care system. These changes could profoundly affect not only the discipline of radiology but the evolution of its core technologies. To respond successfully to these challenges, radiology must aggressively build out the prognostic power of its imaging tools. It must also help create new, subspecialty clinical disciplines to use those tools and develop new payment models that capture the value created for patients and for society. PMID:21371664

Goldsmith, Jeff

2011-03-01

67

Medical response to a major radiologic emergency: a primer for medical and public health practitioners.  

PubMed

There are several types of serious nuclear or radiologic emergencies that would require a specialized medical response. Four scenarios of great public health, economic, and psychologic impact are the detonation of a nuclear weapon, the meltdown of a nuclear reactor, the explosion of a large radiologic dispersal device ("dirty bomb"), or the surreptitious placement of a radiation exposure device in a public area of high population density. With any of these, medical facilities that remain functional may have to deal with large numbers of ill, wounded, and probably contaminated people. Special care and/or handling will be needed for those with trauma, blast injuries, or thermal burns as well as significant radiation exposures or contamination. In addition, radiologists, nuclear medicine specialists, and radiation oncologists will be called on to perform a number of diverse and critically important tasks, including advising political and public health leaders, interfacing with the media, managing essential resources, and, of course, providing medical care. This article describes the medical responses needed following a radiologic or nuclear incident, including the symptoms of and specific treatments for acute radiation syndrome and other early health effects. (c) RSNA, 2010 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.09090330/-/DC1. PMID:20177084

Wolbarst, Anthony B; Wiley, Albert L; Nemhauser, Jeffrey B; Christensen, Doran M; Hendee, William R

2010-03-01

68

National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory Annual Report, 1995.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This annual report showcases some of the scientific activities of the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL) in various health and environmental effects research areas. Where appropriate, the contributions of other collabor...

1996-01-01

69

Public Health Laboratory Testing to Detect and Report Biological Threats.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

To assess the extent to which State public health laboratories have made progress toward the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions (CDC) requirements intended to decrease the time needed to detect and report biological public health threats. Since 2...

2008-01-01

70

Health, Safety and Environmental Laboratories Procedures and Practices Manual.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Procedures and Practices Manual documents the manner in which environmental, health, and industrial safety samples are analyzed by the Rocky Flats Health, Safety and Environmental Laboratories (HS and EL). This document is intended as an information ...

W. F. Williams L. F. Smith

1982-01-01

71

Health implications of radiological terrorism: Perspectives from Israel  

PubMed Central

September 11th events taught us, members of the medical community, that we need to prepared for the worst. Nuclear terror is no longer science fiction. Radiological weapons of mass terror come in three flavors: The first one is nuclear. Since 1992, there have been six known cases of highly enriched uranium or plutonium being intercepted by authorities as it passed in or out of the former Soviet Union. Constructing a nuclear fission weapon requires high-level expertise, substantial facilities, and lots of money. All three of which would be difficult, although not impossible, for a terrorist group to pull off without state support. However, terrorists could carry out potential mass destruction without sophisticated weaponry by targeting nuclear facilities using conventional bombs or hijacked aircrafts. Terror attacks could also carry out mass panic and radioactive contamination of people and environment by dispersal of radioactive materials with or without the use of conventional explosive devices. Most medical and para-medical personnel are not familiar with CBRN terror and radiation casualties. To lessen the impact of those potential attacks and provide care for the greatest number of potential survivors, the community as a whole – and the medical community in particular – must acquire the knowledge of the various signs and symptoms of exposure to irradiation and radioactive contamination as well as have a planned response once such an attack has occurred. Based on knowledge of radiation hazards, medical emergency planers should analyze the risks of each scenario, offer feasible solutions and translate them into internationally accepted plans that would be simple to carry out once such an attack took place. The planned response should be questioned and tested by drills. Those drills should check the triage, evacuation routes, decontamination posts, evacuation centers and receiving hospitals. It is crucial that the drill will consist of simulated casualties that will follow the evacuation route from point zero to the ED. Knowledge and exercise will reduce terror (fear) from radiation and help the community as a whole better cope with such an event. This article will review the general information of radiation types, their biological damage, clinical appearance and general concepts of nuclear event planning, focusing on medical response and focus on the Israeli perspective.

Hagby, Moti; Goldberg, Avishay; Becker, Steven; Schwartz, Dagan; Bar-Dayan, Yaron

2009-01-01

72

Health implications of radiological terrorism: Perspectives from Israel.  

PubMed

September 11(th) events taught us, members of the medical community, that we need to prepared for the worst. Nuclear terror is no longer science fiction. Radiological weapons of mass terror come in three flavors: The first one is nuclear. Since 1992, there have been six known cases of highly enriched uranium or plutonium being intercepted by authorities as it passed in or out of the former Soviet Union. Constructing a nuclear fission weapon requires high-level expertise, substantial facilities, and lots of money. All three of which would be difficult, although not impossible, for a terrorist group to pull off without state support. However, terrorists could carry out potential mass destruction without sophisticated weaponry by targeting nuclear facilities using conventional bombs or hijacked aircrafts. Terror attacks could also carry out mass panic and radioactive contamination of people and environment by dispersal of radioactive materials with or without the use of conventional explosive devices. Most medical and para-medical personnel are not familiar with CBRN terror and radiation casualties. To lessen the impact of those potential attacks and provide care for the greatest number of potential survivors, the community as a whole - and the medical community in particular - must acquire the knowledge of the various signs and symptoms of exposure to irradiation and radioactive contamination as well as have a planned response once such an attack has occurred. Based on knowledge of radiation hazards, medical emergency planers should analyze the risks of each scenario, offer feasible solutions and translate them into internationally accepted plans that would be simple to carry out once such an attack took place. The planned response should be questioned and tested by drills. Those drills should check the triage, evacuation routes, decontamination posts, evacuation centers and receiving hospitals. It is crucial that the drill will consist of simulated casualties that will follow the evacuation route from point zero to the ED. Knowledge and exercise will reduce terror (fear) from radiation and help the community as a whole better cope with such an event. This article will review the general information of radiation types, their biological damage, clinical appearance and general concepts of nuclear event planning, focusing on medical response and focus on the Israeli perspective. PMID:19561972

Hagby, Moti; Goldberg, Avishay; Becker, Steven; Schwartz, Dagan; Bar-Dayan, Yaron

2009-05-01

73

Aerial radiological survey of the Brookhaven National Laboratory and surrounding area, Upton, New York. Date of survey: June 1983  

Microsoft Academic Search

An aerial radiological survey was performed from 11 to 13 June 1983, over approximately a 64-square-kilometer (25-square-mile) area surrounding the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). BNL is located in the center of Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. All gamma radiation data were collected by flying east-west lines spaced 76 meters (250 feet) apart at an altitude of 46 meters (150

Hobaugh

1985-01-01

74

Health and Safety Surveys at University Chemistry Laboratories  

Microsoft Academic Search

The academic chemistry laboratory has been described as a setting which provides the occupational health professional with unique challenges. The chemistry laboratories of a major public university were surveyed to determine the nature of likely exposures, the level of utilization of personal protective equipment, provision of safety equipment, level of hygienic practices, and compliance with generally accepted health and safety

Joseph Guarino

1990-01-01

75

Building the Body: Active Learning Laboratories that Emphasize Practical Aspects of Anatomy and Integration with Radiology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This article describes the development of active learning techniques to review anatomy material in the context of radiology. Explanations of how the curriculum was designed to integrate knowledge and reemphasize concepts in different contexts is explained.

Kitt Shaffer (Boston University Radiology)

2010-04-23

76

RISKIND: A computer program for calculating radiological consequences and health risks from transportation of spent nuclear fuel.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents the technical details of RISIUND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the collective population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclea...

Y. C. Yuan S. Y. Chen D. J. LePoire R. Rothman

1993-01-01

77

Radiological hazards from uranium mining  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a At all the French uranium mines where it made radiological surveys, the CRIIRAD laboratory discovered situations of environmental\\u000a contamination and a lack of proper protection of the inhabitants against health risks due to ionizing radiation. Radiological\\u000a problems are not only to be addressed during mining or milling operations but also on the longer term after mine closure.

Bruno Chareyron

78

Health care facility-based decontamination of victims exposed to chemical, biological, and radiological materials.  

PubMed

Since the US terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, concern regarding use of chemical, biological, or radiological weapons is heightened. Many victims of such an attack would present directly to health care facilities without first undergoing field decontamination. This article reviews basic tenets and recommendations for health care facility-based decontamination, including regulatory concerns, types of contaminants, comprehensive decontamination procedures (including crowd control, triage, removal of contaminated garments, cleaning of body contaminants, and management of contaminated materials and equipment), and a discussion of methods to achieve preparedness. PMID:18082785

Koenig, Kristi L; Boatright, Connie J; Hancock, John A; Denny, Frank J; Teeter, David S; Kahn, Christopher A; Schultz, Carl H

2008-01-01

79

Individual dose monitoring of the nuclear medicine departments staff controlled by Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection.  

PubMed

Presented paper describes the results of the individual doses measurements for ionizing radiation, carried out by the Laboratoryof Individual and Environmental Doses Monitoring (PDIS) of the Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection in Warsaw (CLOR) for the medical staff employees in several nuclear medicine (NM) departments across Poland. In total there are48 NM departments in operation in Poland [1] (consultation inNuclear Atomic Agency). Presented results were collected over the period from January 2011 to December 2011 at eight NMdepartments located in Krakow, Warszawa (two departments), Rzeszow (two departments), Opole, Przemysl and Gorzow Wielkopolski. For radiation monitoring three kinds of thermo luminescence dosimeters (TLD) were used. The first TLD h collectedinformation about whole body (C) effective dose, the second dosimeter was mounted in the ring (P) meanwhile the third on thewrist (N) of the tested person. Reading of TLDs was performed in quarterly periods. As a good approximation of effective and equivalent dose assessment of operational quantities both the individual dose equivalent Hp(10) and the Hp(0.07) were used. The analysis of the data was performed using two methods The first method was based on quarterly estimations of Hp(10)q andHp(0.07)q while the second measured cumulative annual doses Hp(10)a and Hp(0.07)a. The highest recorded value of the radiation dose for quarterly assessments reached 24.4 mSv and was recorded by the wrist type dosimeter worn by a worker involved in source preparation procedure. The mean values of Hp(10)q(C type dosimeter) and Hp(0.07)q (P and N type dosimeter) for all monitored departments were respectively 0.46 mSv and 3.29 mSv. There was a strong correlation between the performed job and the value of the received dose. The highest doses alwayswere absorbed by those staff members who were involved insources preparation. The highest annual cumulative dose for a particular worker in the considered time period was 4.22 mSv for Hp(10)a and 67.7 mSv for Hp(0.07)a. In 2011 no case of exceeding the allowed dose limits was noted. PMID:24068634

Szewczak, Kamil; Jednoróg, S?awomir; Krajewski, Pawe?

2013-01-01

80

Quality Assurance Program for Field Health Laboratories.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 (and previously the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969) established mandatory dust standards for coal mines. Title II requires the Secretary of Labor to make frequent inspections of coal mines to...

H. N. Treaftis P. S. Parobeck

1984-01-01

81

HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH PROGRAM: AN OVERVIEW SUMMARY  

EPA Science Inventory

The present Health Effects Research Laboratory (HERL) biotechnology program is an outgrowth of previously existing programs in microbial pesticide research and genetic toxicology research. In order to meet the recommendation issued during the Coolfont Conference, HERL presently m...

82

Strengthening national laboratory health systems in the Caribbean Region.  

PubMed

The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) programme for the Caribbean Region was established in 2008 to address health system challenges, including fragile laboratory services and systems. The laboratory component of this programme consisted of several phases: assessment of laboratory needs of all 12 countries engaged in the programme; addressing gaps identified during the assessment; and monitoring and evaluation of the progress achieved. After one year of PEPFAR collaboration with national governments and other partners, laboratory services and systems greatly improved. Some of the milestones include: (1) the accreditation of a public laboratory; (2) improved access to HIV diagnosis with faster turnaround time; (3) establishment of capacity for platforms for DNA PCR, viral load and HIV drug resistance; (4) development of the laboratory workforce; and (5) establishment of a framework for implementation of sustainable quality management systems for laboratory accreditation. The progress recorded in strengthening laboratory health systems after one year of initiating this collaboration shows that with a rigorous initial assessment, programme design and intervention and strategic partnership, national laboratory health systems can be greatly enhanced to support programme implementation. Continued collaboration and country leadership is critical to create an integrated and sustainable laboratory network in the Caribbean. PMID:22519703

Alemnji, George A; Branch, Songee; Best, Anton; Kalou, Mireille; Parekh, Bharat; Waruiru, Wanjiru; Milstrey, Eric; Conn, William; Nkengasong, John N; Lecher, Shirley

2012-04-23

83

Building the Body: Active Learning Laboratories that Emphasize Practical Aspects of Anatomy and Integration with Radiology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Active learning exercises were developed to allow advanced medical students to revisit and review anatomy in a clinically meaningful context. In our curriculum, students learn anatomy two to three years before they participate in the radiology clerkship. These educational exercises are designed to review anatomy content while highlighting its…

Zumwalt, Ann C.; Lufler, Rebecca S.; Monteiro, Joseph; Shaffer, Kitt

2010-01-01

84

Critical review of the reactor-safety study radiological health effects model. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This review of the radiological health effects models originally presented in the Reactor Safety Study (RSS) and currently used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was undertaken to assist the NRC in determining whether or not to revise the models and to aid in the revision, if undertaken. The models as presented in the RSS and as implemented in the CRAC (Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences) Code are described and critiqued. The major elements analyzed are those concerning dosimetry, early effects, and late effects. The published comments on the models are summarized, as are the important findings since the publication of the RSS.

Cooper, D.W.; Evans, J.S.; Jacob, N.; Kase, K.R.; Maletskos, C.J.; Robertson, J.B.; Smith, D.G.

1983-03-01

85

Diagnostic Radiology Guidelines.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The health systems agency that reviews certificate of need applications for replacing or adding diagnostic radiology equipment should benefit from these guidelines. To help determine need for diagnostic radiology equipment, the Health Services Council, In...

1978-01-01

86

Los Alamos National Laboratory's environmental surveillance and radiological emergency vehicle and the Co60 incident  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 4-wheel drive van has been outfitted at Los Alamos for environmental surveillance and radiological emergencies. The van's capabilities were described at this conference in 1982. The rapid gamma search and spectral analysis capabilities were utilized in conjunction with the cobalt-60 (⁶°Co) teletherapy source incident in Juarez, Mexico. Assistance was requested by the State of New Mexico (through DOE\\/Albuquerque Area

D. M. Van Etten; A. J. Ahlquist; W. R. Hansen

1984-01-01

87

Training and qualification of health and safety technicians at a national laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Over the last 30 years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has successfully implemented the concept of a multi-disciplined technician. LLNL Health and Safety Technicians have responsibilities in industrial hygiene, industrial safety, health physics, as well as fire, explosive, and criticality safety. One of the major benefits to this approach is the cost-effective use of workers who display an ownership of health and safety issues which is sometimes lacking when responsibilities are divided. Although LLNL has always promoted the concept of a multi-discipline technician, this concept is gaining interest within the Department of Energy (DOE) community. In November 1992, individuals from Oak Ridge Institute of Science and Education (ORISE) and RUST Geotech, joined by LLNL established a committee to address the issues of Health and Safety Technicians. In 1993, the DOE Office of Environmental, Safety and Health, in response to the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 91-6, stated DOE projects, particularly environmental restoration, typically present hazards other than radiation such as chemicals, explosives, complex construction activities, etc., which require additional expertise by Radiological Control Technicians. They followed with a commitment that a training guide would be issued. The trend in the last two decades has been toward greater specialization in the areas of health and safety. In contrast, the LLNL has moved toward a generalist approach integrating the once separate functions of the industrial hygiene and health physics technician into one function.

Egbert, W.F.; Trinoskey, P.A.

1994-10-01

88

The Fukushima radiological emergency and challenges identified for future public health responses.  

PubMed

On 11 March 2011, northern Japan was rocked by first a magnitude 9.0 earthquake off the eastern coast and then an ensuing tsunami. The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant complex was hit by these twin disasters, and a cascade of events was initiated that led to radionuclide releases causing widespread radioactive contamination of residential areas, agricultural land, and coastal waters. Radioactive material from Japan was subsequently transmitted to locations around the globe, including the U.S. The levels of radioactive material that arrived in the U.S. were never large enough to be a concern for health effects, but the presence of this material in the environment was enough to create a public health emergency in the U.S. The radiation safety and public health communities in the U.S. are identifying challenges they faced in responding to this incident. This paper discusses three of those challenges: (1) The growing shortage of trained radiation subject matter experts in the field of environmental transport and dosimetry of radionuclides; (2) the need to begin expressing all radiation-related quantities in terms of the International System of Units; and (3) the need to define when a radiation dose is or is not one of "public health concern." This list represents only a small subset of the list of challenges being identified by public health agencies that responded to the Fukushima incident. However, these three challenges are fundamental to any radiological emergency response. Addressing them will have a significant positive impact on how the U.S. responds to the next radiological emergency. PMID:22469934

Miller, Charles W

2012-05-01

89

The laboratory efficiencies initiative: partnership for building a sustainable national public health laboratory system.  

PubMed

Beginning in early 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Association of Public Health Laboratories launched the Laboratory Efficiencies Initiative (LEI) to help public health laboratories (PHLs) and the nation's entire PHL system achieve and maintain sustainability to continue to conduct vital services in the face of unprecedented financial and other pressures. The LEI focuses on stimulating substantial gains in laboratories' operating efficiency and cost efficiency through the adoption of proven and promising management practices. In its first year, the LEI generated a strategic plan and a number of resources that PHL directors can use toward achieving LEI goals. Additionally, the first year saw the formation of a dynamic community of practitioners committed to implementing the LEI strategic plan in coordination with state and local public health executives, program officials, foundations, and other key partners. PMID:23997300

Ridderhof, John C; Moulton, Anthony D; Ned, Renée M; Nicholson, Janet K A; Chu, May C; Becker, Scott J; Blank, Eric C; Breckenridge, Karen J; Waddell, Victor; Brokopp, Charles

2013-09-01

90

Responsible conduct of radiology research. Part V. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and research.  

PubMed

For the past 5 years, the regulatory environment for research involving humans has been turbulent, with criticism coming from the federal government, the academic community, and the press. The purpose of this series of articles is to explain the ethical and legal bases for responsible conduct of radiology research and the rules that an investigator must follow. The purpose of this fifth part of the series is to explain the requirements of the Privacy Rule, which is a component of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), as they relate to human research. Under the HIPAA Privacy Rule, researchers within covered entities must follow appropriate methods as they use or disclose protected health information (PHI). Investigators should know the conditions under which PHI may be accessed for research purposes (ie, with authorization or waiver of authorization, when only a limited data set is evaluated, if data have been de-identified, or in reviews preparatory to research). Furthermore, researchers should know which information, such as the Notice of Privacy Practices and the Accounting of Disclosures, must be provided to potential subjects, when appropriate. At the conclusion of this article, several scenarios related to various types of radiology research and related regulatory requirements are presented. PMID:16304095

Johnson, Matthew S; Gonzales, Marcia N; Bizila, Shelley

2005-12-01

91

Occupational health hazards in the interventional laboratory: progress report of the Multispecialty Occupational Health Group  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Multispecialty Occupational Health Group (MSOHG), formed in 2005, is an informal coalition of societies representing professionals who work in or are concerned with interventional fluoroscopy. The group's long term goals are to improve occupational health and operator and staff safety in the interventional laboratory while maintaining quality patient care and optimal use of the laboratory. MSOHG has conducted a

Donald L Miller; Lloyd W Klein; Stephen Balter; Alexander Norbash; David Haines; Lynne Fairobent; James A Goldstein

2010-01-01

92

Results of the radiological survey at the Space Radiation Effects Laboratory, Newport News, Virginia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Space Radiation Effects Laboratory located in Newport News, Virginia, was operated by the College of William and Mary for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). A synchrocyclotron was formerly in operation in this laboratory and a primary beam of 600 MeV protons and secondary beams of 400 MeV pions and muons were produced for the purpose of studying

M. G. Yalcintas

1986-01-01

93

Health and Safety Laboratory Environmental Quarterly, March 1, 1977--June 1, 1977.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents current information from the HASL environmental programs, The Technical University of Wroclaw, Poland, and the Radiological and Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The initial section consists of interpreti...

E. P. Hardy

1977-01-01

94

Overutilization of Radiological Examinations.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The radiologist's potentially important role in controlling the use of radiological examinations of patients is examined. Attempts to expedite patient processing and increase physician efficiency have resulted in the overuse of radiological laboratory fun...

F. M. Hall

1976-01-01

95

Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of low-level alpha contaminated wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document provides radiological, physical, and chemical characterization data for low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and low-level alpha-contaminated radioactive and hazardous (i.e., mixed) wastes stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and considered for treatment under the Private Sector Participation Initiative Program. Waste characterization data are provided in the form of INEL Waste Profile Sheets. These documents provide, for each content code, information on waste identification, waste description, waste storage configuration, physical/chemical waste composition, radionuclide and associated alpha activity waste characterization data, and hazardous constituents present in the waste. Information is provided for 97 waste streams which represent an estimated total volume of 25,450 m 3 corresponding to a total mass of approximately 12,000,000 kg. In addition, considerable information concerning alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron source term data specific to Rocky Flats-generated waste forms stored at the INEL are provided to assist in facility design specification.

Apel, M.L.; Becker, G.K.; Ragan, Z.K.; Frasure, J.; Raivo, B.D.; Gale, L.G.; Pace, D.P.

1994-03-01

96

Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Director`s overview of research performed for DOE Office of Health And Environmental Research  

SciTech Connect

A significant portion of the research undertaken at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is focused on the strategic programs of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER). These programs, which include Environmental Processes (Subsurface Science, Ecosystem Function and Response, and Atmospheric Chemistry), Global Change (Climate Change, Environmental Vulnerability, and Integrated Assessments), Biotechnology (Human Genome and Structural Biology), and Health (Health Effects and Medical Applications), have been established by OHER to support DOE business areas in science and technology and environmental quality. PNL uses a set of critical capabilities based on the Laboratory`s research facilities and the scientific and technological expertise of its staff to help OHER achieve its programmatic research goals. Integration of these capabilities across the Laboratory enables PNL to assemble multidisciplinary research teams that are highly effective in addressing the complex scientific and technical issues associated with OHER-sponsored research. PNL research efforts increasingly are focused on complex environmental and health problems that require multidisciplinary teams to address the multitude of time and spatial scales found in health and environmental research. PNL is currently engaged in research in the following areas for these OHER Divisions: Environmental Sciences -- atmospheric radiation monitoring, climate modeling, carbon cycle, atmospheric chemistry, ecological research, subsurface sciences, bioremediation, and environmental molecular sciences; Health Effects and Life Sciences -- cell/molecular biology, and biotechnology; Medical Applications and Biophysical Research -- analytical technology, and radiological and chemical physics. PNL`s contributions to OHER strategic research programs are described in this report.

NONE

1995-06-01

97

Swine influenza test results from animal health laboratories in Canada.  

PubMed

Due to its infrastructure and partnerships the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance Network was able to rapidly collect test results from 9 Canadian laboratories that were conducting primary testing for influenza on swine-origin samples, in response to the threat posed by the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in 2009. PMID:24155436

Kloeze, Harold; Mukhi, Shamir N; Alexandersen, Soren

2013-05-01

98

World Health Organization/HIVResNet Drug Resistance Laboratory Strategy.  

PubMed

With rapidly increasing access to antiretroviral drugs globally, HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) has become a significant public health issue. This requires a coordinated and collaborative response from country level to international level to assess the extent of HIVDR and the establishment of efficient and evidence-based strategies to minimize its appearance and onward transmission. In parallel with the rollout of universal access to HIV treatment, countries are developing protocols based on the recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO) to measure, at a population level, both transmitted HIVDR and HIVDR emerging during treatment. The WHO in collaboration with international experts (HIVResNet Laboratory Working Group), has developed a laboratory strategy, which has the overall goal of delivering quality-assured HIV genotypic results on specimens derived from the HIVDR surveys. The results will be used to help control the emergence and spread of drug resistance and to guide decision makers on antiretroviral therapy policy at national, regional and global level. The HIVDR Laboratory Strategy developed by the WHO includes several key aspects: the formation of a global network of national, regional and specialized laboratories accredited to perform HIVDR testing using a common set of WHO standard and performance indicators; recommendations of acceptable methods for collection, handling, shipment and storage of specimens in field conditions; and the provision of laboratory technical support, capacity building and quality assurance for network laboratories. The WHO/HIVResNet HIVDR Laboratory Network has been developed along the lines of other successful laboratory networks coordinated by the WHO. As of August 2007, assessment for accreditation has been conducted in 30 laboratories, covering the WHO's African, South-East Asia, Western Pacific, and the Caribbean Regions. PMID:18575191

Bertagnolio, Silvia; Derdelinckx, Inge; Parker, Monica; Fitzgibbon, Joseph; Fleury, Herve; Peeters, Martin; Schuurman, Rob; Pillay, Deenan; Morris, Lynn; Tanuri, Amilcar; Gershy-Damet, Guy-Michel; Nkengasong, John; Gilks, Charles F; Sutherland, Donald; Sandstrom, Paul

2008-01-01

99

Health and safety of laboratory science students in Ibadan, Nigeria.  

PubMed

Laboratory science students are engaged in laboratory practice under supervision during the course of their training programme. They are exposed to the risk of laboratory-acquired infection and need to be adequately informed and equipped with facilities to protect their health. A questionnaire was administered to laboratory science students to determine their perception of hazards in laboratory practice and the observance of safety codes in their work practices. Of 128 students, 118 completed the questionnaire, a response rate of 92%. Sixty of them (51%) were males and 53 (45%) were females; five students did not indicate their sex. The results revealed that only 34 (29%) of the students use gloves for handling biological samples and 26 (22%) use gloves for handling clinical waste. Ninety-four students (80%) reported that they washed their hands after handling specimens. Eighteen of the students (15%) had been immunised against tuberculosis, 80 (68%) against tetanus, six (5%) against hepatitis B, and 18 (15%) against yellow fever. Ninety-six students (81%) thought the greatest hazard in laboratory practice was harmful biological organisms, while 13 (11%) indicated that chemical agents were the greatest hazard. Virology was thought to be the most hazardous specialty by 41 students (35%) while morbid anatomy was ranked as least hazardous by 48 (41%) of the students. These findings indicate that whilst laboratory science students are aware of the hazards in laboratory practice, this knowledge is not translated to safe practices and students may endanger their health as a result of exposure to laboratory practice. They therefore need to be provided with adequate facilities to protect themselves and adequate supervision to ensure that they imbibe safe work practices during their training years. PMID:12134763

Omokhodion, F O

2002-06-01

100

Radiological consequence analyses under severe accident conditions for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses salient aspects of methodology, assumptions, modeling of various features related to radiation exposure, and health consequences from source terms resulting from two conservatively scoped severe accident scenarios. Radiological consequences for a site-suitability scenario based on 10 CFR 100 guidelines also are presented. Consequences arising from severe accidents involving steaming pools and core-concrete interaction (CCI) events combined with several different containment configurations are presented. Results are presented in the form of mean cumulative values for prompt and latent cancer fatality estimates and related cumulative, complementary distribution functions as a function of distance from the reactor site. It is shown that the reactor-site-suitability risk goals are met by a large margin and that overall risk is dominated by early containment failure combined with CCI events.

Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Kim, S.H.; Georgevich, V.

1992-10-01

101

Los Alamos National Laboratory's environmental surveillance and radiological emergency vehicle and the Co-60 incident  

SciTech Connect

A 4-wheel drive van has been outfitted at Los Alamos for environmental surveillance and radiological emergencies. The van's capabilities were described at this conference in 1982. The rapid gamma search and spectral analysis capabilities were utilized in conjunction with the cobalt-60 (/sup 60/Co) teletherapy source incident in Juarez, Mexico. Assistance was requested by the State of New Mexico (through DOE/Albuquerque Area Office) in January 1984 to perform initial in-situ isotopic identification of the contaminated steel that was first discovered in the United States by Los Alamos. The van's capabilities were again called upon in March 1984 to survey the New Mexico highways using the highly sensitive delta count rate monitoring system for /sup 60/Co pellets that may have been tracked into the state. This paper provides (1) setup and results of the surveys conducted with the van, (2) interactions with the press, and (3) an evaluation of the van's usefulness in such an emergency response. 2 references, 5 figures.

Van Etten, D.M.; Ahlquist, A.J.; Hansen, W.R.

1984-01-01

102

Radiologically contaminated lead shot reuse at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This project involved the utilization of radioactively contaminated lead shot located at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for radiation shielding on a radioactive liquid process tank located at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). The use of previously contaminated shot precludes the radioactive contamination of clean shot. With limited treatment and disposal options for contaminated lead shot, the reuse of lead

W. M. Heileson; R. P. Grant

1995-01-01

103

Aerial radiological survey of Technical Areas 2, 21, and 53 and surroundings, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Date of survey, September 1982.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An aerial radiological survey of the entire Los Alamos National Laboratory was flown in September 1982. The data from a part of the survey, Technical Areas 2, 21, and 53, are presented here along with pertinent data from an October 1975 survey of limited ...

A. E. Fritzsche

1990-01-01

104

Aerial radiological survey of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory and surrounding area, Waxahachie, Texas. Date of survey: July--August 1991.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) site from July 22 through August 20,1991. Parallel lines were flown at intervals of 305 meters over a 1,036-square-kilometer (400-square-mile) area surro...

A. E. Fritzsche

1993-01-01

105

Public Health Preparedness and Response to Chemical and Radiological Incidents: Functions, Practices, and Areas for Future Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This 66 page report released in August 2009 looks into the world of public health emergency preparedness, and for those persons who work in the fields of emergency response policy, public health, or security studies, this work will be most timely. Authored by five researchers at the RAND Corporation this technical report looks into "the roles of the public health service in emergency preparedness and its response to chemical and radiological incidents." The report is divided into four chapters, two appendices, and a references section. As events like nuclear plant accidents, chemical terrorism, and other related occurrences can have tremendous implications for public health, the report is most valuable.

Latourrette, Tom

106

RADIOLOGICAL EMISSIONS AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING FOR BROOKHAV EN NATIONAL LABORATORY, 1947 - 1961.  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has monitored its releases to the environment since its inception in 1947. From 1962 to 1966 and from 1971 to the present, annual reports,were published that recorded the emissions and releases to the environment from Laboratory operations. In 1998, a report was written to summarize the environmental data for the years 1967 to 1970. One of the purposes of the current report is to complete BNL's environmental history by covering the period from 1948 through 1961. The activities in 1947 were primarily organizational and there is no information on the use of radiation at the Laboratory before 1948. An additional objective of this report is to provide environmental data to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). The report does not provide an estimate of the doses associated with BNL operations. The report is comprised of two parts. The first part is a summary of emissions, releases, and environmental monitoring information including a discussion of the uncertainties in these data. Part two contains the detailed information on the approach taken to estimate the releases from the fuel cartridge failures at the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR). A series of appendices present more detailed information on these events in tabular form. The approach in this report is to be reasonable, conservative, (pessimistic), and transparent in estimating releases from fuel cartridge ruptures. Clearly, reactor stack monitoring records and more extensive records would have greatly improved this effort, but in accordance with Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) Appendix 0230 Annex C-9, many of the detailed records from this time were not retained.

MEINHOLD,C.B.; MEINHOLD,A.F. (EDITED BY BOND,P.D.)

2001-05-30

107

Implementing total quality management (TQM) in health-care laboratories.  

PubMed

Health-care organizations are beginning to apply the principles of total quality management (TQM). Implementing TQM in a health-care laboratory requires incorporating quality improvement (QI) and quality planning (QP) with quality laboratory practices (QLP), quality control (QC), and quality assurance (QA) to provide a complete quality management system. QI and QP can be initiated by developing a strategic plan as a pilot QI project. QI project teams are then introduced to accomplish the highest priority goals. This implementation approach improves strategic planning by using group problem-solving tools and techniques, such as process flow charts, brainstorming, nominal group, fishbone diagrams, consensus decision making, and Pareto analysis. The approach also improves the success of project teams by providing a clear management agenda and a commitment to project-by-project QI. PMID:10113715

Westgard, J O; Barry, P L; Tomar, R H

108

The laboratory's role in environmental health emergency investigations.  

PubMed

An emergency environmental health investigation of a mass poisoning of unknown origin is a multidiscipline effort that requires the cooperation and close communication of epidemiologists, toxicologists, and chemists. The laboratory's role in this effort is important; special instruments, knowledge, and experience are needed. Our approach to such an investigation is discussed and past cases are used as illustrations. The role of the analytical chemist is presented, and the major resources needed for these investigations are described. PMID:3783801

Hill, R H; Needham, L L; Liddle, J A

1986-01-01

109

The Los Alamos Radiological Instrumentation and Calibration Facility  

Microsoft Academic Search

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has a rich history with respect to all health physics functions. The radiological calibration program has long been one of the pillars of the health physics programs at LANL. Because of the diversity of the hazards on the site, many health physics calibration capabilities are required. Some examples include beta-gamma calibrations, neutron remmeter calibrations, and

Eisele

1996-01-01

110

The Danube Hospital digital radiology as a prerequisite for a health care network  

Microsoft Academic Search

The history of “PACS” is closely related to the Danube Hospital. The Opening of the worlds first entirely large-scale filmless radiology department in 1992 was a milestone in the early stages of digital radiology. At that point, PACS had just taken the step from being an idea to becoming an adventure, undertaken by a few pioneers worldwide. At the beginning,

W. Hruby; H. Mosser; W. Krampla

2005-01-01

111

75 FR 384 - Event Problem Codes Web Site; Center for Devices and Radiological Health; Availability  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FDA-2009-N-0576] Event Problem Codes Web Site; Center for Devices and Radiological...FDA) is announcing the availability of a Web site where the Center for Devices and Radiological...FDA is announcing the availability of a Web site that will make modifications to...

2010-01-05

112

Bioremediation of Petroleum and Radiological Contaminated Soils at the Savannah River Site: Laboratory to Field Scale Applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the process of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations limited amounts of waste are generated containing petroleum, and radiological contaminated soils. Currently, this combination of radiological and petroleum contaminated waste does not have an immediate disposal route and is being stored in low activity vaults. SRS developed and implemented a successful plan for clean up of the petroleum portion of

Robin L. Brigmon

2004-01-01

113

Health, Safety and Environmental Laboratories Procedures and Practices Manual  

SciTech Connect

This Procedures and Practices Manual documents the manner in which environmental, health, and industrial safety samples are analyzed by the Rocky Flats Health, Safety and Environmental Laboratories (HS and EL). This document is intended as an information service for HS and EL users and other interested groups. It is not to be used as a procedure manual by HS and EL technicians. Since research is constantly ongoing into methods to improve processes, these procedures are subject to change without notice. Thirty-three procedures are described including those for the analysis of urine samples for Pu, Am and U, the analysis of soil samples for Pu, Th, and U, and the analysis of ashed necropsy tissue for Am, Pu, and U.

