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1

FURTHER EVALUATIONS OF RADIONUCLIDE PHYTOEXTRACTION FEASIBILITY USING SOILS FROM THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COMPLEX  

SciTech Connect

Fiscal Year 98 (FY98) radionuclide phytoextraction studies involved resumption of the radiocesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) investigations at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and the total uranium (U{sub t}) investigations at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site. This project was a collaborative effort involving scientists and engineers from MSE Technology Applications, Inc.; the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Plant Growth Laboratory at Cornell University; Phytotech, Inc.; BNL; and FEMP. In both cases, the essential goal was to improve bioavailability, uptake, and transport of these contaminants from soil to leaf-and-stalk biomass (LSB). In particular, the practical goal was to demonstrate that about half the radionuclide contaminant mass present in near surface [{le}30 centimeters (cm) below ground surface (bgs)] soils could be transferred into LSB in approximately 5 years. Based on previous (1996) study results, it would require concentration ratios (CRs) of at 5-to-10 to achieve this goal. In addition, the rate of {sup 137}Cs removal must be {ge} 2.3% per year{sup -1} [i.e., (0.693/30.2) {center_dot} 100] to equal or exceed the loss of this radionuclide through natural decay. This report first presents and discusses the results from greenhouse and field evaluations of {sup 137}Cs uptake from rooting zone soils (0-15 cm bgs) located near the Medical/Biological Research Building (No. 490) at BNL. Contamination of this site resulted from the use of near surface soils originating at the former Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF), which served as a source of landscaping materials for erosion control, etc. Project personnel from USDA evaluated various combinations of nonradioactive solutions of cesium chloride (CsCl) and rubidium chloride, ammonium nitrate solution (NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}), and humic acid suspensions to enhance and sustain {sup 137}Cs levels in soil solution. Of the plants grown in such amended soils, the highest CRs occurred in the golden pigweed (Amaranthus aureus L.) with an overall CR of 3.0 (and 275 picoCurie/gram {sup 137}Cs in soil). The maximum CR (3.8) was associated with dosing this species with 100 millimole (mM) CsCl solution. However, this treatment was immediately toxic to all the species evaluated. Thus, continued use of ammonium nitrate (NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}) (CR=2.9) or humic acid (CR=3.2) and golden pigweed appeared to be the best approach for removing {sup 137}Cs from test site soils.

Jay Cornish

1999-01-01

2

Enhanced phyto-extraction not a feasible option to clean up uranium contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: A greenhouse experiment was set up to evaluate the potential of enhanced phyto-extraction to clean up U contaminated soils. One soil had a naturally high U concentration and the other soil was impacted by effluents from the former radium extraction industry. Enhancement of U solubility and uptake by plants (ryegrass and Indian mustard) was monitored after addition of 5 chemical amendments (5 mmol kg{sup -1} soil dry weight): citric acid, ammonium citrate-citric acid mixture, oxalic acid, EDDS and NTA. Uranium solubilization and uptake were highly influenced by the amendment applied and soil-plant combinations. Citric acid was most effective in increasing U solubility (up to 18-fold increase). Citric acid and the ammonium citrate-citric acid mixture were most effective in increasing U uptake by ryegrass (up to 6-fold). For Indian mustard, EDDS and citric acid were most effective (up to 9- fold). In the optimal scenario only 0.16 % of the total uranium present in the soil could be extracted with one harvest and it would take more than 200 years to reduce the initial uranium content with 10 %. Based on these results, we must conclude that phyto-extraction is not a feasible technique to decrease the uranium concentration of historically contaminated soils. (authors)

Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Duquene, Lise; Wannijn, Jean [SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, BE-2400 Mol (Belgium); Filip, Tack [Ghent University (Belgium); Baeten, Joke [Katholieke Hogeschool Kempen (Belgium)

2007-07-01

3

Phytoextraction of metals and metalloids from contaminated soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

The removal of inorganic contaminants by plants is termed phytoextraction. Recent studies have looked at the feasibility of phytoextraction, and demonstrate that both good biomass yields and metal hyperaccumulation are required to make the process efficient. Adding chelating agents to soil to increase the bioavailability of contaminants can sometimes induce hyperaccumulation in normal plants, but may produce undesirable environmental risks.

Steve P McGrath; Fang-Jie Zhao

2003-01-01

4

EDTA-assisted Pb phytoextraction.  

PubMed

Pb is one of the most widespread and metal pollutants in soil. It is generally concentrated in surface layers with only a minor portion of the total metal found in soil solution. Phytoextraction has been proposed as an inexpensive, sustainable, in situ plant-based technology that makes use of natural hyperaccumulators as well as high biomass producing crops to help rehabilitate soils contaminated with heavy metals without destructive effects on soil properties. The success of phytoextraction is determined by the amount of biomass, concentration of heavy metals in plant, and bioavailable fraction of heavy metals in the rooting medium. In general, metal hyperaccumulators are low biomass, slow growing plant species that are highly metal specific. For some metals such as Pb, there are no hyperaccumulator plant species known to date. Although high biomass-yielding non-hyperaccumulator plants lack an inherent ability to accumulate unusual concentrations of Pb, soil application of chelating agents such as EDTA has been proposed to enhance the metal concentration in above-ground harvestable plant parts through enhancing the metal solubility and translocation from roots to shoots. Leaching of metals due to enhanced mobility during EDTA-assisted phytoextraction has been demonstrated as one of the potential hazards associated with this technology. Due to environmental persistence of EDTA in combination with its strong chelating abilities, the scientific community is moving away from the use of EDTA in phytoextraction and is turning to less aggressive alternative strategies such as the use of organic acids or more degradable APCAs (aminopolycarboxylic acids). We have therefore arrived at a point in phytoremediation research history in which we need to distance ourselves from EDTA as a proposed soil amendment within the context of phytoextraction. However, valuable lessons are to be learned from over a decade of EDTA-assisted phytoremediation research when considering the implementation of more degradable alternatives in assisted phytoextraction practices. PMID:19121533

Saifullah; Meers, E; Qadir, M; de Caritat, P; Tack, F M G; Du Laing, G; Zia, M H

2009-01-01

5

Phytoextraction: an assessment of biogeochemical and economic viability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phytoextraction describes the use of plants to remove metals and other contaminants from soils. This low-cost technology has potential for the in situ remediation of large areas of contaminated land. Despite more than 10 years of intensive research on the subject, very few commercial phytoextraction operations have been realised. Here, we investigate the viability of phytoextraction as an effective land-treatment

Brett Robinson; José-Enrique Fernández; Paula Madejón; Teodoro Marañón; José M. Murillo; Steve Green; Brent Clothier

2003-01-01

6

Feasibility study for production of 175Yb: a promising therapeutic radionuclide.  

PubMed

Owing to its favourable decay characteristics 175Yb (T1/2 = 4.2 d, E beta(max) = 480 keV) can be regarded as a potential radionuclide for therapeutic applications. Production of 175Yb using (174Yb(n, gamma)175Yb) reaction by thermal neutron bombardment on natural ytterbium target is described. The activity of 175Yb produced as well as its radionuclidic purity under different irradiation conditions were determined by gamma-ray spectrometry using an HPGe 4 K MCA system and compared with theoretically calculated values. The radiochemical purity after chemical processing was determined by paper chromatography as well as paper electrophoresis techniques. It is found that 31 Ci/g (1145 GBq/g) of 175Yb can be produced with > 95% radionuclidic purity (with approximately 3% of 169Yb and approximately 2% of 177Lu) by irradiating natural Yb2O3 target at a thermal neutron flux of 3 x 10(13) n/cm2/s for a period of 5 d. PMID:12201133

Chakraborty, Sudipta; Unni, P R; Venkatesh, Meera; Pillai, M R A

2002-09-01

7

Supernova injection of short-lived radionuclides into the presolar cloud: A feasibility study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Meteorite inclusions show that the early solar system was radioactive with species of short lifetimes compared to the formation time of the solar system. Transporting the radioactive material from the creation site to the formation site of the sun was expected to take enough time that these species should have decayed to nonexistence. Some special series of events seems necessary to speed the process along. Cameron & Truran (1977) suggested that the source of these short-lived radionuclides could have been a supernova. Numerical hydrodynamic studies have shown that slow shockwaves can inject material into a small, dense cloud core. Most stars are not born in lone dense cores. Thus any core that might have become the solar system was probably shrouded with an envelope that the ejecta from supernova would have had to penetrate along with the intervening interstellar medium. We present numerical hydrodynamic studies using Zeus-2D investigating how a supernova can inject its material into a moderately dense molecular cloud. We model a self-similar explosion colliding with a spherical cloud and examine the results for injection. We have modified Zeus-2D by adding three tracking dyes and changing the effective adiabatic index of the fluid in response to the shock-cloud collision. We find that if the effective adiabatic index of the gas is less than 5/3 then injection can occur, and we describe the basics of the mechanism by which this occurs.

Davis, Keith W.

8

PHYTOEXTRACTION OF HEAVY METALS WITH HYPERACCUMULATOR PLANTS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

When soils contain metals at high enough levels to comprise risk thru food-chain or soil ingestion, some methods must be applied to alleviate the risk, or the land use must be constrained. One approach to remediate risks from some metals is phytoextraction using hyperaccumulator plants. These remark...

9

Phytoextraction of Zinc: Physiological and Molecular Mechanism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Zinc is an essential trace element, necessary for plants, animals, and microorganisms. Zn is required for many enzymes as a catalytic cofactor, for photosynthetic CO2 fixation, and in maintaining the integrity of bio-membranes. However, Zn is potentially toxic when accumulated beyond cellular needs. Phytoextraction technique, which is a part of phytoremediation, has opened new avenues for remediation of Zn-contaminated places.

Rajesh Dhankhar; Poonam Ahlawat Sainger; Manish Sainger

2012-01-01

10

Improved Understanding of Hyperaccumulation Yields Commercial Phytoextraction and Phytomining Technologies  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This paper reviews progress in phytoextraction of soil elements and illustrates the key role of hyperaccumulator plant species in useful technologies. Much research has focused on elements which are not practically phytoextracted (Pb); on addition of chelating agents which cause unacceptable contam...

11

Phytoextraction: a review on enhanced metal availability and plant accumulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phytoextraction has emerged as a novel approach to clean up metal-polluted soils in which plants are used to transfer toxic metals from soils to shoots. This review provides a synthesis of current knowledge on phytoextraction of metals from soils and their accumulation in plants. The objective is to integrate soil-related (root exudates and chemical amendments) and biological advances to suggest

Clístenes Williams Araújo do Nascimento; Baoshan Xing

2006-01-01

12

Chelate-assisted phytoextraction of lead from contaminated soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phytoextraction, a remediation strategy for lead (Pb)-contaminated soils that removes soil Pb through plant uptake and harvest, may be enhanced by use of synthetic chelates. The authors evaluated Pb desorption from four contaminated soils by seven chelates (CDTA, DTPA, EDDHA, EFTA, HEDTA, HEIDA, and NTA) at three rates. The three most effective chelates (CDTA, DTPA, and HEDTA) were used in

E. M. Cooper; J. T. Sims; S. D. Cunningham; J. W. Huang; W. R. Berti

1999-01-01

13

Citric acid-assisted phytoextraction of lead: a field experiment.  

PubMed

Soil contamination with heavy metals has become a serious environmental problem that requires affordable strategies of remediation. This study was carried out to assess the performance of maize and vetiver in the phytoextraction of Pb from a soil contaminated by battery recycling activities. The species were planted with different spacings between rows (0.80, 0.65 and 0.50m). Citric acid (40mmolkg(-1)) was applied on each experimental plot on the 61st d of cultivation in order to solubilize the Pb and assist the phytoextraction. The results showed that the chelating agent promoted a 14-fold increase in the Pb concentration in maize shoots as compared to the control, which accumulated only 111mgkg(-1) of the metal. The citric acid induced a Pb concentration in vetiver shoots that was 7.2-6.7-fold higher than the control at both the 0.65 and 0.50m plant spacing, respectively. The use of citric acid increased substantially the uptake and translocation of Pb to the shoots, regardless of plant spacing. Citric acid was efficient in solubilizing Pb from the soil and inducing its uptake by both species. Environmentally-friendly and cost effective, commercial citric acid is recommended for assisting Pb-phytoextraction in the studied area. Due to the low natural solubility of Pb and a time frame needed of longer than 150yr to accomplish the clean-up, phytoextraction with no chelate assistance is not recommended for the area. PMID:23490185

Freitas, Eriberto Vagner; Nascimento, Clístenes Williams; Souza, Adailson; Silva, Fernando Bruno

2013-03-13

14

DEVELOPMENT OF A NEW TECHNOLOGY FOR PHYTOEXTRACTION OF NICKEL - COMMERCIAL CONSIDERATIONS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

We have made important progress in developing a commercial technology using hyperaccumulator plant species to phytoextract nickel (Ni) from contaminated and/or Ni-rich soils. Development of such a technology required identifying or creating an ideal phytoextraction plant, optimizing soil and crop m...

15

Phytoextraction of heavy metals by canola ( Brassica napus) and radish ( Raphanus sativus) grown on multicontaminated soil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phytoextraction can provide an effective in situ technique for removing heavy metals from polluted soils. The experiment reported in this paper was undertaken to study the basic potential of phytoextraction of Brassica napus (canola) and Raphanus sativus (radish) grown on a multi-metal contaminated soil in the framework of a pot-experiment. Chlorophyll contents and gas exchanges were measured during the experiment;

L Marchiol; S Assolari; P Sacco; G Zerbi

2004-01-01

16

Phytoextraction of Cd-Contaminated Soils: Current Status and Future Challenges  

PubMed Central

Cadmium (Cd) is one of the most toxic and widely distributed pollutants in the environment. Cadmium contamination of soils has posed a serious threat to safe food production in many parts of the world. The authors present a comprehensive review of present status of phytoextraction technology for cleaning up Cd-contaminated soils, based primarily on the data resulting from both laboratory and field-scale studies that have been conducted to assess or improve the Cd phytoextraction potential of various plant species in the past decade. The encouraging results of field-scale studies have provided a fundamental basis to usher phytoextraction technology into practical use to remediate slightly to moderately Cd-contaminated soils in Europe and Asia, although this technology is not yet ready for widespread application. Chelators and microorganisms tested so far seem not to contribute to the applicability of Cd phytoextraction. The major challenges for the large-scale application of Cd phytoextraction are (a) how to further improve the efficiency of Cd phytoextraction, (b) how to cut the overall costs of Cd phytoextraction, and (c) how to get greater stakeholders’ acceptance of Cd phytoextraction as a reliable option.

Li, Jin-Tian; Baker, Alan J. M.; Ye, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Hong-Bin; Shu, Wen-Sheng

2012-01-01

17

Feasibility of Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes into the Seabed: Review of Laboratory Investigations of Radionuclide Migration Through Deep-Sea Sediments.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Sediment Barrier Task Group (SBTG) coordinated laboratory studies of radionuclide migration through deep-sea sediments by investigators in six countries over a period of 12 years. The objectives of these studies were to evaluate the barrier properties...

L. H. Brush

1988-01-01

18

Radionuclide Therapy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radionuclide therapy utilizes unsealed sources of radionuclides as a treatment for cancer or other pathological conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Radionuclides that decay by the emission of ? and ? particles, as well as those that emit Auger electrons, have been used for this purpose. In this chapter, radiochemical aspects of radionuclide therapy, including criteria for radionuclide selection, radionuclide production, radiolabeling chemistry, and radiation dosimetry are discussed.

Zalutsky, M. R.

19

Feasibility of disposal of high-level radioactive wastes into the seabed: Review of laboratory investigations of radionuclide migration through deep-sea sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sediment Barrier Task Group (SBTG) coordinated laboratory studies of radionuclide migration through deep-sea sediments by investigators in six countries over a period of 12 years. The objectives of these studies were to evaluate the barrier properties of a variety of deep- sea sediments from study locations characterized by the Site Assessment Task Group (SATG), and to obtain site-specific data

Brush

1988-01-01

20

Chemically enhanced phytoextraction of lead-contaminated soils.  

PubMed

The effects of the combined application of soil fungicide (benomyl) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on lead (Pb) phytoextraction by ryegrass (Lolium perenne) were examined. Twenty-five pots of Pb-contaminated soil (200 mg Pb kg(-1)) were seeded with ryegrass and randomly arranged into the following treatments: (1) Control, (2) benomyl, (3) EDTA, (4) benomyl and EDTA (B+E), and (5) benomyl followed by an application of EDTA 14 days later (B .. . E). Chemicals were applied when plants had reached maximum growth. Plants were analyzed for foliage Pb concentration using inductively coupled argon plasma (ICAP) spectrometry. The synergistic effects of the combined benomyl and EDTA application (treatments 4 and 5) were made evident by the significantly (p < 0.05) highest foliage Pb concentrations. However, the foliage dry biomass was significantly lowest for plants in treatments 4 and 5. The bioaccumulation factor (BF) and phytoextraction ratio (PR) were highest for plants in treatment 5 followed by plants in treatment 4. PMID:22908638

Perry, V Ryan; Krogstad, Eirik J; El-Mayas, Hanan; Greipsson, Sigurdur

2012-08-01

21

Thermal treatment of metal-enriched biomass produced from heavy metal phytoextraction.  

PubMed

Phytoextraction is an environmentally sound method for cleaning up sites that are contaminated with toxic heavy metals. However, the method has been questioned because it produces a biomass-rich secondary waste containing the extracted metals. Therefore, further treatment of this biomass is necessary. In this study, we investigated whether thermal treatment could be a feasible option for evaporatively separating metals from the plant residues. We used a laboratory scale reactor designed to simulate the volatilization behavior of heavy metals in a grate furnace. The evaporation of alkali and heavy metals from plant samples was investigated online, using a thermo-desorption spectrometer (TDS). Experiments were performed in the temperature range of 25-950 degrees C with leaves of the Cd and Zn hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens and of the high biomass plant Salix viminalis (willow), both grown on contaminated soils. Gasification (i.e., pyrolysis), which occurs under reducing conditions, was a better method than incineration under oxidizing conditions to increase volatilization and, hence subsequently recovery, of Cd and Zn from plants. It would also allow the recycling of the bottom ash as fertilizer. Thus, our investigations confirmed that incineration (or co-incineration) is a viable option for the treatment of the heavy metal-enriched plants. PMID:15926590

Keller, Catherine; Ludwig, Christian; Davoli, Frédéric; Wochele, Jörg

2005-05-01

22

Fertilizer amendment for improving the phytoextraction of cadmium by a hyperaccumulator Rorippa globosa (Turcz.) Thell  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Two main pathways of phytoremediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils are phytostabilization and phytoextraction. Some soil\\u000a amendments can strengthen phytostabilization or phytoextraction through either reducing heavy metal bioavailability in soil\\u000a or increasing the heavy metal accumulation capacity of the hyperaccumulator (enhancing heavy metal concentration or shoot\\u000a biomass of the hyperaccumulator). Urea and chicken manure are often used as fertilizers. This research

Shuhe Wei; Jiangong Zhu; Qixing X. Zhou; Jie Zhan

23

Chelate-assisted phytoextraction using canola ( Brassica napus L.) in outdoors pot and lysimeter experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phytoextraction is an emerging technology for non-destructive remediation of heavy metal-polluted soils. This study was conducted to test chelate-assisted phytoextraction of Cu, Pb and Zn using EDTA and canola (Brassica napus L. cv. Petranova) on a moderately polluted industrial soil (loamy sand) in the sub-continental climate of Eastern Austria. The effects of the rate (up to 2.1 g kg-1 soil)

Walter W. Wenzel; Reinhard Unterbrunner; Peter Sommer; Pasqualina Sacco

2003-01-01

24

Potential of Taraxacum mongolicum Hand-Mazz for accelerating phytoextraction of cadmium in combination with eco-friendly amendments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phytoextraction and phytostabilization are well-established sub-processes of phytoremediation that are being followed for in situ remediation of soils contaminated with toxic metals. Taraxacum mongolicum Hand-Mazz, a newly reported Cd accumulator has shown considerable potential for phytoextracting Cd. This paper investigated the effects of urea and chicken manure on T. mongolicum phytoextracting Cd from soil using pot culture experiments. The results

Shuhe Wei; Shanshan Wang; Qixing Zhou; Jie Zhan; Lihui Ma; Zhijie Wu; Tieheng Sun; M. N. V. Prasad

2010-01-01

25

Stimulated phytoextraction of metals from fly ash by microbial interventions.  

PubMed

Various combinations of fly ash tolerant bacteria isolated from the rhizospheric zone of Typha latifolia naturally growing on a fly ash dump site were tested for enhanced metal uptake by Brassica juncea grown in fly ash amended with press mud. After enrichment of the bacteria in a nutrient broth, they were subsequently applied to the rhizospheric zone of B. juncea in different combinations. When the metal analysis was done in the plants at their maturity, it was revealed that out of 11 bacterial consortia prepared from the different combinations of four bacterial strains, Micrococcus roseus NBRFT2 (MTCC 9018), Bacillus endophyticus NBRFT4 (MTCC 9021), Paenibacillus macerans NBRFT5 (MTCC 8912) and Bacillus pumilus NBRFT9 (MTCC 8913), a combination of NBRFT5, NBRFT4 and NBRFT9 (ST3) was found to have induced the highest metal accumulations as compared to other consortia. The bioaugmentation of the ST3 consortium enhanced Fe accumulation by 247%, Ni by 231% and Zn by 223% in B. juncea as compared to control plants. These values were found to be significantly higher than the other bacterial consortia. Bacteria were also found to produce siderophores which could enhance the metal uptake by plants through metal mobilization. Besides siderophores, bacteria are also known to produce protons, organic acids and enzymes which enhance the metal mobilization and boost the phytoextraction process. The translocation of metals from root to stem was invariably higher than from stem to leaf. Hence, ST3 was adjudged the best consortium to be used in the field application to accelerate the phytoextraction of metals from fly ash by B. juncea. PMID:23393983

Tiwari, Sadhna; Singh, S N; Garg, S K

26

Radionuclide trap  

DOEpatents

The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition.

McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

1978-01-01

27

Chelate-Assisted Phytoextraction of Cadmium and Lead using Mustard and Fenugreek  

Microsoft Academic Search

A screen-house experiment was conducted to study cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) phytoextraction using mustard and fenugreek as test crops. Cadmium was applied at a rate of 20 mg kg soil for both crops, and Pb was applied at 160 and 80 mg kg soil for mustard and fenugreek, respectively. The disodium salt of ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) was applied

Roopinder Singh; I. M. Chhibba

2010-01-01

28

Comparison of Organic and Inorganic Amendments for Enhancing Soil Lead Phytoextraction by Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phytoextraction has received increasing attention as a promising, cost-effective alternative to conventional engineering-based remediation methods for metal contaminated soils. In order to enhance the phytoremediative ability of green plants chelating agents are commonly used. Our study aims to evaluate whether, citric acid (CA) or elemental sulfur (S) should be used as an alternative to the ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA)

Saifullah; Abdul Ghafoor; Munir Hussain Zia; Ghulam Murtaza; Ejaz Ahmad Waraich; Sadia Bibi; Prashant Srivastava

2010-01-01

29

Screening of sunflower cultivars for metal phytoextraction in a contaminated field prior to mutagenesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sunflower can be used for the remediation of metal-contaminated soils. Its high biomass production makes this plant species interesting for phytoextraction and using sunflower oil for a technical purpose may improve the economic balance of phytoremediation. The aim of the present field study was to screen 15 commercial cultivars of Helianthus annuus L., grown on metal-contaminated soil, to find out

Erika Nehnevajova; Rolf Herzig; Guido Federer; Karl-Hans Erismann; Jean-Paul Schwitzguébel

2005-01-01

30

Role of Hyperaccumulators in Phytoextraction of Metals From Contaminated Mining Sites: A Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Accumulation of heavy metals in selective locations of the environment has been attracting considerable public attention over the last decades. The conventional clean-up technologies to extract and remove heavy metals from mining sites are either inadequate or too expensive for developing countries. In the past decades, research efforts have been directed toward phytoextraction by using hyperaccumulators as an alternative, low-cost

V. Sheoran; A. S. Sheoran; P. Poonia

2010-01-01

31

100-N Area Strontium90 Treatability Demonstration Project: Phytoextraction Along the 100-N Columbia River Riparian Zone Field Treatability Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Strontium-90 (90Sr) is present both in the aquifer near the river and in the vadose and riparian zones of the rivers shore at 100-NR-2. Phytoextraction of 90Sr is being considered as a potential remediation system along the riparian zone of the Columbia River. Phytoextraction would employ coyote willow (Salix exigua). Past studies have shown that willow roots share uptake mechanisms

Robert J. Fellows; Jonathan S. Fruchter; Crystal J. Driver; Calvin C. Ainsworth

2010-01-01

32

Phytoextraction of Lead from Soil from a Battery Recycling Site: The Use of Citric Acid and NTA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phytoextraction is a soil remediation technique involving plants that concentrate heavy metals in their shoots, which may\\u000a be removed from the area by harvest. The application of synthetic chelants to soil increases metal solubility, and therefore\\u000a enhances phytoextraction. However, synthetic chelants degrade poorly in soil, and metal leaching poses a threat to human and\\u000a animal health. The aim of this

Josângela do Carmo Trezena de Araújo; Clístenes Williams Araújo do Nascimento

2010-01-01

33

Heavy Metals Phytoextraction from the Polluted Soils of Zakamensk (Russia)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mining and ore-dressing are one of the most serious causes of environment pollution. Last century in days of active industrialization in Russia a considerable quantity of mineral deposits has been developed. It was not given sufficient attention for ecological safety at that time. After an economic crisis connected with disorder of the USSR and a planned economy, a number of the enterprises became bankrupts and have stopped the activity. As a result the broken landscapes have not been recultivated everywhere, there were numerous wastes. The negative consequences were especially strongly manifested in areas with severe climatic conditions where environmental self-renewal occurred is slowed rather down. The degree of a waste toxicity also acted as the important factor. One of such situations has arisen in Zakamensk - an administrative center of Zakamensky area of Buryat Republic (Russia). Environmental problems of the town have arisen in connection with activity of town-forming enterprise - Dzhidinsky tungsten-molybdenum industrial complex. The enterprise has been organized in 1934 and functioned within 63 years till 1997. During enterprise operating time 3 deposits have been exploited and is created 2 large (more than 40 million tons) tails depository of technogenic sands (TS), located in immediate proximity (less than 1-2 km) from a town residential zone.Sand of tails are rather toxic, the average maintenance of heavy metals in them is (mg/kg): Cd - 42, Pb - 7500, Zn - 3160, Cu - 620, Ni - 34, Co - 44, Mn - 121, Cr - 70, Hg - 0,01, As - 13, Mo - 90. Due to the lack of knowledges on the toxicity of TS in the past century, they were actively used in the road and house construction, during the erection of dams. After scientific studies they were recommended for using as fertilizers. Besides anthropogenic sands movement, there was intensive dispersion of sand by means of water and wind erosion. As a result of natural migration sands got to the subordinated elements of the landscape - Modonkul river flood plain, were transferred by its waters and redeposited in an estuary, forming a cone of carrying out with capacity of up to 2 meters or more. The presence of large number of private houses with garden plots, in which the population grew potatoes, vegetables and fruit-berry trees cultures for food purposes, is the feature of many Siberian towns, including Zakamensk. The biogeochemical assessment of the town territory current status has shown a high level of contamination of soils and plants by heavy metals that poses a threat to the health of townsmen. In this connection search of effective ways of clearing up of the polluted soils by phytoextraction and selection of plants, capable to extract high quantities of heavy metals from soil in concrete ecological conditions, is actual. For this purpose we had been made experiments with 8 species of plants. Modeling of various conditions of pollution carried out by addition of following quantities of TS (%): 0; 25; 33; 50; 67; 75 and 100. In the report results of the experiments and the recommendations on using of plants as extractors on soils polluted by technogenic sand will be presented.

Ubugunov, V.; Dorzhonova, V.; Ubugunov, L.

2012-04-01

34

Comparison of willow and sunflower for uranium phytoextraction induced by citric acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study deals with an efficiency of a low dose of citric acid soil application on phytoextraction of uranium. Willow (Salix\\u000a spp.) and sunflower (Helianthus annus L.) were tested in this experiment with contaminated soil. The enhancing of uranium bioaccumulation was confirmed, but in\\u000a contrast to previous studies, the highest quantity of uranium was accumulated in leaves. After 5 weeks of

Ján Mihalík; Pavel Tlustoš; Ji?ina Szaková

2010-01-01

35

COPPER PHYTOEXTRACTION IN TANDEM WITH OILSEED PRODUCTION USING COMMERCIAL CULTIVARS AND MUTANT LINES OF SUNFLOWER  

Microsoft Academic Search

Use of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) for Cu phytoextraction and oilseed production on Cu-contaminated topsoils was investigated in a field trial at a former wood preservation site. Six commercial cultivars and two mutant lines were cultivated in plots with and without the addition of compost (5% w\\/w) and dolomitic limestone (0.2% w\\/w). Total soil Cu ranged from 163 to 1170

A. Kolbas; M. Mench; R. Herzig; E. Nehnevajova; C. M. Bes

2011-01-01

36

PHYTOEXTRACTION: SIMULATING UPTAKE AND TRANSLOCATION OF ARSENIC IN A SOIL–PLANT SYSTEM  

Microsoft Academic Search

The uptake, transport, and accumulation of metals by plants are functions central to successful phytoextraction. This study investigates the uptake and translocation of arsenic from a contaminated sandy soil by a mature Chinese brake fern (Pteris vittataL.). An existing mathematical model for the coupled transport of water, heat, and solutes in the soil–plant–atmosphere continuum (CTSPAC) was modified to examine the

Ying Ouyang

2005-01-01

37

Humic Acid Addition Enhances B and Pb Phytoextraction by Vetiver Grass ( Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phytoremediation is an attractive, economic alternative to soil removal and burial methods to remediate contaminated soil.\\u000a However, it is also a slow process. The effect of humic acid in enhancing B and Pb phytoextraction from contaminated soils\\u000a was studied (pot experiment) using transplanted vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides (L.) Nash). Boron was applied at 0, 45, 90 and 180 kg B ha?1

Ilker Angin; Metin Turan; Quirine M. Ketterings; Avni Cakici

2008-01-01

38

Phytosiderophore effects on subsurface actinide contaminants: potential for phytostabilization and phytoextraction  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recognition of the need for a safe, effective technology for long term Pu\\/Th\\/Actinide stabilization or removal from soils, we have begun an investigation of the potential for phytoremediation (phytostabilization and\\/or phytoextraction) of Pu and other actinide soil contaminants at DOE sites using phytosiderophore producing plants, and are investigating the contribution of phytosiderophores to actinide mobility in the subsurface environment.

C. E. Ruggiero; S. N. Twary; E. Deladurantaye

2003-01-01

39

Findings on the phytoextraction and phytostabilization of soils contaminated with heavy metals.  

PubMed

As a result of human activities such as mining, metal pollution has become one of the most serious environmental problems today. Phytoremediation, an emerging cost-effective, non-intrusive, and aesthetically pleasing technology that uses the remarkable ability of plants to concentrate elements can be potentially used to remediate metal-contaminated sites. The aim of this work was to assess the extent of metal accumulation by plants found in a mining area in Hamedan province with the ultimate goal of finding suitable plants for phytoextraction and phytostabilization (two processes of phytoremediation). To this purpose, shoots and roots of the 12 plant species and the associated soil samples were collected and analyzed by measurement of total concentrations of some elements (Fe, Mn, Zn, and Cu) using atomic absorption spectrophotometer and then biological absorption coefficient, bioconcentration factor, and translocation factor parameters calculated for each element. Our results showed that none of the plants were suitable for phytoextraction and phytostabilization of Fe, Zn, and Cu, while Chenopodium botrys, Stipa barbata, Cousinia bijarensis, Scariola orientalis, Chondrila juncea, and Verbascum speciosum, with a high biological absorption coefficient for Mn, were suitable for phytoextraction of Mn, and C. bijarensis, C. juncea, V. speciosum, S. orientalis, C. botrys, and S. barbata, with a high bioconcentration factor and low translocation factor for Mn, had the potential for the phytostabilization of this element. PMID:19319488

Cheraghi, M; Lorestani, B; Khorasani, N; Yousefi, N; Karami, M

2009-03-26

40

Potential of Taraxacum mongolicum Hand-Mazz for accelerating phytoextraction of cadmium in combination with eco-friendly amendments.  

PubMed

Phytoextraction and phytostabilization are well-established sub-processes of phytoremediation that are being followed for in situ remediation of soils contaminated with toxic metals. Taraxacum mongolicum Hand-Mazz, a newly reported Cd accumulator has shown considerable potential for phytoextracting Cd. This paper investigated the effects of urea and chicken manure on T. mongolicum phytoextracting Cd from soil using pot culture experiments. The results showed that urea application did not affect the Cd concentrations in root, leaf, inflorescence and shoot of T. mongolicum, but chicken manure significantly decreased them (p<0.05) by 23.5%, 31.5%, 24.8% and 30.4% owing to decreased extractable Cd. Urea and chicken manure significantly increased (p<0.05) the phytoextraction capacities (microg pot(-1)) of T. mongolicum to Cd by 3-5-fold due to the increase in shoot biomass (increased 4-7 folds). Further, addition of urea and chicken manure increased organic matter, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium, the microorganism count, urease and phosphatase activities of soil indicating their eco-friendly function. Urea is ideal for optimizing phytoextraction of T. mongolicum to Cd, while chicken manure is appropriate for phytostabilization. PMID:20570438

Wei, Shuhe; Wang, Shanshan; Zhou, Qixing; Zhan, Jie; Ma, Lihui; Wu, Zhijie; Sun, Tieheng; Prasad, M N V

2010-05-13

41

Radionuclide removal  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed new and revised regulations on radionuclide contaminants in drinking water in June 1991. During the 1980's, the Drinking Water Research Division, USEPA conducted a research program to evaluate various technologies to remove radium, uranium and radon from drinking water. The research consisted of laboratory and field studies conducted by USEPA, universities and consultants. The paper summarizes the results of the most significant projects completed. General information is also presented on the general chemistry of the three radionuclides. The information presented indicates that the most practical treatment methods for radium are ion exchange and lime-soda softening and reverse osmosis. The methods tested for radon are aeration and granular activated carbon and the methods for uranium are anion exchange and reverse osmosis.

Sorg, T.J.

1991-01-01

42

Phytoextraction and phytostabilisation of metal-contaminated soil in temperate maritime climate of coastal British Columbia, Canada  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research addressed the phytoremediation of roadside soils subjected to multi-component metal solutions. A typical right of way for roads in Canada is around 30 m, and at least 33% of that land in the right of way is unpaved and can support animal life. Thus, land associated with 12,000 km of roads in the province of British Columbia and millions of kilometres around the world represent a substantial quantity of wildlife habitat where metal contamination needs to be remediated. Phytostabilisation, requires least maintenance among different phytoremediation techniques, and it could be a feasible and practical method of remediating in roadside soils along highways and for improving highway runoff drainage. The suitability of five plant species was studied for phytoextraction and phytostabilisation in a region with temperate maritime climate of coastal British Columbia, Canada. Pot experiments were conducted using Lolium perenne L (perennial rye grass), Festuca rubra L (creeping red fescue), Helianthus annuus L (sunflower), Poa pratensis L (Kentucky bluegrass) and Brassica napus L (rape) in soils treated with three different metal (Cu, Pb, Mn and Zn) concentrations. The bio-metric characters of plants in soils with multiple-metal contaminations, their metal accumulation characteristics, translocation properties and metal removal were assessed at different stages of plant growth, 90 and 120 DAS (days after sowing). Lolium was found to be suitable for the phytostabilisation of Cu and Pb, Festuca for Mn and Poa for Zn. Metal removal was higher at 120 than at 90 days after sowing, and metals concentrated more in the underground tissues with less translocation to the above-ground parts. Bioconcentration factors indicate that Festuca had the highest accumulation for Cu, Helianthus for Pb and Zn and Poa for Mn.

Padmavathiamma, P. K.; Li, L. Y.

2009-04-01

43

The role of plant-associated bacteria in the mobilization and phytoextraction of trace elements in contaminated soils  

PubMed Central

Phytoextraction makes use of trace element-accumulating plants that concentrate the pollutants in their tissues. Pollutants can be then removed by harvesting plants. The success of phytoextraction depends on trace element availability to the roots and the ability of the plant to intercept, take up, and accumulate trace elements in shoots. Current phytoextraction practises either employ hyperaccumulators or fast-growing high biomass plants; the phytoextraction process may be enhanced by soil amendments that increase trace element availability in the soil. This review will focus on the role of plant-associated bacteria to enhance trace element availability in the rhizosphere. We report on the kind of bacteria typically found in association with trace element – tolerating or – accumulating plants and discuss how they can contribute to improve trace element uptake by plants and thus the efficiency and rate of phytoextraction. This enhanced trace element uptake can be attributed to a microbial modification of the absorptive properties of the roots such as increasing the root length and surface area and numbers of root hairs, or by increasing the plant availability of trace elements in the rhizosphere and the subsequent translocation to shoots via beneficial effects on plant growth, trace element complexation and alleviation of phytotoxicity. An analysis of data from literature shows that effects of bacterial inoculation on phytoextraction efficiency are currently inconsistent. Some key processes in plant–bacteria interactions and colonization by inoculated strains still need to be unravelled more in detail to allow full-scale application of bacteria assisted phytoremediation of trace element contaminated soils.

Sessitsch, Angela; Kuffner, Melanie; Kidd, Petra; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Wenzel, Walter W.; Fallmann, Katharina; Puschenreiter, Markus

2013-01-01

44

Heating treatment schemes for enhancing chelant-assisted phytoextraction of heavy metals from contaminated soils.  

PubMed

Recent research has shown that chelant-assisted phytoextraction approaches often require a high dosage of chelant applied to soil. The present study focused on optimization of phytoremediation processes to increase the phytoextraction efficiency of metals at reduced chelant applications. Pot experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of increased soil temperature on shoot uptake of heavy metals by corn (Zea mays L.) and mung bean (Vigna radiat L. Wilczek) from heavy metal-contaminated soils. After the application of S,S-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid or ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid, soils were exposed to high temperatures (50 or 80 degrees C) for 3 h, which significantly increased the concentration of heavy metals in shoots. The heating treatment 2 d after the chelant addition resulted in higher concentrations of metals compared with those treatments 2 d before or simultaneously with the chelant application. Irrigation with 100 degrees C water 2 d after the chelant addition, or irrigation with 100 degrees C chelant solutions directly, also resulted in significantly higher phytoextraction of metals in the two crops compared with 25 degrees C chelant solutions. In addition, a novel application method to increase soil temperature using underground polyvinyl chloride tubes would increase the chelant-assisted extraction efficiency of Cu approximately 10- to 14-fold in corn and fivefold in mung bean compared with those nonheating treatments. In a field experiment, increasing soil temperature 2 d after chelant addition also increased the shoot Cu uptake approximately fivefold compared with those nonheating treatments. This new technique may represent a potential, engineering-oriented approach for phytoremediation of metal-polluted soils. PMID:18333687

Chen, Yahua; Wang, Chunchun; Wang, Guiping; Luo, Chunling; Mao, Ying; Shen, Zhenguo; Li, Xiangdong

2008-04-01

45

Specific Dioscorea Phytoextracts Enhance Potency of TCL-Loaded DC-Based Cancer Vaccines  

PubMed Central

Dioscorea tuber phytoextracts can confer immunomodulatory activities ex vivo and improve regeneration of bone marrow cells in vivo. In present study, we evaluated specific Dioscorea phytoextracts for use ex vivo as a bone-marrow-derived dendritic cell- (DC-) based vaccine adjuvant for cancer immunotherapy. Fractionated Dioscorea extracts (DsII) were assayed for their effect on maturation and functions of DC ex vivo and antimelanoma activity of DC-based vaccine in vivo. The phytoextract from 50–75% ethanol-precipitated fraction of Dioscorea alata var. purpurea Tainung no. 5 tuber, designated as DsII-TN5, showed a strong augmentation of tumor cell lysate- (TCL-) loaded DC-mediated activation of T-cell proliferation. DsII-TN5 stimulated the expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and IL-1? in TCL-loaded DCs and downregulated the expression of TGF-?1. DC vaccines prepared by a specific schema (TCL (2 h) + LPS (22 h)) showed the strongest antitumor activity. DsII-TN5 as a DC vaccine adjuvant showed strong antimelanoma activity and reduced myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) population in tested mice. DsII-TN5 can also activate DCs to enhance Th1- and Th17-related cytokine expressions. Biochemical analysis showed that DsII-TN5 consists mainly of polysaccharides containing a high level (53%) of mannose residues. We suggest that DsII-TN5 may have potential for future application as a potent, cost-effective adjuvant for DC-based cancer vaccines.

Chang, Wei-Ting; Chen, Hui-Ming; Yin, Shu-Yi; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Wen, Chih-Chun; Wei, Wen-Chi; Lai, Phoency; Wang, Cheng-Hsin; Yang, Ning-Sun

2013-01-01

46

Phytosiderophore Effects on Subsurface Actinide Contaminants: Potential for Phytostabilization and Phytoextraction  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to determine the potential of phytosiderophore-producing plants for phytostabilization and phytoextraction of actinides and some metal soil contaminants. Phytosiderophores are secreted by graminaceous plants such as barley and wheat for the solubilization, mobilization and uptake of Fe and other essential nutrients from soils. The ability for these phytosiderophores to chelate and absorb actinides using the same uptake system as for Fe is hereby investigated though characterization of actinide-phytosiderophore complexes (independently of plants), and characterization of plant uptake of such complexes.

Ruggiero, Christy

2003-06-01

47

A feasibility study of perennial/annual plant species to restore soils contaminated with heavy metals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A feasibility study was carried out to evaluate the application of perennial/annual plant species in a phytoextraction process of a previously washed industrial urban soil contaminated by nickel, arsenic and cupper. The plant species selected for this study were Ipomea (Ipomea variada); grass (Poa pratensis); grass mixture (Festuca rubra, Cynodon dactylon, Lolium multiforum, Pennisetum sp.); Monks Cress (Tropaeolum majus); ficus (Ficus benajamina) and fern (Pteris cretica). Soil was characterized and it presented the following heavy metals concentrations (dry weight): 80 mg of Ni/kg, 456-656 mg of As/kg and 1684-3166 mg of Cu/kg. Germination and survival in contaminated soil tests were conducted, from these, P. pratensis was discarded and the rest of plant species tested were used for the phytoextraction selection test. After 4 months of growth, biomass production was determined, and content of Ni, As and Cu was analyzed in plant's tissue. Metal biological absorption coefficient (BAC), bio-concentration factor (BCF) and translocation factor (TF), were calculated.Regarding to biomass generation it was observed, in every case, an inhibition of the plant growth compared with blanks sown in a non contaminated soil; inhibition ranged from 22.5% for the Monk cress to 98% for Ipomea. Even though the later presented high BAC, BCF and TF, its growth was severely inhibited, and therefore, due its low biomass generation, it is not recommended for phytoextraction under conditions for this study.Heavy metals concentrations in plant's tissue (dry weight) were as high as 866 mg Cu/kg and 602 mg As/kg for grass mixture; and 825 mg As/kg was observed for Monks cress.Grass mixture and monks cress had high BAC, BCF and TF, also they had high metal concentrations in its plants tissues and the lowest growth inhibition rates; hence the application in phytoextraction processes of these plants is advisable.

Zacarías, Montserrat; Beltrán, Margarita; Gilberto Torres, Luis; González, Abelardo

48

Citric acid enhances the phytoextraction of manganese and plant growth by alleviating the ultrastructural damages in Juncus effusus L  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chelate-assisted phytoextraction by high biomass producing plant species enhances the removal of heavy metals from polluted environments. In this regard, Juncus effusus a wetland plant has great potential. This study evaluated the effects of elevated levels of manganese (Mn) on the vegetative growth, Mn uptake and antioxidant enzymes in J. effusus. We also studied the role of citric acid and

U. Najeeb; L. Xu; Shafaqat Ali; Ghulam Jilani; H. J. Gong; W. Q. Shen; W. J. Zhou

2009-01-01

49

A novel strategy using biodegradable EDDS for the chemically enhanced phytoextraction of soils contaminated with heavy metals  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the sake of cost and potential environmental risk, it is necessary to minimize the amount of chelants used in chemically enhanced phytoextraction. In the present study, a biodegradable chelating agent, EDDS was added in a hot solution at 90°C to the soil in which garland chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum coronarium L.) and beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L., white bean) were growing. The

Chun-Ling Luo; Zhen-Guo Shen; Alan J. M. Baker; Xiang-Dong Li

2006-01-01

50

Metal uptake by young trees from dredged brackish sediment: limitations and possibilities for phytoextraction and phytostabilisation.  

