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Sample records for radiometric dating techniques

  1. Radiometric Dating Does Work!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalrymple, G. Brent

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the accuracy of dating methods and creationist arguments that radiometric dating does not work. Explains the Manson meteorite impact and the Pierre shale, the ages of meteorites, the K-T tektites, and dating the Mount Vesuvius eruption. (Author/YDS)

  2. Absolute Time Radiometric Dating: the source

    E-print Network

    Kammer, Thomas

    Absolute Time Radiometric Dating: the source of the dates on the Geologic Time Scale #12;Radiometric Dating · Actually a simple technique. · Only two measurements are needed: · 1. The parent of parent and daughter elements. #12;Basis of the Technique · Radioactive elements "decay." Decay occurs

  3. Radiometric dating in geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankhurst, R. J.

    1980-11-01

    The method of dating rocks and minerals is known as geochronology. Although in principle this term could be applied to estimation of relative ages according to traditional geological observation, it is nowadays usually restricted to the quantitative measurement of geological time using the constant-rate natural process of radioactive decay. 14C dating is a technique based on measuring the residual radioactivity of this isotope which decays exponentially from the time of death of organisms which extract it from the atmosphere (e.g. when a living tree becomes simply 'wood'). The halflife of this decay is only 5600 years. Even using pre-concentration techniques and highly sensitive detectors, the practical range of the dating method does not extend back beyond about 100000 years-a period utterly insignificant in terms of the geological evolution of the Earth, which extends over the past 4500 million years. For geological dating one requires naturally occurring elements with much longer halflives. Most of the handful of appropriate decay schemes are listed. Most of the parent elements are rare metal constituents in the bulk chemical composition of the Earth. For such 'trace' elements it is generally convenient to express their concentration in natural materials in parts per million by weight (ppm) and even in the one case of a fairly common element (potassium) only a very small proportion occurs as the radioactive 40K. Also, some of the halflives are very long, even by geological reckoning, so that the actual level of natural radioactivity is rarely more than a few disintegrations per minute per gram.

  4. Radiometric Dating in Geology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankhurst, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Described are several aspects and methods of quantitatively measuring geologic time using a constant-rate natural process of radioactive decay. Topics include half lives and decay constants, radiogenic growth, potassium-argon dating, rubidium-strontium dating, and the role of geochronology in support of geological exploration. (DS)

  5. Absolute Time Radiometric Dating: the source of the dates on

    E-print Network

    Kammer, Thomas

    Time Scale · Radiometric dates from igneous rocks can be used to indirectly date sedimentary rocks.029x109 · t = 360,178,000 +/- 859,000 years Setting the Radiometric Clock · When an igneous melt, muscovite, and biotite. · Note that whole rock analysis would not give the age of cooling. #12;Setting

  6. Use of radiometric (Cs-137, Pb-210), geomorphic, and stratigraphic techniques to date recent oxbow sediments in the Rio Puerco drainage Grants uranium region, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, C.J.; Dehn, M. ); Hawley, J.W.; Love, D.W. )

    1988-06-01

    In the absence of historic geochemical baseline data for the Grants uranium region, environmental changes resulting from uranium mine-mill activities can be determined only by indirect methods. A methodology for determining the age of recent sediments in streams draining the region has been established based on combined geomorphic, stratigraphic, and radiometric dating techniques. Because clay-rich sediments retain possible radionuclides and heavy metals derived from mineralization and mined sources, sample sites which contain fine-grained deposits that both predate and postdate mine-mill activity were located in abandoned-channel segments (oxbows) of major streams draining the eastern Grants uranium region. Aerial photographs (and derivative maps) taken between 1935 and 1971 provided the historical and geomorphic documentation of approximate dates of oxbow formation and ages of alluvial fills in the abandoned-channel segments. Pits were dug at these oxbow sites to determine stratigraphy and composition of the deposits. Samples collected from pit walls and auger holes below the pits were subjected to radiometric analysis by gamma ray spectrometry for the artificial radionuclide Cs-137 and the natural radionuclide Pb-210 as well as other U-238 and Th-232 daughters. Because of the dynamic nature of the system, absolute dating with Cs-137 was not possible but samples could be dated as either pre- or post-1950. The 1950 date is important because it marked the beginning of the uranium exploitation in the region. The Pb-210 dating was not possible because background Pb-210 was very high relative to fallout Pb-210.

  7. Radiometric 81Kr dating identifies 120,000-year-old ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Buizert, Christo; Baggenstos, Daniel; Jiang, Wei; Purtschert, Roland; Petrenko, Vasilii V; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Müller, Peter; Kuhl, Tanner; Lee, James; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P; Brook, Edward J

    2014-05-13

    We present successful (81)Kr-Kr radiometric dating of ancient polar ice. Krypton was extracted from the air bubbles in four ?350-kg polar ice samples from Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, and dated using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA). The (81)Kr radiometric ages agree with independent age estimates obtained from stratigraphic dating techniques with a mean absolute age offset of 6 ± 2.5 ka. Our experimental methods and sampling strategy are validated by (i) (85)Kr and (39)Ar analyses that show the samples to be free of modern air contamination and (ii) air content measurements that show the ice did not experience gas loss. We estimate the error in the (81)Kr ages due to past geomagnetic variability to be below 3 ka. We show that ice from the previous interglacial period (Marine Isotope Stage 5e, 130-115 ka before present) can be found in abundance near the surface of Taylor Glacier. Our study paves the way for reliable radiometric dating of ancient ice in blue ice areas and margin sites where large samples are available, greatly enhancing their scientific value as archives of old ice and meteorites. At present, ATTA (81)Kr analysis requires a 40-80-kg ice sample; as sample requirements continue to decrease, (81)Kr dating of ice cores is a future possibility. PMID:24753606

  8. Radiometric 81Kr dating identifies 120,000-year-old ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Buizert, Christo; Baggenstos, Daniel; Jiang, Wei; Purtschert, Roland; Petrenko, Vasilii V.; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Müller, Peter; Kuhl, Tanner; Lee, James; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Brook, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    We present successful 81Kr-Kr radiometric dating of ancient polar ice. Krypton was extracted from the air bubbles in four ?350-kg polar ice samples from Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, and dated using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA). The 81Kr radiometric ages agree with independent age estimates obtained from stratigraphic dating techniques with a mean absolute age offset of 6 ± 2.5 ka. Our experimental methods and sampling strategy are validated by (i) 85Kr and 39Ar analyses that show the samples to be free of modern air contamination and (ii) air content measurements that show the ice did not experience gas loss. We estimate the error in the 81Kr ages due to past geomagnetic variability to be below 3 ka. We show that ice from the previous interglacial period (Marine Isotope Stage 5e, 130–115 ka before present) can be found in abundance near the surface of Taylor Glacier. Our study paves the way for reliable radiometric dating of ancient ice in blue ice areas and margin sites where large samples are available, greatly enhancing their scientific value as archives of old ice and meteorites. At present, ATTA 81Kr analysis requires a 40–80-kg ice sample; as sample requirements continue to decrease, 81Kr dating of ice cores is a future possibility. PMID:24753606

  9. Radiometric 81Kr dating identifies 120,000 year old ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica

    E-print Network

    Buizert, Christo; Jiang, Wei; Purtschert, Roland; Petrenko, Vasilii V; Lu, Zheng-Tian; Mueller, Peter; Kuhl, Tanner; Lee, James; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P; Brook, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    We present the first successful 81Kr-Kr radiometric dating of ancient polar ice. Krypton was extracted from the air bubbles in four ~350 kg polar ice samples from Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, and dated using Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA). The 81Kr radiometric ages agree with independent age estimates obtained from stratigraphic dating techniques with a mean absolute age offset of 6 +/- 2.5 ka. Our experimental methods and sampling strategy are validated by 1) 85Kr and 39Ar analyses that show the samples to be free of modern air contamination, and 2) air content measurements that show the ice did not experience gas loss. We estimate the error in the 81Kr ages due to past geomagnetic variability to be below 3 ka. We show that ice from the previous interglacial period (MIS 5e, 130-115 ka before present) can be found in abundance near the surface of Taylor Glacier. Our study paves the way for reliable radiometric dating of ancient ice in blue ice areas and margin sites where large samp...

  10. Radiometric 81Kr dating identifies 120,000 year old ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buizert, C.; Baggenstos, D.; Jiang, W.; Purtschert, R.; Petrenko, V. V.; Lu, Z.; Müller, P.; Kuhl, T.; Lee, J.; Severinghaus, J. P.; Brook, E.

    2013-12-01

    Ice cores from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets provide highly resolved, well-dated climate records of past polar temperatures, atmospheric composition and aerosol loading up to 800 ka before present. In addition to deep ice cores, old ice can also be found at ice margin sites and blue ice areas (BIAs) where it is exposed due to local ice dynamics and ablation. BIAs have great potential for paleoclimate studies, as large quantities of old ice are available at the surface where it can be sampled with relative ease. Determining the age of the ablating ice is the main difficulty in using BIAs for climate reconstructions. There is significant scientific interest in obtaining glacial ice dating beyond 800ka, as such an archive would extend the ice core record further back in time; such old ice can potentially be found in Antarctic BIAs such as the Allan Hills site, providing a strong impetus to developing reliable (absolute) dating tools for glacial ice. 81Kr is naturally produced in the upper atmosphere by cosmic ray interactions with the stable isotopes of Kr. The long half-life (229 ka) of 81Kr allows for radiometric dating in the 50 ka - 1.5 Ma age range, well past the reach of radiocarbon dating. Recent technological advances in Atom Trace Trap Analysis (ATTA) have reduced sample requirements to 40-80 kg of ice, which can realistically be obtained from BIAs and ice margins. We present the first successful 81Kr-Kr radiometric dating of ancient polar ice. Krypton was extracted from the air bubbles in four ~350 kg polar ice samples from Taylor Glacier in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, and dated using ATTA. The 81Kr radiometric ages agree with independent age estimates obtained from stratigraphic dating techniques with a root mean square offset of 6.5 ka. Our experimental methods and sampling strategy are validated by 1) 85Kr and 39Ar analyses that show the samples to be free of modern air contamination, and 2) air content measurements that show the ice did not experience gas loss. We estimate the error in the 81Kr ages due to past geomagnetic variability to be below 3 ka. We show that ice from the Eemian interglacial period (130-115ka BP) can be found in abundance near the surface of Taylor Glacier. Our study paves the way for reliable radiometric dating of ancient ice in blue ice areas and margin sites, greatly enhancing their scientific value as archives of old ice and meteorites. As sample requirements continue to decrease, 81Kr dating of ice cores is a future possibility.

  11. Better mathematical constraints on ages of Carboniferous stage boundaries using radiometric tuff dates and cyclostratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, John A.

    2011-05-01

    Using more geologically reasonable constraints on radiometric dates from tuffs in a cyclic mixed carbonate-siliciclastic succession in the Donets Basin, Ukraine, newer and more geologically accurate ages of stage boundaries are calculated for the Carboniferous period. These calculations assume astronomically forced (Milankovitch) cyclicity and use radiometric dates of ash layers in the stratigraphic record. Unlike previous work, measurement uncertainties are propagated through calculations to provide mathematically constrained uncertainty in the ages of the boundaries. This work uses more realistic errors in the known dates of zircons in the ash layers and does not assume an a priori value for the Milankovitch long-eccentricity period. These calculations are compatible with other previous methods of determining the boundaries and represent improvement over existing age constraints.

  12. Radiometric dating of three large volume flank collapses in the Lesser Antilles Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samper, A.; Quidelleur, X.; Boudon, G.; Le Friant, A.; Komorowski, J. C.

    2008-10-01

    It is now recognised that flank collapses are a recurrent process in the evolution of the Lesser Antilles Arc volcanoes. Large magnitude debris-avalanche deposits have been identified off the coast of Dominica, Martinique and St. Lucia, with associated volumes up to 20 km 3 [Deplus, C., Le Friant, A., Boudon, G., Komorowski, J.-C., Villemant, B., Harford, C., Ségoufin, J., Cheminée, J.-L., 2001. Submarine evidence for large-scale debris avalanches in the Lesser Antilles Arc. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 192: 145-157.]. We present new radiometric dating of three major events using the K-Ar Cassignol-Gillot technique. In the Qualibou depression of St. Lucia, a collapse has been constrained by dome emplacement prior to 95 ± 2 ka. In Dominica, where repetitive flank collapse events have occurred [Le Friant, A., Boudon, G., Komorowski, J.-C., Deplus, C., 2002. L'île de la Dominique, à l'origine des avalanches de débris les plus volumineuses de l'arc des Petites Antilles. C.R. Geoscience, 334: 235-243], the Plat Pays event probably occurred after 96 ± 2 ka. Inside the depression caused by this event, Scotts Head, which is interpreted as a proximal megabloc from the subsequent Soufriere avalanche event has been dated at 14 ± 1 ka, providing an older bound for this event. On Martinique three different domes within the Carbets structure dated at 337 ± 5 ka constrain the age of this high magnitude event. Finally, these results obtained from three of the most voluminous flank collapses provide constraints to estimate the recurrence of these events, which represent one of the major hazards associated with volcanoes of the Lesser Antilles Arc.

  13. Radiometric dating of sediments using fission tracks in conodonts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sachs, H.M.; Denkinger, M.; Bennett, C.L.; Harris, A.G.

    1980-01-01

    Conodonts are microfossils which are commonly found in marine rocks of Cambrian to Triassic age. Although their biological affinities are difficult to assess, conodonts are valuable stratigraphical indices for much of their geological range1. Recent work has also established that conodont colour alteration indices (CAI) are useful guides to diagenetic temperatures and hence burial depth2. Fission tracks3 in conodonts allow measurement of uranium concentrations and estimates of 'age' to be made using isotopic methods4. We report here that fission tracks counted in irradiated, thermally unaltered (as indicated by CAI) middle Palaeozoic conodonts indicate typical uranium concentrations of ???1 part in 10 9, with some samples higher. A single specimen of Siphonodella from the Lower Mississippian yielded an age estimate of 380??140 Myr consistent with conventional interpolations. This method may also allow the unroofing of deeply buried sediments to be dated. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

  14. Calibrating Late Quaternary terrestrial climate signals: radiometrically dated pollen evidence from the southern Sierra Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Litwin, Ronald J.; Smoot, Joseph P.; Durika, Nancy J.; Smith, George I.

    1999-01-01

    We constructed a radiometrically calibrated proxy record of Late Pleistocene and Holocene climate change exceeding 230,000 yr duration, using pollen profiles from two cores taken through age-equivalent dry lakes - one core having greater age control (via 230Th alpha mass-spectrometry) and the other having greater stratigraphic completeness. The better dated of these two serial pollen records (Searles Lake) served as a reference section for improving the effective radiometric age control in a nearby and more complete pollen record (Owens Lake) because they: (1) are situated ~90 km apart in the same drainage system (on, and immediately leeward of, the eastern flank of the Sierra Nevada), and (2) preserved strikingly similar pollen profiles and concordant sequences of sedimentological changes. Pollen assemblages from both lakes are well preserved and diverse, and document serial changes in Late Pleistocene and Holocene plant zone distribution and composition in the westernmost Great Basin; they consist of taxa now inhabiting montane forest, woodland, steppe, and desert-scrub environments. The studied core intervals are interpreted here to be the terrestrial equivalent of marine ?18O stages 1 through 9; these pollen profiles now appear to be among the best radiometrically dated Late Pleistocene records of terrestrial climate change known.

  15. Radiometric Calibration Techniques for Signal-of-Opportunity Reflectometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Shah, Rashmi; Deshpande, Manohar; Johnson, Carey

    2014-01-01

    Bi-static reflection measurements utilizing global navigation satellite service (GNSS) or other signals of opportunity (SoOp) can be used to sense ocean and terrestrial surface properties. End-to-end calibration of GNSS-R has been performed using well-characterized reflection surface (e.g., water), direct path antenna, and receiver gain characterization. We propose an augmented approach using on-board receiver electronics for radiometric calibration of SoOp reflectometers utilizing direct and reflected signal receiving antennas. The method calibrates receiver and correlator gains and offsets utilizing a reference switch and common noise source. On-board electronic calibration sources, such as reference switches, noise diodes and loop-back circuits, have shown great utility in stabilizing total power and correlation microwave radiometer and scatterometer receiver electronics in L-band spaceborne instruments. Application to SoOp instruments is likely to bring several benefits. For example, application to provide short and long time scale calibration stability of the direct path channel, especially in low signal-to-noise ratio configurations, is directly analogous to the microwave radiometer problem. The direct path channel is analogous to the loopback path in a scatterometer to provide a reference of the transmitted power, although the receiver is independent from the reflected path channel. Thus, a common noise source can be used to measure the gain ratio of the two paths. Using these techniques long-term (days to weeks) calibration stability of spaceborne L-band scatterometer and radiometer has been achieved better than 0.1. Similar long-term stability would likely be needed for a spaceborne reflectometer mission to measure terrestrial properties such as soil moisture.

  16. Antiquity of man in America indicated by radiometric dates on the Yuha burial site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Merriam, R.; Childers, W.M.; Protsch, R.

    1976-01-01

    MUCH evidence suggests that man was present in the Western Hemisphere before 12,000 yr ago, but the case has remained less than conclusive 1. In some situations, the geological age of the site is reasonably well established but the association or nature of the artefacts is questionable2,3. In other cases, museum specimens of human bones dated by radiocarbon analysis of collagen lack desirable information concerning site location, geology, and stratigraphy even though the accuracy of their absolute ages seems valid4-6. We report here the results of radiometric dates of the Yuha burial site from Imperial County, California, for which the geology and stratigraphy have been documented and reported in detail7. ?? 1976 Nature Publishing Group.

  17. The Relationship between Balancing Reactions and Reaction Lifetimes: A Consideration of the Potassium-Argon Radiometric Method for Dating Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, William A.

    2005-01-01

    A detailed examination of a commonly accepted practice in geology offers an example of how to stimulate critical thinking, teaches students how to read reactions, and challenges students to formulate better experiments for determining mineral ages more accurately. A demonstration of a Potassium-Argon radiometric method for dating minerals is…

  18. Artifact correction and absolute radiometric calibration techniques employed in the Landsat 7 image assessment system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boncyk, Wayne C.; Markham, Brian L.; Barker, John L.; Helder, Dennis

    1996-01-01

    The Landsat-7 Image Assessment System (IAS), part of the Landsat-7 Ground System, will calibrate and evaluate the radiometric and geometric performance of the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM +) instrument. The IAS incorporates new instrument radiometric artifact correction and absolute radiometric calibration techniques which overcome some limitations to calibration accuracy inherent in historical calibration methods. Knowledge of ETM + instrument characteristics gleaned from analysis of archival Thematic Mapper in-flight data and from ETM + prelaunch tests allow the determination and quantification of the sources of instrument artifacts. This a priori knowledge will be utilized in IAS algorithms designed to minimize the effects of the noise sources before calibration, in both ETM + image and calibration data.

  19. Radiometric dating of Ochoan (Permian) evaporites, WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) site, Delaware Basin, New Mexico, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Brookins, D.G.; Lambert, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    We have attempted radiometric dating of halide-sulfate salts and clay minerals from the Delaware Basin, New Mexico, USA, as part of geochemical study of the stability of the evaporite sequence at the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - a US DOE facilty) site. We undertook this dating to determine: (1) primary age of evaporite genesis or time(s) of recrystallization; (2) if previously undated evaporite minerals (leonite, polyhalite, kieserite) give useful data; and (3) if the detrital clay minerals have been radiometrically reset at any time following their incorporation into the evaporite medium. We have shown earlier that polyhalites can indeed be successfully dated by the K-Ar method, and once corrections are applied for admixed halide minerals, dates of 210-230 Ma for the Delaware Basin are obtained. Rb-Sr isochrons from early stage sylvites-polyhalites- anhydrites yield 220 +- 10 Ma, even when some sylvites yield lower K-Ar dates due to loss of *40-Ar. K-Ar dates on leonites and kieserities are also low due to *40-Ar loss, but their Rb-Sr dates are higher. Detrital clay minerals from the Delaware Basin collectively yield a highly scattered isochron (390 +- 77 Ma), but samples from a local area, such as the WIPP Site, give a much better age of 428 +- 7 Ma. These dates show that the interaction between the clay minerals and the evaporitic brines was insufficient to reset the clay minerals Rb-Sr systematics. In a related study, we note that a dike emplaced into the evaporite at 34 Ma had only very limited effect on the intruded rocks; contact phenomena were all within 2 m of the dike. All of our geochemical (radio-metric and trace element) studies of the WIPP site argue for preservation of the isotopic and chemical integrity of the major minerals for the past 200 Ma.

  20. Dating Techniques in Archaeology and Paleoanthropology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, R. E.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the new physical dating methods being used by archaeologists and paleoanthropologists to study the material remains of ancient primates. Describes the quaternary physical dating techniques, advances in radiocarbon dating, and the radiocalcium data method. (TW)

  1. Dating techniques in archaeology and paleoanthropology

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.E.

    1987-02-15

    Archaeologists have an increasing array of physical dating methods at their disposal. R.E. Taylor of the University of California discusses available techniques, recent advances in radiocarbon dating, and current developments in radiocalcium dating.

  2. Radiometric dating of the type-site for Homo heidelbergensis at Mauer, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Günther A.; Krbetschek, Matthias; Degering, Detlev; Bahain, Jean-Jacques; Shao, Qingfeng; Falguères, Christophe; Voinchet, Pierre; Dolo, Jean-Michel; Garcia, Tristan; Rightmire, G. Philip

    2010-01-01

    The Mauer mandible, holotype of Homo heidelbergensis, was found in 1907 in fluvial sands deposited by the Neckar River 10 km southeast of Heidelberg, Germany. The fossil is an important key to understanding early human occupation of Europe north of the Alps. Given the associated mammal fauna and the geological context, the find layer has been placed in the early Middle Pleistocene, but confirmatory chronometric evidence has hitherto been missing. Here we show that two independent techniques, the combined electron spin resonance/U-series method used with mammal teeth and infrared radiofluorescence applied to sand grains, date the type-site of Homo heidelbergensis at Mauer to 609 ± 40 ka. This result demonstrates that the mandible is the oldest hominin fossil reported to date from central and northern Europe and raises questions concerning the phyletic relationship of Homo heidelbergensis to more ancient populations documented from southern Europe and in Africa. We address the paleoanthropological significance of the Mauer jaw in light of this dating evidence. PMID:21041630

  3. Radiometric dating of the type-site for Homo heidelbergensis at Mauer, Germany.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Günther A; Krbetschek, Matthias; Degering, Detlev; Bahain, Jean-Jacques; Shao, Qingfeng; Falguères, Christophe; Voinchet, Pierre; Dolo, Jean-Michel; Garcia, Tristan; Rightmire, G Philip

    2010-11-16

    The Mauer mandible, holotype of Homo heidelbergensis, was found in 1907 in fluvial sands deposited by the Neckar River 10 km southeast of Heidelberg, Germany. The fossil is an important key to understanding early human occupation of Europe north of the Alps. Given the associated mammal fauna and the geological context, the find layer has been placed in the early Middle Pleistocene, but confirmatory chronometric evidence has hitherto been missing. Here we show that two independent techniques, the combined electron spin resonance/U-series method used with mammal teeth and infrared radiofluorescence applied to sand grains, date the type-site of Homo heidelbergensis at Mauer to 609 ± 40 ka. This result demonstrates that the mandible is the oldest hominin fossil reported to date from central and northern Europe and raises questions concerning the phyletic relationship of Homo heidelbergensis to more ancient populations documented from southern Europe and in Africa. We address the paleoanthropological significance of the Mauer jaw in light of this dating evidence. PMID:21041630

  4. Ar-Ar dating techniques for terrestrial meteorite impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, S. P.

    2003-04-01

    The ages of the largest (>100 km) known impacts on Earth are now well characterised. However the ages of many intermediate sized craters (20-100 km) are still poorly known, often the only constraints are stratigraphic - the difference between the target rock age and the age of crater filling sediments. The largest impacts result in significant melt bodies which cool to form igneous rocks and can be dated using conventional radiometric techniques. Smaller impacts give rise to thin bands of melted rock or melt clasts intimately mixed with country rock clasts in breccia deposits, and present much more of a challenge to dating. The Ar-Ar dating technique can address a wide variety of complex and heterogeneous samples associated with meteorite impacts and obtain reasonable ages. Ar-Ar results will be presented from a series of terrestrial meteorite impact craters including Boltysh (65.17±0.64 Ma, Strangways (646±42 Ma), and St Martin (220±32 Ma) and a Late Triassic spherule bed, possibly representing distal deposits from Manicouagan (214±1 Ma) crater. Samples from the Boltysh and Strangways craters demonstrate the importance of rapid cooling upon the retention of old ages in glassy impact rocks. A Late Triassic spherule bed in SW England is cemented by both carbonate and K-feldspar cements allowing Ar-Ar dating of fine grained cement to place a mimimum age upon the age of the associated impact. An age of 214.7±2.5 Ma places the deposit with errors of the age of the Manicouagan impact, raising the possibility that it may represent a distal deposit (the deposit lay around 2000 km away from the site of the Manicouagan crater during the Late Triassic). Finally the limits of the technique will be demonstrated using an attempt to date melt rocks from the St Martin Crater in Canada.

  5. A Comprehensive Paleomagnetic Study on Radiometrically Dated Late Cretaceous Lava Flows from Jalisco Block (Western Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas-Elguera, J.; Cervantes, M. A.; Gogichaishvili, A.; Morales, J.

    2014-12-01

    Western and central Mexico is segmented by several regional structural systems that bound crustal blocs. Paleomagnetic data from the western and eastern Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt as well as from adjacent terrains are still scarce which limits analyses of the both local and regional-scale tectonic evolution. A combined radiometric and paleomagnetic survey performed on late Cretaceous lava flows demonstrate that vertical-axis rotations characterize the paleotectonic evolution of western-central Mexico. The characteristic paleomagnetic directions determined in this study may be considered of primary (thermoremanent) origin. Multicomponent demagnetization plots were observed in some cases. In general, the polarity obtained for the flows studied is consistent with their stratigraphic position and with the radiometric age determination. The mean inclination is in reasonably good agreement with the expected inclination for the Late Creataceous, as derived from reference poles given by Besse and Courtillot (2002) for the North American craton. The declination, however, is quite different from that expected, which suggests a possible counterclockwise tectonic rotation of at least 12º. Aceptable palointensity determinations were obtained for only eleven individual samples from two basaltic lava flows. The mean virtual dipole moment (VDM) obtained in this study is 4.2 ± 1.2 _ 1022 A m2, which is almost half than the present geomagnetic field strength.

  6. Radiometric dating of quaternary deposits and the hominid mandible of lake banyolas, Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julia, R.; Bischoff, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    We report results of U-series analyses of the travertine matrix surrounding the Banyolas mandible that indicate an age of 45??4 ka bp. The mandible, an archaic hominid fossil generally deemed of mid-Pleistocene age, was recovered from a travertine matrix in 1887. Similar analyses on 21 travertine samples from quarries near the discovery site yield coherent U-series dates in correct stratigraphic order, ranging from 44 ka bp to 117 ka bp. Isotopic composition of these samples and the mandible matrix show no evidence of open system behaviour. Coherent isotopic results from adjacent quarries support the validity of the date on the mandible travertine, and we conclude the mandible is much younger than previously believed. ?? 1991.

  7. Hexabromocyclododecanes, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, and polychlorinated biphenyls in radiometrically dated sediment cores from English lakes, ~1950-present.

    PubMed

    Yang, Congqiao; Rose, Neil L; Turner, Simon D; Yang, Handong; Goldsmith, Ben; Losada, Sara; Barber, Jonathan L; Harrad, Stuart

    2016-01-15

    This paper reports input fluxes between ~1950 and present, of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) in radiometrically-dated sediment cores from 7 English lakes. Fluxes of PCBs at all but one location prone to significant sediment resuspension peaked in the late-1960s/early-1990s, before declining thereafter. Input fluxes of HBCDs at all sites increased from first emergence in the mid-1960s. Thereafter, fluxes peaked in the late-1980s/early-2000s, before declining through to the present, except at the most urban site where HBCD fluxes are still increasing. Trends of PBDEs predominant in the Penta-BDE and Octa-BDE formulations vary between sites. While at some locations, fluxes peaked in the late-1990s/early-2000s; at others, fluxes are still increasing. This suggests the full impact of EU restrictions on these formulations has yet to be felt. Fluxes of BDE-209 have yet to peak at all except one location, suggesting little discernible environmental response to recent EU restrictions on the Deca-BDE product. Strikingly, fluxes of BDE-209 in the most recent core slices either exceed or approach peak fluxes of ?PCBs, implying substantial UK use of Deca-BDE. Excepting HBCDs, inventories of our target contaminants correlated significantly with local population density, implying substantial urban sources. PMID:26433331

  8. NASA IKONOS Radiometric Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Frisbee, Troy; Zanoni, Vicki; Blonski, Slawek; Daehler, Erik; Grant, Brennan; Holekamp, Kara; Ryan, Robert; Sellers, Richard; Smith, Charles

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this program: Perform radiometric vicarious calibrations of IKQNOS imagery and compare with Space Imaging calibration coefficients The approach taken: utilize multiple well-characterized sites which are widely used by the NASA science community for radiometric characterization of airborne and spaceborne sensors; and to Perform independent characterizations with independent teams. Each team has slightly different measurement techniques and data processing methods.

  9. High precision radiometric dates from the Miocene Shadow Valley basin, So. California: Preliminary rates

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, S.J. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    The sedimentary fill of the Shadow Valley basin can be subdivided into three stratigraphic units, lower, middle, and upper, separated by locally developed angular unconformities. The basin contains a number of volcanic units suitable for single-crystal [sup 40]AR/[sup 39]Ar geochronology. These units are generally sanidine-bearing ashes or hornblende-biotite-bearing flows and are distributed temporally and spatially throughout the basin. Arrays of single crystals, measured at the CLAIR facility at M.I.T. yield isotope correlation diagrams with a general precision of [+-]0.2 m.y. The new dates place the base of the basin fill at ca. 13.0 Ma. The middle unit of basin fill was deposited after intrusion of the Kingston Peak pluton (ca. 12.5). These age data suggest the following interpretations of the basinal strata: (1) the basin experienced episodic sedimentation, with intervening hiatuses of approx. 500,000 yr duration; (2) the intrusion of the Kingston Peak pluton (ca. 12.5 Ma) strongly affected basin sedimentation and led to an hiatus and disconformity; (3) rates of deposition during sedimentation were high (approx. 1 m/1,000 yr or more); (4) upper plate extension, which affects the full stratigraphic package, occurred after 11 Ma; and (5) the basin and the bounding detachment fault were active for at least 2 m.y. before upper plate extension.

  10. Radiometric dating of marine-influenced coal using Re-Os geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Gyana Ranjan; Hannah, Judith L.; Stein, Holly J.; Geboy, Nicholas J.; Ruppert, Leslie F.

    2015-12-01

    Coal deposits are integral to understanding the structural evolution and thermal history of sedimentary basins and correlating contemporeous estuarine and fluvial delatic strata with marine sections. While marine shales may readily lend themselves to Re-Os dating due to the dominance of hydrogenous Re and Os, the lack of a chronometer for near-shore sedimentary environments hampers basinwide correlations in absolute time. Here, we employ the Re-Os geochronometer, along with total organic carbon (TOC) and Rock-Eval data, to determine the timing and conditions of a marine incursion at the top of the Matewan coal bed, Kanawha Formation, Pottsville Group, West Virginia, USA. The observed range for hydrogen index (HI: 267-290 mg hydrocarbon/gram total organic carbon) for these coal samples suggests dominance of aliphatic hydrocarbons with low carbon (

  11. Initial Radiometric Calibration of the AWiFS using Vicarious Calibration Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Thome, Kurtis; Aaron, David; Leigh, Larry

    2006-01-01

    NASA SSC maintains four ASD FieldSpec FR spectroradiometers: 1) Laboratory transfer radiometers; 2) Ground surface reflectance for V&V field collection activities. Radiometric Calibration consists of a NIST-calibrated integrating sphere which serves as a source with known spectral radiance. Spectral Calibration consists of a laser and pen lamp illumination of integrating sphere. Environmental Testing includes temperature stability tests performed in environmental chamber.

  12. Radiometric Calibration of the AWiFS Using Vicarious Calibration Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Holekamp, Kara

    2007-01-01

    A radiometric calibration assessment of the AWiFS (Advanced Wide Field Sensor) on the Indian Remote Sensing Resourcesat-1 satellite was performed by the NASA Applied Research & Technology Project Office (formerly the Applied Sciences Directorate) at the John C. Stennis Space Center. A reflectance-based vicarious calibration approach, requiring ground-based measurements coincident with satellite acquisitions and radiative transfer calculations, was used to estimate at-sensor radiance. The AWiFS is a 4-band, multispectral, moderate-resolution (60 m) imaging sensor that operates in the visible through short-wave infrared spectrum and is currently being considered as a Landsat-like alternative. Several study sites near the Stennis Space Center that attempted to span the dynamic range of the sensor were employed. Satellite at-sensor radiance values were compared to those estimated to determine the sensor's radiometric accuracy. The results of this evaluation provide the user community with an independent assessment of the radiometric accuracy of AWiFS image products, which are commercially available through GeoEye. These results are an extension of an independent assessment made by the University of Arizona Remote Sensing Group, the South Dakota State University Satellite Calibration Group & Image Processing Lab, and the NASA Applied Sciences Directorate at the John C. Stennis Space Center the previous year.

  13. A comparison of four relative radiometric normalization (RRN) techniques for mosaicing H-res multi-temporal thermal infrared (TIR) flight-lines of a complex urban scene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Hay, G. J.; Couloigner, I.; Hemachandran, B.; Bailin, J.

    2015-08-01

    High-spatial and -radiometric resolution (H-res) thermal infrared (TIR) airborne imagery, such as the TABI-1800 (Thermal Airborne Broadband Imager) provide unique surface temperature information that can be used for urban heat loss mapping, heat island analysis, and landcover classifications. For mapping large urban areas at a high-spatial resolution (i.e., sub-meter), airborne thermal imagery needs to be acquired over a number of flight-lines and mosaiced together. However, due to radiometric variations between flight-lines the similar objects tend to have different temperature characteristics on the mosaicked image, resulting in reduced visual and radiometric agreement between the flight-lines composing the final mosaiced output. To reduce radiometric variability between airborne TIR flight-lines, with a view to produce a visually seamless TIR image mosaic, we evaluate four relative radiometric normalization techniques including: (i) Histogram Matching, (ii) Pseudo Invariant Feature (PIF) Based Linear Regression, (iii) PIF-Based Theil-Sen Regression, and (iv) No-Change Stratified Random Samples (NCSRS) Based Linear Regression. The techniques are evaluated on two adjacent TABI-1800 airborne flight-lines (each ?30 km × 0.9 km) collected ?25 min apart over a portion of The City of Calgary (with ?30% overlap between them). The performances of these techniques are compared based on four criteria: (i) speed of computation, (ii) ability to automate, (iii) visual assessment, and (iv) statistical analysis. Results show that NCSRS-Based Linear Regression produces the best overall results closely followed by Histogram Matching. Specifically, these two radiometric normalization techniques: (i) increase the visual and statistical agreement between the tested TIR airborne flight-lines (NCSRS Based Linear Regression increases radiometric agreement between flight-lines by 53.3% and Histogram Matching by 52.4%), (ii) produce a visually seamless image mosaic, and (iii) can be rapidly automated within an operational multi-flight-line, multi-temporal mosaic workflow.

  14. A comparison of radiometric correction techniques in the evaluation of the relationship between LST and NDVI in Landsat imagery.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kok Chooi; Lim, Hwee San; Matjafri, Mohd Zubir; Abdullah, Khiruddin

    2012-06-01

    Atmospheric corrections for multi-temporal optical satellite images are necessary, especially in change detection analyses, such as normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) rationing. Abrupt change detection analysis using remote-sensing techniques requires radiometric congruity and atmospheric correction to monitor terrestrial surfaces over time. Two atmospheric correction methods were used for this study: relative radiometric normalization and the simplified method for atmospheric correction (SMAC) in the solar spectrum. A multi-temporal data set consisting of two sets of Landsat images from the period between 1991 and 2002 of Penang Island, Malaysia, was used to compare NDVI maps, which were generated using the proposed atmospheric correction methods. Land surface temperature (LST) was retrieved using ATCOR3_T in PCI Geomatica 10.1 image processing software. Linear regression analysis was utilized to analyze the relationship between NDVI and LST. This study reveals that both of the proposed atmospheric correction methods yielded high accuracy through examination of the linear correlation coefficients. To check for the accuracy of the equation obtained through linear regression analysis for every single satellite image, 20 points were randomly chosen. The results showed that the SMAC method yielded a constant value (in terms of error) to predict the NDVI value from linear regression analysis-derived equation. The errors (average) from both proposed atmospheric correction methods were less than 10%. PMID:21755424

  15. Statistical techniques applied to aerial radiometric surveys (STAARS): principal components analysis user's manual. [NURE program

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, C.D.; Pirkle, F.L.; Schmidt, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    A Principal Components Analysis (PCA) has been written to aid in the interpretation of multivariate aerial radiometric data collected by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. The variations exhibited by these data have been reduced and classified into a number of linear combinations by using the PCA program. The PCA program then generates histograms and outlier maps of the individual variates. Black and white plots can be made on a Calcomp plotter by the application of follow-up programs. All programs referred to in this guide were written for a DEC-10. From this analysis a geologist may begin to interpret the data structure. Insight into geological processes underlying the data may be obtained.

  16. A potential dating technique using 228Th/228Ra ratio for tracing the chronosequence of elemental concentrations in plants.

    PubMed

    Chao, J H; Niu, H; Chiu, C Y; Lin, C

    2007-06-01

    We propose a radiometric method based on measurement of the radioactivity of the naturally occurring radionuclides (228)Ra and 228)Th and the derived (228)Th/(228)Ra ratios in plant samples to estimate plant age and the corresponding nutritional conditions in a field-growing fern, Dicranopteris linearis. Plant age (tissue age) was associated with the (228)Th/(228)Ra ratio in fronds, which implies the accumulation time of immobile elements in the plant tissue or the life span of the fronds. Results indicated that the accumulation of alkaline earth elements in D. linearis is relatively constant with increased age, while the K concentration is reversed with age because of translocation among plant tissues. Estimation of dating uncertainty based on measurement conditions revealed that the radiometric technique can be applied to trace chronosequential changes of elemental concentrations and environmental pollutants in plants with ages of less than 10-15 years. PMID:17336537

  17. Radiometric dating/techniques The International Encyclopedia of Geography: People, the Earth,

    E-print Network

    Dorn, Ron

    : climate / landform / vegetation history, erosion and sedimentation, geomorphology, hydrological and fluvial processes, paleoenvironments and paleoenvironmental change Free Text Keywords: Abstract to youngest (Shiraiwa and Watanabe 1991), such as soil development over time or a sequence of superimposed

  18. Safeguards applications of far infrared radiometric techniques for the detection of contraband

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, D.T.; Reber, E.E.; Foote, F.B.; Schellenbaum, R.L.

    1980-02-01

    A new safeguards system under development employs radiometers in the 100 to 300 GHz spectral band to detect contraband, including shielding materials (used to attenuate the gamma ray emissions from nuclear materials), weapons, or explosives covertly concealed on personnel. Clothing is highly transparent at these frequencies and imaging techniques can detect contraband by its emissivity and reflectivity differences relative to human tissues. Experimental data are presented and sample images are used as a basis to discuss system advantages and limitations.

  19. Dating human skeletal remains using a radiometric method: biogenic versus diagenetic 90Sr and 210Pb in vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Bettina; Uldin, Tanya; Mangin, Patrice; Froidevaux, Pascal

    2012-07-10

    In forensic science, there is a strong interest in determining the post-mortem interval (PMI) of human skeletal remains up to 50 years after death. Currently, there are no reliable methods to resolve PMI, the determination of which relies almost exclusively on the experience of the investigating expert. Here we measured (90)Sr and (210)Pb ((210)Po) incorporated into bones through a biogenic process as indicators of the time elapsed since death. We hypothesised that the activity of radionuclides incorporated into trabecular bone will more accurately match the activity in the environment and the food chain at the time of death than the activity in cortical bone because of a higher remodelling rate. We found that determining (90)Sr can yield reliable PMI estimates as long as a calibration curve exists for (90)Sr covering the studied area and the last 50 years. We also found that adding the activity of (210)Po, a proxy for naturally occurring (210)Pb incorporated through ingestion, to the (90)Sr dating increases the reliability of the PMI value. Our results also show that trabecular bone is subject to both (90)Sr and (210)Po diagenesis. Accordingly, we used a solubility profile method to determine the biogenic radionuclide only, and we are proposing a new method of bone decontamination to be used prior to (90)Sr and (210)Pb dating. PMID:22497702

  20. The Sima de los Huesos hominids date to beyond U/Th equilibrium (>350 kyr) and perhaps to 400-500 kyr: New radiometric dates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Shamp, D.D.; Aramburu, Arantza; Arsuaga, J.L.; Carbonell, E.; Bermudez de Castro, Jose Maria

    2003-01-01

    The Sima de los Huesos site of the Atapuerca complex near Burgos, Spain contains the skeletal remains of at least 28 individuals in a mud breccia underlying an accumulation of the Middle Pleistocene cave bear (U. deningeri). Earlier dating estimates of 200 to 320 kyr were based on U-series and ESR methods applied to bones, made inaccurate by unquantifiable uranium cycling. We report here on a new discovery within the Sima de los Huesos of human bones stratigraphically underlying an in situ speleothem. U-series analyses of the speleothem shows the lower part to be at isotopic U/Th equilibrium, translating to a firm lower limit of 350 kyr for the SH hominids. Finite dates on the upper part suggest a speleothem growth rate of c. 1 cm/32 kyr. This rate, along with paleontological constraints, place the likely age of the hominids in the interval of 400 to 600 kyr. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. (25143) Itokawa: The power of radiometric techniques for the interpretation of remote thermal observations in the light of the Hayabusa rendezvous results*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Usui, Fumihiko

    2014-06-01

    The near-Earth asteroid (25143) Itokawa was characterized in great detail by the Japanese Hayabusa mission. We revisited the available thermal observations in the light of the true asteroid properties with the goal of evaluating the possibilities and limitations of thermal model techniques. In total, we used 25 published ground-based mid-infrared photometric observations and five so far unpublished measurements from the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite AKARI in combination with improved H-G values (absolute magnitude and slope parameter). Our thermophysical model (TPM) approach allowed us to determine correctly the sense of rotation, to estimate the thermal inertia and to derive robust effective size and albedo values by only using a simple spherical shape model. A more complex shape model, derived from light-curve inversion techniques, improved the quality of the predictions considerably and made the interpretation of the thermal light curve possible. The radiometrically derived effective diameter value agrees within 2% with the true Itokawa size value. The combination of our TPM and the final (25143) Itokawa in-situ shape model was then used as a benchmark for deriving and testing radiometric solutions. The consolidated value for the surface-averaged thermal inertia is ? = 700 ± 200 J m-2 s-0.5 K-1. We found that even the high-resolution shape models still require additional small-scale roughness in order to explain the disk-integrated infrared measurements. Our description of the thermal effects as a function of wavelengths, phase angle, and rotational phase facilitates the planning of crucial thermal observations for sophisticated characterization of small bodies, including other potentially hazardous asteroids. Our analysis shows the power of radiometric techniques to derive the size, albedo, thermal inertia, and also spin-axis orientation from small sets of measurements at thermal infrared wavelengths.

  2. Surface dating of bricks, an application of luminescence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Anna; Martini, Marco; Maspero, Francesco; Panzeri, Laura; Sibilia, Emanuela

    2014-05-01

    Luminescence techniques are a powerful tool to date archaeological ceramic materials and geological sediments. Thermoluminescence (TL) is widely used for bricks dating to reconstruct the chronology of urban complexes and the development of human cultures. However, it can sometimes be inconclusive, since TL assesses the firing period of bricks, which can be reused, even several centuries later. This problem can be circumvented using a dating technique based on a resetting event different from the last heating. OSL (Optically Stimulated Luminescence) exploits the last light exposition of the brick surface, which resets the light-sensitive electron traps until the surface is definitely shielded by mortar and superimposed bricks. This advanced application (surface dating) has been successfully attempted on rocks, marble and stone artifacts, but not yet on bricks. A recent conservation campaign at the Certosa di Pavia gave the opportunity to sample some bricks belonging to a XVII century collapsed wall, still tied to their mortars. This was an advantageous condition to test this technique, comparing the dating results with precise historical data. This attempt gave satisfactory results, allowing to identify bricks surely reused and to fully confirm that the edification of the perimetral wall occurred at the end of XVII century.

  3. Recent documents dating: an approach using radiocarbon techniques.

    PubMed

    Zavattaro, D; Quarta, G; D'Elia, M; Calcagnile, L

    2007-04-11

    The possibility to develop an absolute technique, independent from the paper conservation conditions, to date recent paper documents (i.e. less than 50 years old) for forensics purposes is discussed. We suggest the possibility to use the curve representing the strong increase in the atmospheric radiocarbon concentration induced in the last 50 years by nuclear weapons tests as reference to date paper documents, with a resolution down to a few months. The results obtained in the analysis of two known age documents are presented together with a first order mathematical model developed in order to take into account the contributions of the different tree rings employed in the paper production. PMID:16872773

  4. (25143) Itokawa: The Power of Radiometric Techniques for the Interpretation of Remote Thermal Observations in the Light of the Hayabusa Rendezvous Results

    E-print Network

    Müller, T G; Usui, F

    2014-01-01

    The near-Earth asteroid (25143) Itokawa was characterised in great detail by the Japanese Hayabusa mission. We revisited the available thermal observations in the light of the true asteroid properties with the goal to evaluate the possibilities and limitations of thermal model techniques. In total, we used 25 published ground-based mid-infrared photometric observations and 5 so far unpublished measurements from the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite AKARI in combination with improved H-G values. Our thermophysical model (TPM) approach allowed us to determine correctly the sense of rotation, to estimate the thermal inertia and to derive robust effective size and albedo values by only using a simple spherical shape model. A more complex shape model, derived from light-curve inversion techniques, improved the quality of the predictions considerably and made the interpretation of thermal light-curve possible. The radiometrically derived effective diameter value agrees within 2% of the true Itokawa size valu...

  5. Radiometric ages of Tennessee rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Corgan, J.X.; Bradley, M.W.

    1983-01-01

    This report compiles and summarizes all known radiometric age determinations based on bedrock samples from Tennessee. Data are available for 89 sites. Specimens record both igneous and metamorphic events ranging in age from 1.3 billion to 220 million years before present. Tennessee rocks have been dated by techniques that measure the results of four different kinds of radioactive decay: thorium-lead, uranium-lead, potassium-argon, and rubidium-strontium. Most determinations meet normal scientific standards for reliability. This study focuses on clarifying published data by bringing together geochemical, geological, and geographical information for each site. In addition to data on the age of bedrock samples, this study presents basic information on the ages of meteorites from Tennessee and on the ages of sediments and organic remains from Ice Age fossil sites and more recent archeological sites. While bedrock ages are the thrust of the report, other kinds of absolute age determinations are briefly discussed. 98 references, 11 figures, 3 tables.

  6. New twist on dating: radiocarbon dating techniques applied to air pollution studies

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, G.

    1981-05-01

    This paper deals with the problem of urban air pollution and to what extent it is caused by the burning of fossil fuels at factories or in cars, and to what extent it is due to the breathing processes of trees or the burning of natural fuels like wood. With the use of radiocarbon dating techniques the distinction between the pollutants can be made. The article describes the design of the gas proportional counter used to measure the extremely small samples of carbon in polluted air. (KRM)

  7. New Sakmarian ages for the Rio Bonito formation (Paraná Basin, southern Brazil) based on LA-ICP-MS U-Pb radiometric dating of zircons crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagliari, Joice; Lavina, Ernesto Luiz Correa; Philipp, Ruy Paulo; Tognoli, Francisco Manoel Wohnrath; Basei, Miguel Angelo Stipp; Faccini, Ubiratan Ferrucio

    2014-12-01

    Two ash fall beds (tonstein) sampled from the post-glacial Permian deposits of the Paraná Basin have provided new U-Pb radiometric age constraints for this stratigraphic interval. The zircon grains were recovered from tonstein layers interbedded with fine-grained and carbonaceous lithologies in the middle portion of the Rio Bonito Formation. In both samples, the dominant population is interpreted as generated by explosive volcanism, as having formed immediately before the eruption. Based on 238U/206Pb, the selected zircon grains from the dominant population have weighted mean ages of 290.6 ± 2.8 Ma and 281.7 ± 3.2 Ma, corresponding to the Sakmarian and Kungurian ages in the Cisuralian epoch, respectively. These ages constrain the time of the deposition of the tonstein horizons and have important stratigraphic implications for the Late Paleozoic evolution of both the Paraná Basin and the southwestern region of Gondwana. The results presented here and the radiometric data already published suggest that deposition of the post-glacial coal-bearing deposits of the Rio Bonito Formation was probably initiated before the Early Permian. Thus, we infer that the climate had already ameliorated by this period in order to allow for the formation and accumulation of peat in this region of Gondwana.

  8. Teaching the Mathematics of Radioactive Dating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, James H.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a method used to teach the concept of radiometric dating using mathematical equations. Explores the lack of information in textbooks on how to solve radiometric dating problems using mathematical concepts. (SAH)

  9. Cryogenic Separation Of Glauconite And Foraminifera From The Cretaceous/Paleogene Boundary Interval At Nasi?ów, Poland, For Radiometric Dating And Stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójtowicz, Artur; Pie?kos, Tomasz; Ha?as, Stanis?aw; Peryt, Danuta; Durakiewicz, Tomasz; M?ynek, Agnieszka

    2015-03-01

    We have demonstrated that cryogenic separation of glauconite and foraminifera from the host rock allows to preserve the integrity of extracted specimens, assures minimal damage and causes no artificial fractionation. The K/Ar dating of two glauconite samples from Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary in the Nasi?ów outcrop yields 62.0 and 66.3 Ma. The discrepancy in these dates, much larger than expected from analytical precision, may result from too low %K, which was 5.91 and 5.73, respectively.

  10. NASA IKONOS Radiometric Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert E.; Kelly, Michelle; Holekamp, Kara; Daehler, Erik; Zanoni, Vicki; Schiller, Stephen; Thome, Kurtis

    2002-01-01

    NASA acquired imagery from the IKONOS satellite as part of its Scientific Data Purchase (SDP) program, which purchases scientific data sets from commercial sources. This viewgraph presentation describes the IKONOS satellite and its sensors, and then gives an overview of characterization efforts undertaken by NASA in cooperation with other government agencies. The characterization included relative radiometric correction, absolute radiometric characterization of data from Lunar Lake Playa, Nevada, and calibration of data from Stennis Space Center, Mississippi.

  11. Radiometric instrumentation and measurements guide for photovoltaic performance testing

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.

    1997-04-01

    The Photovoltaic Module and Systems Performance and Engineering Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory performs indoor and outdoor standardization, testing, and monitoring of the performance of a wide range of photovoltaic (PV) energy conversion devices and systems. The PV Radiometric Measurements and Evaluation Team (PVSRME) within that project is responsible for measurement and characterization of natural and artificial optical radiation which stimulates the PV effect. The PV manufacturing and research and development community often approaches project members for technical information and guidance. A great area of interest is radiometric instrumentation, measurement techniques, and data analysis applied to understanding and improving PV cell, module, and system performance. At the Photovoltaic Radiometric Measurements Workshop conducted by the PVSRME team in July 1995, the need to communicate knowledge of solar and optical radiometric measurements and instrumentation, gained as a result of NREL`s long-term experiences, was identified as an activity that would promote improved measurement processes and measurement quality in the PV research and manufacturing community. The purpose of this document is to address the practical and engineering need to understand optical and solar radiometric instrument performance, selection, calibration, installation, and maintenance applicable to indoor and outdoor radiometric measurements for PV calibration, performance, and testing applications. An introductory section addresses radiometric concepts and definitions. Next, concepts essential to spectral radiometric measurements are discussed. Broadband radiometric instrumentation and measurement concepts are then discussed. Each type of measurement serves as an important component of the PV cell, module, and system performance measurement and characterization process.

  12. VERIFICATION OF THE RADIOMETRIC CALIBRATION OF SCIAMACHY IN THE UV FOR TWO ALTERNATIVE KEY DATA SETS

    E-print Network

    Tilstra, Gijsbert

    VERIFICATION OF THE RADIOMETRIC CALIBRATION OF SCIAMACHY IN THE UV FOR TWO ALTERNATIVE KEY DATA@knmi.nl, stammes@knmi.nl 1 November 2004 ABSTRACT This document deals with the well-known radiometric calibration. The orbits used are orbit 2509, dated 23 August 2002, and orbit 5973, dated April 22, 2003. The processor

  13. Small satellite radiometric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    A critical need for the Mission to Planet Earth is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, flexible radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated data and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted vehicles (RPVs). 12 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Landsat thematic mapper radiometric calibration study

    SciTech Connect

    Wukelic, G.E.; Gibbons, D.E.; Foote, H.P.; Martucci, L.M.

    1987-08-01

    The intent was to develop and test analytical techniques that will enhance the scientific and technical exploitation of digital multispectral data. The thrust involved radiometric calibration efforts aimed at determining the bias and validity in absolute temperature determinations using TM band 6 data. Other objectives included: looking at spectral characterization; change detection; combined reflective and emissive data use; and mixed pixel and atmospheric adjustments. To date, six TM data sets (five day scenes and one night scene) have been analyzed. Calibration accuracy of the water and non-water satellite-determined temperatures, using atmospherically corrected radiance values determined from LOWTRAN 6 with local radiosonde, non-local radiosonde, and LOWTRAN 6 model atmospheres, have been studied. Thermal values for non-water pixels have recently been determined. Extensive progress has been made in validating our calibration methodology, analyzing TM5-band 6 data sets for water and non-water pixels, verifying the mixed pixel and atmospheric adjustment methodologies, considering the quantitative effects of clouds and emissivities on absolute temperature determinations, and in conducting initial experiments relative to band 7 calibration.

  15. Using Melting Ice to Teach Radiometric Dating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Donald Underkofler

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which a mystery setting is used to motivate students to construct their own decay curves of melting ice used as an analogy to radioactive decay. Procedures, materials, apparatus, discussion topics, presentation, and thermodynamics are discussed. (CW)

  16. Radiometric cloud imaging with an uncooled microbolometer thermal infrared camera.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Joseph; Nugent, Paul; Pust, Nathan; Thurairajah, Brentha; Mizutani, Kohei

    2005-07-25

    An uncooled microbolometer-array thermal infrared camera has been incorporated into a remote sensing system for radiometric sky imaging. The radiometric calibration is validated and improved through direct comparison with spectrally integrated data from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI). With the improved calibration, the Infrared Cloud Imager (ICI) system routinely obtains sky images with radiometric uncertainty less than 0.5 W/(m(2 )sr) for extended deployments in challenging field environments. We demonstrate the infrared cloud imaging technique with still and time-lapse imagery of clear and cloudy skies, including stratus, cirrus, and wave clouds. PMID:19498585

  17. Radiometric sounding system

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, C.D.; Anderson, G.A.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Shaw, W.J.

    1995-04-01

    Vertical profiles of solar and terrestrial radiative fluxes are key research needs for global climate change research. These fluxes are expected to change as radiatively active trace gases are emitted to the earth`s atmosphere as a consequence of energy production and industrial and other human activities. Models suggest that changes in the concentration of such gases will lead to radiative flux divergences that will produce global warming of the earth`s atmosphere. Direct measurements of the vertical variation of solar and terrestrial radiative fluxes that lead to these flux divergences have been largely unavailable because of the expense of making such measurements from airplanes. These measurements are needed to improve existing atmospheric radiative transfer models, especially under the cloudy conditions where the models have not been adequately tested. A tethered-balloon-borne Radiometric Sounding System has been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide an inexpensive means of making routine vertical soundings of radiative fluxes in the earth`s atmospheric boundary layer to altitudes up to 1500 m above ground level. Such vertical soundings would supplement measurements being made from aircraft and towers. The key technical challenge in the design of the Radiometric Sounding System is to develop a means of keeping the radiometers horizontal while the balloon ascends and descends in a turbulent atmospheric environment. This problem has been addressed by stabilizing a triangular radiometer-carrying platform that is carried on the tetherline of a balloon sounding system. The platform, carried 30 m or more below the balloon to reduce the balloon`s effect on the radiometric measurements, is leveled by two automatic control loops that activate motors, gears and pulleys when the platform is off-level. The sensitivity of the automatic control loops to oscillatory motions of various frequencies and amplitudes can be adjusted using filters.

  18. A Review of LIDAR Radiometric Processing: From Ad Hoc Intensity Correction to Rigorous Radiometric Calibration.

    PubMed

    Kashani, Alireza G; Olsen, Michael J; Parrish, Christopher E; Wilson, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    In addition to precise 3D coordinates, most light detection and ranging (LIDAR) systems also record "intensity", loosely defined as the strength of the backscattered echo for each measured point. To date, LIDAR intensity data have proven beneficial in a wide range of applications because they are related to surface parameters, such as reflectance. While numerous procedures have been introduced in the scientific literature, and even commercial software, to enhance the utility of intensity data through a variety of "normalization", "correction", or "calibration" techniques, the current situation is complicated by a lack of standardization, as well as confusing, inconsistent use of terminology. In this paper, we first provide an overview of basic principles of LIDAR intensity measurements and applications utilizing intensity information from terrestrial, airborne topographic, and airborne bathymetric LIDAR. Next, we review effective parameters on intensity measurements, basic theory, and current intensity processing methods. We define terminology adopted from the most commonly-used conventions based on a review of current literature. Finally, we identify topics in need of further research. Ultimately, the presented information helps lay the foundation for future standards and specifications for LIDAR radiometric calibration. PMID:26561813

  19. [Laser-based radiometric calibration].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-gang; Zheng, Yu-quan

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly higher demands are put forward to spectral radiometric calibration accuracy and the development of new tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration technology is promoted, along with the development of studies of terrestrial remote sensing, aeronautical and astronautical remote sensing, plasma physics, quantitative spectroscopy, etc. Internationally a number of national metrology scientific research institutes have built tunable laser based spectral radiometric calibration facilities in succession, which are traceable to cryogenic radiometers and have low uncertainties for spectral responsivity calibration and characterization of detectors and remote sensing instruments in the UK, the USA, Germany, etc. Among them, the facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCCUS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in the USA and the Tunable Lasers in Photometry (TULIP) facility at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany have more representatives. Compared with lamp-monochromator systems, laser based spectral radiometric calibrations have many advantages, such as narrow spectral bandwidth, high wavelength accuracy, low calibration uncertainty and so on for radiometric calibration applications. In this paper, the development of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration and structures and performances of laser-based radiometric calibration facilities represented by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in the UK, NIST and PTB are presented, technical advantages of laser-based spectral radiometric calibration are analyzed, and applications of this technology are further discussed. Laser-based spectral radiometric calibration facilities can be widely used in important system-level radiometric calibration measurements with high accuracy, including radiance temperature, radiance and irradiance calibrations for space remote sensing instruments, and promote the development of aerospace, atmospheric physics, spectroscopy, biological science and so on in the fields of research and industry. PMID:25881452

  20. Developing OSL Geological Dating Techniques for Use on Future Missions to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, M. W.; Kalchgruber, R.; Deo, S.; McKeever, S. W. S.

    2005-01-01

    The surface of Mars has been subject to aeolian, fluvial, and periglacial activity in the (relatively) recent past. Unfortunately, chronological dating of recent events on Mars is difficult as the errors associated with crater counting are comparable to younger ages (approx. 1 Ma). Consequently, techniques to quantify the ages of geological processes on Mars have become an important area of research. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is one candidate technique for in-situ dating of the deposition of Martian surface sediments. This method can aid in developing a geological and climatic history of the last million years on Mars. The current paper addresses some of the challenges and progress associated with developing OSL as a viable in-situ dating technique for Mars. Some of the challenges include the mineral composition, the effectiveness of solar resetting under Martian conditions, the temperature regime, and determining the natural dose rate on Mars. All of these topics are currently under investigation, and some preliminary results are presented.

  1. 40Ar/39Ar technique of KAr dating: a comparison with the conventional technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brent, Dalrymple G.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1971-01-01

    K-Ar ages have been determined by the 40Ar/39Ar total fusion technique on 19 terrestrial samples whose conventional K-Ar ages range from 3.4 my to nearly 1700 my. Sample materials included biotite, muscovite, sanidine, adularia, plagioclase, hornblende, actinolite, alunite, dacite, and basalt. For 18 samples there are no significant differences at the 95% confidence level between the KAr ages obtained by these two techniques; for one sample the difference is 4.3% and is statistically significant. For the neutron doses used in these experiments (???4 ?? 1018 nvt) it appears that corrections for interfering Ca- and K-derived Ar isotopes can be made without significant loss of precision for samples with K/Ca > 1 as young as about 5 ?? 105 yr, and for samples with K/Ca < 1 as young as about 107 yr. For younger samples the combination of large atmospheric Ar corrections and large corrections for Ca- and K-derived Ar may make the precision of the 40Ar/39Ar technique less than that of the conventional technique unless the irradiation parameters are adjusted to minimize these corrections. ?? 1971.

  2. Dating intramontane alluvial deposits from NW Argentina using luminescence techniques: Problems and potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Joel Q. G.; Robinson, Ruth A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Intramontane basin sediments are an archive of the interaction between basin bounding faults, and alluvial fan and fluvial systems. The chronologies of intramontane basin sedimentation enable an understanding of the cycling of sediments within a basin through time, can be interrogated to identify periods of alluvial storage and erosion, provide rates of sediment accumulation and storage and date fault movement. If suitable dating methods (in terms of resolution and timescale) are applied to develop the chronologies of alluvial archives, it is then possible to discriminate between climate and tectonic forcing mechanisms on long-term basin behaviour. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of quartz grains from alluvial sediments is an ideal technique for establishing a chronological framework of basin sedimentation as the method directly dates sedimentation events. However, our experience of OSL dating of quartz minerals extracted from Late Quaternary alluvial sequences in the quebradas of the Eastern Cordillera of NW Argentina has presented a number of challenges concerning selection of appropriate facies to analyse, mineral contamination, failure of fundamental protocol tests, proximity to saturation, and broad and multi-modal age distributions. Through careful analysis of the alluvial sedimentology and choice of sampling environments we have been able to locate suitable samples in most vertical sequences studied. A post-infrared-OSL approach demonstrated that contaminant signals were resulting in protocol test failure and, conversely, circumvention of this problem has increased confidence and reliability in the dating results. Assessment of dose-response characteristics suggests that the luminescence for the oldest samples is not likely to be saturated and in turn ages are not considered to be underestimated. Finally, different statistical tests have enabled objective identification of single low-dose populations in complex distributions and confirmed that broad distributions in some samples may be treated as single populations. These statistical approaches have considerably lowered uncertainty on OSL ages and confirmed concordance with other dating evidence.

  3. Cation-ratio dating: A new rock varnish age-determination technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Ronald I.

    1983-07-01

    Rock varnish coats many surfaces of geomorphic and archaeologic interest in arid lands. All varnish dating techniques are limited by the time lag between the exposure of a surface to subaerial processes and the onset of varnishing. They are valid only where manganese is not remobilized after deposition, for example, in most arid environments. The premise of a new age-determination method, cation-ratio dating, is that the ratio of the more mobile cations (e.g., K and Ca) to titanium in varnish decreases with time. Although there are many inherent assumptions and potential limitations, cation-ratio dating has been verified on relative age-sequences from a Death Valley debris cone, Negev Desert talus flatirons, and prehistoric lake levels at Searles Lake in California. Varnish cation ratios have been calibrated to independently dated surfaces in the Coso volcanic field and vicinity in California. Tentative absolute dates have been assigned to geomorphic surfaces in the Coso area. Cation ratios have been used to distinguish relative ages of archaeologic artifacts in southwestern North America and to demonstrate that varnish at the South Stoddard locality, Mojave Desert, did not form in 25 yr.

  4. U-series dating of impure carbonates: An isochron technique using total-sample dissolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Fitzpatrick, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    U-series dating is a well-established technique for age determination of Late Quaternary carbonates. Materials of sufficient purity for nominal dating, however, are not as common as materials with mechanically inseparable aluminosilicate detritus. Detritus contaminates the sample with extraneous Th. We propose that correction for contamination is best accomplished with the isochron technique using total sample dissolution (TSD). Experiments were conducted on artificial mixtures of natural detritus and carbonate and on an impure carbonate of known age. Results show that significant and unpredictable transfer of radionuclides occur from the detritus to the leachate in commonly used selective leaching procedures. The effects of correcting via leachate-residue pairs and isochron plots were assessed. Isochrons using TSD gave best results, followed by isochron plots of leachates only. ?? 1991.