Williams, W.F.; Smith, L.F.

1982-03-01

114

Audit report: health physics technician subcontracts at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

To supplement its health physics staff, Brookhaven National Laboratory (Brookhaven) subcontracted with a support service business (the subcontractor) to obtain the services of health physics technicians. During the pefiormance of these subcontracts, certain issues arose concerning per diem payments to the subcontractor for local technicians. The objective of this audit was to determine whether Brookhaven fi.dly etiorced the terms and conditions of its subcontracts for health physics technicians. Brookhaven had not fully enforced the terms of its subcontracts, and as a result, Brookhaven and the Department paid about $288,000 more than necessary for health physics technicians. For example, Brookhaven reimbursed the subcontractor for per diem on days when work was not performed and when the subcontractor did not pay subsistence expenses to its technicians. Brookhaven also increased the subcontracts' fixed reimbursement rates without adequate justification and reimbursed the subcontractor for overtime even though the subcontract did not provide for an overtime reimbursement rate. We recommend that the Manager, Chicago Operations Office, recover the unreasonable costs identified in the audit and require Brookhaven to strengthen its subcontract administration practices. Management agreed in principle with the audit finding and recommendations. However, management - stated that additional time was needed to further examine the issues.

Brendlinger, Terry L.

1999-05-01

115

Radiological control manual. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Radiological Control Manual (LBNL RCM) has been prepared to provide guidance for site-specific additions, supplements and interpretation of the DOE Radiological Control Manual. The guidance provided in this manual is one methodology to implement the requirements given in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835 (10 CFR 835) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual. Information given in this manual is also intended to provide demonstration of compliance to specific requirements in 10 CFR 835. The LBNL RCM (Publication 3113) and LBNL Health and Safety Manual Publication-3000 form the technical basis for the LBNL RPP and will be revised as necessary to ensure that current requirements from Rules and Orders are represented. The LBNL RCM will form the standard for excellence in the implementation of the LBNL RPP.

Kloepping, R.

1996-05-01

116

Radiological health implications of lead-210 and polonium-210 accumulations in LPG refineries  

SciTech Connect

Radon-222, a naturally occurring radioactive noble gas, is often a contaminant in natural gas. During fractionation at processing plants, Radon tends to be concentrated in the Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) product stream. Radon-222 decays into a number of radioactive metallic daughters which can plate out on the interior surfaces of plant machinery. The hazards associated with gamma-emitting short-lived radon daughters have been investigated previously. The present work reports an analysis of the hazards associated with the long-lived daughters; Pb-210, Bi-210, and Po-210. These nuclides do not emit appreciable penetrating radiation, and hence do not represent a hazard as long as they remain on the inside surfaces of equipment. However, when equipment that has had prolonged exposure to an LPG stream is disassembled for repair or routine maintenance, opportunities for exposure to radioactive materials can occur. A series of measurements made on an impeller taken from a pump in an LPG facility is reported. Alpha spectroscopy revealed the presence of Po-210, and further measurements showed that the amount on the impeller surface was well above the exempt quantity. Breathing zone measurements made in the course of cleaning the impeller showed that an inhalation exposure equivalent to breathing Po-210 at the Maximum Permissible Concentration (MPC) for 60 hours could be delivered in less than half an hour. It was concluded that maintenance and repair work on LPG and derivitive product stream equipment must be carried out with the realization that a potential radiological health problem exists.

Summerlin, J. Jr.; Prichard, H.M.

1985-04-01

117

Genetic Analyses in Health Laboratories: Current Status and Expectations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Genetic analyses performed in health laboratories involve adult patients, newborns, embryos/fetuses, pre-implanted pre-embryos, pre-fertilized oocytes and should meet the major medical needs of hospitals and pharmaceutical companies. Recent data support the concept that, in addition to diagnosis and prognosis, genetic analyses might lead to development of personalized therapy. Novel frontiers in genetic testing involve the development of single cell analyses and non-invasive assays, including those able to predict outcome of cancer pathologies by looking at circulating tumor cells, DNA, mRNA and microRNAs. In this respect, PCR-free diagnostics appears to be one of the most interesting and appealing approaches.

Finotti, Alessia; Breveglieri, Giulia; Borgatti, Monica; Gambari, Roberto

118

An e-health driven laboratory information system to support HIV treatment in Peru: Equity for laboratory personnel, health providers and people living with HIV  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Peru has a concentrated HIV epidemic with an estimated 76,000 people living with HIV (PLHIV). Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) expanded between 2004-2006 and the Peruvian National Institute of Health was named by the Ministry of Health as the institution responsible for carrying out testing to monitor the effectiveness of HAART. However, a national public health laboratory

Patricia J García; Javier H Vargas; Patricia Caballero N; Javier Calle V; Angela M Bayer

2009-01-01

119

A Low-Cost, Real-Time Network for Radiological Monitoring Around Nuclear Facilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

A low-cost, real-time radiological sensor network for emergency response has been developed and deployed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring (RTRAM) network is comprised of 16 Geiger-Mueller (GM) sensors positioned on the site perimeter to continuously monitor radiological conditions as part of LLNL's comprehensive environment\\/safety\\/health protection program. The RTRAM network sensor locations coincide with

Bertoldo

2004-01-01

120

Health Risks from High-Level Radiation Exposures from Radiological Weapons  

Microsoft Academic Search

When a radiological weapon (dirty bomb) is detonated, radioactive debris can be spread over a wide area impacting on a large number of citizens. In addition to people at the site of the incident, downwind members of the public, first responders, physicians, nurses, on-site public officials, police officers, firemen, and press members could also receive significant radiation exposures. The risk

Bobby R. Scott

2004-01-01

121

Progress in increasing electronic reporting of laboratory results to public health agencies - United States, 2013.  

PubMed

Electronic reporting of laboratory results to public health agencies can improve public health surveillance for reportable diseases and conditions by making reporting more timely and complete. Since 2010, CDC has provided funding to 57 state, local, and territorial health departments through the Epidemiology and Laboratory Capacity for Infectious Diseases cooperative agreement to assist with improving electronic laboratory reporting (ELR)* from clinical and public health laboratories to public health agencies. As part of this agreement, CDC and state and large local health departments are collaborating to monitor ELR implementation in the United States by developing data from each jurisdiction regarding total reporting laboratories, laboratories sending ELR by disease category and message format, and the number of ELR laboratory reports compared with the total number of laboratory reports. At the end of July 2013, 54 of the 57 jurisdictions were receiving at least some laboratory reports through ELR, and approximately 62% of 20 million laboratory reports were being received electronically, compared with 54% in 2012. Continued progress will require collaboration between clinical laboratories, laboratory information management system (LIMS) vendors, and public health agencies. PMID:24067585

2013-09-27

122

Implementation of a quality management system in public health laboratories in the Republic of Georgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Through a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute and CDC Laboratory Strengthening Department implemented quality management systems (QMS) into the two national public health laboratories in Tbilisi, Georgia. The QMS was based on CLSI's document Quality Management System: A Model for Laboratory Services; Approved Guideline and ISO 15189, Medical

Brandy Greenhill

2012-01-01

123

The Predictive Value of Selected Extrinsic and Intrinsic Indicators of Overall Job Satisfaction in Diagnostic Radiological Technology, Radiation Therapy, and Nuclear Medicine Technology Allied Health Faculty  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Healthcare is the largest industry in the United States and 60 percent of its 14 million workers are in allied health jobs. The need to attract and retain allied health faculty is critical to preparing a competent workforce in healthcare. This study reports the results of a survey of 259 faculty members working in diagnostic radiologic…

Beavers, Gregory S.

2010-01-01

124

OVERVIEW OF GLOBAL RESEARCH WITHIN THE EPA NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY (NHEERL)  

EPA Science Inventory

The National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL) is one of the laboratories in EPA's Office of Research and Development contributing the Global Change Research Program. NHEERL is studying the potential effects of global change on vulnerable ecosystems. ...

125

An e-health driven laboratory information system to support HIV treatment in Peru: E-quity for laboratory personnel, health providers and people living with HIV  

PubMed Central

Background Peru has a concentrated HIV epidemic with an estimated 76,000 people living with HIV (PLHIV). Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) expanded between 2004-2006 and the Peruvian National Institute of Health was named by the Ministry of Health as the institution responsible for carrying out testing to monitor the effectiveness of HAART. However, a national public health laboratory information system did not exist. We describe the design and implementation of an e-health driven, web-based laboratory information system - NETLAB - to communicate laboratory results for monitoring HAART to laboratory personnel, health providers and PLHIV. Methods We carried out a needs assessment of the existing public health laboratory system, which included the generation and subsequent review of flowcharts of laboratory testing processes to generate better, more efficient streamlined processes, improving them and eliminating duplications. Next, we designed NETLAB as a modular system, integrating key security functions. The system was implemented and evaluated. Results The three main components of the NETLAB system, registration, reporting and education, began operating in early 2007. The number of PLHIV with recorded CD4 counts and viral loads increased by 1.5 times, to reach 18,907. Publication of test results with NETLAB took an average of 1 day, compared to a pre-NETLAB average of 60 days. NETLAB reached 2,037 users, including 944 PLHIV and 1,093 health providers, during its first year and a half. The percentage of overall PLHIV and health providers who were aware of NETLAB and had a NETLAB password has also increased substantially. Conclusion NETLAB is an effective laboratory management tool since it is directly integrated into the national laboratory system and streamlined existing processes at the local, regional and national levels. The system also represents the best possible source of timely laboratory information for health providers and PLHIV, allowing patients to access their own results and other helpful information about their health, extending the scope of HIV treatment beyond the health facility and providing a model for other countries to follow. The NETLAB system now includes 100 diseases of public health importance for which the Peruvian National Institute of Health and the network of public health laboratories provide testing and results.

2009-01-01

126

21 CFR 892.1980 - Radiologic table.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1980 Radiologic table. (a) Identification. A radiologic table is a...

2013-04-01

127

Aerial radiological survey of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and surrounding area, Livermore, California. Date of survey, April 1986.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over four areas in the California cities of Dublin, Livermore, and Tracy from 8 through 29 April 1986. Although a similar aerial survey had been previously conducted over Livermore and Tracy in 1975, this was th...

1990-01-01

128

A radiological control implementation guide  

SciTech Connect

A manual is being developed to explain to line managers how radiological controls are designed and implemented. The manual also fills a gap in the Health Physics literature between textbooks and on-the-floor procedures. It may be helpful to new Health Physicists with little practical experience and to those wishing to improve self-assessment, audit, and appraisal processes. Many audits, appraisals, and evaluations have indicated a need for cultural change, increased vigor and example, and more effective oversight by line management. Inadequate work controls are a frequent and recurring problem identified in occurrence reports and accident investigations. Closer study frequently indicates that many line managers are willing to change and want to achieve excellence, but no effective guidance exists that will enable them to understand and implement a modern radiological control program. The manual is now in draft form and includes information that will be of use to line managers dealing with improving radiological performance and the practical aspects of radiological controls implementation. The manual is expected to be completed by the fall of 1993 and to be used in conjunction with a performance-based self-assessment training program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Hamley, S.A.

1993-01-01

129

A radiological control implementation guide  

SciTech Connect

A manual is being developed to explain to line managers how radiological controls are designed and implemented. The manual also fills a gap in the Health Physics literature between textbooks and on-the-floor procedures. It may be helpful to new Health Physicists with little practical experience and to those wishing to improve self-assessment, audit, and appraisal processes. Many audits, appraisals, and evaluations have indicated a need for cultural change, increased vigor and example, and more effective oversight by line management. Inadequate work controls are a frequent and recurring problem identified in occurrence reports and accident investigations. Closer study frequently indicates that many line managers are willing to change and want to achieve excellence, but no effective guidance exists that will enable them to understand and implement a modern radiological control program. The manual is now in draft form and includes information that will be of use to line managers dealing with improving radiological performance and the practical aspects of radiological controls implementation. The manual is expected to be completed by the fall of 1993 and to be used in conjunction with a performance-based self-assessment training program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Hamley, S.A.

1993-06-01

130

Bioremediation of Petroleum and Radiological Contaminated Soils at the Savannah River Site: Laboratory to Field Scale Applications  

SciTech Connect

In the process of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations limited amounts of waste are generated containing petroleum, and radiological contaminated soils. Currently, this combination of radiological and petroleum contaminated waste does not have an immediate disposal route and is being stored in low activity vaults. SRS developed and implemented a successful plan for clean up of the petroleum portion of the soils in situ using simple, inexpensive, bioreactor technology. Treatment in a bioreactor removes the petroleum contamination from the soil without spreading radiological contamination to the environment. This bioreactor uses the bioventing process and bioaugmentation or the addition of the select hydrocarbon degrading bacteria. Oxygen is usually the initial rate-limiting factor in the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Using the bioventing process allowed control of the supply of nutrients and moisture based on petroleum contamination concentrations and soil type. The results of this work have proven to be a safe and cost-effective means of cleaning up low level radiological and petroleum-contaminated soil. Many of the other elements of the bioreactor design were developed or enhanced during the demonstration of a ''biopile'' to treat the soils beneath a Polish oil refinery's waste disposal lagoons. Aerobic microorganisms were isolated from the aged refinery's acidic sludge contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Twelve hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were isolated from the sludge. The predominant PAH degraders were tentatively identified as Achromobacter, Pseudomonas Burkholderia, and Sphingomonas spp. Several Ralstonia spp were also isolated that produce biosurfactants. Biosurfactants can enhance bioremediation by increasing the bioavailability of hydrophobic contaminants including hydrocarbons. The results indicated that the diversity of acid-tolerant PAH-degrading microorganisms in acidic oil wastes may be much greater than previously demonstrated and they have numerous applications to environmental restoration. Twelve of the isolates were subsequently added to the bioreactor to enhance bioremediation. In this study we showed that a bioreactor could be bioaugmented with select bacteria to enhance bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated soils under radiological conditions.

BRIGMON, ROBINL.

2004-06-07

131

NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY - AN ANNUAL REPORT OF ACCOMPLISHMENTS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2000  

EPA Science Inventory

This Annual Report showcases some of the research activities of the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL) in various health and environmental effects research areas. The report is an indicator of the examples of progress and accomplishments that ...

132

Manual of Basic Techniques for a Health Laboratory.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Described are basic laboratory methods for diagnosing and investigating diseases of importance to developing countries. Intended primarily for the training of technicians who will work in peripheral laboratories, the manual is designed so that student laboratory assistants can be taught to use it with minimal supervision from a teacher. The…

World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

133

Post-remedial-action radiological survey of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, Pennsylvania, October 1-8, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The post-remedial-action radiological assessment conducted by the ANL Radiological Survey Group in October 1981, following decommissioning and decontamination efforts by Westinghouse personnel, indicated that except for the Advanced Fuels Laboratory exhaust ductwork and north wall, the interior surfaces of the Plutonium Laboratory and associated areas within Building 7 and the Advanced Fuels Laboratory within Building 8 were below both the ANSI Draft Standard N13.12 and NRC Guideline criteria for acceptable surface contamination levels. Hence, with the exceptions noted above, the interior surfaces of those areas within Buildings 7 and 8 that were included in the assessment are suitable for unrestricted use. Air samples collected at the involved areas within Buildings 7 and 8 indicated that the radon, thoron, and progeny concentrations within the air were well below the limits prescribed by the US Surgeon General, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Department of Energy. The Building 7 drain lines are contaminated with uranium, plutonium, and americium. Radiochemical analysis of water and dirt/sludge samples collected from accessible Low-Bay, High-Bay, Shower Room, and Sodium laboratory drains revealed uranium, plutonium, and americium contaminants. The Building 7 drain lines hence are unsuitable for release for unrestricted use in their present condition. Low levels of enriched uranium, plutonium, and americium were detected in an environmental soil coring near Building 8, indicating release or spillage due to Advanced Reactors Division activities or Nuclear Fuel Division activities undr NRC licensure. /sup 60/Co contamination was detected within the Building 7 Shower Room and in soil corings from the environs of Building 7. All other radionuclide concentrations measured in soil corings and the storm sewer outfall sample collected from the environs about Buildings 7 and 8 were within the range of normally expected background concentrations.

Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.; Sholeen, C.M.; Smith, W.H.; Wynveen, R.A.

1984-01-01

134

Implementing a Network for Electronic Surveillance Reporting from Public Health Reference Laboratories: An International Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electronic data reporting from public health laboratories to a central site pro- vides a mechanism for public health officials to rapidly identify problems and take action to prevent further spread of disease. However, implementation of reference laboratory systems is much more complex than simply adopting new technology, especially in international settings. We describe three major areas to be considered by

Nancy H. Bean; Stanley M. Martin

2001-01-01

135

Environmental, safety, and health plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 10, Operable Unit 3, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This document outlines the environmental, safety, and health (ES&H) approach to be followed for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 10 at Oak at Ridge National Laboratory. This ES&H Plan addresses hazards associated with upcoming Operable Unit 3 field work activities and provides the program elements required to maintain minimal personnel exposures and to reduce the potential for environmental impacts during field operations. The hazards evaluation for WAG 10 is presented in Sect. 3. This section includes the potential radiological, chemical, and physical hazards that may be encountered. Previous sampling results suggest that the primary contaminants of concern will be radiological (cobalt-60, europium-154, americium-241, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239, cesium-134, cesium-137, and curium-244). External and internal exposures to radioactive materials will be minimized through engineering controls (e.g., ventilation, containment, isolation) and administrative controls (e.g., procedures, training, postings, protective clothing).

Not Available

1993-10-01

136

Health effects models for off-site radiological consequence analysis of nuclear reactor accidents.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A first version of models has been developed for predicting the number of occurrences of health effects induced by radiation exposure in nuclear reactor accidents. The models are based on the health effects models developed originally by Harvard Universit...

O. Togawa T. Homma H. Matsuzuru S. Kobayashi

1991-01-01

137

Public health laboratory workforce outreach in Hawai'i: CLIA-focused student internship pilot program at the state laboratories.  

PubMed

Chronically understaffed public health laboratories depend on a decreasing number of employees who must assume broader responsibilities in order to sustain essential functions for the many clients the laboratories support. Prospective scientists considering a career in public health are often not aware of the requirements associated with working in a laboratory regulated by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA). The purpose of this pilot internship was two-fold; introduce students to operations in a regulated laboratory early enough in their academics so that they could make good career decisions, and evaluate internship methodology as one possible solution to workforce shortages. Four interns were recruited from three different local universities, and were paired with an experienced State Laboratories Division (SLD) staff mentor. Students performed tasks that demonstrated the importance of CLIA regulations for 10-15 hours per week over a 14 week period. Students also attended several directed group sessions on regulatory lab practice and quality systems. Both interns and mentors were surveyed periodically during the semester. Surveys of mentors and interns indicated overall positive experiences. One-on-one pairing of experienced public health professionals and students seems to be a mutually beneficial arrangement. Interns reported that they would participate if the internship was lower paid, unpaid, or for credit only. The internship appeared to be an effective tool to expose students to employment in CLIA-regulated laboratories, and potentially help address public health laboratory staffing shortfalls. Longer term follow up with multiple classes of interns may provide a more informed assessment. PMID:23386992

Whelen, A Christian; Kitagawa, Kent

2013-01-01

138

An Information Management and Technology Laboratory in an Academic Health Center Library  

PubMed Central

The aims and goals in setting up an Information Management and Technology Laboratory in the Lyman Maynard Stowe Library at the University of Connecticut Health Center are outlined. Health professionals have a chance in the Laboratory to try software and machines and acquaint themselves with some of the new technology. The Laboratory can save individual departments time, the necessity for extensive research and money and will be used to give students and staff experience in information management techniques.

Peterson, Margaret G.E.; Brantz, Malcolm H.

1984-01-01

139

Radiological dose assessment for bounding accident scenarios at the Critical Experiment Facility, TA-18, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A computer modeling code, CRIT8, was written to allow prediction of the radiological doses to workers and members of the public resulting from these postulated maximum-effect accidents. The code accounts for the relationships of the initial parent radionuclide inventory at the time of the accident to the growth of radioactive daughter products, and considers the atmospheric conditions at time of release. The code then calculates a dose at chosen receptor locations for the sum of radionuclides produced as a result of the accident. Both criticality and non-criticality accidents are examined.

NONE

1991-09-01

140

Descriptive profile of tuberculin skin testing programs and laboratory-acquired tuberculosis infections in public health laboratories.  

PubMed

The increase in numbers of cases of tuberculosis in the United States has placed greater demands on mycobacteriology laboratory workers to produce rapid and accurate results. The greater number of specimens generated by the increased emphasis on detecting the disease has placed these workers at greater risk of laboratory-acquired infection. We surveyed 56 state and territorial public health laboratories to determine the status of existing tuberculin skin testing (TST) programs and to evaluate the frequency of probable laboratory-acquired tuberculosis for each responding mycobacteriology laboratory. Probable laboratory-acquired infections were determined by each laboratory's evaluation of occupational positions, duties, and employee histories and review of medical records. Two-step TST for new employees was routinely practiced in only 33% of responding laboratories, and mycobacteriology laboratorians were found to be most frequently screened when they were compared to employees of other departments. Of 49 (88%) responding laboratories, 13 reported that 21 employees were TST converters from 1990 to 1994. Seven of these 21 employees were documented to have laboratory-acquired infections based on evaluations by their respective laboratories. Based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, converters are categorized on the basis of both a change in the size of the zone of induration and the age of the person being tested. By the definitions in the guidelines, 14 mycobacteriologists were identified as recent converters, 7 of whom were > or = 35 years of age and 4 of whom were exposed in the laboratory within a 2-year period. Inadequate isolation procedures, the high volume of specimen handling, and faulty ventilation accounted for these laboratory-associated infections. These results suggest that more frequent periodic evaluations based on documented TST conversions for workers in mycobacterial laboratories should be performed, since this population is at increased risk of becoming infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although general assessments are necessary to accurately and effectively evaluate the risk of tuberculosis transmission, they are especially important for those working in high-risk areas within a public health laboratory. PMID:9196206

Kao, A S; Ashford, D A; McNeil, M M; Warren, N G; Good, R C

1997-07-01

141

Descriptive profile of tuberculin skin testing programs and laboratory-acquired tuberculosis infections in public health laboratories.  

PubMed Central

The increase in numbers of cases of tuberculosis in the United States has placed greater demands on mycobacteriology laboratory workers to produce rapid and accurate results. The greater number of specimens generated by the increased emphasis on detecting the disease has placed these workers at greater risk of laboratory-acquired infection. We surveyed 56 state and territorial public health laboratories to determine the status of existing tuberculin skin testing (TST) programs and to evaluate the frequency of probable laboratory-acquired tuberculosis for each responding mycobacteriology laboratory. Probable laboratory-acquired infections were determined by each laboratory's evaluation of occupational positions, duties, and employee histories and review of medical records. Two-step TST for new employees was routinely practiced in only 33% of responding laboratories, and mycobacteriology laboratorians were found to be most frequently screened when they were compared to employees of other departments. Of 49 (88%) responding laboratories, 13 reported that 21 employees were TST converters from 1990 to 1994. Seven of these 21 employees were documented to have laboratory-acquired infections based on evaluations by their respective laboratories. Based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, converters are categorized on the basis of both a change in the size of the zone of induration and the age of the person being tested. By the definitions in the guidelines, 14 mycobacteriologists were identified as recent converters, 7 of whom were > or = 35 years of age and 4 of whom were exposed in the laboratory within a 2-year period. Inadequate isolation procedures, the high volume of specimen handling, and faulty ventilation accounted for these laboratory-associated infections. These results suggest that more frequent periodic evaluations based on documented TST conversions for workers in mycobacterial laboratories should be performed, since this population is at increased risk of becoming infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although general assessments are necessary to accurately and effectively evaluate the risk of tuberculosis transmission, they are especially important for those working in high-risk areas within a public health laboratory.

Kao, A S; Ashford, D A; McNeil, M M; Warren, N G; Good, R C

1997-01-01

142

National Health Service laboratories in England, 1966-74.  

PubMed Central

Laboratory workloads increased substantially between 1966 and 1974, the total number of laboratories was reduced, and productivity improved. The trends are likely to continue, but in the present economic situation the availability of accommodation will be an important constraint in determining the pattern of future development.

Buttolph, M A

1977-01-01

143

Improving newborn screening laboratory test ordering and result reporting using health information exchange  

Microsoft Academic Search

Capture, coding and communication of newborn screening (NBS) information represent a challenge for public health laboratories, health departments, hospitals, and ambulatory care practices. An increasing number of conditions targeted for screening and the complexity of interpretation contribute to a growing need for integrated information-management strategies. This makes NBS an important test of tools and architecture for electronic health information exchange

Stephen M Downs; Peter C van Dyck; Piero Rinaldo; Clement McDonald

144

Results of the radiological and chemical characterization of surface impoundments 3539 and 3540 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

A radiological and chemical characterization survey of impoundments 3539 and 3540 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted during December 1997. Impoundments 3539 and 3540 are located in the Surface Impoundments Operable Unit (SIOU) of Waste Area Group 1. The investigation was performed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Life Sciences Division of ORNL at the request of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration. Sampling was conducted in order to quantify the presence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents, and other contaminants of interest in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation for the SIOU> The survey included collection of sediment/clay samples, quality control blank water samples and equipment rinsate samples for chemical and radiological analysis. Results show the samples contain traces of various organic, inorganic, and radioactive materials. Of particular interest are PCB values which demonstrate the impoundments are not regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act.

Murray, M.E.; Rose, D.A.; Brown, K.S.; Winton, W.; Dean, R.A.; Coe, R.H. III

1998-03-01

145

Surface radiological investigations of Trench 6 and low-level waste Line Leak Site 7. 4b at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

A surface radiological investigation of Trench 6 and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) Line Leak Site 7.4b was conducted in July and August 1989 and January 1990 by the Measurement Applications and Development Group, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purposes of this survey were (1) to determine the presence, nature, and extent of surface radiological contamination and (2) to recommend interim corrective action to limit human exposures to radioactivity and minimize the potential for contaminant dispersion. Highest surface gamma levels encountered during the survey (39 mR/h) were found just south of the asphalt covering LLW Line Leak Site 7.4b. Elevated surface gamma levels (measuring 28 to 560 {mu}R/h) extended from this area to a width of 100 ft, westward 250 ft, and beyond the survey boundary. Beta-gamma levels up to 17 mrad/h measured on contact with the trunks of trees growing in the area southwest of Trench 6 suggest that three roots are reaching contamination deep within the ground. Since no gamma activity is associated with the trees or their leaves, the elevated beta levels are probably due to the uptake of residual {sup 90}Sr originating from the documented seepage at the Trench 6/Leak Site 7.4b area. Beta activity present in the leaf litter and surface soil indicate that decaying leaves are depositing measurable contaminants on the ground surface. Recommendations for corrective actions are included. 7 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

Uziel, M.S.; Tiner, P.F.; Williams, J.K.

1991-08-01

146

Automated Identification of Patients with Pulmonary Nodules in an Integrated Health System Using Administrative Health Plan Data, Radiology Reports, and Natural Language Processing  

PubMed Central

Introduction Lung nodules are commonly encountered in clinical practice, yet little is known about their management in community settings. An automated method for identifying patients with lung nodules would greatly facilitate research in this area. Methods Using members of a large, community-based health plan in 2006–2010, we developed a method to identify patients with lung nodules by combining five diagnostic codes, four procedural codes and a natural language processing (NLP) algorithm that performed free text searches of radiology transcripts. An experienced pulmonologist reviewed a random sample of 116 radiology transcripts, providing a reference standard for the NLP algorithm. Results We identified 7,112 unique members as having one or more incident lung nodules using an automated method. The mean age was 65 (SD 14) years. There were slightly more women (54%) than men, and Hispanics and non-whites comprised 45% of the lung nodule cohort. Thirty-six percent were never smokers while 11% were current smokers. Fourteen percent were subsequently diagnosed with lung cancer. The sensitivity and specificity of the NLP algorithm for identifying the presence of lung nodule(s) were 96% and 86%, respectively, compared with clinician review. Among the true positive transcripts in the validation sample, only 35% were solitary and unaccompanied by one or more associated findings and 56% measured 8–30 mm in diameter. Conclusions A combination of diagnostic codes, procedural codes and an NLP algorithm for free text searching of radiology reports can accurately and efficiently identify patients with incident lung nodules, many of whom are subsequently diagnosed with lung cancer.

Danforth, Kim N.; Early, Megan I.; Ngan, Sharon; Kosco, Anne E.; Zheng, Chengyi; Gould, Michael K.

2012-01-01

147

An aerial radiological survey of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory and surrounding area, Waxahachie, Texas. Date of survey: July--August 1991  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) site from July 22 through August 20,1991. Parallel lines were flown at intervals of 305 meters over a 1,036-square-kilometer (400-square-mile) area surrounding Waxahachie, Texas. The 70,000 terrestrial gamma energy spectra obtained were reduced to an exposure rate contour map overlaid on a United States Geological Survey (USGS) map of the area. The mean terrestrial exposure rate measured was 5.4 {mu}R/h at 1 meter above ground level. Comparison to ground-based measurements shows good agreement. No anomalous or man-made isotopes were detected.

Fritzsche, A.E.

1993-02-01

148

The World Health Organization African region laboratory accreditation process: improving the quality of laboratory systems in the African region.  

PubMed

Few developing countries have established laboratory quality standards that are affordable and easy to implement and monitor. To address this challenge, the World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa (WHO AFRO) established a stepwise approach, using a 0- to 5-star scale, to the recognition of evolving fulfillment of the ISO 15189 standard rather than pass-fail grading. Laboratories that fail to achieve an assessment score of at least 55% will not be awarded a star ranking. Laboratories that achieve 95% or more will receive a 5-star rating. This stepwise approach acknowledges to laboratories where they stand, supports them with a series of evaluations to use to demonstrate improvement, and recognizes and rewards their progress. WHO AFRO's accreditation process is not intended to replace established ISO 15189 accreditation schemes, but rather to provide an interim pathway to the realization of international laboratory standards. Laboratories that demonstrate outstanding performance in the WHO-AFRO process will be strongly encouraged to enroll in an established ISO 15189 accreditation scheme. We believe that the WHO-AFRO approach for laboratory accreditation is affordable, sustainable, effective, and scalable. PMID:20716795

Gershy-Damet, Guy-Michel; Rotz, Philip; Cross, David; Belabbes, El Hadj; Cham, Fatim; Ndihokubwayo, Jean-Bosco; Fine, Glen; Zeh, Clement; Njukeng, Patrick A; Mboup, Souleymane; Sesse, Daniel E; Messele, Tsehaynesh; Birx, Deborah L; Nkengasong, John N

2010-09-01

149

Case Report: The Development of a Highly Constrained Health Level 7 Implementation Guide to Facilitate Electronic Laboratory Reporting to Ambulatory Electronic Health Record Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electronic laboratory interfaces can significantly increase the value of ambulatory electronic health record (EHR) systems by providing laboratory result data automatically and in a computable form. However, many ambulatory EHRs cannot implement electronic laboratory interfaces despite the existence of messaging standards, such as Health Level 7, version 2 (HL7). Among several barriers to implementing laboratory interfaces is the extensive optionality

Walter V. Sujansky; J. Marc Overhage; Sophia Chang; Jonah Frohlich; Samuel A. Faus

2009-01-01

150

Radiological health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis.  

PubMed

Improved health effects models have been developed for assessing the early effects, late somatic effects and genetic effects that might result from low-LET radiation exposures to populations following a major accident in a nuclear power plant. All the models have been developed in such a way that the dynamics of population risks can be analyzed. Estimates of life years lost and the duration of illnesses were generated and a framework recommended for summarizing health impacts. Uncertainty is addressed by providing models for upper, central and lower estimates of most effects. The models are believed to be a significant improvement over the models used in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Reactor Safety Study, and they can easily be modified to reflect advances in scientific understanding of the health effects of ionizing radiation. PMID:2925380

Evans, J S; Moeller, D W

1989-04-01

151

Abstract-U.S. Public Health Response to the Fukushima Radiological Emergency: One Agency's Perspective.  

PubMed

On 11 March 2011, northern Japan suffered first a magnitude 9.0 earthquake centered ~208 km off the eastern coast and then an ensuing tsunami. These natural events caused widespread destruction along the east coast of Japan. One location hit was the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Reactor Complex. The destruction at this site initiated a cascade of events that led to multiple reactors overheating, core meltdown, and radionuclide releases causing widespread radioactive contamination of residential areas, agricultural land, and coastal waters. The public health and medical community in Japan faced many challenges as a result of these multiple events. Our sympathies go out to the Japanese people who will be dealing with the consequences of this incident for years to come.As the radionuclide releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Reactor escaped into the atmosphere and the ocean, the impact of this disaster was felt around the world. Like many other nations, the U.S. public health system was concerned about the safety of both its citizens living in Japan and citizens residing in the United States as the radioactive materials released from Fukushima were detected in trace amounts as they traveled around the globe. As with any crisis, these events present opportunities to learn and prepare for similar incidents in the future. Events in both Japan and the United States during the response illustrated some U.S. preparedness gaps that had been anticipated previously and others that were newly identified. The Secretary of Health and Human Services has forwarded a report to the National Security Staff discussing public health preparedness gaps and challenges identified by the Fukushima incident. Some of these gaps include the following:•Equipment and personnel resources to monitor potentially exposed people for radioactive contamination are insufficient.•There is no public health authority to detain people contaminated with radioactive materials.•Public health and medical expertise and treatment capacities for response to radiation emergencies are limited.•There is an insufficient number of radiation health experts.•Public health communications regarding radiation emergency preparedness, health effects of radiation exposures, resilience, and response actions are inadequate.•National and international exposure standards for radiation measurements (and units) and protective action guides lack uniformity.•Access to radiation emergency monitoring data is limited and procedurally complex.•The policy on stockpiling potassium iodide in the Strategic National Stockpile should be revisited.This event was a major disaster for the people of Japan, but it was also a significant public health emergency for the U.S. public health community. We should capitalize upon this rare opportunity to improve our public health preparedness based on the experience of our Japanese colleagues and our own. PMID:24077048

Miller, Charles W; Whitcomb, Robert C; Buzzell, Jennifer; McCurley, M Carol; Ansari, Armin; Evans, Lynn

2013-11-01

152

Autoclaving practice in microbiology laboratories: report of a survey. The Public Health Laboratory Service Subcommittee on laboratory autoclaves.  

