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Sample records for radiopharmaceutical showing pharmacokinetic

  1. Radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Theobald, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a review of the latest developments in radiopharmaceuticals. It covers the development of radiopharmaceutical compounds, the theory and practice of their synthesis, and examples of their application. Also covers safe handling of radiopharmaceuticals, legislation affecting their use, radiation monitoring, radiochromatography, and computer techniques.

  2. 'Naked' radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, Paul E. . E-mail: pwallner@rtsx.com

    2006-10-01

    The term 'naked' radiopharmaceuticals, more appropriately, 'unbound' radiopharmaceuticals, refers to any radioisotope used for clinical research or clinical purposes that is not attached to a chemical or biological carrier, and that localizes in various tissues because of a physiologic or chemical propensity/affinity, or secondary to focal anatomic placement. Although they remain useful in selected clinical circumstances, the available agents (except for Iodine-131) have been relegated to an unfortunate and somewhat secondary role. The agents remain useful and worthy of consideration for new clinical investigation and clinical use.

  3. Organometallic Radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberto, Roger

    Although molecular imaging agents have to be synthesized ultimately from aqueous solutions, organometallic complexes are becoming more and more important as flexible yet kinetically stable building blocks for radiopharmaceutical drug discovery. The diversity of ligands, targets, and targeting molecules related to these complexes is an essential base for finding novel, noninvasive imaging agents to diagnose and eventually treat widespread diseases such as cancer. This review article covers the most important findings toward these objectives accomplished during the past 3-4 years. The two major available organometallic building blocks will be discussed in the beginning together with constraints for market introduction as imposed by science and industry. Since targeting radiopharmaceuticals are a major focus of current research in molecular imaging, attempts toward so-called technetium essential radiopharmaceuticals will be briefly touched in the beginning followed by the main discussion about the labeling of targeting molecules such as folic acid, nucleosides, vitamins, carbohydrates, and fatty acids. At the end, some new strategies for drug discovery will be introduced together with results from organometallic chemistry in water. The majority of the new results have been achieved with the [99mTc(OH2)3(CO)3]+ complex which will, though not exclusively, be a focus of this review.

  4. Medicinal Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry of Metal Radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saw, Maung Maung

    2012-06-01

    Metal complexes have been used as medicinal compounds. Metals have advantageous features over organic compounds. Significant applications of metal complexes are in the field of nuclear medicine. Radiopharmaceuticals are drugs containing radioisotopes used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The generalized targeting strategy for molecular imaging probe consists of three essential parts: (i) reporter unit or payload, (ii) carrier, and (iii) targeting system. Medicinal radiopharmaceutical chemistry pays special consideration to radioisotopes, as a reporter unit for diagnostic application or as a payload for therapeutic application. Targeting is achieved by a few approaches but the most common is the bifunctional chelator approach. While designing a radiopharmaceutical, a range of issues needs to be considered including properties of metal radioisotopes, bifunctional chelators, linkers, and targeting molecules. Designing radiopharmaceuticals requires consideration of two key words: "compounds of biological interest" and "fit for intended use." The ultimate goal is the development of new diagnostic methods and treatment. Diagnostic metal radiopharmaceuticals are used for SPECT and PET applications. Technetium chemistry constitutes a major portion of SPECT and gallium chemistry constitutes a major portion of PET. Therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals can be constructed by using alpha-, beta minus-, or Auger electron-emitting radiometals. Special uses of medicinal radiopharmaceuticals include internal radiation therapy, brachytherapy, immunoPET, radioimmunotherapy, and peptide receptor radionuclide imaging and therapy.

  5. Dosimetry for Radiopharmaceutical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Hobbs, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) involves the use of radionuclides that are either conjugated to tumor-targeting agents (eg, nanoscale constructs, antibodies, peptides, and small molecules) or concentrated in tissue through natural physiological mechanisms that occur predominantly in neoplastic or otherwise targeted cells (eg, Graves disease). The ability to collect pharmacokinetic data by imaging and use this to perform dosimetry calculations for treatment planning distinguishes RPT from other systemic treatment modalities. Treatment planning has not been widely adopted, in part, because early attempts to relate dosimetry to outcome were not successful. This was partially because a dosimetry methodology appropriate to risk evaluation rather than efficacy and toxicity was being applied to RPT. The weakest links in both diagnostic and therapeutic dosimetry are the accuracy of the input and the reliability of the radiobiological models used to convert dosimetric data to the relevant biologic end points. Dosimetry for RPT places a greater demand on both of these weak links. To date, most dosimetric studies have been retrospective, with a focus on tumor dose-response correlations rather than prospective treatment planning. In this regard, transarterial radioembolization also known as intra-arterial radiation therapy, which uses radiolabeled (90Y) microspheres of glass or resin to treat lesions in the liver holds much promise for more widespread dosimetric treatment planning. The recent interest in RPT with alpha-particle emitters has highlighted the need to adopt a dosimetry methodology that specifically accounts for the unique aspects of alpha particles. The short range of alpha-particle emitters means that in cases in which the distribution of activity is localized to specific functional components or cell types of an organ, the absorbed dose will be equally localized and dosimetric calculations on the scale of organs or even voxels (~5 mm) are no longer sufficient

  6. Dithiocarbamate-thiourea hybrids useful as vaginal microbicides also show reverse transcriptase inhibition: design, synthesis, docking and pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Bala, Veenu; Jangir, Santosh; Mandalapu, Dhanaraju; Gupta, Sonal; Chhonker, Yashpal S; Lal, Nand; Kushwaha, Bhavana; Chandasana, Hardik; Krishna, Shagun; Rawat, Kavita; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Bhatta, Rabi S; Siddiqi, Mohammad I; Tripathi, Rajkamal; Gupta, Gopal; Sharma, Vishnu L

    2015-02-15

    Prophylactic prevention is considered as the most promising strategy to tackle STI/HIV. Twenty-five dithiocarbamate-thiourea hybrids (14-38) were synthesized as woman controlled topical vaginal microbicides to counter Trichomonas vaginalis and sperm along with RT inhibition potential. The four promising compounds (18, 26, 28 and 33) were tested for safety through cytotoxic assay against human cervical cell line (HeLa) and compatibility with vaginal flora, Lactobacillus. Docking study of most promising vaginal microbicide (33) revealed that it docked in a position and orientation similar to known reverse transcriptase inhibitor Nevirapine. The preliminary in vivo pharmacokinetics of compound 33 was performed in NZ-rabbits to evaluate systemic toxicity in comparison to Nonoxynol-9. PMID:25592712

  7. Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry.

  8. Cyclotron produced radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopička, K.; Fišer, M.; Hradilek, P.; Hanč, P.; Lebeda, O.

    2003-01-01

    Some of the cyclotron-produced radionuclides may serve as important materials for the production of radiopharmaceuticals. This lecture deals with basic information relating to various aspects of these compounds. In comparison with radionuclides/compounds used for non-medical purposes, radiopharmaceuticals are subject to a broader scale of regulations, both from the safety and efficacy point of view; besides that, there are both radioactive and medical aspects that must be taken into account for any radiopharmaceutical. According to the regulations and in compliance with general rules of work with radioactivity, radiopharmaceuticals should only be prepared/manufactured under special conditions, using special areas and special equipment and applying special procedures (e.g. sterilisation, disinfection, aseptic work). Also, there are special procedures for cleaning and maintenance. Sometimes the requirements for the product safety clash with those for the safety of the personnel; several examples of solutions pertaining to these cases are given in the lecture. Also, the specific role of cyclotron radiopharmaceuticals is discussed.

  9. Astatine Radiopharmaceuticals: Prospects and Problems

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    For the treatment of minimum residual diseases such micrometastases and residual tumor margins that remain after debulking of the primary tumor, targeted radiotherapy using radiopharmaceuticals tagged with α-particle-emitting radionuclides is very attractive. In addition to the their short range in tissue, which helps minimize harmful effects on adjacent normal tissues, α-particles, being high LET radiation, have several radiobiological advantages. The heavy halogen, astatine-211 is one of the prominent α-particle-emitting radionuclides in practice. Being a halogen, it can often be incorporated into biomolecules of interest by adapting radioiodination chemistry. A wide spectrum of compounds from the simple [211At]astatide ion to small organic molecules, peptides, and large proteins labeled with 211At have been investigated with at least two reaching the stage of clinical evaluation. The chemistry, cytotoxic advantages, biodistribution studies, and microdosimetry/pharmacokinetic modeling of some of these agents will be reviewed. In addition, potential problems such as the harmful effect of radiolysis on the synthesis, lack of sufficient in vivo stability of astatinated compounds, and possible adverse effects when they are systemically administered will be discussed. PMID:20150978

  10. Astatine Radiopharmaceuticals: Prospects and Problems.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2008-09-01

    For the treatment of minimum residual diseases such micrometastases and residual tumor margins that remain after debulking of the primary tumor, targeted radiotherapy using radiopharmaceuticals tagged with alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides is very attractive. In addition to the their short range in tissue, which helps minimize harmful effects on adjacent normal tissues, alpha-particles, being high LET radiation, have several radiobiological advantages. The heavy halogen, astatine-211 is one of the prominent alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in practice. Being a halogen, it can often be incorporated into biomolecules of interest by adapting radioiodination chemistry. A wide spectrum of compounds from the simple [(211)At]astatide ion to small organic molecules, peptides, and large proteins labeled with (211)At have been investigated with at least two reaching the stage of clinical evaluation. The chemistry, cytotoxic advantages, biodistribution studies, and microdosimetry/pharmacokinetic modeling of some of these agents will be reviewed. In addition, potential problems such as the harmful effect of radiolysis on the synthesis, lack of sufficient in vivo stability of astatinated compounds, and possible adverse effects when they are systemically administered will be discussed. PMID:20150978

  11. Method for preparing radiopharmaceutical complexes

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Abrams, Michael J.

    1989-05-02

    A method for preparing radiopharmaceutical complexes that are substantially free of the reaction materials used to produce the radiopharmaceutical complex is disclosed. The method involves admixing in a suitable first solvent in a container a target seeking ligand or salt or metal adduct thereof, a radionuclide label, and a reducing agent for said radionuclide, thereby forming said radiopharmaceutical complex; coating the interior walls of the container with said pharmaceutical complex; discarding the solvent containing by-products and unreacted starting reaction materials; and removing the radiopharmaceutical complex from said walls by dissolving it in a second solvent, thereby obtaining said radiopharmaceutical complex substantially free of by-products and unreacted starting materials.

  12. Audits of radiopharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Castronovo, F P

    1992-03-01

    A procedure for auditing radiopharmaceutical formulations is described. To meet FDA guidelines regarding the quality of radiopharmaceuticals, institutional radioactive drug research committees perform audits when such drugs are formulated away from an institutional pharmacy. All principal investigators who formulate drugs outside institutional pharmacies must pass these audits before they can obtain a radiopharmaceutical investigation permit. The audit team meets with the individual who performs the formulation at the site of drug preparation to verify that drug formulations meet identity, strength, quality, and purity standards; are uniform and reproducible; and are sterile and pyrogen free. This team must contain an expert knowledgeable in the preparation of radioactive drugs; a radiopharmacist is the most qualified person for this role. Problems that have been identified by audits include lack of sterility and apyrogenicity testing, formulations that are open to the laboratory environment, failure to use pharmaceutical-grade chemicals, inadequate quality control methods or records, inadequate training of the person preparing the drug, and improper unit dose preparation. Investigational radiopharmaceutical formulations, including nonradiolabeled drugs, must be audited before they are administered to humans. A properly trained pharmacist should be a member of the audit team. PMID:1598931

  13. Radiopharmaceuticals for thrombus detection

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, L.C. )

    1990-01-01

    Most of the components of the thrombotic and fibrinolytic systems have at some time been evaluated as a means of carrying a radiolabel specifically to thrombi, although very few have been promising enough to emerge from investigational status to routine clinical use. New approaches are being explored, including improved methods of labeling platelets, chemically modified forms of previously tested plasma proteins, and new biomolecules, including monoclonal antibodies specific for fibrin and platelets. The current goal is to find one or more radiotracers that bind specifically and rapidly to thrombi, and that also have a rapid blood disappearance rate, permitting a clear diagnosis within a few hours after injection. Because this test may be needed to assess the course of therapy in an anticoagulated patient, the ideal radiopharmaceutical should be able to locate thrombi without interference by anticoagulants. Until a suitable thrombus-specific radiopharmaceutical becomes generally available, many hospitals will continue to attempt to make a diagnosis with nonspecific radiopharmaceuticals that can at best provide blood pool images to indicate filling defects. Several of the new approaches seem likely to provide the radiopharmaceutical sought, although clinical trials are at an early stage.137 references.

  14. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  15. Process for preparing radiopharmaceuticals

    DOEpatents

    Barak, Morton; Winchell, Harry S.

    1977-01-04

    A process for the preparation of technetium-99m labeled pharmaceuticals is disclosed. The process comprises initially isolating technetium-99m pertechnetate by adsorption upon an adsorbent packing in a chromatographic column. The technetium-99m is then eluted from the packing with a biological compound to form a radiopharmaceutical.

  16. Pharmacovigilance in radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rishi; Kalaiselvan, Vivekanandan; Kumar, Rakesh; Verma, Ravendra; Singh, Gyanendra Nath

    2016-01-01

    Indian Pharmacopoeia Commission is Committed for maintaining the standards of drugs including Radiopharmaceuticals (RPs) by publishing Indian Pharmacopoeia. These RPs are being used in India for diagnostic or therapeutic purpose. RPs though contain relatively small quantities of active ingredient and administered in small volumes could cause some adverse reactions to the patients. The objective of presenting this article is to introduce the system of adverse drug reaction reporting to the nuclear medicine fraternity who are dealing with RPs. PMID:27095855

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine practice

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalsky, R.J.; Perry, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the basic principles and clinical applications of radiopharmaceuticals. Topics include atomic physics as applied to radiopharmaceuticals, radionuclide generator function, nuclear pharmacy and safety, and radiopharmaceutical use in evaluating the major organ systems of the body. For each body system the author explains rationale for use, typical procedures, current agents of choice, and interpretation of results. Images, tables, and graphs illustrate normal and abnormal studies.

  18. I-123 - FP-CIT pharmacokinetics and dosimetry show great potential for the evaluation of dopamine transporter system in clinical routine

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, D.C.; Walker, S.; Waddington, W. |

    1996-05-01

    FP-CIT is a N-fluoropropyl analogue of the [2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane] which has been labelled with I-123 and developed as a new marker of the pre-synaptic dopamine transporter system. Its selective uptake in the striatum of non-human primates and human volunteers has been reported with advantageous faster brain kinetics than {beta}-CIT. In this pilot work we studied the whole body imaging kinetics of FP-CIT in one normal volunteer - NV (5, 60, 100, 360 minutes and 24 hours post-injection for 20 minutes each) and a drug-free patient with well established Parkinson`s disease - PD (100 minutes) after intravenous injection of 111 MBq. Both subjects had high resolution brain SPECT at 35 minutes and 3.5 hours post-injection. Percent of whole body uptake (geometric mean of anterior and posterior projections) in different organs, including total brain and basal ganglia shows rapid clearance from blood during the first hour with no significant change from 100 minutes to 24 hours. The basal ganglia uptake is approximately 0.4% of total body from 100 minutes onwards. Striatal uptake (ratio to frontal cortex) is different between subjects, mainly at 3.5 hours and more marked in the putamen: Calculated dosimetry (mSv/MBq) showed E.D.E.-0.034, and total doses to whole body - 0.01, total brain - 0.017, basal ganglia - 0.155, small intestine - 0.06, urinary bladder - 0.05 and liver - 0.03. These data confirm that FP-CIT has acceptable dosimetry with good pharmacokinetics enabling the study of pre-synaptic dopamine transport system in nigrostriatal degeneration with clinical SPECT at 3-4 hrs p.i.

  19. [Cephalexin pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Koroleva, V G; Vasil'ev, V K; Danilova, V I; Firsov, A A

    1981-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cephalexin monohydrate after its oral administration in a single dose was studied on rats and dogs. The analysis of the pharmacokinetic data obtained with the one-compartmental model showed that the rate of the antibiotic absorption in the rats was higher than that in the dogs. The periods of the cephalexin half-absorption and maximum concentration were 0.2 and 1.1 hour in the rats and 0.64 and 1.9 hours in the dogs respectively. The period of the antibiotic half-life was almost the same in both animal species. Selective localization of cephalexin in the kidney and liver tissues was noted. The antibiotic was mainly excreted by the kidneys (98.8 per cent for 24 hours). PMID:7235651

  20. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  1. Unconventional Nuclides for Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Jason P.; Williamson, Matthew J.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and widespread growth in the use of nuclear medicine for both diagnosis and therapy of disease has been the driving force behind burgeoning research interests in the design of novel radiopharmaceuticals. Until recently, the majority of clinical and basic science research has focused on the development of 11C-, 13N-, 15O-, and 18F-radiopharmaceuticals for use with positron emission tomography (PET) and 99mTc-labeled agents for use with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). With the increased availability of small, low-energy cyclotrons and improvements in both cyclotron targetry and purification chemistries, the use of “nonstandard” radionuclides is becoming more prevalent. This brief review describes the physical characteristics of 60 radionuclides, including β+, β−, γ-ray, and α-particle emitters, which have the potential for use in the design and synthesis of the next generation of diagnostic and/or radiotherapeutic drugs. As the decay processes of many of the radionuclides described herein involve emission of high-energy γ-rays, relevant shielding and radiation safety issues are also considered. In particular, the properties and safety considerations associated with the increasingly prevalent PET nuclides 64Cu, 68Ga, 86Y, 89Zr, and 124I are discussed. PMID:20128994

  2. Instrumentation and radiopharmaceutical validation.

    PubMed

    Zigler, S S

    2009-08-01

    Although the promise of new positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents is great, the process of bringing these agents to commercialization remains in its infancy. There are no PET products today that have gone through the full clinical and chemistry development process required to gain marketing approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The purpose of this paper was to review validation from the perspective of the chemistry, manufacturing and controls (CMC) section of an FDA filing, as well as the validation requirements described in FDA good manufacturing practice (GMP) regulations, guidance documents and general chapters of the US Pharmacopeia (USP). The review includes discussion of validation from development to commercial production of PET radiopharmaceuticals with a special emphasis on equipment and instrumentation used in production and testing. The goal is to stimulate a dialog that leads to the standardization of industry practices and regulatory requirements for validation practices in PET. PMID:19834450

  3. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    We report on our efforts in PET basic radiochemistry, radiopharmaceutical synthesis, and preclinical radiopharmaceutical evaluation. These efforts are focused on three fronts. First predictive abilities in nucleophilic aromatic substitution with [[sup 18]F]fluorination of substituted aromatic rings. Although radiochemical yields can be predicted within a very similar group of compounds with similar leaving groups and substituent patterns, generalization to all nucleophilic substitutions with [[sup 18]F] fluoride is not warranted. Kinetic studies indicate significantly different rates of reactions, depending on ring substituents. Second, preclinical evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals. We have synthesized and begun the preclinical evaluation of [[sup 11]C]tetrabenazine, a new radioligand based on the vesicular monoamine transport system. Third, our work, on [[sup 18]F]fluorination/decarbonylation reactions, structure-activity relationships in dopamine uptake inhibitors and effects of chronic drugs on radioligand binding is described.

  4. Population pharmacokinetic analysis for 10-monohydroxy derivative of oxcarbazepine in pediatric epileptic patients shows no difference between Japanese and other ethnicities.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Ikuo; Bouillon, Thomas; Yamaguchi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Hikoe; Hirota, Takashi; Fink, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Oxcarbazepine is an anti-epileptic drug, which is almost completely metabolized by cytosolic enzymes in the liver to the active 10-monohyroxy metabolite (MHD) following oral administration. The pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of MHD were evaluated in pediatric epileptic patients and a possible ethnic difference in PK of MHD between Japanese and non-Japanese pediatric patients was assessed. A non-linear mixed effect modeling approach was used to determine the PK of MHD. A one-compartment population model with first-order absorption appropriately described the PK of MHD. No clinically relevant differences were found for using body surface area or weight to explain between-patient variability, therefore the final model included the effects of body weight on apparent clearance (CL/F) and apparent volume of distribution (V/F) of MHD, and in addition, the effect of 3 concomitant anti-epileptic drugs (carbamazepine, phenobarbital and phenytoin) on CL/F of MHD. Inclusion of ethnicity as a covariate in the final model, concluded no ethnic difference with respect to CL/F of MHD between Japanese and non-Japanese patients. Hence, oxcarbazepine can be generally applied using the same dosage and administration for the treatment of partial onset seizures in pediatric patients, regardless of ethnicity. PMID:25989891

  5. Internal dose assessment for 211At α-emitter in isotonic solution as radiopharmaceutical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuminov, O. A.; Fotina, O. V.; Priselkova, A. B.; Tultaev, A. V.; Platonov, S. Yu.; Eremenko, D. O.; Drozdov, V. A.

    2003-12-01

    The functional fitness of the α-emitter 211At for radiotherapy of the thyroid gland cancer is evaluated. Radiation doses are calculated using the MIRD method and previously obtained pharmacokinetic data for 211At in isotonic solution and for 123I as sodium iodide. Analysis of the 211At radiation dose to the thyroid gland suggests that this radiopharmaceutical may be predominantly used for the treatment of the thyroid cancer.

  6. Preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with metal radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1992-06-01

    We recently developed a useful zinc-62/copper-62 generator and are presently evaluating copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals for clinical studies. While developing these copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals, in collaboration with the University of Missouri Research Reactor, Columbia we have also explored copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals. The PET images we obtained with copper-64 tracers were of such high quality that we have developed and evaluated copper-64 labeled antibodies for PET imaging. The major research activities described herein include: the development and assessment of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals; the development and evaluation of a new zinc-62/copper-62 generator and the assessment of copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals; mechanistic studies on proteins labeled with metal radionuclides.

  7. Bioinorganic Activity of Technetium Radiopharmaceuticals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkerton, Thomas C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Technetium radiopharmaceuticals are diagnostic imaging agents used in the field of nuclear medicine to visualize tissues, anatomical structures, and metabolic disorders. Bioavailability of technetium complexes, thyroid imaging, brain imaging, kidney imaging, imaging liver function, bone imaging, and heart imaging are the major areas discussed. (JN)

  8. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    In the period 1969-1986, this project was directed to the evolution of target-specific labeled chemicals useful for nuclear medical imaging, especially radioactive indicators suited to tracing adrenal functions and localizing tumors in the neuroendocrine system. Since 1986, this project research has focused on the chemistry of positron emission tomography (PET) ligands. This project has involved the evaluation of methods for radiochemical syntheses with fluorine-18, as well as the development and preliminary evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography. In the radiochemistry area, the ability to predict fluorine-18 labeling yields for aromatic substitution reactions through the use of carbon-13 NMR analysis was studied. Radiochemical yields can be predicted for some structurally analogous aromatic compounds, but this correlation could not be generally applied to aromatic substrates for this reaction, particularly with changes in ring substituents or leaving groups. Importantly, certain aryl ring substituents, particularly methyl groups, appeared to have a negative effect on fluorination reactions. These observations are important in the future design of syntheses of complicated organic radiopharmaceuticals. In the radiopharmaceutical area, this project has supported the development of a new class of radiopharmaceuticals based on the monoamine vesicular uptake systems. The new radioligands, based on the tetrabenazine structure, offer a new approach to the quantification of monoaminergic neurons in the brain. Preliminary primate imaging studies support further development of these radioligands for PET studies in humans. If successful, such radiopharmaceuticals will find application in studies of the causes and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson`s disease.

  9. Preparation of Radiopharmaceuticals Labeled with Metal Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    2012-02-16

    oxygen retention of the tissue and the significantly greater retention amounting in hypoxic tissue. This hypothesis was confirmed in a series of animal studies. Cu-64 can be used both as an imaging radionuclide and a therapeutic radionuclide. The therapeutic efficacy of Cu-64 ATSM was proven in hamsters bearing the CW39 human colorectal tumors. The administration of Cu-64 ATSM significantly increased the survival time of tumor-bearing animals with no acute toxicity. This copper agent therefore shows promise for radiotherapy. The flow tracer Cu-64 PTSM also demonstrates therapeutic potential by inhibiting cancer cells implanted in animal models. Again, this inhibition occurred at doses which showed no sign of toxicity to the animals. Cu-ATSM was translated to humans, under other support a series of tumors were investigated; these included head and neck cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, cervical cancer and renal cancer. Another radionuclide that was investigated was titanium 45. This radionuclide was successfully produced by radiation of a scandium foil with 15 MeV protons. The titanium 45 was processed and separated from residual scandium by high exchange chomotrophy. Titanium titanocene has been utilized as a therapeutic agent; this compound was prepared and studied in vitro and in vivo. Another project was the preparation of cyclodextrin dimers as a new pre-targeting approach for tumor uptake. Beta-cyclodextradin and two other dimers were synthesized. These dimers were studied for the in vivo application. Work continued on the application of the radionuclide already discussed. Technetium 94m, a positron emitting radionuclide of the widely used 99m Tc nuclide was also prepared. This allows the quantification of the uptake of technetium radiopharmaceuticals. In collaboration with Professor David Piwnica-Worms, technetium 94m, sestamibi was studied in animal models and in a limited number of human subjects.

  10. (Radiopharmaceutical and chemotherapeutic drug technology)

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, P.C.

    1988-01-14

    The purpose was to undertake a TOKTEN Distinguished Scientist Award assignment sponsored by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in cooperation with the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) of India to conduct research in the areas of nucleosides and protein labeling agents at the Central Drug Research Institute (CDRI), Lucknow, and to help research scientists develop chemotherapeutic drugs in India. His work at CDRI consisted of syntheses of imidazole nucleosides, iodination reactions of nucleosides, synthesis of a bifunctional bismaleimide protein labeling agent, coordination of protein labeling studies with the Membrane Biology Group of CDRI, and initiation of several new collaborative research projects at CDRI. In addition, as a part of the CSIR-UNDP, the traveler visited several academic and industrial research institutions in India, delivered five seminars describing various aspects of radiopharmaceutical development at ORNL, and interacted extensively with scientists in India on current drug and radiopharmaceutical develop technologies in India and abroad.

  11. Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging the heart

    DOEpatents

    Green, M.A.; Tsang, B.W.

    1994-06-28

    Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging myocardial tissues are prepared by forming lipophilic, cationic complexes of radioactive metal ions with metal chelating ligands comprising the Schiff base adducts of triamines and tetraamines with optionally substituted salicylaldehydes. The lipophilic, cationic, radioactive complexes of the invention exhibit high uptake and retention in myocardial tissues. Preferred gallium-68(III) complexes in accordance with this invention can be used to image the heart using positron emission tomography. 6 figures.

  12. Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging the heart

    DOEpatents

    Green, Mark A.; Tsang, Brenda W.

    1994-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging myocardial tissues are prepared by forming lipophilic, cationic complexes of radioactive metal ions with metal chelating ligands comprising the Schiff base adducts of triamines and tetraamines with optionally substituted salicylaldehydes. The lipophilic, cationic, radioactive complexes of the invention exhibit high uptake and retention in myocardial tissues. Preferred gallium-68(III) complexes in accordance with this invention can be used to image the heart using positron emission tomography.

  13. Prospective of 68Ga-Radiopharmaceutical Development

    PubMed Central

    Velikyan, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) experienced accelerated development and has become an established method for medical research and clinical routine diagnostics on patient individualized basis. Development and availability of new radiopharmaceuticals specific for particular diseases is one of the driving forces of the expansion of clinical PET. The future development of the 68Ga-radiopharmaceuticals must be put in the context of several aspects such as role of PET in nuclear medicine, unmet medical needs, identification of new biomarkers, targets and corresponding ligands, production and availability of 68Ga, automation of the radiopharmaceutical production, progress of positron emission tomography technologies and image analysis methodologies for improved quantitation accuracy, PET radiopharmaceutical regulations as well as advances in radiopharmaceutical chemistry. The review presents the prospects of the 68Ga-based radiopharmaceutical development on the basis of the current status of these aspects as well as wide range and variety of imaging agents. PMID:24396515

  14. Radiation dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    Tables of radiation dose estimates based on the Cristy-Eckerman adult male phantom are provided for a number of radiopharmaceuticals commonly used in nuclear medicine. Radiation dose estimates are listed for all major source organs, and several other organs of interest. The dose estimates were calculated using the MIRD Technique as implemented in the MIRDOSE3 computer code, developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Internal Dose Information Center. In this code, residence times for source organs are used with decay data from the MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes to produce estimates of radiation dose to organs of standardized phantoms representing individuals of different ages. The adult male phantom of the Cristy-Eckerman phantom series is different from the MIRD 5, or Reference Man phantom in several aspects, the most important of which is the difference in the masses and absorbed fractions for the active (red) marrow. The absorbed fractions for flow energy photons striking the marrow are also different. Other minor differences exist, but are not likely to significantly affect dose estimates calculated with the two phantoms. Assumptions which support each of the dose estimates appears at the bottom of the table of estimates for a given radiopharmaceutical. In most cases, the model kinetics or organ residence times are explicitly given. The results presented here can easily be extended to include other radiopharmaceuticals or phantoms.

  15. Pharmacokinetics & Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Andrew S.; Salpekar, Jay A.

    2009-01-01

    Medications administered in clinical practice obtain their therapeutic effect only to the extent that the drug is present in the appropriate concentration at the desired site. To achieve this goal, the prescribing clinician must be aware of how a drug may interact with the physiology of the patient. Pharmacokinetics is the study of this process…

  16. Modeling Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Bois, Frederic Y; Brochot, Céline

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics is the study of the fate of xenobiotics in a living organism. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models provide realistic descriptions of xenobiotics' absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion processes. They model the body as a set of homogeneous compartments representing organs, and their parameters refer to anatomical, physiological, biochemical, and physicochemical entities. They offer a quantitative mechanistic framework to understand and simulate the time-course of the concentration of a substance in various organs and body fluids. These models are well suited for performing extrapolations inherent to toxicology and pharmacology (e.g., between species or doses) and for integrating data obtained from various sources (e.g., in vitro or in vivo experiments, structure-activity models). In this chapter, we describe the practical development and basic use of a PBPK model from model building to model simulations, through implementation with an easily accessible free software. PMID:27311461

  17. Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J.

    2012-12-19

    The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

  18. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    In this grant period we have continued our efforts in the areas of PE basic radiochemistry, radiopharmaceutical synthesis, and preclinical radiopharmaceutical evaluation. A new synthetic sequence, consisting, of no-carrier-added fluorine-18 labeling of substituted benzaldehydes followed by reductive decarbonylation, has been developed. This new methodology can be applied to the fluorine-18 labeling of a wide variety of drugs not previously accessible through existing fluorine-18 labeling methods. Following up on a literature report that the ability to radiolabel aromatic rings can be predicted by {sup 13}C-NMR chemical shifts, we have examined the generality of this correlation in aromatic rings bearing a variety of substituents. Although the original correlation holds for nitro substituted anisaldehydes, it cannot be extended to other rings substitution patterns. We have examined the relationship of in vivo localization of various fluorine-18 labeled dopamine uptake inhibitors to their in vitro binding affinities and lipophilicities. We have found that remarkably small decreases in binding affinity result in dramatic losses of in vivo binding to the desired high affinity binding sites. In order to probe the effects of endogenous neurotransmitter on the in vivo binding of radiolabeled dopamine uptake inhibitors, we have examined the in vivo regional localization of (18{sub F}) GBR 13119 after acute and chronic drug treatments which alter the endogenous levels of dopamine. We have found that acute changes in dopamine levels do not affect the binding of this radioligand, but chronic depletion of neurotransmitter results in down-regulation of the in vivo binding sites. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Advancement in treatment and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer with radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yu-Ping; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a major health problem. Conventional imaging modalities show limited accuracy for reliable assessment of the tumor. Recent researches suggest that molecular imaging techniques with tracers provide more biologically relevant information and are benefit for the diagnosis of the cancer. In addition, radiopharmaceuticals also play more important roles in treatment of the disease. This review summaries the advancement of the radiolabeled compounds in the theranostics of PC. PMID:26909131

  20. Pharmacokinetics of macrolides in foals.

    PubMed

    Villarino, N; Martín-Jiménez, T

    2013-02-01

    Macrolides are used for treatment of pneumonia and extrapulmonary conditions caused by Rhodococcus equi. In foals, macrolides have an extraordinary capacity to accumulate in different lung tissue compartments. These drugs show unique pharmacokinetic features such as rapid and extensive distribution and long persistence in pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells from foals. This article reviews the pharmacokinetic characteristics of erythromycin, azithromycin, clarithromycin, tulathromycin, telithromycin, gamithromycin, and tilmicosin in foals, with emphasis on PELF and BAL cell concentrations. PMID:23082900

  1. Radiopharmaceuticals in PET, progress and promise

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1988-11-01

    It is the intention of this presentation to focus on the current state of radiopharmaceuticals for PET and where this is leading us. PET radiopharmaceuticals can be broken down into perhaps seven categories at present with each being applicable to a different aspect of human biochemistry. These are: metabolic probes, neurochemical probes, enzyme probes, ion channel blockers, blood flow agents, ethical drugs and other positron emitters. 7 refs.

  2. Radiopharmaceuticals in PET, Progress and Promise

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wolf, A. P.; Fowler, J. S.

    1988-11-01

    It is the intention of this presentation to focus on the current state of radiopharmaceuticals for PET and where this is leading us. PET radiopharmaceuticals can be broken down into perhaps seven categories at present with each being applicable to a different aspect of human biochemistry. These are: metabolic probes, neurochemical probes, enzyme probes, ion channel blockers, blood flow agents, ethical drugs and other positron emitters.

  3. Rational development of radiopharmaceuticals for HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Lau, Chuen-Yen; Maldarelli, Frank; Eckelman, William C; Neumann, Ronald D

    2014-04-01

    The global battle against HIV-1 would benefit from a sensitive and specific radiopharmaceutical to localize HIV-infected cells. Ideally, this probe would be able to identify latently infected host cells containing replication competent HIV sequences. Clinical and research applications would include assessment of reservoirs, informing clinical management by facilitating assessment of burden of infection in different compartments, monitoring disease progression and monitoring response to therapy. A "rational" development approach could facilitate efficient identification of an appropriate targeted radiopharmaceutical. Rational development starts with understanding characteristics of the disease that can be effectively targeted and then engineering radiopharmaceuticals to hone in on an appropriate target, which in the case of HIV-1 (HIV) might be an HIV-specific product on or in the host cell, a differentially expressed gene product, an integrated DNA sequence specific enzymatic activity, part of the inflammatory response, or a combination of these. This is different from the current approach that starts with a radiopharmaceutical for a target associated with a disease, mostly from autopsy studies, without a strong rationale for the potential to impact patient care. At present, no targeted therapies are available for HIV latency, although a number of approaches are under study. Here we discuss requirements for a radiopharmaceutical useful in strategies targeting persistently infected cells. The radiopharmaceutical for HIV should be developed based on HIV biology, studied in an animal model and then in humans, and ultimately used in clinical and research settings. PMID:24607432

  4. Improving radiopharmaceutical supply chain safety by implementing bar code technology.

    PubMed

    Matanza, David; Hallouard, François; Rioufol, Catherine; Fessi, Hatem; Fraysse, Marc

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate an approach for improving radiopharmaceutical supply chain safety by implementing bar code technology. We first evaluated the current situation of our radiopharmaceutical supply chain and, by means of the ALARM protocol, analysed two dispensing errors that occurred in our department. Thereafter, we implemented a bar code system to secure selected key stages of the radiopharmaceutical supply chain. Finally, we evaluated the cost of this implementation, from overtime, to overheads, to additional radiation exposure to workers. An analysis of the events that occurred revealed a lack of identification of prepared or dispensed drugs. Moreover, the evaluation of the current radiopharmaceutical supply chain showed that the dispensation and injection steps needed to be further secured. The bar code system was used to reinforce product identification at three selected key stages: at usable stock entry; at preparation-dispensation; and during administration, allowing to check conformity between the labelling of the delivered product (identity and activity) and the prescription. The extra time needed for all these steps had no impact on the number and successful conduct of examinations. The investment cost was reduced (2600 euros for new material and 30 euros a year for additional supplies) because of pre-existing computing equipment. With regard to the radiation exposure to workers there was an insignificant overexposure for hands with this new organization because of the labelling and scanning processes of radiolabelled preparation vials. Implementation of bar code technology is now an essential part of a global securing approach towards optimum patient management. PMID:25144560

  5. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1992-12-01

    We report on our efforts in PET basic radiochemistry, radiopharmaceutical synthesis, and preclinical radiopharmaceutical evaluation. These efforts are focused on three fronts. First predictive abilities in nucleophilic aromatic substitution with [{sup 18}F]fluorination of substituted aromatic rings. Although radiochemical yields can be predicted within a very similar group of compounds with similar leaving groups and substituent patterns, generalization to all nucleophilic substitutions with [{sup 18}F] fluoride is not warranted. Kinetic studies indicate significantly different rates of reactions, depending on ring substituents. Second, preclinical evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals. We have synthesized and begun the preclinical evaluation of [{sup 11}C]tetrabenazine, a new radioligand based on the vesicular monoamine transport system. Third, our work, on [{sup 18}F]fluorination/decarbonylation reactions, structure-activity relationships in dopamine uptake inhibitors and effects of chronic drugs on radioligand binding is described.

  6. In Vitro Assessment of the In Vivo Stability of Cu-64 Radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Packard, Alan B

    2011-12-15

    Benefits: The FISRE method that will be used in this project, once validated, will provide researchers with a core technology by which the stability of Cu 64 radiopharmaceuticals can be accurately measured. In the short-term, we expect to produce extensive data regarding the stability of Cu-64 complexes of ligands of radiopharmaceutical interest, primarily those that are most commonly used as BFCs (e.g., DOTA, TETA). These data will provide a quantitative basis for deciding which ligands may be best suited for use as BFCs, data that is not currently available. In the intermediate term, we expect that these results will facilitate the development of new Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals by providing a quantitative approach to assessing the stability of Cu-64 chelates. This innovative methodology will enable investigators to quantitatively compare the ability of different BFCs to retain Cu-64 in vivo. The benefits of this approach will be best seen in the development of Cu-64-labeled monoclonal antibodies where the accumulation of antibodies in the liver obviates liver uptake as an effective surrogate measure of Cu-64 lability. In the longer-term, we anticipate an improvement in the way in which various diseases (especially cancer) are detected, diagnosed, staged, and treated. This method will also enable researchers to distinguish differences in biodistribution that may arise from differences in charge, lipophilicity, etc. from those that may arise from loss of Cu-64 from the chelator. Last, this novel quantitative tool will allow investigators to evaluate the chemical factors that determine the in vivo stability of Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals laying the groundwork for the future development of more effective Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals. Once the feasibility of this method is established, it can also be used to evaluate the stability of other metalloradiopharmaceuticals including those based on Ga-68, a radionuclide that is showing great promise in tumor imaging.

  7. Joint CDRH (Center for Devices and Radiological Health) and state quality-assurance surveys in nuclear medicine: Phase 2 - radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, D.R.; Evans, C.D.

    1986-08-01

    The report discusses survey results on aspects of the quality assurance of radio-pharmaceuticals from 180 nuclear-medicine facilities in the United States. Data were collected from facilities in 8 states. Demographic information about nuclear-medicine operations and quality-assurance programs was gathered by state radiation-control-program personnel. The data collected from the survey show an incomplete acceptance of quality-assurance practices for radiopharmaceuticals. Most of the facilities in the survey indicated that, because an inferior radiopharmaceutical was prepared so infrequently, they did not believe it was cost-effective to perform extensive quality-assurance testing. The Center for Devices and Radiological Health hopes that the information from the survey will stimulate nuclear-medicine professionals and their organizations to encourage appropriate testing of all radiopharmaceuticals.

  8. Clinical pharmacokinetics of molsidomine.

    PubMed

    Rosenkranz, B; Winkelmann, B R; Parnham, M J

    1996-05-01

    Molsidomine is a prodrug for the formation of nitric oxide (NO). Its pharmacokinetics are characterised by rapid absorption and hydrolysis, taking a short time to achieve maximal systemic concentrations of both the parent compound and its active metabolite, SIN-1. The time to peak plasma drug concentration (tmax) is 1 to 2 hours. The bioavailability of the parent compound after oral administration in tablet form is 44 to 59%, but further metabolism to release NO and form polar metabolites is rapid; the half-life (t-1/2) of SIN-1 is 1 to 2 hours. Urinary excretion accounts for more than 90% of the part of the administered dose of molsidomine which is not excreted unchanged. Protein binding of the parent compound is very low (3 to 11%) and its volume of distribution (Vd) corresponds to the range of bodyweight. Single-dose studies (1, 2 and 4 mg) have revealed linear pharmacokinetics, and multiple dose studies in healthy individuals (2 mg 3 times daily for 7 days) and coronary artery disease (CAD) patients (4 mg 4 times daily for 4 weeks) do not show any accumulation of the drug. A study in young and elderly individuals indicated that the first-pass effect is decreased and t-1/2 prolonged with age, resulting in an increased area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of molsidomine and SIN-1. In patients with liver disease and congestive heart failure similar changes were observed, but much less so in patients with CAD. Clearance was also impaired in patients with liver disease, but the pharmacokinetics of molsidomine were not markedly altered by impaired renal function. In general, due to a large therapeutic dose range, dosage adjustments are not required on the basis of clinical experience. In certain patients a lower starting dose may be recommended, such as in those with impaired liver or kidney function, in congestive heart failure or in the presence of concomitant treatment with other vasoactive compounds. A linear dose-effect relationship is observed with

  9. Dose Assessments to the Hands of Radiopharmaceutical Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Dan; Eckerman, Keith F; Sherbini, Sami; Karagiannis, Harriet

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the characterization of radiation doses to the hands of nuclear medicine technicians resulting from the handling of radiopharmaceuticals. Radiation monitoring using ring dosimeters indicates that finger dosimeters may overestimate or underestimate the radiation doses to the skin that are used to show compliance with applicable regulations depending on the nature of the particular procedure and the radioisotope being handled. To better understand the parameters governing the absorbed dose distributions, a detailed model of the hands was created and used in Monte Carlo simulations of selected nuclear medicine procedures. Simulations on realistic configurations typical for workers handling radiopharmaceuticals were performed for a range of energies of the source photons. The lack of charged-particle equilibrium necessitated full photon-electron coupled transport calculations. The results show that the dose to different regions of the fingers can differ substantially from the dosimeters' readings when the dosimeters are located at the base of the finger. We tried to identify consistent patterns that relate the actual dose to the dosimeter readings. These patterns depend on the specific work conditions and can be used to better assess the absorbed dose to different regions of the exposed skin.

  10. Simplification of Methods for PET Radiopharmaceutical Syntheses

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbourn, Michael, R.

    2011-12-27

    In an attempt to develop simplified methods for radiochemical synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals useful in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), current commercially available automated synthesis apparati were evaluated for use with solid phase synthesis, thin-film techniques, microwave-accelerated chemistry, and click chemistry approaches. Using combinations of these techniques, it was shown that these automated synthesis systems can be simply and effectively used to support the synthesis of a wide variety of carbon-11 and fluorine-18 labeled compounds, representing all of the major types of compounds synthesized and using all of the common radiochemical precursors available. These techniques are available for use to deliver clinically useful amounts of PET radiopharmaceuticals with chemical and radiochemical purities and high specific activities, suitable for human administration.

  11. Transport processes of radiopharmaceuticals and -modulators

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy and radiology have been indispensable components in cancer care for many years. The detection limit of small tumor foci as well as the development of radio-resistance and severe side effects towards normal tissues led to the development of strategies to improve radio-diagnostic and -therapeutic approaches by pharmaceuticals. The term "radiopharmaceutical" has been used for drugs labeled with radioactive tracers for therapy or diagnosis. In addition, drugs have been described to sensitize tumor cells to radiotherapy (radiosensitizers) or to protect normal tissues from detrimental effects of radiation (radioprotectors). The present review summarizes recent concepts on the transport of radiopharmaceuticals, radiosensitizers, and radioprotectors in cells and tissues, e.g. by ATP-binding cassette transporters such as P-glycoprotein. Strengths and weaknesses of current strategies to improve transport-based processes are discussed. PMID:21645349

  12. Advances in the robotic production of radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Gaehle, G.; Welch, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    A variety of robotic systems, including Zymark, Hudson Control Group, Anotech, and Questech formerly U.M.I, have been used as a reliable and safe way to produce radiopharmaceuticals. A robotic system`s ability allows it to produce a variety of radiopharmaceuticals on a routine basis including final preparation and quality control. With proper scheduling, a single robotic system can synthesize {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose, {sup 18}F-estradiol, {sup 11}C-acetate, {sup 68}Ga-citrate and at the same time control black box type syntheses such as {sup 15}O-butanol in a single day. A robotic system`s flexibility allows it to be used in designing and testing new syntheses, thus making the development of the new radiopharmaceuticals safer for the chemist. The development of Windows, a multi-tasking operating system for PC computers, allows a robot controlled by that computer to function simultaneously with a large variety of other systems. This increases the system`s ability to communicate with other systems and it allows for change without replacing the entire system. Improvements in robot technology has increased their reliability while making them competitive in price to other means of automation. Today a robotic system to produce {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose can cost as little as $55,000 U.S. depending on the cost of the hot cell.

  13. Pitfalls and Limitations of SPECT, PET, and Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, James R

    2015-09-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are widely accepted to be a very safe class of drugs, with very few adverse reactions and unexpected biodistributions. However, problems can arise because of technical issues in manufacture or reconstitution, patient preparation, or drug administration. This review presents highlights of issues that have arisen in the newer classes of radiopharmaceuticals in the last 20 years and expands the scope of the previous report to include PET and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Variations in the "quality" of the eluate of a (99)Mo/(99m)Tc generator remain a major issue. Several of the newer (99m)Tc tracers require a heating step in preparation that can also lead to unacceptably low radiochemical purity. Radiolytic breakdown can be a problem with all classes of radiopharmaceuticals. Many of the newer radiopharmaceuticals localize by receptor- or transporter-mediated processes and thus can be affected by other drugs, making patient preparation more important than ever. Therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals may require coadministration of radioprotectant regimens, such as the use of lysine-arginine infusions with radiopeptide therapy. Extravasation can have serious consequences with therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Adverse reactions to newer radiopharmaceuticals remain rare, though may increase because of coadministration of agents such as contrast media. However, there is known to be underreporting of minor adverse reactions. Knowledge of the pitfalls that can occur with radiopharmaceuticals is important in the interpretation of nuclear medicine images and optimal patient care. PMID:26278857

  14. Oritavancin Pharmacokinetics and Bone Penetration in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ostiguy, Valerie; Cadieux, Cordelia; Malouin, Mireille; Belanger, Odette; Far, Adel Rafai; Parr, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and bone concentrations of oritavancin were investigated after a single intravenous dose was administered to rabbits. The pharmacokinetic profile of oritavancin in rabbits showed that it is rapidly distributed to bone tissues, with concentrations remaining stable for up to 168 h, the last measured time point. Based on these findings, further evaluation of oritavancin for the treatment of infections in bone tissues is warranted. PMID:26239977

  15. Design of CGMP Production of 18F- and 68Ga-Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Pei-Chun; Chao, Hao-Yu; Shieh, Wei-Chen; Chen, Chuck C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Radiopharmaceutical production process must adhere to current good manufacturing process (CGMP) compliance to ensure the quality of precursor, prodrug (active pharmaceutical ingredient, API), and the final drug product that meet acceptance criteria. We aimed to develop an automated system for production of CGMP grade of PET radiopharmaceuticals. Methods. The hardware and software of the automated synthesizer that fit in the hot cell under cGMP requirement were developed. Examples of production yield and purity for 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG at CGMP facility were optimized. Analytical assays and acceptance criteria for cGMP grade of 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG were established. Results. CGMP facility for the production of PET radiopharmaceuticals has been established. Radio-TLC and HPLC analyses of 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG showed that the radiochemical purity was 92% and 96%, respectively. The products were sterile and pyrogenic-free. Conclusion. CGMP compliance of radiopharmaceuticals has been reviewed. 68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG were synthesized with high radiochemical yield under CGMP process. PMID:25276810

  16. Consequences of electroplated targets on radiopharmaceutical preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, R. D.; Tirelli, S.; Sheh, Y.; Knott, A.; Gelbard, A. S.; Larson, S. M.; Dahl, J. R.

    1991-05-01

    The staff of the cyclotron facility at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center is involved in a comprehensive radionuclide preparation program which culminates with the formulation of numerous requested short-lived, positron-emitting radiopharmaceutical agents for clinical investigation. Both the produced radionuclide as well as the final radiolabeled compound are subjected to stringent quality control standards including assays for radiochemical and chemical purity. The subtle chemical consequences resulting from the irradiation of a nickel-plated target for 13N production serve to emphasize some of these potential technical difficulties.

  17. Stochastic Control of Pharmacokinetic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Schumitzky, Alan; Milman, Mark; Katz, Darryl; D'Argenio, David Z.; Jelliffe, Roger W.

    1983-01-01

    The application of stochastic control theory to the clinical problem of designing a dosage regimen for a pharmacokinetic system is considered. This involves defining a patient-dependent pharmacokinetic model and a clinically appropriate therapeutic goal. Most investigators have attacked the dosage regimen problem by first estimating the values of the patient's unknown model parameters and then controlling the system as if those parameter estimates were in fact the true values. We have developed an alternative approach utilizing stochastic control theory in which the estimation and control phases of the problem are not separated. Mathematical results are given which show that this approach yields significant potential improvement in attaining, for example, therapeutic serum level goals over methods in which estimation and control are separated. Finally, a computer simulation is given for the optimal stochastic control of an aminoglycoside regimen which shows that this approach is feasible for practical applications.

  18. Small Molecule Radiopharmaceuticals – A Review of Current Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Shubhra; Mishra, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are an integral component of nuclear medicine and are widely applied in diagnostics and therapy. Though widely applied, the development of an “ideal” radiopharmaceutical can be challenging. Issues such as specificity, selectivity, sensitivity, and feasible chemistry challenge the design and synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals. Over time, strategies to address the issues have evolved by making use of new technological advances in the fields of biology and chemistry. This review presents the application of few advances in design and synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals. The topics covered are bivalent ligand approach and lipidization as part of design modifications for enhanced selectivity and sensitivity and novel synthetic strategies for optimized chemistry and radiolabeling of radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:26942181

  19. Placental transfer of radiopharmaceuticals and dosimetry in pregnancy

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.R.; Stabin, M.G.; Sparks, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    The calculation of radiation dose estimates to the fetus is often important in nuclear medicine. To obtain the best estimates of radiation dose to the fetus, the best biological and physical models should be employed. In this paper, after identification of radiopharmaceuticals often administered to women of childbearing age, the most recent data available on the placental crossover of these radiopharmaceuticals was used (with standard kinetic models describing the maternal distribution and retention and with the best available physical models) to obtain fetal dose estimates for these radiopharmaceuticals were identified as those most commonly administered to women of childbearing years. The literature yielded information on placental crossover of 15 radiopharmaceuticals, from animal or human data. Radiation dose estimates are presented in early pregnancy and at 3-, 6-, and 9-months gestation for these radiopharmaceuticals, as well as for many others used in nuclear medicine (the latter considering only maternal organ contributions to fetal dose). 46 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  20. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. A total of 220 patients were included into the study: 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and 100 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). No abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In the breast cancer patients, the increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.4% patients. The increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients, and 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, the sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI was 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in the patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. The data obtained showed that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  1. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. Materials and Methods: a total of 220 patients were included into the study. Of them, there were 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and '00 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). Results: no abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In breast cancer patients, increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI in 93.4% patients. Increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients and 99mTc-MIBI in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI were 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. Conclusion: the data obtained show that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  2. Radiopharmaceutical dosage selection for pediatric nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, R.M.; Hendee, W.R.

    1986-02-01

    To identify the most rational method for adjusting adult radiopharmaceutical dosages for children, four methods of dosage computation were examined from the perspectives of diagnostic adequacy and radiation absorbed dose. For static imaging, information density is the most important factor in study quality, and adjustment of dosage by body weight (Wt) for thick organs, and body surface area (BSA) for thin organs is recommended. Compared with adults, small children receive less radiation exposure if radiopharmaceutical dosages are adjusted by Wt, and slightly greater exposure if dosages are adjusted by BSA. For dynamic imaging studies, dosage requirements are governed by the spatial resolution needed for region of interest assignment, and the statistical reliability of the time-activity data. For dynamic renal imaging, renograms of similar quality are obtained if dosages are adjusted by height (Ht). Dynamic cardiac studies might appear to require dosages even larger than those adjusted by Ht which would result in higher radiation absorbed doses to pediatric patients. However, smaller dosages can be used in children by prolonging the imaging time and accepting lower temporal resolution. Dosage requirements for dynamic studies depend on which physiologic characteristics are measured from the time-activity data. Since the measurements of some characteristics demand higher count rates than others, dosage requirements ultimately depend on which measurements are clinically necessary. Close attention to the factors that determine these requirements may yield significant reduction in dosages, and thus in radiation exposure, for patients of all ages.