  5. Dating human skeletal remains using 90Sr and 210Pb: case studies.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Bettina; Uldin, Tanya; Mangin, Patrice; Bochud, François; Froidevaux, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    In legal medicine, the post mortem interval (PMI) of interest covers the last 50 years. When only human skeletal remains are found, determining the PMI currently relies mostly on the experience of the forensic anthropologist, with few techniques available to help. Recently, several radiometric methods have been proposed to reveal PMI. For instance, (14)C and (90)Sr bomb pulse dating covers the last 60 years and give reliable PMI when teeth or bones are available. (232)Th series dating has also been proposed but requires a large amount of bones. In addition, (210)Pb dating is promising but is submitted to diagenesis and individual habits like smoking that must be handled carefully. Here we determine PMI on 29 cases of forensic interest using (90)Sr bomb pulse. In 12 cases, (210)Pb dating was added to narrow the PMI interval. In addition, anthropological investigations were carried out on 15 cases to confront anthropological expertise to the radiometric method. Results show that 10 of the 29 cases can be discarded as having no forensic interest (PMI>50 years) based only on the (90)Sr bomb pulse dating. For 10 other cases, the additional (210)Pb dating restricts the PMI uncertainty to a few years. In 15 cases, anthropological investigations corroborate the radiometric PMI. This study also shows that diagenesis and inter-individual difference in radionuclide uptake represent the main sources of uncertainty in the PMI determination using radiometric methods. PMID:24287304

  6. Irradiation of dates: insect disinfestation, microbial and chemical assessments, and use of thermoluminescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kahtani, Hassan A.; M. Abu-Tarboush, Hamza; Al-Dryhim, Yousif N.; Ahmed, Mohamed A.; Bajaber, Adnan S.; Adam, El-Shami E.; El-Mojaddidi, Mohamed A.

    1998-08-01

    Irradiation of dates (Khalas variety) at 0.9 kGy was sufficient to eliminate single insect infestation ( Oryzaephilus surinamensis) and mixed infestation ( O. surinamensis and Tribolium castaneum), whereas 0.3 kGy was effective only in controlling single infestation. Sensory properties were not affected but irradiation contributed to some reduction in microbial counts immediately after irradiation and counts remained low till the end of 6 months storage period. All sugars were significantly reduced immediately after irradiation but they increased gradually with increasing storage time. Thermoluminescence (TL) technique was useful in discriminating between irradiated and unirradiated dates during the entire storage period but was less sensitive as far as the dose estimation is concerned.

  7. Uncooled radiometric camera performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Bill; Hoelter, T.

    1998-07-01

    Thermal imaging equipment utilizing microbolometer detectors operating at room temperature has found widespread acceptance in both military and commercial applications. Uncooled camera products are becoming effective solutions to applications currently using traditional, photonic infrared sensors. The reduced power consumption and decreased mechanical complexity offered by uncooled cameras have realized highly reliable, low-cost, hand-held instruments. Initially these instruments displayed only relative temperature differences which limited their usefulness in applications such as Thermography. Radiometrically calibrated microbolometer instruments are now available. The ExplorIR Thermography camera leverages the technology developed for Raytheon Systems Company's first production microbolometer imaging camera, the Sentinel. The ExplorIR camera has a demonstrated temperature measurement accuracy of 4 degrees Celsius or 4% of the measured value (whichever is greater) over scene temperatures ranges of minus 20 degrees Celsius to 300 degrees Celsius (minus 20 degrees Celsius to 900 degrees Celsius for extended range models) and camera environmental temperatures of minus 10 degrees Celsius to 40 degrees Celsius. Direct temperature measurement with high resolution video imaging creates some unique challenges when using uncooled detectors. A temperature controlled, field-of-view limiting aperture (cold shield) is not typically included in the small volume dewars used for uncooled detector packages. The lack of a field-of-view shield allows a significant amount of extraneous radiation from the dewar walls and lens body to affect the sensor operation. In addition, the transmission of the Germanium lens elements is a function of ambient temperature. The ExplorIR camera design compensates for these environmental effects while maintaining the accuracy and dynamic range required by today's predictive maintenance and condition monitoring markets.

  8. Laser photothermal radiometric instrumentation for fast in-line industrial steel hardness inspection and

    E-print Network

    Mandelis, Andreas

    between thermal diffusivity or thermal conductivity and 0003-6935/09/070C11-13$15.00/0 © 2009 OpticalLaser photothermal radiometric instrumentation for fast in-line industrial steel hardness photothermal radiometric instrumentation technique was developed to meet industrial demand for on-line steel

  9. The ID-KArD technique: In-situ dating on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartwright, J. A.; Farley, K. A.; Hurowitz, J.; Asimow, P. D.; Jacobson, N. S.

    2013-12-01

    The ability to measure absolute ages on the Martian surface is crucial for understanding the planet's evolution. A detailed geological history of the Moon has been determined through analysis of returned samples from specific units, and relative ages calculated by crater counting techniques. However, without returned samples or in-situ dating analyses, we lack absolute age markers for Mars and thus cannot accurately or precisely date its well-documented surface. Instead, we have relied on an estimated Mars/Moon cratering ratio and relative crater counting techniques in an attempt to calculate surface ages and classify geological units. The use of such relative parameters diminishes the precision and accuracy for surface age calculations, and thus highlights the need for independent age determinations from returned samples or in-situ dating. In this research, we describe our technique - ID-KArD (Isotope Dilution K-Ar Dating) - intended for in-situ age dating of geological units on the Martian surface. ID-KArD resolves two challenges that have previously obstructed in-situ age dating on Mars: 1) High fusion temperatures are avoided with the use of a lithium-borate flux; 2) Sample mass measurement is not required, due to the addition of an isotope dilution doubly-spiked glass. The glass has a known 39Ar/41K ratio, which removes the need for concentration measurements. Thus, only isotope ratios are required for a K-Ar age determination. ID-KArD has the potential to address Mars chronology inaccuracies, and would be a suitable technique for consideration on future missions. In the first phase of ID-KArD proof of concept, we selected a Viluy trap basalt (K2O ~ 0.7 wt%), with concordant K-Ar and Ar-Ar ages of 354.3 × 3.5 and 357.7 × 1.4 Ma respectively (Courtillot et al., 2010). An aliquot was combined into a crucible with the flux and the spike glass for separate Ar (MAP 215:50, Caltech), followed by K (KEMS, GRC) isotopic analysis. Combining our results, we obtained an age of 351 × 19 Ma (Farley et al., 2013), in good agreement with the previously published ages. For the second phase, we have designed and built a single instrument, capable of analysing both Ar and K from a single sample. The instrument includes two ionisation sources for separate K (thermal) and Ar (electron impact) ionsiation, and a quadrupole mass spectrometer. In addition, we have designed a sample heating mechanism that allows degassing of flux prior to sample addition, and achieves temperatures in the range of the SAM oven on Curiosity. Thus far, the instrument has successfully measured both isotopic systems, and following further testing in the coming weeks, we will date Martian surface analogues, age standards, and finally meteoritic material.

  10. Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager Radiometric Calibration and Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian; Barsi, Julia; Kvaran, Geir; Ong, Lawrence; Kaita, Edward; Biggar, Stuart; Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey; Mishra, Nischal; Helder, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    The Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) was radiometrically calibrated prior to launch in terms of spectral radiance, using an integrating sphere source traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) standards of spectral irradiance. It was calibrated on-orbit in terms of reflectance using diffusers characterized prior to launch using NIST traceable standards. The radiance calibration was performed with an uncertainty of (is) approximately 3%; the reflectance calibration to an uncertainty of approximately 2%. On-orbit, multiple calibration techniques indicate that the sensor has been stable to better than 0.3% to date, with the exception of the shortest wavelength band, which has degraded about 1.0%. A transfer to orbit experiment conducted using the OLI's heliostat-illuminated diffuser suggests that some bands increased in sensitivity on transition to orbit by as much as 5%, with an uncertainty of approximately 2.5%. On-orbit comparisons to other instruments and vicarious calibration techniques show the radiance (without a transfer to orbit adjustment), and reflectance calibrations generally agree with other instruments and ground measurements to within the uncertainties. Calibration coefficients are provided with the data products to convert to either radiance or reflectance units.

  11. Radiometric Self Calibration * Tomoo Mitsunaga

    E-print Network

    Nayar, Shree K.

    Radiometric Self Calibration * Tomoo Mitsunaga Media Processing Laboratories Sony Corporation mitsunag @av.crl.sony.co.jp Abstract A simple algorithm is described that computes the ra- diometric a David and Lucile Packard Fellowship. Tomoo Mitsunaga is supported by the Sony Cor- poration. 0

  12. Instrument Design Simulations for Synthetic Aperture Microwave Radiometric Imaging of Wind Speed and

    E-print Network

    Ruf, Christopher

    Instrument Design Simulations for Synthetic Aperture Microwave Radiometric Imaging of Wind Speed and direction prior to landfall. To date, the NOAA Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer, SFMR, is the best. This paper describes modeling and simulations for HIRad, some of the applications in HIRad design to date

  13. JACIE Radiometric Assessment of QuickBird Multispectral Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Carver, David; Holekamp, Kara; Knowlton, Kelly; Ryan, Robert; Zanoni, Vicki; Thome, Kurtis; Aaron, David

    2004-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of commercial imaging satellite products is required to ensure that science and application communities can place confidence in the imagery they use and can fully understand its properties. Inaccurate radiometric calibrations can lead to erroneous decisions and invalid conclusions and can limit intercomparisons with other systems. To address this calibration need, the NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) Earth Science Applications (ESA) directorate,through the Joint Agency for Commercial Imagery Evaluation (JACIE) framework, established a commercial imaging satellite radiometric calibration team consisting of two groups: 1) NASA SSC ESA, supported by South Dakota State University, and 2) the University of Arizona Remote Sensing Group. The two groups determined the absolute radiometric calibration coefficients of the Digital Globe 4-band, 2.4-m QuickBird multispectral product covering the visible through near-infrared spectral region. For a 2-year period beginning in 2002, both groups employed some variant of a reflectance-based vicarious calibration approach, which required ground-based measurements coincident with QuickBird image acquisitions and radiative transfer calculations. The groups chose several study sites throughout the United States that covered nearly the entire dynamic range of the QuickBird sensor. QuickBird at-sensor radiance values were compared with those estimated by the two independent groups to determine the QuickBird sensor's radiometric accuracy. Approximately 20 at-sensor radiance estimates were vicariously determined each year. The estimates were combined to provide a high-precision radiometric gain calibration coefficient. The results of this evaluation provide the user community with an independent assessment of the QuickBird sensor's absolute calibration and stability over the 2-year period. While the techniques and method described reflect those developed at the NASA SSC, the results of both JACIE team groups are included in this paper.

  14. A radiometric calibration of the SPECMAP timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, William G.; Goldstein, Steven L.

    2006-12-01

    The astronomical theory of climate change asserts that Earth's climate is affected by changes in its orbit, which vary the seasonal and latitudinal distribution of solar radiation. This theory is the basis of the orbitally tuned SPECMAP timescale. A key constraint for this important chronology was the mid-point of the Penultimate Deglaciation, initially dated to 127,000 years ago. Recent work suggests this event may be considerably older, casting doubt on the astronomical theory, the SPECMAP timescale, and the accuracy of orbitally tuned chronologies. Difficulties with U/Th coral dating of sea-level events have impeded progress on this problem, because most corals are not closed systems. Here, we use a new approach to U/Th dating that corrects for open-system behavior and produces a sea-level curve of sufficient resolution to confidently correlate with SPECMAP over the last 240,000 years, permitting a reassessment of both this critical chronology and a central tenet of climate change theory. High-precision ages for 24 oxygen isotope events provide a 240,000-year chronology for marine ?18O records that is independent of orbital tuning assumptions. Although there appear to be significant differences between the radiometric and orbitally tuned timescales near the lastglacial maximum and at the Marine Isotope Stage 7/6 boundary, a comparison of radiometric and SPECMAP ages for identical isotope events suggest that the SPECMAP timescale is quite accurate and that its errors were, in general, overestimated. Despite suborbital complexity, orbital cyclicity is clearly evident in our record. High-amplitude sea-level oscillations at periods greater than ˜20,000 years are very close in phase to summer insolation in the Northern Hemisphere. Although sea-level changes cannot be uniquely tied to a specific season or latitude of insolation forcing, the simplest explanation is that long-period, high-amplitude sea-level change is linked to Northern Hemisphere insolation forcing. These results validate the principles of orbital tuning and suggest such timescales are generally robust.

  15. Application of the 40Ar/39Ar technique to date the Minoan Tuff, Santorini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijbrans, J. R.; Kuiper, K.; Morgan, L. E.; Klaver, M.; Vroon, P. Z.

    2012-12-01

    The age of the catastrophic eruption of the volcano of Santorini during the Bronze Age is well established from 14C dating at 3344.9 ± 7.5 a1 (uncertainties quoted as 1-?). Application of the 40Ar/39Ar technique to products from this eruption is used here to (1) investigate the limits of the technique using conventional single collector mass spectrometry on a MAP215-50 instrument, (2) analyse sources of uncertainty to identify major contributing factors for the uncertainty of young 40Ar/39Ar ages, and (3) provide 40Ar/39Ar ages for a sample that has been previously dated via 14C and dendrochronology to further investigate issues with the accuracy of 40Ar/39Ar dating in the late Quaternary. We have separated the plagioclase fraction from the lower Minoan Tuff that immediately overlies the Cape Riva (rp6) tuff in a bay on the west coast of Thira, NW of the town of Oia. Using the calibration of 40Ar/36Ar of Lee et al.2, the decay constant recommended by Min at al.3, and the FCs age of Kuiper et al.4, we calculate an inverse isochron age of 3.7 ± 1.6 ka and a trapped 40Ar/36Ar intercept of 299.8 ± 1.2, slightly higher than the ratio for atmospheric argon of 298.56 ± 0.31, when all steps with ages > 50 ka are included in the regression. Enrichment in radiogenic 40Ar in the steps used for the isochron is extremely low, given the low concentration of K2O in plagioclase and the extremely young age. The stepwise heating approach proved useful because in all 5 replicate experiments unexpectedly high ages showed up at higher step temperatures, suggesting that in each separate some older contaminant was present. The plateaus of each of the replicate experiments had quite reproducible ages, however, and a pooled age was calculated for 23 out of 48 individual steps. The pooled age for the plateau was 17.6 ± 4.1 ka, which is high due to the slight component of excess 40Ar in the non-radiogenic component, as revealed from regression analysis. refs: 1SW Manning et al. (2006) Chronology for the Aegean Late Bronze Age 1700-1400 B.C., Science 312, 565 - 569. 2Lee J-Y, et al. (2006), A redetermination of the isotopic abundances of atmospheric Ar. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 70, 4507-4512 3Min K, et al. (2001), Call for an improved set of decay constants for geochronological use. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 65, 111 - 121. 4Kuiper et al. (2008), Synchronizing rock clocks of Earth History. Science 320, 500 - 504.

  16. Young Inclusions in an Old Host: Dating Alteration Events With Electron-Beam Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetherington, C. J.; Jercinovic, M. J.; Roberts, R. J.

    2006-05-01

    A basic premise in deciphering the history of a rock is that textures such as mineral zoning, fold interference patterns, and unconformities establish a relative time line for an outcrop. A similar argument can be applied to poikiloblastic minerals, which provide information on pre-metamorphic mineral assemblages, a rock's P-T path, and, in cases where the inclusions are good chronometers, a P-T-t path. The focus of this study are zircons from an alkaline complex in the Seiland Igneous Province (Northern Norway) that presented several technical challenges during ID-TIMS analyses owing to the presence of xenotime and thorite mineral inclusions. These zircons also display irregular trace element distribution, localised internal porosity, and crystal face embayment. Careful selection of inclusion-free grains allowed the bracketing of alkaline magmatism to between 570 and 560 Ma. Discordant zircon grains give similar upper intercept ages, whilst the lower intercepts scatter widely (± 150) around 400 Ma. The data has been used to argue that there was only one demonstrable metamorphic event post-dating magmatism in the Seiland Igneous Province, corresponding to the Scandian phase of the Caledonian Orogeny. However, from the ID-TIMS analysis alone, this conclusion is not definitive; older Pb-loss events may be masked by Scandian metamorphism. The textural features of the zircon are diagnostic of dissolution-reprecipitation processes; a complex fluid-rock interaction commonly resulting in volume changes, porosity, replacement textures, and growth of mineral inclusions, and would also result in Pb loss from the primary zircon. To test for a correlation between Pb loss, zircon alteration, regional metamorphism, and dissolution-reprecipitation, electron-probe chemical-dating techniques were applied to suitable mineral inclusions in the zircon. The data yield a clustering of ages around 420 Ma, with no evidence for an older inclusion assemblage. These results support the hypothesis established by ID-TIMS. It is also noted that the age of the inclusions is in conflict with a classical interpretation of the poikilitic texture that requires the inclusions be coeval or older than the host zircon.

  17. A double-spike method for KAr measurement: A technique for high precision in situ dating on Mars and other

    E-print Network

    A double-spike method for K­Ar measurement: A technique for high precision in situ dating on Mars in the Solar System. This is especially true for Mars, which carries a long and rich geologic record documented climate change on Mars, with obvious implications for habitability (e.g., Carr, 1996; Bibring et al., 2006

  18. Radiometric Measurements and Data for Evaluating Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D. R.; Andreas, A.; Rymes, M.; Stoffel, T.; Reda, I.; Wilcox, S.; Treadwell, J.

    2000-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltiac Radiometric Measurements Task ddresses the impact of solar and optical radiation on photovoltaic (PV) devices. The task maintains spectral and broadband calibration capability directly traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the World Radiometric Reference (WRR) of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

  19. Age validation of canary rockfish (Sebastes pinniger) using two independent otolith techniques: lead-radium and bomb radiocarbon dating.

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, A H; Kerr, L A; Cailliet, G M; Brown, T A; Lundstrom, C C; Stanley, R D

    2007-11-04

    Canary rockfish (Sebastes pinniger) have long been an important part of recreational and commercial rockfish fishing from southeast Alaska to southern California, but localized stock abundances have declined considerably. Based on age estimates from otoliths and other structures, lifespan estimates vary from about 20 years to over 80 years. For the purpose of monitoring stocks, age composition is routinely estimated by counting growth zones in otoliths; however, age estimation procedures and lifespan estimates remain largely unvalidated. Typical age validation techniques have limited application for canary rockfish because they are deep dwelling and may be long lived. In this study, the unaged otolith of the pair from fish aged at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada was used in one of two age validation techniques: (1) lead-radium dating and (2) bomb radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) dating. Age estimate accuracy and the validity of age estimation procedures were validated based on the results from each technique. Lead-radium dating proved successful in determining a minimum estimate of lifespan was 53 years and provided support for age estimation procedures up to about 50-60 years. These findings were further supported by {Delta}{sup 14}C data, which indicated a minimum estimate of lifespan was 44 {+-} 3 years. Both techniques validate, to differing degrees, age estimation procedures and provide support for inferring that canary rockfish can live more than 80 years.

  20. Changes in the Radiometric Sensitivity of SeaWiFS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Charles R.; Barnes, Robert A.; Eplee, Robert E., Jr.; Patt, Frederick S.

    1998-01-01

    We report on the lunar and solar measurements used to determine the changes in the radiometric sensitivity of the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS). Radiometric sensitivity is defined as the output from the instrument (or from one of the instrument bands) per unit spectral radiance at the instrument's input aperture. Knowledge of the long-term repeatability of the SeaWiFS measurements is crucial to maintaining the quality of the ocean scenes derived from measurements by the instrument. For SeaWiFS bands 1 through 6 (412 nm through 670 rim), the change in radiometric sensitivity is less than 0.2% for the period from November 1997 through November 1998. For band 7 (765 nm), the change is about 1.5%, and for band 8 (865 nm) about 5%. The rates of change of bands 7 and 8, which were linear with time for the first eight months of lunar measurements, are now slowing. The scatter in the data points about the trend lines in this analysis is less than 0.3% for all eight SeaWiFS bands. These results are based on monthly measurements of the moon. Daily solar measurements using an onboard diffuser show that the radiometric sensitivities of the SeaWiFS bands have changed smoothly during the time intervals between lunar measurements. Since SeaWiFS measurements have continued past November 1998, the results presented here are considered as a snapshot of the instrument performance as of that date.

  1. Investigation of the irradiation history of the Iranian dates and pistachio nuts using thermoluminescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifzadeh, M.; Sohrabpour, M.

    1993-07-01

    Three different varieties of Iranian fresh dates and five types of raw and salted pistachio nuts have been tested for identification of irradiation histories. Doses of 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10 kGy from a gamma cell Gc-220 have been administrated to the samples under investigation. TL response versus dose for date and for pistachio nuts have been obtained. The effect of added ingredients such as salt in pistachio nuts, and moisture in date samples on the TL response have been studied. The fading of TL intensity of the irradiated dates and pistachio nuts have also been measured. Based on the latter results, it appears possible to identify the irradiated dates (10 kGy), within (1-2) months post-irradiation. In the salted pistachio nuts, the salt itself gives a very significant and distinguishable response. In the unsalted case, however, the difference between the irradiated and unirradiated samples seem difficult to detect due to partial overlapping of the respective responses.

  2. Small satellite radiometric measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the earth's radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted aircraft (RPAs). An example of the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite is given. Significant benefits derive from simultaneous measurements of specific narrow (in wavelength) spectral features; such data may be obtained by combining LARI with a compact spectrometer on the same platform. Well-chosen satellite orbits allow one to use data from other satellites (e.g. DMSP) to enhance the data product, or to provide superior coverage of specific locations. 23 refs.

  3. Small satellite radiometric measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the earth`s radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted aircraft (RPAs). An example of the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite is given. Significant benefits derive from simultaneous measurements of specific narrow (in wavelength) spectral features; such data may be obtained by combining LARI with a compact spectrometer on the same platform. Well-chosen satellite orbits allow one to use data from other satellites (e.g. DMSP) to enhance the data product, or to provide superior coverage of specific locations. 23 refs.

  4. Radionuclide dating (210 Am) of recent lake

    E-print Network

    Gilli, Adrian

    ; Volcanic eruption; Catastrophic flood; South America; Chile 1. Introduction Radiometric dating methods haveRadionuclide dating (210 Pb, 137 Cs, 241 Am) of recent lake sediments in a highly active geodynamic radionuclide profiles to date four short sediment cores taken from two Chilean lakes located in a highly active

  5. Fold dating: A new Ar/Ar illite dating application to constrain the age of deformation in shallow crustal rocks

    E-print Network

    constrained stratigraphic timing. The method offers a novel approach to radiometric dating of clayFold dating: A new Ar/Ar illite dating application to constrain the age of deformation in shallow Available online 15 June 2013 Keywords: Fold dating Illite AreAr dating Basin inversion a b s t r a c t We

  6. Results of magnetic HGI and radiometric surveys in W. Canada

    SciTech Connect

    LeSchack, L.A.

    1997-05-19

    This article presents four case histories in which ground-based magnetic horizontal gradient intensity (HGI) and radiometric surveys were used in Western Canada for cost-effective geochemical exploration for hydrocarbons. The authors has developed these two surface exploration techniques from published studies and adapted them for use on the prairies the past 7 years. These surveys are used in conjunction with the usual geologic and seismic studies for: (1) evaluating prospects and land; (2) verifying seismic anomalies and inexpensively locating areas for conducting expensive 3D seismic surveys. Occasionally, as in two of the case histories discussed, these surveys were used successfully as stand-alone exploration methods where seismic exploration is not effective. The HGI and radiometric surveys measure, by geophysical methods, those effects associated with geochemical alterations due to vertical microseepage of hydrocarbons. The total cost, including permitting, data acquisition, data processing, and interpretation of the combination HGI and radiometric surveys is about 15% the total cost of a 3D seismic survey. Because of this, the author finds them an attractive and rapid survey adjunct to traditional exploration. They substantially reduce finding costs and significantly raise the probability of financial success.

  7. Surface aerosol radiative forcing derived from collocated ground-based radiometric observations during PRIDE, SAFARI, and ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansell, Richard A.; Tsay, Si-Chee; Ji, Qiang; Liou, K. N.; Ou, Szu-Cheng

    2003-09-01

    An approach is presented to estimate the surface aerosol radiative forcing by use of collocated cloud-screened narrowband spectral and thermal-offset-corrected radiometric observations during the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment 2000, South African Fire Atmosphere Research Initiative (SAFARI) 2000, and Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia 2001. We show that aerosol optical depths from the Multiple-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer data match closely with those from the Cimel sunphotometer data for two SAFARI-2000 dates. The observed aerosol radiative forcings were interpreted on the basis of results from the Fu-Liou radiative transfer model, and, in some cases, cross checked with satellite-derived forcing parameters. Values of the aerosol radiative forcing and forcing efficiency, which quantifies the sensitivity of the surface fluxes to the aerosol optical depth, were generated on the basis of a differential technique for all three campaigns, and their scientific significance is discussed.

  8. Testing the Cambrian explosion hypothesis by using a molecular dating technique.

    PubMed

    Bromham, L; Rambaut, A; Fortey, R; Cooper, A; Penny, D

    1998-10-13

    Molecular studies have the potential to shed light on the origin of the animal phyla by providing independent estimates of the divergence times, but have been criticized for failing to account adequately for variation in rate of evolution. A method of dating divergence times from molecular data addresses the criticisms of earlier studies and provides more realistic, but wider, confidence intervals. The data are not compatible with the Cambrian explosion hypothesis as an explanation for the origin of metazoan phyla, and provide additional support for an extended period of Precambrian metazoan diversification. PMID:9770496

  9. Investigation of Pre- and Post-Flight Radiometric Calibration Uncertainties from Surface Based Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, D.F.; Wei, Z.Y.; Ahman, Z.

    1997-06-01

    A new technique has been developed for inferring column ozone amounts and aerosol optical depths from zenith sky observations. A new radiometric calibration technique for large aperture remote sensing instruments observing the earth through space has been validated which subsequently increased the accuracy of remote sensing measurements of ozone and vertical profiles using measurements of back-scattered ultraviolet solar radiation.

  10. A new technique for precise uranium-series dating of travertine micro-samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Ronzon; Frank, Norbert

    2002-12-01

    Secondary carbonate formations, such as travertine and calcareous tufa deposits, are important archives for quaternary continental climate studies and archaeology. The extremely complex growth mechanisms result in some serious problems for precise mass spectrometric uranium-series dating. Often, detrital and organic particles contaminate the carbonate and large pore volumes yield a great potential for open system behavior. We utilized microscopic, mineralogical and geochemical methods prior to sample selection to determine the abundance of primary calcite, i.e. micrite and spar. Furthermore, the state of alteration was characterized by cathodoluminescence and trace-element analysis. We conclude that travertine and calcareous tufa are appropriate for precise U-series age determination if a) micrite and/or spar are the dominant phases; b) cathodoluminescence of both phases is weak or absent; c) Fe and Al levels are low; and d) Sr concentrations are close to the average of the studied site. We mapped and sampled solely areas of major micrite/spar abundance having minor alteration for accurate U-series dating. When this new method was applied, travertines located in eastern Germany (sites Bad Langensalza, Burgtonna and Weimar-Ehringsdorf) gave single 230Th/ 238U-ages consistent with the lithological growth sequence and greatly improved compared to previously published chronologies. In addition, we determined 230Th/U isochron ages on bulk samples that confirm our single ages. In contrast to primary calcite, pore cements are homogeneously distributed throughout the travertine fabric and reflect early diagenetic processes and/or weathering.

  11. Geochemistry and radiometric dating of a Middle Pleistocene peat

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, P.J.; Atkinson, T.C.; Richards, D.A.; Bottrell, S.H.; Cliff, R.A.

    1997-10-01

    Uranium, lead, and sulphur data for a Middle Pleistocene interglacial peat deposit from Norfolk, UK, suggest that uptake of these elements was synchronous and confined to a single early diagenetic episode, probably coeval with peat formation. Sulphur isotope data indicate that reducing conditions have been maintained within the deposit throughout its history. Both uranium and lead concentration profiles show a marked discontinuity near the middle of the bed, probably indicating an environmental change, possibly emergence. The lead isotope data are compatible with a single lead component below the discontinuity and two components above. Groundwater is thought to be the dominant source of lead with an additional airfall component present in the upper peat. The uranium and lead concentration profiles below the discontinuity and the sulfur isotope profile throughout the peat support the view that these elements were sequestered from upwelling groundwaters. 35 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Radiometric surveys in underground environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochiolo, Massimo; Chiozzi, Paolo; Verdoya, Massimo; Pasquale, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    Due to their ability to travel through the air for several metres, gamma-rays emitted from natural radioactive elements can be successfully used in surveys carried out both with airborne and ground equipments. Besides the concentration of the radio-elements contained in rocks and soils and the intrinsic characteristics of the gamma-ray detector, the detected count rate depends on the solid angle around the spectrometer. On a flat outcrop, ground spectrometry detects the radiation ideally produced by a cylindrical mass of rock of about two metres in diameter and thickness of about half a meter. Under these geometrical conditions, the natural radioactivity can be easily evaluated. With operating conditions different from the standard ones, such as at the edge of an escarpment, the count rate halves because of the missing material, whereas in the vicinity of a rock wall the count rate will increase. In underground environment, the recorded count rate may even double and the in situ assessment of the concentration of radio-elements may be rather difficult, even if the ratios between the different radio-elements may not be affected. We tested the applicability of gamma-ray spectrometry for rapid assessment of the potential hazard levels related to radon and radiation dose rate in underground environment. A mine shaft, located in a zone of uranium enrichment in Liguria (Italy), has been investigated. A preliminary ground radiometric survey was carried out to define the extent of the ore deposit. Then, the radiometric investigation was focussed on the mine shaft. Due to rock mass above the shaft vault, the background gamma radiation can be considered of negligible influence on measurements. In underground surveys, besides deviations from a flat geometry, factors controlling radon exhalation, emanation and stagnation, such as fractures, water leakage and the presence of ventilation, should be carefully examined. We attempted to evaluate these control factors and collected a set of rock samples along the mine shaft to compare in situ results with high resolution gamma-ray analysis in the laboratory. The comparison points to a systematic overestimation (on the average, by a factor of two) of the uranium, thorium and potassium concentrations obtained with the portable apparatus. The bias between laboratory and field is slightly smaller for potassium and could be due only to deviation from standard geometric conditions. The largest differences occur in uranium concentrations, probably due also to the influence of the activity deriving from radon stagnation. The calculated radon flux depends on the radium specific activity, which, under the assumption of secular radioactive equilibrium, can be easily inferred from the uranium concentration, and the specific exhalation coefficient. Measurements of specific exhalation coefficient are difficult and only few studies have examined unaltered rocks in details. We estimated the values of this parameter by considering the degree of fracturing, width of fissures and evidence of percolating groundwater. In general, the coefficient increases from the entrance, where rocks are more massive, towards the shaft bottom, where closely spaced open fissures, often filled with percolating groundwater, might boost exhalation. As a whole, both potential radon flux and radiation dose values are relevant to radio protection rules.

  13. Radiometric calibration of Landsat Thematic Mapper multispectral images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavez, P.S., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A main problem encountered in radiometric calibration of satellite image data is correcting for atmospheric effects. Without this correction, an image digital number (DN) cannot be converted to a surface reflectance value. In this paper the accuracy of a calibration procedure, which includes a correction for atmospheric scattering, is tested. Two simple methods, a stand-alone and an in situ sky radiance measurement technique, were used to derive the HAZE DN values for each of the six reflectance Thematic Mapper (TM) bands. The DNs of two Landsat TM images of Phoenix, Arizona were converted to surface reflectances. -from Author

  14. Earth Observing-1 Advanced Land Imager: Radiometric Response Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendenhall, J. A.; Lencioni, D. E.; Evans, J. B.

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) is one of three instruments to be flown on the first Earth Observing mission (EO-1) under NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP). ALI contains a number of innovative features, including a wide field of view optical design, compact multispectral focal plane arrays, non-cryogenic HgCdTe detectors for the short wave infrared bands, and silicon carbide optics. This document outlines the techniques adopted during ground calibration of the radiometric response of the Advanced Land Imager. Results from system level measurements of the instrument response, signal-to-noise ratio, saturation radiance, and dynamic range for all detectors of every spectral band are also presented.

  15. Dating of the Urengoi tectites by the track technique using an age standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, A. N.; Masaitis, V. L.; Ezerskii, V. A.

    1990-11-01

    The age of three Urengoi (northwestern Siberia) tektites was estimated by the 'repeated-polishing' version of the track technique, using the Apatite FC-3 as the age standard. The average age for the three samples was found to be 23 + or - 1.6 million years. This age does not coincide with the age of known tektite fields on the earth, and it is not close to the age of the certain impact craters on Soviet territory. It is concluded that the Urengoi tektites may have originated on a hitherto unknown tektite dispersion field.

  16. Direct Dating of Hominids Remains In Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Y.; Falguères, C.

    When archaeological sites are associated with human remains, it is relevant to be able to date those valuable remains for different reasons. The main one is that it avoids the stratigraphical problems which can be due to intrusive burials in the sequence. The other reason consists in the fact that human bones may be encountered out of established stratigraphical context. On the other hand, the majority of dating methods currently used are destructive and can not be applied on these precious samples particularly when they are older than 40,000 years and can not be dated by radiocarbon. Since several years, we have developped a completely non-destructive method which consists in the measurement of human remains using the gamma -ray spectrometry. This technique has been used recently by other laboratories. We present here two important cases for the knowledge of human evolution in Eurasia. The first example is Qafzeh site in Israel where many human skeletons have been unearthed from burials associated with fauna and lithic artefacts. This site has been dated by several independent radiometric methods. So, it was possible to compare our gamma results with the other results yielded by the different methods. The second case concerns the most evolved Homo erectus found in Java, Indonesia, at Ngandong site, close to the Solo river. A recent debate has been focused on the age of these fossils and their direct dating is of outmost importance for the knowledge of settlement of Modern Humans in South-East Asia.

  17. Correction function in the Lidar equation and the solution techniques for CO2 Lidar date reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Lea, T. K.; Schotland, R. M.

    1986-08-01

    For lidar systems with long laser pulses the unusual behavior of the near-range signals causes serious difficulties and large errors in reduction. The commonly used lidar equation is no longer applicable since the convolution of the laser pulse with the atmospheric parameter distributions should be taken into account. It is important to give more insight into this problem and find the solution techniques. Starting from the original equation, a general form is suggested for the single scattering lidar equation where a correction function Cr is introduced. The correction Function Cr(R) derived from the original equation indicates the departure from the normal lidar equation. Examples of Cr(R) for a coaxial CO2 lidar system are presented. The Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) errors caused by the differences of Cr(R) for H2O measurements are plotted against height.

  18. Comparing OSL and CN techniques for dating fluvial terraces and estimating surface process rates in Pamir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Margret; Gloaguen, Richard; Pohl, Eric; Sulaymonova, Vasila; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg

    2014-05-01

    The quantification of surface process rates is crucial for understanding the topographic evolution of high mountains. Spatial and temporal variations in fluvial incision and basin-wide erosion enable to decipher the role of tectonic and climatic drivers. The Pamir is peculiar in both aspects because of its location at the western end of the India-Asia collision zone, and its position at the edge of two atmospheric circulation systems, the Westerlies and the Indian Summer Monsoon. The architecture of the Panj river network indicates prominent variations across the main tectonic structures of the Pamir. The trunk stream, deflects from the predominantly westward river orientation and cuts across the southern and central Pamir domes before doubling back to the west and leaving the orogen. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of fluvial terraces reveals short-term sedimentation along the trunk stream during the last ~25 kyr. The agreement of OSL results to new exposure ages based on the cosmogenic nuclide (CN) 10Be confirms accurate terrace age modelling and treatment of incomplete bleaching. The consistent terrace sedimentation and exposure ages suggest also fast terrace abandonment and rapid onset of incision. Considerable differences in terrace heights reflect high spatial variations of fluvial incision, independent of time interval, change in rock type or catchment increase. Highest rates of (5.9 ± 1.1) mm/yr to (10.0 ± 2.0) mm/yr describe the fluvial dynamic across the Shakhdara Dome and that related to the Darvaz Fault Zone. Lower rates of (3.9 ± 0.6) mm/yr to (4.5 ± 0.7) mm/yr indicate a transient stage north of the Yazgulom Dome. Fluvial incision decreases to rates ranging from (1.7 ± 0.3) mm/yr to (3.9 ± 0.7) mm/yr in graded river reaches associated to southern dome boundaries. The pattern agrees to the interpretation of successive upstream river captures across the southern and central Pamir domes inferred from morphometric analyses of river and valley profiles. Basin-wide erosion rates based on 10Be concentrations in modern fluvial sediments yield relatively consistent rates between (0.61 ± 0.1) mm/yr and (0.75 ± 0.14) mm/yr along the Panj. The increasing Panj catchment averages variations of tributary basins, but minor variations in erosion rates of along-stream sub-basins resemble the pattern of OSL-based incision rates. In contrast, basin-wide erosion rates of tributary basins clearly differentiate between plateau-related sub-basins of (0.05 ± 0.01) mm/yr to (0.17 ± 0.03) mm/yr, and plateau margin-related sub-basins of (0.38 ± 0.06) mm/yr to (1.43 ± 0.26) mm/yr. The differentiation in plateau-related and marginal sub-basins and the northward increase in erosion rates correlate with the 75-percentile of the slope distribution within respective basins and to a minor degree to cumulative annual precipitation.

  19. MODIS Cloud Optical Property Retrieval Uncertainties Derived from Pixel-Level VNIR/SWIR Radiometric Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, S.; Wind, G.; Xiong, X.

    2011-01-01

    Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) retrievals of optical thickness and effective particle radius for liquid water and ice phase clouds employ a well-known VNIR/ SWIR solar reflectance technique. For this type of algorithm, we evaluate the quantitative uncertainty in simultaneous retrievals of these two cloud parameters to pixel-level radiometric calibration estimates and other fundamental (and tractable) error sources.

  20. Chemical Principles Revisited: Archaeological Dating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses methods used to date archaeological artifacts and other remains. They include: (1) nuclear dating techniques (radiocarbon dating, accelerator radiocarbon dating, thermoluminescence, and others); (2) chemical dating techniques (amino acid racemization, obsidian hydration dating, elemental content changes, and thermal analysis dating); and…

  1. Radiometric surface temperature components for row crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land surface temperature is a boundary condition often used in assessing soil moisture status and energy exchange from the soil-vegetation-atmosphere interface. For row crops having incomplete canopy cover, the radiometric surface temperature is a composite of sunlit and shaded vegetation and substr...

  2. Radiometric Characterization of IKONOS Multispectral Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert E.; Kelly, Michelle; Holekamp, Kara; Zanoni, Vicki; Thome, Kurtis; Schiller, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    A radiometric characterization of Space Imaging's IKONOS 4-m multispectral imagery has been performed by a NASA funded team from the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC), the University of Arizona Remote Sensing Group (UARSG), and South Dakota State University (SDSU). Both intrinsic radiometry and the effects of Space Imaging processing on radiometry were investigated. Relative radiometry was examined with uniform Antarctic and Saharan sites. Absolute radiometric calibration was performed using reflectance-based vicarious calibration methods on several uniform sites imaged by IKONOS, coincident with ground-based surface and atmospheric measurements. Ground-based data and the IKONOS spectral response function served as input to radiative transfer codes to generate a Top-of-Atmosphere radiance estimate. Calibration coefficients derived from each vicarious calibration were combined to generate an IKONOS radiometric gain coefficient for each multispectral band assuming a linear response over the full dynamic range of the instrument. These calibration coefficients were made available to Space Imaging, which subsequently adopted them by updating its initial set of calibration coefficients. IKONOS imagery procured through the NASA Scientific Data Purchase program is processed with or without a Modulation Transfer Function Compensation kernel. The radiometric effects of this kernel on various scene types was also investigated. All imagery characterized was procured through the NASA Scientific Data Purchase program.

  3. Based on Narcissus of radiometric calibration technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Libing; Tang, Shaofan; Liu, Jianfeng; Peng, Honggang

    2015-08-01

    Thermal radiation is an inherent property of all objects. Generally, it is believed that the body, which temperature is above absolute zero, can keep generating infrared radiation. Infrared remote sensing, using of satellite-borne or airborne sensors, collects infrared information to identify the surface feature and inversion of surface parameters, temperature, etc. In order to get more accurately feature information, quantitative measurement is required. Infrared radiometric calibration is one of the key technologies of quantitative infrared remote sensing. Most high-resolution thermal imaging systems are cooling. For the infrared optical system which is having a cooled detector, there are some special phenomenons. Since the temperature of the detector's photosensitive surface is generally low, which is very different from system temperature, it is a very strong cold radiation source. Narcissus refers to the case that the cooled detector can "see" its own reflecting image, which may affect the image quality of infrared system seriously. But for radiometric calibration of satellite-borne infrared camera, it can sometimes take advantage of the narcissus instead of cold cryogenic radiometric calibration. In this paper, the use of narcissus to carry out radiometric calibration is summarized, and simulation results show the feasibility.

  4. Uranium-series dating of antarctic ice

    SciTech Connect

    Fireman, E.L.

    1986-01-01

    It is very interesting to date polar ice radiometrically. Bands of dust imbedded in ice are frequently observed in antarctic ice fields. This work focuses on dating ice samples with high dust contents by the uranium-series method. The author obtained uranium-series ages of 325 thousand (+/- 75) and 100 thousand (+/- 20) years for dusty ice samples from two sites in the main Allan Hills ice field. The dust-banded ice was collected from 50- to 100-centimeter depth at two sites, called Cul de Sac 100 and Cul de Sac 150. The particles in these samples were examined with an optical microscope and found to consist essentially (more than 95% of the particulates) of fine volcanic glass shards full of vesicles and microvesicles. Evidently the fine volcanic glass shards were deposited on snow, became incorporated in the ice, and moved with the ice to the Allan Hills sites. Ice samples with other types of particulates, such as terrestrial morraine, may also be amenable to uranium-series dating; however, it is difficult to date ice with less than 0.03 gram of fine particulates per kilogram of ice with their present technique. The uranium-series method can cover the age range from 10,000 to 600,000 years.

  5. Microwave radiometric signatures of temperature anomalies in tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Patrick; Sobers, Tamara; St. Peter, Benjamin; Siqueira, Paul; Capraro, Geoffrey

    2012-03-01

    Because of its ability to measure the temperature-dependent power of electromagnetic radiation emitted from tissue down to several centimeters beneath the skin, microwave radiometry has long been of interest as a means for identifying the internal tissue temperature anomalies that arise from abnormalities in physiological parameters such as metabolic and blood perfusion rates. However, the inherent lack of specificity and resolution in microwave radiometer measurements has limited the clinical usefulness of the technique. The idea underlying this work is to make use of information (assumed to be available from some other modality) about the tissue configuration in the volume of interest to study and improve the accuracy of anomaly detection and estimation from radiometric data. In particular, knowledge of the specific anatomy and the properties of the overall measurement system enable determination of the signatures of localized physiological abnormalities in the radiometry data. These signatures are used to investigate the accuracy with which the location of an anomaly can be determined from radiometric measurements. Algorithms based on matches to entries in a signature dictionary are developed for anomaly detection and estimation. The accuracy of anomaly identification is improved when the coupling of power from the body to the sensor is optimized. We describe the design of a radiometer waveguide having dielectric properties appropriate for biomedical applications.

  6. Radiometric tests on wet and dry antenna reflector surface panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Franco, M. M.

    1990-01-01

    The results of X-band noise temperature tests on two types of antenna surface panels are presented. The first type tested was a solid antenna panel, while the second type was a perforated panel with 3/16-in.-diameter holes. Measurements were made at 8.45 GHz using an X-band radiometric system. Included in this article are measured noise temperature contributions from: (1) thermal diffusive white paint on solid and perforated panels, and (2) water sprayed on both painted and unpainted perforated panels. Experiments on perforated panels were restricted to the 3/16-in.-diameter hole panels formerly used on Deep Space Network 64-m antennas. Rigorous calibration equations, applicable to a variety of antenna panel and dichroic plate test configurations, are presented. It was demonstrated that an accurate, stable radiometric measurement system of the type used for the results of this research makes it possible to obtain information that would be much more difficult to obtain using other techniques.

  7. NASA IKONOS Multispectral Radiometric Calibration and 3-Year Temporal Stability Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Carver, David; Holekamp, Kara; Ryan, Robert; Zanoni, Vicki; Thome, Kurtis; Schiller, Stephen; Aaran, David

    2003-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of commercial imaging satellite products is required to ensure that science and application communities can place confidence in the imagery they use and can fully understand its properties. Inaccurate radiometric calibrations can lead to erroneous decisions and invalid conclusions and can limit intercomparisons with other system. In addition, the user community has little or no insight into the design and operation of commercial sensors or into the methods involved in generating commercial products. To address this calibration need, the NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) Earth Science Applications (ESA) Directorate established a commercial satellite imaging radiometric calibration team consisting of three independent groups: NASA, SSC,ESA, the University of Arizona Remote Sensing Group, and South Dacota State University. Each group determined the absolute radiometric calibration coefficients of the Space Imaging IKONOS 4-band, 4 m multispectral product covering the visible through near-infrared spectral region. For a three year period beginning in 2000, each team employed some variant of a reflectance-based vicarious calibration approach, requiring ground-based measurements coincident with IKONOS image acquisitions and radiative transfer calculations. Several study sites throughout the United States were employed that covered nearly the entire dynamic range of the IKONOS sensor. IKONOS at-sensor radiance values were compared to those estimated by each independent group to determine the IKONOS sensor's radiometric accuracy and stability. Over 10 individual vicariously determined at-sensor radiance estimates were used each year. When combined, these estimates provided a high-precision radiometric gain calibration coefficient. No significant calibration offset was observed. The results of this evaluation provide the scientific community with an independent assessment of the IKONOS sensor's absolute calibration and temporal stability over the 3-year period. While the techniques and method described in this paper reflect those developed at the NASA SSC, the results of the entire team are included.

  8. Dating loess with high temperature IRSL signals from polymineral fine grains: luminescence characteristics and comparison with conventional techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, C.; Buylaert, J.-P.; Murray, A. S.; Tsukamoto, S.; Jain, M.; Frechen, M.

    2009-04-01

    It is well known that loess deposits contain detailed terrestrial archives of palaeoenvironmental changes. Unfortunately, loess sequences often lack a reliable absolute chronology, and thus these changes are difficult to constrain in time. Luminescence dating is the technique of choice to address this issue. Quartz and feldspar are the most commonly used dosimeters in luminescence dating. The age range of standard quartz OSL is usually limited by the saturation level of ~200 Gy (corresponding to ~50 ka). In contrast, the age range of feldspar IRSL signals - which usually have a more extended growth curve (up to ~2000 Gy) - is hampered by anomalous fading for which a reliable correction is still not available. Recently, Thomsen et al. (2008) identified several laboratory-induced feldspar signals which show less anomalous fading than the standard IRSL signal stimulated at 50°C. Based on this work, Buylaert et al. (accepted) tested a post-IR IR signal, i.e. IR bleach at 50°C and subsequent IRSL measurement at 225°C, and observed significantly lower fading rates in nature for a number of coarse-grained K-feldspar samples. In this study we explore the possibility of using such a post-IR IR signal from polymineral fine grains extracted from loess. Murray et al. (accepted) showed that a more stringent preheat treatment (320°C for 60 s) can be safely used for feldspar; as a result, we have been able to use a post-IR IR measurement temperature of 290°C, higher than that in the study of Buylaert et al. (accepted), with the expectation that this might further reduce the observed fading rate. The results of the elevated temperature IRSL signal fading measurements clearly indicate a significantly lower fading rate (g2days values typically 1-1.5 %/decade) than the standard IRSL measured at 50°C (g2days values typically 3 %/decade). Results of the performance in the SAR protocol (recycling ratios, recuperation and dose recovery) are very encouraging (measured dose within 15% of the given dose). This high temperature signal is also bleachable by daylight, as confirmed by the values of De observed in young samples and by performing controlled laboratory bleaching experiments. The enhanced post-IR IR dating protocol was applied to loess samples from Austria and Japan and compared with standard IRSL at 50°C and quartz OSL measurements. First results suggest that there is good agreement for the younger samples of Weichselian age but that the ages begin to deviate for the older samples. Final results, including a comparison with independent age control provided by known age tephra layers for the Japan samples (Watanuki et al., 2005), will be presented. Buylaert, J. P., Murray, A. S., Thomsen, K. J., Jain, M., accepted. Testing the potential of an elevated temperature IRSL signal from K-feldspar. Radiation Measurements, Special Issue, LED08. Murray, A. S., Buylaert, J. P., Thomsen, K. J., Jain, M., accepted. The Effect of Preheating on the IRSL Signal from Feldspar. Radiation Measurements, Special Issue, LED08. Thomsen, K. J., Murray, A. S., Jain, M., Bøtter-Jensen, L., 2008. Laboratory fading rates of various luminescence signals from feldspar-rich sediment extracts. Radiation Measurements, 43, 1474-1486. Watanuki, T., Murray, A. S., Tsukamoto, S., 2005. Quartz and polymineral luminescence dating of Japanese loess over the last 0.6 Ma: Comparison with an independent chronology. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 240, 774-789.

  9. Climate Change and Sounder Radiometric Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Manning, Evan

    2009-01-01

    Satellite instrument radiometric stability is critical for climate studies. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances are of sufficient stability and accuracy to serve as a climate data record as evidenced by comparisons with the global network of buoys. In this paper we examine the sensitivity of derived geophysical products to potential instrument radiometric stability issues due to diurnal, orbital and seasonal variations. Our method is to perturb the AIRS radiances and examine the impact to retrieved parameters. Results show that instability in retrieved temperature products will be on the same order of the brightness temperature error in the radiances and follow the same time dependences. AIRS excellent stability makes it ideal for examining impacts of instabilities of future systems on geophysical parameter performance.

  10. A radiometric Bode's Law: Predictions for Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetospheres of three planets, Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, are known to be sources of intense, nonthermal radio bursts. The emissions from these sources undergo pronounced long term intensity fluctuations that are caused by the solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere of each planet. Determinations by spacecraft of the low frequency radio spectra and radiation beam geometry now permit a reliable assessment of the overall efficiency of the solar wind in stimulating these emissions. Earlier estimates of how magnetospheric radio output scales with the solar wind energy input must be revised greatly, with the result that, while the efficiency is much lower than previously thought, it is remarkably uniform from planet to planet. The formulation of a radiometric Bode's Law from which a planet's magnetic moment is estimated from its radio emission output is presented. Applying the radiometric scaling law to Uranus, the low-frequency radio power is likely to be measured by the Voyager 2 spacecraft as it approaches this planet.

  11. Methods for LWIR Radiometric Calibration and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert; Harrington, Gary; Howell, Dane; Pagnutti, Mary; Zanoni, Vicki

    2002-01-01

    The utility of a remote sensing system increases with its ability to retrieve surface temperature or radiance accurately. Research applications, such as sea temperature and power plant discharge, require a 0.2 C resolution or better for absolute temperature retrievals. Other applications, including agriculture water stress detection, require at least a 1 C resolution. To achieve these levels of accuracy routinely, scientists must perform laboratory and onboard calibration, as well as in-flight vicarious radiometric characterization. A common approach used for in-flight radiometric characterization incorporates a well-calibrated infrared radiometer that is mounted on a bouy and placed on a uniform water body. The radiometer monitors radiant temperature along with pressure, humidity, and temperature measurements of an associated column of atmosphere. On very still waters, however, a buoy can significantly distrub these measurements. Researchers at NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) have developed a novel approach of using an uncooled infrared camera mounted on a boom to quantify buoy effects. Another critical aspect of using buoy-mounted infrared radiometers is the need for extensive laboratory characterization of the instruments' radiometric sensitivity, field of view, and spectral response. Proper surface temperature retrieval also requires detailed knowledge of both the upward emission and the reflected sky emission. Recent work at SSC has demonstrated that the use of a polarization-based radiometer operating at the Brewster angle can greatly simplify temperature retrieval as well as improve overall accuracy.

  12. Radiometric cross-calibration of CBERS-02 IRMSS thermal channel against TERRA MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Gu, Xingfa; Yu, Tao; Li, Xiaoying

    2005-10-01

    TERRA MODIS band 31 was selected as the criterion for doing the radiometric cross-calibration of CBERS-02 IRMSS band 9 in this paper. From August to December, 2004, seven times day and night synchronous images of two sensors passing through the Lake Qinghai and Lake Taihu were selected to get the cross-calibration data. Using TERRA MODIS band 31 data to conduct out the at pupil radiance of CBERS-02 IRMSS band 9 based on the two sensors' spectrum matching, and then pick-up the DN values from the IRMSS data in the same area. A new model to calculate the radiometric calibration coefficients was carried out in this paper: multi-points linear regression method with 7 times day and night synchronous images at different dates and locations. This new method can obviously control the radiometric calibration uncertainties aroused by the single point method to do the in-flight calibration like CBERS-02 IRMSS, this kind of sensors can't collect the radiometric signals from the deep space. In this research, the radiometric calibration coefficients obtained through the linear regression method were 8.0567 (gain, unit: DN/ (W/m2/sr1/?m1)) and 47.892 (offset, unit: DN). Preliminary estimate of calibration coefficients using Shanghai area was carried out and the results showed that the calibration coefficients obtained from the linear regression method was with a similar precision to TERRA MODIS band 31's. This suit of calibration coefficients can satisfy the quantitative applications of CBERS-02 IRMSS thermal data.

  13. Radiometric levitation of micron sized spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewittes, M.; Arnold, S.; Oster, G.

    1982-03-01

    Radiometric levitation of a 20-?-diam dye-impregnated glycerol sphere has been observed at intensities as low as ˜1 W/cm2 in air at 30 Torr. The levitation has been effected on both strongly absorbing spheres in the direction of the light and weakly absorbing spheres in the opposite sense. Both strongly and weakly absorbing spheres are found to laterally seek an intensity minimum. Consequently particles were stably held in the focused beam of an Ar+ laser (4880 Å) operating in the TEM*01 (doughnut) mode.

  14. Dating Old Maps with the Print Clock By S. Blair Hedges

    E-print Network

    Hedges, Blair

    as a "probabilistic clock," a group that includes the radiometric clock that geologists use to date rocksDating Old Maps with the Print Clock By S. Blair Hedges INTRODUCTION The print dock is a method for dating early prints and maps thatwere produced bywoodbJocks and copperplates but which are poorly dated

  15. Impact of antenna errors on the radiometric accuracy of large aperture synthesis radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps, A.; Bará, J.; Torres, F.; Corbella, I.; Romeu, J.

    1997-03-01

    A classification of system errors in aperture synthesis radiometry applied to Earth observation is presented. A general procedure to quantify the impact of antenna errors on the radiometric accuracy is developed and is then particularized to an L-band Y-shaped interferometer called MIRAS (microwave imaging radiometer by aperture synthesis) currently under study at the European Space Agency. This work analyzes in detail the impact of antenna errors on the radiometric accuracy of the instrument. These antenna errors are grouped into amplitude and phase antenna pattern errors, antenna position errors and antenna cross polarization errors. Special attention is paid to antenna coupling effects because of their importance in the selection of a suitable inversion algorithm for large aperture synthesis interferometers: the G-matrix techniques or the Fourier techniques proposed for MIRAS.

  16. Rapid radiometric methods to detect and differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis/M. bovis from other mycobacterial species

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqi, S.H.; Hwangbo, C.C.; Silcox, V.; Good, R.C.; Snider, D.E. Jr.; Middlebrook, G.

    1984-10-01

    Rapid methods for the differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis/M. bovis (TB complex) from other mycobacteria (MOTT bacilli) were developed and evaluated in a three-phase study. In the first phase, techniques for identification of Mycobacterium species were developed by using radiometric technology and BACTEC Middlebrook 7H12 liquid medium. Based on /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ evolution, characteristic growth patterns were established for 13 commonly encountered mycobacterial species. Mycobacteria belonging to the TB complex were differentiated from other mycobacteria by cellular morphology and rate of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ evolution. For further differentiation, radiometric tests for niacin production and inhibition by Q-nitro-alpha-acetyl amino-beta-hydroxy-propiophenone (NAP) were developed. In the second phase, 100 coded specimens on Lowenstein-Jensen medium were identified as members of the TB complex, MOTT bacilli, bacteria other than mycobacteria, or ''no viable organisms'' within 3 to 12 (average 6.4) days of receipt from the Centers for Disease Control. Isolation and identification of mycobacteria from 20 simulated sputum specimens were carried out in phase III. Out of 20 sputum specimens, 16 contained culturable mycobacteria, and all of the positives were detected by the BACTEC method in an average of 7.3 days. The positive mycobacterial cultures were isolated and identified as TB complex or MOTT bacilli in an average of 12.8 days. The radiometric NAP test was found to be highly sensitive and specific for a rapid identification of TB complex, whereas the radiometric niacin test was found to have some inherent problems. Radiometric BACTEC and conventional methodologies were in complete agreement in Phase II as well as in Phase III.

  17. Relative radiometric calibration of LANDSAT TM reflective bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    A common scientific methodology and terminology is outlined for characterizing the radiometry of both TM sensors. The magnitude of the most significant sources of radiometric variability are discussed and methods are recommended for achieving the exceptional potential inherent in the radiometric precision and accuracy of the TM sensors.

  18. Radiometric calibration of infrared imagers using an internal shutter as

    E-print Network

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    Radiometric calibration of infrared imagers using an internal shutter as an equivalent external blackbody Paul W. Nugent Joseph A. Shaw Nathan J. Pust #12;Radiometric calibration of infrared imagers using publication, including its DOI. [DOI: 10.1117/1.OE.53.12.123106] Keywords: infrared imaging; thermal imaging

  19. Radiometric resolution enhancement by lossy compression as compared to truncation followed by lossless compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, James C.; Manohar, Mareboyana

    1994-01-01

    Recent advances in imaging technology make it possible to obtain imagery data of the Earth at high spatial, spectral and radiometric resolutions from Earth orbiting satellites. The rate at which the data is collected from these satellites can far exceed the channel capacity of the data downlink. Reducing the data rate to within the channel capacity can often require painful trade-offs in which certain scientific returns are sacrificed for the sake of others. In this paper we model the radiometric version of this form of lossy compression by dropping a specified number of least significant bits from each data pixel and compressing the remaining bits using an appropriate lossless compression technique. We call this approach 'truncation followed by lossless compression' or TLLC. We compare the TLLC approach with applying a lossy compression technique to the data for reducing the data rate to the channel capacity, and demonstrate that each of three different lossy compression techniques (JPEG/DCT, VQ and Model-Based VQ) give a better effective radiometric resolution than TLLC for a given channel rate.

  20. Relative Radiometric Normalization and Atmospheric Correction of a SPOT 5 Time Series

    PubMed Central

    Hajj, Mahmoud El; Bégué, Agnès; Lafrance, Bruno; Hagolle, Olivier; Dedieu, Gérard; Rumeau, Matthieu

    2008-01-01

    Multi-temporal images acquired at high spatial and temporal resolution are an important tool for detecting change and analyzing trends, especially in agricultural applications. However, to insure a reliable use of this kind of data, a rigorous radiometric normalization step is required. Normalization can be addressed by performing an atmospheric correction of each image in the time series. The main problem is the difficulty of obtaining an atmospheric characterization at a given acquisition date. In this paper, we investigate whether relative radiometric normalization can substitute for atmospheric correction. We develop an automatic method for relative radiometric normalization based on calculating linear regressions between unnormalized and reference images. Regressions are obtained using the reflectances of automatically selected invariant targets. We compare this method with an atmospheric correction method that uses the 6S model. The performances of both methods are compared using 18 images from of a SPOT 5 time series acquired over Reunion Island. Results obtained for a set of manually selected invariant targets show excellent agreement between the two methods in all spectral bands: values of the coefficient of determination (r2 exceed 0.960, and bias magnitude values are less than 2.65. There is also a strong correlation between normalized NDVI values of sugarcane fields (r2 = 0.959). Despite a relative error of 12.66% between values, very comparable NDVI patterns are observed.

  1. 40Ar/(39)Ar dating of the Kapthurin Formation, Baringo, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Deino, Alan L; McBrearty, Sally

    2002-01-01

    The(40)Ar/(39)Ar radiometric dating technique has been applied to tuffs and lavas of the Kapthurin Formation in the Tugen Hills, Kenya Rift Valley. Two variants of the(40)Ar/(39)Ar technique, single-crystal total fusion (SCTF) and laser incremental heating (LIH) have been employed to date five marker horizons within the formation: near the base, the Kasurein Basalt at 0.61+/-0.04 Ma; the Pumice Tuff at 0.543+/-0.004 Ma; the Upper Kasurein Basalt at 0.552+/-0.015 Ma; the Grey Tuff at 0.509+/-0.009 Ma; and within the upper part of the formation, the Bedded Tuff at 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. The new, precise radiometric age determination for the Pumice Tuff also provides an age for the widespread Lake Baringo Trachyte, since the Pumice Tuff is the early pyroclastic phase of this voluminous trachyte eruption. These results establish the age of fossil hominids KNM-BK 63-67 and KNM-BK 8518 at approximately 0.510-0.512 Ma, a significant finding given that few Middle Pleistocene hominids are radiometrically dated. The Kapthurin hominids are thus the near contemporaries of those from Bodo, Ethiopia and Tanzania. A flake and core industry from lacustrine sediments in the lower part of the formation is constrained by new dates of 0.55-0.52 Ma, a period during which the Acheulian industry, characterized by handaxes, is known throughout East Africa. Points, typical of the Middle Stone Age (MSA), are found in Kapthurin Formation sediments now shown to date to between 0.509+/-0.009 Ma and 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. This date exceeds previous estimates for the age of the MSA elsewhere in East Africa by 49 ka, and establishes the age of Acheulian to MSA transition for the region. Evidence of the use of the Levallois technique for the manufacture of both small flakes and biface preforms, the systematic production of blades, and the use and processing of red ochre also occurs in this interval. The presence of blades and red ochre at this depth is important as blades signify a high degree of technical competence and red ochre suggests symbolic behavior. PMID:11795974

  2. Age of Barrier Canyon-style rock art constrained by cross-cutting relations and luminescence dating techniques

    PubMed Central

    Pederson, Joel L.; Chapot, Melissa S.; Simms, Steven R.; Sohbati, Reza; Rittenour, Tammy M.; Murray, Andrew S.; Cox, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Rock art compels interest from both researchers and a broader public, inspiring many hypotheses about its cultural origin and meaning, but it is notoriously difficult to date numerically. Barrier Canyon-style (BCS) pictographs of the Colorado Plateau are among the most debated examples; hypotheses about its age span the entire Holocene epoch and previous attempts at direct radiocarbon dating have failed. We provide multiple age constraints through the use of cross-cutting relations and new and broadly applicable approaches in optically stimulated luminescence dating at the Great Gallery panel, the type section of BCS art in Canyonlands National Park, southeastern Utah. Alluvial chronostratigraphy constrains the burial and exhumation of the alcove containing the panel, and limits are also set by our related research dating both a rockfall that removed some figures and the rock’s exposure duration before that time. Results provide a maximum possible age, a minimum age, and an exposure time window for the creation of the Great Gallery panel, respectively. The only prior hypothesis not disproven is a late Archaic origin for BCS rock art, although our age result of A.D. ?1–1100 coincides better with the transition to and rise of the subsequent Fremont culture. This chronology is for the type locality only, and variability in the age of other sites is likely. Nevertheless, results suggest that BCS rock art represents an artistic tradition that spanned cultures and the transition from foraging to farming in the region. PMID:25157162

  3. Age of Barrier Canyon-style rock art constrained by cross-cutting relations and luminescence dating techniques.

    PubMed

    Pederson, Joel L; Chapot, Melissa S; Simms, Steven R; Sohbati, Reza; Rittenour, Tammy M; Murray, Andrew S; Cox, Gary

    2014-09-01

    Rock art compels interest from both researchers and a broader public, inspiring many hypotheses about its cultural origin and meaning, but it is notoriously difficult to date numerically. Barrier Canyon-style (BCS) pictographs of the Colorado Plateau are among the most debated examples; hypotheses about its age span the entire Holocene epoch and previous attempts at direct radiocarbon dating have failed. We provide multiple age constraints through the use of cross-cutting relations and new and broadly applicable approaches in optically stimulated luminescence dating at the Great Gallery panel, the type section of BCS art in Canyonlands National Park, southeastern Utah. Alluvial chronostratigraphy constrains the burial and exhumation of the alcove containing the panel, and limits are also set by our related research dating both a rockfall that removed some figures and the rock's exposure duration before that time. Results provide a maximum possible age, a minimum age, and an exposure time window for the creation of the Great Gallery panel, respectively. The only prior hypothesis not disproven is a late Archaic origin for BCS rock art, although our age result of A.D. ? 1-1100 coincides better with the transition to and rise of the subsequent Fremont culture. This chronology is for the type locality only, and variability in the age of other sites is likely. Nevertheless, results suggest that BCS rock art represents an artistic tradition that spanned cultures and the transition from foraging to farming in the region. PMID:25157162

  4. Abstract Although numerous studies have uti-lized elemental analysis techniques for age deter-

    E-print Network

    Sorin, Eric J.

    radiometric dating to determine ages of the leopard shark, Triakis semifasciata, the Pacific angel shark of disequilibrium analyses between radioisotopes through bomb radiocarbon dating has provided a method for age

  5. Landsat-7 ETM+ radiometric stability and absolute calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markham, B.L.; Barker, J.L.; Barsi, J.A.; Kaita, E.; Thome, K.J.; Helder, D.L.; Palluconi, Frank Don; Schott, J.R.; Scaramuzza, P.

