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Sample records for radiometry saber kinetic

  1. Errors in Sounding of the Atmosphere Using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) Kinetic Temperature Caused by Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Model Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Comas, Maya; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Bermejo-Pantaleon, D.; Marshall, Benjamin T.; Mertens, Christopher J.; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Gordley, L. L.; Russell, James M.

    2008-01-01

    The vast set of near global and continuous atmospheric measurements made by the SABER instrument since 2002, including daytime and nighttime kinetic temperature (T(sub k)) from 20 to 105 km, is available to the scientific community. The temperature is retrieved from SABER measurements of the atmospheric 15 micron CO2 limb emission. This emission separates from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) conditions in the rarefied mesosphere and thermosphere, making it necessary to consider the CO2 vibrational state non-LTE populations in the retrieval algorithm above 70 km. Those populations depend on kinetic parameters describing the rate at which energy exchange between atmospheric molecules take place, but some of these collisional rates are not well known. We consider current uncertainties in the rates of quenching of CO2 (v2 ) by N2 , O2 and O, and the CO2 (v2 ) vibrational-vibrational exchange to estimate their impact on SABER T(sub k) for different atmospheric conditions. The T(sub k) is more sensitive to the uncertainty in the latter two and their effects depend on altitude. The T(sub k) combined systematic error due to non-LTE kinetic parameters does not exceed +/- 1.5 K below 95 km and +/- 4-5 K at 100 km for most latitudes and seasons (except for polar summer) if the Tk profile does not have pronounced vertical structure. The error is +/- 3 K at 80 km, +/- 6 K at 84 km and +/- 18 K at 100 km under the less favourable polar summer conditions. For strong temperature inversion layers, the errors reach +/- 3 K at 82 km and +/- 8 K at 90 km. This particularly affects tide amplitude estimates, with errors of up to +/- 3 K.

  2. Sounding of the atmosphere using broadband emission radiometry (SABER): sensor design, performance, and lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Steven B.; Jensen, Mark; Jensen, Scott; Hansen, Glen; Zollinger, Lorin; Esplin, Roy; Miller, James B.

    2006-08-01

    The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument, a 10-channel infrared (1.27 - 16.9 μm) radiometer, was launched on the TIMED (Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics) satellite in December 2001 from Vandenburg Air Force Base. SABER is being used to measure earthlimb emissions and to characterize infrared radiation, allowing calculation of cooling rates and determination of composition and temperature profiles in the mesosphere, lower thermosphere, and ionosphere (60-180 km). The SABER telescope is an on-axis Cassegrain design with a picket-fence tuning fork chopper at the first focus and a clamshell re-imager to focus the image on the focal plane. The telescope was designed to reject stray light from the Earth and atmosphere outside the instrument's instantaneous field-of-view (IFOV). The baffle assembly contains a single-axis scan mirror, which permits the 2 km vertical IFOV of each detector to be scanned from the Earth to a 400 km tangent height. The telescope and baffle assembly are cooled to 220 K by a dedicated radiator. The focal plane assembly is cooled to 75 K by a miniature cryogenic refrigerator. Field programmable gate arrays are used to implement state machine algorithms for control and operation of the instrument and subsystems. Although originally designed for a two-year lifetime requirement, the SABER instrument has been in continuous operation since January 2002. This paper discusses the SABER instrument design and innovations developed to achieve the required performance, along with instrument performance and lessons learned from the program.

  3. Kinetic Temperature and Carbon Dioxide from Broadband Infrared Limb Emission Measurements Taken from the TIMED/SABER Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Russell III, James M.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; She, Chiao-Yao; Schmidlin, Francis J.; Goldberg, Richard A.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Wintersteiner, Peter P.; Picard, Richard H.; Winick, Jeremy R.; Xu, Xiaojing

    2008-01-01

    The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) experiment is one of four instruments on NASA's Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite. SABER measures broadband infrared limb emission and derives vertical profiles of kinetic temperature (Tk) from the lower stratosphere to approximately 120 km, and vertical profiles of carbon dioxide (CO2) volume mixing ratio (vmr) from approximately 70 km to 120 km. In this paper we report on SABER Tk/CO2 data in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region from the version 1.06 dataset. The continuous SABER measurements provide an excellent dataset to understand the evolution and mechanisms responsible for the global two-level structure of the mesopause altitude. SABER MLT Tk comparisons with ground-based sodium lidar and rocket falling sphere Tk measurements are generally in good agreement. However, SABER CO2 data differs significantly from TIME-GCM model simulations. Indirect CO2 validation through SABER-lidar MLT Tk comparisons and SABER-radiation transfer comparisons of nighttime 4.3 micron limb emission suggest the SABER-derived CO2 data is a better representation of the true atmospheric MLT CO2 abundance compared to model simulations of CO2 vmr.

  4. Off-axis response measurement of the sounding of the atmosphere using broadband emission radiometry (SABER) telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauder, John L.; Bates, Lynne R.; Dyer, James S.; Esplin, Roy W.; Miles, Duane O.

    2002-09-01

    The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument is a 10-channel earth limb-viewing sensor that measures atmospheric emissions in the spectral range of 1.27 μm to 16.9 μm. SABER is part of NASA's Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) mission, which was successfully launched in December 2001. Uncommon among limb-viewing sensors, SABER employs an on-axis telescope design with reimaging optics to allow for an intermediate field stop and a Lyot stop. Additional stray light protection is achieved by an innovative inner Lyot stop, which is placed conjugate to the secondary obscuration and support structure. Presented in this paper is the off-axis response of SABER as measured in the Terrestrial Black Hole off-axis scatter facility at the Space Dynamics Laboratory. The measurement was made at visible wavelengths; thus, the response is only representative of SABER's short wavelength channels. The measurement validated the stray light design and complemented the APART software model, which predicts that mirror scatter is the dominant stray light mechanism at short wavelengths. In addition, estimates of the mirror bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) were made. The off-axis response measurement indicates that SABER is an exceptional stray light suppression telescope.

  5. Stray light design and analysis of the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauder, John L.; Esplin, Roy W.

    1998-11-01

    The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument is a 10-channel earth limb- viewing sensor that is to measure atmospheric emissions in the spectral range of 1.27 micrometer to 16.9 micrometer. Presented in this paper is the stray light design and analysis of SABER. Unwanted radiation from the earth and atmosphere are suppressed by the use of stray light features that are critical to mission success. These include the use of an intermediate field stop, an inner and outer Lyot stop, and super-polished mirrors. The point source normalized irradiance transmission (PSNIT) curve, which characterizes the sensor's off-axis response, was computed using the stray light analysis program APART. An initial calculation of the non-rejected radiance (NRR) due to emissions and scatter from the earth and atmosphere was made using the PSNIT data. The results indicate that stray light will not impede the mission objectives.

  6. Retrieval of Kinetic Temperature and Carbon Dioxide Abundance from Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium Limb Emission Measurements made by the SABER Experiment on the TIMED Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Wintersteiner, Peter P.; Picard, Richard H.; Winick, Jeremy R.; Gordley, Larry L.; Russell, James M., III

    2002-01-01

    The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) experiment was launched onboard the TIMED satellite in December, 2001. SABER is designed to provide measurements of the key radiative and chemical sources and sinks of energy in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). SABER measures Earth limb emission in 10 broadband radiometer channels ranging from 1.27 micrometers to 17 micrometers. Measurements are made both day and night over the latitude range from 54 deg. S to 87 deg. N with alternating hemisphere coverage every 60 days. In this paper we concentrate on retrieved profiles of kinetic temperature (T(sub k)) and CO2 volume mixing ratio (vmr), inferred from SABER-observed 15 micrometer and 4.3 micrometer limb emissions, respectively. SABER-measured limb radiances are in non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) in the MLT region. The complexity of non-LTE radiation transfer combined with the large volume of data measured by SABER requires new retrieval approaches and radiative transfer techniques to accurately and efficiently retrieve the data products. In this paper we present the salient features of the coupled non-LTE T(sub k)/CO2 retrieval algorithm, along with preliminary results.

  7. Quantitative remineralization evolution kinetics of artificially demineralized human enamel using photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence.

    PubMed

    Hellen, Adam; Mandelis, Andreas; Finer, Yoav; Amaechi, Bennett T

    2011-11-01

    Human molars were subjected to demineralization in acid gel followed by incubation in remineralization solutions without or with fluoride (1 or 1000 ppm). Photothermal radiometry (PTR) and modulated luminescence (LUM) frequency scans were performed prior to and during de/remineralization treatments. Transverse Micro-Radiography (TMR) analysis followed at treatment conclusion to determine mineral loss and lesion depth. The remineralization process illustrated a complex interplay between surface and subsurface mineral deposition, confining the thermal-wave centroid toward the dominating layer. Experimental amplitudes and phases were fitted to a coupled diffuse-photon-density-wave and thermal-wave theoretical model used to quantitatively evaluate evolving changes in thermal and optical properties of de/remineralized enamel lesions. Additional information obtained from the LUM data corroborated the remineralization kinetics affecting the PTR signals. The results pointed to enhanced effectiveness of subsurface lesion remineralization in the presence of fluoride. PMID:21761572

  8. Kinetics of the drying process of an anti-adherent coating using Photothermal Radiometry and Micro-Raman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurtado-Castañeda, D. M.; Fernández, J.; Velázquez, R.; Estévez, M.; Vargas, S.; Rodríguez, R.; Rodríguez, M. E.

    2005-06-01

    The kinetics of the drying process of a new anti-adherent (anti-graffiti) polymeric coating containing organic solvent was determined using Photothermal Radiometry (PTR) and Micro-Raman (μ-R) Spectroscopy. PTR Spectroscopy was used to study, in real time, the kinetics of the drying process in samples protected with coatings with and without anti-adherent molecules. These were applied on a metal and silicon substrates. The PTR spectrum for coating without anti-adherent, shows a single relaxation time, while for coating containing anti-adherent shows two relaxation times corresponding to two different mechanisms: the solvent evaporation and the molecular re-arrangements of the two different molecular species present in the coating; the kinetic of the solvent evaporation is strongly dependent, as expected, on the solvent concentration.

  9. Quantitative evaluation of the kinetics of human enamel simulated caries using photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence.

    PubMed

    Hellen, Adam; Mandelis, Andreas; Finer, Yoav; Amaechi, Bennett T

    2011-07-01

    Photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence (PTR-LUM) is an emerging nondestructive methodology applied toward the characterization and quantification of dental caries. We evaluate the efficacy of PTR-LUM in vitro to detect, monitor, and quantify human enamel caries. Artificial caries are created in extracted human molars (n = 15) using an acidified gel system (pH 4.5) for 10 or 40 days. PTR-LUM frequency scans (1 Hz-1 kHz) are performed before and during demineralization. Transverse microradiography (TMR) analysis, the current gold standard, follows at treatment conclusion to determine the mineral loss and depth of the artificially demineralized lesions. A theoretical model is applied to PTR experimental data to evaluate the changes in optothermophysical properties of demineralized enamel as a function of time. Higher optical scattering coefficients and poorer thermophysical properties are characteristic of the growing demineralized lesions, as verified by TMR, where the generated microporosities of the subsurface lesion confine the thermal-wave centroid. Enhanced optical scattering coefficients of demineralized lesions result in poorer luminescence yield due to scattering of both incident and converted luminescent photons. PTR-LUM sensitivity to changes in tooth mineralization coupled with opto-thermophysical property extraction illustrates the technique's potential for nondestructive quantification of enamel caries. PMID:21806252

  10. Quantitative evaluation of the kinetics of human enamel simulated caries using photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellen, Adam; Mandelis, Andreas; Finer, Yoav; Amaechi, Bennett T.

    2011-07-01

    Photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence (PTR-LUM) is an emerging nondestructive methodology applied toward the characterization and quantification of dental caries. We evaluate the efficacy of PTR-LUM in vitro to detect, monitor, and quantify human enamel caries. Artificial caries are created in extracted human molars (n = 15) using an acidified gel system (pH 4.5) for 10 or 40 days. PTR-LUM frequency scans (1 Hz-1 kHz) are performed before and during demineralization. Transverse microradiography (TMR) analysis, the current gold standard, follows at treatment conclusion to determine the mineral loss and depth of the artificially demineralized lesions. A theoretical model is applied to PTR experimental data to evaluate the changes in optothermophysical properties of demineralized enamel as a function of time. Higher optical scattering coefficients and poorer thermophysical properties are characteristic of the growing demineralized lesions, as verified by TMR, where the generated microporosities of the subsurface lesion confine the thermal-wave centroid. Enhanced optical scattering coefficients of demineralized lesions result in poorer luminescence yield due to scattering of both incident and converted luminescent photons. PTR-LUM sensitivity to changes in tooth mineralization coupled with opto-thermophysical property extraction illustrates the technique's potential for nondestructive quantification of enamel caries.

  11. Quantitative evaluation of simulated human enamel caries kinetics using photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellen, Adam; Mandelis, Andreas; Finer, Yoav; Amaechi, Bennett T.

    2011-03-01

    Photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence (PTR-LUM) is a non-destructive methodology applied toward the detection, monitoring and quantification of dental caries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of PTRLUM to detect incipient caries lesions and quantify opto-thermophysical properties as a function of treatment time. Extracted human molars (n=15) were exposed to an acid demineralization gel (pH 4.5) for 10 or 40 days in order to simulate incipient caries lesions. PTR-LUM frequency scans (1 Hz - 1 kHz) were performed prior to and during demineralization. Transverse Micro-Radiography (TMR) analysis followed at treatment conclusion. A coupled diffusephoton- density-wave and thermal-wave theoretical model was applied to PTR experimental amplitude and phase data across the frequency range of 4 Hz - 354 Hz, to quantitatively evaluate changes in thermal and optical properties of sound and demineralized enamel. Excellent fits with small residuals were observed experimental and theoretical data illustrating the robustness of the computational algorithm. Increased scattering coefficients and poorer thermophysical properties were characteristic of demineralized lesion bodies. Enhanced optical scattering coefficients of demineralized lesions resulted in poorer luminescence yield due to scattering of both incident and converted luminescent photons. Differences in the rate of lesion progression for the 10-day and 40-day samples points to a continuum of surface and diffusion controlled mechanism of lesion formation. PTR-LUM sensitivity to changes in tooth mineralization coupled with opto-thermophysical property extraction illustrates the technique's potential for non-destructive quantification of enamel caries.

  12. Influence of Solar-Geomagnetic Disturbances on SABER Measurements of 4.3 Micrometer Emission and the Retrieval of Kinetic Temperature and Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Winick, Jeremy R.; Picard, Richard H.; Evans, David S.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Wintersteiner, Peter P.; Xu, Xiaojing; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Russell, James M., III

    2008-01-01

    Thermospheric infrared radiance at 4.3 micrometers is susceptible to the influence of solar-geomagnetic disturbances. Ionization processes followed by ion-neutral chemical reactions lead to vibrationally excited NO(+) (i.e., NO(+)(v)) and subsequent 4.3 micrometer emission in the ionospheric E-region. Large enhancements of nighttime 4.3 m emission were observed by the TIMED/SABER instrument during the April 2002 and October-November 2003 solar storms. Global measurements of infrared 4.3 micrometer emission provide an excellent proxy to observe the nighttime E-region response to auroral dosing and to conduct a detailed study of E-region ion-neutral chemistry and energy transfer mechanisms. Furthermore, we find that photoionization processes followed by ion-neutral reactions during quiescent, daytime conditions increase the NO(+) concentration enough to introduce biases in the TIMED/SABER operational processing of kinetic temperature and CO2 data, with the largest effect at summer solstice. In this paper, we discuss solar storm enhancements of 4.3 micrometer emission observed from SABER and assess the impact of NO(+)(v) 4.3 micrometer emission on quiescent, daytime retrievals of Tk/CO2 from the SABER instrument.

  13. Trap State Effects in PbS Colloidal Quantum Dot Exciton Kinetics Using Photocarrier Radiometry Intensity and Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Mandelis, Andreas; Melnikov, Alexander; Sun, Qiming

    2016-06-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) have attracted significant interest for applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices such as photodetectors, light-emitting diodes, and solar cells. However, a poor understanding of charge transport in these nanocrystalline films hinders their practical applications. The photocarrier radiometry (PCR) technique, a frequency-domain photoluminescence method spectrally gated for monitoring radiative recombination photon emissions while excluding thermal infrared photons due to non-radiative recombination, has been applied to PbS CQD thin films for the analysis of charge transport properties. Linear excitation intensity responses of PCR signals were found in the reported experimental conditions. The type and influence of trap states in the coupled PbS CQD thin film were analyzed with PCR temperature- and time-dependent results.

  14. Estimated synoptic distributions of SABER data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingenfelser, G.; Remsberg, E.; Harvey, V.; Grose, W.

    2003-04-01

    The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument aboard the TIMED (Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics) satellite has been obtaining measurements since January 2002. The Version 1.01 Level 2A LTE temperature data have been compared with temperature data obtained by other satellites, lidars, and falling spheres. The agreement between the SABER temperature profiles and those for other data sets indicate that the Version 1.01 SABER LTE temperature versus pressure distributions are suitable to use in dynamical studies of the middle atmosphere through the calculation of winds and potential vorticity. A first step in the calculation of dynamical parameters is to use a sequential estimation technique to obtain synoptic temperature distributions from the asynoptic SABER satellite data. The algorithm that was used in the LIMS data mapping has been updated and applied to the SABER temperature data to generate Fourier coefficients which are output at noon UT for each day as a function of latitude. From these spectral coefficients, synoptic temperature fields are estimated. The estimated data will be compared with assimilated fields in an attempt to further assess the quality of the SABER data.

  15. SABER instrument design update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esplin, Roy W.; Zollinger, Lorin; Batty, J. Clair; Folkman, Steve; Roosta, Mehrdad; Tansock, Joseph J.; Jensen, Mark; Stauder, John; Miller, Jim; Vanek, Michael; Robinson, Don

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the design of a 10-channel infrared (1.27 to 16.9 micrometers ) radiometer instrument known as SABER (sounding of the atmosphere using broadband emission radiometry) that will measure earth-limb emissions from the TIMED (thermosphere- ionosphere-mesosphere energetics and dynamics) satellite. The instrument telescope, designed to reject stray light from the earth and the atmosphere, is an on-axis Cassegrain design with a clam shell reimager and a one-axis scan mirror. The telescope is cooled below 210 K by a dedicated radiator. The focal plane assembly (consisting of a filter array, a detector array, a Lyot stop, and a window) is cooled to 75 K by a miniature cryogenic refrigerator. The conductive heat load on the refrigerator is minimized by a Kevlar support system that thermally isolates the focal plane assembly from the telescope. Kevlar is also used to thermally isolate the telescope from the spacecraft. Instrument responsivity drifts due to changes in telescope and focal plane temperatures as well as other causes are neutralized by an in-flight calibration system. The detector array consists of discrete HgCdTe, InSb, and InGaAs detectors. Two InGaAs detectors are a new long wavelength type, made by EG&G, that have a long wavelength cutoff of 2.33 micrometers at 77 K.

  16. Validation of the global distribution of CO2 volume mixing ratio in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere from SABER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezac, L.; Jian, Y.; Yue, J.; Russell, J. M.; Kutepov, A.; Garcia, R.; Walker, K.; Bernath, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on board the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics satellite has been measuring the limb radiance in 10 broadband infrared channels over the altitude range from ~ 400 km to the Earth's surface since 2002. The kinetic temperatures and CO2 volume mixing ratios (VMRs) in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere have been simultaneously retrieved using SABER limb radiances at 15 and 4.3 µm under nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) conditions. This paper presents results of a validation study of the SABER CO2 VMRs obtained with a two-channel, self-consistent temperature/CO2 retrieval algorithm. Results are based on comparisons with coincident CO2 measurements made by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier transform spectrometer (ACE-FTS) and simulations using the Specified Dynamics version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (SD-WACCM). The SABER CO2 VMRs are in agreement with ACE-FTS observations within reported systematic uncertainties from 65 to 110 km. The annual average SABER CO2 VMR falls off from a well-mixed value above ~80 km. Latitudinal and seasonal variations of CO2 VMRs are substantial. SABER observations and the SD-WACCM simulations are in overall agreement for CO2 seasonal variations, as well as global distributions in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Not surprisingly, the CO2 seasonal variation is shown to be driven by the general circulation, converging in the summer polar mesopause region and diverging in the winter polar mesopause region.

  17. SABER Optical Design

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.; Bane, K.; Emma, P.; Nosochkov, y.; /SLAC

    2006-07-07

    SABER, the South Arc Beam Experimental Region, is a proposed new beam line facility designed to replace the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC. In this paper, we outline the optical design features and beam parameters now envisioned for SABER. A magnetic chicane to compress positron bunches for SABER and a bypass line that could transport electrons or positrons from the two-thirds point of the linac to SABER, bypassing the LCLS systems, are also discussed.

  18. On the weighting of SABER temperature profiles for comparison with ground based hydroxyl rotational temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, William; Mulligan, Frank

    2010-05-01

    Kinetic temperature profiles are retrieved from limb-emission radiance measurements of CO2 at 15 and 4.3 um by the SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) instrument on the TIMED (Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics) satellite. Profiles extend from about 20-120km and measurements are available since the spacecraft launch in Dec-2001. Hydroxyl (6-2) band rotational temperatures are measured using a ground-based scanning spectrometer at Davis station, Antarctica (68°S, 78°E). Measurements are available each year since 1995 on nights between early February and late October, when the sun is more than 6° below the horizon. In order to compare temperatures from these two instruments we must derive hydroxyl layer equivalent temperatures for the SABER profiles using a weighting function which represents the hydroxyl layer profile. In this study, we examine a number of different weighting profiles to determine the best equivalent to hydroxyl nightly average temperatures at Davis. These profiles include (1) the customary Gaussian peaked at 87km and width 8km [Baker and Stair, 1988 :Physica Scripta. 37 611-622], (2) the layer profile derived from WINDIIUARS hydroxyl height profiles [She and Lowe, 1998 :JASTP 60, 1573-1583], (3) layer profiles derived from the hydroxyl volume emission rate (VER) from the SABER OH-B channel at 1.6um, which contains the Meinel OH(4-2) and OH(5-3) bands and (4) a Gaussian fitted to the SABER hydroxyl VER peak. The comparison is made with approximately 2500 SABER retrievals from overpasses within 500km of Davis station, and with solar zenith angle >97°, which have coincident hydroxyl temperature measurements over the 8 winters between 2002 and 2009. Due to the satellite 60 day yaw cycle the sampling over Davis has occurred in approximately the same three time intervals each year; between days 75-140, 196-262 and 323-014, however the latter interval is entirely rejected on the solar zenith

  19. Theory of zone radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, R. C.; Audeh, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    A spectroscopic instrumentation system was developed which was used to measure temperature and concentration distributions in axisymmetric and two dimensional combusting flows. This measurement technique is known as zone radiometry.

  20. Analysis of the February 2002 stratospheric warming using SABER data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grose, W.; Lingenfelser, G.; Remsberg, E.; Harvey, V.

    2003-04-01

    The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument began acquiring data in January 2002. Version 1.01 Level 2A LTE temperature data have been compared with various correlative data sources (e.g. satellites, lidar, and falling spheres). These results generally show good agreement in the stratosphere. Synoptic temperature distributions are being generated from the SABER data using a sequential estimation technique which was developed for the use with the Nimbus 7 LIMS data. From these temperature distributions, corresponding synoptic fields of geopotential height and geostrophic winds can be obtained. The evolution of the lower stratosphere of the Northern Hemisphere during the warming of February 2002 will be analyzed using these SABER data and compared with a similar analysis using assimilated data.

  1. Stray-light analysis of the SABER telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauder, John; Esplin, Roy W.; Zollinger, Lorin; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Russell, James M.; Gordley, Larry L.; Marshall, Tom

    1995-09-01

    The stray light analysis of the sounding of the atmosphere using broadband emission radiometry (SABER) instrument on the thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere energetics and dynamics (TIMED) mission is discussed. Relevant mission objectives and operating conditions are stated to define the stray light problem. Since SABER is an earth limb viewing sensor, the telescope must be designed for large off-axis rejection. Described are the key design features which make the instrument well suited for its mission. Representative point source transmittance (PST) curves computed using the commercial stray light program APART are presented. Nonrejected radiance (NRR) values computed using APART generated PST curves and LINEPACK generated curves for the total radiance from the earth and the atmosphere are given. A method for computing NRR from the earth and the atmosphere using line-of-sight radiance profiles versus tangent height is described. Computed NRR values demonstrate that the effect of stray light on SABER's measurement capability is negligible.

  2. Fourteen Years of Atomic Hydrogen from SABER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, L. A.; Mlynczak, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    We present results for atomic hydrogen in the mesopause region (80-100 km) derived from measurements made by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the TIMED satellite. SABER has been measuring the vertical distribution of infrared radiation emitted by various atmospheric gases for nearly 14 years, providing important information about chemical species, including atomic oxygen, atomic hydrogen, ozone and hydroxyl; temperature; and the radiation budget in the upper atmosphere. The methodology for the derivation of daytime and nighttime concentrations and volume mixing ratios will be presented. Zonal mean and global average daytime and nighttime concentrations of H, which demonstrate excellent agreement between 87 and 95 km, have been calculated and the results are compared with observations from the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) satellite made nearly 30 years ago. Variability over the course of the SABER mission will be shown, including the apparent inverse dependence on the solar cycle, which stems from the temperature dependence of various reaction rate coefficients for H photochemistry. Results for H near solar max will be compared for Solar Cycles 23 and 24.

  3. Assessment of the Quality of the Version 1.07 Temperature-Versus-Pressure Profiles of the Middle Atmosphere from TIMED/SABER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.; Marshall, B. T.; Garcia-Comas, M.; Krueger, D.; Lingenfelser, G. S.; Martin-Torres, J.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Russell, J. M., III; Smith, A. K.; Zhao, Y.; Brown, C.; Gordley, L. L.; Lopez-Gonzalez, M. J.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; She, C.-Y.; Taylor, M. J.; Thompson, R. E.

    2008-01-01

    The quality of the retrieved temperature-versus-pressure (or T(p)) profiles is described for the middle atmosphere for the publicly available Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) Version 1.07 (V1.07) data set. The primary sources of systematic error for the SABER results below about 70 km are (1) errors in the measured radiances, (2) biases in the forward model, and (3) uncertainties in the corrections for ozone and in the determination of the reference pressure for the retrieved profiles. Comparisons with other correlative data sets indicate that SABER T(p) is too high by 1-3 K in the lower stratosphere but then too low by 1 K near the stratopause and by 2 K in the middle mesosphere. There is little difference between the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) algorithm results below about 70 km from V1.07 and V1.06, but there are substantial improvements/differences for the non-LTE results of V1.07 for the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere (UMLT) region. In particular, the V1.07 algorithm uses monthly, diurnally averaged CO2 profiles versus latitude from the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model. This change has improved the consistency of the character of the tides in its kinetic temperature (T(sub k)). The T(sub k) profiles agree with UMLT values obtained from ground-based measurements of column-averaged OH and O2 emissions and of the Na lidar returns, at least within their mutual uncertainties. SABER T(sub k) values obtained near the mesopause with its daytime algorithm also agree well with the falling sphere climatology at high northern latitudes in summer. It is concluded that the SABER data set can be the basis for improved, diurnal-to-interannual-scale temperatures for the middle atmosphere and especially for its UMLT region.

  4. Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry observations of daytime mesospheric O2(1Δ) 1.27 μm emission and derivation of ozone, atomic oxygen, and solar and chemical energy deposition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Marshall, B. Thomas; Martin-Torres, F. Javier; Russell, James M.; Thompson, R. Earl; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Gordley, Larry L.

    2007-08-01

    We report observations of the daytime O2(1Δ) airglow emission at 1.27 μm recorded by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the NASA Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite. The measured limb radiances are inverted to yield vertical profiles of the volume emission rate of energy from the O2 molecule. From these emission rates we subsequently derive the mesospheric ozone concentrations using a nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) radiative and kinetic model. Rates of energy deposition due to absorption of ultraviolet radiation in the Hartley band of ozone are also derived, independent of knowledge of the ozone abundance and solar irradiances. Atomic oxygen concentrations are obtained from the ozone abundance using photochemical steady state assumptions. Rates of energy deposition due to exothermic chemical reactions are also derived. The data products illustrated here are from a test day (4 July 2002) of SABER Version 1.07 data which are now becoming publicly available. This test day illustrates the high quality of the SABER O2(1Δ) airglow and ozone data and the variety of fundamental science questions to which they can be applied.

  5. Microwave radiometry and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polívka, Jiří

    1995-09-01

    The radiometry in general is a method of detecting the radiation of matter. All material bodies and substances radiate energy in the form of electromagnetic waves according to Planck s Law. The frequency spectrum of such thermal radiation is determined, beyond the properties of a blackbody, by the emissivity of surfaces and by the temperature of a particular body. Also, its reflectivity and dispersion take part. Investigating the intensity of radiation and its spectral distribution, one may determine the temperature and characterize the radiating body as well as the ambient medium, all independently of distance. With the above possibilities, the radiometry represents a base of scientific method called remote sensing. Utilizing various models, temperature of distant bodies and images of observed scenes can be determined from the spatial distribution of radiation. In this method, two parameters are of paramount importance: the temperature resolution, which flows out from the detected energy, and the spatial resolution (or, angular resolution), which depends upon antenna size with respect to wavelength. An instrument usable to conduct radiometric observations thus consists of two basic elements: a detector or radiometer, which determines the temperature resolution, and an antenna which determines the angular or spatial resolution. For example, a photographic camera consists of an objective lens (antenna) and of a sensitive element (a film or a CCD). In remote sensing, different lenses and reflectors and different sensors are employed, both adjusted to a particular spectrum region in which certain important features of observed bodies and scenes are present: frequently, UV and IR bands are used. The microwave radiometry utilizes various types of antennas and detectors and provides some advantages in observing various scenes: the temperature resolution is recently being given in milikelvins, while the range extends from zero to millions of Kelvins. Microwaves also offer

  6. Radiometry spot measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Harry H.; Lawn, Stephen J.

    1994-01-01

    The radiometry spot measurement system (RSMS) has been designed for use in the Diffusive And Radiative Transport in Fires (DARTFire) experiment, currently under development at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The RSMS can measure the radiation emitted from a spot of specific size located on the surface of a distant radiation source within a controlled wavelength range. If the spot is located on a blackbody source, its radiation and temperature can be measured directly or indirectly by the RSMS. This report presents computer simulation results used to verify RSMS performance.

  7. Cementum on Smilodon sabers.

    PubMed

    Riviere, Holliston L; Wheeler, H Todd

    2005-07-01

    The maxillary canines of Smilodon californicus Bovard, 1907 have a deeply curved cementoenamel junction. The gingiva of modern cats is attached to the tooth at the cementoenamel junction and provides tactile and other dental information to the animal. The presence of cementum at the cervix of the maxillary canines, also called sabers, would indicate that the gingiva in Smilodon was attached in this region. Such an attachment would be advantageous, providing stability and sensory input for the large tooth. Also, gingiva at the cervix would impact the manner in which the teeth were used. Previous study using scanning electron microscopy of dental casts was indirect. The purpose of this study was to confirm by direct methods the presence of cementum at the cervix of Smilodon californicus sabers. Parts of three Smilodon californicus sabers were sectioned and examined with light and scanning electron microscopy (EDS). In addition, percent weight of calcium and phosphorus was measured in enamel, dentin, and cementum using electron dispersive spectroscopy. Cementum was identified in the cervical region of each saber. Spectroscopy confirmed that the tissue is calcified and the mineral is hydroxyapatite. Percent calcium and percent phosphorus of individual tissues were highly variable between specimens. However, the ratios of calcium to phosphorus were not significantly different from the hydroxyapatite standard. In the future, bite models will have to take the presence of soft tissues into account. PMID:15942954

  8. Landsat Radiometry Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This final report summarizes three years of work characterizing the radiometry of the Landsat 4, 5 and 7 Thematic Mappers. It is divided into six sections that are representative of the major areas of effort: 1) Internal Calibrator Lamp Monitoring; 2) Vicarious Calibration; 3) Relative Gain Analysis; 4) Outgassing; 5) Landsat 4 Absolute Calibration; and 6) Landsat 5 Scene Invariant Analysis. Each section provides a summary overview of the work that has been performed at SDSU. Major results are highlighted. In several cases, references are given to publications that have developed from this work, Several team members contributed to this report: Tim Ruggles, Dave Aaron, Shriharsha Madhavan, Esad Micijevic, Cory Mettler, and Jim Dewald. At the end of the report is a summary section.

  9. Hemispheric Differences and Evolution of the Cold Summer Mesopause Observed by the SABER Experiment on the TIMED Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, J. M.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Mertens, C. J.; Gordley, L. L.; Picard, R. H.; Winick, J.; Wintersteiner, P.; Garcia, R.; Siskind, D. E.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Remsberg, E. E.; Baker, D.

    2004-12-01

    The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) experiment was launched on December 7, 2001 into a 74.1 degree inclined, 625 km orbit onboard the TIMED satellite. The primary science goal of SABER is to achieve major advances in understanding the structure, energetics, chemistry, and dynamics in the atmospheric region extending from 60 to 180 km altitude. SABER has been operating almost continuously since activation using the space flight proven experiment approach of spectral broadband limb emission radiometry applied in 10 selected infrared spectral bands ranging from 1.27 micrometers to 17 micrometers wavelength. Observed limb emission profiles are being processed on the ground to provide vertical profiles with 2 km altitude resolution of key constituents, energetics parameters and temperature. Measurements are made both night and day over the latitude range from 52 degrees to 83 degrees with alternating hemisphere coverage every 60 days. During the time SABER has been operating, there have been two major solar storms in April 2002 and October 2003. The temporal and geographic coverage provided by SABER has provided path finding observations on the atmospheric effects of these events. In addition, the battery of measurements made by SABER has yielded new information on atmospheric energetics effects including radiative cooling due to the 15 micrometer band of CO2 and the persistence of heating due to exothermic chemical reactions. SABER observations have also provided new information on the mesopause latitudinal structure and evolution and have revealed the presence of a two-day wave in the mesopause region that previously was known only through modeling. Further, the data have shed light on the global distribution of the effects of nitric oxide vertical descent into the upper stratosphere and on the variability of atomic oxygen. This paper summarizes the major scientific results from SABER up to now using illustrative examples.

  10. Digital Receiver for Microwave Radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellingson, Steven W.; Hampson, Grant A.; Johnson, Joel T.