PubMed

Five tree species (Acer pseudoplatanus L., Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn., Fraxinus excelsior L., Populus alba L. and Robinia pseudoacacia L.) were planted on a mound constructed of dredged sediment. The sediment originated from a brackish river mouth and was slightly polluted with heavy metals. This preliminary study evaluated the use of trees for site reclamation by means of phytoextraction of metals or phytostabilisation. Although the brackish nature of the sediment caused slight salt damage, overall survival of the planted trees was satisfactory. Robinia and white poplar had the highest growth rates. Ash, maple and alder had the highest survival rates (>90%) but showed stunted growth. Ash, alder, maple and Robinia contained normal concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in their foliage. As a consequence these species reduce the risk of metal dispersal and are therefore suitable species for phytostabilisation under the given conditions. White poplar accumulated high concentrations of Cd (8.0 mg kg(-1)) and Zn (465 mg kg(-1)) in its leaves and might therefore cause a risk of Cd and Zn input into the ecosystem because of autumn litter fall. This species is thus unsuitable for phytostabilisation. Despite elevated metal concentrations in the leaves, phytoextraction of heavy metals from the soil by harvesting stem and/or leaf biomass of white poplar would not be a realistic option because it will require an excessive amount of time to be effective. PMID:15142776

Mertens, Jan; Vervaeke, Pieter; De Schrijver, An; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan

2004-06-29

51

The use of the model species Arabidopsis halleri towards phytoextraction of cadmium polluted soils.  

PubMed

Phytoremediation consists in treating environmental pollutions through the use of plants and their associated microbes. Phytoremediation can be used for pollutant stabilization, extraction, degradation or volatilization. Cadmium is one of the most toxic trace metallic elements for living organisms and its accumulation in the environment is recognized as a worldwide concern. Plants suitable for efficient pollutant extraction from the soil should combine different characteristics like fast growth, high biomass, high tolerance and high accumulation capacities in harvestable parts. A rare class of plants called hyperaccumulators combines extremely high tolerance degrees and foliar accumulation of trace elements. With regard to cadmium, none of the Cd hyperaccumulators identified has met the criteria for efficient phytoextraction so far. By virtue of genetic engineering it is possible to transfer genes involved in Cd tolerance or accumulation in high biomass plants. Nevertheless, the genetic determinants of Cd hyperaccumulation are far from being understood. It is thus indispensable to acquire more knowledge about these processes. Among Cd hyperaccumulators, Arabidopsis halleri (some populations can hyperaccumulate Cd) is considered as a model species for the study of metal homeostasis and detoxification. This review will summarize our knowledge about Cd tolerance and accumulation acquired in A. halleri and how this knowledge may be used in phytoextraction. PMID:22850245

Claire-Lise, Meyer; Nathalie, Verbruggen

2012-07-28

52

Results of a Greenhouse Study Investigating the Phytoextraction of Lead from Contaminated Soils Obtained from the Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant, Desoto, Kansas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report describes the results of greenhouse studies conducted to determine if phytoextraction methods could be enhanced by increasing ionic lead's solubility in water. Soil acidifiers and chelating agents were used to increase lead's solubility in wat...

A. D. Behel D. A. Kelly D. F. Bader P. A. Pier R. A. Almond

1998-01-01

53

Role of plant growth regulators and a saprobic fungus in enhancement of metal phytoextraction potential and stress alleviation in pearl millet.  

PubMed

"Assisted phytoextraction" involving application of chemical additives such as plant growth regulators (PGRs) has become a trend in phytoremediation technology. This study identifies a cost-effective, naturally available crude PGR (PGR1) that produces the same effects as the commercial PGR (PGR2), increasing metal uptake by plants and the reduction of metal stress. Assisted phytoextraction by pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum) from a multi-metal (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Na and Zn) contaminated soil medium with tannery solid waste (TSW) soil amendments of 5 and 10%, was evaluated in a full-factorial pot trial with PGR1, PGR2 and Trichoderma pseudokoningii as factors. The effects of these phytoextraction assistants were measured through dry biomass production, heavy metal uptake, stress tolerance enzymes catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), soluble protein content of plant, and phytoextraction efficiency. Dry biomass and multi-metal accumulation were the highest in the soil treatments with a combined application of PGR1, PGR2 and T. pseudokoningii and the lowest in the control. The soluble protein contents and the SOD and CAT values were the highest in the 10% TSW treatment provided with PGR2+T. pseudokoningii, while the lowest were in the control. Thus, application of crude PGR in combination with other phytoextraction assistants can increase biomass production as well as multi-metal accumulation in plants. However, the biochemical properties of the plant depend on the level of TSW stress in the soil treatment as well as the type of phytoextraction assistants. PMID:22959131

Firdaus-e-Bareen; Shafiq, Muhammad; Jamil, Sidra

2012-08-22

54

Nitrogen fertilizer improves boron phytoextraction by Brassica juncea grown in contaminated sediments and alleviates plant stress.  

PubMed

In this study we evaluated the effect of different fertilizer treatments on Brassica plants grown on boron-contaminated sediments. Experiments were conducted in the laboratory and on the lysimeter scale. At laboratory scale (microcosm), five different fertilizers were tested for a 35-d period. On the lysimeter scale, nitrogen fertilization was tested at three different doses and plants were allowed to grow until the end of the vegetative phase (70 d). Results showed that nitrogen application had effectively increased plant biomass production, while B uptake was not affected. Total B phytoextracted increased three-fold when the highest nitrogen dose was applied. Phytotoxicity on Brassica was evaluated by biochemical parameters. In plants grown in unfertilized B-contaminated sediments, the activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and pyrogallol peroxidase (PPX) increased, whereas catalase (CAT) decreased with respect to control plants. Addition of N progressively mitigated the alteration of enzymatic activity, thus suggesting that N can aid in alleviating B-induced oxidative stress. SOD activity was restored to control levels just at the lowest N treatment, whereas the CAT inhibition was partially restored only at the highest one. N application also lowered the B-induced increase in APX and PPX activities. Increased glutathione reductase activity indicated the need to restore the oxidative balance of glutathione. Data also suggest a role of glutathione and phytochelatins in B defense mechanisms. Results suggest that the nitrogen fertilizer was effective in improving B phytoextraction by increasing Brassica biomass and by alleviating B-induced oxidative stress. PMID:22382070

Giansoldati, Virginia; Tassi, Eliana; Morelli, Elisabetta; Gabellieri, Edi; Pedron, Francesca; Barbafieri, Meri

2012-02-29

55

Radionuclide deposition control  

DOEpatents

The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition.

Brehm, William F. (Richland, WA); McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01

56

Potential phytoextraction and phytostabilization of perennial peanut on copper-contaminated vineyard soils and copper mining waste.  

PubMed

This study sought to evaluate the potential of perennial peanut (Arachis pintoi) for copper phytoremediation in vineyard soils (Inceptisol and Mollisol) contaminated with copper and copper mining waste. Our results showed high phytomass production of perennial peanut in both vineyard soils. Macronutrient uptakes were not negatively affected by perennial peanut cultivated in all contaminated soils. Plants cultivated in Mollisol showed high copper concentrations in the roots and shoots of 475 and 52 mg kg(-1), respectively. Perennial peanut plants showed low translocation factor values for Cu, although these plants showed high bioaccumulation factor (BCF) for both vineyard soils, Inceptisol and Mollisol, with BCF values of 3.83 and 3.24, respectively, being characterized as a copper hyperaccumulator plant in these soils. Copper phytoextraction from Inceptisol soil was the highest for both roots and entire plant biomass, with more than 800 mg kg(-1) of copper in whole plant. The highest potential copper phytoextraction by perennial peanut was in Inceptisol soil with copper removal of 2,500 g ha(-1). Also, perennial peanut showed high potential for copper phytoremoval in copper mining waste and Mollisol with 1,700 and 1,500 g of copper per hectare, respectively. In addition, perennial peanuts characterized high potential for phytoextraction and phytostabilization of copper in vineyard soils and copper mining waste. PMID:21286847

Andreazza, Robson; Bortolon, Leandro; Pieniz, Simone; Giacometti, Marcelo; Roehrs, Dione D; Lambais, Mácio R; Camargo, Flávio A O

2011-02-01

57

Quantitative radionuclide angiocardiography  

SciTech Connect

This study introduces a new method for calculating actual left ventricular volumes and cardiac output from data recorded during a single transit of a radionuclide bolus through the heart, and describes in detail current radionuclide angiocardiography methodology. A group of 64 healthy adults with a wide age range were studied to define the normal range of hemodynamic parameters determined by the technique. Radionuclide angiocardiograms were performed in patients undergoing cardiac catherization to validate the measurements. In 33 patients studied by both techniques on the same day, a close correlation was documented for measurement of ejection fraction and end-diastolic volume. To validate the method of volumetric cardiac output calcuation, 33 simultaneous radionuclide and indocyanine green dye determinations of cardiac output were performed in 18 normal young adults. These independent comparisons of radionuclide measurements with two separate methods document that initial transit radionuclide angiocardiography accurately assesses left ventricular function.

Scholz, P.M.; Rerych, S.K.; Moran, J.F.; Newman, G.E.; Douglas, J.M.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.; Jones, R.H.

1980-01-01

58

Copper phytoextraction in tandem with oilseed production using commercial cultivars and mutant lines of sunflower.  

PubMed

Use of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) for Cu phytoextraction and oilseed production on Cu-contaminated topsoils was investigated in afield trial at a former wood preservation site. Six commercial cultivars and two mutant lines were cultivated in plots with and without the addition of compost (5% w/w) and dolomitic limestone (0.2% w/w). Total soil Cu ranged from 163 to 1170 mg kg(-1). In soil solutions, Cu concentration varied between 0.16-0.93 mg L(-1). The amendment increased soil pH, reduced Cu exposure and promoted sunflower growth. Stem length, shoot and capitulum biomasses, seed yield, and shoot and leaf Cu concentrations were measured. At low total soil Cu, shoot Cu mineralomass was higher in commercial cultivars, Le., Salut, Energic, and Countri, whereas competition and shading affected morphological traits of mutants. Based on shoot yield (7 Mg DW ha(-1)) and Cu concentration, the highest removal was 59 g Cu ha(-1). At high total soil Cu, shoot Cu mineralomass peaked for mutants (e.g., 52 g Cu ha(-1) for Mutant 1 line) and cultivars Energic and Countri. Energic seed yield (3.9 Mg air-DW ha(-1)) would be sufficient to produce oil Phenotype traits and shoot Cu removal depended on sunflower types and Cu exposure. PMID:22046751

Kolbas, A; Mench, M; Herzig, R; Nehnevajova, E; Bes, C M

2011-01-01

59

Phytosiderophore Effects on Subsurface Actinide Contaminants: Potential for Phytostabilization and Phytoextraction  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to understand the influence of phytosiderophore-producing plants (grasses, including crops such as wheat and barley) on the biogeochemistry of actinide and other metal contaminants in the subsurface environment, and to determine the potential of phytosiderophoreproducing plants for phytostabilization and phytoextraction of actinides and some metal soil contaminants. Phytosiderophores are secreted by graminaceous plants such as barley and wheat for the solubilization, mobilization and uptake of Fe and other essential nutrients from soils. The ability for these phytosiderophores to chelate and absorb actinides using the same uptake system, as for Fe is being investigated though characterization of actinide-phytosiderophore complexes (independently of plants), and characterization of plant uptake of such complexes. We may also show possible harm caused by increased chelation of actinides, which may increase actinide mobilization & migration in the subsurface environment. This information can then be directly applied by either removal of harmful plants, or can be used to develop plant-based soil stabilization/remediation technologies. Such technologies could be the low-cost, low risk solution to many DOE actinide contamination problems.

Ruggiero, Christy

2004-06-01

60

Screening of sunflower cultivars for metal phytoextraction in a contaminated field prior to mutagenesis.  

PubMed

Sunflower can be used for the remediation of metal-contaminated soils. Its high biomass production makes this plant species interestingfor phytoextraction and using sunflower oil for a technical purpose may improve the economic balance of phytoremediation. The aim of the present field study was to screen 15 commercial cultivars of Helianthus annuus L. grown on metal-contaminated soil, to find out the variety with the highest metal extraction, which can be further improved by mutation or in vitro breeding procedures. Two different fertilizers (ammonium sulphate and ammonium nitrate) were also used to enhance the bioavailability of metals in soil Highly significant differences were observed within tested varieties for metal accumulation and extraction efficiency. Furthermore, ammonium nitrate increased cadmium extraction, whereas ammonium sulphate enhanced zinc and lead uptake in most tested cultivars. In this field-based sunflower screening, we found enhanced cumulative Cd, Zn, and Pb extraction efficiency by a factor 4.4 for Salut cultivar. We therefore emphasize that prior to any classical breeding or genetic engineering enhancing metal uptake potential, a careful screening of various genotypes should be done to select the cultivar with the naturally highest metal uptake and to start the genetic improvement with the best available plant material. PMID:16463545

Nehnevajova, Erika; Herzig, Rolf; Federer, Guido; Erismann, Karl-Hans; Schwitzguébel, Jean-Paul

2005-01-01

61

Phytosiderophore Effects on Subsurface Actinide Contaminants: Potential for Phytostabilization and Phytoextraction  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to understand the influence of phytosiderophore-producing plants (grasses, including crops such as wheat and barley) on the biogeochemistry of actinide and other metal contaminants in the subsurface environment, and to determine the potential of phytosiderophore-producing plants for phytostabilization and phytoextraction of actinides and some metal soil contaminants. Phytosiderophores are secreted by graminaceous plants such as barley and wheat for the solubilization, mobilization and uptake of Fe and other essential nutrients from soils. The ability for these phytosiderophores to chelate and absorb actinides using the same uptake system as for Fe is being investigated though characterization of actinide-phytosiderophore complexes (independently of plants), and characterization of plant uptake of such complexes. We may also show possible harm caused by these plants through increased chelation of actinides that increase in actinide mobilization & migration in the subsurface environment. This information can then be directly applied by either removal of harmful plants, or can be used to develop plant-based soil stabilization/remediation technologies. Such technologies could be the low-cost, low risk solution to many DOE actinide contamination problems.

Ruggiero, Christy

2005-06-01

62

Ammonium thiosulphate enhanced phytoextraction from mercury contaminated soil--results from a greenhouse study.  

PubMed

According to the 'hard and soft' acid-base principle, mercury is a 'soft metal' and will preferentially form soluble chemical complexes with sulphur-containing ligands. In this work mercury uptake by Chenopodium glaucum L. growing on mercury-contaminated soil was promoted using ammonium thiosulphate. The relative geochemical fractionation of mercury in the soil was subsequently investigated as a function of plant growth with and without thiosulphate amendment. The results indicate that the solubility of mercury is significantly increased through the application of thiosulphate to the soil. Substantially higher mercury levels were found in C. glaucum L. treated with 2 g kg(-1) thiosulphate of soil when compared to the non-treated plants. Compared with initial soil, soluble and exchangeable fractions were increased both in planted and planted treated plants. However, no significant difference was observed between the soils of the planted and planted treated plants. The oxide-bound mercury concentration was significantly decreased for the planted soil (treated and non-treated) at the end of the experiment. Moreover, this fraction was highly correlated with the plant tissue mercury concentration. Taken together, thiosulphate assisted phytoextraction could be used to reduce environmental risk apparent for mercury-contaminated soil through reducing the oxide bound fractions, while managing the bioavailable fractions (compared with no treated plant). PMID:21122988

Wang, Jianxu; Feng, Xinbin; Anderson, Christopher W N; Qiu, Guangle; Ping, Li; Bao, Zhengduo

2010-11-03

63

Phytoextraction potential of the nickel hyperaccumulators Leptoplax emarginata and Bornmuellera tymphaea.  

PubMed

Leptoplax emarginata and Bornmuellera tymphaea are nickel hyperaccumulators of the Brassicaceae family endemic to serpentine soils in Greece. The aims of this work were to compare the growth and uptake behavior of these plants with the Ni hyperaccumulator species Thlaspi caerulescens and Alyssum murale, and to evaluate their effect on soil Ni availability. Plants were grown for 3 mo on three soils that differ in Ni availability. Ni availability in soils was measuredby isotopic exchange kinetics and DTPA-TEA extractions. Results showed that L. emarginata produced significantly more biomass than other plants. On the serpentine soil, B. tymphaea showed the highest Ni concentration in shoots. However, Niphytoextraction on the three soils was maximal with L. emarginata. The high initial Ni availability of soil Serp (470.5 mg kg(-1)) was the main explanation for the high Ni concentrations measured in plant shoots grown on this soil, compared to those grown on soils Calc and Silt A. murale was the least efficient in reducing Ni availability on the serpentine soil L. emarginata appeared as the most efficient species for Ni phytoextraction and decrease of the Ni available pool. PMID:16463544

Chardot, Vanessa; Massoura, Stamatia Tina; Echevarria, Guillaume; Reeves, Roger D; Morel, Jean-Louis

2005-01-01

64

Results of a greenhouse study investigating the phytoextraction of lead from contaminated soils obtained from the Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant, Desoto, Kansas  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of greenhouse studies conducted to determine if phytoextraction methods could be enhanced by increasing ionic lead`s solubility in water. Soil acidifiers and chelating agents were used to increase lead`s solubility in water. The study was conducted using lead contaminated soil from the Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant near Desoto, Kansas. These soils were shipped to the Tennessee Valley Authority`s Environmental Research Facility in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, where the study was conducted. The report concludes that phytoextraction methods may be enhanced by these techniques and that the risk of leaching lead out of the soil`s root zone is minimal.

Bader, D.F.; Behel, A.D.; Almond, R.A.; Kelly, D.A.; Pier, P.A.

1998-08-01

65

Radionuclides in Drinking Water  

Microsoft Academic Search

Impending new maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for radionuclides, plus increased concern for radon in the air inside homes, have sparked new interest in these substances. An assessment of research needs,* which also provided background information on completed and ongoing research projects, showed that Rn-222 represents the most serious threat to health of all the radionuclides in drinking water, leading to

Jerry D. Lowry; Sylvia B. Lowry

1988-01-01

66

Radionuclides Production, vol 2  

SciTech Connect

Twelve specialists present a comprehensive and integrated guide on the theory and practical aspects of radionuclide production. Vol. II: Special consideration is given to production techniques of short-lived positron radionuclides and labeling procedures. Illustrative examples combined with technical explanations on the biomedical studies are also included.

Helus, F.

1983-01-01

67

Identification and validation of heavy metal and radionuclide hyperaccumulating terrestrial plant species. Quarterly technical progress report, March 20, 1997--June 19, 1997  

SciTech Connect

This laboratory has been involved in a collaborative project focusing on a range of issues related to the phytoremediation of heavy metal-and radionuclide- contaminated soils. While much of the research has been fundamental in nature, involving physiological and molecular characterizations of the mechanisms of hyperaccumulation in plants, the laboratory is also investigating more practical issues related to phytoremediation. A central issue in this latter research has been the identification of amendments capable of increasing the bioavailability and subsequent phytoextraction of radionuclides. The results described here detail these efforts for uranium and Cs-137. A study was also conducted on a Cs-137 contaminated site at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), which allowed application of the laboratory and greenhouse results to a field setting.

Kochian, L.

1997-11-01

68

Use of natural radionuclides to predict the behavior of radwaste radionuclides in far-field aquifers  

SciTech Connect

In appropriate aquifers the natural radionuclides of the U and Th decay series are important sources of information about the behavior of radwaste radionuclides in far-field aquifers. The Wolfcamp Carbonate, Pennsylvanian Carbonate and Granite Wash aquifers in the Palo Duro Basin of the Texas Panhandle are prime examples of such aquifers. Sampling and analysis for key radionuclides in the ground waters of these aquifers are quite feasible and have been accomplished. Key early results are: (1) Ra does not appear to be retarded by sorption, (2) Th appears to be strongly sorbed, (3) kinetics seem to be different on time scales of days to months than on ones of hundreds of thousands of years, and (4) U and Th behave similarly when the time scales (half-lives) are similar, leading to the suggestion that uranium is in the +4 valence state in these aquifers. 10 references, 3 figures.

Hubbard, N.; Laul, J.C.; Perkins, R.W.

1984-01-01

69

Use of natural radionuclides to predict the behavior of radwaste radionuclides in far-field aquifiers  

SciTech Connect

In appropriate aquifers the natural radionuclides of the U and Th decay series are important sources of information about the behavior of radwaste radionuclides in far-field aquifers. The Wolfcamp Carbonate, Pennsylvanian Carbonate and Granite Wash aquifers in the Palo Duro Basin of the Texas Panhandle are prime examples of such aquifers. Sampling and analysis for key radionuclides in the ground waters of these aquifers are quite feasible and have been accomplished. Key early results are: (1) Ra does not appear to be retarded by sorption, (2) Th appears to be strongly sorbed, (3) kinetics seem to be different on time scales of days to months than on ones of hundreds of thousands of years, and (4) U and Th behave similarily when the time scales (half-lives) are similar, leading to the suggestion that uranium is in the +4 valence state in these aquifers. 10 references, 9 figures.

Hubbard, N.; Laul, J.C.; Perkins, R.W.

1983-10-01

70

Phytoextraction of zinc, copper, nickel and lead from a contaminated soil by different species of Brassica.  

PubMed

In a pot culture experiment, five different species of Brassica (Brassica juncea, Brassica campestris, Brassica carinata, Brassica napus, and Brassica nigra) were grown for screening possible accumulators of heavy metals, viz. Zn, Cu, Ni, and Pb. The plants were grown to maturity in a soil irrigated with sewage effluents for more than two decades in West Delhi, India. The soil analysis showed enhanced accumulation of Zn, Cu, Ni, and Pb in this sewage-irrigated soil. Among all species, B. carinata showed the highest concentration (mg kg(-1)) as well as uptake (microg pot(-1)) of Ni and Pb at maturity. Although B. campestris showed a higher concentration of Zn in its shoots (stem plus leaf), B. carinata extracted the largest amount of this metal due to greater biomass production. However, B. juncea phytoextracted the largest amount of Cu from the soil. In general, the highest concentration and uptake of metal was observed in shoots compared to roots or seeds of the different species. Among the Brassica spp., B. carinata cv. DLSC1 emerged as the most promising, showing greater uptake of Zn, Ni, and Pb, while B. juncea cv. Pusa Bold showed the highest uptake of Cu. The B. napus also showed promise, as it ranked second with respect to total uptake of Pb, Zn, and Ni, and third for Cu. Total uptake of metals by Brassica spp. correlated negatively with available as well as the total soil metal concentrations. Among the root parameters, root length emerged as the powerful parameter to dictate the uptake of metals by Brassica spp. Probably for the first time, B. carinata was reported as a promising phytoextractor for Zn, Ni, and Pb, which performed better than B. juncea. PMID:18709932

Purakayastha, T J; Viswanath, Thulasi; Bhadraray, S; Chhonkar, P K; Adhikari, P P; Suribabu, K

71

The use of maize and poplar in chelant-enhanced phytoextraction of lead from contaminated agricultural soils.  

PubMed

Chelant-enhanced phytoextraction of heavy metals is an emerging technological approach for a non-destructive remediation of contaminated soils. The main objectives of this study were (i) to assess the extraction efficiency of two different synthetic chelating agents (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS)) for desorbing Pb from two contaminated agricultural soils originating from a mining and smelting district and (ii) to assess the phytoextraction efficiency of maize (Zea mays) and poplar (Populus sp.) after EDTA application. EDTA was more efficient than EDDS in desorbing and complexing Pb from both soils, removing as much as 60% of Pb. Maize exhibited better results than poplar when extracting Pb from the more acidic (pH approximately 4) and more contaminated (up to 1360 mg Pb kg(-1)) agricultural soil originating from the smelting area. On the other hand, poplars proved to be more efficient when grown on the near-neutral (pH approximately 6) and less contaminated (up to 200 mg Pb kg(-1)) agricultural soil originating from the mining area. Furthermore, the addition of EDTA led to a significant increase of Pb content especially in poplar leaves, proving a strong translocation rate within the poplar plants. PMID:17184814

Komárek, Michael; Tlustos, Pavel; Száková, Jirina; Chrastný, Vladislav; Ettler, Vojtech

2006-12-20

72

Radionuclide Cystogram (Bladder Scan)  

MedlinePLUS

... as bladder scan, radionuclide cystogram is a diagnostic nuclear test that uses a solution containing radioactive material ... Kidney (Renal) Failure Kidney (Renal) Infection Kidney (Renal) Nuclear Medicine Scan Kidney (Renal) Transplantation Kidney (Renal) Trauma ...

73

Potential of Brassic rapa, Cannabis sativa, Helianthus annuus and Zea mays for phytoextraction of heavy metals from calcareous dredged sediment derived soils.  

PubMed

Remediation of soil pollution is one of the many current environmental challenges. Anthropogenic activity has resulted in the contamination of extended areas of land, the remediation of which is both invasive and expensive by conventional means. Phytoextraction of heavy metals from contaminated soils has the prospect of being a more economic in situ alternative. In addition, phytoextraction targets ecotoxicologically the most relevant soil fraction of these metals, i.e. the bioavailable fraction. Greenhouse experiments were carried out to evaluate the potential of four high biomass crop species in their potential for phytoextraction of heavy metals, with or without with the use of soil amendments (EDTA or EDDS). A calcareous dredged sediment derived surface soil, with high organic matter and clay content and moderate levels of heavy metal pollution, was used in the experiments. No growth depression was observed in EDTA or EDDS treated pots in comparison to untreated controls. Metal accumulation was considered to be low for phytoextraction purposes, despite the use of chelating agents. The low observed shoot concentrations of heavy metals were attributed to the low phytoavailability of heavy metals in this particular soil substrate. The mobilising effects induced by EDTA in the soil were found to be too long-lived for application as a soil amendment in phytoextraction. Although EDDS was found to be more biodegradable, higher effect half lives were observed than reported in literature or observed in previous experiments. These findings caution against the use of any amendment, biodegradable or otherwise, without proper investigation of its effects and the longevity thereof. PMID:16202810

Meers, E; Ruttens, A; Hopgood, M; Lesage, E; Tack, F M G

2005-04-19

74

Phytoremediation of metals, metalloids, and radionuclides  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phytoremediation is a developing technology that can potentially address the problems of contaminated agricultural land or more intensely polluted areas affected by urban or industrial activities. Three main strategies currently exist to phytoextract inorganic substances from soils using plants:(1) use of natural hyperaccumulators; (2) enhancement of element uptake of high biomass species by chemical additions to soil and plants; and

S. P. McGrath; J. Zhao; E. Lombi

2002-01-01

75

Phytoextraction and phytoexcretion of Cd by the leaves of Tamarix smyrnensis growing on contaminated non-saline and saline soils  

SciTech Connect

Phytoremediation and more specifically phytoextraction, is an alternative restoration strategy for the clean up of heavy metal contaminated soils. Phytoextraction can only be successful if suitable plant species colonize the contaminated area, extract the toxic substances and accumulate them in their above ground tissues. In this study, the salt cedar Tamarix smyrnensis that is a widespread salt-tolerant plant in the Mediterranean region has been investigated. A pot experiment is conducted with T. smyrnensis grown in polluted soil with 16 ppm of cadmium and at three different salt concentrations (0.0, 0.5, 3.0% NaCl) for a 10-week period. It took place in an open-air area with natural light, at ambient temperature and humidity in an effort to keep the plants under conditions as similar as possible to those in the field. However, care was taken not to let them be rained on. Temperature ranged from 19 to 50 deg. C with 33 and 21 deg. C being the average day and night temperature, respectively. Humidity ranged from 28% to 87% with a 13-14 h photoperiod. The specific aims of this work are to investigate the accumulation of cadmium via root uptake at different saline conditions and cadmium excretion through salt glands on the surface of the leaves as a probable detoxification mechanism of the plant. Furthermore, measurements of chlorophyll content, biomass, and shoot length are used to evaluate the potential of the plant for the removal of cadmium from contaminated saline and non-saline soils. The experimental data suggest that increased soil salinity results in an increase of the cadmium uptake by T. smyrnensis. Analysis of white salt crystals taken from glandular tissue confirmed the fact that this plant excretes cadmium through its salt glands on the surface of the leaves as a possible detoxification mechanism in order to resist metal toxicity. Excreted cadmium is again released into the environment and it is redeposited on the top soil. Furthermore, increased salinity results in an increased excretion of the metal on Tamarix leaf surface. The presence of metals usually affects negatively the plant health, but T. smyrnensis developed no visible signs of metal toxicity, only salt toxicity symptoms were observed. Cadmium usually decreases the chlorophyll content in plants; however, the amount of photosynthetic pigments of T. smyrnensis was found not to be affected. All the above points to the potential of T. smyrnensis for use in phytoremediation with the metal secretion from the leaves being a unique advantage that may change current phytoextraction practices.

Manousaki, Eleni [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Polytechneioupolis, 73100 Chania (Greece); Kadukova, Jana [Department of Non-Ferrous Metals and Waste Treatment, Technical University of Kosice, Letna 9, 04011 Kosice (Slovakia); Papadantonakis, Nikolaos [Department of Sustainable Agriculture, Mediterranean Agronomic Institute of Chania, Alsyllio Agrokepiou, P.O. Box 85, 73100 Chania (Greece); Kalogerakis, Nicolas [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Polytechneioupolis, 73100 Chania (Greece)], E-mail: nicolas.kalogerakis@enveng.tuc.gr

2008-03-15

76

Enhancing phytoextraction: the effect of chemical soil manipulation on mobility, plant accumulation, and leaching of heavy metals.  

PubMed

For heavy metal-contaminated agricultural land, low-cost, plant-based phytoextraction measures can be a key element for a new land management strategy. When agents are applied into the soil, the solubility of heavy metals and their subsequent accumulation by plants can be increased, and, therefore, phytoextraction enhanced. An overview is given of the state of the art of enhancing heavy metal solubility in soils, increasing the heavy metal accumulation of several high-biomass-yielding and metal-tolerant plants, and the effect of these measures on the risk of heavy metal leaching. Several organic as well as inorganic agents can effectively and specifically increase solubility and, therefore, accumulation of heavy metals by several plant species. Crops like willow (Salix viminalis L.), Indian mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern.], corn (Zea mays L.), and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) show high tolerance to heavy metals and are, therefore, to a certain extent able to use the surpluses that originate from soil manipulation. More than 100-fold increases of lead concentrations in the biomass of crops were reported, when ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was applied to contaminated soils. Uranium concentrations could be strongly increased when citric acid was applied. Cadmium and zinc concentrations could be enhanced by inorganic agents like elemental sulfur or ammonium sulfate. However, leaching of heavy metals due to increased mobility in soils cannot be excluded. Thus, implementation on the field scale must consider measures to minimize leaching. So, the application of more than 1 g EDTA kg(-1) becomes inefficient as lead concentration in crops is not enhanced and leaching rate increases. Moreover, for large-scale applications, agricultural measures as placement of agents, dosage splitting, the kind and amount of agents applied, and the soil properties are important factors governing plant growth, heavy metal concentrations, and leaching rates. Effective prevention of leaching, breeding of new plant material, and use of the contaminated biomass (e.g., as biofuels) will be crucial for the acceptance and the economic breakthrough of enhanced phytoextraction. PMID:14674516

Schmidt, Ulrich

77

Targeted Radionuclide Therapy  

PubMed Central

Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose.

Ersahin, Devrim; Doddamane, Indukala; Cheng, David

2011-01-01

78

Leaching and uptake of heavy metals by ten different species of plants during an EDTA-assisted phytoextraction process.  

PubMed

In a pot experiment, the potential use of 10 plant species, including six dicotyledon species and four monocotyledon species, was investigated for the EDTA-enhanced phytoextraction of Pb from contaminated soil. Mung bean and buckwheat had a higher sensitivity to the EDTA treatment in soils. In the 2.5 and 5.0 mmol kg(-1) EDTA treatments, the Pb concentrations in the shoots of the six dicotyledon species ranged from 1,000 to 3,000 mg kg(-1) of dry matter, which were higher than those of the monocotyledon species. The highest amount of phytoextracted Pb (2.9 mg Pb pot(-1)) was achieved in sunflowers, due to the high concentration of Pb in their shoots and large biomass, followed by corns (1.8 mg Pb pot(-1)) and peas (1.1 mg Pb pot(-1)). The leaching behavior of heavy metals as a result of applying EDTA to the surface of the soil was also investigated using short soil-leaching columns (9.0-cm diameter, 20-cm height) by the percolation of artificial rainfall. About 3.5%, 15.8%, 13.7% and 20.6% of soil Pb, Cu, Zn and Cd, respectively, were leached from the soil columns after the application of 5.0 mmol kg(-1) of EDTA. The growth of sunflowers in the soil columns had little effect on the amount of metals that were leached out. This was probably due to the shallowness of the layer of soil, the short time-span of the uptake of metals by the plant and the plant's simple root systems. PMID:15312735

Chen, Yahua; Li, Xiangdong; Shen, Zhenguo

2004-10-01

79

Phytoextraction and phytostabilization potential of plants grown in the vicinity of heavy metal-contaminated soils: a case study at an industrial town site.  

PubMed

With the development of urbanization and industrialization, soils have become increasingly polluted by heavy metals. Phytoremediation, an emerging cost-effective, nonintrusive, and aesthetically pleasing technology that uses the remarkable ability of plants to concentrate elements, can be potentially used to remediate metal-contaminated sites. In this research, two processes of phytoremediation (phytoextraction and phytostabilization) were surveyed in some plant species around an industrial town in the Hamedan Province in the central-western part of Iran. To this purpose, shoots and roots of the seven plant species and the associated soil samples were collected and analyzed by measuring Pb, Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn concentrations using ICP-AES and then calculating the biological absorption coefficient, bioconcentration factor, and translocation factor parameters for each element. The obtained results showed that among the collected plants, Salsola soda is the most effective species for phytoextraction and phytostabilization and Cirsium arvense has the potential for phytostabilization of the measured heavy metals. PMID:23856813

Lorestani, B; Yousefi, N; Cheraghi, M; Farmany, A

2013-07-16

80

EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work is to develop the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, as directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a). This abstraction is the conceptual model that will be used to determine the rate of release of radionuclides from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ) in the total system performance assessment-license application (TSPA-LA). In particular, this model will be used to quantify the time-dependent radionuclide releases from a failed waste package (WP) and their subsequent transport through the EBS to the emplacement drift wall/UZ interface. The development of this conceptual model will allow Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department to provide a more detailed and complete EBS flow and transport abstraction. The results from this conceptual model will allow PA0 to address portions of the key technical issues (KTIs) presented in three NRC Issue Resolution Status Reports (IRSRs): (1) the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (ENFE), Revision 2 (NRC 1999a), (2) the Container Life and Source Term (CLST), Revision 2 (NRC 1999b), and (3) the Thermal Effects on Flow (TEF), Revision 1 (NRC 1998). The conceptual model for flow and transport in the EBS will be referred to as the ''EBS RT Abstraction'' in this analysis/modeling report (AMR). The scope of this abstraction and report is limited to flow and transport processes. More specifically, this AMR does not discuss elements of the TSPA-SR and TSPA-LA that relate to the EBS but are discussed in other AMRs. These elements include corrosion processes, radionuclide solubility limits, waste form dissolution rates and concentrations of colloidal particles that are generally represented as boundary conditions or input parameters for the EBS RT Abstraction. In effect, this AMR provides the algorithms for transporting radionuclides using the flow geometry and radionuclide concentrations determined by other elements of the TSPA-SR model. The scope of the EBS RT Abstraction also does not include computational or numerical procedures for solving the process-level equations; rather, it identifies the important processes that must then be evaluated with process-level or component-level software using analytical or numerical solutions.

R. Schreiner

2001-06-27

81

Radionuclide Migration: Prediction Experience  

SciTech Connect

Many different methods of calculating radionuclide migration (transfer) with groundwater-from very simple handmade calculations to use of sophisticated computer models, - exist and are in use. There is no doubt whether we can solve a particular problem in this area; the question is how can we find means of doing this in a fast, precise and economical way. According to practical experience of MosSIA 'Radon' specialists it is useful at the first stage to assess the degree to which various parameters affect the final result. Then the relevance of modeling parameters is usually assessed. SUE MosSIA 'Radon' has applied this complex approach to assessing possible radionuclide transfer from the long term storage facilities located within one of the sites in Moscow. Questions of model verification, computer realization, the analysis of obtained results, a role and a place of these calculations in safety assessment and safety case are beyond the scope of this paper. (authors)

Martianov, V.V.; Sheglov, M.Yu.; Guskov, A.V. [State Unitary Enterprise MosSIA 'Radon', 2/14, 7th Rostovsky pereulok, Moscow 119121 (Russian Federation)

2006-07-01

82

Cyclotron Production of Medical Radionuclides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cyclotron products are gaining in significance in diagnostic investigations via PET and SPECT, as well as in some therapeutic studies. The scientific and technological background of radionuclide production using a cyclotron is briefly discussed. Production methods of the commonly used positron and photon emitters are described and developments in the production of some new positron emitters and therapeutic radionuclides outlined. Some perspectives of cyclotron production of medical radionuclides are considered.

Qaim, S. M.

83

Radionuclides production. Volumes 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

This book presents papers on isotope production. Topics considered include historical aspects of radioisotope production, nuclear physics fundamentals, activation techniques, the radiochemical processing of activated targets, reactor-produced radionuclides, short-lived positron emitting radionuclides, other cyclotron radionuclides, nuclear medicine, the production of radionuclides by a 14 MeV neutron generator, and radionuclides and labelled compounds produced at an electron linear accelerator.

Not Available

1983-01-01

84

Quantitative modeling of Cerenkov light production efficiency from medical radionuclides.  

PubMed

There has been recent and growing interest in applying Cerenkov radiation (CR) for biological applications. Knowledge of the production efficiency and other characteristics of the CR produced by various radionuclides would help in accessing the feasibility of proposed applications and guide the choice of radionuclides. To generate this information we developed models of CR production efficiency based on the Frank-Tamm equation and models of CR distribution based on Monte-Carlo simulations of photon and ? particle transport. All models were validated against direct measurements using multiple radionuclides and then applied to a number of radionuclides commonly used in biomedical applications. We show that two radionuclides, Ac-225 and In-111, which have been reported to produce CR in water, do not in fact produce CR directly. We also propose a simple means of using this information to calibrate high sensitivity luminescence imaging systems and show evidence suggesting that this calibration may be more accurate than methods in routine current use. PMID:22363636

Beattie, Bradley J; Thorek, Daniel L J; Schmidtlein, Charles R; Pentlow, Keith S; Humm, John L; Hielscher, Andreas H

2012-02-20

85

Reliability of Current Biokinetic and Dosimetric Models for Radionuclides: A Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of a pilot study of the reliability of the biokinetic and dosimetric models currently used by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as predictors of dose per unit internal or external exposure to radionuclides. The study examines the feasibility of critically evaluating the accuracy of these models for a comprehensive set of radionuclides of concern to the NRC. Each critical evaluation would include: identification of discrepancies between the models and current databases; characterization of uncertainties in model predictions of dose per unit intake or unit external exposure; characterization of variability in dose per unit intake or unit external exposure; and evaluation of prospects for development of more accurate models. Uncertainty refers here to the level of knowledge of a central value for a population, and variability refers to quantitative differences between different members of a population. This pilot study provides a critical assessment of models for selected radionuclides representing different levels of knowledge of dose per unit exposure. The main conclusions of this study are as follows: (1) To optimize the use of available NRC resources, the full study should focus on radionuclides most frequently encountered in the workplace or environment. A list of 50 radionuclides is proposed. (2) The reliability of a dose coefficient for inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide (i.e., an estimate of dose per unit intake) may depend strongly on the specific application. Multiple characterizations of the uncertainty in a dose coefficient for inhalation or ingestion of a radionuclide may be needed for different forms of the radionuclide and different levels of information of that form available to the dose analyst. (3) A meaningful characterization of variability in dose per unit intake of a radionuclide requires detailed information on the biokinetics of the radionuclide and hence is not feasible for many infrequently studied radionuclides. (4) The biokinetics of a radionuclide in the human body typically represents the greatest source of uncertainty or variability in dose per unit intake. (5) Characterization of uncertainty in dose per unit exposure is generally a more straightforward problem for external exposure than for intake of a radionuclide. (6) For many radionuclides the most important outcome of a large-scale critical evaluation of databases and biokinetic models for radionuclides is expected to be the improvement of current models. Many of the current models do not fully or accurately reflect available radiobiological or physiological information, either because the models are outdated or because they were based on selective or uncritical use of data or inadequate model structures. In such cases the models should be replaced with physiologically realistic models that incorporate a wider spectrum of information.

Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Meck, Robert A. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

2008-10-01

86

Application of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria for enhancing bioavailability and phytoextraction of cadmium (Cd) from polluted soil.  

PubMed

In this study, phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB), Bacillus megaterium, were used to enhance Cd bioavailability and phytoextractability of Cd from contaminated soils. This strain showed a potential for directly solubilizing phosphorous from soils more than 10 folds greater than the control without inoculation. The results of pot experiments revealed that inoculation with B. megaterium significantly increased the extent of Cd accumulation in Brassica juncea and Abutilon theophrasti by two folds relative to the uninoculated control. The maximum Cd concentrations due to inoculation were 1.6 and 1.8 mg Cd g(-1) plant for B. juncea and A. theophrasti after 10 wk, respectively. The total biomass of A. theophrasti was not significantly promoted by the inoculation treatment, yet the total biomass of B. juncea increased from 0.087 to 0.448 g. It is also worth to mention that B. juncea predominantly accumulates Cd in its stems (39%) whereas A. theophrasti accumulates it in its leaves (68%) after 10 wk. The change of the Cd speciation indicated that inoculation of B. megaterium as PSB increased the bioavailabilty of Cd and consequently enhanced its uptake by plants. The present study may provide a new insight for improving phytoremediation using PSB in the Cd-contaminated soils. PMID:22472099

Jeong, Seulki; Moon, Hee Sun; Nam, Kyoungphile; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Tae Sung

2012-04-01

87

Radionuclides in nephrology  

SciTech Connect

In 47 expert contributions, this volume provides a summary of the latest research on radionuclides in nephro-urology together with current and new clinical applications especially in renovascular hypertension, kidney transplantation, and metabolic and urological diseases. In addition, attention is given to aspects of basic renal physiology and function and possible applications of nuclear magnetic resonance and spectroscopy in nephro-urology. New testing procedures which promise to improve diagnosis, and new radiopharmaceuticals are described. The reports are divided into eight sections, the first of which features studies on the renin-angiotensin system, cisplatin, atrial natriuretic factor and determining plasma oxalate. Four papers describe a number of new radiopharmaceuticals which have the potential to replace hippuran. In the third section, radionuclide methods for the measurement of renal function parameters are discussed. The book then focuses on the potential role of captopril in the improved diagnosis of renovascular hypertension. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance and spectroscopy are demonstrated in the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis, kidney assessment after lithotripsy, kidney evaluation prior to transplantation, and in monitoring renal ischemia during hypotension.

Lausanne, A.B.D.

1987-01-01

88

Reactor-Produced Medical Radionuclides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The therapeutic use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine, oncology, and cardiology is the most rapidly growing use of medical radionuclides. Since most therapeutic radionuclides are neutron rich and decay by ?- emission, they are reactor-produced. This chapter deals mainly with production approaches with neutrons. Neutron interactions with matter, neutron transmission and activation rates, and neutron spectra of nuclear reactors are discussed in some detail. Further, a short discussion of the neutron-energy dependence of cross sections, reaction rates in thermal reactors, cross section measurements and flux monitoring, and general equations governing the reactor production of radionuclides are presented. Finally, the chapter is concluded by providing a number of examples encompassing the various possible reaction routes for the production of a number of medical radionuclides in a reactor.

Mirzadeh, S.; Mausner, L. F.; Garland, M. A.