    2002-01-01

    Launched in April 1999, the Landsat-7 ETM+ instrument is in its fourth year of operation. The quality of the acquired calibrated imagery continues to be high, especially with respect to its three most important radiometric performance parameters: reflective band instrument stability to better than ??1%, reflective band absolute calibration to better than ??5%, and thermal band absolute calibration to better than ??0.6 K. The ETM+ instrument has been the most stable of any of the Landsat instruments, in both the reflective and thermal channels. To date, the best on-board calibration source for the reflective bands has been the Full Aperture Solar Calibrator, which has indicated changes of at most -1.8% to -2.0% (95% C.I.) change per year in the ETM+ gain (band 4). However, this change is believed to be caused by changes in the solar diffuser panel, as opposed to a change in the instrument's gain. This belief is based partially on ground observations, which bound the changes in gain in band 4 at -0.7% to +1.5%. Also, ETM+ stability is indicated by the monitoring of desert targets. These image-based results for four Saharan and Arabian sites, for a collection of 35 scenes over the three years since launch, bound the gain change at -0.7% to +0.5% in band 4. Thermal calibration from ground observations revealed an offset error of +0.31 W/m 2 sr um soon after launch. This offset was corrected within the U. S. ground processing system at EROS Data Center on 21-Dec-00, and since then, the band 6 on-board calibration has indicated changes of at most +0.02% to +0.04% (95% C.I.) per year. The latest ground observations have detected no remaining offset error with an RMS error of ??0.6 K. The stability and absolute calibration of the Landsat-7 ETM+ sensor make it an ideal candidate to be used as a reference source for radiometric cross-calibrating to other land remote sensing satellite systems.

  6. Errors in radiometric remote sensing of sea-surface temperature and salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, C. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for remote measurement of sea-surface physical temperature and salinity using radiometric measurements from aircraft or satellite are reviewed. Studies have been conducted to determine the sensitivity of the errors in surface temperature and salinity to errors in the measured brightness temperatures using combinations of UHF, L, S, and C-band measurements. These investigations were made using values of conductivity, static dielectric constant, and relaxation time derived from the regression equations of Klein and Swift (1977). Results of the error sensitivity study are presented in the form of error contour plots which permit the calculation of errors in the estimation of the physical parameters for given errors in the raw radiometric measurements.

  7. Radiometric responsivity determination for Feature Identification and Location Experiment (FILE) flown on space shuttle mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. G.; Davis, R. E.; Wright, R. E., Jr.; Sivertson, W. E., Jr.; Bullock, G. F.

    1986-12-01

    A procedure was developed to obtain the radiometric (radiance) responsivity of the Feature Identification and Local Experiment (FILE) instrument in preparation for its flight on Space Shuttle Mission 41-G (November 1984). This instrument was designed to obtain Earth feature radiance data in spectral bands centered at 0.65 and 0.85 microns, along with corroborative color and color-infrared photographs, and to collect data to evaluate a technique for in-orbit autonomous classification of the Earth's primary features. The calibration process incorporated both solar radiance measurements and radiative transfer model predictions in estimating expected radiance inputs to the FILE on the Shuttle. The measured data are compared with the model predictions, and the differences observed are discussed. Application of the calibration procedure to the FILE over an 18-month period indicated a constant responsivity characteristic. This report documents the calibration procedure and the associated radiometric measurements and predictions that were part of the instrument preparation for flight.

  8. Precision radiometric surface temperature (PRST) sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, James T.; Roberts, Carson; Bodkin, Andrew; Sundberg, Robert; Beaven, Scott; Weinheimer, Jeffrey

    2013-05-01

    There is a need for a Precision Radiometric Surface Temperature (PRST) measurement capability that can achieve noncontact profiling of a sample's surface temperature when heated dynamically during laser processing, aerothermal heating or metal cutting/machining. Target surface temperature maps within and near the heated spot provide critical quantitative diagnostic data for laser-target coupling effectiveness and laser damage assessment. In the case of metal cutting, this type of measurement provides information on plastic deformation in the primary shear zone where the cutting tool is in contact with the workpiece. The challenge in these cases is to measure the temperature of a target while its surface's temperature and emissivity are changing rapidly and with incomplete knowledge of how the emissivity and surface texture (scattering) changes with temperature. Bodkin Design and Engineering, LLC (BDandE), with partners Spectral Sciences, Inc. (SSI) and Space Computer Corporation (SCC), has developed a PRST Sensor that is based on a hyperspectral MWIR imager spanning the wavelength range 2-5 ?m and providing a hyperspectral datacube of 20-24 wavelengths at 60 Hz frame rate or faster. This imager is integrated with software and algorithms to extract surface temperature from radiometric measurements over the range from ambient to 2000K with a precision of 20K, even without a priori knowledge of the target's emissivity and even as the target emissivity may be changing with time and temperature. In this paper, we will present a description of the PRST system as well as laser heating test results which show the PRST system mapping target surface temperatures in the range 600-2600K on a variety of materials.

  9. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  10. Building on previous OSL dating techniques for gypsum: a case study from Salt Basin playa, New Mexico and Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahan, Shannon; Kay, John

    2012-01-01

    The long term stability and reliability of the luminescence signal for gypsum has not been well documented or systematically measured until just recently. A review of the current literature for luminescence dating of gypsum is compiled here along with original efforts at dating an intact and in-situ bed of selenite gypsum at Salt Basin Playa, New Mexico and Texas. This effort differs from other documented luminescence dating efforts because the gypsum is not powdery or redistributed from its original growth patterns within the playa basin but is instead of a crystalline form. Sixteen ages from eight cores were ultimately produced with seven of the ages coming from rare detrital quartz encased in or with the gypsum crystals while the remaining ages are from the crystalline gypsum. As far as can be ascertained, the quartz was measured separately from the gypsum and no contaminants were noted in any of the aliquots. Some basic and preliminary tests of signal stability were measured and found to be mitigated by lessening of pre-heat protocols. Ages ranged from 8 ka to 10 ka in the shallow cores and 16 ka to 22 ka in the deeper cores. These ages will be useful in determining rates of gypsum growth within a sequence of evaporates which, in turn, will help to better document historic rates of evaporation and thus estimate, with more precision, the corresponding annual evaporation rates.

  11. Amino acid racemization dating of Upper Pleistocene - Holocene terrestrial gastropods from a Mediterranean region (Murcia, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Mayordomo, Julian; Ortiz, Jose E.; Torres, Trinidad; Insua-Arevalo, Juan M.; Martinez-Diaz, Jose J.; Altolaguirre, Yul; Canales-Fernandez, Maria L.; Martin-Banda, Raquel

    2014-05-01

    The amino acid racemization method has become a widely used geochronological tool for dating Quaternary deposits. The method is based on the fact that living organisms contain only L-amino acids which gradually racemize into D-amino acids after death. Thus, the D/L ratio increases with time after death until it is equal to 1, that is, when equilibrium is reached. Gastropod shells are particularly useful for amino acid racemization dating. Because the amino acid racemization method is not a numerical dating method in isolation, it needs to be calibrated, mainly with radiometric dating methods. The racemization process is genus- and temperature-dependent. In this work we present a preliminary analysis that compares the radiometric age estimated from different dating methods of a number of gastropods recovered in localities from Murcia (Southeastern Spain), with the age obtained through the amino acid racemization method. Taking advantage of recent paleoseismological research in the Murcia region (SE Spain), 28 gastropods specimens were collected from different trenches dug in young Quaternary alluvial deposits. The specimens were subsequently classified and then analyzed according to the standards protocols of the Biomolecular Stratigraphy Laboratory (UPM, Madrid School of Mines). The species found were Otala lactea, Iberus gualterianus, Sphincterochila candidissima and Theba pisana. The D/L ratios of aspartic acid, leucine, phenylalanine and glutamic acid were determined, and the corresponding average age of each specimen was calculated introducing the D/L values in the age calculation algorithm of Torres et al. (1997) for gastropods of central and southern Spain. The racemization age for each locality was then compared to the radiometric age of the deposit where the specimens were collected. To this respect, the samples were classified in different groups considering the reliability on the age control method. The most reliable sample consists only on dates obtained by the radiocarbon method applied to pieces of charcoal found in the same sedimentary unit as the gastropod. The other subsets consider dates, or bracketed dates, obtained from other dating techniques (TL, OSL, Uranium series) or even stratigraphic criteria. Preliminary results show that Torres et al. (1997) calibration algorithm estimates ages as much as ten times older than the most likely one. We think that this result is due to a strong bias on the way the algorithm was obtained, based mostly in Lower Pleistocene/Pliocene samples. Hence, the new data presented here could be used to constraint better the Torres et al. (1997) function towards Upper Pleistocene and Holocene dates. This type of calibration model would be very valuable in determining ages of recent deposits in the Murcia Region, a matter that is critical in paleoseismological research.

  12. Radiocarbon dates on bones of extinct birds from Hawaii.

    PubMed Central

    James, H F; Stafford, T W; Steadman, D W; Olson, S L; Martin, P S; Jull, A J; McCoy, P C

    1987-01-01

    Bones from a stratified sedimentary deposit in the Puu Naio Cave site on Maui, Hawaiian Islands, reveal the late Holocene extinction of 19 species of birds. The age of the sediment and associated fauna was determined by direct radiocarbon dating (tandem particle accelerator-mass spectrometer; TAMS) of amino acids extracted from bones weighing as little as 450 mg. The 14C dates indicate that sediment has been accumulating in the lava tube for at least the last 7750 years, a suitable time frame for testing the hypothesis that Holocene extinction on islands began after human colonization. Despite growing evidence that a worldwide wave of extinctions coincided with human colonization of oceanic islands, little radiometric data have been available to date the extinction of most small fossil vertebrates on islands. The TAMS technique of dating purified collagen from the bones of small vertebrates could lead to vastly improved chronologies of extinction for oceanic islands where catastrophic mid- to late-Holocene extinction is expected or known to have occurred. Chronologies derived from nonarcheological sites that show continuous sedimentation, such as the Puu Naio Cave deposit, may also yield key evidence on the timing of earliest human settlement of Oceania. Images PMID:3470800

  13. Radiocarbon dates on bones of extinct birds from Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    James, H.F.; Stafford, T.W. Jr.; Steadman, D.W.; Olson, S.L.; Martin, P.S.; Jull, A.J.; McCoy, P.C.

    1987-04-01

    Bones from a stratified sedimentary deposit in the Puu Naio Cave site on Maui, Hawaiian Islands, reveal the late Holocene extinction of 19 species of birds. The age of the sediment and associated fauna was determined by direct radiocarbon dating (tandem particle accelerator-mass spectrometer; TAMS) of amino acids extracted from bones weighing as little as 450 mg. The /sup 14/C dates indicate that sediment has been accumulating in the lava tube for at least the last 7750 years, a suitable time frame for testing the hypothesis that Holocene extinction on islands began after human colonization. Despite growing evidence that a worldwide wave of extinctions coincided with human colonization of oceanic islands, little radiometric data have been available to date the extinction of most small fossil vertebrates on islands. The TAMS technique of dating purified collagen from the bones of small vertebrates could lead to vastly improved chronologies of extinction for oceanic islands where catastrophic mid- to late-Holocene extinction is expected or known to have occurred. Chronologies derived from nonarcheological sites that show continuous sedimentation, such as the Puu Naio Cave deposit, may also yield key evidence on the timing of earliest human settlement of Oceania.

  14. Relative Radiometric Calibration of LANDSAT TM Reflective Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Results and recommendations pertaining to the characterization of the relative radiometric calibration of the protoflight thematic mapper (TM/PF) on the LANDSAT-4 satellite are presented. Some preliminary pre-launch and in-orbit results are also included from the flight model (TM/F) on LANDSAT-5. A common scientific methodology and terminology is outlined for characterizing the radiometry of both TM sensors. The magnitude of the most significant sources of radiometric variability are discussed and methods are recommended for achieving the exceptional potential inherent in the radiometric precision and accuracy of the sensors.

  15. U-Pb Dating of CA/non-CA Treated Zircons Obtained by LA-ICP-MS and CA-TIMS Techniques: Impact for their Geological Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Quadt, A.; Gallhofer, D.; Guillong, M.; Peytcheva, I.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical Abrasion Isotope-Dilution Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CA-ID-TIMS) is known as a high precision technique for resolving lead loss and improving the interpretation of U-Pb zircon age data. We argue that combining CA with the widely applied Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) improves the precision and accuracy of zircon dates, while removing the substantial parts with lead loss, reducing data scatter, and providing meaningful geological interpretations. The samples are magmatic rocks chosen from different geological time periods (Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic time). All zircon separates are analysed by LA-ICP-MS before and after CA, and all age data are compared with CA-ID-TIMS 206Pb/238U dates that are considered as the most accurately age. All CA-treated zircon crystals show up to 50% less data scatter compared to the non-CA treated zircon grains and thus a reduction of the calculated uncertainties is apparent. The obtained wt average LA-ICP-MS 206Pb/238U ages of the CA-treated zircon grains are up to 4-6% higher than those of the non-CA treated crystals, exceeding the analytical uncertainties of the LA-ICP-MS dating technique of 1-2%. The damaged crystal parts, caused by U-decay, with lead loss are removed, so that we can exclude younging from the possible geological scenarios. CA-LA-ICP-MS age data are in good agreement with the CA-ID-TIMS dates and suggest advantages of using CA-LA-ICP-MS in order to define accurate ages. The use of the CA technique for very young zircons (~0.2 Ma, Kos rhyolitic tuff, Greece) seems optional; as the obtained mean 206Pb/238U ages of non-CA and CA treated zircons coincide within the uncertainty. The negligible time to produce the lattice damage (based on alpha decay or spontaneous fission) makes lead loss less important for age dating and data interpretation of very young zircons (<1 Ma). Von Quadt, A. et al., 2014, JAAS, doi: 10.1039/c4ja00102h.

  16. Shaft speleogenesis in Picos de Europa (North Spain): contribution of cave geomorphological mapping and U-Th dating techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros, D.; Jiménez-Sánchez, M.; Giralt, S.; García-Sansegundo, J.; Sendra, G.

    2012-04-01

    Picos de Europa Mountains are located in the North of Spain, showing more than 2,000 m thickness of Carboniferous limestone, in which the 14 % of the deepest shafts of the world are developed. This work concerns with a speleogenetical research carried out in two shafts (Torca Teyera and La Texa), using geomorphological maps and U-Th dating. The spatial distribution of cave geomorphological processes is established by the elaboration of geomorphological maps at a 1:500 scale, using genetical criteria for the classification of cave features. Cave temporal evolution is established from relative chronology between cave features and deposits and absolute dating of eight selected samples with U-series disintegration (234U/230Th). Torca Teyera Shaft (4° 52' 56.9'' W 43° 16' 33.1'' N) is a multilevel cave 4,438 m long and 738 m deep with three cave levels located at 1,300, 800-900 and 615 m.a.s.l. Cave levels are formed by phreatic and epiphreatic tubes strongly modified by vadose stream incision and breakdown processes. Fluvial and slackwater deposits, frequently covering breakdown deposits, are preserved up to 70 m over the active level and reach thickness of 3 m, appearing sometimes interbedded with flowstone. Flowstone levels usually fossilize fluvial deposits, being covered by other speleothems, as stalagmites and pool deposits. La Texa shaft (4° 58'1.3'' W 43° 15'45.2'' N), 2,231 m long and 215 m deep, presents only one cave level at 1,300 m a.s.l. formed by phreatic and epiphreatic tubes modified by vadose incision. Flowstones and dripstones are often covering fluvial (slackwater deposits) and gravity deposits, being the last the most frequently feature in shaft bottom. Eight speleothem samples from the two shafts were dated using the U-series disintegration method. Two flowstones from the middle cave level of Torca Teyera yielded ages of 185 and 238 ka, respectively. The age of a pool deposit sample and of a flowstone from the upper level exceeded 300 ka. On the other hand, three flowstone samples from Torca La Texa were dated between 156 and 181 ka, whereas the third sample is out of range of the U-Th method. Finally, one sample of a pool deposit found over flowstones is dated at 65 ka. These ages allowed us to establish a preliminary chronology of the speleogenetic events. The development of Torca Teyera and La Texa began at least during the Mid Pleistocene and in both cases it was controlled by the dropping of the base level. Fluvial activity and the grow of speleothems started prior 300 ka and both processes have been continuous up to at least 185 ka, at the middle level of Torca Teyera, and up to 156 ka at Torca La Texa. The most important flowstone of Torca La Texa precipitated at about 65 ka ago. These results are consistent to validate the previous speleogenetical models in the area, in which new shafts and canyons began to develop downwards cutting the old cave levels that remained perched during Alpine uplift.

  17. Radiometric detection of yeasts in blood cultures of cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hopfer, R.L.; Orengo, A.; Chesnut, S.; Wenglar, M.

    1980-09-01

    During a 12-month period, 19,457 blood cultures were collected. Yeasts were isolated from 193 cultures derived from 76 cancer patients. Candida albicans or Candida tropicalis accounted for 79% of isolates. Of the three methods compared, the radiometric method required 2.9 days to become positive, blind subculture required 2.6 days, and Gram stains required 1 day. However, the radiometric method was clearly superior in detecting positive cultures, since 73% of all cultures were first detected radiometrically, 22% were detected by subculture, and only 5% were detected by Gram stain. Although 93% of the isolates were detected by aerobic culture, five (7%) isolates were obtained only from anaerobic cultures. Seven days of incubation appear to be sufficient for the radiometric detection of yeasts.

  18. The Radiometric Bode's Law and Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, T. Joseph, W.; Farrell, W. M.; Dietrick, Jill; Greenlees, Elizabeth; Hogan, Emily; Jones, Christopher; Hennig, L. A.

    2004-09-01

    We predict the radio flux densities of the extrasolar planets in the current census, making use of an empirical relation-the radiometric Bode's law-determined from the five ``magnetic'' planets in the solar system (the Earth and the four gas giants). Radio emission from these planets results from solar wind-powered electron currents depositing energy in the magnetic polar regions. We find that most of the known extrasolar planets should emit in the frequency range 10-1000 MHz and, under favorable circumstances, have typical flux densities as large as 1 mJy. We also describe an initial, systematic effort to search for radio emission in low radio frequency images acquired with the Very Large Array (VLA). The limits set by the VLA images (~300 mJy) are consistent with, but do not provide strong constraints on, the predictions of the model. Future radio telescopes, such as the Low Frequency Array and the Square Kilometer Array, should be able to detect the known extrasolar planets or place austere limits on their radio emission. Planets with masses much lower than those in the current census will probably radiate below 10 MHz and will require a space-based array.

  19. Radiometric sensitivity comparisons of multispectral imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Nadine C.; Slater, Philip N.

    1989-01-01

    Multispectral imaging systems provide much of the basic data used by the land and ocean civilian remote-sensing community. There are numerous multispectral imaging systems which have been and are being developed. A common way to compare the radiometric performance of these systems is to examine their noise-equivalent change in reflectance, NE Delta-rho. The NE Delta-rho of a system is the reflectance difference that is equal to the noise in the recorded signal. A comparison is made of the noise equivalent change in reflectance of seven different multispectral imaging systems (AVHRR, AVIRIS, ETM, HIRIS, MODIS-N, SPOT-1, HRV, and TM) for a set of three atmospheric conditions (continental aerosol with 23-km visibility, continental aerosol with 5-km visibility, and a Rayleigh atmosphere), five values of ground reflectance (0.01, 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, and 1.00), a nadir viewing angle, and a solar zenith angle of 45 deg.

  20. The Radiometric Bode's Law and Extrasolar Planets

    E-print Network

    Joseph Lazio; W. M. Farrell; Jill Dietrick; Elizabeth Greenlees; Emily Hogan; Christopher Jones; L. A. Hennig

    2004-05-18

    We predict the radio flux densities of the extrasolar planets in the current census, making use of an empirical relation--the radiometric Bode's Law--determined from the five ``magnetic'' planets in the solar system (Earth and the four gas giants). Radio emission from these planets results from solar-wind powered electron currents depositing energy in the magnetic polar regions. We find that most of the known extrasolar planets should emit in the frequency range 10--1000 MHz and, under favorable circumstances, have typical flux densities as large as 1 mJy. We also describe an initial, systematic effort to search for radio emission in low radio frequency images acquired with the Very Large Array. The limits set by the VLA images (~ 300 mJy) are consistent with, but do not provide strong constraints on, the predictions of the model. Future radio telescopes, such as the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) and the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), should be able to detect the known extrasolar planets or place austere limits on their radio emission. Planets with masses much lower than those in the current census will probably radiate below 10 MHz and will require a space-based array.

  1. Fission track dating of kimberlitic zircons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haggerty, S.E.; Raber, E.; Naeser, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    The only reliable method for dating kimberlites at present is the lengthy and specialized hydrothermal procedure that extracts 206Pb and 238U from low-uranium zircons. This paper describes a second successful method by fission track dating of large single-crystal zircons, 1.0-1.5 cm in dimension. The use of large crystals overcomes the limitations imposed in conventional fission track analysis which utilizes crushed fragments. Low track densities, optical track dispersion, and the random orientation of polished surfaces in the etch and irradiation cycle are effectively overcome. Fission track ages of zircons from five African kimberlites are reported, from the Kimberley Pool (90.3 ?? 6.5 m.y.), Orapa (87.4 ?? 5.7 and 92.4 ?? 6.1 m.y.), Nzega (51.1 ?? 3.8 m.y.), Koffiefontein (90.0 ?? 8.2 m.y.), and Val do Queve (133.4 ?? 11.5 m.y.). In addition we report the first radiometric ages (707.9 ?? 59.6 and 705.5 ?? 61.0 m.y.) of crustal zircons from kimberlites in northwest Liberia. The fission track ages agree well with earlier age estimates. Most of the zircons examined in this study are zoned with respect to uranium but linear correlations are established (by regression analysis) between zones of variable uranium content, and within zones of constant uranium content (by analysis of variance). Concordance between the fission track method and the U/Pb technique is established and we concluded that track fading from thermal annealing has not taken place. Kimberlitic zircons dated in this study, therefore, record the time of eruption. ?? 1983.

  2. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of Narrow-Swath Imaging Sensors with Reference to Non-Coincident Wide-Swath Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCorkel, Joel; Thome, Kurtis; Lockwood, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    An inter-calibration method is developed to provide absolute radiometric calibration of narrow-swath imaging sensors with reference to non-coincident wide-swath sensors. The method predicts at-sensor radiance using non-coincident imagery from the reference sensor and knowledge of spectral reflectance of the test site. The imagery of the reference sensor is restricted to acquisitions that provide similar view and solar illumination geometry to reduce uncertainties due to directional reflectance effects. Spectral reflectance of the test site is found with a simple iterative radiative transfer method using radiance values of a well-understood wide-swath sensor and spectral shape information based on historical ground-based measurements. At-sensor radiance is calculated for the narrow-swath sensor using this spectral reflectance and atmospheric parameters that are also based on historical in situ measurements. Results of the inter-calibration method show agreement on the 2 5 percent level in most spectral regions with the vicarious calibration technique relying on coincident ground-based measurements referred to as the reflectance-based approach. While the variability of the inter-calibration method based on non-coincident image pairs is significantly larger, results are consistent with techniques relying on in situ measurements. The method is also insensitive to spectral differences between the sensors by transferring to surface spectral reflectance prior to prediction of at-sensor radiance. The utility of this inter-calibration method is made clear by its flexibility to utilize image pairings with acquisition dates differing in excess of 30 days allowing frequent absolute calibration comparisons between wide- and narrow-swath sensors.

  3. A Kalman Approach to Lunar Surface Navigation using Radiometric and Inertial Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelmins, David T.; Welch, Bryan W.; Sands, O. Scott; Nguyen, Binh V.

    2009-01-01

    Future lunar missions supporting the NASA Vision for Space Exploration will rely on a surface navigation system to determine astronaut position, guide exploration, and return safely to the lunar habitat. In this report, we investigate one potential architecture for surface navigation, using an extended Kalman filter to integrate radiometric and inertial measurements. We present a possible infrastructure to support this technique, and we examine an approach to simulating navigational accuracy based on several different system configurations. The results show that position error can be reduced to 1 m after 5 min of processing, given two satellites, one surface communication terminal, and knowledge of the starting position to within 100 m.

  4. Fundus image change analysis: geometric and radiometric normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, David S.; Kaiser, Richard S.; Lee, Michael S.; Berger, Jeffrey W.

    1999-06-01

    Image change analysis will potentiate fundus feature quantitation in natural history and intervention studies for major blinding diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Geometric and radiometric normalization of fundus images acquired at two points in time are required for accurate change detection, but existing methods are unsatisfactory for change analysis. We have developed and explored algorithms for correction of image misalignment (geometric) and inter- and intra-image brightness variation (radiometric) in order to facilitate highly accurate change detection. Thirty-five millimeter color fundus photographs were digitized at 500 to 1000 dpi. Custom-developed registration algorithms correcting for translation only; translation and rotation; translation, rotation, and scale; and polynomial based image-warping algorithms allowed for exploration of registration accuracy required for change detection. Registration accuracy beyond that offered by rigid body transformation is required for accurate change detection. Radiometric correction required shade-correction and normalization of inter-image statistical parameters. Precise geometric and radiometric normalization allows for highly accurate change detection. To our knowledge, these results are the first demonstration of the combination of geometric and radiometric normalization offering sufficient accuracy to allow for accurate fundus image change detection potentiating longitudinal study of retinal disease.

  5. Virtual courseware for geoscience education: Virtual Earthquake and Virtual Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Gary A.

    1999-05-01

    Virtual courseware developed for introductory-level, on-line geology labs is an interactive teaching/learning model that has an enormous pedagogical potential for making Web sites places where students learn by doing. Virtual Earthquake and Virtual Dating are modest examples of the `virtual courseware' paradigm. Virtual Earthquake helps students explore the techniques of how an earthquake's epicenter is located and how its Richter magnitude is determined. Virtual Dating models the theory and techniques of the radiometric age determination of rocks and minerals. Virtual courseware applications offer several advantages over traditional floppy disk or CD ROM-based courseware, the most significant being the ease of dissemination. The author's experience with bringing these two virtual applications on-line suggests that there is a need for interactive geology labs on-line and that the approach will be received with enthusiasm by the educational community. The widespread implementation and adoption of virtual courseware can bring meaningful educational content and interactivity for the geosciences that goes beyond multimedia on the World-Wide-Web.

  6. A Detailed Radiometric Chronological Framework for Nordic Seas Ocean-Ice Sheet Interactions Spanning 50-150 Ka BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brendryen, J.; Edwards, R. L.; Haflidason, H.; Cheng, H.; Grasmo, K. J.; Sejrup, H. P.

    2014-12-01

    Chronological control of sedimentary deposits is a key to do paleoclimatic interpretations of proxy records and to compare them with records from other archives. Beyond the reach of radiocarbon dating there are however few options for developing chronological control. We present a detailed radiometrical-based chronological framework of a Norwegian Sea core archive that records ocean-ice sheet interactions in the Nordic Seas covering the time span 50-150 ka BP. The chronology is based on a detailed multi-proxy and multi-archive alignment of high resolution records from the Norwegian Sea and precisely radiometric dated speleothem ?18O record from both China and the Alps. This approach utilizes the close and well documented millennial and multi-centennial scale coupling between the North Atlantic climate variability (recorded in the Norwegian Sea records, the Greenland ice cores and in the Alpine speleothems) and the Asian Monsoon system recorded in the Chinese speleothem ?18O. One intriguing feature of the Norwegian Sea record is that it often is more similar to the Chinese speleothem records than to the Greenland ice core records. The alignment is aided by a tephrostratigraphic link to the Greenland ice cores which provide an independent test of the age model and alignment. Uncertainties are addressed by Bayesian age-depth modeling. The radiometric-based age model and the quantified uncertainties enable an independent comparison between the Nordic Seas ocean-ice sheet interaction and other absolutely dated records such as U/Th dated sea-level indices and orbital parameters. This improves our ability to interpret the ocean-ice sheet interactions of the polar north in a global context over this time span that comprises a glacial-interglacial cycle.

  7. ASD FieldSpec Calibration Setup and Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olive, Dan

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) Fieldspec Calibration Setup and Techniques. The topics include: 1) ASD Fieldspec FR Spectroradiometer; 2) Components of Calibration; 3) Equipment list; 4) Spectral Setup; 5) Spectral Calibration; 6) Radiometric and Linearity Setup; 7) Radiometric setup; 8) Datadets Required; 9) Data files; and 10) Field of View Measurement. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  8. In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of the thematic mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, K. R.; Holm, R. G.; Kastner, C. J.; Palmer, J. M.; Slater, P. N.; Dinguirard, M.; Ezra, C. E.; Jackson, R. D.; Savage, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    In order to determine temporal changes of the absolute radiometric calibration of the entire TM system in flight spectroradiometric measurements of the ground and the atmosphere were made simultaneously with TM image collections over the White Sands, New Mexico area. By entering the measured values in an atmospheric radiative transfer program, the radiance levels in four of the spectral bands of the TM were determined, band 1:0.45 to 0.52 micrometers, band 2:0.53 to 0.61 micrometers band 3:0.62 to 0.70 micrometers and 4:0.78 to 0.91 micrometers. These levels were compared to the output digital counts from the detectors that sampled the radiometrically measured ground area, thus providing an absolute radiometric calibration of the entire TM system utilizing those detectors.

  9. Radiometric Calibration of the Earth Observing System's Imaging Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, Philip N. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The work on the grant was mainly directed towards developing new, accurate, redundant methods for the in-flight, absolute radiometric calibration of satellite multispectral imaging systems and refining the accuracy of methods already in use. Initially the work was in preparation for the calibration of MODIS and HIRIS (before the development of that sensor was canceled), with the realization it would be applicable to most imaging multi- or hyper-spectral sensors provided their spatial or spectral resolutions were not too coarse. The work on the grant involved three different ground-based, in-flight calibration methods reflectance-based radiance-based and diffuse-to-global irradiance ratio used with the reflectance-based method. This continuing research had the dual advantage of: (1) developing several independent methods to create the redundancy that is essential for the identification and hopefully the elimination of systematic errors; and (2) refining the measurement techniques and algorithms that can be used not only for improving calibration accuracy but also for the reverse process of retrieving ground reflectances from calibrated remote-sensing data. The grant also provided the support necessary for us to embark on other projects such as the ratioing radiometer approach to on-board calibration (this has been further developed by SBRS as the 'solar diffuser stability monitor' and is incorporated into the most important on-board calibration system for MODIS)- another example of the work, which was a spin-off from the grant funding, was a study of solar diffuser materials. Journal citations, titles and abstracts of publications authored by faculty, staff, and students are also attached.

  10. A revised radiometric calibration for the Hinode/EIS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Zanna, G.

    2013-07-01

    An assessment of the in-flight radiometric calibration of the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) is presented. This is done with the line ratio technique applied to a wide range of observations of the quiet Sun, active regions, and flares from 2006 until 2012. The best diagnostic lines and the relevant atomic data are discussed in detail. Radiances over the quiet Sun are also considered, with comparisons with previous measurements. Some departures in the shapes of the ground calibration responsivities are found at the start of the mission. These shapes do not change significantly over time, with the exception of the shorter wavelengths of the EIS short-wavelength (SW) channel, which shows some degradation. The sensitivity of the SW channel at longer wavelengths does not show significant degradation, while that of the long-wavelength (LW) channel shows a significant degradation with time. By the beginning of 2010 the responsivity of the LW channel was already lower than the values measured on the ground by a factor of two or more. A first-order correction is proposed. With this correction, the main ratios of lines in the two channels become constant to within a relative 20%, and the He ii 256 Å radiances over the quiet Sun also become constant over time. This correction removes long-standing discrepancies for a number of lines and ions, in particular those involving the strongest Fe x, Fe xiii, Fe xiv, Fe xvii, and Fe xxiv lines, where discrepancies of factors of more than two were found. These results have important implications for various EIS science analyses, in particular for measurements of temperatures, emission measures and elemental abundances. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Radium decay series dating of barite deposition in the Gulf of Mexico: Initial results

    SciTech Connect

    Van Gent, D.L.; Scott, L.M.; Fu, B.

    1995-12-31

    Barite deposits consisting of chimneys and crusts were recently documented and recovered by submersible from hydrocarbon seeps in the Gulf of Mexico offshore Louisiana at water depths of 510-670 m in the Garden Banks and Mississippi Canyon areas. This is the first discovery of barite deposits associated with cold hydrocarbon seeps. The outer part of the chimneys are dominated by barite whereas the inner part of the chimneys are dominated by barite with pyrite as accessory mineral. The crusts are about 5-8 cm thick and their surficial layers are composed of barite coexisting with carbonate whereas the lower part of the crusts consists of barite, carbonate, and pyrite. A program of radiometric dating by Ra decay series isotopes was initiated in order to derive a chronology of barite deposition in association with the hydrocarbon seeps. Chimneys and crusts were analyzed for NORM using a high purity intrinsic germanium gamma spectroscopy system. The deposits were found to contain {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra at concentrations comparable to those found in scale associated with oil production in the Gulf States Region (approximately 500 pCi/gm and 250 pCi/gm, respectively). The deposits were subjected to two separate age dating techniques. The primary technique utilized gamma spectroscopy for determination of {sup 210}Pb/{sup 226}Ra ratios. The second technique utilized gamma spectroscopy for determination of {sup 226}Th/{sup 228}Ra ratios. Ages as determined by {sup 210}Pb/{sup 226}Ra ranged from 2 years to 40 years. The {sup 228}Th/{sup 228}Ra methodology tended to validate the primary dating technique, although the useful range of dating for this method does not exceed 15 years. Sulfide-rich layers in the barite deposits tended to give anomalous and biased results when dated by the primary method. Both methodologies also appear valid for age dating scale deposits {le} 100 years old that are generated in oil production operations.

  12. Research radiometric calibration quantitative transfer methods between internal and external

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ju Guang; Ma, Yong hui; Zhang, Guang; Yang, Zhi hui

    2015-10-01

    This paper puts forward a method by realizing the internal and external radiation calibration transfer for infrared radiation characteristics quantitative measuring system. Through technological innovation and innovation application to establish a theoretical model of the corresponding radiated transfer method. This method can be well in engineering application for technology conversion process of radiometric calibration that with relatively simple and effective calibration in the half light path radiation instead of complex difficult whole optical path radiometric calibration. At the same time, it also will provide the basis of effective support to further carry out the target radiated characteristics quantitative measurement and application for ground type infrared radiated quantitative measuring system.

  13. Date: _____________________ ______________________________________________ UID

    E-print Network

    Lathrop, Daniel P.

    Date: _____________________ __ __ ______________________________________________ UID Print Full ________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________ Instructor (Print Name then Sign) Adv. Spec. Students Only Date Telephone extension and Email Address ________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________ Advisor (Print Name then Sign) Date Telephone extension and Email Address

  14. Date: _________________________ From: ____________________________________________

    E-print Network

    06/21/13 Date: _________________________ From: ____________________________________________ Via information apply: Business name & address Daily rate Hotel tax Date from Date for an online booking hotel receipt." This form may not be used for lost online booking receipts. (b) Other. I

  15. Dating of sub fossil oaks from Smarho riverine sediments Adomas Vitas1*

    E-print Network

    8 Dating of sub fossil oaks from Smarho riverine sediments Adomas Vitas1* , Jonas Mazeika2 , Rimantas Petrosius2 , R til Pukien 1 1 Group of Dendroclimatology and Radiometrics, Centre of Environmental in the attention of scientists since the 1960s. The initial dating difficulties were caused by the lack

  16. AMS Radiocarbon Dating of the Type Plainview and Firstview (Paleoindian) Assemblages: The Agony and the Ecstasy

    E-print Network

    Holliday, Vance T.

    AMS Radiocarbon Dating of the Type Plainview and Firstview (Paleoindian) Assemblages: The Agony #12;AMS RADIOCARBON DATING OF THE TYPE PLAINVIEW AND FIRSTVIEW (PALEOINDIAN)ASSEMBLAGES: THE AGONY of theprincipal post-Folsom Paleoindian artifact assemblages on the Great Plains, but good radiometric age

  17. Oxygen isotope studies and compilation of isotopic dates from Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Grootes, P.M.; Stuiver, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Quaternary Isotope Laboratory, alone or in collaboration with other investigators, is currently involved in a number of oxygen-isotope studies mainly in Antarctica. Studies of a drill core from the South Pole, seasonal oxygen-18 signals preserved in the Dominion Range, isotope dating of the Ross Ice Shelf, oxygen-18 profiles of the Siple Coast, McMurdo Ice Shelf sampling, and a data compilation of radiometric dates from Antarctica are discussed.

  18. Results of 11.6 GHz radiometric experiment in Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, D. K.; Allnutt, J. E.; Salazar, W. E.; Wanmi, F.; Tchinda, M.; Ndinayi, T. D. G.; Zaks, C.

    1992-01-01

    Three experiments were set up within a joint African radiometric propagation measurement programme to provide data at frequencies above 10 GHz for predictive modeling. The results of the first year of measurements in Douala, Cameroon are reported. These show significant departures from the CCIR rain climate and path attenuation models.

  19. Luminescence dating and palaeomagnetic age constraint on hominins from Sima de los Huesos, Atapuerca, Spain.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lee J; Demuro, Martina; Parés, Josep M; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Aranburu, Arantza; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2014-02-01

    Establishing a reliable chronology on the extensive hominin remains at Sima de los Huesos is critical for an improved understanding of the complex evolutionary histories and phylogenetic relationships of the European Middle Pleistocene hominin record. In this study, we use a combination of 'extended-range' luminescence dating techniques and palaeomagnetism to provide new age constraint on sedimentary infills that are unambiguously associated with the Sima fossil assemblage. Post-infrared-infrared stimulated luminescence (pIR-IR) dating of K-feldspars and thermally transferred optically stimulated luminescence (TT-OSL) dating of individual quartz grains provide weighted mean ages of 433 ± 15 ka (thousands of years) and 416 ± 19 ka, respectively, for allochthonous sedimentary horizons overlying the hominin-bearing clay breccia. The six replicate luminescence ages obtained for this deposit are reproducible and provide a combined minimum age estimate of 427 ± 12 ka for the underlying hominin fossils. Palaeomagnetic directions for the luminescence dated sediment horizon and underlying fossiliferous clays display exclusively normal polarities. These findings are consistent with the luminescence dating results and confirm that the hominin fossil horizon accumulated during the Brunhes Chron, i.e., within the last 780 ka. The new bracketing age constraint for the Sima hominins is in broad agreement with radiometrically dated Homo heidelbergensis fossil sites, such as Mauer and Arago, and suggests that the split of the H. neanderthalensis and H. sapiens lineages took place during the early Middle Pleistocene. More widespread numerical dating of key Early and Middle Pleistocene fossil sites across Europe is needed to test and refine competing models of hominin evolution. The new luminescence chronologies presented in this study demonstrate the versatility of TT-OSL and pIR-IR techniques and the potential role they could play in helping to refine evolutionary histories over Middle Pleistocene timescales. PMID:24485349

  20. Dating Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stader, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Dating violence is a form of student-on-student victimization and is a serious school safety issue. Research indicates that at a minimum, 10 percent of high school students are victims of dating violence in one form or another. Among female high school students that date, some data indicate that as many as 30 percent may be victims of dating

  1. Radiometric Correctionradiometric correction Radiometric correction is important to ensure that terrestrial variables retrieved from optical satellite sensor

    E-print Network

    Coburn, Craig

    that terrestrial variables retrieved from optical satellite sensor systems are calibrated to a common physical to the retrieval of land, atmosphere, and ocean information. These preprocessing procedures are essential for ensuring high-quality information from remote sensors. Radiometric correction ensures that measurements

  2. Radiometric Calibration of Earth-Observing Sensors Using the Radiometric Calibration Test Site (RadCaTS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla-Myers, J.; Anderson, N. J.; Thome, K. J.; Biggar, S. F.

    2014-12-01

    The Remote Sensing Group (RSG) of the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona uses the reflectance-based approach to perform the absolute radiometric calibration of such sensors as Landsat 5 TM, Landsat 7 ETM+, Landsat 8 OLI, Terra and Aqua MODIS, ASTER, RapidEye, and others. The reflectance-based approach requires that personnel be present at a test site during the sensor overpass, so the Radiometric Calibration Test Site (RadCaTS) was developed in order to capture data during every possible overpass, which assists in the temporal trending of the radiometric calibration of earth-observing sensors. The number of earth-observing sensors is rapidly increasing in recent years, and RadCaTS provides the ability to radiometrically calibrate them without the requirement of frequent field campaigns. The 2013 launch of Landsat 8 provides a unique opportunity for RadCaTS in that it is being used to supplement the in situ measurements by RSG ground personnel, and it will be used throughout the lifetime of the Landsat 8 mission. This allows more data to be collected throughout the year, and it also allows the accuracy and uncertainty of RadCaTS to be analyzed. The current top-of-atmosphere (TOA) spectral radiance uncertainty of the reflectance-based approach is ~2.6% in the mid-visible region of the spectrum, and current work indicates that the uncertainty of RadCaTS in TOA spectral radiance is ~3-4%. This work presents the radiometric calibration results of RadCaTS for a variety of sensors such as Landsat 7 ETM+, Landsat 8 OLI, Terra and Aqua MODIS, MISR, ASTER, and Suomi NPP VIIRS.

  3. The 90 GHz radiometric imaging. [for terrain analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, H. E.; White, J. D.; Wilson, W. J.; Mori, T. T.; Hollinger, J. P.; Troy, B. E.; Kenney, J. E.; Mcgoogan, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    A 90-GHz (3 mm wavelength) radiometer with a noise output fluctuation of 0.22 K (RMS), with a scanning antenna beam mirror, and the data processing system are described. Real-time radiometric imaging of terrain and man-made objects are shown. Flying at an altitude of 1500 ft a radiometer antenna with a 2 degrees halfpower beamwidth can distinguish landforms, waterways, roads, runways, bridges, ships at sea and their wakes, aircraft on runways, and athletic fields. A flight taken at an altitude of 3000 ft with approximately 2000 ft of clouds below the radiometer demonstrates the ability to distinguish bridges, rivers, marshland and other landforms even though the clouds are optically opaque. The radiometric images of a few representative scenes along with photographs of the corresponding scenes are presented to demonstrate the resolution of the imager system.

  4. Rapid radiometric method for detection of Salmonella in foods

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, B.J.; Eyles, M.J.; Murrell, W.G.

    1980-08-01

    A radiometric method for the detection of Salmonella in foods has been developed which is based on Salmonella poly H agglutinating serum preventing Salmonella from producing 14CO2 from (14C) dulcitol. The method will detect the presence or absence of Salmonella in a product within 30 h compared to 4 to 5 days by routine culture methods. The method has been evaluated against a routine culture method using 58 samples of food. The overall agreement was 91%. Five samples negative for Salmonella by the routine method were positive by the radiometric method. These may have been false positives. However, the routine method may have failed to detect Salmonella due to the presence of large numbers of lactose-fermenting bacteria which hindered isolation of Salmonella colonies on the selective agar plates.

  5. The OLI Radiometric Scale Realization Round Robin Measurement Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutlip, Hansford; Cole,Jerold; Johnson, B. Carol; Maxwell, Stephen; Markham, Brian; Ong, Lawrence; Hom, Milton; Biggar, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    A round robin radiometric scale realization was performed at the Ball Aerospace Radiometric Calibration Laboratory in January/February 2011 in support of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) Program. Participants included Ball Aerospace, NIST, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and the University of Arizona. The eight day campaign included multiple observations of three integrating sphere sources by nine radiometers. The objective of the campaign was to validate the radiance calibration uncertainty ascribed to the integrating sphere used to calibrate the OLI instrument. The instrument level calibration source uncertainty was validated by quatnifying: (1) the long term stability of the NIST calibrated radiance artifact, (2) the responsivity scale of the Ball Aerospace transfer radiometer and (3) the operational characteristics of the large integrating sphere.

  6. Characterization of radiometric calibration of LANDSAT-4 TM reflective bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.; Abrams, R. B.; Ball, D. L.; Leung, K. C.

    1984-01-01

    Prelaunch and postlaunch internal calibrator, image, and background data is to characterize the radiometric performance of the LANDSAT-4 TM and to recommend improved procedures for radiometric calibration. All but two channels (band 2, channel 4; band 5, channel 3) behave normally. Gain changes relative to a postlaunch reference for channels within a band vary within 0.5 percent as a group. Instrument gain for channels in the cold focal plane oscillates. Noise in background and image data ranges from 0.5 to 1.7 counts. Average differences in forward and reverse image data indicate a need for separate calibration processing of forward and reverse scans. Precision is improved by increasing the pulse integration width from 31 to 41 minor frames, depending on the band.

  7. Dating Violence

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Dating Violence, You Might… Think it's your fault. Feel angry, sad, lonely, depressed, or confused. Feel ... a victim of dating violence is not your fault. Nothing you say, wear, or do gives anyone ...

  8. Radiocarbon Dating

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A

    2007-12-20

    Radiocarbon dating can be used to determine the age of objects that contain components that were once alive. In the case of human remains, a radiocarbon date can distinguish between a crime scene and an archeological site. Documents, museum artifacts and art objects can be dated to determine if their age is correct for the historical context. A radiocarbon date does not confirm authenticity, but it can help identify a forgery.

  9. BOREAS TE-18, 60-m, Radiometrically Rectified Landsat TM Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-18 team used a radiometric rectification process to produce standardized DN values for a series of Landsat TM images of the BOREAS SSA and NSA in order to compare images that were collected under different atmospheric conditions. The images for each study area were referenced to an image that had very clear atmospheric qualities. The reference image for the SSA was collected on 02-Sep-1994, while the reference image for the NSA was collected on 2 1 Jun-1995. The 23 rectified images cover the period of 07-Jul-1985 to 18-Sep-1994 in the SSA and 22-Jun-1984 to 09-Jun-1994 in the NSA. Each of the reference scenes had coincident atmospheric optical thickness measurements made by RSS-11. The radiometric rectification process is described in more detail by Hall et al. (1991). The original Landsat TM data were received from CCRS for use in the BOREAS project. Due to the nature of the radiometric rectification process and copyright issues, the full-resolution (30-m) images may not be publicly distributed. However, this spatially degraded 60-m resolution version of the images may be openly distributed and is available on the BOREAS CD-ROM series. After the radiometric rectification processing, the original data were degraded to a 60-m pixel size from the original 30-m pixel size by averaging the data over a 2- by 2-pixel window. The data are stored in binary image-format files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  10. Radiometric measurements of gap probability in conifer tree canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, Bryan J.; Strahler, Alan H.; Li, Xiaowen; Liang, Shunlin; Clarke, Keith C.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of gap probability were made for some moderate-sized, open-grown conifers of varying species. Results of the radiometric analysis show that the gap probability, which is taken as the mean of the binomial, fits well a negative exponential function of a path length. The conifer shadow, then, is an object of almost uniform darkness with some bright holes or gaps that are found near the shadow's edge and rapidly disappear toward the shadows center.

  11. DATE PALM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter reviews date palm biology and cultivation. Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) is one of the oldest fruit crops grown in the arid regions of the Arabian Peninsula, North Africa, and the Middle East. The exact origin of the date palm is unknown but most probably the area of origin w...

  12. Laboratory-Based BRDF Calibration of Radiometric Tarps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiev, Georgi T.; Butler, James J.

    2007-01-01

    The current study provides the remote sensing community with important high accuracy laboratory-based BRDF calibration of radiometric tarps. The results illustrate the dependence of tarps' weft and warp threads orientation on BRDF. The study was done at incident angles of 0deg, 10deg, and 30deg; scatter zenith angles from 0deg to 60deg, and scatter azimuth angles of 0deg, 45deg, 90deg, 135deg, and 180deg. The wavelengths were 485nm, 550nm, 633nm and 800nm. The dependence is well defined at all measurement geometries and wavelengths. It can be as high as 8% at 0deg incident angle and 2% at 30deg incident angle. The fitted BRDF data show a very small discrepancy from the measured ones. New data on the forward and backscatter properties of radiometric tarps is reported. The backward scatter is well pronounced for the white samples. The black sample has well pronounced forward scatter. The BRDF characterization of radiometric tarps can be successfully extended to other structured surface fabric samples. The results are NIST traceable.

  13. Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Studies of Temperature, Water Vapor and Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Westwater, Edgeworth

    2011-05-06

    The importance of accurate measurements of column amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid has been well documented by scientists within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA), both microwave radiometers (MWR) and the MWRProfiler (MWRP), been used operationally by ARM for passive retrievals of the quantities: Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) and Liquid Water Path (LWP). However, it has been convincingly shown that these instruments are inadequate to measure low amounts of PWV and LWP. In the case of water vapor, this is especially important during the Arctic winter, when PWV is frequently less than 2 mm. For low amounts of LWP (< 50 g/m{sup 2}), the MWR and MWRP retrievals have an accuracy that is also not acceptable. To address some of these needs, in March-April 2004, NOAA and ARM conducted the NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment - Water Vapor Intensive Operational Period at the ARM NSA/Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) site. After this experiment, the radiometer group at NOAA moved to the Center for Environmental Technology (CET) of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. During this 2004 experiment, a total of 220 radiosondes were launched, and radiometric data from 22.235 to 380 GHz were obtained. Primary instruments included the ARM MWR and MWRP, a Global Positioning System (GPS), as well as the CET Ground-based Scanning Radiometer (GSR). We have analyzed data from these instruments to answer several questions of importance to ARM, including: (a) techniques for improved water vapor measurements; (b) improved calibration techniques during cloudy conditions; (c) the spectral response of radiometers to a variety of conditions: clear, liquid, ice, and mixed phase clouds; and (d) forward modeling of microwave and millimeter wave brightness temperatures from 22 to 380 GHz. Many of these results have been published in the open literature. During the third year of this contract, we participated in another ARM-sponsored experiment at the NSA during February-March 2007. This experiment is called the Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC) and the GSR was operated successfully for the duration of the campaign. One of the principal goals of the experiment was to provide retrievals of water vapor during PWV amounts less than 2 mm and to compare GSR data with ARM radiometers and radiosondes. A secondary goal was to compare the radiometric response of the microwave and millimeter wavelength radiometers to water and ice clouds. In this final report, we will include the separate progress reports for each of the three years of the project and follow with a section on major accomplishments of the project.

  14. Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits through geological time: Implications from recent age-dating research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leach, D.L.; Bradley, D.; Lewchuk, Michael T.; Symons, David T. A.; De Marsily, G.; Brannon, J.

    2001-01-01

    Remarkable advances in age dating Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) lead-zinc deposits provide a new opportunity to understand how and where these deposits form in the Earth's crust. These dates are summarized and examined in a framework of global tectonics, paleogeography, fluid migration, and paleoclimate. Nineteen districts have been dated by paleomagnetic and/or radiometric methods. Of the districts that have both paleomagnetic and radiometric dates, only the Pine Point and East Tennessee districts have significant disagreements. This broad agreement between paleomagnetic and radiometric dates provides added confidence in the dating techniques used. The new dates confirm the direct connection between the genesis of MVT lead-zinc ores with global-scale tectonic events. The dates show that MVT deposits formed mainly during large contractional tectonic events at restricted times in the history of the Earth. Only the deposits in the Lennard Shelf of Australia and Nanisivik in Canada have dates that correspond to extensional tectonic events. The most important period for MVT genesis was the Devonian to Permian time, which corresponds to a series of intense tectonic events during the assimilation of Pangea. The second most important period for MVT genesis was Cretaceous to Tertiary time when microplate assimilation affected the western margin of North America and Africa-Eurasia. There is a notable paucity of MVT lead-zinc ore formation following the breakup of Rodinia and Pangea. Of the five MVT deposits hosted in Proterozoic rocks, only the Nanisivik deposit has been dated as Proterozoic. The contrast in abundance between SEDEX and MVT lead-zinc deposits in the Proterozoic questions the frequently suggested notion that the two types of ores share similar genetic paths. The ages of MVT deposits, when viewed with respect to the orogenic cycle in the adjacent orogen suggest that no single hydrologic model can be universally applied to the migration of the ore fluids. However, topographically driven models best explain most MVT districts. The migration of MVT ore fluids is not a natural consequence of basin evolution; rather, MVT districts formed mainly where platform carbonates had some hydrological connection to orogenic belts. There may be a connection between paleoclimate and the formation of some MVT deposits. This possible relationship is suggested by the dominance of evaporated seawater in fluid inclusions in MVT ores, by hydrological considerations that include the need for multiple-basin volumes of ore fluid to form most MVT districts, and the need for adequate precipitation to provide sufficient topographic head for topographically-driven fluid migration. Paleoclimatic conditions that lead to formation of evaporite conditions but yet have adequate precipitation to form large hydrological systems are most commonly present in low latitudes. For the MVT deposits and districts that have been dated, more than 75% of the combined metal produced are from deposits that have dates that correspond to assembly of Pangea in Devonian through Permian time. The exceptional endowment of Pangea and especially, North America with MVT lead-zinc deposits may be explained by the following: (1) Laurentia, which formed the core of North America, stayed in low latitudes during the Paleozoic, which allowed the development of vast carbonate platforms; (2) intense orogenic activity during the assembly of Pangea created ground preparation for many MVT districts through far-field deformation of the craton; (3) uplifted orogenic belts along Pangean suture zones established large-scale migration of basin fluids; and (4) the location of Pangea in low latitudes with paleoclimates with high evaporation rates led to the formation of brines by the evaporation of seawater and infiltration of these brines into deep basin aquifers during Pangean orogenic events.

  15. Radiometric ages of laterites and constraints on long-term denudation rates in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnell, Yanni

    2003-02-01

    In stable cratonic regions, most tropical weathering mantles evolve over long time scales and record long-term environmental change. They may therefore also reflect tectonism and its denudation-related signals detected through apatite fission-track thermochronology, cosmogenic radionuclide dating, and the age bracketing of laterites by 40Ar/39Ar dating of potassium- and manganese-rich oxides. Based on an existing Cenozoic pedimentation model for the West African craton, this study uses the three combined radiometric methods to define rates of Cenozoic denudation. Denudation rates of <2 m/m.y. on the lateritic plateaus, in comparison to rates of 7 13 m/m.y. adjacent to them, fit ages of 45 50 Ma for late stages of bauxite development and 24 25 Ma for one phase of lateritization. Together, they support the theory implicit in the landscape model that depths of denudation in cratonic interiors are equal to, or not significantly greater than, existing elevation differences between lateritic landforms.

  16. Novel Hyperspectral Sun Photometer for Satellite Remote Sensing Data Radiometric Calibration and Atmospheric Aerosol Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert E.; Holekamp, Kara; Harrington, Gary; Frisbie, Troy

    2006-01-01

    A simple and cost-effective, hyperspectral sun photometer for radiometric vicarious remote sensing system calibration, air quality monitoring, and potentially in-situ planetary climatological studies, was developed. The device was constructed solely from off the shelf components and was designed to be easily deployable for support of short-term verification and validation data collects. This sun photometer not only provides the same data products as existing multi-band sun photometers, this device requires a simpler setup, less data acquisition time and allows for a more direct calibration approach. Fielding this instrument has also enabled Stennis Space Center (SSC) Applied Sciences Directorate personnel to cross calibrate existing sun photometers. This innovative research will position SSC personnel to perform air quality assessments in support of the NASA Applied Sciences Program's National Applications program element as well as to develop techniques to evaluate aerosols in a Martian or other planetary atmosphere.

  17. In Situ Radiometric and Exposure Age Dating of the Martian Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, K. A.; Malespin, C.; Mahaffy, P.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Vasconcelos, P. M.; Milliken, R. E.; Malin, M.; Edgett, K. S.; Pavlov, A. A.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Grant, J. A.; Miller, H. B.; Arvidson, R.; Beegle, L.; Calef, F.; Conrad, P. G.; Dietrich, W. E.; Eigenbrode, J.; Gellert, R.; Gupta, S.; Hamilton, V.; Hassler, D. M.; Lewis, K. W.; McLennan, S. M.; Ming, D.; Navarro-González, R.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Steele, A.; Stolper, E. M.; Sumner, D. Y.; Vaniman, D.; Vasavada, A.; Williford, K.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Blake, David F.; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Dworkin, Jason P.; Floyd, Melissa; Freissinet, Caroline; Garvin, James; Glavin, Daniel; Harpold, Daniel; Martin, David K.; McAdam, Amy; Raaen, Eric; Smith, Michael D.; Stern, Jennifer; Tan, Florence; Trainer, Melissa; Meyer, Michael; Posner, Arik; Voytek, Mary; Anderson, Robert C.; Aubrey, Andrew; Behar, Alberto; Blaney, Diana; Brinza, David; Christensen, Lance; Crisp, Joy A.; DeFlores, Lauren; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Flesch, Gregory; Hurowitz, Joel; Jun, Insoo; Keymeulen, Didier; Maki, Justin; Mischna, Michael; Morookian, John Michael; Parker, Timothy; Pavri, Betina; Schoppers, Marcel; Sengstacken, Aaron; Simmonds, John J.; Spanovich, Nicole; Juarez, Manuel de la Torre; Webster, Christopher R.; Yen, Albert; Archer, Paul Douglas; Cucinotta, Francis; Jones, John H.; Morris, Richard V.; Niles, Paul; Rampe, Elizabeth; Nolan, Thomas; Fisk, Martin; Radziemski, Leon; Barraclough, Bruce; Bender, Steve; Berman, Daniel; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Tokar, Robert; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Yingst, Aileen; Leshin, Laurie; Cleghorn, Timothy; Huntress, Wesley; Manhès, Gérard; Hudgins, Judy; Olson, Timothy; Stewart, Noel; Sarrazin, Philippe; Vicenzi, Edward; Wilson, Sharon A.; Bullock, Mark; Ehresmann, Bent; Peterson, Joseph; Rafkin, Scot; Zeitlin, Cary; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kozyrev, Alexander; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Mokrousov, Maxim; Nikiforov, Sergey; Prokhorov, Vasily; Sanin, Anton; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Varenikov, Alexey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Clark, Benton; Wolff, Michael; Botta, Oliver; Drake, Darrell; Bean, Keri; Lemmon, Mark; Anderson, Ryan B.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Lee, Ella Mae; Sucharski, Robert; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Ávalos, Juan José Blanco; Ramos, Miguel; Kim, Myung-Hee; Plante, Ianik; Muller, Jan-Peter; Ewing, Ryan; Boynton, William; Downs, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Harshman, Karl; Morrison, Shaunna; Kortmann, Onno; Palucis, Marisa; Williams, Amy; Lugmair, Günter; Wilson, Michael A.; Rubin, David; Jakosky, Bruce; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Frydenvang, Jens; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Kinch, Kjartan; Koefoed, Asmus; Madsen, Morten Bo; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Boyd, Nick; Campbell, John L.; Perrett, Glynis; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott; Jacob, Samantha; Owen, Tobias; Rowland, Scott; Savijärvi, Hannu; Boehm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Burmeister, Sönke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; García, César Martín; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Bridges, John C.; McConnochie, Timothy; Benna, Mehdi; Franz, Heather; Bower, Hannah; Brunner, Anna; Blau, Hannah; Boucher, Thomas; Carmosino, Marco; Atreya, Sushil; Elliott, Harvey; Halleaux, Douglas; Rennó, Nilton; Wong, Michael; Pepin, Robert; Elliott, Beverley; Spray, John; Thompson, Lucy; Gordon, Suzanne; Newsom, Horton; Ollila, Ann; Williams, Joshua; Bentz, Jennifer; Nealson, Kenneth; Popa, Radu; Kah, Linda C.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Tate, Christopher; Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary; Hallet, Bernard; Sletten, Ronald; Francis, Raymond; McCullough, Emily; Cloutis, Ed; ten Kate, Inge Loes; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Fraeman, Abigail; Scholes, Daniel; Slavney, Susan; Stein, Thomas; Ward, Jennifer; Berger, Jeffrey; Moores, John E.

    2014-01-01

    We determined radiogenic and cosmogenic noble gases in a mudstone on the floor of Gale Crater. A K-Ar age of 4.21 ± 0.35 billion years represents a mixture of detrital and authigenic components and confirms the expected antiquity of rocks comprising the crater rim. Cosmic-ray-produced 3He, 21Ne, and 36Ar yield concordant surface exposure ages of 78 ± 30 million years. Surface exposure occurred mainly in the present geomorphic setting rather than during primary erosion and transport. Our observations are consistent with mudstone deposition shortly after the Gale impact or possibly in a later event of rapid erosion and deposition. The mudstone remained buried until recent exposure by wind-driven scarp retreat. Sedimentary rocks exposed by this mechanism may thus offer the best potential for organic biomarker preservation against destruction by cosmic radiation.

  18. In situ radiometric and exposure age dating of the martian surface.

    PubMed

    Farley, K A; Malespin, C; Mahaffy, P; Grotzinger, J P; Vasconcelos, P M; Milliken, R E; Malin, M; Edgett, K S; Pavlov, A A; Hurowitz, J A; Grant, J A; Miller, H B; Arvidson, R; Beegle, L; Calef, F; Conrad, P G; Dietrich, W E; Eigenbrode, J; Gellert, R; Gupta, S; Hamilton, V; Hassler, D M; Lewis, K W; McLennan, S M; Ming, D; Navarro-González, R; Schwenzer, S P; Steele, A; Stolper, E M; Sumner, D Y; Vaniman, D; Vasavada, A; Williford, K; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R F

    2014-01-24

    We determined radiogenic and cosmogenic noble gases in a mudstone on the floor of Gale Crater. A K-Ar age of 4.21 ± 0.35 billion years represents a mixture of detrital and authigenic components and confirms the expected antiquity of rocks comprising the crater rim. Cosmic-ray-produced (3)He, (21)Ne, and (36)Ar yield concordant surface exposure ages of 78 ± 30 million years. Surface exposure occurred mainly in the present geomorphic setting rather than during primary erosion and transport. Our observations are consistent with mudstone deposition shortly after the Gale impact or possibly in a later event of rapid erosion and deposition. The mudstone remained buried until recent exposure by wind-driven scarp retreat. Sedimentary rocks exposed by this mechanism may thus offer the best potential for organic biomarker preservation against destruction by cosmic radiation. PMID:24324273

  19. Radiometric dating of young MORB using the (40)Ar-(39)Ar incremental heating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, R. A.; Hogan, L. G.

    1994-09-01

    Determination of reliable crystallization ages by K-Ar methods for young (is less than 1 Ma), fresh basalts from the seafloor (mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORBs)) has been frustrated by several effects. The small amounts of radiogenic Ar-40 developed over these timescales in such low-K rocks are difficult to resolve from predominantly atmospheric Ar-40. An additional concern is that mantle-derived Ar-40 may not be totally outgassed when magmas quench at seafloor hydrostatic pressures. We have developed a successful strategy for partially separating atmospheric from radiogenic Ar-40 in (40)Ar-(39)Ar incremental heating experiments on mid-ocean ridge basalts, from the East Pacific Rise near the Clipperton Fracture Zone. Pre-heating samples to 400 C removes surficial atmospheric Ar-40, while subsequent heating at 600-1000 C produces favorable proportions of radiogenic Ar-40. Experiments using 'zero-age' glassy and holocrystalline samples show that mantle-derived Ar-40 is retained only in the outermost few cm of rapidly cooled pillow basalts.

  20. Dating of Impact Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schärer, Urs

    This chapter presents the different methods used or potentially useful to determine the age of an impact event on terrestrial planets or meteorite parent bodies. Two approaches exist: (1) geological methods such as Stratigraphy, which is the study of succeeding geological events, and (2) methods based on natural radioactivity (radiometric dating), as well as the measurement of isotopes produced by cosmic rays in space or on the Earth's surface. The nuclear methods are preferentially discussed because they yield absolute ages, whereas geological methods define relative ages only. Shock metamorphic effects on minerals and rocks are presented in the frame of an impact crater. The different phase transformations induced by shock wave passage are typical for high-pressure regimes (20-60 GPa) which cannot be produced by any classical geological process like regional metamorphism or magmatism. In consequence, impacts produce rocks called "impactites" that are very distinct from lithologies of continental or oceanic crust. Their composition varies between molten glass (tektites and spheruls), diaplectic glasses (amorphous phases), breccias with either entirely or partially glassy matrix, and rock fragments enclosed in a fine grained fragmental matrix. To determine an age, isotopic equilibrium must be achieved among the newly produced phases. Such conditions are potentially present in glasses that are produced by residual heat after decompression ( C). The best candidates on the large scale are: samples taken in melt layers of craters, in the glassy matrix of breccias in the crater area, as well as tektites and spheruls found in distant ejecta. The presence of such types of ejecta allows to date the impact event through the analyses of layers preserved in sediments. An excellent example for this scenario is the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary where a large series of impact produced minerals have been preserved. In certain cases, it is possible to trace events even if the crater remains unknown. The majority of shock-wave produced rocks are not in isotopic equilibrium, and often the values measured represent mixed ages or disturbed systems, not giving the impact age. Only the combination of different dating methods, and very selective sample selection allows impact dating.