    2005-01-01

    A receiver proposed for use in L-band microwave radiometry (for measuring soil moisture and sea salinity) would utilize digital signal processing to suppress interfering signals. Heretofore, radio frequency interference has made it necessary to limit such radiometry to a frequency band about 20 MHz wide, centered at .1,413 MHz. The suppression of interference in the proposed receiver would make it possible to expand the frequency band to a width of 100 MHz, thereby making it possible to obtain greater sensitivity and accuracy in measuring moisture and salinity

  11. Multibaseline gravitational wave radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Talukder, Dipongkar; Bose, Sukanta; Mitra, Sanjit

    2011-03-15

    We present a statistic for the detection of stochastic gravitational wave backgrounds (SGWBs) using radiometry with a network of multiple baselines. We also quantitatively compare the sensitivities of existing baselines and their network to SGWBs. We assess how the measurement accuracy of signal parameters, e.g., the sky position of a localized source, can improve when using a network of baselines, as compared to any of the single participating baselines. The search statistic itself is derived from the likelihood ratio of the cross correlation of the data across all possible baselines in a detector network and is optimal in Gaussian noise. Specifically, it is the likelihood ratio maximized over the strength of the SGWB and is called the maximized-likelihood ratio (MLR). One of the main advantages of using the MLR over past search strategies for inferring the presence or absence of a signal is that the former does not require the deconvolution of the cross correlation statistic. Therefore, it does not suffer from errors inherent to the deconvolution procedure and is especially useful for detecting weak sources. In the limit of a single baseline, it reduces to the detection statistic studied by Ballmer [Classical Quantum Gravity 23, S179 (2006).] and Mitra et al.[Phys. Rev. D 77, 042002 (2008).]. Unlike past studies, here the MLR statistic enables us to compare quantitatively the performances of a variety of baselines searching for a SGWB signal in (simulated) data. Although we use simulated noise and SGWB signals for making these comparisons, our method can be straightforwardly applied on real data.

  12. Energetics of the Thermosphere in Polar Regions Observed by SABER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, L. A.; Mlynczak, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on NASA's TIMED satellite has been measuring the vertical distribution of infrared radiation emitted by various atmospheric gases for nearly 14 years, providing important information about chemical species, including atomic oxygen, hydrogen, ozone and hydroxyl; temperature; and the radiation budget in the upper atmosphere. From these measurements, the infrared power and energy radiated by nitric oxide (NO) at 5.3 µm and carbon dioxide (CO2) at 15 µm have been computed. These infrared emissions have been shown to be a mechanism for the dissipation of the atmospheric heating that results from geoeffective solar storm energy, serving as a natural thermostat to cool the atmosphere to pre-storm conditions. We present the response in the polar region to several storm events that have occurred during the SABER mission, including the location of maximum response and a comparison of the relative NO and CO2 cooling that occurred, since they are each driven by different factors.

  13. Simultaneous retrieval of T(p) and CO2 VMR from two-channel non-LTE limb radiances and application to daytime SABER/TIMED measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezac, L.; Kutepov, A.; Russell, J. M.; Feofilov, A. G.; Yue, J.; Goldberg, R. A.

    2015-08-01

    The kinetic temperature, Tk, and carbon dioxide, CO2 density, are key parameters that characterize the energetics and dynamics of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region. The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on-board the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite has been providing global, simultaneous measurements of limb radiance in 10 spectral channels continuously since late January 2002. In this paper we (1) present a methodology for a self-consistent simultaneous retrieval of temperature/pressure, Tk(p), and CO2 volume mixing ratio (VMR) from the broadband infrared limb measurements in the 15 and 4.3 μm channels, and (2) qualitatively describe the first results on the CO2 VMR and Tk obtained from application of this technique to the SABER 15 and 4.3 μm channels, including issues, which demand additional constraints to be applied. The self-consistent two-channel retrieval architecture updates parameters at all altitudes simultaneously, and it is built upon iterative switching between two retrieval modules, one for CO2 and one for Tk. A detailed study of sensitivity, stability and convergence was carried out to validate the algorithm. The Tk/CO2 VMR distribution can be reliably retrieved without biases connected with this non-linear inverse problem starting with an initial guess as far as ±20% of CO2 VMR and ±15 K from the solution (as global shift, or somewhat larger if only local deviations are considered). In polar summer toward high latitudes the retrieved CO2 VMR profile shows a local peak around 90 km. We discuss details of this feature and show that: (a) it is not an algorithm artifact or instability, (b) additional a priori constraints are needed in order to obtain a physical profile and to remove this peak, and (c) several possibilities are explored as to uncover the real cause of this feature, but no firm conclusion can be reached at this time. This

  14. Conditions for PMC formation in 2002-2008 estimated from TIMED/SABER measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofilov, Artem; Goldberg, Richard A.; Kutepov, Alexander; Pesnell, William

    In this work, mesospheric temperature, pressure, and water vapor concentration measured by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on board the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satel-lite are used to estimate the probability of the polar mesospheric ice clouds (PMC) formation for the summer periods of 2002-2008. We show the zonal averages of the PMC probability distri-butions and estimated PMC heights for both hemispheres and compare them to ground-based and satellite observations.

  15. Increasing carbon dioxide concentration in the upper atmosphere observed by SABER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Jia; Russell, James; Jian, Yongxiao; Rezac, Ladislav; Garcia, Rolando; López-Puertas, Manuel; Mlynczak, Martin G.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon dioxide measurements made by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument between 2002 and 2014 were analyzed to reveal the rate of increase of CO2 in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The CO2 data show a trend of ~5% per decade at ~80 km and below, in good agreement with the tropospheric trend observed at Mauna Loa. Above 80 km, the SABER CO2 trend is larger than in the lower atmosphere, reaching ~12% per decade at 110 km. The large relative trend in the upper atmosphere is consistent with results from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). On the other hand, the CO2 trend deduced from the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model remains close to 5% everywhere. The spatial coverage of the SABER instrument allows us to analyze the CO2 trend as a function of latitude for the first time. The trend is larger in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere mesopause above 80 km. The agreement between SABER and ACE-FTS suggests that the rate of increase of CO2 in the upper atmosphere over the past 13 years is considerably larger than can be explained by chemistry-climate models.

  16. An Overview and Science Results from the SABER Experiment on the TIMED Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, J. M.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Gordley, L. L.; Mertens, C. J.; Picard, R.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Siskind, D. E.; Baker, D.; Ulwick, J.; Remsberg, E. E.; Winick, J.; Wintersteiner, P.; Espy, P.; Garcia, R.; Roble, R. G.; Solomon, S.

    2002-12-01

    TThe Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) experiment was launched onboard the TIMED satellite by a Delta II rocket at 7:07:35 am PST on December 7, 2001 from the Western Test Range. The satellite was placed in a 74.1°inclined, 625 km orbit. The primary science goal of SABER is to achieve major advances in understanding the structure, energetics, chemistry, and dynamics in the atmospheric region extending from 60 to 180 km altitude. The SABER instrument is a 10-channel limb scanning infrared emission radiometer that provides radiance profiles in selected spectral bands ranging from 1.27 μm to 17 μm wavelength. The observed radiance profiles are processed on the ground to provide vertical profiles with 2 km altitude resolution of the following: temperature, O3, H2O, and CO2 mixing ratios; volume emission rates due to O2 (1 Δ), OH (υ = 3,4,5), OH (υ = 7,8,9), and NO; key atmospheric cooling rates, solar heating rates, chemical heating rates, and airglow losses; atomic oxygen, atomic hydrogen and geostrophic winds. Measurements are made both night and day over the latitude range from 54°S to 87°N with alternating hemispheric coverage every 60 days. This paper provides an experiment overview, orbital performance, example data products, and comparisons with correlative observations. Key science highlights will be described.

  17. Large-Scale Waves in the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere Observed by SABER.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Rolando R.; Lieberman, Ruth; Russell, James M., III; Mlynczak, Martin G.

    2005-12-01

    Observations made by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on board NASA’s Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite have been processed using Salby’s fast Fourier synoptic mapping (FFSM) algorithm. The mapped data provide a first synoptic look at the mean structure and traveling waves of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) since the launch of the TIMED satellite in December 2001. The results show the presence of various wave modes in the MLT, which reach largest amplitude above the mesopause and include Kelvin and Rossby gravity waves, eastward-propagating diurnal oscillations (“non-sun-synchronous tides”), and a set of quasi-normal modes associated with the so-called 2-day wave. The latter exhibits marked seasonal variability, attaining large amplitudes during the solstices and all but disappearing at the equinoxes. SABER data also show a strong quasi-stationary Rossby wave signal throughout the middle atmosphere of the winter hemisphere; the signal extends into the Tropics and even into the summer hemisphere in the MLT, suggesting ducting by westerly background zonal winds. At certain times of the year, the 5-day Rossby normal mode and the 4-day wave associated with instability of the polar night jet are also prominent in SABER data.

  18. Microwave radiometry over Titan's seas and lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, A. A.; Janssen, M. A.; Encrenaz, P.; Lunine, J. I.; Lorenz, R. D.; Hayes, A.; Fernandez, L. I.; Ries, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    In its passive, or radiometry, mode of operation, the Cassini Radar measures the microwave thermal emission from the surface at a wavelength of 2.2 cm. In doing so, it provides unique insight into surface properties of Saturn's largest moon Titan such as physical temperature, overall composition and structure (roughness, heterogeneity...). To date, almost the whole surface of Titan has been mapped by the Cassini Radiometer , whose calibration has been recently refined resulting in an unprecedented accuracy of about 1%. The measured brightness temperatures have also been referenced to the same epoch (i.e. 2005 based on CIRS observations of seasonal surface temperature variations) and to normal incidence. This allows the use of measurements performed at different epochs and with different observational geometries to compare the emissivities of different geological units on Titan. In particular, comparison of radiometry data acquired over Titan's seas and lakes at different places and times should provide clues to their composition and potential seasonal variations. In this paper, we will mainly focus on the radiometry data collected over the northern seas Ligeia Mare and Kraken Mare and the southern lake Ontario Lacus. These three features have been observed several times over the course of the Cassini mission, both in SAR-radiometry and altimetry-radiometry modes of operation. In all cases, assuming no evaporative cooling, radiometry data point to a dielectric constant of about 1.70×0.25, consistent with liquid hydrocarbons. Comparison of radiometry at sea with nearby onshore measurements may allow us to detect evaporative cooling. This will be investigated and further discussed.

  19. Thermodynamic temperature by primary radiometry.

    PubMed

    Anhalt, Klaus; Machin, Graham

    2016-03-28

    Above the freezing temperature of silver (1234.93 K), the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) gives a temperature, T90, in terms of a defining fixed-point blackbody and Planck's law of thermal radiation in ratio form. Alternatively, by using Planck's law directly, thermodynamic temperature can be determined by applying radiation detectors calibrated in absolute terms for their spectral responsivity. With the advent of high-quality semiconductor photodiodes and the development of high-accuracy cryogenic radiometers during the last two decades radiometric detector standards with very small uncertainties in the range of 0.01-0.02% have been developed for direct, absolute radiation thermometry with uncertainties comparable to those for the realization of the ITS-90. This article gives an overview of a number of design variants of different types of radiometer used for primary radiometry and describes their calibration. Furthermore, details and requirements regarding the experimental procedure for obtaining low uncertainty thermodynamic temperatures with these radiometers are presented, noting that such radiometers can also be used at temperatures well below the silver point. Finally, typical results obtained by these methods are reviewed. PMID:26903102

  20. SABER-School Finance: Data Collection Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Elizabeth; Patrinos, Harry; Rogers, Halsey

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the SABER-school finance initiative is to collect, analyze and disseminate comparable data about education finance systems across countries. SABER-school finance assesses education finance systems along six policy goals: (i) ensuring basic conditions for learning; (ii) monitoring learning conditions and outcomes; (iii) overseeing…

  1. Characterization of the bruise healing process using pulsed photothermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidovič, Luka; Milanič, Matija; Randeberg, Lise L.; Majaron, Boris

    2013-06-01

    An analytical model of mass diffusion and biochemical transformation kinetics in bruise development and healing process was recently developed in order to simulate bruised skin color at various time points and enable objective determination of the time of injury. However, parameters of the model were not determined directly. Instead, biologically plausable values were applied in prior analyses. Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) allows noninvasive determination of the laser-induced temperature depth profile in human skin. We have applied this technique to characterize dynamics of extravasated hemoglobin concentration profile evolution. By applying Monte Carlo simulation of laser energy deposition and simulation of PPTR signal, a more exact comparison with measured temperature profiles is possible. We show that PPTR depth profiling can be used to derive rather accurate estimates of the hemoglobin mass diffusivity, hemoglobin degradation time, as well as approximate skin geometry. This enables assessment of the bruise healing dynamics and could offer a valuable addition to existing bruise age determination techniques.

  2. SABER observations of mesospheric ozone during NH late winter 2002-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. K.; López-Puertas, M.; García-Comas, M.; Tukiainen, S.

    2009-12-01

    Observations from the SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) instrument on the TIMED (Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere, Energetics and Dynamics) satellite show interannual variations of mesospheric ozone in the NH late winter. Ozone in the mid-January to mid-March period is significantly different in 2004, 2006, and 2009 than in other years (2002, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2008). The altitudes of the ozone secondary maximum (˜90-95 km), the minimum (˜80 km) and the tertiary maximum (˜72 km) are all lower by 3-5 km during the three anomalous winters. The ozone anomalies indicate enhanced downward motion and are consistent with other observations of unusual profiles of trace species. The ozone perturbations extend to at least 100 km while temperatures above 90 km are within the range found in the other years.

  3. Revised correlation between Odin/OSIRIS PMC properties and coincident TIMED/SABER mesospheric temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofilov, A.; Petelina, S. V.; Kutepov, A. A.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.; Llewellyn, E. J.; Russell, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imaging System (OSIRIS) instrument on board the Odin satellite detects Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) through the enhancement in the limb-scattered solar radiance. The Sounding of the Atmosphere using the Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on board the TIMED satellite is a limb scanning infrared radiometer that measures temperature and vertical profiles and energetic parameters for minor constituents in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The combination of OSIRIS and SABER data has been previously used to statistically derive thermal conditions for PMC existence [Petelina et al., 2005]. In this work, we employ the simultaneous common volume measurements of PMCs by OSIRIS and temperature profiles measured by SABER for the Northern Hemisphere summers of 2002--2005 and corrected in the polar region by accounting for the vibrational-vibrational energy exchange among the CO2 isotopes [Kutepov et al., 2006]. For each coincidence identified within ±1 degree latitude, ±2 degrees longitude and ≤1 hour time the frost point temperatures were calculated using the corresponding SABER temperature profile and water vapor densities of 1, 3, and 10 ppmv. We found that the PMC presence and brightness correlated only with the temperature threshold that corresponds to the frost point. The absolute value of the temperature below the frost point, however, didn't play a significant role in the intensity of PMC signal for the majority of selected coincidences. The presence of several bright clouds at temperatures above the frost point is obviously related to the limitation of the limb geometry when some near- or far-field PMCs, actually located at higher (and colder) altitudes are detected at lower altitudes. S.V. Petelina, D.A. Degenstein, E.J. Llewellyn, N.D. Lloyd, C.J. Mertens, M.G. Mlynczak, and J.M. Russell III, "Thermal conditions for PMC existence derived from Odin/OSIRIS and TIMED/SABER data", Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L

  4. Pulsed photothermal radiometry of human artery

    SciTech Connect

    Long, F.H.; Deutsch, T.F.

    1987-10-01

    Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) has been used to measure, in vitro, the optical attenuation coefficients of normal and diseased human artery at four wavelengths (308, 351, 488, 532 nm) in the near UV and visible spectrum. The advantages and limitations of this noncontact method of measuring the optical properties of biological material, as well as other potential applications, are discussed.

  5. A Comparison of a Photochemical Model with SHIMMER hydroxyl and SABER ozone data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siskind, D. E.; Stevens, M. H.; Englert, C. R.; Marsh, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Mesospheric ozone photochemistry is primarily dominated by a catalytic loss cycle involving odd hydrogen (HOx). In principal, this comparatively simple chemistry could be tested with simultaneous comparison of a model with ozone and odd hydrogen data. Until recently, such comparisons could not be made because such simultaneous data did not exist. However, with the recent conclusion of the successful 30 month mission of The Spatial Heterodyne Image for Mesospheric Radicals (SHIMMER) on a Space Test Program satellite (STPSat-1) , we now have the data with which to perform these studies. SHIMMER made high quality, high vertical resolution measurements measurements of hydroxyl (OH) from 60-80 km for a wide range of local times. The ozone data comes from measurements made by the Sounding of the Atmosphere with Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) on the NASA TIMED satellite. Since TIMED and STPSat observed the atmosphere simultaneously but at different local times, these OH and ozone data are studied using a diurnal photochemical model as a "transfer standard" that was sampled for lighting conditions appropriate to each experiment. We have used the eddy diffusion coefficient as a free parameter to be constrained by the model-data comparison. The results suggest very good general agreement with SHIMMER OH, except for a puzzling overestimate by the model of the data in the late afternoon at the highest altitudes. By contrast, the comparison with SABER ozone shows persistent large discrepancies whereby the model falls below the data; reasons for this will be offered.

  6. SABER Observations of the OH Meinel Airglow Variability Near the Mesopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Daniel R.; Smith, Anne K.; Mlynczak, Martin G.

    2005-01-01

    The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument, one of four on board the TIMED satellite, observes the OH Meinel emission at 2.0 m that peaks near the mesopause. The emission results from reactions between members of the oxygen and hydrogen chemical families that can be significantly affected by mesopause dynamics. In this study we compare SABER measurements of OH Meinel emission rates and temperatures with predictions from a 3-dimensional chemical dynamical model. In general, the model is capable of reproducing both the observed diurnal and seasonal OH Meinel emission variability. The results indicate that the diurnal tide has a large effect on the overall magnitude and temporal variation of the emission in low latitudes. This tidal variability is so dominant that the seasonal cycle in the nighttime emission depends very strongly on the local time of the analysis. At higher latitudes, the emission has an annual cycle that is due mainly to transport of oxygen by the seasonally reversing mean circulation.

  7. Profiling atmospheric water vapor by microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Wilheit, T. T.; Szejwach, G.; Gesell, L. H.; Nieman, R. A.; Niver, D. S.; Krupp, B. M.; Gagliano, J. A.; King, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    High-altitude microwave radiometric observations at frequencies near 92 and 183.3 GHz were used to study the potential of retrieving atmospheric water vapor profiles over both land and water. An algorithm based on an extended kalman-Bucy filter was implemented and applied for the water vapor retrieval. The results show great promise in atmospheric water vapor profiling by microwave radiometry heretofore not attainable at lower frequencies.

  8. Cokriging with ground-based radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, P. M.; Webster, R.; Curran, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    The formulas for cokriging and a coherent coregionalization model are presented. The model is applied to design sampling strategies for surveys using a ground-based radiometer. Results indicate that cokriging based on measured radiation is nine times as efficient as kriging the cover alone. It is concluded that cokriging in conjunction with ground-based radiometry provides an economical and operational technique for using reflectance to estimate the earth surface properties.

  9. Comparative study of middle atmosphere temperature at Rothera with Lidar and SABER, and the effect of the Antarctic Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, B.; Harvey, L.; Chu, X.; Espy, P. J.; Gardner, C. S.

    2009-12-01

    The data collected by Fe Boltzmann lidar from 2003 to 2005 at Rothera, Antarctica (67.5 S, 68.0 W) are used to generate temperature morphology in stratosphere and mesosphere covering an entire year. Satellite temperatures by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) are compared to the lidar data and show good agreements in general. SABER provides near global coverage on a daily basis but yaws toward the Northern Hemisphere resulting in months when comparisons are not available. The lidar measures the temperature profile over Rothera at high vertical resolution while the vertical resolution of SABER is 2-3 km. Large variability in temperature is observed in austral fall and spring around 60 km. In this work, we explore the extent to which the observed variability is due to sampling inside, at the edge, or outside the Antarctic polar vortex. The edge of the vortex is co-located with very large temperature gradient and daily movement of the vortex likely contributes to a geophysical explanation for large temperature variations. The position of the vortex edge, based on GEOS-5 temperatures and winds, is used to aid in the interpretation of the temperature structure as a function of altitude and time. Results will be shown that indicate notable differences between profiles sampled in the different air mass regions.

  10. Water vapor radiometry research and development phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, G. M.; Chavez, M. C.; Yamane, N. L.; Barbier, K. M.; Chandlee, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the research and development phase for eight dual-channel water vapor radiometers constructed for the Crustal Dynamics Project at the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, and for the NASA Deep Space Network. These instruments were developed to demonstrate that the variable path delay imposed on microwave radio transmissions by atmospheric water vapor can be calibrated, particularly as this phenomenon affects very long baseline interferometry measurement systems. Water vapor radiometry technology can also be used in systems that involve moist air meteorology and propagation studies.

  11. Study of photoinduced absorption by the method of modified laser photothermal radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Skvortsov, L A; Maksimov, E M; Tuchkov, A A

    2008-10-31

    The application of the method of modified laser photothermal radiometry for studying the photoinduced absorption in thin films is considered. The sensitivity of the method is estimated. The mechanism of induced near-IR absorption in titanium dioxide films is proposed and the nature of surface defects responsible for this process is explained. It is shown that kinetic equations describing monomolecular recombination are consistent with the experimental dependences for the thermal activation energy of defects equal to 0.17{+-}0.04 eV. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  12. Advances in radiometry for ocean color

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, S.W.; Clark, D.K.; Johnson, B.C.; Yoon, H.; Lykke, K.R.; Flora, S.J.; Feinholz, M.E.; Souaidia, N.; Pietras, C.; Stone, T.C.; Yarbrough, M.A.; Kim, Y.S.; Barnes, R.A.; Mueller, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    We have presented a number of recent developments in radiometry that directly impact the uncertainties achievable in ocean-color research. Specifically, a new (2000) U. S. national irradiance scale, a new LASER-based facility for irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations, and applications of the LASER facility for the calibration of sun photometers and characterization of spectrographs were discussed. For meaningful long-time-series global chlorophyll-a measurements, all instruments involved in radiometric measurements, including satellite sensors, vicarious calibration sensors, sensors used in the development of bio-optical algorithms and atmospheric characterization need to be fully characterized and corrected for systematic errors, including, but not limited to, stray light. A unique, solid-state calibration source is under development to reduce the radiometric uncertainties in ocean color instruments, in particular below 400 nm. Lunar measurements for trending of on-orbit sensor channel degradation were described. Unprecedented assessments, within 0.1 %, of temporal stability and drift in a satellite sensor's radiance responsivity are achievable with this approach. These developments advance the field of ocean color closer to the desired goal of reducing the uncertainty in the fundamental radiometry to a small component of the overall uncertainty in the derivation of remotely sensed ocean-color data products such as chlorophyll a.

  13. Investigation of atmospheric blasts by fast radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Dov, R.; Bushlin, Y.; Devir, A. D.; Lessin, A. B.; Mendelewicz, I.; Shvebelman, M.

    2014-06-01

    Blasts and detonations release large amount of energy in short time duration. Some of this energy is released through radiation in the whole optical spectrum. Measurement of this radiation may serve as a base for investigation of the blast phenomena. A fast multispectral radiometer that operates in proper chosen spectral bands provides extensive information on the physical processes that govern the blast. This information includes the time dependence of the temperature, area of the blast as-well-as of the aerosols and gases that are generated. Analysis of this data indicates the order of the detonation and provides good estimation on the masses and types of the high-explosives (HE) materials and their casing. This paper presents the methodology and instrumentation of fast multispectral radiometry in application to the blast measurement and analysis in a Near-ground Explosion Test (NET). In NET, the flash radiation of the blast was measured for two HE materials: TNT and composition B (CB). The investigation includes charges of different masses (0.25 - 20.0 kg) and of various casing materials (steel, Al, PVC), thickness (2 - 6 mm) and various casing type (open on both face ends and hermetically closed). Analysis of the data demonstrates the power of fast radiometry methodology and reveals the governing characteristics of atmospheric blasts.

  14. Viking lander camera radiometry calibration report, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, M. R.; Atwood, D. L.; Morrill, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    The test methods and data reduction techniques used to determine and remove instrumental signatures from Viking Lander camera radiometry data are described. Gain, offset, and calibration constants are presented in tables.

  15. Frequency domain photothermal radiometry with spherical solids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chinhua; Liu, Yue; Mandelis, Andreas; Shen, Jun

    2007-04-15

    Motivated by increasing practical and industrial applications of photothermal techniques in the measurement of materials of various shapes with curvature, we extend the applications of photothermal diagnostics to solid spheres, in which both theoretical and experimental photothermal radiometry studies on spherical geometries and thermal diffusivity of the sample are discussed. Based on the Green function method, a full thermal-wave field distribution of a spherical solid is obtained. The characteristics of the thermal-wave field with respect to thermophysical properties of the material, the diameter of the solid, the size of the incident laser beam, and the measurement angle are discussed. Experimental results with steel spheres of different diameters exhibit good agreement between the theory and the experiments.

  16. Advances in Solar Radiometry and Metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.; Andreas, A.; Reda, I.; Gotseff, P.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.; Anderberg, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Radiometry and Metrology task at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provides traceable optical radiometric calibrations and measurements to photovoltaic (PV) researchers and the PV industry. Traceability of NREL solar radiometer calibrations to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR) was accomplished during the NREL Pyrheliometer Comparison in October 2003. The task has calibrated 10 spectral and more than 180 broadband radiometers for solar measurements. Other accomplishments include characterization of pyranometer thermal offset errors with laboratory and spectral modeling tools; developing a simple scheme to correct pyranometer data for known responsivity variations; and measuring detailed spectral distributions of the NREL High Intensity Pulsed Solar Simulator (HIPSS) as a function of lamp voltage and time. The optical metrology functions support the NREL Measurement and Characterization Task effort for ISO 17025 accreditation of NREL Solar Reference Cell Calibrations. Optical metrology functions have been integrated into the NREL quality system and audited for ISO17025 compliance.

  17. Water Vapor, Temperature, and Ice Particles in Polar Mesosphere as Measured by SABER/TIMED and OSIRIS/Odin Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feofilov, A. G.; Petelina, S. V.; Kutepov, A. A.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    Although many new details on the properties of mesospheric ice particles that farm Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs) and also cause polar mesospheric summer echoes have been recently revealed, certain aspects of mesospheric ice microphysics and dynamics still remain open. The detailed relation between PMC parameters and properties of their environment, as well as interseasonal and interhemispheric differences and trends in PMC properties that are possibly related to global change, are among those open questions. In this work, mesospheric temperature and water vapor concentration measured by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on board the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite are used to study the properties of PMCs with respect to the surrounding atmosphere. The cloud parameters, namely location, brightness, and altitude, are obtained from the observations made by the Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imager System (OSIRIS) on the Odin satellite. About a thousand of simultaneous common volume measurements made by SABER and OSIRIS in both hemispheres from 2002 until 2008 are used. The correlation between PMC brightness (and occurrence rate) and temperatures at PMC altitudes and at the mesopause is analysed. The relation between PMC parameters, frost point temperature, and gaseous water vapor content in and below the cloud is also discussed. Interseasonal and interhemispheric differences and trends in the above parameters, as well as in PMC peak altitudes and mesopause altitudes are evaluated.

  18. Mesospheric H2O Concentrations Retrieved from SABER/TIMED Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feofilov, A. G.; Marshall, B. T.; Garcia-Comas, M.; Kutepov, A. A.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Manuilova, R. O.; Yankovsky, V.A.; Goldberg, R. A.; Gordley, L. L.; Petelin, S.; Russell, J. M., III

    2008-01-01

    The SABER instrument on board the TIMED Satellite is a limb scanning infrared radiometer designed to measure temperature and minor constituent vertical profiles and energetics parameters in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The H2O concentrations are retrieved from 6.3 micron band radiances. The populations of H2O(v2) vibrational levels are in non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (non-LTE) above approximately 55 km altitude and the interpretation of 6.3 micron radiance requires utilizing non-LTE H2O model that includes various energy exchange processes in the system of H2O vibrational levels coupled with O2, N2, and CO2 vibrational levels. We incorporated these processes including kinetics of O2/O3 photolysis products to our research non-LTE H2O model and applied it for the development and optimization of SABER operational model. The latter has been validated using simultaneous SCISAT1/ACE occultation measurements. This helped us to estimate CO2(020)-O2(X,v=I), O2(X,v=I)- H2O(010), and O2(X,v=1) O rates at mesopause temperatures that is critical for an adequate interpretation of non-LTE H2O radiances in the MLT. The first distributions of seasonal and meridional H2O concentrations retrieved from SABER 6.3 micron radiances applying an updated non-LTE H2O model are demonstrated and discussed.

  19. Refinement of Phobos Ephemeris Using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter Radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, G. A.; Bills, B. G.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2004-01-01

    Radiometric observations from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) can be used to improve the ephemeris of Phobos, with particular interest in refining estimates of the secular acceleration due to tidal dissipation within Mars. We have searched the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) radiometry data for shadows cast by the moon Phobos, finding 7 such profiles during the Mapping and Extended Mission phases, and 5 during the last two years of radiometry operations. Preliminary data suggest that the motion of Phobos has advanced by one or more seconds beyond that predicted by the current ephemerides, and the advance has increased over the 5 years of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) operations.

  20. Atmospheric Compensation for Uplink Arrays via Radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nessel, James A.; Acosta, Roberto J.

    2010-01-01

    Uplink arrays for communications applications are gaining increased visibility within the NASA and military community due to the enhanced flexibility and reliability they provide. When compared with the conventional large, single aperture antennas currently comprising the Deep Space Network (DSN), for example, smaller aperture antenna arrays have the benefits of providing fault tolerance (reduced single-point failure), reduced maintenance cost, and enhanced capabilities such as electronic beam-steering and multi-beam operation. However, signal combining of antenna array elements spaced many wavelengths apart becomes problematic due to the inherent instability of earth's turbulent atmosphere, particularly at the frequencies of interest to the DSN (i.e., Ka-band). Degradation in the power combining of the individual elements comprising the array arises due to uncorrelated phase errors introduced as the signals propagate through the troposphere. It is well known that the fundamental source of this error is due to the inhomogeneous distribution of water vapor in the atmosphere [1]. Several techniques have been proposed to circumvent this issue, including the use of phase calibration towers and a moon bounce to generate a feedback loop which would provide a means of intermittent calibration of the system phase errors (thermal drifts, atmosphere) [2,3]. However, these techniques require repositioning of the antenna elements to perform this operation which ultimately results in reduced system availability. And, though they are sufficient for compensating for slow varying phase drifts, they are insufficient to compensate for faster varying phase errors, such as those introduced by the atmosphere. In this paper, preliminary radiometry and interferometry measurements collected by the NASA Glenn Research Center are analyzed and indicate that the use of optimized water vapor radiometers as a feedback system in a communications platform could provide the necessary atmospheric

  1. Implications of odd oxygen observations by the TIMED/SABER instrument for lower D region ionospheric modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siskind, David E.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Marshall, Tom; Friedrich, Martin; Gumbel, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    We document the variability in atomic oxygen inferred by the Sounding of the Atmosphere with Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the NASA/TIMED satellite in the lower mesosphere (50-80 km altitude) according to its diurnal, latitudinal, seasonal and solar cycle components. The dominant variation is diurnal and latitudinal. Below 75 km, seasonal and solar cycle effects are less than 5%. Accordingly, we have developed a simple climatology that depends upon local time and latitude and applied it to a model of the D region of the ionosphere. Between 60 and 70 km, atomic oxygen is important in governing the ratio of negative ions to electrons. Using the SABER O climatology along with a previously published climatology of nitric oxide based upon UARS/HALOE data, we compare our model results both to previous calculations and to a profile of electron density [e-] acquired by a rocket launched from Kwajalein Atoll. The model results are shown to be consistent with previously published calculations, but the comparison with the data reveals a dramatic discrepancy whereby the calculated [e-] is over an order of magnitude less than the observations below 65 km. The most plausible explanation involves changing the partition of negative charge between molecules such as O2 which rapidly dissociate in sunlight versus heavier, more stable negative ions. Although observations of [e-] below 70 km are difficult and infrequent, more research should be invested to evaluate the pervasiveness and the seasonal, latitudinal and diurnal morphology of this model [e-] deficit. This may have practical implications as empirical models of the ionosphere predict a secondary maximum in HF radio absorption in the 70 km altitude region.

  2. Thermal mapping of the lunar surface. [using infrared radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raine, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    A program of lunar infrared radiometry which uses large area scanning is described, and procedures for atmospheric attenuation correction and data reduction to temperature by relative radiometry are outlined. Flow charts of the computer data reduction program are shown which contain the astrometric analysis from ephemeral data. The scan data, taken on 10 evenings in 1971 and 1972 in the 10 to 12 micron window, are presented as isothermal contour maps of the lunar disc. More than 160 areas of anomalous thermal emission were found in the lunar darkside data. Eclipse cooling curves, measured in the same wavelength band for 7 lunar regions during the eclipse of February 10, 1971, are also presented. Errors of the scan and eclipse data were calculated from accuracy estimates of the parameters.

  3. Precipitating cloud vertical structure derived from passive microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, Christian D.; Liberti, Gian L.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure for the retrieval of cloud vertical structure from passive microwave radiometry is demonstrated by using passive microwave radiometry observations made during the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission. The procedure uses a set of cloud radiative models, with each model consisting of five vertical layers, specifying a distinct cloud vertical structure in terms of the near-surface parameters. The retrieval procedure is separated into two tasks (1) retrieving a set of geophysical parameters for each cloud radiative model and (2) finding which of the cloud radiative models and its associated retrieved parameters best fit the observed geophysical conditions. It is shown that this retrieval technique can detect differences and similarities between precipitating systems.

  4. Contamination control of the SABER cryogenic infrared telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, James S.; Brown, Steven; Esplin, Roy W.; Hansen, Galen; Jensen, Scott M.; Stauder, John L.; Zollinger, Lorin

    2002-09-01

    The SABER instrument (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Spectroscopy) is a cryogenic infrared sensor on the TIMED spacecraft with stringent molecular and particulate contamination control requirements. The sensor measures infrared emissions from atmospheric constituents in the earth limb at altitudes ranging from 60 to 180 km using radiatively-cooled 240 K optics and a mechanically-refrigerated 75 K detector. The stray light performance requirements necessitate nearly pristine foreoptics. The cold detector in a warm sensor presents challenges in controlling the cryodeposition of water and other condensable vapors. Accordingly, SABER incorporates several unique design features and test strategies to control and measure the particulate and molecular contamination environment. These include internal witness mirrors, dedicated purge/depressurization manifolds, labyrinths, cold stops, and validated procedures for bakeout, cooldown, and warmup. The pre-launch and on-orbit contamination control performance for the SABER telescope will be reviewed.