PubMed Central

The performance of autoclaves in 27 laboratories, operated in accordance with the normal routine of local practice, has been monitored using thermometric equipment. Sterilising performance was unsatisfactory on 10 of 62 occasions, and cooling was inadequate on 52 of 60 occasions.

1978-01-01

153

Integrating environment, safety and health training at a national laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In a multi-purpose research laboratory, innovation and creativity are required to satisfy the training requirements for hazards to people and the environment. A climate that encourages excellence in research and enhances hazard minimization skills is created by combining technical expertise with instructional design talent.

Larson, D.R.

1993-01-01

154

Integrating environment, safety and health training at a national laboratory  

SciTech Connect

In a multi-purpose research laboratory, innovation and creativity are required to satisfy the training requirements for hazards to people and the environment. A climate that encourages excellence in research and enhances hazard minimization skills is created by combining technical expertise with instructional design talent.

Larson, D.R.

1993-03-01

155

Exposure pathways and health effects associated with chemical and radiological toxicity of natural uranium: a review.  

PubMed

Natural uranium exposure derives from the mining, milling, and processing of uranium ore, as well as from ingestion of groundwater that is naturally contaminated with uranium. Ingestion and inhalation are the primary routes of entry into the body. Absorption of uranium from the lungs or digestive track is typically low but can vary depending on compound specific solubility. From the blood, two-thirds of the uranium is excreted in urine over the first 24 hours and up to 80% to 90% of uranium deposited in the bone leaves the body within 1.5 years. The primary health outcomes of concern documented with respect to uranium are renal, developmental, reproductive, diminished bone growth, and DNA damage. The reported health effects derive from experimental animal studies and human epidemiology. The Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Level (LOAEL) derived from animal studies is 50 microg/m3 for inhalation and 60 ug/kg body weight/day for ingestion. The current respiratory standard of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), 50 microg/m3, affords no margin of safety. Considering the safety factors for species and individual variation, the ingestion LOAEL corresponds to the daily consumption set by the World Health Organization Drinking Water Standard at 2 microg/L. Based on economic considerations, the United States Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level is 30 microg/L. Further research is needed, with particular attention on the impact of uranium on indigenous populations, on routes of exposure in communities near uranium sites, on the combined exposures present at many uranium sites, on human developmental defects, and on health effects at or below established exposure standards. PMID:16342416

Brugge, Doug; de Lemos, Jamie L; Oldmixon, Beth

156

Occupational Health Hazards in the Interventional Laboratory: Time for a Safer Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This document is a consensus statement by the major American societies of physicians who work in the interventional laboratory environment. It reviews available data on the prevalence of occupational health risks and summarizes ongoing epidemiologic studies designed to further elucidate these risks. Its purpose is to affirm that the interventional laboratory poses workplace hazards that must be acknowledged, better understood,

Lloyd W. Klein; Donald L. Miller; Stephen Balter; Warren Laskey; David Haines; Alexander Norbash; Matthew A. Mauro; James A. Goldstein

2010-01-01

157

Utilisation of laboratory services by health workers in a district hospital in Malawi  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims:To identify priorities for improving effective use of laboratory services in a district hospital in Malawi.Methods:A prospective observational study of clinician–patient interactions to analyse laboratory test requesting practices and utilisation of laboratory results. The proportion of tests that was appropriately ordered, processed and ultimately influenced clinical management was used to assess effectiveness of utilisation.Results:420 clinical consultations between health professionals and

S O Mepham; S Bertel Squire; L Chisuwo; J Kandulu; I Bates

2009-01-01

158

Analyzing how radiologists recommend follow-up: toward development of an automated tracking and feedback system for clinical, laboratory, and radiologic studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radiologists often recommend further imaging, laboratory or clinical follow-up as part of a study interpretation, but rarely receive feedback as to the results of these additional tests. In most cases, the radiologist has to actively pursue this information by searching through the multiple electronic medical records at our institution. In this work, we seek to determine if it would be possible to automate the feedback process by analyzing how radiologists phrase recommendations for clinical, laboratory or radiologic follow-up. We surveyed a dozen attending radiologists to create a set of phrases conventionally used to indicate the need for follow-up. Next, we mined dictated reports over a 1-year period to quantify the appearance of each of these phrases. We are able to isolate 5 phrases that appear in over 21,000 studies performed during the 1-year period, and classify them by modality. We also validated the query by evaluating one day's worth of reports for follow-up recommendations and assessing the comparative performance of the follow-up query. By automatically mining imaging reports for these key phrases and tracking these patients' electronic medical records for additional imaging or pathology, we can begin to provide radiologists with automated feedback regarding studies they have interpreted. Furthermore, we can analyze how often these recommendations lead to a definitive diagnosis and enable radiologists to adjust their practice and decision-making accordingly and ultimately improve patient care.

Cook, T. S.; Itri, J. N.; Boonn, W. W.; Kim, W.

2010-03-01

159

Green tea and bone health: Evidence from laboratory studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoporosis is a major health problem in the elderly. Epidemiological evidence has shown an association between tea consumption and the prevention of bone loss in the elderly population. Ingestion of green tea and green tea bioactive compounds may be beneficial in mitigating bone loss of this population and decreasing their risk of osteoporotic fractures. This review describes the effect of

Chwan-Li Shen; James K. Yeh; Jay J. Cao; Ming-Chien Chyu; Jia-Sheng Wang

2011-01-01

160

Objective assessment of stress levels and health status using routinely measured clinical laboratory parameters as biomarkers.  

PubMed

Observed stress intensity was estimated using a scoring system from 0-100. Health status was estimated using the readily available laboratory measurements of C-reactive protein, neutrophil count, and fasting plasma glucose. We found that the stress score determined was linked to patient health status. Further studies are indicated. PMID:21851309

Hui, Liu; Shijun, Li; Xinyu, Zhao; Yuai, Wang; Xiaoting, Xu

2011-08-19

161

Bringing the laboratory and clinic to the community: mobile technologies for health promotion and disease prevention.  

PubMed

Health-related information collected in psychological laboratories may not be representative of people's everyday health. For at least 70 years, there has been a call for methods that sample experiences from everyday environments and circumstances. New technologies, including cell phones, sensors, and monitors, now make it possible to collect information outside of the laboratory in environments representative of everyday life. We review the role of mobile technologies in the assessment of health-related behaviors, physiological responses, and self-reports. Ecological momentary assessment offers a wide range of new opportunities for ambulatory assessment and evaluation. The value of mobile technologies for interventions to improve health is less well established. Among 21 randomized clinical trials evaluating interventions that used mobile technologies, more than half failed to document significant improvements on health outcomes or health risk factors. Theoretical and practical issues for future research are discussed. PMID:22994919

Kaplan, Robert M; Stone, Arthur A

2012-09-17

162

Orthopedic radiology  

SciTech Connect

This book is a presentation on orthopedic radiology. The book features coverage of the skeleton by anatomic area, with use of radiographs. Each chapter presents radiologic coverage of normal anatomy, normal variants, and common disorders for each system.

Weissman, N.W.; Sledge, C.B.

1986-01-01

163

Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Is Thioacetamide a Serious Health Hazard in Inorganic Chemistry Laboratories?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes the potential health hazards of using thioacetamide in introductory courses where students are involved in qualitative inorganic analysis. Describes the chemical as possessing carcinogenic, hepatotoxic, and mutagenic properties. Cautions that thioacetamide has caused various biochemical changes in the liver, and recommends limited uses…

Elo, Hannu

1987-01-01

164

Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Is Thioacetamide a Serious Health Hazard in Inorganic Chemistry Laboratories?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the potential health hazards of using thioacetamide in introductory courses where students are involved in qualitative inorganic analysis. Describes the chemical as possessing carcinogenic, hepatotoxic, and mutagenic properties. Cautions that thioacetamide has caused various biochemical changes in the liver, and recommends limited uses…

Elo, Hannu

1987-01-01

165

Developing a Behavioral Health Screening Program for BSL-4 Laboratory Workers at the National Institutes of Health  

PubMed Central

The events and aftermath of September 11, 2001, accelerated a search for personnel reliability test measures to identify individuals who could pose a threat to our nation's security and safety. The creation and administration of a behavioral health screen for BSL-4 laboratory workers at the National Institutes of Health represents a pioneering effort to proactively build a BSL-4 safety culture promoting worker cohesiveness, trust, respect, and reliability with a balance of worker privacy and public safety.

Wilson, Deborah E.

2011-01-01

166

21 CFR 892.1830 - Radiologic patient cradle.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1830 Radiologic patient cradle. (a) Identification. A radiologic...

2013-04-01

167

An aerial radiological survey of Technical Area 15 and surroundings, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

An aerial gamma survey of the entire Los Alamos National Laboratory and the adjacent area was flown in September 1982. The data from a part of the survey, Technical Area 15, are presented here. Other parts of the survey data that will complete the presentation will be published in a separate report. The gamma survey data show significant Pa-234m activity which implies U-238 activity above background levels. Concentration isopleths overlaid on aerial photographs of this area indicate the position and extent of this isotope. The inventory of Pa-234m (above background) is probably between 4 and 23 curies, depending on the actual vertical distribution of the Pa-234m in the soil. Isopleth maps of the natural background gamma exposure rates and the total exposure rates (natural plus exposure due to Pa-234m) are included. Implied exposure rates at 1 meter above the ground range from a minimum terrestrial component of 6{mu}R/h to 22{mu}R/h over areas where Pa-234m and the parent, U-238, exist. 1 ref., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Fritzsche, A.E.

1989-09-01

168

"Meaningful use" of electronic health records and its relevance to laboratories and pathologists.  

PubMed

Electronic health records (EHRs) have emerged as a major topic in health care and are central to the federal government's strategy for transforming healthcare delivery in the United States. Recent federal actions that aim to promote the use of EHRs promise to have significant implications for laboratories and for pathology practices. Under the HITECH (Health Information Technology Economic and Clinical Health) Act, an EHR incentive program has been established through which individual physicians and hospitals can qualify to receive incentive payments if they achieve "meaningful use" of "certified" EHR technology. The rule also establishes payment penalties in future years for eligible providers who have not met the requirements for meaningful use of EHRs. Meaningful use must be achieved using EHR technology that has been certified in accordance with functional and technical criteria that are set forth a regulation that parallels the meaningful use criteria in the incentive program. These actions and regulations are important to laboratories and pathologists for a number of reasons. Several of the criteria and requirements in the meaningful use rules and EHR certification criteria relate directly or indirectly to laboratory testing and laboratory information management, and future stage requirements are expected to impact the laboratory as well. Furthermore, as EHR uptake expands, there will be greater expectations for electronic interchange of laboratory information and laboratory information system (LIS)-EHR interfaces. Laboratories will need to be aware of the technical, operational, and business challenges that they may face as expectations for LIS-EHR increase. This paper reviews the important recent federal efforts aimed at accelerating EHR use, including the incentive program for EHR meaningful use, provider eligibility, and EHR certification criteria, from a perspective of their relevance for laboratories and pathology practices. PMID:21383931

Henricks, Walter H

2011-02-11

169

Application of clinical laboratory measurements to issues of environmental health.  

PubMed

Monitoring of biochemical constituents in serum is an important component in revealing potential toxicity in humans and experimental animals due to exposure to a variety of xenobiotic agents. The relative toxicity of pure compounds, usually at large doses, has helped elucidate the mode of action of these compounds and their relative risk. However, most actual cases of environmental exposure present an extensive range of components and the potential for synergistic or inhibitory interactions. In this paper we review two such environmental cases: The Love Canal chemical dump site in Niagara Falls, NY, and the transformer fire at the State Office Building in Binghamton, NY. We focus on the clinical laboratory measurements obtained in these studies (including serum glucose, triglycerides, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, sodium and potassium), their usefulness, limitations, and application to such cases. Significant alterations in serum triglyceride and alanine aminotransferase levels were found in guinea pigs due to exposure to dioxins. These two tests were useful in estimating the 'equivalent' concentration of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in complex chemical mixtures. PMID:1572081

Rej, R; Silkworth, J B; DeCaprio, A P

1992-03-13

170

An aerial radiological survey of Technical Areas 2, 21, and 53 and surroundings, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey of the entire Los Alamos National Laboratory was flown in September 1982. The data from a part of the survey, Technical Areas 2, 21, and 53, are presented here along with pertinent data from an October 1975 survey of limited areas of Los Alamos. The data from Technical Area 15, another part of the survey, will be published in another report. Contour maps of the gamma survey data show some Cs-137 activity in Los Alamos Canyon as well as in DP Canyon beside TA-21. Some Be-7, Sb-124, and Co-58 apparently exist in the canyon immediately below the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) ponds. Estimates on the Cs-137 inventory in the canyons range from 210 mCi to 1270 mCi. An exposure rate contour map at 1 meter above ground level (AGL) was constructed from the gamma data and overlaid on an aerial photograph and map of the area. The terrestrial exposure rates ranged from 6{mu}R/h to about 18{mu}R/h. 25 figs., 3 tabs.

Fritzsche, A.E.

1990-09-01

171

Improvement of Tuberculosis Laboratory Capacity on Pemba Island, Zanzibar: A Health Cooperation Project  

PubMed Central

Low-income countries with high Tuberculosis burden have few reference laboratories able to perform TB culture. In 2006, the Zanzibar National TB Control Programme planned to decentralize TB diagnostics. The Italian Cooperation Agency with the scientific support of the “L. Spallanzani” National Institute for Infectious Diseases sustained the project through the implementation of a TB reference laboratory in a low-income country with a high prevalence of TB. The implementation steps were: 1) TB laboratory design according to the WHO standards; 2) laboratory equipment and reagent supplies for microscopy, cultures, and identification; 3) on-the-job training of the local staff; 4) web- and telemedicine-based supervision. From April 2007 to December 2010, 921 sputum samples were received from 40 peripheral laboratories: 120 TB cases were diagnosed. Of all the smear-positive cases, 74.2% were culture-positive. During the year 2010, the smear positive to culture positive rate increased up to 100%. In March 20, 2010 the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare of Zanzibar officially recognized the Public Health Laboratory- Ivo de Carneri as the National TB Reference Laboratory for the Zanzibar Archipelago. An advanced TB laboratory can represent a low cost solution to strengthen the TB diagnosis, to provide capacity building and mid-term sustainability.

Paglia, Maria G.; Bevilacqua, Nazario; Haji, Haji Said; Vairo, Francesco; Girardi, Enrico; Nicastri, Emanuele; Muhsin, Juma; Racalbuto, Vincenzo; Jiddawi, Mohammed S.; Ippolito, Giuseppe

2012-01-01

172

Improvement of tuberculosis laboratory capacity on Pemba Island, Zanzibar: a health cooperation project.  

PubMed

Low-income countries with high Tuberculosis burden have few reference laboratories able to perform TB culture. In 2006, the Zanzibar National TB Control Programme planned to decentralize TB diagnostics. The Italian Cooperation Agency with the scientific support of the "L. Spallanzani" National Institute for Infectious Diseases sustained the project through the implementation of a TB reference laboratory in a low-income country with a high prevalence of TB. The implementation steps were: 1) TB laboratory design according to the WHO standards; 2) laboratory equipment and reagent supplies for microscopy, cultures, and identification; 3) on-the-job training of the local staff; 4) web- and telemedicine-based supervision. From April 2007 to December 2010, 921 sputum samples were received from 40 peripheral laboratories: 120 TB cases were diagnosed. Of all the smear-positive cases, 74.2% were culture-positive. During the year 2010, the smear positive to culture positive rate increased up to 100%. In March 20, 2010 the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare of Zanzibar officially recognized the Public Health Laboratory- Ivo de Carneri as the National TB Reference Laboratory for the Zanzibar Archipelago. An advanced TB laboratory can represent a low cost solution to strengthen the TB diagnosis, to provide capacity building and mid-term sustainability. PMID:22952891

Paglia, Maria G; Bevilacqua, Nazario; Haji, Haji Said; Vairo, Francesco; Girardi, Enrico; Nicastri, Emanuele; Muhsin, Juma; Racalbuto, Vincenzo; Jiddawi, Mohammed S; Ippolito, Giuseppe

2012-08-27

173

Audit of environmental monitoring and health physics laboratories at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories at the Department of Energy`s (Department) Savannah River Site are over 40 years old and are approaching the end of their useful lives. The managing and operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (Westinghouse), and the Savannah River Operations Office (Operations Office) proposed to build two new facilities to replace them. We conducted this audit to determine whether the construction of new laboratories was the most cost-effective alternative to accomplish the site`s environmental monitoring and health physics missions.

NONE

1997-10-24

174

Learning Radiology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website is produced by William Herring, MD, who is the Vice-Chairman and Radiology Residency Program Director at the Albert Einstein Medical Center. Resources featured on the website include images, lectures, notes, as well as quizzes and flashcards. The lectures under the heading âÂÂMedical Studentsâ provide an overview of chest, bone, cardiac and GI radiology. These short lessons are intended for beginning students and those who are new to the field of radiology. Students can also test their diagnostic skills and knowledge gained from the lectures in the âÂÂcase of the weekâ section. The wealth of radiology resources and its straightforward layout makes this website a perfect resource for medical students and professionals entering the fields of Radiologic Technology and Radiology.

Herring, William

2007-04-11

175

7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...quality system for laboratory seed health testing...selection procedure and a training system to ensure technical...plant pathologist or by laboratory technicians under the supervision...the facility, the training program must be...

2009-01-01

176

7 CFR 353.9 - Standards for accreditation of non-government facilities to perform laboratory seed health...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...quality system for laboratory seed health testing...selection procedure and a training system to ensure technical...plant pathologist or by laboratory technicians under the supervision...the facility, the training program must be...

2010-01-01

177

Automatic Electronic Laboratory-Based Reporting of Notifiable Infectious Diseases at a Large Health System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Electronic laboratory-based reporting, developed by the UPMC Health System, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was evaluated to determine if it could be integrated into the conventional paper-based reporting system. We reviewed reports of 10 infectious diseases from 8 UPMC hospitals that reported to the Allegheny County Health Department in southwestern Pennsylvania during January 1-November 26, 2000. Elec- tronic reports were received a median

Anil A. Panackal; Nkuchia M. M'ikanatha; Fu-Chiang Tsui; Joan McMahon; Michael M. Wagner; Bruce W. Dixon; Juan Zubieta; Maureen Phelan; Sara Mirza; Juliette Morgan; Daniel Jernigan; A. William Pasculle; James T. Rankin; Rana A. Hajjeh; Lee H. Harrison

178

Health and safety plan for the Environmental Restoration Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Programmatic Health and Safety plan (PHASP) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. This plan follows the format recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for remedial investigations and feasibility studies and that recommended by the EM40 Health and Safety Plan (HASP) Guidelines (DOE February 1994). This

C. Jr. Clark; S. N. Burman; D. J. Jr. Cipriano; M. S. Uziel; K. R. Kleinhans; P. F. Tiner

1994-01-01

179

NDE environmental, safety and health activities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

There has been a dramatic increase in environmental protection concerns over the last few decades. This has resulted in an extensive Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES H) effort within the Department of Energy and at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Laboratory has made a number of Lab-wide commitments to assure that it's environmental policy is properly implemented: The Laboratory will comply fully with local, county, state, and federal regulations and DOE orders; all employees will be trained to understand their environmental obligations and the potential impacts of their activities on the environment; waste minimization will be a part of every new and ongoing project that produces hazardous, mixed, or radioactive waste; and the laboratory will cooperate fully with regulators and communicate openly with the community on environmental issues. The numerous federal, state and local laws and regulations concerning safety, health and the environment affect all aspects of the Laboratory's operations, from the office to the laboratory. Some of the principal regulations controlling the Laboratory's operations are listed in this paper. 2 tabs.

Fritts, W.T.

1990-10-01

180

Leveraging the military health system as a laboratory for health care reform.  

PubMed

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act recently passed into law is poised to profoundly affect the provision of medical care in the United States. In today's environment, the foundation for most ongoing comparative effectiveness research is financial claims data. However, there is an alternative that possesses much richer data. That alternative, uniquely positioned to serve as a test system for national health reform efforts, is the Department of Defense Military Health System. This article describes how to leverage the Military Health System and provide effective solutions to current health care reform challenges in the United States. PMID:23495458

Dorrance, Kevin A; Ramchandani, Suneil; Neil, Nancy; Fisher, Harry

2013-02-01

181

EPA/OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT'S NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY INTERNET (PUBLIC) SITE  

EPA Science Inventory

The National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL) is EPA's focal point for scientific research on the effects of contaminants and environmental stressors on human health and ecosystem integrity....

182

Learning Laboratories for Unemployed, Out-of-School Youth. Health Education, Part 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The learning activities suggested in this publication supplement those found in the curriculum resource handbook "Learning Laboratories for Unemployed Out-of-School Youth." This phase of the program deals on a practical level with various health problems in short, achievable units. Activities keyed to the curriculum resource handbook and followed…

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Continuing Education Curriculum Development.

183

ORD/NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS LABORATORY'S RESEARCH PROGRAMS AND TOPICS INTERNET SITE  

EPA Science Inventory

This Internet site provides information on the research (by Research Area) conducted under the direction of the EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) at the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL). Information on all of NHEERL's Research Ar...

184

Clinical Laboratory Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Education in the clinical laboratory sciences in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and…

Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

185

A Study of the Clinical Laboratory Occupations. The UCLA Allied Health Professions Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objectives of this study which was conducted as part of the UCLA Allied Health Professions Project were: (1) to determine the percent of medical laboratory workers who perform a comprehensive list of tasks and procedures; (2) to evaluate this performance in terms of certification and specialty area; and (3) on the basis of these data, to make…

California Univ., Los Angeles. Div. of Vocational Education.

186

Clinical Laboratory Sciences Discipline Advisory Group Final Report. Kentucky Allied Health Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Education in the clinical laboratory sciences in Kentucky and articulation within the field are examined, based on the Kentucky Allied Health Project (KAHP), which designed an articulated statewide system to promote entry and exit of personnel at a variety of educational levels. The KAHP model promotes articulation in learning, planning, and…

Kentucky Council on Public Higher Education, Frankfort.

187

Learning Laboratories for Unemployed, Out-of-School Youth. Health Education - Part 1.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Learning activities which would supplement those found in the curriculum resource handbook, "Learning Laboratories for Unemployed, Out-of-School Youth," which are useful for the health teacher are presented. Activities suggested concern: (1) Community drug survey, (2) Physician resource on drug use, (3) Physical and psychological harm, (4)…

New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Continuing Education Curriculum Development.

188

Allied Health Occupations II. Medical Laboratory Assistant Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is intended to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by medical laboratory technicians and technologists. Addressed in the individual units of the course are the following topics: the value of…

Middletown Public Schools, CT.

189

Illegal Methamphetamine Drug Laboratories: A New Challenge for Environmental Health Professionals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports on clandestine drug laboratories for manufacturing methamphetamine; the formation of an interagency steering committee to address the problem; and the role Environmental Health professionals need to play as the problem becomes more prevalent across the United States. Provides background information on methamphetamine characteristics and…

Skeers, Vicki M.

1992-01-01

190

Use of Lean Response to Improve Pandemic Influenza Surge in Public Health Laboratories  

PubMed Central

A novel influenza A (H1N1) virus detected in April 2009 rapidly spread around the world. North American provincial and state laboratories have well-defined roles and responsibilities, including providing accurate, timely test results for patients and information for regional public health and other decision makers. We used the multidisciplinary response and rapid implementation of process changes based on Lean methods at the provincial public health laboratory in British Columbia, Canada, to improve laboratory surge capacity in the 2009 influenza pandemic. Observed and computer simulating evaluation results from rapid processes changes showed that use of Lean tools successfully expanded surge capacity, which enabled response to the 10-fold increase in testing demands.

Chang, Yin; Prystajecky, Natalie; Petric, Martin; Mak, Annie; Abbott, Brendan; Paris, Benjamin; Decker, K.C.; Pittenger, Lauren; Guercio, Steven; Stott, Jeff; Miller, Joseph D.

2012-01-01

191

Orthopaedic radiology  

SciTech Connect

This book is an account of the principles of modern diagnostic imaging techniques and their applications in orthopedics. The aim is to show radiology as a dynamic subject. Orthopaedic Radiology is divided into two sections with the first part focusing on the principles of diagnostic imaging and interpretation and the second applying this information to practical clinical problems.

Park, W.M.; Hughes, S.P.F.

1987-01-01

192

Interventional radiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interventional radiology is the use of imaging guidance for the performance of minimally invasive therapy. Interventional radiology procedures often replace open surgical procedures. In general, they avoid large incisions, involve less risk and pain, and shorter recovery times. The development of new imaging technologies and interventional devices has greatly increased the spectrum of diseases that can be treated by interventional

Tarun Sabharwal; Richard Salter

2005-01-01

193

Changes in the American health care system: crisis in the clinical laboratory.  

PubMed

American medicine is undergoing unprecedented changes, and the resulting distortions are affecting the economics, organization and operations of all clinical laboratories. Professionals who work in these laboratories are facing administrative and economic pressures to reduce costs, to increase productivity, and to comply with proliferating new statutes and regulations. The medical 'cottage industry' in which the patient was the focus of the medical professionals' attention and endeavours is being replaced by the corporate management of many health care activities in which financial profits are being given first priority. Medical facilities, including clinical laboratories, are being bought and sold, being consolidated, or simply being closed. The clinical laboratories may be at the vortex of the maelstrom affecting American medicine. Cost pressures are encouraging further automation and retraining of laboratory staffs. If the leaders in laboratory medicine are unable to accomplish the necessary tasks to meet the new challenges, there inevitably is a non-medical, non-scientific financial manager at hand who is willing to define the changes and the desired outcome. Because of the rapidity of the changes taking place, it is not possible to predict with any confidence the modifications that will achieve a permanent status or the degree to which medical professionals will remain masters of their fates. The evolving health care system will become less costly, more technologically advanced, and a more challenging system in which to work. PMID:9469243

Conn, R B; Snyder, J W

1997-11-01

194

Assessment of laboratory logistics management information system practice for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in selected public health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia  

PubMed Central

Introduction Logistics management information system for health commodities remained poorly implemented in most of developing countries. To assess the status of laboratory logistics management information system for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in public health facilities in Addis Ababa. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from September 2010-January 2011 at selected public health facilities. A stratified random sampling method was used to include a total of 43 facilities which, were investigated through quantitative methods using structured questionnaires interviews. Focus group discussion with the designated supply chain managers and key informant interviews were conducted for the qualitative method. Results There exists a well-designed logistics system for laboratory commodities with trained pharmacy personnel, distributed standard LMIS formats and established inventory control procedures. However, majority of laboratory professionals were not trained in LMIS. Majority of the facilities (60.5%) were stocked out for at least one ART monitoring and TB laboratory reagents and the highest stock out rate was for chemistry reagents. Expired ART monitoring laboratory commodities were found in 25 (73.5%) of facilities. Fifty percent (50%) of the assessed hospitals and 54% of health centers were currently using stock/bin cards for all HIV/AIDS and TB laboratory commodities in main pharmacy store, among these only 25% and 20.8% of them were updated with accurate information matching with the physical count done at the time of visit for hospitals and health centers respectively. Conclusion Even though there exists a well designed laboratory LMIS, keeping quality stock/bin cards and LMIS reports were very low. Key ART monitoring laboratory commodities were stock out at many facilities at the day of visit and during the past six months. Based on findings, training of laboratory personnel's managing laboratory commodities and keeping accurate inventory control procedures were recommended.

Desale, Adino; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Nigatu, Alemayehu

2013-01-01

195

PATHWAYS TO HEALTH CAREERS, EXPLORING HEALTH OCCUPATIONS AND PROFESSIONS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

CAREERS IN THE AREAS OF DENTISTRY, DIETETICS, MEDICAL RECORD LIBRARY SCIENCE, MEDICAL LABORATORY WORK, MEDICINE, NURSING, OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, OPTOMETRY, PHARMACY, PHYSICAL THERAPY, PODIATRY, PUBLIC HEALTH, RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY, SOCIAL WORK, VETERINARY MEDICINE, HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION, AND OTHER HEALTH OCCUPATIONS ARE DESCRIBED IN TERMS OF THE…

Health Careers Council of Illinois, Chicago.

196

Puumala virus infection: radiologic findings.  

PubMed

A 33-year-old male patient was admitted to our nephrology department with rapidly deteriorating general health, fever, respiratory difficulties, and acute renal failure. Computed tomography of the thorax revealed interstitial edema with thickening of the interlobular septa, peribronchial cuffing, ground-glass opacities, and small pleural and pericardial effusions. Polymerase chain reaction tests verified Puumala virus infection. The patient recovered with supportive treatment. Hantavirus infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of young patients who present with acute renal failure of an unknown origin and the nonspecific radiologic finding of noncardiogenic interstitial edema, which in combination with typical clinical symptoms and laboratory parameters, can be indicative of this disease. PMID:20736852

Fakhrai, Negar; Mueller-Mang, Christina; El-Rabadi, Karem; Böhmig, Georg A; Herold, Christian J

2011-05-01

197

78 FR 29140 - Center for Devices and Radiological Health Appeals Processes: Questions and Answers About 517A...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...This draft document provides CDRH's proposed interpretation of key provisions...FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David S. Buckles, Center for Devices and Radiological...section 517A of the FD&C Act (21 U.S.C. 360g-1) was added by...

2013-05-17

198

U.S. Radiologic Technologists (USRT) Cohort  

Cancer.gov

The U.S. Radiologic Technologists (USRT) Study is a collaborative effort between the University of Minnesota, the NCI, and the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT). One of the key goals of the study is to understand how repeated occupational low-dose ionizing radiation exposures, such as those potentially experienced by radiologic technologists, are related to cancer and other health conditions.

199

Radiologic Safety: Historical Perspectives and Contemporary Recommendations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exposure to ionizing radiation poses many risks and dangers to health care workers. Radiology nurses are particularly vulnerable to its damaging effects. Radiologic principles and practices are not addressed in the required curricula of most generic nursing programs for licensure as a registered nurse. Radiology nurses must learn these principles and practices through staff development, continuing education, or on-the-job mentoring.

J. Mari Beth Barr; Alan D. Schiska

2005-01-01

200

Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research annual report, fiscal year 1986  

SciTech Connect

This report to the US Department of Energy summarizes research activities for the period from 1 October 1985--30 September 1986 at the Laboratory for Energy-related Health Research (LEHR) which is operated by the University of California, Davis. The laboratory's research objective is to provide new knowledge for an improved understanding of the potential bioenvironmental and occupational health problems associated with energy utilization to contribute to the safe and healthful development of energy resources for the benefit of mankind. This research encompasses several areas of basic investigation that relate to toxicological and biomedical problems associated with potentially toxic chemical and radioactive substances and ionizing radiation, with particular emphasis on carcinogenicity. Studies of systemic injury and nuclear medical diagnostic and therapeutic methods are also involved. This is an interdisciplinary program spanning physics, chemistry, environmental engineering, biophysics and biochemistry, cellular and molecular biology, physiology, immunology, toxicology, both human and veterinary medicine, nuclear medicine, pathology, hematology, radiation biology, reproductive biology, oncology, biomathematics, and computer science. The principal themes of the research at LEHR center around the biology, radiobiology, and health status of the skeleton and its blood-forming constituents; the toxicology and properties of airborne materials; the beagle as an experimental animal model; carcinogenesis; and the scaling of the results from laboratory animal studies to man for appropriate assessment of risk.

Abell, D.L. (ed.)

1989-02-01

201

A Model Curriculum for Multiskilled Education in the Radiologic Sciences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains how multiskilled cross-trained health professionals provide cost-effective health care. Outlines a baccalaureate program in radiologic science with specialization in radiology therapy, medical sonography, or advanced imaging. (SK)

Jensen, Steven C.; Grey, Michael L.

1995-01-01

202

A Model Curriculum for Multiskilled Education in the Radiologic Sciences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Explains how multiskilled cross-trained health professionals provide cost-effective health care. Outlines a baccalaureate program in radiologic science with specialization in radiology therapy, medical sonography, or advanced imaging. (SK)|

Jensen, Steven C.; Grey, Michael L.

1995-01-01

203

Value of Laboratory Tests in Employer-Sponsored Health Risk Assessments for Newly Identifying Health Conditions: Analysis of 52,270 Participants  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundEmployer-sponsored health risk assessments (HRA) may include laboratory tests to provide evidence of disease and disease risks for common medical conditions. We evaluated the ability of HRA-laboratory testing to provide new disease-risk information to participants.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsWe performed a cross-sectional analysis of HRA-laboratory results for participating adult employees and their eligible spouses or their domestic partners, focusing on three common health

Harvey W. Kaufman; Fred R. Williams; Mouneer A. Odeh

2011-01-01

204

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH EFFECTS 20 YEARS AFTER THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT: DATA OF THE NATIONAL RADIATION AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REGISTRY  

Microsoft Academic Search

On the decree of the Russian Federation Government N 948 of 22 September 1993 the National Radiation and Epidemiological Registry\\u000a was established. This is a legal entity on the base of the Medical Radiological Research Center of Russian Academy of Medical\\u000a Sciences. Two main tasks were imposed upon the Registry: 1) objective estimation of radiation risks of cancer and non-cancer

VICTOR IVANOV; ANATOLY TSYB

205

Molecular Typing in Public Health Laboratories: From an Academic Indulgence to an Infection Control Imperative  

PubMed Central

Using three Austrian case studies, the variegated applications of molecular typing in today's public health laboratories are discussed to help illustrate preventive management strategies relying on DNA subtyping. DNA macrorestriction analysis by pulsed field gel electrophoresis has become the gold standard for subtyping of food borne pathogens like listeria, salmonella, campylobacter and Bacillus cereus. Using a Salmonella Mbandaka outbreak from the year 2010 as example, it is shown how the comparison of patterns from human isolates, food isolates, animal isolates and feed isolates can allow to identify and confirm a source of disease. An epidemiological connection between the simultaneous occurrence of tuberculosis in cattle and deer with cases of human tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium caprae in 2010 was excluded using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units variable-number tandem repeats subtyping. Also in 2010, multilocus sequence typing with nonselective housekeeping genes, the so-called sequence based typing protocol, was used to elucidate connections between an environmental source (a hospital drinking water system) and a case of legionellosis. During the last decades, molecular typing has evolved to become a routine tool in the daily work of public health laboratories. The challenge is now no longer to simply type microorganisms, but to type them in a way that allows for data exchange between public health laboratories all over the world.