89

Reactor-Produced Medical Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

The therapeutic use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine, oncology and cardiology is the most rapidly growing use of medical radionuclides. Since most therapeutic radionuclides are neutron rich and decay by beta emission, they are reactor-produced. This chapter deals mainly with production approaches with neutrons. Neutron interactions with matter, neutron transmission and activation rates, and neutron spectra of nuclear reactors are discussed in some detail. Further, a short discussion of the neutron-energy dependence of cross sections, reaction rates in thermal reactors, cross section measurements and flux monitoring, and general equations governing the reactor production of radionuclides are presented. Finally, the chapter is concluded by providing a number of examples encompassing the various possible reaction routes for production of a number of medical radionuclides in a reactor.

Mirzadeh, Saed [ORNL; Mausner, Leonard [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Garland, Marc A [ORNL

2011-01-01

90

Natural radionuclides in groundwaters  

SciTech Connect

The U-234 and Th-230 radionuclides are highly retarded by factors of 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 5} in basalt groundwater (Hanford) and briny groundwaters from Texas and geothermal brine from the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). In basalt groundwaters (low ionic strength), Ra is highly sorbed, while in brines (high ionic strength), Ra is soluble. This is probably because the sorption sites are saturated with Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} ions and RaCl{sub 2} is soluble in brines. Pb-210 is soluble in SSGF brine, probably as a chloride complex. The U-234/Th-230 ratios in basalt groundwaters and brines from Texas and SSGF are nearly unity, indicating that U is in the +4 state, suggesting a reducing environment for these aquifers. 19 refs., 3 figs.

Laul, J.C.

1990-01-01

91

Radionuclide therapy for arthritic knees  

SciTech Connect

A new radionuclide therapeutic approach for rheumatoid arthritis of the knee is described. This therapy combines a short-lived radionuclide with a carrier whose physical and chemical characteristics aid retention of the radioactive particles within the joint. Joining a radionuclide to a particulate carrier had not been explored previously as a potential method for inhibiting radiation leakage. The treatment couples the rare earth element dysprosium 165 to ferric hydroxide in macroaggregate form (size range: 3 to 10 ..mu..m). After the relatively inert iron complex penetrates the synovium, it causes cell death. Macrophages and phagocytes clear away the cellular debris, essentially eliminating the synovium.

Doepel, L.K.

1985-02-08

92

Phytoextraction of Cd and Pb and physiological effects in potato plants (Solanum tuberosum var. Spunta): importance of root temperature.  

PubMed

Three consecutive years of field experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of different root-zone temperatures, induced by the application of mulches, on the concentration and accumulation of Cd and Pb and on bioindicators (chlorophylls, catalase, peroxidase and cell wall fractions) in different organs of potato plants (roots, tubers, stems, and leaflets). Four different plastic covers were employed (T1, transparent polyethylene; T2, white polyethylene; T3, white and black coextruded polyethylene, and T4, black polyethylene), using uncovered plants as the control (T0). The different treatments had a significant effect on the mean root-zone temperatures (T0 = 16 degrees C, T1 = 20 degrees C, T2 = 23 degrees C, T3 = 27 degrees C, and T4 = 30 degrees C) and induced significantly different responses in the Cd and Pb concentrations and phytoaccumulation, with T2 (23 degrees C) and T3 (27 degrees C) giving high concentrations of Cd in the roots and low concentrations in other organs. In relation to Pb, T2 and T3 reached higher levels in the tubers and lower levels in the roots, stems, and leaves. In terms of phytoaccumulation, the roots and tubers were the most effective organs for Cd and Pb. On the other hand, the highest values of peroxidase and catalase activities were obtained for T3. In addition, most of the carbohydrate fractions in both the roots and the tubers were highest for T3. Meanwhile, the lowest pigment values were registered for T1 (20 degrees C). For phytoremediation, it is necessary to ascertain the relevance and control of the thermal regime of the soil to optimize the phytoextraction of pollutant elements (Cd and Pb). PMID:11714328

Baghour, M; Moreno, D A; Víllora, G; Hernández, J; Castilla, N; Romero, L

2001-11-01

93

Bioaugmentation with cadmium-resistant plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria to assist cadmium phytoextraction by Helianthus annuus.  

PubMed

Micrococcus sp. MU1 and Klebsiella sp. BAM1, the cadmium-resistant plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), produce high levels of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) during the late stationary phase of their growth. The ability of PGPR to promote root elongation, plant growth and cadmium uptake in sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) was evaluated. Both species of bacteria were able to remove cadmium ions from an aqueous solution and enhanced cadmium mobilization in contaminated soil. Micrococcus sp. and Klebsiella sp. use aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid as a nitrogen source to support their growth, and the minimum inhibitory concentrations of cadmium for Micrococcus sp. and Klebsiella sp. were 1000 and 800mM, respectively. These bacteria promoted root elongation in H. annuus seedlings in both the absence and presence of cadmium compared to uninoculated seedlings. Inoculation with these bacteria was found to increase the root lengths of H. annuus that had been planted in cadmium-contaminated soil. An increase in dry weight was observed for H. annuus inoculated with Micrococcus sp. Moreover, Micrococcus sp. enhanced the accumulation of cadmium in the root and leaf of H. annuus compared to untreated plants. The highest cadmium accumulation in the whole plant was observed when the plants were treated with EDTA following the treatment with Micrococcus sp. In addition, the highest translocation of cadmium from root to the above-ground tissues of H. annuus was found after treatment with Klebsiella sp. in the fourth week after planting. Our results show that plant growth and cadmium accumulation in H. annuus was significantly enhanced by cadmium-resistant PGPRs, and these bacterial inoculants are excellent promoters of phytoextraction for the rehabilitation of heavy metal-polluted environments. PMID:23478127

Prapagdee, Benjaphorn; Chanprasert, Maesinee; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

2013-03-07

94

The use of NTA and EDDS for enhanced phytoextraction of metals from a multiply contaminated soil by Brassica carinata.  

PubMed

The potential of nine different species to grow in the presence of metals (As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) and to accumulate them in the shoots was assessed for each metal separately by germination and root length tests, and successively by hydroponic experiments. Of the nine species tested, Brassica carinata was the species that accumulated the highest amounts of metals in shoots without suffering a significant biomass reduction. To further evaluate the potential of B. carinata for chelant-enhanced phytoextraction of a natural, multiply metal-polluted soil (As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn), both hydroponic and pot experiments were carried out with nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) or (S,S)-ethylenediamine disuccinic acid (EDDS) as complexing agents. The hydroponic study with solutions containing the five metals together showed that accumulation of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in shoots was higher following EDDS addition compared to NTA. EDDS was more effective than NTA in desorbing Cu, Pb and Zn from the soil, whereas As and Cd were poorly extracted. B. carinata plants were grown for 4 weeks in the multiply metal-contaminated soil and then the soil was amended with 5 mmol kg(-1) NTA or EDDS. All plants were harvested 1 week after amendment. In comparison to NTA, EDDS was more effective in enhancing the concentrations of Cu, Pb and Zn in B. carinata shoots (2- to 4-fold increase compared to the control). One week after chelant addition, the DTPA-extractable metal concentrations in the polluted soil were lower in the EDDS treatment in comparison with the NTA amendment. Even though B. carinata showed a reduced growth and a relatively low metal uptake, it demonstrated the ability to survive and tolerate the presence of more metals simultaneously. PMID:17418884

Quartacci, Mike F; Irtelli, Barbara; Baker, Alan J M; Navari-Izzo, Flavia

2007-04-06

95

Radionuclide Generators for Biomedical Applications.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This document reviews the chemical literature of those radionuclide generators that have gained or appear to possess utility in medical imaging. The text represents a conscientious effort to peruse the scientific literature through 1980. The intent of thi...

R. D. Finn V. J. Molinski H. B. Hupf H. Kramer

1983-01-01

96

Efficiency of biodegradable EDDS, NTA and APAM on enhancing the phytoextraction of cadmium by Siegesbeckia orientalis L. grown in Cd-contaminated soils.  

PubMed

Chelant assisted phytoextraction has been proposed to enhance the efficiency of remediation. This study evaluated the effects of biodegradable ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDDS), nitrilotriacetic (NTA) and anionic polyacrylamide (APAM) on the tolerance and uptake of Siegesbeckia orientalis L. at 10 and 100 mg kg(-1) Cd-contaminated soils. On the 80th and 90th days of transplanting, pots were treated with EDDS and NTA at 0 (control), 1 and 2 mmol kg(-1) soils, and APAM at 0 (control), 0.07 and 0.14 g kg(-1). Generally, the root and shoot biomass of S. orientalis in all treatments reduced not significantly compared with the control, and the activities of peroxidase and catalase in leaves generally increased by the application of chelants (P<0.05). The concentrations of Cd in the shoots were increased significantly by addition of all chelants. As a result, the Cd accumulation of S. orientalis under treatments with higher dosages of the three chelants on the 80th day were 1.40-2.10-fold and 1.12-1.25-fold compared to control at 10 and 100 mg kg(-1) Cd, respectively. Under the addition of 2 mmol kg(-1) NTA on the 80th day, the highest metal extraction ratio reached 1.2% and 0.4% at 10 and 100 mg kg(-1) Cd soils, respectively. Therefore, the applications of EDDS, NTA and APAM may provide more efficient choices in chemical-enhanced phytoextraction. PMID:23466280

Lan, Jichuan; Zhang, Shirong; Lin, Haichuan; Li, Ting; Xu, Xiaoxun; Li, Yun; Jia, Yongxia; Gong, Guoshu

2013-03-01

97

Inoculation of Ni-resistant plant growth promoting bacterium Psychrobacter sp. strain SRS8 for the improvement of nickel phytoextraction by energy crops.  

PubMed

This study was conducted to elucidate effects of inoculating plant growth-promoting bacterium Psychrobacter sp. SRS8 on the growth and phytoextraction potential of energy crops Ricinus communis and Helianthus annuus in artificially Ni contaminated soils. The toxicity symptom in plants under Ni stress expressed as chlorophyll, protein content, growth inhibition, and Fe, P concentrations were studied, and the possible relationship among them were also discussed. The PGPB SRS8 was found capable of stimulating plant growth and Ni accumulation in both plant species. Further, the stimulation effect on plant biomass, chlorophyll, and protein content was concomitant with increased Fe and P assimilation from soil to plants. Further, the induction of catalase and peroxidase activities was also involved in the ability of SRS8 to increase the tolerance in both plant species under Ni stress. The findings suggest that strain SRS8 play an important role in promoting the growth and phytoextraction efficiency of R. communis and H. annuus, which may be used for remediation of metal contaminated sites. PMID:21598781

Ma, Y; Rajkumar, M; Vicente, J A F; Freitas, H

2011-02-01

98

[Teratogenic effects of incorporated radionuclides].  

PubMed

Experimental data on teratogenic effects induced by incorporated alpha, beta and gamma-emitters were analyzed. It was found that the radioactive substances as well as external irradiation induced teratogenic effects. Teratogenesis caused by incorporated radionuclides has some peculiarities compared to the effect caused by fetus exposure to external radiation. These peculiarities are related to the fact of the limited penetration of incorporated radionuclides via placenta barrier so the radiation fetal doses are accumulated within long period of time and radiation dose rates are relatively low. The exposure to incorporated radionuclides does not induce severe developmental defects. Most frequent developmental defects of fetus include its death, general retardation of the development and growth. In such case the earlier pregnancy term was affected by radionuclide the more severe fetal damages occur in fetus because of the gradual increase of absorbed dose even in case of single intake of radionuclide. RBEs of radionuclides if compared to that for external gamma radiation are evaluated as follows: 2-4 (tritium oxide), 20 (241Am), 50 (238Pu) and 3-5 (131I in thyroid). PMID:11898639

Liaginskaia, A M; Osipov, V A

99

Investigation of the feasibility of a small scale transmutation device  

Microsoft Academic Search

This dissertation presents the design and feasibility of a small-scale, fusion-based transmutation device incorporating a commercially available neutron generator. It also presents the design features necessary to optimize the device and render it practical for the transmutation of selected long-lived fission products and actinides. Four conceptual designs of a transmutation device were used to study the transformation of seven radionuclides:

Roger Carson Sit

2009-01-01

100

Computed radionuclide urogram for assessing acute renal failure  

SciTech Connect

The computed radionuclide urogram is advocated as a noninvasive diagnostic method for differentiation of the most common prerenal, renal, and postrenal causes of acute renal failure. On the basis of characteristic changes in the effective renal plasma flow rate, the calculated filtration fraction, and the calculated glomerular filtration rate, prerenal conditions such as renal artery stenosis or thrombosis, renal conditions such as acute rejection or acute tubular necrosis, and postrenal conditions such as obstruction or leakage, which are the most common causes of acute renal failure, can be differentiated. In conjunction with morphologic criteria derived from sonograms, a diagnosis with acceptable confidence can be rendered in most instances. Both the computed radionuclide urogram and sonogram are noninvasive and can be used without adverse effects in the presence of azotemia and even anuria. This also makes feasible reexamination at intervals to assess effect of therapy and offer prognostic information.

Schlegel, J.U.; Lang, E.K.

1980-05-01

101

Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particle s in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

2004-06-29

102

Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particles in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

2003-06-01

103

Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem requiring monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to the analytical laboratory where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of short ranges of beta and alpha particles in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector, using automated microfluidics for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field analytical chemistry.

Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

2001-06-01

104

Citric acid enhances the phytoextraction of manganese and plant growth by alleviating the ultrastructural damages in Juncus effusus L.  

PubMed

Chelate-assisted phytoextraction by high biomass producing plant species enhances the removal of heavy metals from polluted environments. In this regard, Juncus effusus a wetland plant has great potential. This study evaluated the effects of elevated levels of manganese (Mn) on the vegetative growth, Mn uptake and antioxidant enzymes in J. effusus. We also studied the role of citric acid and EDTA on improving metal accumulation, plant growth and Mn toxicity stress alleviation. Three-week-old plantlets of J. effusus were subjected to various treatments in the hydroponics as: Mn (50, 100 and 500 microM) alone, Mn (500 microM) + citric acid (5 mM), and Mn (500 microM) + EDTA (5 mM). After 2 weeks of treatment, higher Mn concentrations significantly reduced the plant biomass and height. Both citric acid and EDTA restored the plant height as it was reduced at the highest Mn level. Only the citric acid (but not EDTA) was able to recover the plant biomass weight, which was also obvious from the microscopic visualization of mesophyll cells. There was a concentration dependent increase in Mn uptake in J. effusus plants, and relatively more deposition in roots compared to aerial parts. Although both EDTA and citric acid caused significant increase in Mn accumulation; however, the Mn translocation was enhanced markedly by EDTA. Elevated levels of Mn augmented the oxidative stress, which was evident from changes in the activities of antioxidative enzymes in plant shoots. Raised levels of lipid peroxidation and variable changes in the activities of antioxidant enzymes were recorded under Mn stress. Electron microscopic images revealed several modifications in the plants at cellular and sub-cellular level due to the oxidative damage induced by Mn. Changes in cell shape and size, chloroplast swelling, increased number of plastoglobuli and disruption of thylakoid were noticed. However, these plants showed a high degree of tolerance against Mn toxicity stress, and it removed substantial amounts of Mn from the media. The EDTA best enhanced the Mn uptake and translocation, while citric acid best recovered the plant growth. PMID:19541411

Najeeb, U; Xu, L; Ali, Shafaqat; Jilani, Ghulam; Gong, H J; Shen, W Q; Zhou, W J

2009-05-22

105

Radionuclide injury to the lung.  

PubMed

Radionuclide injury to the lung has been studied in rats, hamsters, dogs, mice and baboons. Exposure of the lung to high dose levels of radionuclides produces a spectrum of progressively more severe functional and morphological changes, ranging from radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis to lung tumors. These changes are somewhat similar for different species. Their severity can be related to the absorbed radiation dose (measured in rads) produced by alpha, beta or gamma radiation emanating from various deposited radionuclides. The chemicophysical forms of radionuclides and spatial-temporal factors are also important variables. As with other forms of injury to the lung, repair attempts are highlighted by fibrosis and proliferation of pulmonary epithelium. Lung tumors are the principal late effect observed in experimental animals following pulmonary deposition of radionuclides at dose levels that do not result in early deaths from radiation pneumonitis or fibrosis. The predominant lung tumors described have been of epithelial origin and have been classified, in decreasing frequency of occurrence, as adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, epidermoid carcinomas and combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma. Mesothelioma and fibrosarcoma have been observed in rats, but less commonly in other species. Hemangiosarcomas were frequency observed in dogs exposed to beta-gamma emitters, and occasionally in rats exposed to alpha emitters. These morphologic changes in the lungs of experimental animals were reviewed and issues relevant to the prediction of human hazards discussed. PMID:6376095

Dagle, G E; Sanders, C L

1984-04-01

106

Radionuclide injury to the lung.  

PubMed Central

Radionuclide injury to the lung has been studied in rats, hamsters, dogs, mice and baboons. Exposure of the lung to high dose levels of radionuclides produces a spectrum of progressively more severe functional and morphological changes, ranging from radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis to lung tumors. These changes are somewhat similar for different species. Their severity can be related to the absorbed radiation dose (measured in rads) produced by alpha, beta or gamma radiation emanating from various deposited radionuclides. The chemicophysical forms of radionuclides and spatial-temporal factors are also important variables. As with other forms of injury to the lung, repair attempts are highlighted by fibrosis and proliferation of pulmonary epithelium. Lung tumors are the principal late effect observed in experimental animals following pulmonary deposition of radionuclides at dose levels that do not result in early deaths from radiation pneumonitis or fibrosis. The predominant lung tumors described have been of epithelial origin and have been classified, in decreasing frequency of occurrence, as adenocarcinoma, bronchioloalveolar carcinoma, epidermoid carcinomas and combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma. Mesothelioma and fibrosarcoma have been observed in rats, but less commonly in other species. Hemangiosarcomas were frequency observed in dogs exposed to beta-gamma emitters, and occasionally in rats exposed to alpha emitters. These morphologic changes in the lungs of experimental animals were reviewed and issues relevant to the prediction of human hazards discussed.

Dagle, G E; Sanders, C L

1984-01-01

107

Using radionuclide tracers to derive suspended sediment provenance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In June 2009, an extreme flash flood event occurred in the South Amana subwatershed of the Clear Creek watershed in Iowa, U.S.A. Suspended sediment data was collected during the event using two different collection techniques. The data collected during the event is of high value to the research community because suspended sediment measurements during flash floods are rare. Due to the extreme nature of the event, the validity of the data was assessed on a point-by-point basis. The sediment rating curve was then analyzed to elucidate the suspended sediment transport processes occurring in the subwatershed. A pronounced clockwise hysteresis effect (e.g., sedigraph peak occurs before the hydrograph peak) was evident. This clockwise hysteresis effect is based on the type of land cover present throughout the subwatershed. The provenance of the suspended sediment was then determined using radionuclide tracers. The radionuclides Be-7 and Pb-210 were used to identify the suspended sediment source areas. A mixing model was used to identify the relative percentages of material originating from i) the stream channel and ii) upland areas within the subwatershed. Material originating from the upland source area was identified based on its relative enrichment in Be-7, while sediments depleted in Be-7 originated from the channel source areas. Use of the radionuclide tracing technique is feasible in the South Amana subwatershed because upland soils are clay-enriched (favored in Be-7 bonding) and because the channel materials are primarily comprised of sandy particles (minimal Be-7 bonding). Additionally, nearly vertical banks dominate the study reach; these vertical banks do not allow rainfall and associated radionuclides to impact the bank sediment, which further minimizes bonding of Be-7 to the bank sediments. Coupling the radionuclide tracing technique with the direct suspended sediment measurements, the rather paradoxical relationship between the suspended sediment transport rate and the flow rate in the South Amana subwatershed can be explained.

Denn, K. D.; Papanicolaou, T.; Wilson, C. G.

2009-12-01

108

Radionuclide Therapy of Bone Metastases  

PubMed Central

The skeleton is a potential metastatic target of many malignant tumors. Up to 85% of prostate and breast cancer patients may develop bone metastases causing severe pain syndromes in many of them. In patients suffering from multilocular, mainly osteoblastic lesions and pain syndrome, radionuclide therapy is recommended for pain palliation. Low-energy beta-emitting radionuclides (153samarium-ethylenediaminetetrameth-ylenephosphonate (EDTMP) and 89strontium) deliver high radiation doses to bone metastases and micrometastases in the bone marrow, but only negligible doses to the hematopoietic marrow. The response rate regarding pain syndrome is about 75%; about 25% of the patients may even become pain free. The therapy is repeatable, depending on cell counts. Concomitant treatment with modern bisphosphonates does not interfere with the treatment effects. Clinical trials using a new, not yet approved nuclide (223Radium) and/or combinations of chemotherapy and radionuclides are aiming at a more curative approach.

Fischer, Manfred; Kampen, Willm U.

2012-01-01

109

Radionuclide Therapy of Bone Metastases.  

PubMed

The skeleton is a potential metastatic target of many malignant tumors. Up to 85% of prostate and breast cancer patients may develop bone metastases causing severe pain syndromes in many of them. In patients suffering from multilocular, mainly osteoblastic lesions and pain syndrome, radionuclide therapy is recommended for pain palliation. Low-energy beta-emitting radionuclides ((153)samarium-ethylenediaminetetrameth-ylenephosphonate (EDTMP) and (89)strontium) deliver high radiation doses to bone metastases and micrometastases in the bone marrow, but only negligible doses to the hematopoietic marrow. The response rate regarding pain syndrome is about 75%; about 25% of the patients may even become pain free. The therapy is repeatable, depending on cell counts. Concomitant treatment with modern bisphosphonates does not interfere with the treatment effects. Clinical trials using a new, not yet approved nuclide ((223)Radium) and/or combinations of chemotherapy and radionuclides are aiming at a more curative approach. PMID:22740795

Fischer, Manfred; Kampen, Willm U

2012-04-24

110

Radionuclide labeled lymphocytes for therapeutic use  

DOEpatents

Lymphocytes labelled with .beta.-emitting radionuclides are therapeutically useful, particularly for lymphoid ablation. They are prepared by incubation of the lymphocytes with the selected radionuclide-oxine complex.

Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Fawwaz, Rashid A. (Pelham, NY); Richards, Powell (Bayport, NY)

1985-01-01

111

Movement of Radionuclides past a Redox Front.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

It is assumed that radiolysis of water in a penetrated canister containing spent fuel has occured. Radionuclides and oxidizing agents are diffusing from the corroded canister and out through the clay barrier. A concentration front of radionuclides as well...

I. Neretnieks B. Aaslund

1983-01-01

112

Radionuclide labeled lymphocytes for therapeutic use  

DOEpatents

Lymphocytes labelled with ..beta..-emitting radionuclides are therapeutically useful, particularly for lymphoid ablation. They are prepared by incubation of the lymphocytes with the selected radionuclide-oxine complex.

Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Richards, P.

1983-05-03

113

MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes  

SciTech Connect

For all physicians, scientists, and physicists working in the nuclear medicine field, the MIRD: Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes updated edition is an essential sourcebook for radiation dosimetry and understanding the properties of radionuclides.

Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Endo, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)

2007-01-01

114

Radionuclide Sensors for Subsurface Water Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of the subsurface by radionuclides is a persistent and vexing problem for the Department of Energy. These radionuclides must be measured in field studies and monitoed in the long term when they cannot be removed. However, no radionuclide sensors existed for groundwater monitoring prior to this team's research under the EMSP program Detection of a and b decays from radionuclides in water is difficult due to their short ranges in condensed media.

Timothy DeVol

2006-06-30

115

Data Authentication Demonstration for Radionuclide Stations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data authentication is required for certification of sensor stations in the International Monitoring System (IMS). Authentication capability has been previously demonstrated for continuous waveform stations (seismic and infrasound). This paper addresses data surety for the radionuclide stations in the IMS, in particular the Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler\\/Analyzer (RASA) system developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Radionuclide stations communicate data by

Mark Harris; Pres Herrington; Harry Miley; J. Edward Ellis; David McKinnon; Devon St. Pierre

1999-01-01

116

Solubility Limits on Radionuclide Dissolution.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Moun...

J. F. Kerrisk

1984-01-01

117

Radionuclide evaluation in childhood injuries  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclide techniques serve an important role in evaluating childhood injuries. Frequently, they can be employed as the initial and definitive examination. At times they represent the only modality that will detect specific injuries such as the skeletal system. Familiarity with the advantages and limitations of tracer techniques will insure appropriate management of childhood injuries.

Sty, J.R.; Starshak, R.J.; Hubbard, A.M.

1983-07-01

118

Illicit Trafficking of Natural Radionuclides  

Microsoft Academic Search

Natural radionuclides have been subject to trafficking worldwide, involving natural uranium ore (U 238), processed uranium (yellow cake), low enriched uranium (20% U 235), radium (Ra 226), polonium (Po 210), and natural thorium ore (Th 232). An important prerequisite to successful illicit trafficking activities is access to a suitable logistical infrastructure enabling an undercover shipment of radioactive materials and, in

Steinhaeusler Friedrich; Zaitseva Lyudmila

2008-01-01

119

RADIONUCLIDE RISK COEFFICIENT UNCERTAINTY REPORT  

EPA Science Inventory

EPA has published excess cancer risk coefficients for the US population in Federal Guidance Report 13 (FGR 13). FGR 13 gives separate risk coefficients for food ingestion, water ingestion, inhalation, and external exposure for each of over 800 radionuclides. Some information on...

120

GETOUT; Radionuclide Transport Geologic Media.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

GETOUT is a set of four FORTRAN programs and associated subroutines developed as an aid to investigate the migration of radionuclide chains from an underground source. The model to be analyzed is an underground nuclear waste disposal site and a uniform on...

M. O. Cloninger W. V. DeMier P. J. Liddell H. C. Burkholder

1984-01-01

121

Terrestrial radionuclide cycling and effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

In Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ; ending September 30, 1973. Research progress on radionuclide cycling includes ; studies of the mechanism of strontium sorption-desorption by soils from the ; southeastern United States. Results indicate that strontium adsorption by clays ; may be related to the same sites which bond organic matter. The Aspergillus ; niger technique

R. C. Dahlman; S. H. Anderson; H. H. Andrews

1974-01-01

122

RADIONUCLIDE SENSORS FOR WATER MONITORING  

EPA Science Inventory

We propose a research program directed toward developing novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. In order to meet the requirements for isotope specific detection at ultra-low re...

123

Identification of CSF fistulas by radionuclide counting  

SciTech Connect

A radionuclide counting method, performed with the patient prone and the neck flexed, was used successfully to diagnose CSF rhinorrhea in two patients. A normal radionuclide ratio (radionuclide counts in pledget/radionuclide counts in 1-ml blood sample) was obtained in 11 normal control subjects. Significance was determined to be a ratio greater than 0.37. Use of radionuclide counting method of determining CSF rhinorrhea is recommended when other methods have failed to locate a site of leakage or when posttraumatic meningitis suggests subclinical CSF rhinorrhea.

Yamamoto, Y.; Kunishio, K.; Sunami, N.; Yamamoto, Y.; Satoh, T.; Suga, M.; Asari, S. (Matsuyama Shimin Hospital (Japan))

1990-07-01

124

Relationships between Changes of Three Organic Acids (Oxalic Acid, Citric Acid and Tartaric Acid) and Phytoextraction by Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) in Sand Cultures Contaminated with Cadmium and Lead  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sand culture was used to investigated the Cd and Pb phytoextraction by sunflower, and changes of organic acids including oxalic acids, citric acids and tartaric acids. The results showed that bioconcentration factors (BCF) of Cd or Pb increased with time and decreased with concentrations, the highest Cd-BCF and Pb-BCF appeared in Cd5 (21) and Pb50 (7.95), respectively. The contents of

Zhixin Niu; Lina Sun; Tieheng Sun

2011-01-01

125

A Feasibility Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A feasibility study has produced a sporozoite-induced rodent malaria test system that is based on the mortality rather than on the morbidity of negative controls. The test is performed with the NK65 strain of Plasmodium berghei, Anopheles stephensi and IC...

D. S. Rane

1975-01-01

126

MASCOT. Radionuclide Decay Chain Transport  

SciTech Connect

MASCOT computes the two- and three-dimensional space-time dependent, convective-dispersive transport of a four-member radionuclide decay chain in unbounded homogeneous porous media for constant (step and band) and radionuclide-dependent release. A steady-state isothermal groundwater flow regime is assumed with parallel streamlines along the direction of flow. The solutions are designed for an unbounded medium flow field assumed to be semi-infinite normal to the source and infinite orthogonal to the source with a variety of boundary conditions, including a single or multiple finite line source or a Gaussian-distributed source in the two-dimensional case, and a single or multiple patch source or bivariate-normal distributed source in the three-dimensional case. A postprocessor program, MAS-GRF, which produces tables and/or graphs from MASCOT output, is included.

Gureghian, A.B. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

1989-03-29

127

Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this Model Report is to document two models for drift-scale radionuclide transport. This has been developed in accordance with ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC) 2002 [160819]), which includes planning documents for the technical work scope, content, and management of this Model Report in Section 1.15, Work Package AUZM11, ''Drift-Scale

P. R. Dixon

2004-01-01

128

Chernobyl radionuclide distribution and migration.  

PubMed

The accident at Unit No. 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on 26 April 1986 presented severe challenges in radiation protection. Early activity measurements defined the contaminated areas in order to determine what persons should be evacuated on the basis of the exposure limit at that time of 100 mSv (10 rem) for accidents. The immediate definition of these areas was accomplished with specially equipped aircraft capable of measuring external gamma-exposure rate and radionuclide spectra. Over time, maps of 137Cs contamination (the most important long-lived radionuclide) have become more and more sophisticated and have been used for further determinations of the control of the consequences of the accident. About 70% of the total release of 137Cs was deposited in Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine; but there was also widespread deposition throughout the countries of Western Europe. Two atlases of contamination throughout Europe were prepared, and the Russian atlas included data on other radionuclides and on external gamma-exposure rates. The radiocesiums behaved as volatile radionuclides because of the volatility of cesium. In contrast to the typical pattern after nuclear weapons tests, 90Sr behaved only as a refractory element, as its volatile precursors krypton and rubidium had already decayed within the reactor. Nearly all of the refractory elements (strontium, plutonium, etc.) released by the accident were confined to the 30-km zone around the reactor. A proposal is made to develop a more complete atlas of 137Cs deposition from the accident that would include the entire Northern Hemisphere. Water was not an important vector of exposure to human beings following the accident. PMID:18049217

Izrael, Yury A

2007-11-01

129

Natural chelates for radionuclide decorporation  

DOEpatents

This invention relates to the method and resulting chelates of desorbing a radionuclide selected from thorium, uranium, and plutonium containing cultures in a bioavailable form involving pseudomonas or other microorganisms. A preferred microorganism is Pseudomonas aeruginosa which forms multiple chelates with thorium in the range of molecular weight 1000 to 1000 and also forms chelates with uranium of molecular weight in the area of 100 to 1000 and 1000 to 2000.

Premuzic, E.T.

1983-08-25

130

Radionuclide behavior in the environment  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the results of the following task: Review for quality and consistency the available data on measurements of initial ground contamination of Chernobyl radionuclides in various parts of Norway and subsequent concentrations of these radionuclides in various environmental media as functions of time. Utilize the data obtained to verify the existing models, or to improve them, for describing radionuclide behavior in the environment. Some of the processes standard were: migration into soil; weathering; resuspension; food-chain contamination; and loss or reconcentration by run-off. The task performed within this contract has been to use post-Chernobyl data from Norway to verify or find areas for possible improvement in the chronic exposure pathway models utilized in MACCS. Work has consisted mainly of collecting and evaluating post-Chernobyl information from Norway or other countries when relevant; but has also included experimental work performed specifically for the current task. In most connections the data available show the models and data in MACCS to be appropriate. A few areas where the data indicate that the MACCS approach is faulty or inadequate are, however, pointed out in the report. These should be examined carefully, and appropriate modifications should eventually be made. 14 refs., 12 figs., 22 tabs.

Tveten, U. (Institutt for Energiteknikk, Kjeller (Norway))

1991-09-01

131

THE USE OF BATCH TESTS AS A SCREENING TOOL FOR RADIONUCLIDE SORPTION CHARACTERIZATION STUDIES, HANFORD, WASHINGTON, U.S.A.  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Department of Energy was studying the feasibility of locating a high-level radioactive waste repository in basalt at the Hanford site in south-central Washington. This is a saturated site where ground water transport of radionuclides away from a repository is the mechani...

132

USE OF BATCH TESTS AS A SCREENING TOOL FOR RADIONUCLIDE SORPTION CHARACTERIZATION STUDIES, HANFORD, WSHINGTON, U.S.A.  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Department of Energy was studying the feasibility of locating a high-level radioactive waste repository in basalt at the Hanford site in south-central Washington. his is a saturated site where ground water transport of radionuclides away from a repository is the mechanis...

133

Feasibility of residential curtailment  

Microsoft Academic Search

The feasibility of residential curtailment plans which would lead to a reduction in gas consumption by residential customers is assessed. An average use curtailment plan as outlined in the staff proposal in PUCO Case No. 75-901-GA-C01 and curtailment plans based on historic use were analyzed. These approaches are characterized by the imposition of price penalties to induce conservation. The primary

J. R. Devanney; C. R. Scott; M. A. Walters; G. D. Ball; R. R. Konst

2008-01-01

134

Feasibility analysis of recycling radioactive scrap steel  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to: (1) establish a conceptual design that integrates commercial steel mill technology with radioactive scrap metal (RSM) processing to produce carbon and stainless steel sheet and plate at a grade suitable for fabricating into radioactive waste containers; (2) determine the economic feasibility of building a micro-mill in the Western US to process 30,000 tons of RSM per year from both DOE and the nuclear utilities; and (3) provide recommendations for implementation. For purposes of defining the project, it is divided into phases: economic feasibility and conceptual design; preliminary design; detail design; construction; and operation. This study comprises the bulk of Phase 1. It is divided into four sections. Section 1 provides the reader with a complete overview extracting pertinent data, recommendations and conclusions from the remainder of the report. Section 2 defines the variables that impact the design requirements. These data form the baseline to create a preliminary conceptual design that is technically sound, economically viable, and capitalizes on economies of scale. Priorities governing the design activities are: (1) minimizing worker exposure to radionuclide hazards, (2) maximizing worker safety, (3) minimizing environmental contamination, (4) minimizing secondary wastes, and (5) establishing engineering controls to insure that the plant will be granted a license in the state selected for operation. Section 3 provides details of the preliminary conceptual design that was selected. The cost of project construction is estimated and the personnel needed to support the steel-making operation and radiological and environmental control are identified. Section 4 identifies the operational costs and supports the economic feasibility analysis. A detailed discussion of the resulting conclusions and recommendations is included in this section.

Nichols, F. [Manufacturing Sciences Corp., Woodland, WA (United States); Balhiser, B. [MSE, Inc., Butte, MT (United States); Cignetti, N. [Cignetti Associates, North Canton, OH (United States)] [and others

1995-09-01

135

Methods of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides  

DOEpatents

The present invention is a method of obtaining a radionuclide product selected from the group consisting of {sup 223}Ra and {sup 225}Ac, from a radionuclide ``cow`` of {sup 227}Ac or {sup 229}Th respectively. The method comprises the steps of (a) permitting ingrowth of at least one radionuclide daughter from said radionuclide ``cow`` forming an ingrown mixture; (b) insuring that the ingrown mixture is a nitric acid ingrown mixture; (c) passing the nitric acid ingrown mixture through a first nitrate form ion exchange column which permits separating the ``cow`` from at least one radionuclide daughter; (d) insuring that the at least one radionuclide daughter contains the radionuclide product; (e) passing the at least one radionuclide daughter through a second ion exchange column and separating the at least one radionuclide daughter from the radionuclide product and (f) recycling the at least one radionuclide daughter by adding it to the ``cow``. In one embodiment the radionuclide ``cow`` is the {sup 227}Ac, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a {sup 227}Th and the product radionuclide is the {sup 223}Ra and the first nitrate form ion exchange column passes the {sup 227}Ac and retains the {sup 227}Th. In another embodiment the radionuclide ``cow`` is the {sup 229}Th, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a {sup 225}Ra and said product radionuclide is the {sup 225}Ac and the {sup 225}Ac and nitrate form ion exchange column retains the {sup 229}Th and passes the {sup 225}Ra/Ac. 8 figs.

Bray, L.A.; Ryan, J.L.

1998-09-15

136

Methods of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides  

DOEpatents

The present invention is a method of obtaining a radionuclide product selected from the group consisting of .sup.223 Ra and .sup.225 Ac, from a radionuclide "cow" of .sup.227 Ac or .sup.229 Th respectively. The method comprises the steps of a) permitting ingrowth of at least one radionuclide daughter from said radionuclide "cow" forming an ingrown mixture; b) insuring that the ingrown mixture is a nitric acid ingrown mixture; c) passing the nitric acid ingrown mixture through a first nitrate form ion exchange column which permits separating the "cow" from at least one radionuclide daughter; d) insuring that the at least one radionuclide daughter contains the radionuclide product; e) passing the at least one radionuclide daughter through a second ion exchange column and separating the at least one radionuclide daughter from the radionuclide product and f) recycling the at least one radionuclide daughter by adding it to the "cow". In one embodiment the radionuclide "cow" is the .sup.227 Ac, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.227 Th and the product radionuclide is the .sup.223 Ra and the first nitrate form ion exchange column passes the .sup.227 Ac and retains the .sup.227 Th. In another embodiment the radionuclide "cow"is the .sup.229 Th, the at least one daughter radionuclide is a .sup.225 Ra and said product radionuclide is the .sup.225 Ac and the .sup.225 Ac and nitrate form ion exchange column retains the .sup.229 Th and passes the .sup.225 Ra/Ac.

Bray, Lane A. (Richland, WA); Ryan, Jack L. (West Richland, WA)

1998-01-01

137

Microbial Transformations of Actinides and Other Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of the actinides and other radionuclides released from nuclear fuel cycle and from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can alter the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution in the environment and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of radionuclides is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect non-enzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of radionuclides have been extensively investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes and biochemical mechanisms which affect the stability and mobility of radionuclides. The mechanisms of microbial transformations of the major and minor actinides U, Pu, Cm, Am, Np, the fission products and other radionuclides such as Ra, Tc, I, Cs, Sr, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of electron donors and acceptors are reviewed.

Francis,A.J.; Dodge, C. J.

2009-01-07

138

Use of Natural Radionuclides to Predict the Behavior of Radwaste Radionuclides in Far-Field Aquifiers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In appropriate aquifers the natural radionuclides of the U and Th decay series are important sources of information about the behavior of radwaste radionuclides in far-field aquifers. The Wolfcamp Carbonate, Pennsylvanian Carbonate and Granite Wash aquife...

N. Hubbard J. C. Laul R. W. Perkins

1983-01-01

139

DKPRO: A radionuclide decay and reprocessing code  

SciTech Connect

The DKPRO code solves the general problem of modeling complex nuclear wastes streams using ORIGEN2 radionuclide production files. There is a continuing need for estimates of Hanford radionuclides. Physical measurements are one basis; calculational estimates, the approach represented here, are another. Given a known nuclear fuel history, it is relatively straightforward to calculate radionuclide inventories with codes such as the widely-used Oak Ridge National Laboratory code ORIGEN2.

Wootan, D.; Schmittroth, F.A.

1997-07-14

140

Measurement of radionuclides in waste packages  

DOEpatents

A method is described for non-destructively assaying the radionuclide content of solid waste in a sealed container by analysis of the waste's gamma-ray spectrum and neutron emissions. Some radionuclides are measured by characteristic photopeaks in the gamma-ray spectrum; transuranic nuclides are measured by neutron emission rate; other radionuclides are measured by correlation with those already measured.

Brodzinski, R.L.; Perkins, R.W.; Rieck, H.G.; Wogman, N.A.

1984-09-12

141

Therapy for incorporated radionuclides: scope and need  

SciTech Connect

In the United States the recent termination of funding for research on therapy for incorporated radionuclides has virtually halted progress on improved or new agents and procedures for removing radioactivity from the body. Research was eliminated, but is still needed on new removal agents, improved delivery system, in vitro test systems, and the toxicology of treatments. For many radionuclides, no adequate therapy exists. The relationship between radionuclide removal and reduction in cancer risk is still unanswered. Without proper research support, needed improvements in the treatment for incorporated radionuclides in the US are uncertain.

Smith, V.H.

1981-03-01

142

Use of natural radionuclides to predict the behavior of radwaste radionuclides in far-field aquifers  

Microsoft Academic Search

In appropriate aquifers the natural radionuclides of the U and Th decay series are important sources of information about the behavior of radwaste radionuclides in far-field aquifers. The Wolfcamp Carbonate, Pennsylvanian Carbonate and Granite Wash aquifers in the Palo Duro Basin of the Texas Panhandle are prime examples of such aquifers. Sampling and analysis for key radionuclides in the ground

N. Hubbard; J. C. Laul; R. W. Perkins

1984-01-01

143

Use of natural radionuclides to predict the behavior of radwaste radionuclides in far-field aquifiers  

Microsoft Academic Search

In appropriate aquifers the natural radionuclides of the U and Th decay series are important sources of information about the behavior of radwaste radionuclides in far-field aquifers. The Wolfcamp Carbonate, Pennsylvanian Carbonate and Granite Wash aquifers in the Palo Duro Basin of the Texas Panhandle are prime examples of such aquifers. Sampling and analysis for key radionuclides in the ground

N. Hubbard; J. C. Laul; R. W. Perkins

1983-01-01

144

Radionuclide Imaging of Musculoskeletal Infections  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Conventional nuclear medicine offers a variety of different methods for the diagnosis of musculoskeletal infections, including\\u000a three-phase bone scintigraphy, gallium imaging, and labeled leukocyte imaging with indium-111 (111In)-oxine or Tc-99-hexamethyl-propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) and labeled antibodies against leukocyte surface antigens (antigranulocyte\\u000a antibodies). However, most of the conventional radionuclide imaging techniques are of low specificity in the detection of\\u000a low-grade and chronic

Katrin D. M. Stumpe

145

21 CFR 892.5650 - Manual radionuclide applicator system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-04-01 false Manual radionuclide applicator system...Therapeutic Devices § 892.5650 Manual radionuclide applicator system. (a) Identification. A manual radionuclide applicator...surface of the body for radiation therapy. This generic type of...

2010-04-01

146

21 CFR 892.5650 - Manual radionuclide applicator system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2009-04-01 false Manual radionuclide applicator system...Therapeutic Devices § 892.5650 Manual radionuclide applicator system. (a) Identification. A manual radionuclide applicator...surface of the body for radiation therapy. This generic type of...

2009-04-01

147

21 CFR 892.5750 - Radionuclide radiation therapy system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Radionuclide radiation therapy system. 892.5750 Section...Devices § 892.5750 Radionuclide radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A radionuclide radiation therapy system is a device...

2013-04-01

148

Radionuclide evaluation of tubal function  

SciTech Connect

The tubal capacity to transport radioactively labeled human albumin microspheres deposited in the vaginal fornix and cervical canal and to concentrate them on the ovarian surface was evaluated in a group of 34 patient-volunteers. One millicurie of /sup 99m/Tc was used to label human albumin microspheres of 20 ..mu.. in diameter, suspended in 1 ml of saline. The distribution of the radioactive material was imaged on a gamma camera at different intervals between 15 and 240 minutes. The radiation dose to the ovaries was estimated to be similar to that of a hysterosalpingogram. The results of the radionuclide evaluation were compared with the surgical findings at the time of laparoscopy or laparotomy performed for diagnostic or therapeutic reasons. The overall correlation was 87.1%. It would appear that as opposed to the traditional hysterosalpingogram, a radionuclide test may give a better understanding of the functional capacity of the tube and may also prove a useful method in the evaluation of the results of tubal microsurgical procedures.

Stone, S.C.; McCalley, M.; Braunstein, P.; Egbert, R.

1985-05-01

149

Plant-associated bacteria and their role in the success or failure of metal phytoextraction projects: first observations of a field-related experiment.  