  5. SABER: The Searchable Annotated Bibliography of Education Research in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruning, David H.; Bailey, J. M.; Brissenden, G.

    2006-12-01

    Starting a new research project in astronomy education is hard because the literature is scattered throughout many journals. Relevant astronomy education research may be in psychology journals, science education journals, physics education journals, or even in science journals themselves. Tracking the vast realm of literature is difficult, especially since libraries do not carry many of these journals and related abstracting services. SABER is an online resource (http://astronomy.uwp.edu/saber/) that was started in 2001 specifically to reduce this “scatter” by compiling into one place an annotated bibliography of relevant education research articles. The database now includes more than 150 articles specifically addressing astronomy education research. Visit SABER and see what it can do for you.

  6. SABER: The Searchable Annotated Bibliography of Education Research in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruning, David; Bailey, Janelle M.; Brissenden, Gina

    Starting a new research project can be a challenge, but especially so in education research because the literature is scattered throughout many journals. Relevant astronomy education research may be in psychology journals, science education journals, physics education journals, or even in science journals. Tracking the vast realm of literature is difficult, especially because libraries frequently do not subscribe to many of the relevant journals and abstracting services. The Searchable Annotated Bibliography of Education Research (SABER) is an online resource that was started to service the needs of the astronomy education community, specifically to reduce this "scatter" by compiling an annotated bibliography of education research articles in one electronic location. Although SABER started in 2001, the database has a new URL—http://astronom- y.uwp.edu/saber/—and has recently undergone a major update.

  7. Chapter 1: An Introduction to the Saber-Tooth Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Phillip

    1999-01-01

    Introduces a theme issue on the Saber-Tooth Project, an ongoing reform effort involving a university and school district that collaborate to improve middle school physical education by improving teaching conditions and engaging teachers in professional development emphasizing curriculum improvement. The monograph explains the nature of…

  8. Chapter 3: Design of the Saber-Tooth Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Phillip

    1999-01-01

    Used data from interviews, surveys, and document analysis to describe the methods and reform processes of the Saber Tooth Project, examining selection of sites; demographics (school sites, teachers, data sources, and project assumptions); and project phases (development, planning, implementation, and support). The project's method of reform was…

  9. Kapitza thermal resistance studied by high-frequency photothermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horny, Nicolas; Chirtoc, Mihai; Fleming, Austin; Hamaoui, Georges; Ban, Heng

    2016-07-01

    Kapitza thermal resistance is determined using high-frequency photothermal radiometry (PTR) extended for modulation up to 10 MHz. Interfaces between 50 nm thick titanium coatings and silicon or stainless steel substrates are studied. In the used configuration, the PTR signal is not sensitive to the thermal conductivity of the film nor to its optical absorption coefficient, thus the Kapitza resistance is directly determined from single thermal parameter fits. Results of thermal resistances show the significant influence of the nature of the substrate, as well as of the presence of free electrons at the interface.

  10. Low Latitude Gravity Wave Variances in the MLT Derived from Saber Temperature Observation and Compared with Model Simulations of Waves Generated By Deep Tropical Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walterscheid, R. L.; Christensen, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Equatorial regions are the scene of prolific generation of gravity waves by deep tropical convection. Waves generated by deep convection have appreciable energy at frequencies and spatial scales that are able to reach altitudes in the Middle Atmosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) and above where they may attain significant amplitudes. A portion of these waves have scales and amplitudes large enough to be detected by space borne instruments. We have analyzed temperature data from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics Dynamics (TIMED) satellite for sub-tidal scale fluctuations. Filtering was applied both vertically and horizontally to extract wave variances. We have examined the variances at equatorial latitudes for the altitude region between 70 and 120 km and have have characterized them as a function of season, local time intervals, geographical location and altitude. We find large variances in locations of where convection is particularly prolific (e.g., western South Pacific) and at altitudes where wave trapping is known to be favored (e.g., the lower thermospheric duct). The locations of significant variances persist from year to year. Variances of on the order of a few tens of degrees are found. We have also performed simulations of the response to deep tropical convection with the The Aerospace Corporation Dynamical Model (ADM). This model is a time dependent, high-resolution fully compressible dynamical model that has been used to examine the MLT wave response to intense cellular convection in northern Australia. The background thermal structure for the present simulations was obtained from TIMED/SABER data averaged over low latitudes by season and local time. Our simulations give wave amplitudes that agree reasonably well with the observed amplitudes and show layering that is consistent with the observations. We will show the results of our analysis of

  11. Absolute Temperature Monitoring Using RF Radiometry in the MRI Scanner.

    PubMed

    El-Sharkawy, Abdel-Monem M; Sotiriadis, Paul P; Bottomley, Paul A; Atalar, Ergin

    2006-11-01

    Temperature detection using microwave radiometry has proven value for noninvasively measuring the absolute temperature of tissues inside the body. However, current clinical radiometers operate in the gigahertz range, which limits their depth of penetration. We have designed and built a noninvasive radiometer which operates at radio frequencies (64 MHz) with ∼100-kHz bandwidth, using an external RF loop coil as a thermal detector. The core of the radiometer is an accurate impedance measurement and automatic matching circuit of 0.05 Ω accuracy to compensate for any load variations. The radiometer permits temperature measurements with accuracy of ±0.1°K, over a tested physiological range of 28° C-40° C in saline phantoms whose electric properties match those of tissue. Because 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners also operate at 64 MHz, we demonstrate the feasibility of integrating our radiometer with an MRI scanner to monitor RF power deposition and temperature dosimetry, obtaining coarse, spatially resolved, absolute thermal maps in the physiological range. We conclude that RF radiometry offers promise as a direct, noninvasive method of monitoring tissue heating during MRI studies and thereby providing an independent means of verifying patient-safe operation. Other potential applications include titration of hyper- and hypo-therapies. PMID:18026562

  12. Nonintrusive noncontacting frequency-domain photothermal radiometry of caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.; Abd-Elwahab, Bassam

    2010-04-01

    Among diffusion methods, photothermal radiometry (PTR) has the ability to penetrate and yield information about an opaque medium well beyond the range of conventional optical imaging. Owing to this ability, pulsed-laser PTR has been extensively used in turbid media such as biological tissues to study the sub-surface deposition of laser radiation, a task that may be difficult or impossible for many optical methods due to excessive scattering and absorption. In this paper considers the achievements of Pulsed Photothermal Radiometry using IR camera in the investigation of physical properties of biological materials and the diagnostics of the interaction of laser radiation with biological materials. A three-dimensional heat conduction formulation with the use of three-dimensional optical diffusion is developed to derive a turbid frequency-domain PTR model. The present photo-thermal model for frequency-domain PTR may prove useful for non-contact; non-invasive, in situ evaluate the depth profilometric imaging capabilities of FDPTR in monitoring carious and artificial subsurface lesions in human teeth.

  13. Hand-held radiometry: A set of notes developed for use at the Workshop of Hand-held radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, R. D.; Pinter, P. J., Jr.; Reginato, R. J.; Idso, S. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    A set of notes was developed to aid the beginner in hand-held radiometry. The electromagnetic spectrum is reviewed, and pertinent terms are defined. View areas of multiband radiometers are developed to show the areas of coincidence of adjacent bands. The amounts of plant cover seen by radiometers having different fields of view are described. Vegetation indices are derived and discussed. Response functions of several radiometers are shown and applied to spectrometer data taken over 12 wheat plots, to provide a comparison of instruments and bands within and among instruments. The calculation of solar time is reviewed and applied to the calculation of the local time of LANDSAT satellite overpasses for any particular location in the Northern Hemisphere. The use and misuse of hand-held infrared thermometers are discussed, and a procedure for photographic determination of plant cover is described. Some suggestions are offered concerning procedures to be followed when collecting hand-held spectral and thermal data. A list of references pertinent to hand-held radiometry is included.

  14. Directional Radiometry and Radiative Transfer: the Convoluted Path From Centuries-old Phenomenology to Physical Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    This Essay traces the centuries-long history of the phenomenological disciplines of directional radiometry and radiative transfer in turbid media, discusses their fundamental weaknesses, and outlines the convoluted process of their conversion into legitimate branches of physical optics.

  15. Feasibility Study of Radiometry for Airborne Detection of Aviation Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gimmestad, Gary G.; Papanicolopoulos, Chris D.; Richards, Mark A.; Sherman, Donald L.; West, Leanne L.; Johnson, James W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Radiometric sensors for aviation hazards have the potential for widespread and inexpensive deployment on aircraft. This report contains discussions of three aviation hazards - icing, turbulence, and volcanic ash - as well as candidate radiometric detection techniques for each hazard. Dual-polarization microwave radiometry is the only viable radiometric technique for detection of icing conditions, but more research will be required to assess its usefulness to the aviation community. Passive infrared techniques are being developed for detection of turbulence and volcanic ash by researchers in this country and also in Australia. Further investigation of the infrared airborne radiometric hazard detection approaches will also be required in order to develop reliable detection/discrimination techniques. This report includes a description of a commercial hyperspectral imager for investigating the infrared detection techniques for turbulence and volcanic ash.

  16. Modulated photothermal radiometry applied to semitransparent samples: Models and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, S.; Rémy, B.; Maillet, D.; Degiovanni, A.; Serra, J.-J.

    2004-09-01

    Mathematical modeling is presented of the combined conductive and radiative heat transfer occurring in a semitransparent material (STM) subjected to a periodic heat flux. The models rely on the quadrupole method, which is a very powerful tool to obtain analytical solutions in the Fourier or Laplace domain. Photoacoustic or photothermal radiometry techniques are reviewed. Two groups of methods are discussed depending on whether the sample has natural or opaque interfaces to simulate radiative exchanges with the surroundings. The metrological problem of measuring the phonic thermal diffusivity of semitransparent materials is investigated. Theoretical simulations are given. They explain some typical features of the phase-lag signal of temperature responses. Experimental measurements on pure silica validate the results and prove that these methods are efficient for the thermal characterization of STM.

  17. Target contrast considerations in millimeter wave radiometry for airborne navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, A.

    1971-01-01

    Target signal requirements for aircraft navigation systems that use radiometric receivers which map thermally emitted power radiated by terrain or power radiated by ground-based beacons are discussed. For selected millimeter wavelength bands, microwaves suffer relatively little degradation by absorption or scattering on passage through the atmosphere, despite extreme weather variations. Interest centers on 8-millimeter waves because of component availability, portability (small size), high image resolution, and all-weather capability at this wavelength. The idea of radiometric airborne navigation is introduced. Elements of radiometry, terrain radiation, and atmospheric transmission characteristics are reviewed. Data pertaining to these elements at 8 mm wavelength are collected. Calculation of radiometric contrasts is discussed for some simple models of terrain targets.

  18. Fiscal Year 2005 Solar Radiometry and Metrology Task Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.; Andreas, A.; Reda, I.; Gotseff, P.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.; Anderberg, M.; Kay, B.; Bowen, A.

    2005-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Radiometry and Metrology task provides traceable optical radiometric calibrations and measurements to photovoltaic (PV) researchers and the PV industry. Traceability of NREL solar radiometer calibrations to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR) was accomplished during Pyrheliometer Comparison at NREL in October 2004. Ten spectral and more than 200 broadband radiometers for solar measurements were calibrated this year. We measured detailed spectral distributions of the NREL and PV industry Pulsed Solar Simulators and are analyzing the influence of environmental variables on radiometer uncertainty. New systems for indoor and outdoor solar radiometer calibrations and ultraviolet (UV) spectral measurements and UV radiometer calibrations were purchased and tested. Optical metrology functions support the NREL Measurement and Characterization Task effort for ISO 17025 accreditation of NREL Solar Reference Cell Calibrations and have been integrated into the NREL quality system and audited for ISO17025 compliance.

  19. Thermal characterization of diamond films through modulated photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Guillemet, Thomas; Kusiak, Andrzej; Fan, Lisha; Heintz, Jean-Marc; Chandra, Namas; Zhou, Yunshen; Silvain, Jean-François; Lu, Yongfeng; Battaglia, Jean-Luc

    2014-02-12

    Diamond (Dia) films are promising heat-dissipative materials for electronic packages because they combine high thermal conductivity with high electrical resistivity. However, precise knowledge of the thermal properties of the diamond films is crucial to their potential application as passive thermal management substrates in electronics. In this study, modulated photothermal radiometry in a front-face configuration was employed to thermally characterize polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto silicon (Si) substrates through laser-assisted combustion synthesis. The intrinsic thermal conductivity of diamond films and the thermal boundary resistance at the interface between the diamond film and the Si substrate were investigated. The results enlighten the correlation between the deposition process, film purity, film transverse thermal conductivity, and interface thermal resistance. PMID:24422442

  20. Pulsed photothermal radiometry of port-wine-stain lesions.

    PubMed

    Jacques, S L; Nelson, J S; Wright, W H; Milner, T E

    1993-05-01

    Pulsed photothermal radiometry is used to map the heat deposition in human skin after a short laser pulse. It uses an IR (HgCdTe) detector for a rapid noncontact measurement of the skin surface temperature based on the blackbody emission in the 8-12-microm spectrum. The heat deposited by the laser pulse in the superficial epidermis causes an immediate temperature jump, and the heat deposited in basal epidermal melanin and deep port wine stains diffuses to the surface before detection. The time course of the surface temperature T(z = 0, t), indicates the initial spatial distribution of heat, T(z, t = 0), deposited by the laser. PMID:20820403

  1. Photothermal Radiometry and Diffuse Reflectance Analysis of Thermally Treated Bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, S.; Martínez-Torres, P.; Quintana, P.; Alvarado-Gil, Juan Jose

    2010-05-01

    Different fields such as archaeology, biomedicine, forensic science, and pathology involve the analysis of burned bones. In this work, the effects of successive thermal treatments on pig long bones, measured by photothermal radiometry and diffuse reflectance are reported. Measurements were complemented by X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Samples were thermally treated for 1 h within the range of 25 °C to 350 °C. The thermal diffusivity and reflectance increase in the low-temperature range, reaching a maximum around 125 °C and decaying at higher temperatures. These results are the consequence of complex modifications occurring in the inorganic and organic bone structure. For lower temperatures dehydration, dehydroxilation, and carbonate loss processes are dominant, followed by collagen denaturing and decompositions, which have an influence on the bone microstructure.

  2. Measurement of the body surface temperature by the method of laser photothermal radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Skvortsov, L A; Kirillov, V M

    2003-12-31

    The specific features of contactless measurements of the body surface temperature by the method of repetitively pulsed laser photothermal radiometry are considered and the requirements to the parameters of the laser and measurement scheme are formulated. The sensitivity of the method is estimated. The advantages of laser photothermal radiometry over the conventional passive radiometric method are discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  3. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator Experiments at the SABER Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kanareykin, A.; Thompson, M.C.; Berry, M.K.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Kirby, N.A.; Siemann, Robert H.; Walz, D.R.; Badakov, H.; Cook, A.M.; Rosenzweig, J.B.; Tikhoplav, R.; Travish, G.; Muggli, P.; /Southern California U.

    2008-01-28

    Electron bunches with the unparalleled combination of high charge, low emittances, and short time duration, as first produced at the SLAC Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB), are foreseen to be produced at the SABER facility. These types of bunches have enabled wakefield driven accelerating schemes of multi-GV/m in plasmas. In the context of the Dielectric Wakefield Accelerators (DWA) such beams, having rms bunch length as short as 20 um, have been used to drive 100 um and 200 um ID hollow tubes above 20 GV/m surface fields. These FFTB tests enabled the measurement of a breakdown threshold in fused silica (with full data analysis still ongoing) [1]. With the construction and commissioning of the SABER facility at SLAC, new experiments would be made possible to test further aspects of DWAs including materials, tube geometrical variations, direct measurements of the Cerenkov fields, and proof of acceleration in tubes >10 cm in length. This collaboration will investigate breakdown thresholds and accelerating fields in new materials including CVD diamond. Here we describe the experimental plans, beam parameters, simulations, and progress to date as well as future prospects for machines based of DWA structures.

  4. Familia and Comunidad-Based Saberes: Learning in an Indigenous Heritage Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urrieta, Luis, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores how children and youth learned indigenous heritage "saberes" (knowings) through intent community participation in Nocutzepo, Mexico. The "familia" (family) and "comunidad" (community)-based saberes were valuable for skills acquisition, but most important for learning indigenous forms of…

  5. Detecting volcanism on Titan and Venus with microwave radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Le Gall, Alice; Janssen, Michael A.

    2016-05-01

    The detection by spaceborne instrumentation of infrared thermal emission from volcanic eruptions is well-established on Earth, but is challenged on Venus and Titan by their optically-thick atmospheres. Microwave radiometry in principle offers the ability to detect emission from surface thermal anomalies on these worlds due to greater atmospheric transparency: microwaves also offer the prospect of sensing the shallow subsurface and thus may detect warmth from lava flows for longer than surface infrared emission. However, satellite microwave instruments typically have low spatial resolution (10s of km) so volcanic heat is diluted in the wide instrument footprint. We examine the prospects for the detection of volcanic deposits by microwave, given likely planetary eruption rates and lava flow deposit geometries, using Mt Etna as a template. Nondetection of prominent hotspots in Cassini data may imply that the resurfacing rate is lower than ∼2 km3/yr, five times smaller than the expression of an Earth-like fraction of geothermal heat flow as latent heat in extrusive volcanism.

  6. Tower-Perturbation Measurements in Above-Water Radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Zibordi, Giuseppe; Berthon, Jean-Francois; DAlimonte, Davide; vanderLinde, Dirk; Brown, James W.

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the scientific activities which took place during June 2001 and June 2002 on the Acqua Alta Oceanographic Tower (AAOT) in the northern Adriatic Sea. The primary objective of these field campaigns was to quantify the effect of platform perturbations (principally reflections of sunlight onto the sea surface) on above-water measurements of water-leaving radiances. The deployment goals documented in this report were to: a) collect an extensive and simultaneous set of above- and in-water optical measurements under predominantly clear-sky conditions; b) establish the vertical properties of the water column using a variety of ancillary measurements, many of which were taken coincidently with the optical measurements; and c) determine the bulk properties of the environment using a diversity of atmospheric, biogeochemical, and meteorological techniques. A preliminary assessment of the data collected during the two field campaigns shows the perturbation in above-water radiometry caused by a large offshore structure is very similar to that caused by a large research vessel.

  7. History of Solar Radiometry and the World Radiometric Reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, C.

    1991-01-01

    The history of solar radiometry since the first pyrheliometer of Pouillet is presented. After the invention of the Ångström and the Smithsonian pyrheliometers around the turn of this century two different "scales" were in use. Comparisons with absolute cavity radiometers developed in America and Europe have been performed since about 1910 which show remarkably accurate measurements in terms of the SI units. However, these results have never been accepted and several rules have been established to reference radiation measurements in the meteorological community and to remedy the unsatisfactory fact of having different "scales". Unfortunately none of these rules led to a reference close to the SI units of irradiance, confusing the issue even more. With the advent of modern absolute radiometers in the late 1960s the situation improved and led to the definition of the World Radiometric Reference in use by the meteorological community since 1981. This reference has an estimated accuracy of 0,3% and guarantees the worldwide homogeneity of radiation measurements within 0,1% precision.

  8. Accuracy of subsurface temperature distributions computed from pulsed photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Smithies, D J; Milner, T E; Tanenbaum, B S; Goodman, D M; Nelson, J S

    1998-09-01

    Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) is a non-contact method for determining the temperature increase in subsurface chromophore layers immediately following pulsed laser irradiation. In this paper the inherent limitations of PPTR are identified. A time record of infrared emission from a test material due to laser heating of a subsurface chromophore layer is calculated and used as input data for a non-negatively constrained conjugate gradient algorithm. Position and magnitude of temperature increase in a model chromophore layer immediately following pulsed laser irradiation are computed. Differences between simulated and computed temperature increase are reported as a function of thickness, depth and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The average depth of the chromophore layer and integral of temperature increase in the test material are accurately predicted by the algorithm. When the thickness/depth ratio is less than 25%, the computed peak temperature increase is always significantly less than the true value. Moreover, the computed thickness of the chromophore layer is much larger than the true value. The accuracy of the computed subsurface temperature distribution is investigated with the singular value decomposition of the kernel matrix. The relatively small number of right singular vectors that may be used (8% of the rank of the kernel matrix) to represent the simulated temperature increase in the test material limits the accuracy of PPTR. We show that relative error between simulated and computed temperature increase is essentially constant for a particular thickness/depth ratio. PMID:9755938

  9. Accurate Radiometry from Space: An Essential Tool for Climate Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Nigel; Kaiser-Weiss, Andrea; Schmutz, Werner; Thome, Kurtis; Young, Dave; Wielicki, Bruce; Winkler, Rainer; Woolliams, Emma

    2011-01-01

    The Earth s climate is undoubtedly changing; however, the time scale, consequences and causal attribution remain the subject of significant debate and uncertainty. Detection of subtle indicators from a background of natural variability requires measurements over a time base of decades. This places severe demands on the instrumentation used, requiring measurements of sufficient accuracy and sensitivity that can allow reliable judgements to be made decades apart. The International System of Units (SI) and the network of National Metrology Institutes were developed to address such requirements. However, ensuring and maintaining SI traceability of sufficient accuracy in instruments orbiting the Earth presents a significant new challenge to the metrology community. This paper highlights some key measurands and applications driving the uncertainty demand of the climate community in the solar reflective domain, e.g. solar irradiances and reflectances/radiances of the Earth. It discusses how meeting these uncertainties facilitate significant improvement in the forecasting abilities of climate models. After discussing the current state of the art, it describes a new satellite mission, called TRUTHS, which enables, for the first time, high-accuracy SI traceability to be established in orbit. The direct use of a primary standard and replication of the terrestrial traceability chain extends the SI into space, in effect realizing a metrology laboratory in space . Keywords: climate change; Earth observation; satellites; radiometry; solar irradiance

  10. Study of blood flow sensing with microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. A.; Wentz, F. J., III

    1973-01-01

    A study and experimental investigation has been performed to determine the feasibility of measuring regional blood flow and volume in man by means of microwave radiometry. An indication was expected of regional blood flow from measurement of surface and subsurface temperatures with a sensitive radiometer. Following theoretical modeling of biological tissue, to determine the optimum operating frequency for adequate sensing depth, a sensitive microwave radiometer was designed for operation at 793 MHz. A temperature sensitivity of of 0.06 K rms was realized in this equipment. Measurements performed on phantom tissue models, consisting of beef fat and lean beefsteak showed that the radiometer was capable of sensing temperatures from a depth between 3.8 and 5.1 cm. Radiometric and thermodynamic temperature measurements were also performed on the hind thighs of large dogs. These showed that the radiometer could sense subsurface temperatures from a depth of, at least, 1.3 cm. Delays caused by externally-generated RF interference, coupled with the lack of reliable blood flow measurement equipment, prevented correlation of radiometer readings with reginal blood flow. For the same reasons, it was not possible to extend the radiometric observations to human subjects.

  11. Volatile organic compound monitoring by photo acoustic radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sollid, J.E.; Trujillo, V.L.; Limback, S.P.; Woloshun, K.A.

    1995-12-01

    Two methods for sampling and analyzing volatile organics in subsurface pore gas were developed for use at the Hazardous Waste Disposal Site at Los Alamos National Laboratory. One is Thermal Desorption Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (TDGCMS), the other is Photoacoustic Radiometry (PAR). Presented here are two years worth of experience and lessons learned as both techniques matured. The sampling technique is equally as important as the analysis method. PAR is a nondispersive infrared technique utilizing band pass filters in the region from 1 to 15 {mu}m. A commercial instrument, the Model 1302 Multigas Analyzer, made by Bruel and Kjaer, was adapted for field use. To use the PAR there must be some a priori knowledge of the constellation of analytes to be measured. The TDGCMS method is sensitive to 50 analytes. Hence TDGCMS is used in an initial survey of the site to determine what compounds are present and at what concentration. Once the major constituents of the soil-gas vapor plume are known the PAR can be configured to monitor for the five analytes of most interest. The PAR can analyse a sample in minutes, while in the field. The PAR is also quite precise in controlled situations.

  12. The Traceable Radiometry Underpinning Terrestrial and Helio Studies (TRUTHS) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Paul D.; Fox, Nigel P.; Lobb, Daniel; Friend, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    TRUTHS (Traceable Radiometry Underpinning Terrestrial- and Helio-Studies) is a proposed small satellite mission to enable a space-based climate observing system capable of delivering data of the quality needed to provide the information needed by policy makers to make robust mitigation and adaptation decisions. This is achieved by embedding trust and confidence in the data and derived information (tied to international standards) from both its own measurements and by upgrading the performance and interoperability of other EO platforms, such as the Sentinels by in-flight reference calibration. TRUTHS would provide measurements of incoming (total and spectrally resolved) and global reflected spectrally and spatially (50 m) solar radiation at the 0.3% uncertainty level. These fundamental climate data products can be convolved into the building blocks for many ECVs and EO applications as envisaged by the 2015 ESA science strategy; in a cost effective manner. We describe the scientific drivers for the TRUTHS mission and how the requirements for the climate benchmarking and cross-calibration reference sensor are both complementary and simply implemented, with a small additional complexity on top of heritage calibration schemes. The calibration scheme components and the route to SI-traceable Earth-reflected solar spectral radiance and solar spectral irradiance are described.

  13. Quantum Tunneling Sb-Heterostructures for Millimeter Wave Radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Joel N.

    2003-03-01

    Imaging in the millimeter wavelength range has been making rapid progress as high speed electronics increase in frequency. Applications include viewing through adverse visibility conditions (fog, smoke, dust, precipitation) and also the relative transparency of clothing (concealed-weapons-detection) and some building materials (through-the-wall-detection). Atmospheric radiometry (climate assessment and weather prediction) already depend heavily on this wavelength range. Astronomical applications include incorporation in instruments for cosmic microwave background detection. An important ingredient is a diode that "rectifies" in a special way. It must convert input power, i.e., voltage squared, into a DC voltage output -- a "square-law" detector. We have recently found that quantum tunneling through an InAs/AlSb/GaAlSb heterostructure system provides the ideal physical mechanism for this purpose.1,2 We will present our results to date, demonstrating how a close coupling of semiconductor quantum tunneling theory with electrical engineering know-how have brought an "exotic" quantum phenomon to practical and economic application. 1. "Sb-heterostructure interband backward diodes" J.N. Schulman and D.H. Chow. IEEE Electron Device Letters 21, 353-355 (2000). 2. "High-Performance Antimonide-Based Heterostructure Backward Diodes for Millimeter-wave Detection" P. Fay, J. N. Schulman, S. Thomas III, D. H. Chow, Y. K. Boegeman, and K. S. Holabird, IEEE Electron Device Letters 23, 585-587 (2002).

  14. RFI Risk Reduction Activities Using New Goddard Digital Radiometry Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Damon; Kim, Ed; Young, Peter; Miles, Lynn; Wong, Mark; Morris, Joel

    2012-01-01

    The Goddard Radio-Frequency Explorer (GREX) is the latest fast-sampling radiometer digital back-end processor that will be used for radiometry and radio-frequency interference (RFI) surveying at Goddard Space Flight Center. The system is compact and deployable, with a mass of about 40 kilograms. It is intended to be flown on aircraft. GREX is compatible with almost any aircraft, including P-3, twin otter, C-23, C-130, G3, and G5 types. At a minimum, the system can function as a clone of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) ground-based development unit [1], or can be a completely independent system that is interfaced to any radiometer, provided that frequency shifting to GREX's intermediate frequency is performed prior to sampling. If the radiometer RF is less than 200MHz, then the band can be sampled and acquired directly by the system. A key feature of GREX is its ability to simultaneously sample two polarization channels simultaneously at up to 400MSPS, 14-bit resolution each. The sampled signals can be recorded continuously to a 23 TB solid-state RAID storage array. Data captures can be analyzed offline using the supercomputing facilities at Goddard Space Flight Center. In addition, various Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) - amenable radiometer signal processing and RFI detection algorithms can be implemented directly on the GREX system because it includes a high-capacity Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA prototyping system that is user customizable.

  15. Determination of combustion gas temperatures by infrared radiometry in sooting and nonsooting flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Valerie J.; Gracia-Salcedo, Carmen M.

    1989-01-01

    Flame temperatures in nonsooting and sooting environments were successfully measured by radiometry for pre-mixed propane-oxygen laminar flames stabilized on a water-cooled, porous sintered-bronze burner. The measured temperatures in the nonsooting flames were compared with fine-wire thermocouple measurements. The results show excellent agreement below 1700 K, and when the thermocouple measurements were corrected for radiation effects, the agreement was good for even higher temperatures. The benefits of radiometry are: (1) the flow is not disturbed by an intruding probe, (2) calibration is easily done using a blackbody source, and (3) measurements can be made even with soot present. The theory involved in the radiometry measurements and the energy balance calculations used to correct the thermocouple temperature measurements are discussed.

  16. Improved methods for measuring thermal parameters of liquid samples using photothermal infrared radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriakose, Maju; Depriester, Michael; Dadarlat, Dorin; Sahraoui, Abdelhak Hadj

    2013-02-01

    High accuracy, non-contact measuring methods for finding thermal properties of liquid samples using photothermal infrared radiometry (PTR) are presented. The use of transparent windows to confine micro volume liquid samples and the implementation of front and/or back signal detection procedures helped the successful implementation of the PTR technique for measuring liquids with high proficiency. We present two configurations, the so-called back-front photothermal infrared radiometry and back photothermal infrared radiometry to find thermal diffusivity and thermal effusivity of liquid samples. Sensitivity studies and error analyses included prove the robustness of each method. As an illustration of the temperature and electric field varying studies, we have included the experimental results on a 5CB (4-cyano-4‧-pentylbiphenyl) liquid crystal.

  17. Modulated IR radiometry for determining thermal properties and basic characteristics of titanium thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Apreutesei, Mihai; Lopes, Claudia; Vaz, Filipe; Macedo, Francisco; Borges, Joel

    2014-07-01

    Titanium thin films of different thicknesses were prepared by direct current magnetron sputtering to study modulated infrared (IR) radiometry as a tool for analyzing film thickness. Thickness was varied by regularly increasing the deposition time, keeping all the other deposition parameters constant. The influence of film thickness on morphological, structural, and electrical properties of the titanium coatings also was investigated. The experimental results revealed a systematic grain growth with increasing film thickness, along with enhanced film crystallinity, which led to increased electrical conductivity. Using the results obtained by modulated IR radiometry, the thickness of each thin film was calculated. These thickness values were then compared with the coating thickness measurements obtained by scanning electron microscopy. The values confirmed the reliability of modulated IR radiometry as an analysis tool for thin films and coatings, and for determining thicknesses in the micrometer range, in particular.

  18. Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Water Vapour by Pressure Modulation Radiometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, G. R.

    1987-09-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (SAMS) was a limb-sounding satellite experiment which used the technique of pressure modulation radiometry to measure the temperature and constituent distributions in the middle atmosphere. Two channels in the SAMS were devoted to the detection of water vapour, but the analysis of these data have produced unexpectedly high mixing ratios in the region of the stratopause. This thesis describes an attempt to resolve the discrepancy between theory and experiment by a laboratory investigation of the pressure modulation of water vapour. The central role of water vapour in the physics and chemistry of the middle atmosphere and previous attempts to measure its abundance are discussed. It is shown that the intercomparison of humidity sensing instruments has not produced a consensus and that the accuracy of the reported measurements is therefore in question. The SAMS water vapour channels are described and the need is shown for a laboratory transmission experiment. The pressure modulation technique is described in chapter 2 and a mathematical formulation is given. The constraints due to contaminant signals and harmonic contributions are considered and the use of the square wave chopping approximation in the interpretation of the measurements is discussed. In chapter 3, the spectroscopy of the H _2O rotation band is considered and it is shown that there are large uncertainties in most aspects of the problem due to the lack of spectroscopic measurements in this spectral region. In particular, the shapes of the collision broadened line wings under both self and foreign broadened conditions are poorly determined, a situation which is especially problematic for pressure modulation radiometry. The pressure modulation of water vapour is investigated in chapter 4 and it is shown by direct measurement of the pressure cycle that the linear model used by previous

  19. Multi-parameter-fitting procedure for photothermal infrared radiometry on multilayered and bulk-absorbing solids

    SciTech Connect

    Dorr, Peter; Gruss, Christian

    2001-06-15

    Photothermal infrared radiometry has been used for the measurement of thermophysical, optical, and geometrical properties of multilayered samples of paint on a metallic substrate. A special data normalization is applied to reduce the number of sensitive parameters which makes the identification task for the remaining parameters easier. The normalization stabilizes the evaluation of the photothermal signal and makes the infrared radiometry more attractive for applications in the industrial environment. It is shown that modeling and multi-parameter-fitting can be applied successfully to the normalized data for the determination of layer thicknesses. As a side product we can calculate some other physical properties of the sample. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Io's heat flow from infrared radiometry: 1983-1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, Glenn J.; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Blaney, Diana L.; Goguen, Jay D.

    1994-01-01

    We report the following results from a decade of infrared radiometry of Io: (1) The average global heat flow is more than approx. 2.5 W/sq.m, (2) large warm (less than or equal to 200 K) volcanic regions dominate the global heat flow, (3) smal high-temperature (greater than or = 300 K) 'hotspots' contribute little to the average heat flow, (4) thermal anomalies on the leading hemisphere contribute about half of the heat flow, (5) a substantial amount of heat is radiated during Io's night, (6) high-temperature (greater than or = 600 K) 'outbursts' occurred during approx. 4% of the nights we observed, (7) 'Loki' is the brightest, persistent, infrared emission feature, and (8) some excess emission is always present at the longitude of Loki, but its intensity and other characteristics change between apparitions. Observations of Io at M(4.8 micrometer), 8.7 micrometer, N(10 micrometer), and Q(20 micrometer) with the Infrared Telescope Facility presented here were collected during nine apparitions between 1983 and 1993. These measurements provide full longitudinal coveraged as well as an eclipse observation and the detection of two outbursts. Reflected sunlight, passive thermal emission, and radiation from thermal anomalies all contribute to the observed flux densities. We find that a new thermophysical model is required to match all the data. Two key elements of this model are (1) a 'thermal reservoir' unit which lowers daytime temperatures, and (2) the 'thermal pedestal effect' which shifts to shorter wavelengths the spectral emission due to the reradiation of solar energy absorbed by the thermal anomalies. The thermal anomalies are modeled with a total of 10 source components at five locations. Io's heat flow is the sum of the power from these components.