  1. Optimal spectral inversion of atmospheric radiometric measurements in the near-UV to near-IR range: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fussen, Didier; Vanhellemont, Filip; Bingen, Christine

    2002-01-01

    WWe present a general analysis of the error budget in the spectral inversion of atmospheric radiometric measurements. By focussing on the case of an occultation experiment, we simplify the problem through a reduced number of absorbers in a linearized formalism. However, our analysis is quite general and applies to many other situations. For a spectrometer having an infinite spectral resolution, we discuss the origin of systematic and random errors. In particular, the difficult case of aerosols is investigated and several inversion techniques are compared. We underline the importance of carefully simulating the spectral inversion as a function of the target constituent to be retrieved, and the required accuracy level.

  2. Decay of the El Chichon perturbation to the stratospheric aerosol layer - Multispectral ground-based radiometric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, E. W.; Lebaron, B. A.; Michalsky, J. J.

    1988-01-01

    A 9-yr time series of multispectral radiometric observations taken at Rattlesnake Mountain Observatory is analyzed to determine the long-term behavior of the El Chichon-induced perturbation to the stratospheric aerosol layer. A technique for determining the volcanic enhancement is described. Time series data for the volcanic enhancement in stratospheric optical depth at wavelengths of 1010, 785, 535, 486, and 428 nm are presented. The main features of the results, slight wavelength dependence and a seasonal oscillation superimposed on the expected exponential decay at all wavelengths, are discussed.

  3. BOREAS TE-18, 30-m, Radiometrically Rectified Landsat TM Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-18 team used a radiometric rectification process to produce standardized DN values for a series of Landsat TM images of the BOREAS SSA and NSA in order to compare images that were collected under different atmospheric conditions. The images for each study area were referenced to an image that had very clear atmospheric qualities. The reference image for the SSA was collected on 02-Sep-1994, while the reference image for the NSA was collected on 21-Jun-1995. the 23 rectified images cover the period of 07-Jul-1985 to 18 Sep-1994 in the SSA and from 22-Jun-1984 to 09-Jun-1994 in the NSA. Each of the reference scenes had coincident atmospheric optical thickness measurements made by RSS-11. The radiometric rectification process is described in more detail by Hall et al. (199 1). The original Landsat TM data were received from CCRS for use in the BOREAS project. The data are stored in binary image-format files. Due to the nature of the radiometric rectification process and copyright issues, these full-resolution images may not be publicly distributed. However, a spatially degraded 60-m resolution version of the images is available on the BOREAS CD-ROM series. See Sections 15 and 16 for information about how to possibly acquire the full resolution data. Information about the full-resolution images is provided in an inventory listing on the CD-ROMs. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Activity Archive Center (DAAC).

  4. Radiometric calibration of digital cameras using Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schall, Martin; Grunwald, Michael; Umlauf, Georg; Franz, Matthias O.

    2015-05-01

    Digital cameras are subject to physical, electronic and optic effects that result in errors and noise in the image. These effects include for example a temperature dependent dark current, read noise, optical vignetting or different sensitivities of individual pixels. The task of a radiometric calibration is to reduce these errors in the image and thus improve the quality of the overall application. In this work we present an algorithm for radiometric calibration based on Gaussian processes. Gaussian processes are a regression method widely used in machine learning that is particularly useful in our context. Then Gaussian process regression is used to learn a temperature and exposure time dependent mapping from observed gray-scale values to true light intensities for each pixel. Regression models based on the characteristics of single pixels suffer from excessively high runtime and thus are unsuitable for many practical applications. In contrast, a single regression model for an entire image with high spatial resolution leads to a low quality radiometric calibration, which also limits its practical use. The proposed algorithm is predicated on a partitioning of the pixels such that each pixel partition can be represented by one single regression model without quality loss. Partitioning is done by extracting features from the characteristic of each pixel and using them for lexicographic sorting. Splitting the sorted data into partitions with equal size yields the final partitions, each of which is represented by the partition centers. An individual Gaussian process regression and model selection is done for each partition. Calibration is performed by interpolating the gray-scale value of each pixel with the regression model of the respective partition. The experimental comparison of the proposed approach to classical flat field calibration shows a consistently higher reconstruction quality for the same overall number of calibration frames.

  5. Thermochronology of economic mineral deposits: dating the stages of mineralization at Panasqueira, Portugal, by high-precision 40Ar/ 39Ar age spectrum techniques on muscovite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snee, L.W.; Sutter, J.F.; Kelly, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    This study is an example of a new and powerful application of 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum dating of muscovite. It is now possible to establish time constraints necessary for solving some of the long-standing problems in economic geology. Beyond this, the unique geologic situation of Panasqueira has allowed us to quantify the thermal characteristics of muscovite. Published fluid inclusion data have been used to estimate a muscovite argon closure temperature of ~325??C during rapid cooling or short reheating and a temperature of ~270??C during slow cooling or extended reheating. Argon-loss patterns displayed by all dated muscovites resulted from reheating after original closure; the mechanism for this argon loss appears to have been argon transport by volume diffusion. Thus, 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum dating of muscovite can be used to evaluate thermal conditions controlling argon diffusion as well as age, duration, and number of episodes of mineralization. -from Authors

  6. Spectrally and Radiometrically Stable, Wideband, Onboard Calibration Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, James B.; Richardson, Brandon S.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Sarture, Charles M.; Quetin, Gregory R.; Porter, Michael D.; Green, Robert O.; Nolte, Scott H.; Hernandez, Marco A.; Knoll, Linley A.

    2013-01-01

    The Onboard Calibration (OBC) source incorporates a medical/scientific-grade halogen source with a precisely designed fiber coupling system, and a fiber-based intensity-monitoring feedback loop that results in radiometric and spectral stabilities to within less than 0.3 percent over a 15-hour period. The airborne imaging spectrometer systems developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory incorporate OBC sources to provide auxiliary in-use system calibration data. The use of the OBC source will provide a significant increase in the quantitative accuracy, reliability, and resulting utility of the spectral data collected from current and future imaging spectrometer instruments.

  7. A radiometric interpretive legend for Landsat digital thematic maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinove, Charles J.

    1977-01-01

    A legend is suggested for use with computer-generated thematic maps made from Landsat digital data that designates some of the radiometric characteristics of each thematic map unit as well as the described terrain attributes of each map unit. The relationship between spectral band and radiance for each map unit is shown by a two-dimensional polygon with the four Landsat multispectral scanner bands plotted on the ordinate and radiance levels on the abscissa. The resulting shape is colored to correspond with the map unit color, thus facilitating the recognition and understanding of the computer-generated map units.

  8. In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of the thematic mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, K. R.; Holm, R. G.; Kastner, C. J.; Palmer, J. M.; Slater, P. N.; Dinguirard, M.; Ezra, C. E.; Jackson, R. D.; Savage, R. K.

    1983-01-01

    The TM multispectral scanner system was calibrated in an absolute manner before launch. To determine the temporal changes of the absolute radiometric calibration of the entire system, spectroradiometric measurements of the ground and the atmosphere were made simultaneously with TM collections over White Sands, New Mexico. By entering the measured values in an atmospheric radiative transfer program, the radiance levels of the in four of the spectral bands of the TM were determined. Tables show values for the reflectance of snow at White Sands measured by a modular 8 channel radiometer, and values for exoatmospheric irradiance within the TM passbands, calculated for the Earth-Sun distance using a solar radiometer.

  9. Date Rape

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... Abusive Relationships Dynamic Stretching A Guy's Guide to Body Image Date Rape KidsHealth > Teens > Mind > Relationships > Date Rape Print A A A Text ...

  10. Automatic and improved radiometric correction of Landsat imagery using reference values from MODIS surface reflectance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, X.; Pesquer, L.; Cristóbal, J.; González-Guerrero, O.

    2014-12-01

    Radiometric correction is a prerequisite for generating high-quality scientific data, making it possible to discriminate between product artefacts and real changes in Earth processes as well as accurately produce land cover maps and detect changes. This work contributes to the automatic generation of surface reflectance products for Landsat satellite series. Surface reflectances are generated by a new approach developed from a previous simplified radiometric (atmospheric + topographic) correction model. The proposed model keeps the core of the old model (incidence angles and cast-shadows through a digital elevation model [DEM], Earth-Sun distance, etc.) and adds new characteristics to enhance and automatize ground reflectance retrieval. The new model includes the following new features: (1) A fitting model based on reference values from pseudoinvariant areas that have been automatically extracted from existing reflectance products (Terra MODIS MOD09GA) that were selected also automatically by applying quality criteria that include a geostatistical pattern model. This guarantees the consistency of the internal and external series, making it unnecessary to provide extra atmospheric data for the acquisition date and time, dark objects or dense vegetation. (2) A spatial model for atmospheric optical depth that uses detailed DEM and MODTRAN simulations. (3) It is designed so that large time-series of images can be processed automatically to produce consistent Landsat surface reflectance time-series. (4) The approach can handle most images, acquired now or in the past, regardless of the processing system, with the exception of those with extremely high cloud coverage. The new methodology has been successfully applied to a series of near 300 images of the same area including MSS, TM and ETM+ imagery as well as to different formats and processing systems (LPGS and NLAPS from the USGS; CEOS from ESA) for different degrees of cloud coverage (up to 60%) and SLC-off. Reflectance products have been validated with some example applications: time series robustness (for a pixel in a pseudoinvariant area, deviations are only 1.04% on average along the series), spectral signatures generation (visually coherent with the MODIS ones, but more similar between dates), and classification (up to 4 percent points better than those obtained with the original manual method or the CDR products). In conclusion, this new approach, that could also be applied to other sensors with similar band configurations, offers a fully automatic and reasonably good procedure for the new era of long time-series of spatially detailed global remote sensing data.

  11. Radiometric calibration of Landsat Thematic Mapper Thermal Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wukelic, G. E.; Gibbons, D. E.; Martucci, L. M.; Foote, H. P.

    1989-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of satellite-acquired data is essential for quantitative scientific studies, as well as for a variety of image-processing applications. This paper describes a multiyear, on-orbit radiometric calibration of the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) Band 6 conducted at DOE's Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Numerous Landsat TM scenes acquired and analyzed included day and night coverages at several geographical locations over several seasons. Concurrent with Landsat overpasses, thermal field and local meteorological (surface and radiosonde) measurements were collected. At-satellite (uncorrected) radiances and temperatures for water and nonwater land cover were compared to ground truth (GT) measurements after making adjustments for atmospheric (using LOWTRAN), mixed-pixel, and emissivity effects. Results indicate that, for both water and nonwater features, TM Band 6 average corrected temperature determinations using local radiosonde data to adjust for atmospheric effects, and using appropriate emissivities, are within 1.0 C of GT temperature values. Temperatures of water pixels derived from uncorrected TM Band 6 data varied roughly between 1 and 3 C of ground truth values for water temperatures ranging between 4 and 24 C. Moreover, corrections using nonlocal and noncoincident radiosonde data resulted in errors as large as 12 C. Corrections using the U.S. Standard Atmosphere gave temperature values within 1 to 2 C of GT. The average uncertainty for field instruments was + or - 0.2 C; average uncertainty for Landsat TM corrected temperature determinations was + or - 0.4 C.

  12. Calculated sensitivities of several optical radiometric indices for vegetation canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shultis, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    The present study employs a radiative transfer model for a vegetation canopy to compute several quantities used in remote sensing applications and to determine the sensitivity of these radiometric quantities to several of the important problem parameters. Attention is given to the ratio of near IR to visible reflected intensities in the nadir direction, the ratio of the fraction of incident energy reflected in the near IR to that in the visible, the normalized difference between the near IR and visible nadir-reflected intensities, and the visible intensity transmitted in a given downward direction. A realistic radiative transfer model is proposed for calculating these radiometric quantities. With these models, the sensitivity of the reflected and transmitted quantities to various canopy and illumination conditions are then determined. The sensitivity of the calculated quantities are presented as a function of the leaf area index of the canopy, and, for the reflected quantities, also as a function of the fraction of visible light absorbed in the canopy.

  13. Blood culture cross contamination associated with a radiometric analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, M.R.; Miller, A.D.; Davis, A.C.

    1982-04-01

    During a 9-day period in August 1980 in a New Jersey hospital, three pairs of consecutively numbered blood cultures from different patients were identified as positive for the same organism, for each pair, both cultures were positive in the same atmosphere, both organisms had the same sensitivities, and the second of each pair grew at least 2 days after the first and was the only positive blood culture obtained from the patient. When the hospital laboratory discontinued use of its radiometric culture analyzer for 15 days, no more consecutive pairs of positive cultures occurred. Subsequent use of the machine for 9 days with a new power unit but the original circuit boards resulted in one more similar consecutive pair (Staphylococcus epidermidis). After replacement of the entire power unit, there were no further such pairs. Examination of the machine by the manufacturer revealed a defective circuit board which resulted in inadequate needle sterilization. Laboratories which utilize radiometric analyzers should be aware of the potential for cross contamination. Recognition of such events requires alert microbiologists and infection control practitioners and a record system in the bacteriology laboratory designed to identify such clusters.

  14. Radiometric Characterization of Hyperspectral Imagers using Multispectral Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCorkel, Joel; Kurt, Thome; Leisso, Nathan; Anderson, Nikolaus; Czapla-Myers, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    The Remote Sensing Group (RSG) at the University of Arizona has a long history of using ground-based test sites for the calibration of airborne and satellite based sensors. Often, ground-truth measurements at these test sites are not always successful due to weather and funding availability. Therefore, RSG has also automated ground instrument approaches and cross-calibration methods to verify the radiometric calibration of a sensor. The goal in the cross-calibration method is to transfer the calibration of a well-known sensor to that of a different sensor, This work studies the feasibility of determining the radiometric calibration of a hyperspectral imager using multispectral a imagery. The work relies on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (M0DIS) as a reference for the hyperspectral sensor Hyperion. Test sites used for comparisons are Railroad Valley in Nevada and a portion of the Libyan Desert in North Africa. Hyperion bands are compared to MODIS by band averaging Hyperion's high spectral resolution data with the relative spectral response of M0DlS. The results compare cross-calibration scenarios that differ in image acquisition coincidence, test site used for the calibration, and reference sensor. Cross-calibration results are presented that show agreement between the use of coincident and non-coincident image pairs within 2% in most brands as well as similar agreement between results that employ the different MODIS sensors as a reference.

  15. Parallel relative radiometric normalisation for remote sensing image mosaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chong; Chen, Zhenjie; Li, Manchun; Liu, Yongxue; Cheng, Liang; Ren, Yibin

    2014-12-01

    Relative radiometric normalisation (RRN) is a vital step to achieve radiometric consistency among remote sensing images. Geo-analysis over large areas often involves mosaicking massive remote sensing images. Hence RRN becomes a data-intensive and computing-intensive task. This study implements a parallel RNN method based on the iteratively re-weighted multivariate alteration detection (IR-MAD) transformation and orthogonal regression. To parallelise the method of IR-MAD and orthogonal regression, there are two key problems: the normalisation path determination and the task dependence on normalisation coefficients calculation. In this paper, the reference image and normalisation paths are determined based on the shortest distance algorithm to reduce normalisation error. Formulas of orthogonal regression are acquired considering the effect of the normalisation path to reduce the task dependence on the calculation of coefficients. A master-slave parallel mode is proposed to implement the parallel method, and a task queue and a process queue are used for task scheduling. Experiments show that the parallel RRN method provides good normalisation results and favourable parallel speed-up, efficiency and scalability, which indicate that the parallel method can handle large volumes of remote sensing images efficiently.

  16. Evaluating Radiometric Measurements Using a Fixed 45 Degrees Responsivity and Zenith Angle Dependent Responsivities (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Dooraghi, M.; Habte, A.; Reda, I.; Sengupta, M.; Gotseff, P.; Andreas, A.; Anderberg, M.

    2014-03-01

    This poster seeks to demonstrate the importance and application of an existing but unused approach that ultimately reduces the uncertainty of radiometric measurements. Current radiometric data is based on a single responsivity value that introduces significant uncertainty to the data, however, through using responsivity as a function of solar zenith angle, the uncertainty could be decreased by 50%.

  17. Application of radiometric surface temperature for surface energy balance estimation: John Monteith's contributions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over 25 years ago, Huband and Monteith paper’s investigating the radiative surface temperature and the surface energy balance of a wheat canopy, highlighted the key issues in computing fluxes with radiometric surface temperature. These included the relationship between radiometric and aerodynamic s...

  18. Radiometric Calibration and Processing Procedure for Reflective Bands on LANDSAT-4 Protoflight Thematic Mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.; Abrams, R. B.; Ball, D. L.; Leung, K. C.

    1984-01-01

    Descriptive and procedural background material for understanding results from radiometric calibration of the reflective bands and digital image products of the thermal mapper (TM) are discussed. The radiometric subsystems of the TM are described, with emphasis on the internal calibrator pulse shapes and timing cycle.

  19. Comp. by: SGunasekar Date:28/3/08 Time:03:08:24 Stage:First Proof File Path://ppdys1108/Womat3/ Production/PRODENV/0000000005/0000007785/0000000016/0000778331.3D Proof by: QC by

    E-print Network

    Dorn, Ron

    where VMLs have been calibrated by radiometric dating methods, they can yield corre- lated ages for rockComp. by: SGunasekar Date:28/3/08 Time:03:08:24 Stage:First Proof File Path://ppdys1108/Womat3 convincing evi- dence that varnish microstratigraphy is a valid dating tool to estimate surface exposure ages

  20. Absolute ages from crater statistics: Using radiometric ages of Martian samples for determining the Martian cratering chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neukum, G.

    1988-01-01

    In the absence of dates derived from rock samples, impact crater frequencies are commonly used to date Martian surface units. All models for absolute dating rely on the lunar cratering chronology and on the validity of its extrapolation to Martian conditions. Starting from somewhat different lunar chronologies, rather different Martian cratering chronologies are found in the literature. Currently favored models are compared. The differences at old ages are significant, the differences at younger ages are considerable and give absolute ages for the same crater frequencies as different as a factor of 3. The total uncertainty could be much higher, though, since the ratio of lunar to Martian cratering rate which is of basic importance in the models is believed to be known no better than within a factor of 2. Thus, it is of crucial importance for understanding the the evolution of Mars and determining the sequence of events to establish an unambiguous Martian cratering chronology from crater statistics in combination with clean radiometric ages of returned Martian samples. For the dating goal, rocks should be as pristine as possible from a geologically simple area with a one-stage emplacement history of the local formation. A minimum of at least one highland site for old ages, two intermediate-aged sites, and one very young site is needed.

  1. Influence of Leaf Area Index on the Radiometric Resistance to Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Lee, Xuhui; Suyker, Andrew E.; Wen, Xuefa

    2015-09-01

    Sensible heat flux is an important component of the surface energy balance. Land surface models often use the radiative surface temperature instead of the aerodynamic temperature to predict the surface sensible flux, because the former is much easier to observe by remote sensing or to compute from the surface energy balance equation. Here, measurements from 44 FLUXNET sites are used to examine the stability and leaf area index (LAI) dependence of the radiometric resistance, a resistance that should be included in the bulk transfer method if the radiometric temperature is used for the flux calculation. Results show that the radiometric resistance is much higher under stable conditions than under unstable conditions. In unstable conditions, the radiometric resistance is highly sensitive to LAI, decreasing exponentially as LAI increases. Omission of the radiometric resistance from the bulk transfer method causes a large overestimation in the sensible heat flux, especially for low-LAI surfaces and under unstable conditions.

  2. An overview of in-orbit radiometric calibration of typical satellite sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, G. Q.; Li, C. Y.; Yue, T.; Jiang, L. J.; Liu, N.; Sun, Y.; Li, M. Y.

    2015-06-01

    This paper reviews the development of in-orbit radiometric calibration methods in the past 40 years. It summarizes the development of in-orbit radiometric calibration technology of typical satellite sensors in the visible/near-infrared bands and the thermal infrared band. Focuses on the visible/near-infrared bands radiometric calibration method including: Lamp calibration and solar radiationbased calibration. Summarizes the calibration technology of Landsat series satellite sensors including MSS, TM, ETM+, OLI, TIRS; SPOT series satellite sensors including HRV, HRS. In addition to the above sensors, there are also summarizing ALI which was equipped on EO-1, IRMSS which was equipped on CBERS series satellite. Comparing the in-orbit radiometric calibration technology of different periods but the same type satellite sensors analyzes the similarities and differences of calibration technology. Meanwhile summarizes the in-orbit radiometric calibration technology in the same periods but different country satellite sensors advantages and disadvantages of calibration technology.

  3. The Landsat Data Continuity Mission Operational Land Imager (OLI) Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian L.; Dabney, Philip W.; Murphy-Morris, Jeanine E.; Knight, Edward J.; Kvaran, Geir; Barsi, Julia A.

    2010-01-01

    The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) has a comprehensive radiometric characterization and calibration program beginning with the instrument design, and extending through integration and test, on-orbit operations and science data processing. Key instrument design features for radiometric calibration include dual solar diffusers and multi-lamped on-board calibrators. The radiometric calibration transfer procedure from NIST standards has multiple checks on the radiometric scale throughout the process and uses a heliostat as part of the transfer to orbit of the radiometric calibration. On-orbit lunar imaging will be used to track the instruments stability and side slither maneuvers will be used in addition to the solar diffuser to flat field across the thousands of detectors per band. A Calibration Validation Team is continuously involved in the process from design to operations. This team uses an Image Assessment System (IAS), part of the ground system to characterize and calibrate the on-orbit data.

  4. Data from radar images integrated with information from traditional lithologic and dating techniques improve resolution of surficial geologic units in the central Florida peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    McCartan, L.; Moy, W.S.; Wingard, G.L. Owens, J.P.; Kover, A.N.; Van Valkenburg, S.G.; Mason, D.B. )

    1994-03-01

    Side Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) images provide information useful to 1:100,000-scale surficial geologic mapping across the Florida peninsula from Sarasota to Fort Pierce. The SLAR images show textural patterns, sharp gradients, and certain compositional variations that cause differences in reflectivity. Quaternary and Pliocene beach ridges and marginal marine plains, visible on SLAR images, occupy most of the eastern half of the area; the most prominent beach ridge, which was deposited during the late Pliocene or early Pleistocene, is the southern terminus of the central highlands of Florida. Other geologic features detected by radar are a change from iron-poor to moderately iron-rich soil that marks the boundary between two middle Quaternary ( ) units, oyster reefs associated with late Pleistocene bay deposits northwest of Lake Okeechobee, and permanent and ephemeral ponds that reflect the thickness of unconsolidated sediment over weathered carbonate rocks. In addition to the geomorphic and compositional information from SLAR, mineralogic, textural, and age data from drill holes and pits were used to delineate surficial geologic map units. Stratigraphic and numerical age estimates are based on molluscan biostratigraphy, uranium disequilibrium series dates on corals, [sup 87]Sr/[sup 66]Sr dates on molluscs, and [sup 14]C dates on peat and humate.

  5. Image quality analysis of a spectra-radiometric sparse-aperture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Noah R.; Introne, Robert E.; Schott, John R.

    2004-09-01

    Sparse aperture (SA) telescopes represent a promising technology to increase the effective diameter of an optical system while reducing overall weight and stowable size. Although conceptually explored in the literature for decades, the technology has only recently matured to the point of being reasonably considered for certain applications. In general, a sparse aperture system consists of an array of sub-apertures that are phased to synthesize a larger effective aperture. The models used to date to create predictions of sparse aperture imagery typically make use of a "gray world" assumption, where the input is a resampled black and white panchromatic image. This input is then degraded and resampled with a so-called polychromatic system optical transfer function (OTF), which is a weighted average of the OTFs over the spectral bandpass. In reality, a physical OTF is spectrally dependent, exhibiting varying structure with spatial frequency (especially in the presence of optical aberrations or sub-aperture phase errors). Given this spectral variation with spatial frequency, there is some concern the traditional gray world resampling approach may not address significant features of the image quality associated with sparse aperture systems. This research investigates the subject of how the image quality of a sparse aperture system varies with respect to a conventional telescope from a spectra-radiometric perspective, with emphasis on whether the restored sparse aperture image will be beset by spectral artifacts.

  6. Relative Dating Via Fractures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This VIS image of the eastern part of the Tharsis region illustrates how fractures can be used in relative dating of a surface. The fractured materials on the right side of the image are embayed by younger volcanic flows originating to the west of the image. Note how the younger flows cover the ends of the fractures, and are not at all fractured themselves.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 43.2, Longitude 269.4 East (90.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Millennial-scale varnish microlamination dating of late Pleistocene geomorphic features in the drylands of western USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tanzhuo; Broecker, Wallace S.

    2013-04-01

    Varnish microlamination (VML) dating is a climate-based correlative age determination technique used to correlate and date various geomorphic features in deserts. In this study, we establish a generalized late Pleistocene (18-74 ka) millennial-scale microlamination sequence in fine-grained, fast-accumulating rock varnish for the drylands of western USA, radiometrically calibrate the sequence and correlate it with the ?18O record in the GISP2 Greenland ice core. We then use this climate-correlated varnish microstratigraphy to estimate surface exposure ages for radiometrically dated late Pleistocene geomorphic features in the study region. The VML dating of debris flow deposits on the Sehoo recessional shorelines of Lake Lahontan at the Jessup embayment of central Nevada yields a minimum-limiting age of 14.95-15.95 ka, in good agreement with a calibrated 14C age of 15.22 ± 0.12 ka for the timing of the lake recession. The VML dating of a giant ejecta block on the rim of Meteor Crater in northern Arizona yields a minimum-limiting age of 49.15 ka, closely matching a thermoluminescence (TL) age of 49 ± 3 ka and slightly younger than a recently updated cosmogenic 36Cl age of 56.0 ± 2.4 ka for the meteor impact event. The VML dating of distal Q2c fan surfaces on Hanaupah Canyon alluvial fan in Death Valley, California, yields a minimum-limiting age of 73.55 ka, in accord with cosmogenic 36Cl depth-profile ages of 66 + 22/-14 ka and 72 + 24/- 20 ka for the same fan deposits. The close agreement between the VML age estimates and the independently derived radiometric ages for these geomorphic features attests to the validity and reliability of millennial-scale VML dating. To further assess its potential in desert geomorphological research, we use the VML method to study alluvial-fan responses to millennial-scale climatic changes. The VML dating of a small tributary fan in Death Valley reveals two episodes of fan aggradation, one ceasing at 73.55-86.75 ka during the dry period of the last interglacial (MIS 5a) and the other finishing at 66.15 ka during the wet period of the last glacial (MIS 4). The VML and 36Cl dating of the distal Q2c fan surfaces on Hanaupah Canyon fan reveal two episodes of large-scale fan aggradation ended at 72 + 24/- 20 ka and 73.55 ka during the wet period of MIS 4. Fanhead incision and associated within-channel or fantoe aggradation are found to take place during the relatively dry period of the glacial-to-interglacial climatic transition (12-24 ka) and the Holocene interglacial dry period (0-12 ka). These data indicate that, on the millennial to sub-Milankovitch timescale (~ 103-104 years), fan aggradation is a discrete sedimentational process under various climatic conditions. Because fan aggradation is ultimately controlled by the intensity and frequency of precipitation events - which in turn are modulated by major climatic oscillations such as Heinrich events, Dansgaard/Oeschger (DO) events, and glacial/interglacial shifts - these major climatic changes could be the pacemaker of regionally contemporaneous large-area fan segmentation.

  8. Dating terrestrial impact events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutsch, Alexander; Schaerer, Urs

    1994-05-01

    Systematic examination of dating results from various craters indicates that about 90% of the rocks affected by an impact preserve their pre-shock ages because shock and post-shock conditions are not sufficient to disturb isotopic dating systems. In the other 10% of target lithologies, various geochronometers show significant shock-induced effects. Major problems in dating impactites are caused by their non-equlibrated character. They often display complex textures, where differently shocked and unshocked phases interfinger on the sub-mm scale. Due to this, dating on whole rock samples or insufficiently pure mineral fractions often yielded ambiguous results that set broad age limits but are not sufficient to answer reliably questions such as a possible periodicity in cratering on Earth, or correlation of impact events with mass extinctions. Dating results from shock recovery experiments indicate that post-shock annealing plays the most important role in resetting isotopic clocks. Therefore, the major criterion for sample selection in and around craters is the post-shock thermal regime. Based on their different thermal evolution, the following geological impact formations can be distinguished: (1) the coherent impact melt layer, (2) allochthonous breccia deposits, (3) the crater basement, and (4) distant ejecta deposits. Samples of the coherent impact melt layer are the most suitable candidates for dating. Excellent ages of high precision can be obtained by internal Rb-Sr, and Sm-Nd isochrons, U-Pb analyses on newly crystallized accessory minerals, and K-Ar (Ar-39-Ar-40) dating of clast-free melt rocks. Fission track counting on glassy material has yielded correct ages, and paleomagnetic measurements have been successfully applied to post-Triassic craters. In the ideal case of a fast-cooling impact melt layer, all these different techniques should give identical ages. Allochthonous breccias contain shocked, unshocked, and/or glassy components in various proportions; and, hence, each of these ejecta deposits has its own individual thermal history, making sample evaluation difficult. Glassy melt particles in suevitic breccias are well suited for fission track and Ar-Ar dating. Weakly shocked material may yield reliable Ar-Ar and fission track ages, if formation temperatures were high, and cooling rates moderate. In contrast, highly shocked but rapidly cooled lithologies show only disturbed and not reset isotopic systems. For ejecta deposits and the crater wall of young craters, dating with cosmogenic nuclides is a new and powerful technique. Crater basement lithologies have a high potential in impact dating, although it has not been exploited so far. techniques are most promising, because both systems are easily reset at low temperatures. Good candidates for impact dating are long-term annealed rocks, even if shock metamorphic overprint is very weak. In addition, Ar-Ar dating dating of pseudotachylites appears promising. *In large impact structures, where high temperatures persist for long times, polymict 'footwall' breccias beneath the melt sheet are also appropriate for dating, using the isochron approach and U-Pb on accessory minerals. -Distant ejecta material have undergone very fast cooling, and the ejecta deposits have ambient formation temperatures. Among this material, tektites and impact melt glass are ideal objects for Ar-Ar and fission track impact dating. Dating on other material from distant ejecta deposits, such as U-Pb analyses on zircons, offers new possibilities. %Efforts to correlate distant ejecta with distinct craters critically depend on proper error assignment to a specific age. This aspect is illustrated on the K/T boundary example.

  9. Parallel algorithms of relative radiometric correction for images of TH-1 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Tingtao; Cheng, Jiasheng; Yang, Tao

    2014-05-01

    The first generation of transitive stereo-metric satellites in China, TH-1 Satellite, is able to gain stereo images of three-line-array with resolution of 5 meters, multispectral images of 10 meters, and panchromatic high resolution images of 2 meters. The procedure between level 0 and level 1A of high resolution images is so called relative radiometric correction (RRC for short). The processing algorithm of high resolution images, with large volumes of data, is complicated and time consuming. In order to bring up the processing speed, people in industry commonly apply parallel processing techniques based on CPU or GPU. This article firstly introduces the whole process and each step of the algorithm - that is in application - of RRC for high resolution images in level 0; secondly, the theory and characteristics of MPI (Message Passing Interface) and OpenMP (Open Multi-Processing) parallel programming techniques is briefly described, as well as the superiority for parallel technique in image processing field; thirdly, aiming at each step of the algorithm in application and based on MPI+OpenMP hybrid paradigm, the parallelizability and the strategies of parallelism for three processing steps: Radiometric Correction, Splicing Pieces of TDICCD (Time Delay Integration Charge-Coupled Device) and Gray Level Adjustment among pieces of TDICCD are deeply discussed, and furthermore, deducts the theoretical acceleration rates of each step and the one of whole procedure, according to the processing styles and independence of calculation; for the step Splicing Pieces of TDICCD, two different strategies of parallelism are proposed, which are to be chosen with consideration of hardware capabilities; finally, series of experiments are carried out to verify the parallel algorithms by applying 2-meter panchromatic high resolution images of TH-1 Satellite, and the experimental results are analyzed. Strictly on the basis of former parallel algorithms, the programs in the experiments are written by parallelizing the serial version. Numerical results show that, the parallel algorithms proposed in this article can effectively bring up the processing speed of RRC for high resolution images of TH-1 Satellite, and, with its stable running and excellent image processing, meet the need of application. For three kinds of images, such as images with large amount of cloud, with little differences of ground features, and with good climate and plentiful ground features, the average acceleration rates could reach 2.484, 2.539 and 4.159 respectively.

  10. Ar-Ar Dating of Martian Chassignites, NWA2737 and Chassigny, and Nakhlite MIL03346

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    2006-01-01

    Until recently only three nakhlites and one chassignite had been identified among martian meteorites. These four exhibit very similar radiometric ages and cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages, indicating that they may have derived from a common location on Mars and were ejected into space by a single impact. This situation is quite different from that of martian shergottites, which exhibit a range of radiometric ages and CRE ages (1). Recently, several new nakhlites and a new martian dunite (NWA2737) have been recognized. Here we report our results of Ar-39-Ar-40 dating for the MIL03346 nakhlite and the NWA2737 "chassignite", along with new results on Chassigny.

  11. [In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of UAV multispectral sensor].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Yan, Lei; Gou, Zhi-Yang; Zhao, Hong-Ying; Liu, Da-Ping; Duan, Yi-Ni

    2012-12-01

    Based on the data of the scientific experiment in Urad Front Banner for UAV Remote Sensing Load Calibration Field project, with the help of 6 hyperspectral radiometric targets with good Lambertian property, the wide-view multispectral camera in UAV was calibrated adopting reflectance-based method. The result reveals that for green, red and infrared channel, whose images were successfully captured, the linear correlation coefficients between the DN and radiance are all larger than 99%. In final analysis, the comprehensive error is no more than 6%. The calibration results demonstrate that the hyperspectral targets equipped by the calibration field are well suitable for air-borne multispectral load in-flight calibration. The calibration result is reliable and could be used in the retrieval of geophysical parameters. PMID:23427528

  12. Visual and radiometric photometry of 1580 Betulia. [asteroid infrared observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebofsky, L. A.; Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Lebofsky, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Broadband visual and 10.6-micron photometry of 1580 Betulia was obtained during its close approach to earth in May 1976. The photometry was analyzed by using the 'radiometric method' to derive the radius (2.10 + or - 0.40 km) and albedo (0.108 + or - 0.012) of Betulia. Radar and polarimetric results indicate a radius greater than 3.0 km and a geometric albedo of about 0.05. To be compatible with these results, Betulia was also modeled as having a surface with the thermal characteristics of bare rock rather than those of the 'lunar' regolith model used for previous analysis of radiometry of other asteroids. A 3.7-km radius and a geometric albedo of about 0.04 are compatible with all available observations. Betulia is the first Mars-crossing asteroid found to have such a low albedo, which may be indicative of carbonaceous surface material.

  13. The importance and attainment of accurate absolute radiometric calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of accurate absolute radiometric calibration is discussed by reference to the needs of those wishing to validate or use models describing the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with the atmosphere and earth surface features. The in-flight calibration methods used for the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and the Systeme Probatoire d'Observation de la Terre, Haute Resolution visible (SPOT/HRV) systems are described and their limitations discussed. The questionable stability of in-flight absolute calibration methods suggests the use of a radiative transfer program to predict the apparent radiance, at the entrance pupil of the sensor, of a ground site of measured reflectance imaged through a well characterized atmosphere. The uncertainties of such a method are discussed.

  14. Determination of precipitation profiles from airborne passive microwave radiometric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian; Hakkarinen, Ida M.; Pierce, Harold F.; Weinman, James A.

    1991-01-01

    This study presents the first quantitative retrievals of vertical profiles of precipitation derived from multispectral passive microwave radiometry. Measurements of microwave brightness temperature (Tb) obtained by a NASA high-altitude research aircraft are related to profiles of rainfall rate through a multichannel piecewise-linear statistical regression procedure. Statistics for Tb are obtained from a set of cloud radiative models representing a wide variety of convective, stratiform, and anvil structures. The retrieval scheme itself determines which cloud model best fits the observed meteorological conditions. Retrieved rainfall rate profiles are converted to equivalent radar reflectivity for comparison with observed reflectivities from a ground-based research radar. Results for two case studies, a stratiform rain situation and an intense convective thunderstorm, show that the radiometrically derived profiles capture the major features of the observed vertical structure of hydrometer density.

  15. Radiometric resolution for monitoring vegetation: How many bits are needed?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    The significance of the various number of radiometric quantizing levels required for satellite monitoring of vegetation resources was evaluated by using in situ collected spectral reflectance data, an atmospheric radiative transfer simulation model, and a satellite sensor simulation model. Reflectance data were converted to radiance data; passed through a model atmosphere to an altitude of 706 km; and subsequently quantized at 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, and 512 digital count levels for Thematic Mapper bands TM3(0.63 - 0.69 microns) and TM4(0.76 - 0.90 microns). The simulated digital count data were regressed against the in situ biological data to quantify the relationship between quantizing levels.

  16. Directional radiometric measurements of row-crop temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.; Kirchner, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    The variability of directional sensor response for a cotton row crop in Phoenix, Arizona was measured for various solar zenith angles. The geometric structure of the canopy was described with regard to height, width, spacing, and shape of rows. In addition, radiometric temperature data were collected on four scene components: sunlit and shaded vegetation and sunlit and shaded soil. These data were used to test the predictions and assumptions of a modified version of the row crop model of Jackson et al. (1979), which predicts the thermal infrared response of a sensor as a function of sensor view angle, component temperature, and geometrical structure of the canopy. The field data showed sensor response differentials as great as 16.2 C when going from a zenith view angle of 0 deg to one of 80 deg normal to the row direction. The rms deviation between the predicted and measured sensor response for all measurement periods and view angles was 0.96 C.

  17. Radiometric calibration and SNR calculation of a SWIR imaging telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, Ozgur; Turk, Fethi; Selimoglu, Ozgur

    2012-09-06

    Radiometric calibration of an imaging telescope is usually made using a uniform illumination sphere in a laboratory. In this study, we used the open-sky images taken during bright day conditions to calibrate our telescope. We found a dark signal offset value and a linear response coefficient value for each pixel by using three different algorithms. Then we applied these coefficients to the taken images, and considerably lowered the image non-uniformity. Calibration can be repeated during the operation of telescope with an object that has better uniformity than open-sky. Also SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) of each pixel was calculated from the open-sky images using the temporal mean and standard deviations. It is found that SNR is greater than 80 for all pixels even at low light levels.

  18. Ground-based radiometric measurements of slant-path attenuation in the V/W bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, George; Magde, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    Ground-based radiometric techniques were applied to measure the slant-path attenuation cumulative distribution function to over 20 dB of attenuation and to less than 1% exceedance probability at the V and W band frequencies of 72.5 and 82.5 GHz. These are the first such measurements in these frequency bands. Brightness temperature measurements were collected at an elevation angle of 36° in Rome, NY, using a four-channel radiometer that included 23.8 and 31.4 GHz receivers. A model-based approach was used to invert brightness temperature to attenuation. An atmospheric model relevant to the geographic location and statistically representative of the attenuating conditions was developed for this purpose. The main assumption of the atmospheric model was that the sources of attenuation for exceedance probabilities of concern were dominated by stratiform rain. Monte Carlo solutions to the radiative transfer equation for the precipitating atmosphere were used to generate the attenuation retrieval algorithm. Sensitivity analysis showed that the attenuation retrieval algorithm was robust to uncertainties in the model parameters. Slant-path attenuation was also measured with the radiometer using the Sun as a source of radiation. Over 30 dB of attenuation dynamic range was possible with this technique. Sun-beacon measurements were used to test model predictions.

  19. Concept, Simulation, and Instrumentation for Radiometric Inflight Icing Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryerson, Charles; Koenig, George G.; Reehorst, Andrew L.; Scott, Forrest R.

    2009-01-01

    The multi-agency Flight in Icing Remote Sensing Team (FIRST), a consortium of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), has developed technologies for remotely detecting hazardous inflight icing conditions. The USACE Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) assessed the potential of onboard passive microwave radiometers for remotely detecting icing conditions ahead of aircraft. The dual wavelength system differences the brightness temperature of Space and clouds, with greater differences potentially indicating closer and higher magnitude cloud liquid water content (LWC). The Air Force RADiative TRANsfer model (RADTRAN) was enhanced to assess the flight track sensing concept, and a 'flying' RADTRAN was developed to simulate a radiometer system flying through simulated clouds. Neural network techniques were developed to invert brightness temperatures and obtain integrated cloud liquid water. In addition, a dual wavelength Direct-Detection Polarimeter Radiometer (DDPR) system was built for detecting hazardous drizzle drops. This paper reviews technology development to date and addresses initial polarimeter performance.

  20. Date: _____________________ ______________________________________________ Student ID Number

    E-print Network

    Lathrop, Daniel P.

    Date: _____________________ ______________________________________________ Student ID Number Project Date Completed Comprehensive Examinations passed: Yes No Date Passed _____________ Provisions have No ________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________ Advisor (Print Name then Sign) Date Telephone extension and Email Address

  1. New U-series dates at the Caune de l'Arago, France

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falgueres, Christophe; Yokoyama, Y.; Shen, G.; Bischoff, J.L.; Ku, T.-L.; de Lumley, Henry

    2004-01-01

    In the beginning of the 1980s, the Caune de l'Arago was the focus of an interdisciplinary effort to establish the chronology of the Homo heidelbergensis (Preneandertals) fossils using a variety of techniques on bones and on speleothems. The result was a very large spread of dates particularly on bone samples. Amid the large spread of results, some radiometric data on speleothems showed a convergence in agreement with inferences from faunal studies. We present new U-series results on the stalagmitic formation located at the bottom of Unit IV (at the base of the Upper Stratigraphic Complex). Samples and splits were collaboratively analyzed in the four different laboratories with excellent interlaboratory agreement. Results show the complex sequence of this stalagmitic formation. The most ancient part is systematically at internal isotopic equilibrium (>350 ka) suggesting growth during or before isotopic stage 9, representing a minimum age for the human remains found in Unit III of the Middle Stratigraphical Complex which is stratigraphically under the basis of the studied stalagmitic formation. Overlaying parts of the speleothem date to the beginning of marine isotope stages 7 and 5. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. New U-series dates at the Caune de l'Arago, France

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Falgueres, Christophe; Yokoyama, Y.; Shen, G.; Bischoff, J.L.; Ku, T.-L.; de Lumley, Henry

    2004-01-01

    In the beginning of the 1980s, the Caune de l'Arago was the focus of an interdisciplinary effort to establish the chronology of the Homo heidelbergensis (Preneandertals) fossils using a variety of techniques on bones and on speleothems. The result was a very large spread of dates particularly on bone samples. Amid the large spread of results, some radiometric data on speleothems showed a convergence in agreement with inferences from faunal studies. We present new U-series results on the stalagmitic formation located at the bottom of Unit IV (at the base of the Upper Stratigraphic Complex). Samples and splits were collaboratively analyzed in the four different laboratories with excellent interlaboratory agreement. Results show the complex sequence of this stalagmitic formation. The most ancient part is systematically at internal isotopic equilibrium (>350 ka) suggesting growth during or before isotopic stage 9, representing a minimum age for the human remains found in Unit III of the Middle Stratigraphical Complex which is stratigraphically under the basis of the studied stalagmitic formation. Overlaying parts of the speleothem date to the beginning of marine isotope stages 7 and 5. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiometric Characterization of the IKONOS, QuickBird, and OrbView-3 Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara

    2006-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of commercial imaging satellite products is required to ensure that science and application communities can better understand their properties. Inaccurate radiometric calibrations can lead to erroneous decisions and invalid conclusions and can limit intercomparisons with other systems. To address this calibration need, satellite at-sensor radiance values were compared to those estimated by each independent team member to determine the sensor's radiometric accuracy. The combined results of this evaluation provide the user community with an independent assessment of these commercially available high spatial resolution sensors' absolute calibration values.

  4. Radiometric Calibration Assessment of Commercial High Spatial Resolution Multispectral Image Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara; Aaron, David; Thome, Kurtis

    2006-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of commercial imaging satellite products is required to ensure that science and application communities can better understand their properties. Inaccurate radiometric calibrations can lead to erroneous decisions and invalid conclusions and can limit intercomparisons with other systems. To address this calibration need, satellite at-sensor radiance values were compared to those estimated by each independent team member to determine the sensor's radiometric accuracy. The combined results of this evaluation provide the user community with an independent assessment of these commercially available high spatial resolution sensors' absolute calibration values.

  5. San Bernardino Cave (Italy) and the Appearance of Levallois Technology in Europe: Results of a Radiometric and Technological Reassessment

    PubMed Central

    Picin, Andrea; Peresani, Marco; Falguères, Christophe; Gruppioni, Giulia; Bahain, Jean-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of Levallois technology in Europe marked the transition from the Lower to the early Middle Paleolithic. This new method of flake production was accompanied by significant behavioral changes in hominin populations. The emergence of this technological advance is considered homogeneous in the European archaeological record at the Marine isotopic stage (MIS) 9/MIS 8 boundary. In this paper we report a series of combined electron spin resonance/U-series dates on mammal bones and teeth recovered from the lower units of San Bernardino Cave (Italy) and the technological analyses of the lithic assemblages. The San Bernardino Cave has yielded the earliest evidence of Levallois production on the Italian Peninsula recovered to date. In addition to our results and the review of the archaeological record, we describe the chronological and geographical differences between European territories and diversities in terms of technological developments. The belated emergence of Levallois technology in Italy compared to western Europe corresponds to the late Italian Neanderthal speciation event. The new radiometric dates and the technological analyses of San Bernardino Cave raise the issue of the different roles of glacial refugia in the peopling and the spread of innovative flaking strategies in Europe during the late Middle Pleistocene. PMID:24146836

  6. South american geochronology: radiometric time scale for middle to late tertiary mammal-bearing horizons in patagonia.

    PubMed

    Marshall, L G; Pascual, R; Curtis, G H; Drake, R E

    1977-03-25

    Radiometric (potassium-argon) age determinations for basalts and tuffs associated with middle to late Tertiary mammal-bearing horizons in Patagonia, southern Argentina, permit refinement of boundaries and hiatuses between beds of Deseadan (early Oligocene) through Friasian (middle to late Miocene) age. At two localities beds of Deseadan age are overlain by basalts, which gave dates of 33.6 and 35.4 million years ago; 34.0 million years ago is tentatively accepted as a terminal date for known Deseadan. At several localities beds of Colhuehuapian age are underlain by basalts, which gave dates ranging from 28.8 to 24.3 million years ago; 25.0 million years is tentatively taken as a basal age for known Colhuehuapian. The paleontological hiatus between known Deseadan and known Colhuehuapian is thus in the order of 9.0 million years. Two tuffs from the Santa Cruz Formation (Santacrucian) gave ages of 21.7 and 18.5 million years. Plagioclase and biotite concentrates of an ignimbrite from the Collón Curá Formation (Friasian) gave ages ranging from 15.4 to 14.0 million years. PMID:17738414

  7. QuEChERS, a sample preparation technique that is “catching on”: an up-to-date interview with its inventors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The technique of QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) is only 7 years old, yet it is revolutionizing the manner in which multiresidue, multiclass pesticide analysis (and perhaps beyond) is performed. Columnist Ron Majors sits down with inventors Steve Lehotay and Michelangelo An...

  8. Calibration of cosmogenic noble gas production based on 36Cl-36Ar ages. Part 2. The 81Kr-Kr dating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leya, I.; Dalcher, N.; Vogel, N.; Wieler, R.; Caffee, M. W.; Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.

    2015-11-01

    We calibrated the 81Kr-Kr dating system for ordinary chondrites of different sizes using independent shielding-corrected 36Cl-36Ar ages. Krypton concentrations and isotopic compositions were measured in bulk samples from 14 ordinary chondrites of high petrologic type and the cosmogenic Kr component was obtained by subtracting trapped Kr from phase Q. The thus-determined average cosmogenic 78Kr/83Kr, 80Kr/83Kr, 82Kr/83Kr, and 84Kr/83Kr ratiC(Lavielle and Marti 1988; Wieler 2002). The cosmogenic 78Kr/83Kr ratio is correlated with the cosmogenic 22Ne/21Ne ratio, confirming that 78Kr/83Kr is a reliable shielding indicator. Previously, 81Kr-Kr ages have been determined by assuming the cosmogenic production rate of 81Kr, P(81Kr)c, to be 0.95 times the average of the cosmogenic production rates of 80Kr and 82Kr; the factor Y = 0.95 therefore accounts for the unequal production of the various Kr isotopes (Marti 1967a). However, Y should be regarded as an empirical adjustment. For samples whose 80Kr and 82Kr concentrations may be affected by neutron-capture reactions, the shielding-dependent cosmogenic (78Kr/83Kr)c ratio has been used instead to calculate P(81Kr)/P(83Kr), as for some lunar samples, this ratio has been shown to linearly increase with (78Kr/83Kr)c (Marti and Lugmair 1971). However, the 81Kr-Kr ages of our samples calculated with these methods are on average ~30% higher than their 36Cl-36Ar ages, indicating that most if not all the 81Kr-Kr ages determined so far are significantly too high. We therefore re-evaluated both methods to determine P(81Kr)c/P(83Kr)c. Our new Y value of 0.70 ± 0.04 is more than 25% lower than the value of 0.95 used so far. Furthermore, together with literature data, our data indicate that for chondrites, P(81Kr)c/P(83Kr)c is rather constant at 0.43 ± 0.02, at least for the shielding range covered by our samples ([78Kr/83Kr]c = 0.119-0.185; [22Ne/21Ne]c = 1.083-1.144), in contrast to the observations on lunar samples. As expected considering the method used, 81Kr-Kr ages calculated either directly with this new P(81Kr)c/P(83Kr)c value or with our new Y value both agree with the corresponding 36Cl-36Ar ages. However, the average deviation of 2% indicates the accuracy of both new 81Kr-Kr dating methods and the precision of the new dating systems of ~10% is demonstrated by the low scatter in the data. Consequently, this study indicates that the 81Kr-Kr ages published so far are up to 30% too high.

  9. Mars chronology: Assessing techniques for quantifying surficial processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doran, P.T.; Clifford, S.M.; Forman, S.L.; Nyquist, L.; Papanastassiou, D.A.; Stewart, B.W.; Sturchio, N.C.; Swindle, T.D.; Cerling, T.; Kargel, J.; McDonald, G.; Nishiizumi, K.; Poreda, R.; Rice, J.W.; Tanaka, K.

    2004-01-01

    Currently, the absolute chronology of Martian rocks, deposits and events is based mainly on crater counting and remains highly imprecise with epoch boundary uncertainties in excess of 2 billion years. Answers to key questions concerning the comparative origin and evolution of Mars and Earth will not be forthcoming without a rigid Martian chronology, enabling the construction of a time scale comparable to Earth's. Priorities for exploration include calibration of the cratering rate, dating major volcanic and fluvial events and establishing chronology of the polar layered deposits. If extinct and/or extant life is discovered, the chronology of the biosphere will be of paramount importance. Many radiometric and cosmogenic techniques applicable on Earth and the Moon will apply to Mars after certain baselines (e.g. composition of the atmosphere, trace species, chemical and physical characteristics of Martian dust) are established. The high radiation regime may pose a problem for dosimetry-based techniques (e.g. luminescence). The unique isotopic composition of nitrogen in the Martian atmosphere may permit a Mars-specific chronometer for tracing the time-evolution of the atmosphere and of lithic phases with trapped atmospheric gases. Other Mars-specific chronometers include measurement of gas fluxes and accumulation of platinum group elements (PGE) in the regolith. Putting collected samples into geologic context is deemed essential, as is using multiple techniques on multiple samples. If in situ measurements are restricted to a single technique it must be shown to give consistent results on multiple samples, but in all cases, using two or more techniques (e.g. on the same lander) will reduce error. While there is no question that returned samples will yield the best ages, in situ techniques have the potential to be flown on multiple missions providing a larger data set and broader context in which to place the more accurate dates. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mars chronology: assessing techniques for quantifying surficial processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doran, Peter T.; Clifford, Stephen M.; Forman, Steven L.; Nyquist, Larry; Papanastassiou, Dimitri A.; Stewart, Brian W.; Sturchio, Neil C.; Swindle, Timothy D.; Cerling, Thure; Kargel, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    Currently, the absolute chronology of Martian rocks, deposits and events is based mainly on crater counting and remains highly imprecise with epoch boundary uncertainties in excess of 2 billion years. Answers to key questions concerning the comparative origin and evolution of Mars and Earth will not be forthcoming without a rigid Martian chronology, enabling the construction of a time scale comparable to Earth's. Priorities for exploration include calibration of the cratering rate, dating major volcanic and fluvial events and establishing chronology of the polar layered deposits. If extinct andor extant life is discovered, the chronology of the biosphere will be of paramount importance. Many radiometric and cosmogenic techniques applicable on Earth and the Moon will apply to Mars after certain baselines (e.g. composition of the atmosphere, trace species, chemical and physical characteristics of Martian dust) are established. The high radiation regime may pose a problem for dosimetry-based techniques (e.g. luminescence). The unique isotopic composition of nitrogen in the Martian atmosphere may permit a Mars-specific chronometer for tracing the time-evolution of the atmosphere and of lithic phases with trapped atmospheric gases. Other Mars-specific chronometers include measurement of gas fluxes and accumulation of platinum group elements (PGE) in the regolith. Putting collected samples into geologic context is deemed essential, as is using multiple techniques on multiple samples. If in situ measurements are restricted to a single technique it must be shown to give consistent results on multiple samples, but in all cases, using two or more techniques (e.g. on the same lander) will reduce error. While there is no question that returned samples will yield the best ages, in situ techniques have the potential to be flown on multiple missions providing a larger data set and broader context in which to place the more accurate dates.

  11. Experimental Research on Passive Millimeter Wave Radiometric Stealth Technology of Metal Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangfeng; Lou, Guowei; Li, Xingguo

    2012-12-01

    Working all day and all weather, a passive millimeter wave radiometer (PMMW) can be widely used in civil and military affairs. It can get some specific information about the material characteristics different from radar and infrared detectors. On basis of the radiometric operating range equation, the radiation cross section and stealth effect of metal objects are presented for the PMMW near-sensing application. The measurement experiments of metal solid models adopts 3 mm band Dicke radiometer with the outdoor calibration system. The sky temperature and other different surface metal objects are also measured as the contrastive experiments. The results show the radiometric temperature contrasts of solid models have remarkable difference in the bare and coated conditions, and the radiometric operating range can decrease to 60.8 %. In addition, the PMMW stealth methods through different surface treatment respectively reduce the radiometric antenna temperature contrast in some degree.

  12. Quantitative measurements of sliding friction coefficients of tribological interfaces with a new differential infrared radiometric instrument

    E-print Network

    Mandelis, Andreas

    Quantitative measurements of sliding friction coefficients of tribological interfaces with a new sliding friction coefficient SFC measurements using a mechanical friction rig and infrared radiometric. INSTRUMENTAL DESIGN FOR SLIDING FRICTION COEFFICIENT MEASUREMENTS Figure 1 is an overview of the differential

  13. Flight Technology Improvement. [spaceborne optical radiometric instruments, attitude control, and electromechanical and power subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Shortcomings in spaceborne instrumentation technology are analyzed and recommendations are given for corrections and technology development. The technologies discussed are optical radiometric instruments and calibration, attitude control and determination, and electromechanical and power subsystems.

  14. Study of Spectral/Radiometric Characteristics of the Thematic Mapper for Land Use Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A. (principal investigator); Metzler, M. D. (principal investigator)

    1985-01-01

    An investigation conducted in support of the LANDSAT 4/5 Image Data Quality Analysis (LIDQA) Program is discussed. Results of engineering analyses of radiometric, spatial, spectral, and geometric properties of the Thematic Mapper systems are summarized; major emphasis is placed on the radiometric analysis. Details of the analyses are presented in appendices, which contain three of the eight technical papers produced during this investigation; these three, together, describe the major activities and results of the investigation.

  15. Usefulness of systematic in situ gamma-ray surveys in the radiometric characterization of natural systems with poorly contrasting geological features (examples from NE of Portugal).

    PubMed

    Duarte, Pedro; Mateus, António; Paiva, Isabel; Trindade, Romão; Santos, Pedro

    2011-02-01

    This paper focuses on the starting point of various studies that are being carried out in two possible locations being considered to host a hypothetical site for a repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) produced in Portugal in compliance with international requirements on the long-term safety of this kind of repository. Previous studies concerning the geology of the much larger geographical areas where these locations are included were fundamental in the choice of these locations and for the design of the survey strategy. One of the fundamental assessment studies during the site-selection is the overall radiological characterization of the locations and its relation to the geology. This paper pretends to show the adequability of using a fast and reasonably inexpensive survey technique such as in situ gamma-ray portable detectors, to access the radiometric response of the systems in study by providing the radiometric mapping of the areas. The existence of adequate radiometric maps represents a critical pre-requisite to constrain both the number and spatial distribution of samples to be collected for further analysis, sustaining as well the subsequent extrapolation of results needed to fully characterise the surveyed system. Both areas were surveyed using portable gamma-ray spectrometers with NaI(Tl) detectors. In situ gamma-ray measurements have clearly shown not only the poorly contrasting geological features, but also their differences representing: (i) a deformed/metamorphosed ophiolite complex and (ii) a monotonous meta-sedimentary sequence. The radiometric maps obtained have show heterogeneities that reflect mostly changes in rock-forming mineral assemblages, even in the presence of small variations of gamma radiation. These maps support objective criteria about the number/distribution of samples to be collected for subsequent comprehensive studies and reinforce the valuable contribution of in situ gamma spectrometry to assess, in radiological terms, the prevalent geological features. PMID:20971016

  16. Evaluating AIRS Radiometric Error in Non-uniform Scenes using MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, T. S.; Aumann, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft was launched on May 4, 2002. AIRS acquires hyperspectral infrared radiances in 2378 channels ranging in wavelength from 3.7-15.4 um with spectral resolution of better than 1200, and spatial resolution of 13.5 km with global daily coverage. The AIRS was designed to measure temperature and water vapor profiles for improvement in weather forecast and improved parameterization of climate processes. Currently the AIRS Level 1B Radiance Products are assimilated by NWP centers worldwide and have shown considerable forecast improvement. AIRS L1 and L2 products are widely used for studying critical climate processes related to water vapor feedback, atmospheric transport and cloud properties. AIRS trace gas products include ozone profiles, carbon monoxide, and the first global maps of mid-tropospheric carbon dioxide. The AIRS radiances are calibrated using a uniform on-board blackbody and full aperture space view. For this reason, all radiometric measurements assume a uniform scene. As with most instruments, the AIRS 2D spatial response functions (tophat functions) are not flat for all channels, nor are they the same. When viewing a non-uniform scene, this causes a radiometric error that is scene dependent and cannot be removed without knowledge of the scene response. The magnitude of the error depends on the non-uniformity of the AIRS spatial response and the non-uniformity of the scene, but typically only affects about 1% of the data. In this effort we use data from the MODIS instrument to provide information on the scene uniformity that can be used to correct the AIRS data. Early results show we can match the AIRS and MODIS radiances to about 0.6K when we include the AIRS tophat functions in the normalization of the MODIS data (Elliott, Proc SPIE 6296, 2006). The method requires use of different infrared bands in MODIS depending on the channels of AIRS being corrected. Resulting improvement in noise and bias will be presented by comparing to the new AIRS Level 1C product that uses PC techniques to correct impacted channels. The method can be used to recover impacted channels, validate the Level 1C product, and identify scene conditions where the error is most significant.

  17. Wavelength-dependent radiometric modeling for an active geosynchronous satellite imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Keith A.; Barnard, Calvin C.

    2000-10-01

    Recent interest in imaging satellites in geo-synchronous earth orbit has led to the design of a ground-based active imaging system using a concept known as Fourier Telescopy. Fourier Telescopy systems use active laser illumination, aperture synthesis, and extensive computer processing to minimize atmospheric turbulence effects and form high-resolution images of distant stationary objects. Three laser transmitters of slightly different frequency illuminate the object with varying baseline separations to temporally encode object spatial frequency information in the energy backscattered from the object. Detection and demodulation of the temporal signals and processing using phase closure and wavefront reconstruction techniques yield measurements of the object's incoherent Fourier amplitude and phase distribution. We have developed a detailed wave optics simulation to analyze and optimize the performance of this system. Wavelength dependent renderings of 3-D satellite models and the statistical variations of object illumination determine the radiometric returns received for a given scenario and the effect on imaging system performance. This work uses the simulation to examine system performance for three different illumination laser wavelengths and for realistic system design limitations. System design trade-offs based on the wavelength dependence of satellite optical cross-section, atmospheric propagation, and diffraction are discussed. Our results indicate that a near infra-red (IR) wavelength may be most suitable for this system.

  18. Radiometric analysis of the longwave infrared channel of the Thematic Mapper on LANDSAT 4 and 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schott, John R.; Volchok, William J.; Biegel, Joseph D.

    1986-01-01

    The first objective was to evaluate the postlaunch radiometric calibration of the LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) band 6 data. The second objective was to determine to what extent surface temperatures could be computed from the TM and 6 data using atmospheric propagation models. To accomplish this, ground truth data were compared to a single TM-4 band 6 data set. This comparison indicated satisfactory agreement over a narrow temperature range. The atmospheric propagation model (modified LOWTRAN 5A) was used to predict surface temperature values based on the radiance at the spacecraft. The aircraft data were calibrated using a multi-altitude profile calibration technique which had been extensively tested in previous studies. This aircraft calibration permitted measurement of surface temperatures based on the radiance reaching the aircraft. When these temperature values are evaluated, an error in the satellite's ability to predict surface temperatures can be estimated. This study indicated that by carefully accounting for various sensor calibration and atmospheric propagation effects, and expected error (1 standard deviation) in surface temperature would be 0.9 K. This assumes no error in surface emissivity and no sampling error due to target location. These results indicate that the satellite calibration is within nominal limits to within this study's ability to measure error.

  19. Measurement of human placental 5'-AMP deaminase activity by radiometric assay

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, M.H.; Aronson, D.M.

    1981-09-01

    The level of 5'-AMP deaminase in homogenates of human term placenta has been measured by means of a simple radiometric assay. The assay uses /sup 14/C-labeled AMP as substrate and incorporates conditions of pH and K/sup +/ concentration, which optimize the 5'-AMP deaminase activity, and inhibitors of 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase to reduce interferences from these enzymes. Assay products are separated by descending paper chromatography and quantitated by liquid scintillation counting. The activity of 5'-AMP deaminase in human term placenta determined by this assay was 474 +/- 37 nmol min/sup -1/ g/sup -1/ at 30/sup o/C and was less than the 5'-AMP phosphatase activity evident under the same assay conditions. The assay is suitable for measurement of 5'-AMP deaminase in extracts of other tissues in which high levels of phosphates and adenosine deaminase preclude assay of 5'-AMP deaminase by such techniques as ultraviolet absorption changes or ammonia estimation.

  20. Application of gamma-ray spectrometry in a NORM industry for its radiometrical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantero, J.; Gázquez, M. J.; Hurtado, S.; Bolívar, J. P.; García-Tenorio, R.

    2015-11-01

    Industrial activities involving Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) are found among the most important industrial sectors worldwide as oil/gas facilities, metal production, phosphate Industry, zircon treatment, etc. being really significant the radioactive characterization of the materials involved in their production processes in order to assess the potential radiological risk for workers or natural environment. High resolution gamma spectrometry is a versatile non-destructive radiometric technique that makes simultaneous determination of several radionuclides possible with little sample preparation. However NORM samples cover a wide variety of densities and composition, as opposed to the standards used in gamma efficiency calibration, which are either water-based solutions or standard/reference sources of similar composition. For that reason self-absorption correction effects (especially in the low energy range) must be considered individually in every sample. In this work an experimental and a semi-empirical methodology of self-absorption correction were applied to NORM samples, and the obtained results compared critically, in order to establish the best practice in relation to the circumstances of an individual laboratory. This methodology was applied in samples coming from a TiO2 factory (NORM industry) located in the south-west of Spain where activity concentration of several radionuclides from the Uranium and Thorium series through the production process was measured. These results will be shown in this work.

  1. In-flight radiometric calibration of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, James E.; Green, Robert O.; Alley, Ronald E.; Bruegge, Carol J.; Carrere, Veronique; Margolis, Jack S.; Vane, Gregg; Chrien, Thomas G.; Slater, Philip N.; Biggard, Stuart F.