  3. Lisdexamfetamine: A pharmacokinetic review.

    PubMed

    Comiran, Eloisa; Kessler, Félix Henrique; Fröehlich, Pedro Eduardo; Limberger, Renata Pereira

    2016-06-30

    Lisdexamfetamine (LDX) is a d-amphetamine (d-AMPH) pro-drug used to treat Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) symptoms. The in vivo pharmacodynamics of LDX is the same as that of its active product d-AMPH, although there are a few qualitative and quantitative differences due to pharmacokinetics. Due to the specific pharmacokinetics of the long-acting stimulants, this article revises the pharmacokinetic studies on LDX, the newest amphetamine pro-drug. The Medline/Pubmed, Science Direct and Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (Lilacs and Ibecs) (2007-2016) databases were searched for articles and their list of references. As for basic pharmacokinetics studies, since LDX is a newly developed medication, there are few results concerning biotransformation, distribution and the use of different biological matrices for analysis. This is the first robust review on this topic, gathering data from all clinical pharmacokinetics studies available in the literature. The particular pharmacokinetics of LDX plays a major role in studying this pro-drug, since this knowledge was essential to understand some reports on clinical effects in literature, e.g. the small likelihood of reducing the effect by interactions, the effect of long duration use and the still questionable reduction of the potential for abuse. In general the already well-known pharmacokinetic properties of amphetamine make LDX relatively predictable, simplifying the use of LDX in clinical practice. PMID:27125257

  4. Relative biological effectiveness of 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Narra, V R; Sastry, K S; Goddu, S M; Howell, R W; Strand, S E; Rao, D V

    1994-12-01

    The radiotoxicity of three 99mTc-labeled compounds is investigated using spermatogenesis in mouse testis as the experimental model, and spermatogonial cell survival as the biological end point. The radiopharmaceuticals studied are pertechnetate (99mTcO4-), pyrophosphate (99mTc-PYP), and hydroxyethylene diphosphate (99mTc-HDP). The mean lethal doses at 37% survival (D37) are 0.70 +/- 0.06, 0.84 +/- 0.13, and 0.59 +/- 0.08 Gy for 99mTcO4-, 99mTc-PYP, and 99mTc-HDP, respectively. When these results are compared with the D37 value obtained with external x rays or internal gamma rays, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of these compounds are 0.94 +/- 0.09, 0.79 +/- 0.13, and 1.1 +/- 0.16, respectively. These results show that the radiotoxicity of 99mTc in mouse testis is essentially similar to that of low-LET radiations (i.e., RBE approximately 1). To understand these results, the distribution of these radiocompounds in the testis is determined and correlated with the observed RBE values. The expected range of RBE values for 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals in organs is 0.95 to 1.5, depending on the fraction of organ activity that is bound to DNA. This suggests that the Auger electrons emitted in the decay of 99mTc are not capable of causing extreme toxicity in vivo. These results provide further support for 99mTc as the radionuclide of choice for imaging in nuclear medicine. PMID:7700199

  5. Predicting neonatal pharmacokinetics from prior data using population pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Edginton, Andrea N; Avant, Debbie; Burckart, Gilbert J

    2015-10-01

    Selection of the first dose for neonates in clinical trials is very challenging. The objective of this analysis was to assess if a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model developed with data from infants to adults is predictive of neonatal clearance and to evaluate what age range of prior PK data is needed for informative modeling to predict neonate exposure. Two sources of pharmacokinetic data from 8 drugs were used to develop population models: (1) data from all patients > 2 years of age, and (2) data from all nonneonatal patients aged > 28 days. The prediction error based on the models using data from subjects > 2 years of age showed bias toward overprediction, with median average fold error (AFE) for CL predicted/CLobserved greater than 1.5. The bias for predicting neonatal PK was improved when using all prior PK data including infants as opposed to an assessment without infant PK data, with the median AFE 0.91. As an increased number of pediatric trials are conducted in neonates under the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act, dose selection should be based on the best estimates of neonatal pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics prior to conducting efficacy and safety studies in neonates. PMID:25907280

  6. Organophosphorus Insecticide Pharmacokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Timchalk, Charles

    2010-01-01

    This chapter highlights a number of current and future applications of pharmacokinetics to assess organophosphate (OP) insecticide dosimetry, biological response and risk in humans exposed to these agents. Organophosphates represent a large family of pesticides where insecticidal as well as toxicological mode of action is associated with their ability to target and inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Pharmacokinetics entails the quantitative integration of physiological and metabolic processes associated with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of drugs and xenobiotics. Pharmacokinetic studies provide important data on the amount of toxicant delivered to a target site as well as species-, age-, gender-specific and dose-dependent differences in biological response. These studies have been conducted with organophosphorus insecticides in multiple species, at various dose levels, and across different routes of exposure to understand their in vivo pharmacokinetics and how they contribute to the observed toxicological response. To access human exposure to organophosphorus insecticides, human pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted and used to develop biological monitoring strategies based on the quantitation of key metabolites in biological fluids. Pharmacokinetic studies with these insecticides are also useful to facilitate extrapolation of dosimetry and biological response from animals to humans and for the assessment of human health risk. In this regard, physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) models are being utilized to assess risk and understand the toxicological implications of known or suspected exposures to various insecticides. In this chapter a number of examples are presented that illustrate the utility and limitation of pharmacokinetic studies to address human health concerns associated with organophosphorus insecticides.

  7. Manufacture of radiopharmaceuticals-recent advances

    SciTech Connect

    Krieger, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    Trends in radiopharmaceutical manufacturing have been influenced by the demands of the regulatory agencies, the demands of the customers, and the ever-increasing complexity of new products. Process improvements resulting from automation in the production of radionuclides for diagnostic imaging products, {sup 99m}/Tc generators, {sup 67}Ga, and {sup 201}Tl have been introduced to enhance compliance with current good manufacturing practices and to improve worker safety, both by reducing dose in accord with as low as reasonably achievable levels of radiation and by providing an ergonomically sound environment. Tighter process control has resulted in less lot-to-lot variability and ensures reliability of supply. Reduced manufacturing lapse time for {sup 99m}Tc generators minimizes decay and conserves the supply of {sup 99}Mo. Automation has resulted in an even greater degree of remote operation and has led to reductions in dose, improved process control, and faster throughput in the manufacture of radionuclides.

  8. Cancer-targeted therapies and radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Rachner, Tilman D; Jakob, Franz; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of bone metastases remains a clinical challenge. Although a number of well-established agents, namely bisphosphonates and denosumab, are available to reduce the occurrence of skeletal-related events, additional cancer-targeted therapies are required to improve patients' prognosis and quality of life. This review focuses on novel targets and agents that are under clinical evaluation for the treatment of malignant bone diseases such as activin A, src and endothelin-1 inhibition or agents that are clinically approved and may positively influence bone, such as the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. In addition, the potential of alpharadin, a novel radiopharmaceutical approved for the treatment of prostatic bone disease, is discussed. PMID:26131359

  9. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1991-12-31

    In this grant period we have continued our efforts in the areas of PE basic radiochemistry, radiopharmaceutical synthesis, and preclinical radiopharmaceutical evaluation. A new synthetic sequence, consisting, of no-carrier-added fluorine-18 labeling of substituted benzaldehydes followed by reductive decarbonylation, has been developed. This new methodology can be applied to the fluorine-18 labeling of a wide variety of drugs not previously accessible through existing fluorine-18 labeling methods. Following up on a literature report that the ability to radiolabel aromatic rings can be predicted by {sup 13}C-NMR chemical shifts, we have examined the generality of this correlation in aromatic rings bearing a variety of substituents. Although the original correlation holds for nitro substituted anisaldehydes, it cannot be extended to other rings substitution patterns. We have examined the relationship of in vivo localization of various fluorine-18 labeled dopamine uptake inhibitors to their in vitro binding affinities and lipophilicities. We have found that remarkably small decreases in binding affinity result in dramatic losses of in vivo binding to the desired high affinity binding sites. In order to probe the effects of endogenous neurotransmitter on the in vivo binding of radiolabeled dopamine uptake inhibitors, we have examined the in vivo regional localization of [18{sub F}] GBR 13119 after acute and chronic drug treatments which alter the endogenous levels of dopamine. We have found that acute changes in dopamine levels do not affect the binding of this radioligand, but chronic depletion of neurotransmitter results in down-regulation of the in vivo binding sites. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Metallic radionuclides in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sibaprasad; Dixit, Manish

    2011-06-21

    Metallic radionuclides are the mainstay of both diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Therapeutic nuclear medicine is less advanced but has tremendous potential if the radionuclide is accurately targeted. Great interest exists in the field of inorganic chemistry for developing target specific radiopharmaceuticals based on radiometals for non-invasive disease detection and cancer radiotherapy. This perspective will focus on the nuclear properties of a few important radiometals and their recent applications to developing radiopharmaceuticals for imaging and therapy. Other topics for discussion will include imaging techniques, radiotherapy, analytical techniques, and radiation safety. The ultimate goal of this perspective is to introduce inorganic chemists to the field of nuclear medicine and radiopharmaceutical development, where many applications of fundamental inorganic chemistry can be found. PMID:21541393

  11. Application of a Small Molecule Radiopharmaceutical Concept to Improve Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae Min

    2016-06-01

    Recently, large molecules or nanoparticles are actively studied as radiopharmaceuticals. However, their kinetics is problematic because of a slow penetration through the capillaries and slow distribution to the target. To improve the kinetics, a two-step targeting method can be applied by using small molecules and very rapid copper-free click reaction. Although this method might have limitations such as internalization of the first targeted conjugate, it will provide high target-to-non-target ratio imaging of radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:27275356

  12. UNCERTAINTIES IN TRICHLOROETHYLENE PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of a chemical¯its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in humans and laboratory animals ¯ is critical to the assessment of its human health risks. For trichloroethylene (TCE), numerous physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)...

  13. Ethnic and genetic factors in methadone pharmacokinetics: A population pharmacokinetic study☆

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Gavin; Lenz, Scott; Straka, Robert J.; Brundage, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment of opiate use disorders with methadone is complicated by wide interindividual variability in pharmacokinetics. To identify potentially contributing covariates in methadone pharmacokinetics, we used population pharmacokinetic modeling to estimate clearance (CL/F) and volume of distribution (V/F) for each methadone enantiomer in an ethnically diverse methadone maintained population. Methods Plasma levels of the opiate-active R-methadone and opiate-inactive S-methadone were measured in 206 methadone maintained subjects approximately two and twenty-three hours after a daily oral dose of racmethadone. A linear one-compartment population pharmacokinetic model with first-order conditional estimation with interaction (FOCE-I) was used to evaluate methadone CL/F and V/F. The influence of covariates on parameter estimates was evaluated using stepwise covariate modeling. Covariates included ethnicity, gender, weight, BMI, age, methadone dose, and 21 single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes implicated in methadone pharmacokinetics. Results In the final model, for each enantiomer, Hmong ethnicity reduced CL/F by approximately 30% and the rs2032582 (ABCB1 2677G > T/A) GG genotype was associated with a 20% reduction in CL/F. The presence of the rs3745274 minor allele (CYP2B6 515G > T) reduced CL/F by up to 20% for S-methadone only. A smaller effect of age was noted on CL/F for R-methadone. Conclusion This is the first report showing the influence of the rs2032582 and rs3745274 variants on methadone pharmacokinetics rather than simply dose requirements or plasma levels. Population pharmacokinetics is a valuable method for identifying the influences on methadone pharmacokinetic variability. PMID:25456329

  14. Traceability from governmental producers of radiopharmaceuticals in measuring (18)F in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A E; Iwahara, A; Silva, C J; Cruz, P A L; Poledna, R; Silva, R L; Laranjeira, A S; Delgado, J U; Tauhata, L; Loureiro, J S; Toledo, B C; Braghirolli, A M S; Andrade, E A L; Silva, J L; Hernandes, H O K; Valente, E S; Dalle, H M; Almeida, V M; Silva, T G; Fragoso, M C F; Oliveira, M L; Nascimento, E S S; Oliveira, E M; Herrerias, R; Souza, A A; Bambalas, E; Bruzinga, W A

    2016-03-01

    Since the inception of its proficiency test program to evaluate radionuclide measurement in hospitals and clinics, the National Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation-LNMRI, that represents Brazilian National Metrology Institute (NMI) for ionizing radiation has expanded its measurement and calibration capability. Requirements from the National Health Surveillance Agency from Ministry of Health (ANVISA), to producers of radiopharmaceuticals provided an opportunity to improve the full traceability chain to the highest level. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-(18)F) is the only radiopharmaceutical simultaneously produced by all Brazilian radiopharmaceutical production centers (RPCs). By running this proficiency test, LNMRI began to provide them with the required traceability. For evaluation, the ratio of RPC to reference value results and ISO/IEC17043:2010 criteria were used. The reference value established as calibration factor on the secondary standard ionization chamber was obtained from three absolute measurements systems, and routinely confirmed in each round of proficiency test by CIEMAT/NIST liquid scintillation counting. The γ-emitting impurities were checked using a High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The results show that Brazilian RPCs are in accordance with (accuracy within ±10%) the Brazilian standard for evaluation of measurements with radionuclide calibrators (CNEN NN 3.05., 2013). Nevertheless, the RPCs should improve the methodology of uncertainty estimates, essential when using the statistical criteria of ISO/IEC 17043 standard, in addition to improving accuracy to levels consistent with their position in the national traceability chain. PMID:26688362

  15. Skin contamination by radiopharmaceuticals and decontamination strategies.

    PubMed

    Bolzinger, M A; Bolot, C; Galy, G; Chabanel, A; Pelletier, J; Briançon, S

    2010-12-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the percutaneous penetration of five common radiopharmaceuticals ((99m)Tc, (67)Ga, (125)I, (111)In and (51)Cr) and to evaluate the effect of decontamination by a detergent solution dedicated to hospital institutions for that purpose. The skin kinetic profiles were established by using the in vitro Franz cell method over 24h. The skin distribution in each skin layer was quantified after 6h exposure time and the efficacy of the detergent solution to remove radionuclides was evaluated also after 6h. The most striking result was the repartition into two classes of kinetic profiles: (125)I and (99m)Tc permeated quickly (∼60% of applied activity after 24h) while the 3 other radionuclides permeated slowly (from ∼2.75% for (67)Ga to ∼10% of applied activity for (111)In). The lag times, i.e. the time necessary to cross the skin varied from 20min for (99m)Tc to 5h for (51)Cr, which accumulated in skin compartments. Skin washings with the detergent solution were particularly efficient for this radionuclide, contrary to the others for which the washing procedure should be applied earlier. The permeation of ions was dependent on their chemical and physical forms and on their salting-in or salting-out effects (coordination state and Hofmeister series). PMID:20888404

  16. Stroma Targeting Nuclear Imaging and Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Dinesh; Jeong, Jae-Min; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2012-01-01

    Malignant transformation of tumor accompanies profound changes in the normal neighboring tissue, called tumor stroma. The tumor stroma provides an environment favoring local tumor growth, invasion, and metastatic spreading. Nuclear imaging (PET/SPECT) measures biochemical and physiologic functions in the human body. In oncology, PET/SPECT is particularly useful for differentiating tumors from postsurgical changes or radiation necrosis, distinguishing benign from malignant lesions, identifying the optimal site for biopsy, staging cancers, and monitoring the response to therapy. Indeed, PET/SPECT is a powerful, proven diagnostic imaging modality that displays information unobtainable through other anatomical imaging, such as CT or MRI. When combined with coregistered CT data, [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG)-PET is particularly useful. However, [18F]FDG is not a target-specific PET tracer. This paper will review the tumor microenvironment targeting oncologic imaging such as angiogenesis, invasion, hypoxia, growth, and homing, and also therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals to provide a roadmap for additional applications of tumor imaging and therapy. PMID:22685650

  17. (Coordinated research of chemotherapeutic agents and radiopharmaceuticals)

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, P.C.

    1991-01-14

    The traveler received a United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Award for Distinguished Scientists to visit Indian Research Institutions including Central Drug Research Institute (CDRI), Lucknow, the host institution, in cooperation with the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) of India. At CDRI, the traveler had meetings to discuss progress and future directions of on-going collaborative research work on nucleosides and had the opportunity to initiate new projects with the divisions of pharmacology, biopolymers, and membrane biology. As a part of this program, the traveler also visited Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute (SGPI) of Medical Sciences, Lucknow; Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT) and Bhabha Atomic Research Center (BARC), Bombay; Variable Energy Cyclotron Center (VECC) and Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Calcutta. He also attended the Indo-American Society of Nuclear Medicine Meeting held in Calcutta. The traveler delivered five seminars describing various aspects of radiopharmaceutical development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and discussed the opportunities for exchange visits to ORNL by Indian scientists.

  18. Nanodrugs: pharmacokinetics and safety.

    PubMed

    Onoue, Satomi; Yamada, Shizuo; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2014-01-01

    To date, various nanodrug systems have been developed for different routes of administration, which include dendrimers, nanocrystals, emulsions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, micelles, and polymeric nanoparticles. Nanodrug systems have been employed to improve the efficacy, safety, physicochemical properties, and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile of pharmaceutical substances. In particular, functionalized nanodrug systems can offer enhanced bioavailability of orally taken drugs, prolonged half-life of injected drugs (by reducing immunogenicity), and targeted delivery to specific tissues. Thus, nanodrug systems might lower the frequency of administration while providing maximized pharmacological effects and minimized systemic side effects, possibly leading to better therapeutic compliance and clinical outcomes. In spite of these attractive pharmacokinetic advantages, recent attention has been drawn to the toxic potential of nanodrugs since they often exhibit in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and genotoxicity. A better understanding of the pharmacokinetic and safety characteristics of nanodrugs and the limitations of each delivery option is necessary for the further development of efficacious nanodrugs with high therapeutic potential and a wide safety margin. This review highlights the recent progress in nanodrug system development, with a focus on the pharmacokinetic advantages and safety challenges. PMID:24591825

  19. Aptamers as radiopharmaceuticals for nuclear imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Gijs, Marlies; Aerts, An; Impens, Nathalie; Baatout, Sarah; Luxen, André

    2016-04-01

    Today, radiopharmaceuticals belong to the standard instrumentation of nuclear medicine, both in the context of diagnosis and therapy. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals consist of targeting biomolecules which are designed to interact with a disease-related molecular target. A plethora of targeting biomolecules of radiopharmaceuticals exists, including antibodies, antibody fragments, proteins, peptides and nucleic acids. Nucleic acids have some significant advantages relative to proteinaceous biomolecules in terms of size, production, modifications, possible targets and immunogenicity. In particular, aptamers (non-coding, synthetic, single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides) are of interest because they can bind a molecular target with high affinity and specificity. At present, few aptamers have been investigated preclinically for imaging and therapeutic applications. In this review, we describe the use of aptamers as targeting biomolecules of radiopharmaceuticals. We also discuss the chemical modifications which are needed to turn aptamers into valuable (radio-)pharmaceuticals, as well as the different radiolabeling strategies that can be used to radiolabel oligonucleotides and, in particular, aptamers. PMID:26746572

  20. Auger Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals for Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falzone, Nadia; Cornelissen, Bart; Vallis, Katherine A.

    Radionuclides that emit Auger electrons have been of particular interest as therapeutic agents. This is primarily due to the short range in tissue, controlled linear paths and high linear energy transfer of these particles. Taking into consideration that ionizations are clustered within several cubic nanometers around the point of decay the possibility of incorporating an Auger emitter in close proximity to the cancer cell DNA has immense therapeutic potential thus making nuclear targeted Auger-electron emitters ideal for precise targeting of cancer cells. Furthermore, many Auger-electron emitters also emit γ-radiation, this property makes Auger emitting radionuclides a very attractive option as therapeutic and diagnostic agents in the molecular imaging and management of tumors. The first requirement for the delivery of Auger emitting nuclides is the definition of suitable tumor-selective delivery vehicles to avoid normal tissue toxicity. One of the main challenges of targeted radionuclide therapy remains in matching the physical and chemical characteristics of the radionuclide and targeting moiety with the clinical character of the tumor. Molecules and molecular targets that have been used in the past can be classified according to the carrier molecule used to deliver the Auger-electron-emitting radionuclide. These include (1) antibodies, (2) peptides, (3) small molecules, (4) oligonucleotides and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), (5) proteins, and (6) nanoparticles. The efficacy of targeted radionuclide therapy depends greatly on the ability to increase intranuclear incorporation of the radiopharmaceutical without compromising toxicity. Several strategies to achieve this goal have been proposed in literature. The possibility of transferring tumor therapy based on the emission of Auger electrons from experimental models to patients has vast therapeutic potential, and remains a field of intense research.

  1. New radiopharmaceutical agents for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Maffioli, L; Florimonte, L; Costa, D C; Correia Castanheira, J; Grana, C; Luster, M; Bodei, L; Chinol, M

    2015-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the fourth most common cancer worldwide in terms of incidence and third among male, but is becoming the most common cancer in developed countries. In many patients the disease will progress despite of castration levels of testosterone, to become castration-resistant PCa (CRPC). Nearly all patients with CRPC show bone metastases. The treatment of patients with bony metastases has dramatically changed during the past three years because of new therapeutic approaches addressed to obtain pain control, reduced skeletal morbidity, and most importantly, increased survival rate. A possible therapy can be based also on the use of radiopharmaceuticals systemically administered to slow or reverse the bone metastatic progression. In facts bone-homing radiopharmaceuticals are taken up in areas of high bone turnover, including areas with high osteoblastic activity. Recently, a bone targeting radiopharmaceutical, Radium-223 dichloride was added to this group of drugs clearly representing a new generation of radiopharmaceutical in bone therapy. Clinical trials had shown that the treatment with Ra-223 allowed the reduction of the risk of death respect to placebo. No other radiometabolic treatment achieved such result, evidentiating the disease-modifying properties of this bone-homing radiopharmaceutical. In an effort to treat patients with disseminated PCa, who became resistant to hormonal therapy, molecular targets have been recently identified. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one attractive target for diagnosis and therapy of metastasized PCa since its expression levels are directly correlated to androgen independence, metastasis, and progression. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPr) are also highly overexpressed in PCa. Numerous studies suggest the possibility of a high PCa-specific signal with radiolabeled bombesin analogs targeting GRPr. Low molecular weight peptides directed against these molecular targets have been radiolabeled

  2. Applications of quantitative whole body autoradiographic technique in radiopharmaceutical research

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Oster, Z.H.; Yonekura, Y.; Meyer, M.A.; Fand, I.; Brill, A.B.

    1982-01-01

    The routine evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals involves dissecting tissue distribution studies (DTDS) and gamma or positron imaging. DTDS have the following disadvantages: since not all tissues can always be sampled, sites of radiopharmaceutical uptake may be missed and because the procedure involves weighing of dissected tissue samples, the spatial resolution of this method is low and determined by the smallest amount that can be weighed accurately. Gamma camera imaging and positron emission tomography though more comprehensive in evaluating the global distribution of a compound, have relative low spatial resolution. Whole body autoradiography of small animals has a much higher spatial resolution as compared to the above and depicts the global distribution of radiopharmaceuticals. A computer-assisted quantification method of WBARG applied to positron, beta, and gamma emitters will complement the method by producing quantitative values comparable to those obtained by dissection and direct tissue counting, with the advantages of depicting the global distribution at high spatial resolution.

  3. Newer positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals for radiotherapy planning: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) has changed cancer imaging in the last decade, for better. It can be employed for radiation treatment planning of different cancers with improved accuracy and outcomes as compared to conventional imaging methods. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose remains the most widely used though relatively non-specific cancer imaging PET tracer. A wide array of newer PET radiopharmaceuticals has been developed for targeted imaging of different cancers. PET-CT with such new PET radiopharmaceuticals has also been used for radiotherapy planning with encouraging results. In the present review we have briefly outlined the role of PET-CT with newer radiopharmaceuticals for radiotherapy planning and briefly reviewed the available literature in this regard. PMID:26904575

  4. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of fosaprepitant dimeglumine

    PubMed Central

    Colon-Gonzalez, Francheska; Kraft, Walter K.

    2011-01-01

    Importance of the field Chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a common complication in the treatment of patients with cancer. The introduction of the first in class neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist aprepitant provided additive control on CINV in combination to existing antiemetics. Due to formulation issues, aprepitant is only available for oral administration. Fosaprepitant, a prodrug of aprepitant, was introduced to the market in 2008 as an intravenous bioequivalent to aprepitant. Areas covered in this review This review examines the chemical development of fosaprepitant, its pharmacokinetic properties, approved uses, and potential applications. What the reader will gain The reader will get up-to-date information on the pharmacology and clinical uses of fosaprepitant. Clinical studies have demonstrated pharmacokinetic bioequivalence of aprepitant 125-mg to fosaprepitant 115-mg, as well as comparable efficacy in prevention of acute and delayed emesis following the first day of chemotherapy regimens. Take home message Fosaprepitant is an IV pro-drug of aprepitant that offers a new alternative to patients with CINV. Currently, fosaprepitant can substitute oral aprepitant in the first day of a 3-day regimen. Current studies show that a single-day fosaprepitant regimen is also bioequivalent to the 3-day aprepitant regimen, this could significantly simplify the care for CINV patients in the future. PMID:20795794

  5. Clinical pharmacokinetics of dapsone.

    PubMed

    Zuidema, J; Hilbers-Modderman, E S; Merkus, F W

    1986-01-01

    Dapsone (DDS) has for about 4 decades been the most important antileprosy drug. Concentrations of dapsone and its monoacetyl metabolite, MADDS, can be determined in biological media by high-performance liquid chromatography. After oral administration, the drug is slowly absorbed, the maximum concentration in plasma being reached at about 4 hours, with an absorption half-life of about 1.1 hours. However, the extent of absorption has not been adequately determined. The elimination half-life of dapsone is about 30 hours. The drug shows linear pharmacokinetics within the therapeutic range and the time-course after oral administration fits a 2-compartment model. The concentration-time profile of dapsone after parenteral administration is reviewed. Of clinical importance is the development of a new long acting injection, which permits monthly supervised administration as recommended by the World Health Organization. Following dapsone injection in gluteal subcutaneous adipose tissue, a sufficiently sustained absorption for this purpose has been reported. Dapsone is about 70 to 90% protein bound and its monoacetylated metabolite (MADDS) is almost completely protein bound. The volume of distribution of dapsone is estimated to be 1.5 L/kg. It is distributed in most tissues, but M. leprae living in the Schwann cells of the nerves might be unaffected. Dapsone crosses the placenta and is excreted in breast milk and saliva. Dapsone is extensively metabolised. Dapsone, some MADDS and their hydroxylated metabolites are found in urine, partly conjugated as N-glucuronides and N-sulphates. The acetylation ratio (MADDS:dapsone) shows a genetically determined bimodal distribution and allows the definition of 'slow' and 'rapid' acetylators. As enterohepatic circulation occurs, the elimination half-life of dapsone is markedly decreased after oral administration of activated charcoal. This permits successful treatment in cases of intoxication. The daily dose of dapsone in leprosy is 50 to

  6. "The Show"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    For the past 16 years, the blue-collar city of Huntington, West Virginia, has rolled out the red carpet to welcome young wrestlers and their families as old friends. They have come to town chasing the same dream for a spot in what many of them call "The Show". For three days, under the lights of an arena packed with 5,000 fans, the state's best…

  7. Pharmacokinetic consequences of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, L.; Cintron, N. M.

    1991-01-01

    Spaceflight induces a wide range of physiological and biochemical changes, including disruption of gastrointestinal (GI) function, fluid and electrolyte balance, circulatory dynamics, and organ blood flow, as well as hormonal and metabolic perturbations. Any of these changes can influence the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of in-flight medication. That spaceflight may alter bioavailability was proposed when drugs prescribed to alleviate space motion sickness (SMS) had little therapeutic effect. Characterization of the pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic behavior of operationally critical medications is crucial for their effective use in flight; as a first step, we sought to determine whether drugs administered in space actually reach the site of action at concentrations sufficient to elicit the therapeutic response.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of melatonin in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Nazakat M; Azzopardi, Denis V; Hawwa, Ahmed F; McElnay, James C; Middleton, Benita; Arendt, J; Arichi, Tomoki; Gressens, Pierre; Edwards, A David

    2013-01-01

    Aims Preterm infants are deprived of the normal intra-uterine exposure to maternal melatonin and may benefit from replacement therapy. We conducted a pharmacokinetic study to guide potential therapeutic trials. Methods Melatonin was administered to 18 preterm infants in doses ranging from 0.04–0.6 μg kg−1 over 0.5–6 h. Pharmacokinetic profiles were analyzed individually and by population methods. Results Baseline melatonin was largely undetectable. Infants receiving melatonin at 0.1 μg kg−1 h−1 for 2 h showed a median half-life of 15.82 h and median maximum plasma concentration of 203.3 pg ml−1. On population pharmacokinetics, clearance was 0.045 l h−1, volume of distribution 1.098 l and elimination half-life 16.91 h with gender (P = 0.047) and race (P < 0.0001) as significant covariates. Conclusions A 2 h infusion of 0.1 μg kg−1 h−1 increased blood melatonin from undetectable to approximately peak adult concentrations. Slow clearance makes replacement of a typical maternal circadian rhythm problematic. The pharmacokinetic profile of melatonin in preterm infants differs from that of adults so dosage of melatonin for preterm infants cannot be extrapolated from adult studies. Data from this study can be used to guide therapeutic clinical trials of melatonin in preterm infants. PMID:23432339

  9. Axitinib plasma pharmacokinetics and ethnic differences.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Suzuki, Akiyuki; Tortorici, Michael A; Garrett, May; LaBadie, Robert R; Umeyama, Yoshiko; Pithavala, Yazdi K

    2015-04-01

    Axitinib, a potent and selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1, 2, and 3, showed improved progression-free survival over sorafenib in patients previously treated for advanced renal cell carcinoma in the AXIS trial. Although a few studies had established the efficacy and safety of axitinib in Asian patients, additional evaluation was necessary to obtain regulatory approval in several Asian countries, especially in light of ethnic differences that are known to exist in genetic polymorphisms for metabolizing enzymes such as cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A5, CYP2C19 and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1, which are involved in axitinib metabolism. Axitinib plasma pharmacokinetics following single or multiple administration of oral axitinib in Asian (Japanese or Chinese) healthy subjects as well as Asian patients with advanced solid tumors was compared with that obtained in Caucasians. Upon review, the data demonstrated that axitinib can be characterized as not sensitive to ethnic factors based on its pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Axitinib exhibited similar pharmacokinetics in Asian and non-Asian subjects. A pooled population pharmacokinetic analysis indicated lack of a clinically meaningful effect of ethnicity on axitinib disposition. Therefore, dose adjustment for axitinib on the basis of ethnicity is not currently warranted. PMID:25663295

  10. Preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with metal radionuclides. Progress report, July 1, 1988--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1992-06-01

    We recently developed a useful zinc-62/copper-62 generator and are presently evaluating copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals for clinical studies. While developing these copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals, in collaboration with the University of Missouri Research Reactor, Columbia we have also explored copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals. The PET images we obtained with copper-64 tracers were of such high quality that we have developed and evaluated copper-64 labeled antibodies for PET imaging. The major research activities described herein include: the development and assessment of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals; the development and evaluation of a new zinc-62/copper-62 generator and the assessment of copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals; mechanistic studies on proteins labeled with metal radionuclides.

  11. Process for producing astatine-211 for radiopharmaceutical use

    DOEpatents

    Mirzadeh, S.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1984-04-10

    A process is described for reliably and consistently producing astatine-211 in small controlled volumes of a solution, which is selected from a choice of solvents that are useful in selected radiopharmaceutical procedures in which the At-211 activities are to be applied. 4 figures, 1 table.

  12. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report presents research on radiopharmaceuticals. The following topics are discussed: antibody labeling with positron-emitting radionuclides; antibody modification for radioimmune imaging; labeling antibodies; evaluation of technetium acetlyacetonates as potential cerebral blood flow agents; and studies in technetium chemistry. (CBS)

  13. Radioisotope requirements and usage in the radiopharmaceutical industry

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    Radioisotopes are used extensively in many different productive and beneficial human endeavors. Amersham International, a U.K.-based company originating in the British Scientific Civil Service during World War II, has been actively involved in many of these activities for more than 50 yr. Today they are one of the world`s largest suppliers of radioactive compounds and scaled radiation sources for use in industrial quality and safety assurance, life science research, and medicine. This paper outlines one of these applications: the use of radioisotopes as radiopharmaceuticals. Radiopharmaceuticals are radioactive nuclides and labeled compounds that have been developed for the diagnosis and treatment of (human) disease. They are manufactured via highly controlled processes and have gone through regulatory scrutiny and approval far in excess of other radioisotopes used in other applications. Radiopharmaceuticals can be conveniently split into two categories. One type is simply an active analog that mimics the physiological behavior of its inactive counterpart in the body. The other involves an actual pharmacological compound that exhibits the desired physiological behavior, which is then labeled with a radionuclide suitable for either imaging or the delivery of a therapeutic radiation dose as appropriate but which plays no part in the mechanism of action of the drug. The latter type, which is the more common of the two, can be supplied either as an active compounded product or as a {open_quotes}cold kit,{close_quotes} which is then labeled with the appropriate radiopharmaceutical-grade radionuclide to yield the final product.

  14. Process for producing astatine-211 for radiopharmaceutical use

    DOEpatents

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Lambrecht, Richard M.

    1987-01-01

    A process for reliably and consistently producing astatine-211 in small controlled volumes of a solution, which is selected from a choice of solvents that are useful in selected radiopharmaceutical procedures in which the At-211 activities are to be applied.

  15. Radiopharmaceuticals for single-photon emission computed tomography brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Kung, Hank F; Kung, Mei-Ping; Choi, Seok Rye

    2003-01-01

    In the past 10 years, significant progress on the development of new brain-imaging agents for single-photon emission computed tomography has been made. Most of the new radiopharmaceuticals are designed to bind specific neurotransmitter receptor or transporter sites in the central nervous system. Most of the site-specific brain radiopharmaceuticals are labeled with (123)I. Results from imaging of benzodiazepine (gamma-aminobutyric acid) receptors by [(123)I]iomazenil are useful in identifying epileptic seizure foci and changes of this receptor in psychiatric disorders. Imaging of dopamine D2/D3 receptors ([(123)I]iodobenzamide and [(123)I]epidepride) and transporters [(123)I]CIT (2-beta-carboxymethoxy-3-beta(4-iodophenyl)tropane) and [(123)I]FP-beta-CIT (N-propyl-2-beta-carboxymethoxy-3-beta(4-iodophenyl)-nortropane has proven to be a simple but powerful tool for differential diagnosis of Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases. A (99m)Tc-labeled agent, [(99m)Tc]TRODAT (technetium, 2-[[2-[[[3-(4-chlorophenyl)-8-methyl-8-azabicyclo [3,2,1]oct-2-yl]methyl](2-mercaptoethyl)amino]ethyl]amino] ethanethiolato(3-)]oxo-[1R-(exo-exo)]-), for imaging dopamine transporters in the brain has been successfully applied in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Despite the fact that (123)I radiopharmaceuticals have been widely used in Japan and in Europe, clinical application of (123)I-labeled brain radiopharmaceuticals in the United States is limited because of the difficulties in supplying such agents. Development of (99m)Tc agents will likely extend the application of site-specific brain radiopharmaceuticals for routine applications in aiding the diagnosis and monitoring treatments of various neurologic and psychiatric disorders. PMID:12605353

  16. Estrogen receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals: II. Tissue distribution of 17. cap alpha. -methylestradiol in normal and tumor-bearing rats

    SciTech Connect

    Feenstra, A.; Vaalburg, W.; Nolten, G.M.J.; Reiffers, S.; Talma, A.G.; Wiegman, T.; van der Molen, H.D.; Woldring, M.G.

    1983-06-01

    Tritiated 17..cap alpha..-methylestradiol was synthesized to investigate the potential of the carbon-11-labeled analog as an estrogen-receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical. In vitro, 17..cap alpha..-methylestradiol is bound with high affinity to the cytoplasmic estrogen receptor from rabbit uterus (K/sub d/ = 1.96 x 10/sup -10/M), and it sediments as an 8S hormone-receptor complex in sucrose gradients. The compound shows specific uptake in the uterus of the adult rat, within 1 h after injection. In female rats bearing DMBA-induced tumors, specific uterine and tumor uptakes were observed, although at 30 min the tumor uptake was only 23 to 30% of the uptake in the uterus. Tritiated 17..cap alpha..-methylestradiol with a specific activity of 6 Ci/mmole showed a similar tissue distribution. Our results indicate that a 17 ..cap alpha..-methylestradiol is promising as an estrogen-receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of cannabidiol in dogs.

    PubMed

    Samara, E; Bialer, M; Mechoulam, R

    1988-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of the major nonpsychoactive cannabinoids produced by Cannabis sativa L. Recent studies have shown that CBD has a high protective index, comparable to that of phenobarbital and phenytoin. Because CBD has been reported to possess both anticonvulsant and antiepileptic activity, its pharmacokinetics were studied in dogs after the administration of two iv doses (45 and 90 mg) and one oral dose (180 mg) to dogs. After iv administration, CBD was rapidly distributed, followed by a prolonged elimination. It has a terminal half-life of 9 hr. CBD plasma levels declined in a triphasic fashion. The total body clearance of CBD was 17 liters/hr (after the 45-mg dose) and 16 liters/hr (after the 90-mg dose). This clearance value, after its normalization to blood clearance using mathematical equations, approaches the value of the hepatic blood flow; the extraction ratio in the liver is 0.74. CBD was observed to have a large volume of distribution, approximately 100 liters. In the dose range of 45 to 90 mg, the increase in the AUC was proportional to the dose, a fact that indicates that the pharmacokinetic profile of CBD in this dose range was not dose dependent. In three of the six dogs studied, CBD could not be detected in the plasma after oral administration. In the other three, the oral bioavailability ranged from 13 to 19%. The results of this study show that CBD is barely absorbed after oral administration to dogs. This low bioavailability may be due to a first pass effect. PMID:2900742

  18. Pharmacokinetics of pivmecillinam.

    PubMed

    Parsons, R L; Hossack, G A; Paddock, G M

    1977-06-01

    1 The plasma concentration/time curves of ampicillin and mecillinam in normal subjects were measured after oral administration of ampicillin (500 mg) and pivmecillinam (400 and 600 mg). 2 Similar plasma concentration/time curves of ampicillin and mecillinam in the starved normal subjects followed oral administration of ampicillin (500 mg) and pivmecillinam (600 mg). 3 The plasma concentration/time curve of mecillinam was measured in the same normal subjects after oral administration of pivmecillinam (400 mg) with a reproducible standardized Lundh test meal. 4 There was no statistically significant difference in the plasma concentration/time curve of mecillinam after pivmecillinam/400 mg) and the meal compared with the plasma concentration/time curve after oral pivmecillinam (400 mg) was given to the same subjects when starved. After administration of pivmecillinam (400 mg) with meal, Tasc was significantly delayed beyond the value obtained when the subjects were starved. 5 The pharmacokinetics of pivmecillinam in coeliac disease are normal. This finding contrasts with previous studies on the pharmacokinetics of another pivaloyloxymethylpenicillin ester, pivampicillin, in this condition. PMID:197981

  19. Pharmacokinetics of pivmecillinam.

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, R L; Hossack, G A; Paddock, G M

    1977-01-01

    1 The plasma concentration/time curves of ampicillin and mecillinam in normal subjects were measured after oral administration of ampicillin (500 mg) and pivmecillinam (400 and 600 mg). 2 Similar plasma concentration/time curves of ampicillin and mecillinam in the starved normal subjects followed oral administration of ampicillin (500 mg) and pivmecillinam (600 mg). 3 The plasma concentration/time curve of mecillinam was measured in the same normal subjects after oral administration of pivmecillinam (400 mg) with a reproducible standardized Lundh test meal. 4 There was no statistically significant difference in the plasma concentration/time curve of mecillinam after pivmecillinam/400 mg) and the meal compared with the plasma concentration/time curve after oral pivmecillinam (400 mg) was given to the same subjects when starved. After administration of pivmecillinam (400 mg) with meal, Tasc was significantly delayed beyond the value obtained when the subjects were starved. 5 The pharmacokinetics of pivmecillinam in coeliac disease are normal. This finding contrasts with previous studies on the pharmacokinetics of another pivaloyloxymethylpenicillin ester, pivampicillin, in this condition. PMID:197981

  20. Monte Carlo Assessments of Absorbed Doses to the Hands of Radiopharmaceutical Workers Due to Photon Emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Dan; Eckerman, Keith F; Karagiannis, Harriet

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the characterization of radiation doses to the hands of nuclear medicine technicians resulting from the handling of radiopharmaceuticals. Radiation monitoring using ring dosimeters indicates that finger dosimeters that are used to show compliance with applicable regulations may overestimate or underestimate radiation doses to the skin depending on the nature of the particular procedure and the radionuclide being handled. To better understand the parameters governing the absorbed dose distributions, a detailed model of the hands was created and used in Monte Carlo simulations of selected nuclear medicine procedures. Simulations of realistic configurations typical for workers handling radiopharmaceuticals were performedfor a range of energies of the source photons. The lack of charged-particle equilibrium necessitated full photon-electron coupled transport calculations. The results show that the dose to different regions of the fingers can differ substantially from dosimeter readings when dosimeters are located at the base of the finger. We tried to identify consistent patterns that relate the actual dose to the dosimeter readings. These patterns depend on the specific work conditions and can be used to better assess the absorbed dose to different regions of the exposed skin.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of melatonin in human sexual maturation.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, A; Ritschel, W A

    1996-05-01

    To determine whether melatonin pharmacokinetics change during puberty, we infused melatonin iv in 9 prepubertal, 8 pubertal, and 16 adult subjects and measured melatonin in serum and saliva, and 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate in urine. A pilot study of 3 adult males showed dose linearity, absence of saturation kinetics, and unaltered metabolism and urinary excretion for doses of 0.1, 0.5, and 5.0 micrograms/kg. All other subjects received 0.5 microgram/kg melatonin. The results of pharmacokinetic parameters calculated from serum melatonin showed no significant gender differences in adults. However, developmental differences were significant between prepubertal children and adults for terminal elimination rate constant (1.08 +/- 0.25 vs. 0.89 +/- 0.11 h-1), elimination half-life (0.67 +/- 0.12 vs. 0.79 +/- 0.10 h), and area under the concentration-time curve (250.9 +/- 91.8 vs. 376.9 +/- 154.3 (pg/mL).h, respectively). At all time points melatonin levels were higher in serum than in saliva, and the ratio between serum and salivary melatonin varied up to 55-fold within and between individuals. Results based on salivary melatonin showed significant differences between prepubertal children and adults for the terminal elimination rate constant (1.90 +/- 0.95 vs. 1.06 +/- 0.28 h-1). The described group differences in pharmacokinetic parameters suggest that prepubertal children metabolize melatonin faster than adults. The inconsistent ratio between serum and salivary melatonin calls for caution in the use of salivary melatonin for pharmacokinetic studies or to infer pineal function. The present findings, suggestive of faster melatonin metabolism in prepubertal children, combined with the known decline of serum melatonin with age and higher excretion rate of the metabolite in prepubertal children lead us to conclude that the prepubertal pineal gland has a higher melatonin secretion rate than the adult gland. PMID:8626852

  2. A simple liquid detector for radiopharmaceutical processing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alexoff, D.L.; Hallaba, K.; Schlyer, D.; Ferrieri, R.

    1995-03-01

    Sensing the presence of liquids in tubing and vessels in radiochemical processing equipment provides information important to the remote or automatic control of the production of clinical doses of radiopharmaceuticals. Although modern commercial automated radiopharmaceutical synthesis machines do not usually include liquid presence as a measured process variable, earlier more complex automated synthesis devices did; and the inclusion of such feedback can increase system reliability and simplify trouble-shooting tasks carried out by computer software or human operators. Commercial liquid level detectors are often designed for large-scale industrial processes and are therefore too large or expensive to be useful in many radiochemical hardware systems. An inexpensive miniature optical liquid detector originally by Kramer and Fuchs has been duplicated here for use in monitoring the presence of liquids in teflon tubing (1/16 in. O.D.) in an enriched oxygen-18 water recovery system.

  3. Freeware for reporting radiation dosimetry following the administration of radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Gómez Perales, Jesús Luis; García Mendoza, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    This work describes the development of a software application for reporting patient radiation dosimetry following radiopharmaceutical administration. The resulting report may be included within the patient's medical records. The application was developed in the Visual Basic programming language. The dosimetric calculations are based on the values given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The software is available in both Spanish and English and can be downloaded at no cost from www.radiopharmacy.net. PMID:26092354

  4. [Computer simulated images of radiopharmaceutical distributions in anthropomorphic phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-17

    We have constructed an anatomically correct human geometry, which can be used to store radioisotope concentrations in 51 various internal organs. Each organ is associated with an index number which references to its attenuating characteristics (composition and density). The initial development of Computer Simulated Images of Radiopharmaceuticals in Anthropomorphic Phantoms (CSIRDAP) over the first 3 years has been very successful. All components of the simulation have been coded, made operational and debugged.

  5. 18F-Labeled Silicon-Based Fluoride Acceptors: Potential Opportunities for Novel Positron Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Bernard-Gauthier, Vadim; Wängler, Carmen; Wängler, Bjoern; Schirrmacher, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Background. Over the recent years, radiopharmaceutical chemistry has experienced a wide variety of innovative pushes towards finding both novel and unconventional radiochemical methods to introduce fluorine-18 into radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET). These “nonclassical” labeling methodologies based on silicon-, boron-, and aluminium-18F chemistry deviate from commonplace bonding of an [18F]fluorine atom (18F) to either an aliphatic or aromatic carbon atom. One method in particular, the silicon-fluoride-acceptor isotopic exchange (SiFA-IE) approach, invalidates a dogma in radiochemistry that has been widely accepted for many years: the inability to obtain radiopharmaceuticals of high specific activity (SA) via simple IE. Methodology. The most advantageous feature of IE labeling in general is that labeling precursor and labeled radiotracer are chemically identical, eliminating the need to separate the radiotracer from its precursor. SiFA-IE chemistry proceeds in dipolar aprotic solvents at room temperature and below, entirely avoiding the formation of radioactive side products during the IE. Scope of Review. A great plethora of different SiFA species have been reported in the literature ranging from small prosthetic groups and other compounds of low molecular weight to labeled peptides and most recently affibody molecules. Conclusions. The literature over the last years (from 2006 to 2014) shows unambiguously that SiFA-IE and other silicon-based fluoride acceptor strategies relying on 18F− leaving group substitutions have the potential to become a valuable addition to radiochemistry. PMID:25157357

  6. Pharmacokinetics of cefixime

    SciTech Connect

    Tonelli, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    The serum protein binding of cefixime, was concentration-dependent. Below 30 mcg/mL, free-fractions (fu) of cefixime in dog serum were approximately 8%. As cefixime concentrations increased, concomitant increases in free-fraction were observed. At 328 mcg/mL almost half of the cefixime in serum was not bound. To examine the effect of this concentration-dependent binding on cefixime's pharmacokinetics, four dogs were administered 50 mg/kg of the carbon 14-labeled drug by the oral and intravenous routes. The absolute bioavailability of cefixime was 48.0 +/- 17% (mean +/- SD). Absorption of radioactivity was 51.9 +/- 18%. Cefixime's elimination was a function of its free-fraction in serum and reabsorption of filtered drug by the kidney.

  7. Clinical pharmacokinetics of anticonvulsants.

    PubMed

    Hvidberg, E F; Dam, M

    1976-01-01

    Anticonvulsant therapy was among the first areas to benefit from clinical pharmacokinetic studies. The most important advantage is that the frequent interindividual variation in the plasma level/dose ratio for these drugs can be circumvented by plasma level monitoring. For several anticonvulsants the brain concentration is shown to parallel the plasma concentration. Phenytoin (diphenylhydantoin) is stil the most important anticonvulsant and the one for which kinetics have been thoroughly investigated in man. These investigations have revealed several reasons for the wellknown difficulties in using this drug clinically. The absorption rate and fraction are very much dependent on the pharmaceutical preparation, and changes of brand may alter the plasma level of phenytoin in spite of unaltered dose. The elimination capacity is saturable causing dose dependent kinetics, which again means disproportional changes in plasma level with changes in dose. Great individual variations exist in the rate of metabolism, and several pharmacokinetic drug interactions are known. As an optimum therapeutic plasma concentration range has been established monitoring plasma levels must be strongly advocated. Interpretation of plasma levels in uraemic patients must take into account decreased protein binding of the drug. Carbamazepine is probably as effective as phenytoin. The elimination is a first order process, but the rate of metabolism increases after a few weeks' treatment. An active metabolite (epoxide) may be the cause of some side-effects. Combined treatment with other anticonvulsant drugs decreases the half-life and more frequent dosing may be necessary. An optimum therapeutic concentration range has been suggested and plasma monitoring is advocated, along with that of the active metabolite, the epoxide. Phenobarbitone is still much used but its kinetics have been investigated to a lesser extent. The main problem is the variability in the rate of elimination. In children the half

  8. [Pharmacokinetics--pharmacodynamics of modafinil in mice].

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhang-Qing; Hong, Zong-Yuan; Wang, Wu-San; Tao, Fang

    2012-01-01

    To guide the reasonable clinical application of modafinil (MOD), pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of MOD in mice and the correlation between them were investigated. Male mice (Kunming strain) were given a single oral dose of MOD (120 mg x kg(-1)). The plasma concentration of MOD was measured by HPLC and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated with DAS 3.0 software. For another batch of male Kunming strain mice, their locomotor activities were recorded by an infrared ray passive sensor after a same oral dose of MOD, and the synchronization and correlation between the changes of MOD plasma concentration and the locomotor activity induced by MOD were compared and analyzed. The results showed that the plasma concentration-time curve of MOD was fitted to two-compartment open model with a first order absorption. The main pharmacokinetic parameters t1/2alpha, t1/2beta, t(max), C(max) and AUC(0-inifinity) were 0.42 h, 3.10 h, 1.00 h, 41.34 mg x L(-1) and 142.22 mg x L(-1) x h, respectively. MOD significantly increased locomotor activity and the effect lasted for about 4 h. The changes of MOD plasma concentration and the locomotor activity induced by MOD were synchronous. In conclusion, there is a significant correlation between the effect of MOD and its plasma concentration after administration of 120 mg x kg(-1) in mice. PMID:22493813

  9. Pharmacokinetics of Hoasca alkaloids in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Callaway, J C; McKenna, D J; Grob, C S; Brito, G S; Raymon, L P; Poland, R E; Andrade, E N; Andrade, E O; Mash, D C

    1999-06-01

    N,N-Dimethyltryptamine (DMT), harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine (THH) are the characteristic alkaloids found in Amazonian sacraments known as hoasca, ayahuasca, and yajè. Such beverages are characterized by the presence of these three harmala alkaloids, where harmine and harmaline reversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) while tetrahydroharmine weakly inhibits the uptake of serotonin. Together, both actions increase central and peripheral serotonergic activity while facilitating the psychoactivity of DMT. Though the use of such 'teas' has be known to western science for over 100 years, little is known of their pharmacokinetics. In this study, hoasca was prepared and administered in a ceremonial context. All four alkaloids were measured in the tea and in the plasma of 15 volunteers, subsequent to the ingestion of 2 ml hoasca/kg body weight, using gas (GC) and high pressure liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated and peak times of psychoactivity coincided with high alkaloid concentrations, particularly DMT which had an average Tmax of 107.5 +/- 32.5 min. While DMT parameters correlated with those of harmine, THH showed a pharmacokinetic profile relatively independent of harmine's. PMID:10404423

  10. Auger Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Targeting Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Kiess, Ana P.; Hobbs, Robert; Sgouros, George; Mease, Ronnie C.; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Shen, Colette J.; Foss, Catherine A.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    Auger electron emitters such as 125I have a high linear energy transfer and short range of emission (<10 μm), making them suitable for treating micrometastases while sparing normal tissues. We used a highly specific small molecule targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) to deliver 125I to prostate cancer cells. Methods The PSMA-targeting Auger emitter 2-[3-[1-carboxy-5-(4-125I-iodo-benzoylamino)-pentyl]-ureido]-pentanedioic acid (125I-DCIBzL) was synthesized. DNA damage (via phosphorylated H2A histone family member X staining) and clonogenic survival were tested in PSMA-positive (PSMA+) PC3 PIP and PSMA-negative (PSMA−) PC3 flu human prostate cancer cells after treatment with 125I-DCIBzL. Subcellular drug distribution was assessed with confocal microscopy using a related fluorescent PSMA-targeting compound YC-36. In vivo antitumor efficacy was tested in nude mice bearing PSMA+ PC3 PIP or PSMA− PC3 flu flank xenografts. Animals were administered (intravenously) 111 MBq (3 mCi) of 125I-DCIBzL, 111 MBq (3 mCi) of 125I-NaI, an equivalent amount of nonradiolabeled DCIBzL, or saline. Results After treatment with 125I-DCIBzL, PSMA+ PC3 PIP cells exhibited increased DNA damage and decreased clonogenic survival when compared with PSMA− PC3 flu cells. Confocal microscopy of YC-36 showed drug distribution in the perinuclear area and plasma membrane. Animals bearing PSMA+ PC3 PIP tumors had significant tumor growth delay after treatment with 125I-DCIBzL, with only 1 mouse reaching 5 times the initial tumor volume by 60 d after treatment, compared with a median time to 5 times volume of less than 15 d for PSMA− PC3 flu tumors and all other treatment groups (P = 0.002 by log-rank test). Conclusion PSMA-targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy with the Auger emitter 125I-DCIBzL yielded highly specific antitumor efficacy in vivo, suggesting promise for treatment of prostate cancer micrometastases. PMID:26182968

  11. Estimation of pharmacokinetic model parameters.

    PubMed

    Timcenko, A; Reich, D L; Trunfio, G

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating the depth of anesthesia in clinical practice where many drugs are used in combination. The aim of the project is to use pharmacokinetically-derived data to predict episodes of light anesthesia. The weighted linear combination of anesthetic drug concentrations was computed using a stochastic pharmacokinetic model. The clinical definition of light anesthesia was based on the hemodynamic consequences of autonomic nervous system responses to surgical stimuli. A rule-based expert system was used to review anesthesia records to determine instances of light anesthesia using hemodynamic criteria. It was assumed that light anesthesia was a direct consequence of the weighted linear combination of drug concentrations in the patient's body that decreased below a certain threshold. We augmented traditional two-compartment models with a stochastic component of anesthetics' concentrations to compensate for interpatient pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variability. A cohort of 532 clinical anesthesia cases was examined and parameters of two compartment pharmacokinetic models for 6 intravenously administered anesthetic drugs (fentanyl, thiopenthal, morphine, propofol, midazolam, ketamine) were estimated, as well as the parameters for 2 inhalational anesthetics (N2O and isoflurane). These parameters were then prospectively applied to 22 cases that were not used for parameter estimation, and the predictive ability of the pharmacokinetic model was determined. The goal of the study is the development of a pharmacokinetic model that will be useful in predicting light anesthesia in the clinically relevant circumstance where many drugs are used concurrently. PMID:8563327

  12. Symbol-and-Arrow Diagrams in Teaching Pharmacokinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayton, William L.