  1. Traceable Radiometry Underpinning Terrestrial- and Helio- Studies (TRUTHS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fox, N.; Aiken, J.; Barnett, J.J.; Briottet, X.; Carvell, R.; Frohlich, C.; Groom, S.B.; Hagolle, O.; Haigh, J.D.; Kieffer, H.H.; Lean, J.; Pollock, D.B.; Quinn, T.; Sandford, M.C.W.; Schaepman, M.; Shine, K.P.; Schmutz, W.K.; Teillet, P.M.; Thome, K.J.; Verstraete, M.M.; Zalewski, E.

    2002-01-01

    The Traceable Radiometry Underpinning Terrestrial- and Helio- Studies (TRUTHS) mission offers a novel approach to the provision of key scientific data with unprecedented radiometric accuracy for Earth Observation (EO) and solar studies, which will also establish well-calibrated reference targets/standards to support other EO missions. This paper will present the TRUTHS mission and its objectives. TRUTHS will be the first satellite mission to calibrate its instrumentation directly to SI in orbit, overcoming the usual uncertainties associated with drifts of sensor gain and spectral shape by using an electrical rather than an optical standard as the basis of its calibration. The range of instruments flown as part of the payload will also provide accurate input data to improve atmospheric radiative transfer codes by anchoring boundary conditions, through simultaneous measurements of aerosols, particulates and radiances at various heights. Therefore, TRUTHS will significantly improve the performance and accuracy of Earth observation missions with broad global or operational aims, as well as more dedicated missions. The provision of reference standards will also improve synergy between missions by reducing errors due to different calibration biases and offer cost reductions for future missions by reducing the demands for on-board calibration systems. Such improvements are important for the future success of strategies such as Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) and the implementation and monitoring of international treaties such as the Kyoto Protocol. TRUTHS will achieve these aims by measuring the geophysical variables of solar and lunar irradiance, together with both polarised and un-polarised spectral radiance of the Moon, and the Earth and its atmosphere.

  2. Traceable Radiometry Underpinning Terrestrial - and Helio- Studies (TRUTHS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fox, N.; Aiken, J.; Barnett, J.J.; Briottet, X.; Carvell, R.; Frohlich, C.; Groom, S.B.; Hagolle, O.; Haigh, J.D.; Kieffer, H.H.; Lean, J.; Pollock, D.B.; Quinn, T.; Sandford, M.C.W.; Schaepman, M.; Shine, K.P.; Schmutz, W.K.; Teillet, P.M.; Thome, K.J.; Verstraete, M.M.; Zalewski, E.

    2003-01-01

    The Traceable Radiometry Underpinning Terrestrial- and Helio- Studies (TRUTHS) mission offers a novel approach to the provision of key scientific data with unprecedented radiometric accuracy for Earth Observation (EO) and solar studies, which will also establish well-calibrated reference targets/standards to support other EO missions. This paper presents the TRUTHS mission and its objectives. TRUTHS will be the first satellite mission to calibrate its EO instrumentation directly to SI in orbit, overcoming the usual uncertainties associated with drifts of sensor gain and spectral shape by using an electrical rather than an optical standard as the basis of its calibration. The range of instruments flown as part of the payload will also provide accurate input data to improve atmospheric radiative transfer codes by anchoring boundary conditions, through simultaneous measurements of aerosols, particulates and radiances at various heights. Therefore, TRUTHS will significantly improve the performance and accuracy of EO missions with broad global or operational aims, as well as more dedicated missions. The provision of reference standards will also improve synergy between missions by reducing errors due to different calibration biases and offer cost reductions for future missions by reducing the demands for on-board calibration systems. Such improvements are important for the future success of strategies such as Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) and the implementation and monitoring of international treaties such as the Kyoto Protocol. TRUTHS will achieve these aims by measuring the geophysical variables of solar and lunar irradiance, together with both polarised and unpolarised spectral radiance of the Moon, Earth and its atmosphere. Published by Elsevier Ltd of behalf of COSPAR.

  3. Ozone and temperature decadal trends in the stratosphere, mesosphere and lower thermosphere, based on measurements from SABER on TIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F. T.; Mayr, H. G.; Russell, J. M., III; Mlynczak, M. G.

    2014-08-01

    We have derived ozone and temperature trends from years 2002 through 2012, from 20 to 100 km altitude, and 48° S to 48° N latitude, based on measurements from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite. For the first time, trends of ozone and temperature measured at the same times and locations are obtained, and their correlations should provide useful information about the relative importance of photochemistry versus dynamics over the longer term. We are not aware of comparable results covering this time period and spatial extent. For stratospheric ozone, until the late 1990s, previous studies found negative trends (decreasing amounts). In recent years, some empirical and modeling studies have shown the occurrence of a turnaround in the decreasing ozone, possibly beginning in the late 1990s, suggesting that the stratospheric ozone trend is leveling off or even turning positive. Our global results add more definitive evidence, expand the coverage, and show that at mid-latitudes (north and south) in the stratosphere, the ozone trends are indeed positive, with ozone having increased by a few percent from 2002 through 2012. However, in the tropics, we find negative ozone trends between 25 and 50 km. For stratospheric temperatures, the trends are mostly negatively correlated to the ozone trends. The temperature trends are positive in the tropics between 30 and 40 km, and between 20 and 25 km, at approximately 24° N and at 24° S latitude. The stratospheric temperature trends are otherwise mostly negative. In the mesosphere, the ozone trends are mostly flat, with suggestions of small positive trends at lower latitudes. The temperature trends in this region are mostly negative, showing decreases of up to ~ -3 K decade-1. In the lower thermosphere (between ~ 85 and 100 km), ozone and temperature trends are both negative. The ozone trend can

  4. Titan's surface from the Cassini RADAR radiometry data during SAR mode

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paganelli, F.; Janssen, M.A.; Lopes, R.M.; Stofan, E.; Wall, S.D.; Lorenz, R.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Kirk, R.L.; Roth, L.; Elachi, C.

    2008-01-01

    We present initial results on the calibration and interpretation of the high-resolution radiometry data acquired during the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mode (SAR-radiometry) of the Cassini Radar Mapper during its first five flybys of Saturn's moon Titan. We construct maps of the brightness temperature at the 2-cm wavelength coincident with SAR swath imaging. A preliminary radiometry calibration shows that brightness temperature in these maps varies from 64 to 89 K. Surface features and physical properties derived from the SAR-radiometry maps and SAR imaging are strongly correlated; in general, we find that surface features with high radar reflectivity are associated with radiometrically cold regions, while surface features with low radar reflectivity correlate with radiometrically warm regions. We examined scatterplots of the normalized radar cross-section ??0 versus brightness temperature, outlining signatures that characterize various terrains and surface features. The results indicate that volume scattering is important in many areas of Titan's surface, particularly Xanadu, while other areas exhibit complex brightness temperature variations consistent with variable slopes or surface material and compositional properties. ?? 2007.

  5. Photothermal radiometry probing of scars in the internal surface of a thin metal tube.

    PubMed

    Li, P Z; Zhou, G Y

    1992-07-01

    The principle and equipment of photothermal radiometry probing of scars in the internal surface of a thin metal tube are described. By measuring the amplitude frequency characteristics of the photothermal signal, we calculated the depth of the scars in the internal surface of a sample. PMID:20725353

  6. Detection of Vesicoureteral Reflux using Microwave Radiometry – System Characterization with Tissue Phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Maccarini, Paolo; De Luca, Valeria; Tognolatti, Piero; Bardati, Fernando; Snow, Brent; Stauffer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Microwave (MW) radiometry is proposed for passive monitoring of kidney temperature to detect vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) of urine that is externally heated by a MW hyperthermia device and thereafter reflows from the bladder to kidneys during reflux. Here we characterize in tissue-mimicking phantoms the performance of a 1.375 GHz radiometry system connected to an electromagnetically (EM) shielded microstrip log spiral antenna optimized for VUR detection. Phantom EM properties are characterized using a coaxial dielectric probe and network analyzer (NA). Power reflection and receive patterns of the antenna are measured in layered tissue phantom. Receiver spectral measurements are used to assess EM shielding provided by a metal cup surrounding the antenna. Radiometer and fiberoptic temperature data are recorded for varying volumes (10–30 mL) and temperatures (40–46°C) of the urine phantom at 35 mm depth surrounded by 36.5°C muscle phantom. Directional receive pattern with about 5% power spectral density at 35 mm target depth and better than −10dB return loss from tissue load are measured for the antenna. Antenna measurements demonstrate no deterioration in power reception and effective EM shielding in the presence of the metal cup. Radiometry power measurements are in excellent agreement with the temperature of the kidney phantom. Laboratory testing of the radiometry system in temperature controlled phantoms supports the feasibility of passive kidney thermometry for VUR detection. PMID:21257366

  7. Detection of vesicoureteral reflux using microwave radiometry-system characterization with tissue phantoms.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo; De Luca, Valeria; Tognolatti, Piero; Bardati, Fernando; Snow, Brent; Stauffer, Paul

    2011-06-01

    Microwave (MW) radiometry is proposed for passive monitoring of kidney temperature to detect vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) of urine that is externally heated by a MW hyperthermia device and thereafter reflows from the bladder to kidneys during reflux. Here, we characterize in tissue-mimicking phantoms the performance of a 1.375 GHz radiometry system connected to an electromagnetically (EM) shielded microstrip log spiral antenna optimized for VUR detection. Phantom EM properties are characterized using a coaxial dielectric probe and network analyzer (NA). Power reflection and receive patterns of the antenna are measured in layered tissue phantom. Receiver spectral measurements are used to assess EM shielding provided by a metal cup surrounding the antenna. Radiometer and fiberoptic temperature data are recorded for varying volumes (10-30 mL) and temperaturesg (40-46°C) of the urine phantom at 35 mm depth surrounded by 36.5°C muscle phantom. Directional receive pattern with about 5% power spectral density at 35 mm target depth and better than -10 dB return loss from tissue load are measured for the antenna. Antenna measurements demonstrate no deterioration in power reception and effective EM shielding in the presence of the metal cup. Radiometry power measurements are in excellent agreement with the temperature of the kidney phantom. Laboratory testing of the radiometry system in temperature-controlled phantoms supports the feasibility of passive kidney thermometry for VUR detection. PMID:21257366

  8. Modeling the Detectability of Vesicoureteral Reflux using Microwave Radiometry

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo F.; De Luca, Valeria; Bardati, Fernando; Snow, Brent W.; Stauffer, Paul R

    2010-01-01

    We present the modeling efforts on antenna design, frequency selection and receiver sensitivity estimation to detect vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) using microwave (MW) radiometry as the warm urine from the bladder maintained at fever range temperature using a MW hyperthermia device reflows into the kidneys. Radiometer center frequency (fc), frequency band (Δf), and aperture radius (ra) of the physical antenna for kidney temperature monitoring are determined using a simplified universal antenna model with circular aperture. Anatomical information extracted from computed tomography (CT) images of children age 4–6 years is used to construct a layered 3D tissue model. Radiometric antenna efficiency is evaluated in terms of the ratio between the power collected from the target at depth and the total power received by the antenna (η). Power ratio of the theoretical antenna is used to design a microstrip log spiral antenna with directional radiation pattern over fc ± Δf/2. Power received by the log spiral from the deep target is enhanced using a thin low-loss dielectric matching layer. A cylindrical metal cup is proposed to shield the antenna from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Transient thermal simulations are carried out to determine the minimum detectable change in antenna brightness temperature (δTB) for 15–25 mL urine refluxes at 40–42°C located 35 mm from the skin surface. Theoretical antenna simulations indicate maximum η over 1.1–1.6 GHz for ra = 30–40 mm. Simulations of the 35 mm radius tapered log spiral yielded higher power ratio over fc ± Δf/2 for the 35–40 mm deep targets in the presence of an optimal matching layer. Radiometric temperature calculations indicate δTB ≥ 0.1 K for the 15 mL urine at 40°C and 35 mm depth. Higher η and δTB were observed for the antenna and matching layer inside the metal cup. Reflection measurements of the log spiral in saline phantom are in agreement with the simulation data. Numerical study suggests

  9. Modeling the detectability of vesicoureteral reflux using microwave radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo F.; De Luca, Valeria; Bardati, Fernando; Snow, Brent W.; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2010-09-01

    We present the modeling efforts on antenna design, frequency selection and receiver sensitivity estimation to detect vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) using microwave (MW) radiometry as warm urine from the bladder maintained at fever range temperature using a MW hyperthermia device reflows into the kidneys. The radiometer center frequency (fc), frequency band (Δf) and aperture radius (ra) of the physical antenna for kidney temperature monitoring are determined using a simplified universal antenna model with a circular aperture. Anatomical information extracted from the computed tomography (CT) images of children aged 4-6 years is used to construct a layered 3D tissue model. Radiometric antenna efficiency is evaluated in terms of the ratio of the power collected from the target at depth to the total power received by the antenna (η). The power ratio of the theoretical antenna is used to design a microstrip log spiral antenna with directional radiation pattern over fc ± Δf/2. Power received by the log spiral from the deep target is enhanced using a thin low-loss dielectric matching layer. A cylindrical metal cup is proposed to shield the antenna from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Transient thermal simulations are carried out to determine the minimum detectable change in the antenna brightness temperature (δTB) for 15-25 mL urine refluxes at 40-42 °C located 35 mm from the skin surface. Theoretical antenna simulations indicate maximum η over 1.1-1.6 GHz for ra = 30-40 mm. Simulations of the 35 mm radius tapered log spiral yielded a higher power ratio over fc ± Δf/2 for the 35-40 mm deep targets in the presence of an optimal matching layer. Radiometric temperature calculations indicate δTB >= 0.1 K for the 15 mL urine at 40 °C and 35 mm depth. Higher η and δTB were observed for the antenna and matching layer inside the metal cup. Reflection measurements of the log spiral in a saline phantom are in agreement with the simulation data. The numerical study

  10. Modeling the detectability of vesicoureteral reflux using microwave radiometry.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo F; De Luca, Valeria; Bardati, Fernando; Snow, Brent W; Stauffer, Paul R

    2010-09-21

    We present the modeling efforts on antenna design, frequency selection and receiver sensitivity estimation to detect vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) using microwave (MW) radiometry as warm urine from the bladder maintained at fever range temperature using a MW hyperthermia device reflows into the kidneys. The radiometer center frequency (f(c)), frequency band (Deltaf) and aperture radius (r(a)) of the physical antenna for kidney temperature monitoring are determined using a simplified universal antenna model with a circular aperture. Anatomical information extracted from the computed tomography (CT) images of children aged 4-6 years is used to construct a layered 3D tissue model. Radiometric antenna efficiency is evaluated in terms of the ratio of the power collected from the target at depth to the total power received by the antenna (eta). The power ratio of the theoretical antenna is used to design a microstrip log spiral antenna with directional radiation pattern over f(c) +/- Deltaf/2. Power received by the log spiral from the deep target is enhanced using a thin low-loss dielectric matching layer. A cylindrical metal cup is proposed to shield the antenna from electromagnetic interference (EMI). Transient thermal simulations are carried out to determine the minimum detectable change in the antenna brightness temperature (deltaT(B)) for 15-25 mL urine refluxes at 40-42 degrees C located 35 mm from the skin surface. Theoretical antenna simulations indicate maximum eta over 1.1-1.6 GHz for r(a) = 30-40 mm. Simulations of the 35 mm radius tapered log spiral yielded a higher power ratio over f(c) +/- Deltaf/2 for the 35-40 mm deep targets in the presence of an optimal matching layer. Radiometric temperature calculations indicate deltaT(B) 0.1 K for the 15 mL urine at 40 degrees C and 35 mm depth. Higher eta and deltaT(B) were observed for the antenna and matching layer inside the metal cup. Reflection measurements of the log spiral in a saline phantom are in agreement

  11. Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) (290-400 nm) radiometry of solar simulation for experimental radiation in drug and chemical photosensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, A. R.; Magnus, I. A.; Gibbs, N. K.

    1982-02-01

    The ultraviolet radiation (UVR) radiometry of solar simulated radiation in a long-term photocarcinogenesis project is described. The methods used were (a) a phototherapy radiometer, (b) an electronic integrating dosimeter, (c) indirect spectroradiometry,and (d) polysulphone and naladixic film badge dosimeters for UV-B (280-315 nm) and UV-A (315-400 nm) radiation, respectively. The merits of the various methods are discussed. The importance of reliable and practical UVR radiometry is emphasised.

  12. EBE/ECE Radiometry on COMPASS Tokamak - Design and First Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zajac, J.; Preinhaelter, J.; Urban, J.; Sestak, D.; Nanobashvili, S.

    2009-11-26

    COMPASS tokamak has started its operation in IPP Prague recently. A new 16-channel radiometry system has been designed and manufactured for the electron Bernstein/cyclotron wave emission (EBE/ECE) experiments. For EBE studies, based on EBW-X-O mode conversion, radiometry in Ka-band (26.5-40 GHz will be used which corresponds to the fundamental EC harmonics for the low-B{sub t}(B{sub o}{approx}1.2 T) tokamak operation. Alternatively, an E-band antenna and front-end (60-73.5/76.5-90 GHz) will be used with the same 16-channel receiver for the conventional second harmonics ECE diagnostics. In the contribution the design of the system is described as well as the initial testing measurements on tokamak COMPASS.

  13. Wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry: theory and experimental applications to glucose detection in water.

    PubMed

    Mandelis, Andreas; Guo, Xinxin

    2011-10-01

    A differential photothermal radiometry method, wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry (WM-DPTR), has been developed theoretically and experimentally for noninvasive, noncontact biological analyte detection, such as blood glucose monitoring. WM-DPTR features analyte specificity and sensitivity by combining laser excitation by two out-of-phase modulated beams at wavelengths near the peak and the base line of a prominent and isolated mid-IR analyte absorption band (here the carbon-oxygen-carbon bond in the pyran ring of the glucose molecule). A theoretical photothermal model of WM-DPTR signal generation and detection has been developed. Simulation results on water-glucose phantoms with the human blood range (0-300 mg/dl) glucose concentration demonstrated high sensitivity and resolution to meet wide clinical detection requirements. The model has also been validated by experimental data of the glucose-water system obtained using WM-DPTR. PMID:22181185

  14. Depth profiling of laser-heated chromophores in biological tissues by pulsed photothermal radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Milner, T.E.; Goodman, D.M.; Tanenbaum, B.S.; Nelson, J.S.

    1995-07-01

    A solution method is proposed to the inverse problem of determining the unknown initial temperature distribution in a laser-exposed test material from measurements provided by infrared radiometry. A Fredholm integral equation of the first kind is derived that relates the temporal evolution of the infrared signal amplitude to the unknown initial temperature distribution in the exposed test material. The singular-value decomposition is used to demonstrate the severely ill-posed nature of the derived inverse problem. Three inversion methods are used to estimate solutions for the initial temperature distribution. A nonnegatively constrained conjugate-gradient algorithm using early termination is found superior to unconstrained inversion methods and is applied to image the depth of laser-heated chromophores in human skin. {ital Key} {ital words}: constrained conjugate gradients, ill-posed problem, infrared radiometry, laser surgery, nonnegative, singular-value decomposition.

  15. Wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry: Theory and experimental applications to glucose detection in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelis, Andreas; Guo, Xinxin

    2011-10-01

    A differential photothermal radiometry method, wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry (WM-DPTR), has been developed theoretically and experimentally for noninvasive, noncontact biological analyte detection, such as blood glucose monitoring. WM-DPTR features analyte specificity and sensitivity by combining laser excitation by two out-of-phase modulated beams at wavelengths near the peak and the base line of a prominent and isolated mid-IR analyte absorption band (here the carbon-oxygen-carbon bond in the pyran ring of the glucose molecule). A theoretical photothermal model of WM-DPTR signal generation and detection has been developed. Simulation results on water-glucose phantoms with the human blood range (0-300 mg/dl) glucose concentration demonstrated high sensitivity and resolution to meet wide clinical detection requirements. The model has also been validated by experimental data of the glucose-water system obtained using WM-DPTR.

  16. Remote sensing of the atmosphere of Mars using infrared pressure modulation and filter radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccleese, D. J.; Schofield, J. T.; Zurek, R. W.; Martonchik, J. V.; Haskins, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    The study of the atmosphere and climate of Mars will soon be advanced considerably by the Mars Observer mission. This paper describes the atmospheric sounder for this mission and how it will measure key Martian atmospheric parameters using IR gas correlation and filter radiometry. The instrument now under development will provide high-resolution vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature, pressure, water vapor, dust, and clouds using limb sounding techniques as well as nadir observations of surface thermal properties and polar radiative balance.

  17. New methodology for thermal parameter measurements in solids using photothermal radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Depriester, M.; Hus, P.; Delenclos, S.; Sahraoui, A. Hadj

    2005-07-15

    The photothermal radiometry (PTR) signal is analyzed in order to simultaneously obtain the thermal diffusivity and effusivity of solid materials. Analytical procedures that allow the determination of the thermal parameters via a frequency scan of the amplitude or the phase of the PTR signal are presented. The measurement procedures do not involve a multiparameter-fit optimization algorithm. The methods have been used for the measurement of thermophysical properties of vitreous carbon and lead-itanate-zirconate ceramic samples.

  18. Study of thermal parameters' temperature dependence in solids using photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Depriester, M; Hus, P; Delenclos, S; Hadj Sahraoui, A

    2007-03-01

    A photothermal radiometry configuration that allows the measurement of the temperature dependence of thermal parameters of solid materials is described. Two procedures are proposed. The first one is based on a combination of phase and amplitude signal data collected at a single frequency and the second one makes use of the information contained in the phase signal data, obtained at two different chopping frequencies. The methods are recommended for calorimetric studies requiring temperature scans at a constant chopping frequency. PMID:17411226

  19. Approach of the measurement of thermal diffusivity of mural paintings by front face photothermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candoré, Jean Charles; Bodnar, J. L.; Detalle, Vincent; Remy, B.; Grossel, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    In this paper we present, in an experimental way, the possibilities of front face photothermal radiometry to measure, in situ, the longitudinal thermal diffusivity of mural paintings. First, we present the principle of the method of measurement. Then, we present the experimental device implemented for the study. Finally, we show, using the experimental study of a plaster sample, the photothermal method allows in a particular case, a good approximation of the parameter longitudinal thermal diffusivity.

  20. Titan's surface from Cassini RADAR SAR and high resolution radiometry data of the first five flybys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paganelli, F.; Janssen, M.A.; Stiles, B.; West, R.; Lorenz, R.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Wall, S.D.; Callahan, P.; Lopes, R.M.; Stofan, E.; Kirk, R.L.; Johnson, W.T.K.; Roth, L.; Elachi, C.; The Radar Team

    2007-01-01

    The first five Titan flybys with Cassini's Synthetic Aperture RADAR (SAR) and radiometer are examined with emphasis on the calibration and interpretation of the high-resolution radiometry data acquired during the SAR mode (SAR-radiometry). Maps of the 2-cm wavelength brightness temperature are obtained coincident with the SAR swath imaging, with spatial resolution approaching 6 km. A preliminary calibration shows that brightness temperature in these maps varies from 64 to 89 K. Surface features and physical properties derived from the SAR-radiometry maps and SAR imaging are strongly correlated; in general, we find that surface features with high radar reflectivity are associated with radiometrically cold regions, while surface features with low radar reflectivity correlate with radiometrically warm regions. We examined scatterplots of the normalized radar cross-section ??0 versus brightness temperature, finding differing signatures that characterize various terrains and surface features. Implications for the physical and compositional properties of these features are discussed. The results indicate that volume scattering is important in many areas of Titan's surface, particularly Xanadu, while other areas exhibit complex brightness temperature variations consistent with variable slopes or surface material and compositional properties. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc.

  1. Studying the MLT by a Combined Analysis of SABER/TIMED and Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feofilov, A. G.; Kutepov, A. A.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.; Zecha, M.; Gerding, M.; Luebken, F. J.; Fiedler, J.; vonZhan, U.; Russell, J. M., III

    2006-01-01

    The SABER instrument on board the TIMED Satellite is a limb scanning infrared radiometer designed to measure temperature and minor constituent vertical profiles and energetics parameters in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). The measurements have been performed continuously since January 25, 2002 to provide excellent coverage for both hemispheres. The Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics (LAP) at Kuehlungsborn, Germany (54N, 12E) operates two lidar instruments, using three different temperature measurement methods, optimized for three altitude ranges. The total altitude range of the lidar installation lies from 1 to 105 km. Another instrument used for intercomparison is the ALOMAR RMR lidar, located at Andoya, Norway (69N, 16E). We have searched the SABER and lidar datasets for coincidental common volume measurements within plus or minus 1 degree in latitude, plus or minus 2 degrees in longitude and approx. 1 hour in time for the sake of (a) comparison of measured temperatures; (b) validation of the models used in SABER data analysis; and (c) extracting new information about MLT parameters. In this work we applied the non-LTE ALI-ARMS code designed to calculate the nonequilibrium radiance in different viewing geometries to the analysis of measurements which satisfied these search criteria. The results of this analysis (a) support the application of higher value of CO2-O quenching rate (6e-12 cubic centimeters per second) by the non-LTE temperature retrievals from the SABER 15 micrometer limb radiance data, and (b) demonstrate the importance of accounting for the vibrational-vibrational energy exchange among the CO2 isotopes for accurate temperature retrievals. Using temperature profiles obtained in lidar measurements as inputs for the retrieval algorithm we also retrieved the nighttime CO2 densities from the SABER 15 micrometer limb radiances and compared them with the model and climatology CO2 data used in the SABER nighttime temperature retrievals.

  2. The use of photothermal radiometry in assessing leaf photosynthesis: II. Correlation of energy storage to Photosystem II fluorescence parameters.

    PubMed

    Driesenaar, A R; Schreiber, U; Malkin, S

    1994-04-01

    Following the first part of this work (Malkin et al. (1991) Photosynth Res 29: 87-96), where modulated photothermal radiometry (PTR) was used to measure energy storage (ES) in intact leaves as a function of P700 redox state, we report here on simultaneous ES and fluorescence measurements, which characterize the state of PS II. PTR monitors the conversion of modulated light into heat by measuring the modulated infra-red radiation emitted from the sample. The ratio [PTR+-PTR-]/PTR+, where PTR indicates the PTR signal and the subscripts +,- indicate the presence or absence of saturating background light, is used to quantitate ES. We searched carefully for the right conditions where the background light does not introduce a significant rise in the leaf temperature, which influences the PTR signal as such, otherwise the above ratio deviates from the true ES. Under such conditions, ES and the fluorescence parameters, F (momentary fluorescence level) Fm' (fluorescence of fully reduced PS II reaction centers) were measured during the induction phase of photosynthesis and in the steady state. ES and the parameter γ=(Fm'-F)/Fm', considered by Genty et al. ((1989) Biochim Biophys Acta 990: 87-92) to reflect the yield of PS II, had similar kinetics during the induction phase. Both reached a final maximum plateau after about 4-5 min. of illumination. In different experiments, where the measuring light intensities varied, γ was approximately linearly related to ES. This linear relationship was found in the same way also in steady-state measurements, where these parameters varied by using different background light intensities. Extrapolation to an ES value of zero indicates a finite non-zero value of γ. A possible explanation for this may be found in the existence an electron transport cycle around PS II which does not store energy in the range corresponding to the modulation frequency used (ca. 3.6 Hz). PMID:24311213

  3. Chapter 7: Lessons, Conclusions, and Implications of the Saber-Tooth Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Phillip; Doutis, Panayiotis; Evans, Sharon A.

    1999-01-01

    Summarizes findings from the Saber-Tooth Project related to systemic change and student learning, concluding that vision is everything; workplace conditions must be addressed at multiple levels; strong relationships exist among planning, teaching, and assessment; and improvement in reform may occur due to the cessation of business as usual. This…

  4. Characterization of a Digital Microwave Radiometry System for Noninvasive Thermometry using Temperature Controlled Homogeneous Test Load

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, K; Stauffer, P R; Maccarini, PF; Jacobsen, S; Sterzer, F

    2009-01-01

    Microwave radiometry has been proposed as a viable noninvasive thermometry approach for monitoring subsurface tissue temperatures and potentially controlling power levels of multielement heat applicators during clinical hyperthermia treatments. With the evolution of technology, several analog microwave radiometry devices have been developed for biomedical applications. In this paper, we describe a digital microwave radiometer with built-in electronics for signal processing and automatic self-calibration. Performance of the radiometer with an Archimedean spiral receive antenna is evaluated over a bandwidth of 3.7–4.2GHz in homogeneous and layered water test loads. Controlled laboratory experiments over the range of 30–50°C characterize measurement accuracy, stability, repeatability and penetration depth sensitivity. The ability to sense load temperature through an intervening water coupling bolus of 6mm thickness is also investigated. To assess clinical utility and sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), experiments are conducted inside standard clinical hyperthermia treatment rooms with no EM shielding. The digital radiometer provided repeatable measurements with 0.075°C resolution and standard deviation of 0.217°C for homogeneous and layered tissue loads at temperatures between 32–45°C. Within the 3.7–4.2GHz band, EM noise rejection was good other than some interference from overhead fluorescent lights in the same room as the radiometer. The system response obtained for ideal water loads suggests that this digital radiometer should be useful for estimating subcutaneous tissue temperatures under a 6mm waterbolus used during clinical hyperthermia treatments. The accuracy and stability data obtained in water test loads of several configurations support our expectation that single band radiometry should be sufficient for sub-surface temperature monitoring and power control of large multielement array superficial hyperthermia applicators. PMID

  5. The Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter Archive: Final Precision Experiment Data Record Release and Status of Radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, Gregory A.; Lemoine, F. G.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2003-01-01

    A final release (Version L) of the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Precision Experiment Data Record (PEDR) has been submitted to the Planetary Data System (PDS). Additional gridded data record products are forthcoming. These products have evolved since their original description, owing in part to improved gravity modeling and cartographic reference frames, and in part to refinements in calibration. An additional component, the 1064 nm narrowband radiometry data, is also being archived. These data will be invaluable for future studies by Mars explorers and scientists.

  6. Interface resistance in copper coated carbon determined by frequency dependent photothermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijamnajsuk, P.; Giuliani, F.; Chirtoc, M.; Horny, N.; Gibkes, J.; Chotikaprakhan, S.; Bein, B. K.; Pelzl, J.

    2010-03-01

    The heat transfer in copper-carbon flat model systems was studied by frequency dependent photothermal radiometry. A novel approach which relies on the frequency dependence of the photothermal signal phase and amplitude at intermediate frequencies was introduced to determine the thermal interface resistance between the Cu-film and the substrate. The frequency dependent amplitude and phase of the photothermal signals were analyzed in the frame of a model of a one- dimensional heat flow perpendicular to the film plane. The interface resistance of the investigated CuC-sample with a Ti-bonding layer was found to increase by a factor two on heat treatment.

  7. Thermal diffusivity measurement by photothermal radiometry under random excitation and parametric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahim, S.; Bodnar et, J. L.; Grossel, P.

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this work is to approach in an experimental way, the possibilities of diffusivity thermal measurement, under less energy constraints, offered by front face random photothermal radiometry associated to a parametric analysis. First, we present the principle of the random method. Then, we present the experimental device SAMMIR used in our study. In a third stage, we present the studied sample, the experimental conditions selected and the model developed for the study. We show finally, using the experimental study of a sample of nylon 6.6 that the photothermal method allows, in a particular case, a good approximation of the thermal diffusivity parameter.

  8. Measurement of the optical and thermal properties of biliary calculi using pulsed photothermal radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Long, F.H.; Nishioka, N.S.; Deutsch, T.F.

    1987-01-01

    The optical absorption coefficients for biliary calculi are important in understanding the mechanism of laser-induced stone fragmentation. However, the heterogeneous composition of calculi and difficulties in producing optically thin samples prevent conventional spectrophotometric measurement techniques from being used. To overcome these limitations, we used a pulsed photothermal radiometry system to measure the optical absorption coefficients and thermal diffusivities of various biliary calculi. In the wavelength range examined (350-1060 nm), there was strong optical absorption which was greater for pigment stones than for cholesterol stones. The data support the theory that the initiation of the plasma accompanying laser fragmentation of calculi is a thermal process.

  9. Fiber-optic pulsed photothermal radiometry for fast surface-temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    Eyal, O; Scharf, V; Katzir, A

    1998-09-01

    Temperature measurement based on pulsed photothermal radiometry is described. In this technique a body is irradiated by a laser pulse and its temperature is inferred from the shape of the emitted photothermal-signal curve. A prototypical system based on a pulsed CO(2) laser, an IR detector, and IR-transmitting silver halide optical fibers was constructed and used to evaluate the feasibility of this technique. An important feature of the technique is that changes in sample emissivity or geometric factors do not introduce errors in the temperature determination. Theory, simulation, and experimental results are given and discussed. PMID:18286089

  10. Thickness microscopy based on photothermal radiometry for the measurement of thin films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Prekel, Helmut; Liu, Hengbiao; Deng, Yanzhuo; Hu, Jiming; Goch, Gert

    2009-03-01

    The photothermal detection technique is an innovative and non-contact method to investigate the properties of films on workpieces. This paper describes a novel experimental set-up for thickness microscopy based on photothermal radiometry. The correlation between the thermal wave signal and the film thickness is deduced and evaluated to determine the film thickness with a lateral resolution of less than 1mm. Results indicate that the thickness microscopy is a useful method to characterize thin films and has the potential to be applied in-process. PMID:19046925

  11. Analysis of layered scattering materials by pulsed photothermal radiometry: application to photon propagation in tissue.

    PubMed

    Vitkin, I A; Wilson, B C; Anderson, R R

    1995-06-01

    A model of pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) based on optical diffusion theory is presented for a turbid, two-layer, semi-infinite medium containing a surface layer whose optical absorption and scattering properties differ from that of the underlying layer. Assuming one-dimensional geometry, we develop expressions for the depth-dependent fluence distributions and radiant-energy-density profiles and for the time dependence of the PPTR signal. Experimental tests of the PPTR model in a series of layered phantoms of varying optical properties are described. The results of these tests are consistent with the model predictions. PMID:21052451

  12. Differential radiometry for measuring the net radiative flux in the earth`s atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    La Delfe, P.C.; Love, S.P.; Weber, P.G.

    1996-11-01

    The Hemispheric Optimized NEt Radiometer (HONER) is very briefly described. HONER was developed to resolve technical issues impeding the accurate measurement of atmospheric radiative flux. HONER uses differential radiometry, chopping the signal from upwelling and downwelling fluxes onto a single AC detector system, allowing true optical differencing as well as measurements of the individual fluxes. Wavelength coverage encompasses ultraviolet to more than 50 micrometers. HONER has been used in a ground-based version and will be tested on the Perseus B Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle.