    1988-01-01

    A reflectance-based method was used to provide an analysis of the in-flight radiometric performance of AVIRIS. Field spectral reflectance measurements of the surface and extinction measurements of the atmosphere using solar radiation were used as input to atmospheric radiative transfer calculations. Five separate codes were used in the analysis. Four include multiple scattering, and the computed radiances from these for flight conditions were in good agreement. Code-generated radiances were compared with AVIRIS-predicted radiances based on two laboratory calibrations (pre- and post-season of flight) for a uniform highly reflecting natural dry lake target. For one spectrometer (C), the pre- and post-season calibration factors were found to give identical results, and to be in agreement with the atmospheric models that include multiple scattering. This positive result validates the field and laboratory calibration technique. Results for the other spectrometers (A, B and D) were widely at variance with the models no matter which calibration factors were used. Potential causes of these discrepancies are discussed.

  2. Radiometric calibration of the in-flight blackbody calibration system of the GLORIA interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monte, C.; Gutschwager, B.; Adibekyan, A.; Kehrt, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Olschewski, F.; Hollandt, J.

    2014-01-01

    GLORIA (Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere) is an airborne, imaging, infrared Fourier transform spectrometer that applies the limb-imaging technique to perform trace gas and temperature measurements in the Earth's atmosphere with three-dimensional resolution. To ensure the traceability of these measurements to the International Temperature Scale and thereby to an absolute radiance scale, GLORIA carries an on-board calibration system. Basically, it consists of two identical large-area and high-emissivity infrared radiators, which can be continuously and independently operated at two adjustable temperatures in a range from -50 °C to 0 °C during flight. Here we describe the radiometric and thermometric characterization and calibration of the in-flight calibration system at the Reduced Background Calibration Facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. This was performed with a standard uncertainty of less than 110 mK. Extensive investigations of the system concerning its absolute radiation temperature and spectral radiance, its temperature homogeneity and its short- and long-term stability are discussed. The traceability chain of these measurements is presented.

  3. A multi-channel radiometric profiler of temperature, humidity and cloud liquid.

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, R.; Carpenter, R.; Guldner, J.; Liljegren, J.; Nehrkorn, T.; Solheim, F.; Vandenberghe, F.; Environmental Research; Radiometrics Corp.; Univ. Corp. for Atmospheric Research; Weather Decision Technologies Inc.; Atmospheric and Environmental Research Inc.; National Center for Atmospheric Research

    2003-07-31

    A microwave radiometer is described that provides continuous thermodynamic (temperature, water vapor, and moisture) soundings during clear and cloudy conditions. The radiometric profiler observes radiation intensity at 12 microwave frequencies, along with zenith infrared and surface meteorological measurements. Historical radiosonde and neural network or regression methods are used for profile retrieval. We compare radiometric, radiosonde, and forecast soundings and evaluate the accuracy of radiometric temperature and water vapor soundings on the basis of statistical comparison with radiosonde soundings. We find that radiometric soundings are equivalent in accuracy to radiosonde soundings when used in numerical weather forecasting. A case study is described that demonstrates improved fog forecasting on the basis of variational assimilation of radiometric soundings. The accuracy of radiometric cloud liquid soundings is evaluated by comparison with cloud liquid sensors carried by radiosondes. Accurate high-resolution three-dimensional water vapor and wind analysis is described on the basis of assimilation of simulated thermodynamic and wind soundings along with GPS slant delays. Examples of mobile thermodynamic and wind profilers are shown. Thermodynamic profiling, particularly when combined with wind profiling and slant GPS, provides continuous atmospheric soundings for improved weather and dispersion forecasting.

  4. Early detection of RFI in SMOS radiometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anterrieu, Eric

    2011-10-01

    The SMOS mission is a European Space Agency (ESA) project aimed at global monitoring of surface Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity from radiometric L-band observations. The single payload of the mission is MIRAS, the very first Microwave Imaging Radiometer using Aperture Synthesis ever launched into space. This work is concerned with the contamination of the data collected by MIRAS by radio frequency interferences (RFI) which degrade the performance of the mission. RFI events are evidenced and it is explained why well-known standard RFI detection methods cannot be used. Accounting for specificities of MIRAS, an early detection method tailored to SMOS measurements is presented and illustrated with data acquired with the reference radiometers during the first year of the mission. The aim of this method is not to localize nor to quantify the RFI sources but only to detect, to quantify and possibly to mitigate the corresponding RFI effects in the signals measured by these radiometers. This is done as soon as possible in the processing pipeline so that the propagation of such undesirable effects is known and under control from measurements to final products.

  5. Advanced radiometric and interferometric milimeter-wave scene simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauss, B. I.; Moffa, P. J.; Steele, W. G.; Agravante, H.; Davidheiser, R.; Samec, T.; Young, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    Smart munitions and weapons utilize various imaging sensors (including passive IR, active and passive millimeter-wave, and visible wavebands) to detect/identify targets at short standoff ranges and in varied terrain backgrounds. In order to design and evaluate these sensors under a variety of conditions, a high-fidelity scene simulation capability is necessary. Such a capability for passive millimeter-wave scene simulation exists at TRW. TRW's Advanced Radiometric Millimeter-Wave Scene Simulation (ARMSS) code is a rigorous, benchmarked, end-to-end passive millimeter-wave scene simulation code for interpreting millimeter-wave data, establishing scene signatures and evaluating sensor performance. In passive millimeter-wave imaging, resolution is limited due to wavelength and aperture size. Where high resolution is required, the utility of passive millimeter-wave imaging is confined to short ranges. Recent developments in interferometry have made possible high resolution applications on military platforms. Interferometry or synthetic aperture radiometry allows the creation of a high resolution image with a sparsely filled aperture. Borrowing from research work in radio astronomy, we have developed and tested at TRW scene reconstruction algorithms that allow the recovery of the scene from a relatively small number of spatial frequency components. In this paper, the TRW modeling capability is described and numerical results are presented.

  6. A radiometric method for estimating blood cholinesterase in the field*

    PubMed Central

    Winteringham, F. P. W.; Disney, R. W.

    1964-01-01

    A radiometric method has been developed which provides for the simple and rapid measurement of human blood cholinesterase under field conditions. The method involves minimal dilution of samples and the use of very low substrate concentrations, and is therefore more sensitive to cholinesterase inhibition by reversible anticholinesterases such as carbamates than the conventional manometric or ?pH methods. A 20-?l sample of haemolysed whole blood is mixed with 14C-labelled acetylcholine on a cavity microscope slide. After half a minute or three minutes the mixture is acidified and dried. Under these conditions radioactive acetate liberated enzymically is completely volatile while the radioactive unhydrolysed substrate is not. The loss of radioactivity on acidification and drying is therefore a direct measure of the acetylcholinesterase activity. The levels of radioactivity employed are far below those likely to present any significant health hazard or to require special laboratory conditions. Although the method requires a labelled substrate, a single preparation is sufficient for several hundred thousand enzyme assays. The method has been tested under simulated field conditions. PMID:14122430

  7. Design, manufacture, and calibration of infrared radiometric blackbody sources

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, D.A.; Michaud, F.D.; Bender, S.C.

    1996-04-01

    A Radiometric Calibration Station (RCS) is being assembled at the Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL) which will allow for calibration of sensors with detector arrays having spectral capability from about 0.4-15 {mu}m. The configuration of the LANL RCS. Two blackbody sources have been designed to cover the spectral range from about 3-15 {mu}m, operating at temperatures ranging from about 180-350 K within a vacuum environment. The sources are designed to present a uniform spectral radiance over a large area to the sensor unit under test. The thermal uniformity requirement of the blackbody cavities has been one of the key factors of the design, requiring less than 50 mK variation over the entire blackbody surface to attain effective emissivity values of about 0.999. Once the two units are built and verified to the level of about 100 mK at LANL, they will be sent to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), where at least a factor of two improvement will be calibrated into the blackbody control system. The physical size of these assemblies will require modifications of the existing NIST Low Background Infrared (LBIR) Facility. LANL has constructed a bolt-on addition to the LBIR facility that will allow calibration of our large aperture sources. Methodology for attaining the two blackbody sources at calibrated levels of performance equivalent to present state of the art will be explained in the following.

  8. Radiometric STFT Analysis of PDV recordings and detectivity limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozier, Olivier; Prudhomme, Gabriel; Mercier, Patrick; Berthe, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    Photonic Doppler Velocimetry is a plug-and-play and versatile diagnostic used in dynamic physic experiments to measure velocities. When signals are analyzed using a Short-Time Fourier Transform, multiple velocities can be distinguished: by example, the velocities of moving particle-cloud appear on spectrograms. In order to estimate the back-scattering fluxes of target, we propose an original approach ``PDV Radiometric analysis'' resulting in an expression of time-velocity spectrograms coded in power units. Experiments involving micron-sized particles raise the issue of detection limit; particle-size limit is very difficult to evaluate. From the quantification of noise sources, we derivate an estimation of the spectrogram noise leading to a detectivity limit. It may be compared to back-scattering and collected power from a particle, which is increasing with its size. At least, some results from laser-shock accelerated particles using two different PDV systems are compared: it may show the improvement of sensitivity.

  9. Radiometric sensor performance model including atmospheric and IR clutter effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Rudolf; Davis, Joel S.; Duggin, Michael J.

    1997-06-01

    The computer code SENSAT developed for radiometric investigations in remote sensing was extended to include two statistical clutter models of infrared background and the prediction of the target detection probability. The first one is based on the standard deviation of scene clutter estimated from scene data, the second one is based on the power spectral density of different classes of IR background as a function of temporal or spatial frequency. The overall code consists of modules describing the optoelectronic sensor (optics, detector, signal processor), a radiative transfer code (MODTRAN) to include the atmospheric effects, and the scene module consisting of target and background. The scene is evaluated for a certain pixel at a time. However, a sequence of pixels can be simulated by varying the range, view angle, atmospheric condition, or the clutter level. The target consists of one or two subpixel surface elements, the remaining part of the pixels represents background. Multiple paths, e.g. sun-ground-target-sensor, can also be selected. An expert system, based upon the IDL language, provides user-friendly input menus, performs consistency checks, and submits the required MODTRAN and SENSAT runs. A sample case of the detection probability of a sub-pixel target in a marine cluttered background is discussed.

  10. Robust Multiscale Stereo Matching from Fundus Images with Radiometric Differences

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Li; Garvin, Mona K.; Lee, Kyungmoo; Alward, Wallace L.M.; Kwon, Young H.; Abràmoff, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    A robust multiscale stereo matching algorithm is proposed to find reliable correspondences between low contrast and weakly textured retinal image pairs with radiometric differences. Existing algorithms designed to deal with piecewise planar surfaces with distinct features and Lambertian reflectance do not apply in applications such as 3D reconstruction of medical images including stereo retinal images. In this paper, robust pixel feature vectors are formulated to extract discriminative features in the presence of noise in scale space, through which the response of low-frequency mechanisms alter and interact with the response of high-frequency mechanisms. The deep structures of the scene are represented with the evolution of disparity estimates in scale space, which distributes the matching ambiguity along the scale dimension to obtain globally coherent reconstructions. The performance is verified both qualitatively by face validity and quantitatively on our collection of stereo fundus image sets with ground truth, which have been made publicly available as an extension of standard test images for performance evaluation. PMID:21464502

  11. On-orbit performance of the Landsat-7 ETM+ radiometric calibrators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markham, Brian L; Barker, J. L.; Kaita, E.; Seiferth, J.; Morfitt, Ron

    2003-01-01

    The Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) incorporates two new devices to improve its absolute radiometric calibration: a Full Aperture Solar Calibrator (FASC) and a Partial Aperture Solar Calibrator (PASC). The FASC is a diffuser panel, typically deployed once per month. Initial FASC absolute calibration results were within 5% of the pre-launch calibrations. Over time, the responses of the ETM+ to the FASC have varied with the location viewed on the panel, suggesting a localized degradation or contamination of the panel. On the best part of the panel, the trends in response range from m 1.4% y m 1 (band 4) to +0.6% y m 1 (band 7), with band 5 showing the least change at m 0.4% y m 1 . Changes in the panel reflectance due to UV exposure are believed to be the origin of these trends. The PASC is a set of auxiliary optics that allows the ETM+ to image the Sun through reduced apertures. PASC data have normally been acquired on a daily basis. Unlike the FASC, the PASC has exhibited significant anomalies. During the first six months of operation, responses to the PASC increased up to 60%, sending bands 2, 3 and 8 into saturation (band 1 was saturated at launch). The short-wave infrared (SWIR) band individual detectors have shown variations up to - 20% in response to the PASC. The variation is different for each detector. After the first six months, the responses to the PASC have become more stable, with much of the variation related to the within-scan position of the solar image. Overall results to date for all calibrators and comparisons with vicarious calibrations indicate that most of the response variations have been due to the calibrators themselves and suggest that the instrument has been stable with changes in response of less than 0.5% y m 1 .

  12. Polarization impacts on the water-leaving radiance retrieval from above-water radiometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Harmel, Tristan; Gilerson, Alexander; Tonizzo, Alberto; Chowdhary, Jacek; Weidemann, Alan; Arnone, Robert; Ahmed, Sam

    2012-12-10

    Above-water measurements of water-leaving radiance are widely used for water-quality monitoring and ocean-color satellite data validation. Reflected skylight in above-water radiometry needs to be accurately estimated prior to derivation of water-leaving radiance. Up-to-date methods to estimate reflection of diffuse skylight on rough sea surfaces are based on radiative transfer simulations and sky radiance measurements. But these methods neglect the polarization state of the incident skylight, which is generally highly polarized. In this paper, the effects of polarization on the sea surface reflectance and the subsequent water-leaving radiance estimation are investigated. We show that knowledge of the polarization field of the diffuse skylight significantly improves above-water radiometry estimates, in particular in the blue part of the spectrum where the reflected skylight is dominant. A newly developed algorithm based on radiative transfer simulations including polarization is described. Its application to the standard Aerosol Robotic Network-Ocean Color and hyperspectral radiometric measurements of the 1.5-year dataset acquired at the Long Island Sound site demonstrates the noticeable importance of considering polarization for water-leaving radiance estimation. In particular it is shown, based on time series of collocated data acquired in coastal waters, that the azimuth range of measurements leading to good-quality data is significantly increased, and that these estimates are improved by more than 12% at 413 nm. Full consideration of polarization effects is expected to significantly improve the quality of the field data utilized for satellite data validation or potential vicarious calibration purposes. PMID:23262527

  13. Critical Evaluation of Radiometric Ages Used for Tracking Hotspots in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksi, A. K.

    2004-12-01

    One of the pillars supporting the plume hypothesis, is the progression of ages for numerous hotspot tracks in oceans. These ages should be based on radiometric measurements. The argon dating methods have been the tool most commonly used. Since most of the rocks selected for dating have suffered (considerable) alteration, K-Ar dates should not be used as accurate measures of the age of crystallization. 40Ar/39Ar total fusion ages, though better than K-Ar dates in general, do not pinpoint samples that (a) contain excess argon or (b) have suffered partial loss of 40Ar* due to alteration. Hence 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating studies remain as the (only) tool of choice. From such experiments, at a minimum, ages must be based on plateau and/or isochron sections that meet the necessary statistical requirements to be considered crystallization ages. Earlier (Baksi, 1999, Jour. Geol.) it has been shown that almost all the purported crystallization ages for hotspot tracks in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, are invalid (see also www.mantleplumes.org/ArAr.html). Herein, I apply the tests outlined therein, to evaluate ages available in the literature for hotspot tracks in the Pacific Ocean. These can be divided into five main groups. (1) Those with reliable age data (e.g. Dalrymple and Garcia,1980; Dalrymple et al., 1980, DSDP 55, Hawaiian-Emperor Chain); the authors use care in selecting valid ages from their data sets. (2) Others (e.g. Pringle, 1993, AGU Monograph 77, Musicians Seamounts), most ages are statistically valid, though some fail the requisite test. In addition, many samples show high levels of atmospheric argon, suggesting the samples are (quite) altered; this could lead to incorrect plateau ages. (3) The next set (e.g. Winterer et al., 1993, AGU Monograph 77, Cretaceous guyots in the Northwest Pacific; Ozima et al., 1977, JGRAS, Western Pacific guyots; Saito and Ozima, 1977, EPSL, Western Pacific area) have few, if any, valid ages. Most plateaux/isochrons clearly fail the statistical test of reliability; many steps show high levels of atmospheric argon - the samples are (badly) altered. (4) A set of papers (e.g. Gripp and Gordon, 2002, Geophys. J. Int., young hotspot tracks; Duncan, 1985 - New Hebrides-Samoa lineament) make use of K-Ar dates, wholly or in the main. These dates should be treated as minimum estimates of the crystallization age. (5) A final set of papers (Sager et al., 1993, AGU Monograph 77, Japanese and Marcus-Wake Seamounts; Lincoln et al., 1993, AGU Monograph 77, Marshall Islands), quote ages without listing the relevant analytical data. These results are to be treated as suspect, and not used for quantitative tracking of hotspot trails. In conclusion, the purported progression of ages for numerous hotspot tracks in the Pacific Ocean does not withstand critical scrutiny.

  14. Laser photothermal radiometric instrumentation for fast in-line industrial steel hardness inspection and case depth measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Xinxin; Sivagurunathan, Konesh; Garcia, Jose; Mandelis, Andreas; Giunta, Salvatore; Milletari, Salvatore

    2009-03-01

    A contact-free, nondestructive laser photothermal radiometric instrumentation technique was developed to meet industrial demand for on-line steel hardness inspection and quality control. A series of industrial steel samples, flat or curvilinear, with different effective hardness case depths ranging between 0.21 and 1.78 mm were measured. The results demonstrated that three measurement parameters (metrics) extracted from fast swept-sine photothermal excitation and measurements, namely, the phase minimum frequency fmin, the peak or trough frequency width W, and the area S, are complementary for evaluating widely different ranges of hardness case depth: fmin is most suitable for large case depths, and W and S for small case depths. It was also found that laser beam angular inclination with respect to the surface plane of the sample strongly affects hardness measurement resolution and that the phase frequency maximum is more reliable than the amplitude maximum for laser beam focusing on the sample surface.

  15. Linear-array apertures for in-flight dynamic solar calibration of radiometric channels for Earth radiation-budget applications.

    PubMed

    Tira, N E; Mahan, J R; Lee Iii, R B; Keynton, R J

    1994-08-20

    The zero-frequency gain of nonimaging radiometers used in Earth radiation-budget applications is usually verified by a procedure that allows the instrument to view the Sun through an appropriate attenuating aperture and then equates its response to the known attenuated solar constant. However, channel intercomparison often requires that data from a low-resolution, relatively slow instrument such as an active-cavity radiometer be compared with data from a high-resolution, fast instrument such as a scanning thermistor-bolometer radiometer. In such a case, consideration of the difference in the dynamic responses of the two channels may be important. A novel technique for in-flight measurement of the radiometric transfer function of such instruments is described and then demonstrated through the use of a high-order dynamic model of the total, wide-field-of-view, nonscanning channel of NASA's Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE). PMID:20935961

  16. Up-to-date Review and Cases Report on Chondral Defects of Knee Treated by ACI Technique: Clinical-instrumental and Histological Results.

    PubMed

    Dell'Osso, Giacomo; Ghilardi, Marco; Bottai, Vanna; Bugelli, Giulia; Guido, Giulio; Giannotti, Stefano

    2015-05-01

    The limited regenerative potential of a full thickness defect of the knee joint cartilage has certainly conditioned the development of therapeutic strategies that take into account all the aspects of the healing process. The most common treatments to repair chondral and osteochondral lesions are bone marrow stimulation, osteochondral autograft transplantation, autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis, and autologous chondrocyte implantation. We like to emphasize the difference between a chondral and an osteochondral lesion because the difference is sometimes lost in the literature. In the context of treatment of injuries of the knee joint cartilage, the second-generation autologous chondrocyte transplant is a consolidated surgical method alternative to other techniques. Our experience with the transplantation of chondrocytes has had exceptional clinical results. We report 2 complete cases of a group of 22 in knee and ankle. These 2 cases had histological and instrumental evaluation. We cannot express conclusions, but can only make considerations, stating that, with the clinical functional result being equal, we obtained an excellent macroscopic result in both cases of second look. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a multiple surgical procedure with expensive chondrocyte culture, but even with this limitation, we think that it must be the choice in treating chondral lesions, especially in young patients. PMID:26055026

  17. Radioactive Dating: A Method for Geochronology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Gives historical background on the discovery of natural radiation and discusses various techniques for using knowledge of radiochemistry in geochronological studies. Indicates that of these radioactive techniques, Potassium-40/Argon-40 dating is used most often. (JN)

  18. Directly dating geologic events: U-Pb dating of carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasbury, E. Troy; Cole, Jennifer M.

    2009-07-01

    Carbonates are ubiquitous, forming in a variety of settings including caves, soils, the oceans, during burial from hydrothermal fluids, and along faults. U-Pb dating of carbonates is applicable to almost the entire geologic time scale, with results from Pleistocene speleothems showing great promise for dating records <1 Ma old. Here we review studies of U-Pb dating of carbonates from a range of depositional and diagenetic environments and consider published results with regard to stratigraphic associations and the behavior of U and Pb in various fluids. We detail the steps required to select suitable samples, summarize current laboratory techniques, and provide directions for improvement of analytical protocols. The U-Pb dating of carbonates has tremendous potential for dating events of geologic interest and is virtually untapped.

  19. Improved Thermal-Vacuum Compatible Flat Plate Radiometric Souce for System-Level Testing of Optical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Mark A.; Kent, Craig J.; Bousquet, Robert; Brown, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the development of an improved vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source used for characterizing and calibrating remote optical sensors, in situ, throughout their testing period. The original flat plate radiometric source was developed for use by the VIIRS instrument during the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP). Following this effort, the FPI has had significant upgrades in order to improve both the radiometric throughput and uniformity. Results of the VIIRS testing with the reconfigured FPI are reported and discussed.

  20. An automated method for relative radiometric correction performed through spectral library based classification and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Elia, C.; Ruscino, S.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we propose a method to perform automated radiometric correction of remotely sensed multispectral hyperspectral images. The effects of atmosphere, as well as the calibration errors which the satellite sensors may present, may be compensated by performing the radiometric correction operation in order to achieve good performances in different applications, such as classification and change detection. As far as the change detection is concerned, relative radiometric correction is particularly interesting since it deals with images which have to be compared and since in this context an absolute correction may be characterized by a high complexity. One method for performing radiometric correction of multispectral images can be based on a least-square approach: considering one image as the reference one and the other as a linearly scaled version of the reference one, the linear coefficients can be calculated by using a set of control points conveniently chosen. Unfortunately, the choice of control points is a tricky operation, strictly connected to the specific application. In this paper we propose an automated method for performing relative radiometric correction of multispectral remotely sensed images, in which the choice of the control points is based on a comparison of the spectral content of those images to the spectral response of known materials. Specifically, we perform a vector quantization of the images separately, considering N quantization levels represented by N known materials' signatures properly selected. Then the quantized images are compared in order to identify the areas classified as belonging to the same class, so identified by the same quantization index which will make the subset of control points that should be used for performing relative radiometric correction. Experimental results showed that choosing points characterized by an homogeneous spectral content for radiometric correction improves the performances of specific image processing algorithms, such as change detection and classification algorithms.

  1. English/Russian terminology on radiometric calibration of space-borne optoelectronic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privalsky, V.; Zakharenkov, V.; Humpherys, T.; Sapritsky, V.; Datla, R.

    The efficient use of data acquired through exo-atmospheric observations of the Earth within the framework of existing and newly planned programs requires a unique understanding of respective terms and definitions. Yet, the last large-scale document on the subject - The International Electrotechnical Vocabulary - had been published 18 years ago. This lack of a proper document, which would reflect the changes that had occurred in the area since that time, is especially detrimental to the developing international efforts aimed at global observations of the Earth from space such as the Global Earth Observations Program proposed by the U.S.A. at the 2003 WMO Congress. To cover this gap at least partially, a bi-lingual explanatory dictionary of terms and definitions in the area of radiometric calibration of space-borne IR sensors is developed. The objectives are to produce a uniform terminology for the global space-borne observations of the Earth, establish a unique understanding of terms and definitions by the radiometric communities, including a correspondence between the Russian and American terms and definitions, and to develop a formal English/Russian reference dictionary for use by scientists and engineers involved in radiometric observations of the Earth from space. The dictionary includes close to 400 items covering basic concepts of geometric, wave and corpuscular optics, remote sensing technologies, and ground-based calibration as well as more detailed treatment of terms and definitions in the areas of radiometric quantities, symbols and units, optical phenomena and optical properties of objects and media, and radiometric systems and their properties. The dictionary contains six chapters: Basic Concepts, Quantities, Symbols, and Units, Optical phenomena, Optical characteristics of surfaces and media, Components of Radiometric Systems, Characteristics of radiometric system components, plus English/Russian and Russian/Inglish indices.

  2. An overview of MODIS radiometric calibration and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, X. X.; Barnes, W.

    2006-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is one of the key instruments for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS), currently operating on both the Terra and Aqua satellites. The MODIS is a major advance over the previous generation of sensors in terms of its spectral, spatial, and temporal resolutions. It has 36 spectral bands: 20 reflective solar bands (RSB) with center wavelengths from 0.41 to 2.1 mu m and 16 thermal emissive bands (TEB) with center wavelengths from 3.7 to 14.4 mu m, making observations at three spatial resolutions: 250 in (bands 1-2), 500 m (hands 3-7), and 1km (bands 8-36). MODIS is a cross-track scanning radiometer with a wide field-of-view, providing a complete global coverage of the Earth in less than 2 days. Both Terra and Aqua MODIS went through extensive pre-launch calibration and characterization at various levels. In orbit, the calibration and characterization tasks are performed using its on-board calibrators (OBCs) that include a solar diffuser (SD) and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM), a v-grooved flat panel blackbody (BB), and a spectro-radiometric calibration assembly (SRCA). In this paper, we present an overview of MODIS calibration and characterization activities, methodologies, and lessons learned from pre-launch characterization and in-orbit operation. Key issues discussed in this paper include in-orbit efforts of monitoring the noise characteristics of the detectors, tracking the solar diffuser and optics degradations, and updating the sensor's response versus scan angle. The experiences and lessons learned through MODIS have played and will continue to play major roles in the design and characterization of future sensors.

  3. Reintroducing radiometric surface temperature into the Penman-Monteith formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallick, Kaniska; Boegh, Eva; Trebs, Ivonne; Alfieri, Joseph G.; Kustas, William P.; Prueger, John H.; Niyogi, Dev; Das, Narendra; Drewry, Darren T.; Hoffmann, Lucien; Jarvis, Andrew J.

    2015-08-01

    Here we demonstrate a novel method to physically integrate radiometric surface temperature (TR) into the Penman-Monteith (PM) formulation for estimating the terrestrial sensible and latent heat fluxes (H and ?E) in the framework of a modified Surface Temperature Initiated Closure (STIC). It combines TR data with standard energy balance closure models for deriving a hybrid scheme that does not require parameterization of the surface (or stomatal) and aerodynamic conductances (gS and gB). STIC is formed by the simultaneous solution of four state equations and it uses TR as an additional data source for retrieving the "near surface" moisture availability (M) and the Priestley-Taylor coefficient (?). The performance of STIC is tested using high-temporal resolution TR observations collected from different international surface energy flux experiments in conjunction with corresponding net radiation (RN), ground heat flux (G), air temperature (TA), and relative humidity (RH) measurements. A comparison of the STIC outputs with the eddy covariance measurements of ?E and H revealed RMSDs of 7-16% and 40-74% in half-hourly ?E and H estimates. These statistics were 5-13% and 10-44% in daily ?E and H. The errors and uncertainties in both surface fluxes are comparable to the models that typically use land surface parameterizations for determining the unobserved components (gS and gB) of the surface energy balance models. However, the scheme is simpler, has the capabilities for generating spatially explicit surface energy fluxes and independent of submodels for boundary layer developments. This article was corrected on 27 AUG 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  4. Wafer-level radiometric performance testing of uncooled microbolometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Denis G.; Topart, Patrice; Tremblay, Bruno; Julien, Christian; Martin, Louis; Vachon, Carl

    2014-03-01

    A turn-key semi-automated test system was constructed to perform on-wafer testing of microbolometer arrays. The system allows for testing of several performance characteristics of ROIC-fabricated microbolometer arrays including NETD, SiTF, ROIC functionality, noise and matrix operability, both before and after microbolometer fabrication. The system accepts wafers up to 8 inches in diameter and performs automated wafer die mapping using a microscope camera. Once wafer mapping is completed, a custom-designed quick insertion 8-12 ?m AR-coated Germanium viewport is placed and the chamber is pumped down to below 10-5 Torr, allowing for the evaluation of package-level focal plane array (FPA) performance. The probe card is electrically connected to an INO IRXCAM camera core, a versatile system that can be adapted to many types of ROICs using custom-built interface printed circuit boards (PCBs). We currently have the capability for testing 384x288, 35 ?m pixel size and 160x120, 52 ?m pixel size FPAs. For accurate NETD measurements, the system is designed to provide an F/1 view of two rail-mounted blackbodies seen through the Germanium window by the die under test. A master control computer automates the alignment of the probe card to the dies, the positioning of the blackbodies, FPA image frame acquisition using IRXCAM, as well as data analysis and storage. Radiometric measurement precision has been validated by packaging dies measured by the automated probing system and re-measuring the SiTF and Noise using INO's pre-existing benchtop system.

  5. Radiometric calibration of a polarization-sensitive sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, S.P.; Markham, B.L. NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD )

    1992-11-01

    The radiometric accuracy of a sensor is adversely affected by scene polarization if its optical system is sensitive to polarization. Tests performed on the reflective bands of the NS001 Thematic Mapper simulator, an aircraft multispectral scanner, show that it is very sensitive to the polarization state of the incoming radiations. For 100 percent linearly polarized light, errors in the measured intensity vary from -40 to +40 percent, depending on the scan angle and spectral band. To estimate polarization-induced errors in the intensity measured at aircraft level, the intensity and polarization of the atmospheric radiances were simulated using a realistic earth-atmosphere radiative transfer model. For the polarization of atmospheric radiances in the solar meridian plane over a vegetated target, intensity errors may range from -10 to + 10 percent. The polarization-induced errors are highest in the shortest NS001 spectral band (0.450-0.525 microns) because of large atmospheric polarizations contributed by Rayleigh particles and small diluting effects caused by the small contributions of weakly polarized radiations coming from aerosols and the surface. Depending on the illumination and view angles, the errors in derived surface reflectance due to the radiance errors can be very large. In particular, for large off-nadir view angles in the forward scattered direction when the sun is low, the relative errors in the derived surface reflectance can be as large as 4 to 5 times the relative error in the radiances. Polarization sensitivity errors cannot be neglected for the shorter wavelengths when the surface reflectance contribution to atmospheric radiances is very small. 40 refs.

  6. Dating human bone: is racemization dating species-specific?

    PubMed

    Moini, Mehdi; Rollman, Christopher M; France, Christine A M

    2013-12-01

    Our recently developed dating technique based on the racemization rate of aspartic acid was applied to dating human bone, as well as that of other mammals, utilizing capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry. First, several well-dated (mostly (14)C-dated and with strong archeological evidence) human bones ranging in age from 150 to ~10,000 years were used to develop a calibration curve for human bone. The D/L ratio of aspartic acid for these specimens ranged from 2.4% to ~10%, with a correlation coefficient of better than 0.99, indicating a strong linear relationship between the d/l ratio of aspartic acid and the age of the specimens. This calibration curve can now be used to date human archeological specimens of unknown age, up to ~10,000 years. However, when the technique was applied to well-dated mixed species of larger mammal bones such as bison, whale, llama, etc., the calibration curve showed a slower rate of racemization with a lower correlation (0.88). As additional large mammal bones with less certain age (i.e., using archeological evidence alone with no (14)C-dating) were dated the correlation coefficient decreased to 0.70. The correlation coefficient decreased further to 0.58 when the racemization data from all mammals (including human) were added to the calibration curve, indicating the importance of using well-dated, species-specific specimens for forming a calibration curve. This conclusion is consistent with our previously published calibration curve for a single species of silk (Bombyx mori), which followed the expected reversible first-order kinetics. These results support species specificity of amino acid racemization dating. PMID:24156614

  7. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Forward Modeling Results from the 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Westwater, E.R.; Cimini, D.; Klein, M.; Leuski, V.; Mattioli, V.; Gasiewski, A.J.; Dowlatshahi, S.; Liljegren, J.S.; Lesht, B.M.; Shaw, J.A.

    2005-03-18

    The 2004 Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment was conducted at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program field site near Barrow, Alaska from March 9 to April 9, 2004. The goals of the experiment were: to study the microwave and millimeter wave radiometric response to water vapor and clouds during cold and dry conditions; to obtain data for forward model studies at frequencies ranging from 22.235 to 400 GHz, to demonstrate new Environmental Technology Laboratory's (ETL) radiometric receiver and calibration technology and to compare both radiometric and in situ measurements of water vapor.

  8. Dating sediments using luminescence signals

    SciTech Connect

    Wintle, A. )

    1993-05-01

    Before siting a nuclear power station or a nuclear waste repository, it is necessary to establish that the area has been free of earthquake activity for a sufficient period of time. Evidence of past earthquake activity is often provided by faults in surface sediments. Age limits for fault formation can be set by obtaining the depositional ages of the sediment unit in which the fault was formed and the overlying sediment. A useful technique would be one that dating could be applied to the mineral grains that make up the sediments and that would give the time that has passed since the grains were blown or washed into position. Luminescence dating techniques, of which the most well known is thermo-luminescence (TL), provide such information. This approach has been successful in dating movement on the Wasatch Fault in Utah. A combination of TL and radiocarbon dates indicated that three faulting events had occurred within the past 5000 years. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  9. The nature of the systematic radiometric error in the MGS TES spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankine, Alexey A.

    2015-05-01

    Several systematic radiometric errors are known to affect the data collected by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) onboard Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). The time-varying wavenumber dependent error that significantly increased in magnitude as the MGS mission progressed is discussed in detail. This error mostly affects spectra of cold (nighttime and polar caps) surfaces and atmospheric spectra in limb viewing geometry. It is proposed here that the source of the radiometric error is a periodic sampling error of the TES interferograms. A simple model of the error is developed that allows predicting its spectral shape for any viewing geometry based on the observed uncalibrated spectrum. Comparison of the radiometric errors observed in the TES spaceviews and those predicted by the model shows an excellent agreement. Spectral shapes of the errors for nadir and limb spectra are simulated based on representative TES spectra. In nighttime and limb spectra, and in spectra of cold polar regions, these radiometric errors can result in an error of ±3-5 K in the retrieved atmospheric and surface temperatures, and significant errors in retrieved opacities of atmospheric aerosols. The model of the TES radiometric error presented here can be used to improve the accuracy of the TES retrievals and increase scientific return from the MGS mission.

  10. Radiometric Characterization Results for the IKONOS, Quickbird, and OrbView-3 Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holekamp, Kara; Aaron, David; Thome, Kurtis

    2006-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of commercial imaging satellite products is required to ensure that science and application communities better understand commercial imaging satellite properties. Inaccurate radiometric calibrations can lead to erroneous decisions and invalid conclusions and can limit intercomparisons with other systems. To address this calibration need, the NASA Applied Sciences Directorate (ASD) at Stennis Space Center established a commercial satellite imaging radiometric calibration team consisting of three independent groups: NASA ASD, the University of Arizona Remote Sensing Group, and South Dakota State University. Each group independently determined the absolute radiometric calibration coefficients of available high-spatial-resolution commercial 4-band multispectral products, in the visible though near-infrared spectrum, from GeoEye(tradeMark) (formerly SpaceImaging(Registered TradeMark)) IKONOS, DigitalGlobe(Regitered TradeMark) QuickBird, and GeoEye (formerly ORBIMAGE(Registered TradeMark) OrbView. Each team member employed some variant of reflectance-based vicarious calibration approach, requiring ground-based measurements coincident with image acquisitions and radiative transfer calculations. Several study sites throughout the United States that covered a significant portion of the sensor's dynamic range were employed. Satellite at-sensor radiance values were compared to those estimated by each independent team member to evaluate the sensor's radiometric accuracy. The combined results of this evaluation provide the user community with an independent assessment of these sensors' absolute calibration values.

  11. Practicum Application 2015 Date:__________________

    E-print Network

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    :_____________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Date of last Tetanus Vaccination:_____________________________ Emergency Contact Person

  12. Global Positioning Radiometric Scanner System. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    2001-03-01

    The US DOE continually seeks safer and more cost-effective technologies for use in decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. To this end, the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE OST sponsors the Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Projects (LSDDP). At these LSDDPs, developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to the DOE projects and to others in the D&D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, and decreased costs of operation. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) LSDDP generated a list of statements defining specific needs or problems where improved technology could be incorporated into ongoing D&D tasks. One of the stated needs was for developing technologies that would reduce costs and shorten D&D schedules by providing radiological characterizations to meet the free-release criteria. The Global Positioning Radiometric Scanner (GPRS system shown in Figure 1) utilizes a detection system; a portable computer, a differential global positioning system (d-gps), and a four wheel drive vehicle. Once the survey data has been collected, a software program called GeoSoft{trademark} generates a graphical representation of the radiological contamination extent. Baseline technology involves gridding the area and hand surveying each grid. This demonstration investigated the associated costs and the required time to evaluate the radiological characterization data from the GPRS with respect to the baseline technology. The GPRS system performs in-situ, real-time analyses to identify the extent of radiological contamination. Benefits expected from using the new innovative technology (GPRS) include: Reduced labor hours associated with performing the survey; Increased number of survey data points; Reduced exposure to radiation; Shortened D&D schedules; Reduced operating costs; Real time, in-situ radiological measurements; Visual representation of the extent of radiological contamination; and More accurate and reproducible survey results. This document contains information on the above-mentioned technology, including description, applicability, cost, and performance data.

  13. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of ALS Intensity Data: Effects on Accuracy and Target Classification

    PubMed Central

    Kaasalainen, Sanna; Pyysalo, Ulla; Krooks, Anssi; Vain, Ants; Kukko, Antero; Hyyppä, Juha; Kaasalainen, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    Radiometric calibration of airborne laser scanning (ALS) intensity data aims at retrieving a value related to the target scattering properties, which is independent on the instrument or flight parameters. The aim of a calibration procedure is also to be able to compare results from different flights and instruments, but practical applications are sparsely available, and the performance of calibration methods for this purpose needs to be further assessed. We have studied the radiometric calibration with data from three separate flights and two different instruments using external calibration targets. We find that the intensity data from different flights and instruments can be compared to each other only after a radiometric calibration process using separate calibration targets carefully selected for each flight. The calibration is also necessary for target classification purposes, such as separating vegetation from sand using intensity data from different flights. The classification results are meaningful only for calibrated intensity data. PMID:22346660

  14. Radiometric calibration and processing procedure for reflective bands on LANDSAT-4 protoflight Thematic Mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.; Abrams, R. B.; Ball, D. L.; Leung, K. C.

    1984-01-01

    The radiometric subsystem of NASA's LANDSAT-4 Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor is described. Special emphasis is placed on the internal calibrator (IC) pulse shapes and timing cycle. The procedures for the absolute radiometric calibration of the TM channels with a 122-centimeter integrating sphere and the transfer of radiometric calibration from the channels to the IC are reviewed. The use of the IC to calibrate TM data in the ground processing system consists of pulse integration, pulse averaging, IC state identification, linear regression analysis, and histogram equalization. An overview of the SCROUNGE-era (before August 1983) method is presented. Procedural differences between SCROUNGE and the TIPS-era (after July 1983) and the implications of these differences are discussed.

  15. Landsat-7 ETM+: 12 years on-orbit reflective-band radiometric performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markham, B.L.; Haque, M.O.; Barsi, J.A.; Micijevic, E.; Helder, D.L.; Thome, K.J.; Aaron, D.; Czapla-Myers, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    The Landsat-7 ETM+ sensor has been operating on orbit for more than 12 years, and characterizations of its performance have been ongoing over this period. In general, the radiometric performance of the instrument has been remarkably stable: 1) noise performance has degraded by 2% or less overall, with a few detectors displaying step changes in noise of 2% or less; 2) coherent noise frequencies and magnitudes have generally been stable, though the within-scan amplitude variation of the 20 kHz noise in bands 1 and 8 disappeared with the failure of the scan line corrector and a new similar frequency noise (now about 18 kHz) has appeared in two detectors in band 5 and increased in magnitude with time; 3) bias stability has been better than 0.25 DN out of a normal value of 15 DN in high gain; 4) relative gains, the differences in response between the detectors in the band, have generally changed by 0.1% or less over the mission, with the exception of a few detectors with a step response change of 1% or less; and 5) gain stability averaged across all detectors in a band, which is related to the stability of the absolute calibration, has been more stable than the techniques used to measure it. Due to the inability to confirm changes in the gain (beyond a few detectors that have been corrected back to the band average), ETM+ reflective band data continues to be calibrated with the prelaunch measured gains. In the worst case, some bands may have changed as much as 2% in uncompensated absolute calibration over the 12 years.

  16. Overview of current technology in MMW radiometric sensors for law enforcement applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, David D., Jr.; Currie, Nicholas C.

    2000-07-01

    This paper discusses the current state-of-the-art in millimeter-wave radiometric imagers being developed for law enforcement use within the United States. The most prevalent application at present is the detection of concealed weapons (guns, knives, etc.) with a secondary application involving the detection of drugs and explosives. Three main topics will be addressed: the phenomenology of concealed weapon detection at millimeter wavelengths, the promise and short comings of first generation radiometric imagers, and the characteristics of second generation systems currently under development.

  17. Comparison of diverse methods for the correction of atmospheric effects on LANDSAT and SKYLAB images. [radiometric correction in Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (principal investigator); Camara, G.; Dias, L. A. V.; Mascarenhas, N. D. D.; Desouza, R. C. M.; Pereira, A. E. C.

    1982-01-01

    Earth's atmosphere reduces a sensors ability in currently discriminating targets. Using radiometric correction to reduce the atmospheric effects may improve considerably the performance of an automatic image interpreter. Several methods for radiometric correction from the open literature are compared leading to the development of an atmospheric correction system.

  18. A Sounding Rocket Mission Concept to Acquire High-Resolution Radiometric Spectra Spanning the 9 nm - 31 nm Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, L. Habash; Cirtain, Jonathan; McGuirck, Michael; Pavelitz, Steven; Weber, Ed.; Winebarger, Amy

    2012-01-01

    When studying Solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) emissions, both single-wavelength, two- dimensional (2D) spectroheliograms and multi-wavelength, one-dimensional (1D) line spectra are important, especially for a thorough understanding of the complex processes in the solar magnetized plasma from the base of the chromosphere through the corona. 2D image data are required for a detailed study of spatial structures, whereas radiometric (i.e., spectral) data provide information on relevant atomic excitation/ionization state densities (and thus temperature). Using both imaging and radiometric techniques, several satellite missions presently study solar dynamics in the EUV, including the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Hinode, and the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO). The EUV wavelengths of interest typically span 9 nm to 31 nm, with the shorter wavelengths being associated with the hottest features (e.g., intense flares and bright points) and the longer wavelengths associated with cooler features (e.g., coronal holes and filaments). Because the optical components of satellite instruments degrade over time, it is not uncommon to conduct sounding rocket underflights for calibration purposes. The authors have designed a radiometric sounding rocket payload that could serve as both a calibration underflight for and a complementary scientific mission to the upcoming Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) mission aboard the GOES-R satellite (scheduled for a 2015 launch). The challenge to provide quality radiometric line spectra over the 9-31 nm range covered by SUVI was driven by the multilayer coatings required to make the optical components, including mirrors and gratings, reflective over the entire range. Typically, these multilayers provide useful EUV reflectances over bandwidths of a few nm. Our solution to this problem was to employ a three-telescope system in which the optical components were coated with multilayers that spanned three wavelength ranges to cover the three pairs of SUVI bands. The complete system was designed to fit within the Black Brandt-IX 22.-diameter payload skin envelope. The basic optical path is that of a simple parabolic telescope in which EUV light is focused onto a slit and shutter assembly and imaged onto a normal-incidence diffraction grating, which then disperses the light onto a 2048 2048 CCD sensor. The CCD thus records 1D spatial information along one axis and spectral information along the other. The slit spans 40 arc-minutes in length, thus covering a solar diameter out to +/- 1.3 solar radii. Our operations concept includes imaging at three distinct positions: the north-south meridian, the northeast-southwest diagonal, and real-time pointing at an active region. Six 10-second images will be obtained at each position. Fine pointing is provided by the SPARCS-VII attitude control system typically employed on Black Brandt solar missions. Both before and after launch, all three telescopes will be calibrated with the EUV line emission source and monochromater system at NASA's Stray Light Facility at Marshall Spaceflight Center. Details of the payload design, operations concept, and data application will be presented.

  19. Magnetostratigraphic and radiometric constraints on salt formation in the Qaidam Basin, NE Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiuyi; Fang, Xiaomin; Appel, Erwin; Zhang, Weilin

    2013-10-01

    The Qaidam Basin is the largest Cenozoic intermontane basin within the northeast (NE) Tibetan Plateau. It contains large amounts of nonmarine evaporite deposits formed during the Pliocene-Quaternary. Even at present, extensive salt deposits dominated by halite and potash are formed by solar-driven concentration of brine water in the basin interior, making it the most important industrial base for potash exploitation in China. The formation of salt required an arid climatic, appropriate hydrological and tectonic setting through geologic times and will do so in the future. Studying the salt formation in the Qaidam Basin will enhance our understanding of processes driven by saline lake evolution, regional climate change, and tectonic movements, not only for the setting of the Tibetan Plateau. Reliable dating is crucial for assessing the time of salt formation in Qaidam Basin and the accumulation process, yet no comprehensive scientific studies have been reported on this important issue until now. In this paper, we critically review and compile magnetostratigraphic and radiometric studies of the salt-bearing strata within seven depressions of the basin. We find that the ages of salt formation are very different in these depressions: for the Dalangtan, Yiliping, Chahansilatu, and Kunteyi depressions, first salt deposits occurred at >3.90 ± 0.02 Ma, 2.88 ± 0.04 Ma, 2.24 ± 0.01 Ma and 1.18 ± 0.02 Ma, respectively. For the Mahai, Gasikule, and Qarhan, the ages of earliest salt formation are much younger i.e., 302 ± 56 ka, 608 ± 38 ka, and 54-24 ka, respectively. However, the result from Mahai has to be considered with caution. The variability of ages suggests an older salt-forming stage in the center of the western basin and a younger salt accumulation period along the basin margin. In a regional view, previous results from stratigraphy, sedimentology, geomorphology, and tectonic history allow us to conclude that the salt formation in the Qaidam Basin was probably controlled by pulsed intrabasinal tectonic movements and the distribution and migration of paleo-rivers during the Pliocene-Quaternary. However, the climatic shift towards drier and colder conditions in the Asian interior during this time also promoted salt formation.

  20. 210Pb dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Roughly fifty years ago, a small group of scientists from Belgium and the United States, trying to better constrain ice sheet accumulation rates, attempted to apply what was then know about environmental lead as a potential geochronometer. Thus Goldberg (1963) developed the first principles of the 210Pb dating method, which was soon followed by a paper by Crozaz et al. (1964), who examined accumulation history of Antarctic snow using 210Pb. Shortly thereafter, Koide et al. (1972, 1973) adapted this technique to unravel sediment deposition and accumulation records in deep-sea environments. Serendipitously, they chose to work in a deep basin off California, where an independent and robust age model had already been developed. Krishanswami et al. (1971) extended the use of this technique to lacustrine deposits to reconstruct depositional histories of lake sediment, and maybe more importantly, contaminant inputs and burial. Thus, the powerful tool for dating recent (up to about one century old) sediment deposits was established and soon widely adopted. Today almost all oceanographic or limnologic studies that address recent depositional reconstructions employ 210Pb as one of several possible geochronometers (Andrews et al., 2009; Gale, 2009; Baskaran, 2011; Persson and Helms, 2011). This paper presents a short overview of the principles of 210Pb dating and provides a few examples that illustrate the utility of this tracer in contrasting depositional systems. Potential caveats and uncertainties (Appleby et al., 1986; Binford, 1990; Binford et al., 1993; Smith, 2001; Hancock et al., 2002) inherent to the use and interpretation of 210Pb-derived age-models are also introduced. Recommendations as to best practices for most reliable uses and reporting are presented in the summary.

  1. Airborne lidar and radiometric observations of PBL- and low clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamant, P. H.; Valentin, R.; Pelon, J.

    1992-01-01

    Boundary layer- and low altitude clouds over open ocean and continent areas have been studied during several field campaigns since mid-1990 using the French airborne backscatter lidar LEANDRE in conjunction with on-board IR and visible radiometers. LEANDRE is an automatic system, and a modification of the instrumental parameters, when airborne, is computer controlled through an operator keyboard. The vertical range squared lidar signals and instrument status are displayed in real time on two dedicated monitors. The lidar is used either down- or up-looking while the aircraft is flying above or below clouds. A switching of the viewing configuration takes about a minute. The lidar measurements provide a high resolution description of cloud morphology and holes in cloud layers. The flights were conducted during various meteorological conditions on single or multilayer stratocumulus and cumulus decks. Analysis on a single shot basis of cloud top (or bottom) altitude and a plot of the corresponding histogram allows one to determine a probability density function (PDF). The preliminary results show the PDFs for cloud top are not Gaussian and symmetric about the mean value. The skewness varies with atmospheric conditions. An example of results recorded over the Atlantic ocean near Biarritz is displayed, showing: (1) the range squared lidar signals as a function of time (here 100 s corresponds to about 8 km, 60 shots are averaged on horizontal); the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) - up to 600 m - is observed at the beginning of the leg as well as on surface returns, giving an indication of the porosity; (2) the cloud top altitude variation between 2.4 to 2.8 km during the 150 to 320 s section; and (3) the corresponding PDF. Similar results are obtained on stratocumulus over land. Single shot measurements can be used also to determine an optical porosity at a small scale as well as a fractional cloudiness at a larger scale. A comparison of cloud top altitude retrieved from lidar and narrowbeam IR radiometer is conducted to study the scale integration problem. A good agreement within less than 100 m relies on spatial uniformity and an optically thick layer. In the presence of holes, a discrepancy is observed. This is illustrated in figure 2, displaying as a function of time (1) the lidar signals; (2) the target temperature (either clouds or sea surface) retreived from a narrowbeam IR radiometer, 17 C is the sea surface temperature on that day; and (3) the visible flux, linked to cloud albedo, measured by a pyranometer. In preparation of ASTEX, down- and up-looking measurements where conducted on stratocumulus clouds over the Atlantic Ocean near Quimper in Brittany. Depending on the flight pattern orientation with respect to the wind, the top and bottom cloud morphologies are different. Preliminary results are given on cloud morphology, cloud top PDFs, optical porosity, fractional cloudiness, and comparison of lidar and radiometric measurements.

  2. Surface and aerosol models for use in radiative transfer codes. [for radiometric calibration of Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Quinn J.

    1991-01-01

    Absolute reflectance-based radiometric calibrations of Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) are improved with the inclusion of a method to invert optical-depth measurements to obtain aerosol-particle size distributions, and a non-Lambertian surface reflectance model. The inverted size distributions can predict radiances varying from the previously assumed jungian distributions by as much as 5 percent, though the reduction in the estimated error is less than one percent. Comparison with measured diffuse-to-global ratios show that neither distribution consistently predicts the ratio accurately, and this is shown to be a large contributor to calibration uncertainties. An empirical model for the surface reflectance of White Sands, using a two-degree polynomial fit as a function of scattering angle, was employed. The model reduced estimated errors in radiance predictions by up to one percent. Satellite calibrations dating from October, 1984 were reprocessed using the improved methods and linear estimations of satellite counts per unit radiance versus time since launch were determined which showed a decrease over time for the first four bands.

  3. Position: Date UMCES Location

    E-print Network

    Boynton, Walter R.

    Position: Date UMCES Location: Lab Director or PI: 1. Advertising Media: A. Publication Date Date B: Position must be listed with MD State Employment Security Administration Location Date Date 2. Male Female for position 4. Applicant selected for position: Race/Ethnic Category _______; Gender-Male______, Female

  4. Landsat: radiometric and topographic correction of satellite imagery (R package)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most Geographic Information System software includes routines for atmospheric and topograhic correction of satellite imagery such as that taken by Landsat. Radiometric correction is an active area of research, and new, improved methods are rarely if ever available for testing and application. The R...

  5. Onboard Real-Time Absolute Radiometric Calibration for Thermal Infrared Channels of Chinese Geostationary Meteorological Satellites

    E-print Network

    Dery, Stephen

    Onboard Real-Time Absolute Radiometric Calibration for Thermal Infrared Channels of Chinese and brightness temperatures with the corresponding DNs. In addition, the temperatures of onboard blackbody (OBB and temperatures of various mirrors, the transform equations from TOBB to TEBB are developed. Finally, the onboard

  6. Lifetime radiometric calibration of HJ-1A/B CCD sensor using Dunhuang Gobi site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qijin; Zhang, Xuewen; Liu, Li; Wang, Aichun

    2014-11-01

    Dunhuang Gobi site, a pseudo-invariant ground target, has been extensively used to calibrate the remote sensing instruments because of its high spatial and spectral uniformity and good temporal stability. Four Charge Coupled Device (CCD) sensors onboard HUANGJING-A/B (HJ-1A/B) satellites have been running 5-years since launched in 2008, and provided important remote sensing data for land surface reflectance retrieval, bio/geophysical variables estimation and environment pollution /disaster monitoring. The radiometric performance of HJ-1A/B CCD may change after launched because of many factors, thus, we have carried out many ground measurement campaigns at a pseudo-invariant test site-Dunhuang gobi to perform radiometric calibration of these sensors. This article describes the characteristics of Dunhuang gobi site and lifetime radiometric calibration monitoring results obtained for four CCD sensors. The results indicate that the long-term changes in calibration coefficients trending exceeding the dark-noise changes are primarily due to the drifts in the CCD radiometric responsivity, and the degradations of HJ-1A/B CCD are from -2.3%/year to -9.5%/year.

  7. Infrared lock-in carrierography ,,photocarrier radiometric imaging... of Si solar cells

    E-print Network

    Mandelis, Andreas

    for useful photovoltaic PV energy con- version as well as energy dissipation. When applied to solar cells for monitoring the energy conversion mechanisms affecting efficiency and transport properties of solar cellsInfrared lock-in carrierography ,,photocarrier radiometric imaging... of Si solar cells A. Melnikov

  8. Adjustments to the MODIS Terra Radiometric Calibration and Polarization Sensitivity in the 2010 Reprocessing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meister, Gerhard; Franz, Bryan A.

    2011-01-01

    The Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA s Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite Terra provides global coverage of top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances that have been successfully used for terrestrial and atmospheric research. The MODIS Terra ocean color products, however, have been compromised by an inadequate radiometric calibration at the short wavelengths. The Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) at NASA has derived radiometric corrections using ocean color products from the SeaWiFS sensor as truth fields. In the R2010.0 reprocessing, these corrections have been applied to the whole mission life span of 10 years. This paper presents the corrections to the radiometric gains and to the instrument polarization sensitivity, demonstrates the improvement to the Terra ocean color products, and discusses issues that need further investigation. Although the global averages of MODIS Terra ocean color products are now in excellent agreement with those of SeaWiFS and MODIS Aqua, and image quality has been significantly improved, the large corrections applied to the radiometric calibration and polarization sensitivity require additional caution when using the data.

  9. Radiometric comparison of Mars Climate Sounder and Thermal Emission spectrometer measurements

    E-print Network

    Bandfield, Joshua L.

    March 2013 Keywords: Mars, Climate Infrared observations Mars, Atmosphere a b s t r a c t Mars ClimateRadiometric comparison of Mars Climate Sounder and Thermal Emission spectrometer measurements Emission Spectrometer (TES) measurements across multiple Mars years. Thermal infrared measurements were

  10. ESTIMATING SUBPIXEL SURFACE TEMPERATURES AND ENERGY FLUXES FROM THE VEGETATION INDEX-RADIOMETRIC TEMPERATURE RELATIONSHIP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Routine (i.e., daily to weekly) monitoring of surface energy fluxes, particularly evapotranspiration (ET), using satellite observations of radiometric surface temperature has not been feasible at high pixel resolution because of the low frequency in satellite coverage over the region of interest (i...

  11. Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) radiometric performance on-orbit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morfitt, Ron; Barsi, Julia A.; Levy, Raviv; Markham, Brian L.; Micijevic, Esad; Ong, Lawrence; Scaramuzza, Pat; Vanderwerff, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Expectations of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) radiometric performance onboard Landsat-8 have been met or exceeded. The calibration activities that occurred prior to launch provided calibration parameters that enabled ground processing to produce imagery that met most requirements when data were transmitted to the ground. Since launch, calibration updates have improved the image quality even more, so that all requirements are met. These updates range from detector gain coefficients to reduce striping and banding to alignment parameters to improve the geometric accuracy. This paper concentrates on the on-orbit radiometric performance of the OLI, excepting the radiometric calibration performance. Topics discussed in this paper include: signal-to-noise ratios that are an order of magnitude higher than previous Landsat missions; radiometric uniformity that shows little residual banding and striping, and continues to improve; a dynamic range that limits saturation to extremely high radiance levels; extremely stable detectors; slight nonlinearity that is corrected in ground processing; detectors that are stable and 100% operable; and few image artifacts.

  12. Radiometric ages for basement rocks from the Emperor Seamounts, ODP Leg 197

    E-print Network

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Radiometric ages for basement rocks from the Emperor Seamounts, ODP Leg 197 Robert A. Duncan@coas.oregonstate.edu) [1] The Hawaiian-Emperor seamount chain is the ``type'' example of an age-progressive, hot spot (Site 1205), and Koko (Site 1206) Seamounts (Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 197) and Meiji Seamount

  13. Radiometric normalization and cloud detection of optical satellite images using invariant pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chao-Hung; Lin, Bo-Yi; Lee, Kuan-Yi; Chen, Yi-Chen

    2015-08-01

    Clouds in optical satellite images can be a source of information for water measurement or viewed as contaminations that obstruct landscape observations. Thus, the use of a cloud detection method that discriminates cloud and clear-sky pixels in images is necessary in remote sensing applications. With the aid of radiometric correction/normalization, previous methods utilized temporal and spectral information as well as cloud-free reference images to develop threshold-based cloud detection filters. Although this strategy can effectively identify cloud pixels, the detection accuracy mainly relies on the successful radiometric correction/normalization and reference image quality. Relative radiometric normalization generally suffers from cloud covers, while multi-temporal cloud detection is sensitive to the radiometric normalization quality. Thus, the current study proposes a method based on weighted invariant pixels for both processes. A set of invariant pixels is extracted from a time series of cloud-contaminated images by using the proposed weighted principle component analysis, after which multi-temporal images are normalized with the selected invariant pixels. In addition, a reference image is generated for each cloud-contaminated image using invariant pixels with a weighting scheme. In the experiments, image sequences acquired by the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus sensor are analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively to evaluate the proposed method. Experimental results indicate that F-measures of cloud detections are improved by 1.1-6.9% using the generated reference images.

  14. Circular Polarization for L-band Radiometric Soil Moisture Roger D. De Roo, Anthony W. England

    E-print Network

    De Roo, Roger

    Circular Polarization for L-band Radiometric Soil Moisture Retrieval Roger D. De Roo, Anthony W retrievals of surface soil moisture at L-band, the preferred polarization is hori- zontal polarization, because it has higher sensitivity to the soil moisture than does vertical polarization. However, L- band

  15. Radiometric age determinations and their interpretations phenomena in the Menderes Massif (western Anatolia-Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdogan, B.; Hasozbek, A.; Akay, E.; Gungor, T.; Satir, M.; Siebel, W.

    2012-04-01

    Radiometric isotope applications in geosciences have been enormously improving during the last decade. Most of these applications were also performed in the entire Turkey by various researchers. From southern to northern part of the Menderes Massif (western Anatolia), 40Ar-39Ar mica; Rb-Sr whole rock, mica; K-Ar whole rock, mica; U-Pb zircon isotope dilution; 207Pb-206Pb single zircon evaporation; apatite, zircon fission tracks, and Th-Pb monazite techniques are commonly applied methods. Most of the age determinations and their interpretations in the Menderes Massif were or are still used to evidence the geodynamic nature of the region with its bordered paleogeography. Last 20 years, nearly, most of the age data in the massif conflict with the well-known stratigraphical and lithological features and still preserve its debate. Moreover, individual age techniques were not properly interpreted or performed within their parameters (closure temperatures, related mineral equilibrium, metamorphic conditions…etc.). Particularly, most popular age determination methods of 40Ar/39Ar mistakenly interpreted as cooling ages instead of neo-crystallization ages. Similarly, Rb-Sr mica ages could easily demonstrate open chemical behavior related to the fluid interactions and present the timing of last fluid circulation events instead of cooling ages. The age data obtained from massif were interpreted without any consideration of the widespread Oligo-Miocene magmatic activity in the northern Menderes Massif, Neogene volcanism, and graben structures in western Anatolia. This study aims to present and summarize new (U-Pb-ID, 207Pb-206Pb single zircon evaporation, Rb-Sr mica) and previously obtained age data from northern and southern Menderes Massif in comparison with literature to better understanding of the age interpretations within their geological limits and related mineral features. Our results in comparison with previously published age data in their detailed stratigraphical features indicate that obtained youngest ages (c.20-25 Ma), which were previously interpreted as the cooling of the massif, are still questionable, and they are more likely representing the timing of fluid circulation events and/or resetting of their related isotopic systems.

  16. Date: _____________________ ______________________________________________ Student ID Number

    E-print Network

    Lathrop, Daniel P.

    Date: _____________________ __ __ ______________________________________________ Student ID Number ________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________ Director of Graduate Program (Print Name then Sign) Date Telephone extension and Email Address ________________________________________________________ Granted Denied Graduate School Representative Date Please return this form to: The Graduate School 2123

  17. Dendrochronologically Dated Ottoman Monuments

    E-print Network

    Manning, Sturt

    Dendrochronologically Dated Ottoman Monuments Peter Ian Kuniholm #12;Dendrochronologically Dated 4 Ottoman Monuments Peter Ian Kuniholm INTRODUCTION Dendrochronology or tree-ring dating has been carried history, no matter PETERIANKUNMOLMl Aegean Dendrochronology Project, Department of the History of Art

  18. Teen Dating Violence

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Data & Statistics (WISQARS) Press Room Social Media Publications Teen Dating Violence Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... serious forms of violence. What is dating violence? Teen Dating Violence Prevention Infographic The infographic highlights the ...

  19. Multi-temporal MODIS-Landsat Data Fusion for Relative Radiometric Normalization and gap Filling of Landsat Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, D. P.; Ju, J.

    2007-12-01

    The primary limitation to the utility of Landsat data, other than data cost, is the availability of cloud-free surface observations. As currently only degraded Landsat 5 and Landsat ETM+ systems are acquiring data, and only a single successor Landsat Data Continuity Mission sensor is scheduled, a potential alternative to provide more surface observations is the fusion of Landsat data with data from other remote sensing systems. A semi-physical fusion approach that uses the MODIS BRDF/Albedo surface anisotropy characterization product and Landsat ETM+ data to predict 30m Landsat reflectance on any date is presented. The methodology may be used for ETM+ cloud and SLC-off gap filling and for relative radiometric normalization. It does not require any tuning parameters and so may be automated, it is applied on a per-pixel basis and is unaffected by the presence of missing or contaminated neighboring Landsat pixels. The methodology and spatially explicit results are presented for two Landsat acquisitions at three Landsat scenes, one in Africa and two in the U.S., selected to encompass a range of land cover land use types, and temporal variations in solar illumination, land cover, and phenology. Summary statistics of the difference between the predicted and observed ETM+ reflectance (prediction residual) are compared with the difference between the ETM+ reflectance observed on the two dates (temporal residual) and with respect to the MODIS BRDF model parameter quality. For all three Landsat scenes, and for all bands, except one short wavelength band, the mean prediction residual is smaller than the mean temporal residual, typically by a factor two. This fusion methodology may be applied to any high spatial resolution satellite data with similar spectral bands as MODIS and where the sensor viewing and solar illumination geometry can be accurately derived.

  20. Dynamic noise corrected hyperspectral radiometric calibration in the SWIR range using a supercontinuum laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keresztes, Janos C.; Aernouts, Ben; Koshel, R. J.; Saeys, Wouter

    2015-09-01

    As line scanning short wave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a growing field in the food industry, it is important to select efficient illumination designs to image contaminants with high contrast and low noise. Illumination systems can efficiently be compared and optimized through the use of ray tracing simulations. However, these simulations provide illumination patterns in absolute radiometric units while HSI systems typically provide relative measurements. To bridge this gap, a supercontinuum laser and monochromator setup was used in this study to calibrate a SWIR HSI imager in spectral radiometric units. For the radiometric calibration, an integrating sphere (IS) was illuminated with the monochromatic laser light, while both a high sensitivity photodiode and the hyperspectral camera were positioned at different ports of the IS to measure the diffuse light synchronously. For each spectral band, the radiance observed by the imager corresponding to a line was detected using image analysis, while the remainder of the image was used to sample the noise of the sensor. Laser power fluctuations were monitored using a power meter coupled with a thermal sensor, allowing for their correction. As these measurements were time consuming, while InGaAs based sensors are very sensitive to thermal drift, the dark current was sampled frequently to avoid noise time drifts. This approach allowed correcting for 6% of temporal noise fluctuations. A per-pixel linear radiometric model was fitted with an R2 of 0:94+/-0:3 and used to transfer the measured light distribution of a halogen spot with and without a diffuser into absolute radiometric units. This allowed comparing measurements with the results of ray tracing.