2012-01-01

206

One Health concept for strengthening public health surveillance and response through Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training in Ghana  

PubMed Central

The lack of highly trained field epidemiologists in the public health system in Ghana has been known since the 1970s when the Planning Unit was established in the Ghana Ministry of Health. When the Public Health School was started in 1994, the decision was taken to develop a 1 academic-year general MPH course. The persisting need for well-trained epidemiologists to support the public health surveillance, outbreak investigation and response system made the development of the Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme (FELTP) a national priority. The School of Public health and the Ministry of Health therefore requested the technical and financial assistance of the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in organizing the Programme. The collaboration started by organizing short courses in disease outbreak investigations and response for serving Ghana Health Service staff. The success of the short courses led to development of the FELTP. By October 2007, the new FELTP curriculum for the award of a Masters of Philosophy in Applied Epidemiology and Disease Control was approved by the Academic Board of the University of Ghana and the programme started that academic year. Since then five cohorts of 37 residents have been enrolled in the two tracks of the programme. They consist of 12 physicians, 12 veterinarians and 13 laboratory scientists. The first two cohorts of 13 residents have graduated. The third cohort of seven has submitted dissertations and is awaiting the results. The fourth cohort has started the second year of field placement while the fifth cohort has just started the first semester. The field activities of the graduates have included disease outbreak investigations and response, evaluation of disease surveillance systems at the national level and analysis of datasets on diseases at the regional level. The residents have made a total of 25 oral presentations and 39 poster presentations at various regional and global scientific conferences. The Ghana FELTP (GFELTP) has promoted the introduction of the One Health concept into FELTP. It hosted the first USAID–supported workshop in West Africa to further integrate and strengthen collaboration of the animal and human health sectors in the FETP model. GFELTP has also taken the lead in hosting the first AFENET Center for Training in Public Health Leadership and Management, through which the short course on Management for Improving Public Health Interventions was developed for AFENET member countries. The GFELTP pre-tested the Integrated Avian Influenza Outbreak and Pandemic Influenza course in preparation for introducing the materials into the curriculum of other FELTP in the network. The leadership positions to which the graduates of the program have been appointed in the human and animal Public Health Services, improvement in disease surveillance, outbreak investigation and response along with the testimony of the health authorities about their appreciation of the outputs of the graduates at various fora, is a strong indication that the GFELTP is meeting its objectives.

Wurapa, Frederick; Afari, Ebenezer; Ohuabunwo, Chima; Sackey, Samuel; Clerk, Christine; Kwadje, Simon; Yebuah, Nathaniel; Amankwa, Joseph; Amofah, George; Appiah-Denkyira, Ebenezer

2011-01-01

207

One Health concept for strengthening public health surveillance and response through Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training in Ghana.  

PubMed

The lack of highly trained field epidemiologists in the public health system in Ghana has been known since the 1970s when the Planning Unit was established in the Ghana Ministry of Health. When the Public Health School was started in 1994, the decision was taken to develop a 1 academic-year general MPH course. The persisting need for well-trained epidemiologists to support the public health surveillance, outbreak investigation and response system made the development of the Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme (FELTP) a national priority. The School of Public health and the Ministry of Health therefore requested the technical and financial assistance of the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in organizing the Programme. The collaboration started by organizing short courses in disease outbreak investigations and response for serving Ghana Health Service staff. The success of the short courses led to development of the FELTP. By October 2007, the new FELTP curriculum for the award of a Masters of Philosophy in Applied Epidemiology and Disease Control was approved by the Academic Board of the University of Ghana and the programme started that academic year. Since then five cohorts of 37 residents have been enrolled in the two tracks of the programme. They consist of 12 physicians, 12 veterinarians and 13 laboratory scientists. The first two cohorts of 13 residents have graduated. The third cohort of seven has submitted dissertations and is awaiting the results. The fourth cohort has started the second year of field placement while the fifth cohort has just started the first semester. The field activities of the graduates have included disease outbreak investigations and response, evaluation of disease surveillance systems at the national level and analysis of datasets on diseases at the regional level. The residents have made a total of 25 oral presentations and 39 poster presentations at various regional and global scientific conferences. The Ghana FELTP (GFELTP) has promoted the introduction of the One Health concept into FELTP. It hosted the first USAID-supported workshop in West Africa to further integrate and strengthen collaboration of the animal and human health sectors in the FETP model. GFELTP has also taken the lead in hosting the first AFENET Center for Training in Public Health Leadership and Management, through which the short course on Management for Improving Public Health Interventions was developed for AFENET member countries. The GFELTP pre-tested the Integrated Avian Influenza Outbreak and Pandemic Influenza course in preparation for introducing the materials into the curriculum of other FELTP in the network. The leadership positions to which the graduates of the program have been appointed in the human and animal Public Health Services, improvement in disease surveillance, outbreak investigation and response along with the testimony of the health authorities about their appreciation of the outputs of the graduates at various fora, is a strong indication that the GFELTP is meeting its objectives. PMID:22359694

Wurapa, Frederick; Afari, Ebenezer; Ohuabunwo, Chima; Sackey, Samuel; Clerk, Christine; Kwadje, Simon; Yebuah, Nathaniel; Amankwa, Joseph; Amofah, George; Appiah-Denkyira, Ebenezer

2011-12-14

208

Laboratory-based surveillance in the molecular era: the TYPENED model, a joint data-sharing platform for clinical and public health laboratories.  

PubMed

Laboratory-based surveillance, one of the pillars of monitoring infectious disease trends, relies on data produced in clinical and/or public health laboratories. Currently, diagnostic laboratories worldwide submit strains or samples to a relatively small number of reference laboratories for characterisation and typing. However, with the introduction of molecular diagnostic methods and sequencing in most of the larger diagnostic and university hospital centres in high-income countries, the distinction between diagnostic and reference/public health laboratory functions has become less clear-cut. Given these developments, new ways of networking and data sharing are needed. Assuming that clinical and public health laboratories may be able to use the same data for their own purposes when sequence-based testing and typing are used, we explored ways to develop a collaborative approach and a jointly owned database (TYPENED) in the Netherlands. The rationale was that sequence data - whether produced to support clinical care or for surveillance -can be aggregated to meet both needs. Here we describe the development of the TYPENED approach and supporting infrastructure, and the implementation of a pilot laboratory network sharing enterovirus sequences and metadata. PMID:23369392

Niesters, H G; Rossen, J W; van der Avoort, H; Baas, D; Benschop, K; Claas, E C; Kroneman, A; van Maarseveen, N; Pas, S; van Pelt, W; Rahamat-Langendoen, J C; Schuurman, R; Vennema, H; Verhoef, L; Wolthers, K; Koopmans, M

2013-01-24

209

TVA's radiological emergency monitoring vans  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Tennessee Valley Authority uses eight sampling vans and a single mobile screening laboratory for radiological emergency environmental monitoring. Sampling vans are utilized to obtain direct radiation survey measurements, air samples, and terrestrial samples, and to perform preliminary analyses on air samples. Samples are conveyed via couriers to the mobile screening laboratory, which is equipped to perform full-spectrum gamma isotopic

J. R. Flood; R. L. Coleman; C. E. Kent

1984-01-01

210

[Epidemiology and laboratory: a different point or view of public health in Chile].  

PubMed

The authors present an abridged history from their personal point of view of public health dealing with communicable diseases in Chile, in reference to an article previously published in Revista Chilena de Infectología. They do not agree with the mainly critical view of the author. They recognize that although there is a lot to be done on this matter, Chile has been a pioneer in Latin America in many policies relating to the control of these infections, having been recognized by international organisms. The relationship between the National Institute of Public Health, the Ministry of Health and the Laboratory Network, has strongly contributed along the years to concrete sanitary achievements in the field of transmissible diseases which are a pride for our country. PMID:18580992

García M, Julio; Heitmann G, Ingrid

2008-06-24

211

Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) University of California at Davis, California. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Site Environmental Report for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Site (the Site) includes 1996 environmental monitoring data for Site air, soil, ground water, surface water, storm water and ambient radiation. DOE operation of LEHR as a functioning research location ceased in 1989, after the completion of three decades of research on the health effects of low-level radiation exposure (primarily strontium-90 and radium-226), using beagles to simulate effects on human health. During 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted activities at the Site in support of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Environmental remediation and the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of Site buildings. Extensive environmental data were collected in 1996 to evaluate appropriate remedial actions for the Site.

NONE

1997-09-01

212

[The role of reference laboratories in animal health programmes in South America].  

PubMed

The contribution of the Panamerican Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) Centre (PANAFTOSA), as an OIE (World organisation for animal health) regional reference laboratory for the diagnosis of FMD and vesicular stomatitis, and for the control of the FMD vaccine, has been of fundamental importance to the development, implementation and harmonisation of modern laboratory procedures in South America. The significance of the work conducted by PANAFTOSA is particularly obvious when one considers the two pillars on which eradication programmes are based, namely: a well-structured regional laboratory network, and the creation of a system which allows technology and new developments to be transferred to Member Countries as quickly and efficiently as possible. Over the past decade, PANAFTOSA has kept pace with the changing epidemiological situation on the continent, and with developments in the international political and economical situation. This has involved the strengthening of quality policies, and the elaboration and implementation of diagnostic tools that make for more thorough epidemiological analyses. The integration of PANAFTOSA into the network of national laboratories and its cooperation with technical and scientific institutes, universities and the private sector means that local needs can be met, thanks to the design and rapid implementation of methodological tools which are validated using internationally accepted criteria. This collaboration, which ensures harmonisation of laboratory tests and enhances the quality of national Veterinary Services, serves to promote greater equity, a prerequisite for regional eradication strategies and this in turn, helps to increase competitiveness in the region. PMID:15884590

Bergmann, I E

2003-08-01

213

Ten-year Investigation of Clinical, Laboratory and Radiologic Manifestations and Complications in Patients with Takayasu's Arteritis in Three University Hospitals  

PubMed Central

Background: Takayasu arteritis is a condition of unknown aetiology that affects the aorta and its primary branches. The disease has been primarily recognized and described in Asia. The aims of this study were to identify the main clinical, laboratory, and angiographic features of Takayasu arteritis in Iranian patients over a 10 year period from 2000 to 2010. Methods: Data were obtained from angiographic and medical records of patients treated at Shahid-Rajai, Taleghani, and Loghman Hospitals during the above-mentioned time period. The criteria for definitions and findings were those proposed by the American College of Rheumatology. Results: A total of 15 patients were identified. The median age at presentation was 36 years and 73.3% of patients were females. Fever was the most common presentation. According to “modified” National Institute of Health criteria, 44.7% of patients were in the acute phase of disease with systemic symptoms such as fever, weight loss, and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Immunological markers such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (C-ANCA) were absent. The tuberculin test result was positive in 40% of the patients. Vascular bruit was present in 86.7% and hypertension was detected in 53.3% with 13.3% having associated renal artery stenosis. The angiographic manifestations were classified as; type I, cervicobrachial type (26.6%); type II, thoracoabdominal type (20.0%); type III, peripheral type (6.6%); and type IV, generalised type (46.7%). Coronary arteries were involved in three cases, pulmonary in two and renal in two. Conclusion: Based on our findings, the most common clinical, laboratory and angiographic findings were fever, increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and stenosis, respectively. Because of dangerous consequences of this disease, attention to fever and increased ESR, especially in young women may be helpful for physicians to prevent diagnosis delay.

Nooshin, Dalili; Neda, Pazhouhi; Shahdokht, Samangooyi; Ali, Jamalian

2013-01-01

214

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response; HHS Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise implementation plan for chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear threats. Notice.  

PubMed

The United States faces serious public health threats from the deliberate use of weapons of mass destruction (WMD)--chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN)--by hostile States or terrorists, and from naturally emerging infectious diseases that have a potential to cause illness on a scale that could adversely impact national security. Effective strategies to prevent, mitigate, and treat the consequences of CBRN threats is an integral component of our national security strategy. To that end, the United States must be able to rapidly develop, stockpile, and deploy effective medical countermeasures to protect the American people. The HHS Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise (PHEMCE) has taken a holistic, end-to-end approach that considers multiple aspects of the medical countermeasures mission including research, development, acquisition, storage, maintenance, deployment, and guidance for utilization. Phase one of this approach established the HHS PHEMCE Strategy for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Threats (HHS PHEMCE Strategy). The HHS PHEMCE Strategy, published in the Federal Register on March 20, 2007, described a framework of strategic policy goals and objectives for identifying medical countermeasure requirements and establishing priorities for medical countermeasure evaluation, development and acquisition. These strategic policy goals and objectives were used to establish the Four Pillars upon which this HHS Public Health Emergency Medical Countermeasures Enterprise Implementation Plan (HHS PHEMCE Implementation Plan) is based. The HHS PHEMCE Implementation Plan considers the full spectrum of medical countermeasures-related activities, including research, development, acquisition, storage/maintenance, deployment, and utilization. The HHS PHEMCE Implementation Plan is consistent with the President's Biodefense for the 21st Century and is aligned with the National Strategy for Medical Countermeasures against Weapons of Mass Destruction. PMID:17520758

2007-04-23

215

Study of the Division of Allied Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines student outcomes in the seven curriculum programs (chemical technology, dental hygiene, dental laboratory, medical laboratory, nursing, opthalmic dispensing, and radiologic technology) of the Division of Allied Health and Natural Sciences at New York City Community College. The following variables are examined: student…

Perelle, Ira B.

216

Central African Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program: building and strengthening regional workforce capacity in public health.  

PubMed

The Central African Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (CAFELTP) is a 2-year public health leadership capacity building training program. It was established in October 2010 to enhance capacity for applied epidemiology and public health laboratory services in three countries: Cameroon, Central African Republic, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The aim of the program is to develop a trained public health workforce to assure that acute public health events are detected, investigated, and responded to quickly and effectively. The program consists of 25% didactic and 75% practical training (field based activities). Although the program is still in its infancy, the residents have already responded to six outbreak investigations in the region, evaluated 18 public health surveillance systems and public health programs, and completed 18 management projects. Through these various activities, information is shared to understand similarities and differences in the region leading to new and innovative approaches in public health. The program provides opportunities for regional and international networking in field epidemiology and laboratory activities, and is particularly beneficial for countries that may not have the immediate resources to host an individual country program. Several of the trainees from the first cohort already hold leadership positions within the ministries of health and national laboratories, and will return to their assignments better equipped to face the public health challenges in the region. They bring with them knowledge, practical training, and experiences gained through the program to shape the future of the public health landscape in their countries. PMID:22359692

Andze, Gervais Ondobo; Namsenmo, Abel; Illunga, Benoit Kebella; Kazambu, Ditu; Delissaint, Dieula; Kuaban, Christopher; Mbopi-Kéou, Francois-Xavier; Gabsa, Wilfred; Mulumba, Leopold; Bangamingo, Jean Pierre; Ngulefac, John; Dahlke, Melissa; Mukanga, David; Nsubuga, Peter

2011-12-14

217

Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research: Annual report, fiscal year 1987  

SciTech Connect

The laboratory's research objective is to provide new knowledge for an improved understanding of the potential bioenvironmental and occupational health problems associated with energy utilization. Our purpose is to contribute to the safe and healthful development of energy resources for the benefit of mankind. This research encompasses several areas of basic investigation that relate to toxicological and biomedical problems associated with potentially toxic chemical and radioactive substances and ionizing radiation, with particular emphasis on carcinogenicity. Studies of systemic injury and nuclear-medical diagnostic and therapeutic methods are also involved. This program is interdisciplinary; it involves physics, chemistry, environmental engineering, biophysics and biochemistry, cellular and molecular biology, physiology, immunology, toxicology, both human and veterinary medicine, nuclear medicine, pathology, hematology, radiation biology, reproductive biology, oncology, biomathematics, and computer science. The principal themes of the research at LEHR center around the biology, radiobiology, and health status of the skeleton and its blood-forming constituents; the toxicology and properties of airborne materials; the beagle as an experimental animal model; carcinogenesis; and the scaling of the results from laboratory animal studies to man for appropriate assessment of risk.

Abell, D.L. (ed.)

1989-04-01

218

Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 93-1121-2530, State of North Dakota Department of Health and Consolidated Laboratories, Bismarck, North Dakota.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In response to a request from the North Dakota State Department of Health and Consolidated Laboratories, Division of Disease Control the potential occupational transmission of anthrax among livestock workers during an anthrax outbreak was investigated. Me...

A. M. Krake C. L. Connon T. M. Gomez

1995-01-01

219

A brief economic history of radiology.  

PubMed

The authors present a historical review of radiology reimbursement, including the effects of health care legislation and court decisions. The political leadership of the American College of Radiology is detailed. Changes in the delivery of health care will alter the practice of medicine. PMID:8570107

Timins, J E; Linton, O W

1995-11-01

220

CDC Grand Rounds: radiological and nuclear preparedness.  

PubMed

Radiological and nuclear disasters are infrequent, but when they occur, they result in large and demonstrable health burdens. Several scenarios can result in the public's exposure to radiation. For example, radiation sources used in health care or other industries can be lost or misused. Incidents in the nuclear power industry, such as those at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island, require significant public health response. In addition, radiological terrorism can involve the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) or an improvised nuclear device (IND). State and local health agencies are expected to perform essential public health functions in response to any of these emergencies. PMID:20847721

2010-09-17

221

EPA/OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT'S NATIONAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY/REPRODUCTIVE TOXICOLOGY DIVISION INTERNET SITE  

EPA Science Inventory

The National Hhealth and Environmental Effect Research Laboratory's Reproductive Toxicology Division(RTD) brings together an unparalleled combination of expertise in teratogenesis and male and female reproductive toxicity to investigate the health effects of environmental contami...

222

Radiology and Children: Extra Care Required  

MedlinePLUS

... gov/consumer/updates/radiology_ kids062308.html 1 / FDA Consumer Health Information / U.S. Food and Drug Administration JUNE 23, 2008 Consumer Health Information www.fda.gov/consumer Additional vigilance and ...

223

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1990 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health  

SciTech Connect

Part 5 of the 1990 Annual Report to the US Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Environmental Guidance, the Office of Environmental Compliance, the Office of Environmental Audit, the Office of National Environmental Policy Act Project Assistance, the Office of Nuclear Safety, the Office of Safety Compliance, and the Office of Policy and Standards. For each project, as identified by the Field Work Proposal, there is an article describing progress made during fiscal year 1990. Authors of these articles represent a broad spectrum of capabilities derived from five of the seven technical centers of the Laboratory, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the work.

Faust, L.G.; Moraski, R.V.; Selby, J.M.

1991-05-01

224

Interventional radiology  

SciTech Connect

This reference gives a step-by-step presentation of the elements of interventional radiology. CONTENTS: Introduction; Radiation protection; Embolotherapy; Interventional techniques in the management of gastrointestinal bleeding; Transluminal angioplasty; Thrombolytic therapy; Foreign body removal; Inferior vena cava filter placement; Percutaneous uroradiologic techniques; Interventional techniques in the biliary tract; Nonvascular gastrointestinal tract dilations; Percutaneous biopsy techniques; Drainage of abscess fluid collections in the abdomen.

Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.

1987-01-01

225

Orthopaedic radiology  

SciTech Connect

This book provides an account of the principles of modern diagnostic imaging techniques and their applications in orthopedics. The aim of the book is to show radiology as a dynamic subject which can help clinicians, while at the same time assisting radiologists to understand the needs of the orthopedic surgeon.

Park, W.M.; Hughes, S.P.F.

1985-01-01

226

Establishing a Molecular Diagnostic Testing Quality Assurance Program for Detection of Infectious Diseases Validation of Molecular Tests at the North Carolina State Laboratory of Public Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-quality clinical laboratory services are critical for public health. Accurate and timely laboratory results are important in identifying, tracking, controlling, and preventing public health threats. For the past 20 years, molecular diagnostic assays have been available for infectious disease detection. These technologies have played and continue to play a critical role in clinical laboratories. Molecular diagnostic testing offers laboratories the

Shermalyn R. Greene

227

Radiological containment handbook  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this NUREG is to be used as a reference text. It is meant to be used by the working personnel as a guide for using temporary radiological containments. The installing group and health physics group may vary among organizations but responsibilities and duties will not change. It covers installation and inspection containments; working and operating guidelines; operating requirement; emergency procedures; and removal of containments.

Not Available

1982-10-01

228

Analysis of containment performance and radiological consequences under severe accident conditions for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A severe accident study was conducted to evaluate conservatively scoped source terms and radiological consequences to support the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Conceptual Safety Analysis Report (CSAR). Three different types of severe accident scenarios were postulated with a view of evaluating conservatively scoped source terms. The first scenario evaluates maximum possible steaming loads and associated radionuclide transport, whereas the next scenario is geared towards evaluating conservative containment loads from releases of radionuclide vapors and aerosols with associated generation of combustible gases. The third scenario follows the prescriptions given by the 10 CFR 100 guidelines. It was included in the CSAR for demonstrating site-suitability characteristics of the ANS. Various containment configurations are considered for the study of thermal-hydraulic and radiological behaviors of the ANS containment. Severe accident mitigative design features such as the use of rupture disks were accounted for. This report describes the postulated severe accident scenarios, methodology for analysis, modeling assumptions, modeling of several severe accident phenomena, and evaluation of the resulting source term and radiological consequences.

Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

1994-01-01

229

Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programs in West Africa as a model for sustainable partnerships in animal and human health.  

PubMed

The concept of animal and human health experts working together toward a healthier world has been endorsed, but challenges remain in identifying concrete actions to move this one health concept from vision to action. In 2008, as a result of avian influenza outbreaks in West Africa, international donor support led to a unique opportunity to invest in Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programs (FELTPs) in the region that engaged the animal and human health sectors to strengthen the capacity for prevention and control of zoonotic diseases. The FELTPs mixed 25% to 35% classroom and 65% to 75% field-based training and service for cohorts of physicians, veterinarians, and laboratory scientists. They typically consisted of a 2-year course leading to a master's degree in field epidemiology and public health laboratory management for midlevel public health leaders and competency-based short courses for frontline public health surveillance workers. Trainees and graduates work in multidisciplinary teams to conduct surveillance, outbreak investigations, and epidemiological studies for disease control locally and across borders. Critical outcomes of these programs include development of a cadre of public health leaders with core skills in integrated disease surveillance, outbreak investigation, vaccination campaigns, laboratory diagnostic testing, and epidemiological studies that address priority public health problems. A key challenge exists in identifying ways to successfully scale up and transform this innovative donor-driven program into a sustainable multisectoral one health workforce capacity development model. PMID:22916854

Becker, Karen M; Ohuabunwo, Chima; Ndjakani, Yassa; Nguku, Patrick; Nsubuga, Peter; Mukanga, David; Wurapa, Frederick

2012-09-01

230

Educating medical laboratory technologists: revisiting our assumptions in the current economic and health-care environment.  

PubMed

Health care occupies a distinct niche in an economy struggling to recover from recession. Professions related to the care of patients are thought to be relatively resistant to downturns, and thus become attractive to students typically drawn to more lucrative pursuits. Currently, a higher profile for clinical laboratory technology among college students and those considering career change results in larger and better prepared applicant pools. However, after decades of contraction marked by closing of programs, prospective students encounter an educational system without the capacity or vigor to meet their needs. Here discussed are some principles and proposals to allow universities, partnering with health-care providers, government agencies, and other stake-holders to develop new programs, or reenergize existing ones to serve our students and patients. Principles include academic rigor in biomedical and clinical science, multiple points of entry for students, flexibility in format, cost effectiveness, career ladders and robust partnerships. PMID:23653802

Linder, Regina

2012-12-03

231

Radioactive Waste Management Complex low-level waste radiological performance assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of radioactive low-level waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This radiological performance assessment was conducted to evaluate compliance with applicable radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals inadvertently intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty and sensitivity analyses were performed. The results of the analyses indicate compliance with established radiological criteria and provide reasonable assurance that public health and safety will be protected.

Maheras, S.J.; Rood, A.S.; Magnuson, S.O.; Sussman, M.E.; Bhatt, R.N.

1994-04-01

232

Modeling, simulation, and analysis at Sandia National Laboratories for health care systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Modeling, Simulation, and Analysis are special competencies of the Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories which have been developed and refined through years of national defense work. Today, many of these skills are being applied to the problem of understanding the performance of medical devices and treatments. At Sandia National Laboratories we are developing models at all three levels of health care delivery: (1) phenomenology models for Observation and Test, (2) model-based outcomes simulations for Diagnosis and Prescription, and (3) model-based design and control simulations for the Administration of Treatment. A sampling of specific applications include non-invasive sensors for blood glucose, ultrasonic scanning for development of prosthetics, automated breast cancer diagnosis, laser burn debridement, surgical staple deformation, minimally invasive control for administration of a photodynamic drug, and human-friendly decision support aids for computer-aided diagnosis. These and other projects are being performed at Sandia with support from the DOE and in cooperation with medical research centers and private companies. Our objective is to leverage government engineering, modeling, and simulation skills with the biotechnical expertise of the health care community to create a more knowledge-rich environment for decision making and treatment.

Polito, Joseph

1994-12-01

233

Genitourinary radiology  

SciTech Connect

A literature review of genitourinary radiology highlights new findings in the field that have occurred in the past year. The physiology of contrast media, and the occasional life-threatening contrast medial reaction are discussed. Common urologic problems such as stones, infection, and obstruction are examined in order to interpret static radiographs in a more meaningful way. The field of interventional uroradiology continues to expand, with new procedures being tried and new indications for old procedures being developed. (KRM)

McClennan, B.L.

1982-01-01

234

The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) -- formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory (RRL) -- of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis, and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. Experiments performed from May 1991--April 1992 are described.

Hall, E.J.

1992-05-01

235

The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) is based on a 4-MV Van de Graaff accelerator, which is used to generate a variety of well-characterized radiation beams for research in radiobiology, radiological physics, and radiation chemistry. It is part of the Center for Radiological Research (CRR) - formerly the Radiological Research Laboratory of Columbia University, and its operation is supported as a National Facility by the US Department of Energy (DOE). As such, RARAF is available to all potential users on an equal basis and scientists outside the CRR are encouraged to submit proposals for experiments at RARAF. The operation of the Van de Graaff is supported by the DOE, but the research projects themselves must be supported separately. This report provides a listing and brief description of experiments performed at RARAF during the May 1, 1992 through April 30, 1993.

Hall, E.J.; Marino, S.A.

1993-05-01

236

21 CFR 892.1940 - Radiologic quality assurance instrument.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1940 Radiologic quality assurance instrument. (a) Identification....

2013-04-01

237

Field issues for the plan and operation of the laboratory component of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.  

PubMed

The design of the laboratory component of a mobile examination survey such as the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey requires that the physical limitation of the mobile examination center be balanced against the requirements of the laboratory analyses needed to fulfill the goals of the survey. In order to include an analysis in the survey, the scientific merit of the laboratory test must be established and a consensus must be reached on the appropriateness of the technology for the six years of the survey. The public health importance of the analysis and the subsequent results are also evaluated before inclusion into the laboratory protocol. Finally, the feasibility of incorporating the analysis into the protocol is reviewed. The laboratory component of NHANES III is discussed, addressing these points with descriptions of the reasons for inclusion and exclusion of key analytes. PMID:2243285

McQuillan, G M; Gunter, E W; Lannom, L

1990-11-01

238

Surface radiological investigations at environmental research area 11, [sup 137]Cs- and [sup 60]Co-contaminated plots at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

A surface radiological investigation at the [sup 137]Cs- and [sup 6O]Co-contaminated forest area (Chestnut Ridge east and west plots) was conducted from January 1992 through August 1992. Results of the survey revealed numerous spots and small areas of surface contamination that followed the original placement of feeders used for [sup 6O]Co- and [sup 137]Cs-labeled seeds in a 1969--1970 study. Surface gamma exposure rates reached 380 [mu]R/h at the east plot and 400 [mu]R/h at the west plot, but approximately one-half and one- third, respectively, of the identified anomalies did not exceed 39 [mu]R/h. Results of soil sample analyses demonstrated that [sup 137]Cs and [sup 6O]Co were responsible for the elevated radiation levels. Radionuclides were found below the surface at soil sample locations, in some cases at depths below 18 in. The same pattern of subsurface contamination may be present at other elevated surface spots at both plots. These survey results show that current radiological conditions at the site remain an environmental problem. Recommendations for corrective actions are included.

Uziel, M.S.; Tiner, P.F.; Williams, J.K.

1993-02-01

239

Muscle Atlas: Musculoskeletal Radiology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Not enough people know about the world of musculoskeletal radiology, but this site can address some of those glaring gaps in medical and physiological knowledge. Created by Doctor Michael Richardson at the University of Washington, this online muscle atlas covers the lower and upper extremity, and is primarily designed for use by health science professionals. The site also includes some teaching and instructional materials related to radiology. Visitors will note that the site contains a table of contents, and all of the major muscles are listed alphabetically, from the Adductor Brevis to the Vastus Medialis. Additionally, for each muscle, visitors can view a high-quality image of the related muscle groups and the function of each muscle in question.

Richardson, Michael L.

2009-08-13

240

Diagnostic radiology 1987  

SciTech Connect

This is the latest version of the continuing education course on diagnostic radiology given yearly by the Department of Radiology at the University of California, San Francisco. The lectures are grouped into sections on gastrointestinal radiology, mammography, uroradiology, magnetic resonance, hepatobiliary radiology, pediatric radiology, ultrasound, interventional radiology, chest radiology, nuclear medicine, cardiovascular radiology, and skeletal radiology. Each section contains four to eight topics. Each of these consists of text that represents highlights in narrative form, selected illustrations, and a short bibliography. The presentation gives a general idea of what points were made in the lecture.

Margulis, A.R.; Gooding, C.A.

1987-01-01

241

Tiger Team environment, safety, and health assessment of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, conducted from October 22 and November 30, 1990. The assessment was conducted by a tam comprised of environment, safety, and health (ES H) professional from the Department, its contractors, and consultants. The purpose of the ORNL Tiger Team Assessment is to provide the Secretary of Energy with concise information on: current ES H compliance status at the site and the vulnerabilities associated with that compliance status; root causes for noncompliance; and adequacy of DOE and site contractor ES H management programs. This information will assist DOE in determining patterns and trends in ES H compliance and probable root causes, and will provide guidance for management to take needed corrective actions.

Not Available

1990-11-01

242

Human-health effects of radium: an epidemiolgic perspective of research at Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The topic of health effects of radium has recently been considerably broadened by the identification of multiple myeloma as a specific outcome of bone-seeking radionuclides, and by evidence that the incidence of breast cancer may be significantly increased by radium exposure. All soft-tissue tumors are now suspect, especially leukemias. Concepts of dose-response need to be broadened to include the concept of risk factors, or, if one prefers, of susceptible subgroups. Biological factors relating to radium uptake and retention require study, as do risk factors modifying risk of both the clasical tumors, osteosarcoma and nasal sinus/mastoid, and the more recently suspect soft-tissue tumors. The history, organization, and current research activities in epidemiology at Argonne National Laboratory are described, and findings of the last decade and a half reviewed. Plans for future research are briefly discussed.

Stebbings, J.H.

1982-01-01

243

Post-remediation action radiological report for Surface Impoundments C (3539) and D (3540) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

During August and September 1998, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC performed a remedial action within Impoundments 3539 and 3540 (Impoundments C and D, respectively) in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision (ROD) for the Surface Impoundments Operable Unit. The remedial action included removal of sediments and 0.1 ft of subimpoundment soil. A post-remedial action radiological survey was conducted to provide data to support the Bethel Valley ROD. Data was obtained from (1) a walkover survey for residual gamma radiation on the base of the impoundments, (2) smear surveys for transferable contamination on remaining riprap, and (3) representative sampling of subimpoundment soils. Walkover surveys identified no locations outside the impoundments with gamma exposure levels greater than three times background levels. Smear surveys detected no removable contamination above release limits as specified in 10 CFR 835, Appendix D. Subimpoundment soil samples quantified low levels of residual contamination.

NONE

1998-12-01

244

Learning Radiology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Learning Radiology website was conceived and created by Professor William Herring of the Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia. The site was started in June 2002, and now receives upwards of 12,000 visitors a day. Since the time the site was started, it has grown to include video podcasts, lectures from medical professionals, and interactive tutorials. The materials on the site are divided into seven topical areas, including Lectures, Notes, Images, Case of the Week Archive, and Quick Quizzes. In the Lectures area visitors can find talks on everything from bone tumors to the "ABCs of Heart Disease." Many of the talks are available in a variety of formats, including as pdf files and PowerPoint presentations. In the Notes area, visitors can read clear and concise summaries of over 45 topics, including Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm and Paget's Disease. Also, visitors can follow Learning Radiology via Twitter and take advantage of their interactive Museum of Modern Imaging, which includes fun and informative areas like the Hall of Hype and Roentgen's Room.

Herring, William

2012-05-11

245

Health and Safety Laboratory environmental quarterly, March 1--June 1, 1976. [Fallout, natural radioactivity, and lead in environmental samples from USA, India, and Taiwan during 1976  

SciTech Connect

This report presents current data from the HASL environmental programs, the Air Monitoring Section of the Bhabha Atomic Research Center in India, the Health Physics Section of the Institute of Nuclear Science in Taiwan and the Radiological and Environmental Research Division at Argonne National Laboratory. The initial section consists of interpretive reports and notes on the history of long-range fallout, cesium-137 in Bombay milk, natural and fallout radioactivity in Indian diet, reporting results of radioactivity measurements at near zero levels of sample activity and background, plutonium in soil northeast of the Nevada Test Site, radon levels at the Lloyd, NY regional station, strontium-90 in New York and San Francisco diets through 1975, plutonium-239, 240 in 1974 diet, up-dating stratospheric radionuclide inventories to July 1975 and a revised table of radionuclides. Subsequent sections include tabulations of radionuclide levels in stratospheric air; lead and radionuclides in surface air; strontium-90 in deposition, milk, diet, tap water, and human bone; cesium-137 in Chicago foods in April 1976; and environmental radioactivity surveys for nuclear power plants in North Taiwan. A bibliography of recent publications related to environmental studies is also presented.

Hardy, E.P. Jr.