  13. Non-destructive evaluation of cylindrical composite structures using photothermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Mandelis, A.; Liu, Y.

    2005-06-01

    Thermal-wave diagnostics by means of infrared photothermal radiometry (PTR) has been used for quantitative non-destructive evaluation of cylindrical composite structures. To quantitatively evaluate the thermal-wave field of a cylindrical composite material, the Green function corresponding to the composite structure has been developed and subsequently the thermal-wave field has been derived. Furthermore, the characteristics of the thermal-wave field for a cylindrical material with a surface coating are discussed. Experimental results from a stainless steel (AISI 302) tube are used to validate the theoretical model.

  14. Comparison of photoacoustic radiometry to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods for monitoring chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sollid, J.E.; Trujillo, V.L.; Limback, S.P.; Woloshun, K.A.

    1996-03-01

    A comparison of two methods of gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and a nondispersive infrared technique, photoacoustic radiometry (PAR), is presented in the context of field monitoring a disposal site. First is presented an historical account describing the site and early monitoring to provide an overview. The intent and nature of the monitoring program changed when it was proposed to expand the Radiological Waste Site close to the Hazardous Waste Site. Both the sampling methods and analysis techniques were refined in the course of this exercise.

  15. Ozone and temperature decadal responses to solar variability in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere, based on measurements from SABER on TIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F. T.; Mayr, H. G.; Russell, J. M., III; Mlynczak, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    We have derived ozone and temperature responses to solar variability over a solar cycle, from June 2002 through June 2014, 50 to 100 km, 48° S to 48° N, based on data from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite. Results with this extent of coverage in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere have not been available previously. A multiple regression is applied to obtain responses as a function of the solar 10.7 cm flux (solar flux units, sfu). Positive responses mean that they are larger at solar maximum than at solar minimum of the solar cycle. From ˜ 80 to 100 km, both ozone and temperature responses are positive for all latitudes and are larger than those at lower altitudes. From ˜ 80 to 100 km, ozone responses can exceed 10 % (100 sfu)-1, and temperature responses can approach 4 °K. From 50 to ˜ 80 km, the ozone responses at low latitudes ( ˜ ±35°) are mostly negative and can approach ˜ negative 3 % (100 sfu)-1. However, they are mostly positive at midlatitudes in this region and can approach ˜ 2 % (100 sfu)-1. In contrast to ozone, from ˜ 50 to 80 km, the temperature responses at low latitudes remain positive, with values up to ˜ 2.5 K (100 sfu)-1, but are weakly negative at midlatitudes. Consequently, there is a systematic and robust relation between the phases of the ozone and temperature responses. They are positively correlated (in phase) from ˜ 80 to 100 km for all latitudes and negatively correlated (out of phase) from ˜ 50 to 80 km, also for all latitudes. The negative correlation from 50 to 80 km is maintained even though the ozone and temperature responses can change signs as a function of altitude and latitude, because the corresponding temperature responses change signs in step with ozone. This is consistent with the idea that dynamics have the larger influence between ˜ 80 and 100 km, while photochemistry is

  16. A laboratory module on radiometry, photometry and colorimetry for an undergraduate optics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polak, Robert D.

    2014-07-01

    The bachelor's degree in Physics at Loyola University Chicago requires both an upper-division course in Optics as well as a companion Optics Laboratory course. Recently, the laboratory course has undergone dramatic changes. Traditional weekly laboratories have been replaced with three laboratory modules, where students focus on a single topic over several weeks after which the students submit a laboratory report written in the style of a journal article following American Institute of Physics style manual. With this method, students are able to gain a deeper understanding of the specific topic areas of radiometry, photometry and colorimetry, lens design and aberrations, and polarization and interference while using industry-standard equipment and simulation software. In particular, this work will provide the details of the laboratory module on radiometry, photometry and colorimetry where students use a photoradiometer and integrating sphere to characterize the optical properties of an LCD monitor, light bulb and a fiber optic light source calculating properties such as luminous flux, luminous intensity, luminance, CIE color coordinates, NTSC ratio, color temperature and luminous efficacy.

  17. Molecular phylogenetic inference from saber-toothed cat fossils of Rancho La Brea.

    PubMed Central

    Janczewski, D N; Yuhki, N; Gilbert, D A; Jefferson, G T; O'Brien, S J

    1992-01-01

    A method for the successful extraction of sequestered cellular DNA from 14,000-year-old fossil bones was developed and applied to asphalt-preserved specimens of the extinct saber-toothed cat, Smilodon fatalis. Two distinct gene segments, the mitochondrial gene for 12S rRNA and nuclear FLA-I (the feline class I major histocompatibility complex gene), from three different individual fossil specimens were cloned and sequenced after PCR amplification. Comparison of fossil-derived DNA sequences to homologous regions in 15 living carnivorous species, including 9 species of Felidae and 6 nonfelids, affirmed the phylogenetic placement of Smilodon within the modern radiation of Felidae distinct from the Miocene paleofelid (Nimravidae) saber-toothed "cat" species. These results raise the prospect of obtaining genetically informative DNA from preserved bones of extinct fossil species, particularly among the 2 million specimens excavated from the asphaltic sediments at Rancho La Brea in metropolitan Los Angeles. PMID:1409696

  18. Two-Dimensional Synthetic Aperture Radiometry Over Land Surface During Soil Moisture Experiment in 2003 (SMEX03)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microwave radiometry at low frequencies (L-band, 1.4 GHz) has been known as an optimal solution for remote sensing of soil moisture. However, the antenna size required to achieve an appropriate resolution from space has limited the development of spaceborne L-band radiometers. This problem can be ad...

  19. Size effect of out-of-plane thermal conductivity of epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films at room temperature measured by photothermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Tatsuya; Ando, Tetsu; Taguchi, Yoshihiro; Nagasaka, Yuji

    2013-05-01

    The out-of-plane (c-axis) thermal conductivities of high-temperature superconducting thin films (YBa2Cu3O7-δ: YBCO) have been measured by photothermal radiometry (PTR) at room temperature. The YBCO samples are in c-axis-aligned epitaxially grown thin films with thicknesses of 250, 500, and 1000 nm. PTR is a noncontact measurement technique for the thermal conductivity and is based on the detection of infrared radiation emitted from a sample heated by a frequency-modulated laser beam. By changing the modulation frequency up to about 1 MHz, the thermal conductivity of thin film can be determined by a curve-fitting analysis of phase-lag data in the frequency domain. The uncertainty of measured thermal conductivity is estimated to be better than ±7%. The experimental results for thermal conductivity exhibit apparently positive film thickness dependence, and their absolute values are less than half of those for single crystal at the smallest thickness. The results indicate a size effect that cannot be explained by the very short phonon mean free path that the kinetic theory predicts. By employing a simple model taking into account phonon boundary scattering, the possible mean free path to interpret the present results is substantially larger than the prediction. The conclusion supports the validity of quite broad spectral distribution of phonons responsible for the thermal conductivity of YBCO.

  20. Cassini SAR, radiometry, scatterometry and altimetry observations of Titan's dune fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Le, Gall A.; Janssen, M.A.; Wye, L.C.; Hayes, A.G.; Radebaugh, J.; Savage, C.; Zebker, H.; Lorenz, R.D.; Lunine, J.I.; Kirk, R.L.; Lopes, R.M.C.; Wall, S.; Callahan, P.; Stofan, E.R.; Farr, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Large expanses of linear dunes cover Titan's equatorial regions. As the Cassini mission continues, more dune fields are becoming unveiled and examined by the microwave radar in all its modes of operation (SAR, radiometry, scatterometry, altimetry) and with an increasing variety of observational geometries. In this paper, we report on Cassini's radar instrument observations of the dune fields mapped through May 2009 and present our key findings in terms of Titan's geology and climate. We estimate that dune fields cover ???12.5% of Titan's surface, which corresponds to an area of ???10millionkm2, roughly the area of the United States. If dune sand-sized particles are mainly composed of solid organics as suggested by VIMS observations (Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) and atmospheric modeling and supported by radiometry data, dune fields are the largest known organic reservoir on Titan. Dune regions are, with the exception of the polar lakes and seas, the least reflective and most emissive features on this moon. Interestingly, we also find a latitudinal dependence in the dune field microwave properties: up to a latitude of ???11??, dune fields tend to become less emissive and brighter as one moves northward. Above ???11?? this trend is reversed. The microwave signatures of the dune regions are thought to be primarily controlled by the interdune proportion (relative to that of the dune), roughness and degree of sand cover. In agreement with radiometry and scatterometry observations, SAR images suggest that the fraction of interdunes increases northward up to a latitude of ???14??. In general, scattering from the subsurface (volume scattering and surface scattering from buried interfaces) makes interdunal regions brighter than the dunes. The observed latitudinal trend may therefore also be partially caused by a gradual thinning of the interdunal sand cover or surrounding sand sheets to the north, thus allowing wave penetration in the underlying

  1. Monitoring local heating around an interventional MRI antenna with RF radiometry

    PubMed Central

    Ertürk, M. Arcan; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Radiofrequency (RF) radiometry uses thermal noise detected by an antenna to measure the temperature of objects independent of medical imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, an active interventional MRI antenna can be deployed as a RF radiometer to measure local heating, as a possible new method of monitoring device safety and thermal therapy. Methods: A 128 MHz radiometer receiver was fabricated to measure the RF noise voltage from an interventional 3 T MRI loopless antenna and calibrated for temperature in a uniformly heated bioanalogous gel phantom. Local heating (ΔT) was induced using the antenna for RF transmission and measured by RF radiometry, fiber-optic thermal sensors, and MRI thermometry. The spatial thermal sensitivity of the antenna radiometer was numerically computed using a method-of-moment electric field analyses. The gel’s thermal conductivity was measured by MRI thermometry, and the localized time-dependent ΔT distribution computed from the bioheat transfer equation and compared with radiometry measurements. A “H-factor” relating the 1 g-averaged ΔT to the radiometric temperature was introduced to estimate peak temperature rise in the antenna’s sensitive region. Results: The loopless antenna radiometer linearly tracked temperature inside a thermally equilibrated phantom up to 73 °C to within ±0.3 °C at a 2 Hz sample rate. Computed and MRI thermometric measures of peak ΔT agreed within 13%. The peak 1 g-average temperature was H = 1.36 ± 0.02 times higher than the radiometric temperature for any media with a thermal conductivity of 0.15–0.50 (W/m)/K, indicating that the radiometer can measure peak 1 g-averaged ΔT in physiologically relevant tissue within ±0.4 °C. Conclusions: Active internal MRI detectors can serve as RF radiometers at the MRI frequency to provide accurate independent measures of local and peak temperature without the artifacts that can accompany MRI thermometry or

  2. REVIEW ARTICLE: Photometry, radiometry and 'the candela': evolution in the classical and quantum world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwinkels, Joanne C.; Ikonen, Erkki; Fox, Nigel P.; Ulm, Gerhard; Rastello, Maria Luisa

    2010-10-01

    The metrological fields of photometry and radiometry and their associated units are closely linked through the current definition of the base unit of luminous intensity—the candela. These fields are important to a wide range of applications requiring precise and accurate measurements of electromagnetic radiation and, in particular, the amount of radiant energy (light) that is perceived by the human eye. The candela has been one of the base units since the inception of the International System of Units (SI) and is the only base unit that quantifies a fundamental biological process—human vision. This photobiological process spans an enormous dynamic range of light levels from a few-photon interaction involved in triggering the vision mechanism to a level of more than 1015 photons per second that is accommodated by the visual response under bright daylight conditions. This position paper, prepared by members of the Task Group on the SI of the Consultative Committee for Photometry and Radiometry Strategic Planning Working Group (CCPR WG-SP), reviews the evolution of these fields of optical radiation measurements and their consequent impact on definitions and realization of the candela. Over the past several decades, there have been significant developments in sources, detectors, measuring instruments and techniques, that have improved the measurement of photometric and radiometric quantities for classical applications in lighting design, manufacturing and quality control processes involving optical sources, detectors and materials. These improved realizations largely underpin the present (1979) definition of the candela. There is no consensus on whether this radiant-based definition fully satisfies the current and projected needs of the optical radiation community. There is also no consensus on whether a reformulation of the definition of the candela in terms of photon flux will be applicable to the lighting community. However, there have been significant recent

  3. Monitoring local heating around an interventional MRI antenna with RF radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ertürk, M. Arcan; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Radiofrequency (RF) radiometry uses thermal noise detected by an antenna to measure the temperature of objects independent of medical imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, an active interventional MRI antenna can be deployed as a RF radiometer to measure local heating, as a possible new method of monitoring device safety and thermal therapy. Methods: A 128 MHz radiometer receiver was fabricated to measure the RF noise voltage from an interventional 3 T MRI loopless antenna and calibrated for temperature in a uniformly heated bioanalogous gel phantom. Local heating (ΔT) was induced using the antenna for RF transmission and measured by RF radiometry, fiber-optic thermal sensors, and MRI thermometry. The spatial thermal sensitivity of the antenna radiometer was numerically computed using a method-of-moment electric field analyses. The gel’s thermal conductivity was measured by MRI thermometry, and the localized time-dependent ΔT distribution computed from the bioheat transfer equation and compared with radiometry measurements. A “H-factor” relating the 1 g-averaged ΔT to the radiometric temperature was introduced to estimate peak temperature rise in the antenna’s sensitive region. Results: The loopless antenna radiometer linearly tracked temperature inside a thermally equilibrated phantom up to 73 °C to within ±0.3 °C at a 2 Hz sample rate. Computed and MRI thermometric measures of peak ΔT agreed within 13%. The peak 1 g-average temperature was H = 1.36 ± 0.02 times higher than the radiometric temperature for any media with a thermal conductivity of 0.15–0.50 (W/m)/K, indicating that the radiometer can measure peak 1 g-averaged ΔT in physiologically relevant tissue within ±0.4 °C. Conclusions: Active internal MRI detectors can serve as RF radiometers at the MRI frequency to provide accurate independent measures of local and peak temperature without the artifacts that can accompany MRI thermometry or

  4. FOREWORD: The 11th International Conference on New Developments and Applications in Optical Radiometry (NEWRAD 2011) The 11th International Conference on New Developments and Applications in Optical Radiometry (NEWRAD 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikonen, Erkki

    2012-04-01

    The NEWRAD Conferences bring together people from the National Metrology Institutes and the principal user communities of advanced radiometry, including Earth observation and climate communities. The eleventh NEWRAD Conference was held in Hawaii, USA, between 18 and 23 September 2011. The Conference was organized by the Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Maui, at the Grand Wailea resort. The organization was a joint Pacific effort, where handling of the submitted abstracts and website administration were taken care of by KRISS (Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science) and NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology), respectively. As satellite activities, the working groups of CCPR (Consultative Committee for Photometry and Radiometry) and the MOBY project arranged meetings at the Grand Wailea before and after the Conference. The Conference was attended by more than a hundred registered participants from five continents, which matches the number of foreign participants of NEWRAD 2008 at KRISS. A total of 153 papers were presented at NEWRAD 2011, of which 10 were invited talks and 100 posters. The poster sessions during the extended lunch breaks created a stimulating atmosphere for lively discussions and exchange of ideas. A technical visit was arranged to the astronomical observatory at the summit of Haleakala volcano, where some of the world's most advanced telescope systems are operated. The relaxed Hawaiian life, nearby ocean and excellent weather conditions gave an unprecedented flavour to this NEWRAD Conference. The abstract classification system was renewed for NEWRAD 2011, consisting of the following categories: EAO: Earth observation SSR: Solar/stellar radiometry SBR: Source-based radiometry OPM: Optical properties of materials/components DBR: Detector-based radiometry SFR: Single/few-photon radiometry. The new system worked well for refereeing and program purposes. Conference proceedings containing two-page extended abstracts were

  5. Differential thermal wave radiometry for noninvasive blood glucose monitoring: feasibility analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telenkov, Sergey A.

    2004-04-01

    Blood glucose monitoring is essential for management of diabetes especially for those patients who requires regular insulin injections. A reliable noninvasive technique may eliminate inconvenience associated with frequent skin puncture to draw blood for measurement by a standard meter. Laser-induced thermal waves in tissue and detection of resulting IR response may provide a valuable approach to development of noninvasive glucose sensor. The present report analyzes radiometric response of tissue at the two wavelengths in mid-IR spectral band with phase-sensitive detection to evaluate feasibility of differential phase radiometry for noninvasive glucose monitoring. Sensitivity of the differential phase method is computed using two models of laser-tissue interaction: homogeneous light absorption and a discrete chromophore heating.

  6. Simultaneous measurement of thermal diffusivity and optical absorption coefficient using photothermal radiometry. II Multilayered solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Agustín; Fuente, Raquel; Apiñaniz, Estibaliz; Mendioroz, Arantza; Celorrio, R.

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the ability of modulated photothermal radiometry to retrieve the thermal diffusivity and the optical absorption coefficient of layered materials simultaneously. First, we extend the thermal quadrupole method to calculate the surface temperature of semitransparent multilayered materials. Then, this matrix method is used to evaluate the influence of heat losses by convection and radiation, the influence of the use of thin paint layers on the accuracy of thermal diffusivity measurements, and the effect of lateral heat diffusion due to the use of Gaussian laser beams. Finally, we apply the quadrupole method to retrieve (a) the thermal contact resistance in glass stacks and (b) the thermal diffusivity and optical absorption coefficient depth profiles in heterogeneous materials with continuously varying physical properties, as is the case of functionally graded materials and partially cured dental resins.

  7. Noninvasive in-vehicle alcohol detection with wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xinxin; Mandelis, Andreas; Liu, Yijun; Chen, Bo; Zhou, Qun; Comeau, Felix

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the potential of wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry (WM-DPTR) for non-invasive in-vehicle alcohol detection which can be of great importance in reducing alcohol-impaired driving. Ethanol content in the range of concern, 0-100 blood alcohol concentration (BAC) in water phantoms and blood serum diffused in human skin in vitro were measured with high sensitivity. The results show that the WM-DPTR system can be optimized for alcohol detection with the combination of two sensitivity-tuning parameters, amplitude ratio R and phase shift ΔP. WM-DPTR has demonstrated the potential to be developed into a portable alcohol ignition interlock biosensor that could be fitted as a universal accessory in vehicles. PMID:25071967

  8. Noninvasive in-vehicle alcohol detection with wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xinxin; Mandelis, Andreas; Liu, Yijun; Chen, Bo; Zhou, Qun; Comeau, Felix

    2014-07-01

    This study describes the potential of wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry (WM-DPTR) for non-invasive in-vehicle alcohol detection which can be of great importance in reducing alcohol-impaired driving. Ethanol content in the range of concern, 0-100 blood alcohol concentration (BAC) in water phantoms and blood serum diffused in human skin in vitro were measured with high sensitivity. The results show that the WM-DPTR system can be optimized for alcohol detection with the combination of two sensitivity-tuning parameters, amplitude ratio R and phase shift ΔP. WM-DPTR has demonstrated the potential to be developed into a portable alcohol ignition interlock biosensor that could be fitted as a universal accessory in vehicles. PMID:25071967

  9. Quantitative characterization of traumatic bruises by combined pulsed photothermal radiometry and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidovič, Luka; Milanič, Matija; Randeberg, Lise L.; Majaron, Boris

    2015-02-01

    We apply diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) for characterization of the bruise evolution process. While DRS provides information in a wide range of visible wavelengths, the PPTR enables extraction of detailed depth distribution and concentration profiles of selected absorbers (e.g. melanin, hemoglobin). In this study, we simulate experimental DRS spectra and PPTR signals using the Monte Carlo technique and focus on characterization of a suitable fitting approach for their analysis. We find inverse Monte Carlo to be superior to the diffusion approximation approach for the inverse analysis of DRS spectra. The analysis is then augmented with information obtainable by the fitting of the PPTR signal. We show that both techniques can be coupled in a combined fitting approach. The combining of two complementary techniques improves the robustness and accuracy of the inverse analysis, enabling a comprehensive quantitative characterization of the bruise evolution dynamics.

  10. Non-invasive Glucose Measurements Using Wavelength Modulated Differential Photothermal Radiometry (WM-DPTR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.; Mandelis, A.; Zinman, B.

    2012-11-01

    Wavelength-modulated differential laser photothermal radiometry (WM-DPTR) is introduced for potential development of clinically viable non-invasive glucose biosensors. WM-DPTR features unprecedented glucose-specificity and sensitivity by combining laser excitation by two out-of-phase modulated beams at wavelengths near the peak and the baseline of a prominent and isolated mid-IR glucose absorption band. Measurements on water-glucose phantoms (0 to 300 mg/dl glucose concentration) demonstrate high sensitivity to meet wide clinical detection requirements ranging from hypoglycemia to hyperglycemia. The measurement results have been validated by simulations based on fully developed WM-DPTR theory. For sensitive and accurate glucose measurements, the key is the selection and tight control of the intensity ratio and the phase shift of the two laser beams.

  11. Opto-Thermal Transient Emission Radiometry (OTTER) to image diffusion in nails in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xiao, P; Zheng, X; Imhof, R E; Hirata, K; McAuley, W J; Mateus, R; Hadgraft, J; Lane, M E

    2011-03-15

    This work describes the first application of Opto-Thermal Transient Emission Radiometry (OTTER), an infrared remote sensing technique, to probe the extent to which solvents permeate the human nail in vivo. Decanol, glycerol and butyl acetate were selected as model solvents. After application of the solvents, individually, to human volunteers, OTTER was used to depth profile the solvents. The permeation rate of the solvents was ranked as glycerol>decanol>butyl acetate. It is possible that some of the butyl acetate may have evaporated during the experiment. The ability of decanol to extract lipids from biological tissue is also considered. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential of OTTER as a tool to identify optimal excipients with which to target drugs to the nail. PMID:21251961

  12. Remote sensing of snow properties by passive microwave radiometry: GSFC truck experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Rango, A.; Shiue, J.

    1980-01-01

    Recent results indicate that microwave radiometry has the potential for inferring the snow depth and water equivalent information from snowpacks. In order to assess this potential for determining the water equivalent of a snowpack, it is necessary to understand the microwave emission and scattering behavior of the snow at various wavelengths under carefully controlled conditions. Truck-mounted microwave instrumentation was used to study the microwave characteristics of the snowpack in the Colorado Rocky Mountain region during the winters of 1977 to 78 and 7978 to 79. The spectral signatures of C, X, K sub u, and K sub a band radiometers with dual polarization were used, together with measurements of snowpack density, temperature an ram profiles, liquid water content, and rough characterization of the crystal sizes. These data compared favorably with calculated results based on recent microscopic scattering models.

  13. Noninvasive glucose detection in human skin using wavelength modulated differential laser photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xinxin; Mandelis, Andreas; Zinman, Bernard

    2012-11-01

    Noninvasive glucose monitoring will greatly improve diabetes management. We applied Wavelength-Modulated Differential Laser Photothermal Radiometry (WM-DPTR) to noninvasive glucose measurements in human skin in vitro in the mid-infrared range. Glucose measurements in human blood serum diffused into a human skin sample (1 mm thickness from abdomen) in the physiological range (21-400 mg/dl) demonstrated high sensitivity and accuracy to meet wide clinical detection requirements. It was found that the glucose sensitivity could be tuned by adjusting the intensity ratio and phase difference of the two laser beams in the WM-DPTR system. The measurement results demonstrated the feasibility of the development of WM-DPTR into a clinically viable noninvasive glucose biosensor. PMID:23162736

  14. Noninvasive glucose detection in human skin using wavelength modulated differential laser photothermal radiometry

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xinxin; Mandelis, Andreas; Zinman, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Noninvasive glucose monitoring will greatly improve diabetes management. We applied Wavelength-Modulated Differential Laser Photothermal Radiometry (WM-DPTR) to noninvasive glucose measurements in human skin in vitro in the mid-infrared range. Glucose measurements in human blood serum diffused into a human skin sample (1 mm thickness from abdomen) in the physiological range (21-400 mg/dl) demonstrated high sensitivity and accuracy to meet wide clinical detection requirements. It was found that the glucose sensitivity could be tuned by adjusting the intensity ratio and phase difference of the two laser beams in the WM-DPTR system. The measurement results demonstrated the feasibility of the development of WM-DPTR into a clinically viable noninvasive glucose biosensor. PMID:23162736

  15. Photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence examination of demineralized and remineralized dental lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellen, A.; Mandelis, A.; Finer, Y.

    2010-03-01

    Dental caries involves continuous challenges of acid-induced mineral loss and a counteracting process of mineral recovery. As an emerging non-destructive methodology, photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence (PTR-LUM) has shown promise in measuring changes in tooth mineral content. Human molars (n=37) were subjected to demineralization in acid gel (pH 4.5, 10 days), followed by incubation in remineralisation solutions (pH 6.7, 4 weeks) without or with fluoride (1 or 1000 ppm). PTR-LUM frequency scans (1 Hz - 1 kHz) were performed prior to and during demineralization and remineralization treatments. Transverse Micro-Radiography (TMR) analysis followed at treatment conclusion. The non-fluoridated group exhibited opposite amplitude and phase trends to those of the highly fluoridated group: smaller phase lag and larger amplitude. These results point to a complex interplay between surface and subsurface processes during remineralization, confining the thermal-wave centroid toward the dominating layer.

  16. Determination of optical properties of turbid media using pulsed photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Prahl, S A; Vitkin, I A; Bruggemann, U; Wilson, B C; Anderson, R R

    1992-06-01

    Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) measures blackbody radiation emitted by a sample after absorption of an optical pulse. Three techniques for obtaining the absorption coefficient of absorbing-only, semi-infinite samples are examined and shown to give comparable results. An analytic theory for the time dependence of the PPTR signal in semi-infinite scattering and absorbing media has been derived and tested in a series of controlled gel phantoms. This theory, based on the diffusion approximation of the radiative transport equation, is shown to model the time course of the detected signal accurately. Furthermore, when the incident fluence is known, the theory can be used in a non-linear, two-parameter fitting algorithm to determine the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of a turbid sample with an accuracy of 10-15% for transport albedos ranging from 0.42-0.88. PMID:1626021

  17. Correlation Between Chemical Composition of Silver Alloys and Photothermal Radiometry Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Rodríguez, I.; Velázquez-Hernández, R.; Jaramillo-Vigueras, D.; Mendoza-López, M. L.; Millan-Malo, M.; Rodíguez-García, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    The development of nondestructive and noncontact techniques for evaluation of metallic materials is invaluable to metal characterization. The photothermal radiometry (PTR) amplitude and phase images of silver alloys were used to study the silver distribution in alloys rich in silver and copper for Ag concentrations between 37 mass% and 92 mass%. The silver concentration was determined using inductively coupled plasma. It was found that for Ag concentrations lower than 50 mass%, the PRT signals are governed by the thermal and optical properties of copper and vice versa. It was possible to establish a good correlation between the PTR amplitude and phase signal with the Ag concentration. This means that after calibration it is possible to determine the Ag concentration using nondestructive evaluation.

  18. Depth determination of chromophores in human skin by pulsed photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Milner, T E; Smithies, D J; Goodman, D M; Lau, A; Nelson, J S

    1996-07-01

    We report on the application of pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) to determine the depth of in-vitro and in-vivo subsurface chromophores in biological materials. Measurements provided by PPTR in combination with a nonnegative constrained conjugate-gradient algorithm are used to determine the initial temperature distribution in a biological material immediately following pulsed laser irradiation. Within the experimental error, chromophore depths (50-450 µm) in 55 in-vitro collagen phantoms determined by PPTR and optical low-coherence reflectometry are equivalent. The depths of port-wine-stain blood vessels determined by PPTR correlate very well with their locations found by computer-assisted microscopic observation of histologic sections. The mean blood-vessel depth deduced from PPTR and histologic observation is statistically indistinguishable (p > 0.94). PMID:21102725

  19. Thermophysical properties of thermal sprayed coatings on carbon steel substrates by photothermal radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J.A.; Mandelis, A.; Farahbakhsh, B.; Lebowitz, C.; Harris, I.

    1999-09-01

    Laser infrared photothermal radiometry (PTR) was used to measure the thermophysical properties (thermal diffusivity and conductivity) of various thermal sprayed coatings on carbon steel. A one-dimensional photothermal model of a three-layered system in the backscattered mode was introduced and compared with experimental measurements. The uppermost layer was used to represent a roughness-equivalent layer, a second layer represented the substrate. The thermophysical parameters of thermal sprayed coatings examined in this work were obtained when a multiparameter-fit optimization algorithm was used with the backscattered PTR experimental results. The results also suggested a good method to determine the thickness of tungsten carbide and stainless-steel thermal spray coatings once the thermal physical properties are known. The ability of PTR to measure the thermophysical properties and the coating thickness has a strong potential as a method for in situ characterization of thermal spray coatings.

  20. Study of the heat transfer in solids using infrared photothermal radiometry and simulation by COMSOL Multiphysics.

    PubMed

    Suarez, V; Hernández Wong, J; Nogal, U; Calderón, A; Rojas-Trigos, J B; Juárez, A G; Marín, E

    2014-01-01

    It is reported the study of the heat transfer through a homogeneous and isotropic solid exited by square periodic light beam on its front surface. For this, we use the Infrared Photothermal Radiometry in order to obtain the evolution of the temperature difference on the rear surface of three samples, silicon, copper and wood, as a function of the exposure time. Also, we solved the heat transport equation for this problem with the boundary conditions congruent with the physical situation, by means of numerical simulation based in finite element analysis. Our results show a good agreement between the experimental and numerical simulated results, which demonstrate the utility of this methodology for the study of the thermal response of solids. PMID:23684428

  1. Pulsed photothermal radiometry in optically transparent media containing discrete optical absorbers.

    PubMed

    Vitkin, I A; Wilson, B C; Anderson, R R; Prahl, S A

    1994-10-01

    A description of heat transport by conduction and radiation in inhomogeneous materials following absorption of a brief optical pulse is presented, and investigated experimentally using pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR). The model indicates that the role of radiation as an intramedium heat transfer modality increases with increasing temperatures and decreasing infrared (IR) absorption of the medium. However, for the range of conditions analysed in this study, conductive transfer dominates. Thus, the inclusion of radiation does not significantly perturb the internal temperature profiles, although it does influence the radiometric emission from the sample, and hence the PPTR signal. The thermal confinement effects described in this study may be relevant in photomedicine, for example in pulsed laser irradiation of tissues containing small absorbing targets. PMID:15551541

  2. Depth determination of chromophores in human skin by pulsed photothermal radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Milner, T.E. |; Smithies, D.J.; Goodman, D.M.; Nelson, J.S. |; Goodman, D.M.; Lau, A.

    1996-07-01

    We report on the application of pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) to determine the depth of {ital in}-{ital vitro} and {ital in}-{ital vivo} subsurface chromophores in biological materials. Measurements provided by PPTR in combination with a nonnegative constrained conjugate-gradient algorithm are used to determine the initial temperature distribution in a biological material immediately following pulsed laser irradiation. Within the experimental error, chromophore depths (50{endash}450 {mu}m) in 55 {ital in}-{ital vitro} collagen phantoms determined by PPTR and optical low-coherence reflectometry are equivalent. The depths of port-wine-stain blood vessels determined by PPTR correlate very well with their locations found by computer-assisted microscopic observation of histologic sections. The mean blood-vessel depth deduced from PPTR and histologic observation is statistically indistinguishable ({ital p}{lt}0.94). {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  3. Depth profiling of laser-heated chromophores in biological tissues by pulsed photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Milner, T E; Goodman, D M; Tanenbaum, B S; Nelson, J S

    1995-07-01

    A solution method is proposed to the inverse problem of determining the unknown initial temperature distribution in a laser-exposed test material from measurements provided by infrared radiometry. A Fredholm integral equation of the first kind is derived that relates the temporal evolution of the infrared signal amplitude to the unknown initial temperature distribution in the exposed test material. The singular-value decomposition is used to demonstrate the severely ill-posed nature of the derived inverse problem. Three inversion methods are used to estimate solutions for the initial temperature distribution. A nonnegatively constrained conjugate-gradient algorithm using early termination is found superior to unconstrained inversion methods and is applied to image the depth of laser-heated chromophores in human skin. PMID:7608789

  4. Computational model to evaluate port wine stain depth profiling using pulsed photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bernard; Majaron, Boris; Nelson, J Stuart

    2004-01-01

    We report on development of an optical-thermal model to evaluate the use of pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) for depth profiling of port wine stain (PWS) skin. In the model, digitized histology sections of a PWS biopsy were used as the input skin geometry. Laser induced temperature profiles were reconstructed from simulated PPTR signals by applying an iterative, non-negatively constrained conjugate gradient algorithm. Accuracy of the following PWS skin characteristics extracted from the reconstructed profiles was determined: (1) average epidermal thickness (z(epi)), (2) maximum epidermal temperature rise (DeltaT(epi,max)), (3) depth of PWS upper boundary (z(PWS)), and (4) depth of maximum PWS temperature rise (z(PWS,max)). Comparison of the actual and reconstructed profiles from PPTR data revealed a good match for all four PWS skin characteristics. Results of this study indicate that PPTR is a viable approach for depth profiling of PWS skin. PMID:15065895

  5. Monte carlo uncertainty analysis for photothermal radiometry measurements using a curve fit process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Kyle; Fleming, Austin; Timmins, Ben; Ban, Heng

    2015-12-01

    Photothermal radiometry (PTR) has become a popular method to measure thermal properties of layered materials. Much research has been done to determine the capabilities of PTR, but with little uncertainty analysis. This study reports a Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis to quantify uncertainty of film diffusivity and effusivity measurements, presents a sensitivity study for each input parameter, compares linear and logarithmic spacing of data points on frequency scans, and investigates the validity of a one-dimensional heat transfer assumption. Logarithmic spacing of frequencies when taking data is found to be unequivocally superior to linear spacing, while the use of a higher-dimensional heat transfer model is only needed for certain measurement configurations. The sensitivity analysis supports the frequency spacing conclusion, as well as explains trends seen in the uncertainty data.

  6. Diurnal variation of stratospheric and mesospheric ozone observed by ground-based microwave radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocke, Klemens; Studer, Simone; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Schanz, Ansgar

    2013-04-01

    Knowledge on diurnal ozone variations in the middle atmosphere is of general interest for the estimation of atmospheric tides propagating throughout the whole atmosphere. Another aspect is the important area of ozone trend analysis. Does the ozone layer recover in the next decades? Expected trends are of the order of 1 percent per decade. If the diurnal ozone variation is not considered, avoided, or removed in the observational data sets then an ozone trend detection will be not possible since the amplitude of the diurnal variation of stratospheric ozone is of the same order as the decadal ozone trend. Ground-based microwave radiometry measures the diurnal ozone variation at a certain geographic location at altitudes from 25 to 65 km. Here we discuss the challenges for the measurement technique and the retrieval method. Finally we present characteristics of the diurnal ozone variation above Switzerland, continuously observed since 1994.