  1. Using the Dunhuang test site to monitor the radiometric stability of the ZY-3 multispectral sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuewen; Han, Qijin; Liu, Li

    2014-11-01

    The ZY-3 satellite plays an important role in agriculture, forestry, water conservancy, ecological environment, and so on since its successfully running. In order to achieve continuity, stability and reliability of the remote sensing data, and improve quantitative application level of the ZY-3 satellite data, an accurate sensor radiometric calibration is essential. Because ZY-3 satellite doesn't have onboard calibration system, in-fight filed absolute radiometric calibration as a means to effective monitor the radiometric stability.This paper uses multi-day, multi-field at the Dunhuang test site to calibrate the ZY-3 multispectral sensor. The experiment obtained a synchronization measurement data on the August 18, 23 and 28, respectively. The two of ground surface were selected for measuring reflectance, which middling reflectance field (20%) and high reflectance field (40%). At the time of the ZY-3 overpass on the site, synchronous measure surface reflectance of ground targets, atmospheric optical characteristics parameters, such as atmospheric aerosol optical depth, atmospheric columnar water vapor content. Then use the radiative transfer model to estimate the top of atmosphere (TOA) radiance for MSS band. Radiometric calibration coefficient of MSS band was estimated by comparing the TOA radiance with average digital number of the MSS image. Based on multi-day, multi-field, and the real-time measurement at the Dunhuang site, radiometric calibration for ZY-3 MSS was successfully performed using reflectance-based method and calibration coefficients for MSS bands were obtained as well. According to contrast between in-fight calibration and the prelaunch, it was shown that the response of MSS changed at some extent after launch, especially band 1 and band 4. As a result, it was quite essential to update calibration coefficient timely and periodically in order to monitor the change of ZY-3 MSS better and to improve the quantitative application of MSS data as well.

  2. Sample detection and analysis techniques for electrophoretic separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falb, R. D.; Hughes, K. E.; Powell, T. R.

    1975-01-01

    Methods for detecting and analyzing biological agents suitable for space flight operations were studied primarily by literature searches which were conducted of cell separation techniques. Detection methods discussed include: photometrometric, electric, radiometric, micrometry, ultrasonic, microscopic, and photographic. A bibliography, and a directory of vendors are included along with an index of commercial hardware.

  3. Three-dimensional radiometric aperture synthesis microscopy for security screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Neil A.; Bowring, Nick

    2014-10-01

    The three dimensional (3D) aperture synthesis imaging technique investigated here is a generalisation of the classic twodimensional radio astronomy technique with refinements for the near-field so it can be applied a personnel security screening portal. This technique can be viewed as a novel form of diffraction emission tomography and extends previous 3D aperture synthesis imaging research using matrix inversion techniques [1]. Simulations using three-dimensional Fourier transforms to create three-dimensional images from simulated three-dimensional visibility functions illustrate the Abbe microscopy resolution should be achievable in three dimensions simultaneously in a single sensor. The field-of-view is demonstrated to be limited by Fresnel scale effects and a means to over coming this by processing sub-sets of local visibility functions with different phase centres throughout the imaging volume is presented. The applications of this technique to a full 3D imaging security screening portal is explored and a route to extending simulation software for market driven imaging scenarios is discussed.

  4. Lithostratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy, and radiometric dating of the Stanislaus Group, CA, and age of the Little Walker Caldera

    E-print Network

    Busby, Cathy

    counties, CA), composed of intercalated latite and quartz-latite (trachyandesite and trachyte-latite (trachytes/trachydacites) ignimbrites that erupted from the vicinity of Sonora Pass, CA. These volcanic rocks

  5. Calcium-41 concentration in terrestrial materials: prospects for dating of pleistocene samples

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, W.; Bell, W.A.; Billquist, P.J.; Glagola, B.G.; Kutschera, W.; Liu, Z.; Lucas, H.F.; Paul, M.; Rehm, K.E.; Yntema, J.L.

    1987-05-08

    Calcium-41 bas been suggested as a new tool for radiometric dating in the range of 10/sup 5/ to 10/sup 6/ years. The concentration of cosmogenic calcium-41 in natural samples of terrestrial origin has now been determined by high-sensitivity accelerator mass spectrometry after pre-enrichment in calcium-41 with an isotope separator. Ratios of calcium-41 to total calcium between 2 x 10/sup -14/ and 3 x 10/sup -15/ were measured for samples of contemporary bovine bone and from limestone deposits. Some prospects for the use of calcium-41 for dating Middle and Late Pleistocene bone and for other geophysical applications are discussed.

  6. Research paper Constraining the age of rock art by dating a rockfall event using sediment and

    E-print Network

    Pederson, Joel L.

    dating techniques, dendrochronology and lichenometry, are indirect measurements requiring the presence of specific species of organisms (Lang et al., 1999). Dendrochronology is a useful method for dating rockfall

  7. Microwave radiometric measurements of sea-surface parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. M.; Blume, H. J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique to remotely measure sea-surface temperature and salinity (for concentrations greater than 5 parts-per-thousand) with accuracies of 1 C and 1 part-per-thousand, respectively, was demonstrated with a two-frequency microwave radiometer system.

  8. Dating of Modern Human Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grun, R.

    Dating studies on palaoeanthropological sites is usually carried out on material associ- ated with the human remains, such as the sediment, charcoal or other fauna rather than the human specimen itself. The reason lies in the fact that most dating techniques are destructive and because the hominid remains are too rare to be sacrificed for dating. This indirect dating approach is in many cases not satisfactory, because: (i) the human remains are often buried into the sediments and the association with other materials is uncertain (e.g. Skhul, Qafzeh, etc.); (ii) faunal remains or minerals from the sediment are re-worked from older deposits (see e.g. present discussion of the age of the Homo erectus remains in Indonesia; (iii) the hominid fossils were discovered at a time when no careful excavations were carried out and it is impossible to correlate the specimen with other datable material (which applies tonearly 90% of all palaeoanthropological specimens). For example, the hominid burial site of Qafzeh in Israel has been dated by several independent dating laboratories with a multitude of methods. However, the data are still not accepted by some because the dating has not been carried out on the hominid specimen. Until recently, hominid fossils could only be dated by radiocarbon. This method reaches back to about 40,000 years. As a consequence, all the older fossils could not be analysed and many important questions in our understanding of human evolution could not be addressed. Human remains are scarce and extremely valuable, therefore any sort of destruction has to be kept to an absolute minimum. This is of particular importance in Australia where any human fossils are sacred. Thus, for the analysis of hominid material it was necessary to develop a more or less non-destructive techniques. This has been ac- complished in recent years by the application of ESR dating of tooth enamel and a combination of gamma spectrometric and TIMS U-series dating of bones. The exam- ples of Florisbad, Mungo 3, Shkul and Tabun are used to illustrate the potential and pitfalls of these methods in palaeoanthropology.

  9. Expected Graduation Date _______________ ____ Original ____ Revision

    E-print Network

    Selmic, Sandra

    Expected Graduation Date _______________ ____ Original ____ Revision PLAN OF STUDY The Graduate ___________________________________________________________________ ____________________ Signature of Student Date Approved: __________________________________ _________ __________________________________ _________ Chairman, Advisory Committee Date Department Head Date

  10. Improved thermal-vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source for system-level testing of optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Mark A.; Kent, Craig J.; Brown, Steven W.; Woodward, John T.; Lin, Chungsan

    2014-09-01

    In this work, development of a fiber-optically coupled, vacuum-compatible, flat plate radiometric source applicable to the characterization and calibration of remote sensing optical sensors in situ in a thermal vacuum chamber is described. The original flat plate radiometric source configuration's performance was presented at the 2009 Berlin SPIE. Following the original effort, design upgrades were incorporated in order to improve radiometric throughput and uniformity. Results of thermal and radiometric performance, with incorporated upgrades, of a flat plate illumination source in a temperature-controlled vacuum chamber operating at liquid nitrogen temperature are presented. Applications, including use with monochromatic tunable laser sources for the end-to-end system-level testing of large aperture sensors, are briefly discussed.

  11. Improving Ocean Color Data Products using a Purely Empirical Approach: Reducing the Requirement for Radiometric Calibration Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson

    2008-01-01

    Radiometric calibration is the foundation upon which ocean color remote sensing is built. Quality derived geophysical products, such as chlorophyll, are assumed to be critically dependent upon the quality of the radiometric calibration. Unfortunately, the goals of radiometric calibration are not typically met in global and large-scale regional analyses, and are especially deficient in coastal regions. The consequences of the uncertainty in calibration are very large in terms of global and regional ocean chlorophyll estimates. In fact, stability in global chlorophyll requires calibration uncertainty much greater than the goals, and outside of modern capabilities. Using a purely empirical approach, we show that stable and consistent global chlorophyll values can be achieved over very wide ranges of uncertainty. Furthermore, the approach yields statistically improved comparisons with in situ data, suggesting improved quality. The results suggest that accuracy requirements for radiometric calibration cab be reduced if alternative empirical approaches are used.

  12. Constraints on the timing of Marinoan ``Snowball Earth'' glaciation by 187Re-187Os dating of a Neoproterozoic, post-glacial black shale in Western Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Brian S.; Creaser, Robert A.; Ross, Gerald M.; Selby, David

    2004-06-01

    New Re-Os isotopic data were obtained from chlorite-grade black shales from the upper Old Fort Point Formation (Windermere Supergroup), a post-glacial Neoproterozoic marker horizon in western Canada. A Re-Os isochron date of 634±57 Ma (MSWD=65, n=5) was determined using the conventional inverse aqua regia digestion medium. However, dissolution of the same samples with a new CrO 3-H 2SO 4 dissolution technique [Chem. Geol. 200 (2003) 225] yielded a much more precise date of 607.8±4.7 Ma (MSWD=1.2). Both dates are in agreement with existing U-Pb age constraints that bracket the Old Fort Point Formation between ˜685 and ˜570 Ma. The distinctive Re-Os systematics recorded by the two analytical protocols is explained by dissolution of a variably radiogenic, detrital Os component by the aqua regia method. In contrast, the CrO 3-H 2SO 4 technique minimizes this detrital component by selectively dissolving organic matter that is dominated by hydrogenous (seawater) Re and Os. The date of 607.8±4.7 Ma is thus interpreted as the depositional age for the upper Old Fort Point Formation providing a minimum age constraint for the timing of the second Windermere glaciation in western Canada. This ice age is correlative with the Marinoan (˜620-600 Ma) ice age and older than the ˜580-Ma Gaskiers glaciation of northeastern North America. The new Re-Os age determined from the CrO 3-H 2SO 4 digestion technique thus provides further support to a growing body of evidence for a global Marinoan glacial episode. Such an interpretation would not be discernable from the imprecise Re-Os date obtained with the aqua regia protocol. These results also indicate the potential for Re-Os radiometric dating of black shales that was not previously recognized. Importantly, neither chlorite-grade metamorphism nor the low organic content (TOC <1%) of the Old Fort Point Formation precluded the determination of a precise Re-Os depositional age using the CrO 3-H 2SO 4 analytical protocol.

  13. Efficient radiometrically accurate synthetic representation of IR scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Patrick C.; Gover, Robert E.

    2003-08-01

    A technique is developed for synthesizing a high spectral resolution IR ship signature image, for use in an imaging IR Anti-Ship Cruise Missile (ASCM) model, from an IR scene database provided by the ship signature model NTCS/ShipIR. This synthesized IR ship image is generated for use over ranges representative of an ASCM engagement. The technique presented focuses on the application of in-band averaged transmittance to the source ship signature as a means of reducing the spectral calculations required by the cruise missile model. In order to achieve this reduction in computation, while preserving the fidelity of the apparent ship signature, the idea of sub-banding is introduced. Sub-banding describes the manner in which the IR band is partitioned into smaller bandwidths, such that the error produced in the ship's average contrast radiance due to the use of in-band averaged transmittance is minimized over range. The difference between the average contrast radiance of an IR ship image generated using in-band averaging and the average contrast radiance of a spectrally generated IR ship image is the metric for this minimization. This choice is based on measured data collected from the recent NATO SIMVEX trial, which used high quality IR measurements of the CFAV Quest in an effort to refine the NTCS/ShipIR model. The technique is general and applicable to any band(s) of interest. Results are presented which verify that the use of in-band averaged transmittance over an IR band (3.5-5.0 ?m), partitioned using three optimal sub-bands, produces an IR ship image with an average contrast radiance within the desired error bar of a spectrally generated ship image's average contrast radiance.

  14. Rapid detection and identification of pathogenic mycobacteria by combining radiometric and nucleic acid probe methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ellner, P.D.; Kiehn, T.E.; Cammarata, R.; Hosmer, M.

    1988-07-01

    The combination of radiometric methodology (BACTEC 12B) and probe technology for recovery and identification of mycobacteria was studied in two large hospital laboratories. The sediment from vials with positive growth indices was tested with DNA probes specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium, and Mycobacterium intracellulare. The sensitivity of the radiometric method and the specificity of the probes resulted in a marked reduction in the time to the final report. Biochemical testing could be eliminated on isolates giving a positive reaction with one of the probes. Some 176 isolates of M. tuberculosis, 110 of M. avium, and 5 of M. intracellulare were recovered. Two-thirds of these isolates were detected and identified within 2 weeks of inoculation and the remainder was detected by 4 weeks, a reduction of 5 to 7 weeks to the final report.

  15. An information theory characterization of radar images and a new definition for radiometric resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, V. S.; Shanmugan, K. S.; Holtzman, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The noise properties of the radar image formation process are used in the present modeling of a communication channel in which the desired target properties are the information transmitted, and the final image represents the received signal. The average information rate over this communication channel is calculated together with appropriate bounds and approximations, and is found to be small on a per-sample basis. As a result, many samples must be averaged to allow for the discrimination, or classification, of several levels of target reflectivity. These information rate properties are consistent with known results concerning target detection and image quality in speckle, and the rate is applicable to the definition of radar image radiometric resolution. Radiometric resolution is functionally related to the degree of noncoherent averaging performed by the sensor.

  16. Uncertainty propagation algorithm from the radiometric calibration to the restored earth observation radiance.

    PubMed

    Guorui, Jia; Huijie, Zhao; Hao, Lei

    2014-04-21

    The uncertainty of the radiometric calibration affects the accuracy of the earth observation (EO) radiance restored from the remote sensing digital number (DN) data. However, it has not been intensively analyzed whether they are equivalent to each other. The algorithm to deduce the uncertainty of the restored EO radiance in the solar-reflective spectral range (400-2500 nm) along the uncertainty propagation chain in the radiometric calibration process is proposed. It was validated compared with the traditional calibration uncertainty algorithm through an example of calibrating an imaging spectrometer. The interval about the real EO radiance and the corresponding level of confidence was reported as a result, which shows the possibility to accurately expressing the quality of the restored EO radiance following the rules used in the field of metrology. PMID:24787833

  17. Radiometric, SEM and XRD investigation of the Chituc black sands, southern Danube Delta, Romania.

    PubMed

    Margineanu, R M; Blebea-Apostu, Ana-Maria; Celarel, Aurelia; Gomoiu, Claudia-Mariana; Costea, C; Dumitras, Delia; Ion, Adriana; Duliu, O G

    2014-12-01

    The black sand of the Chituc marine sand bank, northern of the city of Navodari (Romania), presents anomalous high radioactivity. Field measurements recorded in some places dose rate up to 200 nSv/h, significantly overpassing the average value of 44 ± 20 nSv/h along the entire Southern sector of Romanian Black Sea shore. Gamma ray spectrometry performed on both Slanic-Prahova Underground Low Background Laboratory and Geological Institute of Romania Radiometric Facilities showed with clarity the dominance of (228)Ac radioisotope in the 50 microns fraction together with the (226)Ra and traces of (40)K. No significant amount of anthropogenic (137)Cs was identified. Based on radiometric as well as on SEM-EDAX and XRD determinations we come to the conclusion that the evidenced radioactivity could be attributed to both uranium and thorium series in the zircon and monazite fractions and to a lesser extent to potassium in the feldspars. PMID:25181034

  18. Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) Multiple EUV Grating Spectrographs (MEGS): Radiometric Calibrations and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hock, R. A.; Woods, T. N.; Crotser, D.; Eparvier, F. G.; Woodraska, D. L.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, E. C.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), scheduled for launch in early 2010, incorporates a suite of instruments including the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE). EVE has multiple instruments including the Multiple Extreme ultraviolet Grating Spectrographs (MEGS) A, B, and P instruments, the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), and the Extreme ultraviolet SpectroPhotometer (ESP). The radiometric calibration of EVE, necessary to convert the instrument counts to physical units, was performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF III) located in Gaithersburg, Maryland. This paper presents the results and derived accuracy of this radiometric calibration for the MEGS A, B, P, and SAM instruments, while the calibration of the ESP instrument is addressed by Didkovsky et al. . In addition, solar measurements that were taken on 14 April 2008, during the NASA 36.240 sounding-rocket flight, are shown for the prototype EVE instruments.

  19. Radiometric calibration and atmospheric correction of satellite and aircraft data for FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Scott J.; Markham, Brian L.; Newcomer, Jeffery A.

    1992-01-01

    The satellite and aircraft radiometric calibration and atmospheric correction work carried out as part of the first International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) are summarized. A large volume (120 Gbytes) of radiometric data were acquired and derived from a number of different instruments on a variety of platforms. The same basic procedure was applied to each instrument: derive the most recent calibration coefficients for converting sensor counts to reflective spectral radiances; correct the radiances for earth-sun distance variations and incident solar spectral irradiance within the bandpass of each respective instrument channel at the top of the atmosphere; characterize the atmosphere for aerosols and absorbing gases; and derive apparent surface reflectance by correcting the exoatmospheric values for atmospheric attenuation. The same basic approach was used for surface temperature derivation. The results of this processing were verified by surface measurements, and corroborated by sensor intercomparisons.

  20. Results of a thermoluminescence radiometric survey in Takala area of China's Tarim basin

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, F.R. ); Vaz, J.E. ); Su, J. )

    1993-01-11

    This paper reports on a thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) radiometric study of the near-surface radiation flux which was done as an adjunct to oil exploration research in the Takala area, Tarim basin, western China. About 80 sq km of the basin were evaluated using lithium fluoride (LiF) TLDs buried at about 0.5 m; Rn and [Delta]C (anomalous carbonate) measurements were made in this region as well. Small target areas were defined in the region by low value TL radiometric signals. Comparative measurements of Rn and [Delta]C were not as effective as TL in defining small areas for follow-up seismic work or in revealing the structural trends. The structural nature of the area was mimicked by the near-surface radiometries distribution pattern determined by TLDs and suggested the possibility of fault-influenced traps in the subsurface.

  1. First realisation of the Space Absolute Radiometric Reference (SARR) during the ATLAS 2 flight period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crommelynck, D.; Fichot, A.; Lee, R. B., III; Romero, J.

    1995-01-01

    A number of different solar constant observations all made from space during the ATLAS 2 mission have been gathered and compared to each other. The Sun did not have a single sunspot during several days. As eight of the radiometric channels were all within 0.1%, the mean of the observations has been used to determine a set of adjustment factors providing de facto the definition of the Space Absolute Radiometric Reference (SARR). The differential absolute radiometers of Solar Constant (SOLCON) experiment and the Solar Variability-1 (SOVA 1) experiment, as well as the SOVA 2 and Active Cavity Radiometer (ACR) radiometers that have been brought back to the Earth may, if used in the same conditions, reproduce and maintain the SARR for the future.

  2. First realisation of the Space Absolute Radiometric Reference (SARR) during the ATLAS 2 flight period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crommelynck, D.; Fichot, A.; Lee, R. B., III; Romero, J.

    A number of different solar constant observations all made from space during the ATLAS 2 mission have been gathered and compared to each other. The Sun did not have a single sunspot during several days. As eight of the radiometric channels were all within 0.1%, the mean of the observations has been used to determine a set of adjustment factors providing de facto the definition of the Space Absolute Radiometric Reference (SARR). The differential absolute radiometers of Solar Constant (SOLCON) experiment and the Solar Variability-1 (SOVA 1) experiment, as well as the SOVA 2 and Active Cavity Radiometer (ACR) radiometers that have been brought back to the Earth may, if used in the same conditions, reproduce and maintain the SARR for the future.

  3. System implications of large radiometric array antennas. [for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levis, C. A.; Lin, H.-C.

    1977-01-01

    Temperature sensitivity degradation due to antenna losses is recognized as a hindrance to extension of available remote-sensing radiometry techniques to larger systems for enhanced spatial resolution. The use of large antennas is also complicated by difficulties with bandwidth and integration time. Advantages of introducing active devices at the subarray level, with distributed Dicke switching or correlation detection, are examined, and their possible contribution to the design of effective imaging microwave radiometers for remote sensing of geophysical parameters (sea state, distribution of sea ice, cloud types and their distributions, soil moisture) is assessed.

  4. Prime candidate earth targets for the post-launch radiometric calibration of space-based optical imaging instruments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teillet, P.M.; Barsi, J.A.; Chander, G.; Thome, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive list of prime candidate terrestrial targets for consideration as benchmark sites for the post-launch radiometric calibration of space-based instruments. The key characteristics of suitable sites are outlined primarily with respect to selection criteria, spatial uniformity, and temporal stability. The establishment and utilization of such benchmark sites is considered an important element of the radiometric traceability of satellite image data products for use in the accurate monitoring of environmental change.

  5. Office Use Only Date Form Received: Start Date

    E-print Network

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    4/2015 Office Use Only Date Form Received: Start Date: End Date: Date Processed: HARVARD UNIVERSITY payable to "Harvard University" Student Signature Date Print legibly, complete, and submit this form

  6. Production and radiometric measurements of the large particle plutonium oxide non-destructive assay standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thronas, Denise L.; Wong, Amy S.; Mecklenburg, Sandra L.; Marshall, Robert S.

    2000-07-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has produced several sets of working reference materials (WRMs) for the National TRU Waste Program (NTWP) NDA PDP(Non-Destructive Assay Performance Demonstration Program). This paper describes the first example of production of traceable, certified standards containing plutonium oxide in large particle form for the DOE complex. Discussion of the production and radiometric measurements of these NDA standards is included herein.

  7. A procedure for radiometric recalibration of Landsat 5 TM reflective-band data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Haque, M.O.; Micijevic, E.; Barsi, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    From the Landsat program's inception in 1972 to the present, the Earth science user community has been benefiting from a historical record of remotely sensed data. The multispectral data from the Landsat 5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor provide the backbone for this extensive archive. Historically, the radiometric calibration procedure for the L5 TM imagery used the detectors' response to the internal calibrator (IC) on a scene-by-scene basis to determine the gain and offset for each detector. The IC system degraded with time, causing radiometric calibration errors up to 20%. In May 2003, the L5 TM data processed and distributed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science Center through the National Landsat Archive Production System (NLAPS) were updated to use a lifetime lookup-table (LUT) gain model to radiometrically calibrate TM data instead of using scene-specific IC gains. Further modification of the gain model was performed in 2007. The L5 TM data processed using IC prior to the calibration update do not benefit from the recent calibration revisions. A procedure has been developed to give users the ability to recalibrate their existing level-1 products. The best recalibration results are obtained if the work-order report that was included in the original standard data product delivery is available. However, if users do not have the original work-order report, the IC trends can be used for recalibration. The IC trends were generated using the radiometric gain trends recorded in the NLAPS database. This paper provides the details of the recalibration procedure for the following: 1) data processed using IC where users have the work-order file; 2) data processed using IC where users do not have the work-order file; 3) data processed using prelaunch calibration parameters; and 4) data processed using the previous version of the LUT (e.g., LUT03) that was released before April 2, 2007.

  8. The absolute radiometric calibration of the advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.; Teillet, P. M.; Ding, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The need for independent, redundant absolute radiometric calibration methods is discussed with reference to the Thematic Mapper. Uncertainty requirements for absolute calibration of between 0.5 and 4 percent are defined based on the accuracy of reflectance retrievals at an agricultural site. It is shown that even very approximate atmospheric corrections can reduce the error in reflectance retrieval to 0.02 over the reflectance range 0 to 0.4.

  9. Study of spectral/radiometric characteristics of the Thematic Mapper for land use applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A.; Metzler, M. D. (principal investigators)

    1985-01-01

    The radiometric characteristics of LANDSAT 5 TM data were analyzed. Effects which were found earlier and quantified in LANDSAT 4 TM data were quantified for LANDSAT-5 data as well, including: scan-direction-related signal droop and scan correlated level shifts. Coincident LANDSAT 4 and 5 fully corrected (CCT-PT) TM data were analyzed, and band-by-band relationships between the two sensors were derived in terms of both signal counts and radiance.

  10. Reduced major axis approach for correcting GPM/GMI radiometric biases to coincide with radiative transfer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Tanvir; Srivastava, Prashant K.; Petropoulos, George P.; Singh, Sudhir K.

    2016-01-01

    Correcting radiometric biases is crucial prior to the use of satellite observations in a physically based retrieval or data assimilation system. This study proposes an algorithm - RARMA (Radiometric Adjustment using Reduced Major Axis) for correcting the radiometric biases so that the observed radiances coincide with the simulation of a radiative transfer model. The RARMA algorithm is a static bias correction algorithm, which is developed using the reduced major axis (RMA) regression approach. NOAA's Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) has been used as the basis of radiative transfer simulation for adjusting the observed radiometric biases. The algorithm is experimented and applied to the recently launched Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's GPM Microwave Imager (GMI). Experimental results demonstrate that radiometric biases are apparent in the GMI instrument. The RARMA algorithm has been able to correct such radiometric biases and a significant reduction of observation residuals is revealed while assessing the performance of the algorithm. The experiment is currently tested on clear scenes and over the ocean surface, where, surface emissivity is relatively easier to model, with the help of a microwave emissivity model (FASTEM-5).

  11. Opportunities to Intercalibrate Radiometric Sensors from International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roithmayr, C. M.; Lukashin, C.; Speth, P. W.; Young, D. F.; Wielicki, B. A.; Thome, K. J.; Kopp, G.

    2014-01-01

    Highly accurate measurements of Earth's thermal infrared and reflected solar radiation are required for detecting and predicting long-term climate change. Consideration is given to the concept of using the International Space Station to test instruments and techniques that would eventually be used on a dedicated mission, such as the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO). In particular, a quantitative investigation is performed to determine whether it is possible to use measurements obtained with a highly accurate (0.3%,with 95%confidence) reflected solar radiation spectrometer to calibrate similar, less accurate instruments in other low Earth orbits. Estimates of numbers of samples useful for intercalibration are made with the aid of yearlong simulations of orbital motion. Results of this study support the conclusion that the International Space Station orbit is ideally suited for the purpose of intercalibration between spaceborne sensors.

  12. Opportunities to Intercalibrate Radiometric Sensors From International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roithmayr, C. M.; Lukashin, C.; Speth, P. W.; Thome, K. J.; Young, D. F.; Wielicki, B. A.

    2012-01-01

    Highly accurate measurements of Earth's thermal infrared and reflected solar radiation are required for detecting and predicting long-term climate change. We consider the concept of using the International Space Station to test instruments and techniques that would eventually be used on a dedicated mission such as the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory. In particular, a quantitative investigation is performed to determine whether it is possible to use measurements obtained with a highly accurate reflected solar radiation spectrometer to calibrate similar, less accurate instruments in other low Earth orbits. Estimates of numbers of samples useful for intercalibration are made with the aid of year-long simulations of orbital motion. We conclude that the International Space Station orbit is ideally suited for the purpose of intercalibration.

  13. Employee Information Employee Name: Date

    E-print Network

    Dennett, Daniel

    Employee Information Employee Name: Date: Employee ID: Job Title: Manager: Department: Personal why the employee/group deserves the award: Approval Signatures Requesting Manager Name: Date: Requesting Manager Signature: Date: Next Level Manager Name: Date: Next Level Manager Signature: Date

  14. Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Bailey, K.; Jiang, W.; Müller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Zappala, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Due to its simple production and transport processes in the terrestrial environment, the long-lived noble-gas isotope 81Kr (half-life = 230 kyr) is the ideal tracer for studying old water and ice in the age range of 10^5-10^6 years, a range beyond the reach of 14C. 81Kr dating, a concept pursued in the past four decades by numerous laboratories employing a variety of techniques, is now available for the first time to the earth science community at large. This is made possible by the development of ATTA-3 (Jiang et al., GCA 91, 1-6; 2012), an efficient and selective atom counter based on the Atom Trap Trace Analysis method (Chen et al., Science 286, 1139-1141; 1999). The instrument is capable of measuring both 81Kr/Kr and 85Kr/Kr ratios of environmental samples in the range of 10^-14-10^-10. For 81Kr-dating in the age range of 150 - 1,500 kyr, the required sample size is 5 - 10 micro-L STP of krypton gas, which can be extracted from approximately 100 - 200 kg of water or 40 - 80 kg of ice. For 85Kr/Kr analysis, the required sample size is generally smaller by an order of magnitude because of the isotope's higher initial abundance in the atmosphere. The Laboratory for Radiokrypton Dating is currently equipped to analyze up to 120 samples per year. With future equipment upgrades, this limit can be increased as demand grows. In the period since November 2011, the Laboratory has measured both 81Kr/Kr and 85Kr/Kr ratios in over 50 samples that had been extracted by collaborators from six different continents. The samples were from groundwater wells in the Great Artesian Basin (Australia), Guarani Aquifer (Brazil), and Locust Grove (Maryland); from brine wells of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (New Mexico); from geothermal steam vents in Yellowstone National Park; from near-surface ice at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica; and from deep mines in South Africa. Sample collection and purification was performed by groups including the University of Illinois at Chicago, University of Bern, and International Atomic Energy Agency. ATTA is a laser-based atom counting method, not a mass spectrometry method. A magneto-optical trap is used to capture neutral atoms (rather than ions) of the desired isotope using laser beams. A photo-sensor detects the laser induced fluorescence emitted by the individual trapped atoms. ATTA is unique among trace analysis techniques in that it is free of interferences from any other isotopes, isobars, atomic or molecular species. In an experiment demonstrating that ATTA-3 can analyze 39Ar/Ar ratios in environmental samples, no interference from other atomic or molecular species was observed at the 1x10^-16 level (Jiang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 103001; 2011). This work proved the feasibility of performing 39Ar dating using the ATTA method. We are supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357, and by Argonne National Laboratory.

  15. HOSPITALITY APPROVAL FORM DATE: __________________________

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    HOSPITALITY APPROVAL FORM DATE: __________________________ PERMISSION IS REQUESTED TO USE __ASMSU ___________________________________ DATE ______________ (Valid for FUNDS 426XXX through 429999 and 4WXXXX) *****THE HOSPITALITY APPROVAL refreshments or meals served during seminars, workshops, professional meetings, or conferences. Hospitality

  16. HOSPITALITY APPROVAL FORM DATE: __________________________

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    HOSPITALITY APPROVAL FORM DATE: __________________________ PERMISSION IS REQUESTED TO USE ___________________________________ DATE ______________ (Valid for FUNDS 426XXX through 429999 and 4WXXXX) *****THE HOSPITALITY APPROVAL refreshments or meals served during seminars, workshops, professional meetings, or conferences. Hospitality

  17. A Date with Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Robert; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Teen dating violence is common but preventable. A survey of Texas high schoolers showed that half of respondents had been victims of dating violence. A majority of both sexes believed that certain behaviors justified being hit by their dating partners. It is important to raise the awareness of school personnel, parents, and students. Peer…

  18. A Low Loss Microstrip Antenna for Radiometric Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahid, Parveen

    2000-01-01

    The design and analysis of a series-fed, low-loss, inverted microstrip array antenna, operating at 1.413 GHz is presented. The antenna is composed of two subarrays. Each subarray consists of an equal number of microstrip patches all connected together with microstrip lines. In the first design microstrip array for linear polarization is presented which incorporated a series feeding technique. The next design, which is capable of dual linear polarization (V-polarization and H-polarization), utilizes a corporate feed network for the V-pol and series feed arrangement for the H-pol. The first element of each subarray for H-pol is coaxially fed with a 180 deg phase difference. This approach ensures a symmetric radiation pattern on broadside in H-pol. For the V-pol two feeds are in the same phase on the two subarrays ensuring a broadside beam in V-pol. The designs presented here are simulated using the IE3D code that utilizes the method of moments. Measured results are compared with simulated results and show good agreement.

  19. The 60 GHz radiometric local vertical sensor experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grauling, C. H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The experiment concept involves the use of millimeter wave radiation the atmospheric oxygen to provide vertical sensing information to a satellite-borne radiometer. The radiance profile studies require the calculation of ray brightness temperature as a function of tangential altitude and atmosphere model, and the computer program developed for this purpose is discussed. Detailed calculations have been made for a total of 12 atmosphere models, including some showing severe warning conditions. The experiment system analysis investigates the effect of various design choices on system behavior. Calculated temperature profiles are presented for a wide variety of frequencies, bandwidths, and atmosphere models. System performance is determined by the convolution of the brightness temperature and an assumed antenna pattern. A compensation scheme to account for different plateau temperatures is developed and demonstrated. The millimeter wave components developed for the local vertical sensor are discussed, with emphasis on the antenna, low noise mixer, and solid state local oscillator. It was concluded that a viable sensing technique exists, useful over a wide range of altitude with an accuracy generally on the order of 0.01 degree or better.

  20. An analysis of new techniqes for radiometric correction of LANDSAT-4 Thematic Mapper images. [Terrebonne Bay, Louisiana and Grand Bahamas scenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, J.; Larduinat, E.; Fitzgerald, M.

    1983-01-01

    The utility of methods for generating TM RLUTS which can improve the quality of the resultant images was investigated. The TM-CCT-ADDS tape was changed to account for a different collection window for the calibration data. Several scenes of Terrebonne Bay, Louisiana and the Grand Bahamas were analyzed to evaluate the radiometric corrections operationally applied to the image data and to investigate several techniques for reducing striping in the images. Printer plots for the TM shutter data were produced and detector statistics were compiled and plotted. These statistics included various combinations of the average shutter counts for each scan before and after DC restore for forward and reverse scans. Results show that striping is caused by the detectors becoming saturated when they view a bright cloud and depress the DC restore level.

  1. From Romance to Rocket Science: Speed Dating in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muurlink, Olav; Poyatos Matas, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    This article is the first comprehensive review of speed dating in the tertiary sector. While speed dating has its origins as a networking technique to connect singles, it has only more recently made its way into the academy. Since 2005 universities world-wide have begun to adopt speed dating protocols as a tool for building research culture. An…

  2. Landsat-8 Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) Vicarious Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsi, Julia A.; Shott, John R.; Raqueno, Nina G.; Markham, Brian L.; Radocinski, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Launched in February 2013, the Landsat-8 carries on-board the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS), a two-band thermal pushbroom imager, to maintain the thermal imaging capability of the Landsat program. The TIRS bands are centered at roughly 10.9 and 12 micrometers (Bands 10 and 11 respectively). They have 100 m spatial resolution and image coincidently with the Operational Land Imager (OLI), also on-board Landsat-8. The TIRS instrument has an internal calibration system consisting of a variable temperature blackbody and a special viewport with which it can see deep space; a two point calibration can be performed twice an orbit. Immediately after launch, a rigorous vicarious calibration program was started to validate the absolute calibration of the system. The two vicarious calibration teams, NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), both make use of buoys deployed on large water bodies as the primary monitoring technique. RIT took advantage of cross-calibration opportunity soon after launch when Landsat-8 and Landsat-7 were imaging the same targets within a few minutes of each other to perform a validation of the absolute calibration. Terra MODIS is also being used for regular monitoring of the TIRS absolute calibration. The buoy initial results showed a large error in both bands, 0.29 and 0.51 W/sq m·sr·micrometers or -2.1 K and -4.4 K at 300 K in Band 10 and 11 respectively, where TIRS data was too hot. A calibration update was recommended for both bands to correct for a bias error and was implemented on 3 February 2014 in the USGS/EROS processing system, but the residual variability is still larger than desired for both bands (0.12 and 0.2 W/sq m·sr·micrometers or 0.87 and 1.67 K at 300 K). Additional work has uncovered the source of the calibration error: out-of-field stray light. While analysis continues to characterize the stray light contribution, the vicarious calibration work proceeds. The additional data have not changed the statistical assessment but indicate that the correction (particularly in band 11) is probably only valid for a subset of data. While the stray light effect is small enough in Band 10 to make the data useful across a wide array of applications, the effect in Band 11 is larger and the vicarious results suggest that Band 11 data should not be used where absolute calibration is required.

  3. Total ozone and aerosol optical depths inferred from radiometric measurements in the Chappuis absorption band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flittner, D. E.; Herman, B. M.; Thome, K. J.; Simpson, J. M.; Reagan, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    A second-derivative smoothing technique, commonly used in inversion work, is applied to the problem of inferring total columnar ozone amounts and aerosol optical depths. The application is unique in that the unknowns may be solved for directly without employing standard inversion methods. It is shown, however, that by employing inversion constraints, better solutions are normally obtained. The method is quite versatile and able to deal with varying total ozone and various aerosol size distributions. The technique is applied first in simulation, then to 119 days of measurements taken in Tucson, Arizona, that are compared to TOMS values for the same dates. The technique is also applied to two measurements taken at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, for which Dobson ozone values are available in addition to the TOMS values, and the results agree to within 15 percent. It is also shown through simulations that additional information can be obtained from measurements outside the Chappuis band. This approach reduces the bias and spread of the estimated total ozone and is unique in that it uses measurements from both the Chappuis and Huggins absorption bands.

  4. Three Years of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder Radiometric Calibration Validation using Sea Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aumann, H. H.; Broberg, Steve; Elliott, Denis; Gaiser, Steve; Gregorich, Dave

    2006-01-01

    This paper evaluates the absolute accuracy and stability of the radiometric calibration of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) by analyzing the difference between the brightness temperatures measured at 2616 cm(exp -1) and those calculated at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), using the Real-Time Global Sea Surface Temperature (RTGSST) for cloud-free night tropical oceans between +/- 30 degrees latitude. The TOA correction is based on radiative transfer. The analysis of the first 3 years of AIRS radiances verifies the absolute calibration at 2616 cm(exp -1) to better than 200 mK, with better than 16 mK/yr stability. The AIRS radiometric calibration uses an internal full aperture wedge blackbody with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable prelaunch calibration coefficients. The calibration coefficients have been unchanged since launch. The analysis uses very tight cloud filtering, which selects about 7000 cloud-free tropical ocean spectra per day, about 0.5% of the data. The absolute accuracy and stability of the radiometry demonstrated at 2616 cm(sup -1) are direct consequences of the implementation of AIRS as a thermally controlled, cooled grating-array spectrometer and meticulous attention to details. Comparable radiometric performance is inferred from the AIRS design for all 2378 channels. AIRS performance sets the benchmark for what can be achieved with a state-of-the-art hyperspectral radiometer from polar orbit and what is expected from future hyperspectral sounders. AIRS was launched into a 705 km altitude polar orbit on NASA's Earth Observation System (EOS) Aqua spacecraft on 4 May 2002. AIRS covers the 3.7-15.4 micron region of the thermal infrared spectrum with a spectral resolution of nu/Delta nu = 1200 and has returned 3.7 million spectra of the upwelling radiance each day since the start of routine data gathering in September 2002.

  5. A novel solution for car traffic control based on radiometric microwave devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Denisov, Alexander; Speziale, Victor

    2014-05-01

    The significant problem of traffic in big cities, connected with huge and building up quantity of automobile cars, demands for novel strategies, based on nonconventional solutions, in order to improve system traffic control, especially at crossroads. As well known, the usual solution is based on the time relay, which requires the installation of a fixed traffic interval (signal light switching) at a crossroad; this solution is low cost, but does not account for the actual traffic conditions. Therefore, in the recent years, attention is towards to new designs, where the monitoring of the and control of traffic is carried out by using various methods including, optical, the infrared, magnetic, radar tracking, acoustical ones. In this work, we discuss the deployment of high sensitivity radiometric systems and radiometers(sensor) in the microwave range [1, 2]. In fact, the radiometer as "sensor" can provide an always updated information about the car traffic in any weather condition and in absence or low visibility conditions. In fact, the radiometric sensor detects the cars thanks to the different behavior of the car roofs which reflect the cold sky whereas the road asphalt is visible as warm object (at around outside temperature). [1] A. G. Denisov, V. P. Gorishnyak, S. E. Kuzmin et al., "Some experiments concerning resolution of 32 sensors passive 8mm wave imaging system," in Proceedings of the International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology (ISSTT '09), Charlottesville, Va, USA, April 2009. [2] F. Soldovieri, A. Natale, V. Gorishnyak, A. Pavluchenko, A. Denisov, and L. Chen, "Radiometric Imaging for Monitoring and Surveillance Issues," International Journal of Antennas and Propagation, vol. 2013, Article ID 272561, 8 pages, 2013. doi:10.1155/2013/272561.

  6. Storm-Associated Microwave Radiometric Signatures in the Frequency Range of 90-220 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, James R.; Zhan, J.; Racette, P.

    1997-01-01

    Radiometric measurements were made by a millimeter-wave imaging radiometer (MIR) at the frequencies of 89, 150, 183.3 +/- 1, 183.3 +/- 3, 183.3 +/- 7, and 220 GHz aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft at an altitude of about 20 km over two rainstorms: one in the western Pacific Ocean on 19 January 1993 and another in southern Florida on 5 October 1993. These measurements were complemented by nearly simultaneous observations by other sensors aboard the same aircraft and another aircraft flying along the same path. Analysis of data from these measurements, aided by radiative transfer and radar reflectivity calculations of hydrometeor profiles, which arc generated by a general cloud ensemble model, demonstrates the utility of these frequencies for studying the structure of frozen hydrometeors associated with storms. Particular emphasis is placed on the three water vapor channels near 183.3 GHz. Results show that the radiometric signatures measured by these channels over the storm-associated scattering media bear a certain resemblance to those previously observed over a clear and fairly dry atmosphere with a cold ocean background. Both of these atmospheric conditions are characterized by a small amount of water vapor above a cold background. Radiative transfer calculations were made at these water vapor channels for a number of relative humidity profiles characterizing dry atmospheres over an ocean surface. The results are compared with the measurements to infer some characteristics of the environment near the scattering media. Furthermore, radiometric signatures from these channels display unique features for towering deep convective cells that could be used to identify the presence of such cells in storms.

  7. Radiometrically Terrain Corrected ALOS PALSAR Data Available from the Alaska Satellite Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, T. A.; Nicoll, J.; Laurencelle, J.; Hogenson, K.; Gens, R.; Buechler, B.; Barton, B.; Shreve, W.; Stern, T.; Drew, L.; Guritz, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Alaska Satellite Facility Distributed Active Archive Data Center (ASF DAAC) now offers a suite of geometrically and radiometrically terrain corrected data products derived from ALOS PALSAR, processed using the Gamma Remote Sensing software package. Radiometric terrain correction (RTC) addresses two aspects of the effects of side-looking geometry of SAR imagery. First, the geometric distortions are corrected using the best digital elevation model available for a given region. Second, the radiometry is adjusted in the affected foreshortening and layover regions using the pixel-area integration approach for radiometric normalization. The RTC process provides improved backscatter estimates that can be used as input for applications such as the monitoring of deforestation, land-cover classification, and delineation of wet snow covered areas. RTC products are distributed at two resolutions. RT1 products with a pixel size of 12.5 m are generated from high-resolution and mid-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs). RT2 products are generated at a 30 m level for all available DEMs. Layover and shadow masks as well as incidence angle maps are available for both product resolutions. Products cover landmasses generally from 60 degrees northern latitude to 59 degrees southern latitude. An exception to the rule is the inclusion of all of North America. Excluded landmasses are Greenland, Iceland, Antarctica, and northern Eurasia. Since scientists are generally interested in quantitative measurements that are referenced to the ground, products are distributed in ?0 power. All RTC products are geocoded to the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) projection, provided in GIS ready GeoTIFF format and downloadable from the ASF DAAC.

  8. Segmentation of Heritage Building by Means of Geometric and Radiometric Components from Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitelkadi, K.; Tahiri, D.; Simonetto, E.; Sebari, I.; Polidori, L.

    2013-07-01

    Nowadays, the terrestrial laser scanning represents an integral source of data for cultural heritage 3D storage and access through digital communication tools. The achievement of 3D models requires the implementation of several tasks such as segmentation. Segmentation is the key step during the point cloud processing where all homogeneous areas are identified, which describe a building facade. Usually, a large part of the segmentation approach focuses on the geometric information contained in the point cloud data by exploiting mathematical representation of a parametric surface. However, due to the complexity of the architecture, such segmentation does not suffice. Henceforth, other approaches turn to the use of color and laser intensity components. Although a variety of algorithms have been developed in this sense, problems of over-segmentation or under-segmentation are observed. In this context, we propose a new approach for point cloud segmentation aiming at a more accurate result. This approach relies on all the components of a colored point - both geometric and radiometric - combining the RGB values, laser intensity and geometric data. Our process begins with the extraction of homogeneous planar segments using the RANSAC algorithm. Next, the result is subjected to a radiometric-based segmentation, first through color similarity as one of the homogeneity criteria of a region growing algorithm, then through the use of intensity similarity for segment fusion. Experiments are performed on a facade presenting an example of Moroccan classical architecture located in Casablanca's Medina. Results show the importance of integrating all point cloud components, both geometric and radiometric.

  9. Study of spectral/radiometric characteristics of the Thematic Mapper for land use applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A. (principal investigator); Metzler, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    Progress during the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan-ERIM's and 5 image data quality assessment program for the thematic mapper is described. Analyses of LANDSAT 5 TM radiometric characteristics were performed. Effects which had earlier been found in LANDSAT 4 TM data were found to be present in LANDSAT 5 data as well, including: (1) scan direction related signal droop; (2) scan correlated level shifts; and (3) low frequency coherent noise. Coincident LANDSAT 4 and 5 raw TM data were analyzed, and band by band relationships between the two sensors were derived. Earlier efforts which developed an information theoretic measure of multispectral information content were continued, comparing TM and MSS information content.

  10. On-Orbit Radiometric Characterization of OLI (Landsat 8) for Applications in Aquatic Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahlevan, Nima; Lee, Zhongping; Wei, Jianwei; Schaaf, Crystal; Schott, John R.; Berk, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Landsat-8 carries two separate sensors, namely the Operational Land Imager (OLI) and the Thermal Infrared Radiometer Suite (TIRS), that image the earth surface throughout the visible and thermal portions of the spectrum. Compared to Landsat heritage sensors, the OLI has enhanced features, which include its 12-bit radiometric resolution and the addition of a band centered at 443 nm. The dramatically improved data quality/quantity expands existing applications of Landsat imagery in aquatic sciences from the retrieval of bio-geochemical properties, such as near-surface concentrations of chlorophyll-a (CHL) and total suspended solids (TSS), to benthic mapping. This study offers analysis of OLI's absolute radiometric performance over bodies ofwater using benchmark observations, namely the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) ocean color observations and marine in situ radiometric measurements. Sensor-to-sensor comparisons are performed to derive gain factors (g1) from near-concurrent observations in TOA radiance and reflectance domains. The gains in the radiance domain were further validated/adjusted by determining a second set of gains (g2) via analysis of OLI-derived water-leaving radiance, i.e., L(sub w) (gamma), against in situ measurements made either at the Ocean Color AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONETOC) sites or during field campaigns. The analyses yield the OLI calibration uncertainties that need to be accounted forwhen studying aquatic environments. Itwas found that, for the visible and near-infrared channels, the OLI radiometric responses, on average, are well in agreement (b 2 % discrepancies) with the TOA radiances estimated by ocean color satellites or those predicted by models based onmeasurements of aquatic and atmospheric properties. However, the TOA radiance at the new 443-nm band is found to be, on average, 3.4 % larger than the reference observations. The inter-sensor comparisons in the reflectance domain, however, indicated slightly different results with the OLI responses being low in the blue bands. To enhance the retrieval accuracy of aquatic-science products from OLI datasets, sets of temporally averaged gains (radiance and reflectance) are derived and recommended for use prior to the retrieval of in-water products.

  11. Study on spectral/radiometric characteristics of the Thematic Mapper for land use applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A. (principal investigator); Metzler, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    Progress under the LANDSAT-4 and 5 Image Data Quality Assessment program for the Thematic Mapper is described. An initial screening of LANDSAT-5 data is performed. Tools are developed to allow access to TIPS-format data. Analysis of scan direction related signal droop is resumed with detailed analysis of nighttime data. A new mathematical model is developed to describe the effect. Coherent noise of a lower frequency than previously reported is discovered and analyzed. Coincident LANDSAT-4 TM and MSS data are analyzed to improve understanding of radiometric relationships between similar wavebands in the two sensors.

  12. Evaluation of spatial, radiometric and spectral Thematic Mapper performance for coastal studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V.; Ackleson, S. G.; Hardisky, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    On 31 March 1983, the University of Delaware's Center for Remote Sensing initiated a study to evaluate the spatial, radiometric and spectral performance of the LANDSAT Thematic Mapper for coastal and estuarine studies. The investigation was supported by Contract NAS5-27580 from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The research was divided into three major subprojects: (1) a comparison of LANDSAT TM to MSS imagery for detecting submerged aquatic vegetation in Chesapeake Bay; (2) remote sensing of submerged aquatic vegetation - a radiative transfer approach; and (3) remote sensing of coastal wetland biomass using Thematic Mapper wavebands.

  13. Radiometric traverse along the Yukon River from Fort Yukon to Ruby, Alaska, 1949

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Max G.; Stevens, John M.; Matzko, John J.

    1956-01-01

    In 1949, a radiometric traverse was made of rocks exposed along the banks of and near the Yukon River about Fort Yukon to Ruby, Alaska. Granitic rocks of Tertiary age and of Devonian or Carboniferous age and sandstone beds of Cretaceous age gave the highest readings obtained in the field. Other rock types examined were greenstone of Devonian or Carboniferous age and metamorphic rocks of Devonian and pre-Devonian age, sedimentary rocks, and liginite of Tertiary age, and alluvial deposits of Quaternary age. The most radioactive sample, from Melozitna River canyon, contained only 0.017 percent equivalent uranium.

  14. Radiometric calibration of SPOT 2 HRV - A comparison of three methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biggar, Stuart F.; Dinguirard, Magdeleine C.; Gellman, David I.; Henry, Patrice; Jackson, Ray D.; Moran, M. S.; Slater, Philip N.

    1991-01-01

    Three methods for determining an absolute radiometric calibration of a spacecraft optical sensor are compared. They are the well-known reflectance-based and radiance-based methods and a new method based on measurements of the ratio of diffuse-to-global irradiance at the ground. The latter will be described in detail and the comparison of the three approaches will be made with reference to the SPOT-2 HRV cameras for a field campaign 1990-06-19 through 1990-06-24 at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico.

  15. An update on the status and performance of the Radiometric All-Sky Infrared Camera (RASICAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reil, Kevin; Lewis, Peter; Schindler, Rafe; Zhang, Zhang

    2014-08-01

    The Radiometric All-Sky Infrared Camera (RASICAM) has been operating on Cerro Tololo for over two years looking for clouds in the 10 to 12 micron IR band. Every 90 seconds each night RASICAM collects an integrated image of sky conditions and reports them to the Blanco telescope control system (TCS) to be shared with other instruments. We report on the RASICAM design, calibration and performance of the system. Additionally, correlation with conditions as observed in the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) will be presented.

  16. In-progress Absolute Radiometric Inflight Calibration of the LANDSAT-4 Sensors. [New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, K. R.; Dinguirard, M.; Ezra, C. E.; Holm, R. G.; Jackson, R. D.; Kastner, C. J.; Palmer, J. M.; Savage, R.; Slater, P. N.

    1985-01-01

    Using selected instrumented areas at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico as reference, radiometric calibration is to be effected on the sensors of LANDSAT 4, particularly the thematic mapper. Optical measurements made during a TM overpass are discussed. The radiances of selected large ground areas are measured in the spectral bandpasses of the TM; the total optical thickness of the atmosphere is measured in nine narrow spectral intervals. Ground truth in the form of reflectances collected for the alkalai flat region of gypsum and for the snow at White Sands is described.

  17. Radiometric assay of ghrelin hydrolase activity and (3)H-ghrelin distribution into mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Vicky Ping; Gao, Yang; Geng, Liyi; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2015-12-15

    A high-throughput radiometric assay was developed to characterize enzymatic hydrolysis of ghrelin and to track the peptide's fate in vivo. The assay is based on solvent partitioning of [(3)H]-octanoic acid liberated from [(3)H]-octanoyl ghrelin during enzymatic hydrolysis. This simple and cost-effective method facilitates kinetic analysis of ghrelin hydrolase activity of native and mutated butyrylcholinesterases or carboxylesterases from multiple species. In addition, the assay's high sensitivity facilitates ready evaluation of ghrelin's pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution in mice after i.v. bolus administration of radiolabeled peptide. PMID:26514871

  18. An In-Situ Rb-Sr Dating & Organics Characterization Instrument For A MER+ Sized Rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, F.; Whitaker, T.; Nowicki, K.; Zacny, K.; Pierce, J.

    2012-12-01

    We posit that a Mars in-situ geochronology mission that will triage and validate samples for Mars Sample Return (MSR) is technically feasible in the 2018-2022 time frame and addresses the competing scientific, political, and fiscal requirements for flight in this decade.The mission must be responsive to the astrobiological and chronological science goals of the MEPAG, Decadal Survey (DS), and E2E-iSAG, and avoid the MSR appearance of long term political commitment and cost. These requirements can best be accomplished by a rover with a coring drill. JPL has reassessed the MER landing system performance, and determined that the system is capable of significantly higher landed mass (~40-60 kg plus reserve), allowing more sophisticated instruments to be carried. The instrument package is comprised of a time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometer combined with a laser desorption resonance ionization source to sensitively measure isobar free Rb-Sr isotopes for geochronology and organics characterization. The desorption laser is also used with a ?Raman/LIBS for mineral characterization, which in combination with the TOF, will additionally provide measurements of K-Ar isotopes for a second form of radiometric dating. The laser desorption resonance ionization mass spectrometry (LDRIMS) technique avoids the interference and mass resolution issues associated with geochronology measurements, and has miniaturization potential. A sample is placed in the TOF mass spectrometer and surface atoms, molecules, and ions are desorbed with a 213 nm laser. Ions are suppressed by an electric field and the plume of expanding particles is present for many ?s, during which it is first illuminated with laser light tuned to ionize only Sr, and then 1-3 ?s later, for Rb. We have partially miniaturized the instrument, including Sr lasers, ablation laser, and mass spectrometer, and will soon to start using the instrument for field measurements. Our current prototype can measure the isotope ratio of lab standards with 10 ppm net Sr or Rb to a precision of ±0.1% (1?), with a sensitivity of 1:10^10 in ~15 minutes. Before working with high value samples, we are validating the technique on terrestrial materials such as the Boulder Creek Granite (BCG). Using LDRIMS, we have succeeded at producing a moderate precision date for BCG of 1.72±0.087 Ga (n=288, MSWD=1; ±0.60 Ga for MSWD=2). Our mission feeds forward into MSR by validating that the collected samples are astrobiologically and geochronologically relevant, and triages those samples by scientific priority for return by MSR. Figure 1: Calibrated repeat isochron of the BCG.

  19. Student Information: Student Name Date

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    Student Information: Student Name Date Student ID Number Email Daytime Phone Graduate Program Catalog Year Anticipated Completion Date Instructions: Purpose: A DRP involves research conducted Date Signature Print name Approved / Disapproved Professor Directing Research Date Signature Print name

  20. Dating of Impact Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schärer, U.

    Introduction Some Numbers amd Definitions Geological Dating Methods Crater Counting Bio-magnetostratigraphy and Paleomagnetism Nuclear Dating Methods General Aspects Thermoluminescence Cosmogenic Nuclides Fission Track Dating Radioactive Decay Shock Wave Metamorphism General Aspects Coherent Impacts Melt Layers The Crater Basement Allochthonous Breccia Deposits Distant Ejecta Implications from Experiments Dating and Sample Selection Geological Frame Coherent Impact Melt Layers Allochthonous Breccia Deposits Crater Basement Distant Ejecta Deposits Examples Impactites of the Crater Area Distant Ejecta, and the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) Boundary Crater Basement References

  1. Structure and dating errors in the geologic time scale and periodicity in mass extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.

    1989-01-01

    Structure in the geologic time scale reflects a partly paleontological origin. As a result, ages of Cenozoic and Mesozoic stage boundaries exhibit a weak 28-Myr periodicity that is similar to the strong 26-Myr periodicity detected in mass extinctions of marine life by Raup and Sepkoski. Radiometric dating errors in the geologic time scale, to which the mass extinctions are stratigraphically tied, do not necessarily lessen the likelihood of a significant periodicity in mass extinctions, but do spread the acceptable values of the period over the range 25-27 Myr for the Harland et al. time scale or 25-30 Myr for the DNAG time scale. If the Odin time scale is adopted, acceptable periods fall between 24 and 33 Myr, but are not robust against dating errors. Some indirect evidence from independently-dated flood-basalt volcanic horizons tends to favor the Odin time scale.

  2. Not only Chauvet: dating Aurignacian rock art in Altxerri B Cave (northern Spain).

    PubMed

    González-Sainz, C; Ruiz-Redondo, A; Garate-Maidagan, D; Iriarte-Avilés, E

    2013-10-01

    The discovery and first dates of the paintings in Grotte Chauvet provoked a new debate on the origin and characteristics of the first figurative Palaeolithic art. Since then, other art ensembles in France and Italy (Aldène, Fumane, Arcy-sur-Cure and Castanet) have enlarged our knowledge of graphic activity in the early Upper Palaeolithic. This paper presents a chronological assessment of the Palaeolithic parietal ensemble in Altxerri B (northern Spain). When the study began in 2011, one of our main objectives was to determine the age of this pictorial phase in the cave. Archaeological, geological and stylistic evidence, together with radiometric dates, suggest an Aurignacian chronology for this art. The ensemble in Altxerri B can therefore be added to the small but growing number of sites dated in this period, corroborating the hypothesis of more complex and varied figurative art than had been supposed in the early Upper Palaeolithic. PMID:24012252

  3. An Empirical Approach to Ocean Color Data: Reducing Bias and the Need for Post-Launch Radiometric Re-Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Casey, Nancy W.; O'Reilly, John E.; Esaias, Wayne E.

    2009-01-01

    A new empirical approach is developed for ocean color remote sensing. Called the Empirical Satellite Radiance-In situ Data (ESRID) algorithm, the approach uses relationships between satellite water-leaving radiances and in situ data after full processing, i.e., at Level-3, to improve estimates of surface variables while relaxing requirements on post-launch radiometric re-calibration. The approach is evaluated using SeaWiFS chlorophyll, which is the longest time series of the most widely used ocean color geophysical product. The results suggest that ESRID 1) drastically reduces the bias of ocean chlorophyll, most impressively in coastal regions, 2) modestly improves the uncertainty, and 3) reduces the sensitivity of global annual median chlorophyll to changes in radiometric re-calibration. Simulated calibration errors of 1% or less produce small changes in global median chlorophyll (less than 2.7%). In contrast, the standard NASA algorithm set is highly sensitive to radiometric calibration: similar 1% calibration errors produce changes in global median chlorophyll up to nearly 25%. We show that 0.1% radiometric calibration error (about 1% in water-leaving radiance) is needed to prevent radiometric calibration errors from changing global annual median chlorophyll more than the maximum interannual variability observed in the SeaWiFS 9-year record (+/- 3%), using the standard method. This is much more stringent than the goal for SeaWiFS of 5% uncertainty for water leaving radiance. The results suggest ocean color programs might consider less emphasis of expensive efforts to improve post-launch radiometric re-calibration in favor of increased efforts to characterize in situ observations of ocean surface geophysical products. Although the results here are focused on chlorophyll, in principle the approach described by ESRID can be applied to any surface variable potentially observable by visible remote sensing.

  4. Airborne lidar/radiometric measurements of cirrus cloud parameters and their application to LOWTRAN radiance evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uthe, Edward E.

    1990-01-01

    SRI has assembled an airborne lidar/radiometric instrumentation suite for mapping cirrus cloud distribution and analyzing cirrus cloud optical properties. Operation of upward viewing infrared radiometers from an airborne platform provides the optimum method of measuring high altitude cold cloud radiative properties with minimum interference from the thermal emission by the earth's surface and lower atmospheric components. Airborne installed sensors can also operate over large regional areas including water, urban, and mountain surfaces and above lower atmospheric convective clouds and haze layers. Currently available sensors installed on the SRI Queen Air aircraft are illustrated. Lidar and radiometric data records are processed for real time viewing on a color video screen. A cirrus cloud data example is presented as a black and white reproduction of a color display of data at the aircraft altitude of 12,000 ft, the 8 to 14 micron atmospheric radiation background was equivalent to a blackbody temperature of about -60 C and, therefore, the radiometer did not respond strongly to low density cirrus cloud concentrations detected by the lidar. Cloud blackbody temperatures (observed by radiometer) are shown plotted against midcloud temperatures (derived from lidar observed cloud heights and supporting temperature profiles) for data collected on 30 June and 28 July.

  5. A multi-frequency radiometric measurement of soil moisture content over bare and vegetated fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Schmugge, T. J.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Gould, W. I.; Glazar, W. S.; Fuchs, J. E. (principal investigators)

    1981-01-01

    A USDA Beltsville Agricultural Research Center site was used for an experiment in which soil moisture remote sensing over bare, grass, and alfalfa fields was conducted over a three-month period using 0.6 GHz, 1.4 GHz, and 10.6 GHz Dicke-type microwave radiometers mounted on mobile towers. Ground truth soil moisture content and ambient air and sil temperatures were obtained concurrently with the radiometric measurements. Biomass of the vegetation cover was sampled about once a week. Soil density for each of the three fields was measured several times during the course of the experiment. Results of the radiometric masurements confirm the frequency dependence of moisture sensing sensitivity reduction reported earlier. Observations over the bare, wet field show that the measured brightness temperature is lowest at 5.0 GHz and highest of 0.6 GHz frequency, a result contrary to expectation based on the estimated dielectric permittivity of soil water mixtures and current radiative transfer model in that frequency range.

  6. Radiometric calibration of ocean color satellite sensors using AERONET-OC data.

    PubMed

    Hlaing, Soe; Gilerson, Alexander; Foster, Robert; Wang, Menghua; Arnone, Robert; Ahmed, Sam

    2014-09-22

    Radiometric vicarious calibration of ocean color (OC) satellite sensors is carried out through the full sunlight path radiative transfer (RT) simulations of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system based on the aerosol and water-leaving radiance data from AERONET-OC sites for the visible and near-infrared (NIR) bands. Quantitative evaluation of the potential of such approach for achieving the radiometric accuracies of OC satellite sensors is made by means of direct comparisons between simulated and satellite measured top of atmosphere (TOA) radiances. Very high correlations (R ? 0.96 for all visible channels) are achieved for the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor when this approach is applied with the data from the LISCO and WaveCIS AERONET-OC sites. Vicarious calibration gain factors derived with this approach are highly consistent, with comparisons between the two sites exhibiting around 0.5% discrepancy in the blue and green parts of the spectrum, while their average temporal variability is also within 0.28% - 1.23% permitting the approach to be used, at this stage, for verification of sensor calibration performance. PMID:25321808

  7. Use of Radiometrically Calibrated Flat-Plate Calibrators in Calibration of Radiation Thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas-García, D.; Méndez-Lango, E.

    2015-08-01

    Most commonly used, low-temperature, infrared thermometers have large fields of view sizes that make them difficult to be calibrated with narrow aperture blackbodies. Flat-plate calibrators with large emitting surfaces have been proposed for calibrating these infrared thermometers. Because the emissivity of the flat plate is not unity, its radiance temperature is wavelength dependent. For calibration, the wavelength pass band of the device under test should match that of the reference infrared thermometer. If the device under test and reference radiometer have different pass bands, then it is possible to calculate the corresponding correction if the emissivity of the flat plate is known. For example, a correction of at is required when calibrating a infrared thermometer with a "" radiometrically calibrated flat-plate calibrator. A method is described for using a radiometrically calibrated flat-plate calibrator that covers both cases of match and mismatch working wavelength ranges of a reference infrared thermometer and infrared thermometers to be calibrated with the flat-plate calibrator. Also, an application example is included in this paper.

  8. [In-flight absolute radiometric calibration of UAV hyperspectral camera and its validation analysis].