    1990-01-01

    Symbol-and-arrow diagrams are helpful adjuncts to equations derived from pharmacokinetic models. Both show relationships among dependent and independent variables. Diagrams show only qualitative relationships, but clearly show which variables are dependent and which are independent, helping students understand complex but important functional…

  13. Pharmacokinetics of pantoprazole in man.

    PubMed

    Huber, R; Hartmann, M; Bliesath, H; Lühmann, R; Steinijans, V W; Zech, K

    1996-05-01

    The proton pump inhibitor pantoprazole is a substituted benzimidazole sulphoxide for the treatment of acid-related gastrointestinal diseases such as reflux esophagitis, duodenal and gastric ulcers. Pantoprazole, administered as a 40 mg enteric coated tablet, is quantitatively absorbed. Its absolute bioavailability is 77% and does not change upon multiple dosing. Following a single oral dose of 40 mg, Cmax is approximately 2.5 mg/l, with a tmax of 2-3 h. The AUC(0,inf.) is approximately 5 mgxh/l. Pantoprazole shows linear pharmacokinetics after both i.v. and oral administration. Pantoprazole is extensively metabolized in the liver, has a total serum clearance of 0.1 l/h/kg, a serum elimination half-life of about 1.1 h, and an apparent volume of distribution of 0.15 l/kg. 98% of pantoprazole is bound to serum proteins. Elimination half-life, clearance and volume of distribution are independent of the dose. The main serum metabolite is formed by demethylation at the 4-position of the pyridine ring, followed by conjugation with sulphate. Almost 80% of an oral or intravenous dose is excreted as metabolites in urine; the remainder is found in feces and originates from biliary secretion. The pharmacokinetics of pantoprazole are unaltered in patients with renal failure. In patients with severe liver cirrhosis, the decreased rate of metabolism results in a half-life of 7-9 h. The clearance of pantoprazole is only slightly affected by age, its half-life being approximately 1.25 h in the elderly. Concomitant intake of food had no influence on the bioavailability of pantoprazole. Pantoprazole showed lack of cytochrome P450 interaction with concomitantly administered drugs in any of the studies conducted to date. Lack of interaction was also demonstrated with a coadministered antacid. The absence of inductive effects on metabolism after chronic administration was first shown by using antipyrine as a probe for mixed functional oxidative cytochrome P450 enzymes. Absence of CYP1A2

  14. Pharmacokinetics of pantoprazole in man.

    PubMed

    Huber, R; Hartmann, M; Bliesath, H; Lühmann, R; Steinijans, V W; Zech, K

    1996-05-01

    The proton pump inhibitor pantoprazole is a substituted benzimidazole sulphoxide for the treatment of acid-related gastrointestinal diseases such as reflux esophagitis, duodenal and gastric ulcers. Pantoprazole, administered as a 40 mg enteric coated tablet, is quantitatively absorbed. Its absolute bioavailability is 77% and does not change upon multiple dosing. Following a single oral dose of 40 mg, Cmax is approximately 2.5 mg/l, with a tmax of 2-3 h. The AUC(O,inf.) is approximately 5 mgxh/l. Pantoprazole shows linear pharmacokinetics after both i.v. and oral administration. Pantoprazole is extensively metabolized in the liver, has a total serum clearance of 0.1 l/h/kg, a serum elimination halflife of about 1.1 h, and an apparent volume of distribution of 0.15 l/kg. 98% of pantoprazole is bound to serum proteins. Elimination half-life, clearance and volume of distribution are independent of the dose. The main serum metabolite is formed by demethylation at the 4-position of the pyridine ring, followed by conjugation with sulphate. Almost 80% of an oral or intravenous dose is excreted as metabolites in urine; the remainder is found in feces and originates from biliary secretion. The pharmacokinetics of pantoprazole are unaltered in patients with renal failure. In patients with severe liver cirrhosis, the decreased rate of metabolism results in a half-life of 7-9 h. The clearance of pantoprazole is only slightly affected by age, its half-life being approximately 1.25 h in the elderly. Concomitant intake of food had no influence on the bioavailability of pantoprazole. Pantoprazole showed lack of cytochrome P450 interaction with concomitantly administered drugs in any of the studies conducted to date. Lack of interaction was also demonstrated with a coadministered antacid. The absence of inductive effects on metabolism after chronic administration was first shown by using antipyrine as a probe for mixed functional oxidative cytochrome P450 enzymes. Absence of CYP1A2

  15. Pharmacokinetics of ambroxol and clenbuterol tablets in healthy Chinese volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong-Ge; Song, Li-Xue; Jiang, Nan; Xu, Xue-Ting; Di, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the pharmacokinetics of Ambroxol and Clenbuterol Tablets in Chinese healthy volunteers after a single or multiple dosages oral administration. Methods: A total of 9 healthy adult subjects were given Ambroxol and Clenbuterol Tablets in a single dosage or multiple dosages respectively. LC/MS/MS were used for the determination of Ambroxol and Clenbuterol of in plasma. The important pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by DAS 2.0 software (compartment model). Results: Single and multiple dosage groups of Ambroxol and Clenbuterol were all fitted two-compartment model. The pharmacokinetics fitted first order kinetics process. No difference in pharmacokinetics of Ambroxol in single and multiple dosage groups volunteers was observed, Which showed no marked changes, suggesting that multiple dosing did not influence the velocity of drug metabolism. Moreover, parameters of Clenbuterol had significant difference between the single and multiple dosage groups (P<0.05), showing there was accumulation in the body. 9 subjects had completed single or multiple dosages oral administration test, with no adverse drug reactions appeared during the test. Conclusion: There was no obvious accumulation of Ambroxol after repeated dosing. But obvious accumulation of Clenbuterol was noted in multiple-dose administration. The established method is sensitive, accurate, reliable and specific, and it can meet the requirement of clinical pharmacokinetic trial. PMID:26770490

  16. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1990-01-01

    The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics Panel met on 29-30 Aug. 1988 at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas to discuss pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic implications of space flight and make recommendations for operational and research strategies. Based on the knowledge available on the physiological changes that occur during space flight, the dependence of pharmacokinetics on physiological factors, and the therapeutic requirements for future space missions, the panel made several recommendations for research. It was suggested that using medications available with a large (wide) therapeutic window will avoid unforeseen therapeutic consequences during flight. The sequence for conducting research was outlined as follows: (1) identify ground-based simulation models (e.g., antiorthostatic bed rest) for conducting pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic research; (2) estimate parametric changes in these models using pharmacologic agents that have different pharmacokinetic characteristics and a narrow therapeutic index; (3) verify these findings during flight; and (4) develop and identify appropriate and effective drug delivery systems, dosage forms, and regimens. The panel recommended gaining a thorough understanding of the pharmacokinetic deviations of medications that have a narrow therapeutic index (e.g. cardiovascular drugs and sedative hypnotics) in order to ensure safe and effective treatment during flight with these agents. It was also suggested that basic information on physiological factors such as organ blood flow, protein composition and binding, tissue distribution, and metabolism by hepatic enzymes must be accumulated by conducting ground-based animal and human studies using models of weightlessness. This information will be useful to construct and identify physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that can provide valuable information on the pharmacodynamic consequences of space flight and aid in identifying appropriate therapeutic

  17. Pharmacokinetic study of sulbactomax.

    PubMed

    Payasi, Anurag; Chaudhary, Manu; Gupta, Ankush; Dwivedi, Vivek Kumar; Bhatnagar, Anuj

    2010-08-01

    We have evaluated pharmacokinetics of a fixed dose combination (FDC) of ceftriaxone and sulbactam (2:1) or sulbactomax in eight healthy volunteers. A 1.5 g dose of sulbactomax, 1 g dose of ceftriaxone and 0.5 g sulbactam were given intravenously in a balanced two-ways cross-over study. Serially collected plasma sample was analyzed for ceftriaxone and sulbactam by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The mean peaks of ceftriaxone and sulbactam concentrations in plasma were 152.06+/-6.65 microg/ml and 21.32+/-1.80 microg/ml, respectively and plasma half-lives for ceftriaxone and sulbactam were 5.2+/-0.35 hr and 0.94+/-0.038 hr, respectively. The AUC0-24 for ceftriaxone and sulbactam was 760.16+/-27.68 microg.hr/ml and 20.74+/-2.34 microg.hr/ml, respectively, with elimination rate constant of 0.133+/-0.009 hr(-1) and 0.732+/-0.029 hr(-1), respectively. The kinetics of ceftriaxone and sulbactum did not change in combination as compared to the alone treatment. Also, concentration of the ceftriaxone after 24 hr is higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the most of the gram positive and gram negative bacteria indicating that one dose in a day is sufficient to treat the disease caused by these organisms. PMID:20686332

  18. Applied Pharmacokinetics: Course Description and Retrospective Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Diane E.

    1984-01-01

    An applied course designed to allow students to formulate pharmacokinetic recommendations individually for actual patient data and compare their recommendations to those of a pharmacokinetic consulting service is described and evaluated, and an objective student evaluation method is outlined. (MSE)

  19. Molecular Engineering of Technetium and Rhenium Based Radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Zubieta, J.

    2003-06-30

    The research was based on the observation that despite the extraordinarily rich coordination chemistry of technetium and rhenium and several notable successes in reagent design, the extensive investigations by numerous research groups on a variety of N{sub 2}S{sub 2} and N{sub 3}S donor type ligands and on HYNIC have revealed that the chemistries of these ligands with Tc and Re are rather complex, giving rise to considerable difficulties in the development of reliable procedures for the development of radiopharmaceutical reagents.

  20. Silver-coated monolithic columns for separation in radiopharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Sedlacek, Ondrej; Kucka, Jan; Svec, Frantisek; Hruby, Martin

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the preparation of a macroporous monolithic column containing anchored silver nanoparticles and its use for the elimination of excess radioiodine from the radiolabeled pharmaceutical. The poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith was first functionalized with cystamine and the free thiol groups liberated by reaction with borohydride. In-house-prepared silver nanoparticles were then attached by interaction with the surface thiols. The deiodization process was demonstrated with the commonly used radiopharmaceutical m-iodobenzylguanidine labeled with radionuclide iodine-125. PMID:24478196

  1. (177) Lu-5-Fluorouracil a potential theranostic radiopharmaceutical: radiosynthesis, quality control, biodistribution, and scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Rashid; Tariq, Saleha; Naqvi, Syed Ali Raza; Gillani, Syed Jawad Hussain; Rizvi, Faheem Askari; Sajid, Muhammad; Rasheed, Shahid

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to develop (177) Lu-5-Flourouracil as a potential cancer therapeutic radiopharmaceutical. 5-Flourouracil (5-FU) is widely accepted as an anticancer drug of broad spectrum fame. The labeling of 5-FU was carried out at different set of experimental conditions using high specific activity of (177) LuCl3 . The optimum conditions for maximum radiochemical yield was set: 5-FU (5 mg), (177) LuCl3 (185 MBq), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (10 µg), reaction volume (2 mL), pH (5.5), temperature (80°C), and reaction time (20 min). The radiochemical labeling was assessed with Whatman No. 2 paper, instant thin layer chromatographic, and radio-HPLC, which revealed >94% labeling results with sufficient stability up to 6 h. Serum stability study also showed (177) Lu-5-FU promising stability. Biodistribution study in normal rats and rabbits showed liver, stomach, kidney, and heart as area of increased tracer accumulation just after injection, which decreased to 1.4%, 0.4%, 0.2%, and 0.39% ID/g, respectively, after 72 h. Glomerular filtration rate and cytotoxicity study results of (177) Lu-5-FU showed it had no adverse effect on renal function and nontoxic to blood cells. The promising characteristics of (177) Lu-5-FU, that is, clever elimination from kidney and nontoxic nature toward blood cells make it the radiopharmaceutical for further testing in patients for therapeutic purposes. PMID:27444959

  2. Pirbenicillin: Pharmacokinetic Parameters in Mice

    PubMed Central

    English, Arthur R.; Girard, Dennis; Retsema, James A.

    1976-01-01

    The rapid intravenous administration to mice of pirbenicillin, carbenicillin, and ampicillin produced biexponential blood concentration-time curves when assessed by frequent blood samplings at short intervals. The pharmacokinetic behavior of pirbenicillin and the other penicillins was analyzed by the two-compartment open model. This is thought to be the first study giving detailed pharmacokinetic values of penicillins in mice. Some significant differences were noted between the pharmacokinetic values of pirbenicillin, ampicillin, and carbenicillin. These values suggest that the interchange of pirbenicillin between the central and peripheral body compartments of the mouse was slower than that of either carbenicillin or ampicillin and indicated that a greater fraction of the pirbenicillin than the ampicillin dose reached the peripheral compartment. PMID:984791

  3. Clinical pharmacokinetics of metformin.

    PubMed

    Graham, Garry G; Punt, Jeroen; Arora, Manit; Day, Richard O; Doogue, Matthew P; Duong, Janna K; Furlong, Timothy J; Greenfield, Jerry R; Greenup, Louise C; Kirkpatrick, Carl M; Ray, John E; Timmins, Peter; Williams, Kenneth M

    2011-02-01

    Metformin is widely used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is a biguanide developed from galegine, a guanidine derivative found in Galega officinalis (French lilac). Chemically, it is a hydrophilic base which exists at physiological pH as the cationic species (>99.9%). Consequently, its passive diffusion through cell membranes should be very limited. The mean ± SD fractional oral bioavailability (F) of metformin is 55 ± 16%. It is absorbed predominately from the small intestine. Metformin is excreted unchanged in urine. The elimination half-life (t(½)) of metformin during multiple dosages in patients with good renal function is approximately 5 hours. From published data on the pharmacokinetics of metformin, the population mean of its clearances were calculated. The population mean renal clearance (CL(R)) and apparent total clearance after oral administration (CL/F) of metformin were estimated to be 510 ± 130 mL/min and 1140 ± 330 mL/min, respectively, in healthy subjects and diabetic patients with good renal function. Over a range of renal function, the population mean values of CL(R) and CL/F of metformin are 4.3 ± 1.5 and 10.7 ± 3.5 times as great, respectively, as the clearance of creatinine (CL(CR)). As the CL(R) and CL/F decrease approximately in proportion to CL(CR), the dosage of metformin should be reduced in patients with renal impairment in proportion to the reduced CL(CR). The oral absorption, hepatic uptake and renal excretion of metformin are mediated very largely by organic cation transporters (OCTs). An intron variant of OCT1 (single nucleotide polymorphism [SNP] rs622342) has been associated with a decreased effect on blood glucose in heterozygotes and a lack of effect of metformin on plasma glucose in homozygotes. An intron variant of multidrug and toxin extrusion transporter [MATE1] (G>A, SNP rs2289669) has also been associated with a small increase in antihyperglycaemic effect of metformin. Overall, the effect of structural

  4. PET Pharmacokinetic Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Schauenburg, Wolfgang; Reimold, Matthias

    Positron Emission Tomography is a well-established technique that allows imaging and quantification of tissue properties in-vivo. The goal of pharmacokinetic modelling is to estimate physiological parameters, e.g. perfusion or receptor density from the measured time course of a radiotracer. After a brief overview of clinical application of PET, we summarize the fundamentals of modelling: distribution volume, Fick's principle of local balancing, extraction and perfusion, and how to calculate equilibrium data from measurements after bolus injection. Three fundamental models are considered: (i) the 1-tissue compartment model, e.g. for regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with the short-lived tracer [15O]water, (ii) the 2-tissue compartment model accounting for trapping (one exponential + constant), e.g. for glucose metabolism with [18F]FDG, (iii) the reversible 2-tissue compartment model (two exponentials), e.g. for receptor binding. Arterial blood sampling is required for classical PET modelling, but can often be avoided by comparing regions with specific binding with so called reference regions with negligible specific uptake, e.g. in receptor imaging. To estimate the model parameters, non-linear least square fits are the standard. Various linearizations have been proposed for rapid parameter estimation, e.g. on a pixel-by-pixel basis, for the prize of a bias. Such linear approaches exist for all three models; e.g. the PATLAK-plot for trapping substances like FDG, and the LOGAN-plot to obtain distribution volumes for reversibly binding tracers. The description of receptor modelling is dedicated to the approaches of the subsequent lecture (chapter) of Millet, who works in the tradition of Delforge with multiple-injection investigations.

  5. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science)

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.D.; Beck, R.N.

    1990-09-01

    This is a report of progress in Year Two (January 1, 1990--December 31, 1990) of Grant FG02-86ER60438, Quantitative Studies in Radiopharmaceutical Science,'' awarded for the three-year period January 1, 1989--December 31, 1991 as a competitive renewal following site visit in the fall of 1988. This program addresses the problems involving the basic science and technology underlying the physical and conceptual tools of radioactive tracer methodology as they relate to the measurement of structural and functional parameters of physiologic importance in health and disease. The principal tool is quantitative radionuclide imaging. The overall objective of this program is to further the development and transfer of radiotracer methodology from basic theory to routine clinical practice in order that individual patients and society as a whole will receive the maximum net benefit from the new knowledge gained. The focus of the research is on the development of new instruments and radiopharmaceuticals, and the evaluation of these through the phase of clinical feasibility. 25 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Process for producing astatine-211 for radiopharmaceutical use

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzadeh, S.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1987-07-21

    A one-step chemical manipulation is described in combination with a distillation and collection process for producing At-211 comprising; a. providing a target of irradiated Bismuth coated to a predetermined thickness of a backing member, b. providing a vapor-producing still operably connected with a condenser that has a water cooled condensate collector formed of a dry silica gel mesh maintained at a temperature above the freezing point of water, and providing an effluent gas filter that is operably connected to receive effluent gas from the condenser, c. heating the target in the still at a temperature in the range of about 630/sup 0/-680/sup 0/C for a time period in the range of 50 to 80 minutes, to evole At-211 vapor from the target, c. providing a dry carrier gas having an oxygen concentration that is sufficient to form Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/ thereby to essentially preclude vaporization of Bi metal, passing the carrier gas through the still to carry the At-211 vapor to the condenser, and to carry effluent from the condenser to the effluent gas filter, e. eluting At-211 from the condensate collector of the condenser with a controlled volume of eluent containing predetermined solvents that are compatible with a given desired radiopharmaceutical procedure, and f. collecting the At-211 in the controlled volume of eluent for use in the given radiopharmaceutical procedure.

  7. Cyclotron targets and production technologies used for radiopharmaceuticals in NPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fišer, M.; Kopička, K.; Hradilek, P.; Hanč, P.; Lebeda, O.; Pánek, J.; Vognar, M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with some technical aspects of the development and production of cyclotronmade radiopharmaceuticals (excluding PET). In this field, nuclear chemistry and pharmacy are in a close contact; therefore, requirements of the both should be taken into account. The principles of cyclotron targetry, separation/recovery of materials and synthesis of active substances are given, as well as issues connected with formulation of pharmaceutical forms. As the radiopharmaceuticals should fulfil the requirements on in vivo preparations, there exist a variety of demands pertaining to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) concept, which is also briefly discussed. A typical production chain is presented and practical examples of real technologies based on cyclotron-made radionuclides are given as they have been used in Nuclear Physics Institute of CAS (NPI). Special attention is devoted to the technology of enriched cyclotron targets. Frequently used medicinal products employing cyclotron-produced active substances are characterised (Rb/Kr generators, 123I-labelled MIBG, OIH and MAB's). The cyclotron produced radioactive implants for transluminal coronary angioplasty (radioactive stents) are introduced as an example of a medical device developed for therapeutic application.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of mitragynine in man

    PubMed Central

    Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Sathirakul, Korbtham; Auparakkitanon, Saranya; Krongvorakul, Jatupon; Sueajai, Jetjamnong; Noumjad, Nantida; Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Wananukul, Winai

    2015-01-01

    Background Kratom, known botanically as Mitragyna speciosa (Korth.), is an indigenous tree in Southeast Asia. Kratom is currently easily available worldwide via special shops and the Internet to use as a drug of abuse, opioid alternative, or pain killer. So far, the pharmacokinetics of this plant has been studied only in animals, and there is no such study in humans. The major abundant active alkaloid in Kratom, mitragynine, is one of the promising new chemical substances to be developed as a new drug. The aim of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetics of mitragynine and assess the linearity in pharmacokinetics in chronic users. Methods Since Kratom is illegal in Thailand, studies in healthy subjects would be unethical. We therefore conducted a prospective study by enrolling ten chronic, regular, healthy users. We adjusted the steady state in each subject by giving a known amount of Kratom tea for 7 days before commencement of the experiment. We admitted and gave different oral doses to subjects to confirm linearity in pharmacokinetics. The mitragynine blood concentrations at 17 times points and the urine concentrations during the 24-hour period were collected and measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Results Ten male subjects completed the study without adverse reactions. The median duration of abuse was 1.75 years. We analyzed one subject separately due to the abnormal behavior of blood concentration. From data of nine subjects, the pharmacokinetic parameters established were time to reach the maximum plasma concentration (0.83±0.35 hour), terminal half-life (23.24±16.07 hours), and the apparent volume of distribution (38.04±24.32 L/kg). The urine excretion of unchanged form was 0.14%. The pharmacokinetics were observed to be oral two-compartment model. Conclusion This was the first pharmacokinetic study in humans, which demonstrated linearity and was consistent with the oral two-compartment model with a terminal half

  9. Population Pharmacokinetics and Therapeutic Efficacy of Febuxostat in Patients with Severe Renal Impairment.

    PubMed

    Hira, Daiki; Chisaki, Yugo; Noda, Satoshi; Araki, Hisazumi; Uzu, Takashi; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Yano, Yoshitaka; Morita, Shin-Ya; Terada, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of severe renal dysfunction (estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 ml/min/1.73 m(2), including hemodialysis) on the pharmacokinetics and therapeutic effects of febuxostat using a population pharmacokinetic analysis. This study recruited patients with hyperuricemia who were initially treated with allopurinol, but were switched to febuxostat, and it consists of 2 sub-studies: a pharmacokinetic study (26 patients) and retrospective efficacy evaluation study (51 patients). The demographic and clinical data of patients were collected from electronic medical records. Plasma febuxostat concentrations were obtained at each hospital visit. Population pharmacokinetic modeling was performed with NONMEM version 7.2. A total of 128 plasma febuxostat concentrations from 26 patients were used in the population pharmacokinetic analysis. The data were best described by a 1-compartment model with first order absorption. Covariate analysis revealed that renal function did not influence the pharmacokinetics of febuxostat, whereas actual body weight significantly influenced apparent clearance and apparent volume of distribution. The retrospective efficacy analysis showed the favorable therapeutic response of febuxostat switched from allopurinol in patients with moderate to severe renal impairment. No serious adverse event associated with febuxostat was observed irrespective of renal function. The population pharmacokinetic analysis and therapeutic analysis of febuxostat revealed that severe renal dysfunction had no influence on the pharmacokinetic parameters of febuxostat. These results suggest that febuxostat is tolerated well by patients with severe renal impairment. PMID:26183164

  10. Peptide Based Radiopharmaceuticals: Specific Construct Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P; Rhodes, B A; Sharma, S S

    1997-10-21

    The objective of this project was to develop receptor based peptides for diagnostic imaging and therapy. A series of peptides related to cell adhesion molecules (CAM) and immune regulation were designed for radiolabeling with 99mTc and evaluated in animal models as potential diagnostic imaging agents for various disease conditions such as thrombus (clot), acute kidney failure, and inflection/inflammation imaging. The peptides for this project were designed by the industrial partner, Palatin Technologies, (formerly Rhomed, Inc.) using various peptide design approaches including a newly developed rational computer assisted drug design (CADD) approach termed MIDAS (Metal ion Induced Distinctive Array of Structures). In this approach, the biological function domain and the 99mTc complexing domain are fused together so that structurally these domains are indistinguishable. This approach allows construction of conformationally rigid metallo-peptide molecules (similar to cyclic peptides) that are metabolically stable in-vivo. All the newly designed peptides were screened in various in vitro receptor binding and functional assays to identify a lead compound. The lead compounds were formulated in a one-step 99mTc labeling kit form which were studied by BNL for detailed in-vivo imaging using various animals models of human disease. Two main peptides usingMIDAS approach evolved and were investigated: RGD peptide for acute renal failure and an immunomodulatory peptide derived from tuftsin (RMT-1) for infection/inflammation imaging. Various RGD based metallopeptides were designed, synthesized and assayed for their efficacy in inhibiting ADP-induced human platelet aggregation. Most of these peptides displayed biological activity in the 1-100 µM range. Based on previous work by others, RGD-I and RGD-II were evaluated in animal models of acute renal failure. These earlier studies showed that after acute ischemic injury the renal cortex displays

  11. [A new radiopharmaceutical for bone imaging: experimental study of 99mTc-HEDTMP].

    PubMed

    Hu, Shu; Deng, Houfu; Jiang, Shubin; Luo, Shunzhong; Lei, Yong

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to prepare 99mTc-HEDTMP [N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethlenediamine-1,1,2-tri (methylene phosphonic acid), a new kind of bone seeking compound; to investigate its biological properties; and to explore the possibility of using it as a potential radiopharmaceutical for skeleton scintigraphy. HEDTMP was labeled with 99mTc by "pretinning" method, the radiochemical purity was 97.00% +/- 0.34%. 99mTc-HEDTMP was found to be stable in 5 hours in vitro with the radiochemical purity over 95% even after being diluted by physiological saline with the factor of dilution 100. The plane bone scanning of rabbits showed that 99mTc-HEDTMP was principally absorbed by skeletal system. Skull, spine and legs could be observed clearly, and were more legible than the images of 99mTc-MDP. Mice trial also indicated the high bone seeking of 99mTc-HEDTMP. The skeletal uptake was 11.92% ID/g, 13.19% ID/g, 10.14% ID/g, 10.04% ID/g, 7.71% ID/g separately at 30 minutes, 1 hour, 3 hours, 6 hours and 24 hours after the injection. Kidney seemed to be the major excretory organ. The clearance of blood was quick and the retaining amount in non-target organs was small. These results indicate that 99mTc-HEDTMP can be prepared easily, and its biological properties can be compared favorably with the commonly used bone imaging agent, and it is well worth further researching as a promising potential radiopharmaceutical in nuclide diagnosis for skeleton diseases. PMID:20842850

  12. Ocular pharmacokinetics of cephalosporins using microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Macha, S; Mitra, A K

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate the ocular pharmacokinetics of cephalosporins and investigate the presence of peptide transporters in the retina. New Zealand albino rabbits were kept under anesthesia. A concentric microdialysis probe was implanted in the vitreous chamber and linear probe across the cornea in the aqueous humor. Isotonic phosphate buffer saline was perfused through the probes, and samples were collected every 20 min over a period of 10 hr. A 500 microg dose of cephalexin, cephazolin, and cephalothin was administered intravitreally. Inhibition experiments were carried out in vivo, using gly-pro and gly-sar. The vitreal half-lives of cephalexin, cefazolin, and cephalothin were 185.38 +/- 27.25 min, 111.40 +/- 17.17 min, and 146.68 +/- 47.52 min, respectively. Cephalexin generated higher aqueous humor concentrations compared to cefazolin. The pharmacokinetic parameters of cephalexin in the presence of gly-pro, i.e., AUC (44452.06 +/- 3326.55 microg x min/ml), clearance (0.0013 +/- 0.0004 ml/min) and vitreal half-life (825.12 +/- 499.95 min) were different from that of the control (14612.83 +/- 4036.47 microg x min/ml, 0.0036 +/- 0.0011 ml/min, and 187.96 +/- 65.12 min, respectively). Gly-pro did not inhibit cefazolin, and gly-sar showed no effect on the pharmacokinetics of both drugs. These studies indicate the involvement of a peptide carrier in the transport of cephalosporins across the retina. Although gly-pro inhibited the elimination of cephalexin from the vitreous, the effect of an alpha-amino group on peptide carriers was not clearly evident. PMID:11765153

  13. PHYSIOLOGICALLY-BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PB-PK) models attempt to provide both a realistic anatomic description of the animal to which a drug or toxic chemical has been administered and a biologically accurate representation of the physiological pathways for chemical storage, metab...

  14. Clinical pharmacokinetics of ibuprofen arginine.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Dario; Clementi, Emilio

    2010-11-01

    Currently, several ibuprofen compounds are available on the market, mainly differing in terms of pharmaceutical composition that influence the pharmacokinetic profile and eventually the onset of drug action. This review will mainly deal with the clinical pharmacokinetics of ibuprofen arginine, an alternative formulation specifically designed to improve the absorption of ibuprofen. Indeed, available data from studies in healthy volunteers have consistently shown that the formulation of ibuprofen arginine is characterized by prompt absorption of ibuprofen as compared to the conventional formulation at all tested doses with higher peak plasma concentration and lower Tmax values. This trend has been confirmed also in studies dealing with chiral ibuprofen pharmacokinetics. Most importantly, the shortening in the absorption time observed either with racemic mixture or with the S(+)-enantiomer of ibuprofen arginine did not imply a faster drug elimination eventually leading to inadequate daily drug exposure, as documented by T1/2 and AUC values being comparable to those measured with the free acid form. Taken together, the pharmacokinetic/dynamic characteristics of ibuprofen arginine can be considered particularly favorable for several clinical conditions, such as moderate/severe pain, in which a rapid pharmacologic effect is required. PMID:20925647

  15. Aztreonam pharmacokinetics in burn patients.

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, L V; White, R L; Kays, M B; Brundage, D M; Yarbrough, D

    1991-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of aztreonam in eight adult patients with severe burn injuries (total body surface area burn, 49% +/- 21% [mean +/- standard deviation]) were studied. The time of initiation of study following burn injury was 7.0 +/- 1.4 days. Four patients at first dose and at steady state were studied. Aztreonam concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, and a two-compartment model was used to fit the data. No significant differences in any pharmacokinetic parameters between first dose and steady state were observed. Volume of distribution of the central compartment after first dose (0.14 liters/kg) and volume of distribution at steady state (0.31 liters/kg) were approximately 30% higher than those reported for other patient populations. Total drug clearance and renal drug clearance when normalized to creatinine clearance (CLCR) were similar to those previously reported for other critically ill patients. CLCR was strongly correlated with renal drug clearance (r = 0.94) and total drug clearance (r = 0.95). The extent and degree of burn (percent second or third degree burn) were poorly correlated with all pharmacokinetic parameters with the exception of the volume of distribution at steady state, which was correlated with both total body surface area burn (r = 0.95) and percent second degree burn (r = 0.83). Aztreonam pharmacokinetics are altered as a result of thermal injury; however, CLCR can be used to assess the clearance of aztreonam in burn patients. PMID:2014982

  16. Pharmacokinetics of ricobendazole in calves.

    PubMed

    Formentini, E A; Mestorino, O N; Mariño, E L; Errecalde, J O

    2001-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ricobendazole (RBZ) and its major metabolite albendazole sulphone (ABZSO2) were studied in six calves, after administration of RBZ (7.5 mg/kg), using a 10% experimental solution by the intravenous (i.v.) route, a 10% commercial solution by the subcutaneous (s.c.) route, and a 10% experimental suspension by the intraruminal (i.r.) route. Blood samples were drawn during a 60-h period. Plasma drug and metabolite concentrations were determined by HPLC. The pharmacokinetic evaluation in each case was prepared by weighted least-squares nonlinear regression analysis. Ricobendazole i.v. data were best fitted by a two-compartment model. The best pharmacokinetic exponents and coefficients were estimated, and the pharmacokinetic variables for RBZ and ABZSO2 were calculated from them. Similar patterns of plasma disposition were found for RBZ after i.r. and s.c. administration, suggesting delayed release from the s.c. site resembling the slow release of the drug from the rumen. PMID:11442798

  17. [Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ceftaroline].

    PubMed

    Grau, Santiago; Sorlí, Luisa; Luque, Sonia

    2014-03-01

    Ceftaroline is administered intravenously in the form of a prodrug, ceftaroline fosamil, which is rapidly hydrolyzed by plasma phosphatases to its active form, ceftaroline. In general, the pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline differ little from those of other cephalosporins. A proportional increase in both the peak plasma concentration (Cmax) and the area under the curve (AUC) have been observed when the drug is administered in increasing doses, which demonstrates its linear pharmacokinetics. Half the dose of ceftaroline is excreted actively through the kidneys. The pharmacokinetic parameters of ceftaroline administered through the intramuscular route in diverse animal species were similar to those observed when the drug was administered intravenously and consequently clinical research into ceftaroline administered through this alternative route would be appropriate. Patients with moderate-severe alterations of renal function and those undergoing hemodialysis require dose adjustments. There is limited experience of the pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline in children, which has given rise to several schedules stratified by age groups. The pharmacodynamics of the drug have been studied in models of animal infection and in in vitro infections caused mainly by Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA], strains with intermediate vancomycin sensitivity [hVISA or hGISA]) and by Streptococcus pneumoniae strains with distinct sensitivities to penicillin. Because ceftaroline is a time-dependent antibiotic, the most widely studied pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) indicator is the time interval during which drug concentrations are maintained above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), calculated both as total drug (T > MIC) and as free fraction of the drug (fT > MIC). The PK/PD simulations carried out in these models, developed on the basis of the concentrations obtained with routine doses in humans, have shown that ceftaroline has a good PK

  18. Duloxetine: clinical pharmacokinetics and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Knadler, Mary Pat; Lobo, Evelyn; Chappell, Jill; Bergstrom, Richard

    2011-05-01

    Duloxetine, a potent reuptake inhibitor of serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine, is effective for the treatment of major depressive disorder, diabetic neuropathic pain, stress urinary incontinence, generalized anxiety disorder and fibromyalgia. Duloxetine achieves a maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) of approximately 47 ng/mL (40 mg twice-daily dosing) to 110 ng/mL (80 mg twice-daily dosing) approximately 6 hours after dosing. The elimination half-life of duloxetine is approximately 10-12 hours and the volume of distribution is approximately 1640 L. The goal of this paper is to provide a review of the literature on intrinsic and extrinsic factors that may impact the pharmacokinetics of duloxetine with a focus on concomitant medications and their clinical implications. Patient demographic characteristics found to influence the pharmacokinetics of duloxetine include sex, smoking status, age, ethnicity, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 genotype, hepatic function and renal function. Of these, only impaired hepatic function or severely impaired renal function warrant specific warnings or dose recommendations. Pharmacokinetic results from drug interaction studies show that activated charcoal decreases duloxetine exposure, and that CYP1A2 inhibition increases duloxetine exposure to a clinically significant degree. Specifically, following oral administration in the presence of fluvoxamine, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve and C(max) of duloxetine significantly increased by 460% (90% CI 359, 584) and 141% (90% CI 93, 200), respectively. In addition, smoking is associated with a 30% decrease in duloxetine concentration. The exposure of duloxetine with CYP2D6 inhibitors or in CYP2D6 poor metabolizers is increased to a lesser extent than that observed with CYP1A2 inhibition and does not require a dose adjustment. In addition, duloxetine increases the exposure of drugs that are metabolized by CYP2D6, but not CYP1A2. Pharmacodynamic study results indicate

  19. New selenium-75 labeled radiopharmaceuticals: selenonium analogues of dopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Sadek, S.A.; Basmadjian, G.P.; Hsu, P.M.; Rieger, J.A.

    1983-07-01

    Selenium-75 labeled selenonium analogues of dopamine, (2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethyl)dimethylselenonium iodide and its dihydroxy analogue, were prepared by reducing (/sup 75/Se)selenious acid with sodium borohydride at pH 6.0 and reacting the NaSeH produced with 1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(p-toluenesulfonyloxy)ethane. Tissue distribution studies in rats given the /sup 75/Se-labeled selenonium agents intravenously demonstrated high initial heart uptake. Prolonged adrenal retention and high adrenal to blood ratio of compound 4 were observed. The high uptake and adrenal to blood ratio suggest the potential use of compound 4 as a radiopharmaceutical for the adrenal gland.

  20. Deterioration of stannous ion in radiopharmaceutical kits during storage.

    PubMed

    McBride, M H; Shaw, S M; Kessler, W V

    1979-10-01

    The deterioration of stannous ion (Sn++) in inhouse-prepared and commercial radiopharmaceutical kits was studied. Sn++ content of three types of nonlyophilized, deoxygenated, aqueous inhouse-prepared kits [diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), pyrophosphate and glucoheptonate] and of three commercially prepared kits (two lyophilized pyrophosphate kits and one diphosphonate in sealed glass ampul kit) was measured by differential pulse polarography. Inhouse-prepared kits were assayed initially and after storage for 6, 12, 24 and 48 days at 24, 5 and -18 C. Commercial kits were assayed initially and after storage for 12, 24 and 48 days at 5 and 24 C. Of the inhouse-prepared kits, Sn++ stability when stored for 48 days at 5 and 24 C. Freezer storage should be used, when possible, to insure maximum stability of Sn++ in inhouse-prepared, nonlyophilized ratiopharmaceutical kits. The commercial procedures of lyophilization and of sealing the reagent in a sealed glass ampul prolong Sn++ stability. PMID:507080

  1. 175Yb-TTHMP as a good candidate for bone pain palliation and substitute of other radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Safarzadeh, Laleh

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastasis is one of the most frequent causes of pain in cancer patients. Different radioisotopes such as P-32, Sm-153, Ho-166, Lu-177, and Re-186 with several chemical ligands as ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP), 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetramethylene phosphonic acid (DOTMP), and propylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonate (PDTMP) are recommended for bone pain palliation. In this work, 175Yb-triethylenetetraminehexamethylene phosphonic acid (TTHMP) was produced as a proper alternative to other radiopharmaceuticals. Relatively long half-life (T1/2 = 4.18 days), maximum energy beta particle Eβ =470 keV (86.5%), low abundance gamma emission 396 keV (6.4%), 286 keV (3.01%), 113.8 keV (1.88%) and low cost are considered advantageous of Yb-175 are to wider usage of this isotope; in addition, TTHMP is an ideal carrier moiety for bone metastases. Production, quality control, and biodistribution studies of 175Yb-TTHMP were targeted. Yb-175 chloride was obtained by thermal neutron bombardment of a natural Yb2O3 sample at Tehran Research Reactor (TRR), radiolabeling was completed in 1 h by the addition of TTHMP at the room temperature and pH was 7.5-8, radiochemical purity was higher than 95%. Biodistribution studies in normal rats were carried out. The results showed favorable biodistribution features of 175Yb-TTHMP, indicating significant accumulation in bone tissues compared with clinically used bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals. This research presents 175Yb-TTHMP can be a good candidate for bone pain palliation and substitute of other radiopharmaceuticals, however, further biological studies in other mammals are still needed. PMID:25210277

  2. A rapid and efficient preparation of [123I]radiopharmaceuticals using a small HPLC (Rocket) column.

    PubMed

    Katsifis, Andrew; Papazian, Vahan; Jackson, Timothy; Loc'h, Christian

    2006-01-01

    A simplified method for the rapid and efficient preparation of [(123)I]radiopharmaceuticals is described. Three radiopharmaceuticals, [(123)I]beta-CIT, [(123)I]MIBG and [(123)I]clioquinol, were synthesised and purified as model compounds. The radiotracers were labelled with iodine-123 using electrophilic oxidative conditions and purified by a compact semi-preparative reverse phase column (C-18, 3 microm, 7 x 53 mm, Alltima Rocket, Alltech) using aqueous-ethanol as HPLC solvents that were directly used for radiopharmaceutical formulation. The radiochemical purity of the radioiodinated tracers as assessed by analytical HPLC was higher than 99% with specific activity higher than 3 GBq/nmol. The total preparation time of a radiotracer ranged from 40 to 60 min and, starting from 3.7 GBq of iodine-123, more than 2.5 GBq of formulated radiopharmaceuticals were available for clinical investigations. PMID:16129607

  3. [Interspecies differences of noopept pharmacokinetics].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, S S; Korotkov, S A; Zherdev, V P; Gudasheva, T A; Ostrovskaia, R U; Voronina, T A

    2004-01-01

    Significant interspecific differences in the pharmacokinetics of noopept are manifested by a decrease in the drug elimination rate on the passage from rats to rabbits and humans. Very intensive metabolism of noopept was observed upon intravenous administration in rats. In these animals, presystemic elimination mechanisms lead to the formation of a specific metabolite representing a product of drug biotransformation hydroxylated at the phenyl ring. In rabbits, unchanged noopept circulates in the blood for a longer time upon both intravenous and peroral introduction, biotransformation proceeds at a much slower rate, and no metabolites analogous to that found in rats are detected. The noopept pharmacokinetics in humans differs from that in animals by still slower elimination and considerable individual variability. No drug metabolites are found in the human blood plasma, probably because of a relatively small dose and low concentration. PMID:15079908

  4. Population Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Chow, D. S. L.; Putcha, L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: An intranasal gel dosage formulation of scopolamine (INSCOP) was developed for the treatment of Space Motion Sickness (SMS).The bioavailability and pharmacokinetics (PK) was evaluated using data collected in Phase II IND protocols. We reported earlier statistically significant gender differences in PK parameters of INSCOP at a dose level of 0.4 mg. To identify covariates that influence PK parameters of INSCOP, we examined population covariates of INSCOP PK model for 0.4 mg dose. Methods: Plasma scopolamine concentrations versus time data were collected from 20 normal healthy human subjects (11 male/9 female) after a 0.4 mg dose. Phoenix NLME was employed for PK analysis of these data using gender, body weight and age as covariates for model selection. Model selection was based on a likelihood ratio test on the difference of criteria (-2LL). Statistical significance for base model building and individual covariate analysis was set at P less than 0.05{delta(-2LL)=3.84}. Results: A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order elimination best described INSCOP concentration ]time profiles. Inclusion of gender, body weight and age as covariates individually significantly reduced -2LL by the cut-off value of 3.84(P less than 0.05) when tested against the base model. After the forward stepwise selection and backward elimination steps, gender was selected to add to the final model which had significant influence on absorption rate constant (ka) and the volume of distribution (V) of INSCOP. Conclusion: A population pharmacokinetic model for INSCOP has been identified and gender was a significant contributing covariate for the final model. The volume of distribution and Ka were significantly higher in males than in females which confirm gender-dependent pharmacokinetics of scopolamine after administration of a 0.4 mg dose.

  5. Pregnancy-related pharmacokinetic changes.

    PubMed

    Tasnif, Y; Morado, J; Hebert, M F

    2016-07-01

    The pharmacokinetics of many drugs are altered by pregnancy. Drug distribution and protein binding are changed by pregnancy. While some drug metabolizing enzymes have an apparent increase in activity, others have an apparent decrease in activity. Not only is drug metabolism affected by pregnancy, but renal filtration is also increased. In addition, pregnancy alters the apparent activities of multiple drug transporters resulting in changes in the net renal secretion of drugs. PMID:27082931

  6. USE OF RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS IN DIAGNOSTIC NUCLEAR MEDICINE IN THE UNITED STATES: 1960–2010

    PubMed Central

    Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Brill, Aaron B.; Callahan, Ronald J.; Clanton, Jeffrey A.; DePietro, Allegra; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Greenspan, Bennett S.; Gross, Milton D.; Hays, Marguerite T.; Moore, Stephen C.; Ponto, James A.; Shreeve, Walton W.; Melo, Dunstana R.; Linet, Martha S.; Simon, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    To reconstruct reliable nuclear medicine-related occupational radiation doses or doses received as patients from radiopharmaceuticals over the last five decades, we assessed which radiopharmaceuticals were used in different time periods, their relative frequency of use, and typical values of the administered activity. This paper presents data on the changing patterns of clinical use of radiopharmaceuticals and documents the range of activity administered to adult patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures in the U.S. between 1960 and 2010. Data are presented for 15 diagnostic imaging procedures that include thyroid scan and thyroid uptake, brain scan, brain blood flow, lung perfusion and ventilation, bone, liver, hepatobiliary, bone marrow, pancreas, and kidney scans, cardiac imaging procedures, tumor localization studies, localization of gastrointestinal bleeding, and non-imaging studies of blood volume and iron metabolism. Data on the relative use of radiopharmaceuticals were collected using key informant interviews and comprehensive literature reviews of typical administered activities of these diagnostic nuclear medicine studies. Responses of key informants on relative use of radiopharmaceuticals are in agreement with published literature. Results of this study will be used for retrospective reconstruction of occupational and personal medical radiation doses from diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals to members of the U.S. radiologic technologist’s cohort and in reconstructing radiation doses from occupational or patient radiation exposures to other U.S. workers or patient populations. PMID:25811150

  7. Multiple-dose acetaminophen pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Sahajwalla, C G; Ayres, J W

    1991-09-01

    Four different treatments of acetaminophen (Tylenol) were administered in multiple doses to eight healthy volunteers. Each treatment (325, 650, 825, and 1000 mg) was administered five times at 6-h intervals. Saliva acetaminophen concentration versus time profiles were determined. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated and compared to determine whether acetaminophen exhibited linear or dose-dependent pharmacokinetics. For doses less than or equal to 18 mg/kg, area under the curve (AUC), half-life (t1/2), mean residence time (MRT), and ratio of AUC to dose for the first dose were compared with the last dose. No statistically significant differences were observed in dose-corrected AUC for the first or last dose among subjects or treatments. Half-lives and MRT were not significantly different among treatments for the first or the last dose. Statistically significant differences in t1/2 and MRT were noted (p less than 0.05) among subjects for the last dose. A plot of AUC versus dose for the first and the last doses exhibited a linear relationship. Dose-corrected saliva concentration versus time curves for the treatments were superimposable. Thus, acetaminophen exhibits linear pharmacokinetics for doses of 18 mg/kg or less. Plots of AUC versus dose for one subject who received doses higher than 18 mg/kg were curved, suggesting nonlinear behavior of acetaminophen in this subject. PMID:1800709

  8. Pharmacokinetics of drugs in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Feghali, Maisa; Venkataramanan, Raman; Caritis, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is a complex state where changes in maternal physiology have evolved to favor the development and growth of the placenta and the fetus. These adaptations may affect preexisting disease or result in pregnancy-specific disorders. Similarly, variations in physiology may alter the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics that determines drug dosing and effect. It follows that detailed pharmacologic information is required to adjust therapeutic treatment strategies during pregnancy. Understanding both pregnancy physiology and the gestation-specific pharmacology of different agents is necessary to achieve effective treatment and limit maternal and fetal risk. Unfortunately, most drug studies have excluded pregnant women based on often-mistaken concerns regarding fetal risk. Furthermore, over two-thirds of women receive prescription drugs while pregnant, with treatment and dosing strategies based on data from healthy male volunteers and non-pregnant women, and with little adjustment for the complex physiology of pregnancy and its unique disease states. This review will describe basic concepts in pharmacokinetics and their clinical relevance and highlight the variations in pregnancy that may impact the pharmacokinetic properties of medications. PMID:26452316

  9. Pharmacokinetic interactions of cimetidine 1987.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, A; Muirhead, M

    1987-05-01

    The number of studies on drug interactions with cimetidine has increased at a rapid rate over the past 5 years, with many of the interactions being solely pharmacokinetic in origin. Very few studies have investigated the clinical relevance of such pharmacokinetic interactions by measuring pharmacodynamic responses or clinical endpoints. Apart from pharmacokinetic studies, invariably conducted in young, healthy subjects, there have been a large number of in vitro and in vivo animal studies, case reports, clinical observations and general reviews on the subject, which is tending to develop an industry of its own accord. Nevertheless, where specific mechanisms have been considered, these have undoubtedly increased our knowledge on the way in which humans eliminate xenobiotics. There is now sufficient information to predict the likelihood of a pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction with cimetidine and to make specific clinical recommendations. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions with cimetidine occur at the sites of gastrointestinal absorption and elimination including metabolism and excretion. Cimetidine has been found to reduce the plasma concentrations of ketoconazole, indomethacin and chlorpromazine by reducing their absorption. In the case of ketoconazole the interaction was clinically important. Cimetidine does not inhibit conjugation mechanisms including glucuronidation, sulphation and acetylation, or deacetylation or ethanol dehydrogenation. It binds to the haem portion of cytochrome P-450 and is thus an inhibitor of phase I drug metabolism (i.e. hydroxylation, dealkylation). Although generally recognised as a nonspecific inhibitor of this type of metabolism, cimetidine does demonstrate some degree of specificity. To date, theophylline 8-oxidation, tolbutamide hydroxylation, ibuprofen hydroxylation, misonidazole demethylation, carbamazepine epoxidation, mexiletine oxidation and steroid hydroxylation have not been shown to be inhibited by cimetidine in humans but

  10. Optimizing nanomedicine pharmacokinetics using physiologically based pharmacokinetics modelling

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Darren Michael; Siccardi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic agents is characterized by numerous challenges including poor absorption, low penetration in target tissues and non-specific dissemination in organs, leading to toxicity or poor drug exposure. Several nanomedicine strategies have emerged as an advanced approach to enhance drug delivery and improve the treatment of several diseases. Numerous processes mediate the pharmacokinetics of nanoformulations, with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) being poorly understood and often differing substantially from traditional formulations. Understanding how nanoformulation composition and physicochemical properties influence drug distribution in the human body is of central importance when developing future treatment strategies. A helpful pharmacological tool to simulate the distribution of nanoformulations is represented by physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modelling, which integrates system data describing a population of interest with drug/nanoparticle in vitro data through a mathematical description of ADME. The application of PBPK models for nanomedicine is in its infancy and characterized by several challenges. The integration of property–distribution relationships in PBPK models may benefit nanomedicine research, giving opportunities for innovative development of nanotechnologies. PBPK modelling has the potential to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning nanoformulation disposition and allow for more rapid and accurate determination of their kinetics. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of nanomedicine distribution and the use of PBPK modelling in the characterization of nanoformulations with optimal pharmacokinetics. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Nanomedicine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-17 PMID:24467481

  11. An integrated pharmacokinetics ontology and corpus for text mining

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Drug pharmacokinetics parameters, drug interaction parameters, and pharmacogenetics data have been unevenly collected in different databases and published extensively in the literature. Without appropriate pharmacokinetics ontology and a well annotated pharmacokinetics corpus, it will be difficult to develop text mining tools for pharmacokinetics data collection from the literature and pharmacokinetics data integration from multiple databases. Description A comprehensive pharmacokinetics ontology was constructed. It can annotate all aspects of in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. It covers all drug metabolism and transportation enzymes. Using our pharmacokinetics ontology, a PK-corpus was constructed to present four classes of pharmacokinetics abstracts: in vivo pharmacokinetics studies, in vivo pharmacogenetic studies, in vivo drug interaction studies, and in vitro drug interaction studies. A novel hierarchical three level annotation scheme was proposed and implemented to tag key terms, drug interaction sentences, and drug interaction pairs. The utility of the pharmacokinetics ontology was demonstrated by annotating three pharmacokinetics studies; and the utility of the PK-corpus was demonstrated by a drug interaction extraction text mining analysis. Conclusions The pharmacokinetics ontology annotates both in vitro pharmacokinetics experiments and in vivo pharmacokinetics studies. The PK-corpus is a highly valuable resource for the text mining of pharmacokinetics parameters and drug interactions. PMID:23374886

  12. Synthesis and biological studies of positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Dischino, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    The development and clinical evaluation of two-positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals designed to image myelin in humans is reported. Carbon-11-labeled benzyl methyl ether was synthesized by the reaction of carbon-11-labeled methanol and benzyl chloride in dimethyl sulfoxide containing powdered potassium hydroxide in a radiochemical yield of 43% and a synthesis and purification time of 40 minutes. Carbon-11-labeled diphenylmethanol was synthesized by the reaction of carbon-11-labeled carbon dioxide and phenyllithium followed by the reduction of the carbon-11-labeled intermediate to diphenylmethanol via lithium aluminum hydride in a radiochemical yield of 71% and a synthesis and purification time of 38 minutes. Carbon-11-labeled benzyl methyl ether and diphenylmethanol were each evaluated as myelin imaging agents in three patients with multiple sclerosis via positron-emission tomography. In two out of three patients studied with carbon-11-labeled benzyl methyl ether, the distribution of activity in the brain was not consistent with local lipid content. A new synthesis of carbon-11-labeled-DL-phenylalanine labeled in the benzylic position and the synthesis of fluorine-18-labeled 1-(2-nitro-1-imidazolyl)-3-fluoro-2-propanol, a potential in vivo marker of hypoxic tissue, are reported.

  13. AUTOMATION FOR THE SYNTHESIS AND APPLICATION OF PET RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS.

    SciTech Connect

    Alexoff, D.L.

    2001-09-21

    The development of automated systems supporting the production and application of PET radiopharmaceuticals has been an important focus of researchers since the first successes of using carbon-11 (Comar et al., 1979) and fluorine-18 (Reivich et al., 1979) labeled compounds to visualize functional activity of the human brain. These initial successes of imaging the human brain soon led to applications in the human heart (Schelbert et al., 1980), and quickly radiochemists began to see the importance of automation to support PET studies in humans (Lambrecht, 1982; Langstrom et al., 1983). Driven by the necessity of controlling processes emanating high fluxes of 511 KeV photons, and by the tedium of repetitive syntheses for carrying out these human PET investigations, academic and government scientists have designed, developed and tested many useful and novel automated systems in the past twenty years. These systems, originally designed primarily by radiochemists, not only carry out effectively the tasks they were designed for, but also demonstrate significant engineering innovation in the field of laboratory automation.

  14. The Next Generation of Positron Emission Tomography Radiopharmaceuticals in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Samuel L.; Roney, Celeste A.; Daumar, Pierre; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Although 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) is still the most widely used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer, there are a few well-known limitations to its use. The last decade has seen the development of new PET probes for in vivo visualization of specific molecular targets, along with important technical advances in the production of positron-emitting radionuclides and their related labeling methods. As such, a broad range of new PET tracers are in preclinical development or have recently entered clinical trials. The topics covered in this review include labeling methods, biological targets, and the most recent preclinical or clinical data of some of the next generation of PET radiopharmaceuticals. This review, which is by no means exhaustive, has been separated into sections related to the PET radionuclide used for radiolabeling: fluorine-18, for the labeling of agents such as FACBC, FDHT, choline, and Galacto-RGD; carbon-11, for the labeling of choline; gallium-68, for the labeling of peptides such as DOTATOC and bombesin analogs; and the long-lived radionuclides iodine-124 and zirconium-89 for the labeling of monoclonal antibodies cG250, and J591 and trastuzumab, respectively. PMID:21624561

  15. New SPECT and PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Imaging Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sogbein, Oyebola O.; Pelletier-Galarneau, Matthieu; Schindler, Thomas H.; Wei, Lihui; Wells, R. Glenn; Ruddy, Terrence D.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology has experienced exponential growth within the past four decades with converging capacity to diagnose and influence management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with technetium-99m radiotracers or thallium-201 has dominated the field; however new hardware and software designs that optimize image quality with reduced radiation exposure are fuelling a resurgence of interest at the preclinical and clinical levels to expand beyond MPI. Other imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) continue to emerge as powerful players with an expanded capacity to diagnose a variety of cardiac conditions. At the forefront of this resurgence is the development of novel target vectors based on an enhanced understanding of the underlying pathophysiological process in the subcellular domain. Molecular imaging with novel radiopharmaceuticals engineered to target a specific subcellular process has the capacity to improve diagnostic accuracy and deliver enhanced prognostic information to alter management. This paper, while not comprehensive, will review the recent advancements in radiotracer development for SPECT and PET MPI, autonomic dysfunction, apoptosis, atherosclerotic plaques, metabolism, and viability. The relevant radiochemistry and preclinical and clinical development in addition to molecular imaging with emerging modalities such as cardiac MRI and PET-MR will be discussed. PMID:24901002

  16. Radiopharmaceutical Therapy in the Era of Precision Medicine*

    PubMed Central

    Sgouros, George; Goldenberg, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Precision medicine is the selection of a treatment modality that is specifically tailored to the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of a particular patient’s disease. In cancer, the objective is to treat with agents that inhibit cell signaling pathways that drive uncontrolled proliferation and dissemination of the disease. To overcome the eventual resistance to pathway inhibition therapy, this treatment modality has been combined with chemotherapy. We propose that pathway inhibition therapy is more rationally combined with radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT), a cytotoxic treatment that is also targeted. RPT exploits pharmaceuticals that either bind specifically to tumors or accumulate by a broad array of physiological mechanisms indigenous to the neoplastic cells to deliver radiation specifically to these cells. Consistent with pathway inhibition therapy and in contrast to chemotherapy, RPT is well tolerated. However, the potential of RPT has not been fully exploited; for the most part, treatment has been implemented without using the ability to customize RPT by imaging and deriving individual patient tumor and normal organ radiation absorbed doses. These are more closely related to biological response and their determination should enable RPT treatment administration to maximum therapeutic benefit by treating to normal organ tolerance or demonstrating futility via tumor dosimetry. This is the essence of precision medicine. PMID:24953565

  17. PET - radiopharmaceutical facilities at Washington University Medical School - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Dence, C.S.; Welch, M.J.

    1994-12-31

    The PET program at Washington University has evolved over more than three decades of research and development in the use of positron-emitting isotopes in medicine and biology. In 1962 the installation of the first hospital cyclotron in the USA was accomplished. This first machine was an Allis Chalmers (AC) cyclotron and it was operated until July, 1990. Simultaneously with this cyclotron the authors also ran a Cyclotron Corporation (TCC) CS-15 cyclotron that was purchased in 1977. Both of these cyclotrons were maintained in-house and operated with a relatively small downtime (approximately 3.5%). After the dismantling of the AC machine in 1990, a Japanese Steel Works 16/8 (JSW-16/8) cyclotron was installed in the vault. Whereas the AC cyclotron could only accelerate deuterons (6.2 MeV), the JSW - 16/8 machine can accelerate both protons and deuterons, so all of the radiopharmaceuticals can be produced on either of the two presently owned accelerators. At the end of May 1993, the medical school installed the first clinical Tandem Cascade Accelerator (TCA) a collaboration with Science Research Laboratories (SRL) of Somerville, MA. Preliminary target testing, design and development are presently under way. In 1973, the University installed the first operational PETT device in the country, and at present there is a large basic science and clinical research program involving more than a hundred staff in nuclear medicine, radiation sciences, neurology, neurosurgery, psychiatry, cardiology, pulmonary medicine, oncology, and surgery.

  18. COMPUTATIONAL PHARMACOKINETICS DURING DEVELOPMENTAL WINDOWS OF SUSPECTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Computational modeling has an increasing role in analyses of biological effects including how the body handles chemicals (i.e. pharmacokinetics or toxicokinetics) and how the body responds to chemicals (i.e. pharmacodynamics or toxicodynamics). Pharmacokinetic mo...