PubMed

Phytoextraction has been reported as an economically and ecologically sound alternative for the remediation of metal-contaminated soils. Willow is a metal phytoextractor of interest because it allows to combine a gradual contaminant removal with production of biomass that can be valorized in different ways. In this work two willow clones growing on a metal-contaminated site were selected: 'Belgisch Rood' (BR) with a moderate metal extraction capacity and 'Tora' (TO) with a twice as high metal accumulation. All cultivable bacteria associated with both willow clones were isolated and identified using 16SrDNA ARDRA analysis followed by 16SrDNA sequencing. Further all isolated bacteria were investigated for characteristics that might promote plant growth (production of siderophores, organic acids and indol acetic acid) and for their metal resistance. The genotypic and phenotypic characterization of the isolated bacteria showed that the TO endophytic bacterial population is more diverse and contains a higher percentage of metal-resistant plant growth promoting bacteria than the endophytic population associated with BR. We hypothesize that the difference in the metal accumulation capacity between BR and TO clones might be at least partly related to differences in characteristics of their associated bacterial population. PMID:23425076

Weyens, Nele; Beckers, Bram; Schellingen, Kerim; Ceulemans, Reinhart; Croes, Sarah; Janssen, Jolien; Haenen, Stefan; Witters, Nele; Vangronsveld, Jaco

2013-02-20

150

Phytoextraction of metals and rhizoremediation of PAHs in co-contaminated soil by co-planting of Sedum alfredii with ryegrass (Lolium perenne) or castor (Ricinus communis).  

PubMed

A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the potential for phytoextraction of heavy metals and rhizoremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in co-contaminated soil by co-planting a cadmium/zinc (Cd/Zn) hyperaccumulator and lead (Pb) accumulator Sedum alfredii with ryegrass (Lolium perenne) or castor (Ricinus communis). Co-planting with castor decreased the shoot biomass of S. alfredii as compared to that in monoculture. Cadmium concentration in S. alfredii shoot significantly decreased when grown with ryegrass or castor as compared to that in monoculture. However, no reduction of Zn or Pb concentration in S. alfredii shoot was detected in co-planting treatments. Total removal of either Cd, Zn, or Pb by plants was similar across S. alfredii monoculture or co-planting with ryegrass or castor, except enhanced Pb removal in S. alfredii and ryegrass co-planting treatment. Co-planting of S. alfredii with ryegrass or castor significantly enhanced the pyrene and anthracene dissipation as compared to that in the bare soil or S. alfredii monoculture. This appears to be due to the increased soil microbial population and activities in both co-planting treatments. Co-planting of S. alfredii with ryegrass or castor provides a promising strategy to mitigate both metal and PAH contaminants from co-contaminated soils. PMID:23488013

Wang, Kai; Huang, Huagang; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Li, Tingqiang; He, Zhenli; Yang, Xiaoe; Alva, Ashok

2013-01-01

151

Radionuclide distribution in olympic national park, Washington  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of radionuclides in air, precipitation, streams, sediments, soils, and selected plants was conducted in the Olympic National Park, Northwestern Washington State. Thirty-one radionuclides were observed in concentrations that were 3 to 4 fold higher than those observed in arctic Alaska.

C. E. Jenkins; N. A. Wogman; H. G. Rieck

1972-01-01

152

Mass spectrometry of long-lived radionuclides  

Microsoft Academic Search

The capability of determining element concentrations at the trace and ultratrace level and isotope ratios is a main feature of inorganic mass spectrometry. The precise and accurate determination of isotope ratios of long-lived natural and artificial radionuclides is required, e.g. for their environmental monitoring and health control, for studying radionuclide migration, for age dating, for determining isotope ratios of radiogenic

Johanna Sabine Becker

2003-01-01

153

Anthropogenic Radionuclides in the Caspian Sea  

Microsoft Academic Search

Analysis and interpretation of the distribution of anthropogenic radionuclides 90Sr, 137Cs, and 239,240Pu in the Caspian Sea water are presented. These radionuclides are shown to be of environmental importance and to be useful for studying water mass dynamics.

B. Oregioni; J. Gastaud; M. K. Pham; P. P. Povinec

2003-01-01

154

Sensors and Automated Analyzers for Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

The production of nuclear weapons materials has generated large quantities of nuclear waste and significant environmental contamination. We have developed new, rapid, automated methods for determination of radionuclides using sequential injection methodologies to automate extraction chromatographic separations, with on-line flow-through scintillation counting for real time detection. This work has progressed in two main areas: radionuclide sensors for water monitoring and automated radiochemical analyzers for monitoring nuclear waste processing operations. Radionuclide sensors have been developed that collect and concentrate radionuclides in preconcentrating minicolumns with dual functionality: chemical selectivity for radionuclide capture and scintillation for signal output. These sensors can detect pertechnetate to below regulatory levels and have been engineered into a prototype for field testing. A fully automated process monitor has been developed for total technetium in nuclear waste streams. This instrument performs sample acidification, speciation adjustment, separation and detection in fifteen minutes or less.

Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.

2003-03-27

155

Radionuclide Releases During Normal Operations for Ventilated Tanks  

SciTech Connect

This calculation estimates the design emissions of radionuclides from Ventilated Tanks used by various facilities. The calculation includes emissions due to processing and storage of radionuclide material.

Blunt, B.

2001-09-24

156

Crumb rubber feasibility report  

SciTech Connect

The Cumberland County supply region generates approximately 58,000 tons of scrap tires each year, equivalent to 45,000 tons of rubber after processing. Approximately 8,000 tons per year are in concentrated locations and can be easily collected. The costs of collection for the remainder vary significantly. Given current markets, economically feasible processes (ambient technology) can reprocess approximately 65 to 75 percent of the 37,000 tons into a marketable product. A processing plant sized for this supply would process 120 tons per day, a viable plant by industry standards. The end uses for whole tires constitute a negligible market, aside from the retreader market. Crumbed rubber is the major development efforts, there are potentially large opportunities in North Carolina.

NONE

1985-11-01

157

Transverse section radionuclide scanning system  

DOEpatents

This invention provides a transverse section radionuclide scanning system for high-sensitivity quantification of brain radioactivity in cross-section picture format in order to permit accurate assessment of regional brain function localized in three-dimensions. High sensitivity crucially depends on overcoming the heretofore known raster type scanning, which requires back and forth detector movement involving dead-time or partial enclosure of the scan field. Accordingly, this invention provides a detector array having no back and forth movement by interlaced detectors that enclose the scan field and rotate as an integral unit around one axis of rotation in a slip ring that continuously transmits the detector data by means of laser emitting diodes, with the advantages that increased amounts of data can be continuously collected, processed and displayed with increased sensitivity according to a suitable computer program.

Kuhl, David E. (Rosemont, PA); Edwards, Roy Q. (Plymouth Township, PA)

1976-01-01

158

Tribal Utility Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be developed and sold to the wholesale electricity market. • Facility scale, net metered renewable energy systems – These are renewable energy systems that provide power to individual households or facilities that are connected to conventional electric utility grid.

Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

2007-06-30

159

Natural radionuclides in ground waters and cores  

SciTech Connect

Investigations of natural radionuclides of uranium and thorium decay series in site-specific ground waters and cores (water/rock interaction) can provide information on the expected migration behavior of their radioactive waste and analog radionuclides in the unlikely event of radioactive releases from a repository. These data in ground waters can provide in situ retardation and sorption/desorption parameters for transport models and their associated kinetics (residence time). These data in cores can also provide information on migration or leaching up to a period of about one million years. Finally, the natural radionuclide data can provide baseline information for future monitoring of possible radioactive waste releases. The natural radionuclides of interest are {sup 238}U, {sup 234}Th, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 210}Bi, {sup 210}Po, {sup 232}Th, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 228}Th, and {sup 224}Ra. The half-lives of the daughter radionuclides range from 3 days to 2.5 x 10{sup 5} yr. The data discussed are for low ionic strength ground waters from the Hanford (basalt) site and briny ground waters (high ionic strength) and cores from the Deaf Smith salt site. Similar applications of the natural radionuclide data can be extended to the Nevada Tuff repository site and subseabed disposal site. The concentrations of uranium, thorium, radium, lead, and polonium radionuclides are generally very low in ground waters. However, significant differences in disequilibrium exist between basalt and briny ground waters.

Laul, J.C.; Smith, M.R.; Maiti, T.C.

1988-01-01

160

Radionuclide analysis using solid phase extraction disks  

SciTech Connect

The use of solid phase extraction disks was studied for the quantification of selected radionuclides in aqueous solutions. The extraction of four radionuclides using six types (two commercial, four test materials) of 3M Empore{trademark} RAD disks was studied. The radionuclides studied were: technetium-99 (two types of disks), cesium-137 (two types), strontium-90 (one type), plutonium-238 (one type). Extractions were tested from DI water, river water and seawater. Extraction efficiency, kinetics (flow rate past the disk), capacity, and potential interferences were studied as well as quantification methods.

Beals, D.M; Britt, W.G.; Bibler, J.P.; Brooks, D.A.

1996-12-31

161

2010 LANL radionuclide air emissions report /  

SciTech Connect

The emissions of radionuclides from Department of Energy Facilities such as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are regulated by the Amendments to the Clean Air Act of 1990, National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (40 CFR 61 Subpart H). These regulations established an annual dose limit of 10 mrem to the maximally exposed member of the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides. This document describes the emissions of radionuclides from LANL and the dose calculations resulting from these emissions for calendar year 2010. This report meets the reporting requirements established in the regulations.

Fuehne, David P.

2011-06-01

162

Therapeutic Radionuclides: Biophysical and Radiobiologic Principles  

PubMed Central

Although the general radiobiologic principles underlying external beam therapy and radionuclide therapy are the same, there are significant differences in the biophysical and radiobiologic effects from the two types of radiation. In addition to the emission of particulate radiation, targeted radionuclide therapy is characterized by (i) extended exposures and, usually, declining dose rates; (ii) nonuniformities in the distribution of radioactivity and, thus, absorbed dose; and (iii) particles of varying ionization density and, hence, quality. This chapter explores the special features that distinguish the biologic effects consequent to the traversal of charged particles through mammalian cells. It also highlights what has been learned when these radionuclides and radiotargeting pharmaceuticals are used to treat cancers.

Kassis, Amin I.

2008-01-01

163

Heavy metal accumulation by poplar in calcareous soil with various degrees of multi-metal contamination: implications for phytoextraction and phytostabilization.  

PubMed

The object of this study was to assess the capacity of Populus alba L. var. pyramidalis Bunge for phytoremediation of heavy metals on calcareous soils contaminated with multiple metals. In a pot culture experiment, a multi-metal-contaminated calcareous soil was mixed at different ratios with an uncontaminated, but otherwise similar soil, to establish a gradient of soil metal contamination levels. In a field experiment, poplars with different stand ages (3, 5, and 7 years) were sampled randomly in a wastewater-irrigated field. The concentrations of cadmium (Cd), Cu, lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in the poplar tissues and soil were determined. The accumulation of Cd and Zn was greatest in the leaves of P. pyramidalis, while Cu and Pb mainly accumulated in the roots. In the pot experiment, the highest tissue concentrations of Cd (40.76 mg kg(-1)), Cu (8.21 mg kg(-1)), Pb (41.62 mg kg(-1)), and Zn (696 mg kg(-1)) were all noted in the multi-metal-contaminated soil. Although extremely high levels of Cd and Zn accumulated in the leaves, phytoextraction using P. pyramidalis may take at least 24 and 16 years for Cd and Zn, respectively. The foliar concentrations of Cu and Pb were always within the normal ranges and were never higher than 8 and 5 mg kg(-1), respectively. The field experiment also revealed that the concentrations of all four metals in the bark were significantly higher than that in the wood. In addition, the tissue metal concentrations, together with the NH4NO3-extractable concentrations of metals in the root zone, decreased as the stand age increased. P. pyramidalis is suitable for phytostabilization of calcareous soils contaminated with multiple metals, but collection of the litter fall would be necessary due to the relatively high foliar concentrations of Cd and Zn. PMID:23681772

Hu, Yahu; Nan, Zhongren; Su, Jieqiong; Wang, Ning

2013-05-17

164

Micro electric propulsion feasibility  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Miniature, 50 kg class, strategic satellites intended for extended deployment in space require an on-board propulsion capability to perform needed attitude control adjustments and drag compensation maneuvers. Even on such very small spacecraft, these orbit maintenance functions can be significant and result in a substantial propellant mass requirement. Development of advanced propulsion technology could reduce this propellant mass significantly, and thereby maximize the payload capability of these spacecraft. In addition, spacecraft maneuverability could be enhanced and/or multi-year mission lifetimes realized. These benefits cut spacecraft replacement costs, and reduce services needed to maintain the launch vehicles. For SDIO brilliant pebble spacecraft, a miniaturized hydrazine propulsion system provides both boost and divert thrust control. This type of propulsion system is highly integrated and is capable of delivering large thrust levels for short time periods. However, orbit maintenance functions such as drag make-up require only very small velocity corrections. Using the boost and/or divert thrusters for these small corrections exposes this highly integrated propulsion system to continuous on/off cycling and thereby increases the risk of system failure. Furthermore, since drag compensation velocity corrections would be orders of magnitude less than these thrusters were designed to deliver, their effective specific impulse would be expected to be lower when operated at very short pulse lengths. The net result of these effects would be a significant depletion of the on-board hydrazine propellant supply throughout the mission, and a reduced propulsion system reliability, both of which would degrade the interceptors usefulness. In addition to SDIO brilliant pebble spacecraft, comparably small spacecraft can be anticipated for other future strategic defense applications such as surveillance and communication. For such spacecraft, high capability and reliability, minimal detectability and low cost are requirements. All these miniature spacecraft share a common characteristic: because of their on-board electronic equipment they have, by design, solar order 50-100 W. In a relative sense, such spacecraft are power rich when compared to other larger spacecraft. This power rich situation is offset by very tight mass budgets, which make reductions in propellant mass requirements a key issue in meeting overall spacecraft minimum mass goals. In principle, power rich and propellant poor brilliant pebbles class spacecraft can benefit from using high specific impulse electric propulsion to reduce chemical propellant mass requirements. However, at power levels of order 50 W, arcjets cannot be made to function, ion thrusters are too complex and heavy and resistojets have too low a specific impulse. Recognizing these capability limitations in existing electric propulsion technology, the SDIO/IST sponsored the Phase I SBIR Micro Electric Propulsion (MEP) thruster study described in this report. feasibility of developing a very simple, low mass and small volume, electric thruster for operation on hydrazine at less than 100 W of input power. &The feasibility of developing such a MEP thruster was successfully demonstrated by EPL by the discovery of a novel plasma acceleration process. The sections in this report summarize the approach, test results and major accomplishments of this proof-of-concept program.

Aston, Graeme; Aston, Martha

1992-11-01

165

Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this model report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) radionuclide transport model, which evaluates, by means of three-dimensional numerical models, the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the UZ, under ambient conditions,...

2004-01-01

166

Chemical speciation of radionuclides migrating in groundwaters.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In order to more accurately predict the rates and mechanisms of radionuclide migration from low-level waste disposal facilities via groundwater transport, ongoing studies are being conducted at field sites at Chalk River Laboratories to identify and chara...

D. Robertson A. Schilk K. Abel E. Lepel C. Thomas

1994-01-01

167

RADionuclide Transport, Removal, and Dose (RADTRAD) code.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The RADionuclide Transport, Removal, And Dose (RADTRAD) code is designed for US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) use to calculate the radiological consequences to the offsite population and to control room operators following a design-basis accident ...

L. A. Miller D. I. Chanin J. Lee

1993-01-01

168

Reconcentration Phenomenon of Radionuclide Chain Migration.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The potential reconcentration of radionuclide decay products during their transport by flowing groundwater from underground geologic nuclear waste disposal sites to the biosphere is analyzed. The calculations show that the predicted maximum (but not the a...

H. C. Burkholder M. O. Cloninger

1976-01-01

169

Sorption of Radionuclides on Yucca Mountain Tuffs.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A substantial database of sorption coefficients for important radionuclides on Yucca Mountain tuffs has been obtained by Los Alamos National Laboratory over the past ten years. Current sorption studies are focussed on validation questions and augmentation...

A. Meijaer I. Triay S. Knight M. Cisneros

1989-01-01

170

Radionuclide carriers for targeting of cancer  

PubMed Central

This review describes strategies for the delivery of therapeutic radionuclides to tumor sites. Therapeutic approaches are summarized in terms of tumor location in the body, and tumor morphology. These determine the radionuclides of choice for suggested targeting ligands, and the type of delivery carriers. This review is not exhaustive in examples of radionuclide carriers for targeted cancer therapy. Our purpose is two-fold: to give an integrated picture of the general strategies and molecular constructs currently explored for the delivery of therapeutic radionuclides, and to identify challenges that need to be addressed. Internal radiotherapies for targeting of cancer are at a very exciting and creative stage. It is expected that the current emphasis on multidisciplinary approaches for exploring such therapeutic directions should enable internal radiotherapy to reach its full potential.

Sofou, Stavroula

2008-01-01

171

Annual report, October 1980-September 1981 Multimedia radionuclide exposure assessment modeling.  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are jointly developing a methodology for assessing exposures of the air, water, and plants to radionuclides as part of an overall development effort of a radionuclide disposal site evaluation methodology. Work in FY-1981 continued the development of the Multimedia Contaminant Environmental Exposure Assessment (MCEA) methodology and initiated an assessment of radionuclide migration in Los Alamos and Pueblo Canyons, New Mexico, using the methodology. The AIRTRAN model was completed, briefly tested, and documented. In addition, a literature search for existing validation data for AIRTRAN was performed. The feasibility and advisability of including the UNSAT moisture flow model as a submodel of the terrestrial code BIOTRAN was assessed. A preliminary application of the proposed MCEA methodology, as it related to the Mortandad-South Mortandad Canyon site in New Mexico is discussed. This preliminary application represented a scaled-down version of the methodology in which only the terrestrial, overland, and surface water components were used. An update describing the progress in the assessment of radionuclide migration in Los Alamos and Pueblo Canyons is presented. 38 references, 47 figures, 11 tables.

Whelan, G.; Onishi, Y.; Simmons, C.S.; Horst, T.W.; Gupta, S.K.; Orgill, M.M.; Newbill, C.A.

1982-12-01

172

Radionuclide Geomicrobiology of the Deep Biosphere  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review summarizes research into interactions between microorganisms and radionuclides under conditions typical of a repository for high-level radioactive waste in deep hard rock environments at a depth of approximately 500 m. The cell–radionuclide interactions of strains of two bacterial species (i.e., Shewanella putrefaciens and Desulfovibrio aespoeensis) with Cm, Pm, and Pu were investigated in vitro and the results were

Craig Anderson; Anna Johnsson; Henry Moll; Karsten Pedersen

2011-01-01

173

Air kerma rate constants for radionuclides  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conversion to SI units requires that the exposure rate constant which was usually quoted in R·h-1·mCi-1· cm2 be replaced by the air kerma rate constant with units m2·Gy·Bq-1·s-1. The conversion factor is derived and air kerma rate constants for 30 radionuclides used in nuclear medicine and brachytherapy are listed. A table for calculation of air kerma rates for other radionuclides

Herman Wasserman; Wilhelm Groenewald

1988-01-01

174

Radionuclide evaluation of lung trauma  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear medicine imaging procedures can play a significant role in evaluating the pulmonary complications that are seen in trauma patients. A quantitative method for measuring increased pulmonary capillary permeability that uses Tc-99m HSA allows early diagnosis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and accurately differentiates this condition from pneumonia or cardiogenic pulmonary edema. This technique may be of great value in following the response to therapy. The use of 133Xe to diagnose inhalation injury remains an important diagnostic tool, particularly at hospitals with specialized burn units. Regional decreases in ventilation-perfusion images reliably localize aspirated foreign bodies. Radionuclide techniques that are used to demonstrate gastropulmonary aspiration remain controversial and require further clinical evaluation. Pulmonary perfusion imaging, although nonspecific, may provide the earliest clue for correct diagnosis of fat embolism, air embolism, contusion, or laceration. Furthermore, the possibility of perfusion abnormality due to these uncommon conditions must be remembered whenever trauma patients are evaluated for pulmonary thromboembolism with scintigraphy. Occasionally, liver or spleen scintigraphy may be the most appropriate procedure when penetrating chest trauma also involves these subdiaphragmatic organs.

Lull, R.J.; Tatum, J.L.; Sugerman, H.J.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Boll, D.A.; Kaplan, K.A.

1983-07-01

175

Vertical distribution of natural radionuclides in soils  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Low-level alpha spectrometry techniques using semiconductor detectors (PIPS) and liquid scintillation counters (LKB Quantulus 1220™) were used in order to determine the activity concentration of 238U, 232Th, 234U, 230Th, 226Ra, and 210Pb in soil samples. The soils were collected from an old disused uranium mine located in southwest Spain. The soils were selected with different levels of influence from the installation, in such a way that they had different levels of radioactive contamination. The vertical profiles in the soils (down to 40 cm depth) were studied in order to evaluate the vertical distribution of the natural radionuclides. The possible contamination of subsurface waters depends strongly on vertical migration, and the transfer to plants (herbs, shrubs, and trees) also will depend on the distribution of the radionuclides in the root zone. The study of the activity ratios between radionuclides belonging to the same series allowed us to assess the differing behaviour of the radionuclides involved. The vertical profiles for these radionuclides were different at each sampling point, showing the local impact of the installation. However, the profiles per point were similar for the long-lived radionuclides of the 238TJ series (238U, 234U, 230Th, and 226Ra). Also, a major disequilibrium was observed between 210Pb and 226Ra in the surface layer, due to 222Rn emanation and subsequent surface deposition of 210Pb.

Blanco Rodríguez, P.; Tomé, F. Vera; Lozano, J. C.

2012-04-01

176

Hydrology and radionuclide migration program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's participation in the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during fiscal year 1988. The report discusses studies at a new well 100 m down the hydrologic gradient from the previous sampling point at the Cheshire site; laboratory investigations of the mineralogical composition of NTS colloids; the strength of colloidal deposits and parameters affecting their formation and release; accelerator mass spectrometric measurements of {sup 129}I in water from the Cheshire stie; {sup 222}Rn concentrations in water from several pumped wells at the NTS; and a description of a new well (PM3) drilled off the NTS near Area 20. Further studies on groundwater sampled show that both technetium and iodine are quite mobile; both closely track the trend of the decreasing tritium concentration with increasing distance. Antimony and cesium concentrations decrease much more rapidly than tritium, and europium was not detected at all in the new well. Colloidal particles found in water collected from the Cheshire cavity are in size range of 0.050 to 0.003 {mu}m and are dominated by quartz and (Ca, K) feldspars. A new well was drilled on US Air Force land adjacent to the NTS Area 20. Static water level measurements and geochemical data from this well will help to determine the extent to which Pahute Mesa base flow infiltrates Oasis Valley. Preliminary results indicate tritium concentrations in water samples from this well to be in the range of 0.1 to 0.4 pCi/ml as measured under field conditions.

Marsh, K.V. (comp.)

1992-02-01

177

WERF MACT Feasibility Study Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study was undertaken to determine the technical feasibility of upgrading the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to meet the offgas emission limits proposed in the Maximum Achiev...

B. Bonnema D. Moser J. Riedesel K. Kooda K. Liekhus

1998-01-01

178

Portable Instrumentation Kit Feasibility Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of developing an airborne instrumentation kit that could be easily transported and quickly installed. The system would need to be compatible with anticipated US Army vehicle and test requirement...

R. P. Jefferis W. T. Rivers

1972-01-01

179

Flathead Renewable Energy Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The study shall assess the feasibility of a commercial wind facility on lands selected and owned by the Salish and Kootenai Tribes and shall examine the potential for the development of solar and biomass resources located on Tribal Lands.

Belvin Pete: Ed McCarthy; Krista Gordon; Chris Bergen; Rhett Good

2006-10-03

180

Renewable Energy System Feasibility Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A study was performed to determine the economic feasibility of displacing a portion of the electrical energy usage at the Wind tunnel Complex at WPAFB by a renewable energy system. Wind systems, photovoltaic systems and solar thermal systems evaluated usi...

D. E. Klett D. Y. Goswami D. E. Olson E. K. Stefanakos

1982-01-01

181

Idaho radionuclide exposure study: Literature review  

SciTech Connect

Phosphate ores contain elevated levels of natural radioactivity, some of which is released to the environment during processing or use of solid byproducts. The effect of radionuclides from Idaho phosphate processing operations on the local communities has been the subject of much research and study. The literature is reviewed in this report. Two primary radionuclide pathways to the environment have been studied in detail: (1) airborne release of volatile radionuclides, primarily /sup 210/Po, from calciner stacks at the two elemental phosphorus plants; and (2) use of byproduct slag as an aggregate for construction in Soda Springs and Pocatello. Despite the research, there is still no clear understanding of the population dose from radionuclide emissions, effluents, and solid wastes from phosphate processing plants. Two other potential radionuclide pathways to the environment have been identified: radon exhalation from phosphogypsum and ore piles and contamination of surface and ground waters. Recommendations on further study needed to develop a data base for a complete risk assssment are given in the report.

Baker, E.G.; Freeman, H.D.; Hartley, J.N.

1987-10-01

182

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2011  

SciTech Connect

Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are produced, handled, stored, and potentially emitted. These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H. Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2011, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.01 mSv/yr]). These minor sources included about 90 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned airborne radionuclide emissions from Berkeley lab operations. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer codes, CAP88-PC and COMPLY, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI).

Wahl, Linnea

2012-06-04

183

Radionuclide transfer from soil to fruit.  

PubMed

The available literature on the transfer of radionuclides from soil to fruit has been reviewed with the aim of identifying the main variables and processes affecting the behaviour of radionuclides in fruit plants. Where available, data for transfer of radionuclides from soil to other components of fruit plant have also been collected, to help in understanding the processes of translocation and storage in perennial plants. Soil-to-fruit transfer factors were derived from agricultural ecosystems, both from temperate and subtropical or tropical zones. Aggregated transfer factors have also been collected from natural or semi-natural ecosystems. The data concern numerous fruits and various radionuclides. Soil-to-fruit transfer is nuclide specific. The variability for a given radionuclide is first of all ascribable to the different properties of soils. Fruit plant species are very heterogeneous, varying from woody trees and shrubs to herbaceous plants. In temperate areas the soil-to-fruit transfer is higher in woody trees for caesium and in shrubs for strontium. Significant differences between the values obtained in temperate and subtropical and tropical regions do not necessarily imply that they are ascribable to climate. Transfer factors for caesium are higher in subtropical and tropical fruits, while those for strontium, as well as for plutonium and americium, in the same fruits, are lower; these results can be interpreted taking into account different soil characteristics. PMID:11202699

Carini, F

2001-01-01

184

Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Waste Forms  

SciTech Connect

Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how waste form performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of waste form aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of waste form aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the waste forms come in contact with groundwater. The information presented in the report provides data that 1) quantify radionuclide retention within concrete waste form materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG); 2) measure the effect of concrete waste form properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and 3) quantify the stability of uranium-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

2010-09-30

185

PUREX low-level waste radionuclide characterization  

SciTech Connect

The PUREX low-level waste (LLW) radionuclide characterization document describes the methodology for the characterization of solid LLW and solid low-level mixed waste (MW) with the respect to radiological characteristics. This document only serves as an overview of the PUREX radionuclide characterization methodology and provides specific examples for how the radionuclide distribution is derived. It would be impractical to provide all background information in this document. If further clarification and background information is required, consult the PUREX Regulatory Compliance group files. This document applies to only that waste generated in or is the responsibility of the PUREX facilities. The US Department of Energy (DOE) establishes the requirements for radioactive solid waste in DOE Order 5820.2A Radioactive Waste Management. Chapters 2 and 3 from DOE Order 5820.2A requires that generators of solid wastes in the LLW categories and the radioactive mixed waste subcategories: (1) identify the major radionuclides in each solid waste matrix and (2) determine the radionuclide concentrations and waste classes of their solid wastes. In addition, the Order also requires each generator to carry out a compliance program that ensures the proper certification of the solid waste generated.

Ellis, M.W.; LeBaron, G.J.

1995-01-16

186

A new absolute method for the standardization of radionuclides emitting low-energy radiation.  

PubMed

Microcalorimeters (or bolometers) operated at temperatures below 100 mK allow individual counting of photons and electrons with a very low energy detection threshold. The physics is based on the pulse temperature increase of the target (or absorber) of the detector due to the complete absorption of both electrons and photons. Since this target can be constructed with a perfect 4-pi geometry, a bolometer offers potentially a new method for absolute activity measurements of radionuclides emitting low-energy radiation. In this paper we present our first results of a feasibility study of activity standardization of a 55Fe solution with a prototype 4-pi bolometer. PMID:11839023

Leblanc, E; de, Marcillac P; Coron, N; Leblanc, J; Loidl, M; Metge, J F; Bouchard, J

187

Leaching of accelerator-produced radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Leaching of radionuclides produced in soil and rock by high energy proton-induced radiation was studied for the SSC site. Comparison was made with predictions of a Monte Carlo code CASIM and previous results for the Fermilab site. The principal long-lived radionuclides were {sup 3}H and {sup 22}Na in agreement with Fermilab results. A few other radionuclides were present at lower concentrations in a subset of the samples. For example, {sup 134}Cs was detected in a few SSC water samples. Leaching from SSC chalk was dependent on previous weathering and on leaching time. The more soil-like marl and shale were leached more rapidly. Results of this study, in conjunction with the SSC groundwater model, show that adequate groundwater protection would have been maintained for an accidental loss of the entire proton beam at a point in the SSC Collider tunnel. Early warning techniques developed are directly applicable to soil activation monitoring at other facilities.

Baker, S.I.; Bull, J.S. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Waxahachie, TX (United States); Goss, D.L. [Nebraska Wesleyan Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States)

1997-12-01

188

Radionuclide sorption on well construction materials  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the extent to which trace concentrations of radioactive materials would sorb on well construction materials and to assess the rapidity with which sorption would occur. The radionuclides employed in these studies were tritium, Cs-137, and Co-57. Solutions with trace concentrations of these radionuclides were contacted with casings of PVC, fiber-glass-epoxy, stainless steel, carbon steel, and steel rods coated with epoxy. The PVC showed no interaction with the tritium or Cs-137 during contact times of two hours to three weeks ; however, it did sorb Co-57. The fiber-glass-epoxy also interacted only with the cobalt. The stainless steel sorbed cesium and cobalt. The epoxy-coated steel rods did not interact measurably with any of the radionuclides so long as the coating was intact. The sorption reactions generally were apparent after a few days of contact; in the case of carbon steel, they were detectable in a few hours.

Thompson, J.L.

1996-11-01

189

Leaching of accelerator-produced radionuclides.  

PubMed

Leaching of radionuclides produced in soil and rock by high energy proton-induced radiation was studied for the SSC site. Comparison was made with predictions of a Monte Carlo code CASIM and previous results for the Fermilab site. The principal long-lived radionuclides were 3H and 22Na in agreement with Fermilab results. A few other radionuclides were present at lower concentrations in a subset of the samples. For example, 134Cs was detected in a few SSC water samples. Leaching from SSC chalk was dependent on previous weathering and on leaching time. The more soil-like marl and shale were leached more rapidly. Results of this study, in conjunction with the SSC groundwater model, show that adequate groundwater protection would have been maintained for an accidental loss of the entire proton beam at a point in the SSC Collider tunnel. Early warning techniques developed are directly applicable to soil activation monitoring at other facilities. PMID:9373069

Baker, S I; Bull, J S; Goss, D L

1997-12-01

190

Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-particle emitting radionuclides.  

PubMed

An important consideration in the development of effective strategies for radioimmunotherapy is the nature of the radiation emitted by the radionuclide. Radionuclides decaying by the emission of alpha-particles offer the possibility of matching the cell specific reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with radiation with a range of only a few cell diameters. Furthermore, alpha-particles have important biological advantages compared with external beam radiation and beta-particles including a higher biological effectiveness, which is nearly independent of oxygen concentration, dose rate and cell cycle position. In this review, the clinical settings most likely to benefit from alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy will be discussed. The current status of preclinical and clinical research with antibodies labeled with 3 promising alpha-particle emitting radionuclides - (213)Bi, (225)Ac, and (211)At - also will be summarized. PMID:15640792

Zalutsky, M R; Pozzi, O R

2004-12-01

191

Therapeutic radionuclides: Making the right choice  

SciTech Connect

Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in nuclear medicine therapeutic procedures. Using unsealed sources for therapy is not a new concept; it has been around since the beginnings of nuclear medicine. Treatment of thyroid disorders with radioiodine is a classic example. The availability of radionuclides with suitable therapeutic properties for specific applications, as well as methods for their selective targeting to diseased tissue have, however, remained the main obstacles for therapy to assume a more widespread role in nuclear medicine. Nonetheless, a number of new techniques that have recently emerged, (e.g., tumor therapy with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, treatment of metastatic bone pain, etc.) appear to have provided a substantial impetus to research on production of new therapeutic radionuclides. Although there are a number of new therapeutic approaches requiring specific radionuclides, only selected broad areas will be used as examples in this article.

Srivastava, S.C.

1996-08-01

192

Diffusion of Radionuclides in Concrete and Soil  

SciTech Connect

One of the methods being considered for safely disposing of Category 3 low-level radioactive wastes is to encase the waste in concrete. Such concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and would act as an intrusion barrier. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The mobilized radionuclides may escape from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and move into the surrounding subsurface environment. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the ability of the surrounding soil to retard radionuclide migration. The objective of our study was to measure the diffusivity of Re, Tc and I in concrete containment and the surrounding vadose zone soil. Effects of carbonation, presence of metallic iron, and fracturing of concrete and the varying moisture contents in soil on the diffusivities of Tc and I were evaluated.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Parker, Kent E.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Clayton, Libby N.; Wood, Marcus I.

2012-04-25

193

Radionuclide imaging of abomasal emptying in sheep.  

PubMed

A liquid radionuclide tracer was administered to nine sheep in order to visualise the abomasum with a gamma camera computer system. The aim was to develop a method of studying gastric emptying, with minimal surgical intervention. Oral administration of the tracer gave good images of the whole complex stomach, but quantifying abomasal emptying was not possible because of the superimposition of the stomach compartments. When the reticular groove reflex was stimulated with oral copper sulphate the radionuclide bypassed the reticulorumen, allowing quantitative analysis of abomasal activity. However, the repeatability of the reflex activation was low. Radionuclide administered directly into the abomasum produced good images of abomasal outflow and provided digital data which were analysed quantitatively. A wide range of emptying rates was observed, generally with a stepped pattern. PMID:9160420

Nicholson, T; Stockdale, H R; Critchley, M; Grime, J S; Jones, R S; Maltby, P

194

Data Authentication Demonstration for Radionuclide Stations  

SciTech Connect

Data authentication is required for certification of sensor stations in the International Monitoring System (IMS). Authentication capability has been previously demonstrated for continuous waveform stations (seismic and infrasound). This paper addresses data surety for the radionuclide stations in the IMS, in particular the Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer (RASA) system developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Radionuclide stations communicate data by electronic mail using formats defined in IMS 1.0, Formats and Protocols for Messages. An open message authentication standard exists, called S/MIME (Secure/Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions), which has been proposed for use with all IMS radionuclide station message communications. This standard specifies adding a digital signature and public key certificate as a MIME attachment to the e-mail message. It is advantageous because it allows authentication to be added to all IMS 1.0 messages in a standard format and is commercially supported in e-mail software. For command and control, the RASA system uses a networked Graphical User Interface (GUI) based upon Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) communications, which requires special authentication procedures. The authors have modified the RASA system to meet CTBTO authentication guidelines, using a FORTEZZA card for authentication functions. They demonstrated signing radionuclide data messages at the RASA, then sending, receiving, and verifying the messages at a data center. They demonstrated authenticating command messages and responses from the data center GUI to the RASA. Also, the particular authentication system command to change the private/public key pair and retrieve the new public key was demonstrated. This work shows that data surety meeting IMS guidelines may be immediately applied to IMS radionuclide systems.

Harris, Mark; Herrington, Pres; Miley, Harry; Ellis, J. Edward; McKinnon, David; St. Pierre, Devon

1999-08-03

195

Radionuclide imaging of the urinary tract  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the role of nuclear medicine in the evaluation of the genitourinary tract. The technical aspects of radionuclide imaging (radiopharmaceuticals, radiation dosimetry, instrumentation, and method) are briefly presented, and each of the indications for renal scintigraphy--including the evaluation of differential renal function, hypertension, obstruction, renal transplants, masses, trauma, congenital anomalies, vesicoureteral reflux, and infection--are discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide imaging with respect to alternative radiographic examinations (such as intravenous urography, ultrasonography, CT, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging) are emphasized wherever applicable. 136 references.

Velchik, M.G.

1985-11-01

196

Electromigration radionuclide generator: working principles and testing  

SciTech Connect

An electromigration radionuclide generator can be built in which the daughter product is separated from the parent one because of differences in ion migration rates in an electric field. Two types are described in which the daughter after separation is eluted either as a result of hydrostatic pressure of by electrical migration. The barium 140-lanthanum 140 pair has been used to examine the working characteristics (yield, radiochemical purity, specific activity, and so on), and it has been found that the decisive effect comes from the distance between the peaks; the prospects for using the method to make short-lived radionuclides are considered.

Gedeonov, A.D.; Bulatenkov, Yu.V.

1988-09-01

197

Microbiological Transformations of Radionuclides in the Subsurface  

SciTech Connect

Microorganisms are ubiquitous in subsurface environments although their populations sizes and metabolic activities can vary considerably depending on energy and nutrient inputs. As a result of their metabolic activities and the chemical properties of their cell surfaces and the exopolymers they produce, microorganisms can directly or indirectly facilitate the biotransformation of radionuclides, thus altering their solubility and overall fate and transport in the environment. Although biosorption to cell surfaces and exopolymers can be an important factor modifying the solubility of some radionuclides under specific conditions, oxidation state is often considered the single most important factor controlling their speciation and, therefore, environmental behavior.

Marshall, Matthew J.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2010-01-04

198

How We Design Feasibility Studies  

PubMed Central

Public health is moving toward the goal of implementing evidence-based interventions. To accomplish this, there is a need to select, adapt, and evaluate intervention studies. Such selection relies, in part, on making judgments about the feasibility of possible interventions and determining whether comprehensive and multilevel evaluations are justified. There exist few published standards and guides to aid these judgments. This article describes the diverse types of feasibility studies conducted in the field of cancer prevention, using a group of recently funded grants from the National Cancer Institute. The grants were submitted in response to a request for applications proposing research to identify feasible interventions for increasing the utilization of the Cancer Information Service among underserved populations.

Bowen, Deborah J.; Kreuter, Matthew; Spring, Bonnie; Cofta-Woerpel, Ludmila; Linnan, Laura; Weiner, Diane; Bakken, Suzanne; Kaplan, Cecilia Patrick; Squiers, Linda; Fabrizio, Cecilia; Fernandez, Maria

2010-01-01

199

Review of Distribution Coefficients for Radionuclides in Carbonate Minerals.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An understanding of the transport of radionuclides in carbonate minerals is necessary to be able to predict the fate of (and potentially remediate) radionuclides in the environment. In some environments, carbonate minerals such as calciate, aragonite, dol...

M. Sutton

2009-01-01

200

Survey of the Use of Radionuclides in Medicine.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Phase I study, which was a national survey of all licensed and registered medical users of radionuclides, required the compilation of a comprehensive registry of physicians using radionuclides for medical purposes, and the development of a survey ques...

R. M. Rodden B. E. Suta L. W. Weisbecker

1969-01-01

201

Lower Sioux Wind Feasibility & Development  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the process and findings of a Wind Energy Feasibility Study (Study) conducted by the Lower Sioux Indian Community (Community). The Community is evaluating the development of a wind energy project located on tribal land. The project scope was to analyze the critical issues in determining advantages and disadvantages of wind development within the Community. This analysis addresses both of the Community's wind energy development objectives: the single turbine project and the Commerical-scale multiple turbine project. The main tasks of the feasibility study are: land use and contraint analysis; wind resource evaluation; utility interconnection analysis; and project structure and economics.

Minkel, Darin

2012-04-01

202

Migration of radionuclides in geologic media: Fundamental research needs  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of the fundamental research needs in understanding and predicting the migration of radionuclides in the subsurface is provided. Emphasis is on the following three technical areas: (1) aqueous speciation of radionuclides, (2) the interaction of radionuclides with substrates, and (3) intermediate-scale interaction studies. This research relates to important issues associated with environmental restoration and remediation of DOE sites contaminated with mixed radionuclide-organic wastes. 64 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Reed, D.T. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Zachara, J.M.; Wildung, R.E. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Wobber, F.J. (USDOE, Washington, DC (USA))

1990-01-01

203

MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION THROUGH BIOREMEDIATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Treatment of waste streams containing radionuclides, the remediation of contaminated materials, soils, and water, and the safe and economical disposal of radionuclides and toxic metals containing wastes is a major concern. Radionuclides may exist in various oxidation states and may be present as oxide, coprecipitates, inorganic, and organic complexes depending on the process and waste stream. Unlike organic contaminants, the

2006-01-01

204

Review of Distribution Coefficients for Radionuclides in Carbonate Minerals  

Microsoft Academic Search

An understanding of the transport of radionuclides in carbonate minerals is necessary to be able to predict the fate of (and potentially remediate) radionuclides in the environment. In some environments, carbonate minerals such as calciate, aragonite, dolomite and limestone are present and an understanding of the sorption of radionuclides in these carbonate minerals is therefore advantageous. A list of the

2009-01-01

205

Freeman and Johnson's clinical radionuclide imaging. Volume 3 update  

SciTech Connect

This book presents papers on radioisotope scanning. Topics considered include single photon emission computed tomography, radionuclide evaluation of gastrointestinal bleeding, cell labelling, radiolabelled leukocytes, radiolabelled platelets, radiolabelled antibodies, gastrointestinal function, nuclear endocrinology, radionuclide diagnosis and therapy of thyroid cancer, and historical aspects of the radionuclide imaging of parathyroid tumors.

Freeman, L.M.

1986-01-01

206

Radionuclide detection of iatrogenic arteriovenous fistulas of the genitourinary system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radionuclide angiography is a valuable screening test for arteriovenous (AV) fistulas. Seven iatrogenic AV communications of the genitourinary system were initially diagnosed by radionuclide imaging, and untreated patients are being followed up by yearly nuclear examinations. Contrast arteriography is reserved for patients requiring interventional therapy and for symptomatic patients with a negative radionuclide study.

R. Lisbona; M. J. Palayew; R. Satin; B. B. Hyams

1980-01-01

207

Radionuclide bone imaging: an illustrative review.  

PubMed

Bone scintigraphy with technetium-99m-labeled diphosphonates is one of the most frequently performed of all radionuclide procedures. Radionuclide bone imaging is not specific, but its excellent sensitivity makes it useful in screening for many pathologic conditions. Moreover, some conditions that are not clearly depicted on anatomic images can be diagnosed with bone scintigraphy. Bone metastases usually appear as multiple foci of increased activity, although they occasionally manifest as areas of decreased uptake. Traumatic processes can often be detected, even when radiographic findings are negative. Most fractures are scintigraphically detectable within 24 hours, although in elderly patients with osteopenia, further imaging at a later time is sometimes indicated. Athletic individuals are prone to musculoskeletal trauma, and radionuclide bone imaging is useful for identifying pathologic conditions such as plantar fasciitis, stress fractures, "shin splints," and spondylolysis, for which radiographs may be nondiagnostic. A combination of focal hyperperfusion, focal hyperemia, and focally increased bone uptake is virtually diagnostic for osteomyelitis in patients with nonviolated bone. Bone scintigraphy is also useful for evaluating disease extent in Paget disease and for localizing avascular necrosis in patients with negative radiographs. Radionuclide bone imaging will likely remain a popular and important imaging modality for years to come. PMID:12640151

Love, Charito; Din, Anabella S; Tomas, Maria B; Kalapparambath, Tomy P; Palestro, Christopher J

208

Radionuclide assessment of pulmonary microvascular permeability  

Microsoft Academic Search

The literature has been reviewed to evaluate the technique and clinical value of radionuclide measurements of microvascular permeability and oedema formation in the lungs. Methodology, modelling and interpretation vary widely among studies. Nevertheless, most studies agree on the fact that the measurement of permeability via pulmonary radioactivity measurements of intravenously injected radiolabelled proteins versus that in the blood pool, the

A. B. Johan Groeneveld

1997-01-01

209

RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT MODELS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this model report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) radionuclide transport model, which evaluates, by means of three-dimensional numerical models, the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the UZ, under ambient conditions, from the repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

S. Magnuson

2004-11-01

210

Radionuclide partitioning in the modified Unex process  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Universal Extraction (UNEX) process has been developed for simultaneous extraction of long-lived radionuclides (cesium, strontium, actinides, and lanthanides) from acidic solutions in one extraction cycle. Modification of this organic solvent through the use of diamides of dipicolinic acid instead of CMPO increases the extraction capacity of UNEX solvent toward lanthanides and actinide metals, allowing for the processing of spent

V. Babain; I. Smirnov; M. Alyapyshev; T. A. Todd; J. D. Law; R. S. Herbst; A. Paulenova

2008-01-01

211

Interaction between water, sediments and radionuclides.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A model-based measurements program was carried out to evaluate the primary mechanisms controlling transport of uranium 238 and thorium 232 decay chain radionuclides in Quirke Lake, a water body draining much of the uranium mining and milling district near...