1976-07-01

246

Curricular Guidelines for Dental Auxiliary Radiology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

AADS curricular guidelines suggest objectives for these areas of dental auxiliary radiology: physical principles of X-radiation in dentistry, related radiobiological concepts, principles of radiologic health, radiographic technique, x-ray films and intensifying screens, factors contributing to film quality, darkroom, and normal variations in…

Journal of Dental Education, 1981

1981-01-01

247

Radiology Aide. Instructor Key [and] Student Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This manual can be used independently by students in secondary health occupations programs or by persons receiving on-the-job training in a radiology department. The manual includes an instructor's key that provides answers to the activity sheets and unit evaluations. The manual consists of the following five units: (1) orientation to radiology

Hartwein, Jon; Dunham, John

248

Curricular Guidelines for Dental Auxiliary Radiology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|AADS curricular guidelines suggest objectives for these areas of dental auxiliary radiology: physical principles of X-radiation in dentistry, related radiobiological concepts, principles of radiologic health, radiographic technique, x-ray films and intensifying screens, factors contributing to film quality, darkroom, and normal variations in…

Journal of Dental Education, 1981

1981-01-01

249

Radiology Aide. Instructor Key [and] Student Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This manual can be used independently by students in secondary health occupations programs or by persons receiving on-the-job training in a radiology department. The manual includes an instructor's key that provides answers to the activity sheets and unit evaluations. The manual consists of the following five units: (1) orientation to radiology

Hartwein, Jon; Dunham, John

250

Impact of health information technology interventions to improve medication laboratory monitoring for ambulatory patients: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medication errors are a major source of morbidity and mortality. Inadequate laboratory monitoring of high-risk medications after initial prescription is a medical error that contributes to preventable adverse drug events. Health information technology (HIT)-based clinical decision support may improve patient safety by improving the laboratory monitoring of high-risk medications, but the effectiveness of such interventions is unclear. Therefore, the authors

Shira H. Fischer; Jennifer Tjia; Terry S. Field

2010-01-01

251

Ethical problems in radiology: radiological consumerism.  

PubMed

One of the causes of the increasing request for radiological examinations occurring in all economically developed countries is the active role played by the patient-consumer. Consumerism places the radiologist in an ethical dilemma, between the principle of autonomy on the one hand and the ethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice on the other. The choice made by radiologists in moral dilemmas is inspired by an adherence to moral principles, which in Italy and elsewhere refer to the Judaeo-Christian tradition or to neo-Darwinian relativism. Whatever the choice, the radiologist is bound to adhere to that choice and to provide the patient with all the relevant information regarding his or her state of health. PMID:19662338

Magnavita, N; Bergamaschi, A

2009-08-07

252

Reinventing radiology reimbursement.  

PubMed

Lee Memorial Health System (LMHS), located in southwest Florida, consists of 5 hospitals, a home health agency, a skilled nursing facility, multiple outpatient centers, walk-in medical centers, and primary care physician offices. LMHS annually performs more than 300,000 imaging procedures with gross imaging revenues exceeding dollar 350 million. In fall 2002, LMHS received the results of an independent audit of its IR coding. The overall IR coding error rate was determined to be 84.5%. The projected net financial impact of these errors was an annual reimbursement loss of dollar 182,000. To address the issues of coding errors and reimbursement loss, LMHS implemented its clinical reimbursementspecialist (CRS) system in October 2003, as an extension of financial services' reimbursement division. LMHS began with CRSs in 3 service lines: emergency department, cardiac catheterization, and radiology. These 3 CRSs coordinate all facets of their respective areas' chargemaster, patient charges, coding, and reimbursement functions while serving as a resident coding expert within their clinical areas. The radiology reimbursement specialist (RRS) combines an experienced radiologic technologist, interventional technologist, medical records coder, financial auditor, reimbursement specialist, and biller into a single position. The RRS's radiology experience and technologist knowledge are key assets to resolving coding conflicts and handling complex interventional coding. In addition, performing a daily charge audit and an active code review are essential if an organization is to eliminate coding errors. One of the inherent effects of eliminating coding errors is the capturing of additional RVUs and units of service. During its first year, based on account level detail, the RRS system increased radiology productivity through the additional capture of just more than 3,000 RVUs and 1,000 additional units of service. In addition, the physicians appreciate having someone who "keeps up with all the coding changes" and looks out for the charges. By assisting a few physicians' staff with coding questions, providing coding updates, and allowing them to sit in on educational sessions, at least 2 physicians have transferred some their volume to LMHS from a competitor. The provision of a "clean account," without coding errors, allows the biller to avoid the rework and billing delays caused by coding issues. During the first quarter of the RRS system, the billers referred an average of 9 accounts per day for coding resolution. During the fourth quarter of the system, these referrals were reduced to less than one per day. Prior to the RRS system, resolving these issues took an average of 4 business days. Now the conflicts are resolved within 24 hours. PMID:15898580

Marshall, John; Adema, Denise

253

Battlefield radiology.  

PubMed

With the increasing tempo of military conflicts in the last decade, much has been learnt about imaging battlefield casualties in the acute setting. Ultrasound in the form of focused abdominal sonography in trauma (FAST) has proven invaluable in emergency triage of patients for immediate surgery. Multidetector CT allows accurate determination of battlefield trauma injuries. It permits the surgeons and anaesthetists to plan their interventions more thoroughly and to be made aware of clinically occult injuries. There are common injury patterns associated with blast injury, gunshot wounds and blunt trauma. While this body of knowledge is most applicable to the battlefield, there are parallels with peacetime radiology, particularly in terrorist attacks and industrial accidents. This pictorial review is based on the experiences of a UK radiologist deployed in Afghanistan in 2010. PMID:22806621

Graham, R N J

2012-07-17

254

[Cardiac radiology].  

PubMed

From the beginning of the era of X-rays, cardiac radiology has become a target of this new technique. Early pioneers, Ciegem, Rieder, Rosenthal, Williams rapidly accumulated extensive experience with fluoroscopy and radiography and publications on cardiac diseases as soon as 1899 and 1901 and 1902. The next step in cardiac diagnosis was achieved by Forsmann in 1929, with the first attempt at cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography. Many clinicians, Moniz, Reboul, Rousthoi contributed to the development of the technique between 1930 and 1940. A further turning point came in 1941 when Cournand demonstrated that cardiac catheterization was a safe method in man. In the technical field major progress came from Scandinavia were rapid filming was born. The management of ischaemic disease, changed dramatically with the demonstration of coronary anatomy, largely due to Sones, Judkins and Amplatz. A further progress was initiated in 1977 by Gruentzig who invented balloon angioplasty. PMID:8550395

Struyven, J

1995-10-01

255

Radiological benchmarks for screening contaminants of potential concern for effects on aquatic biota at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

A hazardous waste site may contain hundreds of contaminants; therefore, it is important to screen contaminants of potential concern for the ecological risk assessment. Often this screening is done as part of a screening assessment, the purpose of which is to evaluate the available data, identify data gaps, and screen contaminants of potential concern. Screening may be accomplished by using a set of toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks are helpful in determining whether contaminants warrant further assessment or are at a level that requires no further attention. Unlike exposures to chemicals, which are expressed as the concentration in water or sediment, exposures to radionuclides are expressed as the dose rate received by the organism. The recommended acceptable dose rate to natural populations of aquatic biota is 1 rad d{sup {minus}1}. Blaylock, Frank, and O`Neal provide formulas and exposure factors for estimating the dose rates to representative aquatic organisms. Those formulas were used herein to calculate the water and sediment concentrations that result in a total dose rate of 1 rad d{sup {minus}1} to fish for selected radionuclides. These radiological benchmarks are intended for use at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation and at the Portsmouth and Paducah gaseous diffusion plants as screening values only to show the nature and extent of contamination and identify the need for additional site-specific investigation.

NONE

1998-07-01

256

MEMORANDUM: The evolution of the international system of radiological protection: food for thought from the Nuclear Energy Agency Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

From its inception, the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), which is part of the broader Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, has contributed to the development of international radiological protection norms and standards. This continues today, in the form of studies and workshops to assist radiological protection policy makers, regulators and practitioners to develop concepts and approaches to help the international

Ted Lazo

2003-01-01

257

Industrial Pleuropulmonary Disorders: Radiological Considerations  

PubMed Central

Industrial pleuropulmonary disorders may result from exposure of the human respiratory tract to diverse types of dusts and fumes, visible and invisible, benign and toxic, organic and inorganic. Meticulous radiological examination, combined with history and physical examination, appropriate laboratory tests, and the exclusion of other disorders which could produce similar changes, is essential for correct diagnosis. Criteria for the radiological diagnosis of pulmonary fibrosis, of generalized emphysema, and of cor pulmonale are outlined. The commoner types of pneumoconiosis are discussed in some detail, and the possible relationship of various inhaled noxa to primary bronchial carcinoma is considered.

Garland, L. Henry

1965-01-01

258

Hospital management of mass radiological casualties : reassessing exposures from contaminated victims of an exploded radiological dispersal device (RDD).  

SciTech Connect

One of the key issues in the aftermath of an exploded radiological dispersal device from a terrorist event is that of the contaminated victim and the concern among healthcare providers for the harmful exposures they may receive in treating patients, especially if the patient has not been thoroughly decontaminated. This is critically important in the event of mass casualties from a nuclear or radiological incident because of the essential rapidity of acute medical decisions and that those who have life- or limb-threatening injuries may have treatment unduly delayed by a decontamination process that may be unnecessary for protecting the health and safety of the patient or the healthcare provider. To estimate potential contamination of those exposed in a radiological dispersal device event, results were used from explosive aerosolization tests of surrogate radionuclides detonated with high explosives at the Sandia National Laboratories. Computer modeling was also used to assess radiation dose rates to surgical personnel treating patients with blast injuries who are contaminated with any of a variety of common radionuclides. It is demonstrated that exceptional but plausible cases may require special precautions by the healthcare provider, even while managing life-threatening injuries of a contaminated victim from a radiological dispersal device event.

Ansari, Armin (National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA); Harper, Frederick Taylor; Smith, James M. (National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA)

2005-04-01

259

RADIOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY DEVELOPMENT/IMPROVEMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

The office is developing improved methodologies and guidance for evaluating human health risks associated with exposure to environmental radiological contaminants. These activities involve coordination with numerous federal agencies and the development and communication of vari...

260

Environment, safety and health progress assessment of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The onsite assessment, which was conducted from November 9 through November 20, 1992, included a selective review of the ES&H management systems and programs with principal focus on the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs (DP); San Francisco Field Office (SF), including the Livermore Site Office (LSO); and the site contractor, the University of California. The purpose of the LLNL ES&H Progress Assessment is to provide the Secretary with an independent assessment of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to address ES&H issues and requirements. The assessment was not a comprehensive compliance assessment of ES&H activities. The point of reference for assessing programs at LLNL was, for the most part, the Tiger Team Assessment of LLNL, which was conducted from February 26 through April 5, 1990. The LLNL Progress Assessment was conducted by a team of 12 professionals from various DOE offices and their support contractors, with expertise in the areas of management, environment, safety, and health. The Progress Assessment Team concluded that LLNL management recognizes the importance that the Secretary of Energy places on ES&H excellence and has responded with improvements in all ES&H areas. Progress has been made in addressing the deficiencies identified in the 1990 Tiger Team Assessment. Although much remains to be done and concerns were noted in several areas, these concerns do not diminish the significance of the progress made since the 1990 Tiger Team Assessment.

Not Available

1992-11-01

261

Environment, safety and health progress assessment of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES H) Progress Assessment of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The onsite assessment, which was conducted from November 9 through November 20, 1992, included a selective review of the ES H management systems and programs with principal focus on the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs (DP); San Francisco Field Office (SF), including the Livermore Site Office (LSO); and the site contractor, the University of California. The purpose of the LLNL ES H Progress Assessment is to provide the Secretary with an independent assessment of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to address ES H issues and requirements. The assessment was not a comprehensive compliance assessment of ES H activities. The point of reference for assessing programs at LLNL was, for the most part, the Tiger Team Assessment of LLNL, which was conducted from February 26 through April 5, 1990. The LLNL Progress Assessment was conducted by a team of 12 professionals from various DOE offices and their support contractors, with expertise in the areas of management, environment, safety, and health. The Progress Assessment Team concluded that LLNL management recognizes the importance that the Secretary of Energy places on ES H excellence and has responded with improvements in all ES H areas. Progress has been made in addressing the deficiencies identified in the 1990 Tiger Team Assessment. Although much remains to be done and concerns were noted in several areas, these concerns do not diminish the significance of the progress made since the 1990 Tiger Team Assessment.

Not Available

1992-11-01

262

Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure Facilities for Bio-Effects Research at the Health Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes the multi-user radiofrequency radiation exposure facilities for bio-effects research in use at the Health Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC. Four facilities are described: (1) a 100 MHz CW exposure system, (2) a ...

J. S. Ali C. Weil

1983-01-01

263

RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION EXPOSURE FACILITIES FOR BIO-EFFECTS RESEARCH AT THE HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY, RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, NORTH CAROLINA  

EPA Science Inventory

The report describes the multi-user radiofrequency radiation exposure facilities for bio-effects research in use at the Health Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC. Four facilities are described: (1) a 100 MHz CW exposure system, (2) a 2450 MHz CW exposure syst...

264

The prevalence of anthelmintic resistance in ovine case submissions to animal health laboratories in New Zealand in 1993  

Microsoft Academic Search

An analysis was undertaken of 177 veterinary diagnostic case submissions to two North Island and two South Island animal health laboratories for faecal egg count reduction testing in sheep during 1993 to provide some comparative data on the frequency of occurrence of anthelmintic resistance. The results suggest that resistance to anthelmintics in sheep nematodes may be more common in the

P. B. McKenna; C. M. Allan; M. J. Taylor; K. G. Townsend

1995-01-01

265

An overview of dental radiology: a primer on dental radiology  

SciTech Connect

To provide medical and scientific background on certain selected technologies generally considered to be of particular significance, the National Center for Health Care Technology (NCHCT) has commissioned a series of overview papers. This is one of several projects entered into jointly by the Bureau of Radiological Health (BRH) and NCHCT relating to the use of radiation for health care. Dental radiation protection has been a long-time interest of BRH. Both past and on-going efforts to minimize population radiation exposure from electronic products have included specific action programs directed at minimizing unnecessary radiation exposure to the population from dental radiology. Current efforts in quality assurance and referral criteria are two aspects of NCHCT's own assessment of this technology which are described within the larger picture presented in this overview. The issues considered in this document go beyond the radiation exposure aspects of dental x-ray procedures. To be responsive to the informational needs of NCHCT, the assessment includes various other factors that influence the practice of dental radiology. It is hoped this analysis will serve as the basis for planning and conducting future programs to improve the practice of dental radiology.

Manny, E.F.; Carlson, K.C.; McClean, P.M.; Ra1hlin, J.A.; Segal, P.

1980-11-07

266

Health and Safety Plan for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S&H) issues. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to air, soil, or surface water This plan explains additional site-specific health and safety requirements such as Site Specific Hazards Evaluation Addendums (SSHEAs) to the Site Safety and Health Plan which should be used in concert with this plan and existing established procedures.

Van Hoesen, S.D.; Clark, C. Jr.; Burman, S.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Manis, L.W.; Barre, W.L. [Analysas Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1993-12-01

267

Conceptual Site Treatment Plan Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research Environmental Restoration Project  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Facilities Compliance Act (the Act) of 1992 waives sovereign immunity for federal facilities for fines and penalties under the provisions of the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act, state, interstate, and local hazardous and solid waste management requirements. However, for three years the Act delays the waiver for violations involving US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Act, however, requires that the DOE prepare a Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) for each of its sites that generate or store mixed wastes (MWs). The purpose of the CSTP is to present DOE`s preliminary evaluations of the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating a site`s MW. This CSTP presents the preliminary capacity and technology evaluation for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR). The five identified MW streams at LEHR are evaluated to the extent possible given available information. Only one MW stream is sufficiently well defined to permit a technology evaluation to be performed. Two other MW streams are in the process of being characterized so that an evaluation can be performed. The other two MW streams will be generated by the decommissioning of inactive facilities onsite within the next five years.

Chapman, T.E.

1993-10-01

268

Potential human health effects associated with laboratory exposures to Pfiesteria piscicida.  

PubMed Central

The adverse human health effects associated with the most prolonged and intense exposure known to Pfiesteria piscicida Steidinger & Burkholder cultures and toxin(s) are described. In December 1993, a patient presented with acute illness to the Memory Disorders Clinic of the Bryan Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at Duke University Medical Center with significant cognitive deficits 2 weeks after ceasing occupational laboratory exposure on the recommendation of the evaluating primary care physician. The clinical and exposure histories of this patient are presented. The comprehensive neurological examination findings are reviewed, with attention to the patient's neuropsychological evaluation. Six-week follow-up data illustrate the course of symptom resolution with exposure cessation. This case is presented in an effort to contribute to the gradually accruing evidence of potential central nervous system sequelae of Pfiesteria exposure. The case is discussed in the context of additional cases evaluated at Duke University Medical Center and the complicated scientific framework in which such evaluations proceed while definitive surrogate or biological markers are awaited.

Schmechel, D E; Koltai, D C

2001-01-01

269

Public health systems strengthening in Africa: The role of South Africa Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme  

PubMed Central

The South Africa Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programme (SAFELTP) was created in 2006 after recognizing the need to build and sustain the country's human resource capacity in field (applied) epidemiology and public health practice. The programme was formed as a collaboration between the South Africa Department of Health (DoH), the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD), the National Health Laboratory Services (NHLS), the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the University of Pretoria. The primary goal of the programme was to produce field-trained epidemiologists equipped with knowledge and practical skills to effectively and efficiently address the public health priorities of South Africa. SAFELTP is a 2-year full-time training, consisting of a combination of classroom-based instruction (30%) and mentored field work (70%). The training places emphasis on public health surveillance, investigation of disease epidemics, public health laboratory practice and communication of epidemiologic information, among other aspects of epidemiology research. At completion, residents are awarded a Master of Public Health (MPH) degree from the University of Pretoria. Since its inception in 2006, 48 residents have enrolled onto the programme and 30 (62%) of them have completed the training. Over the past 5 years, the residents have conducted more than 92 outbreak investigations, 47 surveillance evaluations, 19 planned studies, analyzed 37 large databases and presented more than 56 papers at local and international conferences. In recognition of the high-quality work, at least five SAFELTP residents have received awards at various international scientific conferences during the 5 years. In conclusion, the South Africa FELTP is now fully established and making valuable contributions to the country's public health system, albeit with innumerable challenges.

Kuonza, Lazarus; Tint, Khin San; Harris, Bernice; Nabukenya, Immaculate

2011-01-01

270

Implementation of a Radiological Safety Coach program  

SciTech Connect

The Safe Sites of Colorado Radiological Safety program has implemented a Safety Coach position, responsible for mentoring workers and line management by providing effective on-the-job radiological skills training and explanation of the rational for radiological safety requirements. This position is significantly different from a traditional classroom instructor or a facility health physicist, and provides workers with a level of radiological safety guidance not routinely provided by typical training programs. Implementation of this position presents a challenge in providing effective instruction, requiring rapport with the radiological worker not typically developed in the routine radiological training environment. The value of this unique training is discussed in perspective with cost-savings through better radiological control. Measures of success were developed to quantify program performance and providing a realistic picture of the benefits of providing one-on-one or small group training. This paper provides a description of the unique features of the program, measures of success for the program, a formula for implementing this program at other facilities, and a strong argument for the success (or failure) of the program in a time of increased radiological safety emphasis and reduced radiological safety budgets.

Konzen, K.K. [Safe Sites of Colorado, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Langsted, J.M. [M.H. Chew and Associates, Golden, CO (United States)

1998-02-01

271

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1987 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health: Part 5: Environment, safety, health, and quality assurance  

SciTech Connect

Part 5 of the 1987 Annual Report to the US Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Nuclear Safety, the Office of Environmental Guidance and Compliance, the Office of Environmental Audit, and the Office of National Environmental Policy Act Project Assistance. For each project, as identified by the Field Work Proposal, articles describe progress made during fiscal year 1987. Authors of these articles represent a broad spectrum of capabilities derived from five of the seven technical centers of the Laboratory, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the work.

Faust, L.G.; Steelman, B.L.; Selby, J.M.

1988-02-01

272

The power of hyphenated chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in public health laboratories.  

PubMed

Laboratories devoted to the public health field have to face the analysis of a large number of organic contaminants/residues in many different types of samples. Analytical techniques applied in this field are normally focused on quantification of a limited number of analytes. At present, most of these techniques are based on gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Using these techniques only analyte-specific information is acquired, and many other compounds that might be present in the samples would be ignored. In this paper, we explore the potential of time-of-flight (TOF) MS hyphenated to GC or LC to provide additional information, highly useful in this field. Thus, all positives reported by standard reference targeted LC-MS/MS methods were unequivocally confirmed by LC-QTOF MS. Only 61% of positives reported by targeted GC-MS/MS could be confirmed by GC-TOF MS, which was due to its lower sensitivity as nonconfirmations corresponded to analytes that were present at very low concentrations. In addition, the use of TOF MS allowed searching for additional compounds in large-scope screening methodologies. In this way, different contaminants/residues not included in either LC or GC tandem MS analyses were detected. This was the case of the insecticide thiacloprid, the plant growth regulator paclobutrazol, the fungicide prochloraz, or the UV filter benzophenone, among others. Finally, elucidation of unknowns was another of the possibilities offered by TOF MS thanks to the accurate-mass full-acquisition data available when using this technique. PMID:22578112

Ibáñez, María; Portolés, Tania; Rúbies, Antoni; Muñoz, Eva; Muñoz, Gloria; Pineda, Laura; Serrahima, Eulalia; Sancho, Juan V; Centrich, Francesc; Hernández, Félix

2012-05-18

273

Health hazard evaluation report HETA 84-198-1560, Division of Public Health Laboratories, State of Ohio, Columbus, Ohio. [Ethylene oxide and organic-solvent vapors  

SciTech Connect

Breathing-zone and environmental samples were analyzed for ethylene oxide and organic-solvent vapors at the Public Health Laboratory, State of Ohio, Columbus, Ohio, on March 26 and 27, 1984. The evaluation was requested because of employee complaints of mucous membrane and skin irritation while they poured gonorrhea culture media into petri dishes that had been sterilized with ethylene oxide. The authors conclude that the environmental cause of the health problems cannot be determined due to the lack of symptoms on the days of the survey. Without taking measurements on the exact day when conspicuous symptoms occur, it is difficult to determine the source of the problem. General recommendations include checking the general air circulation in the media laboratory and encouraging employees to wear gloves that protect hands and wrists while pouring culture media.

Behrens, V.; Burroughs, G.E.

1985-02-01

274

Derivation of strontium-90 and cesium-137 residual radioactive material guidelines for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect

Residual radioactive material guidelines for strontium-90 and cesium-137 were derived for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) site in Davis, California. The guideline derivation was based on a dose limit of 100 mrem/yr. The US Department of Energy (DOE) residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, was used in this evaluation; this code implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines. Three potential site utilization scenarios were considered with the assumption that, for a period of 1,000 years following remedial action, the site will be utilized without radiological restrictions. The defined scenarios vary with regard to use of the site, time spent at the site, and sources of food consumed. The results of the evaluation indicate that the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr will not be exceeded within 1,000 years for either strontium-90 or cesium-137, provided that the soil concentrations of these radionuclides at the LEHR site do not exceed the following levels: 71,000 pCi/g for strontium-90 and 91 pCi/g for cesium-137 for Scenario A (researcher: the expected scenario); 160,000 pCi/g for strontium-90 and 220 pCi/g for cesium-137 for Scenario B (recreationist: a plausible scenario); and 37 pCi/g for strontium-90 and 32 pCi/g for cesium-137 for Scenario C (resident farmer ingesting food produced in the contaminated area: a plausible scenario). The derived guidelines are single-radionuclide guidelines and are linearly proportional to the dose limit used in the calculations. In setting the actual strontium-90 and cesium-137 guidelines for the LEHR site, DOE will apply the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) policy to the decision-making process, along with other factors such as whether a particular scenario is reasonable and appropriate.

Nimmagadda, M.; Yu, C.

1993-04-01

275

Project health and safety plan for the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) in the North and South Tank Farms (NTF and STF) at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to health and safety (H and S) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all GAAT operations in the NTF and STF. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities identifies s part of the GAAT are initiated that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and best management practices in order to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air. This plan explains additional task-specific health and safety requirements such as the Site Safety and health Addendum and Activity Hazard Analysis, which should be used in concert with this plan and existing established procedures.

Abston, J.P.

1997-04-01

276

twodee: the Health and Safety Laboratory's shallow layer model for heavy gas dispersion Part 3: Experimental validation (Thorney Island)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Part 1 of this three-part paper described the mathematical and physical basis of twodee, the Health and Safety Laboratory's shallow layer model for heavy gas dispersion. In part 2, the numerical solution method used to simulate the twodee mathematical model was developed; the flux correction scheme of Zalesak [S.T. Zalesak, Fully multidimensional flux-corrected transport algorithms for fluids, Journal of Computational

R. K. S. Hankin; R. E. Britter

1999-01-01

277

Role of clinical microbiology laboratories in the management and control of infectious diseases and the delivery of health care.  

PubMed

Modern medicine has led to dramatic changes in infectious diseases practice. Vaccination and antibiotic therapy have benefited millions of persons. However, constrained resources now threaten our ability to adequately manage threats of infectious diseases by placing clinical microbiology services and expertise distant from the patient and their infectious diseases physician. Continuing in such a direction threatens quality of laboratory results, timeliness of diagnosis, appropriateness of treatment, effective communication, reduction of health care-associated infections, advances in infectious diseases practice, and training of future practitioners. Microbiology laboratories are the first lines of defense for detection of new antibiotic resistance, outbreaks of foodborne infection, and a possible bioterrorism event. Maintaining high-quality clinical microbiology laboratories on the site of the institution that they serve is the current best approach for managing today's problems of emerging infectious diseases and antimicrobial agent resistance by providing good patient care outcomes that actually save money. PMID:11181125

Peterson, L R; Hamilton, J D; Baron, E J; Tompkins, L S; Miller, J M; Wilfert, C M; Tenover, F C; Thomson Jr, R B

2001-02-07

278

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Health and Safety Long-Range Plan: Fiscal years 1989--1995  

SciTech Connect

The health and safety of its personnel is the first concern of ORNL and its management. The ORNL Health and Safety Program has the responsibility for ensuring the health and safety of all individuals assigned to ORNL activities. This document outlines the principal aspects of the ORNL Health and Safety Long-Range Plan and provides a framework for management use in the future development of the health and safety program. Each section of this document is dedicated to one of the health and safety functions (i.e., health physics, industrial hygiene, occupational medicine, industrial safety, nuclear criticality safety, nuclear facility safety, transportation safety, fire protection, and emergency preparedness). Each section includes functional mission and objectives, program requirements and status, a summary of program needs, and program data and funding summary. Highlights of FY 1988 are included.

Not Available

1989-06-01

279

Radiology Advisory Panel Meeting  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Text VersionPage 1. Radiology Advisory Panel Meeting Robert Ochs, PhD Branch Chief ... 36 Page 37. Radiology Advisory Panel Meeting Jingjing Ye, PhD ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/advisorycommittees/committeesmeetingmaterials

280

Interagency Radiological Assistance Plan.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Interagency Radiological Assistance Plan (IRAP) was developed in 1961 and revised in April 1975 by an interagency committee of Federal agency representatives as a means for providing rapid and effective radiological assistance in the event of a peacet...

1975-01-01

281

Quality assurance programs at the PNL calibrations laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The calibrations laboratory at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) serves as a radiological standardization facility for personnel and environmental dosimetry and radiological survey instruments. As part of this function, the calibrations laboratory must maintain radiological reference fields with calibrations traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). This task is accomplished by a combination of (1) sources or reference

R. K. Piper; J. C. McDonald; R. A. Fox; F. N. Eichner

1993-01-01

282

Radiological assistance program: Region I. Part I  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is to make DOE resources available and provide emergency assistance to state and local agencies in order to control radiological hazards, protect the public health and safety, and minimize the loss of property. This plan is an integral part of a nationwide program of radiological assistance established by the US DOE, and is implemented on a regional basis. The Brookhaven Area Office (BHO) Radiological Assistance Program is applicable to DOE Region I, which consists of the New England States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland and the District of Columbia. The BHO RAP-1 has been developed to: (a) ensure the availability of an effective radiological assistance capability to ensure the protection of persons and property; (b) provide guidelines to RAP-1 Team personnel for the evaluation of radiological incidents and implementation of corrective actions; (c) maintain liaison with other DOE installations, Federal, State and local organizations which may become involved in radiological assistance operations in Region I; and (d) encourage development of a local capability to cope with radiological incidents.

Musolino, S.V.; Kuehner, A.V.; Hull, A.P.

1985-07-15

283

The electronic health record as a primary source of clinical phenotype for genetic epidemiological studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The electronic health record (EHR) is a longitudinal electronic record of a patient’s health information generated by one or more encounters in any care delivery setting. Included in this information are patient demographics, progress notes, problems, medications, vital signs, past medical history, immunizations, laboratory data, and radiology reports. The EHR automates and streamlines the clinician’s work flow. It has the

Yoshiji Yamada

2008-01-01

284

International Data on Radiological Sources  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT The mission of radiological dispersal device (RDD) nuclear forensics is to identify the provenance of nuclear and radiological materials used in RDDs and to aid law enforcement in tracking nuclear materials and routes. The application of databases to radiological forensics is to match RDD source material to a source model in the database, provide guidance regarding a possible second device, and aid the FBI by providing a short list of manufacturers and distributors, and ultimately to the last legal owner of the source. The Argonne/Idaho National Laboratory RDD attribution database is a powerful technical tool in radiological forensics. The database (1267 unique vendors) includes all sealed sources and a device registered in the U.S., is complemented by data from the IAEA Catalogue, and is supported by rigorous in-lab characterization of selected sealed sources regarding physical form, radiochemical composition, and age-dating profiles. Close working relationships with global partners in the commercial sealed sources industry provide invaluable technical information and expertise in the development of signature profiles. These profiles are critical to the down-selection of potential candidates in either pre- or post- event RDD attribution. The down-selection process includes a match between an interdicted (or detonated) source and a model in the database linked to one or more manufacturers and distributors.

Martha Finck; Margaret Goldberg

2010-07-01

285

TVA's radiological emergency monitoring vans  

SciTech Connect

The Tennessee Valley Authority uses eight sampling vans and a single mobile screening laboratory for radiological emergency environmental monitoring. Sampling vans are utilized to obtain direct radiation survey measurements, air samples, and terrestrial samples, and to perform preliminary analyses on air samples. Samples are conveyed via couriers to the mobile screening laboratory, which is equipped to perform full-spectrum gamma isotopic analyses on air sample media and terrestrial samples in 0.5-liter Marinelli beakers. Communications between the sampling vans, mobile laboratory, and emergency centers are provided by a dedicated radio and repeater network covering the Tennessee River Valley. In this paper the design, equipment, and operation of the sampling vans and the mobile laboratory are discussed. Photographs and detailed cabinet-by-cabinet equipment and supplies inventories are included.

Flood, J.R.; Coleman, R.L.; Kent, C.E. (Radiological Health Staff, Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, AL (US))

1984-07-01

286

Laboratory Sampling Guide.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This sampling guide is designed to aid base-level Bioenvironmental Engineers (BEs) in submitting industrial hygiene, environmental health, and radiological samples to the United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, Occupational and Environmental...

T. R. Heline

2012-01-01

287

Evidence-based Radiology: A New Approach to the Practice of Radiology1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Top ABSTRACT In this review, the principles of evidence-based health care and their application to radiology are discussed. Evidence-based health care involves the more formal integration of the best research evidence with clinical expertise and explicit acknowledgment of patient values in clinical decision making, as compared with conventional practice. Recently, many health care disciplines have adopted the principles and practice

Harald O. Stolberg

288

Health Assessment for Whitmoyer Laboratories, Jackson Township, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD003005014.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Whitmoyer Laboratories 17.5-acre site is formerly an animal arsenical pharmaceutical manufacturing facility that operated from 1934 to 1984. In the early 1960s, approximately four million pounds of soluble arsenic wastes were placed into unlined lagoo...

1988-01-01

289

40 CFR 79.60 - Good laboratory practices (GLP) standards for inhalation exposure health effects testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...designated by testing facility management...Registration Rule or a testing facility, if it...under laboratory conditions to determine or...in humans, other living organisms, or media...system means any animal, microorganism...reference substance. Testing facility...

2010-07-01

290

40 CFR 79.60 - Good laboratory practices (GLP) standards for inhalation exposure health effects testing.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...designated by testing facility management...Registration Rule or a testing facility, if it...under laboratory conditions to determine or...in humans, other living organisms, or media...system means any animal, microorganism...reference substance. Testing facility...

2009-07-01

291

Laboratory Office Hours as Outreach in the Health Sciences: Better Research Skills for Better Careers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Medical librarianship is changing in health care environments. Since 1996, by which time the standards that determine how hospitals acquire accreditation changed, many hospitals have been acquiring accreditation without a qualified medical librarian on site. For that reason, it has become even more important that health care professionals,…

Prusin, Todd

2012-01-01

292

Laboratory Office Hours as Outreach in the Health Sciences: Better Research Skills for Better Careers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Medical librarianship is changing in health care environments. Since 1996, by which time the standards that determine how hospitals acquire accreditation changed, many hospitals have been acquiring accreditation without a qualified medical librarian on site. For that reason, it has become even more important that health care professionals,…

Prusin, Todd

2012-01-01

293

Health information and substitution between fish: Lessons from laboratory and field experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper compares results from a lab experiment and a field experiment conducted in France to evaluate the impact of health information on fish consumption. In both experiments, health information concerns a benefit (omega 3) and a risk (methylmercury). While the lab experiment focuses on two species, namely canned tuna and canned sardines, the field experiment offers a complete measure

Stéphan Marette; Jutta Roosen; Sandrine Blanchemanche

2008-01-01

294

Health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment remediation project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of the policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air.

Burman, S.N.; Uziel, M.S.

1995-12-01

295

The Environmental Science & Health Effects Program at the at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

To conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources.

Lawson, Douglas R.

2000-08-20

296

The Environmental Science & Health Effects Program at the at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

To conduct policy-relevant research that will help us understand atmospheric impacts and potential health effects that may be caused by the use of petroleum-based fuels and alternative transportation fuels from mobile sources.

Douglas R

2000-01-01

297

Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual Report for 1980 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental Assessment, Control, Health and Safety.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) 1980 annual report to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment describes research in environment, health, and safety conducted during fiscal year 1980. Part 5 includes technology assessments for natural gas, enhance...

R. W. Baalman I. D. Hays

1981-01-01

298

Worker Safety and Health Issues Associated with the DOE Environmental Cleanup Program: Insights From the DOE Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public health Standards Steering Group  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory Directors' Environmental and Occupational/Public Health Standards Steering Group (or ''SSG'') was formed in 1990. It was felt then that ''risk'' could be an organizing principle for environmental cleanup and that risk-based cleanup standards could rationalize clean up work. The environmental remediation process puts workers engaged in cleanup activities at risk from hazardous materials and from the more usual hazards associated with construction activities. In a real sense, the site remediation process involves the transfer of a hypothetical risk to the environment and the public from isolated contamination into real risks to the workers engaged in the remediation activities. Late in its existence the SSG, primarily motivated by its LANL representative, Dr. Harry Ettinger, actively investigated issues associated with worker health and safety during environmental remediation activities. This paper summarizes the insights noted by the SSG. Most continue to be pertinent today.