  19. Drug Transport and Pharmacokinetics for Chemical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Laurent; Kanneganti, Kumud; Kim, Kwang Seok

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in continuous-stirred vessels were proposed to introduce methods in pharmacokinetics and drug transport to chemical engineering students. The activities can be incorporated into the curriculum to illustrate fundamentals learned in the classroom. An appreciation for the role of pharmacokinetics in drug discovery will also be gained…

  20. Population Pharmacokinetics of Abacavir in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Préta, Laure-Helene; Valade, Elodie; Pannier, Emmanuelle; Urien, Saik; Hirt, Déborah

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, a population approach was used to describe abacavir (ABC) pharmacokinetics in HIV-infected pregnant and nonpregnant women. A total of 266 samples from 150 women were obtained. No covariate effect (from age, body weight, pregnancy, or gestational age) on ABC pharmacokinetics was found. Thus, it seems unnecessary to adapt the ABC dosing regimen during pregnancy. PMID:25070097

  1. Investigation of an alternative generic model for predicting pharmacokinetic changes during physiological stress.

    PubMed

    Peng, Henry T; Edginton, Andrea N; Cheung, Bob

    2013-10-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were developed using MATLAB Simulink® and PK-Sim®. We compared the capability and usefulness of these two models by simulating pharmacokinetic changes of midazolam under exercise and heat stress to verify the usefulness of MATLAB Simulink® as a generic PBPK modeling software. Although both models show good agreement with experimental data obtained under resting condition, their predictions of pharmacokinetics changes are less accurate in the stressful conditions. However, MATLAB Simulink® may be more flexible to include physiologically based processes such as oral absorption and simulate various stress parameters such as stress intensity, duration and timing of drug administration to improve model performance. Further work will be conducted to modify algorithms in our generic model developed using MATLAB Simulink® and to investigate pharmacokinetics under other physiological stress such as trauma. PMID:23852614

  2. Modeling of Corneal and Retinal Pharmacokinetics after Periocular Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Amrite, Aniruddha C.; Edelhauser, Henry F.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop pharmacokinetics models to describe the disposition of small lipophilic molecules in the cornea and retina after periocular (subconjunctival or posterior subconjunctival) administration. Methods Compartmental pharmacokinetics analysis was performed on the corneal and retinal data obtained after periocular administration of 3 mg of celecoxib (a selective COX-2 inhibitor) to Brown Norway (BN) rats. Berkeley Madonna, a differential and difference equation–based modeling software, was used for the pharmacokinetics modeling. The data were fit to different compartment models with first-order input and disposition, and the best fit was selected on the basis of coefficient of regression and Akaike information criteria (AIC). The models were validated by using the celecoxib data from a prior study in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The corneal model was also fit to the corneal data for prednisolone at a dose of 2.61 mg in albino rabbits, and the model was validated at two other doses of prednisolone (0.261 and 26.1 mg) in these rabbits. Model simulations were performed with the finalized model to understand the effect of formulation on corneal and retinal pharmacokinetics after periocular administration. Results Celecoxib kinetics in the BN rat cornea can be described by a two-compartment (periocular space and cornea, with a dissolution step for periocular formulation) model, with parallel elimination from the cornea and the periocular space. The inclusion of a distribution compartment or a dissolution step for celecoxib suspension did not lead to an overall improvement in the corneal data fit compared with the two-compartment model. The more important parameter for enhanced fit and explaining the apparent lack of an increase phase in the corneal levels is the inclusion of the initial leak-back of the dose from the periocular space into the precorneal area. The predicted celecoxib concentrations from this model also showed very good correlation (r = 0

  3. Azithromycin pharmacokinetics and penetration to lymph.

    PubMed

    Bergan, T; Jørgensen, N P; Olszewski, W; Zhang, Y

    1992-01-01

    The study of pharmacokinetics of azithromycin and penetration to peripheral human lymph was carried out in 14 healthy male volunteers taking 1 g orally after overnight fasting. Samples were analyzed by microbiological assay. The mean peak concentrations were 0.82 +/- 0.23 mg/l after 1.7 +/- 0.5 h in serum and 0.22 +/- 0.07 mg/l after 3.1 h in lymph. Nine of the 14 subjects showed a second and lower serum peak indicating the existence of enterohepatic circulation. The total areas under the serum concentrations curves (AUCs) till infinity were 7.9 +/- 3.1 mg. h/l compared to 4.4 +/- 1.2 mg.h/l in lymph. The mean lymph AUC was 68.1 +/- 20.7% of the serum AUC indicating a penetration ratio of 0.68. However, the actual amounts penetrating the tissues were much higher than this ratio suggests. Thus, after 6 h 81% of the drug was within the tissue compartment and after 120 h, 63% of the azithromycin was still present in the tissue compartment. The urinary recovery of azithromycin was 14.7 +/- 7.7% during the first 48 h. The serum curves and lymph curves displayed a distinctly slower phase of elimination after 12 h. The mean serum half-life was 5.4 +/- 3.4 h during the first 12 h (after the peak), whereas the value was 44.2 +/- 10.1 h during the interval 12-120 h. The corresponding half-life values for the peripheral lymph were 5.4 +/- 2.2 h and 50.8 +/- 11.6 h. Azithromycin possesses key pharmacokinetic properties that are prerequisites for a convenient once-daily dosage schedule which may improve patient compliance. PMID:1336891

  4. Pharmacokinetics of procaterol in thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Kusano, K; Nomura, M; Toju, K; Ishikawa, Y; Minamijima, Y; Yamashita, S; Nagata, S

    2016-06-01

    Procaterol (PCR) is a beta-2-adrenergic bronchodilator widely used in Japanese racehorses for treating lower respiratory disease. The pharmacokinetics of PCR following single intravenous (0.5 μg/kg) and oral (2.0 μg/kg) administrations were investigated in six thoroughbred horses. Plasma and urine concentrations of PCR were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Plasma PCR concentration following intravenous administration showed a biphasic elimination pattern. The systemic clearance was 0.47 ± 0.16 L/h/kg, the steady-state volume of the distribution was 1.21 ± 0.23 L/kg, and the elimination half-life was 2.85 ± 1.35 h. Heart rate rapidly increased after intravenous administration and gradually decreased thereafter. A strong correlation between heart rate and plasma concentration of PCR was observed. Plasma concentrations of PCR after oral administration were not quantifiable in all horses. Urine concentrations of PCR following intravenous and oral administrations were quantified in all horses until 32 h after administration. Urine PCR concentrations were not significantly different on and after 24 h between intravenous and oral administrations. These results suggest that the bioavailability of orally administrated PCR in horses is very poor, and the drug was eliminated from the body slowly based on urinary concentrations. This report is the first study to demonstrate the pharmacokinetic character of PCR in thoroughbred horses. PMID:26538319

  5. Intelligent portal monitor for fast suppression of false positives due to radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.W.; Butterfield, K.B.

    1985-01-01

    Monitoring the movement of radioactive material through secure or sensitive areas may be complicated by the existence of unanticipated sources of radiation carried by individuals passing through the area. Typical of such sources are radiopharmaceuticals prescribed for a medical procedure. We report here on an apparatus designed to quickly discriminate between in-vivo radiopharmaceuticals and other nuclear materials, based on a pattern-recognition algorithm and a microcomputer. Principles of operation are discussed, and the data base for the pattern-recognition algorithm is displayed. Operating experience with the apparatus in a trial location is also discussed. Our apparatus correctly identifies in-vivo radiopharmaceuticals in over 80% of all trials; challenges with radioisotopes other than radiopharmaceuticals have led the apparatus, without exception, to reject the challenge isotope as incompatible with medical practice. The apparatus thus rapidly discriminates between individuals bearing radiopharmaceuticals and those bearing illicit sources, such as special nuclear materials. Examples of applications are presented. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Pharmacokinetics of peginterferons.

    PubMed

    Zeuzem, Stefan; Welsch, Christoph; Herrmann, Eva

    2003-01-01

    Two polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified interferons are approved for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. The pharmocokinetic properties of the branched 40 kDa pegylated interferon alfa-2a differ from the linear 12 kDa pegylated interferon alfa-2b. The absorption half-life of standard interferon alfa is 2.3 hours, while absorption half-lives for peginterferon alfa-2a and alfa-2b are 50 hours and 4.6 hours, respectively. The volume of distribution for peginterferon alfa-2a is considerably restricted, while the volume of distribution for peginterferon alfa-2b is only approximately 30% lower than that for conventional interferon. Because of its large size, the 40 kD peginterferon alfa-2a has a more than 100-fold reduction in renal clearance compared with conventional interferon alfa. Clearance of peginterferon alfa-2b is about one-tenth that of unmodified interferon alfa. Although data are limited, both drugs appear to show differences in the initial viral decay pattern in patients with chronic hepatitis C. However, it remains unknown whether these differences in the initial viral decline predict differences in the primary clinical endpoint, sustained virological response. PMID:12934165

  7. Pharmacokinetics of Indomethacin in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Rytting, Erik; Nanovskaya, Tatiana N.; Wang, Xiaoming; Vernikovskaya, Daria I.; Clark, Shannon M.; Cochran, Marlo; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M.; Venkataramanan, Raman; Caritis, Steve N.; Hankins, Gary D. V.; Ahmed, Mahmoud S.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Although indomethacin has been widely used for the treatment of preterm labor over the past 40 years, there are few reports regarding its pharmacokinetics in pregnant women. Methods This opportunistic study assessed the steady-state pharmacokinetics of indomethacin in pregnant subjects to whom an oral dose of 25 mg every 6 h was prescribed. Indomethacin concentrations in plasma and urine were analyzed by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography method with mass spectrometric detection. Results The mean area under the plasma concentration versus time curve at steady state (AUCss) was 1.91 ± 0.53 lg h/mL, mean peak plasma concentration (Cmax) was 1.02 ± 0.49 lg/mL, and mean time to reach Cmax (tmax) was 1.3 ± 0.7 h. The mean apparent clearance at steady state was 14.5 ± 5.5 L/h, which is higher than the apparent clearance reported in the literature for non-pregnant subjects. Indomethacin crosses the placenta; the mean fetal/maternal ratio from five sets of cord blood samples collected at delivery was 4.0 ± 1.1. Conclusions Further studies are needed to determine whether any dose adjustments are necessary as a result of the increased clearance of indomethacin during pregnancy. PMID:24493205

  8. Pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin in ponies.

    PubMed

    Dowling, P M; Wilson, R C; Tyler, J W; Duran, S H

    1995-02-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin was investigated in healthy, mature ponies. Ciprofloxacin was administered intravenously to six ponies at a dose of 5 mg per kg body weight. Seven days later, ciprofloxacin was administered orally to each pony at the same dose. Intravenous ciprofloxacin concentration vs. time data best fit a two-compartment open model with first-order elimination from the central compartment. Mean plasma half-life, based on the terminal phase, was 157.89 min (harmonic mean). Total body clearance of ciprofloxacin was 18.12 +/- 3.99 mL/min/kg. Volume of distribution at steady-state was 3.45 +/- 0.72 L/kg. From the pharmacokinetic data and reported minimum inhibitory concentrations for equine gram-negative pathogens, the appropriate dosage of ciprofloxacin was determined to be 5.32 mg per kg body weight at 12 h intervals. Bioavailability of oral ciprofloxacin in ponies was 6.8 +/- 5.33%. Owing to the poor bioavailability, a dosage regimen could not be proposed for oral ciprofloxacin administration in horses. Ciprofloxacin concentrations were determined in tissues and body fluids at 1, 2 and 4 h after intravenous administration. At all times, tissue concentrations exceeded plasma concentrations of ciprofloxacin. Highest concentrations were achieved in kidneys and urine. Potentially therapeutic concentrations were obtained in cerebrospinal and joint fluid, but low concentrations were achieved in aqueous humour. PMID:7752310

  9. Pharmacokinetic enhancers in HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Larson, Kajal B; Wang, Kun; Delille, Cecile; Otofokun, Igho; Acosta, Edward P

    2014-10-01

    Maximal and durable viral load suppression is one of the most important goals of HIV therapy and is directly related to adequate drug exposure. Protease inhibitors (PIs), an important component of the antiretroviral armada, were historically associated with poor oral bioavailability and high pill burden. However, because the PIs are metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A enzymes, intentional inhibition of these enzymes leads to higher drug exposure, lower pill burden, and therefore simplified dosing schedules with this class of drug. This is the basis of pharmacokinetic enhancement. In HIV therapy, two pharmacokinetic enhancers or boosting agents are used: ritonavir and cobicistat. Both agents inhibit CYP3A4, with cobicistat being a more specific CYP inhibitor than ritonavir. Unlike ritonavir, cobicistat does not have antiretroviral activity. Cobicistat has been evaluated in clinical trials and was recently approved in the USA as a fixed-dose combination with the integrase inhibitor, elvitegravir and two nucleos(t)ide analogs. Additional studies are examining cobicistat in fixed-dose combinations with various PIs. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of these agents and clinically relevant drug regimens and ongoing trials. Studies with elvitegravir and the novel PI TMC319011 are also discussed. PMID:25164142

  10. Technetium Tc-99m pyrophosphate for cerebrospinal fluid leaks: radiopharmaceutical considerations.

    PubMed

    Ponto, James A; Graham, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To confirm the anticipated image quality and absence of adverse reactions in patients undergoing clinical practice cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak imaging procedures using technetium Tc-99m pyrophosphate (PYP). METHODS Following the recent discontinuation of preservative-free calcium trisodium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid kits, PYP was selected as a suitable alternative for CSF leak imaging procedures. Procedures were established for its preparation and dispensing, paying special attention to safety considerations, and its use in clinical practice was implemented. Medical records, including images, were reviewed for the first 15 patients undergoing clinical practice CSF imaging procedures using Tc-99m PYP to confirm anticipated image quality and absence of adverse effects. RESULTS Review of CSF leak imaging procedures using Tc-99m PYP in 15 patients showed images to be of uniformly high quality. The vast majority of injected radiopharmaceutical remained in the CSF throughout the duration of the imaging procedure, allowing visualization of CSF leaks. Only a small amount of Tc-99m PYP diffused into the blood with resultant uptake on the skeleton and excretion into the urine, which did not interfere with image interpretation. No adverse reactions were noted in any of the patients. CONCLUSION With proper attention to safety considerations, Tc-99m PYP is a safe and effective alternative for performing CSF leak imaging procedures. PMID:24257695

  11. Biokinetics and dosimetry of target-specific radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Torres-García, Eugenio; Gonz&Ález-v&Ázquez, Armando; de Murphy, Consuelo Arteaga

    Molecular imaging techniques directly or indirectly monitor and record the spatiotemporal distribution of molecular or cellular processes for biochemical, biologic, diagnostic or therapeutic applications. 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC has shown high stability both in vitro and in vivo and rapid detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. Therapies using radiolabeled anti-CD20 have demonstrated their efficacy in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The aim of this study was to establish biokinetic models for 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and 188Re-anti-CD20 and to evaluate their dosimetry as target-specific radiopharmaceuticals. The OLINDA/EXM code was used to calculate patient-specific internal radiation dose estimates. 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC images showed an average tumor/blood ratio of 4.3±0.7 in receptor-positive tumors with an average effective dose of 4.4 mSv. Dosimetric studies indicated that after administration of 5.8 to 7.5 GBq of 188Re-anti-CD20 the absorbed dose to total body would be 0.75 Gy which corresponds to the recommended dose for NHL therapies.

  12. Hepatic extraction fraction of hepatobiliary radiopharmaceuticals measured using spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Murase, K; Tsuda, T; Mochizuki, T; Ikezoe, J

    1999-11-01

    Measuring the hepatic extraction fraction (HEF) of a hepatobiliary radiopharmaceutical helps to differentiate hepatocyte from biliary tract diseases, and it is generally performed using deconvolution analysis. In this study, we measured HEF using spectral analysis. With spectral analysis, HEF was calculated from (the sum of the spectral data obtained by spectral analysis--the highest frequency component of the spectrum) divided by (the sum of the spectral data) x 100 (%). We applied this method to dynamic liver scintigraphic data obtained from six healthy volunteers and from 46 patients with various liver diseases, using 99Tcm-N-pyridoxyl-5-methyltryptophan (PMT). We also measured HEF using deconvolution analysis, in which the modified Fourier transform technique was employed. The HEF values obtained by spectral analysis correlated closely with those obtained by deconvolution analysis (r = 0.925), suggesting our method is valid. The HEF values obtained by spectral analysis decreased as the severity of liver disease progressed. The values were 100.0 +/- 0.0%, 94.7 +/- 13.6%, 76.2 +/- 27.4%, 45.7 +/- 15.6%, 82.7 +/- 24.2% and 95.2 +/- 11.8% (mean +/- S.D.) for the normal controls (n = 6), mild liver cirrhosis (n = 16), moderate liver cirrhosis (n = 11), severe liver cirrhosis (n = 5), acute hepatitis (n = 8) and chronic hepatitis groups (n = 6), respectively. The HEF was obtained more simply and rapidly by spectral analysis than by deconvolution analysis. The results suggest that our method using spectral analysis can be used as an alternative to the conventional procedure using deconvolution analysis for measuring HEF. PMID:10572914

  13. Circadian variation in tamoxifen pharmacokinetics in mice and breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Binkhorst, Lisette; Kloth, Jacqueline S L; de Wit, Annelieke S; de Bruijn, Peter; Lam, Mei H; Chaves, Ines; Burger, Herman; van Alphen, Robbert J; Hamberg, Paul; van Schaik, Ron H N; Jager, Agnes; Koch, Birgit C P; Wiemer, Erik A C; van Gelder, Teun; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Mathijssen, Ron H J

    2015-07-01

    The anti-estrogen tamoxifen is characterized by a large variability in response, partly due to pharmacokinetic differences. We examined circadian variation in tamoxifen pharmacokinetics in mice and breast cancer patients. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed in mice, dosed at six different times (24-h period). Tissue samples were used for mRNA expression analysis of drug-metabolizing enzymes. In patients, a cross-over study was performed. During three 24-h periods, after tamoxifen dosing at 8 a.m., 1 p.m., and 8 p.m., for at least 4 weeks, blood samples were collected for pharmacokinetic measurements. Differences in tamoxifen pharmacokinetics between administration times were assessed. The mRNA expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes showed circadian variation in mouse tissues. Tamoxifen exposure seemed to be highest after administration at midnight. In humans, marginal differences were observed in pharmacokinetic parameters between morning and evening administration. Tamoxifen C(max )and area under the curve (AUC)0-8 h were 20 % higher (P < 0.001), and tamoxifen t(max) was shorter (2.1 vs. 8.1 h; P = 0.001), indicating variation in absorption. Systemic exposure (AUC0-24 h) to endoxifen was 15 % higher (P < 0.001) following morning administration. The results suggest that dosing time is of marginal influence on tamoxifen pharmacokinetics. Our study was not designed to detect potential changes in clinical outcome or toxicity, based on a difference in the time of administration. Circadian rhythm may be one of the many determinants of the interpatient and intrapatient pharmacokinetic variability of tamoxifen. PMID:26050156

  14. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for lactational transfer of Na-131I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Anita Loretta

    The excretion of radionuclides in human breast milk after administration of radiopharmaceuticals is a concern as a radiation risk to nursing infants. It is not uncommon to administer radiopharmaceuticals to lactating patients due to emergency nuclear medicine investigations such as thyroid complications, kidney failure, and pulmonary embolism. There is a need to quantify the amount of radioactivity translocated into breast milk in cases of ingestion by a breast-fed infant. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model (PBPK) and a modified International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) model have been developed to predict iodine concentrations in breast milk after ingestion of radioiodine by the mother. In the PBPK model, all compartments are interconnected by blood flow and represent real anatomic tissue regions in the body. All parameters involved are measurable values with physiological or physiochemical meaning such as tissue masses, blood flow rates, partition coefficients and cardiac output. However, some of the parameters such as the partition coefficients and metabolic constants are not available for iodine and had to be inferred from other information. The structure of the PBPK model for the mother consists of the following tissue compartments: gastrointestinal tract, blood, kidney, thyroid, milk, and other tissues. With the exception of the milk compartment, the model for the nursing infant is structured similarly to the mother. The ICRP model describing iodine metabolism in a standard 70-kg man was modified to represent iodine metabolism in a lactating woman and nursing infant. The parameters involved in this model are transfer rates and biological half-lives which are based on experimental observations. The results of the PBPK model and the modified ICRP model describing the lactational transfer of iodine were compared. When administering 1 mCi of Na131I to the lactating mother, the concentration reaches a maximum of 0.1 mCi/liter in 24

  15. Preparation and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of the Tongshu Suppository

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Leilei; Lu, Kuan; Liu, Sisi; Zheng, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) (used for intestinal protection) was added to formulate the Tongshu suppository to improve the pharmacokinetics of Aceclofenac, which were assessed in New Zealand rabbits using an orthogonal experimental design. The single-agent Aceclofenac was taken as the control formulation. The concentration-time and drug release curves were drawn, and Tmax (min), Cmax (μg·mL−1), AUC0→∞, and MRT were compared using a pharmacokinetic systems program. The formulated Tongshu suppository had moderate hardness, a smooth surface with uniform color, and theoretical drug-loading rate of 8%. Its release rate was in accordance with the drug preparation requirements. The concentration-time curves and drug release curves revealed that the maximum concentrations (Cmax) were 4.18 ± 1.03 μg·mL−1 and 3.34 ± 0.41 μg·mL−1 for the Tongshu and Aceclofenac suppositories, respectively, showing statistically insignificant difference, while the peak times were 34.87 ± 4.69 min and 34.76 ± 6.34 min, respectively, also showing statistically insignificant difference. Compared with the Aceclofenac suppository, the relative bioavailability of the Tongshu suppository was 104.4%, and the difference between them was statistically insignificant. In this experiment, the Tongshu suppository was prepared using the hot-melt method. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies confirmed it had higher bioavailability than the Aceclofenac suppository. PMID:27610366

  16. Preparation and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of the Tongshu Suppository.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoqiang; Dong, Leilei; Lu, Kuan; Liu, Sisi; Zheng, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) (used for intestinal protection) was added to formulate the Tongshu suppository to improve the pharmacokinetics of Aceclofenac, which were assessed in New Zealand rabbits using an orthogonal experimental design. The single-agent Aceclofenac was taken as the control formulation. The concentration-time and drug release curves were drawn, and T max (min), C max (μg·mL(-1)), AUC0→∞ , and MRT were compared using a pharmacokinetic systems program. The formulated Tongshu suppository had moderate hardness, a smooth surface with uniform color, and theoretical drug-loading rate of 8%. Its release rate was in accordance with the drug preparation requirements. The concentration-time curves and drug release curves revealed that the maximum concentrations (C max) were 4.18 ± 1.03 μg·mL(-1) and 3.34 ± 0.41 μg·mL(-1) for the Tongshu and Aceclofenac suppositories, respectively, showing statistically insignificant difference, while the peak times were 34.87 ± 4.69 min and 34.76 ± 6.34 min, respectively, also showing statistically insignificant difference. Compared with the Aceclofenac suppository, the relative bioavailability of the Tongshu suppository was 104.4%, and the difference between them was statistically insignificant. In this experiment, the Tongshu suppository was prepared using the hot-melt method. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies confirmed it had higher bioavailability than the Aceclofenac suppository. PMID:27610366

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis. [Final] report, 1 January 1991--31 December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1993-06-01

    Since 1987, this grant has supported the development of new radiochemical methods for use with short-lived, positron-emitting radionuclides; new laboratory techniques for radiochemical syntheses; and development of new radiopharmaceuticals which will be of use in Positron Emission Tomography. For the period 1 January 1991 to 31 December 1993, the authors have continued their efforts in all of these areas, as they feel that an integrated approach to the synthesis and characterization of new PET Radiopharmaceuticals is crucial to the continued growth and application of this imaging technique in modern medicine. Progress in a number of these areas is described in this report.

  18. Studying the General Toxicity and Cumulative Properties of a Radiopharmaceutical Nanocolloid, (99m)Tc-Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Varlamova, N V; Churin, A A; Fomina, T I; Ermolaeva, L A; Vetoshkina, T V; Dubskaya, T Yu; Lamzina, T Yu; Fedorova, E P; Neupokoeva, O V; Skuridin, V S; Nesterov, E A; Larionova, L A; Chernov, V I

    2016-07-01

    We studied toxicity of a new Russian radiopharmaceutical Nanocolloid, (99m)Tc-Al2O3. Tests for acute toxicity showed that this agent belongs to a class of moderate-toxicity substances and does not have cumulative properties. The evaluation of subchronic toxicity after subcutaneous injection of this product to rats (0.04, 0.2, and 0.4 ml/kg) and rabbits (0.02 and 0.2 ml/kg) for 7 days did not reveal changes in the general state, temperature, body weight, indices of the peripheral blood and bone marrow, functions of the heart, liver, kidneys, and nervous system, and morphological characteristics of the internal organs in animals. The drug does not produce a local irritant effect. PMID:27502539

  19. Performance of a Lanthanum Bromide Detector and a New Conception Collimator for Radiopharmaceuticals Molecular Imaging in Oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Roberto; Pellegrini, Rosanna; Bennati, Paolo; Cinti, Maria Nerina; Scafè, Raffaele; De Vincentis, Giuseppe; Navarria, Francesco; Moschini, Giuliano; Cencelli, Valentino Orsolini; De Notaristefani, Francesco; Rossi, Paolo

    2009-03-01

    We have realized and tested a new-design compact gamma camera for high resolution SPET (Single Photon Emission Tomography), and small animals' radio-pharmaceutical molecular imaging. The camera is based on a "continuous" Lanthanum tri-Bromide crystal, and a new Low Energy (LE) collimator. The crystal is interfaced to a 2×2 array of Hamamatsu-H8500 position sensitive photo-multipliers. The lead collimator features parallel hexagonal 1.0 mm holes, 18 mm length, 0.2 mm septa and 10×10 cm2 detection area. It was newly designed to fully exploit the high spatial resolution a Lanthanum crystal may provide. To better evaluate its role, we have compared our camera to three other systems with similar crystals and photomultipliers, but employing traditional collimators, either pinhole or parallel. The new camera seems to be complementary to pinhole systems and shows a very attractive trade-off between spatial resolution and detection area.

  20. Data sharing for pharmacokinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian J; Merry, Alan F

    2009-10-01

    Pooling data from different pediatric studies can provide a single robust pharmacokinetic analysis that allows covariate analysis and hypothesis testing. Data sharing should be driven by the altruistic purpose of improving drug understanding to the clinical benefit of children. Electronic communications have rendered the sharing of data relatively easy, and data sharing within the wider scientific community has become commonplace. Data sharing allows verification of results, save costs and time, allows new interpretation of old data, and can fulfill teaching benefits. It may stimulate cooperative competition between researchers and allow individual researchers to concentrate on unique aspects of the scientific puzzle. However, there is occasionally a reluctance to share, in part because of fear of others stealing the hard work of a research group, which may not be recognized in subsequent publications that reuse data. Providing data may require additional effort for presentation in a suitable format. Data may be abused or used for purposes other than those for which they were collected. Propriety claims may limit access to industry-sponsored drug research. The question of who has ownership of data is contentious. Investigators often consider data they have collected to be their own property. Reputations and grants may be hinge on ownership of a data set. However, other team members, institutions, funding agencies, and the public also have a stake. The difficulties identified in the general scientific community also apply to data sharing for pediatric pharmacokinetic studies. There are few clearly established rules at present, and consideration of the issues hinges on ethical and philosophical arguments. The development of databases will depend on collaboration and cooperation and greater clarity and consensus over appropriate processes and procedures. PMID:19558615

  1. Chiral Pesticide Pharmacokinetics: A Range of Values

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approximately 30% of pesticides are chiral and used as mixtures of two or more stereoisomers. In biological systems, these stereoisomers can exhibit significantly different pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination). In spite of these differences, th...

  2. A PHARMACOKINETIC PROGRAM (PKFIT) FOR R

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to create a nonlinear regression (including a genetic algorithm) program (R script) to deal with data fitting for pharmacokinetics (PK) in R environment using its available packages. We call this tool as PKfit.

  3. Molecular pharmacokinetics of catharanthus (vinca) alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Levêque, Dominique; Jehl, François

    2007-05-01

    This review focuses on the published data regarding the molecular determinants (enzymes, transporters, orphan nuclear receptors) of Catharanthus (vinca) alkaloids pharmacokinetics in humans. The clinical impact of these determinants (drug disposition, drug-drug interactions) is also discussed. PMID:17442684

  4. Development of quantitative structure-pharmacokinetic relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, J M; van de Waterbeemd, H

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) relating biological activity to physiochemical descriptors have been successfully used for a number of years. It is also long recognized that pharmacokinetic parameters may play an important and even determinant role in drug action. This prompted several researchers to focus attention to pharmacokinetic parameters as potential descriptors in quantitative drug design. A number of examples of quantitative structure-pharmacokinetic relationships (QSPR) have appeared in the literature. The present contribution reviews some developments in this field. In particular, a number of concepts and problems are critically discussed, rather than compilations of examples already published in recent reviews. Attention will be paid to the main processes of the pharmacokinetic or toxicokinetic phase in drug action, including absorption, distribution and elimination (biotransformation and excretion). It is clear that quantitative approaches are of considerable interest to toxicologists, since these methods may contribute to the development of real predictive toxicology. PMID:3905378

  5. Lutetium-177 DOTATATE Production with an Automated Radiopharmaceutical Synthesis System

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Alireza; Snowdon, Graeme M; Bailey, Dale L; Schembri, Geoffrey P; Bailey, Elizabeth A; Pavlakis, Nick; Roach, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRT) with yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu)-labelled SST analogues are now therapy option for patients who have failed to respond to conventional medical therapy. In-house production with automated PRRT synthesis systems have clear advantages over manual methods resulting in increasing use in hospital-based radiopharmacies. We report on our one year experience with an automated radiopharmaceutical synthesis system. Methods: All syntheses were carried out using the Eckert & Ziegler Eurotope’s Modular-Lab Pharm Tracer® automated synthesis system. All materials and methods used were followed as instructed by the manufacturer of the system (Eckert & Ziegler Eurotope, Berlin, Germany). Sterile, GMP-certified, no-carrier added (NCA) 177Lu was used with GMP-certified peptide. An audit trail was also produced and saved by the system. The quality of the final product was assessed after each synthesis by ITLC-SG and HPLC methods. Results: A total of 17 [177Lu]-DOTATATE syntheses were performed between August 2013 and December 2014. The amount of radioactive [177Lu]-DOTATATE produced by each synthesis varied between 10-40 GBq and was dependant on the number of patients being treated on a given day. Thirteen individuals received a total of 37 individual treatment administrations in this period. There were no issues and failures with the system or the synthesis cassettes. The average radiochemical purity as determined by ITLC was above 99% (99.8 ± 0.05%) and the average radiochemical purity as determined by HPLC technique was above 97% (97.3 ± 1.5%) for this period. Conclusions: The automated synthesis of [177Lu]-DOTATATE using Eckert & Ziegler Eurotope’s Modular-Lab Pharm Tracer® system is a robust, convenient and high yield approach to the radiolabelling of DOTATATE peptide benefiting from the use of NCA 177Lu and almost negligible radiation exposure of the operators. PMID:27408890

  6. A model to resolve organochlorine pharmacokinetics in migrating humpback whales.

    PubMed

    Cropp, Roger; Nash, Susan Bengtson; Hawker, Darryl

    2014-07-01

    Humpback whales are iconic mammals at the top of the Antarctic food chain. Their large reserves of lipid-rich tissues such as blubber predispose them to accumulation of lipophilic contaminants throughout their lifetime. Changes in the volume and distribution of lipids in humpback whales, particularly during migration, could play an important role in the pharmacokinetics of lipophilic contaminants such as the organochlorine pesticide hexachlorobenzene (HCB). Previous models have examined constant feeding and nonmigratory scenarios. In the present study, the authors develop a novel heuristic model to investigate HCB dynamics in a humpback whale and its environment by coupling an ecosystem nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model, a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model, and a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. The model takes into account the seasonal feeding pattern of whales, their energy requirements, and fluctuating contaminant burdens in the supporting plankton food chain. It is applied to a male whale from weaning to maturity, spanning 20 migration and feeding cycles. The model is initialized with environmental HCB burdens similar to those measured in the Southern Ocean and predicts blubber HCB concentrations consistent with empirical concentrations observed in a southern hemisphere population of male, migrating humpback whales. Results show for the first time some important details of the relationship between energy budgets and organochlorine pharmacokinetics. PMID:24733631

  7. A decade of experience with a clinical pharmacokinetics service.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, P J; Smith, W E; Palarea, E R

    1988-09-01

    The development, operation, and functions of the pharmacokinetics service at Memorial Medical Center of Long Beach (MMCLB) are described, and the data used to determine the quality and cost-effectiveness of the service are presented. Current functions of the pharmacokinetics service at MMCLB include making brief written comments about the interpretations of serum drug concentrations (SDCs) and oral recommendations to physicians on dosage adjustment; provision of written consultations with dosage recommendations; provision of drug information, education, and research; and development of drug dosing guidelines for the pharmacy and medical staff. During the 10-year existence of this service, costs have been justified on the basis of not only revenue generated by the service (in the form of "drug concentration scheduling" and "drug concentration evaluation" fees charged to patients) but also by cost savings resulting from the prevention of inappropriate, misleading, and potentially dangerous SDCs. An audit conducted in 1986 showed that the policy of having pharmacists schedule the sampling times for SDCs saves about $500,000 annually. Quality assurance has been documented by auditing compliance with and therapeutic effectiveness of dosing guidelines and by working with laboratory personnel to identify and prevent spurious SDC results and assay errors. The methods used by the pharmacokinetics service at MMCLB to document the benefits of the service have been vital in proving both its cost-effectiveness and its positive effect on patient care. PMID:3147596

  8. Clinical Pharmacokinetics: A Simplified Approach, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Perlin, Elliott; Taylor, Robert E.; Peck, Carl C.

    1986-01-01

    Part 1 of this two-part series in clinical pharmacokinetics (J Natl Med Assoc 1985; 77:475-482) introduced the clinician to the basic principles required for rational therapeutic drug management at the bedside. Practical problems were included that demonstrated how these principles could be put to clinical use. In Part 2 the clinical pharmacology of three commonly used drugs (theophylline, digoxin and gentamicin) are discussed, and practical problems are presented to illustrate the use of their pharmacokinetic profiles. PMID:3783759

  9. Implementing and maintaining a private pharmacokinetics practice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, J E; Ward, E S; Job, M L

    1990-03-01

    The development and maintenance of a private-practice pharmacokinetics service is described. A contracted pharmacokinetics service has been in place at Georgia Baptist Medical Center, a 525-bed hospital, for the past eight years. Physician support, inhouse study results, and literature documentation of the benefits of scheduling drug concentration determinations were used to convince hospital administrators of the value of a pharmacokinetics service. Services were reimbursed by increasing the fee charged for each drug concentration determination, with payment made to the pharmacokinetics service on a monthly basis. The service is associated with the pathology department for administrative purposes. Each member of the pharmacokinetics service is credentialed by the medical staff. The group trains part-time personnel to provide services when needed. Services provided by the group but not required by the contract include collecting quality assurance data, conducting research, serving on hospital committees, writing newsletter articles, conducting inservice-education programs, and providing clinical interventions for nonconsultation patients. This private-practice pharmacokinetics service provides high-quality services and is well accepted within the institution. PMID:2316544

  10. Pharmacokinetics of oral amantadine in greyhound dogs.

    PubMed

    Norkus, C; Rankin, D; Warner, M; KuKanich, B

    2015-06-01

    This study reports the pharmacokinetics of amantadine in greyhound dogs after oral administration. Five healthy greyhound dogs were used. A single oral dose of 100 mg amantadine hydrochloride (mean dose 2.8 mg/kg as amantadine hydrochloride) was administered to nonfasted subjects. Blood samples were collected at predetermined time points from 0 to 24 h after administration, and plasma concentrations of amantadine were measured by liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were performed. Amantadine was well tolerated in all dogs with no adverse effects observed. The mean (range) amantadine CMAX was 275 ng/mL (225-351 ng/mL) at 2.6 h (1-4 h) with a terminal half-life of 4.96 h (4.11-6.59 h). The results of this study can be used to design dosages to assess multidose pharmacokinetics and dosages designed to achieve targeted concentrations in order to assess the clinical effects of amantadine in a variety of conditions including chronic pain. Further studies should also assess the pharmacokinetics of amantadine in other dog breeds or using population pharmacokinetics studies including multiple dog breeds to assess potential breed-specific differences in the pharmacokinetics of amantadine in dogs. PMID:25427541

  11. Clinical Predictors of Venetoclax Pharmacokinetics in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients: a Pooled Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Aksana K; Freise, Kevin J; Agarwal, Suresh K; Humerickhouse, Rod A; Wong, Shekman L; Salem, Ahmed Hamed

    2016-09-01

    Venetoclax (ABT-199/GDC-0199) is a selective, potent, first-in-class BCL-2 inhibitor that restores apoptosis in cancer cells and has demonstrated clinical efficacy in a variety of hematological malignancies. The objective of this analysis was to characterize the population pharmacokinetics of venetoclax and identify demographic, pathophysiologic, and treatment factors that influence its pharmacokinetics. Plasma concentration samples from 505 subjects enrolled in 8 clinical studies were analyzed using non-linear mixed-effects modeling. Venetoclax plasma concentrations were best described by a two-compartment PK model with first-order absorption and elimination. The terminal half-life in cancer subjects was estimated to be approximately 26 h. Moderate and strong CYP3A inhibitors decreased venetoclax apparent clearance by 19% and 84%, respectively, while weak CYP3A inhibitors and inducers did not affect clearance. Additionally, concomitant rituximab administration was estimated to increase venetoclax apparent clearance by 21%. Gastric acid-reducing agent co-administration had no impact on the rate or extent of venetoclax absorption. Females had 32% lower central volume of distribution when compared to males. Food increased the bioavailability by 2.99- to 4.25-fold when compared to the fasting state. Mild and moderate renal and hepatic impairment, body weight, age, race, weak CYP3A inhibitors and inducers as well as OATP1B1 transporter phenotype and P-gp, BCRP, and OATP1B1/OATP1B3 modulators had no impact on venetoclax pharmacokinetics. Venetoclax showed minimal accumulation with accumulation ratio of 1.30-1.44. In conclusion, the concomitant administration of moderate and strong CYP3A inhibitors and rituximab as well as food were the main factors impacting venetoclax pharmacokinetics, while patient characteristics had only minimal impact. PMID:27233802

  12. Synthesis and radioiodination of ergoline derivatives: potential in-vivo dopamine receptor site mapping radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhail, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    The need of a dopamine-receptor based radiopharmaceutical for brain imaging is apparent. If such an agent is made available to physicians, it could provide means for detecting brain tumors, and diagnose such mental disorders as parkinsonism, schizophrenia and psychosis. Currently, such agents are yet to be discovered. Procedures were developed to synthesize and label four ergoline derivatives which could potentially exhibit affinity to dopamine receptors. Labelling with /sup 125/I was accomplished in some cases by displacing a suitably positioned leaving group with /sup 125/I-anion, while in other cases iodine exchange procedures were utilized. Formulations of the labeled derivatives were achieved via the formation of their water soluble tartarate salts. Biodistribution studies in mature Sprague-Dawley rats showed that of the four radioactive compounds injected, the highest uptake in the brain and adrenals was achieved with 8 ..beta..-(I-125)-iodomethyl-6-propylergoline. In addition, high target/nontarget ratios were obtained with the above mentioned compound. On the other hand, the least brain and adrenal uptake as well as the lowest target/nontarget ratios were exhibited by 8 ..beta..-(I-125)-(p-iodobenzenesulfonyl)-lysergol presumably due to its in-vivo instability. A comparative biodistribution study for ergoline derivatives and N-isopropyl-(I-123)-p-iodoamphetamine was conducted. The biodistribution studies showed that the brain to blood ratio for the ergoline derivative 8 ..beta..-(I-125)-iodomethyl-6-propylergoline to be very close to that for /sup 125/I-IMP at 1 minute after dose administration. However after 15 minutes the brain/blood ratio of compound XLVI was half the value of /sup 123/I-IMP. Different mechanisms of brain influx and efflux are known to occur with the amphetamine and ergoline derivatives.

  13. Dynamic 99mTc-MAG3 renography: images for quality control obtained by combining pharmacokinetic modelling, an anthropomorphic computer phantom and Monte Carlo simulated scintillation camera imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brolin, Gustav; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina; Ljungberg, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the main interest is the radiopharmaceutical redistribution as a function of time. Quality control (QC) of renal procedures often relies on phantom experiments to compare image-based results with the measurement setup. A phantom with a realistic anatomy and time-varying activity distribution is therefore desirable. This work describes a pharmacokinetic (PK) compartment model for 99mTc-MAG3, used for defining a dynamic whole-body activity distribution within a digital phantom (XCAT) for accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based images for QC. Each phantom structure is assigned a time-activity curve provided by the PK model, employing parameter values consistent with MAG3 pharmacokinetics. This approach ensures that the total amount of tracer in the phantom is preserved between time points, and it allows for modifications of the pharmacokinetics in a controlled fashion. By adjusting parameter values in the PK model, different clinically realistic scenarios can be mimicked, regarding, e.g., the relative renal uptake and renal transit time. Using the MC code SIMIND, a complete set of renography images including effects of photon attenuation, scattering, limited spatial resolution and noise, are simulated. The obtained image data can be used to evaluate quantitative techniques and computer software in clinical renography.

  14. Systemic metabolic radiopharmaceutical therapy in the treatment of metastatic bone pain.

    PubMed

    Paes, Fabio M; Serafini, Aldo N

    2010-03-01

    Bone pain due to skeletal metastases constitutes the most common type of chronic pain among patients with cancer. It significantly decreases the patient's quality of life and is associated with comorbidities, such as hypercalcemia, pathologic fractures and spinal cord compression. Approximately 65% of patients with prostate or breast cancer and 35% of those with advanced lung, thyroid, and kidney cancers will have symptomatic skeletal metastases. The management of bone pain is extremely difficult and involves a multidisciplinary approach, which usually includes analgesics, hormone therapies, bisphosphonates, external beam radiation, and systemic radiopharmaceuticals. In patients with extensive osseous metastases, systemic radiopharmaceuticals should be the preferred adjunctive therapy for pain palliation. In this article, we review the current approved radiopharmaceutical armamentarium for bone pain palliation, focusing on indications, patient selection, efficacy, and different biochemical characteristics and toxicity of strontium-89 chloride, samarium-153 lexidronam, and rhenium-186 etidronate. A brief discussion on the available data on rhenium-188 is presented focusing on its major advantages and disadvantages. We also perform a concise appraisal of the other available treatment options, including pharmacologic and hormonal treatment modalities, external beam radiation, and bisphosphonates. Finally, the available data on combination therapy of radiopharmaceuticals with bisphosphonates or chemotherapy are discussed. PMID:20113678

  15. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Technical progress report, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1991-12-31

    This report presents research on radiopharmaceuticals. The following topics are discussed: antibody labeling with positron-emitting radionuclides; antibody modification for radioimmune imaging; labeling antibodies; evaluation of technetium acetlyacetonates as potential cerebral blood flow agents; and studies in technetium chemistry. (CBS)

  16. Pharmacokinetics of Ethanol - Issues of Forensic Importance.

    PubMed

    Jones, A W

    2011-07-01

    A reliable method for the quantitative analysis of ethanol in microvolumes (50-100 μL) of blood became available in 1922, making it possible to investigate the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) of ethanol in healthy volunteers. The basic principles of ethanol pharmacokinetics were established in the 1930s, including the notion of zero-order elimination kinetics from blood and distribution of the absorbed dose into the total body water. The hepatic enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) is primarily responsible for the oxidative metabolism of ethanol. This enzyme was purified and characterized in the early 1950s and shown to have a low Michaelis constant (km), being about ~0.1 g/L. Liver ADH is therefore saturated with substrate after the first couple of drinks and for all practical purposes the concentration-time (C-T) profiles of ethanol are a good approximation to zero-order kinetics. However, because of dose-dependent saturation kinetics, the entire postabsorptive declining part of the blood-alcohol concentration (BAC) curve looks more like a hockey stick rather than a straight line. A faster rate of ethanol elimination from blood in habituated individuals (alcoholics) is explained by participation of a high km microsomal enzyme (CYP2E1), which is inducible after a period of chronic heavy drinking. Owing to the combined influences of genetic and environmental factors, one expects a roughly threefold difference in elimination rates of ethanol from blood (0.1-0.3 g/L/h) between individuals. The volume of distribution (Vd) of ethanol, which depends on a person's age, gender, and proportion of fat to lean body mass, shows a twofold variation between individuals (0.4-0.8 L/kg). This forensic science review traces the development of forensic pharmacokinetics of ethanol from a historical perspective, followed by a discussion of important issues related to the disposition and fate of ethanol in the body, including (a) quantitative evaluation of

  17. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions of macrolides.

    PubMed

    Periti, P; Mazzei, T; Mini, E; Novelli, A

    1992-08-01

    The macrolide antibiotics include natural members, prodrugs and semisynthetic derivatives. These drugs are indicated in a variety of infections and are often combined with other drug therapies, thus creating the potential for pharmacokinetic interactions. Macrolides can both inhibit drug metabolism in the liver by complex formation and inactivation of microsomal drug oxidising enzymes and also interfere with microorganisms of the enteric flora through their antibiotic effects. Over the past 20 years, a number of reports have incriminated macrolides as a potential source of clinically severe drug interactions. However, differences have been found between the various macrolides in this regard and not all macrolides are responsible for drug interactions. With the recent advent of many semisynthetic macrolide antibiotics it is now evident that they may be classified into 3 different groups in causing drug interactions. The first group (e.g. troleandomycin, erythromycins) are those prone to forming nitrosoalkanes and the consequent formation of inactive cytochrome P450-metabolite complexes. The second group (e.g. josamycin, flurithromycin, roxithromycin, clarithromycin, miocamycin and midecamycin) form complexes to a lesser extent and rarely produce drug interactions. The last group (e.g. spiramycin, rokitamycin, dirithromycin and azithromycin) do not inactivate cytochrome P450 and are unable to modify the pharmacokinetics of other compounds. It appears that 2 structural factors are important for a macrolide antibiotic to lead to the induction of cytochrome P450 and the formation in vivo or in vitro of an inhibitory cytochrome P450-iron-nitrosoalkane metabolite complex: the presence in the macrolide molecules of a non-hindered readily accessible N-dimethylamino group and the hydrophobic character of the drug. Troleandomycin ranks first as a potent inhibitor of microsomal liver enzymes, causing a significant decrease of the metabolism of methylprednisolone, theophylline

  18. Clinical pharmacokinetics of the salicylates.

    PubMed

    Needs, C J; Brooks, P M

    1985-01-01

    -order kinetics. The serum half-life of salicylic acid is dose-dependent; thus, the larger the dose employed, the longer it will take to reach steady-state. There is also evidence that enzyme induction of salicyluric acid formation occurs. No significant differences exist between the pharmacokinetics of the salicylates in the elderly or in children when compared with young adults. Apart from differences in free versus albumin-bound salicylate in various disease states and physiological conditions associated with low serum albumin, pharmacokinetic parameters in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, chronic renal failure or liver disease are essentially the same.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3888490

  19. Pharmaceutical and clinical development of phosphonate-based radiopharmaceuticals for the targeted treatment of bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rogier; Ter Heine, Rob; Knapp, Russ Ff; de Klerk, John M H; Bloemendal, Haiko J; Hendrikse, N Harry

    2016-10-01

    Therapeutic phosphonate-based radiopharmaceuticals radiolabeled with beta, alpha and conversion electron emitting radioisotopes have been investigated for the targeted treatment of painful bone metastases for >35years. We performed a systematic literature search and focused on the pharmaceutical development, preclinical research and early human studies of these radiopharmaceuticals. The characteristics of an ideal bone-targeting therapeutic radiopharmaceutical are presented and compliance with these criteria by the compounds discussed is verified. The importance of both composition and preparation conditions for the stability and biodistribution of several agents is discussed. Very few studies have described the characterization of these products, although knowledge on the molecular structure is important with respect to in vivo behavior. This review discusses a total of 91 phosphonate-based therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, of which only six agents have progressed to clinical use. Extensive clinical studies have only been described for (186)Re-HEDP, (188)Re-HEDP and (153)Sm-EDTMP. Of these, (153)Sm-EDTMP represents the only compound with worldwide marketing authorization. (177)Lu-EDTMP has recently received approval for clinical use in India. This review illustrates that a thorough understanding of the radiochemistry of these agents is required to design simple and robust preparation and quality control methods, which are needed to fully exploit the potential benefits of these theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. Extensive biodistribution and dosimetry studies are indispensable to provide the portfolios that are required for assessment before human administration is possible. Use of the existing knowledge collected in this review should guide future research efforts and may lead to the approval of new promising agents. PMID:27496068

  20. Population pharmacokinetic modeling and simulation of huperzine A in elderly Chinese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Lei; Qu, Yi; Yan, Jing; Liu, Gang-yi; Wang, Wei-liang; Wang, Yi-jun; Wang, Hong-yi; Zhang, Meng-qi; Lu, Chuan; Liu, Yun; Jia, Jing-yin; Hu, Chao-ying; Li, Xue-ning; Yu, Chen; Xu, Hong-rong

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Our preliminary results show that huperzine A, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients in China, exhibits different pharmacokinetic features in elderly and young healthy subjects. However, its pharmacokinetic data in elderly subjects remains unavailable to date. Thus, we developed a population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model of huperzine A in elderly Chinese people, and identified the covariate affecting its pharmacokinetics for optimal individual administration. Methods: A total of 341 serum huperzine A concentration records was obtained from 2 completed clinical trials (14 elderly healthy subjects in a phase I pharmacokinetic study; 35 elderly AD patients in a phase II study). Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using the non-linear mixed-effect modeling software Phoenix NLME1.1.1. The effects of age, gender, body weight, height, creatinine, endogenous creatinine clearance rate as well as drugs administered concomitantly were analyzed. Bootstrap and visual predictive checks were used simultaneously to validate the final population pharmacokinetics models. Results: The plasma concentration-time profile of huperzine A was best described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. Age was identified as the covariate having significant influence on huperzine A clearance. The final PPK model of huperzine A was: CL (L/h)=2.4649*(age/86)(−3.3856), Ka=0.6750 h−1, V (L)=104.216. The final PPK model was demonstrated to be suitable and effective by the bootstrap and visual predictive checks. Conclusion: A PPK model of huperzine A in elderly Chinese subjects is established, which can be used to predict PPK parameters of huperzine A in the treatment of elderly AD patients. PMID:27180987

  1. Understanding radioxenon isotopical ratios originating from radiopharmaceutical facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saey, P. R. J.; Ringbom, A.; Bowyer, T. W.; Becker, A.; de Geer, L.-E.; Nikkinen, M.; Payne, R. F.

    2009-04-01

    It was recently shown that radiopharmaceutical facilities (RPF) are major contributors to the general background of 133Xe and other xenon isotopes both in the northern and southern hemisphere. To distinguish a nuclear explosion signal from releases from civil nuclear facilities, not only the activity concentrations but also the ratios of the four different CTBT relevant radioxenon isotopes (131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe and 135Xe) have to be well understood. First measurements taken recently in and around two of the world's largest RPF's: NTP at Pelindaba, South Africa and IRE at Fleurus, Belgium have been presented. At both sites, also stack samples were taken in close cooperation with the facility operators. The radioxenon in Belgium could be classified in four classes: the normal European background (133Xe activity between 0 - 5 mBq/m3) on one hand and then the samples where all four isotopes were detected with 133mXe/131mXe > 1. In northern South Africa the Pelindaba RPF is in practice the sole source of radioxenon. It generated a background of 133Xe at the measurement site some 230 km to the west of the RPF of 0 - 5 mBq/m3. In the cases where the air from the Pelindaba facility reached the measurement site directly and in a short time period, the 133Xe was higher, also 135Xe was present and in some samples 133mXe as well. The ratios of the activity concentrations of 135Xe/133Xe vs. 133mXe/131mXe (Multiple Isotope Ratio Plot - MIRC) have been analysed. For both facilities, the possible theoretical ratio's for different scenarios were calculated with the information available and compared with the measurements. It was found that there is an excess of 131mXe present in the European samples compared to theoretical calculations. A similar excess has also been seen in samples measured in northern America. In South Africa, neither the environmental samples nor the stack ones contained 131mXe at measurable levels. This can probably be explained by different processes and

  2. [Pharmacokinetics of cefatrizine administered in repeated doses].

    PubMed

    Couet, W; Reigner, B G; Lefebvre, M A; Bizouard, J; Fourtillan, J B

    1988-05-01

    Twelve healthy volunteers received cefatrizine orally at doses equal to 500 mg every 12 h for 5 days. Cefatrizine was assayed by high performance liquid chromatography in plasma and urines collected after the first and/or the last administration. Cefatrizine absorption was rapid; its peak plasma level was reached at time 1.79 +/- 0.07 h following the first dose, it was equal to 7.37 +/- 0.31 micrograms.ml-1. Its apparent elimination half-life was equal to 1.50 +/- 0.05 h, it explains the lack of accumulation with time during multiple administrations every 12 hours. Comparisons between peak plasma concentration and area under curves following the first and last dosing showed significant (p less than 0.01) but weak (close to 15%) reduction of these 2 parameters with time which could be explained by a slight reduction of cefatrizine absorption with time. In conclusion, cefatrizine does not accumulate when administered repeatedly at a dose equal to 500 mg every 12 h in young adult, and its pharmacokinetics is virtually linear with time. PMID:3043350

  3. Exploring Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling with Resampling Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Fenghua

    2014-01-01

    Background. In the last decade, population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) modeling has spread its influence in the whole process of drug research and development. While targeting the construction of the dose-concentration of a drug based on a population of patients, it shows great flexibility in dealing with sparse samplings and unbalanced designs. The resampling approach has been considered an important statistical tool to assist in PopPK model validation by measuring the uncertainty of parameter estimates and evaluating the influence of individuals. Methods. The current work describes a graphical diagnostic approach for PopPK models by visualizing resampling statistics, such as case deletion and bootstrap. To examine resampling statistics, we adapted visual methods from multivariate analysis, parallel coordinate plots, and multidimensional scaling. Results. Multiple models were fitted, the information of parameter estimates and diagnostics were extracted, and the results were visualized. With careful scaling, the dependencies between different statistics are revealed. Using typical examples, the approach proved to have great capacity to identify influential outliers from the statistical perspective, which deserves special attention in a dosing regimen. Discussion. By combining static graphics with interactive graphics, we are able to explore the multidimensional data from an integrated and systematic perspective. Complementary to current approaches, our proposed method provides a new way for PopPK modeling analysis. PMID:24877118

  4. An overview of translational (radio)pharmaceutical research related to certain oncological and non-oncological applications

    PubMed Central

    Cona, Marlein Miranda; de Witte, Peter; Verbruggen, Alfons; Ni, Yicheng

    2013-01-01

    Translational medicine pursues the conversion of scientific discovery into human health improvement. It aims to establish strategies for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Cancer treatment is difficult. Radio-pharmaceutical research has played an important role in multiple disciplines, particularly in translational oncology. Based on the natural phenomenon of necrosis avidity, OncoCiDia has emerged as a novel generic approach for treating solid malignancies. Under this systemic dual targeting strategy, a vascular disrupting agent first selectively causes massive tumor necrosis that is followed by iodine-131 labeled-hypericin (123I-Hyp), a necrosis-avid compound that kills the residual cancer cells by crossfire effect of beta radiation. In this review, by emphasizing the potential clinical applicability of OncoCiDia, we summarize our research activities including optimization of radioiodinated hypericin Hyp preparations and recent studies on the biodistribution, dosimetry, pharmacokinetic and, chemical and radiochemical toxicities of the preparations. Myocardial infarction is a global health problem. Although cardiac scintigraphy using radioactive perfusion tracers is used in the assessment of myocardial viability, searching for diagnostic imaging agents with authentic necrosis avidity is pursued. Therefore, a comparative study on the biological profiles of the necrosis avid 123I-Hyp and the commercially available 99mTc-Sestamibi was conducted and the results are demonstrated. Cholelithiasis or gallstone disease may cause gallbladder inflammation, infection and other severe complications. While studying the mechanisms underlying the necrosis avidity of Hyp and derivatives, their naturally occurring fluorophore property was exploited for targeting cholesterol as a main component of gallstones. The usefulness of Hyp as an optical imaging agent for cholelithiasis was studied and the results are presented. Multiple uses of automatic contrast injectors may reduce costs

  5. Television Quiz Show Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonnie Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the simulation of four television quiz shows for students in China studying English as a foreign language (EFL). It discusses the adaptation and implementation of television quiz shows and how the students reacted to them.