W. J. Snodgrass P. McKee J. Garnett L. Stieff

1988-01-01

212

Radionuclide cerebral imaging confirming brain death  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by portable radionuclide cerebral imaging (RCI) and by four-vessel cerebral contrast arteriography in 15 clinically brain-dead patients, including six children. Neither technique showed evidence of CBF, although four RCI scans showed sagittal sinus activity. Portable scanning techniques are therefore considered valid determinants of brain death and may be useful in lieu of contrast cerebral

J. A. Schwartz; J. Baxter; D. Brill; J. R. Burns

1983-01-01

213

Systemic targeted radionuclide therapy: Potential new areas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiation oncology is entering an exciting new era with therapies being delivered in a targeted fashion through an increasing number of novel approaches. External beam radiotherapy now integrates functional and anatomic tumor imaging to guide delivery of conformal radiation to the tumor target. Systemic targeted radionuclide therapy (STaRT) adds an important new dimension by making available to Radiation oncologist biologically

Jeffrey Y. C. Wong

2006-01-01

214

PROGRESS REPORT. RADIONUCLIDE SENSORS FOR WATER MONITORING  

EPA Science Inventory

The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors a...

215

Radionuclide imaging of abomasal emptying in sheep  

Microsoft Academic Search

A liquid radionuclide tracer was administered to nine sheep in order to visualise the abomasum with a gamma camera computer system. The aim was to develop a method of studying gastric emptying, with minimal surgical intervention. Oral administration of the tracer gave good images of the whole complex stomach, but quantifying abomasal emptying was not possible because of the superimposition

P Maltby

1997-01-01

216

Colloid labelled with radionuclide and method.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report discusses a ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected r...

R. W. Atcher J. J. Hines

1989-01-01

217

Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers: radionuclide transport modeling for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York  

SciTech Connect

SERATRA, a transient, two-dimensional (laterally-averaged) computer model of sediment-contaminant transport in rivers, satisfactorily resolved the distribution of sediment and radionuclide concentrations in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system in New York. By modeling the physical processes of advection, diffusion, erosion, deposition, and bed armoring, SERATRA routed three sediment size fractions, including cohesive soils, to simulate three dynamic flow events. In conjunction with the sediment transport, SERATRA computed radionuclide levels in dissolved, suspended sediment, and bed sediment forms for four radionuclides (/sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu, and /sup 3/H). By accounting for time-dependent sediment-radionuclide interaction in the water column and bed, SERATA is a physically explicit model of radionuclide fate and migration. Sediment and radionuclide concentrations calculated by SERATA in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system are in reasonable agreement with measured values. SERATRA is in the field performance phase of an extensive testing program designed to establish the utility of the model as a site assessment tool. The model handles not only radionuclides but other contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals and other toxic chemicals. Now that the model has been applied to four field sites, including the latest study of the Cattaraugus Creek stream system, it is recommended that a final model be validated through comparison of predicted results with field data from a carefully controlled tracer test at a field site. It is also recommended that a detailed laboratory flume be tested to study cohesive sediment transport, deposition, and erosion characteristics. The lack of current understanding of these characteristics is one of the weakest areas hindering the accurate assessment of the migration of radionuclides sorbed by fine sediments of silt and clay.

Onishi, Y.; Yabusaki, S.B.; Kincaid, C.T.; Skaggs, R.L.; Walters, W.H.

1982-12-01

218

Scientific Analysis Cover Sheet for Radionuclide Screening  

SciTech Connect

The waste forms under consideration for disposal in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain contain scores of radionuclides (Attachments V and VI). It would be impractical and highly inefficient to model all of these radionuclides in a total system performance assessment (TSPA). Thus, the purpose of this radionuclide screening analysis is to remove from further consideration (screen out) radionuclides that are unlikely to significantly contribute to radiation dose to the public from the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The remaining nuclides (those screened in) are recommended for consideration in TSPA modeling for license application. This analysis also covers radionuclides that are not screened in based on dose, but need to be included in TSPA modeling for other reasons. For example, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations require consideration of the combined activity of Ra-226 and Ra-228 in groundwater (40 CFR 197.30, 10 CFR 63.331). Also, Cm-245, Pu-241, and U-235 decay indirectly to potentially important radionuclides, and are not identified by the screening analysis as important. The radionuclide screening analysis separately considers two different postclosure time periods: the 10,000-y regulatory period for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain and the period after 10,000 y up to 1 million y after emplacement. The incremental effect of extending the screening for the regulatory period to 20,000 y is also addressed. Four release scenarios are considered: (1) the nominal scenario, which entails long-term degradation of disposal containers and waste forms, (2) a human-intrusion scenario, (3) an intrusive igneous event, and (4) an eruptive igneous event. Because the first three scenarios require groundwater transport, they are called groundwater scenarios below. The screening analysis considers the following waste forms: spent boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel, spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), and high-level waste (HLW). Average and outlying (high burnup, high initial enrichment, low age, or otherwise exceptional) forms of each waste-form type are considered. This analysis has been prepared in accordance with a technical work plan (BSC 2002c). In a review of Revision 00 of this radionuclide screening analysis, the NRC found that ''processes that affect transport in the biosphere, such as uptake by plants and bioaccumulation are not accounted for'' and that ''the direct exposure pathway is not accounted for'' (Beckman 2001, Section 5.3.2.1). The NRC also found that the solubility and sorption classes were too broadly defined, noting, for example, that Se is in the same solubility and sorptivity groups as Np and U, yet is ''more soluble than Np and U by several orders of magnitude'' (Beckman 2001, Section 5.3.2.1). This revision seeks to build upon the strengths of the earlier screening method while responding to the specific concerns raised by the NRC and other reviewers. In place of simple inhalation and ingestion dose conversion factors, the revised radionuclide screening uses screening factors that also take into account soil accumulation, uptake by plants, exposure to contaminated ground, and other features of the biosphere that were neglected in the previous screening. Whereas the previous screening analysis allowed only two solubility classes (soluble and insoluble), the revised screening introduces an intermediate solubility class to better segregate the radionuclides into transport groups.

G. Ragan

2002-08-09

219

California offshore LNG port feasible  

Microsoft Academic Search

An offshore facility for liquefied natural gas (LNG) has been declared technologically and economically feasible by the California Coastal Commission, which is also charged with selecting the best onshore site. The Commission chose an offshore site in Ventura County on the basis of its remoteness and fewer potential environmental impacts. An offshore LNG terminal is estimated to cost in the

Murnane

1978-01-01

220

Feasibility of design in stereolithography  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the feasibility of design for a layer-deposition manufacturing process called stereolithography which works by controlling a vertical laser beam which when targeted on a photocurable liquid causes the liquid to harden. Given an object (modeled as a polygon or a polyhedron), we give algorithms that decide in O(n) time whether or not the object can be constructed using

B. Asberg; G. Blanco; P. Bose; J. Garcia-Lopez; M. Overmars; G. Toussaint; G. Wilfong; B. Zhu

1994-01-01

221

The Space Elevator Feasibility Condition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract This paper ties together parameters pertaining to tetherspecific strength and to power system mass density to arrive at an inequality that determines whether a Space Elevator system is viable. The principle for the feasibility condition (FC) is that a Space Elevator must be able to lift its own weight fast enough – fast enough to grow by bootstrapping, fast

Ben Shelef

222

Feasibility Control in Nonlinear Optimization  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyze the properties that optimization algorithms must possess in order toprevent convergence to non-stationary points for the merit function. We show thatdemanding the exact satisfaction of constraint linearizations results in difficulties in awide range of optimization algorithms. Feasibility control is a mechanism that preventsconvergence to spurious solutions by ensuring that sufficient progress towards feasibilityis made, even in the presence

M. Marazzi; Jorge Nocedal

2000-01-01

223

Energy From Waste Is Feasible  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A possible energy source is the utilization of solid waste as fuel for power production. Although this is only a partial solution to the problem, it will provide some energy while research continues. The economic feasibility of using wastes depends upon a greater amount of energy being produced than expended. (MA)

Culham, William B.

1975-01-01

224

Manzanita Wind Energy Feasibility Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Manzanita Indian Reservation is located in southeastern San Diego County, California. The Tribe has long recognized that the Reservation has an abundant wind resource that could be commercially utilized to its benefit. Manzanita has explored the wind resource potential on tribal land and developed a business plan by means of this wind energy feasibility project, which enables Manzanita to

Trisha Frank

2004-01-01

225

Feasibility Study of Capacitive Tomography  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a feasibility study was conducted to test whether capacitive sensors could be used to detect water and produce a graph with the minimal amount of equipment and materials. A lab was setup to conduct experiments and retrieve raw data. The data is then processed using a back projection algorithm in an attempt to produce an image of

Tony Warren; Daren R. Wilcox

2006-01-01

226

Library Data Processing Feasibility Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|To establish the precise effects of using MARC II in West Sussex, and how it could assist the library staff were the goals of this feasibility study. It illustrates the development of the library catalog and associated systems as both realistic and practical. It indicates what kind of repercussions will be felt by the library and how it could…

Mears, M. J.; And Others

227

Cask Maintenance Facility Feasibility Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a transportation system for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and defense high level waste (HLW) as a part of the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS). In early 1988, a feasibility study was undertaken to de...

M. J. Rennich L. G. Medley C. R. Attaway

1989-01-01

228

2006 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the impacts from emissions of radionuclides at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2006. This report fulfills the requirements established by the Radionuclide National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Rad-NESHAP). This report is prepared by LANL's Rad-NESHAP compliance team, part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to an off-site member of the public was calculated using procedures specified by the EPA and described in this report. LANL's EDE was 0.47 mrem for 2006. The annual limit established by the EPA is 10 mrem per year. During calendar year 2006, LANL continuously monitored radionuclide emissions at 28 release points, or stacks. The Laboratory estimates emissions from an additional 58 release points using radionuclide usage source terms. Also, LANL uses a network of air samplers around the Laboratory perimeter to monitor ambient airborne levels of radionuclides. To provide data for dispersion modeling and dose assessment, LANL maintains and operates meteorological monitoring systems. From these measurement systems, a comprehensive evaluation is conducted to calculate the EDE for the Laboratory. The EDE is evaluated as any member of the public at any off-site location where there is a residence, school, business, or office. In 2006, this location was the Los Alamos Airport Terminal. The majority of this dose is due to ambient air sampling of plutonium emitted from 2006 clean-up activities at an environmental restoration site (73-002-99; ash pile). Doses reported to the EPA for the past 10 years are shown in Table E1.

David P. Fuehne

2007-06-30

229

Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Antibodies, specifically monoclonal antibodies, are potentially very useful and powerful carriers of therapeutic agents to target tissues and diagnostic agents. The loading or charging of antibodies with agents, especially radiotracers, is reviewed here. The choice of radioisotope for immunodetection and/or immunotherapy is based on its availability, half-life, nature of the radiation emitted, and the metabolic pathways of the radionuclide in the body. Most important of all are the derivatization techniques available for labeling the antibody with the given radionuclide. Isotopes of iodine and divalent metal ions are the most commonly used radionuclides. Antibodies labeled with iodine at tyrosine residues are metabolized rapidly in vivo. This leads to the incorporation of metabolized radioactive iodine into various tissues, mainly the thyroid gland and stomach, and to the accumulation of high levels of circulating iodine in the blood, which masks tumor uptake considerably. To overcome these limitations, the use of iodohippurate as an iodine-anchoring molecule to the protein should be considered. When divalent or multivalent metal ions are used as the preferred radionuclide, bifunctional chelating reagents such as EDTA or DTPA are first coupled to the protein or antibody. These chelating molecules are attached to the protein by formation of an isopeptide linkage between the carboxylate of the chelating reagent and the amino group of the protein. Several procedures are available to generate the isopeptide linkage. When the anchoring of the chelating agent through isopeptide linkage results in the inactivation of the antibody, periodate oxidation of the carbohydrate moiety of the antibody, followed by reductive coupling of chelator, could be considered as an alternative. There is still a need for better, simpler, and more direct methods for labeling antibodies with radionuclides. 78 references.

Bhargava, K.K.; Acharya, S.A. (Albert Einstein College of Medicine-Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (USA))

1989-07-01

230

Radionuclide removal for small public water systems. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This document has been prepared to aid water utility owners, engineers, operators and municipal managers in understanding and dealing with excessive radionuclide levels in their water supply. It is intended to be used for defining the problem, developing or evaluating proposed solutions, and explaining to water consumers why radionuclides are controlled and what the approximate cost of control will be. This handbook is designed as a technical guide to radionuclide removal for those smaller size systems that have decided that radionuclide control is desirable. This document contains no regulatory policy and does not obligate systems to use any treatment or nontreatment technique to reduce radionuclide concentrations.

Not Available

1983-06-01

231

In-Situ Mitigation of Effluents from Acid Waste Rock Dumps Using Reactive Surface Barriers –– a Feasibility Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   The long-term mitigation of pore waters of acid waste rock dumps formed during uranium mining in the former G.D.R. requires\\u000a new remediation approaches. A study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of reactive surface barriers (RSB) as part of\\u000a an alternative covering system. One topic of the investigation was to evaluate suitable reactive materials for the mitigation\\u000a of radionuclides

P. Schneider; K. Osenbrück; P. L. Neitzel; K. Nindel

2002-01-01

232

Sludge source term (PUREX process radionuclide dose impact)  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the radionuclide dose impact of the PUREX process waste stream. The radionuclide ingestion and inhalation pathways are analyzed. Two spent fuel assemblies processed in the Separation facilities are analyzed, the Mark 31A and Mark 31B. The individual radionuclide significance to dose is evaluated in terms of dose percentage. Comparing the radionuclide individual dose value allows the determination of those radionuclides whose dose impact is significant. The results of this analysis demonstrate that a limited number of radionuclides contribute 1% or more to the total dose and that the major contributor to the sludge source dose is strontium. The results obtained permit reducing the list of radionuclides to be considered in the development of source terms to support the High Level Waste Safety Analysis Report.

Aponte, C.I.

1994-06-28

233

Uptake by plants of radionuclides from FUSRAP waste materials  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclides from FUSRAP wastes potentially may be taken up by plants during remedial action activities and permanent near-surface burial of contaminated materials. In order to better understand the propensity of radionuclides to accumulate in plant tissue, soil and plant factors influencing the uptake and accumulation of radionuclides by plants are reviewed. In addition, data describing the uptake of the principal radionuclides present in FUSRAP wastes (uranium-238, thorium-230, radium-226, lead-210, and polonium-210) are summarized. All five radionuclides can accumulate in plant root tissue to some extent, and there is potential for the translocation and accumulation of these radionuclides in plant shoot tissue. Of these five radionuclides, radium-226 appears to have the greatest potential for translocation and accumulation in plant shoot tissue. 28 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

Knight, M.J.

1983-04-01

234

The Feasibility of Folk Science  

PubMed Central

If folk science means individuals having well worked out mechanistic theories of the workings of the world, then it is not feasible. Lay people's explanatory understandings are remarkably coarse, full of gaps and often full of inconsistencies. Even worse, most people underestimate their own understandings. Yet, recent views suggest that formal scientists may not be so different. In spite of these limitations, science somehow works and its success offers hope for the feasibility of folk science as well. The success of science arises from the ways in which scientists learn to leverage understandings in other minds and to outsource explanatory work through sophisticated methods of deference and simplification of complex systems. Three studies ask whether analogous processes might be present not only in lay people, but also in young children and thereby form a foundation for supplementing explanatory understandings almost from the start of our first attempts to make sense of the world.

Keil, Frank C.

2010-01-01

235

Feasibility of Design in Stereolithography  

Microsoft Academic Search

.    We study the feasibility of design for a layer-deposition manufacturing process called stereolithography which works by controlling a vertical laser beam which when targeted on a photocurable liquid causes the liquid to harden.\\u000a In order to understand the power as well as the limitations of this manufacturing process better, we define a mathematical\\u000a model of stereolithography (referred to

Boudewijn Asberg; Gregoria Blanco; Prosenjit Bose; Jesus Garcia-lopez; Mark H. Overmars; Godfried T. Toussaint; Gordon T. Wilfong; Binhai Zhu

1997-01-01

236

Feasible implementation of taxation methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   This paper studies implementation of taxation methods in one-commodity environments in which the incomes of the agents are\\u000a unknown to the planner. Feasibility out of equilibrium imposes that the mechanism depend on the environment. We present two\\u000a mechanisms. The first one, which requires complete information, implements every taxation method in Nash, strong and coalition-proof\\u000a equilibrium. The second, where informational

Nir Dagan; Roberto Serrano; Oscar Volij

1999-01-01

237

Transfer of fallout radionuclides derived from Fukushima NPP accident: 1 year study on transfer of radionuclides through hydrological processes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous experiences such as Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident have confirmed that fallout radionuclides on the ground surface migrate through natural environment including soils and rivers. Therefore, in order to estimate future changes in radionuclide deposition, migration process of radionuclides in forests, soils, ground water, rivers should be monitored. However, such comprehensive studies on migration through forests, soils, ground water and rivers have not been conducted so far. Here, we present the following comprehensive investigation was conducted to confirm migration of radionuclides through natural environment including soils and rivers. 1)Study on depth distribution of radiocaesium in soils within forests, fields, and grassland 2)Confirmation of radionuclide distribution and investigation on migration in forests 3)Study on radionuclide migration due to soil erosion under different land use 4)Measurement of radionuclides entrained from natural environment including forests and soils 5)Investigation on radionuclide migration through soil water, ground water, stream water, spring water under different land use 6)Study on paddy-to-river transfer of radionuclides through suspended sediments 7)Study on river-to-ocean transfer of radionuclides via suspended sediments 8)Confirmation of radionuclide deposition in ponds and reservoirs

Onda, Yuichi; Kato, Hiroaki; Patin, Jeremy; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Tsujimura, Maki; Wakahara, Taeko; Fukushima, Takehiko

2013-04-01

238

Manzanita Wind Energy Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The Manzanita Indian Reservation is located in southeastern San Diego County, California. The Tribe has long recognized that the Reservation has an abundant wind resource that could be commercially utilized to its benefit. Manzanita has explored the wind resource potential on tribal land and developed a business plan by means of this wind energy feasibility project, which enables Manzanita to make informed decisions when considering the benefits and risks of encouraging large-scale wind power development on their lands. Technical consultant to the project has been SeaWest Consulting, LLC, an established wind power consulting company. The technical scope of the project covered the full range of feasibility assessment activities from site selection through completion of a business plan for implementation. The primary objectives of this feasibility study were to: (1) document the quality and suitability of the Manzanita Reservation as a site for installation and long-term operation of a commercially viable utility-scale wind power project; and, (2) develop a comprehensive and financeable business plan.

Trisha Frank

2004-09-30

239

Radionuclide Sensors and Systems for Environmental Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

We have developed automated sensor and monitoring devices for trace radionuclides in water, using preconcentrating columns and radiometric detection. The preconcentrating minicolumn sensor concept combines selective capture and detection in a single functional unit. We have demonstrated quantification of radionuclides such as technetium-99 to levels below drinking water standards in an equilibration-based process that produces steady state signals, signal proportional to concentration, and easy re-equilibration to new concentration levels. Alternatively, monitors can be developed with separate separation and detection units that are fluidically linked. We have demonstrated detection of strontium-90 to levels below drinking water standards by this approach. We are developing autonomous systems for at-site monitoring on the Hanford Site in Washington State.

Grate, Jay W.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Egorov, Oleg; Burge, Scott R.

2009-05-18

240

Radionuclide metrology using liquid scintillation counting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) techniques can be used for radionuclide standardization when the calculation of detection efficiency is possible. This is done using a model of the physicochemical processes involved in light emission and also of the statistics of photon emission: the free parameter model. This model can then be applied in two ways: by deducing the free parameter from the measurement of a tracer (the CIEMAT/NIST method) or by calculating this free parameter from coincidence ratio in a specific LS counter (the TDCR method). The purpose of this paper is to describe both these models and some practical issues that need to be addressed if LSC is to be effectively used in radionuclide metrology.

Broda, Ryszard; Cassette, Philippe; Kossert, Karsten

2007-08-01

241

Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the author's continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program has 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry /Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section under the DOE grant during the 1989--1992 grant period, will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections of the DOE grant during the 1992--1995 grant period. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

Larson, S.M. Finn, R.D.

1992-08-04

242

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2008  

SciTech Connect

Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2008, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources include more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2008 is 5.2 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (5.2 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2008.

Wahl, Linnea

2009-05-21

243

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2007  

SciTech Connect

Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). The EPA regulates radionuclide emissions that may be released from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or that may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2007, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor stack or building emissions sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]), there were no diffuse emissions, and there were no unplanned emissions. Emissions from minor sources either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities received for use or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, Version 3.0, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2007 is 1.2 x 10{sup -2} mrem/yr (1.2 x 10{sup -4} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) EPA dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 3.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (3.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2007.

Wahl, Linnea; Wahl, Linnea

2008-06-13

244

Detection of osteoporotic sacral fractures with radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Osteoporotic sacral fractures usually occur in elerly patients as a result of mild trauma. Clinical symptoms range from localized sacral tenderness to neurologic problems attributable to sacral nerve root irritation or cauda equina compression. Although the radiographic diagnosis is difficult to establish, bone scans show a characteristic H-shaped pattern of radionuclide uptake across the sacrum and sacroiliac joints. Four cases of osteoporotic sacral fracture with confirmation by computed tomography are included in this report.

Ries, T.

1983-03-01

245

Radionuclide technique in mechanical engineering in Germany  

Microsoft Academic Search

A subject of increasing application of cyclotron machines is the RadionuclideTechnique inMechanical Engineering (RTM), a measuring system that enables wear and corrosion diagnostics of components of operating machines, apparatus or processing plants. The three components of the RTM-system, the thin layer-activation at the cyclotron, the measuring methods and the measuring instruments for application in industry, have been developed systematically at

P. Fehsenfeld; A. Kleinrahm; H. Schweickert

1992-01-01

246

Radionuclide bone scintigraphy in pediatric orthopedics  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclide bone scintigraphy is highly sensitive and specific for diagnosing the musculoskeletal disorders of childhood. Conditions such as neonatal osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, diskitis of childhood, Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, the osteochondroses, the toddler's fracture, sports injuries, spondylolysis, myositis ossificians, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy are readily defined. High-quality state-of-the-art scintigraphy is essential in infants and young children. 64 references.

Conway, J.J.

1986-12-01

247

Radionuclide bone scintigraphy in pediatric orthopedics.  

PubMed

Radionuclide bone scintigraphy is highly sensitive and specific for diagnosing the musculoskeletal disorders of childhood. Conditions such as neonatal osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, diskitis of childhood, Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease, the osteochondroses, the "toddler's fracture," sports injuries, spondylolysis, myositis ossificians, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy are readily defined. High-quality state-of-the-art scintigraphy is essential in infants and young children. PMID:3537946

Conway, J J

1986-12-01

248

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2009  

SciTech Connect

Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40CFR61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2009, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources included more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2009 is 7.0 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (7.0 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.5 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.5 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2009.

Wahl, Linnea

2010-06-01

249

Sedimentation rate determination by radionuclides mass balances  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the past, uranium mining activity took place in the area around Limoges, France. Even nowadays, this activity results in an increase in the input and availability of radionuclides in aquifer reservoirs, making of this area a suitable site to better understand the behaviour of radionuclides in the surficial environment. Water was sampled monthly over the entire year 2001 in a brook that collects mine water and in a lake fed by this brook. Samples were filtered through 0.45?m filters to remove particles. Activities of 238U, 226Ra, 210Pb, 228Th and 228Ra were measured on particulate (>0.45?m), dissolved (<0.45?m) and total (unfiltered) fractions by gamma spectrometry in the well of a high efficiency, low background, germanium detector settled in an underground laboratory, protected from cosmic rays by 1700 m of rocks (LSM, CNRS-CEA, French Alps). Activities measured in particulate and dissolved fractions were summed and compared to the one measured in unfiltered water to test the filtration yield. No significant loss or contamination were detected. In the brook water, 70% of 238U, 60% of 226Ra and 80% of 210Pb are associated with particles. Activities associated with particles decrease drastically along with the velocity of current when the stream enters the lake. An annual mass balance of radionuclides carried by particles from the stream to the lake was used to determine the sedimentation rate in the lake. The flux of particles deduced from mass balance calculations based on five isotopes corresponds to the thickness of sediment accumulated since the creation of this artificial lake (that is, 1976). This study emphasises the usefulness of radionuclides as tracers for environmental investigations.

Cazala, C.; Reyss, J. L.; Decossas, J. L.; Royer, A.

2003-04-01

250

Leaching of accelerator-produced radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Leaching of radionuclides produced in soil and rock by high energy proton-induced radiation was studied for the SCC and CEBAF sites. Comparison was made with predictions of a Monte-Carlo code CASIM and previous results for the Fermilab site. The principal long-lived radionuclides were {sup 3}H and {sup 22}Na in agreement with Fermilab results. A few other radionuclides were present at lower concentrations in a subset of the samples. For example, {sup 134}Cs was detected in a few SSC water samples and {sup 7}Be and {sup 54}Mn were present at higher concentrations in a CEBAF sample. Leaching from SSC chalk was dependent on previous weathering and on leaching time. The more soil-like marl and shale were leached more rapidly. Results of this study in conjunction with the SSC ground-water model show that adequate ground-water protection would result for loss of the entire proton beam in the SSC Collider tunnel.

Baker, S.; Bull, J.; Goss, D.

1994-05-01

251

UPTAKE OF RADIONUCLIDE METALS BY SPME FIBERS  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Laboratory currently does not have on site facilities for handling radioactive evidentiary materials and there are no established FBI methods or procedures for decontaminating high explosive (HE) and fire debris (FD) evidence while maintaining evidentiary value. One experimental method for the isolation of HE and FD residue involves using solid phase microextraction or SPME fibers to remove residue of interest. Due to their high affinity for organics, SPME fibers should have little affinity for most metals. However, no studies have measured the affinity of radionuclides for SPME fibers. The focus of this research was to examine the affinity of dissolved radionuclide ({sup 239/240}Pu, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 85}Sr, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co and {sup 226}Ra) and stable radionuclide surrogate metals (Sr, Co, Ir, Re, Ni, Ba, Cs, Nb, Zr, Ru, and Nd) for SPME fibers at the exposure conditions that favor the uptake of HE and FD residues. Our results from radiochemical and mass spectrometric analyses indicate these metals have little measurable affinity for these SPME fibers during conditions that are conducive to HE and FD residue uptake with subsequent analysis by liquid or gas phase chromatography with mass spectrometric detection.

Duff, M; S Crump, S; Robert02 Ray, R; Keisha Martin, K; Donna Beals, D

2006-08-28

252

7 CFR 762.125 - Financial feasibility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-01-01 false Financial feasibility. 762.125 Section 762.125 Agriculture Regulations of the Department...AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED FARM LOANS § 762.125 Financial feasibility. (a)...

2013-01-01

253

Mathematical Simulation of Sediment and Radionuclide Transport in Surface Waters  

SciTech Connect

The study objective of "The Mathematical Simulation of Sediment and Radionuclide Transport in Surface Waters" is to synthesize and test radionuclide transport models capable of realistically assessing radionuclide transport in various types of surface water bodies by including the sediment-radionuclide interactions. These interactions include radionuclide adsorption by sediment; desorption from sediment into water; and transport, deposition, and resuspension of sorbed radionuclides controlled by the sediment movements. During FY-1979, the modification of sediment and contaminant (radionuclide) transport model, FETRA, was completed to make it applicable to coastal waters. The model is an unsteady, two-dimensional (longitudinal and lateral) model that consists of three submodels (for sediment, dissolved-contaminant, and particulate-contaminant transport), coupled to include the sediment-contaminant interactions. In estuaries, flow phenomena and consequent sediment and radionuclide migration are often three-dimensional in nature mainly because of nonuniform channel cross-sections, salinity intrusion, and lateral-flow circulation. Thus, an unsteady, three-dimensional radionuclide transport model for estuaries is also being synthesized by combining and modifying a PNL unsteady hydrothermal model and FETRA. These two radionuclide transport models for coastal waters and estuaries will be applied to actual sites to examine the validity of the codes.

,

1981-04-01

254

Gold-195m, a new generator-produced short-lived radionuclide for sequential assessment of ventricular performance by first pass radionuclide angiocardiography. [Dogs  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of performing rapid sequential first pass radionuclide angiocardiography using a new short-lived radiotracer, gold-195m (/sup 195//sup m/Au) half-life 30.5 seconds) was evaluated. This radionuclide emits a 262 keV gamma ray and is the daughter of mercury-195 (/sup 195//sup m/Hg) (half-life 41.6 hours). The prototype table top /sup 195//sup m/Hg//sup 195//sup m/Au generator produced 20 to 25 mCi of /sup 195//sup m/Au in 2 ml of eluate (yield of 40 percent). Four dogs each had 15 to 20 sequential first pass studies performed with /sup 195//sup m/Hg at 3 to 10 minute intervals using a computerized multicrystal gamma camera. During the left ventricular phase, 160,000 to 190,000 counts/s were acquired. The end-diastolic left ventricular region of interest contained 3000 to 6000 counts (background- and decay-corrected). Multiple reproducible values for left ventricular ejection fraction were obtained during stable conditions. During infusion of isoproterenol, rapid increase of left ventricular ejection fraction was demonstrated. Excellent agreement was observed between studies performed with technetium-99m diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (/sup 99//sup m/Tc-DTPA) and /sup 195//sup m/Au. This new short-lived radiotracer makes possible rapid sequential assessments of ventricular function at greatly reduced patient exposure to radiation.

Wackers, F.J.; Giles, R.W.; Hoffer, P.B.; Lange, R.C.; Berger, H.J.; Zaret, B.L.

1982-07-01

255

Idaho radionuclide study (radionuclide exposure study, Pocatello and Soda Springs, Idaho)  

SciTech Connect

The report gives the results of a radionuclide exposure study conducted by EPA in southeastern Idaho to estimate the radiation dose resulting from the elemental phosphorus industry. The dispersion of radionuclides through the environs of Pocatello and Soda Springs, Idaho were investigated together with the relative importance of their sources and pathways affecting the populations of both towns and the magnitude of the attendant risks. Gamma ray exposures to the populations of Soda Springs and Pocatello, with the attendant risks, and the corresponding values for average and maximally exposed individuals in both communities are listed.

Not Available

1990-04-01

256

Transfer coefficients of radionuclides secreted in milk of dairy cows.  

PubMed

This study simulated experimentally the transfer of radionuclides to milk of dairy cows on a worst-case situation using various radionuclides known to emanate from nuclear power stations and which have been detected on particulates. Two lactating Holstein cows were administered orally one gelatin capsule containing 10 radionuclides in water-soluble form per day for 14 consecutive days. Milk samples were collected and aliquots analyzed in a germanium lithium-drifted detector coupled to a 2048-multichannel gamma-ray analyzer to measure small amounts of complex mixtures of radionuclides. The transfer coefficients of the radionuclides were calculated when their secretion in milk reached or approached a plateau of concentration. The radionuclides and their transfer coefficients to milk were: chromium51 less than .01%; manganese54 .033 +/- .005%; cobalt60 .01 +/- .002%; iron59 .0048 +/- .002%; zinc65 .31 +/- .07%; selenium75 .29 +/- .1%; antimony125 .011 +/- .003%; iodine131 .88 +/- .05%; and cesium137 .79 +/- .08%. PMID:7430486

Sam, D; Williams, W F; Rockmann, D D; Allen, J T

1980-09-01

257

Measurement of nuclear-physical characteristics of radionuclides  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article provides the revised data for the nuclear-physical characteristics (NPC) measurements of seven radionuclides: 238Pu, 239pu, SSFe, ~25mTe, ~SmSn, ?SSe, and ~V~ These radionuclides are widely used in the preparation of various radionuclide products, standard sources of ionizing radiation, and standard solutions. The emission characteristics data for the nuclides may be used for calibration of semiconductor spectrometers with regard

A. M. Geidel'man; Yu. S. Egorov; V. G. Nedovesov; G. E. Shchukin

1987-01-01

258

Radionuclides associated with potential phosphate mining and their possible hazards  

SciTech Connect

Phosphate deposits exist in several regions in Saudi Arabia. Uranium and thorium and their decay products are known to be in phosphate rocks. Radionuclides of the uranium decay series are the more significant in terms of potential radiation hazard to people. Some of these radionuclides are leachable by acidic solutions. Since the local deposits will eventually be mined and processed, it is important to assay the concentrations of uranium and leachable daughter radionuclides in these ores.

AbdulFattah, A.R.F.; Mamoon, A.; Addas, Y.; Sohsah, M. [King Abdulaziz Univ. (Saudi Arabia)

1994-12-31

259

Selected radionuclides important to low-level radioactive waste management  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low level radioactive waste (LLW) management facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the environment. Extensive surveys of available literature provided information for this report. Certain radionuclides may contribute significantly to the dose estimated during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. Among these are the radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than 5 years). This report discusses these radionuclides and other radionuclides that may be significant during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. This report not only includes essential information on each radionuclide, but also incorporates waste and disposal information on the radionuclide, and behavior of the radionuclide in the environment and in the human body. Radionuclides addressed in this document include technetium-99, carbon-14, iodine-129, tritium, cesium-137, strontium-90, nickel-59, plutonium-241, nickel-63, niobium-94, cobalt-60, curium -42, americium-241, uranium-238, and neptunium-237.

NONE

1996-11-01

260

Transuranic radionuclides dispersed into the aquatic environment, a bibliography  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to compile a bibliography of references containing environmental transuranic radionuclide data. Our intent was to identify those parameters affecting transuranic radionuclide transport that may be generic and those that may be dependent on chemical form and/or environmental conditions (i.e., site specific) in terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric environments An understanding of the unique characteristics and similarities between source terms and environmental conditions relative to transuranic radionuclide transport and cycling will provide the ability to assess and predict the long term impact on man and the environment. An additional goal of our literature review, was to extract the ranges of environmental transuranic radionuclide data from the identified references for inclusion in a data base. Related to source term, these ranges of data can be used to calculate the dose to man from the radionuclides, and to perform uncertainty analyses on these dose assessments. On the basis of our reviews, we have arbitrarily outlined five general source terms. These are fallout, fuel cycle waste, accidents, disposal sites and resuspension. Resuspension of the transuranic radionuclides is a unique source term, in that the radionuclides can originate from any of the other source terms. If these transuranic radionuclides become resuspended into the air, they then become important as a source of inhaled radionuclides.

Noshkin, V.E.; Stoker, A.C.; Wong, Kai M. [and others

1994-04-01

261

Mathematical simulation of sediment and radionuclide transport in estuaries  

SciTech Connect

The finite element model LFESCOT (Flow, Energy, Salinity, Sediment and Contaminant Transport Model) was synthesized under this study to simulate radionuclide transport in estuaries to obtain accurate radionuclide distributions which are affected by these factors: time variance, three-dimensional flow, temperature, salinity, and sediments. Because sediment transport and radionuclide adsorption/desorption depend strongly on sizes or types of sediments, FLESCOT simulates sediment and a sediment-sorbed radionuclide for the total of three sediment-size fractions (or sediment types) of both cohesive and noncohesive sediments. It also calculates changes of estuarine bed conditions, including bed elevation changes due to sediment erosion/deposition, and three-dimensional distributions of three bed sediment sizes and sediment-sorbed radionuclides within the bed. Although the model was synthesized for radionuclide transport, it is general enough to also handle other contaminants such as heavy metals, pesticides, or toxic chemicals. The model was checked for its capability for flow, water surface elevation change, salinity, sediment and radionuclide transport under various simple conditions first, confirming the general validity of the model's computational schemes. These tests also revealed that FLESCOT can use large aspect ratios of computational cells, which are necessary in handling long estuarine study areas. After these simple tests, FLESCOT was applied to the Hudson River estuary between Chelsea and the mouth of the river to examine how well the model can predict radionuclide transport through simulating tidally influenced three-dimensional flow, salinity, sediment and radionuclide movements with their interactions.

Onishi, Y.; Trent, D.S.

1982-11-01

262

Transuranic radionuclides from resuspension in the environment, a bibliography  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to compile a bibliography of references containing environmental transuranic radionuclide data. Our intent was to identify those parameters affecting transuranic radionuclide transport that may be generic and those that may be dependent on chemical form and/or environmental conditions. An understanding of the unique characteristics and similarities between source terms and environmental conditions relative to transuranic radionuclide transport and cycling will provide the ability to assess and predict the long term impact on man and the environment. An additional goal of our literature review, was to extract the ranges of environmental transuranic radionuclide data from the identified references for inclusion in a data base. Related to source term, these ranges of data can be used to calculate the dose to man from the radionuclides, and to perform uncertainty analyses on these dose assessments. On the basis of our reviews, we have arbitrarily outlined five general source terms. These are fallout, fuel cycle waste, accidents, disposal sites and resuspension. Resuspension of the transuranic radionuclides is an unique source term, in that the radionuclides can originate from any of the other source terms. If these transuranic radionuclides become resuspended into the air, they then become important as a source of inhaled radionuclides. This bibliography is a compilation of the references containing studies of plutonium and americium in the environment as a result of resuspension.

Stoker, A.C.; Shinn, J.H.; Noshkin, V.E. [and others

1994-04-01

263

Method of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides  

DOEpatents

The present invention is a method of removing an impurity of plutonium, lead or a combination thereof from a mixture of radionuclides that contains the impurity and at least one parent radionuclide. The method has the steps of (a) insuring that the mixture is a hydrochloric acid mixture; (b) oxidizing the acidic mixture and specifically oxidizing the impurity to its highest oxidation state; and (c) passing the oxidized mixture through a chloride form anion exchange column whereupon the oxidized impurity absorbs to the chloride form anion exchange column and the 22.sup.9 Th or 2.sup.27 Ac "cow" radionuclide passes through the chloride form anion exchange column. The plutonium is removed for the purpose of obtaining other alpha emitting radionuclides in a highly purified form suitable for medical therapy. In addition to plutonium; lead, iron, cobalt, copper, uranium, and other metallic cations that form chloride anionic complexes that may be present in the mixture; are removed from the mixture on the chloride form anion exchange column.

Bray, Lane A. (Richland, WA); Ryan, Jack L. (West Richland, WA)

1999-01-01

264

Method of separating short half-life radionuclides from a mixture of radionuclides  

DOEpatents

The present invention is a method of removing an impurity of plutonium, lead or a combination thereof from a mixture of radionuclides that contains the impurity and at least one parent radionuclide. The method has the steps of (a) insuring that the mixture is a hydrochloric acid mixture; (b) oxidizing the acidic mixture and specifically oxidizing the impurity to its highest oxidation state; and (c) passing the oxidized mixture through a chloride form anion exchange column whereupon the oxidized impurity absorbs to the chloride form anion exchange column and the {sup 229}Th or {sup 227}Ac ``cow`` radionuclide passes through the chloride form anion exchange column. The plutonium is removed for the purpose of obtaining other alpha emitting radionuclides in a highly purified form suitable for medical therapy. In addition to plutonium, lead, iron, cobalt, copper, uranium, and other metallic cations that form chloride anionic complexes that may be present in the mixture are removed from the mixture on the chloride form anion exchange column. 8 figs.

Bray, L.A.; Ryan, J.L.

1999-03-23

265

Radionuclides in the Great Lakes basin.  

PubMed

The Great Lakes basin is of radiologic interest due to the large population within its boundaries that may be exposed to various sources of ionizing radiation. Specific radionuclides of interest in the basin arising from natural and artificial sources include 3H, 14C, 90Sr, 129I, 131I, 137Cs, 222Rn, 226Ra, 235U, 238U, 239Pu, and 241Am. The greatest contribution to total radiation exposure is the natural background radiation that provides an average dose of about 2.6 mSv/year to all basin residents. Global fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests conducted before 1963 has resulted in the largest input of anthropogenic radioactivity into the lakes. Of increasing importance is the radionuclide input from the various components of the nuclear fuel cycle. Although the dose from these activities is currently very low, it is expected to increase if there is continued growth of the nuclear industry. In spite of strict regulations on design and operation of nuclear power facilities, the potential exists for a serious accident as a result of the large inventories of radionuclides contained in the reactor cores; however, these risks are several orders of magnitude less than the risks from other natural and man-made hazards. An area of major priority over the next few decades will be the management of the substantial amounts of radioactive waste generated by nuclear fuel cycle activities. Based on derived risk coefficients, the theoretical incidence of fatal and weighted nonfatal cancers and hereditary defects in the basin's population, attributable to 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation, is conservatively estimated to be of the order of 3.4 x 10(5) cases. The total number of attributable health effects to the year 2050 from fallout radionuclides in the Great Lakes basin is of the order of 5.0 x 10(3). In contrast, estimates of attributable health effects from 50 years of exposure to current nuclear fuel cycle effluent in the basin are of the order of 2 x 10(2). Although these are hypothetical risks, they show that the radiologic impact of man-made sources is very small compared to the effects of normal background radiation. PMID:8635444

Ahier, B A; Tracy, B L

1995-12-01

266

Radionuclide evaluation of nonmalignant bone disorders  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in nuclear imaging have improved the noninvasive evaluation of patients with nonmalignant bone disorders. When bone scanning agents are combined with bone marrow scanning agents and gallium-67 scintigraphy, a more accurate diagnosis can be obtained. By selecting the appropriate imaging sequence, it is often possible to distinguish cellulitis from underlying osteomyelitis. In patients with total hip replacements, it may be possible to separate postsurgical changes from prosthetic loosening or infection. Stress fractures in joggers may be detected by radionuclide bone scintigraphy before radiographs become abnormal. These nuclear imaging procedures can be done in most hospitals.

Winzelberg, G.G.

1983-02-01

267

Microbial metabolism of triethylphosphate, a potential phosphate source for radionuclide mineralization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Significant quantities of metals and radionuclides contaminate unsaturated zones at several sites in the western U.S. In many cases, this contamination has migrated to groundwater, sometimes decades after being released into the subsurface. A potentially useful approach for immobilizing radionuclides such as uranium and strontium in the vadose zone is precipitation with microbially-generated phosphate. Triethylphosphate (TEP) is a low-toxicity organophosphate that can be vaporized and delivered to the vadose zone. Microbes can catalyze TEP degradation, leading to the release of inorganic phosphate that can then lead to the precipitation of phosphate minerals. These minerals are typically highly stable and poorly soluble under environmental conditions. Sequestration in phosphate minerals is a promising strategy for mitigating radionuclide transport in the environment. To examine the feasibility of this strategy, we set up lab-scale incubation experiments with TEP-amended synthetic groundwater inoculated with vadose zone-derived mixed cultures from the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and sediment slurries using solids from the Hanford Reservation in Washington (U.S. Department of Energy facilities with significant radionuclide contamination in the vadose zone). The amount of phosphate released in the cultures was monitored, and the microbial communities were characterized with a high-density microarray (PhyloChip). Significant biodegradation of TEP was observed in the experiments with the synthetic groundwater amended with 5 mM TEP. Phosphate concentrations in live cultures steadily increased to >0.25 mM after 13 months with no phosphate accumulated in killed controls. Surprisingly, no evidence for phosphate mineral precipitation was observed, contrary to expectations based on equilibrium considerations. Studies are underway to investigate potential kinetic inhibition of precipitation under these conditions. Cell counts increased by approximately one order of magnitude during that period. Significant decreases in the d13C values of dissolved inorganic carbon in the live cultures were observed, indicating the microbial community was respiring the carbon in the TEP. In contrast, no significant accumulation of phosphate was observed in the sediment slurries with 5 mM TEP, most likely due to phosphate adsorption to the solids. Microbial community identification indicated that organisms in the families of Xanthomonadaceae, Crenotrichaceae and Comamonadaceae were enriched by the addition of TEP. Further characterization of radionuclide-biota interactions would lead to enhanced understanding of the fate and transport of these contaminants in the subsurface.