  7. Capturing a failure of an ASIC in-situ, using infrared radiometry and image processing software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz, Ronald P.

    2003-01-01

    Failures in electronic devices can sometimes be tricky to locate-especially if they are buried inside radiation-shielded containers designed to work in outer space. Such was the case with a malfunctioning ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) that was drawing excessive power at a specific temperature during temperature cycle testing. To analyze the failure, infrared radiometry (thermography) was used in combination with image processing software to locate precisely where the power was being dissipated at the moment the failure took place. The IR imaging software was used to make the image of the target and background, appear as unity. As testing proceeded and the failure mode was reached, temperature changes revealed the precise location of the fault. The results gave the design engineers the information they needed to fix the problem. This paper describes the techniques and equipment used to accomplish this failure analysis.

  8. Thermal-wave nondestructive evaluation of cylindrical composite structures using frequency-domain photothermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chinhua; Mandelis, Andreas; Liu, Yue

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, thermal-wave diagnostics by means of laser infrared photothermal radiometry (PTR) have been used for quantitative nondestructive evaluation of cylindrical composite structures. To quantitatively evaluate the thermal-wave field of a cylindrical composite material, the Green function corresponding to the composite structure and the PTR measurement scheme has been developed and subsequently the thermal-wave field has been derived. Furthermore, the characteristics of the thermal-wave field for two cases of practical interest, i.e., a cylindrical material with a surface coating and a cylindrical tube filled with a low thermal-conductivity fluid medium inside, are discussed. Experimental results from a stainless-steel (AISI 302) cylinder are used to validate the theoretical model.

  9. Study of Skin Phantoms by Photothermal Radiometry in Frequency Domain and Multivariate Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichardo-Molina, J. L.; Gutiérez-Juárez, G.; Landa-Hernandez, A.; Barbosa-Garcia, O.; Ivanov, R.; Huerta-Franco, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper the use of the photothermal radiometry technique in the frequency domain (PRTF) and the use of multivariate methods in the study of two types of skin phantoms: (a) one in which skin pigmentation was simulated dyeing the gel phantom and (b) the other consists of exposure of animal skin samples to different degrees of thermal damage. In experiment (a), gel phantoms were prepared with different concentrations of methylene blue (MB). The mean values of the radiometry signal (RS) show significant differences in only those cases in which changes in the concentration of MB were higher than 0.38 mM. This result was confirmed with a t test for independent samples of the data ( p < 0.05). The mean values of the amplitude and phase signal do not permit discrimination between phantoms with changes in pigmentation equal to or lower than this value. However, principal component analysis (PCA) demonstrated that it is possible to discriminate between phantoms with changes in molar concentration equal to 0.38 mM (for the phase signal). In the case of experiment (b), the following four groups of pork skin samples were analyzed: one consists of samples of fresh skin, while the other three consist of samples exposed to thermal damage at 45 °C (the exposure time was 4 s) and 80 °C (exposure times were 4 s and 8 s, respectively). The mean values of the RS for each group of samples did not show a clear visual discrimination. However, the t test for independent samples applied to the data demonstrated significant differences only between fresh skin and skin exposure to thermal damage at 80 °C (with exposure times of 4 s and 8 s). PCA was used to discriminate between the four different skin samples.

  10. Proposed Definitions of Some Technical Terms Frequently Used in Microwave Radiometry for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiue, James C.; Zukor, Dorothy J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The use of microwave radiometry for remote sensing is a relatively young field. As a result, there are no standard definitions of many frequently used technical terms; a lot of which are conventional usages carried-over from optical remote sensing, and a lot more are shared with electrical or microwave engineering. Sometimes the divergent notions and assumptions originating from a different field may cause ambiguity or confusions. It is proposed that we establish a list of frequently used terms, together with their 'standard' definitions and hope that they will gradually gain general acceptance by the remote sensing community. It would be even more useful if the IEEE community can set up a standard committee of sort to develop and maintain the standards. To minimize the effort, the existing terms should be kept or reinterpreted as much as possible. For example, the term 'Instantaneous Field of View' (IFOV), originally coming from the optical remote sensing field, is now appearing in microwave remote sensing literature frequently. The IFOV refers to the 'beam width' or the 'diameter' of the beam's geometrical projection on earth surface. Since the definition of 'beam width' is different for an optical system versus a microwave antenna, the use of IFOV in microwave radiometry needed to be clarified. Also, the meaning of the IFOV will be different depending upon whether the beam is scanning or not, and how the scanning takes place, e.g. 'continuous scanning' vs 'stare-and-step scan.' From this one term alone, it is clear that more subtle meanings must be spell out in detail and a 'standard' definition would help in understanding and comparing systems and data in the literature. A selected list of terms with their suggested definitions will be discussed in this presentation.

  11. Kinetic Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgardt, Erik D.; Ryan, Hank

    1996-01-01

    Presents a unit on chemical reaction kinetics that consists of a predemonstration activity, the demonstration, and a set of postdemonstration activities that help students transfer the concepts to actual chemical reactions. Simulates various aspects of chemical reaction kinetics. (JRH)

  12. Kinetic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  13. Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Owen; Cornelius, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Conveys an appreciation of enzyme kinetic analysis by using a practical and intuitive approach. Discusses enzyme assays, kinetic models and rate laws, the kinetic constants (V, velocity, and Km, Michaels constant), evaluation of V and Km from experimental data, and enzyme inhibition. (CW)

  14. Temperature Trends in the Polar Mesosphere between 2002-2007 using TIMED/SABER Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Richard A.; Kutepov, Alexander A.; Pesnell, William Dean; Latteck, Ralph; Russell, James M.

    2008-01-01

    The TIMED Satellite was launched on December 7, 2001 to study the dynamics and energy of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The TIMED/SABER instrument is a limb scanning infrared radiometer designed to measure a large number of minor constituents as well as the temperature of the region. In this study, we have concentrated on the polar mesosphere, to investigate the temperature characteristics as a function of spatial and temporal considerations. We used the recently revised SABER dataset (1.07) that contains improved temperature retrievals in the Earth polar summer regions. Weekly averages are used to make comparisons between the winter and summer, as well as to study the variability in different quadrants of each hemisphere. For each year studied, the duration of polar summer based on temperature measurements compares favorably with the PMSE (Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes) season measured by radar at the ALOMAR Observatory in Norway (69 N). The PMSE period should also define the summer period suitable for the occurrence of polar mesospheric clouds. The unusual short and relatively warm polar summer in the northern hemisphere

  15. Comparison between the Temperature Measurements by TIMED/SABER and Lidar in the Mid-Latitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jiyao; She, C. Y.; Yuan, Wei; Mertens, Chris; Mlynczak, Marty; Russell, James

    2005-01-01

    Comparisons of monthly-mean nighttime temperature profiles observed by the Sodium Lidar at Colorado State University and TIMED/SABER over passes are made. In the altitude range from 85 km to about 100 km, the two observations are in excellent agreement. Though within each other s error bars, important differences occur below 85 km in the entire year and above 100 km in the summer season. Possible reasons for these difference are high photon noise below 85 km in lidar observations, and less than accurate assumptions in the concentration of important chemical species like oxygen (and its quenching rate) in the SABER retrieval above 100 km. However, the two techniques both show the two-level mesopause thermal structure, with the times of change from one level to the other in excellent agreement. Comparison indicates that the high-level (winter) mesopause altitudes are also in excellent agreement between the two observations, though some difference may exist in the low-level (summer) mesopause altitudes between ground-based and satellite-borne data.

  16. Lunar Phase Function at 1064 Nm from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter Passive and Active Radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, M. K.; Sun, X.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    We present initial calibration and results of passive radiometry collected by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter over the course of 12 months. After correcting for time- and temperature-dependent dark noise and detector responsivity variations, the LOLA passive radiometry measurements are brought onto the absolute radiance scale of the SELENE Spectral Profiler. The resulting photometric precision is estimated to be 5%. We leverage the unique ability of LOLA to measure normal albedo to explore the 1064 nm phase function's dependence on various geologic parameters. On a global scale, we find that iron abundance and optical maturity (quantified by FeO and OMAT) are the dominant controlling parameters. Titanium abundance (TiO2), surface roughness on decimeter to decameter scales, and soil thermo- physical properties have a smaller effect, but the latter two are correlated with OMAT, indicating that exposure age is the driving force behind their effects in a globally-averaged sense. The phase function also exhibits a dependence on surface slope at approximately 300 m baselines, possibly the result of mass wasting exposing immature material and/or less space weathering due to reduced sky visibility. Modeling the photometric function in the Hapke framework, we find that, relative to the highlands, the maria exhibit decreased backscattering, a smaller opposition effect (OE) width, and a smaller OE amplitude. Immature highlands regolith has a higher backscattering fraction and a larger OE width compared to mature highlands regolith. Within the maria, the backscattering fraction and OE width show little dependence on TiO2 and OMAT. Variations in the phase function shape at large phase angles are observed in and around the Copernican-aged Jackson crater, including its dark halo, a putative impact melt deposit. Finally, the phase function of the Reiner Gamma Formation behaves more optically immature than is typical for its composition

  17. IAP RAS microwave radiometry complex: sounding atmospheric thermal structure from the ground up to 55km.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikovich, Mikhail; Shvetsov, Alexander; Ryskin, Vitaly; Mukhin, Dmitry; Kulikov, Mikhail; Feigin, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Thermal structure is the key characteristic of the atmosphere. Depending on the altitude, it is measured by different methods. In troposphere a plethora of in-situ techniques exists while in middle atmosphere remote sensing is primary type of measurement. The remote sensing is conducted in different wavelengths: optical, infrared and microwave. Satellite based measurements are the most popular kind of remote sensing measurements as it provides global coverage. Ground based passive microwave remote sensing technique has its place when one need permanent monitoring with high time resolution in order to study short-term local events like gravity waves. Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS) develops multi-purpose radiometry complex for constant atmospheric monitoring. For now, it measures temperature profiles from ground to 55km, tropospheric water vapor and ozone. It consists of several radiometers with spectral bands ranging from 20 to 112 GHz. In 2015 two radiometers were added in order to measure thermal structure at surface level and troposphere: scanning device operating in 55-59GHz, and device at 50-55GHz. The change led to modifying the retrieval software. The work presents the description of the radiometry complex and corresponding retrieval software. The main part is devoted to new radiometers and enhancements in retrieval procedure. The retrieval algorithms are described: for each device separately and for the whole temperature retrieval part of the complex. The use of the single procedure for the group of radiometers helps to merge the profile with each other correctly. The main issue of the single procedure (numerical complexity aside) is dealing with the possible difference in calibration of the devices. Error analysis of the procedures is conducted. The characteristics of the complex and the retrieval algorithms are presented. The capabilities of the algorithms are shown on simulated and real data; the last one was

  18. Lunar phase function at 1064 nm from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter passive and active radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, M. K.; Sun, X.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.

    2016-07-01

    We present initial calibration and results of passive radiometry collected by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter over the course of 12 months. After correcting for time- and temperature-dependent dark noise and detector responsivity variations, the LOLA passive radiometry measurements are brought onto the absolute radiance scale of the SELENE Spectral Profiler. The resulting photometric precision is estimated to be ∼5%. We leverage the unique ability of LOLA to measure normal albedo to explore the 1064 nm phase function's dependence on various geologic parameters. On a global scale, we find that iron abundance and optical maturity (quantified by FeO and OMAT) are the dominant controlling parameters. Titanium abundance (TiO2), surface roughness on decimeter to decameter scales, and soil thermophysical properties have a smaller effect, but the latter two are correlated with OMAT, indicating that exposure age is the driving force behind their effects in a globally-averaged sense. The phase function also exhibits a dependence on surface slope at ∼300 m baselines, possibly the result of mass wasting exposing immature material and/or less space weathering due to reduced sky visibility. Modeling the photometric function in the Hapke framework, we find that, relative to the highlands, the maria exhibit decreased backscattering, a smaller opposition effect (OE) width, and a smaller OE amplitude. Immature highlands regolith has a higher backscattering fraction and a larger OE width compared to mature highlands regolith. Within the maria, the backscattering fraction and OE width show little dependence on TiO2 and OMAT. Variations in the phase function shape at large phase angles are observed in and around the Copernican-aged Jackson crater, including its dark halo, a putative impact melt deposit. Finally, the phase function of the Reiner Gamma Formation behaves more optically immature than is typical for its composition and OMAT

  19. Dental diagnostic clinical instrument ("Canary") development using photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, R. J.; Sivagurunathan, K.; Garcia, J.; Matvienko, A.; Mandelis, A.; Abrams, S.

    2010-03-01

    Since 1999, our group at the CADIFT, University of Toronto, has developed the application of Frequency Domain Photothermal Radiometry (PTR) and Luminescence (LUM) to dental caries detection. Various cases including artificial caries detection have been studied and some of the inherent advantages of the adaptation of this technique to dental diagnostics in conjunction with modulated luminescence as a dual-probe technique have been reported. Based on these studies, a portable, compact diagnostic instrument for dental clinic use has been designed, assembled and tested. A semiconductor laser, optical fibers, a thermoelectric cooled mid-IR detector, and a USB connected data acquisition card were used. Software lock-in amplifier techniques were developed to compute amplitude and phase of PTR and LUM signals. In order to achieve fast measurement and acceptable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for clinical application, swept sine waveforms were used. As a result sampling and stabilization time for each measurement point was reduced to a few seconds. A sophisticated software interface was designed to simultaneously record intra-oral camera images with PTR and LUM responses. Preliminary results using this instrument during clinical trials in a dental clinic showed this instrument could detect early caries both from PTR and LUM signals.

  20. A Bottom-Up Engineered Broadband Optical Nanoabsorber for Radiometry and Energy Harnessing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Coles, James B.; Megerian, Krikor G.; Eastwood, Michael; Green, Robert O.; Bandaru, Prabhakar R.

    2013-01-01

    Optical absorbers based on vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), synthesized using electric-field assisted growth, are described here that show an ultra-low reflectance, 100X lower compared to Au-black from wavelength lamba approximately 350 nm - 2.5 micron. A bi-metallic Co/Ti layer was shown to catalyze a high site density of MWCNTs on metallic substrates and the optical properties of the absorbers were engineered by controlling the bottom-up synthesis conditions using dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Reflectance measurements on the MWCNT absorbers after heating them in air to 400deg showed negligible changes in reflectance which was still low, approximately 0.022 % at lamba approximately 2 micron. In contrast, the percolated structure of the reference Au-black samples collapsed completely after heating, causing the optical response to degrade at temperatures as low as 200deg. The high optical absorption efficiency of the MWCNT absorbers, synthesized on metallic substrates, over a broad spectral range, coupled with their thermal ruggedness, suggests they have promise in solar energy harnessing applications, as well as thermal detectors for radiometry.

  1. Development and characterization of integrating sphere for photometry and radiometry measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibawa, Bambang Mukti; Mujahid, Abdul Al; Mindara, Jajat Yuda; Panatarani, Camellia; Joni, I. Made; Siregar, Rustam Efendi

    2013-09-01

    Integrating Sphere (IS) is an instrument formed a cavity sphere with its inner surface act as a Lambertian reflector. IS is needed in many optical measurements which involves a high diffused reflection. In addition, IS very essential in photometry and radiometry measurement system. However, currently, IS is still an imported product which considered very expensive. The material for the sphere and inner surface coating affect the performance of the IS systems. Therefore, the main challenges in designing IS are the material engineering for the sphere and the procedure for the inner surface coating. The inner surface was coated using BaSO4 which has a low absorption and high diffuse reflection. Spectral responses of the IS system was characterized using USB2000+ and calibrated using a standard Spectralon from ocean optic. The obtained IS system used an inner surface coating from a mixed 80% Barium Sulfate (BaSO4) and 20% Nippon Elastex paint which yield a reflection factor ρ = 0.955 and amplification factor M=10.69. The validation was conducted using an emitter with known specification from Luxeon of LXHL-DW01 which produced light flux 40.5 lumen with injection current 350 mA and junction temperature Tj 25°C.

  2. Melanoma thickness measurement in two-layer tissue phantoms using pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianyi; Qiu, Jinze; Paranjape, Amit; Milner, Thomas E.

    2009-02-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes which are found predominantly in skin. Melanoma is one of the rarer types of skin cancer but causes the majority of skin cancer related deaths. The staging of malignant melanoma using Breslow thickness is important because of the relationship to survival rate after five years. Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) is based on the time-resolved acquisition of infrared (IR) emission from a sample after pulsed laser exposure. PPTR can be used to investigate the relationship between melanoma thickness and detected radiometric temperature using two-layer tissue phantoms. We used a Monte Carlo simulation to mimic light transport in melanoma and employed a three-dimensional heat transfer model to obtain simulated radiometric temperature increase and, in comparison, we also conducted PPTR experiments to confirm our simulation results. Simulation and experimental results show similar trends: thicker absorbing layers corresponding to deeper lesions produce slower radiometric temperature decays. A quantitative relationship exists between PPTR radiometric temperature decay time and thickness of the absorbing layer in tissue phantoms.

  3. Effect of temperature on passive remote sensing of chemicals by differential absorption radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Stephen K.; Krauss, Roland H.; Laufer, Gabriel

    2005-10-01

    Differential absorption radiometry (DAR), using uncooled detectors, is a simple, low-cost method for passive remote sensing of hazardous chemicals for domestic security applications. However, radiometric temperature differences (ΔTeffective) between a target gas species and its background affect detection sensitivity. Two DARs with sensitivities to methanol, diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP), and dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), all spectral or physical simulants of hazardous chemicals, were developed and used to experimentally determine the effect of |ΔTeffective| on detection sensitivity. An analytical model was also developed and compared with the experimental results. With a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)>5, a |ΔTeffective|≥2 K is sufficient for rapid (≤1 s) detection of methanol at <0.03 atm cm and DMMP and DIMP at <0.001 atm cm. These measured sensitivities suggest that rapid detection of hazardous chemical vapor clouds below lethal dose concentrations can be achieved using room-temperature pyroelectric detectors. Measurements were within 3% of the analytical predictions.

  4. Mesoscale monitoring of the soil freeze/thaw boundary from orbital microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, Fawwaz T.; Dobson, M. Craig; Kuhn, William R.

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental objectives are to test the feasibility of delineating the lateral boundary between frozen and thawed condition in the surface layer of soil from orbital microwave radiometry and secondly to examine the sensitivity of general circulation models to an explicit parameterization of the boundary condition. Physical models were developed to relate emissivity to scene properties and a simulation package was developed to predict brightness temperature as a function of emissivity and physical temperature in order to address issues of heterogeneity, scaling, and scene dynamics. Radiative transfer models were develped for both bare soil surfaces and those obscured by an intervening layer of vegetation or snow. These models relate the emissivity to the physical properties of the soil and to those of the snow or vegetation cover. A SMMR simulation package was developed to evaluate the adequacy of the emission models and the limiting effects of scaling for realistic scenarios incorporating spatially heterogeneous scenes with dynamic moisture and temperature gradients at the pixel scale.

  5. Geodesy by radio interferometry - Water vapor radiometry for estimation of the wet delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elgered, G.; Davis, J. L.; Herring, T. A.; Shapiro, I. I.

    1991-01-01

    An important source of error in VLBI estimates of baseline length is unmodeled variations of the refractivity of the neutral atmosphere along the propagation path of the radio signals. This paper presents and discusses the method of using data from a water vapor radiomete (WVR) to correct for the propagation delay caused by atmospheric water vapor, the major cause of these variations. Data from different WVRs are compared with estimated propagation delays obtained by Kalman filtering of the VLBI data themselves. The consequences of using either WVR data or Kalman filtering to correct for atmospheric propagation delay at the Onsala VLBI site are investigated by studying the repeatability of estimated baseline lengths from Onsala to several other sites. The repeatability obtained for baseline length estimates shows that the methods of water vapor radiometry and Kalman filtering offer comparable accuracies when applied to VLBI observations obtained in the climate of the Swedish west coast. For the most frequently measured baseline in this study, the use of WVR data yielded a 13 percent smaller weighted-root-mean-square (WRMS) scatter of the baseline length estimates compared to the use of a Kalman filter. It is also clear that the 'best' minimum elevationi angle for VLBI observations depends on the accuracy of the determinations of the total propagation delay to be used, since the error in this delay increases with increasing air mass.

  6. New contactless method for thermal diffusivity measurements using modulated photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Pham Tu Quoc, S; Cheymol, G; Semerok, A

    2014-05-01

    Modulated photothermal radiometry is a non-destructive and contactless technique for the characterization of materials. It has two major advantages: a good signal-to-noise ratio through a synchronous detection and a low dependence on the heating power and the optical properties of the sample surface. This paper presents a new method for characterizing the thermal diffusivity of a material when the phase shift between a modulated laser power signal and the thermal signal of a plate sample is known at different frequencies. The method is based on a three-dimensional analytical model which is used to determine the temperature amplitude and the phase in the laser heating of the plate. A new simple formula was developed through multi-parametric analysis to determine the thermal diffusivity of the plate with knowledge of the frequency at the minimum phase shift, the laser beam radius r0 and the sample thickness L. This method was developed to control the variation of the thermal diffusivity of nuclear components and it was first applied to determine the thermal diffusivity of different metals: 304 L stainless steel, nickel, titanium, tungsten, molybdenum, zinc, and iron. The experimental results were obtained with 5%-10% accuracy and corresponded well with the reference values. The present paper also demonstrates the limit of application of this method for plate with thickness r0/100 ≤ L ≤ r0/2. The technique is deemed interesting for the characterization of barely accessible components that require a contactless measurement. PMID:24880399

  7. Snow Pack and Lake Ice Pack Remote Sensing using Wideband Autocorrelation Radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S.; De Roo, R. D.; Sarabandi, K.; England, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    A novel microwave radiometric technique, wideband autocorrelation radiometry (WiBAR), offers a deterministic method of remotely sensing the propagation time τdelay of microwaves through low loss layers at the bottom of the atmosphere. Terrestrial examples are the snow and lake ice packs. This technique is based on the Planck radiation from the surface beneath the pack which travels upwards through the pack towards the radiometer; such a signal we call a direct signal. On the other hand, part of this radiation reflects back from the pack's upper interface then from its lower interface, before traveling towards the radiometer's antenna. Thus, there are two signals received by the radiometer, the direct signal and a delayed copy of it. The microwave propagation time τdelay through the pack yields a measure of its vertical extent. We report a time series of measurements of the ice pack on Lake Superior from February to April 2014 to demonstrate this technique. The observations are done at frequencies from 7 to 10 GHz. At these frequencies, the volume and surface scattering are small in the ice pack. This technique is inherently low-power since there is no transmitter as opposed to active remote sensing techniques. The results of this paper is to present the WiBAR technique and show that the microwave travel time within a dry snow pack and lake ice pack can be deterministically measured for different thicknesses using this technique.

  8. Passive standoff detection of radiological products by Fourier-transform infrared radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckrin, Eldon; Thériault, Jean-Marc

    2004-06-01

    A preliminary investigation is made into the possibility of applying the passive standoff detection technique to the identification of radiological and related products. This work is based on laboratory measurements of the diffuse reflectance from a number of products, including U3O8, CsI, SrO, I2O5, and La2O3. These reflectances are incorporated into the MODTRAN4 radiative-transfer model to simulate the nadir radiance from surfaces consisting of these radiological or related materials. The simulations are performed for two situations: at an altitude of 1 m above the ground, to simulate the passive detection of nuclear products with a hand-held instrument, and at an altitude of 1 km, to simulate a passive sensor carried aboard an aircraft. The results of the simulations under idealized conditions, as well as the results of one measurement, show that the passive standoff detection of radiological products by Fourier-transform infrared radiometry may be possible.

  9. Passive standoff detection of radiological products by Fourier-transform infrared radiometry.

    PubMed

    Puckrin, Eldon; Thériault, Jean-Marc

    2004-06-15

    A preliminary investigation is made into the possibility of applying the passive standoff detection technique to the identification of radiological and related products. This work is based on laboratory measurements of the diffuse reflectance from a number of products, including U3O8, CsI, SrO, I2O5, and La2O3. These reflectances are incorporated into the MODTRAN4 radiative-transfer model to simulate the nadir radiance from surfaces consisting of these radiological or related materials. The simulations are performed for two situations: at an altitude of 1 m above the ground, to simulate the passive detection of nuclear products with a hand-held instrument, and at an altitude of 1 km, to simulate a passive sensor carried aboard an aircraft. The results of the simulations under idealized conditions, as well as the results of one measurement, show that the passive standoff detection of radiological products by Fourier-transform infrared radiometry may be possible. PMID:15233440

  10. Applications of ultrasensitive wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry to noninvasive glucose detection in blood serum.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xinxin; Mandelis, Andreas; Zinman, Bernard

    2013-12-01

    Wavelength-Modulated Differential Laser Photothermal Radiometry (WM-DPTR) has been designed for noninvasive glucose measurements in the mid-infrared (MIR) range. Glucose measurements in human blood serum in the physiological range (20-320 mg/dl) with predicted error <10.3 mg/dl demonstrated high sensitivity and accuracy to meet wide clinical detection requirements, ranging from hypoglycemia to hyperglycemia. The glucose sensitivity and specificity of WM-DPTR stem from the subtraction of the simultaneously measured signals from two excitation laser beams at wavelengths near the peak and the baseline of the strongest interference-free glucose absorption band in the MIR range. It was found that the serum glucose sensitivity and measurement precision strongly depend on the tunability and stability of the intensity ratio and the phase shift of the two laser beams. This level of accuracy was favorably compared to other MIR techniques. WM-DPTR has shown excellent potential to be developed into a clinically viable noninvasive glucose biosensor. PMID:22930666

  11. Tower-Perturbation Measurements in Above-Water Radiometry. Volume 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); Zibordi, Giuseppe; Berthon, Jean-Francois; D'Alimonte, Davide; vanderLinde, Dirk; Brown, James W.

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the scientific activities which took place during June 2001 and June 2002 on the Acqua Alta Oceanographic Tower (AAOT) in the northern Adriatic Sea. The primary objective of these field campaigns was to quantify the effect of platform perturbations (principally reflections of sunlight onto the sea surface) on above-water measurements of water-leaving radiances. The deployment goals documented in this report were to: a) collect an extensive and simultaneous set of above- and in-water optical measurements under predominantly clear-sky conditions; b) establish the vertical properties of the water column using a variety of ancillary measurements, many of which were taken coincidently with the optical measurements; and c) determine the bulk properties of the environment using a diversity of atmospheric, biogeochemical, and meteorological techniques. A preliminary assessment of the data collected during the two field campaigns shows the perturbation in above-water radiometry caused by a large offshore structure is very similar to that caused by a large research vessel.

  12. Quantitative dental measurements by use of simultaneous frequency-domain laser infrared photothermal radiometry and luminescence.

    PubMed

    Nicolaides, Lena; Feng, Chris; Mandelis, Andreas; Abrams, Stephen H

    2002-02-01

    Modulated (frequency-domain) infrared photothermal radiometry (PTR) is used as a dynamic quantitative dental inspection tool complementary to modulated luminescence (LM) to quantify sound enamel or dentin. A dynamic high-spatial-resolution experimental imaging setup, which can provide simultaneous measurements of laser-induced modulated PTR and LM signals from defects in teeth, has been developed. Following optical absorption of laser photons, the experimental setup can monitor simultaneously and independently the nonradiative (optical-to-thermal) energy conversion by infrared PTR and the radiative deexcitation by LM emission. The relaxation lifetimes (tau1, tau2) and optical absorption, scattering, and spectrally averaged infrared emission coefficients (mu(alpha), mu(s), mu(IR)) of enamel are then determined with realistic three-dimensional LM and photothermal models for turbid media followed by multiparameter fits to the data. A quantitative band of values for healthy enamel with respect to these parameters can be generated so as to provide an explicit criterion for the assessment of healthy enamel and, in a future extension, to facilitate the diagnosis of the onset of demineralization in carious enamel. PMID:11993925

  13. New contactless method for thermal diffusivity measurements using modulated photothermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham Tu Quoc, S.; Cheymol, G.; Semerok, A.

    2014-05-01

    Modulated photothermal radiometry is a non-destructive and contactless technique for the characterization of materials. It has two major advantages: a good signal-to-noise ratio through a synchronous detection and a low dependence on the heating power and the optical properties of the sample surface. This paper presents a new method for characterizing the thermal diffusivity of a material when the phase shift between a modulated laser power signal and the thermal signal of a plate sample is known at different frequencies. The method is based on a three-dimensional analytical model which is used to determine the temperature amplitude and the phase in the laser heating of the plate. A new simple formula was developed through multi-parametric analysis to determine the thermal diffusivity of the plate with knowledge of the frequency at the minimum phase shift, the laser beam radius r0 and the sample thickness L. This method was developed to control the variation of the thermal diffusivity of nuclear components and it was first applied to determine the thermal diffusivity of different metals: 304 L stainless steel, nickel, titanium, tungsten, molybdenum, zinc, and iron. The experimental results were obtained with 5%-10% accuracy and corresponded well with the reference values. The present paper also demonstrates the limit of application of this method for plate with thickness r0/100 ≤ L ≤ r0/2. The technique is deemed interesting for the characterization of barely accessible components that require a contactless measurement.

  14. Pulsed photothermal radiometry as a method for investigating blood vessel-like structures.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, C H; Oberheide, U; Lohmann, S; Lubatschowski, H; Ertmer, W

    2001-04-01

    Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) is known to be suitable for in vivo investigations of tissue optical properties. As a noncontact, nondestructive method it is a very attractive candidate for on-line dosimetry of laser treatments that rely on thermal laser-tissue interaction. In this article, we extend the one-dimensional (1D) analytical formalism that has widely been used to describe PPTR signals to a two-dimensional treatment of a simplified model of a blood vessel. This approach leads to quantitative description of a PPTR signal that, unlike in an 1D treatment, not only shows changes in time, but also varies in space. Using this approach, we are able to gain instructive understanding on how target characteristics of a blood vessel-like structure influence such a spatiotemporal PPTR signal. Likewise, the ability of extracting target features from those measurements is evaluated. Subsequently, we present experimental realization of the idealized model of a blood vessel as used in our theory. Comparison of actual PPTR measurements with theoretical predictions allow vessel localization laterally and in depth. Using our setup, we furthermore demonstrate the influence of flow inside the vessel on the measured signal. PMID:11375732

  15. Simultaneous measurement of thermal diffusivity and optical absorption coefficient using photothermal radiometry. I. Homogeneous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuente, Raquel; Apiñaniz, Estibaliz; Mendioroz, Arantza; Salazar, Agustín

    2011-08-01

    Modulated photothermal radiometry (PTR) has been widely used to measure the thermal diffusivity of bulk materials. The method is based on illuminating the sample with a plane light beam and measuring the infrared emission with an infrared detector. The amplitude and phase of the PTR voltage is recorded as a function of the modulation frequency and then fitted to the theoretical model. In this work, we test the ability of modulated PTR to retrieve simultaneously the thermal diffusivity and the optical absorption coefficient of homogeneous slabs. In order to eliminate the instrumental factor, self-normalization is used, i.e., the ratio of the PTR signal recorded at the rear and front surfaces. The influence of the multiple reflections of the light beam, the heat losses, and the transparency to infrared wavelengths are analyzed. Measurements performed on a wide variety of homogeneous materials, covering the whole range from transparent to opaque, confirm the validity of the method. In Part II of this work, the method is extended to multilayered materials.

  16. Optical layer development for thin films thermal conductivity measurement by pulsed photothermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of thermal conductivity and volumetric specific heat of optically transparent thin films presents a challenge for optical-based measurement methods like pulsed photothermal radiometry. We present two approaches: (i) addition of an opaque optical layer to the surface and (ii) approximate correction of the mathematical model to incorporate semitransparency of the film. Different single layer and multilayer additive optical layers were tested. The materials of the optical layers were chosen according to analysis and measurement of their optical properties: emissivity and absorption coefficient. Presented are thermal properties' measurement results for 6 different thin films with wide range of thermal conductivity in three configurations of surface: as deposited, added Ti layer, and added Ti/TiAlSiN layer. Measurements were done in dependence on temperature from room temperature to 500 °C. The obtained thermal effusivity evolution in time after the laser pulse shows different effects of the surface layers: apparent effusivity change and time delay. Suitability of different measurement configurations is discussed and results of high temperature testing of different optical layers are presented.

  17. TiO2 coatings with Au nanoparticles analysed by photothermal IR radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedo, F.; Vaz, F.; Torrell, M.; Faria, R. T., Jr.; Cavaleiro, A.; Barradas, N. P.; Alves, E.; Junge, K. H.; Bein, B. K.

    2012-03-01

    Optically active Au : TiO2 nanocomposite thin films with an amount of gold of about 15 at% were prepared by dc reactive magnetron sputtering. After the deposition, the samples were annealed in vacuum at different constant temperatures between 200 and 800 °C. Depending on the annealing temperature, considerable changes have been found in the films' crystalline structure and for the number, the shape and the dimensions of the Au clusters. Modulated IR Radiometry (MIRR), a non-contact, non-destructive modulation-frequency-dependent photothermal measurement technique, was used for the characterization of the thermo-optical depth profiles of the as-deposited and annealed samples. Based on the results of MIRR, it was possible to establish correlations of the measured thermo-optical depth profiles with various effects: the heat treatment induced progress of crystallization of the TiO2 matrix, the evolution of Au nanoparticles and strong subsurface heat sources related to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect. For the annealing temperature of 800 °C, a diffusion and accumulation of gold just at the surface was found, which contributes to limit the subsurface heat sources and the SPR effect.

  18. Optical layer development for thin films thermal conductivity measurement by pulsed photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Martan, J

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of thermal conductivity and volumetric specific heat of optically transparent thin films presents a challenge for optical-based measurement methods like pulsed photothermal radiometry. We present two approaches: (i) addition of an opaque optical layer to the surface and (ii) approximate correction of the mathematical model to incorporate semitransparency of the film. Different single layer and multilayer additive optical layers were tested. The materials of the optical layers were chosen according to analysis and measurement of their optical properties: emissivity and absorption coefficient. Presented are thermal properties' measurement results for 6 different thin films with wide range of thermal conductivity in three configurations of surface: as deposited, added Ti layer, and added Ti/TiAlSiN layer. Measurements were done in dependence on temperature from room temperature to 500 °C. The obtained thermal effusivity evolution in time after the laser pulse shows different effects of the surface layers: apparent effusivity change and time delay. Suitability of different measurement configurations is discussed and results of high temperature testing of different optical layers are presented. PMID:25638108

  19. Optical layer development for thin films thermal conductivity measurement by pulsed photothermal radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Martan, J.