  6. Evaluation of deoxyribonucleic acid toxicity induced by the radiopharmaceutical 99mTechnetium-Methylenediphosphonic acid and by stannous chloride in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Mattos, José Carlos Pelielo De; Matos, Vanessa Coutinho de; Rodrigues, Michelle Pinheiro; Oliveira, Marcia Betânia Nunes de; Dantas, Flavio José S; Santos-Filho, Sebastião David; Bernardo-Filho, Mario; Caldeira-de-Araujo, Adriano

    2012-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are employed in patient diagnostics and disease treatments. Concerning the diagnosis aspect, technetium-99m (99mTc) is utilized to label radiopharmaceuticals for single photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) due to its physical and chemical characteristics. 99mTc fixation on pharmaceuticals depends on a reducing agent, stannous chloride (SnCl(2)) being the most widely-utilized. The genotoxic, clastogenic and anegenic properties of the 99mTc-MDP(methylene diphosphonate used for bone SPECT) and SnCl(2) were evaluated in Wistar rat blood cells using the Comet assay and micronucleus test. The experimental approach was to endovenously administer NaCl 0.9% (negative control), cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg b.w. (positive control), SnCl(2) 500 μg/mL or 99mTc-MDP to animals and blood samples taken immediately before the injection, 3, and 24 h after (in the Comet assay) and 36 h after, for micronucleus test. The data showed that both SnCl(2) and 99mTc-MDP-induced deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) strand breaks in rat total blood cells, suggesting genotoxic potential. The 99mTc-MDP was not able to induce a significant DNA strand breaks increase in in vivo assays. Taken together, the data presented here points to the formation of a complex between SnCl(2) in the radiopharmaceutical 99mTc-MDP, responsible for the decrease in cell damage, compared to both isolated chemical agents. These findings are important for the practice of nuclear medicine. PMID:23117436

  7. Pharmacokinetic modeling in aquatic animals. 1. Models and concepts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, M.G.; Stehly, Guy R.; Hayton, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    While clinical and toxicological applications of pharmacokinetics have continued to evolve both conceptually and experimentally, pharmacokinetics modeling in aquatic animals has not progressed accordingly. In this paper we present methods and concepts of pharmacokinetic modeling in aquatic animals using multicompartmental, clearance-based, non-compartmental and physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models. These models should be considered as alternatives to traditional approaches, which assume that the animal acts as a single homogeneous compartment based on apparent monoexponential elimination.

  8. In vitro-in vivo Pharmacokinetic correlation model for quality assurance of antiretroviral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo Valencia, Piedad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The in vitro-in vivo pharmacokinetic correlation models (IVIVC) are a fundamental part of the drug discovery and development process. The ability to accurately predict the in vivo pharmacokinetic profile of a drug based on in vitro observations can have several applications during a successful development process. Objective: To develop a comprehensive model to predict the in vivo absorption of antiretroviral drugs based on permeability studies, in vitro and in vivo solubility and demonstrate its correlation with the pharmacokinetic profile in humans. Methods: Analytical tools to test the biopharmaceutical properties of stavudine, lamivudine y zidovudine were developed. The kinetics of dissolution, permeability in caco-2 cells and pharmacokinetics of absorption in rabbits and healthy volunteers were evaluated. Results: The cumulative areas under the curve (AUC) obtained in the permeability study with Caco-2 cells, the dissolution study and the pharmacokinetics in rabbits correlated with the cumulative AUC values in humans. These results demonstrated a direct relation between in vitro data and absorption, both in humans and in the in vivo model. Conclusions: The analytical methods and procedures applied to the development of an IVIVC model showed a strong correlation among themselves. These IVIVC models are proposed as alternative and cost/effective methods to evaluate the biopharmaceutical properties that determine the bioavailability of a drug and their application includes the development process, quality assurance, bioequivalence studies and pharmacosurveillance. PMID:26600625

  9. Steady-state pharmacokinetics of lithium carbonate in healthy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, R

    1988-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of lithium in six healthy volunteers stabilised on lithium were investigated and appropriate pharmacokinetic parameters calculated. 2. The results illustrate important differences in single and multiple dose lithium pharmacokinetics; the implications for minimising lithium-induced renal damage are discussed. PMID:3129009

  10. Radiobiological Optimization of Combination Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Applied to Myeloablative Treatment of Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Robert F; Wahl, Richard L; Frey, Eric C; Kasamon, Yvette; Song, Hong; Huang, Peng; Jones, Richard J; Sgouros, George

    2014-01-01

    Combination treatment is a hallmark of cancer therapy. Although the rationale for combination radiopharmaceutical therapy was described in the mid ‘90s, such treatment strategies have only been implemented clinically recently, and without a rigorous methodology for treatment optimization. Radiobiological and quantitative imaging-based dosimetry tools are now available that enable rational implementation of combined targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy. Optimal implementation should simultaneously account for radiobiological normal organ tolerance while optimizing the ratio of two different radiopharmaceuticals required to maximize tumor control. We have developed such a methodology and applied it to hypothetical myeloablative treatment of non-hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) patients using 131I-tositumomab and 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan. Methods The range of potential administered activities (AA) is limited by the normal organ maximum tolerated biologic effective doses (MTBEDs) arising from the combined radiopharmaceuticals. Dose limiting normal organs are expected to be the lungs for 131I-tositumomab and the liver for 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan in myeloablative NHL treatment regimens. By plotting the limiting normal organ constraints as a function of the AAs and calculating tumor biological effective dose (BED) along the normal organ MTBED limits, the optimal combination of activities is obtained. The model was tested using previously acquired patient normal organ and tumor kinetic data and MTBED values taken from the literature. Results The average AA values based solely on normal organ constraints was (19.0 ± 8.2) GBq with a range of 3.9 – 36.9 GBq for 131I-tositumomab, and (2.77 ± 1.64) GBq with a range of 0.42 – 7.54 GBq for 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan. Tumor BED optimization results were calculated and plotted as a function of AA for 5 different cases, established using patient normal organ kinetics for the two radiopharmaceuticals. Results included AA ranges

  11. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Homan; Mintri, Shrutika; Menon, Archita Venugopal; Lee, Hea Yeon; Choi, Hak Soo; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are considered a promising tool in both diagnosis and therapeutics. Theranostic NPs possess the combined properties of targeted imaging and drug delivery within a single entity. While the categorization of theranostic NPs is based on their structure and composition, the pharmacokinetics of NPs are significantly influenced by the physicochemical properties of theranostic NPs as well as the routes of administration. Consequently, altered pharmacokinetics modify the pharmacodynamic efficacy and toxicity of NPs. Although theranostic NPs hold great promise in nanomedicine and biomedical applications, a lack of understanding persists on the mechanisms of the biodistribution and adverse effects of NPs. To better understand the diagnostic and therapeutic functions of NPs, this review discusses the factors that influence the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicology of theranostic NPs, along with several strategies for developing novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

  12. Clinical pharmacokinetics of camptothecin topoisomerase I inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Herben, V M; Ten Bokkel Huinink, W W; Schellens, J H; Beijnen, J H

    1998-08-01

    In this review the clinical pharmacokinetics of camptothecin topoisomerase I inhibitors, an important new class of anticancer drugs, is discussed. Two prototypes, topotecan and irinotecan, are currently marketed in many European countries and the USA for the treatment of patients with ovarian and colorectal cancer, respectively. Other camptothecin derivatives, including lurtotecan, 9-aminocamptothecin (9-AC) and 9-nitrocamptothecin (9-NC), are at different stages of clinical development. The common property of camptothecin analogues is their action against DNA topoisomerase I, but beyond this similarity the compounds differ widely in terms of antitumour efficacy, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and metabolism. We review chemistry, mechanism of action, stability and bioanalysis of the camptothecins. Dosage and administration, status of clinical application, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and drug interactions are discussed. PMID:9762728

  13. The Wordpath Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderton, Alice

    The Intertribal Wordpath Society is a nonprofit educational corporation formed to promote the teaching, status, awareness, and use of Oklahoma Indian languages. The Society produces "Wordpath," a weekly 30-minute public access television show about Oklahoma Indian languages and the people who are teaching and preserving them. The show aims to…

  14. A minor possibility of pharmacokinetic interaction between enoxacin and fenbufen in rats.

    PubMed

    Naora, K; Katagiri, Y; Ichikawa, N; Hayashibara, M; Iwamoto, K

    1990-02-01

    In order to clarify the possibility of pharmacokinetic interaction between quinolone and fenbufen, the plasma concentration-time profiles and serum protein binding of enoxacin, fenbufen and its active metabolite, felbinac, were investigated in rats. The rats were administered an intravenous dose of enoxacin (5 mg/kg) and fenbufen (10 mg/kg) alone or concomitantly. Coadministration with fenbufen tended to prolong the plasma elimination half-life of enoxacin by about 20%, whereas it showed no effect on the area under plasma concentration-time curve, total body clearance or distribution volume of enoxacin. The extent of enoxacin binding to rat serum tended to be slightly reduced by fenbufen in vivo and in vitro. Plasma concentration-time curves, pharmacokinetic parameters and serum protein binding of fenbufen and felbinac were not affected at all by the coadministration with enoxacin. These aspects suggest that there may be only a minor possibility of the pharmacokinetic interaction between enoxacin and fenbufen. PMID:2384853

  15. The pharmacokinetics in mice and dogs of nitroimidazole radiosensitizers and chemosensitizers more lipophilic than misonidazole

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.; Workman, P.; Owen, L.

    1982-03-01

    The pharmacokinetic properties of nitroimidazole radiosensitizers and chemosensitizers more lipophilic than misonidazole (MISO) were examined. In dogs, 2 analogues showed comparable peak plasma concentrations with considerable shorter half-lives (t1/2) and reduced areas under curves (AUC). Benznidazole (R0 07-1051) had a much longer t1/2, a higher AUC, and somewhat higher peak concentrations. In mice tumor/plasma, brain/plasma, and tumor/brain ratios were generally similar to MISO, as was penetration of brain and peripheral nerve by benznidazole in dogs. Selection of lipophilic analogues with appropriate pharmacokinetic properties may facilitate accommodation of the potentially different requirements for improved radiosensitization or chemosensitization.

  16. Pharmacokinetic Comparative Study of Gastrodin and Rhynchophylline after Oral Administration of Different Prescriptions of Yizhi Tablets in Rats by an HPLC-ESI/MS Method

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Zhaohui; Liang, Qionglin; Wang, Yiming; Luo, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic characters of rhynchophylline (RIN), gastrodin (GAS), and gastrodigenin (p-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, HBA) were investigated after oral administration of different prescriptions of Yizhi: Yizhi tablets or effective parts of tianma (total saponins from Gastrodiae, EPT) and gouteng (rhynchophylla alkaloids, EPG). At different predetermined time points after administration, the concentrations of GAS, HBA, and RIN in rat plasma were determined by an HPLC-ESI/MS method, and the main pharmacokinetic parameters were investigated. The results showed that the pharmacokinetic parameters Cmax and AUC0–∞ (P < 0.05) were dramatically different after oral administration of different prescriptions of Yizhi. The data indicated that the pharmacokinetic processes of GAS, HBA, and RIN in rats would interact with each other or be affected by other components in Yizhi. The rationality of the compatibility of Uncaria and Gastrodia elata as a classic “herb pair” has been verified from the pharmacokinetic viewpoint. PMID:25610474

  17. Pharmacokinetic Comparative Study of Gastrodin and Rhynchophylline after Oral Administration of Different Prescriptions of Yizhi Tablets in Rats by an HPLC-ESI/MS Method.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zhaohui; Xie, Yuanyuan; Liang, Qionglin; Wang, Yiming; Luo, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic characters of rhynchophylline (RIN), gastrodin (GAS), and gastrodigenin (p-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, HBA) were investigated after oral administration of different prescriptions of Yizhi: Yizhi tablets or effective parts of tianma (total saponins from Gastrodiae, EPT) and gouteng (rhynchophylla alkaloids, EPG). At different predetermined time points after administration, the concentrations of GAS, HBA, and RIN in rat plasma were determined by an HPLC-ESI/MS method, and the main pharmacokinetic parameters were investigated. The results showed that the pharmacokinetic parameters C max and AUC0-∞ (P < 0.05) were dramatically different after oral administration of different prescriptions of Yizhi. The data indicated that the pharmacokinetic processes of GAS, HBA, and RIN in rats would interact with each other or be affected by other components in Yizhi. The rationality of the compatibility of Uncaria and Gastrodia elata as a classic "herb pair" has been verified from the pharmacokinetic viewpoint. PMID:25610474

  18. Inhalation pharmacokinetics of isoprene in rats and mice.

    PubMed Central

    Peter, H; Wiegand, H J; Filser, J G; Bolt, H M; Laib, R J

    1990-01-01

    Studies on inhalation pharmacokinetics of isoprene were conducted in rats (Wistar) and mice (B6C3F1) to investigate possible species differences in metabolism of this compound. Pharmacokinetic analysis of isoprene inhaled by rats and mice revealed saturation kinetics of isoprene metabolism in both species. For rats and mice, linear pharmacokinetics apply at exposure concentrations below 300 ppm isoprene. Saturation of isoprene metabolism is practically complete at atmospheric concentrations of about 1000 ppm in rats and about 2000 ppm in mice. In the lower concentration range where first-order metabolism applies, metabolic clearance (related to the concentration in the atmosphere) of inhaled isoprene per kilogram body weight was 6200 mL/hr for rats and 12,000 mL/hr for mice. The estimated maximal metabolic elimination rates were 130 mumole/hr/kg for rats and 400 mumole/hr/kg for mice. This shows that the rate of isoprene metabolism in mice is about two or three times that in rats. When the untreated animals are kept in a closed all-glass exposure system, the exhalation of isoprene into the system can be measured. This shows that the isoprene endogenously produced by the animals is systemically available within the animal organism. From such experiments the endogenous production rate of isoprene was calculated to be 1.9 mumole/hr/kg for rats and 0.4 mumole/hr/kg for mice. Our data indicate that the endogenous production of isoprene should be accounted for when discussing a possible carcinogenic or mutagenic risk of this compound. PMID:2401276

  19. A Holographic Road Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Larry D.; Rugheimer, Mac

    1979-01-01

    Describes the viewing sessions and the holograms of a holographic road show. The traveling exhibits, believed to stimulate interest in physics, include a wide variety of holograms and demonstrate several physical principles. (GA)

  20. Pharmacokinetic properties of tandem d-peptides designed for treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Leithold, Leonie H E; Jiang, Nan; Post, Julia; Niemietz, Nicole; Schartmann, Elena; Ziehm, Tamar; Kutzsche, Janine; Shah, N Jon; Breitkreutz, Jörg; Langen, Karl-Josef; Willuweit, Antje; Willbold, Dieter

    2016-06-30

    Peptides are more and more considered for the development of drug candidates. However, they frequently exhibit severe disadvantages such as instability and unfavourable pharmacokinetic properties. Many peptides are rapidly cleared from the organism and oral bioavailabilities as well as in vivo half-lives often remain low. In contrast, some peptides consisting solely of d-enantiomeric amino acid residues were shown to combine promising therapeutic properties with high proteolytic stability and enhanced pharmacokinetic parameters. Recently, we have shown that D3 and RD2 have highly advantageous pharmacokinetic properties. Especially D3 has already proven promising properties suitable for treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Here, we analyse the pharmacokinetic profiles of D3D3 and RD2D3, which are head-to-tail tandem d-peptides built of D3 and its derivative RD2. Both D3D3 and RD2D3 show proteolytic stability in mouse plasma and organ homogenates for at least 24h and in murine and human liver microsomes for 4h. Notwithstanding their high affinity to plasma proteins, both peptides are taken up into the brain following i.v. as well as i.p. administration. Although both peptides contain identical d-amino acid residues, they are arranged in a different sequence order and the peptides show differences in pharmacokinetic properties. After i.p. administration RD2D3 exhibits lower plasma clearance and higher bioavailability than D3D3. We therefore concluded that the amino acid sequence of RD2 leads to more favourable pharmacokinetic properties within the tandem peptide, which underlines the importance of particular sequence motifs, even in short peptides, for the design of further therapeutic d-peptides. PMID:27086111

  1. Developing reimbursable clinical pharmacy programs: pharmacokinetic dosing service.

    PubMed

    Moore, T D; Schneider, P J; Nold, E G

    1979-11-01

    The development, operation and evaluation of a pharmacy-conducted pharmacokinetic dosing service is described. Pharmacists recommend individualized drug dosing regimens based on pharmacokinetic models and equations clinically tested for accuracy by the pharmacy department. Pharmacokinetic values are determined with the aid of online computer programs developed by the department. Drug assays are provided by the hospital's laboratory. All of the department's pharmacists were trained to provide the 24-hour service. The pharmacy department's $20 pharmacokinetic dosing service fee is reimbursed by Blue Cross. The pharmacokinetic dosing service is the first nonteaching, nonproduct-oriented pharmaceutical service whose cost-effectiveness has been recognized by a third-party payer. PMID:517538

  2. Radiopharmaceutical stannic Sn-117m chelate compositions and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Meinken, George E.

    2001-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical compositions including .sup.117m Sn labeled stannic (Sn.sup.4+) chelates are provided. The chelates are preferably polyhydroxycarboxylate, such as oxalates, tartrates, citrates, malonates, gluconates, glucoheptonates and the like. Methods of making .sup.117m Sn-labeled (Sn.sup.4+) polyhydroxycarboxylic chelates are also provided. The foregoing pharmaceutical compositions can be used in methods of preparing bone for scintigraphical analysis, for radiopharmaceutical skeletal imaging, treatment of pain resulting from metastatic bone involvement, treatment of primary bone cancer, treatment of cancer resulting from metastatic spread to bone from other primary cancers, treatment of pain resulting from rheumatoid arthritis, treatment of bone/joint disorders and to monitor radioactively the skeletal system.

  3. Diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals for localization in target tissues exhibiting a regional PH shift relative to surrounding tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, M.; Kung, H. F.

    1984-10-02

    A radiopharmaceutical chemical compound comprising a radioactive isotope, other than an isotope of iodine, in chemical combination with at least one amine group. The compound has a lipophilicity sufficiently high at a pH of 7.6 to permit passage of the compound from the blood of a mammal into a target organ or tissue and sufficiently low at a pH of 6.6 to prevent rapid return of the compound from the target organ or tissue to the blood. The compound has a percent protein binding of less than ninety percent. A method for selectively depositing a radiopharmaceutical compound in at least one target tissue or organ of a mammal, which tissue or organ has a significantly different intracellular pH than the blood of the mammal, by introducing the compound of the invention into the bloodstream of the mammal.

  4. Development of a modular system for the synthesis of PET [(11)C]labelled radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Boschi, Stefano; Lodi, Filippo; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Raul Ledesma, Jorge; Knopp, Roger; Rizzello, Anna; Di Pierro, Donato; Trespidi, Silvia; Marengo, Mario

    2009-10-01

    [((11))C]labelled radiopharmaceuticals as N-[(11)C]methyl-choline ([(11)C]choline), l-(S-methyl-[(11)C])methionine ([(11)C]methionine) and [(11)C]acetate have gained increasing importance in clinical PET and for the routine production of these radiopharmaceuticals, simple and reliable modules are needed to produce clinically relevant radioactivity. On the other hand, flexible devices are needed not only for the routine synthesis but also for more complex applications as the development of new tracers. The aim of this work was the adaptation of an Eckert Ziegler modular system for easy routine synthesis of [(11)C]choline, [(11)C]methionine and [(11)C]acetate using components that account for straightforward scaling up and upgrades. PMID:19535255

  5. [Computer simulated images of radiopharmaceutical distributions in anthropomorphic phantoms]. Performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-17

    We have constructed an anatomically correct human geometry, which can be used to store radioisotope concentrations in 51 various internal organs. Each organ is associated with an index number which references to its attenuating characteristics (composition and density). The initial development of Computer Simulated Images of Radiopharmaceuticals in Anthropomorphic Phantoms (CSIRDAP) over the first 3 years has been very successful. All components of the simulation have been coded, made operational and debugged.

  6. Development new radiopharmaceutical based on 5-thio-d- glucose labeled technetium-99m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasyuk, E. S.; Skuridin, V. S.; Ilina, E. A.; Rogov, A. S.; Nesterov, E. A.; Sadkin, V. L.; Larionova, L. A.; Varlamova, N. V.; Zelchan, R.

    2016-06-01

    The article considers the obtaining and possibility of using 5-thio-D-glucose labeled technetium-99m for the diagnosis of malignant tumors by single photon emission computed tomography. The analysis of the level of international developments of radiopharmaceuticals based on derivatives of glucose has been carried out. Also the article provides information on of using experimental batches of lyophilisate on the basis of 5-thio-D-glucose for preliminary biomedical testing on the mice.

  7. Radiopharmaceutical evaluation of (131)I-protohypericin as a necrosis avid compound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejiao; Feng, Yuanbo; Jiang, Cuihua; Lou, Bin; Li, Yue; Liu, Wei; Yao, Nan; Gao, Meng; Ji, Yun; Wang, Qingqing; Huang, Dejian; Yin, Zhiqi; Sun, Ziping; Ni, Yicheng; Zhang, Jian

    2015-06-01

    Hypericin is a necrosis avid agent useful for nuclear imaging and tumor therapy. Protohypericin, with a similar structure to hypericin except poorer planarity, is the precursor of hypericin. In this study, we aimed to investigate the impact of this structural difference on self-assembly, and evaluate the necrosis affinity and metabolism in the rat model of reperfused hepatic infarction. Protohypericin appeared less aggregative in solution compared with hypericin by fluorescence analysis. Biodistribution data of (131)I-protohypericin showed the percentage of injected dose per gram of tissues (%ID/g) increased with time and reached to the maximum of 7.03 at 24 h in necrotic liver by gamma counting. The maximum ratio of target/non-target tissues was 11.7-fold in necrotic liver at 72 h. Pharmacokinetic parameters revealed that the half-life of (131)I-protohypericin was 14.9 h, enabling a long blood circulation and constant retention in necrotic regions. SPECT-CT, autoradiography, and histological staining showed high uptake of (131)I-protohypericin in necrotic tissues. These results suggest that (131)I-protohypericin is a promising necrosis avid compound with a weaker aggregation tendency compared with hypericin and it may have a broad application in imaging and oncotherapy. PMID:25655506

  8. Show What You Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eccleston, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Big things come in small packages. This saying came to the mind of the author after he created a simple math review activity for his fourth grade students. Though simple, it has proven to be extremely advantageous in reinforcing math concepts. He uses this activity, which he calls "Show What You Know," often. This activity provides the perfect…

  9. The Ozone Show.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieu, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Uses a talk show activity for a final assessment tool for students to debate about the ozone hole. Students are assessed on five areas: (1) cooperative learning; (2) the written component; (3) content; (4) self-evaluation; and (5) peer evaluation. (SAH)

  10. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  11. Talk Show Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mitzi Ruth

    1992-01-01

    Proposes having students perform skits in which they play the roles of the science concepts they are trying to understand. Provides the dialog for a skit in which hot and cold gas molecules are interviewed on a talk show to study how these properties affect wind, rain, and other weather phenomena. (MDH)

  12. Stage a Water Show

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frasier, Debra

    2008-01-01

    In the author's book titled "The Incredible Water Show," the characters from "Miss Alaineus: A Vocabulary Disaster" used an ocean of information to stage an inventive performance about the water cycle. In this article, the author relates how she turned the story into hands-on science teaching for real-life fifth-grade students. The author also…

  13. Showing What They Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2008-01-01

    Having students show their skills in three dimensions, known as performance-based assessment, dates back at least to Socrates. Individual schools such as Barrington High School--located just outside of Providence--have been requiring students to actively demonstrate their knowledge for years. The Rhode Island's high school graduating class became…

  14. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Grotenhermen, Franjo

    2003-01-01

    Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the main source of the pharmacological effects caused by the consumption of cannabis, both the marijuana-like action and the medicinal benefits of the plant. However, its acid metabolite THC-COOH, the non-psychotropic cannabidiol (CBD), several cannabinoid analogues and newly discovered modulators of the endogenous cannabinoid system are also promising candidates for clinical research and therapeutic uses. Cannabinoids exert many effects through activation of G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors in the brain and peripheral tissues. Additionally, there is evidence for non-receptor-dependent mechanisms. Natural cannabis products and single cannabinoids are usually inhaled or taken orally; the rectal route, sublingual administration, transdermal delivery, eye drops and aerosols have only been used in a few studies and are of little relevance in practice today. The pharmacokinetics of THC vary as a function of its route of administration. Pulmonary assimilation of inhaled THC causes a maximum plasma concentration within minutes, psychotropic effects start within seconds to a few minutes, reach a maximum after 15-30 minutes, and taper off within 2-3 hours. Following oral ingestion, psychotropic effects set in with a delay of 30-90 minutes, reach their maximum after 2-3 hours and last for about 4-12 hours, depending on dose and specific effect. At doses exceeding the psychotropic threshold, ingestion of cannabis usually causes enhanced well-being and relaxation with an intensification of ordinary sensory experiences. The most important acute adverse effects caused by overdosing are anxiety and panic attacks, and with regard to somatic effects increased heart rate and changes in blood pressure. Regular use of cannabis may lead to dependency and to a mild withdrawal syndrome. The existence and the intensity of possible long-term adverse effects on psyche and cognition, immune system, fertility and pregnancy remain controversial

  15. Preparation of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals for positron tomography. Progress report, November 1, 1977-October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, M.J.

    1980-06-01

    Although the germanium-68 ..-->.. gallium-68 generator is probably the only source of positron-emitting radionuclides that could enable the widespread application of positron tomography, the commercially available /sup 68/Ga//sup 68/Ge generator system suffers from several major disadvantages. The most important of these is that the generator is eluted with EDTA, which forms a very strong chelate with gallium. In order to produce radiopharmaceuticals other than /sup 68/Ga-EDTA, it is first necessary to break the stable EDTA complex and remove all traces of EDTA. This procedure adds several steps and a significant amount of time to procedures for preparing /sup 68/Ga-radiopharmaceuticals. We have developed a new generator using a solvent extraction system which will produce /sup 68/Ga-oxine (8-hydroxyquinoline), a weak chelate. Using this agent we have synthesized several /sup 68/Ga-radiopharmaceuticals and tested them in vitro and in vivo. We have also carried out some preliminary studies to compare generator systems which produce /sup 68/Ga in an ionic form. Attempts have been made using polarographic and chromatographic techniques, and in vivo distribution data to investigate the stability of radiogallium complexes with a series of potentially lipophilic complexing agents.

  16. Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals as targeted agents of osteosarcoma: samarium-153-EDTMP and radium-223.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter M; Subbiah, Vivek; Rohren, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a cancer characterized by formation of bone by malignant cells. Routine bone scan imaging with Tc-99m-MDP is done at diagnosis to evaluate primary tumor uptake and check for bone metastases. At time of relapse the Tc-99m-MDP bone scan also provides a specific means to assess formation of bone by malignant osteosarcoma cells and the potential for bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals to deliver radioactivity directly into osteoblastic osteosarcoma lesions. This chapter will review and compare a bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical that emits beta-particles, samarium-153-EDTMP, with an alpha-particle emitter, radium-223. The charged alpha particles from radium-223 have far more mass and energy than beta particles (electrons) from Sm-153-EDTMP. Because radium-223 has less marrow toxicity and more radiobiological effectiveness, especially if inside the bone forming cancer cell than samarium-153-EDTMP, radium-223 may have greater potential to become widely used against osteosarcoma as a targeted therapy. Radium-223 also has more potential to be used with chemotherapy against osteosarcoma and bone metastases. Because osteosarcoma makes bone and radium-223 acts like calcium, this radiopharmaceutical could possibly become a new targeted means to achieve safe and effective reduction of tumor burden as well as facilitate better surgery and/or radiotherapy for difficult to resect large, or metastatic tumors. PMID:24924181

  17. Species Dependence of [64Cu]Cu-Bis(thiosemicarbazone) Radiopharmaceutical Binding to Serum Albumins

    PubMed Central

    Basken, Nathan E.; Mathias, Carla J.; Lipka, Alexander E.; Green, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Interactions of three copper(II) bis(thiosemicarbazone) PET radiopharmaceuticals with human serum albumin, and the serum albumins of four additional mammalian species, were evaluated. Methods 64Cu-labeled diacetyl bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-ATSM), pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-PTSM), and ethylglyoxal bis(thiosemicarbazonato)copper(II) (Cu-ETS) were synthesized and their binding to human, canine, rat, baboon, and porcine serum albumins quantified by ultrafiltration. Protein binding was also measured for each tracer in human, porcine, rat, and mouse serum. Results The interaction of these neutral, lipophilic copper chelates with serum albumin is highly compound- and species-dependent. Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM exhibit particularly high affinity for human serum albumin (HSA), while the albumin binding of Cu-ETS is relatively insensitive to species. At HSA concentrations of 40 mg/mL, “% Free” (non-albumin-bound) levels of radiopharmaceutical were 4.0 ± 0.1%; 5.3 ± 0.2%; and 38.6 ± 0.8% for Cu-PTSM; Cu-ATSM; and Cu-ETS, respectively. Conclusions Species-dependent variations in radiopharmaceutical binding to serum albumin may need to be considered when using animal models to predict the distribution and kinetics of these compounds in humans. PMID:18355683

  18. In vitro assays for assessing the potential for copper complexes to function as radiopharmaceutical agents.

    PubMed

    Barnard, P J; Bayly, S R; Holland, J P; Dilworth, J R; Waghorn, P A

    2008-09-01

    A series of chemical in vitro assays are described to provide a rapid initial assessment of the in vivo stability and biological behaviour of potential new copper(II) based radiopharmaceutical agents. Chemical challenges using an excess of cysteine, glutathione (GSH) and histidine, which are models of S- and N-donor molecules found in vivo, are used to provide a measure of the potential for loss of the copper(II) ion from the radiopharmaceutical as a result of ligand dissociation. In addition, thiol containing molecules such as cysteine and GSH provide a redox challenge, whereby the copper(II) complex may be reduced to give a copper(I) species. The stability of the copper(I) species toward oxidation, protonation, and ligand dissociation may be crucial in determining the biodistribution, the biological half-life and excretion mechanisms of a potential radiopharmaceutical. Further evaluation of the redox stability is assessed using the ubiquitous biological reductant ascorbic acid. The relative stability of a complex with respect to ligand dissociation in human serum provides one of the most important experiments assessing the potential of a complex to be used in vivo. Further challenge experiments with serum proteins such as thioredoxin and serum albumin can be used to provide more detailed information on the probable fate of the complex in serum. Evaluation of complex stability and speciation over a range of pH values may also be used to obtain information on potential biodistribution. PMID:18551094

  19. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1995-02-01

    The Harvard-MIT Research Program in Short-lived Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1977 to foster interaction among groups working in radiopharmaceutical chemistry at Harvard Medical School, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Massachusetts General Hospital. To this was added a group at The Childrens Hospital. From these collaborations and building upon the special strengths of the participating individuals, laboratories and institutions, it was hoped that original approaches would be found for the design of new, clinically useful, radiolabeled compounds. The original thrust of this proposal included: (a) examination of the coordination chemistry of technetium as a basis for rational radiopharmaceutical design, (b) development of an ultrashort-lived radionuclide generator for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in newborns, (c) synthesis of receptor-site-directed halopharmaceuticals, (d) improved facile labeling of complex molecules with positron-emitting radionuclides. The authors` 1986 proposal was oriented toward organs and disease, emphasizing radiolabeled agents that delineate specific functions and the distribution of receptors in brain, heart, and tumors. In 1989, they further refined their purposes and focused on two major aims: (a) synthesis and utilization of neutral technetium and rhenium complexes of high specific activity, and (b) development of new approaches to the radiolabeling of proteins, peptides, immunoglobulins, and their fragments. In 1992, the authors amended this proposal to concentrate their efforts on biologically active peptides and proteins for targeted radiodiagnosis and therapy.

  20. Developmental pharmacokinetics of propylene glycol in preterm and term neonates

    PubMed Central

    De Cock, Roosmarijn F W; Knibbe, Catherijne A J; Kulo, Aida; de Hoon, Jan; Verbesselt, Rene; Danhof, Meindert; Allegaert, Karel

    2013-01-01

    AIM Propylene glycol (PG) is often applied as an excipient in drug formulations. As these formulations may also be used in neonates, the aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of propylene glycol, co-administered intravenously with paracetamol (800 mg PG/1000 mg paracetamol) or phenobarbital (700 mg PG/200 mg phenobarbital) in preterm and term neonates. METHODS A population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed based on 372 PG plasma concentrations from 62 (pre)term neonates (birth weight (bBW) 630–3980 g, postnatal age (PNA) 1–30 days) using NONMEM 6.2. The model was subsequently used to simulate PG exposure upon administration of paracetamol or phenobarbital in neonates (gestational age 24–40 weeks). RESULTS In a one compartment model, birth weight and PNA were both identified as covariates for PG clearance using an allometric function (CLi= 0.0849 × {(bBW/2720)1.69× (PNA/3)0.201}). Volume of distribution scaled allometrically with current bodyweight (Vi= 0.967 × {(BW/2720)1.45}) and was estimated 1.77 times higher when co-administered with phenobarbital compared with paracetamol. By introducing these covariates a large part of the interindividual variability on clearance (65%) as well as on volume of distribution (53%) was explained. The final model shows that for commonly used dosing regimens, the population mean PG peak and trough concentrations range between 33–144 and 28–218 mg l−1 (peak) and 19–109 and 6–112 mg l−1 (trough) for paracetamol and phenobarbital formulations, respectively, depending on birth weight and age of the neonates. CONCLUSION A pharmacokinetic model was developed for PG co-administered with paracetamol or phenobarbital in neonates. As such, large variability in PG exposure may be expected in neonates which is dependent on birth weight and PNA. PMID:22536830

  1. Pharmacokinetics of Epsilon-Aminocaproic Acid in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Michael P.; Alfieris, George M; Sweeney, Dawn M; Angona, Ronald E; Cholette, Jill M; Venuto, Charles; Anderson, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background Antifibrinolytic medications such as epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA) are used in pediatric heart surgery to decrease surgical bleeding and transfusion. Dosing schemes for neonates are often based on adult regimens, or are simply empiric, in part due to the lack of neonatal pharmacokinetic information. We sought to determine the pharmacokinetics of EACA in neonates undergoing cardiac surgery and to devise a dosing regimen for this population. Methods Ten neonates undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were given EACA according to standard practice, and blood was drawn at 10 time points to determine drug concentrations. Time-concentration profiles were analyzed using nonlinear mixed effects models. Parameter estimates (standardized to a 70 kg person) were used to develop a dosing regimen intended to maintain a target concentration shown to inhibit fibrinolysis in neonatal plasma (50 mg/L). Results Pharmacokinetics were described using a two compartment model plus an additional compartment for the cardiopulmonary bypass pump. First order elimination was described with a clearance of 5.07 L/h*(WT/70) 0.75. Simulation showed a dosing regimen with a loading dose of 40 mg/kg, and an infusion of 30 mg/kg/h, with a pump prime concentration of 100 mg/L maintained plasma concentrations above 50 mg/L in 90% of neonates during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Conclusions EACA clearance, expressed using allometry, is reduced in neonates compared to older children and adults. Loading dose and infusion dose are approximately half those required in children and adults. PMID:25723765

  2. Preclinical Pharmacokinetic Analysis of NOV-002, a Glutathione Disulfide Mimetic

    PubMed Central

    Uys, Joachim D.; Manevich, Yefim; DeVane, Lindsay C.; He, Lin; Garret, Tracy E.; Pazoles, Christopher J.; Tew, Kenneth D.; Townsend, Danyelle M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary NOV-002 is a glutathione disulfide (GSSG) mimetic that is in Phase III clinical trials for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer and other oncology indications. GSSG is reduced by glutathione reductase (GR) to form glutathione (GSH), thereby maintaining redox homeostasis. The purpose of the study was to report the pharmacokinetic properties of NOV-002 and evaluate the effect that NOV-002 elicits in redox homeostasis. The pharmacokinetic analysis and tissue distribution of NOV-002 and GSH was evaluated in mice following a dose of 250 mg/kg, i.p. The redox potential and total protein thiol status was calculated. Here we show that NOV-002 is a substrate for GR and that GSH is a primary metabolite. Nonlinear pharmacokinetic modeling predicted that the estimated absorption and elimination rate constants correspond to a half-life of ~13 mins with an AUC of 1.18 μg.h/ml, a Cmax of 2.16 μg/ml and a volume of distribution of 42.61 L/kg. In addition, measurement of the redox potential and total protein thiol status indicated the generation of a transient oxidative signal in the plasma compartment after administration of NOV-002. These results indicate that NOV-002 exerts kinetic and dynamic effects in mice consistent with the GSSG component as the active pharmacological constituent of the drug. A longer-lasting decrease in total plasma free thiol content was also seen, suggesting that the oxidative effect of the GSSG from NOV-002 was impacting redox homeostasis. PMID:20359856

  3. Preclinical pharmacokinetic analysis of NOV-002, a glutathione disulfide mimetic.

    PubMed

    Uys, J D; Manevich, Y; Devane, L C; He, L; Garret, T E; Pazoles, C J; Tew, K D; Townsend, D M

    2010-09-01

    NOV-002 is a glutathione disulfide (GSSG) mimetic that is the subject of clinical investigation in oncology indications. GSSG is reduced by glutathione reductase (GR) to form glutathione (GSH), thereby maintaining redox homeostasis. The purpose of the study was to report the pharmacokinetic properties of NOV-002 and evaluate the effect that NOV-002 elicits in redox homeostasis. The pharmacokinetic analysis and tissue distribution of NOV-002 and GSH was evaluated in mice following a dose of 250 mg/kg, i.p. The redox potential and total protein thiol status was calculated. Here we show that NOV-002 is a substrate for GR and that GSH is a primary metabolite. Non-linear pharmacokinetic modeling predicted that the estimated absorption and elimination rate constants correspond to a half-life of approximately 13 min with an AUC of 1.18 μgh/mL, a C(max) of 2.16 μg/ml and a volume of distribution of 42.61 L/kg. In addition, measurement of the redox potential and total protein thiol status indicated the generation of a transient oxidative signal in the plasma compartment after administration of NOV-002. These results indicate that NOV-002 exerts kinetic and dynamic effects in mice consistent with the GSSG component as the active pharmacological constituent of the drug. A longer-lasting decrease in total plasma free thiol content was also seen, suggesting that the oxidative effect of the GSSG from NOV-002 was impacting redox homeostasis. PMID:20359856

  4. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of meloxicam in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Meineke, Ingolf; Türck, Dietrich

    2003-01-01

    Aim To perform a nonlinear mixed effect modelling (NONMEM) population pharmacokinetic analysis of meloxicam plasma concentrations in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients participating in three clinical trials, and to evaluate the effects of age, weight, gender and concomitant medications on meloxicam pharmacokinetics. Methods Meloxicam was administered to RA patients once daily for 3 weeks or 6 months at doses between 7.5 and 60 mg. Plasma samples were obtained at least 7 days after the first dose and meloxicam plasma concentrations were quantified by h.p.l.c.. Results NONMEM analysis was conducted on plasma samples derived from 586 patients. A one-compartmental model was found to describe the data adequately. For a typical subject in the population, a clearance of 0.377 l h−1 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.0304–0.449) in males and 0.347 l h−1 (95% CI 0.274-0.419) in females was obtained. The volume of distribution was estimated to be 14.9 l. The findings were corroborated by subsequent analysis using WinBUGS. Analysis of covariates showed that age and gender both significantly (P < 0.005) affected clearance. The effect of age was relatively small and a dose adjustment of <10% was deemed unnecessary. Differences between males and females were attributed to differences in weight. No clinically relevant drug-drug interactions were found, although sulphasalazine and glucocorticoids both significantly (P < 0.005) affected meloxicam clearance (+19% and −12%, respectively). The mechanisms by which these agents affect meloxicam clearance remain to be elucidated. Conclusions The population pharmacokinetic meloxicam data from patients with RA gave similar results to those obtained from phase I trials. However, uncommon drug interactions may not be detected in phase I trials because of the small number of observations made. PMID:12534638

  5. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Intravitreal Caspofungin

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ying-Cheng; Liang, Chiao-Ying; Wang, Chun-Yuan; Lin, Keng-Hung; Hsu, Min-Yen; Yuen, Hon-Leung

    2014-01-01

    Caspofungin exhibits potent antifungal activities against Candida and Aspergillus species. The elimination rate and retinal toxicity of caspofungin were determined in this study to assess its pharmacokinetics and safety in the treatment of fungal endophthalmitis. Intravitreal injections of 50 μg/0.1 ml of caspofungin were administered to rabbits. Levels of caspofungin in the vitreous and aqueous humors were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) at selected time intervals (10 min and 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, and 48 h), and the half-lives were calculated. Eyes were intravitreally injected with caspofungin to obtain concentrations of 10 μg/ml, 50 μg/ml, 100 μg/ml, and 200 μg/ml. Electroretinograms were recorded 4 weeks after injections, and the injected eyes were examined histologically. The concentrations of intravitreal caspofungin at various time points exhibited an exponential decay with a half-life of 6.28 h. The mean vitreous concentration was 6.06 ± 1.76 μg/ml 1 h after intravitreal injection, and this declined to 0.47 ± 0.15 μg/ml at 24 h. The mean aqueous concentration showed undetectable levels at all time points. There were no statistical differences in scotopic a-wave and b-wave responses between control eyes and caspofungin-injected eyes. No focal necrosis or other abnormality in retinal histology was observed. Intravitreal caspofungin injection may be considered to be an alternative treatment for fungal endophthalmitis based on its antifungal activity, lower retinal toxicity, and lower elimination rate in the vitreous. More clinical data are needed to determine its potential role as primary therapy for fungal endophthalmitis. PMID:25246398

  6. ( sup 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe sup 1 )-octreotide, a potential radiopharmaceutical for imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors: Synthesis, radiolabeling and in vitro validation

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, W.H.; Albert, R.; Bruns, C.; Breeman, W.A.P.; Hofland, L.J.; Marbach, P.; Pless, J.; Pralet, D.; Stolz, B.; Koper, J.W.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Visser, T.J.; Krenning, E.P. Sandoz Pharma AG, Basel )

    1991-01-01

    As starting material for a potentially convenient radiopharmaceutical, a diethylenetriaminopentaacetic acid (DTPA) conjugated derivative of octreotide (SMS 201-995) was prepared. This peptide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide (SDZ 215-811) binds more than 95% of added {sup 111}In in an easy, single-step labeling procedure without necessity of further purification. The specific somatostatin-like biologic effect of these analogues was proven by the inhibition of growth hormone secretion by cultured rat pituitary cells in a dose-dependent fashion by octreotide, (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide and non-radioactive ({sup 115}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide. The binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to rat brain cortex membranes proved to be displaced similarly by natural somatosatin as well as by octreotide, suggesting specific binding of ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide to somatostatin receptors. The binding of the indium-labeled compound showed a somewhat lower affinity when compared with the iodinated (Tyr{sup 3})-octreotide, but indium-labeled (DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide still binds with nanomolar affinity. In conjunction with in vivo studies, these results suggest that ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide is a promising radiopharmaceutical for scintigraphic imaging of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors.

  7. Microcomputer-Based Programs for Pharmacokinetic Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ronald C.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Microcomputer software that simulates drug-concentration time profiles based on user-assigned pharmacokinetic parameters such as central volume of distribution, elimination rate constant, absorption rate constant, dosing regimens, and compartmental transfer rate constants is described. The software is recommended for use in undergraduate…

  8. A Terminal Pharmaceutics Course in Clinical Pharmacokinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuning, Richard H.; Krautheim, Daniel

    1978-01-01

    At Ohio State University, an undergraduate course extends the course sequence in biopharmaceutics and pharmacokinetics to application to problems in optimizing drug therapy. Course content, structure, instructional methods, and student term projects are described, and a course outline, typical projects, and some behavioral objectives are appended.…

  9. Pharmacokinetics of Drug Entry into Cochlear Fluids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salt, Alec N.

    2005-01-01

    The inner ear is exposed to aminoglycosides or other drugs either intentionally or as a side effect of clinical treatments directed at other regions of the body. An understanding of the effects of drugs on the inner ear requires knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of the drug once it reaches the cochlear fluids, specifically how much of it reaches…

  10. Pharmacokinetics of Peptide-Fc fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Benjamin; Sun, Yu-Nien

    2014-01-01

    Peptide-Fc fusion proteins (or peptibodies) are chimeric proteins generated by fusing a biologically active peptide with the Fc-domain of immunoglobulin G. In this review, we describe recent studies that have evaluated the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion characteristics of peptibodies. Key features of the pharmacokinetics of peptibodies include their extended half-life due to recycling by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), a substantial contribution by renal excretion to total clearance and, for certain peptibodies, target-mediated drug disposition. The prolonged half-life of peptibodies permits less-frequent dose administration compared with small therapeutic peptides, thereby supporting patient convenience and compliance. Hence, a considerable number of peptibodies are currently in preclinical and clinical development. Investigation of the metabolism (biotransformation) of biologics is an evolving area of research: ligand-binding mass spectrometry techniques have been employed for the characterization of the peptibody romiplostim, providing a new approach to evaluation of the degradation products of biologics. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling and simulation techniques have been used to predict the pharmacokinetics of peptibodies which can inform clinical decision-making, particularly selection of dosing regimens. This integrated review highlights the distinct pharmacokinetic characteristics of peptibodies and their influence on the drug development process for this emerging family of therapeutics. PMID:24285510

  11. FIRST REPORTS OF CLINICAL PHARMACOKINETICS IN NIGERIA

    PubMed Central

    Michael, O.S.

    2015-01-01

    The German Friedrich Hartmut Dost (1910-1985) introduced the word Pharmacokinetics. Clinical pharmacokinetics is the direct application of knowledge regarding a drug's pharmacokinetics to a therapeutic situation in an individual or a population. It is the basis of therapeutic drug monitoring with the ultimate goal of keeping drugs safe. This branch of pharmacology has become the most relevant to the sub-specialty of clinical pharmacology. First reports of Clinical Pharmacokinetics in Nigeria can be credited to two gifted Nigerians, Prof Ayodele O. Iyun and Prof Lateef A. Salako, both of whom were affiliated to the great institutions- University of Ibadan (UI) and the Teaching Hospital, University College Hospital (UCH). Prof A.O Iyun was Nigeria's first home-trained Clinical Pharmacologist, while Prof L.A. Salako played a most significant role in the creation of the Department of Clinical Pharmacology, UCH. This edition of the Chronicles highlights a few of the first reports of this exciting branch of pharmacology in Nigeria. This historical review is based on publications listed on the United States National Library of Medicine database (PUBMED). PMID:26807087

  12. FIRST REPORTS OF CLINICAL PHARMACOKINETICS IN NIGERIA.

    PubMed

    Michael, O S

    2015-06-01

    The German Friedrich Hartmut Dost (1910-1985) introduced the word Pharmacokinetics. Clinical pharmacokinetics is the direct application of knowledge regarding a drug's pharmacokinetics to a therapeutic situation in an individual or a population. It is the basis of therapeutic drug monitoring with the ultimate goal of keeping drugs safe. This branch of pharmacology has become the most relevant to the sub-specialty of clinical pharmacology. First reports of Clinical Pharmacokinetics in Nigeria can be credited to two gifted Nigerians, Prof Ayodele O. Iyun and Prof Lateef A. Salako, both of whom were affiliated to the great institutions- University of Ibadan (UI) and the Teaching Hospital, University College Hospital (UCH). Prof A.O Iyun was Nigeria's first home-trained Clinical Pharmacologist, while Prof L.A. Salako played a most significant role in the creation of the Department of Clinical Pharmacology, UCH. This edition of the Chronicles highlights a few of the first reports of this exciting branch of pharmacology in Nigeria. This historical review is based on publications listed on the United States National Library of Medicine database (PUBMED). PMID:26807087

  13. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Perfluoroalkyl Acids in Rodents

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has pharmacokinetic properties that appear consistent with a number of processes that are currently not well understood. Studies in mice exposed orally at lower doses (1 and 10 mg/kg) demonstrated blood, liver, and kidney concentration time courses ...