    PubMed

    Gou, Zhi-yang; Yan, Lei; Chen, Wei; Jing, Xin; Yin, Zhong-yi; Duan, Yi-ni

    2012-02-01

    With the data in Urad Front Banner, Inner Mongolia on November 14th, 2010, hyper-spectral camera on UAV was calibrated adopting reflectance-based method. During the in-flight absolute radiometric calibration, 6 hyper-spectral radiometric gray-scale targets were arranged in the validation field. These targets' reflectances are 4.5%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50% and 60% separately. To validate the calibration result, four extra hyper-spectral targets with sharp-edge spectrum were arranged to simulate the reflection and absorption peaks in natural objectives. With these peaks, the apparent radiance calculated by radiation transfer model and that calculated through calibration coefficients are much different. The result shows that in the first 15 bands (blue bands), errors are somewhat huge due to the noises of equipment. In the rest bands with quite even spectrum, the errors are small, most of which are less than 10%. For those bands with sharp changes in spectral curves, the errors are quite considerable, varying from 10% to 25%. PMID:22512184

  9. Radiometric Survey in Western Afghanistan: A Website for Distribution of Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweeney, Ronald E.; Kucks, Robert P.; Hill, Patricia L.; Finn, Carol A.

    2007-01-01

    Radiometric (uranium content, thorium content, potassium content, and gamma-ray intensity) and related data were digitized from radiometric and survey route location maps of western Afghanistan published in 1976. The uranium content data were digitized along contour lines from 33 maps in a series entitled 'Map of Uranium (Radium) Contents of Afghanistan (Western Area),' compiled by V. N. Kirsanov and R. S. Dershimanov. The thorium content data were digitized along contour lines from 33 maps in a series entitled 'Map of Thorium Contents of Afghanistan (Western Area),' compiled by V. N. Kirsanov and R. S. Dershimanov. The potassium content data were digitized along contour lines from 33 maps in a series entitled 'Map of Potassium Contents of Afghanistan (Western Area),' compiled by V. N. Kirsanov and R. S. Dershimanov. The gamma-ray intensity data were digitized along contour lines from 33 maps in a series entitled 'Map of Gamma-Field of Afghanistan (Western Area),' compiled by V. N. Kirsanov and R. S. Dershimanov. The survey route location data were digitized along flight-lines located on 33 maps in a series entitled 'Survey Routes Location and Contours of Flight Equal Altitudes. Western Area of Afghanistan,' compiled by Z. A. Alpatova, V. G. Kurnosov, and F. A. Grebneva.

  10. Initial On-Orbit Radiometric Calibration of the Suomi NPP VIIRS Reflective Solar Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Ning; Wang, Zhipeng; Fulbright, Jon; Lee, Shihyan; McIntire, Jeff; Chiang, Vincent; Xiong, Jack

    2012-01-01

    The on-orbit radiometric response calibration of the VISible/Near InfraRed (VISNIR) and the Short-Wave InfraRed (SWIR) bands of the Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite is carried out through a Solar Diffuser (SD). The transmittance of the SD screen and the SD's Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) are measured before launch and tabulated, allowing the VIIRS sensor aperture spectral radiance to be accurately determined. The radiometric response of a detector is described by a quadratic polynomial of the detector?s digital number (dn). The coefficients were determined before launch. Once on orbit, the coefficients are assumed to change by a common factor: the F-factor. The radiance scattered from the SD allows the determination of the F-factor. In this Proceeding, we describe the methodology and the associated algorithms in the determination of the F-factors and discuss the results.

  11. Intraband Radiometric Performance of the LANDSAT 4 Thematic Mapper. [Washington, DC, Arkansas, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieffer, H. H.; Eliason, E. M.; Chavez, P. S., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Those radiometric characteristics of the LANDSAT 4 thematic mapper (TM) that could be established without absolute calibration of spectral data were examined. Radiometrically raw (B type) data of three daytime and two nighttime scenes were used, including TM scenes from Washington, DC; northeast Arkansas; Cape Cod, MA; Roanoke, VA; Richmond, VA; and Silver Bell, AZ. The effective resolution in radiance is degraded by a factor of about 2 by the irregular width of the digital levels. Underpopulated levels are consistent over all bands and detectors, and are spaced an average of 4 digital numbers (DN) apart. In band 6, level 127 is avoided by a factor 30. Several detectors exhibit a change of gain with a period of several scans; the largest effect is about 4%. At high contrast boundaries, some of the detectors in band 5 commonly overshoot by several DN and require about 30 samples to recover. The high frequency noise level of each detector was characterized by the standard deviation of the first derivative in the sample direction across a flat field. A coherent-sinusoidal-noise pattern is evident in detector 1 of band 3. The correlation between the six reflective bands was determined and used to select three groups of bands whose aggregate first principal components contain the greatest total information. A composite of the first components of bands 1, 2, 3, bands 5 and 7, and band 4, together containing 89% of the information in the reflectance bands, has reduced the effect of noise.

  12. Recovery, compilation, back-calibration, and standardization of existing radiometric survey data: Namibia, southern Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, A.; Urquhart, W.E.S.; Eberle, D.G.; Grasty, R.L.; Hutchins, D.G.

    1994-12-31

    During 1992 and 1993 select portions of existing government airborne radiometric data covering almost 91,000 km{sup 2} of central Namibia were compiled into a master digital data set. This compilation involved the interactive, semi-automated digital recovery of approximately 42,000 line kilometers of original analogue chart traces. A further 49,000 line kilometers of digital data were also reprocessed. Available data represented ten (10) different surveys collected over twelve (12) years with a variety of spectrometers, spectral windows and survey parameters. Preliminary digital grids of each radioelement were compiled, verified and used to select representative sites for ground measurements within each survey block. Results obtained from the ground program were used to back-calibrate the airborne data, standardize the various surveys and convert airborne measurements into equivalent ground concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium. The quality and consistency of final map products conclusively demonstrates that existing analogue radiometric data, in various states of preservation, can be successfully recovered, combined with ``modern`` digital data, and utilized to assist exploration, mapping and environmental studies.

  13. The First SIMBIOS Radiometric Intercomparison (SIMRIC-1), April-September 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meister, Gerhard; Abel, Peter; McClain, Charles; Barnes, Robert; Fargion, Giulietta; Cooper, John; Davis, Curtiss; Korwan, Daniel; Godin, Mike; Maffione, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the first SIMBIOS (Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies) Radiometric Intercomparison (SIMRIC-1). The purpose of the SIMRIC-1 is to ensure a common radiometric scale of the calibration facilities that are engaged in calibrating in situ radiometers used for ocean color related research and to document the calibration procedures and protocols. SIMBIOS staff visited the seven participating laboratories for at least two days each. The SeaWiFS Transfer Radiometer SXR-II measured the calibration radiances produced in the laboratories. The measured radiances were compared with the radiances expected by the laboratories. Typically, the measured radiances were higher than the expected radiances by 0 to 2%. This level of agreement is satisfactory. Several issues were identified, where the calibration protocols need to be improved, especially the reflectance calibration of the reference plaques and the distance correction when using the irradiance standards at distances greater than the 50 cm. The responsivity of the SXR-II changed between 0.3% (channel 6) and 1.6% (channel 2) from December 2000 to December 2001. Monitoring the SXR-II with a portable light source showed a linear drift of the calibration, except for channel 1, where a 2% drop occurred in summer.

  14. Thermal Infrared Radiometric Calibration of the Entire Landsat 4, 5, and 7 Archive (1982-2010)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schott, John R.; Hook, Simon J.; Barsi, Julia A.; Markham, Brian L.; Miller, Jonathan; Padula, Francis P.; Raqueno, Nina G.

    2012-01-01

    Landsat's continuing record of the thermal state of the earth's surface represents the only long term (1982 to the present) global record with spatial scales appropriate for human scale studies (i.e., tens of meters). Temperature drives many of the physical and biological processes that impact the global and local environment. As our knowledge of, and interest in, the role of temperature on these processes have grown, the value of Landsat data to monitor trends and process has also grown. The value of the Landsat thermal data archive will continue to grow as we develop more effective ways to study the long term processes and trends affecting the planet. However, in order to take proper advantage of the thermal data, we need to be able to convert the data to surface temperatures. A critical step in this process is to have the entire archive completely and consistently calibrated into absolute radiance so that it can be atmospherically compensated to surface leaving radiance and then to surface radiometric temperature. This paper addresses the methods and procedures that have been used to perform the radiometric calibration of the earliest sizable thermal data set in the archive (Landsat 4 data). The completion of this effort along with the updated calibration of the earlier (1985 1999) Landsat 5 data, also reported here, concludes a comprehensive calibration of the Landsat thermal archive of data from 1982 to the present

  15. Assessment of the short-term radiometric stability between Terra MODIS and Landsat 7 ETM+ sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, Taeyoung; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Chander, Gyanesh; Angal, A.

    2009-01-01

    Short-term radiometric stability was evaluated using continuous ETM+ scenes within a single orbit (contact period) and the corresponding MODIS scenes for the four matching solar reflective visible and near-infrared (VNIR) band pairs between the two sensors. The near-simultaneous earth observations were limited by the smaller swath size of ETM+ (183 km) compared to MODIS (2330 km). Two sets of continuous granules for Terra MODIS and Landsat 7 ETM+ were selected and mosaicked based on pixel geolocation information for noncloudy pixels over the African continent. The matching pixel pairs were resampled from a fine to a coarse pixel resolution, and the at-sensor spectral radiance values for a wide dynamic range of the sensors were compared and analyzed, covering various surface types. The following study focuses on radiometric stability analysis from the VNIR band-pairs of ETM+ and MODIS. The Libya-4 desert target was included in the path of this continuous orbit, which served as a verification point between the short-term and the long-term trending results from previous studies. MODTRAN at-sensor spectral radiance simulation is included for a representative desert surface type to evaluate the consistency of the results.

  16. Multifrequency Radiometric Method of the Temperature Profile Measurement in the Active Topsoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzalevskiy, K. V.; Ruzhecka, Z.; Mironov, V. L.

    2015-10-01

    In this theoretical paper, we propose a method for measuring the temperature profile in the active topsoil of the Arctic tundra using observations of the brightness temperature for two different polarizations of the radiation at frequencies of 1.4, 6.93, 7.3, and 10.7 GHz. A multifrequency physical model of microwave emission of bare soil, a dielectric model of the Arctic tundra soil, and temperature profiles, which were measured in the active topsoil at the Toolik field station on the Alaska North Slope, were used to calculate the observed values of the brightness temperature. Temperature profiles were retrieved from the observed values of the brightness temperature in the approximation of a piecewise-linear profile of topsoil temperature during 2010-2011. Correlation analysis of the temperature profiles measured at the Toolik station and retrieved from the radiometric data has shown that in winter the error of measurement of the soil temperature at depths of 0.6 and 16.0 cm in terms of the variance (correlation coefficient) does not exceed 2.3 (0.98) and 7.2 (0.62°C), respectively. In summer, the error of measurement of the soil temperature using the radiometric method is two times less than in winter.

  17. Imager-to-radiometer inflight cross calibration: RSP radiometric comparison with airborne and satellite sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCorkel, J.; Cairns, B.; Wasilewski, A.

    2015-10-01

    This work develops a method to compare the radiometric calibration between a radiometer and imagers hosted on aircraft and satellites. The radiometer is the airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP) that takes multi-angle, photo-polarimetric measurements in several spectral channels. The RSP measurements used in this work were coincident with measurements made by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), which was on the same aircraft. These airborne measurements were also coincident with an overpass of the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI). First we compare the RSP and OLI radiance measurements to AVIRIS since the spectral response of the multispectral instruments can be used to synthesize a spectrally equivalent signal from the imaging spectrometer data. We then explore a method that uses AVIRIS as a transfer between RSP and OLI to show that radiometric traceability of a satellite-based imager can be used to calibrate a radiometer despite differences in spectral channel sensitivities. This calibration transfer shows agreement within the uncertainty of both the various instruments for most spectral channels.

  18. Radiometric calibration method for large aperture infrared system with broad dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Chang, Songtao; Zhu, Wei

    2015-05-20

    Infrared radiometric measurements can acquire important data for missile defense systems. When observation is carried out by ground-based infrared systems, a missile is characterized by long distance, small size, and large variation of radiance. Therefore, the infrared systems should be manufactured with a larger aperture to enhance detection ability and calibrated at a broader dynamic range to extend measurable radiance. Nevertheless, the frequently used calibration methods demand an extended-area blackbody with broad dynamic range or a huge collimator for filling the system's field stop, which would greatly increase manufacturing costs and difficulties. To overcome this restriction, a calibration method based on amendment of inner and outer calibration is proposed. First, the principles and procedures of this method are introduced. Then, a shifting strategy of infrared systems for measuring targets with large fluctuations of infrared radiance is put forward. Finally, several experiments are performed on a shortwave infrared system with ?400??mm aperture. The results indicate that the proposed method cannot only ensure accuracy of calibration but have the advantage of low cost, low power, and high motility. Hence, it is an effective radiometric calibration method in the outfield. PMID:26192499

  19. Date Palm Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter reviews date palm genetic resources and their conservation. Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) is an important food crop in the Middle East and North Africa. Its center of origin and diversity most probably is the area near Iraq/Iran. From there, it spread throughout its present range...

  20. HOSPITALITY APPROVAL FORM DATE: __________________________

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    HOSPITALITY APPROVAL FORM DATE: __________________________ PERMISSION IS REQUESTED TO USE HOSPITALITY APPROVAL FORM MUST BE APPROVED PRIOR TO THE DATE OF THE EVENT. NOTE: ALL EXPENSES MUST MEET, or conferences. Hospitality Form required for food over $30.00. (Account Code 62809) _____ Entertainment: Costs

  1. Dating Violence in Russia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysova, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    The phenomenon of violence in interpersonal relationships has been little studied in Russia, and the phenomenon of violence between dating partners has not been the object of scientific interest at all. The study on which the present article is based was designed to obtain information about the violence in dating among students enrolled in…

  2. Study of spectral/radiometric characteristics of the Thematic Mapper for land use applications: Objectives, accomplishments, conclusions, and recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malila, W. A.; Metzler, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation are to quantify the performance of the Thematic Mapper, as manifested by the quality of its image data, in order to suggest improvements in data production and to assess the effects of the data quality on its utility for land resources applications. Analyses of radiometric, spatial, spectral, and geometric effects, with primary emphasis on radiometric effects are included. This effort is part of the LANDSAT 4/5 Image Data Quality Analysis (LIDQA) program sponsored by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  3. Field determination of optimal dates for the discrimination of invasive wetland plant species using derivative spectral analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laba, M.; Tsai, F.; Ogurcak, D.; Smith, S.; Richmond, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Mapping invasive plant species in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems helps to understand the causes of their progression, manage some of their negative consequences, and control them. In recent years, a variety of new remote-sensing techniques, like Derivative Spectral Analysis (DSA) of hyperspectral data, have been developed to facilitate this mapping. A number of questions related to these techniques remain to be addressed. This article attempts to answer one of these questions: Is the application of DSA optimal at certain times of the year? Field radiometric data gathered weekly during the summer of 1999 at selected field sites in upstate New York, populated with purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria L.), common reed (Phragmites australis (Cav.)) and cattail (Typha L.) are analyzed using DSA to differentiate among plant community types. First, second and higher-order derivatives of the reflectance spectra of nine field plots, varying in plant composition, are calculated and analyzed in detail to identify spectral ranges in which one or more community types have distinguishing features. On the basis of the occurrence and extent of these spectral ranges, experimental observations suggest that a satisfactory differentiation among community types was feasible on 30 August, when plants experienced characteristic phenological changes (transition from flowers to seed heads). Generally, dates in August appear optimal from the point of view of species differentiability and could be selected for image acquisitions. This observation, as well as the methodology adopted in this article, should provide a firm basis for the acquisition of hyperspectral imagery and for mapping the targeted species over a broad range of spatial scales. ?? 2005 American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.

  4. Synergic inversion technique for active and passive microwave remote sensing of the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieski, Piotr; Guissard, Albert; Baufays, Christine

    1991-01-01

    A unified approach for combining active and passive microwave measurements for remote sensing applications is described. A synergic inversion technique has been developed and applied to the retrieval of geophysical parameters of the ocean surface and of the atmosphere. It is based on the combination of radiometric and radar measurements at the electromagnetic and cell level and not only on the correction of radar measurements by radiometric measurements, or conversely. Such a combination is performed through a common quantity: the bistatic scattering coefficient of the observed surface. This is used in a direct model to simulate combined measurements from active and passive sensors. It requires a rather complete and accurate calculation of the scattering of microwaves by the rough sea surface. Comparisons with experimental models derived for scatterometers and radar altimeters or with data derived from radiometric measurements show that the results of this unified approach are consistent with those from separate microwave sensors, at least for a foam-free sea surface.

  5. Mapping of local-scale flooding on vegetated floodplains from radiometrically calibrated airborne laser scanning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Rados?aw; Höfle, Bernhard; König, Kristina; Groom, Geoffrey; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Heckrath, Goswin

    2014-05-01

    The agricultural use of riverine lowlands is often dependent on complex hydrological regimes including localized flooding. Knowledge about spatio-temporal inundation patterns enables a better understanding of the state of agricultural areas in lowlands and provides valuable and objective information on land suitability for land use administration and environmental planning. Data from Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS), also referred to as LiDAR, have become one of the most important sources of elevation data during the last two decades. Recently, geometric and radiometric attributes of ALS have also been explored for analysing the extent of water surfaces. Thus, the main objective of this work is to develop a method for mapping the spatial extent of floodplain inundation by means of remote sensing data. Our study focusses on analysing floodwaters partly covered by some vegetation, which is a major challenge in flood mapping. We hypothesize that ALS data due to its high sampling density and high rate of canopy penetration can effectively be used for floodwater detection in such areas. This research utilizes full-waveform ALS data with an average point density of 20 points/m2 obtained for an area of ca. 8 km2 of the Nørreå River valley in Jutland, Denmark. The study area is characterised by the presence of improved or semi-improved grasslands (meadows and pasture), few arable fields, irregularly scattered group of trees and bushes, and an extensive ditch network. Our approach is based on an inspection of properties of single laser points with regard to water vs. vegetation coverage within the laser footprint, which is compared with very detailed field reference data. Exploratory analysis and classification of ALS data were preceded by radiometric calibration of point cloud data, utilizing in situ measurements of reference targets reflectance. The resulting calibration derivatives provide very stable estimates of surface characteristics and are used as the main input in the subsequent classification process of point cloud data. A decision tree classifier is being used, which utilizes radiometric calibration derivatives, mainly the backscattering coefficient, and 3D geometric attributes of ALS data. Here we present initial results on developing a floodwater classification procedure, which assigns class information to each point from the 3D point cloud.

  6. Dating the Vinland Map

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-07-17

    Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory, the University of Arizona, and the Smithsonian Institution used carbon-dating technology to determine the age of a controversial parchment that might be the first-ever map of North America.

  7. Dating the Vinland Map

    SciTech Connect

    2013-01-04

    Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory, the University of Arizona, and the Smithsonian Institution used carbon-dating technology to determine the age of a controversial parchment that might be the first-ever map of North America.

  8. NAME: Date: = Total Velocity

    E-print Network

    Lega, Joceline

    NAME: Date: = Total Velocity = Vertical Velocity = Horizontal Velocity Instructions: Fire your horizontal velocity. My average rate is________________________ #12;To find the average vertical velocity the ground, given an initial vertical velocity v. My average vertical velocity

  9. Event Name: _________________________________ Event Date: ___________________

    E-print Network

    Oviedo, Néstor J.

    Event Name: _________________________________ Event Date: ___________________ 1 Social Justice Programs ­ Event Co-Sponsorship Form The Social Justice Programs: 1. A completed "Club and Organization Advising Form/Event Form" must

  10. Understanding Teen Dating Violence

    MedlinePLUS

    ... prevent dating violence, we need to know how big the problem is, where it is, and who it affects. CDC learns about a problem by gathering and studying data. Step 2: Identify risk and protective factors It ...

  11. Expiration Dates Matter

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... E-mail | Consumer Updates RSS Feed If your medicine has expired, it may not provide the treatment ... Bernstein explains how expiration dates help determine if medicine is safe to use and will work as ...

  12. Date ______________ Program Registration

    E-print Network

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    Date ______________ Program Registration Breastfeeding Support Program ABOUT YOU Name or school: ________________________ NEEDS FROM CAMPUS BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT PROGRAM Please check all the HygieniKit (needed to use the lactation room's pump) Attend the Breastfeeding Your Baby class Other

  13. Date: ___________________ Name: _____________________ UNID: _____________________

    E-print Network

    Provancher, William

    Date: ___________________ Name: _____________________ UNID: _____________________ Master of Science: __________________________________________ Semester Course Name Course Number Grade Cr. Examiner Initials Semester Course Name Course Number Grade Cr. Examiner Initials Semester Course Name Course Number Grade Cr. Examiner Initials Semester Course Name

  14. Modelling Surface Energy Fluxes over Maize using a Two-Source Patch Model and Radiometric Soil and Canopy Temperature Observations.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Models estimating surface energy fluxes over partial canopy cover with thermal remote sensing must account for significant differences between the radiometric temperatures and turbulent exchange rates associated with the soil and canopy components of the thermal pixel scene. Recent progress in separ...

  15. Geometric Calibration and Radiometric Correction of LiDAR Data and Their Impact on the Quality of Derived Products

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Ayman F.; Kersting, Ana P.; Shaker, Ahmed; Yan, Wai-Yeung

    2011-01-01

    LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) systems are capable of providing 3D positional and spectral information (in the utilized spectrum range) of the mapped surface. Due to systematic errors in the system parameters and measurements, LiDAR systems require geometric calibration and radiometric correction of the intensity data in order to maximize the benefit from the collected positional and spectral information. This paper presents a practical approach for the geometric calibration of LiDAR systems and radiometric correction of collected intensity data while investigating their impact on the quality of the derived products. The proposed approach includes the use of a quasi-rigorous geometric calibration and the radar equation for the radiometric correction of intensity data. The proposed quasi-rigorous calibration procedure requires time-tagged point cloud and trajectory position data, which are available to most of the data users. The paper presents a methodology for evaluating the impact of the geometric calibration on the relative and absolute accuracy of the LiDAR point cloud. Furthermore, the impact of the geometric calibration and radiometric correction on land cover classification accuracy is investigated. The feasibility of the proposed methods and their impact on the derived products are demonstrated through experimental results using real data. PMID:22164121

  16. Synergistic application of geometric and radiometric features of LiDAR data for urban land cover mapping.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuchu; Li, Shihua; Vu, Tuong-Thuy; Niu, Zheng; Ban, Yifang

    2015-06-01

    Urban land cover map is essential for urban planning, environmental studies and management. This paper aims to demonstrate the potential of geometric and radiometric features derived from LiDAR waveform and point cloud data in urban land cover mapping with both parametric and non-parametric classification algorithms. Small footprint LiDAR waveform data acquired by RIEGL LMS-Q560 in Zhangye city, China is used in this study. A LiDAR processing chain is applied to perform waveform decomposition, range determination and radiometric characterization. With the synergic utilization of geometric and radiometric features derived from LiDAR data, urban land cover classification is then conducted using the Maximum Likelihood Classification (MLC), Support Vector Machines (SVM) and random forest algorithms. The results suggest that the random forest classifier achieved the most accurate result with overall classification accuracy of 91.82% and the kappa coefficient of 0.88. The overall accuracies of MLC and SVM are 84.02, and 88.48, respectively. The study suggest that the synergic utilization of geometric and radiometric features derived from LiDAR data can be efficiently used for urban land cover mapping, the non-parametric random forest classifier is a promising approach for the various features with different physical meanings. PMID:26072748

  17. Food Product Dating

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Administrative Forms Standard Forms Skip Navigation Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H1 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... / Topics / ... Food Product Dating / Food Product Dating Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H3 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Z7_ ...

  18. The Realities of Date Rape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presley, Cara; Watson, Jennifer; Williams, Audrey R.

    This poster presentation addresses the issue of date rape, specifically in the college environment. Highlighted are date rape statistics, demographics, and date rape drugs. Also discussed are date rape warnings and prevention strategies. It is concluded that college and university administrators must place the issue of date rape and acquaintance…

  19. Radiocarbon dating of ancient rock paintings

    SciTech Connect

    Ilger, W.A.; Hyman, M.; Rowe, M.W.; Southon, J.

    1995-06-20

    This report presents progress made on a technique for {sup 14}C dating pictographs. A low-temperature oxygen plasma is used coupled with high-vacuum technologies to selectively remove C-containing material in the paints without contamination from inorganic carbon from rock substrates or accretions.

  20. A Liquid-Helium-Cooled Absolute Reference Cold Load forLong-Wavelength Radiometric Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Bensadoun, M.; Witebsky, C.; Smoot, George F.; De Amici,Giovanni; Kogut, A.; Levin, S.

    1990-05-01

    We describe a large (78-cm) diameter liquid-helium-cooled black-body absolute reference cold load for the calibration of microwave radiometers. The load provides an absolute calibration near the liquid helium (LHe) boiling point, accurate to better than 30 mK for wavelengths from 2.5 to 25 cm (12-1.2 GHz). The emission (from non-LHe temperature parts of the cold load) and reflection are small and well determined. Total corrections to the LHe boiling point temperature are {le} 50 mK over the operating range. This cold load has been used at several wavelengths at the South Pole and at the White Mountain Research Station. In operation, the average LHe loss rate was {le} 4.4 l/hr. Design considerations, radiometric and thermal performance and operational aspects are discussed. A comparison with other LHe-cooled reference loads including the predecessor of this cold load is given.

  1. Radiometric surveying for the assessment of radiation dose and radon specific exhalation in underground environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochiolo, M.; Verdoya, M.; Chiozzi, P.; Pasquale, V.

    2012-08-01

    We performed a radiometric survey for evaluating the natural radioactivity and the related potential hazard level both outdoor and indoor a mine tunnel. The mine is located in a zone of uranium enrichment in the Western Alps (Italy). At first, a ?-ray spectrometry survey of the area surrounding the mine was carried out to define the extent of the ore deposit. Then, spectrometric measurements were performed in the tunnel and rock samples were collected for laboratory analyses. The results point to significant heterogeneity in uranium concentration and consequently in the absorbed dose rate spatial distribution. Spectrometric results in situ and in the laboratory, together with radon air concentration measurements, were used to infer the radon specific exhalation and flow from the mine rocks. The specific exhalation is positively related to the activity concentration of uranium.

  2. Impact of receiver errors on the radiometric resolution of large two-dimensional aperture synthesis radiometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, F.; Camps, A.; Bará, J.; Corbella, I.

    1997-03-01

    The specifications of the subsystems that compound a radiometer interferometer devoted to Earth observation are of main concern because they set the viability and final performance of such an instrument. The importance of these errors is related to the exact way they are generated, since this determines if a particular calibration procedure is capable of removing them or if they remain as residual errors. This paper presents a general method to analyze system errors. This method is used to analyze in detail the amplitude and phase errors of the receivers and their impact on the radiometric resolution. Special attention has been paid to nonseparable errors, since foreseen calibration procedures can only deal with separable phase and amplitude terms. Finally, the results have been used to set the receiver requirements of the instrument called MIRAS (microwave imaging radiometer by aperture synthesis), which is currently being developed by the European Space Agency (ESA).

  3. Noise maps in aperture synthesis radiometric images due to cross-correlation of visibility noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butora, Robert; Camps, Adriano

    2003-08-01

    This study deals with the calculation of the distribution of radiometric errors ("noise maps") in the images formed by a two-dimensional aperture synthesis radiometer, specifically the MIRAS and the HUT-2D instruments. MIRAS is a spaceborne Y-shaped interferometric radiometer that will be boarded in the European Space Agency's SMOS Earth Explorer Mission. The HUT-2D is a U-shaped airborne interferometric radiometer under development by the Helsinki University of Technology. The study focuses on the known fact that the cross-correlation of the visibility noise does depend on the shape of the sensor. We investigate this dependence for the Y and the U configurations, taking into account also the results of previous studies on redundancy and tapering.

  4. Time course of radiometric detection of positive blood cultures in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Meadow, W.L.; Schwartz, I.K.

    1986-05-01

    We have determined the time course of radiometric detection of microbial growth in 2348 positive blood culture specimens obtained at Wyler Children's Hospital during a 5-year interval. Overall 72 and 88% of isolates were detected within 48 and 72 hours after sampling, respectively. For pathogenic organisms aerobic detection was generally more rapid and more inclusive than anaerobic detection. At 48 hours of incubation the detection of six potential pathogens (Salmonella sp., Haemophilus influenzae, Group D streptococci, Neisseria meningitidis, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Candida sp.) was significantly delayed compared with detection of other pathogenic organisms recovered from blood. At 72 hours of incubation the detection rates remained less than 95% for H. influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella sp., coagulase-negative staphylococci, Group D streptococci and Candida sp. These data should assist clinical decisions regarding duration of antibiotic therapy for the presumptive diagnosis of bacteremia in children.

  5. A Radiometric All-Sky Infrared Camera (RASICAM) for DES/CTIO

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Peter M.; Rogers, Howard; Schindler, Rafe H.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    A novel radiometric all-sky infrared camera [RASICAM] has been constructed to allow automated real-time quantitative assessment of night sky conditions for the Dark Energy Camera [DECam] located on the Blanco Telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The camera is optimized to detect the position, motion and optical depth of thin, high (8-10km) cirrus clouds and contrails by measuring their apparent temperature above the night sky background. The camera system utilizes a novel wide-field equiresolution catadioptic mirror system that provides sky coverage of 2{pi} azimuth and 14-90{sup o} from zenith. Several new technological and design innovations allow the RASICAM system to provide unprecedented cloud detection and IR-based photometricity quantification. The design of the RASICAM system is presented.

  6. Motion of an array of plates in a rarefied gas caused by radiometric force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Satoshi; Aoki, Kazuo

    2015-06-01

    In a rarefied gas in an infinitely long channel between two parallel plates, an array of infinitely many plates, arranged longitudinally with uniform interval, is placed along the channel. The array is assumed to be freely movable along the channel. If one side of each plate is heated, the radiometric force acts on it, and the array starts moving toward the cold sides of the plates. The final steady motion of the array, as well as the corresponding behavior of the gas, is investigated numerically on the basis of kinetic theory using the ellipsoidal statistical model of the Boltzmann equation. As the solution method, a finite-difference method, with a method of characteristics incorporated, that is able to capture the discontinuity in the velocity distribution function is employed. As the result, the local flow field near the edges of the plates and the terminal velocity of the array are obtained accurately for relatively small Knudsen numbers.

  7. Radiometric and geometric analysis of hyperspectral imagery acquired from an unmanned aerial vehicle

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hruska, Ryan; Mitchell, Jessica; Anderson, Matthew; Glenn, Nancy F.

    2012-09-17

    During the summer of 2010, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) hyperspectral in-flight calibration and characterization experiment of the Resonon PIKA II imaging spectrometer was conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory (INL) UAV Research Park. The purpose of the experiment was to validate the radiometric calibration of the spectrometer and determine the georegistration accuracy achievable from the on-board global positioning system (GPS) and inertial navigation sensors (INS) under operational conditions. In order for low-cost hyperspectral systems to compete with larger systems flown on manned aircraft, they must be able to collect data suitable for quantitative scientific analysis.more »The results of the in-flight calibration experiment indicate an absolute average agreement of 96.3%, 93.7% and 85.7% for calibration tarps of 56%, 24%, and 2.5% reflectivity, respectively. The achieved planimetric accuracy was 4.6 meters (based on RMSE).« less

  8. Investigation of LANDSAT follow-on thematic mapper spatial, radiometric and spectral resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalepka, R. F. (principal investigator); Morgenstern, J. P.; Kent, E. R.; Erickson, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Fine resolution M7 multispectral scanner data collected during the Corn Blight Watch Experiment in 1971 served as the basis for this study. Different locations and times of year were studied. Definite improvement using 30-40 meter spatial resolution over present LANDSAT 1 resolution and over 50-60 meter resolution was observed, using crop area mensuration as the measure. Simulation studies carried out to extrapolate the empirical results to a range of field size distributions confirmed this effect, showing the improvement to be most pronounced for field sizes of 1-4 hectares. Radiometric sensitivity study showed significant degradation of crop classification accuracy immediately upon relaxation from the nominally specified values of 0.5% noise equivalent reflectance. This was especially the case for data which were spectrally similar such as that collected early in the growing season and also when attempting to accomplish crop stress detection.

  9. Evaluating Radiometric Sensitivity of LandSat 8 Over Coastal-Inland Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pahlevan, Nima; Wei, Jian-Wei; Shaaf, Crystal B.; Schott, John R.

    2014-01-01

    The operational Land Imager (OLI) aboard Landsat 8 was launched in February 2013 to continue the Landsat's mission of monitoring earth resources at relatively high spatial resolution. Compared to Landsat heritage sensors, OLI has an additional 443-nm band (termed coastal/aerosol (CA) band), which extends its potential for mapping/monitoring water quality in coastal/inland waters. In addition, OLI's pushbroom design allows for longer integration time and, as a result, higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Using a series of radiative transfer simulations, we provide insights into the radiometric sensitivity of OLI when studying coastal/inland waters. This will address how the changes in water constituents manifest at top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and whether the changes are resolvable at TOA (focal plane) relative to OLI's overall noise.

  10. Radiometric and geometric analysis of hyperspectral imagery acquired from an unmanned aerial vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Hruska, Ryan; Mitchell, Jessica; Anderson, Matthew; Glenn, Nancy F.

    2012-09-17

    During the summer of 2010, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) hyperspectral in-flight calibration and characterization experiment of the Resonon PIKA II imaging spectrometer was conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory (INL) UAV Research Park. The purpose of the experiment was to validate the radiometric calibration of the spectrometer and determine the georegistration accuracy achievable from the on-board global positioning system (GPS) and inertial navigation sensors (INS) under operational conditions. In order for low-cost hyperspectral systems to compete with larger systems flown on manned aircraft, they must be able to collect data suitable for quantitative scientific analysis. The results of the in-flight calibration experiment indicate an absolute average agreement of 96.3%, 93.7% and 85.7% for calibration tarps of 56%, 24%, and 2.5% reflectivity, respectively. The achieved planimetric accuracy was 4.6 meters (based on RMSE).

  11. Prediction of radio frequency power generation of Neptune's magnetosphere from generalized radiometric Bode's law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millon, M. A.; Goertz, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetospheric radio frequency emission power has been shown to vary as a function of both solar wind and planetary values such as magnetic field by Kaiser and Desch. Planetary magnetic fields have been shown to scale with planetary variables such as density and angular momentum by numerous researchers. This paper combines two magnetic scaling laws (Busse's and Curtis Ness') with the radiometric law to yield "Bode's"-type laws governing planetary radio emission. Further analysis allows the reduction of variables to planetary mass and orbital distance. These generalized laws are then used to predict the power output of Neptune to be about 1.6×107W; with the intensity peaking at about 3 MHz.

  12. Prediction of radio frequency power generation of Neptune's magnetosphere from generalized radiometric Bode's law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Million, M. A.; Goertz, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetospheric radio frequency emission power has been shown to vary as a function of both solar wind and planetary values such as magnetic field by Kaiser and Desch (1984). Planetary magnetic fields have been shown to scale with planetary variables such as density and angular momentum by numerous researchers. This paper combines two magnetic scaling laws with the radiometric law to yield 'Bode's'-type laws governing planetary radio emissions. Further analysis allows the reduction of variables to planetary mass and orbital distance. These generalized laws are then used to predict the power otuput of Neptune to be about 1.6 x 10 to the 7th W; with the intensity peaking at about 3 MHz.

  13. Stability of vacuum-ultraviolet radiometric transfer standards: Electron cyclotron resonance versus hollow cathode source

    SciTech Connect

    Gottwald, Alexander; Richter, Mathias; Ulm, Gerhard; Schuehle, Udo

    2005-02-01

    Established transfer standards such as Penning and hollow cathode discharge sources suffer from limited spectral range and, in particular, a limited lifetime and stability due to electrode erosion. The development of a vacuum-ultraviolet radiation source based on an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR)-created plasma might overcome these limitations. To test such a source with regard to its usefulness as radiometric transfer standard, the emission intensity of a Ne plasma was monitored over an operation period of 180 days, with regard to stability and reproducibility in the 50-75 nm wavelength range. For comparison and calibration, a hollow cathode was used as transfer standard traceable to the electron storage ring BESSY II as primary standard. It was found that the ECR source exceeded the lifetime of the hollow cathode source by far, offering a more balanced spectral emission line variety with similar stability.

  14. Preliminary results of radiometric measurements of clear air and cloud brightness (antenna) temperatures at 37GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakelyan, A. K.; Hambaryan, A. K.; Arakelyan, A. A.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper the results of polarization measurements of clear air and clouds brightness temperatures at 37GHz are presented. The results were obtained during the measurements carried out in Armenia from the measuring complex built under the framework of ISTC Projects A-872 and A-1524. The measurements were carried out at vertical and horizontal polarizations, under various angles of sensing by Ka-band combined scatterometric-radiometric system (ArtAr-37) developed and built by ECOSERV Remote Observation Centre Co.Ltd. under the framework of the above Projects. In the paper structural and operational features of the utilized system and the whole measuring complex will be considered and discussed as well.

  15. Laboratory experience with radiometric detection of bacteremia with three culture media

    SciTech Connect

    Wicher, K.; Koscinski, D.

    1984-10-01

    In two long-term studies, the BACTEC radiometric system for detection of bacteremia was evaluated with three culture media each: (i) BACTEC media 6A (for aerobes) and 7B (for anaerobes) plus a thioglycolate medium and (ii) BACTEC media 6A, 7B, and 8A (hypertonic). In study 1, clinically significant isolates were identified in 1,873 (13.9%) of 13,432 blood cultures with all three media. The thioglycolate medium revealed 143 (1.1%) organisms not recovered from the 6A and 7B media. In study 2, isolates were identified in 1,135 (12.9%) of 8,759 cultures with all three media; 104 (1.2%) organisms were isolated only from the hypertonic medium. The increased yield of positive cultures in the three-medium system is likely due to the larger volume of blood cultured.

  16. Physics principles in radiometric infrared imaging of clouds in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Joseph A.; Nugent, Paul W.

    2013-11-01

    Imaging the atmosphere with a thermal infrared camera can yield a rich variety of information, ranging from the water-vapour content to the spatial distribution of clouds. Such remote sensing measurements are being used to study climate and to characterize ground-station sites for Earth-space optical communications. The key to turning interesting but qualitative images into the highly accurate quantitative images required for this type of research is careful radiometric calibration. This is especially true when using uncooled microbolometer cameras, which are becoming widely available at relatively low cost. When such cameras are calibrated properly, their images illustrate a variety of important basic principles of optics and atmospheric physics related to thermal emission and absorption by atmospheric gases and clouds.

  17. Calibration of a Solar Absolute Cavity Radiometer with Traceability to the World Radiometric Reference

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, I.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the present method of establishing traceability of absolute cavity radiometers to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR) through the process employed in the International Pyrheliometer Comparisons (IPC). This method derives the WRR reduction factor for each of the participating cavity radiometers. An alternative method is proposed, described, and evaluated as a way to reduce the uncertainty in the comparison process. The two methods are compared using a sample of data from the recent IPC-VIII conducted from September 25th to October 13th, 1995 at the World Radiation Center in Davos, Switzerland. A description of absolute cavity radiometers is also included, using a PMO-6 as an example of active cavity radiometers, and a HF as an example of passive cavity radiometers.

  18. In-progress absolute radiometric inflight calibration of the LANDSAT-4 sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, K.; Dinguirard, M.; Ezra, C. E.; Holm, R. G.; Jackson, R. J.; Kastner, C. J.; Palmer, J. M.; Savage, R.; Slater, P. N.

    1983-01-01

    An approach is described for providing periodic inflight absolute radiometric calibrations of the LANDSAT-4 sensors by reference to selected, instrumented ground areas. Results of some early ground measurements and computer simulations are presented. Selection of a suitable ground reference site, accurate measurement of the spectral reflectance of the selected area, determination of atmospheric characteristics during the morning of the sensor overpass, reduction of the measured data and their use in an appropriate atmospheric radiative transfer program, and comparison of the radiance level data with the digital counts of for the images of the selected areas are discussed. Preliminary measurements of gypsum are being made as an aid in defining the characteristics of field equipment to be constructed and calibrated for use over the White Sands Missile Range.

  19. The Rosetta UV imaging spectrometer ALICE: First light optical and radiometric performance results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, D. C.; Stern, S. A.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Bertaux, J. L.; Feldman, P. D.; Festou, M. C.

    2000-10-01

    We describe the design, scientific objectives, and "first-light" radiometric testing results of the Rosetta/ALICE instrument. ALICE is a lightweight (2.7 kg), low-power (4 W), and low-cost imaging spectrometer optimized for cometary ultraviolet spectroscopy. ALICE, which is funded by NASA (with hardware contributions from CNES, France), will fly on the ESA Rosetta Orbiter to characterize the cometary nucleus, coma, and nucleus/coma coupling of the target comet 46P/Wirtanen. It will obtain spatially-resolved, far-UV spectra of Wirtanen's nucleus and coma in the 700-2050 Å passband with a spectral resolution of 5-10 Å for extended sources that fill the entrance slit's field- of-view. ALICE is also the UV spectrometer model for the PERSI remote sensing suite proposed for the Pluto Kuiper Express (PKE) mission. ALICE uses modern technology to achieve its low mass and low power design specifications. It employs an off-axis telescope feeding a 0.15-m normal incidence Rowland circle spectrograph with a concave (toroidal) holographic reflection grating. The imaging microchannel plate (MCP) detector utilizes dual solar-blind opaque photocathodes of KBr and CsI deposited on a cylindrically-curved (7.5-cm radius) MCP Z-stack, and a matching 2-D cylindrically-curved double delay-line readout array with a 1024 x 32 pixel array format. This array format provides a point source response that is twice that originally proposed (? ? 3 Å). Three data taking modes are possible: (i) histogram image mode for 2-D images, (ii) pixel list mode with periodic time hacks for temporal studies, and (iii) count rate mode for broadband photometric studies. Optical and radiometric sensitivity performance results based on subsystem tests of the flight optics, detector, and preliminary integrated system level tests of the integrated ALICE flight model are presented and discussed.

  20. Radiometric, geometric, and image quality assessment of ALOS AVNIR-2 and PRISM sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saunier, S.; Goryl, P.; Chander, G.; Santer, R.; Bouvet, M.; Collet, B.; Mambimba, A.; Kocaman, Aksakal S.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) was launched on January 24, 2006, by a Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) H-IIA launcher. It carries three remote-sensing sensors: 1) the Advanced Visible and Near-Infrared Radiometer type 2 (AVNIR-2); 2) the Panchromatic Remote-Sensing Instrument for Stereo Mapping (PRISM); and 3) the Phased-Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR). Within the framework of ALOS Data European Node, as part of the European Space Agency (ESA), the European Space Research Institute worked alongside JAXA to provide contributions to the ALOS commissioning phase plan. This paper summarizes the strategy that was adopted by ESA to define and implement a data verification plan for missions operated by external agencies; these missions are classified by the ESA as third-party missions. The ESA was supported in the design and execution of this plan by GAEL Consultant. The verification of ALOS optical data from PRISM and AVNIR-2 sensors was initiated 4 months after satellite launch, and a team of principal investigators assembled to provide technical expertise. This paper includes a description of the verification plan and summarizes the methodologies that were used for radiometric, geometric, and image quality assessment. The successful completion of the commissioning phase has led to the sensors being declared fit for operations. The consolidated measurements indicate that the radiometric calibration of the AVNIR-2 sensor is stable and agrees with the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus and the Envisat MEdium-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer calibration. The geometrical accuracy of PRISM and AVNIR-2 products improved significantly and remains under control. The PRISM modulation transfer function is monitored for improved characterization. ?? 2006 IEEE.

  1. Orbit determination of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter using laser ranging and radiometric tracking data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löcher, Anno; Kusche, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) launched in 2009 by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) still orbits the Moon in a polar orbit at an altitude of 50 kilometers and below. Its main objective is the detailed exploration of the Moon's surface by means of the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) and three high resolution cameras bundled in the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) unit. Referring these observations to a Moon-fixed reference frame requires the computation of highly accurate and consistent orbits. For this task only Earth-based observations are available, primarily radiometric tracking data from stations in the United States, Australia and Europe. In addition, LRO is prepared for one-way laser measurements from specially adapted sites. Currently, 10 laser stations participate more or less regularly in this experiment. For operational reasons, the official LRO orbits from NASA only include radiometric data so far. In this presentation, we investigate the benefit of the laser ranging data by feeding both types of observations in an integrated orbit determination process. All computations are performed by an in-house software development based on a dynamical approach improving orbit and force parameters in an iterative way. Special attention is paid to the determination of bias parameters, in particular of timing biases between radio and laser stations and the drift and aging of the LRO spacecraft clock. The solutions from the combined data set will be compared to radio- and laser-only orbits as well as to the NASA orbits. Further results will show how recent gravity field models from the GRAIL mission can improve the accuracy of the LRO orbits.

  2. Radiometric Cross-calibration of FORMOSAT-2 RSI with Landsat-8 OLI Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Tun-Yu; Lin, Tang-Huang; Lin, Meng-Yue; Liu, Gin-Rong; Liu, Chian-Yi; Hsu, Kuo-Hsien; Chen, Nai-Yu; Wu, An-Ming

    2015-04-01

    FORMOSAT-2 satellite (FS-2) was launched in May, 2004. It is the first Earth observation satellite operated by the National Space Organization (NSPO) of Taiwan. The main payload housed in FS-2 is Remote Sensing Instrument (RSI) with high spatial resolution. Landsat-8 (L-8) is an American Earth observing satellite launched in February 2013 quite recently. The main sensor on L-8 is Operational Land Imager (OLI). For any optical sensors, ensuring the accurate radiance observing is the most important issue for the applications to the scientific researches and environmental monitoring. Since RSI is operated more than 10 years, the optical characters may be altered. Therefore, the goal in this research project is to examine radiometric coefficients of FS-2 RSI sensor by means of in-flight cross-calibration using L-8 OLI image as a reference. For FS-2 RSI sensor, OLI is not only a new and well calibrated sensor but also use the similar spectral bands and bandwidth which can provide a credible data for calibrating RSI. The desert areas are selected for the cross-calibration in this study, including Sahara desert in Africa and Sonoran desert in America. Those sites are usually used in other papers as a satellite sensor calibration site. The radiative transfer code, Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) is employed to drive land surface reflectance and the radiance RSI observed on the top of atmosphere. Eventually, the physical gains of RSI can be figured based on the relationship between observed radiance and the digital number. The results indicate that the changes of physical gains from the counter parts of pre-flight can reach in 10% in most spectral bands of RSI. Keywords: FORMOSAT-2 RSI, Landsat-8 OLI, In-flight radiometric calibration, Cross-calibration, Physical gain

  3. K/Ar Dating of Fine Grained Sediments Near Prydz Bay, Antarctica: East Antarctic Ice Sheet Behavior During the Middle-Miocene Climate Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchesne, A. E.; Pierce, E. L.; Williams, T.; Hemming, S. R.; Johnson, D. L.; May, T.; Gombiner, J.; Torfstein, A.

    2012-12-01

    ¶ The Middle Miocene Climate Transition (MMCT) (~14 Ma) represents a time of major East Antarctic Ice-Sheet (EAIS) expansion, with research suggesting major global sea level fall on the order of ~60 meters (John et al., 2011, EPSL). Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) core data from Site 1165B near Prydz Bay shows an influx of cobbles deposited ~13.8-13.5 Ma, representing a sudden burst of ice-rafted detritus (IRD) during the MMCT. Based on 40Ar/39Ar dating of hornblendes and/or biotite grains, 5 of 6 dated pebbles from a companion study show Wilkes Land origins, indicating transport from over 1500 kilometers away. However, samples throughout this time interval have an anomalously low abundance of sand, thus we seek to understand the sedimentary processes that led to the deposition of these isolated dropstones in a fine matrix through provenance studies of the core's terrigenous fine fraction. Geochemical provenance studies of the terrigenous fraction of marine sediments can aid in identifying past dynamic EAIS behavior; the few outcrops available on the continent provide specific rock characterizations and age constraints from which cored marine sediments can then be matched to using established radiogenic isotope techniques. Here we apply the K/Ar dating method as a provenance tool for identifying the source area(s) of fine-grained terrigenous sediments (<63 ?m) deposited during the MMCT. ¶ After source area characterization, we find that the fine-grained sediments from the mid-Miocene show a mixture of both local Prydz Bay sourcing (~400 Ma signature) and Wilkes Land provenance (~900 Ma signature). While locally-derived Prydz Bay sediments are likely to have been delivered via meltwater from ice and deposited as hemipelagic sediments (with some possible bottom current modification, as this is a drift site), sediments sourced from Wilkes Land required transport via large icebergs. Future work will involve further provenance determination on both the fine-grained sediments and the abundant dropstones deposited at ODP Site 1165B during the MMCT. We anticipate that the use of the K/Ar radiometric dating technique as a proxy for the study of glacially transported fine-grained terrigenous materials will enable future Antarctic provenance research and further aid in providing insight into past EAIS behavior.; ODP Core 34X from Site 1165B

  4. Trainee: _________________________________ PI: _________________________________ Employee Start Date: ______________________

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Date: ______________________ SCIPP Laboratory-Specific Safety Training Checklist Prior to beginning features and understand the proper use of facility equipment. Initial Date Learning Activity how to access safety- related information. Initial Date Learning Activity ______ ______ Complete EH

  5. Assessment of the Short-Term Radiometric Stability between Terra MODIS and Landsat 7 ETM+ Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Taeyoung; Xiong, Xiaxiong; Chander, G.; Angal, Amit

    2009-01-01

    The Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) sensor was launched on April 15th, 1999 and has been in operation for over nine years. It has six reflective solar spectral bands located in the visible and shortwave infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum (0.5 - 2.5 micron) at a spatial resolution of 30 m. The on-board calibrators are used to monitor the on-orbit sensor system changes. The ETM+ performs solar calibrations using on-board Full Aperture Solar Calibrator (FASC) and the Partial Aperture Solar Calibrator (PASC). The Internal Calibrator Lamp (IC) lamps, a blackbody and shutter optics constitute the on-orbit calibration mechanism for ETM+. On 31 May 2003, a malfunction of the scan-line corrector (SLC) mirror assembly resulted in the loss of approximately 22% of the normal scene area. The missing data affects most of the image with scan gaps varying in width from one pixel or less near the centre of the image to 14 pixels along the east and west edges of the image, creating a wedge-shaped pattern. However, the SLC failure has no impacts on the radiometric performance of the valid pixels. On December 18, 1999, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Proto-Flight Model (PFM) was launched on-board the NASA's EOS Terra spacecraft. Terra MODIS has 36 spectral bands with wavelengths ranging from 0.41 to 14.5 micron and collects data over a wide field of view angle (+/-55 deg) at three nadir spatial resolutions of 250 m, 500 in 1 km for bands 1 to 2, 3 to 7, and 8 to 36, respectively. It has 20 reflective solar bands (RSB) with spectral wavelengths from 0.41 to 2.1 micron. The RSB radiometric calibration is performed by using on-board solar diffuser (SD), solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM), space-view (SV), and spectro-radiometric calibration assembly (SRCA). Through the SV port, periodic lunar observations are used to track radiometric response changes at different angles of incidence (AOI) of the scan mirror. As a part of the AM Constellation satellites, Terra MODIS flies approximately 30 minutes behind L7 ETM+ in the same orbit. The orbit of L7 is repetitive, circular, sunsynchronous, and near polar at a nominal altitude of 705 km (438 miles) at the Equator. The spacecraft crosses the Equator from north to south on a descending node between 10:00 AM and 10:15 AM. Circling the Earth at 7.5 km/sec, each orbit takes nearly 99 minutes. The spacecraft completes just over 14 orbits per day, covering the entire Earth between 81 degrees north and south latitude every 16 days. The longest continuous imaging swath that L7 sensor can collect is for a 14-minute subinterval contact period which is equivalent to 35 full WRS-2 scenes. On the other hand, Terra can provide the entire corresponding orbit with wider swath at any given ETM+ collection without contact time limitation. There are six spectral matching band pairs between MODIS (bands 3, 4, 1, 2, 6, 7) and ETM+ (bands 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7) sensor. MODIS has narrower spectral responses than ETM+ in all the bands. A short-term radiometric stability was evaluated using continuous ETM+ scenes within the contact period and the corresponding half orbit MODIS scenes. The near simultaneous earth observations (SNO) were limited by the smaller swath size of ETM+ (187 km) as compared to MODIS (2330 km). Two sets of continuous granules for MODIS and ETM+ were selected and mosaiced based on pixel geolocation information for non cloudy pixels over the North American continent. The Top-of- Atmosphere (TOA) reflectances were computed for the spectrally matching bands between ETM+ and MODIS over the regions of interest (ROI). The matching pixel pairs were aggregated from a finer to a coarser pixel resolution and the TOA reflectance values covering a wide dynamic range of the sensors were compared and analyzed. Considering the uncertainties of the absolute calibration of the both sensors, radiometric stability was verified for the band pairs. The Railroad Valley Playa, Nada (RVPN) was included in the path of this continuous orbit, which served as a verification poin

  6. 2010 RECOMMENDED PLANTING CUT OFF DATES BEAN TYPE CUT OFF DATE MATURITY RISK DATE

    E-print Network

    2010 RECOMMENDED PLANTING CUT OFF DATES BEAN TYPE CUT OFF DATE MATURITY RISK DATE SEAHAWK? June 27? July1 M July 5 BEAN TYPE CUT OFF DATE MATURITY RISK DATE ETNA July 1 E July 3 TAYLOR July 1 E July 3

  7. Recent atmospheric lead deposition recorded in an ombrotrophic peat bog of Great Hinggan Mountains, Northeast China, from 210Pb and 137Cs dating.

    PubMed

    Bao, K; Xia, W; Lu, X; Wang, G

    2010-09-01

    Radioactive markers are useful in dating lead deposition patterns from industrialization in peat archive. Peat cores were collected in an ombrotrophic peat bog in the Great Hinggan Mountains in Northeast China in September 2008 and dated using (210)Pb and (137)Cs radiometric techniques. The mosses in both cores were examined systematically for dry bulk density, water and ash content. Lead also was measured using atomic emission spectroscopy with inductively coupled plasma (ICP-AES). Both patterned peat profiles were preserved well without evident anthropogenic disturbance. Unsupported (210)Pb and (137)Cs decreased with the depth in both of the two sample cores. The (210)Pb chronologies were established using the constant rate of supply model (CRS) and are in good agreement with the (137)Cs time marker. Recent atmospheric (210)Pb flux in Great Hinggan Mountains peat bog was estimated to be 337 Bq m(-2)y(-1), which is consistent with published data for the region. Lead deposition rate in this region was also derived from these two peat cores and ranged from 24.6 to 55.8 mg m(-2)y(-1) with a range of Pb concentration of 14-262 microg g(-1). The Pb deposition patterns were consistent with increasing industrialization over the last 135-170 y, with a peak of production and coal burning in the last 50 y in Northeast China. This work presents a first estimation of atmospheric Pb deposition rate in peatlands in China and suggests an increasing trend of environmental pollution due to anthropogenic contaminants in the atmosphere. More attention should be paid to current local pollution problems, and society should take actions to seek a balance between economic development and environmental protection. PMID:20621757

  8. Mio-Pliocene magnetostratigraphy in the southern Carpathian foredeep and MediterraneanParatethys correlations

    E-print Network

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    be available from bio- stratigraphy or radiometric dating. Once these prerequisites have been met­Pliocene sedi- mentary record of the Paratethys is still lacking. Radiometric datings are scarce as a dating technique for sedimentary rocks. A suitable sedimentary se- quence has to be continuous, without

  9. 76 FR 77831 - 2012 Presidential Candidate Matching Fund Submission Dates and Post Date of Ineligibility Dates...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ...SUMMARY: The Federal Election Commission is publishing matching fund submission dates for publicly funded 2012 presidential...per month on the designated date. The Commission is also publishing the dates on which publicly funded 2012 presidential...

  10. The biology behind lichenometric dating curves.

    PubMed

    Loso, Michael G; Doak, Daniel F

    2006-03-01

    Lichenometry is used to date late-Holocene terminal moraines that record glacier fluctuations. Traditionally, it relies upon dating curves that relate diameters of the largest lichens in a population to surface ages. Although widely used, the technique remains controversial, in part because lichen biology is poorly understood. We use size-frequency distributions of lichens growing on well-dated surfaces to fit demographic models for Rhizocarpon geographicum and Pseudophebe pubescens, two species commonly used for lichenometry. We show that both species suffer from substantial mortality of 2-3% per year, and grow slowest when young-trends that explain a long-standing contradiction between the literatures of lichenometry and lichen biology. Lichenometrists interpret the shape of typical dating curves to indicate a period of rapid juvenile "great growth," contrary to the growth patterns expected by biologists. With a simulation, we show how the "great growth" pattern can be explained by mortality alone, which ensures that early colonists are rarely found on the oldest surfaces. The consistency of our model predictions with biological theory and observations, and with dozens of lichenometric calibration curves from around the world, suggests opportunities to assess quantitatively the accuracy and utility of this common dating technique. PMID:16237538

  11. Dating violence and girls in the juvenile justice system.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patricia J; Cheng, An-Lin; Peralez-Dieckmann, Esther; Martinez, Elisabeth

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the prevalence and associated behaviors of dating violence among a population of girls in the juvenile justice system. A sample of 590 girls from an urban juvenile justice system completed a questionnaire assessing attitudes and self-efficacy about and occurrence of dating violence. The analysis developed a random effect model to determine a risk profile for dating violence. The strongest predictors of dating violence were (a) initial sexual experience at age 13 or earlier, (b) unwillingness of initial sexual experience, (c) drug use, and (d) low self-efficacy about preventing dating violence. The high prevalence of dating violence and associated behaviors among participants suggests the importance of implementing primary prevention programs to assist preteen girls in delaying initial sexual intercourse and in learning techniques to prevent dating violence. PMID:18768739

  12. Accelerator radiocarbon dating: new applications and capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cresswell, R.G.; Beukens, R.P.; Lee, H.W.

    1985-01-01

    As with new advances in any field, radiocarbon dating by accelerator mass spectrometry has to be treated with some scepticism until it has proven itself against the conventional techniques. By the direct atom counting of the radioactive carbon isotope, C-14, rather than the counting of the beta particles, any background is eliminated and microgram-sized samples of a solid graphite-like target can be analyzed in a few hours instead of many days. The IsoTrace laboratory has completed a comparative analysis with materials dated by the conventional method and has shown excellent agreement, yielding an accuracy better than 1% and a precision of 0.3%. For samples less than 10,000 years old, a precision of 1.0% is routinely obtained, while, for samples less than 2000 years old, precision of 0.3% is possible. Dates can also be routinely obtained from materials up to 50,000 years old. With the small sample size and high precision, greater resolution when dating recent materials may be obtained. Materials that previously proved impossible to date due to small sample size or the nature of the material (e.g. high value, weathering etc.) may now readily be subjected to scrutiny. Fragments, rather than bulk samples, may be dated, facilitating significant stratigraphic resolution and correlation in a wide variety of situations.

  13. Student Information Sheet Group Name: _____________________________________ Visit Date: _____________________

    E-print Network

    Lee, Tonghun

    Student Information Sheet Group Name: _____________________________________ Visit Date: _____________________ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Name of Student: _____________________________________________________ Date of Birth: __________________________________ - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Name of Student: _______________________________________________________ Date of Birth

  14. Dating Violence in High School: A Profile of the Victims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuterman, Nicholas A.; Burcky, William D.

    1989-01-01

    Attempted to develop profile of victims of dating violence based on individual characteristics of female high school students (N=123). Found significant differences between subjects who had and had not experienced dating violence on urban/rural residency, suspension or expulsion from schools; type of academic program; family discipline techniques;…

  15. Ar-Ar Dating of Martian Meteorite, Dhofar 378: An Early Shock Event?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Bogard, D. D.

    2006-01-01

    Martian meteorite, Dhofar 378 (Dho378) is a basaltic shergottite from Oman, weighing 15 g, and possessing a black fusion crust. Chemical similarities between Dho378 and the Los Angeles 001 shergottite suggests that they might have derived from the same Mars locale. The plagioclase in other shergottites has been converted to maskelenite by shock, but Dho378 apparently experienced even more intense shock heating, estimated at 55-75 GPa. Dho378 feldspar (approximately 43 modal %) melted, partially flowed and vesiculated, and then partially recrystallized. Areas of feldspathic glass are appreciably enriched in K, whereas individual plagioclases show a range in the Or/An ratio of approximately 0.18-0.017. Radiometric dating of martian shergottites indicate variable formation times of 160-475 Myr, whereas cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages of shergottites indicate most were ejected from Mars within the past few Myr. Most determined Ar-39-Ar-40 ages of shergottites appear older than other radiometric ages because of the presence of large amounts of martian atmosphere or interior Ar-40. Among all types of meteorites and returned lunar rocks, the impact event that initiated the CRE age very rarely reset the Ar-Ar age. This is because a minimum time and temperature is required to facilitate Ar diffusion loss. It is generally assumed that the shock-texture characteristics in martian meteorites were produced by the impact events that ejected the rocks from Mars, although the time of these shock events (as opposed to CRE ages) are not directly dated. Here we report Ar-39-Ar-40 dating of Dho378 plagioclase. We suggest that the determined age dates the intense shock heating event this meteorite experienced, but that it was not the impact that initiated the CRE age.

  16. ... the official newsletter of the School of Earth and Space Exploration

    E-print Network

    Rhoads, James

    used radiometric dating techniques to determine the age of really old things, such as the age with this technique. Radiometric dating can be used to determine the age of a wide range of natural and human... the official newsletter of the School of Earth and Space Exploration ... the official

  17. AFTER Trip Form Today's Date:________________ Name: ______________________________________________ Account # ____________________

    E-print Network

    Indiana University

    AFTER Trip Form Today's Date:________________ Name Destination & Dates and Time Destination: _____________________________________________________________________________ Date and Time Departure: __________________________________ am or pm (from Bloomington) Date and Time

  18. Dating Violence among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iconis, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    Dating violence is a significant problem on college campuses. More than one-fifth of the undergraduate dating population are physically abused by their dating partners and an even greater percentage are psychologically abused. Researchers have identified risk factors for college student dating violence. Preventive interventions are strongly…

  19. Student Information Printed Name: Date

    E-print Network

    Student Information Printed Name: Date: Signature: Date of Birth: Student ID Number: Phone Number Learner Employee Information Printed Name: Date: Signature: Phone Number: CSU ID: # Hours Worked Per Week individual is eligible for the tuition scholarship program at CSU. Signature: Date: Printed Name: Phone

  20. Student Information Printed Name: Date

    E-print Network

    Student Information Printed Name: Date: Signature: Date of Birth: Student ID Number: Phone Number Name: Date: Signature: Phone Number: CSU ID: # Hours Worked Per Week: Job Title: Home Department: HRS scholarship program at CSU. Signature: Date: Printed Name: Phone Number: 970-491-MyHR (6947) Title: Benefits

  1. Date _____________________ Language Partner Program

    E-print Network

    Martin, Jeff

    Date _____________________ Language Partner Program Volunteer Application Form The purpose of the Language Partner Program is to provide English as an Additional Language (EAL) students with the opportunity to practice English in a casual conversation outside the classroom. A volunteer language partner

  2. Date: ___/____/____ YOGA THERAPY QUESTIONNAIRE

    E-print Network

    Pain Reduction Flexibility Improved sleep Personalized practice tips Other been dealing with it (e.g. back pain, 1 year; e.g. insomnia, 5 years): #12;Page 2 Date: ___/____/____ 5 1 being little pain, and 10 being severe pain (e.g. throbbing knee pain, level 5). 8. What relieves

  3. Biodiversity of date palm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) is the dominant component upon which the sustainable biophysical and socio-economic structures of the oasis ecosystem are based; a fruit tree with unique nutritional, biochemical and biophysical characteristics, a rich source of aesthetic and cultural values, and ...

  4. Date palm: Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The future of date palm, as a dioecious, monocot fruit tree largely depends on (1) developing advanced knowledge and information about the dynamics, management, and sustainability of the tree as a central component of the oasis agro-ecosystem, and (2) in-depth understanding of the genetic diversity ...

  5. The Dating Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerger, Monte J.

    1998-01-01

    Presents activities to cultivate the tendency to see special qualities in numbers that can be played on certain calendar days. Includes games on the constant of the day, Fibonacci and golden ratio dates, primes, powers, December 25, and the day of the year. (ASK)

  6. Personal Assistant Agreement Date_____________________

    E-print Network

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    of a personal nature and therefore the Center for Students with Disabilities serves as an agent to assistPersonal Assistant Agreement Date_____________________ Employer_______________________ Phone to termination of services. · The agreed upon required tasks are attached. Personal Assistants are a service

  7. Evaluation of Radiometric Improvements with Electronic Crosstalk Correction for Terra MODIS Band 27

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Junqiang; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Li, Yonghong; Madhavan, Sriharsha; Wu, Aisheng; Wenny, Brian N.