    2015-01-15

    Measurement of thermal conductivity and volumetric specific heat of optically transparent thin films presents a challenge for optical-based measurement methods like pulsed photothermal radiometry. We present two approaches: (i) addition of an opaque optical layer to the surface and (ii) approximate correction of the mathematical model to incorporate semitransparency of the film. Different single layer and multilayer additive optical layers were tested. The materials of the optical layers were chosen according to analysis and measurement of their optical properties: emissivity and absorption coefficient. Presented are thermal properties’ measurement results for 6 different thin films with wide range of thermal conductivity in three configurations of surface: as deposited, added Ti layer, and added Ti/TiAlSiN layer. Measurements were done in dependence on temperature from room temperature to 500 °C. The obtained thermal effusivity evolution in time after the laser pulse shows different effects of the surface layers: apparent effusivity change and time delay. Suitability of different measurement configurations is discussed and results of high temperature testing of different optical layers are presented.

  20. Effective interface state effects in hydrogenated amorphous-crystalline silicon heterostructures using ultraviolet laser photocarrier radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, A.; Mandelis, A.; Halliop, B.; Kherani, N. P.

    2013-12-28

    Ultraviolet photocarrier radiometry (UV-PCR) was used for the characterization of thin-film (nanolayer) intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (i-a-Si:H) on c-Si. The small absorption depth (approximately 10 nm at 355 nm laser excitation) leads to strong influence of the nanolayer parameters on the propagation and recombination of the photocarrier density wave (CDW) within the layer and the substrate. A theoretical PCR model including the presence of effective interface carrier traps was developed and used to evaluate the transport parameters of the substrate c-Si as well as those of the i-a-Si:H nanolayer. Unlike conventional optoelectronic characterization methods such as photoconductance, photovoltage, and photoluminescence, UV-PCR can be applied to more complete quantitative characterization of a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunction solar cells, including transport properties and defect structures. The quantitative results elucidate the strong effect of a front-surface passivating nanolayer on the transport properties of the entire structure as the result of effective a-Si:H/c-Si interface trap neutralization through occupation. A further dramatic improvement of those properties with the addition of a back-surface passivating nanolayer is observed and interpreted as the result of the interaction of the increased excess bulk CDW with, and more complete occupation and neutralization of, effective front interface traps.

  1. AIS-2 radiometry and a comparison of methods for the recovery of ground reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, James E.; Green, Robert O.; Vane, Gregg; Bruegge, Carol J.; Alley, Ronald E.; Curtiss, Brian J.

    1987-01-01

    A field experiment and its results involving Airborne Imaging Spectrometer-2 data are described. The radiometry and spectral calibration of the instrument are critically examined in light of laboratory and field measurements. Three methods of compensating for the atmosphere in the search for ground reflectance are compared. It was found that laboratory determined responsitivities are 30 to 50 percent less than expected for conditions of the flight for both short and long wavelength observations. The combined system atmosphere surface signal to noise ratio, as indexed by the mean response divided by the standard deviation for selected areas, lies between 40 and 110, depending upon how scene averages are taken, and is 30 percent less for flight conditions than for laboratory. Atmospheric and surface variations may contribute to this difference. It is not possible to isolate instrument performance from the present data. As for methods of data reduction, the so-called scene average or log-residual method fails to recover any feature present in the surface reflectance, probably because of the extreme homogeneity of the scene.

  2. Modeling Thermospheric Energetics: Implications of Cooling Rate Measurements by TIMED/SABER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, S. C.; Qian, L.; Mlynczak, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    Infrared radiation from the lower thermosphere has a significant effect on thermospheric temperature throughout its altitude range. Energy deposited in the upper thermosphere is conducted downward to altitudes where collisional processes with heterogeneous molecules are effective in exciting radiative transitions. Thus, exospheric temperature is strongly influenced by the infrared cooling rates. Measurements from the SABER instrument on the TIMED satellite have provided the global distribution and temporal variation of the two most important cooling rates, from the 15-micron band of carbon dioxide, and the 5.3-micron band of nitric oxide, both excited in the thermosphere primarily by collisions with atomic oxygen [e.g., Mlynczak et al., JGR, 2010]. Because these measurements are of the cooling rate itself, they are nearly independent of assumptions concerning carbon dioxide or nitric oxide density, atomic oxygen density, temperature, and rate coefficients, and so provide strong constraints on global models. Simulations using the NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) have obtained reasonable agreement with global nitric oxide cooling rates, on daily and solar-cycle time scales alike [c.f., Qian et al., JGR, 2010; Solomon et al., JGR, 2012]. This may be somewhat surprising, or serendipitous, considering the complexity of the production and chemistry of thermospheric nitric oxide, but is a hopeful indication of the model's ability to describe thermospheric temperature structure and variability. However, initial model simulations of 15-micron carbon dioxide emission have been significantly lower than the SABER measurements. This indicates that there may be issues with the carbon dioxide densities, with the atomic oxygen density, or with the rate coefficient for their interaction. Simply increasing any of these to bring the cooling rate into agreement with SABER measurements will have the additional effect of

  3. Chapter 4: Teachers' and Administrators' Perceptions of the Saber-Tooth Project Reform and of Their Changing Workplace Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doutis, Panayiotis; Ward, Phillip

    1999-01-01

    Describes changing workplace conditions encountered by middle school physical education teachers and administrators engaged in the Saber-Tooth Project, sharing data from interviews about their perspectives of this project. Findings are organized around the themes of collegiality, planning and assessment, and professionalism, all of which empowered…

  4. A Dedicated Z-Stent for Acquired Saber-Sheath Tracheobronchomalacia

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Kazushi; Fujimoto, Hisashi Kobayashi; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Uetani, Kosaku; Nishida, Norifumi; Ohata, Masahiro; Sato, Morio; Yamada, Ryusaku

    1997-11-15

    The tracheobronchial lumen has a continuous horseshoe arch morphology. We formed Z-stents accordingly to support the weakened cartilagenous portions. With this type of stent we treated a patient with acquired saber-sheath type tracheobronchomalacia (TBM), Rayl's type II, Johnson's grade III, whose condition was aggravated even under positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) therapy. The patient improved gradually. No immediate complication was observed. Bronchofiberscopic examination revealed that the tracheobronchial arcade was closely strut-braced and showed no expiratory collapse. Six months later, when the patient was intubated due to asthmatic attacks, tissue ingrowth through the stent was found and removed. There was no recurrence of TBM. The patient died 2 years later of pneumoconiosis.

  5. Petroscirtes pylei, a new saber-toothed blenny from the Fiji Islands (Teleostei: Blenniidae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith-Vaniz, W.F.

    2005-01-01

    Petroscirtes pylei is described from three specimens, 20.3-40.9 mm SL, obtained from a deep-water reef off Suva, Viti Levu, Fiji Islands. It is distinguished from all other congeners by its color pattern, including the presence of two dark body stripes, the lower one broadly extending onto the anal fin, and the dorsal fin with a broad, dark basal stripe, superimposed by a conspicuous white spot centered on the 4th spine. Among Petroscirtes, only the new species and P. springeri typically have 12 dorsal-fin spines but they are not closely related. The holotype was collected in 104-110 m, the second deepest depth record for a species of Petroscirtes. Discovery of this new species, and an apparently second new deep-water Petroscrites (uncollected), at a different Fijian reef indicates that our knowledge of the biodiversity of this habitat and of the saber-toothed blennies is very incomplete. Copyright ?? 2005 Magnolia Press.

  6. Evidence for paleotsunami deposits at Kefret Saber and El Alamein, Mediterranean coast of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Asem; Meghraoui, Mustapha; El Gabry, Mohamed; Maouche, Said; Hussein, Hichem; Korrat, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    Tsunami deposits and dragged large boulders are investigated along the Mediterranean coast of Egypt in the framework of the EC-Funded ASTARTE project (Assessment, Strategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe - FP7-ENV2013 6.4-3, Grant 603839) and the French-Egyptian IMHOTEP project. The targeted zones located west of Alexandria are selected according to historical earthquakes and related inundation events as recorded in archives. Field investigations include: 1) Coastal geomorphology along estuaries, wedge-protected and dune-protected lagunas, and terrace-platforms as potential sites for paleotsunami and boulder records and 2) Investigations of paleotsunamis deposits and their spatial distribution using trenching and coring. The two selected sites at Kefret Saber (immediately west of Marsah Matrouh town) and near El Alamein village are inner lagunas protected by 2 to 40-m-high dunes parallel to the shoreline. Five trenches and six cores dug in Kefret Saber and 1 trench in Alamein revealed an almost identical 5 to 10-cm-thick white sand unit with highly reworked fossil-rich and shells at about 20 to 40-cm-depth, intercalated in light brown laminated sandy and sandy-clay deposits. A total of 50 samples of organic deposits and charcoal fragments were collected from both sites, among which 20 samples have been dated. Dated charcoal in deposits above and below the white sand unit lead us to correlate with the 24 June 1870 major earthquake (M 7.5 - 8.0?) that generated a tsunami with the inundation of Alexandria harbor. Major seismic sources being along the Hellenic subduction zone and Cyprus arc, our progress study of paleotsunami deposits and their distribution along the Egyptian coast will help in a better constraint of the size and recurrence of tsunamis, and their propagation over the east Mediterranean regions.

  7. EDITORIAL: The 10th International Conference on New Developments and Applications in Optical Radiometry (NEWRAD 2008) The 10th International Conference on New Developments and Applications in Optical Radiometry (NEWRAD 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikonen, Erkki

    2009-08-01

    This special issue of Metrologia contains selected papers from the NEWRAD 2008 Conference, held in Daejeon, Korea, on 12-16 October 2008. NEWRAD 2008 continues a series of conferences on radiometry entitled 'New Developments and Applications in Optical Radiometry', which have taken place as follows: Cambridge, MA, USA (1985) Teddington, UK (1988) Davos, Switzerland (1990) Baltimore, MD, USA (1992) Berlin, Germany (1994) Tucson, AZ, USA (1997) Madrid, Spain (1999) Gaithersburg, MD, USA (2002) Davos, Switzerland (2005) Daejeon, Korea (2008) As the first NEWRAD Conference arranged in Asia, NEWRAD 2008 opened a new era for this series of conferences. The conference was followed by a Workshop on High Temperature Fixed Points and meetings of the Working Groups of the Consultative Committee for Photometry and Radiometry (CCPR). The organizer of all these events was Dr In Won Lee of the Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS). The NEWRAD Scientific Committee thanks him and his team for their tremendous efforts which maintained and developed the high standards of previous NEWRAD Conferences. The specific themes of NEWRAD 2008 included optical measurements related to displays, energy and terahertz applications. Furthermore, half a day of sessions was devoted to both remote sensing and to few-photon sources and detectors. A total of 140 papers were presented, including 11 invited and 30 contributed talks. The conference proceedings containing two-page extended abstracts were distributed to the participants as a paper volume and on a USB memory stick. The authors of selected contributions were invited to submit a full paper for this special issue. The submitted papers were handled by the normal reviewing procedures of Metrologia. On behalf of the Scientific Committee, I thank the reviewers and editorial staff of Metrologia for careful processing of the manuscripts. It is evident that this special issue, like its predecessors, will serve as an important

  8. Inverse Kinetics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2000-03-20

    Given the space-independent, one energy group reactor kinetics equations and the initial conditions, this prgram determines the time variation of reactivity required to produce the given input of flux-time data.

  9. Characterization of a digital microwave radiometry system for noninvasive thermometry using a temperature-controlled homogeneous test load.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, K; Stauffer, P R; Maccarini, P F; Jacobsen, S; Sterzer, F

    2008-07-21

    Microwave radiometry has been proposed as a viable noninvasive thermometry approach for monitoring subsurface tissue temperatures and potentially controlling power levels of multielement heat applicators during clinical hyperthermia treatments. With the evolution of technology, several analog microwave radiometry devices have been developed for biomedical applications. In this paper, we describe a digital microwave radiometer with built-in electronics for signal processing and automatic self-calibration. The performance of the radiometer with an Archimedean spiral receive antenna is evaluated over a bandwidth of 3.7-4.2 GHz in homogeneous and layered water test loads. Controlled laboratory experiments over the range of 30-50 degrees C characterize measurement accuracy, stability, repeatability and penetration depth sensitivity. The ability to sense load temperature through an intervening water coupling bolus of 6 mm thickness is also investigated. To assess the clinical utility and sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), experiments are conducted inside standard clinical hyperthermia treatment rooms with no EM shielding. The digital radiometer provided repeatable measurements with 0.075 degrees C resolution and standard deviation of 0.217 degrees C for homogeneous and layered tissue loads at temperatures between 32-45 degrees C. Within the 3.7-4.2 GHz band, EM noise rejection was good other than some interference from overhead fluorescent lights in the same room as the radiometer. The system response obtained for ideal water loads suggests that this digital radiometer should be useful for estimating subcutaneous tissue temperatures under a 6 mm waterbolus used during clinical hyperthermia treatments. The accuracy and stability data obtained in water test loads of several configurations support our expectation that single band radiometry should be sufficient for sub-surface temperature monitoring and power control of large multielement array superficial

  10. Characterization of a digital microwave radiometry system for noninvasive thermometry using a temperature-controlled homogeneous test load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunachalam, K.; Stauffer, P. R.; Maccarini, P. F.; Jacobsen, S.; Sterzer, F.

    2008-07-01

    Microwave radiometry has been proposed as a viable noninvasive thermometry approach for monitoring subsurface tissue temperatures and potentially controlling power levels of multielement heat applicators during clinical hyperthermia treatments. With the evolution of technology, several analog microwave radiometry devices have been developed for biomedical applications. In this paper, we describe a digital microwave radiometer with built-in electronics for signal processing and automatic self-calibration. The performance of the radiometer with an Archimedean spiral receive antenna is evaluated over a bandwidth of 3.7-4.2 GHz in homogeneous and layered water test loads. Controlled laboratory experiments over the range of 30-50 °C characterize measurement accuracy, stability, repeatability and penetration depth sensitivity. The ability to sense load temperature through an intervening water coupling bolus of 6 mm thickness is also investigated. To assess the clinical utility and sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), experiments are conducted inside standard clinical hyperthermia treatment rooms with no EM shielding. The digital radiometer provided repeatable measurements with 0.075 °C resolution and standard deviation of 0.217 °C for homogeneous and layered tissue loads at temperatures between 32-45 °C. Within the 3.7-4.2 GHz band, EM noise rejection was good other than some interference from overhead fluorescent lights in the same room as the radiometer. The system response obtained for ideal water loads suggests that this digital radiometer should be useful for estimating subcutaneous tissue temperatures under a 6 mm waterbolus used during clinical hyperthermia treatments. The accuracy and stability data obtained in water test loads of several configurations support our expectation that single band radiometry should be sufficient for sub-surface temperature monitoring and power control of large multielement array superficial hyperthermia applicators.

  11. CoSSIR: A New Instrument for Exploring the Utility of Submillimeter-wave Radiometry for Earth Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, P. E.; Wang, J. R.; Evans, K. F.; Momosmith, B.; Zhang, Z.

    2004-01-01

    The Conical Scanning Submillimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSSIR) has been developed to study the application of submillimeter-wave radiometry for remote sensing of cirrus clouds and humidity sounding. Measurements of the global distribution of ice cloud mass and particle size are important for understanding the Earth s energy budget and for evaluating global climate models. The spatial variability and the wide variety of cloud particle shapes and sizes make ice clouds particularly difficult to measure. Ice clouds are essentially undetectable at microwave frequencies due to the low dielectric of ice and small size of the particles relative to wavelength. However, submillimeter wavelengths demonstrate significant response to the presence of ice clouds thus this frequency regime is applicable to measuring ice clouds. Another potentially viable application for submillimeter-wave radiometry is humidity and temperature sounding. The principle of sounding at submillimeter wavelengths is similar to that at microwavelengths. Submillimeter-wave radiometry has the advantage of achieving finer spatial resolution using a smaller antenna aperture which is an important consideration for spaceborne observatories. Submillimeter-wave radiometry also offers the potential of sounding over land and as a surrogate measurement for precipitation. CoSSIR is a new instrument to explore these applications. The CoSSIR is designed to fly aboard the ER-2 aircraft and its modest size (approximately 100 kg) permits it to be configured for other aircraft. A dual-axes gimbals mechanism provides conical, across-track, and along-track scanning capability. In its present configuration CoSSIR has fifteen channels between 183 GHz and 640 GHz. Three channels are centered about the 183 GHz water vapor absorption line, four channels are centered about the 380 GHz water vapor absorption line, and three dual-polarized channels are centered about the 487 GHz oxygen absorption line. Two channels are located

  12. Monitoring of amorfization of the oxygen implanted layers in silicon wafers using photothermal radiometry and modulated free carrier absorption methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliński, M.; Pawlak, M.; Chrobak, Ł.; Pal, S.; Ludwig, A.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents experimental results that characterize implanted layers in silicon being the result of a high energy implantation of O+6 ions. We propose a simple relation between attenuation of photothermal radiometry and/or modulated free carrier absorption amplitudes, the implanted layer thickness and its optical absorption coefficient. The thickness of the implanted layers was determined from capacitance-voltage characteristics and computations with the TRIM program. The obtained results allowed to estimate changes of the optical absorption coefficient of the oxygen implanted layers indicating the amorfization of the layers.

  13. New contactless method for thermal diffusivity measurements using modulated photothermal radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pham Tu Quoc, S. Cheymol, G.; Semerok, A.

    2014-05-15

    Modulated photothermal radiometry is a non-destructive and contactless technique for the characterization of materials. It has two major advantages: a good signal-to-noise ratio through a synchronous detection and a low dependence on the heating power and the optical properties of the sample surface. This paper presents a new method for characterizing the thermal diffusivity of a material when the phase shift between a modulated laser power signal and the thermal signal of a plate sample is known at different frequencies. The method is based on a three-dimensional analytical model which is used to determine the temperature amplitude and the phase in the laser heating of the plate. A new simple formula was developed through multi-parametric analysis to determine the thermal diffusivity of the plate with knowledge of the frequency at the minimum phase shift, the laser beam radius r{sub 0} and the sample thickness L. This method was developed to control the variation of the thermal diffusivity of nuclear components and it was first applied to determine the thermal diffusivity of different metals: 304 L stainless steel, nickel, titanium, tungsten, molybdenum, zinc, and iron. The experimental results were obtained with 5%–10% accuracy and corresponded well with the reference values. The present paper also demonstrates the limit of application of this method for plate with thickness r{sub 0}/100 ≤ L ≤ r{sub 0}/2. The technique is deemed interesting for the characterization of barely accessible components that require a contactless measurement.

  14. Geodesy by radio interferometry: Water vapor radiometry for estimation of the wet delay

    SciTech Connect

    Elgered, G.; Davis, J.L.; Herring, T.A.; Shapiro, I.I. )

    1991-04-10

    An important source of error in very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) estimates of baseline length is unmodeled variations of the refractivity of the neutral atmosphere along the propagation path of the radio signals. The authors present and discuss the method of using data from a water vapor readiometer (WVR) to correct for the propagation delay caused by atmospheric water vapor, the major cause of these variations. Data from different WVRs are compared with estimated propagation delays obtained by Kalman filtering of the VLBI data themselves. The consequences of using either WVR data of Kalman filtering to correct for atmospheric propagation delay at the Onsala VLBI site are investigated by studying the repeatability of estimated baseline lengths from Onsala to several other sites. The lengths of the baselines range from 919 to 7,941 km. The repeatability obtained for baseline length estimates shows that the methods of water vapor radiometry and Kalman filtering offer comparable accuracies when applied to VLBI observations obtained in the climate of the Swedish west coast. The use of WVR data yielded a 13% smaller weighted-root-mean-square (WRMS) scatter of the baseline length estimates compared to the use of a Kalman filter. It is also clear that the best minimum elevation angle for VLBI observations depends on the accuracy of the determinations of the total propagation delay to be used, since the error in this delay increases with increasing air mass. For use of WVR data along with accurate determinations of total surface pressure, the best minimum is about 20{degrees}; for use of a model for the wet delay based on the humidity and temperature at the ground, the best minimum is about 35{degrees}.

  15. Aerosol optical depth derived from solar radiometry observations at northern mid-latitude sites

    SciTech Connect

    Laulainen, N.S.; Larson, N.R.; Michalsky, J.J.; Harrison, L.C.

    1994-01-01

    Routine, automated solar radiometry observations began with the development of the Mobile Automated Scanning Photometer (MASP) and its installation at the Rattlesnake Mountain Observatory (RMO). We have introduced a microprocessor controlled rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR), both the single detector and the multi-filter/detector (MFRSR) versions to replace the MASP. The operational mode of the RSRs is substantially different than the MASP or other traditional sun-tracking radiometers, because, by virtue of the automated rotating shadowband, the total and diffuse irradiance on a horizontal plane are measured and the direct-normal component deduced through computation from the total and diffuse components by the self-contained microprocessor. Because the three irradiance components are measured using the same detector for a given wavelength, the calibration coefficients are identical for each component, thus reducing errors when comparing them. The MFRSR is the primary radiometric instrument in the nine-station Quantitative Links Network (QLN) established in the eastern United States in late 1991. Data from this network are being used to investigate how cloud- and aerosol-induced radiative effects vary in time and with cloud structure and type over a mid-latitude continental region. This work supports the DOE Quantitative Links Program to quantify linkages between changes in atmospheric composition and climate forcing. In this paper we describe the setup of the QLN and present aerosol optical depth results from the on-going measurements at PNL/RMO, as well as preliminary results from the QLN. From the time-series of data at each site, we compare seasonal variability and geographical differences, as well as the effect of the perturbation to the stratosphere by Mt. Pinatubo. Analysis of the wavelength dependence of optical depth also provides information on the evolution and changes in the size distribution of the aerosols.

  16. Electromagnetic optimization of dual-mode antennas for radiometry-controlled heating of superficial tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccarini, Paolo F.; Rolfsnes, Hans O.; Neuman, Daniel G., Jr.; Johnson, Jessi E.; Juang, Titania; Jacobsen, Svein; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2005-04-01

    The large variance of survival in the treatment of large superficial tumors indicates that the efficacy of current therapies can be dramatically improved. Hyperthermia has shown significant enhancement of response when used in combination with chemotherapy and/or radiation. Control of temperature is a critical factor for treatment quality (and thus effectiveness), since the response of tumor and normal cells is significantly different over a range of just a few degrees (41-45°). For diffuse spreading tumors, microwave conformal arrays have been shown to be a sound solution to deposit the power necessary to reach the goal temperature throughout the targeted tissue. Continuous temperature monitoring is required for feedback control of power to compensate for physiologic (e.g. blood perfusion and dielectric properties) changes. Microwave radiometric thermometry has been proposed to complement individual fluoroptic probes to non-invasively map superficial and sub-surface temperatures. The challenge is to integrate the broadband antenna used for radiometric sensing with the high power antenna used for power deposition. A modified version of the dual concentric conductor antenna presented previously is optimized for such use. Several design challenges are presented including preventing unwanted radiating modes and thermal and electromagnetic coupling between the two antennas, and accommodating dielectric changes of the target tissue. Advanced 3D and planar 2D simulation software are used to achieve an initial optimized design, focused on maintaining appropriate radiation efficiency and pattern for both heating and radiometry antennas. A cutting edge automated measurement system has been realized to characterize the antennas in a tissue equivalent material and to confirm the simulation results. Finally, the guidelines for further development and improvement of this initial design are presented together with a preliminary implementation of the feedback program to be used

  17. Influence of Rolling on the Thermal Diffusivity of Metal Alloys by Photothermal Infrared Radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgadillo-Holtfort, I.; Chirtoc, M.; Gibkes, J.; Bein, B. K.; Pelzl, J.

    2014-12-01

    The thermal diffusivities of metallic foils subjected to cold-rolling processes have been studied by photothermal radiometry in a thermal transmission and reflection configuration. In this work, measurements were conducted on foils of Al, Cu, and stainless steel (V2A) that were subjected stepwise to cold-rolling process, reducing the sample of around 1 mm, as prepared, to approximately 0.1 mm. It was found that the effect of the cold-rolling is manifested as a relationship between the relative diffusivity and the relative thickness, both with respect to their corresponding initial values. This empirical relationship consists of a linear decrease of the relative diffusivity with the negative of the logarithm of the relative thickness of the sample. Within the approximation of small deformations, this behavior is consistent with linear diminishing of the thermal diffusivity with the degree of rolling. An influence of rolling on both the thermal diffusivity and effusivity was previously observed for a polycrystalline NiTi shape memory alloy with a nearly equi-atomic composition. Due to the thermal-diffusivity behavior of metal alloys due to rolling, a simple microscopic model is proposed to explain this influence upon the effective thermal parameters within the framework of a one-dimensional heat flow perpendicular to the foil surface. The model assumes the reduction of grain sizes and the consequent increase of grain interfaces during rolling as responsible for a larger effective thermal resistance. Numerical results are shown using the available polycrystalline NiTi for both the thermal-diffusivity and thermal-effusivity values.

  18. Passive monitoring using a combination of focused and phased array radiometry: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Farantatos, Panagiotis; Karanasiou, Irene S; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    Aim of this simulation study is to use the focusing properties of a conductive ellipsoidal reflector in conjunction with directive phased microwave antenna configurations in order to achieve brain passive monitoring with microwave radiometry. One of the main modules of the proposed setup which ensures the necessary beamforming and focusing on the body and brain areas of interest is a symmetrical axis ellipsoidal conductive wall cavity. The proposed system operates in an entirely non-invasive contactless manner providing temperature and/or conductivity variations monitoring and is designed to also provide hyperthermia treatment. In the present paper, the effect of the use of patch antennas as receiving antennas on the system's focusing properties and specifically the use of phased array setups to achieve scanning of the areas under measurement is investigated. Extensive simulations to compute the electric field distributions inside the whole ellipsoidal reflector and inside two types of human head models were carried out using single and two element microstrip patch antennas. The results show that clear focusing (creation of "hot spots") inside the head models is achieved at 1.53GHz. In the case of the two element antennas, the "hot spot" performs a linear scan around the brain area of interest while the phase difference of the two microstrip patch antennas significantly affects the way the scanning inside the head model is achieved. In the near future, phased array antennas with multiband and more elements will be used in order to enhance the system scanning properties toward the acquisition of tomography images without the need of subject movement. PMID:22254358

  19. Multi-instrument gravity-wave measurements over Tierra del Fuego and the Drake Passage - Part 1: Potential energies and vertical wavelengths from AIRS, COSMIC, HIRDLS, MLS-Aura, SAAMER, SABER and radiosondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Corwin J.; Hindley, Neil P.; Moss, Andrew C.; Mitchell, Nicholas J.

    2016-03-01

    Gravity waves in the terrestrial atmosphere are a vital geophysical process, acting to transport energy and momentum on a wide range of scales and to couple the various atmospheric layers. Despite the importance of these waves, the many studies to date have often exhibited very dissimilar results, and it remains unclear whether these differences are primarily instrumental or methodological. Here, we address this problem by comparing observations made by a diverse range of the most widely used gravity-wave-resolving instruments in a common geographic region around the southern Andes and Drake Passage, an area known to exhibit strong wave activity. Specifically, we use data from three limb-sounding radiometers (Microwave Limb Sounder, MLS-Aura; HIgh Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder, HIRDLS; Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry, SABER), the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) GPS-RO constellation, a ground-based meteor radar, the Advanced Infrared Sounder (AIRS) infrared nadir sounder and radiosondes to examine the gravity wave potential energy (GWPE) and vertical wavelengths (λz) of individual gravity-wave packets from the lower troposphere to the edge of the lower thermosphere ( ˜ 100 km). Our results show important similarities and differences. Limb sounder measurements show high intercorrelation, typically > 0.80 between any instrument pair. Meteor radar observations agree in form with the limb sounders, despite vast technical differences. AIRS and radiosonde observations tend to be uncorrelated or anticorrelated with the other data sets, suggesting very different behaviour of the wave field in the different spectral regimes accessed by each instrument. Evidence of wave dissipation is seen, and varies strongly with season. Observed GWPE for individual wave packets exhibits a log-normal distribution, with short-timescale intermittency dominating over a well-repeated monthly-median seasonal

  20. Foreword to the Special Issue on the 11th Specialist Meeting on Microwave Radiometry and Remote Sensing Applications (MicroRad 2010)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, David M; Jackson, Thomas J.; Kim, Edward J.; Lang, Roger H.

    2011-01-01

    The Specialist Meeting on Microwave Radiometry and Remote Sensing of the Environment (MicroRad 2010) was held in Washington, DC from March 1 to 4, 2010. The objective of MicroRad 2010 was to provide an open forum to report and discuss recent advances in the field of microwave radiometry, particularly with application to remote sensing of the environment. The meeting was highly successful, with more than 200 registrations representing 48 countries. There were 80 oral presentations and more than 100 posters. MicroRad has become a venue for the microwave radiometry community to present new research results, instrument designs, and applications to an audience that is conversant in these issues. The meeting was divided into 16 sessions (listed in order of presentation): 1) SMOS Mission; 2) Future Passive Microwave Remote Sensing Missions; 3) Theory and Physical Principles of Electromagnetic Models; 4) Field Experiment Results; 5) Soil Moisture and Vegetation; 6) Snow and Cryosphere; 7) Passive/Active Microwave Remote Sensing Synergy; 8) Oceans; 9) Atmospheric Sounding and Assimilation; 10) Clouds and Precipitation; 11) Instruments and Advanced Techniques I; 12) Instruments and Advanced Techniques II; 13) Cross Calibration of Satellite Radiometers; 14) Calibration Theory and Methodology; 15) New Technologies for Microwave Radiometry; 16) Radio Frequency Interference.

  1. Terra and Aqua MODIS Design, Radiometry, and Geometry in Support of Land Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Wolfe, Robert; Barnes, William; Guenther, Bruce; Vermote, Eric; Saleous, Nazmi; Salomonson, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) mission includes the construction and launch of two nearly identical Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments. The MODIS proto-flight model (PFM) is onboard the EOS Terra satellite (formerly EOS AM-1) launched on December 18, 1999 and hereafter referred to as Terra MODIS. Flight model-1 (FM1) is onboard the EOS Aqua satellite (formerly EOS PM-1) launched on May 04, 2002 and referred to as Aqua MODIS. MODIS was developed based on the science community s desire to collect multiyear continuous datasets for monitoring changes in the Earth s land, oceans and atmosphere, and the human contributions to these changes. It was designed to measure discrete spectral bands, which includes many used by a number of heritage sensors, and thus extends the heritage datasets to better understand both long- and short-term changes in the global environment (Barnes and Salomonson 1993; Salomonson et al. 2002; Barnes et al. 2002). The MODIS development, launch, and operation were managed by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, Maryland. The sensors were designed, built, and tested by Raytheon/ Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS), Goleta, California. Each MODIS instrument offers 36 spectral bands, which span the spectral region from the visible (0.41 m) to long-wave infrared (14.4 m). MODIS collects data at three different nadir spatial resolutions: 0.25, 0.5, and 1 km. Key design specifications, such as spectral bandwidths, typical scene radiances, required signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) or noise equivalent temperature differences (NEDT), and primary applications of each MODIS spectral band are summarized in Table 7.1. These parameters were the basis for the MODIS design. More details on the evolution of the NASA EOS and development of the MODIS instruments are provided in Chap. 1. This chapter focuses on the MODIS sensor design, radiometry, and geometry as they apply to land remote sensing. With near

  2. Measurement of Low Amounts of Precipitable Water Vapor Using Ground-Based Millimeterwave Radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, Paul E.; Westwater, Ed R.; Han, Yong; Gasiewski, Albin J.; Klein, Marian; Cimini, Domenico; Jones, David C.; Manning, WIll; Kim, Edward J.; Wang, James R.

    2003-01-01

    Extremely dry conditions characterized by amounts of precipitable water vapor (PWV) as as 1-2 mm commonly occur in high-latitude regions during the winter months. While such atmospheres carry only a few percent of the latent heat energy compared to tropical atmospheres, the effects of low vapor amounts on the polar radiation budget - both directly through modulation of longwave radiation and indirectly through the formation of clouds - are considerable. Accurate measurements of precipitable water vapor (PWV) during such dry conditions are needed to improve polar radiation models for use in understanding and predicting change in the climatically sensitive polar regions. To this end, the strong water vapor absorption at 183.310 GHz provides a unique means of measuring low amounts of PWV. Weighting function analysis, forward model calculations based upon a 7-year radiosonde dataset, and retrieval simulations consistently predict that radiometric measurements made using several millimeter-wavelength (MMW) channels near the 183 GHz line, together with established microwave (MW) measurements at the 22.235 GHz water vapor line and -3 1 GHz atmospheric absorption window can be used to determine within 5% uncertainty the full range of PWV expected in the Arctic. This unique collective capability stands in spite of accuracy limitations stemming from uncertainties due to the sensitivity of the vertical distribution of temperature and water vapor at MMW channels. In this study the potential of MMW radiometry using the 183 GHz line for measuring low amounts of PWV is demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. The study uses data obtained during March 1999 as part of an experiment conducted at the Department of Energy s Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) near Barrow, Alaska. Several radiometers from both NOAA and NASA were deployed during the experiment to provide the first combined MMW and MW ground-based data set during dry arctic conditions. Single-channel retrievals

  3. Remote Sensing of Methane in the Martian Atmosphere using Infrared Laser Heterodyne Radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passmore, R. L.; Bowles, N. E.; Weidmann, D.; Smith, K.

    2011-12-01

    In the last few years, several research teams have reported the detection of methane in the atmosphere of Mars, measuring 10 ppb on average [1][2][3]. The source of the methane is still unknown, but its identification is important as its presence could imply a biological origin. However, the detection limits of current instruments lie below the requirements for an unambiguous determination of concentration mapping and distribution. We investigate the viability of detecting methane in the Martian atmosphere via a high sensitivity remote sensing technique known as passive mid-infrared laser heterodyne radiometry. Although heterodyne spectroscopy is not a new idea, recent advancements in local oscillator technology [4] offer the possibility of significant instrument miniaturisation relevant to space deployment. We present our current work on a laser heterodyne radiometer (LHR) which involves adapting an existing 10 μm laser breadboard design, which was used with much success to study stratospheric ozone [5], to operate at 7.7 μm in order to target the ν4 fundamental band of methane. The core of the LHR consists of a distributed-feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL) operating in continuous-wave mode, which acts as the local oscillator. QCLs are ideal local oscillators for this type of instrument as they emit with high spectral purity and the necessary optical power in the mid-infrared region where characteristic spectral lines of interest lie. Atmospheric modelling of the Martian atmosphere and instrument sensitivity studies enabled simulated methane spectral features to be studied in detail, which subsequently determined the focus for experimental efforts in the laboratory. Testing of the LHR was initially carried out on small gas cells containing pure methane gas, but in order to test the instrument more rigorously for atmospheric studies a larger gas cell was constructed that approximates the Martian atmosphere in the laboratory. Trace quantities of methane were

  4. Scanning Microwave Radiometry for Investigating Water Vapor and Cloud Distributions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crewell, S.; Kneifel, S.; Löhnert, U.; Schween, J.