  14. Heritability of metoprolol and torsemide pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Matthaei, J; Brockmöller, J; Tzvetkov, M V; Sehrt, D; Sachse-Seeboth, C; Hjelmborg, J B; Möller, S; Halekoh, U; Hofmann, U; Schwab, M; Kerb, R

    2015-12-01

    Genetic variation in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide due to polymorphisms in CYP2D6, CYP2C9, and OATP1B1 has been extensively studied. However, it is still unknown how much of the variation in pharmacokinetics of these two clinically important drugs in total is due to genetic factors. Metoprolol and torsemide were intravenously administered to 44 monozygotic and 14 dizygotic twin pairs. Metoprolol area under the curve (AUC) varied 4.7-fold and torsemide AUC 3.5-fold. A very high fraction of AUC variations, 91% of metoprolol and 86% of torsemide, were found to be due to additive genetic effects. However, known genetic variants of CYP2D6, -2C9, and OATP1B1 explained only 39%, 2%, and 39% of that variation, respectively. Comparable results for genetically explained variation in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have been found for other substrates of these enzymes earlier. These findings indicate that a substantial fraction of the heritable variability in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide remains to be elucidated. PMID:26344676

  15. Population Pharmacokinetic Model Characterizing 24-Hour Variation in the Pharmacokinetics of Oral and Intravenous Midazolam in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    van Rongen, A; Kervezee, L; Brill, MJE; van Meir, H; den Hartigh, J; Guchelaar, H-J; Meijer, JH; Burggraaf, J; van Oosterhout, F

    2015-01-01

    Daily rhythms in physiology may affect the pharmacokinetics of a drug. The aim of this study was to evaluate 24-hour variation in the pharmacokinetics of the CYP3A substrate midazolam. Oral (2 mg) and intravenous (1 mg) midazolam was administered at six timepoints throughout the 24-hour period in 12 healthy volunteers. Oral bioavailability (population mean value [RSE%] of 0.28 (7.1%)) showed 24-hour variation that was best parameterized as a cosine function with an amplitude of 0.04 (17.3%) and a peak at 12:14 in the afternoon. The absorption rate constant was 1.41 (4.7%) times increased after drug administration at 14:00. Clearance (0.38 L/min (4.8%)) showed a minor 24-hour variation with an amplitude of 0.03 (14.8%) L/min and a peak at 18:50. Simulations show that dosing time minimally affects the concentration time profiles after intravenous administration, while concentrations are higher during the day compared to the night after oral dosing, reflecting considerable variation in intestinal processes. PMID:26380154

  16. Population Pharmacokinetic Model Characterizing 24-Hour Variation in the Pharmacokinetics of Oral and Intravenous Midazolam in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    van Rongen, A; Kervezee, L; Brill, Mje; van Meir, H; den Hartigh, J; Guchelaar, H-J; Meijer, J H; Burggraaf, J; van Oosterhout, F

    2015-08-01

    Daily rhythms in physiology may affect the pharmacokinetics of a drug. The aim of this study was to evaluate 24-hour variation in the pharmacokinetics of the CYP3A substrate midazolam. Oral (2 mg) and intravenous (1 mg) midazolam was administered at six timepoints throughout the 24-hour period in 12 healthy volunteers. Oral bioavailability (population mean value [RSE%] of 0.28 (7.1%)) showed 24-hour variation that was best parameterized as a cosine function with an amplitude of 0.04 (17.3%) and a peak at 12:14 in the afternoon. The absorption rate constant was 1.41 (4.7%) times increased after drug administration at 14:00. Clearance (0.38 L/min (4.8%)) showed a minor 24-hour variation with an amplitude of 0.03 (14.8%) L/min and a peak at 18:50. Simulations show that dosing time minimally affects the concentration time profiles after intravenous administration, while concentrations are higher during the day compared to the night after oral dosing, reflecting considerable variation in intestinal processes. PMID:26380154

  17. Assessing Predictive Performance of Published Population Pharmacokinetic Models of Intravenous Tobramycin in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Celeste; Staatz, Christine E; Unwin, Sean; Hennig, Stefanie

    2016-06-01

    Several population pharmacokinetic models describe the dose-exposure relationship of tobramycin in pediatric patients. Before the implementation of these models in clinical practice for dosage adjustment, their predictive performance should be externally evaluated. This study tested the predictive performance of all published population pharmacokinetic models of tobramycin developed for pediatric patients with an independent patient cohort. A literature search was conducted to identify suitable models for testing. Demographic and pharmacokinetic data were collected retrospectively from the medical records of pediatric patients who had received intravenous tobramycin. Tobramycin exposure was predicted from each model. Predictive performance was assessed by visual comparison of predictions to observations, by calculation of bias and imprecision, and through the use of simulation-based diagnostics. Eight population pharmacokinetic models were identified. A total of 269 concentration-time points from 41 pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis were collected for external evaluation. Three models consistently performed best in all evaluations and had mean errors ranging from -0.4 to 1.8 mg/liter, relative mean errors ranging from 4.9 to 29.4%, and root mean square errors ranging from 47.8 to 66.9%. Simulation-based diagnostics supported these findings. Models that allowed a two-compartment disposition generally had better predictive performance than those that used a one-compartment disposition model. Several published models of the pharmacokinetics of tobramycin showed reasonable low levels of bias, although all models seemed to have some problems with imprecision. This suggests that knowledge of typical pharmacokinetic behavior and patient covariate values alone without feedback concentration measurements from individual patients is not sufficient to make precise predictions. PMID:27001806

  18. Population Pharmacokinetics of Ciprofloxacin in Neonates and Young Infants Less than Three Months of Age

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Hill, Helen; Le Guellec, Chantal; Neal, Tim; Mahoney, Sarah; Paulus, Stephane; Castellan, Charlotte; Kassai, Behrouz; van den Anker, Johannes N.; Kearns, Gregory L.; Turner, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is used in neonates with suspected or documented Gram-negative serious infections. Currently, its use is off-label partly because of lack of pharmacokinetic studies. Within the FP7 EU project TINN (Treat Infection in NeoNates), our aim was to evaluate the population pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin in neonates and young infants <3 months of age and define the appropriate dose in order to optimize ciprofloxacin treatment in this vulnerable population. Blood samples were collected from neonates treated with ciprofloxacin and concentrations were quantified by high-pressure liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using NONMEM software. The data from 60 newborn infants (postmenstrual age [PMA] range, 24.9 to 47.9 weeks) were available for population pharmacokinetic analysis. A two-compartment model with first-order elimination showed the best fit with the data. A covariate analysis identified that gestational age, postnatal age, current weight, serum creatinine concentration, and use of inotropes had a significant impact on ciprofloxacin pharmacokinetics. Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated that 90% of hypothetical newborns with a PMA of <34 weeks treated with 7.5 mg/kg twice daily and 84% of newborns with a PMA ≥34 weeks and young infants receiving 12.5 mg/kg twice daily would reach the AUC/MIC target of 125, using the standard EUCAST MIC susceptibility breakpoint of 0.5 mg/liter. The associated risks of overdose for the proposed dosing regimen were <8%. The population pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin was evaluated in neonates and young infants <3 months old, and a dosing regimen was established based on simulation. PMID:25155587

  19. Population pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin in neonates and young infants less than three months of age.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Hill, Helen; Le Guellec, Chantal; Neal, Tim; Mahoney, Sarah; Paulus, Stephane; Castellan, Charlotte; Kassai, Behrouz; van den Anker, Johannes N; Kearns, Gregory L; Turner, Mark A; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne

    2014-11-01

    Ciprofloxacin is used in neonates with suspected or documented Gram-negative serious infections. Currently, its use is off-label partly because of lack of pharmacokinetic studies. Within the FP7 EU project TINN (Treat Infection in NeoNates), our aim was to evaluate the population pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin in neonates and young infants <3 months of age and define the appropriate dose in order to optimize ciprofloxacin treatment in this vulnerable population. Blood samples were collected from neonates treated with ciprofloxacin and concentrations were quantified by high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Population pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using NONMEM software. The data from 60 newborn infants (postmenstrual age [PMA] range, 24.9 to 47.9 weeks) were available for population pharmacokinetic analysis. A two-compartment model with first-order elimination showed the best fit with the data. A covariate analysis identified that gestational age, postnatal age, current weight, serum creatinine concentration, and use of inotropes had a significant impact on ciprofloxacin pharmacokinetics. Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated that 90% of hypothetical newborns with a PMA of <34 weeks treated with 7.5 mg/kg twice daily and 84% of newborns with a PMA ≥34 weeks and young infants receiving 12.5 mg/kg twice daily would reach the AUC/MIC target of 125, using the standard EUCAST MIC susceptibility breakpoint of 0.5 mg/liter. The associated risks of overdose for the proposed dosing regimen were <8%. The population pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin was evaluated in neonates and young infants <3 months old, and a dosing regimen was established based on simulation. PMID:25155587

  20. Pharmacokinetics and Drug Dosing in Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Kendrick, Jennifer G.; Carr, Roxane R.; Ensom, Mary H.H.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To review pharmacokinetics in obese children and to provide medication dosing recommendations. METHODS EMBASE, MEDLINE, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts databases were searched using the following terms: obesity, morbid obesity, overweight, pharmacokinetics, drug, dose, kidney function test, creatinine, pediatric, and child. RESULTS We identified 10 studies in which the authors examined drug dosing or pharmacokinetics for obese children. No information was found for drug absorption or metabolism. Obese children have a higher percent fat mass and a lower percent lean mass compared with normal-weight children. Therefore, in obese children, the volume of distribution of lipophilic drugs is most likely higher, and that of hydrophilic drugs is most likely lower, than in normal-weight children. Serum creatinine concentrations are higher in obese than normal-weight children. Total body weight is an appropriate size descriptor for calculating doses of antineoplastics, cefazolin, and succinylcholine in obese children. Initial tobramycin doses may be determined using an adjusted body weight, although using total body weight in the context of monitoring serum tobramycin concentrations would also be an appropriate strategy. We found no information for any of the opioids; antibiotics such as penicillins, carbapenems, vancomycin, and linezolid; antifungals; cardiac drugs such as digoxin and amiodarone; corticosteroids; benzodiazepines; and anticonvulsants. In particular, we found no information about medications that are widely distributed to adipose tissue or that can accumulate there. CONCLUSIONS The available data are limited because of the small numbers of participating children, study design, or both. The number and type of drugs that have been studied limit our understanding of the pharmacokinetics in obese children. In the absence of dosing information for obese children, it is important to consider the nature and severity of a child's illness

  1. Taking in a Show.

    PubMed

    Boden, Timothy W

    2016-01-01

    Many medical practices have cut back on education and staff development expenses, especially those costs associated with conventions and conferences. But there are hard-to-value returns on your investment in these live events--beyond the obvious benefits of acquired knowledge and skills. Major vendors still exhibit their services and wares at many events, and the exhibit hall is a treasure-house of information and resources for the savvy physician or administrator. Make and stick to a purposeful plan to exploit the trade show. You can compare products, gain new insights and ideas, and even negotiate better deals with representatives anxious to realize returns on their exhibition investments. PMID:27249887

  2. SU-E-I-82: PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Prostate Cancer Imaging: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandes, F; Silva, D da; Rodrigues, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to review new and clinical practice PET radiopharmaceuticals for prostate cancer imaging. Methods: PET radiopharmaceuticals were reviewed on the main databases. Availability, dosimetry, accuracy and limitations were considered. Results: The following radioisotopes with respective physical half-life and mean positron energy were found: {sup 18}F (109,7 min, 249,8 keV), {sup 89}Zr (78,4 hs, 395,5 keV), {sup 11}C (20,4 min, 385,7 keV) and {sup 68}Ga (67,8 min, 836 keV). {sup 68}Ga was the only one not produced by cyclotron. Radiopharmaceuticals uptake by glucose metabolism ({sup 18}F-FDG), lipogenesis ({sup 11}C-Choline and {sup 11}C-Acetate), amino acid transport (Anti-{sup 18}F-FACBC), bone matrix ({sup 18}F-NaF), prostatespecific membrane antigen ({sup 68}Ga-PSMA and {sup 89}Zr-J591), CXCR receptors ({sup 89}Ga-Pentixafor), adrenal receptors ({sup 18}F-FDHT) and gastrin release peptide receptor (bombesin analogue). Most of radiopharmaceuticals are urinary excretion, so bladder is the critical organ. 11C-choline (pancreas), Anti-{sup 18}FFACBC (liver) and {sup 18}F-FBDC (stomach wall) are the exception. Higher effective dose was seen {sup 18}F-NaF (27 μSv/MBq) while the lowest was {sup 11}CAcetate (3,5 μSv/MBq). Conclusion: Even though {sup 18}F-FDG has a large availability its high urinary excretion and poor uptake to slow growing disease offers weak results for prostate cancer. Better accuracy is obtained when {sup 18}F-NaF is used for bone metastatic investigation although physicians tend to choose bone scintigraphy probably due to its cost and practice. Many guidelines in oncology consider {sup 11}C or {sup 18}F labeled with Choline the gold standard for biochemical relapse after radical treatment. Local, lymph node and distant metastatic relapse can be evaluated at same time with this radiopharmaceutical. There is no consensus over bigger urinary excretion for {sup 18}F labeling. Anti-{sup 18}F-FACBC, {sup 68}Ga-PSMA and {sup

  3. [Study on in vivo pharmacokinetics of cucurbitacin injection in rats].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Ting; Deng, Zhi-Peng; Fan, Hui-Xia; Zhong, Hao; Yao, Qing-Qiang

    2014-06-01

    To establish a method for the determination of cucurbitacin in plasma samples, in order to study the in vivo pharmacokinetic characteristics of cucurbitacin in rats. Rats were intravenously injected with cucurbitacin. With diphenhydramine as the internal standard (IS), the plasma concentrations of cucurbitacin in rat plasma at different time points were determined by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). With electrospray ionization source, the positive ion detection in the multiple reaction monitoring mode was conducted to determine the ion-pairs for target compound and IS were m/z 503.2/113.1 and m/z 256.0/167.2, respectively. Agilent ZOBAX SB-C18 column (2.1 mm x 50 mm, 1.8 microm) was adopted and eluted with methanol and 0.1% formic acid (55:45), and the flow rate was 0.2 mL x min(-1). DAS 2.0 software was applied to fit the blood concentration and calculate corresponding pharmacokinetic parameters. The rats were intravenously injected with cucurbitacin at the concentration of 3.0 mg x kg(-1). The target blood quality concentration show good linear relations within the range of 10.5-3 150 microg x L(-1) (R2 = 0.996), the lower limit of the standard curve was 10.5 microg x L(-1), and the signal to noise ratio S/N = 12. Intra- and inter-day precisions RSD was less than 6.9% and 14%, respectively; The accuracy RE ranged between 0.20% and 3.7%; The extraction recoveries ranged between 92.7% and 97.1%. Regarding the pharmacokinetic parameters of tail intravenous injection of cucurbitacin, AUC (0-t) was (811.615 +/- 111.578) microg x h x L(-1), (t1/2) was (1.285 +/- 1.390) h, CL was (3.627 +/- 0.487) L x h x kg(-1), and V(d) was (6.721 +/- 7.429) L x kg(-1). In this study, researchers established a simple, accurate, sensitive and highly specific method for determining the blood concentration of cucurbitacin, and reported the in vivo pharmacokinetic characteristics of cucurbitacin in rats for the first time. PMID:25272856

  4. Not a "reality" show.

    PubMed

    Wrong, Terence; Baumgart, Erica

    2013-01-01

    The authors of the preceding articles raise legitimate questions about patient and staff rights and the unintended consequences of allowing ABC News to film inside teaching hospitals. We explain why we regard their fears as baseless and not supported by what we heard from individuals portrayed in the filming, our decade-long experience making medical documentaries, and the full un-aired context of the scenes shown in the broadcast. The authors don't and can't know what conversations we had, what documents we reviewed, and what protections we put in place in each televised scene. Finally, we hope to correct several misleading examples cited by the authors as well as their offhand mischaracterization of our program as a "reality" show. PMID:23631336

  5. Preparation and biological evaluation of (99m)Tc-ropinirole as a novel radiopharmaceutical for brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Motaleb, M A; Ibrahem, I T; Ayoub, V R; Geneidi, A S

    2016-04-01

    Noninvasive brain imaging is a process that allows scientists and physicians to view and monitor the areas of the brain. The aim of this study was to formulate a novel radiopharmaceutical for the detection of brain disorders at early stages in susceptible patients. (99m) Tc-ropinirole was prepared by the direct complexation of ropinirole with technetium-99m. The results showed that the radiochemical yield (99m) Tc-ropinirole was 92 ± 2.87% and the radiochemical yield was evaluated by paper chromatography and HPLC. In vitro studies showed that the formed complex was stable for up to 6 h. In vivo uptake of (99m) Tc-ropinirole in the brain was 4.87 ± 0.15% injected dose/g organ at 30 min post-injection, which cleared from the brain with time till it reaches 2.3% at 2 h post-injection indicating that the brain uptake of (99m) Tc-ropinirole is higher than that of the commercially available (99m) Tc-HMPAO, which is 2.25% at 30 min. Pre-dosing mice with cold ropinirole reduced the brain uptake to 0.26 ± 0.01% injected dose/g organ, so this confirms the high specificity and selectivity of this radiotracer for the assessment of the dopamine receptors. PMID:26913705

  6. Pharmacokinetics in risk assessment: drinking water and health. Volume 8

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Contents include: risk assessment: historical perspectives; tissue dosimetry in risk assessment; modeling: an introduction; physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling; allometry: body-size constraints in animal design; prediction of in vivo parameters of drug metabolism and distribution from in-vitro studies; dose, species, and route extrapolation; uncertainty in pharmacokinetic models using SIMUSOLV; interspecies and dose-route extrapolations; carcinogen DNA adducts as a measure of biological dose for risk analysis of carcinogenic data; resources available for simulation in toxicology; route-to-route extrapolation of dichloromethane exposure using a physiological pharmacokinetic model; sensitivity analysis in pharmacokinetic modeling; mutation accumulation: chronic cytotoxicant exposure; model for ethylene chloride and its application in risk assessment; mathematical modeling of ozone absorption in the lower respiratory tract; development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for multiday inhalation of carbon tetrachloride; the delivered/administered dose relationship and its impact on formaldehyde risk estimates; pharmacokinetic simulation in risk assessment; hazard assessment: ozone; role of pharmacokinetic modeling in risk assessment; development of multispecies, multiroute pharmacokinetic models for methylene chloride and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (methyl chloroform); methotrexate: pharmacokinetics and assessment of toxicity; prospective predictions and validations in anticancer therapy; the application of pharmacokinetic data in carcinogenic risk assessment.

  7. Public medical shows.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In the second half of the 19th century, Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) became famous for the quality of his teaching and his innovative neurological discoveries, bringing many French and foreign students to Paris. A hunger for recognition, together with progressive and anticlerical ideals, led Charcot to invite writers, journalists, and politicians to his lessons, during which he presented the results of his work on hysteria. These events became public performances, for which physicians and patients were transformed into actors. Major newspapers ran accounts of these consultations, more like theatrical shows in some respects. The resultant enthusiasm prompted other physicians in Paris and throughout France to try and imitate them. We will compare the form and substance of Charcot's lessons with those given by Jules-Bernard Luys (1828-1897), Victor Dumontpallier (1826-1899), Ambroise-Auguste Liébault (1823-1904), Hippolyte Bernheim (1840-1919), Joseph Grasset (1849-1918), and Albert Pitres (1848-1928). We will also note their impact on contemporary cinema and theatre. PMID:25273491

  8. The Great Cometary Show

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-01-01

    its high spatial and spectral resolution, it was possible to zoom into the very heart of this very massive star. In this innermost region, the observations are dominated by the extremely dense stellar wind that totally obscures the underlying central star. The AMBER observations show that this dense stellar wind is not spherically symmetric, but exhibits a clearly elongated structure. Overall, the AMBER observations confirm that the extremely high mass loss of Eta Carinae's massive central star is non-spherical and much stronger along the poles than in the equatorial plane. This is in agreement with theoretical models that predict such an enhanced polar mass-loss in the case of rapidly rotating stars. ESO PR Photo 06c/07 ESO PR Photo 06c/07 RS Ophiuchi in Outburst Several papers from this special feature focus on the later stages in a star's life. One looks at the binary system Gamma 2 Velorum, which contains the closest example of a star known as a Wolf-Rayet. A single AMBER observation allowed the astronomers to separate the spectra of the two components, offering new insights in the modeling of Wolf-Rayet stars, but made it also possible to measure the separation between the two stars. This led to a new determination of the distance of the system, showing that previous estimates were incorrect. The observations also revealed information on the region where the winds from the two stars collide. The famous binary system RS Ophiuchi, an example of a recurrent nova, was observed just 5 days after it was discovered to be in outburst on 12 February 2006, an event that has been expected for 21 years. AMBER was able to detect the extension of the expanding nova emission. These observations show a complex geometry and kinematics, far from the simple interpretation of a spherical fireball in extension. AMBER has detected a high velocity jet probably perpendicular to the orbital plane of the binary system, and allowed a precise and careful study of the wind and the shockwave

  9. Sex- and dose-dependency in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of (+)-methamphetamine and its metabolite (+)-amphetamine in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Milesi-Halle, Alessandra; Hendrickson, Howard P.; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M.; Gentry, W. Brooks; Owens, S. Michael . E-mail: mowens@uams.edu

    2005-12-15

    These studies investigated how (+)-methamphetamine (METH) dose and rat sex affect the pharmacological response to METH in Sprague-Dawley rats. The first set of experiments determined the pharmacokinetics of METH and its pharmacologically active metabolite (+)-amphetamine (AMP) in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats after 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg METH doses. The results showed significant sex-dependent changes in METH pharmacokinetics, and females formed significantly lower amounts of AMP. While the area under the serum concentration-time curve in males increased proportionately with the METH dose, the females showed a disproportional increase. The sex differences in systemic clearance, renal clearance, volume of distribution, and percentage of unchanged METH eliminated in the urine suggested dose-dependent pharmacokinetics in female rats. The second set of studies sought to determine the behavioral implications of these pharmacokinetic differences by quantifying locomotor activity in male and female rats after saline, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg METH. The results showed sex- and dose-dependent differences in METH-induced locomotion, including profound differences in the temporal profile of effects at higher dose. These findings show that the pharmacokinetic and metabolic profile of METH (slower METH clearance and lower AMP metabolite formation) plays a significant role in the differential pharmacological response to METH in male and female rats.

  10. A Pharmacometabonomic Approach To Predicting Metabolic Phenotypes and Pharmacokinetic Parameters of Atorvastatin in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing; Aa, Jiye; Jia, Huning; Xin, Xiaoqing; Tao, Chunlei; Liu, Linsheng; Zou, Bingjie; Song, Qinxin; Shi, Jian; Cao, Bei; Yong, Yonghong; Wang, Guangji; Zhou, Guohua

    2015-09-01

    Genetic polymorphism and environment each influence individual variability in drug metabolism and disposition. It is preferable to predict such variability, which may affect drug efficacy and toxicity, before drug administration. We examined individual differences in the pharmacokinetics of atorvastatin by applying gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling to predose plasma samples from 48 healthy volunteers. We determined the level of atorvastatin in plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. With the endogenous molecules, which showed a good correlation with pharmacokinetic parameters, a refined partial least-squares model was calculated based on predose data from a training set of 36 individuals and exhibited good predictive capability for the other 12 individuals in the prediction set. In addition, the model was successfully used to predictively classify individual pharmacokinetic responses into subgroups. Metabolites such as tryptophan, alanine, arachidonic acid, 2-hydroxybutyric acid, cholesterol, and isoleucine were indicated as candidate markers for predicting by showing better predictive capability for explaining individual differences than a conventional physiological index. These results suggest that a pharmacometabonomic approach offers the potential to predict individual differences in pharmacokinetics and therefore to facilitate individualized drug therapy. PMID:26216528

  11. Effect of Catnip Charcoal on the In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of the Main Alkaloids of Rhizoma Coptidis.

    PubMed

    He, Yanfei; Chen, Siyu; Yu, Hai; Zhu, Long; Liu, Yayun; Han, Chunyang; Liu, Cuiyan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effect of catnip Nepeta cataria (CNC) charcoal on the pharmacokinetics of the main alkaloids of Rhizoma Coptidis in vivo. Twenty-four rabbits were randomly divided into four groups and given oral administration of an aqueous extract of Rhizoma Coptidis (RCAE), RCAE plus CNC, RCAE plus activated carbon (AC), or distilled water, respectively. Plasma samples were collected after administration. The concentrations of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine in plasma were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The pharmacokinetics data were calculated using pharmacokinetic DAS 2.0 software. The results showed that the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of berberine increased, while the AUC of coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine decreased in the rabbits that received RCAE plus CNC. Meanwhile, the AUC of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine decreased in the group given RCAE plus AC. The difference of main pharmacokinetics parameters among the four groups was significant (P < 0.05). This study showed that CNC improved the bioavailability of berberine in comparison to AC and prolonged its release in comparison to RCAE alone. However, it decreased the bioavailability of coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine. In comparison, AC uniformly declined the bioavailability of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine. PMID:27313645

  12. Effect of Catnip Charcoal on the In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of the Main Alkaloids of Rhizoma Coptidis

    PubMed Central

    He, Yanfei; Chen, Siyu; Yu, Hai; Zhu, Long; Liu, Yayun; Han, Chunyang; Liu, Cuiyan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effect of catnip Nepeta cataria (CNC) charcoal on the pharmacokinetics of the main alkaloids of Rhizoma Coptidis in vivo. Twenty-four rabbits were randomly divided into four groups and given oral administration of an aqueous extract of Rhizoma Coptidis (RCAE), RCAE plus CNC, RCAE plus activated carbon (AC), or distilled water, respectively. Plasma samples were collected after administration. The concentrations of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine in plasma were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The pharmacokinetics data were calculated using pharmacokinetic DAS 2.0 software. The results showed that the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of berberine increased, while the AUC of coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine decreased in the rabbits that received RCAE plus CNC. Meanwhile, the AUC of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine decreased in the group given RCAE plus AC. The difference of main pharmacokinetics parameters among the four groups was significant (P < 0.05). This study showed that CNC improved the bioavailability of berberine in comparison to AC and prolonged its release in comparison to RCAE alone. However, it decreased the bioavailability of coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine. In comparison, AC uniformly declined the bioavailability of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine. PMID:27313645

  13. Does the Anesthetic Urethane Influence the Pharmacokinetics of Antifungal Drugs? A Population Pharmacokinetic Investigation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Azeredo, Francine Johansson; Hass, Sandra Elisa; Sansone, Pedro; Derendorf, Hartmut; Costa, Teresa Dalla; De Araujo, Bibiana Verlindo

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to analyze the impact of anesthesia induced by urethane on pharmacokinetics (PK) parameters of fluconazole (FCZ), mostly eliminated via renal excretion and voriconazole (VRC), eliminated mainly by hepatic metabolism. FCZ and VRC PK were investigated after administration of 10 mg/kg i.v. and 5 mg/kg i.v. doses to awake and urethane anesthetized Wistar rats (n = 6 per group), respectively. After dosing, blood samples were collected up to 18 h (FCZ) or 12 h (VRC) and the plasma data analysis was performed using the software MONOLIX v. 4.2.2. The population PK parameters and microconstants were determined by fitting plasma concentration-time profiles to two-compartment model for FCZ and three-compartment model for VRC. Fitting of FCZ plasma profiles after dosing to awake and anaesthetized animals resulted in a volume of distribution (V) of 9.3 and 8.1 L/kg, and k10 values of 0.12 and 0.14 h(-1) , respectively. VRC plasma profiles in awake and anaesthetized showed V 8.7 of and 7.6 L/kg, and k10 of 0.15 and 0.16 h(-1) , respectively. No statistical differences between plasma PK parameters and microconstants for the same drug in both animal conditions studied were observed (α = 0.05). PMID:26087701

  14. Impact of Pregnancy on Zonisamide Pharmacokinetics in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Matar, Kamal M.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with various physiological changes which may lead to significant alterations in the pharmacokinetics of many drugs. The present study was aimed to investigate the potential effects of pregnancy on the pharmacokinetic profile of zonisamide (ZNM) in the rabbit. Seven female rabbits were used in this study. The pregnant and nonpregnant rabbits received ZNM orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg and blood samples were collected from the animals just before receiving the drug and then serially for up to 24 h. The plasma samples were analyzed using tandem mass spectrometric method. Following a single oral dose of ZNM to the rabbits, the mean values of ZNM plasma concentrations at different times were consistently low in pregnant compared to nonpregnant rabbits. The mean values of ZNM's Cmax and AUC0−∞ were significantly (P < 0.05) decreased, whereas the CL/F exhibited substantial increase (P < 0.05) in pregnant compared to nonpregnant rabbits. Tmax, t1/2abs, t1/2el, MRT, and Vd/F showed no significant differences between the two groups. The present study demonstrates that pregnancy decreased ZNM plasma concentrations in rabbits and that the decrease could be due to decreased extent of gastrointestinal absorption, induced hepatic metabolism, or enhanced renal elimination of the drug. PMID:24455670

  15. Second-Generation Phenylthiazole Antibiotics with Enhanced Pharmacokinetic Properties.

    PubMed

    Seleem, Mohammed A; Disouky, Ahmed M; Mohammad, Haroon; Abdelghany, Tamer M; Mancy, Ahmed S; Bayoumi, Sammar A; Elshafeey, Ahmed; El-Morsy, Ahmed; Seleem, Mohamed N; Mayhoub, Abdelrahman S

    2016-05-26

    A series of second-generation analogues for 2-(1-(2-(4-butylphenyl)-4-methylthiazol-5-yl)ethylidene)aminoguanidine (1) have been synthesized and tested against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The compounds were designed with the objective of improving pharmacokinetic properties. This main aim has been accomplished by replacing the rapidly hydrolyzable Schiff-base moiety of first-generation members with a cyclic, unhydrolyzable pyrimidine ring. The hydrazide-containing analogue 17 was identified as the most potent analogue constructed thus far. The corresponding amine 8 was 8 times less active. Finally, incorporating the nitrogenous side chain within an aromatic system completely abolished the antibacterial character. Replacement of the n-butyl group with cyclic bioisosteres revealed cyclohexenyl analogue 29, which showed significant improvement in in vitro anti-MRSA potency. Increasing or decreasing the ring size deteriorated the antibacterial activity. Compound 17 demonstrated a superior in vitro and in vivo pharmacokinetic profile, providing compelling evidence that this particular analogue is a good drug candidate worthy of further analysis. PMID:27187739

  16. Pharmacokinetics and efficacy of fluvoxamine and amitriptyline in depression.

    PubMed

    Vezmar, Sandra; Miljkovic, Branislava; Vucicevic, Katarina; Timotijevic, Ivana; Prostran, Milica; Todorovic, Zoran; Pokrajac, Milena

    2009-05-01

    Although often necessary for obtaining remission following major depressive disorder, combined antidepressant treatment is frequently associated with drug interactions and enhanced adverse drug effects. We investigated pharmacokinetic interactions following combined fluvoxamine and amitriptyline treatment and their impact on therapeutic efficacy and tolerability. Twenty-two inpatients with major depression [Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D) rating > or =18] were treated with either amitriptyline (75 mg/day), fluvoxamine (100 mg/day) or both. Blood samples, for determination of amitriptyline, its major metabolite nortritpyline, and fluvoxamine, were obtained after single dose administration and in steady-state. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated using HAM-D and adverse drug effects were evaluated using the clinical global impression scale. Following combined treatment, steady-state plasma levels of nortriptyline were significantly decreased compared to monotherapy. HAM-D scores after two-week treatment showed that there was a better response to combined treatment. There was no significant difference in severity of adverse effects among groups. We observed a pharmacokinetic interaction between fluvoxamine and amitritpyline resulting in impaired metabolism of the later. However, no significant impact of the interaction on treatment safety was observed. Moreover, concomitant use of amitriptyline at 75 mg/day and fluvoxamine at 100 mg/day was well tolerated with a more prompt and stronger onset of clinical response compared to monotherapy in patients with major depression. PMID:19444001

  17. Enhanced Pharmacokinetics of Factor VIIa as a Monomeric Fc Fusion.

    PubMed

    Salas, Joe; Liu, Tongyao; Lu, Qi; Kulman, John D; Ashworth, Tamera; Kistanova, Elena; Moore, Nancy; Pierce, Glenn F; Jiang, Haiyan; Peters, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Recombinant Factor VIIa (rFVIIa) is utilized for on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes in hemophilia patients with neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors) against Factor VIII or Factor IX, but a short half-life in the circulation (~2.5hrs) limits its use in a prophylactic setting. Recombinant FVIIa variants with improved pharmacokinetic properties may enable improved treatment and prevention of bleeding episodes in the inhibitor population. In this study we describe recombinant FVIIaFc (rFVIIaFc), a recombinant Fc-fusion protein generated to utilize the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn)-mediated recycling pathway that protects immunoglobulin G from catabolism. On the basis of activity, rFVIIaFc exhibited a 5.5-fold extension in terminal half-life in hemophilia A mice compared to rFVIIa. The potency of rFVIIaFc was comparable to that of rFVIIa in thrombin generation assay and ROTEM. In agreement with these data, rFVIIaFc and rFVIIa showed similar acute efficacy at comparable molar doses in the tail clip bleeding model in hemophilia A mice. Taken together, these studies demonstrate enhanced pharmacokinetics and similar hemostatic properties for rFVIIaFc compared to rFVIIa. PMID:25721936

  18. Pharmacokinetics and safety of oral almotriptan in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    McEwen, J; Salva, M; Jansat, J M; Cabarrocas, X

    2004-10-01

    Almotriptan (LAS 31416) is a new, oral, specific 5-hydroxytryptamine(1B/1D) receptor agonist for the treatment of migraine. The pharmacokinetics and safety of a range of oral doses were assessed in 23 healthy male volunteers. Peak plasma concentrations were reached between 1.5 and 4 h after dosing. The maximum plasma concentration and area under the curve showed dose proportionality over the dose range 5-200 mg. The elimination half-life was constant at approximately 3 h across all dose levels. A substantial proportion of the initial dose was excreted in urine (27%-39%) during 12 h post-dose and the main excretory product was unchanged drug. Three major urinary metabolites were detected, all of which were pharmacologically inactive. The most common events following almotriptan administration were headache, tiredness and mild nausea. Nine events (18%) were classed as probably related to almotriptan and these were all at the highest dose level of 200 mg. The maximum tolerated dose of almotriptan was, therefore, determined as 150 mg. In conclusion, almotriptan is well tolerated following single, oral doses up to 150 mg and has predictable pharmacokinetics. PMID:15386481

  19. Pharmacokinetics and biodegradation performance of a hydroxypropyl chitosan derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Kai; Han, Baoqin; Dong, Wen; Song, Fulai; Liu, Weizhi; Liu, Wanshun

    2015-10-01

    Hydroxypropyl chitosan (HP-chitosan) has been shown to have promising applications in a wide range of areas due to its biocompatibility, biodegradability and various biological activities, especially in the biomedical and pharmaceutical fields. However, it is not yet known about its pharmacokinetics and biodegradation performance, which are crucial for its clinical applications. In order to lay a foundation for its further applications and exploitations, here we carried out fluorescence intensity and GPC analyses to determine the pharmacokinetics mode of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled HP-chitosan (FITC-HP-chitosan) and its biodegradability. The results showed that after intraperitoneal administration at a dose of 10 mg per rat, FITC-HP-chitosan could be absorbed rapidly and distributed to liver, kidney and spleen through blood. It was indicated that FITC-HP-chitosan could be utilized effectively, and 88.47% of the FITC-HP-chitosan could be excreted by urine within 11 days with a molecular weight less than 10 kDa. Moreover, our data indicated that there was an obvious degradation process occurred in liver (< 10 kDa at 24 h). In summary, HP-chitosan has excellent bioavailability and biodegradability, suggesting the potential applications of hydroxypropyl-modified chitosan as materials in drug delivery, tissue engineering and biomedical area.

  20. Understanding the pharmacokinetics of Coartem®

    PubMed Central

    Djimdé, Abdoulaye; Lefèvre, Gilbert

    2009-01-01

    Artemether and lumefantrine (AL), the active constituents of Coartem® exhibit complementary pharmacokinetic profiles. Artemether is absorbed quickly; peak concentrations of artemether and its main active metabolite, dihydroartemisinin (DHA) occur at approximately two hours post-dose, leading to a rapid reduction in asexual parasite mass and a prompt resolution of symptoms. Lumefantrine is absorbed and cleared more slowly (terminal elimination half-life 3-4 days in malaria patients), and accumulates with successive doses, acting to prevent recrudescence by destroying any residual parasites that remain after artemether and DHA have been cleared from the body. Food intake significantly enhances the bioavailability of both artemether and lumefantrine, an effect which is more apparent for the highly lipophilic lumefantrine. However, a meal with only a small amount of fat (1.6 g) is considered sufficient to achieve adequate exposure to lumefantrine. The pharmacokinetics of artemether or lumefantrine are similar in children, when dosed according to their body weight, compared with adults. No randomized study has compared the pharmacokinetics of either agent in pregnant versus non-pregnant women. Studies in healthy volunteers and in children with malaria have confirmed that the pharmacokinetic characteristics of crushed standard AL tablets and the newly-developed Coartem® Dispersible tablet formulation are similar. Studies to date in healthy volunteers have not identified any clinically relevant drug-drug interactions; data relating to concomitant administration of HIV therapies are limited. While dose-response analyses are difficult to undertake because of the low rate of treatment failures under AL, it appears that artemether and DHA exposure impact on parasite clearance time while lumefantrine exposure is associated with cure rate, consistent with their respective modes of action. In conclusion, knowledge of the pharmacokinetic profiles of artemether and lumefantrine

  1. Development of more efficacious Tc-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceutical mixtures. Progress report, May 1, 1981-April 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, W.R.; Deutsch, E.A.

    1981-12-01

    The objectives of this year's research were to develop a method for rapidly determining TcO/sub 4//sup -/ in /sup 99/Mo//sup 99m/Tc generator eluates, to improve the ability to chromatographically determine individual Tc-HEDP complexes in radiopharmaceuticals, and to investigate the effects of TcO/sub 4//sup -/ concentration and electrochemical reduction on the types and relative amounts of Tc-HEDP complexes present in a radiopharmaceutical formulation. A rapid and sensitive high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for the quantitative determination of pertechnetate (TcO/sub 4//sup -/) was developed. This HPLC-based analysis may be of considerable utility in assessing the history and function of /sup 99/MO/sup 99m/Tc generators as well as in the routine analysis of reduced technetium radiopharmaceuticals for the presence of undesired TcO/sub 4//sup -/. Encouraging results were obtained on a dimethyl amine column using aqueous (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ as the mobile phase. The preparation of Tc(NaBH/sub 4/) HEDP radiopharmaceutical analogues using varying concentrations of total TcO/sub 4//sup -/ shows a dramatic effect in the number and distribution of Tc-HEDP complexes over a TcO/sub 4//sup -/ concentration range of 10/sup -2/ to 10/sup -8/M. These results suggest that total TcO/sub 4//sup -/ concentration is an important parameter to be considered in the preparation of a specific Tc-HEDP complex to improve skeletal imaging. The preparation of Tc(electrode) HEDP radiopharmaceutical analogues by using electrochemical reduction was explored. The resulting solutions contain Tc-HEDP complexes that are tentatively identified as being the same complexes formed by NaBH/sub 4/ reduction, although the relative concentrations of these complexes are quite different with the two modes of reduction. Thus, electrochemical reduction shows promise as a viable route to the preparation of specific Tc-HEDP complexes for improved skeletal imaging.

  2. Integration of Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling into Early Clinical Development: An Investigation of the Pharmacokinetic Nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, L; Gan, J; Yoshitsugu, H; Gu, X; Lutz, JD; Masson, E; Humphreys, WG

    2015-01-01

    BMS-911543, a promising anticancer agent, exhibited time-dependent and dose-dependent nonlinear pharmacokinetics (PKs) in its first-in-human (FIH) study. Initial physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling efforts using CYP1A2-mediated clearance kinetics were unsuccessful; however, further model analysis revealed that CYP1A2 time-dependent inhibition (TDI) and perhaps other factors could be keys to the nonlinearity. Subsequent experiments in human liver microsomes showed that the compound was a time-dependent inhibitor of CYP1A2 and were used to determine the enzyme inactivation parameter values. In addition, a rat tissue distribution study was conducted and human plasma samples were profiled to support the refinement of the PBPK model. It was concluded that the interplay between four BMS-911543 properties, namely, low solubility, saturation of the metabolizing enzyme CYP1A2, CYP1A2 TDI, and CYP1A2 induction likely resulted in the time-dependent and dose-dependent nonlinear PKs. The methodology of PBPK model-guided unmasking of compound properties can serve as a general practice for mechanistic understanding of a new compound's disposition. PMID:26225254

  3. Skin dose rate conversion factors after contamination with radiopharmaceuticals: influence of contamination area, epidermal thickness and percutaneous absorption.

    PubMed

    Covens, P; Berus, D; Caveliers, V; Struelens, L; Vanhavere, F; Verellen, D

    2013-06-01

    Skin contamination with radiopharmaceuticals can occur during biomedical research and daily nuclear medicine practice as a result of accidental spills, after contact with bodily fluids of patients or by inattentively touching contaminated materials. Skin dose assessment should be carried out by repeated quantification to map the course of the contamination together with the use of appropriate skin dose rate conversion factors. Contamination is generally characterised by local spots on the palmar surface of the hand and complete decontamination is difficult as a result of percutaneous absorption. This specific issue requires special consideration as to the skin dose rate conversion factors as a measure for the absorbed dose rate to the basal layer of the epidermis. In this work we used Monte Carlo simulations to study the influence of the contamination area, the epidermal thickness and the percutaneous absorption on the absorbed skin dose rate conversion factors for a set of 39 medical radionuclides. The results show that the absorbed dose to the basal layer of the epidermis can differ by up to two orders of magnitude from the operational quantity Hp(0.07) when using an appropriate epidermal thickness in combination with the effect of percutaneous absorption. PMID:23519114

  4. Environmental effects on the structure of metal ion-DOTA complexes: An ab initio study of radiopharmaceutical metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Lightstone, F C; Colvin, M E

    2006-02-10

    Quantum mechanical calculations were performed to study the differences between the important radiopharmaceutical metals yttrium (Y) and indium (In) bound by DOTA and modified DOTA molecules. Energies were calculated at the MP2/6-31+G(d)//HF/6-31G(d) levels, using effective core potentials on the Y and In ions. Although the minimum energy structures obtained are similar for both metal ion-DOTA complexes, changes in coordination and local environment significantly affect the geometries and energies of these complexes. Coordination by a single water molecule causes a change in the coordination number and a change in the position of the metal ion in In-DOTA; but, Y-DOTA is hardly affected by water coordination. When one of the DOTA carboxylates is replaced by an amide, the coordination energy for the amide arm shows a large variation between the Y and In ions. Optimizations including water and guandinium moieties to approximate the effects of antibody binding indicate a large energy cost for the DOTA-chelated In to adopt the ideal conformation for antibody binding.

  5. Population Approach To Analyze the Pharmacokinetics of Free and Total Lopinavir in HIV-Infected Pregnant Women and Consequences for Dose Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Illamola, Silvia M.; Pressiat, Claire; Lui, Gabrielle; Valade, Elodie; Mandelbrot, Laurent; Lechedanec, Jerome; Delmas, Sandrine; Blanche, Stéphane; Warszawski, Josiane; Urien, Saik; Tubiana, Roland; Hirt, Déborah

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the unbound and total lopinavir (LPV) pharmacokinetics in pregnant women in order to evaluate if a dosing adjustment is necessary during pregnancy. Lopinavir placental transfer is described, and several genetic covariates were tested to explain its variability. A total of 400 maternal, 79 cord blood, and 48 amniotic fluid samples were collected from 208 women for LPV concentration determinations and pharmacokinetics analysis. Among the maternal LPV concentrations, 79 samples were also used to measure the unbound LPV concentrations. Population pharmacokinetics models were developed by using NONMEM software. Two models were developed to describe (i) unbound and total LPV pharmacokinetics and (ii) LPV placental transfer. The pharmacokinetics was best described by a one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. A pregnancy effect was found on maternal clearance (39% increase), whereas the treatment group (monotherapy versus triple therapy) or the genetic polymorphisms did not explain the pharmacokinetics or placental transfer of LPV. Efficient unbound LPV concentrations in nonpregnant women were similar to those measured during the third trimester of pregnancy. Our study showed a 39% increase of maternal total LPV clearance during pregnancy, whereas unbound LPV concentrations were similar to those simulated in nonpregnant women. The genetic polymorphisms selected did not influence the LPV pharmacokinetics or placental transfer. Thus, we suggest that the LPV dosage should not be increased during pregnancy. PMID:26149996

  6. Pharmacokinetics of Tenofovir During Pregnancy and Postpartum

    PubMed Central

    Best, Brookie M.; Burchett, Sandra; Li, Hong; Stek, Alice; Hu, Chengcheng; Wang, Jiajia; Hawkins, Elizabeth; Byroads, Mark; Watts, D. Heather; Smith, Elizabeth; Fletcher, Courtney V.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Mirochnick, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Tenofovir disoproxol fumarate (TDF) is increasingly used in HAART regimens of pregnant women, but limited data exist on pregnancy pharmacokinetics of chronically-dosed TDF. This study described tenofovir pharmacokinetics during pregnancy and postpartum. Methods IMPAACT P1026s is a prospective, non-blinded pharmacokinetic study of HIV-infected pregnant women that included a cohort receiving 300 mg TDF once daily. Steady-state 24-hour pharmacokinetic profiles were measured at 2nd and 3rd trimester and postpartum, with maternal and umbilical cord samples at delivery. Tenofovir was measured by LC-MS. The target AUC was ≥ 1.99 mcg•hr/mL (non-pregnant historical control 10th percentile). Results Median tenofovir AUC was decreased during the 2nd (1.9 mcg•hr/mL) and 3rd (2.4 mcg•hr/mL, p=0.005) trimesters versus postpartum (3.0 mcg•hr/mL). Tenofovir AUC exceeded the target for 2/4 (50%) 2nd trimester; 27/37 (73%; 95% CI: 56%, 86%) 3rd trimester; and 27/32 (84%; 95% CI: 67%, 95%) postpartum women (p>0.05). Median 2nd/3rd trimester troughs were lower (39/54 ng/mL) than postpartum (61 ng/mL). Median 3rd trimester weight was heavier for subjects below target AUC versus those above target (97.9 vs. 74.2 kg, p = 0.006). Median ratio of cord blood to maternal concentrations was 0.88. No infants were HIV infected. Conclusions This study found lower tenofovir AUC and troughs during pregnancy. Transplacental passage with chronic TDF use during pregnancy was high. Standard TDF doses appear appropriate for most HIV-infected pregnant women but therapeutic drug monitoring with dose adjustment should be considered in pregnant women with high weight (> 90kg) or inadequate HIV RNA response. PMID:25959631

  7. Pharmacokinetic Profile of Spectinomycin in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Madhura, Dora Babu; Lee, Richard; Meibohm, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Short Summary Following intravenous (IV) administration, the pharmacokinetics of spectinomycin in rats was found to be on par with its profile in other mammalian species including humans with respect to its overall excretion and half-life at effective concentrations. This study, however, indicates that a small fraction of the spectinomycin dose is retained in peripheral tissues for a prolonged period of time at low concentrations. PMID:24020122

  8. Riociguat (BAY 63-2521) and aspirin: a randomized, pharmacodynamic, and pharmacokinetic interaction study

    PubMed Central

    Reber, Michael; Krätzschmar, Jörn; Unger, Sigrun; Mück, Wolfgang; Wensing, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In preclinical studies, drugs that increase cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels have been shown to influence platelet function/aggregation; however, the effect of riociguat on human platelets is unclear. Aspirin, a platelet inhibitor, is likely to be given concomitantly in patients receiving riociguat. It is therefore important to establish clinically whether (1) riociguat affects platelet function and (2) aspirin and riociguat interact. This randomized, open-label, crossover study investigated potential pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between these drugs in healthy male volunteers (N = 18). There were 3 treatment regimens: a single morning dose of riociguat 2.5 mg, aspirin 500 mg on 2 consecutive mornings, and both treatments together, with riociguat given on the second morning. Fifteen participants were available for pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic analysis. There was no effect of riociguat alone on bleeding time, platelet aggregation, and serum thromboxane B2 levels. The effects of aspirin on these parameters were not influenced by concomitant administration of riociguat. The pharmacokinetic profile of riociguat showed interindividual variability, which was independent of aspirin coadministration. Six of 17 participants available for safety evaluation reported at least 1 treatment-emergent adverse event. All adverse events were of mild severity, apart from 1 report of moderate headache. No serious adverse events occurred. In conclusion, riociguat demonstrated no clinically relevant pharmacodynamic or pharmacokinetic interactions with aspirin at the doses used in this study in healthy men; coadministration of riociguat and aspirin should therefore not require any dose adjustment for either drug. PMID:27162625

  9. Role of the animal model on the pharmacokinetics of equine-derived antivenoms.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Alicia; Vargas, Mariángela; Ramírez, Nils; Estrada, Ricardo; Segura, Alvaro; Herrera, María; Villalta, Mauren; Gómez, Aarón; Gutiérrez, José María; León, Guillermo

    2013-08-01

    Antivenom pharmacokinetics has been studied in heterologous models in which the animal species used as immunoglobulin source is different from that used as recipient. In these models, after intravenous administration of antivenom, the plasma concentration of immunoglobulins shows a rapid initial declining-phase followed by a slower terminal-phase, which has been associated with antivenom distribution and elimination, respectively. We have compared pharmacokinetic parameters for equine-derived antivenom in homologous (horse) and heterologous (cow) models. It was found that the maximum concentration is lower in cows than in horses. Additionally, the steady-state distribution volume is higher in cows as compared to horses. On the other hand, models were not different in the time required to reach the maximum concentration, the area under the concentration/time curve, the half-life of decay during the slowest phase, the systemic clearance and the mean residence time. Similar results were obtained in a rabbit model, in which the pharmacokinetics was also affected by passive immunization of rabbits with anti-equine IgG. We conclude that, in addition to other physiological differences (e.g. cardiac frequency, plasmatic volume, glomerular filtration rate, etc.) between animal models, the ability to remove foreign immunoglobulins might influence the way in which the plasma concentration of antivenom decreases over time, thereby distorting the pharmacokinetic predictions based on non-compartmental models. PMID:23557996

  10. Pharmacokinetics of a new ivermectin/praziquantel suspension after intramuscular administration in sheep.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shusheng; Chen, Linlin; Qian, Minyi; Hao, Lihua; Xiao, Xilong

    2016-05-15

    A new oil suspension containing 0.10% ivermectin (IVM) and 15% praziquantel (PZQ) (Tivm+pzq) for intramuscular injection was developed for sheep, and its pharmacokinetics was investigated in sheep. The quality of the new product met the technical standards set by the Ministry of Agriculture of the People's Republic of China. In pharmacokinetics, the commercially available single-component products approved by the Chinese Ministry of Agriculture and widely used in the livestock industry in China were selected as reference products (Rivm and Rpzq). The results showed that all of the IVM pharmacokinetic parameters of Tivm+pzq were similar to those of the reference. However, after adminstraion of Tivm+pzq, mean residence time (MRT) and plasma elimination half-life (t1/2z) were 20.36h and 11.65h, which were 2.61 and 3.22 times longer than those of Rpzq (7.81h and 3.62h). In summary, the MRT and t1/2z of PZQ in Tivm+pzq were prolonged and IVM pharmacokinetic parameters were similar to commerical product, therefore the new injection may be an alternative choice for sheep to control parasites sensitive to IVM and PZQ. PMID:27084471

  11. Riociguat (BAY 63-2521) and aspirin: a randomized, pharmacodynamic, and pharmacokinetic interaction study.

    PubMed

    Frey, Reiner; Reber, Michael; Krätzschmar, Jörn; Unger, Sigrun; Mück, Wolfgang; Wensing, Georg

    2016-03-01

    In preclinical studies, drugs that increase cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels have been shown to influence platelet function/aggregation; however, the effect of riociguat on human platelets is unclear. Aspirin, a platelet inhibitor, is likely to be given concomitantly in patients receiving riociguat. It is therefore important to establish clinically whether (1) riociguat affects platelet function and (2) aspirin and riociguat interact. This randomized, open-label, crossover study investigated potential pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between these drugs in healthy male volunteers (N = 18). There were 3 treatment regimens: a single morning dose of riociguat 2.5 mg, aspirin 500 mg on 2 consecutive mornings, and both treatments together, with riociguat given on the second morning. Fifteen participants were available for pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic analysis. There was no effect of riociguat alone on bleeding time, platelet aggregation, and serum thromboxane B2 levels. The effects of aspirin on these parameters were not influenced by concomitant administration of riociguat. The pharmacokinetic profile of riociguat showed interindividual variability, which was independent of aspirin coadministration. Six of 17 participants available for safety evaluation reported at least 1 treatment-emergent adverse event. All adverse events were of mild severity, apart from 1 report of moderate headache. No serious adverse events occurred. In conclusion, riociguat demonstrated no clinically relevant pharmacodynamic or pharmacokinetic interactions with aspirin at the doses used in this study in healthy men; coadministration of riociguat and aspirin should therefore not require any dose adjustment for either drug. PMID:27162625

  12. Pharmacokinetics of intravitreal antibiotics in endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Intravitreal antibiotics are the mainstay of treatment in the management of infectious endophthalmitis. Basic knowledge of the commonly used intravitreal antibiotics, which includes their pharmacokinetics, half-life, duration of action and clearance, is essential for elimination of intraocular infection without any iatrogenic adverse effect to the ocular tissue. Various drugs have been studied over the past century to achieve this goal. We performed a comprehensive review of the antibiotics which have been used for intravitreal route and the pharmacokinetic factors influencing the drug delivery and safety profile of these antibiotics. Using online resources like PubMed and Google Scholar, articles were reviewed. The articles were confined to the English language only. We present a broad overview of pharmacokinetic concepts fundamental for use of intravitreal antibiotics in endophthalmitis along with a tabulated compendium of the intravitreal antibiotics using available literature. Recent advances for increasing bioavailability of antibiotics to the posterior segment with the development of controlled drug delivery devices are also described. PMID:25667683

  13. Pharmacokinetics of ketoprofen syrup in small children.

    PubMed

    Kokki, H; Le Liboux, A; Jekunen, A; Montay, G; Heikkinen, M

    2000-04-01

    Ketoprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antipyretic properties. Its pharmacokinetics has not been determined in small children. The objective here was to determine the pharmacokinetics of ketoprofen syrup, 0.5 mg/kg, in two groups of 10 children. Group 1 was from ages 6 months up to 2 years (7/10 younger than 1 year), and Group 2 was from ages 2 to 7 years. Venous blood samples were collected before drug administration and 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 hours after. A validated HPLC method was used to determine plasma levels of ketoprofen. The lower limit of quantification was 0.02 microgram/ml of plasma. Ketoprofen syrup was absorbed rapidly, the plasma level reaching its maximum at 0.5 hours, with C0.5 hours = 3 micrograms/ml. The pharmacokinetics was similar between the two groups of children. The elimination half-life, 2.0 hours in Group 1 or 1.9 hours in Group 2, was similar to that reported in adults. PMID:10761162

  14. Clinical pharmacokinetics in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Rane, A; Wilson, J T

    1976-01-01

    Wide variations in drug dose recommendations for children of the same or different ages reflect the inadequacy of data on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in children. Selected aspects of available literature on pharmacokinetics of drugs used in older infants and children has been reviewed with special attention to calculation of an age-appropriate dose. During the neonatal period and early infancy the elimination of many drugs that are excreted in the urine in unchanged form is restricted by the immaturity of glomerular filtration and renal tubular secretion. On the other hand, in late infancy and/or in childhood, a similar or greater rate of elimination from plasma than in adults has been observed for many drugs, notably digoxin, phenobarbitone, phenytoin, carbamazepine, ethosuximide, diazoxide, clindamycin and propoxyphene. Consistent with this, it has been shown that some drugs exhibit a lower plasma level/dose ratio in infancy and early childhood as compared with the adult. This is true for phenobarbitone, phenytoin and ethosuximide. Some age groups of children remain uninvestigated with regard to pharmacokinetics, even for the drugs reviewed. Therefore, pediatric therapy remains empirically based for many drugs. PMID:1017153

  15. A PC-based graphical simulator for physiological pharmacokinetic models.

    PubMed

    Wada, D R; Stanski, D R; Ebling, W F

    1995-04-01

    Since many intravenous anesthetic drugs alter blood flows, physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models describing drug disposition may be time-varying. Using the commercially available programming software MATLAB, a platform to simulate time-varying physiological pharmacokinetic models was developed. The platform is based upon a library of pharmacokinetic blocks which mimic physiological structure. The blocks can be linked together flexibly to form models for different drugs. Because of MATLAB's additional numerical capabilities (e.g. non-linear optimization), the platform provides a complete graphical microcomputer-based tool for physiologic pharmacokinetic modeling. PMID:7656558

  16. Pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of miglustat in the treatment of pediatric patients with GM2 gangliosidosis.

    PubMed

    Maegawa, Gustavo H B; van Giersbergen, Paul L M; Yang, Sandra; Banwell, Brenda; Morgan, Christopher P; Dingemanse, Jasper; Tifft, Cynthia J; Clarke, Joe T R

    2009-08-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis (GM2g) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by deficiency of lysosomal beta-hexosaminidase A, resulting in accumulation of GM2 ganglioside, principally in the brain. Substrate reduction therapy is currently under investigation as a treatment. The study investigated the pharmacokinetics and safety of miglustat given as single and multiple doses in infantile and juvenile GM2g patients for 6- and 24-months, respectively. Eleven patients with infantile (n = 6) and juvenile (n = 5) GM2g received oral miglustat at 30-200 mg t.i.d. adjusted to the body surface area. Patients underwent pharmacokinetic assessments on day 1 and at month 3. The pharmacokinetics of miglustat were described by a 2-compartmental model with a lag time, median time to maximum concentration of 2.5 h, and terminal half-life of about 10 h. The pharmacokinetics were time-independent, and did not differ between infantile and juvenile cohorts. The accumulation index was 1.7. Among infantile GM2g patients, the major drug-related adverse events (DRAEs) were abdominal discomfort and flatulence. In the juvenile group, however, the major DRAEs observed were diarrhea and weight loss. One juvenile patient developed peripheral neuropathy, and others showed progression of already established neuropathy, which was judged to be part of the natural progression of the disease. Some mild laboratory abnormalities observed were either transient or attributable to concomitant medications. Miglustat showed similar pharmacokinetic parameters in all patients, with no specific difference between infantile and juvenile forms. Miglustat was shown to be a safe drug, with mild to moderate diarrhea, as an age-dependent DRAE, which was controlled by dietary modification. PMID:19447653

  17. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of IPX066: Evaluation of Dose Proportionality and Effect of Food in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hsuan-Ming; Hsu, Ann; Gupta, Suneel; Modi, Nishit B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives IPX066 is an oral, extended-release capsule formulation of carbidopa-levodopa (CD-LD) available in 4 strengths. The goals of this investigation were to assess the dose proportionality of IPX066 and to study the effects of a high-fat, high-calorie meal and of sprinkling the capsule contents on applesauce on the pharmacokinetics of IPX066 in healthy volunteers. Methods Three open-label studies were conducted. In the first study, subjects received 1 capsule of each IPX066 strength (23.75–95, 36.25–145, 48.75–195, and 61.25–245 mg of CD-LD). In the second study, subjects received 1 and 2 capsules of IPX066 245-mg LD under fasting conditions. In the third study, subjects received 2 capsules of IPX066 245-mg LD under 3 conditions: fasting; following a high-fat, high-calorie breakfast; and with the capsule contents sprinkled on applesauce under fasting conditions. Results Peak plasma concentrations (Cmax) and systemic exposure (AUCt, AUCinf) for LD and CD increased dose-proportionally over the range of the IPX066 capsule strengths. Comparison of 1 and 2 IPX066 245-mg LD capsules showed dose-proportional pharmacokinetics for Cmax and AUCt. Sprinkling the capsule contents on applesauce did not affect the pharmacokinetics. A high-fat, high-calorie meal delayed the initial increase in LD concentration by approximately 1 to 2 hours, reduced Cmax by 21%, and increased AUCinf by 13% compared with the fasted state. Conclusions IPX066 shows dose-proportional pharmacokinetics. Sprinkling the capsule contents on applesauce does not affect the pharmacokinetics; a high-fat, high-calorie meal delayed absorption by 1 to 2 hours, slightly reduced Cmax, and slightly increased extent of absorption. PMID:26626430

  18. Effect of fluvoxamine on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Yang, Yu; Fang, Chunxue; Zhao, Jincheng; Han, Mei; Zhu, Qiushuang; Bai, Xue; Liu, Mingyuan; Yang, Guangyuan

    2015-01-01

    1. Fluvoxamine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), is often coprescribed with clopidogrel for the treatment of ischemic vascular diseases. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of fluvoxamine on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel. 2. Twelve male rats were employed to investigate the effect of fluvoxamine on the pharmacokinetics of clopidogrel in vivo. Clopidogrel carboxylic acid was used for the pharmacokinetic study of clopidogrel. 3. After pretreatment with high dose of fluvoxamine (27 mg/kg), there were significant increases in the AUC0-t (from 9850±4060 to 27,300±6910 µg/l h; p<0.05), AUC0-∞ (from 9850±4060 to 27,600±6800 µg/l h; p<0.05) and t1/2 (from 2.07±0.0942 to 7.49±1.22 h; p<0.05) of clopidogrel carboxylic acid. The pharmacokinetic data for clopidogrel carboxylic acid showed significant decreases in VLz/F (from 0.765±0.299 to 0.256±0.0594 l/kg; p<0.05) after pretreatment with high dose of fluvoxamine. Pharmacodynamic studies that measure platelet aggregation percentage (from 21.63±6.05% to 45.98±5.11%; p<0.01) show that high doses of fluvoxamine significantly inhibit the effect of clopidogrel. 4. In conclusion, the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel were significantly affected by high doses of fluvoxamine. This study indicated that potential drug-drug interaction between fluvoxamine and clopidogrel should be taken into consideration in clinical use. PMID:26068527

  19. Proliferation dangers associated with nuclear medicine: getting weapons-grade uranium out of radiopharmaceutical production.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bill; Ruff, Tilman A

    2007-01-01

    Abolishing the threat of nuclear war requires the outlawing of nuclear weapons and dismantling current nuclear weapon stockpiles, but also depends on eliminating access to fissile material (nuclear weapon fuel). The near-universal use of weapons-grade, highly enriched uranium (HEU) to produce radiopharmaceuticals is a significant proliferation hazard. Health professionals have a strategic opportunity and obligation to progress the elimination of medically-related commerce in HEU, closing one of the most vulnerable pathways to the much-feared 'terrorist bomb'. PMID:17987979

  20. USCEA/NIST measurement assurance programs for the radiopharmaceutical and nuclear power industries

    SciTech Connect

    Golas, D.B.