M.C. Edelson; Samuel C. Morris; Joan M. Daisey

2001-03-01

299

TWODEE: the Health and Safety Laboratory's shallow layer model for heavy gas dispersion. Part 1. Mathematical basis and physical assumptions.  

PubMed

The Major Hazard Assessment Unit of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) provides advice to local planning authorities on land use planning in the vicinity of major hazard sites. For sites with the potential for large scale releases of toxic heavy gases such as chlorine this advice is based on risk levels and is informed by use of the computerised risk assessment tool RISKAT [C. Nussey, M. Pantony, R. Smallwood, HSE's risk assessment tool RISKAT, Major Hazards: Onshore and Offshore, October, 1992]. At present RISKAT uses consequence models for heavy gas dispersion that assume flat terrain. This paper is the first part of a three part paper. Part 1 describes the mathematical basis of TWODEE, the Health and Safety Laboratory's shallow layer model for heavy gas dispersion. The shallow layer approach used by TWODEE is a compromise between the complexity of CFD models and the simpler integral models. Motivated by the low aspect ratio of typical heavy gas clouds, shallow layer models use depth-averaged variables to describe the flow behaviour. This approach is particularly well suited to assess the effect of complex terrain because the downslope buoyancy force is easily included. Entrainment may be incorporated into a shallow layer model by the use of empirical formulae. Part 2 of this paper presents the numerical scheme used to solve the TWODEE mathematical model, and validated against theoretical results. Part 3 compares the results of the TWODEE model with the experimental results taken at Thorney Island [J. McQuaid, B. Roebuck, The dispersion of heavier-than-air gas from a fenced enclosure. Final report to the US Coast Guard on contract with the Health and Safety Executive, Technical Report RPG 1185, Safety Engineering Laboratory, Research and Laboratory Services Division, Broad Lane, Sheffield S3 7HQ, UK, 1985]. PMID:10334822

Hankin, R K; Britter, R E

1999-05-14

300

DEVELOPMENT OF THE U.S. EPA HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH LABORATORY FROZEN BLOOD CELL REPOSITORY PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

In previous efforts, we suggested that proper blood cell freezing and storage is necessary in longitudinal studies with reduced between tests error, for specimen sharing between laboratories and for convenient scheduling of assays. e continue to develop and upgrade programs for o...

301

Health Services: Clinical. Medical Laboratory Aide. Instructor's Manual. Competency-Based Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This instructors manual consists of materials for use in presenting a course in the occupational area of medical laboratory aide. Included in the first part of the guide are a program master sequence; a master listing of instructional materials, equipment, and supplies; an overview of the competency-based vocational education (CBVE) system; and…

Cave, Julie; And Others

302

Manual Laboratorio de Microbiologia. Documento de trabajo Programa de Educacion en Ocupaciones de Salud (Microbiology Laboratory Manual. Curriculum Document. Program of Education in Health Occupations).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This laboratory manual on microbiology begins with an introduction relating the study of microorganisms to health occupations education and stressing the importance of teaching critical thinking. The introduction is followed by general instructions for the use of the manual and an illustration of hand washing procedures. The 13 laboratory…

Puerto Rico State Dept. of Education, Hato Rey. Area for Vocational and Technical Education.

303

Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services Annual Report for 1998  

Microsoft Academic Search

During calendar year (CY) 1998, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed its customary radiological protection support services in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations OffIce (RL) and the Hanford contractors. These services included: 1) external dosimetry, 2) internal dosimetry, 3) in vivo measurements, 4) radiological records, 5) instrument calibra- tion and evaluation, and 6) calibration

DE Bihl; JA MacLellan; ML Johnson; RK Piper; TP Lynch

1999-01-01

304

Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services Annual Report for 1999  

Microsoft Academic Search

During calendar year (CY) 1999, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed its customary radiological protection support services in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) and the Hanford contractors. These services included: (1) external dosimetry, (2) internal dosimetry, (3) in vivo measurements, (4) radiological records, (5) instrument calibration and evaluation, and (6) calibration of

TP Lynch; DE Bihl; ML Johnson; MA MacLellan; RK Piper

2000-01-01

305

Human health issues for plutonium inhalation: Perspectives from laboratory animal studies  

SciTech Connect

Since the first production of plutonium in the 1940s, potential health effects from plutonium have been a concern for humans. The few people exposed to plutonium and the relatively small intakes that have occurred, at least in the Western world, have resulted in very little direct information from human population studies. The Manhattan Project workers have been followed for decades, and few health effects have been observed. The situation is similar for the population of workers at the Rocky Flats facility. Some information is now being released from the former Soviet Union on selected worker populations who show biological effects, primarily pulmonary fibrosis and some increase in lung cancers.

Muggenburg, B.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Guilmette, R.A. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-12-01

306

Population-based laboratory surveillance for Serratia species isolates in a large Canadian health region  

Microsoft Academic Search

A population-based laboratory surveillance was conducted during a six-year period to define the incidence, demographic risk\\u000a factors for acquisition, and anti-microbial susceptibilities of Serratia species isolates. A total of 715 incident Serratia species isolates were identified for an annual incidence of 10.8 per 100,000 residents; bacteremic disease occurred in 0.9\\u000a per 100,000 residents annually. The incidence increased with advancing age

K. B. Laupland; M. D. Parkins; D. B. Gregson; D. L. Church; T. Ross; J. D. D. Pitout

2008-01-01

307

Human health issues for plutonium inhalation: Perspectives from laboratory animal studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the first production of plutonium in the 1940s, potential health effects from plutonium have been a concern for humans. The few people exposed to plutonium and the relatively small intakes that have occurred, at least in the Western world, have resulted in very little direct information from human population studies. The Manhattan Project workers have been followed for decades,

B. A. Muggenburg; F. F. Hahn; R. A. Guilmette

1997-01-01

308

Laboratory diagnosis of dengue virus infection: current and future perspectives in clinical diagnosis and public health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since no protective vaccine or specific treatments are available for dengue fever\\/dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), accurate diagnosis is critical for the early initiation of specific preventive health measures to curtail epidemic spread and reduce economic losses. Commonly used diagnosis methods for confirming dengue infection involve virus isolation, detection of virus antigen or RNA in plasma or serum or tissues, and

Chuan-Liang Kao; Chwan-Chuen King; Day-Yu Chao; Hui-Lin Wu; Gwong-Jen J. Chang

309

Degradative Enzymes from the Pharmacy or Health Food Store: Interesting Examples for Introductory Biology Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Degradative enzymes in over-the-counter products from pharmacies and health food stores provide good examples of biological catalysis. These include [beta]-galactosidase in Lactaid[TM], [alpha]-galactosidase in Beano[R], [alpha]-amylase and proteases in digestive aids, and proteases in contact lens cleaners. These enzymes can be studied…

Deutch, Charles E.

2007-01-01

310

Essentials of skeletal radiology  

SciTech Connect

This book discusses the following topics of skeletal radiology: Positioning of patients for diagnostic radiology and normal anatomy; congenital malformations of skeleton; measurements in radiology; spondylolisthesis; metabolic and endocrine diseases of bone and their diagnostic aspects; image processing of vertebrae, skeleton, bone fractures evaluations and epidemiological and social aspects of some bone diseases. Various modalities as CT scanning, NMR imaging, ultrasonography and biomedical radiography are briefly discussed in relation to bone pathology.

Yochum, T.R.; Rowe, L.J.

1987-01-01

311

Work plan and health and safety plan for Building 3019B underground storage tank at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the Underground Storage Tank Program at the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, this Health and Safety Plan has been developed for removal of the 110-gal leaded fuel underground storage tank (UST) located in the Building 3019B area at ORNL This Health and Safety Plan was developed by the Measurement Applications

S. N. Burman; K. S. Brown; D. C. Landguth

1992-01-01

312

Health and safety work plan for sampling colloids in Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Work Plan\\/Site Safety and Health Plan (SSHP) and the attached work plan are for the performance of the colloid sampling project at WAG 5. The work will be conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) and associated ORNL environmental, safety, and health support groups. This activity will fall under the scope of 29 CFR

J. D. Marsh; J. F. McCarthy

1994-01-01

313

Work plan and health and safety plan for Building 3019B underground storage tank at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the Underground Storage Tank Program at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, this Health and Safety Plan has been developed for removal of the 110-gal leaded fuel underground storage tank (UST) located in the Building 3019B area at ORNL This Health and Safety Plan was developed by the Measurement Applications

S. N. Burman; K. S. Brown; D. C. Landguth

1992-01-01

314

The Radiology Assistant  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Radiologists and others entering the field will want to make a beeline for this very fine website, developed as a public service by The Radiological Society of The Netherlands. The stated intention of the site is "to focus on common radiological issues in a problem-oriented way for radiology residents and radiologists." The site's content currently includes content under the headings of abdomen, breast, cardiovascular, chest, head neck, musculoskeletal, neuroradiology and pediatrics. An iPad version of the Radiology Assistant is also available.

315

Machine Learning and Radiology  

PubMed Central

In this paper, we give a short introduction to machine learning and survey its applications in radiology. We focused on six categories of applications in radiology: medical image segmentation, registration, computer aided detection and diagnosis, brain function or activity analysis and neurological disease diagnosis from fMR images, content-based image retrieval systems for CT or MRI images, and text analysis of radiology reports using natural language processing (NLP) and natural language understanding (NLU). This survey shows that machine learning plays a key role in many radiology applications. Machine learning identifies complex patterns automatically and helps radiologists make intelligent decisions on radiology data such as conventional radiographs, CT, MRI, and PET images and radiology reports. In many applications, the performance of machine learning-based automatic detection and diagnosis systems has shown to be comparable to that of a well-trained and experienced radiologist. Technology development in machine learning and radiology will benefit from each other in the long run. Key contributions and common characteristics of machine learning techniques in radiology are discussed. We also discuss the problem of translating machine learning applications to the radiology clinical setting, including advantages and potential barriers.

Wang, Shijun; Summers, Ronald M.

2012-01-01

316

Radiological evaluation of dysphagia  

SciTech Connect

Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

1986-11-21

317

The OIE World Animal Health Information System: the role of OIE Reference Laboratories and Collaborating Centres in disease reporting.  

PubMed

One of the main objectives of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) is to ensure transparency in and knowledge of the world animal health situation. To achieve this objective, the OIE relies on its network of Member Countries, which is complemented by the activities of 221 Reference Laboratories (RLs) and Collaborating Centres. The RL mandate states that, in the case of positive results for diseases notifiable to the OIE, the laboratory should inform the OIE Delegate of the Member Country from which the samples originated and send a copy of the information to OIE Headquarters. However, since 2006 the OIE has received a lower than expected number of notifications from RLs, which implies eitherthat the majority of samples are sent to national laboratories or that some RLs are not fully complying with their mandate. The OIE sent a questionnaire to RLs in preparation for the Second Global Conference of OIE Reference Laboratories and Collaborating Centres (Paris, France, 21-23 June 2010). Two main factors emerged: the need for RLs to clarify their role and responsibilities in disease reporting and the need for an awareness campaign to sensitise national Veterinary Services to the importance of conducting more surveillance (and consequently of submitting samples to RLs) for all OIE-listed diseases. Reference laboratories indicated two main reasons for not sharing more data on positive samples with the OIE: i) a perceived contradiction between their mandate as OIE RLs and the standards of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) dealing with confidentiality; and ii) certain Member Countries or stakeholders asking RLs not to share positive results with the OIE, for political or economic reasons. The OIE has put forward proposals to help RLs resolve these problems in future. The use of ISO standards must be clarified and there must be improved communication between the OIE and its RLs. A lack of transparency about a significant disease event can jeopardise the biosecurity of several countries, an entire region or even the whole world. The reference status of a non-transparent RL could be questioned. PMID:21309446

Ben Jebara, K

2010-12-01

318

Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services Annual Report for 1999.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During calendar year (CY) 1999, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed its customary radiological protection support services in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) and the Hanford contractors...

TP Lynch DE Bihl ML Johnson MA MacLellan RK Piper

2000-01-01

319

78 FR 53151 - The Applicability of Good Laboratory Practice in Premarket Device Submissions: Questions and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration...research and marketing applications...Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration...Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration...device research or marketing...

2013-08-28

320

Dynamic active telepathology over National Health Laboratory service network, South Africa: feasibility study using Nikon Coolscope.  

PubMed

Telepathology recently entered a new era with the introduction of digital microscopes combined with Internet technology. The microscope allows viewing real time of whole slide (macro) as well as different chosen fields in four different magnifications. Three Nikon Coolscope were installed in NHLS laboratories in Mthatha, East London and Port Elizabeth. All these microscopes are connected to NHLS server allowing real time viewing of the full slide at any time of the day using Internet browser. Viewing is possible from any PC connected to NHLS Intranet. The challenge was to be able to view slides from other than NHLS computers due to NHLS IT Department network security measures. This was solved by installing NHLS Virtual Private Network server. About 60 cases were viewed by pathologists in Cape Town (Stellenbosh University) and Pretoria (MEDUNSA). All users assessed the system as a helpful tool allowing easy access to cases needing consultation or second opinion. The quality of images was very good. Our experience with Nikon Coolscope is positive. It is an excellent tool for remote small histopathology departments lacking specialists in such areas as dermatopathology, oncology, and haematopathology. Further studies are needed especially in the scope of full utilization of the microscopes installed and impact on laboratory services. PMID:18673517

Banach, Lech; Stepien, Andrzej; Schneider, Johann; Wichrzycka-Lancaster, Elizabeth

2008-07-15

321

American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Oral Radiology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Oral radiology curricular guidelines developed by the American Association of Dental Schools are provided. The guidelines describe minimal conditions under which a satisfactory educational experience can be offered. Principles of x-radiation, radiobiological concepts, radiological health, radiographic technique, radiographic quality, and darkroom…

Journal of Dental Education, 1980

1980-01-01

322

American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Oral Radiology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Oral radiology curricular guidelines developed by the American Association of Dental Schools are provided. The guidelines describe minimal conditions under which a satisfactory educational experience can be offered. Principles of x-radiation, radiobiological concepts, radiological health, radiographic technique, radiographic quality, and darkroom…

Journal of Dental Education, 1980

1980-01-01

323

Making filmless radiology work  

Microsoft Academic Search

ESPITE 2 DECADES of optimistic and confident predictions that filmless radiology was imminent, the centennial commemoration of Wilhelm Roentgen's discovery of the x-ray will come and go this year with only a small number of radiology departments interpreting more than a small fraction of imaging studies using a computer workstation. The reasons for this undoubtedly representa combination of economic constraints,

Eliot L. Siegel; John N. Diaconis; Stephen Pomerantz; Robert Allman; Brian Briscoe

1995-01-01

324

Radiology of bacterial pneumonia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacterial pneumonia is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Radiology plays a prominent role in the evaluation of pneumonia. Chest radiography is the most commonly used imaging tool in pneumonias due to its availability and excellent cost benefit ratio. CT should be used in unresolved cases or when complications of pneumonia are suspected. The main applications of radiology in pneumonia are

José Vilar; Maria Luisa Domingo; Cristina Soto; Jonathan Cogollos

2004-01-01

325

[Severe acute respiratory syndrome. The public health laboratory in a global emergency].  

PubMed

By the end of year 2002 there was an outbreak of atypical pneumonia in Southeast Asia which soon spread to other continents. This new severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was produced by a novel coronavirus. Due to the severity of the situation and risk of introduction of this pathology in our country, the need to arrange specific laboratory diagnostic tests arose. Classic techniques, such as the electron microscopy and molecular biology test such as retrotranscription followed by the polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were implemented. The araldit included cells infected with bovine coronavirus which allowed the viral particles to be visualized easily but it took more time in comparison with the negative staining of free particles from viral cultures. RT-PCR was able to detect RNA of isolated viruses from cases in Hong Kong and Germany. PMID:15830791

Baumeister, Elsa G; Lewis, Adrián P; Bozzini, Juan P; Savy, Vilma L

2005-01-01

326

nanoLAB: an ultraportable, handheld diagnostic laboratory for global health.  

PubMed

Driven by scientific progress and economic stimulus, medical diagnostics will move to a stage in which straightforward medical diagnoses are independent of physician visits and large centralized laboratories. The future of basic diagnostic medicine will lie in the hands of private individuals. We have taken significant strides towards achieving this goal by developing an autoassembly assay for disease biomarker detection which obviates the need for washing steps and is run on a handheld sensing platform. By coupling magnetic nanotechnology with an array of magnetically responsive nanosensors, we demonstrate a rapid, multiplex immunoassay that eliminates the need for trained technicians to run molecular diagnostic tests. Furthermore, the platform is battery-powered and ultraportable, allowing the assay to be run anywhere in the world by any individual. PMID:21264375

Gaster, Richard S; Hall, Drew A; Wang, Shan X

2011-01-24

327

DOE standard: Radiological control  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

Not Available

1999-07-01

328

CLMA position on HIV/HBV testing of health-care workers. Clinical Laboratory Management Association.  

PubMed

In February 1991, CLMA's National Affairs Committee (NAC) developed a proposed position statement on mandatory HIV/HBV testing of health-care workers. The proposed statement was submitted to the 24-member National Affairs Reactor Panel and, based on their input, appropriate revisions were made. In May 1991, CLMA surveyed the full membership, and, as a result, the following position was adopted. Ninety-six percent of the members responding agreed with principles 1, 2, and 3; 88% agreed with 4, 5, and 6. NAC members include Royal A. Crystal, Chair; Linda D. Bielitzki, J.D., Vice Chair; Michael G. Bissell, M.D., Ph.D.; Earl C. Buck; Michael A. Maffetone, D. A.; Timothy Murray; Laurence J. Peterson; Marianne C. Watters; and Martha A. Feichter, National Affairs Analyst. PMID:10128723

329

Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report is a health risk assessment that addresses continuous releases of tritium to the environment from the National Tritium Labeling Facility (NTLF) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The NTLF contributes approximately 95% of all tritium releases from LBL. Transport and transformation models were used to determine the movement of tritium releases from the NRLF to the air, surface water, soils, and plants and to determine the subsequent doses to humans. These models were calibrated against environmental measurements of tritium levels in the vicinity of the NTLF and in the surrounding community. Risk levels were determined for human populations in each of these zones. Risk levels to both individuals and populations were calculated. In this report population risks and individual risks were calculated for three types of diseases--cancer, heritable genetic effects, and developmental and reproductive effects.

McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P.

1994-12-01

330

Changes, disruption and innovation: An investigation of the introduction of new health information technology in a microbiology laboratory  

PubMed Central

Background: It is expected that health information technology (HIT) will deliver a safer, more efficient and effective health care system. The aim of this study was to undertake a qualitative and video-ethnographic examination of the impact of information technologies on work processes in the reception area of a Microbiology Department, to ascertain what changed, how it changed and the impact of the change. Materials and Methods: The setting for this study was the microbiology laboratory of a large tertiary hospital in Sydney. The study consisted of qualitative (interview and focus group) data and observation sessions for the period August 2005 to October 2006 along with video footage shot in three sessions covering the original system and the two stages of the Cerner implementation. Data analysis was assisted by NVivo software and process maps were produced from the video footage. Results: There were two laboratory information systems observed in the video footage with computerized provider order entry introduced four months later. Process maps highlighted the large number of pre data entry steps with the original system whilst the newer system incorporated many of these steps in to the data entry stage. However, any time saved with the new system was offset by the requirement to complete some data entry of patient information not previously required. Other changes noted included the change of responsibilities for the reception staff and the physical changes required to accommodate the increased activity around the data entry area. Conclusions: Implementing a new HIT is always an exciting time for any environment but ensuring that the implementation goes smoothly and with minimal trouble requires the administrator and their team to plan well in advance for staff training, physical layout and possible staff resource reallocation.

Toouli, George; Georgiou, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna

2012-01-01

331

Radiological control criteria for materials considered for recycle and reuse  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting technical analyses to support the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Guidance, Air, Water, and Radiation Division (DOE/EH-232) in developing radiological control criteria for recycling or reuse of metals or equipment containing residual radioactive contamination from DOE operations. The criteria, framed as acceptable concentrations for release of materials for recycling or reuse, are risk-based and were developed through analysis of generic radiation exposure scenarios and pathways. The analysis includes evaluation of relevant radionuclides, potential mechanisms of exposure, and non-health-related impacts of residual radioactivity on electronics and film. The analysis considers 42 key radionuclides that DOE operations are known to generate and that may be contained in recycled or reused metals or equipment. Preliminary results are compared with similar results reported by the International Atomic Energy Agency, by radionuclide grouping.

Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Hill, R.L.; Aaberg, R.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Wallo, A. III [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Environmental Guidance

1994-11-01

332

LIS-lnterlink-connecting laboratory information systems to remote primary health-care centres via the Internet.  

PubMed

A pilot study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of using the Internet to securely deliver patient laboratory results, and the system has subsequently gone into routine use in Poland. The system went from design to pilot and then to live implementation within a four-month period, resulting in the LIS-Interlink software product. Test results are retrieved at regular intervals from the BioLink(TM) LIS (Laboratory Information System), encrypted and transferred to a secure area on the Web server. The primary health-care centres dial into the Internet using a local-cell service provided by Polish Telecom (TP), obtain a TCP/IP address using the TP DHCP server, and perform HTTP 'get' and 'post' operations to obtain the files by secure handshaking. The data are then automatically inserted into a local SQL database (with optional printing of incoming reports)for cumulative reporting and searching functions. The local database is fully multi-user and can be accessed from different clinics within the centres by a variety of networking protocols. PMID:18924820

Clark, B; Wachowiak, B; Crawford, E W; Jakubowski, Z; Kabata, J

1998-01-01

333

Cost of presumptive source term Remedial Actions Laboratory for energy-related health research, University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect

A Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) is in progress at the Laboratory for Energy Related Health Research (LEHR) at the University of California, Davis. The purpose of the RI/FS is to gather sufficient information to support an informed risk management decision regarding the most appropriate remedial actions for impacted areas of the facility. In an effort to expedite remediation of the LEHR facility, the remedial project managers requested a more detailed evaluation of a selected set of remedial actions. In particular, they requested information on both characterization and remedial action costs. The US Department of Energy -- Oakland Office requested the assistance of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to prepare order-of-magnitude cost estimates for presumptive remedial actions being considered for the five source term operable units. The cost estimates presented in this report include characterization costs, capital costs, and annual operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. These cost estimates are intended to aid planning and direction of future environmental remediation efforts.

Last, G.V.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Josephson, G.B.; Lanigan, D.C.; Liikala, T.L.; Newcomer, D.R.; Pearson, A.W.; Teel, S.S.

1995-12-01

334

Public health consequences of a false-positive laboratory test result for Brucella--Florida, Georgia, and Michigan, 2005.  

PubMed

Human brucellosis, a nationally notifiable disease, is uncommon in the United States. Most human cases have occurred in returned travelers or immigrants from regions where brucellosis is endemic, or were acquired domestically from eating illegally imported, unpasteurized fresh cheeses. In January 2005, a woman aged 35 years who lived in Nassau County, Florida, received a diagnosis of brucellosis, based on results of a Brucella immunoglobulin M (IgM) enzyme immunoassay (EIA) performed in a commercial laboratory using analyte specific reagents (ASRs); this diagnosis prompted an investigation of dairy products in two other states. Subsequent confirmatory antibody testing by Brucella microagglutination test (BMAT) performed at CDC on the patient's serum was negative. The case did not meet the CDC/Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists' (CSTE) definition for a probable or confirmed brucellosis case, and the initial EIA result was determined to be a false positive. This report summarizes the case history, laboratory findings, and public health investigations. CDC recommends that Brucella serology testing only be performed using tests cleared or approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or validated under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) and shown to reliably detect the presence of Brucella infection. Results from these tests should be considered supportive evidence for recent infection only and interpreted in the context of a clinically compatible illness and exposure history. EIA is not considered a confirmatory Brucella antibody test; positive screening test results should be confirmed by Brucella-specific agglutination (i.e., BMAT or standard tube agglutination test) methods. PMID:18528317

2008-06-01

335

Cost-benefit analysis in decision making for diagnostic radiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews certain current concepts and methods relating to benefit-risk analysis, in terms of economic costs and raidation risks to health, in relation to the benefits from diagnostic radiology in clinical medicine.

J. I. Fabrikant; A. W. Hilberg

1982-01-01

336

Transportation radiological emergency preparedness: STAR 95 Exercise final report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Emergency response for a transportation accident involving radiological materials, while not inherently difficult, presents a challenge for several reasons. These accidents, although they can occur anywhere, are rare. Also, although the health consequence...

1998-01-01

337

Health risk assessment for the Building 3001 Storage Canal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This human health risk assessment has been prepared for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The objectives of this risk assessment are to evaluate the alternatives for interim closure of the Building 3001 Storage Canal and to identify the potential health risk from an existing leak in the canal. The Building 3001 Storage Canal connects Buildings 3001 and 3019. The volume of water in the canal is monitored and kept constant at about 62,000 gal. The primary contaminants of the canal water are the radionuclides {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 90}Sr; a layer of sediment on the canal floor also contains radionuclides and metals. The prime medium of contaminant transport has been identified as groundwater. The primary route for occupational exposure at the canal is external exposure to gamma radiation from the canal water and the walls of the canal. Similarly, the primary exposure route at the 3042 sump is external exposure to gamma radiation from the groundwater and the walls of the sump. Based on the exposure rates in the radiation work permits (Appendix C) and assuming conservative occupational work periods, the annual radiation dose to workers is considerably less than the relevant dose limits. The potential risk to the public using the Clinch River was determined for three significant exposure pathways: ingestion of drinking water; ingestion of contaminated fish; and external exposure to contaminated sediments on the shoreline, the dominant exposure pathway.

Chidambariah, V.; White, R.K.

1991-12-01

338

Collaborative Hypertext of Radiology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Medical College of WisconsinâÂÂs Collaborative Hypertext of Radiology (CHORUS) website contains over one thousand documents and images related to anatomy and physiology, radiological findings, diagnostics, and diseases. The site links headings and reference information with images, providing access to case study images in a variety of formats. Not only are the documents and images helpful reference sources, but they are also great tool for those looking to practice their diagnostic skills. This is a valuable tool for students studying the basics of radiology and related fields.

2007-04-10

339

Enhanced radiological work planning  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this standard is to provide Project Hanford Management Contractors (PHMC) with guidance for ensuring radiological considerations are adequately addressed throughout the work planning process. Incorporating radiological controls in the planning process is a requirement of the Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-I), Chapter 3, Part 1. This standard is applicable to all PHMC contractors and subcontractors. The essential elements of this standard will be incorporated into the appropriate site level work control standard upon implementation of the anticipated revision of the PHMC Administration and Procedure System.

DECKER, W.A.

1999-05-21

340

Ability of laboratories to detect emerging antimicrobial resistance: proficiency testing and quality control results from the World Health Organization's external quality assurance system for antimicrobial susceptibility testing.  

PubMed

The accuracy of antimicrobial susceptibility data submitted by microbiology laboratories to national and international surveillance systems has been debated for a number of years. To assess the accuracy of data submitted to the World Health Organization by users of the WHONET software, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention distributed six bacterial isolates representing key antimicrobial-resistance phenotypes to approximately 130 laboratories, all but one of which were outside of the United States, for antimicrobial susceptibility testing as part of the World Health Organization's External Quality Assurance System for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing. Each laboratory also was asked to submit 10 consecutive quality control values for several key organism-drug combinations. Most laboratories were able to detect methicillin (oxacillin) resistance in Staphylococcus aureus, high-level vancomycin resistance in Enterococcus faecium, and resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins in Klebsiella pneumoniae. Many laboratories, particularly those using disk diffusion tests, had difficulty in recognizing reduced susceptibility to penicillin in an isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The most difficult phenotype for laboratories to detect was reduced susceptibility to vancomycin in an isolate of Staphylococcus epidermidis. The proficiency testing challenge also included a request for biochemical identification of a gram-negative bacillus, which most laboratories recognized as Enterobacter cloacae. Although only a small subset of laboratories have submitted their quality control data, it is clear that many of these laboratories generate disk diffusion results for oxacillin when testing S. aureus ATCC 25923 and S. pneumoniae ATCC 49619 that are outside of the acceptable quality control range. The narrow quality control range for vancomycin also proved to be a challenge for many of the laboratories submitting data; approximately 27% of results were out of range. Thus, it is important to establish the proficiency of laboratories submitting data to surveillance systems in which the organisms are tested locally, particularly for penicillin resistance in pneumococci and glycopeptide resistance in staphylococci. PMID:11136778

Tenover, F C; Mohammed, M J; Stelling, J; O'Brien, T; Williams, R

2001-01-01

341

Tiger Team assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Safety and Health (S H) Subteam assessment was to determine the effectiveness of representative safety and health programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site. Four Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) Teams were assembled for this purpose by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety and Quality Assurance, Office of Safety Appraisals (OSA). Team No. 1 reviewed EG G Idaho, Inc. (EG G Idaho) and the Department of Energy Field Office, Idaho (ID) Fire Department. Team No. 2 reviewed Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). Team No. 3 reviewed selected contractors at the INEL; specifically, Morrison Knudsen-Ferguson of Idaho Company (MK-FIC), Protection Technology of Idaho, Inc. (PTI), Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL), and Rockwell-INEL. Team No. 4 provided an Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)-type compliance sitewide assessment of INEL. The S H Subteam assessment was performed concurrently with assessments conducted by Environmental and Management Subteams. Performance was appraised in the following technical areas: Organization and Administration, Quality Verification, Operations, Maintenance, Training and Certification, Auxiliary Systems, Emergency Preparedness, Technical Support, Packaging and Transportation, Nuclear Criticality Safety, Security/Safety Interface, Experimental Activities, Site/Facility Safety Review, Radiological Protection, Personnel Protection, Worker Safety and Health (OSHA) Compliance, Fire Protection, Aviation Safety, Medical Services, and Firearms Safety.

Not Available

1991-08-01

342

Substance abuse and the radiologic technologist.  

PubMed

Radiologic technologists, like other health care professionals, are at risk for substance abuse and addiction. Substance abuse can have grave consequences for technologists, their patients, and their employers, and all technologists should be alert to the problem and prepared to address it. This article defines substance use terminology, identifies commonly abused substances and their effects, describes risk factors for substance abuse, and discusses possible signs of impairment. Radiologic technologists are reminded of their ethical responsibilities regarding substance use, and substance abuse treatment and prevention are addressed. PMID:24029884

Faguy, Kathryn

343

Comparison of the radiological and chemical toxicity of lead  

SciTech Connect

This report estimates the worst-case radiological dose to an individual from ingested lead containing picocurie levels of radionuclides and then compares the calculated radiological health effects to the chemical toxic effects from that same lead. This comparison provides an estimate of the consequences of inadvertently recycling, in the commercial market, lead containing nominally undetectable concentrations of radionuclides. Quantitative expressions for the radiological and chemical toxicities of lead are based on concentrations of lead in the blood stream. The result shows that the chemical toxicity of lead is a greater health hazard, by orders of magnitude, than any probable companion radiation dose.

Beitel, G.A.; Mott, S.

1995-03-01

344

The World Health Organization's External Quality Assurance System Proficiency Testing Program Has Improved the Accuracy of Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing and Reporting among Participating Laboratories Using NCCLS Methods  

PubMed Central

A total of 150 laboratories in 33 countries that followed the NCCLS testing procedures participated in the World Health Organization's External Quality Assurance System for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EQAS-AST) from January 1998 through March 2001. Laboratories tested seven bacterial isolates for antimicrobial resistance and reported the results to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Ga. The results were compared to the results generated at the CDC with the NCCLS broth microdilution and disk diffusion reference methods. Although there were few testing errors with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis, drugs that are not appropriate for therapy of Salmonella infections were tested and reported by 136 (91%) of 150 laboratories. In addition, 29 (20%) of 150 laboratories used the Staphylococcus aureus breakpoints to report oxacillin results for Staphylococcus saprophyticus. For a vanB-containing Enterococcus faecalis strain, 124 (83%) of 150 laboratories correctly reported vancomycin results that were ±1 doubling dilution from the reference MIC or ±3 mm from the reference disk diffusion result. Of the laboratories that tested Streptococcus agalactiae by disk diffusion, 17% reported nonsusceptible results for penicillin in error. While 110 laboratories (73%) tested the S. pneumoniae challenge isolate against a fluoroquinolone, 83% tested it against ciprofloxacin, for which there are no NCCLS interpretive criteria. Ten of 12 laboratories testing levofloxacin and 4 of 4 laboratories testing ofloxacin by an MIC method correctly reported resistant results for the isolate. Feedback letters sent to participating laboratories highlighted areas of susceptibility testing in individual laboratories that needed improvement. The positive impact of the feedback letters and the overall effectiveness of the EQAS program were documented in repeat testing challenges with pneumococci and staphylococci. The 31 and 19% increases in the numbers of laboratories using appropriate testing methods for pneumococci and staphylococci, respectively, in 2000 versus 1998 indicate that laboratory performance is improving.

Chaitram, Jasmine M.; Jevitt, Laura A.; Lary, Sara; Tenover, Fred C.

2003-01-01

345

Radiological safety and control.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the annual results of radiological safety and control program. This program includes working area monitoring (WAM), personnel radiation monitoring (PRM), education for radiation protection (ERP), preparing for KMRR operation and deve...

K. W. Seo Y. S. You S. Y. Chang Y. C. Yoon S. C. Yoon

1994-01-01

346

Society of Interventional Radiology  

Cancer.gov

March 15, 2008 12:00 AM - March 20, 2008 12:00 AM Washington Convention Center Washington, DC + Add to Outlook Calendar 33rd Annual Meeting Print This Page Society of Interventional Radiology News & Events

347

Radiology and the law  

SciTech Connect

This book contains 12 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Law of Medical Malpractice: An Overview; The Radiologist as Defendant; The Radiologist as an Expert Witness; The Missed Diagnosis; Legalities of the Radiograph; and Angiography and Interventional Radiology.

Bundy, A.L.

1988-01-01

348

Radiological Devices Panel  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

... The Radiological Devices Panel reviews and evaluates data concerning the safety and effectiveness of marketed and investigational diagnostic or ... More results from www.fda.gov/advisorycommittees/committeesmeetingmaterials/medicaldevices

349

3.3 Diagnostic Radiology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '3.3 Diagnostic Radiology' of the Chapter '3 Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy' with the contents:

Kramer, H.-M.; Moores, B. M.; Stieve, F.-E.