    2010-12-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometry (MWR) is one of the most promising methods for observing cloud liquid, humidity and temperature as it is a robust, highly automated technique for nearly all weather conditions. Typically, multi-frequency observations between 20 and 90 GHz are performed in zenith direction. The major limitation of such MWR observations is the limited vertical resolution providing only 2-3 independent pieces of information for water vapor and temperature (Löhnert et al., 2009). For cloud liquid the situation is worse due to the relatively low dependance of cloud emissivity on temperature. In principal only the total column - the liquid water path (LWP) can be retrieved. Elevation scanning is commonly used to improve the vertical resolution of temperature profiles in the boundary layer assuming its horizontal homogeneity. Volume scanning, i.e. azimuth and elevation scanning has the potential to investigate the 3D distribution of water vapor and clouds. During the deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility in the Murg Valley, Black Forest, Germany routine azimuth scanning MWR could reveal the increase in average LWP above hill crests compared to the standard zenith observations within the valley. Recently, we could demonstrate the feasibility of detecting horizontal humidity gradients from a single scanning MWR (Schween et al., 2010). Another interesting application of scanning MWR is the use of azimuthal water vapor variability as a proxy for convective activity. For example during fair weather conditions the increase in turbulent mixing after sunrise building up the boundary layer can be detected well from the azimuthal water vapor variations at low elevation angles. The presentation will provide an overview of the capabilities of MWR for the detection of 3D structures by analyzing the information content of the measurements and deriving retrieval methods. In addition, examples from multi-year scanning observations at different locations will be shown to

  5. Stable microwave radiometry system for long term monitoring of deep tissue temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Paul R.; Rodriques, Dario B.; Salahi, Sara; Topsakal, Erdem; Oliveira, Tiago R.; Prakash, Aniruddh; D'Isidoro, Fabio; Reudink, Douglas; Snow, Brent W.; Maccarini, Paolo F.

    2013-02-01

    Background: There are numerous clinical applications for non-invasive monitoring of deep tissue temperature. We present the design and experimental performance of a miniature radiometric thermometry system for measuring volume average temperature of tissue regions located up to 5cm deep in the body. Methods: We constructed a miniature sensor consisting of EMI-shielded log spiral microstrip antenna with high gain onaxis and integrated high-sensitivity 1.35GHz total power radiometer with 500 MHz bandwidth. We tested performance of the radiometry system in both simulated and experimental multilayer phantom models of several intended clinical measurement sites: i) brown adipose tissue (BAT) depots within 2cm of the skin surface, ii) 3-5cm deep kidney, and iii) human brain underlying intact scalp and skull. The physical models included layers of circulating tissue-mimicking liquids controlled at different temperatures to characterize our ability to quantify small changes in target temperature at depth under normothermic surface tissues. Results: We report SAR patterns that characterize the sense region of a 2.6cm diameter receive antenna, and radiometric power measurements as a function of deep tissue temperature that quantify radiometer sensitivity. The data demonstrate: i) our ability to accurately track temperature rise in realistic tissue targets such as urine refluxed from prewarmed bladder into kidney, and 10°C drop in brain temperature underlying normothermic scalp and skull, and ii) long term accuracy and stability of +0.4°C over 4.5 hours as needed for monitoring core body temperature over extended surgery or monitoring effects of brown fat metabolism over an extended sleep/wake cycle. Conclusions: A non-invasive sensor consisting of 2.6cm diameter receive antenna and integral 1.35GHz total power radiometer has demonstrated sufficient sensitivity to track clinically significant changes in temperature of deep tissue targets underlying normothermic surface

  6. The effect of tropospheric fluctuations on the accuracy of water vapor radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, J. Z.

    1992-01-01

    Line-of-sight path delay calibration accuracies of 1 mm are needed to improve both angular and Doppler tracking capabilities. Fluctuations in the refractivity of tropospheric water vapor limit the present accuracies to about 1 nrad for the angular position and to a delay rate of 3x10(exp -13) sec/sec over a 100-sec time interval for Doppler tracking. This article describes progress in evaluating the limitations of the technique of water vapor radiometry at the 1-mm level. The two effects evaluated here are: (1) errors arising from tip-curve calibration of WVR's in the presence of tropospheric fluctuations and (2) errors due to the use of nonzero beamwidths for water vapor radiometer (WVR) horns. The error caused by tropospheric water vapor fluctuations during instrument calibration from a single tip curve is 0.26 percent in the estimated gain for a tip-curve duration of several minutes or less. This gain error causes a 3-mm bias and a 1-mm scale factor error in the estimated path delay at a 10-deg elevation per 1 g/cm(sup 2) of zenith water vapor column density present in the troposphere during the astrometric observation. The error caused by WVR beam averaging of tropospheric fluctuations is 3 mm at a 10-deg elevation per 1 g/cm(sup 2) of zenith water vapor (and is proportionally higher for higher water vapor content) for current WVR beamwidths (full width at half maximum of approximately 6 deg). This is a stochastic error (which cannot be calibrated) and which can be reduced to about half of its instantaneous value by time averaging the radio signal over several minutes. The results presented here suggest two improvements to WVR design: first, the gain of the instruments should be stabilized to 4 parts in 10(exp 4) over a calibration period lasting 5 hours, and second, the WVR antenna beamwidth should be reduced to about 0.2 deg. This will reduce the error induced by water vapor fluctuations in the estimated path delays to less than 1 mm for the elevation range

  7. On the detectability of trace chemical species in the martian atmosphere using gas correlation filter radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, J. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Calcutt, S. B.; Wilson, E. L.

    2015-11-01

    The martian atmosphere is host to many trace gases including water (H2O) and its isotopologues, methane (CH4) and potentially sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) and further organic compounds, which would serve as indirect tracers of geological, chemical and biological processes on Mars. With exception of the recent detection of CH4 by Curiosity, previous detections of these species have been unsuccessful or considered tentative due to the low concentrations of these species in the atmosphere (∼10-9 partial pressures), limited spectral resolving power and/or signal-to-noise and the challenge of discriminating between telluric and martian features when observing from the Earth. In this study, we present radiative transfer simulations of an alternative method for detection of trace gas species - the gas correlation radiometry method. Two potential observing scenarios were explored where a gas correlation filter radiometer (GCFR) instrument: (1) performs nadir and/or limb sounding of the martian atmosphere in the thermal infrared (200-2000 cm-1 from an orbiting spacecraft or (2) performs solar occultation measurements in the near-infrared (2000-5000 cm-1) from a lander on the martian surface. In both scenarios, simulations of a narrowband filter radiometer (without gas correlation) were also generated to serve as a comparison. From a spacecraft, we find that a gas correlation filter radiometer, in comparison to a filter radiometer (FR), offers a greater discrimination between temperature and dust, a greater discrimination between H2O and HDO, and would allow detection of N2O and CH3OH at concentrations of ∼10 ppbv and ∼2 ppbv, respectively, which are lower than previously-derived upper limits. However, the lowest retrievable concentration of SO2 (approximately 2 ppbv) is comparable with previous upper limits and CH4 is only detectable at concentrations of approximately 10 ppbv, which is an order of magnitude higher than the concentration recently measured

  8. Stable Microwave Radiometry System for Long Term Monitoring of Deep Tissue Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Paul R.; Rodriques, Dario B.; Salahi, Sara; Topsakal, Erdem; Oliveira, Tiago R.; Prakash, Aniruddh; D'Isidoro, Fabio; Reudink, Douglas; Snow, Brent W.; Maccarini, Paolo F.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are numerous clinical applications for non-invasive monitoring of deep tissue temperature. We present the design and experimental performance of a miniature radiometric thermometry system for measuring volume average temperature of tissue regions located up to 5cm deep in the body. Methods We constructed a miniature sensor consisting of EMI-shielded log spiral microstrip antenna with high gain on-axis and integrated high-sensitivity 1.35GHz total power radiometer with 500 MHz bandwidth. We tested performance of the radiometry system in both simulated and experimental multilayer phantom models of several intended clinical measurement sites: i) brown adipose tissue (BAT) depots within 2cm of the skin surface, ii) 3–5cm deep kidney, and iii) human brain underlying intact scalp and skull. The physical models included layers of circulating tissue-mimicking liquids controlled at different temperatures to characterize our ability to quantify small changes in target temperature at depth under normothermic surface tissues. Results We report SAR patterns that characterize the sense region of a 2.6cm diameter receive antenna, and radiometric power measurements as a function of deep tissue temperature that quantify radiometer sensitivity. The data demonstrate: i) our ability to accurately track temperature rise in realistic tissue targets such as urine refluxed from prewarmed bladder into kidney, and 10°C drop in brain temperature underlying normothermic scalp and skull, and ii) long term accuracy and stability of ∓0.4°C over 4.5 hours as needed for monitoring core body temperature over extended surgery or monitoring effects of brown fat metabolism over an extended sleep/wake cycle. Conclusions A non-invasive sensor consisting of 2.6cm diameter receive antenna and integral 1.35GHz total power radiometer has demonstrated sufficient sensitivity to track clinically significant changes in temperature of deep tissue targets underlying normothermic surface

  9. Detection of greenbug infestation on wheat using ground-based radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhiming

    Scope of methods of study. The purpose of this greenhouse study was to characterize stress in wheat caused by greenbugs using ground-based radiometry. Experiments were conducted to (a) identify spectral bands and vegetation indices sensitive to greenbug infestation; (b) differentiate stress caused due to greenbugs from water stress; (c) examine the impacts of plant growth stage on detection of greenbug infestation; and (d) compare infestations due to greenbug and Russian wheat aphid. Wheat (variety-TAM 107) was planted (seed spacing 1 in. x 3 in.) in plastic flats with dimension 24 in. x 16 in. x 8.75 in. Fifteen days after sowing, wheat seedlings were infested with greenbugs (biotype-E). Nadir measurement of canopy reflectance started the day after infestation and lasted until most infested plants were dead. Using a 16-band Cropscan radiometer, spectral reflectance data were collected daily (between 13:00--14:00 hours) and 128 vegetation indices were derived in addition to greenbug counts per tiller. Using SAS PROC MIXED, sensitivity of band and vegetation indices was identified based on Threshold Day. Subsequent to Threshold Day there was a consistent significant spectral difference between control and infested plants. Sensitivity of band and vegetation indices was further examined using correlation and relative sensitivity analyses. Findings and conclusions. Results show that it is possible to detect greenbug-induced stress on wheat using hand-held radiometers, such as Cropscan. Band 694 nm and the ratio-based vegetation index (RVI) derived from the band 694 nm and 800 nm were identified as most sensitive to greenbug infestation. Landsat TM bands and their derived vegetation indices also show potential for detecting wheat stress caused by greenbug infestation. Also, RVIs particularly derived using spectral band 694 nm and 800 nm were found useful in differentiating greenbug infestation from water stress. Furthermore, vegetation indices such as Normalized total

  10. X-Band Microwave Radiometry as a Tool for Understanding the Deep Atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffes, P. G.; Devaraj, K.; Butler, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the composition, structure, and spatial variability of the deep Venus atmosphere, including the boundary layer, is a key future direction identified in the Decadal Review. While only Mariner 2 carried a microwave radiometer for the expressed purpose of evaluating the Venus atmosphere, subsequent missions to Venus and other planets have used radar receivers in a "passive mode" to map the microwave emission from both surfaces and atmospheres. Additionally, successful mapping of microwave emissions from the atmospheres of Venus and the outer planets using earth-based antenna arrays have given unique insights into the composition and variability of such atmospheres. In the past two decades, multiple observations of Venus have been made at X band (3.6 cm) using the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), and maps have been created of the 3.6 cm emission from Venus. Since the emission morphology is related both to surface features and to the deep atmospheric absorption from CO2 and SO2 (see, e.g., Butler et al., Icarus 154, 2001), emission measurements can be used to give unique information regarding the deep atmosphere, once surface effects are removed. Since surface emissivities measured at the 12.6 cm wavelength by the Magellan mission can be extrapolated to 3.6 cm (see, e.g., Tryka and Muhleman, JGR(Planets) 197, 1992), the residual effects due to deep atmospheric variability can potentially be detected, as they were for higher altitudes at shorter wavelengths (1.3 cm and 2.0 cm, Jenkins et.al., Icarus 158, 2002). As results from this study show, the limited resolution and sensitivity of earth-based measurements make detection of moderate atmospheric variability somewhat difficult. However, the higher sensitivity and resolution provided by an orbiting X-Band radiometer can provide important insights into the variability and structure of the Venus boundary layer. As shown in the figure, the vertical resolution of X-Band radiometry compares well with IR sounding

  11. Comparative Biomechanical Modeling of Metatherian and Placental Saber-Tooths: A Different Kind of Bite for an Extreme Pouched Predator

    PubMed Central

    Wroe, Stephen; Chamoli, Uphar; Parr, William C. H.; Clausen, Philip; Ridgely, Ryan; Witmer, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Questions surrounding the dramatic morphology of saber-tooths, and the presumably deadly purpose to which it was put, have long excited scholarly and popular attention. Among saber-toothed species, the iconic North American placental, Smilodon fatalis, and the bizarre South American sparassodont, Thylacosmilus atrox, represent extreme forms commonly forwarded as examples of convergent evolution. For S. fatalis, some consensus has been reached on the question of killing behaviour, with most researchers accepting the canine-shear bite hypothesis, wherein both head-depressing and jaw closing musculatures played a role in delivery of the fatal bite. However, whether, or to what degree, T. atrox may have applied a similar approach remains an open question. Here we apply a three-dimensional computational approach to examine convergence in mechanical performance between the two species. We find that, in many respects, the placental S. fatalis (a true felid) was more similar to the metatherian T. atrox than to a conical-toothed cat. In modeling of both saber-tooths we found that jaw-adductor-driven bite forces were low, but that simulations invoking neck musculature revealed less cranio-mandibular stress than in a conical-toothed cat. However, our study also revealed differences between the two saber-tooths likely reflected in the modus operandi of the kill. Jaw-adductor-driven bite forces were extremely weak in T. atrox, and its skull was even better-adapted to resist stress induced by head-depressors. Considered together with the fact that the center of the arc described by the canines was closer to the jaw-joint in Smilodon, our results are consistent with both jaw-closing and neck musculature playing a role in prey dispatch for the placental, as has been previously suggested. However, for T. atrox, we conclude that the jaw-adductors probably played no major part in the killing bite. We propose that the metatherian presents a more complete commitment to the already

  12. In vivo stratum corneum over-hydration and water diffusion coefficient measurements using opto-thermal radiometry and TEWL Instruments.

    PubMed

    Xiao, P; Wong, W; Cottenden, A M; Imhof, R E

    2012-08-01

    Skin over-hydration is a common problem that affects many people who wear incontinence pads or diapers. The aim of this study is to develop a new method for stratum corneum (SC) over-hydration and SC water diffusion coefficient measurements using opto-thermal transient emission radiometry (OTTER) and evaporimetry. With OTTER, we can measure the SC surface hydration and hydration gradient. With evaporimetry, we can measure the time-dependent evaporative drying curves of water vapour flux density (WVFD). The combination of hydration results and WVFD results can yield information on the SC water diffusion coefficient and how it depends on the SC surface hydration level. The results show that SC water diffusion coefficient is non-linearly proportional to the SC surface hydration level. The results also show strong correlations between evaporative drying flux measured using the Evaporimeter and surface hydration estimated from OTTER measurements. PMID:22515301

  13. Passive standoff detection of SF6 at a distance of 5.7 km by differential Fourier transform infrared radiometry.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Hugo; Puckrin, Eldon; Thériault, Jean-Marc; Bouffard, François

    2005-10-01

    Recent results are presented on the passive detection, identification, and quantification of a vapor cloud of SF6 measured at a horizontal standoff distance of 5.7 km using a dual-beam interferometer optimized for background signal suppression. The measurements were performed at Defense Research and Development Canada (DRDC)-Valcartier during a number of recent open-air experiments. The measurement approach is based on the differential passive standoff detection method that has been developed by DRDC Valcartier during the past few years. This work represents the first such measurement reported in the open literature for a standoff distance as large as 5.7 km. These results clearly demonstrate the capability of the differential radiometry approach to the detection, identification, and quantification of chemical vapor clouds located at long distances from the sensor. PMID:16274529

  14. Quantitative Carrier Density Wave Imaging in Silicon Solar Cells Using Photocarrier Radiometry and Lock-in Carrierography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Q. M.; Melnikov, A.; Mandelis, A.

    2016-04-01

    InGaAs camera-based low-frequency homodyne and high-frequency heterodyne lock-in carrierographies (LIC) are introduced for spatially resolved imaging of optoelectronic properties of Si solar cells. Based on the full theory of solar cell photocarrier radiometry (PCR), several simplification steps were performed aiming at the open circuit case, and a concise expression of the base minority carrier density depth profile was obtained. The model shows that solar cell PCR/LIC signals are mainly sensitive to the base minority carrier lifetime. Both homodyne and heterodyne frequency response data at selected locations on a mc-Si solar cell were used to extract the local base minority carrier lifetimes by best fitting local experimental data to theory.

  15. An absolute calibration method of an ethyl alcohol biosensor based on wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi Jun; Mandelis, Andreas; Guo, Xinxin

    2015-11-01

    In this work, laser-based wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry (WM-DPTR) is applied to develop a non-invasive in-vehicle alcohol biosensor. WM-DPTR features unprecedented ethanol-specificity and sensitivity by suppressing baseline variations through a differential measurement near the peak and baseline of the mid-infrared ethanol absorption spectrum. Biosensor signal calibration curves are obtained from WM-DPTR theory and from measurements in human blood serum and ethanol solutions diffused from skin. The results demonstrate that the WM-DPTR-based calibrated alcohol biosensor can achieve high precision and accuracy for the ethanol concentration range of 0-100 mg/dl. The high-performance alcohol biosensor can be incorporated into ignition interlocks that could be fitted as a universal accessory in vehicles in an effort to reduce incidents of drinking and driving. PMID:26628164

  16. An absolute calibration method of an ethyl alcohol biosensor based on wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi Jun; Mandelis, Andreas; Guo, Xinxin

    2015-11-15

    In this work, laser-based wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry (WM-DPTR) is applied to develop a non-invasive in-vehicle alcohol biosensor. WM-DPTR features unprecedented ethanol-specificity and sensitivity by suppressing baseline variations through a differential measurement near the peak and baseline of the mid-infrared ethanol absorption spectrum. Biosensor signal calibration curves are obtained from WM-DPTR theory and from measurements in human blood serum and ethanol solutions diffused from skin. The results demonstrate that the WM-DPTR-based calibrated alcohol biosensor can achieve high precision and accuracy for the ethanol concentration range of 0-100 mg/dl. The high-performance alcohol biosensor can be incorporated into ignition interlocks that could be fitted as a universal accessory in vehicles in an effort to reduce incidents of drinking and driving.

  17. Non-mechanical optical path switching and its application to dual beam spectroscopy including gas filter correlation radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor); Wang, Liang-Guo (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A non-mechanical optical switch is developed for alternately switching a monochromatic or quasi-monochromatic light beam along two optical paths. A polarizer polarizes light into a single, e.g., vertical component which is then rapidly modulated into vertical and horizontal components by a polarization modulator. A polarization beam splitter then reflects one of these components along one path and transmits the other along the second path. In the specific application of gas filter correlation radiometry, one path is directed through a vacuum cell and one path is directed through a gas correlation cell containing a desired gas. Reflecting mirrors cause these two paths to intersect at a second polarization beam splitter which reflects one component and transmits the other to recombine them into a polarization modulated beam which can be detected by an appropriate single sensor.

  18. Photothermal Radiometry Characterization of Limestone Rocks from the Península of Yucatán

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May-Crespo, J.; Martínez-Torres, P.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Quintana, P.; Vilca-Quispe, L.

    2012-11-01

    Limestone is a sedimentary rock composed of calcium carbonate with minor amounts of silica, iron oxide, clay, dolomite, and organic material. These types of stones have been used extensively as building materials. Due to this, determination of their thermal properties is of the utmost importance. These properties depend on the microstructure and composition of each type of rock. In this study, the effect of the thermal treatment of three different limestone rocks from the Peninsula of Yucatán were studied, in the range from 100 °C up to 600 °C, using photothermal radiometry. These studies were complemented by the characterization of the crystalline phases using X-ray diffraction and effective porosity measurements performed by the saturation technique. It is shown that the thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity, and specific heat of the limestone decrease as the temperature increases. This behavior can be related to increases in microcracks and effective porosity due to thermal treatments.

  19. Temperature-dependent thermal characterization of Ge2Sb2Te5 and related interfaces by the photothermal radiometry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Jean-Luc; Cappella, Andrea; Varesi, Enrico; Schick, Vincent; Kusiak, Andrzej; Wiemer, Claudia; longo, Massimo; Gotti, Andrea; Hay, Bruno

    2010-03-01

    The thermal conductivity of Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) layers, as well as the thermal boundary resistance at the interface between the GST and amorphous SiO2, were measured using a PhotoThermal Radiometry experiment. The two phase-changes of the Ge2Sb2Te5 were retrieved, starting from the amorphous and sweeping to the fcc crystalline state at 130 °C and then to the hcp crystalline state at 310 °C. The thermal conductivity resulted to be constant in the amorphous phase, whereas it evolved between the two crystalline states. The thermal boundary resistance at the GST-SiO2 interface was estimated to be higher for the hcp phase than for the amorphous and fcc ones.

  20. Accurate measurement of blood vessel depth in port wine stained human skin in vivo using pulsed photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Bincheng; Majaron, Boris; Viator, John A; Milner, Thomas E; Chen, Zhongping; Zhao, Yonghua; Ren, Hongwu; Nelson, J Stuart

    2004-01-01

    We report on application of pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR) to determine the depth of port wine stain (PWS) blood vessels in human skin. When blood vessels are deep in the PWS skin (>100 microm), conventional PPTR depth profiling can be used to determine PWS depth with sufficient accuracy. When blood vessels are close or partially overlap the epidermal melanin layer, a modified PPTR technique using two-wavelength (585 and 600 nm) excitation is a superior method to determine PWS depth. A direct difference approach in which PWS depth is determined from a weighted difference of temperature profiles reconstructed independently from two-wavelength excitation is demonstrated to be appropriate for a wider range of PWS patients with various blood volume fractions, blood vessel sizes, and depth distribution. The most superficial PWS depths determined in vivo by PPTR are in good agreement with those measured using optical Doppler tomography (ODT). PMID:15447017

  1. Robust multiparameter method of evaluating the optical and thermal properties of a layered tissue structure using photothermal radiometry.

    PubMed

    Matvienko, Anna; Mandelis, Andreas; Abrams, Stephen

    2009-06-10

    The thermal and optical properties of multilayered dental tissue structure, the result of the surface-grown prismless layer on enamel, were evaluated simultaneously using multiparameter fits of photothermal radiometry frequency responses. The photothermal field generated in a tooth sample with near-infrared laser excitation was described using a coupled diffuse-photon-density and thermal wave model. The optical (absorption and scattering) coefficients and thermal parameters (spectrally averaged infrared emissivity, thermal diffusivity and conductivity) of each layer, as well as the thickness of the upper prismless enamel layer, were fitted using a multiparameter simplex downhill minimization algorithm. The results show that the proposed fitting approach can increase robustness of the multiparameter estimation of tissue properties in the case of ill-defined multiparameter fits, which are unavoidable in in vivo tissue evaluation. The described method can readily be used for noninvasive in vitro or in vivo characterization of a wide range of layered biological tissues. PMID:19516364

  2. Thermal diffusivity in thin films measured by noncontact single-ended pulsed-laser-induced thermal radiometry. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, A.C.; Leung, W.P.

    1983-11-22

    A pulsed nitrogen laser is used to induce a sharp thermal gradient in a thin film, and the thermal radiation (infrared) transient from the irradiated region is monitored from the same side as the excitation beam (ie.e, single-ended detection). We show that this pulsed photothermal radiometry lineshape can be analyzed to provide the thermal diffusivity or thickness of the sample, as well as information on subsurface modifications or the degree of thermal contact with a substrate. We present data for several important classes of films, including metal, polymer and paper (e.g., in currency) and show the important features of the present technique for thin-film characterization, namely nondestructive, fast and remote sensing.

  3. Thermal diffusivity in thin films measured by noncontact single-ended pulsed-laser-induced thermal radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, W.P.; Tam, A.C.

    1984-03-01

    A pulsed nitrogen laser is used to induce a sharp thermal gradient in a thin film, and the infrared thermal radiation from the irradiated region is monitored from the same side as the excitation beam (i.e., single-ended detection). We show that the profile of this pulsed photothermal radiometry signal can be analyzed to provide the thermal diffusivity or thickness of the sample as well as information on subsurface modifications or the degree of thermal contact with a substrate. We present data for several important classes of film, including metal, polymer, and paper (e.g., in currency) and show the important features of the present technique for thin-film characterization, namely, nondestructive, fast, and remote sensing.

  4. An absolute calibration method of an ethyl alcohol biosensor based on wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi Jun; Mandelis, Andreas; Guo, Xinxin

    2015-11-01

    In this work, laser-based wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry (WM-DPTR) is applied to develop a non-invasive in-vehicle alcohol biosensor. WM-DPTR features unprecedented ethanol-specificity and sensitivity by suppressing baseline variations through a differential measurement near the peak and baseline of the mid-infrared ethanol absorption spectrum. Biosensor signal calibration curves are obtained from WM-DPTR theory and from measurements in human blood serum and ethanol solutions diffused from skin. The results demonstrate that the WM-DPTR-based calibrated alcohol biosensor can achieve high precision and accuracy for the ethanol concentration range of 0-100 mg/dl. The high-performance alcohol biosensor can be incorporated into ignition interlocks that could be fitted as a universal accessory in vehicles in an effort to reduce incidents of drinking and driving.

  5. Detection of Dental Secondary Caries Using Frequency-Domain Infrared Photothermal Radiometry (PTR) and Modulated Luminescence (LUM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Mandelis, A.; Matvienko, A.; Abrams, S.; Amaechi, B. T.

    2012-11-01

    The ability of frequency-domain photothermal radiometry (PTR) and modulated luminescence (LUM) to detect secondary caries is presented. Signal behavior upon sequential demineralization and remineralization of a spot (diameter ~1 mm) on a vertical wall of sectioned tooth samples was investigated experimentally. From these studies, it was found that PTR-LUM signals change, showing a certain pattern upon progressive demineralization and remineralization. PTR amplitudes slightly decreased upon progressive demineralization and slightly increased upon subsequent remineralization. The PTR phase increased during both demineralization and remineralization. LUM amplitudes exhibit a decreasing trend at excitation/probe distances larger than 200 μm away from the edge for both demineralization and remineralization; however, at locations close to the edge (up to ~200 μm), LUM signals slightly decrease upon demineralization and slightly increase during subsequent remineralization.

  6. Integrative algorithm of determining ice conditions in Polar Regions by data of satellite microwave radiometry (VASIA2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonov, V. V.; Repina, I. A.; Raev, M. D.; Sharkov, E. A.; Boyarskii, D. A.; Komarova, N. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a new algorithm for determining the concentration of the ice cover in Polar Regions by data of satellite microwave radiometry is considered. The technique of its construction is described in detail; it cardinally differs from the technique of creating present-day algorithms. The new algorithm demonstrates good results in determining the concentration of the ice cover in Polar Regions. The algorithm permits one not only to obtain maps of ice concentration, but also to determine areas of puddles covering the ice-cover surface in summer months. The algorithm is easy-to-use and requires no additional or fitting parameters. At the end of the work, advantages and disadvantages of the new algorithm are discussed.

  7. A new application of hyperspectral radiometry: the characterization of painted surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cong; Salvatici, Teresa; Camaiti, Mara; Del Ventisette, Chiara; Moretti, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    Hyperspectral sensors, working in the Visible-Near Infrared and Short Wave Infrared (VNIR-SWIR) regions, are widely employed for geological applications since they can discriminate many inorganic (e.g. mineral phases) and organic compounds (i.e. vegetations and soils) [1]. Their advantage is to work in the portion of the solar spectrum used for remote sensors. Some examples of application of the hyperspectral sensors to the conservation of cultural heritage are also known. These applications concern the detection of gypsum on historical buildings [2], and the monitoring of organic protective materials on stone surfaces [3]. On the contrary, hyperspectral radiometry has not been employed on painted surfaces. Indeed, the characterization of these surfaces is mainly performed with sophisticated, micro-destractive and time-consuming laboratory analyses (i.e. SEM-EDS, FTIR and, GC-MS spectroscopy) or through portable and non-invasive instruments (mid FTIR, micro Raman, XRF, FORS) which work in different spectral ranges [4,5]. In this work the discrimination of many organic and inorganic components from paintings was investigated through a hyperspectral spectroradiometer ,which works in the 350-2500 nm region. The reflectance spectra were collected by the contact reflectance probe, equipped with an internal light source with fixed geometry of illumination and shot. Several standards samples, selected among the most common materials of paintings, were prepared and analysed in order to collect reference spectra. The standards were prepared with powders of 7 pure pigments, films of 5 varnishes (natural and synthetic), and films of 3 dried binding media. Monochromatic painted surfaces have also been prepared and investigated to verify the identification of different compounds on the surface. The results show that the discrimination of pure products is possible in the VNIR-SWIR region, except for compounds with similar composition (e.g. natural resins such as dammar and

  8. Satellite Altimetry And Radiometry for Inland Hydrology, Coastal Sea-Level And Environmental Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Kuo-Hsin

    In this study, we demonstrate three environmental-related applications employing altimetry and remote sensing satellites, and exemplify the prospective usage underlying the current progressivity in mechanical and data analyzing technologies. Our discussion starts from the improved waveform retracking techniques in need for altimetry measurements over coastal and inland water regions. We developed two novel auxiliary procedures, namely the Subwaveform Filtering (SF) method and the Track Offset Correction (TOC), for waveform retracking algorithms to operationally detect altimetry waveform anomalies and further reduce possible errors in determination of the track offset. After that, we present two demonstrative studies related to the ionospheric and tropospheric compositions, respectively, as their variations are the important error sources for satellite electromagnetic signals. We firstly compare the total electron content (TEC) measured by multiple altimetry and GNSS sensors. We conclude that the ionosphere delay measured by Jason-2 is about 6-10 mm shorter than the GPS models. On the other hand, we use several atmospheric variables to study the climate change over high elevation areas. Five types of satellite data and reanalysis models were used to study climate change indicators. We conclude that the spatial distribution of temperature trend among data products is quite different, which is probably due to the choice of various time spans. Following discussions about the measuring techniques and relative bias between data products, we applied our improved altimetry techniques to three environmental science applications with helps of remote sensing imagery. We first manifest the detectability of hydrological events by satellite altimetry and radiometry. The characterization of one-dimensional (along-track) water boundary using former Backscattering Coefficient (BC) method is assisted by the two-dimensional (horizontal) estimate of water extent using the Moderate

  9. TRUTHS (Traceable Radiometry Underpinning Terrestrial- and Helio- Studies): A Mission to Achieve "Climate Quality" Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, N. P.

    2007-12-01

    Over recent years the debate as to whether climate change is real has largely subsided, however there is still significant controversy over its cause and most importantly the scale of its impact and means of mitigation. Much of the latter relies upon the predictive capabilities of sophisticated, but highly complex models. Such models need globally sampled measurements of a variety of key indicative physical parameters, and in some cases proxies of others, as input data and whilst generally predicting similar things the detail of their outputs in the decadal time scales can be highly variable. Clearly the quality of the input data is crucial to such models. However, since the key indicators of climate change may only vary by a few percent per decade, the absolute accuracy of such data also needs to be very small to allow detection and provide some means of validating/discriminating and improving the models. At the present time, the accuracy of currently measured data from space is rarely, if ever, adequate to meet this requirement. Instead, high risk strategies are developed which rely upon overlapping and renormalizing data sets from consecutive flights of similar instruments to establish a long-term trend. Such a strategy is doomed to failure!. The only means of achieving robust data sets of sufficient quality and accuracy with a guarantee of long term reproducibility sufficient to detect the subtle indicators of climate change and its cause (anthropogenic from natural) is through traceability to SI units. Such traceability needs to be regularly re-established and guaranteed throughout the lifetime of a mission. However, given that most sensors degrade in performance during launch, and most importantly whilst in orbit, this is difficult to achieve with sufficient accuracy, since such sensors cannot easily be retrieved and taken back to a national standards laboratory for recalibration. TRUTHS (Traceable Radiometry Underpinning Terrestrial- and Helio- Studies) is a

  10. The variability of nonmigrating tides detected from TIMED/SABER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xing; Wan, Weixing; Ren, Zhipeng; Liu, Libo; Ning, Baiqi

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with the variability of the nonmigrating tides detected from the observation of the SABER instrument on board the TIMED satellite during the 11 year solar period from 2002 to 2012. The longitudinal wave number spectra with 1 day resolution were first estimated from the temperature data measured at the MLT altitudes (70-110 km) and at the lower midlatitudes and low latitudes (between ±45°). Then we used the wave number 4 component to obtain the nonmigrating tides in which the dominant component DE3 was further analyzed in detail. We found that the properties of the spatial distribution and large time scale variation of the DE3 component are similar to those of the previous works, which used the interpolated data with 2 month resolution. These properties are that the DE3 component occurs mainly at the low latitudes within ±30° and at the altitudes from 90 to 110 km; the tidal amplitude is larger during boreal summer and early autumn, smaller in spring and almost tends to disappear in winter; the component is slightly stronger during the eastward wind QBO phase than the westward phase. Practically, the higher-resolution data were used to reveal the day-to-day variability of the DE3 component. It is found that (1) the variability occurs mainly at the altitudes from 100 to 110 km with a peak at 106 km; (2) it is strong at the low latitudes and peaks around the equator, as well, slightly stronger in the Southern Hemisphere than in northern one; (3) it is considerably larger around solstitial months than equinoctial months; and (4) it would not experience an obvious interannual variation. The day-to-day variability of the DE3 component may be explained by the variance of the absolute amplitudes and the contribution of the wave phases, and the later seems to play more important role.