    1993-12-31

    In cooperation with the U.S. Council for Energy Awareness (USCEA), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) supervises and administers two measurement assurance programs for radioactivity measurement traceability. One, in existence since the mid 1970s, provides traceability to suppliers of radiochemicals and radiopharmaceuticals, dose calibrators, and nuclear pharmacy services. The second program, begun in 1987, provides traceability to the nuclear power industry for utilities, source suppliers, and service laboratories. Each program is described, and the results of measurements of samples of known, but undisclosed activity, prepared at NIST and measured by the participants are presented.

  1. Calculating patient-specific doses in X-ray diagnostics and from radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampinen, Juha Sakari

    2000-06-01

    The risk associated with exposure to ionising radiation is dependent on the characteristics of the exposed individual. The size and structure of the individual influences the absorbed dose distribution in the organs. Traditional methods used to calculate the patient organ doses are based on standardised calculation phantoms, which neglect the variance of the patient size or even sex. Methods for patient specific dosimetry in the fields of X-ray diagnostics and diagnostic and therapeutic use of radiopharmaceuticals were proposed in this thesis. A computer program, ODS-60, for calculating organ doses from diagnostic X-ray exposures was presented. The calculation is done in a patient specific phantom with depth dose and profile algorithms fitted to Monte Carlo simulation data from a previous study. Improvements to the version reported earlier were introduced, e.g. bone attenuation was implemented. The applicability of the program to determine patient doses from complex X-ray examinations (barium enema examination) was studied. The conversion equations derived for female and male patients as a function of patient weight gave the smallest deviation from the actual patient doses when compared to previous studies. Another computer program, Intdose, was presented for calculation of the dose distribution from radiopharmaceuticals. The calculation is based on convolution of an isotope specific point dose kernel with activity distribution, obtained from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Anatomical information is taken from magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT) images. According to a phantom study, Intdose agreed within 3% with measurements. For volunteers administered diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals, the results given by Intdose were found to agree with traditional methods in cases of medium sized patients. For patients undergoing systemic radiation therapy, the results by Intdose differed from measurements due to dynamic biodistribution

  2. Application of back-propagation artificial neural network and curve estimation in pharmacokinetics of losartan in rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bin; Lin, Gaotong; Liu, Xianyun; Ma, Jianshe; Wang, Xianchuan; Lin, Feiyan; Hu, Lufeng

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop pharmacokinetic model, a well-known multilayer feed-forward algorithm back-propagation artificial neural networks (BP-ANN) was applied to the pharmacokinetics of losartan in rabbit. The plasma concentrations of losartan in twelve rabbits, which were divided into two groups and given losartan 2 mg/kg by intravenous (Iv) and intragastrical (Ig) administration, were determined by LC-MS. The BP-ANN model included one input layer, hidden layers, and one output layer was constructed and compared with curve estimation based on the time-concentration data of losartan. The results showed the BP-ANN model had high goodness of fit index and good coherence (R > 0.99) between forecasted concentration and measured concentration both in Iv and Ig administration. The residuals of each concentrations generated by BP-ANN model were all smaller than Curve estimation. The pharmacokinetic result showed there was no significant difference between measured and simulated pharmacokinetic parameters including AUC(0-t), AUC(0-∞), MRT(0-t), MRT(0-∞), T1/2 V and Cmax (P > 0.05). In conclusion, the BP-ANN model has remarkably accurate predictions ability, which better than Curve estimation, and can be used as a utility tool in pharmacokinetic experiment. PMID:26885213

  3. 62Zn-EDDA: a radiopharmaceutical for pancreatic functional diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fujibayashi, Y; Saji, H; Yomoda, I; Kawai, K; Horiuchi, K; Adachi, H; Torizuka, K; Yokoyama, A

    1986-01-01

    As Zn is closely associated with the exocrine and endocrine functions of the pancreas, exploitation of Zn metabolism for anatomical and functional diagnosis was conceived, namely with the recent availability of positron emitting 62Zn (t1/2 = 9 h). In the present paper, response changes in Zn biodistribution (mice) and Zn excretion through the pancreatic duct (rats) due to the stimulation of gastro-intestinal hormones like secretin, CCK-PZ (exocrine stimulation) and glucose (endocrine stimulation) were studied. Under these stimuli, the pancreatic secretion of radioactive Zn through cannulated pancreatic duct showed increased Zn secretion only under the CCK-PZ effect, 3 h post 65Zn (t1/2 = 270 d) injection. Tissue biodistribution in mice pre-injected with 65Zn showed pancreas specific decrease of radioactive Zn whenever a gastro-intestinal hormone was post-administered, whereas the glucose effect was negligible. Thus, the effective mobilization of the injected radioactive Zn, upon exocrine stimulation, represented by CCK-PZ, favored the exploration of a functional study of the pancreas with the positron computed tomograph (PCT) using short lived nuclide labeled 62Zn-EDDA in dog. Evidence of the applicability of this system in regional function studies of the pancreas was obtained. Demonstration of Zn participation in the exocrine function of the pancreas in-vivo holds considerable promise for diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. PMID:3086246

  4. Clinical pharmacokinetics of new-generation antiepileptic drugs at the extremes of age: an update.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Perucca, Emilio

    2013-08-01

    Epilepsies occur across the entire age range, and their incidence peaks in the first years of life and in the elderly. Therefore, antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are commonly used at the extremes of age. Rational prescribing in these age groups requires not only an understanding of the drugs' pharmacodynamic properties, but also careful consideration of potential age-related changes in their pharmacokinetic profile. The present article, which updates a review published in 2006 in this journal, focuses on recent findings on the pharmacokinetics of new-generation AEDs in neonates, infants, children, and the elderly. Significant new information on the pharmacokinetics of new AEDs in the perinatal period has been acquired, particularly for lamotrigine and levetiracetam. As a result of slow maturation of the enzymes involved in glucuronide conjugation, lamotrigine elimination occurs at a particularly slow rate in neonates, and becomes gradually more efficient during the first months of life. In the case of levetiracetam, elimination occurs primarily by renal excretion and is also slow at birth, but drug clearance increases rapidly thereafter and can even double within 1 week. In general, infants older than 2-3 months and children show higher drug clearance (normalized for body weight) than adults. This pattern was confirmed in recent studies that investigated the pediatric pharmacokinetics of several new AEDs, including levetiracetam, rufinamide, stiripentol, and eslicarbazepine acetate. At the other extreme of age, in the elderly, drug clearance is generally reduced compared with younger adults because of less efficient drug-metabolizing activity, decreased renal function, or both. This general pattern, described previously for several AEDs, was confirmed in recent studies on the effect of old age on the clearance of felbamate, levetiracetam, pregabalin, lacosamide, and retigabine. For those drugs which are predominantly eliminated by renal excretion, aging

  5. {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceuticals for brain perfusion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, E.; Volkert, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    It is well established that small, neutral, lipophilic technetium complexes can diffuse into the brain and then be trapped intracellularly by a variety of mechanisms. A more detailed understanding of the structural and chemical parameters which promote efficient diffusion into the brain, and which underlie the trapping mechanisms, will be necessary to delineate the clinical relevance of current agents, and to design improved technetium 99 pharmaceuticals. Current technetium 99 brain-perfusion imaging agents do not show ideal characteristics of brain uptake and retention. Furthermore, significant fractions of the technetium 99 complexes are lost between site of injection and the brain. Thus, it is difficult to use these current agents to quantitate regional cerebral blood flow. Nevertheless, these agents are proving extremely valuable for the SPECT evaluation of abnormalities in brain perfusion patients with neurological disorders.

  6. A strategy for the study of cerebral amino acid transport using iodine-123-labeled amino acid radiopharmaceutical: 3-iodo-alpha-methyl-L-tyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, K.; Fujibayashi, Y.; Saji, H.; Yonekura, Y.; Konishi, J.; Kubodera, A.; Yokoyama, A. )

    1991-05-01

    We examined the brain accumulation of iodine-123-iodo-alpha-methyl-L-tyrosine ({sup 123}I-L-AMT) in mice and rats. I-L-AMT showed high brain accumulation in mice, and in rats; rat brain uptake index exceeded that of {sup 14}C-L-tyrosine. The brain uptake index and the brain slice studies indicated the affinity of I-L-AMT for carrier-mediated and stereoselective active transport systems, respectively; both operating across the blood-brain barrier and cell membranes of the brain. The tissue homogenate analysis revealed that most of the accumulated radioactivity belonged to intact I-L-AMT, an indication of its stability. Thus, {sup 123}I-L-AMT appears to be a useful radiopharmaceutical for the selective measurement of cerebral amino acid transport.

  7. A quick review of carbamazepine pharmacokinetics in epilepsy from 1953 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Tolou-Ghamari, Zahra; Zare, Mohammad; Habibabadi, Jafar Mehvari; Najafi, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Carbamazepine has been used as AEDs since 1965, and is most effective against partial seizures. Two basic mechanisms of action have been proposed: 1) enhancement of sodium channel inactivation by reducing high-frequency repetitive firing of action potentials, 2) and action on synaptic transmission. The aim of this study was to provide a review of carbamazepine pharmacokinetics and its management guidelines in Iranian epileptic population. Materials and Methods: Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO), Web of Science were searched; 1600, 722 and 167 research and review articles relevant to the topics; carbamazepine pharmacokinetics, carbamazepine pharmacokinetics in epilepsy and review on carbamazepine pharmacokinetics in epilepsy were found, respectively. Results: Carbamazepine is highly bound to plasma proteins. In patients the protein-bound fraction ranged from 75-80% of the total plasma concentration. Bioavailability ranges from 75-85%. The rate or extent of absorption was not be affected by food. It is completely metabolized and the main metabolite is carbamazepine-epoxide (CBZ-E). Carbamazepine induces its own metabolism, leading to increased clearance, shortened serum half-life, and progressive decrease in serum levels. Increases in daily dosage are necessary to maintain plasma concentration. Severe liver dysfunction may cause disordered pharmacokinetics. In cardiac failure, congestion of major vital organs, including kidneys, may result in abnormally slow absorption and metabolism. Conclusion: Carbamazepine shows variability due to its narrow therapeutic window. Therefore clinical management in a3n Iranian epileptic population should focus on results derived from therapeutic drug monitoring in order to reduce inter and intra- individual variability in plasma drug concentrations. PMID:23961295

  8. The role of digitalis pharmacokinetics in converting atrial fibrillation and flutter to regular sinus rhythm.

    PubMed

    Jelliffe, Roger W

    2014-05-01

    This report examined the role of digitalis pharmacokinetics in helping to guide therapy with digitalis glycosides with regard to converting atrial fibrillation (AF) or flutter to regular sinus rhythm (RSR). Pharmacokinetic models of digitoxin and digoxin, containing a peripheral non-serum effect compartment, were used to analyze outcomes in a non-systematic literature review of five clinical studies, using the computed concentrations of digitoxin and digoxin in the effect compartment of these models in an analysis of their outcomes. Four cases treated by the author were similarly examined. Three literature studies showed results no different from placebo. Dosage regimens achieved ≤11 ng/g in the model's peripheral compartment. However, two other studies achieved significant conversion to RSR. Their peripheral concentrations were 9-14 ng/g. In the four patients treated by the author, three converted using classical clinical titration with incremental doses, plus therapeutic drug monitoring and pharmacokinetic guidance from the models for maintenance dosage. They converted at peripheral concentrations of 9-18 ng/g, similar to the two studies above. No toxicity was seen. Successful maintenance was achieved, using the models and their pharmacokinetic guidance, by giving somewhat larger than average recommended dosage regimens in order to maintain peripheral concentrations present at conversion. The fourth patient did not convert, but only reached peripheral concentrations of 6-7 ng/g, similar to the studies in which conversion was no better than placebo. Pharmacokinetic analysis and guidance play a highly significant role in converting AF to RSR. To the author's knowledge, this has not been specifically described before. In my experience, conversion of AF or flutter to RSR does not occur until peripheral concentrations of 9-18 ng/g are reached. Results in the four cases correlated well with the literature findings. More work is needed to further evaluate these

  9. Pharmacokinetics, intestinal absorption and microbial metabolism of single platycodin D in comparison to Platycodi radix extract

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jinjun; Zou, Jiashuang; Xie, Tong; Kang, An; Zhou, Wei; Deng, Haishan; Mao, Yancao; Di, Liuqing; Wang, Shouchuan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Platycodi radix, the dried root of Platycodon grandiflorum A. DC, has been widely used as food and herb medicine for treating cough, cold and other respiratory ailments, and platycodin D (PD) is one of the most important compounds in Platycodi Radix. Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetic characteristics, intestinal absorption and microbial metabolism of PD in monomer with that in Platycodi radix extract (PRE). Materials and Methods: In the pharmacokinetic study, the concentrations of PD in rat plasma were determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and the main pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by data analysis software (DAS). Besides, in vitro Caco-2 cells and fecal lysate were performed to investigate the intestinal absorption and metabolism, respectively. Results: The results from pharmacokinetics showed that the area under the curve, the peak concentration the time to reach peak concentration and mean residence time of PD in PRE were enhanced significantly compared with that in single PD. Caco-2 cells transport study indicated that the absorption of PD both in monomer and in PRE were poor owning that the permeability of PD were <1/106 cm/s. The hydrolysis degree of PD in PRE was significantly lower than that in monomer PD in fecal lysate, which might be illustrated by the other ingredients in PRE influenced the hydrolysis of PD via gut microbiota. Conclusion: These findings indicated that the difference of microbial metabolism, not apparent absorption in intestine for PD between in monomer and in PRE contributed to their pharmacokinetic difference. PMID:26600720

  10. Pharmacokinetic Comparison of Oral Bacampicillin and Parenteral Ampicillin

    PubMed Central

    Bergan, Tom

    1978-01-01

    Bacampicillin is a new oral prodrug which is rapidly converted to ampicillin during absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. High serum peaks of ampicillin are obtained. Bacampicillin orally was compared pharmacokinetically with parenteral ampicillin (intravenously and intramuscularly). A cross-over study on healthy volunteers showed that ampicillin concentrations after equimolar doses of bacampicillin orally and ampicillin intramuscularly were of the same order. The mean of the individual peak values (regardless of time of occurrence) after a dose of 800 mg of bacampicillin was 13.1 ± 3.8 μg/ml. Absorption rates of the two doses were similar, as were their distribution volumes (approximately 25% of the body weight). Bioavailability was 87% for bacampicillin, compared to 71% for ampicillin. PMID:677863

  11. How MDMA's pharmacology and pharmacokinetics drive desired effects and harms.

    PubMed

    Michael White, C

    2014-03-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is an agent of abuse that has been used by over 16 million Americans. Increased energy, elevated mood, bonding with others, and psychedelic effects are desired effects while liver damage, extended depressed mood, sexual assault, rhabdomyolysis, serotonin syndrome, multiorgan failure, cardiovascular events, arrhythmias, and death are possible adverse effects. These desirable and adverse effects of MDMA are extensions of its fascinating pharmacologic and pharmacokinetic profile. In addition to methamphatemine like effects, MDMA also has mescaline like effects and increases the release of cortisol, oxytocin, and antidiuretic hormone. The desirable effects of MDMA are accentuated by the rave or electronic dance music scene where warm temperatures, vigorous dancing, loud music, and light shows accentuate some of the responses. However, the same environment increases the risk of certain harms. Knowledge of the constellation of these factors is needed for education, prevention of harm, and treatment. PMID:24431106

  12. New peptide deformylase inhibitors design, synthesis and pharmacokinetic assessment.

    PubMed

    Lv, Fengping; Chen, Chen; Tang, Yang; Wei, Jianhai; Zhu, Tong; Hu, Wenhao

    2016-08-01

    The docking approach for the screening of designed small molecule ligands, led to the identification of a critical arginine residue in peptide deformylase for spiro cyclopropyl PDF inhibitor's extra hydrophobic binding, providing us a useful tool for searching more efficient PDF inhibitors to fight for horrifying antibiotics resistance. Further synthetic modification was undertaken to optimize the potency of amide compounds. To lower metabolic susceptibility and in turn reduce unwanted metabolic toxicity that was observed clinically, while retaining desired antibacterial activity, the use of azoles as amide bioisosteres had also been investigated. After the completion of chemical synthesis, all the compounds were evaluated through in vitro antibacterial activity assay, some of which were further subject to in vivo rat pharmacokinetic assessment. Those findings in this letter showed that spiro cyclopropyl proline N-formyl hydroxylamines, and especially the bioisosteric azoles, can represent a promising class of PDF inhibitors. PMID:27293070

  13. Clinical pharmacokinetics of albendazole in children with neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Jung, H; Sánchez, M; González-Astiazarán, A; Martínez, J M; Suástegui, R; González-Esquivel, D F

    1997-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of albendazole sulphoxide, the main metabolite of albendazole, were studied in eight children with brain cysticercosis. Albendazole was given as a single oral dose of 15 mg per kg body weight (Zentel suspension; Smith Kline & Beecham, Philadelphia, PA). Blood samples were taken during 24 h and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. Plasma levels showed great interindividual variation. Maximum plasma levels for albendazole sulphoxide ranged from 0.2-1.0 microg/mL. A double peak was found in four children. The half-life for albendazole sulphoxide was from 2.3-8.3 hours and mean residence time values were from 5. 1-13.6 hours. These values are shorter than those found in adults. The results suggest that when treating children with neurocysticercosis, albendazole should be administered three times a day rather than twice daily as is currently done in Mexico. PMID:10423586

  14. Radiopharmaceuticals for radiation synovectomy: Evaluation of two yttrium-90 particulate agents

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.A.; Chinol, M.

    1989-06-01

    Radiation synovectomy, a noninvasive therapeutic alternative to surgical synovectomy, has not gained widespread acceptance in the United States because of the lack of a suitable radiopharmaceutical. Two new radioactive particles, (/sup 90/Y)Ca oxalate and (/sup 90/Y)ferric hydroxide macroaggregates (FHMA), were developed in our laboratory and evaluated for size, stability, and joint leakage. More than 90% of the (/sup 90/Y)Ca oxalate particles were in the optimal size range of 1-10 microns, and the unbound activity in serum and synovial fluid was 3.7% to 5.0%. Following injection in rabbit knees, leakage of (/sup 90/Y)Ca oxalate was 5 +/- 2%, with localization primarily in the bone and virtually no uptake by the lymph nodes or liver. Yttrium-90 FHMA particles were larger (95% greater than 10 microns), and at least on a microscopic level, appeared to distribute homogeneously over the articular surface. Leakage of (/sup 90/Y)FHMA was initially less but eventually slightly exceeded that of (/sup 90/Y)Ca oxalate. Nevertheless, both radiopharmaceuticals can provide a satisfactory therapeutic dose to the knee with less than half the leakage and a marked reduction in absorbed dose to nontarget tissues compared to previously tested agents. Ease of preparation, physical characteristics of the /sup 90/Y beta ray, and apparent lack of substantial leakage from the joint make these agents extremely attractive for clinical evaluation in rheumatoid arthritis patients who are unresponsive to medical therapy.

  15. Relationship between lipophilicity and brain extraction of C-11-labeled radiopharmaceuticals. [Baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Dischino, D.D.; Welch, M.J.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Raichle, M.E.

    1983-11-01

    The brain extraction of fifteen C-11-labeled compounds during a single capillary transit was studied in adult baboons by external detection of these tracers after injection into the internal carotid artery. The log P/sub oct/ (partition coefficient for octanol/water) values of these compounds range from -0.7 to greater than 4.0. A parabolic relationship was found between the log P/sub oct/value of the C-11-labeled compounds and the fraction of the radiopharmaceutical entering the brain. Compounds with log P/sub oct/ values between 0.9 and 2.5 were found to pass freely across the blood-brain barrier at a cerebral blood flow of 100 ml-min/sup -1/-hg/sup -1/. An apparently decreased extraction of very lipophilic compounds was shown to be related to binding of the tracer to blood components and macromolecules (red blood cells, albumin, etc.). These data suggest that a radiopharmaceutical designed to measure blood flow should have a log P/sub oct/ value of between 0.9 and 2.5.

  16. Radiation for bone metastases: conventional techniques and the role of systemic radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Janjan, N A

    1997-10-15

    Pain management often is difficult in patients with bone metastases. Metastatic disease represents >40% of oncologic practice, and >70% of patients with metastatic disease have uncontrolled cancer-related pain. Significant morbidity caused by pathologic fracture and spinal cord compression can result from untreated bone metastases. Representing both a manifestation of systemic disease as well as causing localized symptoms, bone metastases require a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. Radiation therapy provides both localized and systemic treatment options in addition to chemohormonal therapies and surgery. External beam irradiation provides palliation in >70% of patients through tumor regression of a localized lesion. Systemic radiopharmaceuticals treat multifocal disease either alone or as an adjuvant to external beam irradiation. Efficient and comprehensive management of bone metastases is imperative because of the associated symptoms, prior therapies, complex underlying medical problems, and clinical presentations that often require emergent interventions. Intensification of pain may be observed with hormonal therapy and systemic radiopharmaceuticals. Symptomatic relief from antineoplastic therapies generally requires 4-12 weeks and may be related to reossification. Symptoms, occurring due to the disease and/or while awaiting response to therapy, must be aggressively managed. Persistent or recurrent pain after therapy may be due to bony instability or fracture before reossification occurs. An Interdisciplinary Bone Metastases Clinic, with representatives from Diagnostic Radiology, Medical Oncology, Nuclear Medicine, Orthopedic Surgery, Pain and Symptom Management, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, and Radiation Oncology, was developed that allows coordinated evaluation, treatment, and symptom management of these complex clinical presentations. PMID:9362430

  17. Harvard--MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    This report describes progress on five projects. The first project showed a 1000 fold concentration of the cationic complex {sup 99m}Tc (MIBI) in heart cell mitochondria vs heart cell cytoplasm, as determined by high resolution electron probe microanalysis. Additional technetium-99m based complexes are being developed and tested. The second project involves evaluating technetium acetylacteonates as potential indicators of cerebral blood flow. An intermediate in the synthesis of a technetium porphyrin complex has been synthesized; an oxotechnetium(V)-2,4-pentanedione complex has been prepared and is currently being characterized. The third project involves using radio labelled antibodies for diagnosis and treatment of cancer. An early discovery was that chloramine-T based iodination protocols resulted in a reversal of the charge on mouse lgGs. Immunoperoxidase-labelled monoclonal antibody MOv 18 was shown to bind specifically to the most frequent ovarian aderon carcinomas, and not to healthy tissue, making this antibody a good candidate for immunotherapy or immunodetection. Work on a specific immunotherapy protocol suffered a setback when one reagent, a {sup 125}I-biotin complex, proved to be unstable in vivo. The fourth project involves labelling antibodies with positron emitting radionuclides. Radiofluorination was accomplished through reductive alkylation of {sup 18}F-aldehyde, or pentafluorophenyl esters. Radioiodination was accomplished using alkyl-tin derivation exchange. The fifth project examined antibody modification for use in radioimmune imaging. Technetium-99m-labelled lgG was shown to be biologically equivalent to Indium-III-labelled lgG for imaging focal sites of inflamation. Also, Indium III labelling of small bioactive peptides was examined as a means of imaging important physiological processes. 44 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Reproducibility of Histogram Analysis on Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-yi; Su, Zi-hua; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhi-peng; Duan, Fei-xue; Song, Yuan-yuan; Li, Lu; Wang, Ying-wei; Ma, Xin; Guo, Ai-tao; Ma, Lin; Ye, Hui-yi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been increasingly used to evaluate the permeability of tumor vessel. Histogram metrics are a recognized promising method of quantitative MR imaging that has been recently introduced in analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters in oncology due to tumor heterogeneity. In this study, 21 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system. Extended Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters of RCC tumors. Mean value and histogram metrics (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) of each pharmacokinetic parameter were generated automatically using ImageJ software. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility and scan–rescan reproducibility were evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Our results demonstrated that the histogram method (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) was not superior to the conventional Mean value method in reproducibility evaluation on DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters (K trans & Ve) in renal cell carcinoma, especially for Skewness and Kurtosis which showed lower intra-, inter-observer and scan-rescan reproducibility than Mean value. Our findings suggest that additional studies are necessary before wide incorporation of histogram metrics in quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:27380733

  19. Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Reproducibility of Histogram Analysis on Pharmacokinetic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Yi; Su, Zi-Hua; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhi-Peng; Duan, Fei-Xue; Song, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Lu; Wang, Ying-Wei; Ma, Xin; Guo, Ai-Tao; Ma, Lin; Ye, Hui-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been increasingly used to evaluate the permeability of tumor vessel. Histogram metrics are a recognized promising method of quantitative MR imaging that has been recently introduced in analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters in oncology due to tumor heterogeneity. In this study, 21 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system. Extended Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters of RCC tumors. Mean value and histogram metrics (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) of each pharmacokinetic parameter were generated automatically using ImageJ software. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility and scan-rescan reproducibility were evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Our results demonstrated that the histogram method (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) was not superior to the conventional Mean value method in reproducibility evaluation on DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters (K( trans) &Ve) in renal cell carcinoma, especially for Skewness and Kurtosis which showed lower intra-, inter-observer and scan-rescan reproducibility than Mean value. Our findings suggest that additional studies are necessary before wide incorporation of histogram metrics in quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:27380733

  20. Physiologically based modeling of the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen and its major metabolites in humans using a Bayesian population approach.

    PubMed

    Zurlinden, Todd J; Reisfeld, Brad

    2016-06-01

    The principal aim of this study was to develop, validate, and demonstrate a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model to predict and characterize the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of acetaminophen (APAP) in humans. A PBPK model was created that included pharmacologically and toxicologically relevant tissue compartments and incorporated mechanistic descriptions of the absorption and metabolism of APAP, such as gastric emptying time, cofactor kinetics, and transporter-mediated movement of conjugated metabolites in the liver. Through the use of a hierarchical Bayesian framework, unknown model parameters were estimated using a large training set of data from human pharmacokinetic studies, resulting in parameter distributions that account for data uncertainty and inter-study variability. Predictions from the model showed good agreement to a diverse test set of data across several measures, including plasma concentrations over time, renal clearance, APAP absorption, and pharmacokinetic and exposure metrics. The utility of the model was then demonstrated through predictions of cofactor depletion, dose response of several pharmacokinetic endpoints, and the relationship between APAP biomarker levels in the plasma and those in the liver. The model addressed several limitations in previous PBPK models for APAP, and it is anticipated that it will be useful in predicting the pharmacokinetics of APAP in a number of contexts, such as extrapolating across doses, estimating internal concentrations, quantifying population variability, assessing possible impacts of drug coadministration, and, when coupled with a suitable pharmacodynamic model, predicting toxicity. PMID:25636597

  1. Preparation, pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of baicalin-loaded liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yumeng; Guo, Jianmin; Zheng, Xiaoli; Wu, Jun; Zhou, Yang; Yu, Yu; Ye, Yun; Zhang, Liangke; Zhao, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Baicalin (BA) is a major constituent of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, a medicinal herb. Previous pharmacokinetic studies of BA showed its low oral bioavailability. The aim of the present study was to develop a novel BA-loaded liposome (BA-LP) to enhance oral bioavailability. BA-LP, composed of BA, Tween® 80, Phospholipon® 90H, and citric acid at weight ratio of 96/50/96/50, respectively, was prepared by the effervescent dispersion technique and characterized in terms of morphology, size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, and the in vitro release. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies were carried out in rats after oral administration of BA-LP and a carboxymethyl cellulose suspension containing BA (BA-CMC) as a control. BA-LP exhibited a spherical shape by transmission electron microscopy observation. BA-LP had a mean particle size of 373±15.5 nm, zeta potential of −20.1±0.22 mV, and encapsulation efficiency of 82.7%±0.59%. The BA-LP showed a sustained-release behavior, and the in vitro drug-release kinetic model fit well with the Weibull distribution equation: lnln (1/(1−Q)) =0.609 lnt −1.230 (r=0.995). The oral bioavailability and the peak concentration of the BA-LP was threefold and 2.82-fold that of BA-CMC, respectively. The in vivo distribution results indicated that drug concentrations were significantly increased in the liver, kidney, and lung in the case of BA-LP, which were 5.59-fold, 2.33-fold, and 1.25-fold higher than those of BA-CMC, respectively. In conclusion, the study suggested that BA-LP might be a potential oral drug delivery system to improve bioavailability of BA. PMID:25120360

  2. Pharmacokinetics of three sulphonamides in ruminant and preruminant kids.

    PubMed

    Watson, A D; van Gogh, H; van Deurzen, E J; van Duin, C T; van Miert, A S

    1987-09-01

    The pharmacokinetic properties of three sulphonamides were determined in ruminant and preruminant kids after oral and intravenous administration. First, sulphisomidine (SIM, 50 mg kg-1) and sulphadoxine (SDX, 30 mg kg-1) were given to seven kids, 10 to 12 weeks old, while on a milk replacer diet and again at 15 to 18 weeks when fed roughage. Secondly, SIM (100 mg kg-1) and sulphadimidine (SDD, 100 mg kg-1) were given at six to nine, 12 to 15 and 18 to 21 weeks old to eight kids, of which four were fed milk replacer and four were with their mothers (with access to roughage) until 15 weeks, after which all were fed roughage only. SDX and SDD exhibited non-linear (or capacity limited) absorption after oral dosage, suggesting possible active absorption mechanisms, and both drugs also showed non-linear elimination. Intravenous curves for SDD and SIM indicated that recycling occurred. With SDX, ruminant kids showed poorer systemic availability after oral dosage, shorter t1/2(el) and higher B than did preruminants. For SDD, ruminant kids had lower Vd and higher B than preruminants. SIM's t1/2(el) tended to shorten and beta to increase in both groups throughout the experiment. Not all differences between ruminants and preruminants in sulphonamide pharmacokinetics could be explained by the accumulation of acidic forestomach contents and the change of urine pH from acid to alkaline in the maturing ruminant. Other potential contributing factors require investigation, including possible alterations in hepatic drug metabolism. Of the three drugs tested, SDX might be the most satisfactory for therapeutic use in preruminant animals, because it has good bioavailability after oral administration and long t1/2(el). PMID:3685634

  3. Multiple-Dose Pharmacokinetics of Fluvoxamine in Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labellarte, Michael; Biederman, Joseph; Emslie, Graham; Ferguson, James; Khan, Arifulla; Ruckle, Jon; Sallee, Randy; Riddle, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the pharmacokinetics of fluvoxamine in children and adolescents and to compare pharmacokinetic data from adolescents to adults from a previous study. Method: Fluvoxamine was titrated to a target dose of 100 mg b.i.d. in children (6-11 years) and 150 mg b.i.d. in adolescents (12-17 years) with obsessive-compulsive disorder…

  4. PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING FOR PERFLUORINATED CHEMICALS USED IN HOUSEHOLD CONSUMER PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING FOR PERFLUORONATED CHEMICALS USED IN HOUSEHOLD CONSUMER PRODUCTS
    Leona H. Clark and Hugh A. Barton
    US Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, Research Triangle Park, NC

    The physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model to be presente...

  5. 40 CFR 795.228 - Oral/dermal pharmacokinetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... addition to the reporting requirements as specified in 40 CFR part 792, the following specific information... pharmacokinetics and metabolism of a chemical substance or mixture (“test substance”) are similar after oral and... administration. (3) Examine the effects of repeated dosing on the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the...

  6. 40 CFR 795.231 - Pharmacokinetics of isopropanal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements as specified in the EPA Good Laboratory Practice Standards (40 CFR 792.185), the following... whether the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the “test substance” are similar after oral and inhalation...) Examine the effects of repeated dosing on the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the test substance....

  7. 40 CFR 795.228 - Oral/dermal pharmacokinetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... addition to the reporting requirements as specified in 40 CFR part 792, the following specific information... pharmacokinetics and metabolism of a chemical substance or mixture (“test substance”) are similar after oral and... administration. (3) Examine the effects of repeated dosing on the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the...

  8. 40 CFR 795.231 - Pharmacokinetics of isopropanal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements as specified in the EPA Good Laboratory Practice Standards (40 CFR 792.185), the following... whether the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the “test substance” are similar after oral and inhalation...) Examine the effects of repeated dosing on the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the test substance....

  9. 40 CFR 795.231 - Pharmacokinetics of isopropanal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements as specified in the EPA Good Laboratory Practice Standards (40 CFR 792.185), the following... whether the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the “test substance” are similar after oral and inhalation...) Examine the effects of repeated dosing on the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the test substance....

  10. 40 CFR 795.231 - Pharmacokinetics of isopropanal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements as specified in the EPA Good Laboratory Practice Standards (40 CFR 792.185), the following... whether the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the “test substance” are similar after oral and inhalation...) Examine the effects of repeated dosing on the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the test substance....

  11. 40 CFR 795.228 - Oral/dermal pharmacokinetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... addition to the reporting requirements as specified in 40 CFR part 792, the following specific information... pharmacokinetics and metabolism of a chemical substance or mixture (“test substance”) are similar after oral and... administration. (3) Examine the effects of repeated dosing on the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the...

  12. 40 CFR 795.228 - Oral/dermal pharmacokinetics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... addition to the reporting requirements as specified in 40 CFR part 792, the following specific information... pharmacokinetics and metabolism of a chemical substance or mixture (“test substance”) are similar after oral and... administration. (3) Examine the effects of repeated dosing on the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the...

  13. PHARMACOKINETIC/PHARMACODYNAMIC MODELING OF PERMETHRIN IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was used to describe pharmacokinetics of permethrin and calibrated using experimental data on the concentration time-course of cis- and trans-permethrin in rat blood and brain tissues following oral administration...

  14. KINPLOT: An Interactive Pharmacokinetics Graphics Program for Digital Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robert C.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Inability to see the relevance of mathematics to understanding the time course of drugs in the body may discourage interest in pharmacokinetics. A UNC-developed computer graphics simulation program helps visualize the nature of pharmacokinetic-patient interactions, generates classroom handouts, and is used in the pharmaceuticals industry to…

  15. Yttrium-90/indium-111 DOTA peptide chimeric L6; pharmacokinetics, dosimetry and initial therapeutic studies in patients with breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, S.J.; Shen, S.; Richman, C.M.

    1995-05-01

    Chimeric L6 MoAb(ChL6) as I-131 ChL6 has shown therapeutic promise in breast cancer patients. To enhance this potential, we developed yttrium-90 (Y-90) and indium-111 (In-111) ChL6 radiopharmaceuticals by conjugating Y-90 and In-111 DOTA peptide ChL6. Immunoreactivity of In-111 and Y-90 ChL6 was 80-100% of ChL6. Dosimetry was calculated from pharmacokinetics obtained in four studies of patients with metastatic breast cancer using 200 mg ChL6 and 4mCi In-111/3mCi Y-90 DOTA peptide ChL6 in 3 studies and 10 mCi In-111 in one (specific activity 1.1-3.5mCi/mg). Quantitative imaging of In-111 and in vitro analysis of Y-90/In-111 blood and urine clearances and biopsies for bone and marrow uptake were performed. In-111 and Y-90 DOTA peptide ChL6 blood clearances were compared in each patient with {beta} intercepts for each initial study of 13.9/12.7, 4.9/5.8, 25.2/16.2 (%ID), and {beta} T{1/2} 32/30, 33/35, and 41/57 (h) for In- 111/Y-90, respectively. Normal organ and tumor dosimetry for Y-90 DOTA peptide ChL6 was extrapolated from the In-111 kinetics: WB 2.1-2.3, Liver 3.8-5.9, Lung 6.2-7.9, Kidney 8.1-11.3, Spleen 4.4-14.0 (cGy/mCi). Dosimetry of 13 tumored areas (1-10 g) ranged from 42-260 (mean = 103) cGy/mCi. Marrow doses calculated from Y-90 in blood ranged from 0.6-1.5. Marrow biopsies at 5 d pi showed In-111 and Y-90 (%ID/g), 1-2 x 10{sup -3} and 6-7x10{sup -4} and bone 1-3x10{sup -3} and 0.1-3x10{sup -4}, respectively. Compared to our previous I-131 ChL6 dosimetry, this study indicates that the Y-90 DOTA peptide ChL6 radiation dose to tumor is 4-8 times that of I-131 ChL6 whereas normal organs receive less than twice that of I-131 from Y-90. Based on this calculated enhancement of the therapeutic ratio, a multicycle Y-90 DOTA peptide ChL6 therapy protocol has been initiated in breast cancer patients.

  16. Population Pharmacokinetics of Pyronaridine in Pediatric Malaria Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ayyoub, Amal; Methaneethorn, Janthima; Ramharter, Michael; Djimde, Abdoulaye A.; Tekete, Mamadou; Duparc, Stephan; Borghini-Fuhrer, Isabelle; Shin, Jang-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Pyramax is a pyronaridine (PYR)-artesunate (PA) combination for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in adult and pediatric patients. A granule formulation of this combination is being developed for treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum and P. vivax malaria in pediatric patients. The aims of this study were to describe the pharmacokinetics of PYR using a total of 1,085 blood PYR concentrations available from 349 malaria patients younger than 16 years of age with mild to moderate uncomplicated malaria and to confirm the dosing regimen for the pediatric granule formulation. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling using NONMEM software was used to obtain the pharmacokinetic and inter- and intraindividual variability parameter estimates. The population pharmacokinetics of PYR were described by a two-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. Allometric scaling was implemented to address the effect of body weight on clearance and volume parameters. The final parameter estimates of PYR apparent clearance (CL/F), central volume of distribution (V2/F), peripheral volume of distribution (V3/F), intercompartmental clearance (Q/F), and absorption rate constant (Ka) were 377 liters/day, 2,230 liters, 3,230 liters, 804 liters/day and 17.9 day−1, respectively. Covariate model building conducted using forward addition (P < 0.05) followed by backward elimination (P < 0.001) yielded two significant covariate-parameter relationships, i.e., age on V2/F and formulation on Ka. Evaluation of bootstrapping, visual predictive check, and condition number indicated that the final model displayed satisfactory robustness, predictive power, and stability. Simulations of PYR concentration-time profiles generated from the final model show similar exposures across pediatric weight ranges, supporting the proposed labeling for weight-based dosing of Pyramax granules. (These studies have been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00331136 [phase II study] and

  17. Population Pharmacokinetics of Pyronaridine in Pediatric Malaria Patients.

    PubMed

    Ayyoub, Amal; Methaneethorn, Janthima; Ramharter, Michael; Djimde, Abdoulaye A; Tekete, Mamadou; Duparc, Stephan; Borghini-Fuhrer, Isabelle; Shin, Jang-Sik; Fleckenstein, Lawrence

    2016-03-01

    Pyramax is a pyronaridine (PYR)-artesunate (PA) combination for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in adult and pediatric patients. A granule formulation of this combination is being developed for treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum and P. vivax malaria in pediatric patients. The aims of this study were to describe the pharmacokinetics of PYR using a total of 1,085 blood PYR concentrations available from 349 malaria patients younger than 16 years of age with mild to moderate uncomplicated malaria and to confirm the dosing regimen for the pediatric granule formulation. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling using NONMEM software was used to obtain the pharmacokinetic and inter- and intraindividual variability parameter estimates. The population pharmacokinetics of PYR were described by a two-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination. Allometric scaling was implemented to address the effect of body weight on clearance and volume parameters. The final parameter estimates of PYR apparent clearance (CL/F), central volume of distribution (V2/F), peripheral volume of distribution (V3/F), intercompartmental clearance (Q/F), and absorption rate constant (Ka) were 377 liters/day, 2,230 liters, 3,230 liters, 804 liters/day and 17.9 day(-1), respectively. Covariate model building conducted using forward addition (P < 0.05) followed by backward elimination (P < 0.001) yielded two significant covariate-parameter relationships, i.e., age on V2/F and formulation on Ka. Evaluation of bootstrapping, visual predictive check, and condition number indicated that the final model displayed satisfactory robustness, predictive power, and stability. Simulations of PYR concentration-time profiles generated from the final model show similar exposures across pediatric weight ranges, supporting the proposed labeling for weight-based dosing of Pyramax granules. (These studies have been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00331136 [phase II study] and

  18. [Research progress on current pharmacokinetic evaluation of Chinese herbal medicines].

    PubMed

    Li, Guofu; Zhao, Haoru; Yang, Jin

    2011-03-01

    In order to prove safety and efficacy, herbal medicines must undergo the rigorous scientific researches such as pharmacokinetic and bioavailability, before they are put on the market in the foreign countries. Botanical Drug Products promulgated by the US FDA could guide industry sponsors to develop herbal drugs, which was also an important reference for investigating Chinese herbal medicines. This paper reviews and discusses novel approaches for how to assess systemic exposure and pharmacokinetic of Chinese herbal medicines, which were in line with FDA guidance. This mainly focus on identifying pharmacokinetic markers of botanical products, integral pharmacokinetic study of multiple components, Biopharmaceutics drug disposition classification system, and population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study in herb-drug interaction. PMID:21657088

  19. The pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in vultures.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, V; Wolter, K; Cromarty, A D; Bartels, P; Bekker, L; McGaw, L; Taggart, M A; Cuthbert, R; Swan, G E

    2008-04-01

    Vulture populations across the Asian subcontinent have declined dramatically in the last 15 years and are now on the verge of extinction. Although the cause of the population decline was initially unknown, the decrease has recently been conclusively linked to the use of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac in cattle that inadvertently ended up in the vulture food chain. With the vulture numbers continuing to decline by up to 48% a year, the Indian, Nepali and Pakistan governments have recently banned the manufacture and importation of veterinary diclofenac. They have also suggested meloxicam as an alternate anti-inflammatory for use in cattle. This recommendation was based on extensive acute safety studies in the African White-backed vulture (Gyps africanus), which evaluated worst case scenarios of maximum intake based on a once in three day feeding pattern. However, the possible cumulative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in vultures receiving multiple daily doses of meloxicam over time were not assessed. At present very little pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic information is available to add further support for the safety of meloxicam in this animal species. This article discusses the oral and intramuscular pharmacokinetics of meloxicam in Cape Griffon vultures (Gyps coprotheres). Therapeutic drug monitoring was also undertaken in White-backed, Egyptian (Neophron pernopterus) and one Lappet Faced vulture (Torgos tracheliotos). In all these species, meloxicam was characterized by a short half-life of elimination. The rapid metabolism of meloxicam in combination with a short duration of effect in the studied species Gyps vultures shown in this study makes it unlikely that the drug could accumulate. This confirms the safety of repeated exposure to meloxicam in vultures of this genus. PMID:18307504

  20. Evaluation of Oral and IntravenousRoute Pharmacokinetics, Plasma Protein Binding and Uterine Tissue Dose Metrics of Bisphenol A: A Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Waechter, John M.; Clewell, III, H. J.; Covington, Tammie R.; Barton, H. A.

    2005-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a weakly estrogenic monomer used in the production of polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, both of which are used in food contact and other applications. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of BPA pharmacokinetics in rats and humans was developed to provide a physiological context in which the processes controlling BPA pharmacokinetics (e.g. plasma protein binding, enterohepatic recirculation of the glucuronide (BPAG)) could be incorporated. A uterine tissue compartment was included to allow the correlation of simulated ER binding of BPA with increases in uterine wet weight (UWW) in rats. Intravenous and oral-route blood kinetics of BPA in rats and oral-route plasma and urinary elimination kinetics in humans were well described by the model. Simulations of rat oral-route BPAG pharmacokinetics were less exact, most likely the result of oversimplification of the GI tract compartment. Comparison of metabolic clearance rates derived from fitting rat i.v. and oral-route data implied that intestinal glucuronidation of BPA is significant. In rats but not humans, terminal elimination rates were strongly influenced by enterohepatic recirculation. In the absence of BPA binding to plasma proteins, simulations showed high ER occupancy at doses without uterine effects. Restricting free BPA to the measured unbound amount demonstrated the importance of including plasma binding in BPA kinetic models: the modeled relationship between ER occupancy and UWW increases was consistent with expectations for a receptor mediated response with low ER occupancy at doses with no response and increasing occupancy with larger increases in UWW.

  1. Chemical contaminants, pharmacokinetics, and the lactating mother.

    PubMed Central

    Rogan, W J; Ragan, N B

    1994-01-01

    We review the commonly occurring persistent pesticides and industrial chemicals in breast milk. These chemicals are dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane as dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethene dieldrin, chlordane as oxychlordane, heptachlor, polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins. We present a worked example of the kinds of pharmacokinetic assumptions and calculations necessary for setting regulatory limits of contaminants in the food supply, calculating dose of chemical contaminants to the nursed infant, converting risks from lifetime exposure in laboratory animals to risks for short-term exposure in humans, and estimating the excess cancer risk to the nursed infant. PMID:7737048

  2. Pharmacokinetics of prednisolone in children with nephrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, P F; Bowmer, C J; Wheeldon, J; Brocklebank, J T

    1990-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of prednisolone given intravenously were studied in 11 children with relapsed steroid responsive nephrotic syndrome, and four control subjects. The clearance of both total and unbound drug was decreased in these children and the unbound fraction of the drug in plasma was significantly correlated with the degree of hypoalbuminaemia. We conclude that changes in the clearance of prednisolone and altered protein binding might account for some of the variability in both therapeutic responses and the incidence of toxicity in patients treated with standard dosage regimens. PMID:2317067

  3. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions with phenytoin (Part I).

    PubMed

    Nation, R L; Evans, A M; Milne, R W

    1990-01-01

    Phenytoin, which is used primarily as an anticonvulsant agent, has a relatively low therapeutic index, and monitoring of plasma phenytoin concentration is often used to help guide therapy. It has properties which predispose it to an involvement in pharmacokinetic interactions, a large number of which have been reported. These properties include: low aqueous solubility and slow rate of gastrointestinal absorption; a relatively high degree of plasma protein binding; a clearance that is non-linear due to saturable oxidative biotransformation; and the ability to induce hepatic microsomal enzymes. Because of its narrow therapeutic range, drug interactions leading to alterations in plasma phenytoin concentration may be clinically important. Such interactions have often been reported initially as either cases of phenytoin intoxication or of decreased effectiveness. Drugs may modify the pharmacokinetics of phenytoin by altering its absorption, plasma protein binding, or hepatic biotransformation; alterations in the absorption and/or biotransformation may lead to changes in both the unbound plasma phenytoin concentration and, as a result, the clinical effect. Preparations which may decrease the gastrointestinal absorption of phenytoin include nutritional formulae and charcoal. There are many reports of drugs which may increase (e.g. folic acid, dexamethasone and rifampicin) or decrease (e.g. valproic acid, sulthiame, isoniazid, cimetidine, phenylbutazone, chloramphenicol and some sulphonamides) the metabolism of phenytoin. It is important to bear in mind that, as a result of its non-linear clearance, changes in phenytoin absorption and/or biotransformation will lead to more than proportionate changes in plasma drug concentration. Drugs which may displace phenytoin from plasma albumin include valproic acid, salicylic acid, phenylbutazone and some sulphonamides. Although an alteration in the unbound fraction of phenytoin in plasma would not, in itself, be expected to alter

  4. Cocrystals and alloys of nitazoxanide: enhanced pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Kuthuru; Mannava, M K Chaitanya; Nangia, Ashwini

    2016-03-01

    Two isomorphous cocrystals of nitazoxanide (NTZ) with p-aminosalicylic acid (PASA) and p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) as well as their alloys were prepared by slurry and grinding techniques. The cocrystals exhibit faster dissolution rates and higher pharmacokinetic properties compared to the reference drug, and surprisingly the cocrystal alloy NTZ-PABA : NTZ-PASA (0.75 : 0.25) exhibited 4 fold higher bioavailability of NTZ in Sprague Dawley rats. This study opens the opportunity for cocrystal alloys as improved medicines. PMID:26911515

  5. Effect of SLCO1B1 Polymorphisms on Rifabutin Pharmacokinetics in African HIV-Infected Patients with Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Naiker, Suhashni; Reddy, Tarylee; Egan, Deirdre; Kellerman, Tracy; Wiesner, Lubbe; Owen, Andrew; McIlleron, Helen; Pym, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Rifabutin, used to treat HIV-infected tuberculosis, shows highly variable drug exposure, complicating dosing. Effects of SLCO1B1 polymorphisms on rifabutin pharmacokinetics were investigated in 35 African HIV-infected tuberculosis patients after multiple doses. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling found that influential covariates for the pharmacokinetics were weight, sex, and a 30% increased bioavailability among heterozygous carriers of SLCO1B1 rs1104581 (previously associated with low rifampin concentrations). Larger studies are needed to understand the complex interactions of host genetics in HIV-infected tuberculosis patients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00640887.) PMID:26482301

  6. Development of a rhenium-186-labeled MAG3-conjugated bisphosphonate for the palliation of metastatic bone pain based on the concept of bifunctional radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Mukai, Takahiro; Arano, Yasushi; Ono, Masahiro; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Ishino, Seigo; Hashimoto, Kazuyuki; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Saji, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Rhenium-186-1-hydroxyethylidene-1,1-diphosphonate (186Re-HEDP) has been used for the palliation of metastatic bone pain. Delayed blood clearance and high gastric uptake of radioactivity have been observed upon injection, due to the instability of (186)Re-HEDP in vivo. In this study, on the basis of the concept of bifunctional radiopharmaceuticals, we designed a stable 186Re-mercaptoacetylglycylglycylglycine (MAG3) complex-conjugated bisphosphonate, [[[[(4-hydroxy-4,4-diphosphonobutyl)carbamoylmethyl]carbamoylmethyl]carbamoylmethyl]carbamoylmethanethiolate]oxorhenium(V) (186Re-MAG3-HBP). As a precursor, [1-hydroxy-1-phosphono-4-[2-[2-[2-(2-tritylmercaptoacetylamino)acetylamino]acetylamino]acetylamino]butyl]phosphonic acid (Tr-MAG3-HBP) was synthesized by the conjugation of N-[(tritylmercapto)acetyl]glycylglycylglycine (Tr-MAG3) with the bisphosphonate analogue. After deprotection of the trityl group of Tr-MAG3-HBP, 186Re-labeling was performed by reacting 186ReO4- with SnCl2 in citrate buffer. After purification by HPLC, 186Re-MAG3-HBP showed a radiochemical purity of over 95%. To compare the stability of 186Re-MAG3-HBP and 186Re-HEDP, these (186)Re complexes were incubated in phosphate buffer. No measurable decomposition of 186Re-MAG3-HBP occurred over a 24-h period, while only approximately 30% of 186Re-HEDP remained intact 24 h postincubation. In biodistribution experiments, the radioactivity level of 186Re-MAG3-HBP in bone was significantly higher than that of (186)Re-HEDP. Blood clearance of 186Re-MAG3-HBP was faster than that of 186Re-HEDP. In addition, the gastric accumulation of 186Re-MAG3-HBP radioactivity was lower than that of 186Re-HEDP. In conclusion, 186Re-MAG3-HBP is expected to be a useful radiopharmaceutical for the palliation of metastatic bone pain. PMID:16029015

  7. Liraglutide in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Lisbeth V; Flint, Anne; Olsen, Anette K; Ingwersen, Steen H

    2016-06-01

    Liraglutide is an acylated glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue with 97 % amino acid homology with native glucagon-like peptide-1 and greatly protracted action. It is widely used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and administered by subcutaneous injection once daily. The pharmacokinetic properties of liraglutide enable 24-h exposure coverage, a requirement for 24-h glycaemic control with once-daily dosing. The mechanism of protraction relates to slowed release from the injection site, and a reduced elimination rate owing to metabolic stabilisation and reduced renal filtration. Drug exposure is largely independent of injection site, as well as age, race and ethnicity. Increasing body weight and male sex are associated with reduced concentrations, but there is substantial overlap between subgroups; therefore, dose escalation should be based on individual treatment outcome. Exposure is reduced with mild, moderate or severe renal or hepatic impairment. There are no clinically relevant changes in overall concentrations of various drugs (e.g. paracetamol, atorvastatin, griseofulvin, digoxin, lisinopril and oral combination contraceptives) when co-administered with liraglutide. Pharmacodynamic studies show multiple beneficial actions with liraglutide, including improved fasting and postprandial glycaemic control (mediated by increased insulin and reduced glucagon levels and minor delays in gastric emptying), reduced appetite and energy intake, and effects on postprandial lipid profiles. The counter-regulatory hormone response to hypoglycaemia is largely unaltered. The effects of liraglutide on insulin and glucagon secretion are glucose dependent, and hence the risk of hypoglycaemia is low. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of liraglutide make it an important treatment option for many patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26597252

  8. Evaluation of effect of impaired renal function on lamivudine pharmacokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Bouazza, Naïm; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc; Ghosn, Jade; Hirt, Déborah; Benaboud, Sihem; Foissac, Frantz; Viard, Jean-Paul; Urien, Saik

    2014-01-01

    Aims This study aimed to describe lamivudine pharmacokinetics in patients with impaired renal function and to evaluate the consistency of current dosing recommendations. Methods A total of 244 patients, ranging in age from 18 to 79 years (median 40 years) and in bodyweight from 38 to 117 kg (median 71 kg), with 344 lamivudine plasma concentrations, were analysed using a population pharmacokinetic analysis. Serum creatinine clearance (CLCR) was calculated using the Cockcroft–Gault formula; 177 patients had normal renal function (CLCR > 90 ml min−1), 50 patients had mild renal impairment (CLCR = 60–90 ml min−1), 20 patients had moderate renal impairment (CLCR = 30–60 ml min−1), and five patients had severe renal impairment (CLCR < 30 ml min−1). Results A two-compartment model adequately described the data. Typical population estimates (percentage interindividual variability) of the apparent clearance (CL/F), central (Vc/F) and peripheral volumes of distribution (Vp/F), intercompartmental clearance (Q/F) and absorption rate constant (Ka) were 29.7 l h−1 (32%), 68.2 l, 114 l, 10.1 l h−1 (85%) and 1 h−1, respectively. Clearance increased significantly and gradually with CLCR. Our simulations showed that a dose of 300 mg day−1 in patients with mild renal impairment could overexpose them. A dose of 200 mg day−1 maintained an exposure close to that of adults with normal renal function. However, the current US Food and Drug Administration recommendations for lamivudine in other categories of patients (from severe to moderate renal impairment) provided optimal exposures. Conclusions Lamivudine elimination clearance is related to renal function. To provide optimal exposure, patients with mild renal impairment should receive 200 mg day−1 instead of 300 mg day−1. PMID:24750102

  9. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of boosted once-daily darunavir.