Wu, C. H.; Lam, B. R.; Chou, J.; Bill, M.; Henriksen, J.; Wright, K. E.; Brodie, E. L.; Andersen, G. L.; Hazen, T. C.; Fujita, Y.; Conrad, M. E.

2009-12-01

268

Critical review: Radionuclide transport, sediment transport, and water quality mathematical modeling; and radionuclide adsorption/desorption mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of a detailed literature review of radionuclide transport models applicable to rivers, estuaries, coastal waters, the Great Lakes, and impoundments. Some representatives sediment transport and water quality models were also reviewed to evaluate if they can be readily adapted to radionuclide transport modeling. The review showed that most available transport models were developed for dissolved radionuclide in rivers. These models include the mechanisms of advection, dispersion, and radionuclide decay. Since the models do not include sediment and radionuclide interactions, they are best suited for simulating short-term radionuclide migration where: (1) radionuclides have small distribution coefficients; (2) sediment concentrations in receiving water bodies are very low. Only 5 of the reviewed models include full sediment and radionuclide interactions: CHMSED developed by Fields; FETRA SERATRA, and TODAM developed by Onishi et al, and a model developed by Shull and Gloyna. The 5 models are applicable to cases where: (1) the distribution coefficient is large; (2) sediment concentrations are high; or (3) long-term migration and accumulation are under consideration. The report also discusses radionuclide absorption/desorption distribution ratios and addresses adsorption/desorption mechanisms and their controlling processes for 25 elements under surface water conditions. These elements are: Am, Sb, C, Ce, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, I, Fe, Mn, Np, P, Pu, Pm, Ra, Ru, Sr, Tc, Th, {sup 3}H, U, Zn and Zr.

Onishi, Y.; Serne, R.J.; Arnold, E.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Thompson, F.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1981-01-01

269

Shuttle seated extraction feasibility study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Following the Space Shuttle Challenger accident, serious attention has turned to in-flight escape. Prior to the resumption of flight, a manual bailout system was qualified and installed. For the long term, a seated extraction system to expand the escape envelope is being investigated. This paper describes a 1987 study, conducted jointly by NASA/Johnson Space Center and Langley Research Center, to determine the feasibility of modifying the Space Shuttle Orbiters to incorporate the seated extraction system. Results of the study are positive, indicating retrofit opportunity and high probability of escape for early ascent, late entry, and even for uncontrolled flight such as the Challenger breakup. The system, as envisioned, can extract seven crewmembers within two seconds.

Onagel, Steven R.; Bement, Laurence J.

270

Unsedated Colonoscopy: Is It Feasible?  

PubMed Central

Unsedated colonoscopy has been an evolving subject ever since its initial description four decades ago. Failure in unsedated diagnostic cases due to patient pain led to the introduction of sedation. Extension to screening cases, albeit logical, created a sedation-related barrier to colonoscopy screening. In recent years a water method has been developed to combat the pain during unsedated colonoscopy in the US. In randomized controlled trials the water method decreases pain, increases cecal intubation success, and enhances the proportion of patients who complete unsedated colonoscopy. The salvage cleansing of suboptimal bowel preparation by the water method serendipitously may have increased the detection of adenoma in both unsedated and sedated patients. The state-of-the-art lecture concludes that unsedated colonoscopy is feasible. The hypothesis is that recent advances, such as the development of the water method, may contribute to reviving unsedated colonoscopy as a potentially attractive option for colon cancer screening and deserves to be tested.

Leung, Felix W.; Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M.

2011-01-01

271

IPNS upgrade: A feasibility study  

SciTech Connect

Many of Argonne National Laboratory`s (ANL`s) scientific staff members were very active in R&D work related to accelerator-based spoliation sources in the 1970s and early 1980s. In 1984, the Seitz/Eastman Panel of the National Academy of Sciences reviewed U.S. materials science research facilities. One of the recommendations of this panel was that the United States build a reactor-based steady-state source, the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Subsequently, R&D activities related to the design of an accelerator-based source assumed a lower priority. The resumption of pulsed-source studies in this country started simultaneously with design activities in Europe aimed at the European Spallation Source (ESS). The European Community funded a workshop in September 1991 to define the parameters of the ESS. Participants in this workshop included both accelerator builders and neutron source users. A consortium of European countries has proposed to build a 5-MW pulsed source, and a feasibility study is currently under way. Soon after the birth of the ESS, a small group at ANL set about bringing themselves up to date on pulsed-source information since 1984 and studied the feasibility of upgrading ANL`s Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) to 1 MW by means of a rapidly cycling synchrotron that could be housed, along with its support facilities, in existing buildings. In early 1993, the Kohn panel recommended that (1) design and construction of the ANS should be completed according to the proposed project schedule and (2) development of competitive proposals for cost-effective design and construction of a 1-MW pulsed spallation source should be authorized immediately.

NONE

1995-04-01

272

Radionuclide studies in paediatric nephro-urology.  

PubMed

The main tool of radionuclide techniques applied to paediatric uro-nephrology is the quantitation of function, which is an information not easily obtained by other diagnostic modalities. The radiation burden is low. Drug sedation is only rarely needed, whatever the age of the patient. Accurate determination of glomerular filtration rate can be obtained by means of an intravenous injection of Cr-51 EDTA and one or two blood samples. Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy is an accurate method for evaluation of regional cortical impairment during acute pyelonephritis and later on, for detection of permanent scarring. Tc-99m MAG3 renography is nowadays a well-standardized method for accurate estimation of the split renal function and of renal drainage with or without furosemide challenge. This technique is particularly indicated in uni- or bilateral uropathies with or without renal and/or ureteral dilatation. Direct and indirect radionuclide cystography are two alternative modalities for X-ray MCUG. Their relative place in the strategy of management of vesicoureteral reflux is discussed. PMID:12127212

Piepsz, Amy

2002-08-01

273

Estimation of radionuclide content in contaminated laundry.  

PubMed

Radioactively contaminated laundry is normally sent off site for processing. Laundry is defined as radiologically contaminated anti-cs and respirators. This laundry is shipped as "limited quantity," in accordance with 49CFR173.421. This requires that 95% of the radionuclides shipped are characterized and quantified. In addition, the total quantity must be 10(-3) below the A2 limits specified in 49CFR173. In any facility evaluated, the most conservative (highest activity) waste stream was used as the source term. If a new waste stream is established for a facility, its normalized activity should be compared to the evaluated waste stream to ensure the limits are not exceeded. This article documents a method used for estimating the radionuclide content in contaminated laundry. The maximum values were compared to 49CFR173. Itwas determined that if the contaminated laundry/respirators are shipped in an Interstate Nuclear Services (INS), L-59, limited quantity shipping container and the highest contact radiation level on any side, as measured with an ion chamber, does not exceed 0.5 mR h(-1), the container complies with the requirements of 49CFR173 and could be shipped "limited quantity" from any of the facilities evaluated. PMID:11480863

Schrader, B J

2001-08-01

274

Radionuclide release from research reactor spent fuel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerous investigations with respect to LWR fuel under non oxidizing repository relevant conditions were performed. The results obtained indicate slow corrosion rates for the UO2 fuel matrix. Special fuel-types (mostly dispersed fuels, high enriched in 235U, cladded with aluminium) are used in German research reactors, whereas in German nuclear power plants, UO2-fuel (LWR fuel, enrichment in 235U up to 5%, zircaloy as cladding) is used. Irradiated research reactor fuels contribute less than 1% to the total waste volume. In Germany, the state is responsible for fuel operation and for fuel back-end options. The institute for energy research (IEF-6) at the Research Center Jülich performs investigation with irradiated research reactor spent fuels under repository relevant conditions. In the study, the corrosion of research reactor spent fuel has been investigated in MgCl2-rich salt brine and the radionuclide release fractions have been determined. Leaching experiments in brine with two different research reactor fuel-types were performed in a hot cell facility in order to determine the corrosion behaviour and the radionuclide release fractions. The corrosion of two dispersed research reactor fuel-types (UAlx-Al and U3Si2-Al) was studied in 400 mL MgCl2-rich salt brine in the presence of Fe2+ under static and initially anoxic conditions. Within these experimental parameters, both fuel types corroded in the experimental time period of 3.5 years completely, and secondary alteration phases were formed. After complete corrosion of the used research reactor fuel samples, the inventories of Cs and Sr were quantitatively detected in solution. Solution concentrations of Am and Eu were lower than the solubility of Am(OH)3(s) and Eu(OH)3(s) solid phases respectively, and may be controlled by sorption processes. Pu concentrations may be controlled by Pu(IV) polymer species, but the presence of Pu(V) and Pu(IV) oxyhydroxides species due to radiolytic effects cannot completely be ruled out. Solution concentrations of U were within the range of the solubility limits of the solid phase U(OH)4(am). The determined concentrations of U and Am in solution were about one order of magnitude higher for the U3Si2-Al fuel sample. Here, the formation of U/Si containing secondary phase components and their influence on radionuclide solubility cannot be ruled out. Results of this work show that the U3Si2-Al and UAlx-Al dispersed research reactor spent fuel samples dissolved completely within the test period of 3.5 years in MgCl2-rich brine in the presence of Fe2+. In view of final disposal this means that these fuel matrices represent no barrier. The radionuclides will be released instantaneously. Cs (the long-lived isotope 135Cs is of special concern with respect to final disposal) and Sr were classified as mobile radionuclide species. For U, Am, Pu and Eu, a reimmobilization was observed. Sorption is the process which is assumed to be responsible for the reimmobilization of the long-lived actinide Am and the lanthanide Eu. Solution concentrations of U and Pu seem to be controlled by their solubility controlling solid phases.

Curtius, H.; Kaiser, G.; Müller, E.; Bosbach, D.

2011-09-01

275

Phytoremediation of soil contaminated with low concentrations of radionuclides  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecosystems throughout the world have been contaminated with radionuclides by above-ground nuclear testing, nuclear reactor accidents and nuclear power generation. Radioisotopes characteristic of nuclear fission, such as 137Cs and 90Sr, that are released into the environment can become more concentrated as they move up the food chain often becoming human health hazards. Natural environmental processes will redistribute long lived radionuclides

James A. Entry; Nan C. Vance; Melinda A. Hamilton; Darlene Zabowski; Lidia S. Watrud; Domy C. Adriano

1996-01-01

276

Risk Due to Radiological Terror Attacks With Natural Radionuclides  

Microsoft Academic Search

The naturally occurring radionuclides radium (Ra-226) and polonium (Po-210) have the potential to be used for criminal acts. Analysis of international incident data contained in the Database on Nuclear Smuggling, Theft and Orphan Radiation Sources (CSTO), operated at the University of Salzburg, shows that several acts of murder and terrorism with natural radionuclides have already been carried out in Europe

Steinhaeusler Friedrich; Rydell Stan; Zaitseva Lyudmila

2008-01-01

277

Natural Radionuclide Activity Concentrations In Spas Of Argentina  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal waters have been used on a large scale for bathing, drinking and medical purposes. These waters can contain natural radionuclides that may increase the exposure to people. In this work the most important natural radionuclide activity concentrations in different thermal spas of Argentina were measured to characterize waters and to evaluate the exposure of workers and members of the public.

Gnoni, G.; Czerniczyniec, M.; Canoba, A.; Palacios, M. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. Del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Bs. As. (1429) (Argentina)

2008-08-07

278

Reactor-released radionuclides in Susquehanna River sediments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three Mile Island (TMI) and Peach Bottom (PB) reactors have introduced 137Cs, 134Cs, 60Co, 58Co and several other anthropogenic radionuclides into the lower Susquehanna River. Here we present the release history for these nuclides (Table 1) and radionuclide concentration data (Table 2) for sediment samples collected in the river and upper portions of the Chesapeake Bay (Fig. 1) within a

C. R. Olsen; I. L. Larsen; N. H. Cutshall; J. F. Donoghue; O. P. Bricker; H. J. Simpson

1981-01-01

279

Exercise radionuclide ejection fraction: correlation with exercise contrast ventriculography  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thirty-one patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease or aortic valvular disease were studied at rest and during supine bicycle exercise with radionuclide and contrast left ventriculography. The radionuclide ejection fractions calculated independently by three observers correlated well at rest (r = 0.96) and with exercise (r = 0.94). The calculated values also correlated well with those obtained for

T. J. Brady; K. Lo; J. H. Thrall; J. A. Walton; J. F. Brymer; B. Pitt

1979-01-01

280

Radionuclides in fruit systems: Model–model intercomparison study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Modeling is widely used to predict radionuclide distribution following accidental radionuclide releases. Modeling is crucial in emergency response planning and risk communication, and understanding model uncertainty is important not only in conducting analysis consistent with current regulatory guidance, but also in gaining stakeholder and decision-maker trust in the process and confidence in the results. However, while methods for dealing with

I. Linkov; F. Carini; C. Collins; K. Eged; N. G. Mitchell; C. Mourlon; Z. Ould-Dada; B. Robles; L. Sweeck; A. Venter

2006-01-01

281

Nevada test site radionuclide inventory and distribution: project operations plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is the operational plan for conducting the Radionuclide Inventory and Distribution Program (RIDP) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The basic objective of this program is to inventory the significant radionuclides of NTS origin in NTS surface soil. The expected duration of the program is five years. This plan includes the program objectives, methods, organization, and schedules.

Kordas, J.F.; Anspaugh, L.R.

1982-06-01

282

Sources of anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment: a review.  

PubMed

Studies of radionuclides in the environment have entered a new era with the renaissance of nuclear energy and associated fuel reprocessing, geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes, and concerns about national security with respect to nuclear non-proliferation. This work presents an overview on sources of anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment, as well as a brief discussion of salient geochemical behavior of important radionuclides. We first discuss the following major anthropogenic sources and current developments that have lead, or could potentially contribute, to the radionuclide contamination of the environment: (1) nuclear weapons program; (2) nuclear weapons testing; (3) nuclear power plants; (4) uranium mining and milling; (5) commercial fuel reprocessing; (6) geological repository of high-level nuclear wastes that include radionuclides might be released in the future, and (7) nuclear accidents. Then, we briefly summarize the inventory of radionuclides (99)Tc and (129)I, as well as geochemical behavior for radionuclides (99)Tc, (129)I, and (237)Np, because of their complex geochemical behavior, long half-lives, and presumably high mobility in the environment; biogeochemical cycling and environment risk assessment must take into account speciation of these redox-sensitive radionuclides. PMID:18819734

Hu, Qin-Hong; Weng, Jian-Qing; Wang, Jin-Sheng

2008-09-25

283

Radionuclide migration in groundwater. Annual progress report for 1982  

SciTech Connect

Research has continued at a low-level waste disposal facility to characterize the physicochemical species of radionuclides migrating in groundwater. This facility consists of an unlined basin and connecting trench which receives effluent water containing low levels of a wide variety of fission and activation products and trace amounts of transuranic radionuclides. The effluent water percolates through the soil and a small fraction of it emerges at seepage springs located some 260 meters from the trench. The disposal basin and trench are very efficient in retaining most of the radionuclides, but trace amounts of a number of radionuclides existing in mobile chemical forms migrate in the groundwater from the trench to the springs. This facility provides the opportunity for characterizing the rates and mechanisms of radionuclide migration in groundwaters, identifying retardation processes, and validating geochemical models. 13 references, 25 figures, 23 tables.

Robertson, D.E.; Toste, A.P.; Abel, K.H.; Brodzinski, R.L.

1984-01-01

284

Radionuclide concentrations in white sturgeon from the Columbia River  

SciTech Connect

Although radioactive releases from the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site have been monitored in the environment since the reactors began operating in 1945, recent information regarding historical releases of radionuclides has led to renewed interest in estimating human exposure to radionuclides at Hanford. Knowledge of the fate of radionuclides in some fish species may be important because of the potential for food-chain transfer to humans. White sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) were selected for study because they are long-lived, reside year-round in the Hanford Reach, are benthic, and are an important commercial and sport species in the Columbia River. They also have a greater potential for accumulating persistent radionuclides than shorter-lived species with pelagic and/or anadromous life histories. The purpose of our study was to summarize data on historical concentrations of industrial radionuclides in white sturgeon and to collect additional data on current body burdens in the Columbia River.

Dauble, D.D.; Price, K.R.; Poston, T.M.

1992-09-01

285

Radionuclide concentrations in white sturgeon from the Columbia River  

SciTech Connect

Although radioactive releases from the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site have been monitored in the environment since the reactors began operating in 1945, recent information regarding historical releases of radionuclides has led to renewed interest in estimating human exposure to radionuclides at Hanford. Knowledge of the fate of radionuclides in some fish species may be important because of the potential for food-chain transfer to humans. White sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) were selected for study because they are long-lived, reside year-round in the Hanford Reach, are benthic, and are an important commercial and sport species in the Columbia River. They also have a greater potential for accumulating persistent radionuclides than shorter-lived species with pelagic and/or anadromous life histories. The purpose of our study was to summarize data on historical concentrations of industrial radionuclides in white sturgeon and to collect additional data on current body burdens in the Columbia River.

Dauble, D.D.; Price, K.R.; Poston, T.M.

1992-09-01

286

Intravenous radionuclide cystography for the detection of vesicorenal reflux  

SciTech Connect

Intravenous radionuclide cystography using a single intravenous injection of 99mtechnetium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, provides information on individual kidney function, coarse anatomy and vesicorenal reflux. This study investigates the effectiveness of intravenous radionuclide cystography in detecting reflux. In 58 children intravenous radionuclide cystography detected 53 ureters with reflux compared to 32 detected by voiding cystography. This difference was investigated further with patients in whom other test suggested reflux. While there was no statistically significant difference for patients having pyelonephritis or hydronephrosis, intravenous radionuclide cystography detected significantly more ureters with reflux in patients with abnormal ureteral orifices or infected urine and, therefore, predisposed to reflux. Intravenous radionuclide cystography is a more comprehensive and sensitive test for vesicorenal reflux than voiding cystography.

Pollet, J.E.; Sharp, P.F.; Smith, F.W.; Davidson, A.I.; Miller, S.S.

1981-01-01

287

A limiting factor for the progress of radionuclide-based cancer diagnostics and therapy--availability of suitable radionuclides.  

PubMed

Advances in diagnostics and targeted radionuclide therapy of haematological and neuroendocrine tumours have raised hope for improved radionuclide therapy of other forms of disseminated tumours. New molecular target structures are characterized and this stimulates the efforts to develop new radiolabelled targeting agents. There is also improved understanding of factors of importance for choice of appropriate radionuclides. The choice is determined by physical, chemical, biological, and economic factors, such as a character of emitted radiation, physical half-life, labelling chemistry, chemical stability of the label, intracellular retention time, and fate of radiocatabolites and availability of the radionuclide. There is actually limited availability of suitable radionuclides and this is a limiting factor for further progress in the field and this is the focus in this article. The probably most promising therapeutic radionuclide, 211At, requires regional production and distribution centres with dedicated cyclotrons. Such centres are, with a few exceptions in the world, lacking today. They can be designed to also produce beta- and Augeremitters of therapeutic interest. Furthermore, emerging satellite PET scanners will in the near future demand long-lived positron emitters for diagnostics with macromolecular radiopharmaceuticals, and these can also be produced at such centres. To secure continued development and to meet the foreseen requirements for radionuclide availability from the medical community it is necessary to establish specialized cyclotron centres for radionuclide production. PMID:15244250

Tolmachev, Vladimir; Carlsson, Jörgen; Lundqvist, Hans

2004-01-01

288

Experimental determination of calibration settings of a commercially available radionuclide calibrator for various clinical measurement geometries and radionuclides  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following the approach of the National Primary Laboratory of the UK (NPL) for the calibration of radionuclide calibrators, but using a commercially available instrument with no data available in the literature, the radionuclide calibrator response was investigated as a function of different measurement geometries at the “Regina Elena” National Cancer Institute (IRE) in Rome.Working with Italian National Metrology Institute for

A. Ceccatelli; M. Benassi; M. D’Andrea; P. De Felice; A. Fazio; S. Nocentini; L. Strigari

2007-01-01

289

Is global measles eradication feasible?  

PubMed

Measles is one of most infectious diseases. Before the introduction of the measles vaccine, practically all children in the long run contracted measles. By the end of the 1980s most countries of the world had incorporated measles vaccine into their routine vaccination programs. Globally, some 800,000 deaths due to measles still occur every year, half of them in Africa. Eradication of measles would play an important role in improving child survival. The goal to eradicate measles from the Americas was set by the Pan American Sanitary Conference in 1994. Progress to date has been remarkable. Measles is no longer an endemic disease in the Americas and interruption of transmission has been documented in most countries. As of August 2005, 3 years have elapsed since the detection of the last indigenous case in Venezuela in September 2002. This experience shows that interruption of measles transmission can be achieved and sustained over a long period of time and that global eradication is feasible if appropriate strategy is implemented. Even in a new paradigm in which eradication is not followed by the discontinuation of vaccination, eradication of measles will be a good investment to avoid expensive epidemics and save the almost one million children that die every year to infection with the measles virus. It is not a dream to think that we will se a world free of measles by the year 2015. PMID:16989269

de Quadros, C A

2006-01-01

290

Chemically feasible hypothetical crystalline networks.  

PubMed

Our systematic enumeration of 4-connected crystalline networks (that is, networks in which each atom is connected to exactly four neighbours) used recent advances in tiling theory to evolve over 900 topologies. The results are relevant to the structures of zeolites and other silicates, aluminophosphates (AlPOs), oxides, nitrides, chalcogenides, halides, carbon networks, and even to polyhedral bubbles in foams. Given their importance as molecular sieves, ion exchangers, catalysts and catalyst supports, we have applied the results to microporous aluminosilicates and aluminophosphates (zeolites). Zeolite chemistry has to date produced 152 distinct types of structure. However, it was always clear that although many further structures can be synthesised, only a fraction of the mathematically generated networks would be chemically feasible (many are 'strained' frameworks requiring unrealistic bond lengths and bond angles), and that an effective 'filtering' process is needed to identify the most plausible frameworks. Here, we describe the use of computational chemistry methods to calculate optimized structural parameters, framework energies relative to alpha-quartz, volumes accessible to sorption, and X-ray diffraction patterns for systematically enumerated hypothetical 4-connected crystalline frameworks. Structures were treated as silica polymorphs with the empirical formula SiO(2), and their energies were minimized. PMID:15048108

Foster, Martin D; Simperler, Alexandra; Bell, Robert G; Friedrichs, Olaf Delgado; Paz, Filipe A Almeida; Klinowski, Jacek

2004-03-28

291

Lunar surface mine feasibility study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes a lunar surface mine, and demonstrates the economic feasibility of mining oxygen from the moon. The mine will be at the Apollo 16 landing site. Mine design issues include pit size and shape, excavation equipment, muck transport, and processing requirements. The final mine design will be driven by production requirements, and constrained by the lunar environment. This mining scenario assumes the presence of an operating lunar base. Lunar base personnel will set-up a and run the mine. The goal of producing lunar oxygen is to reduce dependence on fuel shipped from Earth. Thus, the lunar base is the customer for the finished product. The perspective of this paper is that of a mining contractor who must produce a specific product at a remote location, pay local labor, and sell the product to an onsite captive market. To make a profit, it must be less costly to build and ship specialized equipment to the site, and pay high labor and operating costs, than to export the product directly to the site.

Blair, Brad R.

292

Feasibility of utilizing apple pomace  

SciTech Connect

Apple pomace, the solid residue from juice production, is a solid waste problem in the Hudson Valley. This study investigates possibilities for converting it to a resource. The characteristics of the region's apple growing and processing industries are examined at length, including their potential for converting waste biomass. The properties of apple pomace are described. From interviews with Hudson Valley apple processors the following information is presented: quantities of pomace produced; seasonality of production; disposal procedures, costs, and revenues; trends in juice production; and attitudes toward alternatives. Literature research resulted in a list of more than 25 end uses for apple pomace of which eight were selected for analysis. Landfilling, landspreading, composting, animal feed, direct burning, gasification, anaerobic digestion (methane generation), and fermentation (ethanol production) were analyzed with regard to technical availability, regulatory and environmental impact, attitudes toward end use, and energetic and economic feasibility (See Table 19). The study recommends (1) a pilot anaerobic digestion plant be set up, (2) the possibility of extracting methane from the Marlborough landfill be investigated, (3) a study of the mid-Hudson waste conversion potential be conducted, and (4) an education program in alternative waste management be carried out for the region's industrial and agricultural managers.

Stapleton, J.

1983-06-01

293

Muon muon collider: Feasibility study  

SciTech Connect

A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

NONE

1996-06-18

294

Radionuclide Decay and In-growth Technical Basis Document  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to assess the decay and in-growth of radionuclides from the radionuclide source term (RST) deposited by underground nuclear weapons tests conducted at the NTS from 1951 through 1992. A priority of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) project, administered by the Environmental Restoration Division of NNSA/NV, was to determine as accurately as possible a measure of the total radionuclide inventory for calculation of the RST deposited in the subsurface at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The motivation for the development of a total radionuclide inventory is driven by a need to calculate the amount of radioactivity that will move away from the nuclear test cavities over time, referred to as the hydrologic source term (HST). The HST is a subset of the RST and must be calculated using knowledge of the geochemistry and hydrology of the subsurface environment. This will serve the regulatory process designed to protect human health from exposures to contaminated groundwater. Following the detonation of an underground nuclear test, and depending on the presence of water at the location of the detonation, the residual radionuclides may be found in aqueous or gaseous states, precipitated or chemically sorbed states, or incorporated in melt glass produced by the nuclear test. The decay and in-growth of radionuclides may have geochemical implications for the migration of radionuclides away from underground nuclear test cavities. For example, in the case of a long-lived mobile parent decaying to a shorter-lived and less mobile daughter, the geochemical properties of the parent element may control the migration potential of the daughter nuclide. It becomes important to understand the evolution of the RST in terms of effects on the mobility, solubility, or abundance of radionuclides in the HST that are created by decay and in-growth processes. The total radionuclide inventory and thus the RST changes with time due to radioactive decay. The abundance of a specific radionuclide at any given time is a function of the initial amount of radioactivity, the decay rate and in-growth from parent radionuclides. The in-growth of radioactivity is the additional amount of radioactivity for a given radionuclide that comes from the decay of the parent isotopes. In this report, decay and in-growth of radionuclides from the RST are evaluated over the 1000-year time frame in order to determine whether coupled in-growth and decay affect the relative abundance of any RST radionuclide. In addition, it is also necessary to identify whether any new derivative radionuclides not initially produced by the nuclear test but exist now as a result of in-growth from a parent radionuclide One of the major goals of this report is to simplify the transport modeler's task by pointing out where in-growth is unimportant and where it needs to be considered. The specific goals of this document are to evaluate radionuclide decay chains and provide specific recommendations for incorporating radionuclide daughters of concern in the calculation of the radionuclide inventory.

Kersting, A B; Finnegan, D L; Tompson, A F B; Esser, B K; Smith, D K; Zavarin, M; Bruton, C J; Pawloski, G A

2003-07-01

295

Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers: radionuclide transport modeling for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York  

Microsoft Academic Search

SERATRA, a transient, two-dimensional (laterally-averaged) computer model of sediment-contaminant transport in rivers, satisfactorily resolved the distribution of sediment and radionuclide concentrations in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system in New York. By modeling the physical processes of advection, diffusion, erosion, deposition, and bed armoring, SERATRA routed three sediment size fractions, including cohesive soils, to simulate three dynamic flow events. In conjunction

Y. Onishi; S. B. Yabusaki; C. T. Kincaid; R. L. Skaggs; W. H. Walters

1982-01-01

296

Computer models track atmospheric radionuclides worldwide  

SciTech Connect

The big sponge is what initiates call ARAC-the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability-and it is vital to the clean-up after a nuclear accident. But this sobriquet doesn't refer to a propensity for mopping up radiation. It alludes to ARAC's ability to soak up data on weather conditions, regional geography, and the release of radionuclides into the atmosphere at thousands of sites around the globe. ARAC is a contingent of about 30 physicists, meteorologists, electronic engineers, computer scientists, and technicians who work at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory across the bay from San Francisco. The ARAC staff employs computer models to estimate the extent of surface contamination as well as radiation doses to population centers after hypothetical or real nuclear accidents. ARAC works fast. Within 15 minutes of an accident, it can produce a contour map estimating levels of radiation exposure within a 20-km radius of the accident site.

Not Available

1986-08-01

297

Graphene oxide for effective radionuclide removal.  

PubMed

Here we show the efficacy of graphene oxide (GO) for rapid removal of some of the most toxic and radioactive long-lived human-made radionuclides from contaminated water, even from acidic solutions (pH < 2). The interaction of GO with actinides including Am(III), Th(IV), Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI) and typical fission products Sr(II), Eu(III) and Tc(VII) were studied, along with their sorption kinetics. Cation/GO coagulation occurs with the formation of nanoparticle aggregates of GO sheets, facilitating their removal. GO is far more effective in removal of transuranium elements from simulated nuclear waste solutions than other routinely used sorbents such as bentonite clays and activated carbon. These results point toward a simple methodology to mollify the severity of nuclear waste contamination, thereby leading to effective measures for environmental remediation. PMID:23296256

Romanchuk, Anna Yu; Slesarev, Alexander S; Kalmykov, Stepan N; Kosynkin, Dmitry V; Tour, James M

2013-01-08

298

Systemic targeted radionuclide therapy: Potential new areas  

SciTech Connect

Radiation oncology is entering an exciting new era with therapies being delivered in a targeted fashion through an increasing number of novel approaches. External beam radiotherapy now integrates functional and anatomic tumor imaging to guide delivery of conformal radiation to the tumor target. Systemic targeted radionuclide therapy (STaRT) adds an important new dimension by making available to Radiation oncologist biologically targeted radiation therapy. Impressive clinical results with antibody-targeted radiotherapy, leading to the Food and Drug Administration's approval of two anti-CD20 radiolabeled antibodies, highlight the potential of STaRT. Optimization strategies will further improve the efficacy of STaRT by improving delivery systems, modifying the tumor microenvironment to increase targeted dose, and maximizing dose effect. Ultimately, the greatest potential for STaRT will not be as monotherapy, but as therapy integrated into established multimodality regimens and used as adjuvant or consolidative therapy in patients with minimal or micrometastatic disease.

Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Radiation Research, City of Hope National Medical Center and Beckman Research Institute, Duarte, CA (United States)]. E-mail: jwong@coh.org

2006-10-01

299

Characterization of hydrofracture grouts for radionuclide migration  

SciTech Connect

Detailed characterization of hydrofracture grouts was performed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and ..beta..-..gamma.. autoradiography. Laboratory-produced samples containing simulated wastes as well as actual radioactive samples of hydrofracture grout sheets obtained by core drilling were examined in this work. X-ray diffraction results revealed that both laboratory-produced samples and a core-drilled sample consisted primarily of calcium carbonate phases. Both sample types contained very small amounts of strontium or cesium wastes, neither of which could be detected by microscopic techniques. The core-drilled sample contained radioactive /sup 90/Sr, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 60/Co that could be detected by ..beta..-..gamma.. autoradiography. The autoradiograph revealed that these radionuclides were still present in the 20-year-old grout and that they had not migrated into the trapped shale fragments.

Stinton, D.P.; McDaniel, E.W.; Weeren, H.O.

1983-01-01

300

Radioimmunotherapy of malignancy using antibody targeted radionuclides.  

PubMed Central

Antibodies directed against tumour associated antigens provide a means for delivering preferentially cytotoxic radionuclides to the cells of primary and secondary tumours. The factors that influence the effectiveness of the radiation in the tumour compared with its effect on the radiosensitive normal tissues include the specificity of the antibody, the distribution of targeted energy within the tumour and the host's response to the injected foreign antibody. Recently some encouraging results from clinical trials of radioimmunotherapy have been reported in the literature. There is a continual search for more avid and specific antibodies, and the techniques of genetic engineering are being applied to the problem of reducing the antigenicity and mass of the carrier antibody. The improved efficiency of the labelled antibody needs to be supplemented by an identification of those tumours most likely to respond to this form of therapy.

Cobb, L. M.; Humm, J. L.

1986-01-01

301

Fracture occurrence from radionuclides in the skeleton  

SciTech Connect

Because skeletal fractures were an important finding among persons contaminated with {sup 226}Ra, experience with fractures among dogs in the colony was summarized to determine the projected significance for persons contaminated with bone-seeking radionuclides. Comparison by Fisher's Exact Test of lifetime fracture occurrence in the skeletons of beagles injected as young adults suggested that for animals given {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 228}Th, or {sup 239}Pu citrate, there was probably an excess over controls in fractures of the ribs, leg bones, spinous processes, and pelvis (os coxae) plus the mandible for dogs given {sup 226}Ra and the scapulae for dogs given {sup 228}Ra or 228 Th. Regression analysis indicated that significantly elevated fracture occurrence was especially notable at the higher radiation doses, at about 50 Gy average skeletal dose for {sup 239}Pu, 140 Gy for {sup 226}Ra, about 40 Gy for {sup 228}Ra, and more than 15 Gy for {sup 228}Th. The average number of fractures per dog was significantly elevated over that noted in controls for the highest radiation doses of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 226}Ra and for the higher doses of {sup 228}Ra and {sup 228}Th. For those dogs given {sup 90}Sr citrate, there was virtually no important difference from control beagles not given radionuclides, even at group mean cumulative skeletal radiation doses up to 101 Gy. Because of a large proportion of dogs with fractures that died with bone malignancy (even at dosage levels lower than those exhibiting an excess average number of fractures per dog), they conclude that fracture would not be an important endpoint at lower levels of plutonium contamination in humans such as would be expected to occur from occupational or environmental exposure.

Lloyd, R.D.; Taylor, G.N.; Miller, S.C.

2000-06-01

302

Colloid-Associated Radionuclide Concentration Limits: ANL  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and scope of this report is to describe the analysis of available colloidal data from waste form corrosion tests at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to extract characteristics of these colloids that can be used in modeling their contribution to the source term for sparingly soluble radioelements (e.g., Pu). Specifically, the focus is on developing a useful description of the following waste form colloid characteristics: (1) composition, (2) size distribution, and (3) quantification of the rate of waste form colloid generation. The composition and size distribution information are intended to support analysis of the potential transport of the sparingly soluble radionuclides associated with the waste form colloids. The rate of colloid generation is intended to support analysis of the waste form colloid-associated radionuclide concentrations. In addressing the above characteristics, available data are interpreted to address mechanisms controlling colloid formation and stability. This report was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Process Model Report for SR'' (CRWMS M&O 2000). Because the end objective is to support the source term modeling we have organized the conclusions into two categories: (1) data analysis conclusions and (2) recommendations for colloid source term modeling. The second category is included to facilitate use of the conclusions from the data analysis in the abstraction of a colloid source term model. The data analyses and conclusions that are presented in this report are based on small-scale laboratory tests conducted on a limited number of waste glass compositions and spent fuel types.

C. Mertz

2000-12-21

303

Dynamic economic dispatch: feasible and optimal solutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dynamic economic dispatch is an extension of the conventional economic dispatch problem that takes into consideration the limits on the ramp rate of the generating units. This paper examines the factors that affect the feasibility and optimality of solutions to this problem. It proposes two new solution methods. The first is guaranteed to find a feasible solution even when the

X. S. Han; H. B. Gooi; Daniel S. Kirschen

2001-01-01

304

The Assessment of Oracy: Feasibility and Methods.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A feasibility study has been conducted in Australia to investigate school and teacher objectives and practices in the development of oracy, to determine oracy skills agreed to be important, and to assess the feasibility and desirability of testing competence in oracy. The need for oracy assessment arises from a need for schools to account for…

Bourke, Sid

305

Sault Tribe Wind Energy Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The Sault Tribe conducted a feasibility study on tribal lands in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to determine the technical and economic feasibility of both small and large-scale wind power development on tribal lands. The study included a wind resource assessment, transmission system analysis, engineering and regulatory analyzes and assessments.

Toni Osterhout; Global Energy Concepts

2005-07-31

306

Sault Tribe Wind Energy Feasibility Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sault Tribe conducted a feasibility study on tribal lands in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to determine the technical and economic feasibility of both small and large-scale wind power development on tribal lands. The study included a wind resource assessment, transmission system analysis, engineering and regulatory analyzes and assessments.

Toni Osterhout

2005-01-01

307

Developing political intelligence for making feasible decisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this research is to propose a model for acquiring political intelligence by describing steps for assessing feasibility that can be used to systematically evaluate a situation. The paper also aims to discuss individual and situational biases to acquiring an accurate political feasibility assessment. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – A pre- and post-test method was used to compare a

Susan M. Adams; Alberto Zanzi

2006-01-01

308

Agricultural robots: an economic feasibility study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper focuses on the economic feasibility of applying autonomous robotic vehicles compared to conventional systems in three different applications: robotic weeding in high value crops (particularly sugar beet), crop scouting in cereals and cutting grass on golf courses. The comparison is based on a systems analysis and an individual economic feasibility study for each of the three applications. The

S. M. Pedersen; S. Fountas; B. S. Blackmore

309

Results of a Receptor Modeling Feasibility Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper summarizes the results of an Electric Power Research Institute funded research effort to determine the feasibility of using receptor models for the apportionment of power plant contributions to air quality, deposition quality, and light extinction on local and regional scales. Sufficient information currently exists (or was developed during the course of this study) to establish feasibility for the

Harold S. Javitz; John G. Watson; Jacques P. Guertin; Peter K. Mueller

1988-01-01

310

Dynamics and transformations of radionuclides in soils and ecosystem health  

SciTech Connect

The chemical behavior of radionuclides can vary widely in soil and sediment environments. Equally important, for a given radionuclide the physico-chemical properties of the solids and aqueous phase can greatly influence a radionuclides behavior. Radionuclides can conceivably occur in soils as soluble-free, inorganic-soluble-complexed, organic-soluble, complexed, adsorbed, precipitated, coprecipitated, or solid structural species. While it is clear that an assessment of a radionuclide?s soil chemistry and potential shifts in speciation will yield a considerable understanding of its behavior in the natural environment, it does not directly translate to bioavailability or its impact on ecosystems health. The soil chemical factors have to be linked to food chain considerations and other ecological parameters that directly tie to an analysis of ecosystem health. In general, the movement of radionuclides from lower to higher trophic levels diminishes with each trophic level in both aqua tic and terrestrial systems. In some cases, transfer is limited because of low absorption/assimilation by successive trophic organisms (Pu, U); for other radionuclides (Tc, H) assimilation may be high but rapid metabolic turnover and low retention greatly reduce tissue concentrations available to predator species. Still others are chemical analogs of essential elements whose concentrations are maintained under strict metabolic control in tissues (Cs) or are stored in tissues seldom consumed by other organisms (Sr storage in exoskeleton, shells, and bone). Therefore, the organisms that receive the greatest ingestion exposures are those in lower trophic positions or are in higher trophic levels but within simple, short food chains. Food source, behavior, and habitat influence the accumulation of radionuclides in animals.

Fellows, Robert J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Ainsworth, Calvin C. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Driver, Crystal J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Cataldo, Dominic A. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

1998-12-01

311

Consequence ranking of radionuclides in Hanford tank waste  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclides in the Hanford tank waste are ranked relative to their consequences for the Low-Level Tank Waste program. The ranking identifies key radionuclides where further study is merited. In addition to potential consequences for intrude and drinking-water scenarios supporting low-level waste activities, a ranking based on shielding criteria is provided. The radionuclide production inventories are based on a new and independent ORIGEN2 calculation representing the operation of all Hanford single-pass reactors and the N Reactor.

Schmittroth, F.A.; De Lorenzo, T.H.

1995-09-01

312

An economic study of the radionuclides industry. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

The NRC has a broad responsibility to regulate the civilian use of nuclear materials and facilities to ensure public health and safety, national security, and environmental quality. To develop a data base necessary to the effective handling of this responsibility, the NRC has sponsored studies to examine the economic activity associated with the nuclear power industry and the nuclear medicine portion of the radio-nuclides industry. This study addresses the industrial and consumer areas of the radionuclides industry and revises earlier estimates for the nuclear medicine portions of the radionuclides industry.

Birdsong, J.G.

1981-07-01

313

[Radionuclide techniques in early diagnosis of pulmonary artery thromboembolism].  

PubMed

A combined procedure of indirect radionuclide phlebography and emission tomography of the lung with human serum albumin microspheres was employed to diagnose thromboembolism of pulmonary arterial branches (TPAB) and thrombosis in the inferior cava system. Four hundred and forty nine patients suspected for TPAB were examined. The data characteristic of pulmonary thromboembolism were obtained in 21.6% of cases. In 75 (17.6%) of 432 patients, indirect radionuclide phlebography revealed signs of thrombosis in the inferior cava at various sites. The radionuclide study of pulmonary perfusion is the only technique that assesses the degree of recovery of pulmonary perfusion after TPAB. PMID:10067352

Sychev, V K; Zolotareva, L A

1998-01-01

314

Multnomah County Hydrokinetic Feasibility Study: Final Feasibility Study Report  

SciTech Connect

HDR has completed a study of the technical, regulatory, and economic feasibility of installing hydrokinetic turbines under the Morrison, Broadway, and Sellwood bridges. The primary objective of installing hydrokinetic turbines is a demonstration of in-stream hydrokinetic technologies for public education and outreach. Due to the low gradient of the Lower Willamette and the effects of the tide, velocities in the area in consideration are simply not high enough to economically support a commercial installation. While the velocities in the river may at times provide enough energy for a commercial turbine to reach capacity, the frequency and duration of high flow events which provide suitable velocities is not sufficient to support a commercial hydrokinetic installation. We have observed that over an 11 year period, daily average velocities in the Lower Willamette exceeded a nominal cut-in speed of 0.75 m/s only 20% of the time, leaving net zero power production for the remaining 80% of days. The Sellwood Bridge site was estimated to have the best hydrokinetic resource, with an estimated average annual production of about 9,000 kWh. The estimated production could range from 2,500 kWh to 15,000 kWh. Based on these energy estimates, the amount of revenue generated through either a power purchase agreement (PPA) or recovered through net metering is not sufficient to repay the project costs within the life of the turbine. The hydrokinetic resource at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges is slightly smaller than at the Sellwood Bridge. While the Broadway and Morrison Bridges have existing infrastructure that could be utilized, the project is not expected to generate enough revenue to repay the investment. Despite low velocities and energy production, the sites themselves are favorable for installation of a demonstration or experimental project. With high public interest in renewable energy, the possibility exists to develop a hydrokinetic test site which could provide developers and scientists a location to temporarily deploy and test hydrokinetic devices, and also function as an educational tool for the general public. Bridge piers provide an excellent pre-existing anchor point for hydrokinetic devices, and existing infrastructure at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges may reduce installation costs. Opportunity exists to partner with local universities with engineering and environmental interest in renewable energy. A partnership with Portland State University�¢����s engineering school could provide students with an opportunity to learn about hydrokinetics through senior design projects. Oregon State University and University of Washington, which are partnered through the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC) to study and test hydrokinetic technology, are also relatively local to the site. In addition to providing an opportunity for both public and private entities to learn technically about in-stream kinetics, this approach will encourage grant funding for outreach, education, and product development, while also serving as a positive community relations opportunity for the County and its partners.

Stephen Spain

2012-03-15

315

Ecological feasibility studies in restoration decision making.  