350

US DOE Radiological Assistance Program: personnel, equipment and resources  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is intended to provide emergency advice and assistance in the event of radiological incidents. Each of DOE's eight Regional Coordinating Offices in the US provide a 24-hour reporting and response capability. Specifically, the Brookhaven Area Office (BHO) is responsible for DOE's Region I, which includes the 11 northeastern states of the US. Although an inventory of dedicated equipment is assigned to BHO-RAP, it draws upon the resources of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for trained personnel in health physics and for other specialized personnel in both the day to day operation of the program and in the on-the-scene response to an incident. The organization of the BHO-RAP program and its response procedures are described in detail. An inventory and brief description of the contents of a variety of emergency equipment kits and of additional state-of-the-art instruments is included. The BHO-RAP guidelines and requirements for field operations are also indicated, as are other DOE resources upon which it can draw.

Hull, A.P.; Kuehner, A.V.; Phillips, L.F.

1982-01-01

351

Ethical problems in radiology: radiological consumerism  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the causes of the increasing request for radiological examinations occurring in all economically developed countries\\u000a is the active role played by the patient-consumer. Consumerism places the radiologist in an ethical dilemma, between the principle\\u000a of autonomy on the one hand and the ethical principles of beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice on the other. The choice\\u000a made by radiologists in

N. Magnavita; A. Bergamaschi

2009-01-01

352

Basic bone radiology  

SciTech Connect

This clinical book surveys the skeletal system as seen through radiological imaging. It emphasizing abnormalities, disease, and trauma, and includes vital information on bones, bone growth, and the cells involved in bone pathology. It covers many bone diseases and injuries which are rarely covered in medical texts, as well as descriptions of radiologic procedures that specifically relate to the skeleton. This edition includes many illustrations, information on MR imaging and CT scanning, and discussions of osteoporosis, dysplasias, and metabolic bone disease.

Griffiths, H.J.

1987-01-01

353

Scholarship in Radiology Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

When one performs a Google search using the keywords “scholarship,” “radiology,” and “education” the results are quite surprising.\\u000a For many people it appears, the term “scholarship” refers only to monetary support for the educational and training programs\\u000a in radiology. For others, it refers to funding used to sponsor residents and fellows to attend professional conferences. When\\u000a the same keywords were

R. K. Chhem

354

Interventional Radiology in China  

SciTech Connect

With more than 3000 members, the Chinese Society of Interventional Radiology (CSIR) is one of the world's largest societies for interventional radiology (IR). Nevertheless, compared to other societies such as CIRSE and SIR, the CSIR is a relatively young society. In this article, the status of IR in China is described, which includes IR history, structure and patient management, personnel, fellowship, training, modalities, procedures, research, turf battle, and insightful visions for IR from Chinese interventional radiologists.

Teng Gaojun [Zhong-Da Hospital, Southeast University, Jiangsu Key Lab of Molecular and Imaging, Department of Radiology (China)], E-mail: gjteng@vip.sina.com; Xu Ke [First Hospital, China Medical University, Department of Radiology (China); Ni Caifang [First Hospital, Suzhou University, Department of Interventional Radiology (China); Li Linsun [First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Department of Radiology (China)

2008-03-15

355

Laboratory capacity building for the International Health Regulations (IHR[2005]) in resource-poor countries: the experience of the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET)  

PubMed Central

Laboratory is one of the core capacities that countries must develop for the implementation of the International Health Regulations (IHR[2005]) since laboratory services play a major role in all the key processes of detection, assessment, response, notification, and monitoring of events. While developed countries easily adapt their well-organized routine laboratory services, resource-limited countries need considerable capacity building as many gaps still exist. In this paper, we discuss some of the efforts made by the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET) in supporting laboratory capacity development in the Africa region. The efforts range from promoting graduate level training programs to building advanced technical, managerial and leadership skills to in-service short course training for peripheral laboratory staff. A number of specific projects focus on external quality assurance, basic laboratory information systems, strengthening laboratory management towards accreditation, equipment calibration, harmonization of training materials, networking and provision of pre-packaged laboratory kits to support outbreak investigation. Available evidence indicates a positive effect of these efforts on laboratory capacity in the region. However, many opportunities exist, especially to support the roll-out of these projects as well as attending to some additional critical areas such as biosafety and biosecuity. We conclude that AFENET’s approach of strengthening national and sub-national systems provide a model that could be adopted in resource-limited settings such as sub-Saharan Africa.

2010-01-01

356

INEEL Radiological Control Performance Indicator Report - Quarterly  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a report of an analysis of the Radiological Control Program through the fourth quarter of Calendar Year (CY-98) and is the annual report for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This Performance Indicator Report is provided in accordance with Article 133 of the INEEL Radiological Control Manual. The INEEL collective occupational radiation deep dose is 63.034 person-rem year to date, compared to a goal of 83.1 person-rem. During the fourth quarter, all areas experienced deletions of work resulting from the Maintenance Stand Down. This reduction in work is a primary factor in the difference in the year end dose and the ALARA goal. The work will be completed during CY-99. Beginning in CY-98, a numeric Radiological Performance Index (RPI) is being used to compare radiological performance. The RPI takes into consideration frequency and severity of events such as skin contaminations, clothing contaminations, spills, exposures to radiation exceeding limits, and positive internal dose. The RPI measures the cost of these events in cents per hour of radiological work performed. To make the RPI meaningful, tables have been prepared to show the facility that contributes to the values used. The data are compared on a quarterly basis to the prior year to show measurable performance.

Hinckley, Frank Leroy

1999-02-01

357

An aerial radiological survey of Argonne Site A, Palos Hills, Illinois  

Microsoft Academic Search

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the original site of Argonne National Laboratory, viz, Argonne Site A, and over the associated radiological waste dump, Plot M. These areas are 5 km east of the present Laboratory. The survey was performed at an altitude of 30 m on 31 May 1976 using sodium iodide detectors mounted in a helicopter. The

J. E. Jobst; J. M. Houk; R. A. Mohr

1978-01-01

358

Radiology 2012: radiology and radiologists a decade hence--a strategic analysis for radiology from the second annual American College of Radiology FORUM.  

PubMed

The American College of Radiology (ACR) FORUM brings together a multidisciplinary group of experts in a subject area that the ACR believes to be of long-term importance to the specialty of radiology. The goals of the FORUM are to develop scenarios about the way the future might develop with respect to the chosen topic and to advise both the ACR and the specialty on steps that should be taken to maximize the value and influence of radiology in the future. In May 2002, the FORUM brought together radiologists, health services researchers, specialists in medical technologies, representatives of the imaging industry, and payers to discuss the key drivers of the way medical imaging will develop over the next 10 years. PMID:12668737

Hillman, Bruce J; Neiman, Harvey L

2003-04-01

359

Yale School of Medicine: Diagnostic Radiology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Like many health-care related fields, the area of diagnostic radiology is growing rapidly, and a number of educational institutions and professional organizations have been working on creating online resources to help those entering the field. The Department of Diagnostic Radiology at Yale University has created this resource, which functions as a thorough listing of web-based materials. Upon arriving at the site, visitors can scroll through a list of thematic materials, including radiology sites, departmental resources, and teaching file and image sites. Educators working in the field will find the teaching file sites particularly useful, as they include links to materials that can be used in the classroom. Additionally, educators may want to give this site to their students, as they can also make good use of it.

2006-12-19

360

Health and Safety Work Plan for Sampling Colloids in Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This Work Plan/Site Safety and Health Plan (SSHP) and the attached work plan are for the performance of the colloid project at WAG 5. The work will be conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) and associat...

J. D. Marsh J. F. McCarthy

1994-01-01

361

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1980 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental assessment, control, health and safety  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) 1980 annual report to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment describes research in environment, health, and safety conducted during fiscal year 1980. Part 5 includes technology assessments for natural gas, enhanced oil recovery, oil shale, uranium mining, magnetic fusion energy, solar energy, uranium enrichment and industrial energy utilization; regional analysis studies of environmental transport and community

R. W. Baalman; I. D. Hays

1981-01-01

362

Comprehensive work plan and health and safety plan for the 7500 Area Contamination Site sampling at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the Environmental Restoration Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, this plan has been developed for the environmental sampling efforts at the 7500 Area Contamination Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group (MAD) of the Health

S. N. Burman; D. C. Landguth; M. S. Uziel; T. L. Hatmaker; P. F. Tiner

1992-01-01

363

Comprehensive work plan and health and safety plan for the 7500 Area Contamination Site sampling at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the Environmental Restoration Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, this plan has been developed for the environmental sampling efforts at the 7500 Area Contamination Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group (MAD) of the Health

S. N. Burman; D. C. Landguth; M. S. Uziel; T. L. Hatmaker; P. F. Tiner

1992-01-01

364

US Department of Energy radiological calibration intercomparison program  

Microsoft Academic Search

The US Department of Energy (DOE) radiological calibration intercomparison program was initiated in 1986 under the research phase of the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP). The program operates by shipping instrument sets and secondary standard beta source sets to participating laboratories. The participants measure either exposure or dose rates with the instruments and then compare these values with the expected

F. M. Cummings; J. C. McDonald

1988-01-01

365

An Evaluation of the Rates of Repeat Notifiable Disease Reporting and Patient Crossover Using a Health Information Exchange-based Automated Electronic Laboratory Reporting System  

PubMed Central

Patients move across healthcare organizations and utilize services with great frequency and variety. This fact impacts both health information technology policy and patient care. To understand the challenges faced when developing strategies for effective health information exchange, it is important to understand patterns of patient movement and utilization for many healthcare contexts, including managing public-health notifiable conditions. We studied over 10 years of public-health notifiable diseases using the nation’s most comprehensive operational automatic electronic laboratory reporting system to characterize patient utilization patterns. Our cohort included 412,699 patients and 833,710 reportable cases. 11.3% of patients had multiple notifiable case reports, and 19.5% had notifiable disease data distributed across 2 or more institutions. This evidence adds to the growing body of evidence that patient data resides in many organizations and suggests that to fully realize the value of HIT in public health, cross-organizational data sharing must be meaningfully incentivized.

Gichoya, Judy; Gamache, Roland E.; Vreeman, Daniel J.; Dixon, Brian E.; Finnell, John T.; Grannis, Shaun

2012-01-01

366

[Distribution of intestinal parasites detected in the Tokat public health laboratory during the period from January 2007 - December 2009].  

PubMed

In this study, the results of 1868 stool samples and 215 cellophane tapes examined in the Tokat Public Health Laboratory between January 2007-December 2009 and the distribution of these parasites were evaluated retrospectively. A total of 1868 stool specimens from 1146 (61.3%) males and 722 (38.7%) females were examined for intestinal parasites using direct examination and the formol-ethyl acetate concentration methods. Intestinal parasites were found in 40 (2.1%) females and 85 (4.6%) males. A total of 215 cellophane tape specimens from 86 (40%) females and 129 (60%) males were examined. Parasites were detected in 6 (2.8%) female and 11 (5.1%) male patients. The distribution of intestinal parasites detected in stool specimens was as follows: 52 (2.8%) Giardia intestinalis, 15 (0.8%) Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, 46 (2.5%) Entamoeba coli, 2 (0.1%) Hymenolepis nana, 16 (0.9%) Taenia saginata, 3 (0.2%) Ascaris lumbricoides, and 1 (0.05%) Trichuris trichiura. Parasites detected in cellophane tape specimens included 17 (7.9%) Enterobius vermicularis and 3 (1.4%) Taenia saginata. Despite being labor-intensive, parasitological examination of stool samples with necessary staining methods by experienced staff will surely help to determine both the diagnosis and exact prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in Turkey. PMID:20954116

Ata?, Ahmet Duran; Ku?cuo?lu, Salih

2010-01-01

367

The professional status of the radiologic technologist.  

PubMed

There are regional manpower shortages because of the maldistribution of qualified radiologic technologists. In addition, urban versus rural maldistribution problem exists and is predicted to worsen. This and the identified economic constraints faced by institutions are exerting pressure on the profession to develop programs that will result in multiskilled/multicompetent personnel. Flexibility and receptivity to cross-training opportunities should be studied. In geographic areas where shortages have been identified, it may be necessary for the academic, employing, and health professions to cooperate to develop successful recruitment and retention strategies. Unless corrective action is initiated, there will be a critical manpower shortage in the face of increased demands for radiological services requiring qualified radiologic technologists. It will be necessary for us and the health professions being impacted to individually redefine our mission statements, goals, and objectives to focus on the future, and where common goals exist, to jointly work to achieve these goals. Now is the time for our professional organizations to be pro-active rather than wait to become reactive. We must relinquish protection and act in the best interest of the patient--the number one person in our profession--and in the best interest of the profession. To accomplish this end, radiologic technologists and radiologists must join efforts to improve the professional image of radiologic technologists and the financial benefits. This will help ensure the availability of capable and qualified personnel from today's competitive health occupational arena, and the vast array of other professions that demand bright, articulate students. PMID:2916007

368

A TWO-STAGE MODEL OF RADIOLOGICAL INSPECTION: SPENDING TIME  

SciTech Connect

The paper describes a model that visually portrays radiological survey performance as basic parameters (surveyor efficiency and criteria, duration of pause, and probe speed) are varied; field and laboratory tests provided typical parameter values. The model is used to illustrate how practical constraints on the time allotted to the task can affect radiological inspection performance. Similar analyses are applicable to a variety of other tasks (airport baggage inspection, and certain types of non-destructive testing) with similar characteristics and constraints.

BROWN,W.S.

2000-07-30

369

Radiology requirements in United States dental hygiene programs.  

PubMed

A survey of accredited dental hygiene programs in the United States revealed little standardization of requirements for dental radiology. However, most programs satisfied suggested minimum guidelines for didactic instruction in radiology. Six programs had no preclinical laboratory requirements, and seven had no clinical requirements. An area of concern was the high percentage of programs in which classmates exposed one another to ionizing radiation for training purposes. PMID:3862050

Farman, A G; Hunter, N; Grammer, S

1985-09-01

370

[Structured reporting in radiology].  

PubMed

The radiology report plays a key role in the radiological procedure and is used both for documentation of internal procedures as well as in a variety of communication processes within and outside the radiology department. Due to the various communication processes the question arises whether and how the report should be structured. The first stage of such a structured report implies a thematic structure only. This corresponds to the current practice in Germany whereby the reports are structured according to the X-ray act. In the second stage a structure of the contents is added, which is usually implemented by selecting predefined text modules. In the third stage the wording of the text modules is selected from controlled vocabularies, such as the RadLex which allows complete encoding of the report. Templates like this are provided by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) reporting initiative and are available to the general public. As advantages of structured reports of levels 2 and 3 it is expected that they provide a better structure and greater clarity of the findings to the referring physician. By using predefined blocks of text a higher degree of completeness and a shorter reporting time is expected. These benefits have been tested in several studies but have not yet yielded clear results. Within a radiology department the structured reports are communicated according to the integrating the healthcare enterprise (IHE) controlled reporting workflow as DICOM structured reports and outside radiology departments the reports are exchanged as CDA objects using HL7 standards. PMID:23595099

Hackländer, T

2013-07-01

371

Radiological impacts of phosphogypsum.  

PubMed

This study was carried out to assess the radiological impact of Syrian phosphogypsum (PG) piles in the compartments of the surrounding ecosystem. Estimating the distribution of naturally occurring radionuclides (i.e. (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb) in the raw materials, product and by-product of the Syrian phosphate fertilizer industry was essential. The data revealed that the concentrations of the radionuclides were enhanced in the treated phosphate ore. In PG, (226)Ra content had a mean activity of 318 Bq kg(-1). The uranium content in PG was low, ca. 33 Bq kg(-1), because uranium remained in the phosphoric acid produced. Over 80% of (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb present partitioned in PG. The presence of PG piles did not increase significantly the concentration of (222)Rn or gamma rays exposure dose in the area studied. The annual effective dose was only 0.082 mSv y(-1). The geometric mean of total suspended air particulates (TSP) ca. 85 ?g m(-3). The activity concentration of the radionuclides in filtrates and runoff waters were below the detection limits (ca. 0.15 mBq L(-1) for (238)U, 0.1 mBq L(-1) for (232)Th and 0.18 mBq L(-1) for both of (210)Po and (210)Pb); the concentration of the radionuclides in ground water samples and Qattina Lake were less than the permissible limits set for drinking water by the World Health Organisation, WHO, (10, 1 and 0.1 Bq L(-1) for (238)U, (232)Th and both of (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively). Eastern sites soil samples of PG piles recorded the highest activity concentrations, i.e. 26, 33, 28, 61 and 40 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (238)U, (232)Th, (210)Po and (210)Pb, respectively, due to the prevailing western and north-western wind in the area, but remained within the natural levels reported in Syrian soil (13-32 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, 24.9-62.2 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U and 10-32 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th). The impact of PG piles on plants varied upon the plant species. Higher concentrations of the radionuclides were recorded for grass in comparison to broad-leaved plants. Among the species that grow naturally on PG piles, Inula, Ecballium and Polygonium may be radionuclides accumulators. A determined effort is needed at a national level to achieve a common and coherent approach to regulate PG piles or to consider it a resource material rather than waste or residue. PMID:21530064

Al Attar, Lina; Al-Oudat, Mohammad; Kanakri, Salwa; Budeir, Youssef; Khalily, Hussam; Al Hamwi, Ahmad

2011-05-06

372

Radiation dose assessments to support evaluations of radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of materials and equipment  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory is providing Environmental Protection Support and Assistance to the USDOE, Office of Environmental Guidance. Air, Water, and Radiation Division. As part of this effort, PNL is collecting data and conducting technical evaluations to support DOE analyses of the feasibility of developing radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of metals, concrete, or equipment containing residual radioactive contamination from DOE operations. The radiological control levels will be risk-based, as developed through a radiation exposure scenario and pathway analysis. The analysis will include evaluation of relevant radionuclides, potential mechanisms of exposure, and both health and non-health-related impacts. The main objective of this report is to develop a methodology for establishing radiological control levels for recycle or reuse. This report provides the results of the radiation exposure scenario and pathway analyses for 42 key radionuclides generated during DOE operations that may be contained in metals or equipment considered for either recycling or reuse. The scenarios and information developed by the IAEA. Application of Exemption Principles to the Recycle and Reuse of Materials from Nuclear Facilities, are used as the initial basis for this study. The analyses were performed for both selected worker populations at metal smelters and for the public downwind of a smelter facility. Doses to the public downwind were estimated using the US (EPA) CAP88-PC computer code with generic data on atmospheric dispersion and population density. Potential non-health-related effects of residual activity on electronics and on film were also analyzed.

Hill, R.L.; Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

1995-07-01

373

Radiological worker training  

SciTech Connect

This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

NONE

1998-10-01

374

Food Signs in Radiology  

PubMed Central

Objective: Certain diseases show classic radiological signs that resemble various types of food items like fruits, meat, vegetables, eggs, bakery, grocery and confectionary items. In this article various food signs are discussed and correlated with the various food items in a pictorial way. The objective of this pictorial essay is to provide the information and learn the characteristic radiological signs resembling various food items. These food signs are easy to recognize and allows a confident diagnosis on the basis of imaging findings alone or can narrow down the differential diagnosis.

Hussain, Mehboob; Al Damegh, Saleh

2007-01-01

375

Surface radiological investigations at environmental research area 11, {sup 137}Cs- and {sup 60}Co-contaminated plots at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

A surface radiological investigation at the {sup 137}Cs- and {sup 6O}Co-contaminated forest area (Chestnut Ridge east and west plots) was conducted from January 1992 through August 1992. Results of the survey revealed numerous spots and small areas of surface contamination that followed the original placement of feeders used for {sup 6O}Co- and {sup 137}Cs-labeled seeds in a 1969--1970 study. Surface gamma exposure rates reached 380 {mu}R/h at the east plot and 400 {mu}R/h at the west plot, but approximately one-half and one- third, respectively, of the identified anomalies did not exceed 39 {mu}R/h. Results of soil sample analyses demonstrated that {sup 137}Cs and {sup 6O}Co were responsible for the elevated radiation levels. Radionuclides were found below the surface at soil sample locations, in some cases at depths below 18 in. The same pattern of subsurface contamination may be present at other elevated surface spots at both plots. These survey results show that current radiological conditions at the site remain an environmental problem. Recommendations for corrective actions are included.

Uziel, M.S.; Tiner, P.F.; Williams, J.K.

1993-02-01

376

Meta-analysis of self-reported substance use compared with laboratory substance assay in general adult mental health settings.  

PubMed

An accurate assessment of substance use is necessary to make a correct psychiatric diagnosis and to provide appropriate treatment. This study uses meta-analysis to establish the strength of the association between self-reported substance use and the results of laboratory substance assay including the testing for specific substances and screening for any substance use in psychiatric hospitals and in community mental health settings. A systematic search for published studies was supplemented by additional data required for meta-analysis provided by several researchers in this field. Using random-effects meta-analysis, we calculated the pooled estimate of the odds ratio of a positive substance assay in patients reporting use or non-use of substances and estimated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria. Very strong associations were found between self-reported use and positive tests for cannabis [N = 11 studies, odds ratio (OR) = 22.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 10.1-49.1], amphetamines (N = 8, OR = 26.6; 95% CI = 7.9-88.9), cocaine (N = 8, OR = 39.7; 95% CI = 16.2-97.2) and opiates (N = 7, OR = 83.5; 95% CI = 26.7-260.7). Strong associations were found between self-reported use of any substance and positive substance screening (N = 15, OR = 7.2, 95% CI = 3.6-14.1) and tests for alcohol use (N = 5, OR = 8.5; 95% CI = 2.5-28.4). Screening for any substance use had a sensitivity of 61% and a specificity of 66%. Testing for individual substances was specific but lacked sensitivity. Screening has the potential to detect clinically relevant substances that would not be reported by the patient, whereas testing for a specific substance has little advantage over self-report. The sensitivity of the substance assay might be improved by obtaining a sample at the earliest opportunity. Consideration should be given to the increased use of substance screening in general adult mental health settings because it could improve the accuracy of psychiatric diagnosis and increase the likelihood of patients receiving treatment for substance use disorders. PMID:22367926

Large, Matthew M; Smith, Glen; Sara, Grant; Paton, Michael B; Kedzior, Karina Karolina; Nielssen, Olav B

2012-02-27

377

Training Needs for Teachers of Dental Radiology in Auxiliary Training Schools.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The publication describes a conference at the University of Alabama held in conjunction with a contract sponsored by the Bureau of Radiological Health, U.S. Public Health Service, to develop a pilot training program for teachers of dental radiology in den...

R. W. Alcox A. H. Wuehmann

1971-01-01

378

Role of secondary level laboratories in strengthening quality at primary level health facilities' laboratories: an innovative approach to ensure accurate HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria test results in resource-limited settings.  

PubMed

Providing regular external quality assessment of primary level laboratories and timely feedback is crucial to ensure the reliability of testing capacity of the whole laboratory network. This study was aimed to assess the diagnostic performances of primary level laboratories in Southwest Showa Zone in Ethiopia. An external quality assessment protocol was devised whereby from among all the samples collected on-site at 4 health centers (HCs), each HC sent to a district hospital (DH) on a weekly basis 2 TB slides (1 Ziehl-Neelsen stained and another unstained), 2 malaria slides (1 Giemsa stained and another unstained), and 2 blood samples for HIV testing (1 whole blood and another plasma) for a comparative analysis. Similarly, the DH preserved the same amount and type of specimens to send to each HC for retesting. From October to November 2011, 192 single-blinded specimens were rechecked: 64 TB slides, 64 malaria slides, and 64 blood specimens for HIV testing. The analyses demonstrated an overall agreement of 95.3% (183/192) between the test and the retest, and 98.4% (63/64), 92.2% (59/64,) and 95.3% (61/64) for TB microscopy, malaria microscopy, and HIV rapid testing, respectively. Of the total TB slides tested positive, 20/23 (87%) were quantified similar in both laboratories. The agreement on HIV rapid testing was 100% (32/32) when plasma samples were tested either at HC (16/16) or at DH (16/16), while when whole blood specimens were tested, the agreement was 87.5% (14/16) and 93.8% (15/16) for samples prepared by HCs and DH, respectively. Results of this new approach proved that secondary laboratories could play a vital role in assuring laboratory qualities at primary level HCs, without depending on remotely located national and regional laboratories to provide this support. PMID:23102548

Manyazewal, Tsegahun; Paterniti, Antonio D; Redfield, Robert R; Marinucci, Francesco

2012-10-24

379

American Society of Radiologic Technologists  

MedlinePLUS

... CE Approval News & Research ASRT White Papers Radiologic Technology News Press Room ASRT Journals & Magazines ASRT Newsletters ... Committee Regulatory & Legislative News Careers Careers in Radiologic Technology ASRT JobBank Job Search Resources Radiologist Assistant About ...

380

324 Building Baseline Radiological Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the analysis of radiological data collected as part of the characterization study performed in 1998. The study was performed to create a baseline of the radiological conditions in the 324 Building.

R.J. Reeder, J.C. Cooper

2010-06-24

381

Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health: Part 5, Nuclear and operational safety  

SciTech Connect

Part 5 of the 1986 Annual Report to the Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health presents Pacific Northwest Laboratory's progress on work performed for the Office of Nuclear Safety, the Office of Operational Safety, and for the Office of Environmental Analysis. For each project, as identified by the Field Task Proposal/Agreement, articles describe progress made during fiscal year 1986. Authors of these articles represent a broad spectrum of capabilities derived from three of the seven research departments of the Laboratory, reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the work.

Faust, L.G.; Kennedy, W.E.; Steelman, B.L.; Selby, J.M.

1987-02-01

382

Radiological Safety Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Written to be used concurrently with the U.S. Army's Radiological Safety Course, this publication discusses the causes, sources, and detection of nuclear radiation. In addition, the transportation and disposal of radioactive materials are covered. The report also deals with the safety precautions to be observed when working with lasers, microwave…

Army Ordnance Center and School, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.

383

Research Training in Radiology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Radiology today is a major clinical specialty of medicine in terms of the number and complexity of patient examinations, and the financial resources, physician manpower, and supporting personnel required for performing its functions. It reached its present status because it provides accurate methods of diagnosis for so many diseases. However, this…

National Inst. of General Medical Sciences (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

384

Radiology Technician (AFSC 90370).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This five-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for radiology technicians. Covered in the individual volumes are radiographic fundamentals (x-ray production; primary beams; exposure devices; film, film holders, and darkrooms; control of film quality; and environmental safety);…

Sobczak, James

385

Radiological Dispersion Device (RDD)  

MedlinePLUS

... far more likely than use of a nuclear explosive device. An RDD combines a conventional explosive device — such as a bomb — with radioactive material. ... an Radiological Dispersion Device (RDD) Event While the explosive blast will be immediately obvious, the presence of ...

386

Research Training in Radiology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Radiology today is a major clinical specialty of medicine in terms of the number and complexity of patient examinations, and the financial resources, physician manpower, and supporting personnel required for performing its functions. It reached its present status because it provides accurate methods of diagnosis for so many diseases. However,…

National Inst. of General Medical Sciences (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

387

Radiology Technician (AFSC 90370).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This five-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for radiology technicians. Covered in the individual volumes are radiographic fundamentals (x-ray production; primary beams; exposure devices; film, film holders, and darkrooms; control of film quality; and environmental safety);…

Sobczak, James

388

Infection in pediatric interventional radiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interventional radiology in children involves nearly every aspect of infectious disease. Diagnosis, treatment, prophylaxis\\u000a and disease transmission in infectious disease are a daily part of pediatric interventional radiology practice. This article\\u000a will discuss each of these aspects of infection with respect to interventional radiology.

Mark J. Hogan

2011-01-01

389

Telemetry of Aerial Radiological Measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Telemetry has been added to National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Incident Response aircraft to accelerate availability of aerial radiological mapping data. Rapid aerial radiological mapping is promptly performed by AMS Incident Response aircraft in the event of a major radiological dispersal. The AMS airplane flies the entire potentially affected area, plus a generous margin, to provide

H. W. Clark

2002-01-01

390

Balancing the three missions and the impact on academic radiology.  

PubMed

The three missions of academic radiology compete with one another for time and funding. Revenue for the clinical mission often subsidizes education and research. Given the internal and external drivers/pressures on health care and, more particularly, on academic health centers, the current model is unsustainable. Trends seen in other industries are entering academic health care. The radiology department of the future will need to be more efficient with increasingly fewer resources while meeting its missions at higher levels of expectation. PMID:24029050

Rawson, James V; Baron, Richard L

2013-10-01

391

Radiologic–Pathologic Correlation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Treated with Chemoembolization  

Microsoft Academic Search

To correlate posttreatment radiologic and pathologic findings in patients who underwent transarterial chemoembolization before\\u000a transplantation or resection. Thirty-five patients with postchemoembolization follow-up imaging underwent liver transplantation\\/resection.\\u000a Pre- and posttreatment contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging were used to evaluate radiologic findings. Imaging characteristics\\u000a using World Health Organization (WHO) and European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) criteria after treatment\\u000a were

Ahsun Riaz; Robert J. Lewandowski; Laura Kulik; Robert K. Ryu; Mary F. Mulcahy; Talia Baker; Vanessa Gates; Ritu Nayar; Ed Wang; Frank H. Miller; Kent T. Sato; Reed A. Omary; Michael Abecassis; Riad Salem

2010-01-01

392

The radiological assessment system for consequence analysis - RASCAL  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Radiological Assessment System for Consequence Analysis, Version 2.1 (RASCAL 2.1) has been developed for use during a response to radiological emergencies. The model estimates doses for comparison with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Protective Action Guides (PAGs) and thresholds for acute health effects. RASCAL was designed to be used by U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel who report to

A. L. Sjoreen; J. V. Ramsdell; G. F. Athey

1996-01-01

393

Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation of the liquid low-level waste tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be used during the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) RI/FS project to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. The ES H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Energy Systems to direct and control implementation of the project ES H program. This report describes the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES H program to individual task remedial investigations, project facilities, and other major tasks assigned to the project.

Not Available

1991-09-01

394

Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation of the liquid low-level waste tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be used during the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) RI/FS project to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. The ES&H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Energy Systems to direct and control implementation of the project ES&H program. This report describes the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES&H program to individual task remedial investigations, project facilities, and other major tasks assigned to the project.

Not Available

1991-09-01

395

Work plan and health and safety plan for Building 3019B underground storage tank at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Underground Storage Tank Program at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, this Health and Safety Plan has been developed for removal of the 110-gal leaded fuel underground storage tank (UST) located in the Building 3019B area at ORNL This Health and Safety Plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at ORNL The major components of the plan follow: (1) A project description that gives the scope and objectives of the 110-gal tank removal project and assigns responsibilities, in addition to providing emergency information for situations occurring during field operations; (2) a health and safety plan in Sect. 15 for the Building 3019B UST activities, which describes general site hazards and particular hazards associated with specific tasks, personnel protection requirements and mandatory safety procedures; and (3) discussion of the proper form completion and reporting requirements during removal of the UST. This document addresses Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements in 29 CFR 1910.120 with respect to all aspects of health and safety involved in a UST removal. In addition, the plan follows the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) QAMS 005/80 (1980) format with the inclusion of the health and safety section (Sect. 15).

Burman, S.N.; Brown, K.S.; Landguth, D.C.

1992-08-01

396

Work plan and health and safety plan for Building 3019B underground storage tank at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Underground Storage Tank Program at the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, this Health and Safety Plan has been developed for removal of the 110-gal leaded fuel underground storage tank (UST) located in the Building 3019B area at ORNL This Health and Safety Plan was developed by the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at ORNL The major components of the plan follow: (1) A project description that gives the scope and objectives of the 110-gal tank removal project and assigns responsibilities, in addition to providing emergency information for situations occurring during field operations; (2) a health and safety plan in Sect. 15 for the Building 3019B UST activities, which describes general site hazards and particular hazards associated with specific tasks, personnel protection requirements and mandatory safety procedures; and (3) discussion of the proper form completion and reporting requirements during removal of the UST. This document addresses Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements in 29 CFR 1910.120 with respect to all aspects of health and safety involved in a UST removal. In addition, the plan follows the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) QAMS 005/80 (1980) format with the inclusion of the health and safety section (Sect. 15).

Burman, S.N.; Brown, K.S.; Landguth, D.C.

1992-08-01

397

Evaluation of In-house Genotyping Assay Performance Using Dried Blood Spot Specimens in the Global World Health Organization Laboratory Network  

PubMed Central

In resource-limited settings, there is increased demand for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 drug resistance testing. Because preservation of plasma specimens is often not feasible in resource-limited settings, use of dried blood spots (DBSs) is being adopted. We used 2 panels of DBSs for genotyping assay validation and proficiency testing in selected laboratories in the World Health Organization laboratory network in 14 countries. An amplification sensitivity of 1000 copies/mL was achieved by 2 laboratories. Reproducibility and accuracy of nucleotide sequence determination and resistance-associated mutation identification from DBSs was similar to that previously determined for plasma. International shipping at ambient temperature had no significant effect on amplification success. These studies indicate that DBS-based genotyping is equally reproducible and reliable, although slightly less sensitive, compared with plasma.

de Mendoza, Carmen; Schuurman, Rob; Jennings, Cheryl; Bremer, James; Jordan, Michael R.; Bertagnolio, Silvia

2012-01-01

398

Good Practice Recommendations in the Field of Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning for Health Related Research Laboratories.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A collection of laboratory design notes to set forth minimum criteria required in the design of basic medical research laboratory buildings. Recommendations contained are primarily concerned with features of design which affect quality of performance and future flexibility of facility systems. Subjects of economy and safety are discussed where…

Laboratory Design Notes, 1966

1966-01-01

399

Health and Safety Laboratory environmental quarterly, September 1, 1976December 1, 1976. [Monitoring of environment for radioactivity and chemical pollution  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report presents current data from the HASL environmental programs, The Swedish Defense Research Establishment, The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Argonne National Laboratory and The New Zealand National Radiation Laboratory. The initial section consists of interpretive reports and notes on ground level air radioactivity in Sweden from nuclear explosions, plutonium in air near the Rocky Flats Plant, nitrous oxide concentrations

E. P. Jr

2011-01-01

400

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for

R. M. Neupauer; S. M. Thurmond

1992-01-01

401

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 2, Chemical constituents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for

R. M. Neupauer; S. M. Thurmond

1992-01-01

402

Radiology in Nepal.  