    2014-01-01

    The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has 36 bands, covering a wavelength range from 0.4 to 14.4 micrometers. Terra MODIS band 27 (6.72 micrometers), a water vapor band, was found to have electronic crosstalk from other bands located on the same focal plane assembly, which causes surface feature contamination and pronounced detector level striping in the images. In a previous study, an algorithm using a linear approximation derived from on-orbit lunar observations was developed to correct the crosstalk effect. Results demonstrated that the correction substantially reduces the striping and removes the contaminated surface features. However, it was also demonstrated that the crosstalk effect might bring about a long-term increase in the brightness temperatures (BTs) in Terra band 27. In this paper, it is shown that there is a long-term drift (or decrease), which is strongly detector dependent, in the BT for the band induced by the crosstalk effect. It is also shown that the crosstalk correction with the linear algorithm substantially removes the detector-dependent long-term drift and greatly improves the radiometric accuracy of the band. The comparison between the BT of Terra band 27 in the most recent MODIS Level 1B (L1B) collection [Collection 6 (C6)] and those from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer using simultaneous-nadir-overpass observations shows that the detector-averaged long-term drift in the BT in Terra band 27 varies from approximately 1 K to 3 K. The detector difference can be as large as 9 K for a few detectors during the last five years in the northern and southern polar areas. With crosstalk correction applied, the long-term drift is reduced to be less than 0.5 K, and the detector difference is within 1 K. The crosstalk effect-induced detector-dependent long-term drift in Terra band 27 and the capability of the crosstalk correction algorithm to remove the drift are also assessed at three well-characterized sites with different radiance levels, namely, Dome Concordia (Dome C), Libya 1, and the Pacific Ocean at various radiometric levels. The long-term drift and the strong detector dependence of the drift are clearly observed at the three sites with the BT in the Terra band 27 C6 L1B products. The band-averaged BT drifts are about 0.8 K, 5 K, and 5.5 K, and the detector differences can be as large as 4 K, 12 K, and 15 K, respectively, for the three sites. With the crosstalk correction applied, the long-term drifts in the BT over the three sites are substantially removed, and the observed detector differences of Terra band 27 at the three sites are also significantly reduced. The crosstalk correction greatly improves the radiometric accuracy of the band as well as the image quality.

  8. Radiometric Cross-Calibration of the HJ-1B IRS in the Thermal Infrared Spectral Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, K.

    2012-12-01

    The natural calamities occur continually, environment pollution and destruction in a severe position on the earth presently, which restricts societal and economic development. The satellite remote sensing technology has an important effect on improving surveillance ability of environment pollution and natural calamities. The radiometric calibration is precondition of quantitative remote sensing; which accuracy decides quality of the retrieval parameters. Since the China Environment Satellite (HJ-1A/B) has been launched successfully on September 6th, 2008, it has made an important role in the economic development of China. The satellite has four infrared bands; and one of it is thermal infrared. With application fields of quantitative remote sensing in china, finding appropriate calibration method becomes more and more important. Many kinds of independent methods can be used to do the absolute radiometric calibration. In this paper, according to the characteristic of thermal infrared channel of HJ-1B thermal infrared multi-spectral camera, the thermal infrared spectral band of HJ-1B IRS was calibrated using cross-calibration methods based on MODIS data. Firstly, the corresponding bands of the two sensors were obtained. Secondly, the MONDTRAN was run to analyze the influences of different spectral response, satellite view zenith angle, atmosphere condition and temperature on the match factor. In the end, their band match factor was calculated in different temperature, considering the dissimilar band response of the match bands. Seven images of Lake Qinghai in different time were chosen as the calibration data. On the basis of radiance of MODIS and match factor, the IRS radiance was calculated. And then the calibration coefficients were obtained by linearly regressing the radiance and the DN value. We compared the result of this cross-calibration with that of the onboard blackbody calibration, which consistency was good.The maximum difference of brightness temperature between HJ-1B IRS band4 and MODIS band 31 is less than 1 K. Therefore cross-calibration is a rapid and financial way to get calibration coefficients of HJ-1B, however, the matched factor calculation method need further research in order to further improve cross-calibration precision.

  9. A case study on bio-optical and radiometric quantities in northwest European shelf seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaba, Shungu; Zielinski, Oliver

    2013-04-01

    Colour of seawater has become an integral tool in understanding surface marine ecosystems and processes. Additionally, operational oceanographic observatories are becoming more prominent these days while at the same time hyperspectral radiometric sensors are becoming increasingly affordable. This has driven a wide spread use of these hyperspectral sensors to measure reflectance above the water surface from stationary and mobile platforms alike. As enormous amounts of data are produced and favourably processed in real-time, effective quality control procedures become more than just supporting tools, but a crucial prerequisite for trustworthy and manageable information. Here, we use bio-geophysical and hyperspectral radiometric measurements from German Bight (GB), North Sea (NS), Inner Seas (ISS), Irish Sea (IS) and Celtic Sea (CS) to identify and establish relationships between colour producing agents (CPAs) and perceived colour of seawater. In order to obtain valid optical measurements, meteorological and sunglint contamination were mitigated using state-of-the-art quality control protocols. The remote sensing reflectance measured is transformed into discrete Forel-Ule numerical indices (FUI), 1 (indigo-blue, oligotrophic) to 21 (cola brown, hyper-eutrophic). We present a novel approach of estimating which of the three main CPAs of seawater control perceived colour of seawater. Our bio-optical models for estimating FUI for measured CPAs; chlorophyll (Chl-a), coloured dissolved organic material (CDOM) and suspended particulate material (SPM) had correlation coefficients, R² (GB = 0.98, NS = 0.23, ISS=0.99, IS=0.63, CS = 0.16). It was also observed that salinity can be estimated from coloured dissolved organic matter with good accuracy, R² (GB = 0.94, NS = 0.44, ISS=0.90, IS=0.85, CS = 0.51). We show that ocean colour products i.e. reflectance and perceived colour of seawater can be used to infer, with good accuracy, environmental parameters e.g. Chl-a, CDOM, SPM, salinity and Secchi depth of the investigated waters providing an effective and affordable tool for operational marine observations. Improved and extensive field investigations are required to further enhance the sensitivity/accuracy of such region specific bio-optical models.

  10. 225-GHz atmospheric opacity of the South Pole sky derived from continual radiometric measurements of the sky-brightness temperature.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, R A; Bally, J

    1994-02-20

    We report measurements of the atmospheric opacity of the South Pole at 225 GHz for the period from day 3 to day 180 in 1992. These opacity data were derived from continual radiometric measurements of the sky-brightness temperature as a function of the zenith angle. These radiometric measurements were performed with a 225-GHz heterodyne atmospheric radiometer on loan from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. This radiometer was previously used to characterize other candidate millimeter and submillimeter radio-telescope sites. We found that the atmospheric opacity was below 0.098 air mass(-1) 75% of the time from day 3 to day 70 in 1992, and below 0.055 air mass(-1) 75% of the time from day 70 to day 180 in 1992. Thus, our data demonstrate that the South Pole is an excellent site for performing millimeter-and submillimeter-wavelength radio astronomy. PMID:20862122

  11. A Comparison of Rapid-Screen 14C Dates and U/Th Dates from Fossil Corals: Implications for Paleoclimate Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grothe, P. R.; Cobb, K. M.; Bush, S.; Cheng, H.; Santos, G.; Southon, J. R.; Edwards, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    Paleoclimate records from fossil corals provide valuable benchmarks for climate model simulations of tropical climate variability. Unfortunately, the number of such reconstructions is limited by the rarity of the relatively large fossil coral heads that are targeted for paleoclimate studies. Abundant, albeit shorter (5-10yrs-long) fossil coral sequences could be used to generate a more robust, quasi-continuous reconstruction of tropical climate with built-in uncertainty estimates, but the large number of radiometric dates required is costly. A new rapid-screen 14C dating method, with a nominal precision of ±1.8% (1?) for young carbonates (Bush et al., 2013), is roughly 10 times faster than high-precision U/Th dating, making it well-suited to screening a large number of corals. In this study, we compare rapid-screen 14C dates to both high-precision 14C dates and U/Th dates from well-characterized mid- to late-Holocene fossil corals collected from Christmas and Fanning Islands (2-4°N, 157-160°W) (Cobb et al., 2013). Our results show that most rapid-screen 14C dates agree with high-precision 14C dates (N=3) and U/Th dates (N=42), within combined uncertainties. However, two samples that contain 15 and 23% calcite (as determined by XRD) are associated with large discrepancies in calibrated 14C vs published U/Th ages (5065-5579 yBP (2?) versus 6350 ±13 yBP (2?) and 4868-5424 yBP (2?) vs 6598 ±13 yBP (2?)), respectively (Cobb et al., 2013). The 14C-U/Th mismatches, as well as poor reproducibility of replicate U/Th dates from these samples, are consistent with diagenetic alteration indicated by the presence of calcite. Mass balance calculations indicate that the dating discrepancies can be explained by a combination of 14C addition and U removal, both of which can occur through calcite recrystallization during freshwater diagenesis. Results illustrate that the rapid-screen 14C dating method is well-suited to surveying a large number (~100's) of fossil coral samples, provided that samples are pre-screened for calcite. Beyond that, concordance between paired 14C and U/Th dates provides valuable confirmation of closed-system behavior and chronological accuracy.

  12. Orbit Determination and Gravity Field Estimation of the Dawn spacecraft at Vesta Using Radiometric and Image Constraints with GEODYN Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centinello, F. J.; Zuber, M. T.; Mazarico, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Dawn spacecraft orbited the protoplanet Vesta from May 3, 2011 to July 25, 2012. Precise orbit determination was critical for the geophysical investigation, as well as the definition of the Vesta-fixed reference frame and the subsequent registration of datasets to the surface. GEODYN, the orbit determination and geodetic parameter estimation software of NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center, was used to compute the orbit of the Dawn spacecraft and estimate the gravity field of Vesta. GEODYN utilizes radiometric Doppler and range measurements, and was modified to process image data from Dawn's cameras. X-band radiometric measurements were acquired by the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN). The addition of the capability to process image constraints decreases position uncertainty in the along- and cross-orbit track directions because of their geometric strengths compared with radiometric measurements. This capability becomes critical for planetary missions such as Dawn due to the weak gravity environment, where non-conservative forces affect the orbit more than typical of orbits at larger planetary bodies. Radiometric measurements were fit to less than 0.1 mm/s and 5 m for Doppler and range during the Survey orbit phase (compared with measurement noise RMS of about 0.05 mm/s and 2 m for Doppler and range). Image constraint RMS was fit to less than 100 m (resolution is 5 - 150 m/pixel, depending on the spacecraft altitude). Orbits computed using GEODYN were used to estimate a 20th degree and order gravity field of Vesta. The quality of the orbit determination and estimated gravity field with and without image constraints was assessed through comparison with the spacecraft trajectory and gravity model provided by the Dawn Science Team.

  13. A definitive calibration record for the Landsat-5 thematic mapper anchored to the Landsat-7 radiometric scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teillet, P.M.; Helder, D.L.; Ruggles, T.A.; Landry, R.; Ahern, F.J.; Higgs, N.J.; Barsi, J.; Chander, G.; Markham, B.L.; Barker, J.L.; Thome, K.J.; Schott, J.R.; Palluconi, Frank Don

    2004-01-01

    A coordinated effort on the part of several agencies has led to the specification of a definitive radiometric calibration record for the Landsat-5 thematic mapper (TM) for its lifetime since launch in 1984. The time-dependent calibration record for Landsat-5 TM has been placed on the same radiometric scale as the Landsat-7 enhanced thematic mapper plus (ETM+). It has been implemented in the National Landsat Archive Production Systems (NLAPS) in use in North America. This paper documents the results of this collaborative effort and the specifications for the related calibration processing algorithms. The specifications include (i) anchoring of the Landsat-5 TM calibration record to the Landsat-7 ETM+ absolute radiometric calibration, (ii) new time-dependent calibration processing equations and procedures applicable to raw Landsat-5 TM data, and (iii) algorithms for recalibration computations applicable to some of the existing processed datasets in the North American context. The cross-calibration between Landsat-5 TM and Landsat-7 ETM+ was achieved using image pairs from the tandem-orbit configuration period that was programmed early in the Laridsat-7 mission. The time-dependent calibration for Landsat-5 TM is based on a detailed trend analysis of data from the on-board internal calibrator. The new lifetime radiometric calibration record for Landsat-5 will overcome problems with earlier product generation owing to inadequate maintenance and documentation of the calibration over time and will facilitate the quantitative examination of a continuous, near-global dataset at 30-m scale that spans almost two decades.

  14. DENDROCHRONOLOGICAL DATING OF EASTERN RED CEDAR (JUNIPERUS VIRGINIANA L.) LOGS FROM ALFRED'S CABIN,

    E-print Network

    Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

    DENDROCHRONOLOGICAL DATING OF EASTERN RED CEDAR (JUNIPERUS VIRGINIANA L.) LOGS FROM ALFRED'S CABIN these techniques been applied to sites and Structures in the Southeastern U.S. Here, dendrochronology has been most preclude successful application of tree-ring dating techniques. Dendrochronological techniques are rapidly

  15. Spatially Distributed Sensible Heat Flux over a Semiarid Watershed. Part II: Use of a Variable Resistance Approach with Radiometric Surface Temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustas, William P.; Humes, Karen S.

    1997-04-01

    Radiometric surface temperature images from aircraft observations over the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed, a semiarid rangeland watershed, were used with ground-based meteorological data at a reference site for extrapolating estimates of surface sensible heat flux across the basin. Two approaches were used. One method assumed that the resistance to heat transport and other meteorological data at a reference site were constant over the watershed. This resulted in a simple scheme (constant resistance approach) for computing spatially distributed sensible heat flux since the variation in sensible heat flux was directly proportional to surface temperature differences from the reference site. The second approach (the variable resistance approach) used spatially distributed estimates of the surface roughness for momentum and heat, as well as air temperature and wind speed. The sensible heat flux values derived by both techniques were compared to measurements made at several other locations in the watershed for three different days. The environmental conditions for these days ranged from uniformly dry surface soil moisture to variably wet conditions caused by several high intensity and spatially variable rainfall events. Comparisons between these two schemes with observations indicated that the more detailed method of accounting for changes in surface roughness over the basin gave significantly better agreement than the simpler scheme. The average percentage of difference with measured values was 30% for the constant resistance approach compared to approximately 20% for the variable resistance method.

  16. Can we settle with single-band radiometric temperature monitoring during hyperthermia treatment of chestwall recurrence of breast cancer using a dual-mode transceiving applicator?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Svein; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2007-02-01

    The total thermal dose that can be delivered during hyperthermia treatments is frequently limited by temperature heterogeneities in the heated tissue volume. Reliable temperature information on the heated area is thus vital for the optimization of clinical dosimetry. Microwave radiometry has been proposed as an accurate, quick and painless temperature sensing technique for biological tissue. Advantages include the ability to sense volume-averaged temperatures from subsurface tissue non-invasively, rather than with a limited set of point measurements typical of implanted temperature probes. We present a procedure to estimate the maximum tissue temperature from a single radiometric brightness temperature which is based on a numerical simulation of 3D tissue temperature distributions induced by microwave heating at 915 MHz. The temperature retrieval scheme is evaluated against errors arising from unknown variations in thermal, electromagnetic and design model parameters. Whereas realistic deviations from base values of dielectric and thermal parameters have only marginal impact on performance, pronounced deviations in estimated maximum tissue temperature are observed for unanticipated variations of the temperature or thickness of the bolus compartment. The need to pay particular attention to these latter applicator construction parameters in future clinical implementation of the thermometric method is emphasized.

  17. Vesicoureteral reflux in young children: a study of radiometric thermometry as detection modality using an ex vivo porcine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Svein; Klemetsen, Øystein; Birkelund, Yngve

    2012-09-01

    Microwave radiometry is evaluated for renal thermometry tailored to detect the pediatric condition of vesicoureteral urine reflux (VUR) from the bladder through the ureter into the kidney. Prior to a potential reflux event, the urine is heated within the bladder by an external body contacting a hyperthermia applicator to generate a fluidic contrast temperature relative to normal body temperature. A single band, miniaturized radiometer (operating at 3.5 GHz) is connected to an electromagnetic-interference-shielded and suction-coupled elliptical antenna to receive thermal radiation from an ex vivo porcine phantom model. Brightness (radiometric) and fiberoptic temperature data are recorded for varying urine phantom reflux volumes (20-40 mL) and contrast temperatures ranging from 2 to 10 °C within the kidney phantom. The kidney phantom itself is located at 40 mm depth (skin-to-kidney center distance) and surrounded by the porcine phantom. Radiometric step responses to injection of urine simulant by a syringe are shown to be highly correlated with in situ kidney temperatures measured by fiberoptic probes. Statistically, the performance of the VUR detecting scheme is evaluated by error probabilities of making a wrong decision. Laboratory testing of the radiometric system supports the feasibility of passive non-invasive kidney thermometry for the detection of VUR classified within the two highest grades

  18. Effect of radiometric errors on accuracy of temperature-profile measurement by spectral scanning using absorption-emission pyrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    The spectral-scanning method may be used to determine the temperature profile of a jet- or rocket-engine exhaust stream by measurements of gas radiation and transmittance, at two or more wavelengths. A single, fixed line of sight is used, using immobile radiators outside of the gas stream, and there is no interference with the flow. At least two sets of measurements are made, each set consisting of the conventional three radiometric measurements of absorption-emission pyrometry, but each set is taken over a different spectral interval that gives different weight to the radiation from a different portion of the optical path. Thereby, discrimination is obtained with respect to location along the path. A given radiometric error causes an error in computed temperatures. The ratio between temperature error and radiometric error depends on profile shape, path length, temperature level, and strength of line absorption, and the absorption coefficient and its temperature dependency. These influence the choice of wavelengths, for any given gas. Conditions for minimum temperature error are derived. Numerical results are presented for a two-wavelength measurement on a family of profiles that may be expected in a practical case of hydrogen-oxygen combustion. Under favorable conditions, the fractional error in temperature approximates the fractional error in radiant-flux measurement.

  19. Correlation between the radiometric analysis and the surface geology of Abu Zawal area, Central Eastern desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhit, F. S.; Meleik, M. L.; El Taher, M. A.

    Abu Zawal area is located north of the Qena-Safaga road. It consists of igneous and metamorphic rocks of late Precambrian age. It has been subjected to geological, radiometric and structural investigations to reveal the structural setting of the area and its relation to the trends of mineralization, as well as the distribution of the radioactivity in the different rock units. Each rock units has been characterized statistically by a certain radiometric background through the radiometric survey traverses. Application of certain statistical inference tests found the relation between the different rock types of Abu Zawal area and their equivalents in other studied areas. It is found that least radioactivity is associated with basic metavolcanic rocks, while the highest values are associated with the late orogenic plutonites and related rocks, while granodiorites have moderate levels of radioactivity. The study suggests that the late orogenic plutonites of Abu Zawal area may be younger than plutons of similar composition in the north of the Eastern Desert.

  20. Direct radiocarbon dates for Vindija G1 and Velika Pe?ina Late Pleistocene hominid remains

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Fred H.; Trinkaus, Erik; Pettitt, Paul B.; Karavani?, Ivor; Paunovi?, Maja

    1999-01-01

    New accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dates taken directly on human remains from the Late Pleistocene sites of Vindija and Velika Pe?ina in the Hrvatsko Zagorje of Croatia are presented. Hominid specimens from both sites have played critical roles in the development of current perspectives on modern human evolutionary emergence in Europe. Dates of ?28 thousand years (ka) before the present (B.P.) and ?29 ka B.P. for two specimens from Vindija G1 establish them as the most recent dated Neandertals in the Eurasian range of these archaic humans. The human frontal bone from Velika Pe?ina, generally considered one of the earliest representatives of modern humans in Europe, dated to ?5 ka B.P., rendering it no longer pertinent to discussions of modern human origins. Apart from invalidating the only radiometrically based example of temporal overlap between late Neandertal and early modern human fossil remains from within any region of Europe, these dates raise the question of when early modern humans first dispersed into Europe and have implications for the nature and geographic patterning of biological and cultural interactions between these populations and the Neandertals. PMID:10535913

  1. MCMC Radiometric Diameter Uncertainties Applying a Rotating Cratered Thermophysical Model to WISE Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Edward L.; Mainzer, A.

    2014-01-01

    Thermophysical models have many parameters that cannot be determined using infrared observations at a single epoch. But by varying these parameters using a Monte Carlo Markov chain with reasonable prior distributions one can determine the uncertainties in the radiometric diameters introduced by the poorly known parameters: typically the rotation pole and the dimensionless thermal inertia parameter. This MCMC approach has been applied to several asteroids observed by WISE: 2010 AB78, a NEO observed by WISE in 3 epochs, has a well determined rotation pole and a diameter 1.28 +/- 0.03 km with 3 percent precision; 2010 CK9, an MBA observed by WISE in one epoch, has a diameter of 3.46 +/- 0.21 km with 6 percent precision; and 2010 MU112, a very hazardous asteroid with a MOID of 0.0011 AU, C3 = 869 km^2/sec^2, a diameter of 611 +/- 84 meters for 14 percent precision from one WISE epoch at phase angle 62 degrees. The proposed NEOcam mission will achieve a long lifetime using passive cooling and obtain many epochs of IR data on most NEOs, allowing the determination of rotation poles, thermal inertias, and diameters with good precision.

  2. Large-scale clinical comparison of the lysis-centrifugation and radiometric systems for blood culture

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, P.; Kiehn, T.E.

    1985-12-01

    The Isolator 10 lysis-centrifugation blood culture system (E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Inc., Wilmington, Del.) was compared with the BACTEC radiometric method (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.) with 6B and 7D broth media for the recovery of bacteria and yeasts. From 11,000 blood cultures, 1,174 clinically significant organisms were isolated. The Isolator system recovered significantly more total organisms, members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus spp., and yeasts. The BACTEC system recovered significantly more Pseudomonas spp., Streptococcus spp., and anaerobes. Of the Isolator colony counts, 87% measured less than 11 CFU/ml of blood. Organisms, on an average, were detected the same day from each of the two culture systems. Only 13 of the 975 BACTEC isolates (0.01%) were recovered by subculture of growth-index-negative bottles, and 12 of the 13 were detected in another broth blood culture taken within 24 h. Contaminants were recovered from 4.8% of the Isolator 10 and 2.3% of the BACTEC cultures.

  3. Radiometric immunosorbent assay for the detection of anti-hormone-binding protein antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, E.A.; Dame, M.C.; DeLuca, H.F.

    1986-02-15

    A radiometric immunosorbent assay (RISA) for the detection of monoclonal antibodies to hormone-binding proteins has been developed. The assay involves incubating hybridoma supernatants in microtiter wells that have been coated with goat anti-mouse IgG antibodies. Any mouse IgG in the test supernatant is thus specifically retained in the wells. Radioactive ligand-binding protein complexes are then incubated in the wells. The presence of anti-binding protein antibodies in the supernatant is indicated by specific retention of radioactive ligand-binding protein complexes in the wells. Crude antigen preparations, such as tissue homogenates, can be used to detect antibodies. The assay is capable of detecting antibody at concentrations 20 ng/ml (approx. 100 pM IgG). The RISA has been used successfully to screen for monoclonal antibodies to the intracellular receptor for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ and should be useful for the detection of antibodies to ligand-binding proteins in general.

  4. On-orbit radiometric calibration over time and between spacecraft using the moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kieffer, H.H.; Stone, T.C.; Barnes, R.A.; Bender, S.; Eplee, R.E., Jr.; Mendenhall, J.; Ong, L.

    2002-01-01

    The Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) project has developed a spectral irradiance model of the Moon that accounts for variations with lunar phase through the bright half of a month, lunar librations, and the location of an Earth-orbiting spacecraft. The methodology of comparing spacecraft observations of the Moon with this model has been developed to a set of standardized procedures so that comparisons can be readily made. In the cases where observations extend over several years (e.g., SeaWiFS), instrument response degradation has been determined with precision of about 0.1% per year. Because of the strong dependence of lunar irradiance on geometric angles, observations by two spacecraft cannot be directly compared unless acquired at the same time and location. Rather, the lunar irradiance based on each spacecraft instrument calibration can be compared with the lunar irradiance model. Even single observations by an instrument allow inter-comparison of its radiometric scale with other instruments participating in the lunar calibration program. Observations by SeaWiFS, ALI, Hyperion and MTI are compared here.

  5. Interlaboratory drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by a radiometric procedure and two conventional methods

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqi, S.H.; Hawkins, J.E.; Laszlo, A.

    1985-12-01

    A total of 224 recent isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from 163 patients selected to have multidrug resistance were tested against streptomycin (SM), isoniazid, rifampin, and ethambutol (EMB) by the rapid radiometric BACTEC method and two conventional proportion methods: the World Health Organization (WHO) method, using Lowenstein-Jensen medium; and the Veterans Administration reference laboratory for mycobacteria (VA) method, using Middlebrook 7H10 agar medium. The results were compared, focusing on the concentrations of the drugs in all three methods. Among the four drugs tested, most of the discrepancies in measured activity were observed with SM and EMB, generally because of differences in the drug concentrations used by the three methods. A 4-micrograms amount of SM in the BACTEC method was found to be slightly less active than 10 micrograms in the VA method and significantly more active than 4 micrograms of dihydrostreptomycin in the WHO method. With EMB, 2.5 micrograms in BACTEC was similar to 5 micrograms in the VA method and 2 micrograms in the WHO method, while 10 micrograms in the BACTEC method was found to be more active than 10 and 2 micrograms in the VA and WHO methods, respectively. To attain close agreement, drug concentrations used in the BACTEC method should be carefully selected when a comparison is to be made with any conventional method employed in a laboratory. Standardization of in vitro susceptibility testing is greatly needed to achieve uniformity among the test methods used to evaluate tuberculosis therapeutics.

  6. Prelaunch absolute radiometric calibration of the reflective bands on the LANDSAT-4 protoflight Thematic Mapper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L.; Ball, D. L.; Leung, K. C.; Walker, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of the absolute radiometric calibration of the LANDSAT 4 thematic mapper, as determined during pre-launch tests with a 122 cm integrating sphere, are presented. Detailed results for the best calibration of the protoflight TM are given, as well as summaries of other tests performed on the sensor. The dynamic range of the TM is within a few per cent of that required in all bands, except bands 1 and 3. Three detectors failed to pass the minimum SNR specified for their respective bands: band 5, channel 3 (dead), band 2, and channels 2 and 4 (noisy or slow response). Estimates of the absolute calibration accuracy for the TM show that the detectors are typically calibrated to 5% absolute error for the reflective bands; 10% full-scale accuracy was specified. Ten tests performed to transfer the detector absolute calibration to the internal calibrator show a 5% range at full scale in the transfer calibration; however, in two cases band 5 showed a 10% and a 7% difference.

  7. Establishment of a broadband radiometric ground station on the South African east coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Michael J.; Roberts, Lance W.

    2009-08-01

    A radiometric monitoring program for solar irradiance has been initiated on the Howard College campus of the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN) in Durban, South Africa. This paper describes the establishment of the broadband ground station which employs conventional radiometers and a new type of pyranometer shadow band. The ZEBRA (Zonal Exposure to Broadband RAdiation) band consists of a perforated metal strip that permits the separation of direct normal and diffuse irradiance from global data with a single pyranometer. In this paper a time-based model of the new band's shading mask is described. The model is derived from a ray tracing exercise that accounts for ZEBRA geometry and solar position throughout a generic 365-day year. The UKZN facility lies at 29.9° South latitude and is part of a larger test initiative for the new shadow band that includes the NREL Solar Radiation Research Laboratory in Colorado. Data from northern and southern hemisphere test sites are to be used to characterize performance of the band under a range of conditions and for comparison with output from the newly developed model.

  8. Radiometric measurement comparison using the Ocean Color Temperature Scanner (OCTS) visible and near infrared integrating sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.C.; Sakuma, F.; Butler, J.J.; Biggar, S.F.; Cooper, J.W.; Ishida, J.; Suzuki, K.

    1997-11-01

    As part of the pre-flight calibration and validation activities for the Ocean Color and Temperature Scanner (OCTS) and the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) ocean color satellite instruments, a radiometric measurement comparison was held in February 1995 at the NEC Corporation in Yokohama, Japan. Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC), the University of Arizona Optical Sciences Center (UA), and the National Research Laboratory of Metrology (NRLM) in Tsukuba, Japan used their portable radiometers to measure the spectral radiance of the OCTS visible and near-infrared integrating sphere at four radiance levels. These four levels corresponded to the configuration of the OCTS integrating sphere when the calibration coefficients for five of the eight spectral channels, or bands, of the OCTS instrument were determined. The measurements of the four radiometers differed by {minus}2.7% to 3.9% when compared to the NEC calibration of the sphere and the overall agreement was within the combined measurement uncertainties. A comparison of the measurements from the participating radiometers also resulted in agreement within the combined measurement uncertainties. These results are encouraging and demonstrate the utility of comparisons using laboratory calibration integrating sphere sources. Other comparisons will focus on instruments that are scheduled for spacecraft in the NASA study of climate change, the Earth Observing System (EOS).

  9. A Maximum Likelihood Approach to Determine Sensor Radiometric Response Coefficients for NPP VIIRS Reflective Solar Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lei, Ning; Chiang, Kwo-Fu; Oudrari, Hassan; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2011-01-01

    Optical sensors aboard Earth orbiting satellites such as the next generation Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) assume that the sensors radiometric response in the Reflective Solar Bands (RSB) is described by a quadratic polynomial, in relating the aperture spectral radiance to the sensor Digital Number (DN) readout. For VIIRS Flight Unit 1, the coefficients are to be determined before launch by an attenuation method, although the linear coefficient will be further determined on-orbit through observing the Solar Diffuser. In determining the quadratic polynomial coefficients by the attenuation method, a Maximum Likelihood approach is applied in carrying out the least-squares procedure. Crucial to the Maximum Likelihood least-squares procedure is the computation of the weight. The weight not only has a contribution from the noise of the sensor s digital count, with an important contribution from digitization error, but also is affected heavily by the mathematical expression used to predict the value of the dependent variable, because both the independent and the dependent variables contain random noise. In addition, model errors have a major impact on the uncertainties of the coefficients. The Maximum Likelihood approach demonstrates the inadequacy of the attenuation method model with a quadratic polynomial for the retrieved spectral radiance. We show that using the inadequate model dramatically increases the uncertainties of the coefficients. We compute the coefficient values and their uncertainties, considering both measurement and model errors.

  10. Determining irrigation needs of sorghum from two-source energy balance and radiometric temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, J. M.; López-Urrea, R.; Rubio, E.; Caselles, V.

    2011-04-01

    Estimates of surface actual evapotranspiration (ET) can assist in predicting crop water requirements. An alternative to the traditional crop-coefficient methods are the energy balance models. The objective of this research was to show how surface temperature observations can be used, together with a two-source energy balance model, to determine crop water use throughout the different phenological stages of a crop grown. Radiometric temperatures were collected in a sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) field as part of an experimental campaign carried out in Barrax, Spain, during the 2010 summer growing season. Performance of the Simplified Two-Source Energy Balance (STSEB) model was evaluated by comparison of estimated ET with values measured on a weighing lysimeter. Errors of ±0.14 mm h-1 and ±1.0 mm d-1 were obtained at hourly and daily scales, respectively. Accumulated crop water use during the campaign resulted 500 mm versus the total 524 mm measured by the lysimeter. It is then shown that thermal radiometry can provide precise crop water necessities and is a promising tool for irrigation management.

  11. Determining water use of sorghum from two-source energy balance and radiometric temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, J. M.; López-Urrea, R.; Rubio, E.; Caselles, V.

    2011-10-01

    Estimates of surface actual evapotranspiration (ET) can assist in predicting crop water requirements. An alternative to the traditional crop-coefficient methods are the energy balance models. The objective of this research was to show how surface temperature observations can be used, together with a two-source energy balance model, to determine crop water use throughout the different phenological stages of a crop grown. Radiometric temperatures were collected in a sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) field as part of an experimental campaign carried out in Barrax, Spain, during the 2010 summer growing season. Performance of the Simplified Two-Source Energy Balance (STSEB) model was evaluated by comparison of estimated ET with values measured on a weighing lysimeter. Errors of ±0.14 mm h-1 and ±1.0 mm d-1 were obtained at hourly and daily scales, respectively. Total accumulated crop water use during the campaign was underestimated by 5%. It is then shown that thermal radiometry can provide precise crop water necessities and is a promising tool for irrigation management.

  12. Estimation of the cloud transmittance from radiometric measurements at the ground level

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Dario; Mares, Oana

    2014-11-24

    The extinction of solar radiation due to the clouds is more significant than due to any other atmospheric constituent, but it is always difficult to be modeled because of the random distribution of clouds on the sky. Moreover, the transmittance of a layer of clouds is in a very complex relation with their type and depth. A method for estimating cloud transmittance was proposed in Paulescu et al. (Energ. Convers. Manage, 75 690–697, 2014). The approach is based on the hypothesis that the structure of the cloud covering the sun at a time moment does not change significantly in a short time interval (several minutes). Thus, the cloud transmittance can be calculated as the estimated coefficient of a simple linear regression for the computed versus measured solar irradiance in a time interval ?t. The aim of this paper is to optimize the length of the time interval ?t. Radiometric data measured on the Solar Platform of the West University of Timisoara during 2010 at a frequency of 1/15 seconds are used in this study.

  13. Performance and Results from a Space Borne, Uncooled Microbolometer Array Spectral Radiometric Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James M; Scott, V. Stan; Lancaster, Redgie S.; Manizade, Kathrine; Palm, Steven P.

    2000-01-01

    The Infrared Spectral Imaging Radiometer experiment was flown on a space shuttle mission as a shuttle hitchhiker experiment in August of 1997. The goals of the experiment were to test uncooled array detectors for infrared spectral imaging from space and to apply for the first time retrieval from space of brightness temperatures of cloud, land and sea along with direct laser measurements of cloud top height. The instrument operates in 3 narrow and one broad spectral band, all between 7 and 13 microns in either stare or time-delay and integration mode. The nominal spatial resolution was 1/4 kilometer. Using onboard calibrations along with periodic views of deep space, radiometric calibration of imagery was carried out and performance analyzed. The noise equivalent temperature difference and absolute accuracy reported here varied with operating mode, spectral band and scene temperature but were within requirements. This paper provides a description of the instrument, its operating modes, the method of brightness temperature retrieval, the method of spectral registration and results from the flight.

  14. Image processing software for providing radiometric inputs to land surface climatology models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Goetz, Scott J.; Strebel, Donald E.; Hall, Forrest G.

    1989-01-01

    During the First International Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE), 80 gigabytes of image data were generated from a variety of satellite and airborne sensors in a multidisciplinary attempt to study energy and mass exchange between the land surface and the atmosphere. To make these data readily available to researchers with a range of image data handling experience and capabilities, unique image-processing software was designed to perform a variety of nonstandard image-processing manipulations and to derive a set of standard-format image products. The nonconventional features of the software include: (1) adding new layers of geographic coordinates, and solar and viewing conditions to existing data; (2) providing image polygon extraction and calibration of data to at-sensor radiances; and, (3) generating standard-format derived image products that can be easily incorporated into radiometric or climatology models. The derived image products consist of easily handled ASCII descriptor files, byte image data files, and additional per-pixel integer data files (e.g., geographic coordinates, and sun and viewing conditions). Details of the solutions to the image-processing problems, the conventions adopted for handling a variety of satellite and aircraft image data, and the applicability of the output products to quantitative modeling are presented. They should be of general interest to future experiment and data-handling design considerations.

  15. Characterization of the Sonoran desert as a radiometric calibration target for Earth observing sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angal, Amit; Chander, Gyanesh; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Choi, Tae-young; Wu, Aisheng

    2011-01-01

    To provide highly accurate quantitative measurements of the Earth's surface, a comprehensive calibration and validation of the satellite sensors is required. The NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Characterization Support Team, in collaboration with United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation and Science Center, has previously demonstrated the use of African desert sites to monitor the long-term calibration stability of Terra MODIS and Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+). The current study focuses on evaluating the suitability of the Sonoran Desert test site for post-launch long-term radiometric calibration as well as cross-calibration purposes. Due to the lack of historical and on-going in situ ground measurements, the Sonoran Desert is not usually used for absolute calibration. An in-depth evaluation (spatial, temporal, and spectral stability) of this site using well calibrated L7 ETM+ measurements and local climatology data has been performed. The Sonoran Desert site produced spatial variability of about 3 to 5% in the reflective solar regions, and the temporal variations of the site after correction for view-geometry impacts were generally around 3%. The results demonstrate that, barring the impacts due to occasional precipitation, the Sonoran Desert site can be effectively used for cross-calibration and long-term stability monitoring of satellite sensors, thus, providing a good test site in the western hemisphere.

  16. On-ground characterization of Rosetta/VIRTIS-M. II. Spatial and radiometric calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Filacchione, G.; Ammannito, E.; Coradini, A.; Capaccioni, F.; Piccioni, G.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Dami, M.; Barbis, A.

    2006-10-15

    After having considered the spectral and geometrical performances of the Rosetta/VIRTIS-M experiment, we complete here the analysis by evaluating quantitatively the flat-field and radiometric responses. The purpose of this work is to retrieve the flat-field matrix necessary to homogenize the focal plane response. Moreover, the most important result is the determination of the instrument transfer function that allows to convert digital numbers in physical units of spectral radiance (W m{sup -2} {mu}m{sup -1} sterad{sup -1}). The strategy adopted to organize measurement sequence, a basic description of the on-ground experimental setups and the analysis of the collected data, is included in this article. An analysis of the instrumental stability has been performed as well by examining how the internal calibration data are affected by environmental conditions. These data allow to evaluate the cumulative effects of thermal and vibrational stresses on the instrumental performances: up to now we have verified that this effect is negligible. Finally the basic calibration pipeline used to calibrate in-flight data with on-ground parameters is fully described.

  17. Improved detection of tides at Europa with radiometric and optical tracking during flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ryan S.; Bills, Bruce; Buffington, Brent B.; Folkner, William M.; Konopliv, Alexander S.; Martin-Mur, Tomas J.; Mastrodemos, Nickolaos; McElrath, Timothy P.; Riedel, Joseph E.; Watkins, Michael M.

    2015-07-01

    Due to its eccentric orbit about Jupiter, Europa experiences periodic tidal deformation, which causes changes in its gravitational field and induces both radial and transverse displacements of the surface. The amplitude and phase of these tidal changes are diagnostic of internal structure, and can be measured with sufficient radiometric and optical tracking of a spacecraft during a series of flyby encounters with Europa. This paper presents results of the simulated accuracy for recovery of the tides of Europa through measuring the second-degree tidal Love numbers k2, h2, and l2. A reference trajectory, which consists of a total of 45 close flybys, was considered and a detailed covariance analysis was performed. The study was based on Earth-based Doppler tracking during ± 2 h of each periapsis passage and surface imaging data taken below 500 km altitude. The result shows that the formal uncertainty of the second-degree tidal Love numbers can be estimated to be ?k2 = 0.01 , ?h2 = 0.02 , and ?l2 = 0.01 , which is sufficient to constrain the global ice thickness to about 10 km under reasonable assumptions. Moreover, the forced librations of Europa can be measured to 0.3? accuracy, which can further constrain Europa's interior structure.

  18. Revisiting the NEAR mission with radiometric, altimetric and image tracking data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazarico, Erwan; Neumann, Gregory; Rowlands, David; Barnouin, Olivier

    2014-05-01

    The NEAR mission to asteroid 433 Eros in 2000-2001 was the first extended survey of an asteroid. In orbit around Eros for about one year, NEAR acquired a wealth of global and high-resolution data about this Near-Earth Asteroid. The primary geodetic dataset is the radiometric tracking data collected by the NASA Deep Space Network, which have been used to reconstruct the orbits of multiple planetary orbiter missions and determine the gravity field of their target body. However, given the small size of Eros compared to terrestrial bodies, the gravitational environment is relatively weak, and the constraints from Doppler data are not as strong. Altimetric data from the NLR instrument, in the form of altimetric crossovers, were used by the NLR team to support the radio data. Image-based constraints, such as landmark data, were used by the navigation team to provide out-of-plane orbital information. Here, we process the three types of measurements simultaneously. We use the altimetric data not as crossovers, but as direct shot-to-shot distance constraints. We implemented in our GEODYN software both the landmark data type and a constraint on the geometry of image pairs which does not rely on prior accurate knowledge of surface point locations. We present results from this analysis, in terms of spacecraft orbits, gravity field and orientation solution, and shape of 433 Eros.

  19. The absolute radiometric calibration of the advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.; Teillet, P. M.; Ding, Y.

    1988-01-01

    An increasing number of remote sensing investigations require radiometrically calibrated imagery from NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiation (AVHRR) sensors. Although a prelaunch calibration is done for these sensors, there is no capability for monitoring any changes in the in-flight absolute calibration for the visible and near infrared spectral channels. Hence, the possibility of using the reflectance-based method developed at White Sands for in-orbit calibration of LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) and SPOT Haute Resolution Visible (HVR) data to calibrate the AVHRR sensor was investigated. Three diffrent approaches were considered: Method 1 - ground and atmospheric measurements and reference to another calibrated satellite sensor; Method 2 - ground and atmospheric measurements with no reference to another sensor; and Method 3 - no ground and atmospheric measurements but reference to another satellite sensor. The purpose is to describe an investigation on the use of Method 2 to calibrate NOAA-9 AVHRR channels 1 and 2 with the help of ground and atmospheric measurements at Rogers (dry) Lake, Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in the Mojave desert of California.

  20. The absolute radiometric calibration of the advanced very high resolution radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, P. N.; Teillet, P. M.; Mao, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The early results of an absolute radiometric calibration of the NOAA-9 AVHRR sensor indicate significant degradations in the response of bands 1 and 2 compared to prelaunch values. The results are currently in the process of being verified and it may be that refinements of the methodology will be in order as additional data sets are analyzed. The LANDSAT TM calibration used in this approach is known to be very precise and the Herman radiative transfer code, supplemented by the 5-S code for gaseous transmission, is reliable as well. The extent to which other steps in the analysis procedure give rise to uncertainties in the results is currently under investigation. Particular attention is being given to the geometric matching of the AVHRR and TM imagery, as well as to the spectral redistribution procedure. By taking advantage of a reasonably precise calibration of TM imagery acquired on the same day as the AVHRR data at White Sands, a promising approach to the in-orbit calibration of AVHRR sensors is being developed. Current efforts involve primarily the examination of additional test cases and the investigation of possible simplifications in the procedure through judicious use of atmospheric models.

  1. Radiometric calibration stability of the EO-1 advanced land imager: 5 years on-orbit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markham, B.L.; Ong, L.; Barsi, J.A.; Mendenhall, J.A.; Lencioni, D.E.; Helder, D.L.; Hollaren, D.M.; Morfitt, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) was developed as a prototype sensor for follow on missions to Landsat-7. It was launched in November 2000 on the Earth Observing One (EO-1) satellite as a nominal one-year technology demonstration mission. As of this writing, the sensor has continued to operate in excess of 5 years. Six of the ALl's nine multi-spectral (MS) bands and the panchromatic band have similar spectral coverage as those on the Landsat-7 ETM+. In addition to on-board lamps, which have been significantly more stable than the lamps on ETM+, the ALI has a solar diffuser and has imaged the moon monthly since launch. This combined calibration dataset allows understanding of the radiometric stability of the ALI system, its calibrators and some differentiation of the sources of the changes with time. The solar dataset is limited as the mechanism controlling the aperture to the solar diffuser failed approximately 18 months after launch. Results over 5 years indicate that: the shortest wavelength band (443 nm) has degraded in response about 2%; the 482 nm and 565 nm bands decreased in response about 1%; the 660 nm, 790 nm and 868 nm bands each degraded about 5%; the 1250 nm and 1650 nm bands did not change significantly and the 2215 nm band increased in response about 2%.

  2. Estimation of the cloud transmittance from radiometric measurements at the ground level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Dario; Mares, Oana

    2014-11-01

    The extinction of solar radiation due to the clouds is more significant than due to any other atmospheric constituent, but it is always difficult to be modeled because of the random distribution of clouds on the sky. Moreover, the transmittance of a layer of clouds is in a very complex relation with their type and depth. A method for estimating cloud transmittance was proposed in Paulescu et al. (Energ. Convers. Manage, 75 690-697, 2014). The approach is based on the hypothesis that the structure of the cloud covering the sun at a time moment does not change significantly in a short time interval (several minutes). Thus, the cloud transmittance can be calculated as the estimated coefficient of a simple linear regression for the computed versus measured solar irradiance in a time interval ?t. The aim of this paper is to optimize the length of the time interval ?t. Radiometric data measured on the Solar Platform of the West University of Timisoara during 2010 at a frequency of 1/15 seconds are used in this study.

  3. Probability of error and radiometric resolution for target discrimination in radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, V. S.

    1984-01-01

    A straightforward statistical analysis is presented of the problem of discriminating between two distributed targets in a radar image. The probability of making an error is calculated as a function of the target contrast, the number of samples averaged to form each observation, and the system noise. In the absence of system noise, it is observed that a target contrast of 1 dB could not be detected with less than 10 samples averaged; it is also seen that the error probability is sensitive to the number of samples averaged, as expected. Setting the target contrast at the radiometric resolution, a comparison is made of different definitions for this resolution. The comparison shows that each definition yields a different error probability, ranging from less than 0.05 to 0.35. Attention is also given to the effect of system noise, and it is shown that thermal noise does not have a significant effect on the error probability for a fixed target contrast.

  4. Method for radiometric calibration of an endoscope's camera and light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Lav; Higgins, William E.

    2008-03-01

    An endoscope is a commonly used instrument for performing minimally invasive visual examination of the tissues inside the body. A physician uses the endoscopic video images to identify tissue abnormalities. The images, however, are highly dependent on the optical properties of the endoscope and its orientation and location with respect to the tissue structure. The analysis of endoscopic video images is, therefore, purely subjective. Studies suggest that the fusion of endoscopic video images (providing color and texture information) with virtual endoscopic views (providing structural information) can be useful for assessing various pathologies for several applications: (1) surgical simulation, training, and pedagogy; (2) the creation of a database for pathologies; and (3) the building of patient-specific models. Such fusion requires both geometric and radiometric alignment of endoscopic video images in the texture space. Inconsistent estimates of texture/color of the tissue surface result in seams when multiple endoscopic video images are combined together. This paper (1) identifies the endoscope-dependent variables to be calibrated for objective and consistent estimation of surface texture/color and (2) presents an integrated set of methods to measure them. Results show that the calibration method can be successfully used to estimate objective color/texture values for simple planar scenes, whereas uncalibrated endoscopes performed very poorly for the same tests.

  5. Date attachable offline electronic cash scheme.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chun-I; Sun, Wei-Zhe; Hau, Hoi-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Electronic cash (e-cash) is definitely one of the most popular research topics in the e-commerce field. It is very important that e-cash be able to hold the anonymity and accuracy in order to preserve the privacy and rights of customers. There are two types of e-cash in general, which are online e-cash and offline e-cash. Both systems have their own pros and cons and they can be used to construct various applications. In this paper, we pioneer to propose a provably secure and efficient offline e-cash scheme with date attachability based on the blind signature technique, where expiration date and deposit date can be embedded in an e-cash simultaneously. With the help of expiration date, the bank can manage the huge database much more easily against unlimited growth, and the deposit date cannot be forged so that users are able to calculate the amount of interests they can receive in the future correctly. Furthermore, we offer security analysis and formal proofs for all essential properties of offline e-cash, which are anonymity control, unforgeability, conditional-traceability, and no-swindling. PMID:24982931

  6. Date Attachable Offline Electronic Cash Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei-Zhe; Hau, Hoi-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Electronic cash (e-cash) is definitely one of the most popular research topics in the e-commerce field. It is very important that e-cash be able to hold the anonymity and accuracy in order to preserve the privacy and rights of customers. There are two types of e-cash in general, which are online e-cash and offline e-cash. Both systems have their own pros and cons and they can be used to construct various applications. In this paper, we pioneer to propose a provably secure and efficient offline e-cash scheme with date attachability based on the blind signature technique, where expiration date and deposit date can be embedded in an e-cash simultaneously. With the help of expiration date, the bank can manage the huge database much more easily against unlimited growth, and the deposit date cannot be forged so that users are able to calculate the amount of interests they can receive in the future correctly. Furthermore, we offer security analysis and formal proofs for all essential properties of offline e-cash, which are anonymity control, unforgeability, conditional-traceability, and no-swindling. PMID:24982931

  7. A simple and effective radiometric correction method to improve landscape change detection across sensors and across time

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, X.; Vierling, Lee; Deering, D.

    2005-01-01

    Satellite data offer unrivaled utility in monitoring and quantifying large scale land cover change over time. Radiometric consistency among collocated multi-temporal imagery is difficult to maintain, however, due to variations in sensor characteristics, atmospheric conditions, solar angle, and sensor view angle that can obscure surface change detection. To detect accurate landscape change using multi-temporal images, we developed a variation of the pseudoinvariant feature (PIF) normalization scheme: the temporally invariant cluster (TIC) method. Image data were acquired on June 9, 1990 (Landsat 4), June 20, 2000 (Landsat 7), and August 26, 2001 (Landsat 7) to analyze boreal forests near the Siberian city of Krasnoyarsk using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), enhanced vegetation index (EVI), and reduced simple ratio (RSR). The temporally invariant cluster (TIC) centers were identified via a point density map of collocated pixel VIs from the base image and the target image, and a normalization regression line was created to intersect all TIC centers. Target image VI values were then recalculated using the regression function so that these two images could be compared using the resulting common radiometric scale. We found that EVI was very indicative of vegetation structure because of its sensitivity to shadowing effects and could thus be used to separate conifer forests from deciduous forests and grass/crop lands. Conversely, because NDVI reduced the radiometric influence of shadow, it did not allow for distinctions among these vegetation types. After normalization, correlations of NDVI and EVI with forest leaf area index (LAI) field measurements combined for 2000 and 2001 were significantly improved; the r 2 values in these regressions rose from 0.49 to 0.69 and from 0.46 to 0.61, respectively. An EVI "cancellation effect" where EVI was positively related to understory greenness but negatively related to forest canopy coverage was evident across a post fire chronosequence with normalized data. These findings indicate that the TIC method provides a simple, effective and repeatable method to create radiometrically comparable data sets for remote detection of landscape change. Compared to some previous relative radiometric normalization methods, this new method does not require high level programming and statistical skills, yet remains sensitive to landscape changes occurring over seasonal and inter-annual time scales. In addition, the TIC method maintains sensitivity to subtle changes in vegetation phenology and enables normalization even when invariant features are rare. While this normalization method allowed detection of a range of land use, land cover, and phenological/biophysical changes in the Siberian boreal forest region studied here, it is necessary to further examine images representing a wide variety of ecoregions to thoroughly evaluate the TIC method against other normalization schemes. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigation of Madden-Julian waves using a rotating coordinate frame from microwave radiometric measurements 

    E-print Network

    Dossen, Josephus

    1999-01-01

    Ocean, fully mature stage in the maritime continent, and a weakening over the western Pacific followed by dissipation near the International Date Line. These Tb anomalies demonstrate longitudinal, temporal and latitudinal dependence as the features...

  9. Applicant Name: Date of Birth

    E-print Network

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Applicant Name: ID: Date of Birth: Country: Confidential Financial Information Please type or print Hullihen Hall, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716-1501 Name Date of birth Relationship Country Plan

  10. Container #: ______________ Investigator: ________________ Pickup Date: ______________ Lab #: _____________________

    E-print Network

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    Container #: ______________ Investigator: ________________ Pickup Date: ______________ Lab RADIOACTIVE WASTE Environmental Health & Safety Department RADIOACTIVE WASTE TAG Radionuclide Total Activity (mCi) Date Major Chemicals Percentages To submit your request go to: www

  11. Violence in Adolescent Dating Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jouriles, Ernest N.; Platt, Cora; McDonald, Renee

    2009-01-01

    Beginning with a definition of dating and dating violence among adolescents, this article explores the factors which impact such violence. It concludes with a review of two school-based prevention/intervention programs (Safe Dates and The Youth Relationships Project). (Contains 1 table.)

  12. Absolute radiometric calibration of Landsat using a pseudo invariant calibration site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helder, D.; Thome, K.J.; Mishra, N.; Chander, G.; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Angal, A.; Choi, Tae-young

    2013-01-01

    Pseudo invariant calibration sites (PICS) have been used for on-orbit radiometric trending of optical satellite systems for more than 15 years. This approach to vicarious calibration has demonstrated a high degree of reliability and repeatability at the level of 1-3% depending on the site, spectral channel, and imaging geometries. A variety of sensors have used this approach for trending because it is broadly applicable and easy to implement. Models to describe the surface reflectance properties, as well as the intervening atmosphere have also been developed to improve the precision of the method. However, one limiting factor of using PICS is that an absolute calibration capability has not yet been fully developed. Because of this, PICS are primarily limited to providing only long term trending information for individual sensors or cross-calibration opportunities between two sensors. This paper builds an argument that PICS can be used more extensively for absolute calibration. To illustrate this, a simple empirical model is developed for the well-known Libya 4 PICS based on observations by Terra MODIS and EO-1 Hyperion. The model is validated by comparing model predicted top-of-atmosphere reflectance values to actual measurements made by the Landsat ETM+ sensor reflective bands. Following this, an outline is presented to develop a more comprehensive and accurate PICS absolute calibration model that can be Système international d'unités (SI) traceable. These initial concepts suggest that absolute calibration using PICS is possible on a broad scale and can lead to improved on-orbit calibration capabilities for optical satellite sensors.

  13. Ten years of measured UV Index from the Spanish UVB Radiometric Network.

    PubMed

    Utrillas, M P; Marín, M J; Esteve, A R; Estellés, V; Gandía, S; Núnez, J A; Martínez-Lozano, J A

    2013-08-01

    An analysis is made of the UV Index (UVI) obtained from the ultraviolet erythemal solar radiation (UVER) data measured by the Spanish UVB Radiometric Network between the years 2000 and 2009. Previously, the daily UVI has been evaluated using two different criteria: (a) the value corresponding to solar noon; and (b) the daily maximum value. The mean percentage of agreement is 92% if we consider the cases for which the difference is zero or one UVI unit. These results are similar to those obtained in a previous work where only 2 years were analyzed. In all the stations the UVI reaches very high values (8-10) in spring-summer, and the very high and extreme (? 11) UVI values are more dependent on the continental effect than on the latitude effect. From the UVI values it is possible to classify the stations into four groups: Coastal stations, Continental stations (more than 200 km from the coast), Southern stations (Coastal stations but with similar values of UVI as the Continental ones due to their low latitude) and Canary Islands stations (1400 km southwest from the Iberian Peninsula thus lower latitude). The monthly mean maximum of UVI is reached in July due to the annual evolution of the total ozone column. This value corresponds, for a skin phototype II, to three times the minimal erythemal dose (MED) in an hour in a Coastal station, 3.5 MEDs in an hour measured in a Continental or Southern station and up five MEDs in an hour in the Izaña station (Canary Islands). The cumulative dose on a horizontal plane over an average year has been calculated for each station. More than 40% of the annual dose is received in summer, about 35% in spring, more than 11% in autumn and less than 10% in winter except for the stations in the Canary Islands where the difference between seasons is less significant. PMID:23685479

  14. 3D leaf water content mapping using terrestrial laser scanner backscatter intensity with radiometric correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xi; Wang, Tiejun; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Niemann, K. Olaf

    2015-12-01

    Leaf water content (LWC) plays an important role in agriculture and forestry management. It can be used to assess drought conditions and wildfire susceptibility. Terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) data have been widely used in forested environments for retrieving geometrically-based biophysical parameters. Recent studies have also shown the potential of using radiometric information (backscatter intensity) for estimating LWC. However, the usefulness of backscatter intensity data has been limited by leaf surface characteristics, and incidence angle effects. To explore the idea of using LiDAR intensity data to assess LWC we normalized (for both angular effects and leaf surface properties) shortwave infrared TLS data (1550 nm). A reflectance model describing both diffuse and specular reflectance was applied to remove strong specular backscatter intensity at a perpendicular angle. Leaves with different surface properties were collected from eight broadleaf plant species for modeling the relationship between LWC and backscatter intensity. Reference reflectors (Spectralon from Labsphere, Inc.) were used to build a look-up table to compensate for incidence angle effects. Results showed that before removing the specular influences, there was no significant correlation (R2 = 0.01, P > 0.05) between the backscatter intensity at a perpendicular angle and LWC. After the removal of the specular influences, a significant correlation emerged (R2 = 0.74, P < 0.05). The agreement between measured and TLS-derived LWC demonstrated a significant reduction of RMSE (root mean square error, from 0.008 to 0.003 g/cm2) after correcting for the incidence angle effect. We show that it is possible to use TLS to estimate LWC for selected broadleaved plants with an R2 of 0.76 (significance level ? = 0.05) at leaf level. Further investigations of leaf surface and internal structure will likely result in improvements of 3D LWC mapping for studying physiology and ecology in vegetation.

  15. Updated radiometric calibration for the Landsat-5 thematic mapper reflective bands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helder, D.L.; Markham, B.L.; Thome, K.J.; Barsi, J.A.; Chander, G.; Malla, R.

    2008-01-01

    The Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) has been the workhorse of the Landsat system. Launched in 1984, it continues collecting data through the time frame of this paper. Thus, it provides an invaluable link to the past history of the land features of the Earth's surface, and it becomes imperative to provide an accurate radiometric calibration of the reflective bands to the user community. Previous calibration has been based on information obtained from prelaunch, the onboard calibrator, vicarious calibration attempts, and cross-calibration with Landsat-7. Currently, additional data sources are available to improve this calibration. Specifically, improvements in vicarious calibration methods and development of the use of pseudoinvariant sites for trending provide two additional independent calibration sources. The use of these additional estimates has resulted in a consistent calibration approach that ties together all of the available calibration data sources. Results from this analysis indicate a simple exponential, or a constant model may be used for all bands throughout the lifetime of Landsat-5 TM. Where previously time constants for the exponential models were approximately one year, the updated model has significantly longer time constants in bands 1-3. In contrast, bands 4, 5, and 7 are shown to be best modeled by a constant. The models proposed in this paper indicate calibration knowledge of 5% or better early in life, decreasing to nearly 2% later in life. These models have been implemented at the U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) and are the default calibration used for all Landsat TM data now distributed through EROS. ?? 2008 IEEE.

  16. Dates Rponse tudiant Dates Rponse tudiant Dates Rponse tudiant Sciences de la vie (Biologie)

    E-print Network

    Jeanjean, Louis

    Dates Réponse étudiant Dates Réponse étudiant Dates Réponse étudiant Sciences de la vie (Biologie) Parcours Biologie-Ecologie (BE) 19-mai 29-mai 10-juil 20-juil 2-sept 07-sept Parcours Sciences de la vie et vie (Biologie) 24-avr 04-mai Parcours biochimie, biologie cellulaire et physiologie (BBCP) 29-mai 08

  17. Gondwanaland from 650-500 Ma assembly through 320 Ma merger in Pangea to 185-100 Ma breakup: supercontinental tectonics via stratigraphy and radiometric dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veevers, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    Gondwanaland lasted from the 650-500 Ma (late Neoproterozoic-Cambrian) amalgamation of African and South American terranes to Antarctica-Australia-India through 320 Ma (mid-Carboniferous) merging with Laurussia in Pangea to breakup from 185 to 100 Ma (Jurassic and Early Cretaceous). Gondwanaland straddled the equator at 540 Ma, lay wholly in the Southern Hemisphere by 350 Ma, and then rotated clockwise so that at 250 Ma Australia reached the S pole and Africa the equator. By initial breakup of Pangea at 185 Ma, Gondwanaland had moved northward such that North Africa reached 35°N. The first clear picture of Gondwanaland, in the Cambrian, shows the assembly of continents with later Laurentian, European and Asian terranes along the "northern" margin, and with a trench along the "western" and "southern" margins, reflected by a 10,000-km-long chain of 530-500 Ma granites. The interior was crossed by the Prydz-Leeuwin and Mozambique Orogenic Belts. The shoreline lapped the flanks of uplifts generated during this complex terminal Pan-Gondwanaland (650-500 Ma) deformation, which endowed Gondwanaland with a thick, buoyant crust and lithosphere and a nonmarine siliciclastic facies. During the Ordovician, terranes drifted from Africa as the first of many transfers of material to the "northern" continents. Central Australia was crossed by the sea, and the eastern margin and ocean floor were flooded by grains of quartz (and 600-500 Ma zircon) from Antarctica. Ice centres in North Africa and southern South America/Africa waxed and waned in the latest Ordovician, Early Silurian, latest Devonian, and Early Carboniferous. In the mid-Carboniferous, Laurussia and Gondwanaland merged in the composite called Pangea by definitive right-lateral contact along the Variscan suture, with collisional stress and subsequent uplift felt as far afield as Australia. Ice sheets developed on the tectonic uplands of Gondwanaland south of 30°S. In the Early Permian, the self-induced heat beneath Pangea drove the first stage of differential subsidence of the Gondwanaland platform to intercept sediment from the melting ice, then to accumulate coal measures with Glossopteris, and subsequently Early Triassic redbeds. An orogenic zone along the Panthalassan margin propagated from South America to Australia and was terminally deformed in the mid-Triassic. Coal deposition resumed during Late Triassic relaxation in the second stage of Pangean extension. In the Early Jurassic, the vast ˜200 Ma Central Atlantic magmatic province of tholeiite anticipated the 185 Ma breakup in the Central Atlantic. Another magmatic province was erupted at this time between southern Africa and southeastern Australia. The northeastern Indian Ocean opened from 156 Ma, and the western Indian Ocean from 150 Ma. By the 100 Ma mid-Cretaceous, the Gondwanaland province of Pangea had split into its five constituents, and the Earth had entered the thalassocratic state of dispersed continents. The 650-500 Ma "Pan-Gondwanaland" events (? by mafic underplating) rendered Gondwanaland permanently geocratic. Pangean (320-185 Ma) tectonics, driven by pulses of self-induced heat, promoted widespread subsidence at 300 Ma Early Permian and 230 Ma Late Triassic. Pangea initially broke up at 185 Ma and the five continental pieces of Gondwanaland had broken apart by the 100 Ma mid-Cretaceous. Another long-lasting feature of Gondwanaland was subduction beneath the "southern" margin and export of terranes from the "northern" and "northwestern" margins. Export of terranes was promoted by Gondwanaland-induced heat, and internal breakup by Pangea-induced heat.

  18. Breakthrough made in dating of the geological record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgen, F. J.; Krijgsman, W.; Langereis, C. G.; Lourens, L. J.

    Sedimentary cycles reflect climatic oscillations that are ultimately controlled by the Earth's orbital cycles. Therefore, sedimentary cycles can be used to construct astronomical timescales. Using this method, astronomical timescales have been established for the last 12 million years that are more acurate and have a much higher resolution than previous geological timescales. Such timescales are fundamental to an increasing number of applications in many disciplines of Earth science. Researchers are now working to extend the astronomical timescale to earlier time intervals and establish similar time-scales for the continental record. Time is an indispensable tool for Earth scientists striving to understand all kinds of processes and determine rates of change. More than a century ago, just before the invention of radiometric dating, G.K. Gilbert realized that astronomically forced cyclicity in marine sedimentary archives can be used to estimate the duration of parts of the geological record. His estimates suggested that our planet was much older than the 100 million years (or even 20 m.y., by some accounts) that had been calculated by a thermodynamic cooling model of the Earth.

  19. Fission-track dating of volcanically derived sedimentary rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kowallis, B.J.; Heaton, J.S.; Bringhurst, K.

    1986-01-01

    Depositional ages of sedimentary rocks can be determined using fission-track single grain ages on zircons from layers of volcanic ash or bentonite, even when the layers have been contaminated by older grains. This is done by compiling an age probability distribution or age spectrum for a sample from individual grain ages. An age spectrum is a simple and unambiguous way of testing for contamination and extracting useful age information. The youngest peak in the age spectrum approximates the time of deposition. In most contaminated samples, 30 or more grains should be counted to produce a reliable spectrum. However, useful, reproducible ages can be obtained by counting less than 10 grains in samples where most of the older, contaminating grains can be removed. The few older grains that remain after removing the obviously abraded ones may then be eliminated by examining the age spectrum. Although ages determined in this way are probably not precise enough for use in defining stratigraphic boundaries, they still provide a means of obtaining an isotopic age in sediments that cannot be dated by other radiometric methods. 18 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  20. doi: 10.1130/G33634.1 published online 15 October 2012;Geology

    E-print Network

    Harrison, Mark

    radiometric dating techniques (Strutt, 1908), has had a revival as a thermo- chronometer, but it is equally must include the digital object identifier (DOIs) and date of initial publication. priority chronostratigraphy is essential in understanding the timing of human origins, migration, and exchange. Radiometric