PubMed

The restoration of degraded systems is essential for maintaining the provision of valuable ecosystem services, including the maintenance of aesthetic values. However, restoration projects often fail to reach desired goals for a variety of ecologic, financial, and social reasons. Feasibility studies that evaluate whether a restoration effort should even be attempted can enhance restoration success by highlighting potential pitfalls and gaps in knowledge before the design phase of a restoration. Feasibility studies also can bring stakeholders together before a restoration project is designed to discuss potential disagreements. For these reasons, a feasibility study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of restoring a tidal freshwater marsh in the Potomac River near Alexandria, Virginia. The study focused on science rather than engineering questions, and thus differed in approach from other feasibility studies that are mostly engineering driven. The authors report the framework they used to conduct a feasibility study to inform other potential restoration projects with similar goals. The seven steps of the framework encompass (1) initiation of a feasibility study, (2) compilation of existing data, (3) collection of current site information, (4) examination of case studies, (5) synthesis of information in a handbook, (6) meeting with selected stakeholders, and (7) evaluation of meeting outcomes. By conducting a feasibility study using the seven-step framework, the authors set the stage for conducting future compliance studies and enhancing the chance of a successful restoration. PMID:17453281

Hopfensperger, Kristine N; Engelhardt, Katharina A M; Seagle, Steven W

2007-04-19

316

Ecological Feasibility Studies in Restoration Decision Making  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The restoration of degraded systems is essential for maintaining the provision of valuable ecosystem services, including the maintenance of aesthetic values. However, restoration projects often fail to reach desired goals for a variety of ecologic, financial, and social reasons. Feasibility studies that evaluate whether a restoration effort should even be attempted can enhance restoration success by highlighting potential pitfalls and gaps in knowledge before the design phase of a restoration. Feasibility studies also can bring stakeholders together before a restoration project is designed to discuss potential disagreements. For these reasons, a feasibility study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of restoring a tidal freshwater marsh in the Potomac River near Alexandria, Virginia. The study focused on science rather than engineering questions, and thus differed in approach from other feasibility studies that are mostly engineering driven. The authors report the framework they used to conduct a feasibility study to inform other potential restoration projects with similar goals. The seven steps of the framework encompass (1) initiation of a feasibility study, (2) compilation of existing data, (3) collection of current site information, (4) examination of case studies, (5) synthesis of information in a handbook, (6) meeting with selected stakeholders, and (7) evaluation of meeting outcomes. By conducting a feasibility study using the seven-step framework, the authors set the stage for conducting future compliance studies and enhancing the chance of a successful restoration.

Hopfensperger, Kristine N.; Engelhardt, Katharina A. M.; Seagle, Steven W.

2007-06-01

317

Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate (by means of 2-D semianalytical and 3-D numerical models) the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the unsaturated zone (UZ) under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. This is in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan U0060, Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). This AMR documents the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model (RTM). This model considers: the transport of radionuclides through fractured tuffs; the effects of changes in the intensity and configuration of fracturing from hydrogeologic unit to unit; colloid transport; physical and retardation processes and the effects of perched water. In this AMR they document the capabilities of the UZ RTM, which can describe flow (saturated and/or unsaturated) and transport, and accounts for (a) advection, (b) molecular diffusion, (c) hydrodynamic dispersion (with full 3-D tensorial representation), (d) kinetic or equilibrium physical and/or chemical sorption (linear, Langmuir, Freundlich or combined), (e) first-order linear chemical reaction, (f) radioactive decay and tracking of daughters, (g) colloid filtration (equilibrium, kinetic or combined), and (h) colloid-assisted solute transport. Simulations of transport of radioactive solutes and colloids (incorporating the processes described above) from the repository horizon to the water table are performed to support model development and support studies for Performance Assessment (PA). The input files for these simulations include transport parameters obtained from other AMRs (i.e., CRWMS M and O 1999d, e, f, g, h; 2000a, b, c, d). When not available, the parameter values used are obtained from the literature. The results of the simulations are used to evaluate the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids, and to determine the processes, mechanisms, and geologic features that have a significant effect on it. They evaluate the contributions of daughter products of radioactive decay to transport from the bottom of the potential repository to the water table. The effect of the various conceptual models of perched water bodies on transport is also evaluated. Note that a more thorough study of perched water bodies can be found in another AMR (CRWMS M and O 1999d, Sections 6.2 and 6.6). The primary caveat for using the modeling results documented here is that the input transport parameters were based on limited site data. For some input parameters, best estimates were used because no specific data were available. An additional caveat is that the RTM is based on the conceptual models and numerical approaches used for developing the flow fields and infiltration maps, and thus they share the same limitations.

G. Moridis; Q. Hu

2000-03-12

318

Developments in Bioremediation of Soils and Sediments Pollutedwith Metals and Radionuclides: 2. Field Research on Bioremediation of Metals and Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Bioremediation of metals and radionuclides has had manyfield tests, demonstrations, and full-scale implementations in recentyears. Field research in this area has occurred for many different metalsand radionuclides using a wide array of strategies. These strategies canbe generally characterized in six major categories: biotransformation,bioaccumulation/bisorption, biodegradation of chelators, volatilization,treatment trains, and natural attenuation. For all field applicationsthere are a number of critical biogeochemical issues that most beaddressed for the successful field application. Monitoring andcharacterization parameters that are enabling to bioremediation of metalsand radionuclides are presented here. For each of the strategies a casestudy is presented to demonstrate a field application that uses thisstrategy.

Hazen, Terry C.; Tabak, Henry H.

2007-03-15

319

Solubility Limits on Radionuclide Dissolution at a Yucca Mountain Repository.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that are characteristic of a Yucca Mountain ...

J. F. Kerrisk

1984-01-01

320

Radionuclide Inventory and Distribution Program: the Galileo area  

SciTech Connect

The Galileo area is the first region of the Nevada Test Site to be surveyed by the Radionuclide Inventory and Distribution Program (RIDP). This report describes in detail the use of soil sampling and in situ spectrometry to estimate radionuclide activities at selected sampling locations; the descriptions of these methods will be used as a reference for future RIDP reports. The data collected at Galileo were analyzed by kriging and the polygons of influence method to estimate the total inventory and the distribution of six man-made radionuclides. The results of the different statistical methods agree fairly well, although the data did not give very good estimates of the variogram for kriging, and further study showed the results of kriging to be highly dependent on the variogram parameters. The results also showed that in situ spectrometry gives better estimates of radionuclide activity than soil sampling, which tends to miss highly radioactive particles associated with vegetation. 18 references, 28 figures, 11 tables.

McArthur, R.D.; Kordas, J.F.

1983-12-28

321

Transport of Radionuclides with Groundwater from a Bedrock Repository.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The migration of radionuclides from a repository for vitrified high-level waste in Swedish bedrock was studied. The mathematical model used comprises migration with flowing groundwater, dispersion, and geochemical retardation of the migrating nuclides. Th...

B. Grundfelt

1977-01-01

322

National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series  

SciTech Connect

The National Low Level Waste Management Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory has published a report containing key information about selected radionuclides that are most likely to contribute significantly to the radiation exposures estimated from a performance assessment of a low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility. The information includes physical and chemical characteristics, production means, waste forms, behavior of the radionuclide in soils, plants, groundwater, and air, and biological effects in animals and humans. The radionuclides included in this study comprise all of the nuclides specifically listed in 10CFR61.55, Tables 1 and 2, 3 H, 14 C, 59 Ni, 60 Co, 63 Ni, 90 Sr, 94 Nb, 99 Tc, 129 I, 137 Cs, 241 Pu, and 242 Cm. Other key radionuclides addressed in the report include 237 Np, 238 U, 239 Pu, and 241 Am. This paper summarizes key information contained within this report.

J.P. Adams; M.L. Carboneau; W.E. Allred

1999-02-01

323

National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series  

SciTech Connect

The National Low Level Waste Management Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory has published a report containing key information about selected radionuclides that are most likely to contribute significantly to the radiation exposures estimated from a performance assessment of a low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility. The information includes physical and chemical characteristics, production means, waste forms, behavior of the radionuclide in soils, plants, groundwater, and air, and biological effects in animals and humans. The radionuclides included in this study comprise all of the nuclides specifically listed in 10CFR61.55, Tables 1 and 2, 3 H, 14 C, 59 Ni, 60 Co, 63 Ni, 90 Sr, 94 Nb, 99 Tc, 129 I, 137 Cs, 241 Pu, and 242 Cm. Other key radionuclides addressed in the report include 237 Np, 238 U, 239 Pu, and 241 Am. This paper summarizes key information contained within this report.

Adams, James Paul; Carboneau, Michael Leonard; Allred, William Edgar

1999-03-01

324

Migration of Radionuclide Chains Through an Adsorbing Medium.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The migration of actinides and other radionuclides from an underground geologic nuclear waste disposal site through a soil column to a surface water body was investigated for impulse and band releases. Numerical calculation of the analytical solutions rev...

D. H. Lester G. Jansen H. C. Burkholder

1974-01-01

325

Production of Spallation Radionuclides for Medical Applications at BLIP.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Brookhaven LINAC Isotope Producer (BLIP) is the first facility to demonstrate the capability of a large linear accelerator for efficient and economical production of difficult-to-make, medically useful radionuclides. It utilizes the excess beam capaci...

L. F. Mausner P. Richards

1982-01-01

326

Gas: A Neglected Phase in Remediation of Metals and Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

The gas phase is generally ignored in remediation of metals and radionuclides because it is assumed that there is no efficient way to exploit it. In the literal sense, all remediations involve the gas phase because this phase is linked to the liquid and solid phases by vapor pressure and thermodynamic relationships. Remediation methods that specifically use the gas phase as a central feature have primarily targeted volatile organic contaminants, not metals and radionuclides. Unlike many organic contaminants, the vapor pressure and Henry's Law constants of metals and radionuclides are not generally conducive to direct air stripping of dissolved contaminants. Nevertheless, the gas phase can play an important role in remediation of inorganic contaminants and provide opportunities for efficient, cost effective remediation. The objective here is to explore ways in which manipulation of the gas phase can be used to facilitate remediation of metals and radionuclides.

Denham, Miles E.; Looney, Brian B

2005-09-28

327

SRNL RADIONUCLIDE FIELD LYSIMETER EXPERIMENT: BASELINE CONSTRUCTION AND IMPLEMENTATION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to compile information regarding experimental design, facility design, construction, radionuclide source preparation, and path forward for the ten year Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Radionuclide Field Lysimeter Experiment at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This is a collaborative effort by researchers at SRNL and Clemson University. The scientific objectives of this study are to: Study long-term radionuclide transport under conditions more representative of vadose zone conditions than laboratory experiments; Provide more realistic quantification of radionuclide transport and geochemistry in the vadose zone, providing better information pertinent to radioactive waste storage solutions than presently exists; Reduce uncertainty and improve justification for geochemical models such as those used in performance assessments and composite analyses.

Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.; Bagwell, L.; Powell, B.; Almond, P.; Emerson, H.; Hixon, A.; Jablonski, J.; Buchanan, C.; Waterhouse, T.

2012-10-17

328

Role of radionuclides in acute cardiac care: current status  

SciTech Connect

The aforementioned studies demonstrate the varied and important clinical information concerning acute myocardial infarctions that is obtainable from certain radionuclide procedures. Limitations of these procedures as well as futuristic improvements are also discussed. 66 references.

Goldstein, H.A.

1986-01-01

329

Modelling Interaction of Deep Groundwaters with Bentonite and Radionuclide Speciation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In the safety analysis recently reported for a potential Swiss high-level waste repository, radionuclide speciation and solubility limits are calculated for expected granitic groundwater conditions. With the objective of deriving a more realistic descript...

H. Wanner

1986-01-01

330

Anthropogenic radionuclides in the Arctic Ocean. Distribution and pathways.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations have been determined in seawater and sediment samples collected in 1991, 1994 and 1996 in the Eurasian Arctic shelf and interior. Global fallout, releases from European reprocessing plants and the Chernobyl accide...

D. Josefsson

1998-01-01

331

Compositions and Methods for Removal of Toxic Metals and Radionuclides.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The present invention relates to compositions and methods for the removal of toxic metals or radionuclides from source materials. Toxic metals may be removed from source materials using a clay, such as attapulgite or highly cationic bentonite, and chitin ...

D. S. McKay R. G. Cuero

2007-01-01

332

Coprecipitation of radionuclides: basic concepts, literature review and first applications.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Coprecipitation of radionuclides with solid products is currently not analysed quantitatively in safety assessments for nuclear waste repositories, although this process is thought to be an important mechanism for limiting nuclide concentrations in soluti...

E. Curti

1997-01-01

333

Radionuclides Notice of Data Availability Technical Support Document.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 1991, EPA published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to consider changes to the regulations governing the allowable levels of radionuclides in drinking water. The agency recently published a Notice of Data Availabilty (NODA) to publicize new information...

2000-01-01

334

Modeling the Dispersal and Deposition of Radionuclides: Lessons from Chernobyl.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Described are theoretical models that simulate the dispersion of radionuclides on local and global scales following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. Discusses the application of these results to nuclear weapons fallout. (CW)|

ApSimon, H. M.; And Others

1988-01-01

335

21 CFR 892.1420 - Radionuclide test pattern phantom.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1420 Radionuclide test pattern phantom. (a) Identification. A...

2013-04-01

336

21 CFR 892.5740 - Radionuclide teletherapy source.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5740 Radionuclide teletherapy source. (a) Identification. A...

2013-04-01

337

21 CFR 892.5700 - Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5700 Remote controlled radionuclide applicator system. (a)...

2013-04-01

338

21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide brachytherapy source. (a) Identification. A...

2013-04-01

339

21 CFR 892.1360 - Radionuclide dose calibrator.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1360 Radionuclide dose calibrator. (a) Identification. A...

2013-04-01

340

21 CFR 892.5650 - Manual radionuclide applicator system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5650 Manual radionuclide applicator system. (a) Identification....

2013-04-01

341

21 CFR 892.1390 - Radionuclide rebreathing system.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1390 Radionuclide rebreathing system. (a) Identification. A...

2013-04-01

342

Radionuclides in hydrothermal systems as indicators of repository conditions.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Hydrothermal systems in tuffaceous and older sedimentary rocks contain evidence of the interaction of radionuclides in fluids with rock matrix minerals and with materials lining fractures, in settings somewhat analogous to the candidate repository site at...

H. A. Wollenberg S. Flexser A. R. Smith

1990-01-01

343

Modelling of radionuclide migration in forest ecosystems. A literature review.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Chernobyl accident has clearly shown the long-term effects of a radioactive contamination of forest ecosystems. This report is based on a literature review of models which describe the migration of radionuclides, radioactive caesium in particular, in ...

R. Avila L. Moberg L. Hubbard

1998-01-01

344

Total Diet Study - Structure of Radionuclide Analysis Files  

Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN)

... Total Diet Study - Structure of Radionuclide Analysis Files. ... 04/10/2013 Note: If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see ... More results from www.fda.gov/food/foodscienceresearch/totaldietstudy

345

Synthetic gamma-ray spectra for Homeland Security radionuclides analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Homeland Security applications use radiation detectors to identify radionuclides by gamma spectroscopy techniques. In order to check compliance of such systems to performance requirements, a computer code which predicts the gamma-ray spectra for various radiation detectors, as NaI(TI) and Ge was employed. The spectrum of a chosen radio-nuclide is generated according to its activity, its photo peak energy and yield

S. Levinson; B. Sarusi; A. Osovizky; V. Pushkarsky; U. German; E. Marcus; Y. Cohen; I. Belaish

2009-01-01

346

EOS7R: Radionuclide transport for TOUGH2  

Microsoft Academic Search

EOS7R provides radionuclide transport capability for TOUGH2. EOS7R extends the EOS7 module (water, brine, and optional air) to model water, brine, parent component, daughter component, and optional air and heat. The radionuclide components follow a first-order decay law, and may adsorb onto the solid grains. Volatilization of the decaying components is modeled by Henry`s Law. The decaying components are normally

Curtis M. Oldenburg; Karsten Pruess

1995-01-01

347

Production of spallation radionuclides for medical applications at BLIP  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Brookhaven LINAC Isotope Producer (BLIP) is the first facility to demonstrate the capability of a large linear accelerator for efficient and economical production of difficult-to-make, medically useful radionuclides. It utilizes the excess beam capacity of a LINAC that injects 200-MeV protons into the 33-GeV Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. The LINAC provides an integrated beam current of 60 ..mu..A for radionuclide

L. F. Mausner; P. Richards

1982-01-01

348

Blind quality control samples: Which radionuclides, what activity levels?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since today`s radioanalytical laboratory spends a significant amount of time analyzing quality control (QC) samples, it is important to design an efficient measurements quality-assurance (QA) program. Two important considerations when designing or evaluating a blind, QC sample-analysis program are which radionuclides and what activities should be used to evaluate the quality of measurements. If the radionuclides are not chosen carefully,

McFarland

1995-01-01

349

RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINING NATURAL RADIONUCLIDES IN DRINKING WATER  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radionuclides from the natural decay series are ubiquitous in Earth's crust, and because of direct recoil, diffusion, migration, and dissolution, these radionuclides infiltrate drinking water through the water cycle. Extensive data exists on 222Rn and 226Ra in drinking water in Austria; however, little is known about the 232Th decay products like 228Ra, the 222Rn progenies 210Pb and 210Po, and uranium.

Claudia Landstetter; Christian Katzlberger

350

Theoretical approach to explore the production routes of astatine radionuclides  

Microsoft Academic Search

To fulfill the recent thrust of astatine radionuclides in the field of nuclear medicine, various production routes have been explored in the present work. The possible production routes of At209-211 comprise both light- and heavy-ion-induced reactions at the bombarding energy range starting from threshold to a maximum of 100 MeV. Excitation functions of those radionuclides, produced through various production routes,

Moumita Maiti; Susanta Lahiri

2009-01-01

351

Theoretical approach to explore the production routes of astatine radionuclides  

Microsoft Academic Search

To fulfill the recent thrust of astatine radionuclides in the field of nuclear medicine, various production routes have been explored in the present work. The possible production routes of ²°²¹¹At comprise both light- and heavy-ion-induced reactions at the bombarding energy range starting from threshold to a maximum of 100 MeV. Excitation functions of those radionuclides, produced through various production routes,

Moumita Maiti; Susanta Lahiri

2009-01-01

352

Seepage basin radionuclide transport in sediments and vegetation. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclide concentrations were measured in soil and vegetation growing adjacent to and in the Savannah River Laboratory Seepage Basins as part of the plan for closure of the basin system. The results of the measurements provide some information about the mobility of the radionuclides introduced into the basins. {sup 90}Sr is the most mobile of the radionuclides in soil. Its high mobility and high relative uptake by vegetation cause {sup 90}Sr to be distributed throughout the basin system. {sup 137}Cs is not as mobile in the basin soil, limiting its uptake by vegetation growing on the edge of the seepage basins; however, it is readily taken up by the vegetation growing in the basins. Soil mobility and vegetation uptake is relatively low for all of the transuranic radionuclides. For the most part these radionuclides remain near the surface of the basin soils where they were absorbed from the waste-water. The relative role of soil mobility and vegetation uptake on the distribution of radionuclide at the basins was futher evaluated by comparing the vegetation concentration ratio and the half-depth of penetration of the radionuclides in the basin soil. The results suggest that vegetation processes dominate in determining the concentration of {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs in the vegetation. The influences of soil and vegetation are more balanced for {sup 90}Sr. The other radionuclides exhibit both low soil mobility and low vegetation uptake. The lack of soil mobility is seen in the lower concentrations found in vegetation growing on the edge of the basin compared to those growing in the basin.

Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Jerome, K.M.

1993-12-31

353

Radionuclide imaging of soft tissue neoplasms  

SciTech Connect

Two classes of radiopharmaceuticals may be used for imaging tumors of the musculoskeletal system. The first is comprised of soft tissue or tumor specific agents such as gallium-67, bleomycin, and radionuclide-labeled antibodies, which may be useful for detecting and localizing these tumors. The other class of tracer is comprised of those with avidity for bone. The 99mTc-labeled-phosphate skeletal imaging compounds have been found to localize in a variety of soft tissue lesions, including benign and malignant tumors. In 1972, Enneking began to include bone scans in the preoperative evaluation of soft tissue masses. Later, he and his associates reported that these scans were useful in planning operative treatment of sarcomas by detecting involvement of bone by the tumors. Nearly all malignant soft tissue tumors take up bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals, and bone involvement was indicated in two-thirds of the scans we reviewed. About half of benign soft tissue lesions had normal scans, but the other half showed uptake within the lesion and a few also showed bone involvement. Careful, thorough imaging technique is essential to proper evaluation. Multiple, high-resolution static gamma camera images in different projections are necessary to adequately demonstrate the presence or absence of soft tissue abnormality and to define the precise relationship of the tumor to the adjacent bone.

Chew, F.S.; Hudson, T.M.; Enneking, W.F.

1981-10-01

354

Natural chelating agents for radionuclide decorporation  

DOEpatents

This invention relates to the production of metal-binding compounds useful for the therapy of heavy metal poisoning, for biological mining and for decorporation of radionuclides. The present invention deals with an orderly and effective method of producing new therapeutically effective chelating agents. This method uses challenge biosynthesis for the production of chelating agents that are specific for a particular metal. In this approach, the desired chelating agents are prepared from microorganisms challenged by the metal that the chelating agent is designed to detoxify. This challenge induces the formation of specific or highly selective chelating agents. The present invention involves the use of the challenge biosynthetic method to produce new complexing/chelating agents that are therapeutically useful to detoxify uranium, plutonium, thorium and other toxic metals. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa family of organisms is the referred family of microorganisms to be used in the present invention to produce the new chelating agent because this family is known to elaborate strains resistant to toxic metals.

Premuzic, E.T.

1985-06-11

355

Radionuclides' Content Speciation and Fingerprinting of Nigerian Tin Mining Tailings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sediment and process-waste samples rich in cassiterite, monazite and zircon, which are of industrial interest, were analysed for the natural series radionuclides, 232Th and 238U and the non-series radionuclide, 40K using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) technique. The natural radionuclides' radioactivity in the samples from the tin-rich areas of Jos, Nigeria was determined using K0-INAA. The obtained results have a high degree of reliability judging from the techniqués accuracy, precision and its non-dependence on secular equilibrium and density correction problems inherent in gamma spectrometry as well as rigorous contamination-prone sample preparation requirements of other methods. Radionuclides speciation and ratios, giving radionuclide fingerprinting of the tin mining tailings is reported. The measured radionuclides activity levels are several orders of magnitude higher than UNSCEAR reference values, revealing the pollution potential of the tin mining and process activities on the surrounding areas, vis-à-vis heavy particulate matter load, leaching into various water channels and direct exposure to gamma rays emitted from the houses and facilities built from the generated wastes. The observed activity levels reflects possible worst scenario situation and the data would not only be of use to the government in its remediation plan for the study area but will also serve as important information for the nuclear science and technology programme about to be embarked upon. Methods of checking exposure have also been suggested.

Olise, F. S.; Oladejo, O. F.; Owoade, O. K.; Almeida, S. M.; Ho, M. D.; Olaniyi, H. B.

2012-04-01

356

Simulation of radionuclide transport in U. S. agriculture  

SciTech Connect

Because of the recent concern about the impact of energy technologies on man and related health effects, there has emerged a need for models to calculate or predict the effects of radionuclides on man. A general overview is presented of a model that calculates the ingrowth of radionuclides into man's food chain. The FORTRAN IV computer program TERRA, Transport of Environmentally Released Radionuclides in Agriculture, simulates the build-up of radionuclides in soil, four plant food compartments, in meat and milk from beef, and in the livestock food compartments that cause radionuclide build-up in milk and meat from beef. A large data set of spatially oriented parameters has been developed in conjunction with TERRA. This direct-access data set is called SITE, Specific Information on the Terrestrial Environment, and contains 35 parameters for each of 3525 half-degree longitude-latitude cells which define the lower 48 states. TERRA and SITE are used together as a package for determining radionuclide concentrations in man's food anywhere within the conterminous 48 states due to atmospheric releases.

Sharp, R.D.; Baes, C.F. III

1982-01-01

357

Telekom Malaysia Network Feasibility Study: Network Management.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The document is the second volume of a four volume final report submitted to Malaysia Telekom. The final report documents a Network Feasibility Study conducted for Malaysia Telekom. The volume discusses the functional and organizational requirements for n...

1991-01-01

358

Telekom Malaysia Network Feasibility Study: Network Planning.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The volume is the fourth of a four volume final report submitted to Telekom Malaysia. The report documents the Network Feasibility Study conducted for Telekom Malaysia. The volume discusses the functional and organizational requirements for network planni...

1991-01-01

359

Telekom Malaysia Network Feasibility Study: Transmission Maintenance.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The volume is the third of a four volume final report submitted to Malaysia Telekom. The final report documents a Network Feasibility Study conducted for the Malaysia Telekom. The volume addresses the functional and operational requirements of transmissio...

1991-01-01

360

Feasibility Analysis in Small Hydropower Planning.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Hydrologic Engineering Center, Corps of Engineers, has prepared a manual entitled 'Feasibility Studies for Small Scale Hydropower Additions'. The manual provides technical data and procedural guidance for the systematic appraisal of the viability of p...

D. W. Davis B. W. Smith

1979-01-01

361

Three Affliated Tribes Renewable Energy Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The Three Affliated Tribes on the Fort Berthold Reservation studied the feasibility of a commercial wind facility on land selected and owned by the Tribes and examined the potential for the development of renewable energy resources on Tribal Lands.

Belvin Pete; Kent Good; Krista Gordon; Ed McCarthy,

2006-05-26

362

Maxwell Hydroelectric Project Feasibility Assessment Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The results of a feasibility assessment study to determine if it is economical to develop hydroelectric generation at the existing Maxwell Locks and Dam in Pennsylvania on the Monongahela River are summarized. The investigations included site reconnaissan...

1979-01-01

363

Jackson Bluff Hydroelectric Project. Feasibility Assessment Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A feasibility assessment study was conducted to determine if it is economical to reinstall hydroelectric generating units at the existing Jackson Bluff Dam on the Ochlockonee River in Florida. The studies and investigations have included site reconnaissan...

1979-01-01

364

POWER REACTORS AND THEIR ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Problems in reactor construction in West Germany, and the technical ; risks and possibilities involved in calculating their economic feasibility, are ; discussed in comparison with the situation in other countries. (auth);

Flick

1963-01-01

365

Conceptual Thermal Treatment Technologies Feasibility Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report presents a conceptual Thermal Treatment Technologies Feasibility Study (FS) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) focusing exclusively on thermal treatment technologies for contaminated soil, sediment, or sludge remediation projects.

A. Suer

1996-01-01

366

Flow Liner Slot Edge Replication Feasibility Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Surface replication has been proposed as a method for crack detection in space shuttle main engine flowliner slots. The results of a feasibility study show that examination of surface replicas with a scanning electron microscope can result in the detectio...

J. A. Newman S. A. Willard S. W. Smith R. S. Piascik

2006-01-01

367

Assault Boat Coxswain Trainer Feasibility Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

An in-house study was conducted to determine the engineering feasibility of an assault boat coxswain trainer. Investigations were made to identify the training problem and possible training equipment which will simulate the various situations that a coxsw...

M. Aronson F. Chea

1967-01-01

368

Feasibility Study of Filament Wound Cartridge Cases.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The feasibility of fabricating a 60mm composite cartridge case by the filament winding process has been demonstrated. Fabrication procedures for the manufacturing of this type of case are presented in this report. (Author)

G. D'Andrea R. Cullinan P. Croteau

1978-01-01

369

Conceptual Thermal Treatment Technologies Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a conceptual Thermal Treatment Technologies Feasibility Study (FS) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) focusing exclusively on thermal treatment technologies for contaminated soil, sediment, or sludge remediation projects.

Suer, A.

1996-02-28

370

Tactical Missile Launcher Feasibility Study. Book II.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The document contains inertial load tables and air load tables relative to the development and the results of a study of the feasibility of designing a standard tactical missile launcher which is capable of carrying and launching hypothetical stores, weig...

1968-01-01

371

7 CFR 1980.442 - Feasibility studies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...an exception to the requirement of a feasibility study for loans to existing businesses when the financial history of the business, the current financial condition of the business, and guarantees or other collateral offered for the loan are...

2013-01-01

372

7 CFR 1710.112 - Loan feasibility.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...with other utilities and other energy sources to prevent substantial load loss while providing satisfactory... (4) Risks of possible loss of substantial loads from large...feasibility. (5) Risks of loss of portions of the...

2013-01-01

373

Nuts and bolts of conducting feasibility studies.  

PubMed

Many factors can affect the successful implementation and validity of intervention studies. A primary purpose of feasibility and pilot studies is to assess the potential for successful implementation of the proposed main intervention studies and to reduce threats to the validity of these studies. This article describes a typology to guide the aims of feasibility and pilot studies designed to support the development of randomized controlled trials and provides an example of the studies underlying the development of one rehabilitation trial. The purpose of most feasibility and pilot studies should be to describe information and evidence related to the successful implementation and validity of a planned main trial. Null hypothesis significance testing is not appropriate for these studies unless the sample size is properly powered. The primary tests of the intervention effectiveness hypotheses should occur in the main study, not in the studies that are serving as feasibility or pilot studies. PMID:23433271

Tickle-Degnen, Linda

374

Feasibility Study: Integrated 100% Ultrasonic Pouch Inspection.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objectives were to determine and document the technical and economic feasibility of using ultrasonic technology for inspection of food pouches to determine package integrity. Literature searches indicated successful use in some industries, but no expe...

Q. H. Zhang

1999-01-01

375

Warri Premium and Aviation Fuel Feasibility Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This study, conducted by Turner, Mason and Company for Warri Refining and Petrochemical Company Limited, examined the feasibility of a major capital program at WRPC to: maximize motor gasoline production while eliminating the use of lead anti-knock additi...

2003-01-01

376

25 CFR 41.7 - Feasibility studies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...study has been initiated. The study shall be filed with (1) the...body or bodies requesting the studies, and (3) with the board of...established. (e) In the case of any feasibility study which results in a negative...

2013-04-01

377

A Feasibility Study of Nuclear Fireball Simulation.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report describes the initial phase of an experimental program designed to assess the feasibility of simulating the thermal environment of a high-temperature nuclear fireball. A high-performance, explosively driven shock tube is used to produce tempera...

D. W. Baum S. P. Gill

1970-01-01

378

7 CFR 1980.442 - Feasibility studies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the availability of short-term credit for seasonal business and the adequacy of raw material and supplies. (e) Management feasibility. Evidence that continuity and adequacy of management has been evaluated and documented as being...

2010-01-01

379

Solar Cookers for Haiti, A Feasibility Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The objectives of the study were to assess the feasibility of applying solar cookers extensively in rural Haiti, and to present a preliminary design for a solar cooker based on Haitian requirements. Two such designs are presented herein. (Color illustrati...

T. E. Bowman J. R. Sharber J. H. Blatt

1977-01-01

380

Radionuclides for radioimmunotherapy: criteria for selection.  

PubMed

In developing and designing radioimmunotherapy, the selection of the isotope is a major factor. This selection depends on a number of criteria and parameters, affecting usefulness and feasibility. Usefulness is directly related to the radiological performance of the ionising radiation in relation to tissue and its morphology, with a major distinction between the effects of alpha and beta-particles (or rays). Usefulness is also directly related to the pharmacodynamic performance of the isotope-carrier (e.g. antibody) complex, where the proper choice of isotope radiodecay halflife is of major importance. Feasibility depends on availability of the components in the isotope-ligand-carrier complex, and also on convenience and safety aspects in the preparation and the handling of the materials as well as in their application in patients. A comparison is made between the various properties of alpha-emitting isotopes that have been proposed over a number of years, concluding that the combination 225Ac- 213Bi deserves serious further attention. PMID:8277210

Geerlings, M W

381

7 CFR 4280.178 - Scoring feasibility study grant applications.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Scoring feasibility study grant applications. 4280.178 ...Program General Renewable Energy System Feasibility Study Grants § 4280.178 Scoring feasibility study grant applications. Agency...

2013-01-01

382

7 CFR 1737.70 - Description of feasibility study.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2013-01-01 false Description of feasibility study. 1737.70 Section 1737...1737.70 Description of feasibility study. (a) In connection with each loan RUS shall prepare a feasibility study that includes...

2013-01-01

383

7 CFR 4280.173 - Grant funding for feasibility studies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... false Grant funding for feasibility studies. 4280.173 Section 4280.173 Agriculture...General Renewable Energy System Feasibility Study Grants § 4280.173 Grant funding for feasibility studies. (a) Maximum grant amount....

2013-01-01

384

Radionuclide Migation Project 1984 progress report  

SciTech Connect

The report discusses the hydrogeologic settings and histories of studies associated with the Cheshire (U20n), Cambric (U5e), Nash (UE2ce), Bilby (U3cn), Bourbon (U7n), and Faultless (UC1) Events. Radionuclide and some chemical data are presented for water samples from cavity or chimney wells associated with the Cheshire, Cambric, and Bilby Events, and from satellite wells at the Cambric, Nash, Bibly, Bourbon, and Faultless Event sites. The report also gives the results of studies of specific sampling or analytical methodologies. These studies demonstrated that the apparent migration of /sup 155/Eu is an artfact of spectrometric misidentification of gamma- and x-ray peaks from other constituents. A potential problem with atmospheric contamination of samples collected with evacuated thief samples was also identified. Ultrafiltration techniques were applied to some of the Cheshire cavity samples collected, and preliminary results suggest that substantial amounts of activity may be associated with colloidal particles in the size range of 0.006 to 0.45 ..mu..m. A study has begun of the recharge of effluent water from RNM-2S (Cambric satellite well) into the desert floor as a result of nine years of continuous pumping. This report gives the initial results of unsaturated zone studies showing the propagation of moisture and tritium fronts through the shallow soil. Geochemical modeling of the behavior of ruthenium and technetium was carried out, with particular emphasis on the identification of ionic species that would be potentially mobile under NTS ground-water conditions. The report compares the results with observations of ruthenium migration to the Cambric satellite well.

Buddemeier, R.W.; Isherwood, D. (comps.)

1985-04-01

385

Evaluating Radionuclide Air Emission Stack Sampling Systems  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R&D) facilities for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Hanford Site, Washington. These facilities are subject to Clean Air Act regulations that require sampling of radionuclide air emissions from some of these facilities. A revision to an American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard on sampling radioactive air emissions has recently been incorporated into federal and state regulations and a re-evaluation of affected facilities is being performed to determine the impact. The revised standard requires a well-mixed sampling location that must be demonstrated through tests specified in the standard. It also carries a number of maintenance requirements, including inspections and cleaning of the sampling system. Evaluations were performed in 2000 – 2002 on two PNNL facilities to determine the operational and design impacts of the new requirements. The evaluation included inspection and cleaning maintenance activities plus testing to determine if the current sampling locations meet criteria in the revised standard. Results show a wide range of complexity in inspection and cleaning activities depending on accessibility of the system, ease of removal, and potential impact on building operations (need for outages). As expected, these High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA)-filtered systems did not show deposition significant enough to cause concerns with blocking of the nozzle or other parts of the system. The tests for sampling system location in the revised standard also varied in complexity depending on accessibility of the sample site and use of a scale model can alleviate many issues. Previous criteria to locate sampling systems at eight duct diameters downstream and two duct diameters upstream of the nearest disturbances is no guarantee of meeting criteria in the revised standard. A computational fluid dynamics model was helpful in understanding flow and contaminant mixing in an exhaust system and may be useful to identify potential sampling locations in an exhaust system that are likely to meet criteria in the revised standard.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.

2002-12-16

386

Inferring Hillslope Hydrology from the Distribution of Fallout Radionuclides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Be-7, excess Pb-210, Cs-137, and Am-241 are short-lived (half-life < 500 yr) particle-reactive radionuclides with well-defined atmospheric source terms. Previous studies show that the redistribution of these radionuclides on agricultural fields is by particle transport, not via the dissolved phase. We use the distribution of short-lived atmospheric fallout on forested hillslopes to infer the hydrological processes governing local sediment transport. Here, we present radionuclide activities from soil samples collected at different depths along hillslope profiles in a forested watershed in New Hampshire. Radionuclide activities in stream sediment, water, and soil samples were determined by gamma spectroscopy. Sites with fallout radionuclide inventories consistent with the theoretical deposition flux can be assumed to be stable and undergoing little or no erosion. However, near-stream portions of the watershed which could be subject to saturated overland flow show a depletion of Be-7 and excess Pb-210 relative to the more stable locations. Sediment collected from the bottom of stream channels showed significant activities of short-lived radionuclides, particularly Be-7. This suggests that saturated overland flow is an important process eroding soil from certain parts of the hillslope and in-channel deposition occurs. By comparing the distribution of Be-7 (half-life ca. 53 days) with Cs-137 (half-life ca. 30 yr) we can identify the timescales of sediment transport processes. A hydrological model is presented to explain the distribution of radionuclides on hillslopes at our study site. The results from this study will help us better predict the fate of atmospherically deposited contaminants in watersheds.

Kaste, J. M.; Heimsath, A. M.; Friedland, A. J.

2001-05-01

387

Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring (Project Number: 70179)  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem requiring monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to the analytical laboratory where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of short ranges of beta and alpha particles in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector using automated microfluidics for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field analytical chemistry.

Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

2002-06-01

388

MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION THROUGH BIOREMEDIATION.  

SciTech Connect

Treatment of waste streams containing radionuclides, the remediation of contaminated materials, soils, and water, and the safe and economical disposal of radionuclides and toxic metals containing wastes is a major concern. Radionuclides may exist in various oxidation states and may be present as oxide, coprecipitates, inorganic, and organic complexes depending on the process and waste stream. Unlike organic contaminants, the metals cannot be destroyed, but must either be converted to a stable form or removed. Microorganisms present in the natural environment play a major role in the mobilization and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals by direct enzymatic or indirect non-enzymatic actions and could affect the chemical nature of the radionuclides by altering the speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of microbiological transformations of various chemical forms of uranium present in wastes and contaminated soils and water has led to the development of novel bioremediation processes. One process uses anaerobic bacteria to stabilize the radionuclides by reductive precipitation from higher to lower oxidation state with a concurrent reduction in volume due to the dissolution and removal of nontoxic elements from the waste matrix. In an another process, uranium and other toxic metals are removed from contaminated surfaces, soils, and wastes by extracting with the chelating agent citric acid. Uranium is recovered from the citric acid extract after biodegradation followed by photodegradation in a concentrated form as UO{sub 3} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O for recycling or appropriate disposal. These processes use all naturally occurring materials, common soil bacteria, naturally occurring organic compound citric acid and sunlight.

FRANCIS, A.J.

2006-09-29

389

REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES IN DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8)  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that the waste producer 'shall report the curie inventory of radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115.' As part of the strategy to meet WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type all radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and contribute greater than 0.01 percent of the total curie inventory from the time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial list of radionuclides to be reported is based on the design-basis glass identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report. However, it is required that the list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that meet the 'greater than 0.01% of the curie inventory' criterion. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, and U-238; and Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete list of reportable radionuclides must also include these sets of U and Pu isotopes - and the U and Pu isotopic mass distributions must be identified. The DWPF receives HLW sludge slurry from Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 40. For Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), the waste in Tank 40 contained a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) material transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. This sludge blend is also referred to as Macrobatch 8. Laboratory analyses of a Tank 40 sludge sample were performed to quantify the concentrations of pertinent radionuclides in the SB7a waste. Subsequently, radiological decay and in-growth were calculated over the time period from 2015 to 3115. This provided a basis for characterizing the radionuclide content of SB7a over time and for identifying the 'reportable radionuclides.' Details of the characterization methodology and the analytical results are the focus of this report. This work was performed at the request of the Waste Solidification Engineering Department of Savannah River Remediation, initiated via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0031. A minor revision in the reporting requirements was requested via a subsequent email communication. The work was conducted in accordance with the protocols identified in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan SRNL-RP-2010-01218 and Analytical Study Plan SRNL-RP-2010-01219. All of the raw data related to this scope have been recorded in laboratory notebook SRNL-NB-2011-00061. The overall goal of this task was to characterize the radionuclide content of the SB7a waste sufficiently to meet the WAPS and DWPF reporting requirements. The specific objectives were: (1) Quantify the current concentrations of all radionuclides impacting (or potentially-impacting) the total curie content between calendar years 2011 and 3115. Also quantify the current concentrations of other radionuclides specifically requested in the TTR or required by the WAPS. (2) Calculate future concentrations of decayed and in-grown radionuclides impacting the total curie content between calendar years 2015 and 3115; (3) Identify as 'reportable' all radionuclides contributing {ge} 0.01% of the total curie content from 2015 to 3115 and having half-lives {ge} 10 years.

Reboul, S.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.; Bannochie, C.

2011-12-20

390

A model for radionuclide transport in the Cooling Water System  

SciTech Connect

A radionuclide transport model developed to assess radiological levels in the K-reactor Cooling Water System (CWS) in the event of an inadvertent process water (PW) leakage to the cooling water (CW) in the heat exchangers (HX) is described. During and following a process water leak, the radionuclide transport model determines the time-dependent release rates of radionuclide from the cooling water system to the environment via evaporation to the atmosphere and blow-down to the Savannah River. The developed model allows for delay times associated with the transport of the cooling water radioactivity through cooling water system components. Additionally, this model simulates the time-dependent behavior of radionuclides levels in various CWS components. The developed model is incorporated into the K-reactor Cooling Tower Activity (KCTA) code. KCTA allows the accident (heat exchanger leak rate) and the cooling tower blow-down and evaporation rates to be described as time-dependent functions. Thus, the postulated leak and the consequence of the assumed leak can be modelled realistically. This model is the first of three models to be ultimately assembled to form a comprehensive Liquid Pathway Activity System (LPAS). LPAS will offer integrated formation, transport, deposition, and release estimates for radionuclides formed in a SRS facility. Process water and river water modules are forthcoming as input and downstream components, respectively, for KCTA.

Kahook, S.D.

1992-08-01

391

Artificial radionuclides database in the Pacific Ocean: HAM database.  

PubMed

The database "Historical Artificial Radionuclides in the Pacific Ocean and its Marginal Seas", or HAM database, has been created. The database includes 90Sr, 137Cs, and 239,240Pu concentration data from the seawater of the Pacific Ocean and its marginal seas with some measurements from the sea surface to the bottom. The data in the HAM database were collected from about 90 literature citations, which include published papers; annual reports by the Hydrographic Department, Maritime Safety Agency, Japan; and unpublished data provided by individuals. The data of concentrations of 90Sr, 137Cs, and 239,240Pu have been accumulating since 1957-1998. The present HAM database includes 7737 records for 137Cs concentration data, 3972 records for 90Sr concentration data, and 2666 records for 239,240Pu concentration data. The spatial variation of sampling stations in the HAM database is heterogeneous, namely, more than 80% of the data for each radionuclide is from the Pacific Ocean and the Sea of Japan, while a relatively small portion of data is from the South Pacific. This HAM database will allow us to use these radionuclides as significant chemical tracers for oceanographic study as well as the assessment of environmental affects of anthropogenic radionuclides for these 5 decades. Furthermore, these radionuclides can be used to verify the oceanic general circulation models in the time scale of several decades. PMID:15105960

Aoyama, Michio; Hirose, Katsumi

2004-03-15

392

Nanotargeted Radionuclides for Cancer Nuclear Imaging and Internal Radiotherapy  

PubMed Central

Current progress in nanomedicine has exploited the possibility of designing tumor-targeted nanocarriers being able to deliver radionuclide payloads in a site or molecular selective manner to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer imaging and therapy. Radionuclides of auger electron-, ?-, ?-, and ?-radiation emitters have been surface-bioconjugated or after-loaded in nanoparticles to improve the efficacy and reduce the toxicity of cancer imaging and therapy in preclinical and clinical studies. This article provides a brief overview of current status of applications, advantages, problems, up-to-date research and development, and future prospects of nanotargeted radionuclides in cancer nuclear imaging and radiotherapy. Passive and active nanotargeting delivery of radionuclides with illustrating examples for tumor imaging and therapy are reviewed and summarized. Research on combing different modes of selective delivery of radionuclides through nanocarriers targeted delivery for tumor imaging and therapy offers the new possibility of large increases in cancer diagnostic efficacy and therapeutic index. However, further efforts and challenges in preclinical and clinical efficacy and toxicity studies are required to translate those advanced technologies to the clinical applications for cancer patients.

Ting, Gann; Chang, Chih-Hsien; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Lee, Te-Wei

2010-01-01

393

Economic feasibility study for phosphorus recovery processes.  