PubMed

The joys of doing an international visiting professorship are the challenging environment and the enthusiasm of the indigenous students and physicians. Having previously taught radiology at the University of Nairobi, Kenya, for 4 months in 1992, I felt prepared for the advanced diseases, limited supplies, broken equipment, and challenging environment that I would encounter in Nepal. The Radiology Outreach Foundation sponsored me (W. E. Brant) for 3 months to teach radiology at Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital (TUTH) in Kathmandu in the spring of 1995. I was concerned about how effective my teaching would be, how well I could relate to the local conditions of practice, and whether my English-only language skills would be sufficient. My hosts in Nepal proved as eager to teach me as to learn from me. I was captivated by the ability of the TUTH faculty to innovate. Nephrostomy drainage could be accomplished with a feeding tube or refashioned angiography catheter (Fig. 1). Complete aspiration of a hepatic abscess could and should be performed with a single needle at the time of diagnosis because the patient may never be able to return for follow up. One day's film review revealed every manifestation of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), as well as worms in the bile ducts and hydatid cysts in the liver. Without CT scanning, sonography was the prime diagnostic tool. Although my prepared lectures were well received, teaching is best accomplished while the daily film stack and with sonography transducer in hand. English is understood and well spoken by almost all physicians and medical students in Nepal. In this article, we discuss the current practice of radiology in Nepal. PMID:8553927

Brant, W E; Budathoki, T B; Pradhan, R

1996-02-01

403

Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror  

SciTech Connect

Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

Hart, M

2002-11-08

404

Public health approach to detection of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli: summary of two outbreaks and laboratory procedures.  

PubMed

Routine laboratory testing may not detect non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) reliably. Active clinical, epidemiological, environmental health, and laboratory collaboration probably influence successful detection and study of non-O157 STEC infection. We summarized two outbreak investigations in which such coordinated efforts identified non-O157 STEC disease and led to effective control measures. Outbreak 1 involved illness associated with consuming unpasteurized apple cider from a local orchard. Public health personnel were notified by a local hospital; stool specimens from ill persons contained O111 STEC. Outbreak 2 involved bloody diarrhoea at a correctional facility. Public health personnel were notified by the facility infection control officer; O45 STEC was the implicated agent. These reports highlight the ability of non-O157 STEC to cause outbreaks and demonstrate that a coordinated effort by clinicians, infection-control practitioners, clinical diagnostic laboratorians, and public health personnel can lead to effective identification, investigation, and prevention of non-O157 STEC disease. PMID:21554779

Schaffzin, J K; Coronado, F; Dumas, N B; Root, T P; Halse, T A; Schoonmaker-Bopp, D J; Lurie, M M; Nicholas, D; Gerzonich, B; Johnson, G S; Wallace, B J; Musser, K A

2011-05-05

405

Medical treatment of radiological casualties: current concepts.  

PubMed

The threat of radiologic or nuclear terrorism is increasing, yet many physicians are unfamiliar with basic treatment principles for radiologic casualties. Patients may present for care after a covert radiation exposure, requiring an elevated level of suspicion by the physician. Traditional medical and surgical triage criteria should always take precedence over radiation exposure management or decontamination. External contamination from a radioactive cloud is easily evaluated using a simple Geiger-Muller counter and decontamination accomplished by prompt removal of clothing and traditional showering. Management of surgical conditions in the presence of persistent radioactive contamination should be dealt with in a conventional manner with health physics guidance. To be most effective in the medical management of a terrorist event involving high-level radiation, physicians should understand basic manifestations of the acute radiation syndrome, the available medical countermeasures, and the psychosocial implications of radiation incidents. Health policy considerations include stockpiling strategies, effective use of risk communications, and decisionmaking for shelter-in-place versus evacuation after a radiologic incident. PMID:15940101

Koenig, Kristi L; Goans, Ronald E; Hatchett, Richard J; Mettler, Fred A; Schumacher, Thomas A; Noji, Eric K; Jarrett, David G

2005-06-01

406

2011 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike Lewis

2012-01-01

407

2010 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advance Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

mike lewis

2011-01-01

408

2011 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike Lewis

2012-02-01

409

2010 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advance Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

mike lewis

2011-02-01

410

618-11 Burial Ground USRADS radiological surveys  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes and documents the results of the radiological surveys conducted from February 4 through February 10, 1993 over the 618-11 Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. In addition, this report explains the survey methodology using the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS). The 618-11 Burial Ground radiological survey field task consisted of two activities: characterization of the specific background conditions and the radiological survey of the area. The radiological survey of the 618-11 Burial Ground, along with the background study, were conducted by Site Investigative Surveys Environmental Restoration Health Physics Organization of the Westinghouse Hanford Company. The survey methodology was based on utilization of the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS) for automated recording of the gross gamma radiation levels at or near six (6) inches and at three (3) feet from the surface soil.

Wendling, M.A.

1994-05-26

411

618-10 Burial Ground USRADS radiological surveys  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes and documents the results of the radiological surveys conducted from February 11 through February 17 and March 30, 1993 over the 618-10 Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. In addition, this report explains the survey methodology using the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS). The 618-10 Burial Ground radiological survey field task consisted of two activities: characterization of the specific background conditions and the radiological survey of the area. The radiological survey of the 618-10 Burial Ground, along with the background study, were conducted by Site Investigative Surveys Environmental Restoration Health Physics Organization of the Westinghouse Hanford Company. The survey methodology was based on utilization of the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS) for automated recording of the gross gamma radiation levels at or near six (6) inches and at three (3) feet from the surface soil.

Wendling, M.

1994-05-26

412

Environmental health and safety plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) policy is to provide a safe and healthful workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The accomplishment of this policy requires that operations at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environmental protection and safety and health (S and H) issues. The policy and procedures in this plan apply to all MSRE operations. The provisions of this plan are to be carried out whenever activities are initiated at the MSRE that could be a threat to human health or the environment. This plan implements a policy and establishes criteria for the development of procedures for day-to-day operations to prevent or minimize any adverse impact to the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable management of hazardous and radioactive materials and wastes. The plan is written to utilize past experience and the best management practices to minimize hazards to human health or the environment from events such as fires, explosions, falls, mechanical hazards, or any unplanned release of hazardous or radioactive materials to the air.

Burman, S.N.; Tiner, P.F.; Gosslee, R.C.

1998-01-01

413

HAZWOPER work plan and site safety and health plan for the Alpha characterization project at the solid waste storage area 4 bathtubbing trench at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This work plan/site safety and health plan is for the alpha sampling project at the Solid Waste Storage Area 4 bathtubbing trench. The work will be conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Sciences Division and associated ORNL environmental, safety, and health support groups. This activity will fall under the scope of 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER). The purpose of this document is to establish health and safety guidelines to be followed by all personnel involved in conducting work for this project. Work will be conducted in accordance with requirements as stipulated in the ORNL HAZWOPER Program Manual and applicable ORNL; Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc.; and U.S. Department of Energy policies and procedures. The levels of protection and the procedures specified in this plan are based on the best information available from historical data and preliminary evaluations of the area. Therefore, these recommendations represent the minimum health and safety requirements to be observed by all personnel engaged in this project. Unforeseeable site conditions or changes in scope of work may warrant a reassessment of the stated protection levels and controls. All adjustments to the plan must have prior approval by the safety and health disciplines signing the original plan.

Not Available

1994-07-01

414

Digital imaging in diagnostic radiology  

SciTech Connect

This monograph on digital imaging provides a basic overview of this field at the present time. This paper covers clinical application, including subtraction angiography; chest radiology; genitourinary, gastrointestinal, and breast radiology; and teleradiology. The chest section also includes an explanation of multiple beam equalization radiography. The remaining chapters discuss some of the technical aspects of digital radiology. It includes the basic technology of digital radiography, image compression, and reconstruction information on the economics of digital radiography.

Newell, J.D. Jr.; Kelsey, C.A.

1990-01-01

415

100DR1 radiological surveys  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report summarizes and documents the results of the radiological surveys conducted over the surface of the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. In addition, this report explains the survey methodology using the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS). The 100-DR-1 radiological survey field task consisted of two activities: characterization of the operable unit-specific background conditions and the radiological

Naiknimbalkar

1994-01-01

416

Interventional radiology for paediatric trauma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Paediatric interventional radiology plays a cornerstone role in the management of paediatric trauma. In the acute setting,\\u000a interventional radiology techniques allow minimally invasive control of haemorrhage or re-establishment of blood flow. Percutaneous\\u000a stenting and drainage can allow disruptions in urinary or biliary systems to heal without the need for further surgery. Interventional\\u000a radiology techniques also have a significant role in

Manrita K. Sidhu; Mark J. Hogan; Dennis W. W. Shaw; Thomas Burdick

2009-01-01

417

Radiological Toolbox User's Manual  

SciTech Connect

A toolbox of radiological data has been assembled to provide users access to the physical, chemical, anatomical, physiological and mathematical data relevant to the radiation protection of workers and member of the public. The software runs on a PC and provides users, through a single graphical interface, quick access to contemporary data and the means to extract these data for further computations and analysis. The numerical data, for the most part, are stored within databases in SI units. However, the user can display and extract values using non-SI units. This is the first release of the toolbox which was developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Eckerman, KF

2004-07-01

418

Characterization of radiological emergencies  

SciTech Connect

Several severe radiological emergencies were reviewed to determine the likely range of conditions which must be coped with by a mobile teleoperator designed for emergencies. The events reviewed included accidents at TMI (1978), SL-1 (1961), Y-12 (1958), Bethesda (1982), Chalk River (1952 and 1958), Lucens (1969). The important conditions were: radiation fields over 10,000 R/h, severe contamination, possible critical excursion, possible inert atmosphere, temperatures from 50/sup 0/C to -20/sup 0/C, 100% relative humidity, 60-cm-high obstacles, stairs, airlocks, darkness, and lack of electric power.

Chester, C.V.

1985-01-01

419

Radiology of lymphomas  

SciTech Connect

This book reviews the radiological aspects of lymphomas. The topics covered are: Classification of lymphomas as Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas; lymphomas of brain and spinal cord and the radiodiagnosis and chemotherapy; lymphomas of bones; lymph nodes of abdomen, chest and lymphomas of extranodal sites. Diagnostic techniques for lymphomas discussed are tracer techniques, computed tomography, ultrasonography and biopsy. Differential diagnosis of lymphomas from various other pathology of bone, brain and spinal cord is also discussed. Side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy are also described.

Bruneton, J.N.; Schneider, M.

1986-01-01

420

Privacy and Security Solutions for Interoperable Health Information Exchange. Releasing Clinical Laboratory Test Results: Report on Survey of State Laws.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report is one of a series produced under RTI International's contract with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The contract, entitled Privacy and Security Solutions for Interoperable Health Information Exchange, is managed by AHRQ ...

2009-01-01

421

Understanding Contamination; Twenty Years of Simulating Radiological Contamination  

Microsoft Academic Search

A wide variety of simulated contamination methods have been developed by researchers to reproducibly test radiological decontamination methods. Some twenty years ago a method of non-radioactive contamination simulation was proposed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that mimicked the character of radioactive cesium and zirconium contamination on stainless steel. It involved baking the contamination into the surface of the stainless

Emily Snyder; John Drake; Ryan James

2012-01-01

422

DOE radiological calibrations intercomparison program: Results of fiscal year 1986  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Department of Energy Radiological Calibration Intercomparison Program was initiated in January 1986, under the research portion of the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program. The program operates via the exchange of transfer standards, consisting of instrument sets and standard secondary beta sources. There are two instrument sets and the scheduled use has been staggered such that one set is available for

F. M. Cummings; P. L. Roberson; J. C. McDonald

1987-01-01

423

Good laboratory practices  

SciTech Connect

Make your laboratory inspection procedures comply with what EPA expect of you. To ensure products under regulatory jurisdiction are safe and effective, EPA requires laboratories conducting health effects testing comply TSCA and FIFRA. Procedures for conducting laboratory inspections of facilities, techniques, recordkeeping, safety and quality assurance programs are detailed in the new EPA book.

Not Available

1985-01-01

424

Monitoring distant fallout: the role of the Atomic Energy Commission Health and Safety Laboratory during the Pacific tests, with special attention to the events following BRAVO.  

PubMed

The fallout from test BRAVO in March 1954 has had scientific, political, and social implications that have continued for more than 40 years. The test resulted in serious injury to the people of the Marshall Islands and 23 men on a nearby Japanese fishing boat. Prior to BRAVO there was insufficient appreciation of the dangers of fallout to people living downwind from surface or near-surface explosions of megaton weapons. In the absence of sufficient preplanning for fallout monitoring beyond the test-sites of earlier smaller yield tests, and as a result of the concern of the photographic film manufacturers, the Atomic Energy Commission Health and Safety Laboratory, now the Department of Energy Environmental Measurements Laboratory, was requested to develop a program of fallout surveillance. Beginning with Operation IVY in 1952, these surveys included aerial monitoring of the islands of the mid and western Pacific, as well as establishment of fallout monitoring stations in the United States and abroad. The first evidence of the post-BRAVO fallout was detected by a Atomic Energy Commission Health and Safety Laboratory instrument installed on the atoll of Rongerik, where 28 military personnel were stationed. The results of radiation surveys conducted immediately after BRAVO, as well as the reports of medical investigations, radioecological studies, and dose reconstruction that have been conducted by many laboratories over the years have been available from the beginning in unclassified form. However, from the time of the fallout, and continuing to the present, there have been many unanswered questions about what happened during the hours immediately after the fallout was reported. No formal investigation of the circumstances of the fallout was ever conducted, and there were serious misrepresentations of the facts in the official statements made at the time. PMID:9199215

Eisenbud, M

1997-07-01

425

Radiological emergency response planning  

SciTech Connect

The Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 50, Appendix E - Emergency Plans for Production and Utilization Facilities - recommends that production and utilization facilities prepare emergency plans. In addition, Nuclear Regulatory Commission Guides 1.70 and 1.101 provide guidance for the development of Radiological Emergency Response Plans (RERP's) at both the Construction Permit stage and the Operating License stage. This paper addresses the basic concepts of RERP and specifically discusses those RERP's which plan for incidents assumed to have both on-site and off-site consequences. It also provides insights into what has transpired at public hearings, emphasizing the importance of a coordinated effort between the facility and government agencies at all levels. In addition, it gives specific attention to the key elements that comprise an RERP and suggests some planning aids that have been developed to assist in the formulation of effective and efficient response plans. Many of the direct and indirect benefits of a well-developed Radiological Emergency Response Plan are also identified.

Michael, E.J.; Sundstrom, C.F.

1980-01-01

426

COMPARABLE MEASURES OF COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN HUMAN INFANTS AND LABORATORY ANIMALS TO IDENTIFY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH RISKS TO CHILDREN  

EPA Science Inventory

The importance of including neurodevelopmental end points in environmental studies is clear. A validated measure of cognitive function in human infants that also has a homologous or parallel test in laboratory animal studies will provide a valuable approach for large-scale studie...

427

HOMOLOGOUS MEASURES OF COGNITIVE FUNCTION IN HUMAN INFANTS AND LABORATORY ANIMALS TO IDENTIFY ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH RISKS TO CHILDREN  

EPA Science Inventory

The importance of including neurodevelopmental endpoints in environmental studies is clear. A validated measure of cognitive fucntion in human infants that also has a parallel test in laboratory animal studies will provide a valuable approach for largescale studies. Such a ho...

428

Population-based laboratory surveillance for Giardia sp. and Cryptosporidium sp. infections in a large Canadian health region  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Giardia lamblia (intestinalis) and Cryptosporidium parvum are the two most important intestinal parasites infecting North Americans but there is a paucity of active population-based surveillance data from Canada. This study determined the incidence of and demographic risk factors for developing Giardia sp. and Cryptosporidium sp. infections in a general Canadian population. METHODS: Population-based laboratory surveillance was conducted among all

Kevin B Laupland; Deirdre L Church

2005-01-01

429

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1980 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 5. Environmental assessment, control, health and safety  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) 1980 annual report to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment describes research in environment, health, and safety conducted during fiscal year 1980. Part 5 includes technology assessments for natural gas, enhanced oil recovery, oil shale, uranium mining, magnetic fusion energy, solar energy, uranium enrichment and industrial energy utilization; regional analysis studies of environmental transport and community impacts; environmental and safety engineering for LNG, oil spills, LPG, shale oil waste waters, geothermal liquid waste disposal, compressed air energy storage, and nuclear/fusion fuel cycles; operational and environmental safety studies of decommissioning, environmental monitoring, personnel dosimetry, and analysis of criticality safety; health physics studies; and epidemiological studies. Also included are an author index, organization of PNL charts and distribution lists of the annual report, along with lists of presentations and publications. (DLS)

Baalman, R.W.; Hays, I.D. (eds.)

1981-02-01

430

Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1995. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions and effluents to the environment. Areas of known contamination are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies under the Inter Agency Agreement established by the Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency and the New York Department of Environmental Conservation. Except for identified areas of soil and groundwater contamination, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with the applicable environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment. Also, the data show that the environmental impacts at Brookhaven National Laboratory are minimal and pose no threat to the public nor to the environment. This report meets the requirements of Department of Energy Orders 5484.1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information reporting requirements and 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Programs.

Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.E.; Schroeder, G.L. [eds.] [and others

1996-12-01

431

Common Laboratory Instruments for Measurement of Radioactivity.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report clarifies requirements and characteristics of instrumentation used to measure levels of ionizing radiation experienced by man in his environment, and assists responsible radiological health agencies in selecting optimum surveillance and counti...

D. E. Rushing R. W. Coulter J. C. Drobinski C. R. Phillips D. G. Remark

1967-01-01

432

NNSA/NV Consequence Management Capabilities for Radiological Emergency Response  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) provides an integrated Consequence Management (CM) response capability for the (NNSA) in the event of a radiological emergency. This encompasses planning, technical operations, and home team support. As the lead organization for CM planning and operations, NNSA/NV coordinates the response of the following assets during the planning and operational phases of a radiological accident or incident: (1) Predictive dispersion modeling through the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the High Consequence Assessment Group at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); (2) Regional radiological emergency assistance through the eight Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) regional response centers; (3) Medical advice and assistance through the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; (4) Aerial radiological mapping using the fixed-wing and rotor-wing aircraft of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS); (5) Consequence Management Planning Teams (CMPT) and Consequence Management Response Teams (CMRT) to provide CM field operations and command and control. Descriptions of the technical capabilities employed during planning and operations are given below for each of the elements comprising the integrated CM capability.

D. R. Bowman

2002-10-01

433

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Analytical Response  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local government s, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FRMAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant from the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. This paper addresses emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FRMAC operations.

E.C. Nielsen

2003-04-01

434

The evolution of the system of radiological protection - evolution or expedition?  

Microsoft Academic Search

I congratulate the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) on the more open and inclusive process for allowing comments and initial stakeholder reaction to the ICRP's proposal for revisions to the system of radiological protection. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Committee on Radiation Protection on Public Health (CRPPH) has, throughout its existence, been interested

C Rick Jones

2003-01-01

435

Quarterly environmental radiological survey summary, first quarter 1991: 100, 200, 300, and 600 areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Routine radiological surveys to monitor conditions of outdoor sites are performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company's Health and Safety Group. Areas surveyed include the road surfaces, radioactive waste sites (cribs, trenches, burial grounds, stabilized ponds and ditches), and unplanned release sites. A site-wide survey schedule is developed by Environmental Assurance. Environmental Review and Integration reviews the radiological survey reports and files

Huckfeldt

1991-01-01

436

A statistical dynamics approach to the study of human health data: Resolving population scale diurnal variation in laboratory data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Statistical physics and information theory is applied to the clinical chemistry measurements present in a patient database containing 2.5 million patients' data over a 20-year period. Despite the seemingly naive approach of aggregating all patients over all times (with respect to particular clinical chemistry measurements), both a diurnal signal in the decay of the time-delayed mutual information and the presence of two sub-populations with differing health are detected. This provides a proof in principle that the highly fragmented data in electronic health records has potential for being useful in defining disease and human phenotypes.

Albers, D. J.; Hripcsak, George

2010-02-01

437

A statistical dynamics approach to the study of human health data: resolving population scale diurnal variation in laboratory data  

PubMed Central

Statistical physics and information theory is applied to the clinical chemistry measurements present in a patient database containing 2.5 million patients’ data over a 20-year period. Despite the seemingly naive approach of aggregating all patients over all times (with respect to particular clinical chemistry measurements), both a diurnal signal in the decay of the time-delayed mutual information and the presence of two sub-populations with differing health are detected. This provides a proof in principle that the highly fragmented data in electronic health records has potential for being useful in defining disease and human phenotypes.

Albers, D. J.; Hripcsak, George

2010-01-01

438

Radiological Technology. Secondary Curriculum Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide was designed for use in postsecondary radiological technology education programs in Georgia. Its purpose is to provide for the development of entry level skills in radiological technology in the areas of knowledge, theoretical structure, tool usage, diagnostic ability, related supportive skills, and occupational survival…

Simpson, Bruce; And Others

439

Diagnostic Radiology Information System Design.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this, the first phase in the development of a Diagnostic Radiology Information System (DRIS), has been to identify areas of information processing problems as they occur in the practice of radiology, and then to design a system with general...

H. C. Jacobson H. J. Barnhard J. W. Nance

1970-01-01

440

Radiologic diagnosis of explosion casualties.  

PubMed

The threat of terrorist events on domestic soil remains an ever-present risk. Despite the notoriety of unconventional weapons, the mainstay in the armament of the terrorist organization is the conventional explosive. Conventional explosives are easily weaponized and readily obtainable, and the recipes are widely available over the Internet. According to the US Department of State and the Federal Bureau of Investigation, over one half of the global terrorist events involve explosions, averaging two explosive events per day worldwide in 2005 (Terrorism Research Center. Available at www.terrorism.com. Accessed April 1, 2007). The Future of Emergency Care in the United States Health System: Emergency Medical Services at the Crossroads, published by the Institute of Medicine, states that explosions were the most common cause of injuries associated with terrorism (Institute of Medicine Report: The Future of Emergency Care in the United States Health System: Emergency Medical Services at the Crossroads. Washington DC: National Academic Press, 2007). Explosive events have the potential to inflict numerous casualties with multiple injuries. The complexity of this scenario is exacerbated by the fact that few providers or medical facilities have experience with mass casualty events in which human and material resources can be rapidly overwhelmed. Care of explosive-related injury is based on same principles as that of standard trauma management paradigms. The basic difference between explosion-related injury and other injury mechanisms are the number of patients and multiplicity of injuries, which require a higher allocation of resources. With this caveat, the appropriate utilization of radiology resources has the potential to impact in-hospital diagnosis and triage and is an essential element in optimizing the management of the explosive-injured patients. PMID:19069034

Eastridge, Brian J; Blackbourne, Lorne; Wade, Charles E; Holcomb, John B

441

[Problems in the further development of postgraduate training in industrial sanitary chemistry for the laboratory physicians of epidemiological health stations].  

PubMed

The article narrates on the domain of the sanitary inspection medical laboratory workers' supervision in the field of industrial chemistry and their experience in handling different physical and chemical analysis techniques. It is indicated that sanitary inspection medical laboratory personnel requires constant postgraduate training. Proposed is the respective training programme adopted at the Institute for Postgraduate Training of Physicians, Moscow, which includes samples' selection, physical and chemical analysis testing and application in specific conditions, statistical assessment of the results obtained. The programme also includes the hygienic aspects, e. i. current sanitary control, labour hygiene in different gas discharge-related conditions. Practical training is performed in small groups of 2 or 3 persons, thus facilitating adoption of skills in using various analysis techniques. Initial, current and intermediate control, tests and situational analysis are used in the training process. PMID:1879753

Makeeva, E P; Soldatenkova, N A

1991-01-01

442

Comparable measures of cognitive function in human infants and laboratory animals to identify environmental health risks to children.  

PubMed Central

The importance of including neurodevelopmental end points in environmental studies is clear. A validated measure of cognitive function in human infants that also has a homologous or parallel test in laboratory animal studies will provide a valuable approach for large-scale studies. Such a comparable test will allow researchers to observe the effect of environmental neurotoxicants in animals and relate those findings to humans. In this article, we present the results of a review of post-1990, peer-reviewed literature and current research examining measures of cognitive function that can be applied to both human infants (0-12 months old) and laboratory animals. We begin with a discussion of the definition of cognitive function and important considerations in cross-species research. We then describe identified comparable measures, providing a description of the test in human infants and animal subjects. Available information on test reliability, validity, and population norms, as well as test limitations and constraints, is also presented.

Sharbaugh, Carolyn; Viet, Susan Marie; Fraser, Alexa; McMaster, Suzanne B

2003-01-01

443

twodee: the Health and Safety Laboratory's shallow layer model for heavy gas dispersion Part 1. Mathematical basis and physical assumptions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Major Hazard Assessment Unit of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) provides advice to local planning authorities on land use planning in the vicinity of major hazard sites. For sites with the potential for large scale releases of toxic heavy gases such as chlorine this advice is based on risk levels and is informed by use of the computerised

R. K. S. Hankin; R. E. Britter

1999-01-01

444

Radiological data management system  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a radiological data management system (RDMS) is developed that simplifies the compilation and retrieval of data relating to the occupational exposure of individuals to radiation. The system captures historical occupational dose record data, current and real time internal and external exposure data, and data pertaining to exposure to airborne contaminants. RDMS also develops reports required for ALARA analysis and permanent hard copy recordkeeping systems. The system is capable of being installed on, and interfaced with, most existing computer platforms or programs. The two main advantages of RDMS are that it reduces the time required to develop and maintain occupational exposure and radiation work permit records and that the records generated by RDMS are consistent, complete, and up-to-date.

Hofferber, G. (Halliburton NUS, Environmental Corp., Gaithersburg, MI (United States))

1992-09-01

445

Radiology of renal failure  

SciTech Connect

This book covers most aspects of imaging studies in patients with renal failure. The initial chapter provides basic information on contrast agents, intravenous urography, and imaging findings in the urinary tract disorders responsible for renal failure and in patients who have undergone transplantation. It illustrates common gastro-intestinal abnormalities seen on barium studies in patients with renal failure. It illustrates the cardiopulmonary complications of renal failure and offers advice for radiologic differentiation. It details different aspects of skeletal changes in renal failure, including a basic description of the pathophysiology of the changes; many excellent illustrations of classic bone changes, arthritis, avascular necrosis, and soft-tissue calcifications; and details of bone mineral analysis.

Griffiths, H.J.

1990-01-01

446

Radiology today. Volume 4  

SciTech Connect

The book discusses the following contents: Advances in Cardiovascular Imaging: Digital Arteriography: Ongoing Developments. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Cardiovascular System. Comparison of Vascular CT and MRI. Characterization of Vascular Lesions by Ultrasound - Progress in Vascular Interventions: Laser Angioplasty: A Review. Fibrinolytic Therapy Combined with Clot Extraction. Drugs Useful in Angioplasty. Developments in Cardiovascular Imaging: Blood Flow Measurements with Digital Arteriography. Selection of Imaging Techniques for Venous Thromboembolic Disease. Clinical Usefulness of High-Verus Low-Osmolality Contrast Agents. Developments in Angiographic and Interventional Instrumentation. Progress in Cardiovascular Interventions. Inferior Vena Cava Filters: Types, Placement, and Efficiency. Transluminal Vascular Stenting and Grafting. Venography and Sclerotherapy of Varioceles in Children and Adolescents. A New Catheter System - Important Hip Problems: Radiologic and Pathologic Correlation and Hip Disease. Comparison of Imaging Modalities in Femoral Head Necrosis. Osteoartrosis and Arthritis (Synovitis) of the Hip. Hip Anthrography.

Heuck, F.H.W.; Donner, M.W.

1987-01-01

447

[Vascular interventional radiology].  

PubMed

Percutaneous transluminal recanalization of vessels (angioplasty) has been invented by radiologists. Their recent huge development may conceal 120 others endovascular interventional procedures performed by radiologists, surgeons, cardiologists, anesthetists. A variety of interventional endovascular instruments have been produced and used in a wide field of pathologies: balloons for proximal clamping, distal embolization by particles, arterial desobstruction by seeking devices, propping of vascular lumen by stenting, in situ infusion of drugs (fibrinolysis), filters, foreign body retrieval systems. Training in vascular interventional radiology must include experience with endovascular instruments, but also instruction in radiation effects and protection, practice in angiographic lab and perfect knowledge of clinical manifestations and natural history of the disease to be treated. PMID:1809485

Marache, P

1991-10-01

448

Surgical Planning Laboratory Image Gallery  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Surgical Planning Laboratory of the Department of Radiology at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School has a virtual treasure chest of visual anatomical information available at its web site. The SPL offers of series of over 60 MPEG movies on topics such as neurosurgery, multiple sclerosis, the brain, abdominal surgery, flow analysis, and thoracic surgery, among others.

1996-01-01

449

The yearbook of diagnostic radiology. 1987  

SciTech Connect

This book contains seven selections. They are: Neuroradiology; Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology; The Thorax; The Abdomen; The Musculoskeletal System; Pediatric Radiology; and Radiation Physics.

Bragg, D.G.

1987-01-01

450

Radiological Image Compression  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The movement toward digital images in radiology presents the problem of how to conveniently and economically store, retrieve, and transmit the volume of digital images. Basic research into image data compression is necessary in order to move from a film-based department to an efficient digital -based department. Digital data compression technology consists of two types of compression technique: error-free and irreversible. Error -free image compression is desired; however, present techniques can only achieve compression ratio of from 1.5:1 to 3:1, depending upon the image characteristics. Irreversible image compression can achieve a much higher compression ratio; however, the image reconstructed from the compressed data shows some difference from the original image. This dissertation studies both error-free and irreversible image compression techniques. In particular, some modified error-free techniques have been tested and the recommended strategies for various radiological images are discussed. A full-frame bit-allocation irreversible compression technique has been derived. A total of 76 images which include CT head and body, and radiographs digitized to 2048 x 2048, 1024 x 1024, and 512 x 512 have been used to test this algorithm. The normalized mean -square-error (NMSE) on the difference image, defined as the difference between the original and the reconstructed image from a given compression ratio, is used as a global measurement on the quality of the reconstructed image. The NMSE's of total of 380 reconstructed and 380 difference images are measured and the results tabulated. Three complex compression methods are also suggested to compress images with special characteristics. Finally, various parameters which would effect the quality of the reconstructed images are discussed. A proposed hardware compression module is given in the last chapter.

Lo, Shih-Chung Benedict

451

Planning and preparedness for radiological emergencies at nuclear power stations  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Emergency Preparedness (REP) Program was created after the March 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power station. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) assists state and local governments in reviewing and evaluating state and local REP plans and preparedness for accidents at nuclear power plants, in partnership with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), which evaluates safety and emergency preparedness at the power stations themselves. Argonne National Laboratory provides support and technical assistance to FEMA in evaluating nuclear power plant emergency response exercises, radiological emergency plans, and preparedness.

Thomson, R.; Muzzarelli, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Decision and Information Sciences Div.

1996-05-01

452

Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services Annual Report for 2000  

SciTech Connect

During calendar year 2000, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed its customary radiological protection support services in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and the Hanford contractors. These services included: 1) external dosimetry, 2) internal dosimetry, 3) in vivo monitoring, 4) radiological records, 5) instrument calibration and evaluation, and 6) calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Each program summary describes the routine operations, program changes and improvements, program assessments, supporting technical studies, and professional activities.

Lynch, Timothy P.; Bihl, Donald E.; Johnson, Michelle L.; Maclellan, Jay A.; Piper, Roman K.

2001-05-07

453

Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services Annual Report for 1998  

SciTech Connect

During calendar year (CY) 1998, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed its customary radiological protection support services in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations OffIce (RL) and the Hanford contractors. These services included: 1) external dosimetry, 2) internal dosimetry, 3) in vivo measurements, 4) radiological records, 5) instrument calibra- tion and evaluation, and 6) calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (MST). The services were provided under a number of projects as summarized here.

DE Bihl; JA MacLellan; ML Johnson; RK Piper; TP Lynch

1999-05-14

454

Radiology and the mobile device: Radiology in motion  

PubMed Central

The use of mobile devices is revolutionizing the way we communicate, interact, are entertained, and organize our lives. With healthcare in general and radiology in particular becoming increasingly digital, the use of such devices in radiologic practice is inevitable. This article reviews the current status of the use of mobile devices in the clinical practice of radiology, namely in emergency teleradiology. Technical parameters such as luminance and resolution are discussed. The article also discusses the benefits of such mobility vis-à-vis the current limitations of the technologies available.

Panughpath, Sridhar G; Kalyanpur, Arjun

2012-01-01

455

Radiology and the mobile device: Radiology in motion.  

PubMed

The use of mobile devices is revolutionizing the way we communicate, interact, are entertained, and organize our lives. With healthcare in general and radiology in particular becoming increasingly digital, the use of such devices in radiologic practice is inevitable. This article reviews the current status of the use of mobile devices in the clinical practice of radiology, namely in emergency teleradiology. Technical parameters such as luminance and resolution are discussed. The article also discusses the benefits of such mobility vis-à-vis the current limitations of the technologies available. PMID:23833412

Panughpath, Sridhar G; Kalyanpur, Arjun

2012-10-01

456

Prepare Your School for Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Threats  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Recent accidents highlight that chemical, biological, and radiological (CBR) agent exposure risk isn't just about terrorism. In this article, the author, a parent and public health physician, wrestles with the fact that total protection from CBRs is probably not feasible in her son's or in the majority of American schools. Capital investments,…

Sechena, Ruth

2005-01-01

457

Dental Radiology I Student Guide [and Instructor Guide].  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The dental radiology student and instructor guides provide instruction in the following units: (1) x-ray physics; (2) x-ray production; (3) radiation health and safety; (4) radiographic anatomy and pathology; (5) darkroom setup and chemistry; (6) bisecting angle technique; (7) paralleling technique; (8) full mouth survey technique--composition and…

Fox Valley Technical Coll., Appleton, WI.

458

How do training, education, and experience affect quality in radiology?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The quality of care is attracting increasing attention from payers, regulators, and consumers. The assumption that training, education, and experience are major determinants of quality and safety permeates the health care delivery system. However, the relationship between quality and training, education, and experience is neither straightforward nor well documented, particularly for the practice of radiology. A recent Institute of Medicine

Jeffrey C Weinreb; Pamela A Wilcox

2004-01-01

459

Developing a comprehensive and accountable database after a radiological accident  

Microsoft Academic Search

After a radiological accident occurs, it is highly desirable to promptly begin developing a comprehensive and accountable environmental database both for immediate health and safety needs and for long-term documentation. The need to assess and evaluate the impact of the accident as quickly as possible is always very urgent, the technical integrity of the data must also be assured and

H. A. Berry; Z. G. Burson

1986-01-01