PubMed

Phosphorus recovery from wastewater has become a necessity for sustainable development because phosphorus is a non-renewable essential resource, and its discharge into the environment causes serious negative impacts. There are no economic incentives for the implementation of phosphorus recovery technologies because the selling price of rock phosphate is lower than phosphorus recovered from sewage. The methodologies used to determine the feasibility of such projects are usually focused on internal costs without considering environmental externalities. This article shows a methodology to assess the economic feasibility of wastewater phosphorus recovery projects that takes into account internal and external impacts. The shadow price of phosphorus is estimated using the directional distance function to measure the environmental benefits obtained by preventing the discharge of phosphorus into the environment. The economic feasibility analysis taking into account the environmental benefits shows that the phosphorus recovery is viable not only from sustainable development but also from an economic point of view. PMID:21809783

Molinos-Senante, María; Hernández-Sancho, Francesc; Sala-Garrido, Ramón; Garrido-Baserba, Manel

2011-06-01

394

Geothermal feasibility study for Malting Investments Inc  

SciTech Connect

The engineering feasibility of using geothermal heat in the kilning, germination, and steep water cooling processes for a malting facility is determined. The study is based upon a malting facility with an annual capacity of malting three million bushels of clean graded barley per year or 8220 bushels per day. Capital cost figures used in the feasibility study are budget prices for the basic equipment only, they do not include any other costs such as installation, instrumentation or design and engineering costs. Utility prices are based upon $0.03 per kilowatt hour and $0.4548 per therm for natural gas.

Not Available

1981-10-01

395

Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part A, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 1 and 2, A summary of historical activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation with emphasis on information concerning off-site emissions of hazardous materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Phase I feasibility study has focused on determining the availability of information for estimating exposures of the public to chemicals and radionuclides released as a result of historical operation of the facilities at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The estimation of such past exposures is frequently called dose reconstruction. The initial project tasks, Tasks 1 and 2 were designed

G. M. Bruce; J. E. Buddenbaum; J. K. Lamb; T. E. Widner

1993-01-01

396

Removal of dissolved heavy metals and radionuclides by microbial spores  

SciTech Connect

Microbial systems have been shown to remove specific heavy metals from contaminated aqueous waste to levels acceptable to EPA for environmental release. However, systems capable of removing a variety of heavy metals from aqueous waste to environmentally acceptable levels remain to be reported. The present studies were performed to determine the specificity of spores of the bacterium Bacillus megaterium for the adsorption of dissolved metals and radionuclides from aqueous waste. The spores effectively adsorbed eight heavy metals from a prepared metal mix and from a plating rinse waste to EPA acceptable levels for waste water. These results suggest that spores have multiple binding sites for the adsorption of heavy metals. Spores were also effective in adsorbing the radionuclides {sup 85}strontium and {sup 197}cesium. The presence of multiple sites in spores for the adsorption of heavy metals and radionuclides makes this biosorbent a good candidate for the treatment of aqueous wastes associated with the plating and nuclear industries. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

Revis, N.W.; Hadden, C.T.; Edenborn, H. [and others

1997-11-01

397

Radionuclide data bases available for bioaccumulation factors for freshwater biota  

SciTech Connect

Aquatic models currently in use for dose assessment simulate the transfer of radionuclides in aquatic environments and the transfer to man. In these models the assimilation of a radionuclide in aquatic biota is calculated by using a simple empirical relationship known as the bioaccumulation factor (BF) to represent the transfer of the radionuclide from water to organism. The purpose of this article is to review data bases that are available for BFs for freshwater biota and to identify the uncertainties associated with them. Data bases for raidoisotopes of Co, Cs, C, H, I, Pu, Ra, Ru, Sr, and U are reviewed. With the exception of ruthenium and carbon, the review is restricted to BFs determined for natural freshwater systems. Factors influencing the variability of BFs are identified, uncertainties associated with the validation of BFs are discussed, and some guidance is given for collecting data and measuring BFs.

Blaylock, B.G.

1982-07-01

398

MICROBIAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES RELEASED FROM NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING PLANTS.  

SciTech Connect

Microorganisms can affect the stability and mobility of the actinides U, Pu, Cm, Am, Np, and the fission products Tc, I, Cs, Sr, released from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Under appropriate conditions, microorganisms can alter the chemical speciation, solubility and sorption properties and thus could increase or decrease the concentrations of radionuclides in solution and the bioavailability. Dissolution or immobilization of radionuclides is brought about by direct enzymatic action or indirect non-enzymatic action of microorganisms. Although the physical, chemical, and geochemical processes affecting dissolution, precipitation, and mobilization of radionuclides have been investigated, we have only limited information on the effects of microbial processes. The mechanisms of microbial transformations of the major and minor actinides and the fission products under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the presence of electron donors and acceptors are reviewed.

FRANCIS,A.J.

2006-10-18

399

Predictions of radionuclide migration rates for a subseabed repository  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Data from studies of high temperature interactions between sediments and porewater (seawater), and of sorption and diffusion of radionuclides in oxidized, deep sea sediments were used, along with results from heat transfer studies, to predict migration rates of radionuclides in a subseabed repository. Preliminary results for most radionuclides in oxidized sediments are very encouraging fission products with moderate values of K/sub D/ and actinides with high values of K/sub D/ would not migrate significant distances before decaying to innocuous concentrations. Cs137, Sr90, and Pu239 are among this group. The results for anionic species are less encouraging, but preliminary work with reduced sediments indicates that Tc can be effectively isolated. Planning for a field verification of these laboratory and modeling studies is also described.

Brush, L. H.

400

EOS7R: Radionuclide transport for TOUGH2  

SciTech Connect

EOS7R provides radionuclide transport capability for TOUGH2. EOS7R extends the EOS7 module (water, brine, and optional air) to model water, brine, parent component, daughter component, and optional air and heat. The radionuclide components follow a first-order decay law, and may adsorb onto the solid grains. Volatilization of the decaying components is modeled by Henry`s Law. The decaying components are normally referred to as radionuclides, but they may in fact by any trace components that decay, adsorb, and volatilize. The decay process need not be radioactive decay, but could be any process that follows a first-order decay law, such as biodegradation. EOS7R includes molecular diffusion for all components in gaseous and aqueous phases using a simplified binary diffusion model. When EOS7R is used with standard TOUGH2, transport occurs by advection and molecular diffusion in all phases. When EOS7R is coupled with the dispersion module T2DM, one obtains T2DMR, the radionuclide transport version of T2DM. T2DMR models advection, diffusion, and hydrodynamic dispersion in rectangular two-dimensional regions. Modeling of radionuclide transport requires input parameters specifying the half-life for first-order decay, distribution coefficients for each rock type for adsorption, and inverse Henry`s constants for volatilization. Options can be specified in the input file to model decay in inactive grid blocks and to read from standard EOS7 INCON files. The authors present a number of example problems to demonstrate application and accuracy of TOUGH2/EOS7R. One-dimensional simulation results agree well with analytical solutions. For a two-dimensional salt-dome flow problem, the final distribution of daughter radionuclide component is complicated by the presence of weak recirculation caused by density effects due to salinity.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

1995-11-01

401

Numerical studies of radionuclide migration in heterogeneous porous media  

SciTech Connect

Burial of hazardous nuclear waste in geological repositories is considered to be in the best environmental interest. However, to minimize potential risk for future generations, an accurate knowledge is required of the time- and space-dependent concentrations of the radionuclides as they migrate from their burial site. Numerical solutions to both the conventional advection-dispersion equation and a new transport equation (containing directional dependence) are utilized to study the migration of radionuclides in heterogeneous media. In particular, layered fractured formations are examined. The new transport formulation, with its directional dependence, yields details in concentration profiles not shown by the advection-dispersion approach.

Buckley, R.L.; Loyalka, S.K. (Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)); Williams, M.M.R. (Electrowatt Engineering Services Ltd., Sussex (United Kingdom))

1994-11-01

402

U.S. DOE 2004 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Amendments to the Clean Air Act, which added radionuclides to the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), went into effect in 1990. Specifically, a subpart (H) of 40 CFR 61 established an annual limit on the impact to the public attributable to emissions of radionuclides from U.S. Department of Energy facilities, such as the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). As part of the new NESHAP regulations, LANL must submit an annual report to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency headquarters and the regional office in Dallas by June 30. This report includes results of monitoring at LANL and the dose calculations for the calendar year 2004.

K.W. Jacobson

2005-08-12

403

Negative radionuclide scan in osteoid osteoma. A case report  

SciTech Connect

Advances in radionuclide imaging have facilitated the accurate diagnosis and surgical excision of osteoid osteoma. While radionuclide imaging has been inconsistent in the diagnosis of certain problems, its accuracy in the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma has been frequently stressed. To date, no case of a negative bone scan in the presence of a histologically proven osteoid osteoma has been reported. The present case report emphasizes that a negative bone scan does not preclude the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma. Clinical suspicion remains the most sensitive indicator of this lesion.

Fehring, T.K.; Green, N.E.

1984-05-01

404

Concentration of selected radionuclides in seawater from Kuwait.  

PubMed

No baseline existed for the radionuclides in Kuwait territorial water. With changing trend in the region to embrace nuclear energy, the baseline study is imperative to create a reference and to record the influence-functioning of upcoming power plants. The first one in Bushehr, Iran is ready to start and several more are likely to come-up in UAE, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. The present baseline concentration of the four considered radionuclide's show low concentration of tritium, polonium, strontium and cesium; their concentration is comparable to most oceanic waters. PMID:22444480

Uddin, Saif; Al Ghadban, Abdul Nabi; Aba, Abdulaziz; Behbehani, Montaha

2012-03-22

405

Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport: a regulatory perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

What hydrogeologic-geochemical-microbial conditions and processes affect migration of radionuclides sorbed onto microparticles or native colloid-sized radionuclide particles? The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for protecting public health, safety, and the environment at numerous nuclear facilities including a potential high-level nuclear waste disposal site. To fulfill these obligations, NRC needs to understand the mechanisms controlling radionuclide release and transport and their importance to performance. The current focus of NRC staff reviews and technical interactions dealing with colloid-facilitated transport relates to the potential nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. NRC staff performed bounding calculations to quantify radionuclide releases available for ground-water transport to potential receptors from a Yucca Mountain repository. Preliminary analyses suggest insignificant doses of plutonium and americium colloids could be derived from spent nuclear fuel. Using surface complexation models, NRC staff found that colloids can potentially lower actinide retardation factors by up to several orders of magnitude. Performance assessment calculations, in which colloidal transport of plutonium and americium was simulated by assuming no sorption or matrix diffusion, indicated no effect of colloids on human dose within the 10,000 year compliance period due largely to long waste-package lifetimes. NRC staff have identified information gaps and developed technical agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure sufficient information will be presented in any potential future Yucca Mountain license application. DOE has agreed to identify which radionuclides could be transported via colloids, incorporate uncertainties in colloid formation, release and transport parameters, and conceptual models, and address the applicability of field data using synthetic microspheres as colloid analogs. NRC is currently investigating approaches to colloid modeling in order to help evaluate DOE's approach. One alternative approach uses DOE laboratory data to invoke kinetic controls on reversible radionuclide attachment to colloids. A kinetic approach in which desorption from colloids is slow may help assess whether DOE's instantaneous equilibrium approach for reversible attachment, as well as their application of irreversible attachment to only a small portion of the radionuclide inventory, are reasonable and conservative. An approach to examine microbial processes would also contribute to considerations of leaching of radionuclides and colloid formation. Reducing uncertainties in colloid transport processes should help in better understanding their importance to repository performance. This work is an independent product and does not necessarily reflect the views or regulatory position of the NRC. CNWRA participation was funded under contract No. NRC-02-97-009.

Dam, W. L.; Pickett, D. A.; Codell, R. B.; Nicholson, T. J.

2001-12-01

406

Vertical migration of radionuclides in undisturbed grassland soils.  

PubMed

Literature data on numerical values obtained for the parameters of the two most popular models for simulating the migration of radionuclides in undisturbed soils have been compiled and evaluated statistically. Due to restrictions on the applicability of compartmental models, the convection-dispersion equation and its parameter values should be preferred. For radiocaesium, recommended values are derived for its effective convection velocity and dispersion coefficient. Data deficiencies still exist for radionuclides other than caesium and for soils of non-temperate environments. PMID:19036484

Kirchner, Gerald; Strebl, Friederike; Bossew, Peter; Ehlken, Sabine; Gerzabek, Martin H

2008-11-25

407

[Biological effects and risks of accidental radionuclide uptake].  

PubMed

This review presents the actual state of knowledge about medical dangers of a radioactive fall-out. Concepts for the estimation of accidental incorporation, as well as effects and risks that are known to occur after incorporation of radionuclides are discussed. Special attention is paid to the following topics: effect of radioiodine on the thyroid gland, effect of radio-cesium on whole body burden, alpha-emitting particles (plutonium) with deposition in the airways, association of osteotrope radionuclides (strontium) with malignomas of the skeleton and finally prophylaxis with iodine to prevent damage of the thyroid. PMID:3554876

Fueger, G F

1986-01-01

408

Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes our continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections during the next year. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

1993-11-01

409

Radionuclide releases from natural analogues of spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

Measures of {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, {sup 239}Pu and U concentrations in rock samples from uranium deposits at Cigar Lake and Koongarra have been used to study processes of radionuclide release from uranium minerals. Rates of release have been immeasurably slow at Cigar Lake. At Koongarra release rates appear to have been faster, producing small deficiencies of {sup 99}Tc, and larger ones of {sup 129}I. The inferred differences in radionuclide release rates are consistent with expected differences in uranium mineral degradation rates produced by the differing hydrogeochemical environments at the two sites.

Curtis, D.B.; Fabryka-Martin, J.; Dixon, P.; Aguilar, R.; Rokop, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Cramer, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

1993-12-31

410

Maxwell Hydroelectric Project Feasibility Assessment Report  

SciTech Connect

The results of a feasibility assessment study to determine if it is economical to develop hydroelectric generation at the existing Maxwell Locks and Dam in Pennsylvania on the Monongahela River are summarized. The investigations included site reconnaissance, system loads, growth rate, site hydrology, conceptual project arrangements and layouts, power output, estimates of construction costs and annual costs, economic analyses, development of a design and construction schedule, and a preliminary environmental review of the proposed Maxwell Hydroelectric Project. For the scheduled on-line date of January 1985, the Project is estimated to have a Total Investment Cost of $17,801,000 assuming REA financing at 7% interest rate. The Project is considered technically feasible and without any major environmental issues. It shows economic feasibility providing satisfactory financing terms are available. Such satisfactory financing alternatives include a 7% REA loan or DOE financing under the new National Energy Act with the 25% portion for construction not covered being financed with 7% or lower interest loans (possibly through REA). The 7% rate can also be considered as a combination 5% and 9% financing should the REA deem the project deserving of low interest money. In addition, application should be made to DOE for demonstration grant funds. It should be noted that the feasibility of the Project will be jeopardized if not eliminated should Federal dam-user fees be charged. (LCL)

Not Available

1979-03-01

411

FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR AN ASBESTOS AEROSOL MONITOR  

EPA Science Inventory

The feasibility of discriminating and counting asbestos-fiber aerosol particles by means of their shapes, using a two-detector, optical, aerosol counter was determined. The assymmetry of their optical diffraction patterns would distinguish fibers from other, more regular aerosol ...

412

Feasibility of producing ethanol from food waste  

Microsoft Academic Search

Food waste generated in Korea is rich in carbohydrate as high as 65% of total solids. Using the food waste, the feasibility of ethanol production was investigated in a lab-scale fermentor. Pretreatment with hydrolyzing enzymes including carbohydrase, glucoamylase, cellulase and protease were tested for hydrolysis of food waste. The carbohydrase was able to hydrolyze and produce glucose with a glucose

Jae Hyung Kim; Jun Cheol Lee; Daewon Pak

2011-01-01

413

A Feasible Enterprise Business Intelligence Design Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to comparatively fully elaborate the application framework of enterprise business intelligence (BI), build a reference system of business intelligence application for enterprises. By analyzing technology implementation and data logic of a real enterprise IT planning scheme model, Hubei provincial branch of China National Tobacco Corporation (CNTC) BI planning, a feasible enterprise business intelligence design model is put forward

Liyi Zhang; Xiaofan Tu

2009-01-01

414

Chronic Oxygen Electrodes - A Feasibility Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The feasibility of obtaining stable oxygen electrodes by coating with a plasma catalyzed polymer film was studied. These electrodes are to be used for chronic in vivo measurement of tissue oxygen tension. The application of the film was tested on both dis...

A. W. Hahn K. G. Mayhan R. E. Barr

1972-01-01

415

Alaska Challenger Learning Center Feasibility Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Challenger Center for Space Science Education uses space exploration as a theme to create a positive learning experience that raises students' expectations of success; fosters in them a long-term interest in math, science, and technology; and motivates them to pursue studies in these areas. This document is a feasibility report for…

Alaska State Library, Juneau.

416

Feasibility Study of Cumene-Phenol Complex.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report, conducted by M.W. Kellogg Company, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report reviews the M.W. Kellogg's study of the economic and technical feasibility of developing a cumene and phenol unit and supporting infrastructure ...

1998-01-01

417

Tactical Missile Launcher Feasibility Study. Book I.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The document describes the development and the results of a study of the feasibility of designing a standard tactical missile launcher which is capable of carrying and launching hypothetical stores, weighing form 500 to 3,000 pounds, from the F100, F101, ...

1968-01-01

418

Hilltop Retail Feasibility Study (Tacoma, Washington).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Tacoma Urban League has been involved with the development of a program to provide a shopping/job training center in the Tacoma Hilltop community. Further technical studies were needed to determine the feasibility of the proposal before actual project...

1980-01-01

419

Video on demand: is it feasible?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The technological feasibility of a video on demand service that is provided from a centralized location over a digital network is examined. The video on demand service is considered to be a service similar to the currently popular videotape rental services. The problem is divided into two parts: communications and database access. It is argued that the incremental communications cost

W. D. Sincoskie

1990-01-01

420

Electromigration feasibility of green tea catechins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is regarded as the most important of the tea catechins. Therefore, methods for producing tea extracts with high EGCG content have been developed. However, these methods have the disadvantages to use solvent or to allow the purification of small volumes. The aim of this exploratory study was to evaluate the feasibility of selectively extracting catechins and caffeine

David Labbé; Monica Araya-Farias; Angelo Tremblay; Laurent Bazinet

2005-01-01

421

Feasibility of cluster-type controlled fusion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A method is proposed for generating high-temperature fusion plasma through the collision of accelerated clusters of heavy hydrogen inside a magnetic trap. It is noted that the physical feasibility of this method of fusion plasma generation can now be verified using the existing and functioning equipment. Some features of the controlled fusion method proposed here are examined.

Kingsep, A. S.; Okorokov, V. V.; Chuvilo, I. V.

1991-10-01

422

Jordan Rift Valley Telecommunications Feasibility Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this study is to analyze the technical and financial feasibility of three potential fiber optics routes: Project 1: Dead Sea to Red Sea - North/South from Amman to Aqaba; Project 2: Red Sea Submarine Cable; Project 3: East/West Amman to Tel...

1998-01-01

423

Technological feasibility of alternative energy sources  

Microsoft Academic Search

The U.S. energy shortage is discussed. The technology of coal gasification or liquefication, shale oil from oil shale, and geothermal energy recovery is presented in sufficient detail to show feasibility of these as energy source alternatives to petroleum crude. Technical trade publications data show that essentially all necessary process technology is known, although important improvements are possible, and have been

M. L. Zweigle

1974-01-01

424

Digital Silk Road Backbone Feasibility Study.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The USTDA funded a backbone feasibility study to find out if it is possible to install a fiber optic backbone network linking the major towns in Afghanistan and providing links to the neighboring countries. The study was awarded in July 2003 and expected ...

2004-01-01

425

On the Feasibility of Software Certification.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In this report, some of the factors that lead to and inhibit the establishment of a formal certification service are examined. Emphasis is focused on identifying the key issues that must be resolved to make certification feasible rather than on how such a...

R. E. Keirstead

1975-01-01

426

Children's Fitness Testing: A Feasibility Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Objective: This study aimed to determine whether it was necessary, cost effective and practical to investigate Welsh children's fitness levels in order to promote active, healthy lifestyles. Design: A multi-method study comprising a comprehensive review of literature, a questionnaire survey and interviews. Setting: This was a feasibility study…

Harris, J.; Cale, L.

2007-01-01

427

Development and use of radionuclide generators in nuclear medicine -- recent advances and future perspectives.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Although the trend in radionuclide generator research has declined, radionuclide generator systems continue to play an important role in nuclear medicine. Technetium-99m obtained from the molybdenum-99/technetium-99m generator system is used in over 80% o...

F. F. Knapp

1998-01-01

428

Detection of radionuclides originating from a nuclear power plant in sewage sludge.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Sewage sludge is a sensitive indicator of radionuclides entering the environment. Radionuclides originating in nuclear power stations have been detected in sludge found at wastewater treatment plants in communities near the power plants (NPP). The main co...

M. Puhakainen M. Suomela

1999-01-01

429

Retardation Characteristics of Radionuclides in Geologic Media through Batch and Packed Column Experiments.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Batch and packed column experiments are performed to investigate the retardation characteristics of radionuclide,i.e, Cs-137 in geologic media. In batch experiment, the effects of important parameters on the sorption of radionuclide in geologic media, suc...

H. H. Park K. W. Han P. S. Han J. O. Lee C. K. Park

1988-01-01

430

The effects of radionuclides on animal behavior.  

PubMed

Concomitant with the expansion of the nuclear industry, the concentrations of several pollutants, radioactive or otherwise, including uranium, caesium, cadmium and cobalt, have increased over the last few decades. These elemental pollutants do exist in the environment and are a threat to many organisms. Behavior represents the integration of all the anatomical adaptations and physiological processes that occur within an organism. Compared to other biological endpoints, the effects of pollutants on animal behavior have been the focus of only a few studies. However, behavioral changes appear to be ideal for assessing the effects of pollutants on animal populations, because behavior links physiological functions with ecological processes. The alteration of behavioral responses can have severe implications for survival of individuals and of population of some species. Behavioral disruptions may derive from several underlying mechanisms: disruption of neuro-sensorial activity and of endocrines, or oxidative and metabolic disruptions. In this review, we presented an overview of the current literature in which the effects of radioactive pollutants on behavior in humans, rodents, fish and wildlife species are addressed. When possible, we have also indicated the potential underlying mechanisms of the behavioral alterations and parameters measured. In fried, chronic uranium contamination is associated with behavior alterations and mental disorders in humans, and cognitive deficits in rats. Comparative studies on depleted and enriched uranium effects in rats showed that chemical and radiological activities of this metal induced negative effects on several behavioral parameters and also produced brain oxidative stress. Uranium exposure also modifies feeding behavior of bivalves and reproductive behavior of fish. Studies of the effects of the Chernobyl accident shows that chronic irradiation to 137Cs induces both nervous system diseases and mental disorders in humans leading to increased suicides, as well as modification of preferred nesting sites, reduced hatching success and fecundity in birds that live in the Chernobyl zone. No significant effect from caesium exposure was shown in laboratory experiments with rats, but few studies were conducted. Data on radioactive cadmium are not available in the literature, but the effects of its metallic form have been well studied. Cadmium induces mental retardation and psychomotor alterations in exposed populations and increases anxiety in rats, leading to depression. Cadmium exposure also results in well-documented effects on feeding and burrowing behavior in several invertebrate species (crustaceans, gastropods, annelids, bivalves) and on different kinds of fish behavior (swimming activity, fast-start response, antipredatory behavior). Cobalt induces memory deficits in humans and may be involved in Alzheimer's disease; gamma irradiation by cobalt also decreases fecundity and alters mating behavior in insects. Collectively, data are lacking or are meagre on radionuclide pollutants, and a better knowledge of their actions on the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control animal behavior is needed. PMID:21170702

Gagnaire, Beatrice; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Bouron, Alexandre; Lestaevel, Philippe

2011-01-01

431

Radionuclide behaviour in forest soils of Russian Federation and Ukraine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Behaviour of radionuclides in soil determines to a great extent the radionuclide root uptake and their further migration in food chains. The radionuclide fate in the soil is determined by a wide spectrum of simultaneously running, often competitive elementary processes, such as adsorption-desorption, diffusion-mass transport, retention-migration, etc. The intensity of each elementary process depends, in turn, on a combination of several factors such as nature of the radionuclide, physicochemical features of the fallout, soil properties, environmental regimes, etc. Radionuclide deposition in soils is known to be a basic criterion of the radioecological situation in the contaminated territory. Our long-term investigations performed in contaminated forests (30-km zone of Chernobyl NPP; Tula, Kaluga and Bryansk regions of the Russian Federation) had shown that radionuclide migration in the forest landscapes was determined primarily by the forest litter presence. The key factors of radionuclide redistribution within the soil litter are (i) permanent addition of the low-contaminated organic matter ("clean" litterfall), and (ii) high rate of transformation. The dynamics and intensity of decontamination processes depends on the forest litter sub-horizon. Leaf (A0l) layer exhibits the highest rate of decontamination: 137Cs content in this layer decreased twofold by the second year after the accident and reached its equilibrium value (about 1% of the total deposition) by the 4-5th year after the fallout. The corresponding quasi-equilibrium radionuclide content in A0f layer (10-20%) is reached by the 8-9th year after the accident. The corresponding equilibrium in A0h layer is not reached yet. Thus, the effective half-life of radionuclides in soils should be calculated for each sub-horizon separately, taking into account the above-discussed features of the radionuclide dynamics. The rate of annual radionuclide replacement from the forest litter to mineral layers depends on the following factors: (i) soil properties and regimes. In hydromorphic areas, the rate is much higher than in the automorphic areas. This is due to the above-discussed specific features of hydromorphic and automorphic soils, on the one hand, and different pedogenetic processes running under the coniferous and mixed stand, on the other hand; (ii) distance from the accidental unit. The rate of 137Cs migration from forest litter to the mineral soil layers in the territory of the Russian Federation is higher than in the exclusion zone by a factor of 1.5; (iii) weather conditions. Annual rate of 137Cs migration from the forest litter to the mineral horizons varies by 0.5-11%. The variation is well agreed with the dynamics of rainfall during the vegetative season: the migration rate increases drastically in the wet years.

Shcheglov, A. I.; Tsvetnova, O. B.

2012-04-01

432

/sup 195m/Au, a new generator-produced short-lived radionuclide for sequential assessment of ventricular performance by first pass radionuclide angiocardiography  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of performing rapid sequential first pass radionuclide angiocardiography using a new short-lived radiotracer, (/sup 195/mAu) half-life 30.5 seconds) was evaluated. This radionuclide emits a 262 keV gamma ray and is the daughter of (/sup 195/mHg) (half-life 41.6 hours). The prototype tabletop /sup 195/mHg//sup 195/mAu generator produced 20 to 25 mCi of /sup 195/mAu in 2 ml of eluate (yield of 40 percent). The breakthrough of /sup 195/mHg in the eluate was 0.02 percent of the amount of /sup 195/mHg in the generator. The eluate contained 20 microCi of /sup 195/mHg per study, resulting in an estimated human radiation dose of 0.007 rad/study to the whole body and 0.34 rad/study to the kidney. Four dogs each had 15 to 20 sequential first pass studies performed with /sup 1195/mHg at 3 to 10 minute intervals using a computerized multicrystal gamma camera. During the left ventricular phase, 160,000 to 190,000 counts/s were acquired. The end-diastolic left ventricular region of interest contained 3,000 to 6,000 counts (background- and decay-corrected). Multiple reproducible values for left ventricular ejection fraction were obtained during stable conditions. The mean (+/- standard deviation) interstudy variability was 4 +/- 2 percent. During infusion of isoproterenol, rapid increase of left ventricular ejection fraction was demonstrated. Excellent agreement was observed between studies performed with /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA) and /sup 195/mAu. The mean interstudy difference was 4 +/- 3 percent. Thus, sufficiently high yield and dose are obtained from the /sup 195/mHg//sup 195/mAu generator for reliable high count rate first pass determination of left ventricular ejection fraction. This new short-lived radiotracer makes possible rapid sequential assessments of ventricular function at greatly reduced patient exposure to radiation.

Wackers, F.J.; Giles, R.W.; Hoffer, P.B.; Lange, R.C.; Berger, H.J.; Zaret, B.L.

1982-07-01

433

Advanced technique in liquid scintillation counting to compute radionuclide activity using full energy spectrum analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Liquid scintillation research in the area of characterizing the pulse-height energy distribution spectra of different beta particle and gamma-ray emitting radionuclides has resulted in a new technique developed to compute dual-label radionuclide activity (dpm). Improved statistical precision and enhanced radionuclide separations for dual-labeled measurements are significant attributes of this technique. A liquid scintillation counting technique to computer radionuclide activity using

De Filippis

1985-01-01

434

Pathway: a dynamic food-chain model to predict radionuclide ingestion after fallout deposition  

Microsoft Academic Search

This manuscript describes the structure and basis for parameter values of a computerized food-chain transport model for radionuclides. The model, called PATHWAY, estimates the time-integrated ingestion intake by humans of 20 radionuclides after a single deposition from the atmosphere to the landscape. The model solves a set of linear, coupled differential equations to estimate the inventories and concentrations of radionuclides

F. Ward Whicker; T. B. Kirchner

1987-01-01

435

Bioremediation of soils, sludges, and materials contaminated with toxic metals or radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Bioremediation stabilizes and reclaims radionuclide or toxic metal-contaminated materials, soils, sediments, or wastes; it then recovers the contaminating radionuclides and metals. Waste materials are stabilized and reduced in volume using anaerobic bacteria; or alternatively, materials are treated with citric acid before bioremediation begins. Photolysis is used after bioremediation to release radionuclides.

Francis, A.J.

1993-04-01

436

Identification of key radionuclides in a nuclear waste repository in basalt  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radionuclides were identified which appear to pose the greatest potential hazard to man during long term storage of nuclear waste in a repository mined in the Columbia Plateau basalt formation. The criteria used to select key radionuclides were as follows: quantity of radionuclide in stored waste; biological toxicity; leach rate of the wastes into groundwater; and transport rate via ground

G. S. Barney; B. J. Wood

1980-01-01

437

Reconstructing historical radionuclide concentrations along the east coast of Ireland using a compartmental model  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mathematical model is presented that simulates the annually averaged transport of radionuclides, originating from the BNFL reprocessing plant at Sellafield, throughout the Irish Sea. The model, CUMBRIA77, represents the processes of radionuclide transport and dispersion in the marine environment and allows predictions of radionuclide concentration in various environmental media, including biota, to be made throughout the whole of the

C. N Smith; S Clarke; P McDonald; J. A Goshawk; S. R Jones

2000-01-01

438

Analytical solutions for reactive transport of N-member radionuclide chains in a single fracture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several numerical codes have been used to simulate radionuclide transport in fractured rock systems. The validation of such numerical codes can be accomplished by comparison of numerical simulations against appropriate analytical solutions. In this paper, we present analytical solutions for the reactive transport of N-member radionuclide chains (i.e., multiple species of radionuclides and their daughter species) through a discrete fracture

Yunwei Sun; Thomas A. Buscheck

2003-01-01

439

Anthropogenic and geogenic radionuclides content in an undisturbed Slovenian forest soil  

Microsoft Academic Search

The measurements of natural background radiation and anthropogenic radionuclides in terrestrial environment, especially in soil, have been carried out in many countries for several decades to establish base line data of radiation level. So far, the knowledge of radionuclides concentration levels in Slovenia is limited to a few investigations and the use of anthropogenic 137Cs radionuclide has not yet been

Jankong P; Mabit L; Toloza A; Zupanc v

2010-01-01

440

Development and demonstration of solvent extraction processes for the separation of radionuclides from acidic radioactive waste  

Microsoft Academic Search

The presence of long-lived radionuclides presents a challenge to the management of radioactive wastes. Immobilization of these radionuclides must be accomplished prior to long-term, permanent disposal. Separation of the radionuclides from the waste solutions has the potential of significantly decreasing the costs associated with the immobilization and disposal of the radioactive waste by minimizing waste volumes. Several solvent extraction processes

J. D. Law; K. N. Brewer; R. S. Herbst; T. A. Todd; D. J. Wood

1999-01-01

441

NPL secondary standard radionuclide calibrator: new calibration figures for 106Ru, 153Sm and 188re  

Microsoft Academic Search

The NPL secondary standard radionuclide calibrator was introduced in 1985 in order to provide a highly stable, sensitive and accurate facility for the assay of radionuclides. One of its principal advantages is the direct traceability of its calibration figures to national standards of radioactivity. Since its introduction, several additional calibration figures have been measured for radionuclides which had not been

M. J. Woods; J. D. Keightley; M. Ciocanel; C. Paton Walsh

1998-01-01

442

Radionuclide production and yields at Washington University School of Medicine.  

PubMed

Washington University School of Medicine has carried out the production of ''non-standard'' nuclides for the positron emission tomography (PET) community since 1999 under the Radionuclide Resource for Cancer Applications grant R24 CA 86307 funded by the National Cancer Institute. With the support from the grant, we have successfully developed procedures for the high yield production of a wide range of radionuclides and made them available to the research community. The following non-standard PET nuclides, (60)Cu, (61)Cu, (64)Cu, (76)Br, (77)Br, (124)I, (94m)Tc, and (86)Y are routinely produced on Washington University on-site Cyclotron Corporation CS-15 or Japan Steel Works 16/8 cyclotrons. Additionally, a technique to produce (45)Ti has been developed and lately, (89)Zr is being investigated. This paper describes the production techniques and presents the performance results in terms of yields and radionuclidic purity. Sufficient yields for distribution are achieved and high radionuclide purity is also achieved yielding high quality product for medical research. PMID:18043542

Tang, L

2007-11-28

443

Environmental study for radionuclides at Kurun-Uro area.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This work is aimed to study the environmental distribution of the terrestrial radionuclides and the resultant dose at Nuba mountains (Kurun-Uro area). This area has a high background natural radioactivity. It also contains a phosphate zone lying between J...

S. M. N. Salih

1993-01-01

444

Radionuclides in marine mammals off the Portuguese coast.  

PubMed

Radionuclide analyses were performed in tissue samples including muscle, gonad, liver, mammary gland, and bone of marine mammals stranded on the Portuguese west coast during January-July 2006. Tissues were collected from seven dolphins (Delphinus delphis and Stenella coeruleoalba) and one pilot whale (Globicephala sp.). Samples were analyzed for (210)Po and (210)Pb by alpha spectrometry and for (137)Cs and (40)K by gamma spectrometry. Po-210 concentrations in common dolphin's muscle (D. delphis) averaged 56 ± 32 Bq kg(-1) wet weight (w.w.), while (210)Pb averaged 0.17 ± 0.07 Bq kg(-1) w.w., (137)Cs averaged 0.29 ± 0.28 Bq kg(-1) w.w., and (40)K 129 ± 48 Bq kg(-1) w.w. Absorbed radiation doses due to these radionuclides for the internal organs of common dolphins were computed and attained a 1.50 ?Gy h(-1) on a whole body basis. (210)Po was the main contributor to the weighted absorbed dose, accounting for 97% of the dose from internally accumulated radionuclides. These computed radiation doses in dolphins are compared to radiation doses from (210)Po and other radionuclides reported for human tissues. Due to the high (210)Po activity concentration in dolphins, the internal radiation dose in these marine mammals is about three orders of magnitude higher than in man. PMID:21496976

Malta, Margarida; Carvalho, Fernando P

2011-04-14

445

The fate of radionuclides in sewage sludge applied to land  

SciTech Connect

Municipal sewage sludge containing up to 12 pCi/g {sup 137}Cs, 20 pCi/g {sup 60}Co, and 300 ppm U was injected in a pasture (43 Mg/ha) and sprayed over a young pine plantation (34 Mg/ha). In the pasture, radionuclides were largely retained in the upper 15 cm of the soil, and only about 15% moved below 15 cm. Sludge rapidly infiltrated the soil on the pine plantation. One year after application, at least 85% of the {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, and U were found in the upper 7 cm of the pine plantation, with only about 15% moving into the 7- to 15-cm strata. On-site total added radiation dose was 2 to 6 mrem/year. Radionuclides were not detected above background in soil solutions at {approximately}50 cm depth or in shallow down-gradient groundwater wells. Surface runoff from application areas did not have elevated radionuclide concentrations. Concentrations of these radionuclides increased slightly in vegetation on treated sites, and uranium was notably higher in earthworms. 9 refs., 2 tabs.

Boston, H.L.; Van Miegroet, H.; Larsen, I.L.; Walzer, A.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Carlton, J.E. (Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (USA))

1990-01-01

446

Radionuclide transfer to fruit in the IAEA TRS No. 472  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the approach taken to present the information on fruits in the IAEA report TRS No. 472, supported by the IAEA-TECDOC-1616, which describes the key transfer processes, concepts and conceptual models regarded as important for dose assessment, as well as relevant parameters for modelling radionuclide transfer in fruits. Information relate to fruit plants grown in agricultural ecosystems of temperate regions. The relative significance of each pathway after release of radionuclides depends upon the radionuclide, the kind of crop, the stage of plant development and the season at time of deposition. Fruit intended as a component of the human diet is borne by plants that are heterogeneous in habits, and morphological and physiological traits. Information on radionuclides in fruit systems has therefore been rationalised by characterising plants in three groups: woody trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants. Parameter values have been collected from open literature, conference proceedings, institutional reports, books and international databases. Data on root uptake are reported as transfer factor values related to fresh weight, being consumption data for fruits usually given in fresh weight.

Carini, F.; Pellizzoni, M.; Giosuè, S.

2012-04-01

447

Atmospheric radionuclide concentrations measured by Pacific Northwest Laboratory since 1961.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, radon and thoron decay and the SNAP-9A burn-up ((sup 238)Pu) have been measured at Richland, Washington, since 1961; at Barrow, ...

J. A. Young C. W. Thomas

1981-01-01

448

Assessment of spatial distribution of fallout radionuclides through geostatistics concept  

Microsoft Academic Search

After introducing geostatistics concept and its utility in environmental science and especially in Fallout Radionuclide (FRN) spatialisation, a case study for cesium-137 (137Cs) redistribution at the field scale using geostatistics is presented. On a Canadian agricultural field, geostatistics coupled with a Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to test three different techniques of interpolation [Ordinary Kriging (OK), Inverse Distance Weighting

L. Mabit; C. Bernard

2007-01-01

449

Hydrology and radionuclide migration program 1987 progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's participation in the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the fiscal year 1987. The report discussed initial data from a new well (UE20n-1) drilled at the Cheshire site; presents a description of a proposed laboratory study of migration of colloids in fractured media; lists data collected during the drilling and initial sampling of UE20n-1; and describes a tentative proposal for work to be performed in FY88 by Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory. Groundwater sampled from the new well at the Cheshire site contains tritium concentrations comparable to those measured in previous years from locations above and within the Cheshire cavity. This presence of tritium, as well as several other radionuclides, in a well 100 m away from the cavity region indicates transport of radionuclides, validates a proposed model of the flow path, and provides data on rates of groundwater flow. Previous work at the Cheshire site has shown that radionuclides are transported by colloids through fractured media. However, we have no data that can be used for predictive modeling, and existing theories are not applicable. While physical transport mechanisms of sub-micrometer colloids to defined mineral surfaces are well known, predictions based on well-defined conditions differ from experimental observations by orders of magnitude. The U.C. Berkeley group has designed a laboratory experiment to quantify colloid retention and permeability alteration by the retained colloids.

Marsh, K.V. (comp.)

1991-03-01

450

External exposure to radionuclides in air, water, and soil  

SciTech Connect

Federal Guidance Report No. 12 tabulates dose coefficients for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides distributed in air, water, and soil. The dose coefficients are intended for use by Federal Agencies in calculating the dose equivalent to organs and tissues of the body.

Eckerman, K.F.; Ryman, J.C.

1996-05-01

451

Prognostic value of radionuclide exercise testing after myocardial infarction  

SciTech Connect

Abnormal systolic ventricular function and persistent ischemia are sensitive indicators of poor prognosis following myocardial infarction. The use of exercise improves the utility of both radionuclide ventriculography and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy in the identification of postinfarction patients at high risk of subsequent cardiac events. 51 references.

Schocken, D.D.

1984-08-01

452

New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ion  

SciTech Connect

We aim to develop new DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides, such as uranium, technetium, and plutonium, and metal contaminants, such as lead, chromium, and mercury. The sensors will be highly sensitive and selective. They will be applied to on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation, and stability of the individual contaminants before and during bioremediation, and for long-term monitoring of DOE contaminated sites. To achieve this goal, we have employed a combinatorial method called “in vitro selection” to search from a large DNA library (~ 1015 different molecules) for catalytic DNA molecules that are highly specific for radionuclides or other metal ions through intricate 3-dimensional interactions as in metalloproteins. Comprehensive biochemical and biophysical studies have been performed on the selected DNA molecules. The findings from these studies have helped to elucidate fundamental principles for designing effective sensors for radionuclides and metal ions. Based on the study, the DNA have been converted to fluorescent or colorimetric sensors by attaching to it fluorescent donor/acceptor pairs or gold nanoparticles, with 11 part-per-trillion detection limit (for uranium) and over million fold selectivity (over other radionuclides and metal ions tested). Practical application of the biosensors for samples from the Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center (FRC) at Oak Ridge has also been demonstrated.

Yi Lu

2008-03-01

453

Isonitrile radionuclide complexes for labelling and imaging agents  

DOEpatents

A coordination complex of an isonitrile ligand and radionuclide such as Tc, Ru, Co, Pt, Fe, Os, Ir, W, Re, Cr, Mo, Mn, Ni, Rh, Pd, Nb and Ta, is useful as a diagnostic agent for labelling liposomes or vesicles, and selected living cells containing lipid membranes, such as blood clots, myocardial tissue, gall bladder tissue, etc.

Jones, Alun G. (Newton Centre, MA); Davison, Alan (Needham, MA); Abrams, Michael J. (Allston, MA)

1984-06-04

454

Direct methods for radionuclides measurement in water environment.  

PubMed

The paper is devoted to the direct method of anthropogenic radionuclide measurement in the water environment. Opportunities of application of submersible gamma-spectrometers for in situ underwater measurements of gamma-radiating nuclides and also the direct method for 90Sr detection are considered. PMID:15162871

Chernyaev, A; Gaponov, I; Kazennov, A

2004-01-01

455

Analytical methods for radionuclides in liquid and solid media  

SciTech Connect

This lecture describes in vitro techniques for the radiochemical determination and dosimetry of radionuclides in the body that have been metabolized and are in the circulatory system. Measurements are made in the excretions and other body specimens such as blood, perspiration, hair, exhaled air, and tissue. 13 references, 4 tables. (ACR)

Sedlet, J.

1983-01-01

456

4.4 Physical Properties of the Most Important Radionuclides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.4 Physical Properties of the Most Important Radionuclides' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy'.

Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

457

Investigating incorporation and distribution of radionuclides in trinitite  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most of the surface explosions in nuclear tests have released radioactivity to the environment in the form of bulk glassy materials originating from the melting of sandy soil in the neighbourhood of ground zero. In view of clarifying issues concerning the mechanism of formation and the radiological impact of these materials, we investigated incorporation and volume distribution of radionuclides in

F. Belloni; J. Himbert; O. Marzocchi; V. Romanello

2011-01-01

458

GETOUT; radionuclide transport geologic media. [UNIVAC1100; FORTRAN  

Microsoft Academic Search

GETOUT is a set of four FORTRAN programs and associated subroutines developed as an aid to investigate the migration of radionuclide chains from an underground source. The model to be analyzed is an underground nuclear waste disposal site and a uniform one-dimensional soil column that connects the site with a surface water body. At an arbitrary time after the waste

T. B. Fowler; M. L. Tobias; J. N. Fox; B. E. Lawler; J. U. Koppel; J. R. Triplett; L. L. Lynn; L. A. Waldman; I. Goldberg; P. Greebler; M. D. Kelley; R. A. Davis; C. E. Keck; J. A. Redfield; P. J. Liddell

2008-01-01

459

BOOK REVIEW: Radionuclide Exposure of the Embryo\\/Fetus  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report addresses the determination of radiation dose to the embryo (the conceptus from fertilisation to organogenesis) and the fetus (post-organogenesis to birth) from radionuclides that are present in the woman before her pregnancy or that enter her during her pregnancy. This exposure may be via nuclear medicine procedures, occupational exposures or environmental sources that may affect the general population.

Helen Blundell

1999-01-01

460

Quantitative Analysis of Radionuclides in Process and Environmental Samples  

SciTech Connect

An analytical method was developed for the radiochemical separation and quantitative recovery of ruthenium, zirconium, niobium, neptunium, cobalt, iron, zinc, strontium, rare earths, chromium and cesium from a wide variety of natural materials. This paper discusses this analytical method, based on the anion exchange properties of the various radionuclides, although both ion exchange and precipitation techniques are incorporated.

Boni, A.L.

2003-02-21