    PubMed

    Kakuda, Thomas N; Brochot, Anne; Tomaka, Frank L; Vangeneugden, Tony; Van De Casteele, Tom; Hoetelmans, Richard M W

    2014-10-01

    The ability to dose antiretroviral agents once daily simplifies the often complex therapeutic regimens required for the successful treatment of HIV infection. Thus, once-daily dosing can lead to improved patient adherence to medication and, consequently, sustained virological suppression and reduction in the risk of emergence of drug resistance. Several trials have evaluated once-daily darunavir/ritonavir in combination with other antiretrovirals (ARTEMIS and ODIN trials) or as monotherapy (MONET, MONOI and PROTEA trials) in HIV-1-infected adults. Data from ARTEMIS and ODIN demonstrate non-inferiority of once-daily darunavir/ritonavir against a comparator and, together with pharmacokinetic data, have established the suitability of once-daily darunavir/ritonavir for treatment-naive and treatment-experienced patients with no darunavir resistance-associated mutations. The findings of ARTEMIS and ODIN have led to recent updates to treatment guidelines, whereby once-daily darunavir/ritonavir, given with other antiretrovirals, is now a preferred treatment option for antiretroviral-naive adult patients and a simplified treatment option for antiretroviral-experienced adults who have no darunavir resistance-associated mutations. Once-daily dosing with darunavir/ritonavir is an option for treatment-naive and for treatment-experienced paediatric patients with no darunavir resistance-associated mutations based on the findings of the DIONE trial and ARIEL substudy. This article reviews the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety and tolerability of once-daily boosted darunavir. The feasibility of darunavir/ritonavir monotherapy as a treatment approach for some patients is also discussed. Finally, data on a fixed-dose combination of 800/150 mg of darunavir/cobicistat once daily are presented, showing comparable darunavir bioavailability to that obtained with 800/100 mg of darunavir/ritonavir once daily. PMID:24951533

  10. Pharmacokinetic profiles of the analgesic drug flupirtine in cats.

    PubMed

    De Vito, V; Lebkowska-Wieruszewska, B; Owen, H; Kowalski, C J; Giorgi, M

    2014-11-01

    Flupirtine (FLU) is a non-opioid analgesic drug with no antipyretic or antiphlogistic effects, used in the treatment of a wide range of pain states in human beings. There is a substantial body of evidence on the efficacy of FLU in humans but this is inadequate to recommend its off-label use in veterinary clinical practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profiles of FLU after IV and PO administration in healthy cats. Six mixed breed adult cats were randomly assigned to two treatment groups using an open, single-dose, two-treatment, two-phase, paired, cross-over design (2 × 2 Latin-square). Group 1 (n  =  3) received a single dose of 5 mg/kg of FLU injected IV into the jugular vein. Group 2 (n  =  3) received the same dose via PO route. The wash out period was 1 week. Blood samples (1 mL) were collected at assigned times and plasma was then analysed by a validated HPLC method. No adverse effects at the point of injection and no behavioural changes or alterations in health parameters were observed in the animals during or after the study (up to 7 days after the full study). After IV administration, FLU was detectable in plasma up to 36 h. After PO administration, FLU plasma concentrations were lower than those following IV administration, but they were detectable over the same time range. The terminal part of both mean pharmacokinetic curves showed a similar trend of elimination. The oral bioavailability was approximately 40%. This is the first study of FLU in an animal species of veterinary interest and it could pave the way for the use of this active ingredient in the veterinary field. PMID:25011711

  11. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models for everolimus and sorafenib in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pawaskar, Dipti K.; Straubinger, Robert M.; Fetterly, Gerald J.; Hylander, Bonnie H.; Repasky, Elizabeth A.; Ma, Wen W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Everolimus is a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor approved as an immunosuppressant and for second-line therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Sorafenib is a multikinase inhibitor used as first-line therapy in HCC and RCC. This study assessed the pharmacokinetics (PK) of everolimus and sorafenib alone and in combination in plasma and tissues, developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in mice, and assessed the possibility of PK drug interactions. Methods Single and multiple oral doses of everolimus and sorafenib were administered alone and in combination in immunocompetent male mice and to severe combined immune-deficient (SCID) mice bearing low-passage, patient-derived pancreatic adenocarcinoma in seven different studies. Plasma and tissue samples including tumor were collected over a 24-h period and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). Distribution of everolimus and sorafenib to the brain, muscle, adipose, lungs, kidneys, pancreas, spleen, liver, GI, and tumor was modeled as perfusion rate-limited, and all data from the diverse studies were fitted simultaneously using a population approach. Results PBPK models were developed for everolimus and sorafenib. PBPK analysis showed that the two drugs in combination had the same PK as each drug given alone. A twofold increase in sorafenib dose increased tumor exposure tenfold, thus suggesting involvement of transporters in tumor deposition of sorafenib. Conclusions The developed PBPK models suggested the absence of PK interaction between the two drugs in mice. These studies provide the basis for pharmacodynamic evaluation of these drugs in patient-derived primary pancreatic adenocarcinomas explants. PMID:23455451

  12. Modulation of the pharmacokinetics of zinc oxide nanoparticles and their fates in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paek, Hee-Jeong; Lee, Youn-Joung; Chung, Hea-Eun; Yoo, Nan-Hui; Lee, Jeong-A.; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Lee, Jong Kwon; Jeong, Jayoung; Choi, Soo-Jin

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, the effects of particle size (20 nm or 70 nm) and surface charge (negative or positive) on the pharmacokinetics, tissue distributions, and excretion of ZnO nanoparticles were examined following the administration of a single oral dose to rats. Pharmacokinetic profiles and biodistributions were not affected by particle size or gender. However, ZnO (-) particles were markedly more absorbed by the systemic circulation than ZnO (+) particles. Furthermore, the kinetic behaviors of ZnO nanoparticles differed from those of zinc ions, as evidenced by the low dissolution (13-14%) of ZnO nanoparticles under gastric conditions. The kidneys, liver, and lungs were found to be target organs. However, the major biological fate of ZnO nanoparticles in tissues was the ionic form, not the particulate form, and this was independent of exposure routes (oral and intravenous). Particle size was only found to affect excretion kinetics, and 20 nm particles were more rapidly eliminated. Most nanoparticles were excreted via the biliary and fecal routes, but a small amount of the nanoparticles was excreted via urine. The study shows that surface charge, rather than particle size or gender, is the critical modulator of the pharmacokinetic behavior of ZnO nanoparticles.In the present study, the effects of particle size (20 nm or 70 nm) and surface charge (negative or positive) on the pharmacokinetics, tissue distributions, and excretion of ZnO nanoparticles were examined following the administration of a single oral dose to rats. Pharmacokinetic profiles and biodistributions were not affected by particle size or gender. However, ZnO (-) particles were markedly more absorbed by the systemic circulation than ZnO (+) particles. Furthermore, the kinetic behaviors of ZnO nanoparticles differed from those of zinc ions, as evidenced by the low dissolution (13-14%) of ZnO nanoparticles under gastric conditions. The kidneys, liver, and lungs were found to be target organs. However

  13. Improved dose-volume histogram estimates for radiopharmaceutical therapy by optimizing quantitative SPECT reconstruction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lishui; Hobbs, Robert F.; Segars, Paul W.; Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric C.

    2013-06-01

    In radiopharmaceutical therapy, an understanding of the dose distribution in normal and target tissues is important for optimizing treatment. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry takes into account patient anatomy and the nonuniform uptake of radiopharmaceuticals in tissues. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) provide a useful summary representation of the 3D dose distribution and have been widely used for external beam treatment planning. Reliable 3D dosimetry requires an accurate 3D radioactivity distribution as the input. However, activity distribution estimates from SPECT are corrupted by noise and partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we systematically investigated OS-EM based quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) image reconstruction in terms of its effect on DVHs estimates. A modified 3D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that incorporated a non-uniform kidney model and clinically realistic organ activities and biokinetics was used. Projections were generated using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation; noise effects were studied using 50 noise realizations with clinical count levels. Activity images were reconstructed using QSPECT with compensation for attenuation, scatter and collimator-detector response (CDR). Dose rate distributions were estimated by convolution of the activity image with a voxel S kernel. Cumulative DVHs were calculated from the phantom and QSPECT images and compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. We found that noise, PVEs, and ringing artifacts due to CDR compensation all degraded histogram estimates. Low-pass filtering and early termination of the iterative process were needed to reduce the effects of noise and ringing artifacts on DVHs, but resulted in increased degradations due to PVEs. Large objects with few features, such as the liver, had more accurate histogram estimates and required fewer iterations and more smoothing for optimal results. Smaller objects with fine details, such as the kidneys, required more iterations and less

  14. Improved dose-volume histogram estimates for radiopharmaceutical therapy by optimizing quantitative SPECT reconstruction parameters.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lishui; Hobbs, Robert F; Segars, Paul W; Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric C

    2013-06-01

    In radiopharmaceutical therapy, an understanding of the dose distribution in normal and target tissues is important for optimizing treatment. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry takes into account patient anatomy and the nonuniform uptake of radiopharmaceuticals in tissues. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) provide a useful summary representation of the 3D dose distribution and have been widely used for external beam treatment planning. Reliable 3D dosimetry requires an accurate 3D radioactivity distribution as the input. However, activity distribution estimates from SPECT are corrupted by noise and partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we systematically investigated OS-EM based quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) image reconstruction in terms of its effect on DVHs estimates. A modified 3D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that incorporated a non-uniform kidney model and clinically realistic organ activities and biokinetics was used. Projections were generated using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation; noise effects were studied using 50 noise realizations with clinical count levels. Activity images were reconstructed using QSPECT with compensation for attenuation, scatter and collimator-detector response (CDR). Dose rate distributions were estimated by convolution of the activity image with a voxel S kernel. Cumulative DVHs were calculated from the phantom and QSPECT images and compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. We found that noise, PVEs, and ringing artifacts due to CDR compensation all degraded histogram estimates. Low-pass filtering and early termination of the iterative process were needed to reduce the effects of noise and ringing artifacts on DVHs, but resulted in increased degradations due to PVEs. Large objects with few features, such as the liver, had more accurate histogram estimates and required fewer iterations and more smoothing for optimal results. Smaller objects with fine details, such as the kidneys, required more iterations and less

  15. Current activities in the ICRP concerning estimation of radiation doses to patients from radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.; Leide-Svegborn, S.; Liniecki, J.; Nosske, D.; Riklund, K.; Stabin, M.; Taylor, D.

    2011-09-01

    A Task Group within the ICRP Committees 2 and 3 is continuously working to improve absorbed dose estimates to patients investigated with radiopharmaceuticals. The work deals with reviews of the literature, initiation of new or complementary studies of the biokinetics of a compound and dose estimates. Absorbed dose calculations for organs and tissues have up to now been carried out using the MIRD formalism. There is still a lack of necessary biokinetic data from measurements in humans. More time series obtained by nuclear medicine imaging techniques such as whole-body planar gamma-camera imaging, SPECT or PET are highly desirable for this purpose. In 2008, a new addendum to ICRP Publication 53 was published under the name of ICRP Publication 106 containing biokinetic data and absorbed dose information to organs and tissues of patients of various ages for radiopharmaceuticals in common use. That report also covers a number of generic models and realistic maximum models covering other large groups of substances (e.g. "123I-brain receptor substances"). Together with ICRP Publication 80, most radiopharmaceuticals in clinical use at the time of publication were covered except the radioiodine labeled compounds for which the ICRP dose estimates are still found in Publication 53. There is an increasing use of new radiopharmaceuticals, especially PET-tracers and the TG has recently finished its work with biokinetic and dosimetric data for 18F-FET, 18F-FLT and 18F-choline. The work continues now with new data for 11C-raclopride, 11C-PiB and 123I-ioflupan as well as re-evaluation of published data for 82Rb-chloride, 18F-fluoride and radioiodide. This paper summarises published ICRP-information on dose to patients from radiopharmaceuticals and gives some preliminary data for substances under review.

  16. Comparative pharmacokinetics of apalcillin and piperacillin.

    PubMed Central

    Lode, H; Elvers, A; Koeppe, P; Borner, K

    1984-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of apalcillin and piperacillin, each administered intravenously as a single 2-g dose, were compared in 10 volunteers in a randomized study of crossover design using bioassay and high-pressure liquid chromatographic procedures. The concentrations of both penicillins in serum were determined over a period of 12 h and in urine over 24 h. Concentrations of apalcillin and piperacillin at the end of the 15-min infusion were similar; however, at 8 h, concentrations of piperacillin were below measurable levels, whereas concentrations of apalcillin were still measurable at 10 h. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated according to a two-compartment open model. The area under the curve and the half-life for apalcillin were larger than for piperacillin. On the other hand, renal clearance of piperacillin was substantially greater than that of apalcillin. Of the apalcillin excreted via the kidneys, approximately one-fifth was eliminated as two microbiologically inactive penicilloic acid derivatives. The nonrenal clearance of apalcillin was 79% of total clearance. Binding of apalcillin to serum protein was almost twice that of piperacillin. PMID:6703672

  17. Formulation, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of topical microbicides

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jessica L.; Kashuba, Angela D.M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of safe topical microbicides that effectively prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a major goal in curbing the human immunodeficiency virus pandemic. A number of past failures resulting from mucosal toxicity or lack of efficacy have informed the field. Products that caused toxicity to the female genital tract mucosa, and thereby increased the likelihood of HIV acquisition, included nonoxynol 9, cellulose sulfate, and C31 G vaginal gel Savvy®. Topical products that were ineffective in preventing HIV infection include BufferGel®, Carraguard®, and PRO 2000®. Antiretroviral drugs such as tenofovir and dapivirine formulated into microbicide products have shown promise, but there is much to learn about ideal product formulation and acceptability, and drug distribution and disposition (pharmacokinetics). Current formulations for water-soluble molecules include vaginally or rectally applied gels, vaginal rings, films and tablets. Dosing strategies (e.g. coitally dependent or independent) will be based on the pharmacokinetics of the active ingredient and the tolerance for less than perfect adherence. PMID:22306523

  18. Pharmacokinetic Properties of Netilmicin in Newborn Infants

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Jane D.; McCracken, George H.; Thomas, Marion L.; Threlkeld, Norma

    1979-01-01

    Netilmicin and gentamicin susceptibilities of 258 gram-negative organisms and 25 strains of Staphylococcus aureus were nearly identical. The pharmacokinetic properties of netilmicin were evaluated in 101 newborn infants and related to birth weight, gestational age, chronological age, and route of administration. Mean peak serum concentrations of 5.6 to 6.9 and 7.8 to 8.4 μg/ml were observed 30 min after 3- and 4-mg/kg doses, respectively, were given intramuscularly. The peak concentrations were directly related to gestational age. The average serum half-life values varied from 3.4 to 4.7 h and in general were inversely related to birth weight, gestational age, and postnatal age. The pharmacokinetics of netilmicin in 10 infants were similar after intramuscular and intravenous administration. A comparative study of netilmicin and gentamicin in seven neonates revealed greater variability in serum concentrations of gentamicin and a shorter half-life for netilmicin. There was evidence of accumulation of netilmicin in 12 low-birth weight, premature infants who received 4-mg/kg doses for an average of 6.4 days. Serum and urine levels of netilmicin were measured up to 11 days after discontinuation of the drug. These data are well characterized by a two-compartment model. Additional studies of efficacy and long-term toxicity of netilmicin in neonates are necessary. PMID:426516

  19. Pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous fentanyl in Greyhounds.

    PubMed

    KuKanich, Butch

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the pharmacokinetics of subcutaneous fentanyl (15μg/kg) in six healthy Greyhound dogs. Fentanyl plasma concentrations were determined by a liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry method. Non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was used. Fentanyl was rapidly absorbed with a mean peak concentration (C(MAX)) of 3.56ng/mL at 0.24h. The mean terminal half-life, volume of distribution per bioavailability, and clearance per bioavailability were 2.97h, 7.09L/kg, 27.60mL/min/kg, respectively. Pain occurred on injection in all six dogs, but addition of 8.4% sodium bicarbonate (1mL per 20mL fentanyl) resulted in no pain on injection in 3/3 dogs but similar C(MAX) values. The subcutaneous route may be an alternative route of fentanyl administration if intravenous administration is not practical. PMID:21388844

  20. Salicylate pharmacokinetics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Owen, S G; Roberts, M S; Friesen, W T; Francis, H W

    1989-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of salicylic acid (SA) and its major metabolite salicyluric acid (SU) were studied in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis following a 900 mg oral dose of acetylsalicylic acid and during 6 weeks of chronic administration of enteric coated aspirin (3,900 mg day). Response to therapy was also monitored. 2. The various pharmacokinetic parameters determined in the study were similar to those observed in other single dose salicylate studies amongst healthy volunteers but were not predictive of salicylate concentration in the chronic dose study. 3. Plasma concentrations of SA (total and unbound) were found to decline significantly over the 6 weeks and plasma SU concentrations increased. 4. During the chronic dosing study, there was a significant increase in the Vmax (total and unbound) for the formation of SU, whilst the Km and SU clearance remained constant. Also, the elimination rate constant (k) for salicylate was not significantly affected. 5. Therapeutic response to salicylate therapy was not significantly affected by the decline in SA concentrations. PMID:2590603

  1. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug's effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed.

  2. Drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: Technological considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.

    1992-12-31

    Additionally, the use of PET to examine drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacadynamics and the relationship of these properties to the behavioral, therapeutic and toxic properties of drugs and substances of abuse is emerging as a powerful new scientific tool. The pharmacokinetic properties of a drug, which comprises all of the biological processes which determine the fraction of the drug available, can be measured using the labeled drug itself. For example, the labeled drug can be used to measure the absolute uptake, regional distribution and kinetics of a drug at its site of action in the body. Additionally the labeled drug and whole body its labeled metabolites and thus provide information an potential toxic effects as well as tissue half lives. On the other hand, different labeled tracers can be used to assess drug pharmacodynamics which include the biological Processes involved in the drug`s effects. For example, with appropriate radiotracers, the effects of a drug on metabolism, neurotransmitter activity, blood flew, enzyme activity or other processes can be probed.

  3. Pharmacokinetic study of copper (II) acetylsalicylate.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Mohammad S; Sher, Muhammad; Pervez, Humayun; Saeed, Maryiam

    2008-09-01

    This study was aimed at determination of pharmacokinetic parameters of copper (II) acetylsalicylate (CAS). Ten volunteers received a 60-mg dose of CAS. Blood samples were collected just before and after 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0, 1.5, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.5, 7.0, 10, and 12.0 h of administration of the drug. The plasma samples were analyzed for CAS and its metabolites by a validated high-performance liquid chromatography method having a suitable lower limit of quantification. The dose of 60 mg was well tolerated without any adverse effect. The maximum plasma concentration of CAS was found to be 0.38 mg L(-1) with t (max) of 0.72 h. The plasma half-life, clearance, and volume of distribution of CAS were 8.67 h, 66.30 L h(-1) and 829 L kg(-1), respectively. The elimination of CAS, acetylsalicylic acid, copper salicylate, and salicylic acid follows the first order kinetics with r (2) 0.979, 0.880, 0.991, and 0.998, respectively. The study provided for the first time the pharmacokinetic data for CAS after oral administration of CAS. The data were found to be useful in understanding the claimed enhanced anti-inflammatory activity of the drug as compared with that of acetylsalicylic acid. PMID:18478192

  4. Formulation, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of topical microbicides.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jessica L; Kashuba, Angela D M

    2012-08-01

    The development of safe topical microbicides that effectively prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a major goal in curbing the human immunodeficiency virus pandemic. A number of past failures resulting from mucosal toxicity or lack of efficacy have informed the field. Products that caused toxicity to the female genital tract mucosa, and thereby increased the likelihood of HIV acquisition, included nonoxynol 9, cellulose sulfate, and C31 G vaginal gel Savvy. Topical products that were ineffective in preventing HIV infection include BufferGel, Carraguard, and PRO 2000. Antiretroviral drugs such as tenofovir and dapivirine formulated into microbicide products have shown promise, but there is much to learn about ideal product formulation and acceptability, and drug distribution and disposition (pharmacokinetics). Current formulations for water-soluble molecules include vaginally or rectally applied gels, vaginal rings, films and tablets. Dosing strategies (e.g. coitally dependent or independent) will be based on the pharmacokinetics of the active ingredient and the tolerance for less than perfect adherence. PMID:22306523

  5. Gender differences in ondansetron pharmacokinetics in rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Si H; Yang, Kyung H; Lee, Myung G

    2008-10-01

    It has been reported that ondansetron is primarily metabolized via hepatic CYP2D and 3A1/2 in male Sprague-Dawley rats, and CYP2D1 and 3A2 are male dominant and male specific isozymes, respectively, in rats. Thus, it could be expected that the pharmacokinetics of ondansetron would be changed in male rats compared with those in female rats. Thus, gender-different ondansetron pharmacokinetics were evaluated after its intravenous or oral administration at a dose of 8 mg/kg to male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. After intravenous administration of ondansetron to male rats, the AUC and time-averaged non-renal clearance (Clnr) of the drug were significantly smaller (22.6% decrease) and faster (27.3% increase), respectively, than those in female rats. This probably could be due to faster hepatic blood flow rate in male rats. After oral administration of ondansetron to male rats, the AUC of the drug was also significantly smaller (58.8% decrease) than that in female rats, and this could have been due mainly to increased intestinal metabolism of ondansetron in addition to increased hepatic metabolism of the drug in male rats. PMID:18696412

  6. Intravenous buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine pharmacokinetics in humans

    PubMed Central

    Huestis, M.A.; Cone, E.J.; Pirnay, S.O.; Umbricht, A.; Preston, K.L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prescribed sublingual (SL) buprenorphine is sometimes diverted for intravenous (IV) abuse, but no human pharmacokinetic data are available following high-dose IV buprenorphine. Methods Plasma was collected for 72 h after administration of placebo or 2, 4, 8, 12, or 16 mg IV buprenorphine in escalating order (single-blind, double-dummy) in 5 healthy male non-dependent opioid users. Buprenorphine and its primary active metabolite, norbuprenorphine, were quantified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with limits of quantitation of 0.1 μg/L. Results Maximum buprenorphine concentrations (mean ± SE) were detected 10 min after 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 mg IV: 19.3±1.0, 44.5±4.8, 85.2±7.7, 124.6±16.6, and 137.7±18.8 μg/L, respectively. Maximum norbuprenorphine concentrations occurred 10–15 min (3.7±0.7 μg/L) after 16 mg IV administration. Conclusions Buprenorphine concentrations increased in a significantly linear dose-dependent manner up to 12 mg IV buprenorphine. Thus, previously demonstrated pharmacodynamic ceiling effects (over 2–16 mg) are not due to pharmacokinetic adaptations within this range, although they may play a role at doses higher than 12 mg. PMID:23246635

  7. Pharmacokinetics of Chloroquine and Monodesethylchloroquine in Pregnancy▿

    PubMed Central

    Karunajeewa, Harin A.; Salman, Sam; Mueller, Ivo; Baiwog, Francisca; Gomorrai, Servina; Law, Irwin; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Rogerson, Stephen; Siba, Peter; Ilett, Kenneth F.; Davis, Timothy M. E.

    2010-01-01

    In order to determine the pharmacokinetic disposition of chloroquine (CQ) and its active metabolite, desethylchloroquine (DECQ), when administered as intermittent presumptive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp) for malaria, 30 Papua New Guinean women in the second or third trimester of pregnancy and 30 age-matched nonpregnant women were administered three daily doses of 450 mg CQ (8.5 mg/kg of body weight/day) in addition to a single dose of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. For all women, blood was taken at baseline; at 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, 48, and 72 h posttreatment; and at 7, 10, 14, 28, and 42 days posttreatment. Plasma was subsequently assayed for CQ and DECQ by high-performance liquid chromatography, and population pharmacokinetic modeling was performed. Pregnant subjects had significantly lower area under the plasma concentration-time curve for both CQ (35,750 versus 47,892 μg·h/liter, P < 0.001) and DECQ (23,073 versus 41,584 μg·h/liter, P < 0.001), reflecting significant differences in elimination half-lives and in volumes of distribution and clearances relative to bioavailability. Reduced plasma concentrations of both CQ and DECQ could compromise both curative efficacy and posttreatment prophylactic properties in pregnant patients. Higher IPTp CQ doses may be desirable but could increase the risk of adverse hemodynamic effects. PMID:20086162

  8. Pharmacokinetics of cefoperazone in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Saudek, F; Morávek, J; Modr, Z

    1986-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics of cefoperazone was studied in 10 healthy volunteers following 15 min intravenous infusion of 2 g. Cefoperazone levels in the blood serum and in the urine were determined microbiologically. At the end of the infusion, mean serum concentrations of the antibiotic were 340.4 (+/- 81.5) mg/l, at the 4th hour after the infusion 38.4 (+/- 10.3) mg/l, and 12 hours after the infusion all subjects had detectable concentrations with the mean value 2.2 (+/- 0.7) mg/l. Within 12 hours, 33.3 (+/- 6.1) % of the total dose of cefoperazone had been eliminated in the urine. The fitting of the individual serum concentration curves and the determination of pharmacokinetic constants were done according to a two-compartment model with the aid of nonlinear least-squares regression analysis on a programmable calculator TI 59. The mean value of the biological half-life (beta phase) of cefoperazone was 1.77 (+/- 0.25) h, mean serum clearance was 61.7 (+/- 12.1) ml/min and the mean distribution volume (Vd area) was 9.44 (+/- 2.2) 1. Our data are in agreement with those previously reported in the literature. The only exception is the distribution volume, which we found to be smaller. PMID:3095076

  9. Pharmacokinetics of Antiretrovirals in Mucosal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, M.L.; Srinivas, N.; Kashuba, A.D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In the absence of an HIV vaccine or cure, antiretroviral (ARV) based prevention strategies are being investigated to reduce HIV incidence. These prevention strategies depend on achieving effective drug concentrations at the site HIV exposure which is most commonly the mucosal tissues of the lower gastrointestinal tract and the female genital tract. Areas covered This article collates all known data regarding drug exposure in these vulnerable mucosal tissues, and reviews important mechanisms of ARV drug distribution. Research papers and abstracts describing antiretroviral pharmacokinetics in the female genital tract and lower gastrointestinal mucosal tissues available in MEDLINE® or presented at scientific conferences prior to December 2014 are reviewed in detail. Important influences on ARV mucosal tissue distribution, including protein binding, active drug transport, and endogenous hormones, are also reviewed. Expert opinion ARVs exhibit highly variable pharmacokinetics in mucosal tissues. In general, antiretroviral exposure is higher in the lower gastrointestinal tract compared to the female genital tract, but concentrations required for protective efficacy are largely unknown. The expected site of HIV exposure represents an important consideration when designing and optimizing antiretroviral based prevention strategies. PMID:25797064

  10. Physiologic and pharmacokinetic changes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Costantine, Maged M

    2014-01-01

    Physiologic changes in pregnancy induce profound alterations to the pharmacokinetic properties of many medications. These changes affect distribution, absorption, metabolism, and excretion of drugs, and thus may impact their pharmacodynamic properties during pregnancy. Pregnant women undergo several adaptations in many organ systems. Some adaptations are secondary to hormonal changes in pregnancy, while others occur to support the gravid woman and her developing fetus. Some of the changes in maternal physiology during pregnancy include, for example, increased maternal fat and total body water, decreased plasma protein concentrations, especially albumin, increased maternal blood volume, cardiac output, and blood flow to the kidneys and uteroplacental unit, and decreased blood pressure. The maternal blood volume expansion occurs at a larger proportion than the increase in red blood cell mass, which results in physiologic anemia and hemodilution. Other physiologic changes include increased tidal volume, partially compensated respiratory alkalosis, delayed gastric emptying and gastrointestinal motility, and altered activity of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes. Understating these changes and their profound impact on the pharmacokinetic properties of drugs in pregnancy is essential to optimize maternal and fetal health. PMID:24772083

  11. Physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling to predict the clinical pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Glassman, Patrick M; Balthasar, Joseph P

    2016-08-01

    Accurate prediction of the clinical pharmacokinetics of new therapeutic entities facilitates decision making during drug discovery, and increases the probability of success for early clinical trials. Standard strategies employed for predicting the pharmacokinetics of small-molecule drugs (e.g., allometric scaling) are often not useful for predicting the disposition monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), as mAbs frequently demonstrate species-specific non-linear pharmacokinetics that is related to mAb-target binding (i.e., target-mediated drug disposition, TMDD). The saturable kinetics of TMDD are known to be influenced by a variety of factors, including the sites of target expression (which determines the accessibility of target to mAb), the extent of target expression, the rate of target turnover, and the fate of mAb-target complexes. In most cases, quantitative information on the determinants of TMDD is not available during early phases of drug discovery, and this has complicated attempts to employ mechanistic mathematical models to predict the clinical pharmacokinetics of mAbs. In this report, we introduce a simple strategy, employing physiologically-based modeling, to predict mAb disposition in humans. The approach employs estimates of inter-antibody variability in rate processes of extravasation in tissues and fluid-phase endocytosis, estimates for target concentrations in tissues derived through use of categorical immunohistochemical scores, and in vitro measures of the turnover of target and target-mAb complexes. Monte Carlo simulations were performed for four mAbs (cetuximab, figitumumab, dalotuzumab, trastuzumab) directed against three targets (epidermal growth factor receptor, insulin-like growth factor receptor 1, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2). The proposed modeling strategy was able to predict well the pharmacokinetics of cetuximab, dalotuzumab, and trastuzumab at a range of doses, but trended towards underprediction of figitumumab concentrations

  12. Radioprotective effect of the Barbados Cherry (Malpighia glabra L.) against radiopharmaceutical Iodine-131 in Wistar rats in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables has contributed to the improvement of populational health, due in part, to the abundance of antioxidants in these foods. Antioxidants reduce the level of oxidative damage to DNA caused by free radicals and ionizing radiation, including the radioisotope iodine-131 (131I). This isotope is used for the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid injuries, such as hyperthyroidism and cancer. Methods This study aimed to evaluate the radioprotective and cytotoxic activity of acute and subchronic treatments with Barbados Cherry (BC) (Malpighia glabra L.) fruit juice (5 mg), which is rich in potent antioxidants such as vitamin C, phenols, carotenoids, anthocyanins and yellow flavonoids and its activity against the mutagenic activity of the therapeutic dose of 25 μCi of radioiodine for hyperthyroidism. The test system used was the bone marrow cells of Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) that were treated in vivo by gavage. Results BC showed radioprotective activity in acute treatments, which is most likely due to the joint action of its antioxidant components. In subchronic treatments, the continuous treatment presented an effective radioprotective activity, which was significantly different from treatment with the radiopharmaceutical only. Treatment with BC prior to (PRE) and simultaneous with (SIM) ionizing radiation decreased the number of induced chromosomal alterations, while post-treatment produced no protective effect. In addition, BC exhibited no cytotoxic activity. Conclusions These data serve as evidence that BC can be used as a preventive health measure to improve public health quality by countering the action of inevitable exposure to mutagens, such as 131I. PMID:24479389

  13. Discovery of a potent class I selective ketone histone deacetylase inhibitor with antitumor activity in vivo and optimized pharmacokinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Kinzel, Olaf; Llauger-Bufi, Laura; Pescatore, Giovanna; Rowley, Michael; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Monteagudo, Edith; Fonsi, Massimiliano; Gonzalez Paz, Odalys; Fiore, Fabrizio; Steinkühler, Christian; Jones, Philip

    2009-06-11

    The optimization of a potent, class I selective ketone HDAC inhibitor is shown. It possesses optimized pharmacokinetic properties in preclinical species, has a clean off-target profile, and is negative in a microbial mutagenicity (Ames) test. In a mouse xenograft model it shows efficacy comparable to that of vorinostat at a 10-fold reduced dose. PMID:19441846

  14. [Discussion about traditional Chinese medicine pharmacokinetics study based on first botanical drug approved by FDA].

    PubMed

    Huang, Fanghua

    2010-04-01

    Pharmacokinetics study is one of main components of pharmaceuticals development. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Veregen as the first botanical drug in 2006. This article introduced FDA's requirement on pharmacokinetics study of botanical drug and pharmacokinetics studies of Veregen, summarized current requirement and status quo of pharmacokinetics study on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and natural medicine in China, and discussed about pharmacokinetics study strategy for TCM and natural medicine. PMID:20575403

  15. Overview and perspectives on automation strategies in (68)Ga radiopharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Boschi, Stefano; Malizia, Claudio; Lodi, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    The renaissance of (68)Ga radiopharmacy has led to great advances in automation technology. The availability of a highly efficient, reliable, long-lived (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator system along with a well-established coordination chemistry based on bifunctional chelating agents have been the bases of this development in (68)Ga radiopharmacy. Syntheses of (68)Ga peptides were originally performed by manual or semiautomated systems, but increasing clinical demand, radioprotection, and regulatory issues have driven extensive automation of their production process. Several automated systems, based on different post-processing of the (68)Ga generator eluate, on different engineering, and on fixed tubing or disposable cassette approaches, have been developed and are discussed in this chapter. Since automatic systems for preparation of radiopharmaceuticals should comply with qualification and validation protocols established by regulations such as current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) and local regulations, some regulatory issues and the more relevant qualification protocols are also discussed. PMID:22918752

  16. Cage-like bifunctional chelators, copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals and PET imaging using the same

    DOEpatents

    Conti, Peter S.; Cai, Hancheng; Li, Zibo; Liu, Shuanglong

    2016-08-02

    Disclosed is a class of versatile Sarcophagine based bifunctional chelators (BFCs) containing a hexa-aza cage for labeling with metals having either imaging, therapeutic or contrast applications radiolabeling and one or more linkers (A) and (B). The compounds have the general formula ##STR00001## where A is a functional group selected from group consisting of an amine, a carboxylic acid, an ester, a carbonyl, a thiol, an azide and an alkene, and B is a functional group selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, an amine, a carboxylic acid, and ester, a carbonyl, a thiol, an azide and an alkene. Also disclosed are conjugate of the BFC and a targeting moiety, which may be a peptide or antibody. Also disclosed are metal complexes of the BFC/targeting moiety conjugates that are useful as radiopharmaceuticals, imaging agents or contrast agents.

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals for assessing ABC transporters at the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Raaphorst, R M; Windhorst, A D; Elsinga, P H; Colabufo, N A; Lammertsma, A A; Luurtsema, G

    2015-04-01

    ABC transporters protect the brain by transporting neurotoxic compounds from the brain back into the blood. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is the most investigated ABC (efflux) transporter, as it is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Altered function of P-gp can be studied in vivo, using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). To date, several radiopharmaceuticals have been developed to image P-gp function in vivo. So far, attempts to image expression levels of P-gp using radiolabeled P-gp inhibitors have not been successful. Improved knowledge of compound behavior toward P-gp from in vitro studies should increase predictability of in vivo outcome. PMID:25669763

  18. Receptor-specific positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals: /sup 75/Br-labeled butyrophenone neuroleptics

    SciTech Connect

    Moerlein, S.M.; Stoecklin, G.; Weinhard, K.; Pawlik, G.; Heiss, W.D.

    1985-11-01

    Cerebral dopaminergic D/sub 2/ receptors are involved in several common disease states, such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's chorea. The use of radiolabeled D/sub 2/ receptor-binding ligands with positron emission tomography (PET) to noninvasively quantitate D/sub 2/ receptor densities thus has potential application in medicine. Butyrophenone neuroleptics have a high in vitro and in vivo binding affinity for cerebral D/sub 2/ receptors, and due to the useful chemical and nuclear decay properties of /sup 74/Br (76% ..beta../sup +/, half-life = 1.6 h), the authors have evaluated radiobrominated bromospiperone (BSP), brombenperidol (BBP), and bromperidol (BP) as radiopharmaceuticals for use with PET.

  19. In vivo nanoparticle-mediated radiopharmaceutical-excited fluorescence molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhenhua; Qu, Yawei; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zha, Jiali; Song, Tianming; Bao, Chengpeng; Liu, Haixiao; Wang, Zhongliang; Wang, Jing; Liu, Zhongyu; Liu, Haifeng; Tian, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging utilizes visible photons emitted from radiopharmaceuticals to achieve in vivo optical molecular-derived signals. Since Cerenkov radiation is weak, non-optimum for tissue penetration and continuous regardless of biological interactions, it is challenging to detect this signal with a diagnostic dose. Therefore, it is challenging to achieve useful activated optical imaging for the acquisition of direct molecular information. Here we introduce a novel imaging strategy, which converts γ and Cerenkov radiation from radioisotopes into fluorescence through europium oxide nanoparticles. After a series of imaging studies, we demonstrate that this approach provides strong optical signals with high signal-to-background ratios, an ideal tissue penetration spectrum and activatable imaging ability. In comparison with present imaging techniques, it detects tumour lesions with low radioactive tracer uptake or small tumour lesions more effectively. We believe it will facilitate the development of nuclear and optical molecular imaging for new, highly sensitive imaging applications. PMID:26123615

  20. In vivo nanoparticle-mediated radiopharmaceutical-excited fluorescence molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhenhua; Qu, Yawei; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zha, Jiali; Song, Tianming; Bao, Chengpeng; Liu, Haixiao; Wang, Zhongliang; Wang, Jing; Liu, Zhongyu; Liu, Haifeng; Tian, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging utilizes visible photons emitted from radiopharmaceuticals to achieve in vivo optical molecular-derived signals. Since Cerenkov radiation is weak, non-optimum for tissue penetration and continuous regardless of biological interactions, it is challenging to detect this signal with a diagnostic dose. Therefore, it is challenging to achieve useful activated optical imaging for the acquisition of direct molecular information. Here we introduce a novel imaging strategy, which converts γ and Cerenkov radiation from radioisotopes into fluorescence through europium oxide nanoparticles. After a series of imaging studies, we demonstrate that this approach provides strong optical signals with high signal-to-background ratios, an ideal tissue penetration spectrum and activatable imaging ability. In comparison with present imaging techniques, it detects tumour lesions with low radioactive tracer uptake or small tumour lesions more effectively. We believe it will facilitate the development of nuclear and optical molecular imaging for new, highly sensitive imaging applications. PMID:26123615

  1. Copper complexes of bis(thiosemicarbazones): from chemotherapeutics to diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Brett M; Donnelly, Paul S

    2011-05-01

    The molecules known as bis(thiosemicarbazones) derived from 1,2-diones can act as tetradentate ligands for Cu(II), forming stable, neutral complexes. As a family, these complexes possess fascinating biological activity. This critical review presents an historical perspective of their progression from potential chemotherapeutics through to more recent applications in nuclear medicine. Methods of synthesis are presented followed by studies focusing on their potential application as anti-cancer agents and more recent investigations into their potential as therapeutics for Alzheimer's disease. The Cu(II) complexes are of sufficient stability to be used to coordinate copper radioisotopes for application in diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Detailed understanding of the coordination chemistry has allowed careful manipulation of the metal based properties to engineer specific biological activities. Perhaps the most promising complex radiolabelled with copper radioisotopes to date is Cu(II)(atsm), which has progressed to clinical trials in humans (162 references). PMID:21409228

  2. Quantitative autoradiography with radiopharmaceuticals, Part 1: Digital film-analysis system by videodensitometry: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Yonekura, Y.; Brill, A.B.; Som, P.; Bennett, G.W.; Fand, I.

    1983-03-01

    A simple low-cost digital film-analysis system using videodensitometry was developed to quantitate autoradiograms. It is based on a TV-film analysis system coupled to a minicomputer. Digital sampling of transmitted light intensities through the autoradiogram is performed with 8-bit gray levels according to the selected array size (128 X 128 to 1024 X 1024). The performance characteristics of the system provide sufficient stability, uniformity, linearity, and intensity response for use in quantitative analysis. Digital images of the autoradiograms are converted to radioactivity content, pixel by pixel, using step-wedge standards. This type of low-cost system can be installed on conventional mini-computers commonly used in modern nuclear medical facilities. Quantitative digital autoradiography can play an important role, with applications stretching from dosimetry calculations of radiopharmaceuticals to metabolic studies in conjunction with positron-emission tomography.

  3. Design Features Of Microfluidic Reactor For [18F]FDG Radiopharmaceutical Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J. H.; Lee, B. N.; Nam, K. R.; Attla, G. A.; Lee, K. C.; Cjai, J. S.

    2011-06-01

    Microfluidic reactor exhibits advantages for radiopharmaceutical synthesis. Microfluidic chips can reduce the time for radiosynthesis using tiny quantities of chemical compounds. It also has a good heat transfer, performance and provides an integrated system including synthesis, separation, and purification. These advantages make FDG production. So we have designed a microreactor chip which included the whole chemical processing; water evaporation, solvent exchange, radiofluorination and so on. It was designed by using a commercial 3D CAD modeling program CATIA V5, heat transfer performance was analyzed by ANSYS, and CFX was used for analyzing fluid performance. This paper described the design of FDG synthesis system on a microchip, the relevant locations of its parts, both heat and fluid performance efficiency analysis.

  4. Effect of altered thyroid status on the transport of hepatobiliary radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Pahuja, D.N.; Noronha, O.P.

    1985-10-01

    The effect of induced hypothyroidism (by feeding an antithyroid drug-propylthiouracil) on the transport and clearance of the routinely used hepatobiliary radiopharmaceuticals--radioiodinated iodine- T (131I) rose bengal and technetium-99m-N-(4-n-butylphenylcarbamoylmethyl) iminodiacetate, was studied in the rats. Hypothyroidism was associated with depressed growth and retarded clearance of these radiotracers from the in vivo system. Treatment of the hypothyroid rats with thyroxine (2-5 micrograms/100 g b.w. day) for 6 wk, restored these parameters towards normal values. These data suggest that delayed clearance of these hepatobiliary tracers could be related to reduced metabolic rate accompanied with the hypotonia and hypomotility of intestine normally observed in the hypothyroid state.

  5. Highway accident involving radiopharmaceuticals near Brookhaven, Mississippi on December 3, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, P.B.; Mount, M.E.; Schwartz, M.W.

    1985-04-01

    A rear-end collision occurred between a passenger automobile and a luggage trailer carrying 84 packages, 76 of which contained radiopharmaceuticals, on US Highway 84 near Brookhaven, Mississippi on the afternoon of December 3, 1983. The purpose of this report is to document the mechanical circumstances of the accident, confirm the nature and quantity of radioactive materials involved, and assess the nature of the physical environment to which the packages were exposed and the response of the packages. The report consists of three major sections. The first deals wth the nature and circumstances of the accident and findings of fact. The second gives an accounting and description of the materials involved and the consequences of their exposure. The third gives an assessment and analysis of the mechanisms of damage and the conclusions which may be drawn from the investigation. 4 refs., 24 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Positron emission tomography radiopharmaceutical studies in humans: a guide to regulations for academic researchers.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ian N; Whelan, Mark; Baxendale, Roy; Gilbert, Fiona J; Matthews, Paul P; Aigbirhio, Franklin I

    2012-09-01

    All clinical trials are covered by a series of regulations that seek to protect the rights, safety and welfare of participating patients. The regulations covering PET studies are especially complex to interpret because of the specialized nature of the language of the regulations and of PET studies themselves. It is often unclear whether the application demands that the radiotracer used be treated as an investigational medical product. This paper is intended to act as a general guide for UK researchers planning to perform PET research in humans by clarifying key aspects of the regulations that may affect the study and/or the radiopharmaceutical manufacturing process, providing links to useful information sources, introducing the concept of a UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) PET expert panel and outlining the value of sharing investigational medical product dossiers. PMID:22773151

  7. Scaling animal to human biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, Pamela Ochoa; Veloza, Stella

    2016-07-01

    The radiotracer called 68Ga-labelled Glu-urea-Lys(Ahx)-HBED-CC ([68Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC) is a novel radiophar-maceutical for the detection of prostate cancer lesions by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Setting up a cost-effective manual synthesis of this radiotracer and making its clinical translation in Colombia will require two important elements: the evaluation of the procedure to yield a consistent product, meeting standards of radio-chemical purity and low toxicity and then, the evaluation of the radiation dosimetry. In this paper a protocol to extrapolate the biokinetic model made in normal mice to humans by using the computer software for internal dose assessment OLINDA/EXM® is presented as an accurate and standardized method for the calculation of radiation dosimetry estimates.

  8. Theranostic Radiopharmaceuticals Based on Gold Nanoparticles Labeled with (177)Lu and Conjugated to Peptides.

    PubMed

    Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Ocampo-García, Blanca E; Santos-Cuevas, Clara L; de María Ramírez, Flor; Azorín-Vega, Erika P; Meléndez-Alafort, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been proposed for a variety of medical applications such as localized heat sources for cancer treatment and drug delivery systems. The conjugation of peptides to AuNPs produces stable multimeric systems with target-specific molecular recognition. Lutetium- 177 ((177)Lu) has been successfully used in peptide radionuclide therapy. Recently, (177)Lu-AuNPs conjugated to different peptides have been proposed as a new class of theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. These radioconjugates may function simultaneously as molecular imaging agents, radiotherapy systems and thermal-ablation systems. This article covers advancements in the design, synthesis, physicochemical characterization, molecular recognition assessment and preclinical therapeutic efficacy of gold nanoparticles radiolabeled with (177)Lu and conjugated to RGD (-Arg-Gly-Asp-), Lys(3)-Bombesin and Tat(49-57) peptides. PMID:25771363

  9. Toward Prospective Prediction of Pharmacokinetics in OATP1B1 Genetic Variant Populations

    PubMed Central

    Li, R; Barton, H A; Maurer, T S

    2014-01-01

    Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are increasingly being used to provide human pharmacokinetic (PK) predictions for organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) substrates based on in vitro assay data. As a natural extension in the application of these models, in this study, we incorporated in vitro information of three major OATP1B1 genetic variants into a previously reported PBPK model to predict the impact of OATP1B1 polymorphisms on human PK. Using pravastatin and rosuvastatin as examples, we showed that the predicted plasma concentration–time profiles in groups carrying different OATP1B1 genetic variants reasonably matched the clinical observations from multiple studies. This modeling and simulation approach may aid decision making in early pharmaceutical research and development as well as patient-specific dose adjustment in clinical practice. PMID:25494035

  10. The Impact of Team-Based Learning on a Foundational Pharmacokinetics Course

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To assess the impact of team-based learning (TBL) in a foundational pharmacokinetics course. Design. The course was arranged into 5 modules based on the TBL format. Each module contained preclass preparation; readiness-assurance process; and in-class, clinical cases. Survey instruments on professionalism and attitudes of team learning were administered pre- and post-course. Assessment. Examination grades focused at the evaluation/creation level were significantly higher in the TBL format compared with the previous year. Professionalism scores increased over the course of the semester, particularly in altruism and honesty. Other measures of team-learning attitudes significantly increased over time, although there was no change in major subscales. End-of-semester course evaluations showed improvements in active engagement and in various areas of skill development. Conclusion. The TBL format can be used successfully in a foundational pharmacokinetics course to increase higher levels of learning, team-learning skills, and professionalism in pharmacy students. PMID:22438603

  11. Pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and tolerability of phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors: impact of human pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Tenor, Hermann; Hatzelmann, Armin; Beume, Rolf; Lahu, Gezim; Zech, Karl; Bethke, Thomas D

    2011-01-01

    Since more than two decades anti-inflammatory effects of inhibitors of phosphodiesterase-4 have been described in numerous cellular and animal studies and were finally confirmed in clinical trials. The path from an early, pioneering study with Ro20-1724 showing reduction of psoriatric plaque size in 1979 to modern PDE4 inhibitors such as oral apremilast in development for psoriasis, the inhaled PDE4 inhibitor GSK256066 in development for asthma and COPD and finally roflumilast, the first PDE4 inhibitor approved and currently marketed as an oral, once-daily remedy for severe COPD was marked by large progress in chemical optimization based on improved understanding of PDE4 biology and drug-like properties determining the appropriate pharmacokinetic profile. In this chapter aspects of the pharmacology and clinical efficacy of PDE4 inhibitors, which have been in clinical development over the years are summarized with specific emphasis on their clinical pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:21695636

  12. Pregnancy-Related Effects on Nelfinavir-M8 Pharmacokinetics: a Population Study with 133 Women

    PubMed Central

    Hirt, Déborah; Treluyer, Jean-Marc; Jullien, Vincent; Firtion, Ghislaine; Chappuy, Hélène; Rey, Elisabeth; Pons, Gérard; Mandelbrot, Laurent; Urien, Saïk

    2006-01-01

    A relationship between nelfinavir antiretroviral efficacy and plasma concentrations has been previously established. As physiological changes associated with pregnancy have a large impact on the pharmacokinetics of many drugs, a nelfinavir population study with women was developed, and the large intersubject variability was analyzed in order to optimize individual treatment schedules for this drug during pregnancy. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed in order to describe the concentration time course of nelfinavir and its metabolite M8 in pregnant and nonpregnant women. Individual characteristics, such as age, body weight, and weeks of gestation or delivery, which may influence nelfinavir-M8 pharmacokinetics were investigated. Data from therapeutic drug monitoring in 133 women treated with nelfinavir were retrospectively analyzed with NONMEM. Nelfinavir pharmacokinetics was described by a one-compartment model with linear absorption and elimination and M8 produced from the nelfinavir central compartment. Mean pharmacokinetic estimates and the corresponding intersubject percent variabilities for a nonpregnant woman were the following: absorption rate, 0.83 h−1; absorption lag time, 0.85 h; apparent nelfinavir elimination clearance (CL10/F), 35.5 liters/h (50%); apparent volume of distribution (V/F), 596 liters (118%); apparent formation clearance to M8 (CL1M/F), 0.65 liters/h (69%); and M8 elimination rate constant (kM0), 3.3 h−1 (59%). During pregnancy, we observed significant increases in nelfinavir (44.4 liters/h) and M8 (5 h−1) elimination but unchanged nelfinavir transformation clearance to M8, suggesting an induction of CYP3A4 but no effect on CYP2C19. Apparent nelfinavir clearance and volume showed a twofold increase on the day of delivery, suggesting a decrease in bioavailability on this day. The M8 elimination rate was increased by concomitant administration of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. A trough nelfinavir plasma

  13. Implementation and validation of collapsed cone superposition for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Garcia, Manuel; Gardin, Isabelle; Lebtahi, Rachida; Dieudonné, Arnaud

    2015-10-21

    Two collapsed cone (CC) superposition algorithms have been implemented for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters. The straight CC (SCC) superposition method uses a water energy deposition kernel (EDKw) for each electron, positron and photon components, while the primary and scatter CC (PSCC) superposition method uses different EDKw for primary and once-scattered photons. PSCC was implemented only for photons originating from the nucleus, precluding its application to positron emitters. EDKw are linearly scaled by radiological distance, taking into account tissue density heterogeneities. The implementation was tested on 100, 300 and 600 keV mono-energetic photons and (18)F, (99m)Tc, (131)I and (177)Lu. The kernels were generated using the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and EGSnrc. The validation was performed on 6 phantoms representing interfaces between soft-tissues, lung and bone. The figures of merit were γ (3%, 3 mm) and γ (5%, 5 mm) criterions corresponding to the computation comparison on 80 absorbed doses (AD) points per phantom between Monte Carlo simulations and CC algorithms. PSCC gave better results than SCC for the lowest photon energy (100 keV). For the 3 isotopes computed with PSCC, the percentage of AD points satisfying the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion was always over 99%. A still good but worse result was found with SCC, since at least 97% of AD-values verified the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion, except a value of 57% for the (99m)Tc with the lung/bone interface. The CC superposition method for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry is a good alternative to Monte Carlo simulations while reducing computation complexity. PMID:26406778

  14. Implementation and validation of collapsed cone superposition for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Garcia, Manuel; Gardin, Isabelle; Lebtahi, Rachida; Dieudonné, Arnaud

    2015-10-01

    Two collapsed cone (CC) superposition algorithms have been implemented for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry of photon emitters. The straight CC (SCC) superposition method uses a water energy deposition kernel (EDKw) for each electron, positron and photon components, while the primary and scatter CC (PSCC) superposition method uses different EDKw for primary and once-scattered photons. PSCC was implemented only for photons originating from the nucleus, precluding its application to positron emitters. EDKw are linearly scaled by radiological distance, taking into account tissue density heterogeneities. The implementation was tested on 100, 300 and 600 keV mono-energetic photons and 18F, 99mTc, 131I and 177Lu. The kernels were generated using the Monte Carlo codes MCNP and EGSnrc. The validation was performed on 6 phantoms representing interfaces between soft-tissues, lung and bone. The figures of merit were γ (3%, 3 mm) and γ (5%, 5 mm) criterions corresponding to the computation comparison on 80 absorbed doses (AD) points per phantom between Monte Carlo simulations and CC algorithms. PSCC gave better results than SCC for the lowest photon energy (100 keV). For the 3 isotopes computed with PSCC, the percentage of AD points satisfying the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion was always over 99%. A still good but worse result was found with SCC, since at least 97% of AD-values verified the γ (5%, 5 mm) criterion, except a value of 57% for the 99mTc with the lung/bone interface. The CC superposition method for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry is a good alternative to Monte Carlo simulations while reducing computation complexity.

  15. Pharmacokinetic Analysis of 64Cu-ATSM Dynamic PET in Human Xenograft Tumors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Madsen, Jacob; Kjaer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility to perform voxel-wise kinetic modeling on datasets obtained from tumor-bearing mice that underwent dynamic PET scans with 64Cu-ATSM and extract useful physiological parameters. Methods: Tumor-bearing mice underwent 90-min dynamic PET scans with 64Cu-ATSM and CT scans with contrast. Irreversible and reversible two-tissue compartment models were fitted to time activity curves (TACs) obtained from whole tumor volumes and compared using the Akaike information criterion (AIC). Based on voxel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis, parametric maps of model rate constants k1, k3 and Ki were generated and compared to 64Cu-ATSM uptake. Results: Based on the AIC, an irreversible two-tissue compartment model was selected for voxel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis. Of the extracted parameters, k1 (~perfusion) showed a strong correlation with early tracer uptake (mean spearman R = 0.88) 5 min post injection (pi). Moreover, positive relationships were found between late tracer uptake (90 min pi) and both k3 and the net influx rate constant, Ki (mean spearman R = 0.56 and R = 0.86; respectively). Conclusion: This study shows the feasibility to extract relevant parameters from voxel-wise pharmacokinetic analysis to be used for preclinical validation of 64Cu-ATSM as a hypoxia-specific PET tracer. PMID:26854145

  16. [Pharmacokinetic comparison of baicalin absorption medicine Qinbai Qingfei concentrated pellets drug compatibility].

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Long; Feng, Wen-Cheng; Yao, Lin; Sun, Yan; Song, Ya-Juan; Hu, Hao; Wang, Wei-Ming

    2014-05-01

    The Qinbai Qingfei concentrated pellets by traditional Chinese medicine theoryand party and group, the rats were given the drugs group, comparison of pharmacokinetics parameters changes of baicalin , discusses the rationality of Qinbai prescription. The rats were gavaged monarch drug group (Huang Qincu extract, mainly forbaicalin), and official medicine group, adjuvant group, medicine group and Qinbai group (Quan Fangzu) the content of baicalin equal as the monarch drug group, in the 28 h collection in rat plasma at different time point, application of HPLC determination of baicalin glycosides in rat plasmaconcentration time curve, with 3P97 practical pharmacokinetics program to process the data Based on the data analysis, baicalin in rat plasma of Qinbai group Cmax is 4 times as big as monarch druggroup, AUC is 6 times as big as monarch drug group; the content of baicalin in plasma of rats the highest is Qinbai group, the minister drug group, adjuvant group, medicine group of baicalin in rat plasma content of less than the Qinbai group, but was significantly higher than that of monarch drug group; the medicine group is slightly higher than that adjuvant the content of baicalin in plasma of rats. The pharmacokinetic results show that the measured plasma concentration in rats that Qinbai can significantly increase Cmax and AUC of baicalin, other components of qinbai can promoted the baicalin absorption in vivo. It showed that the reasonable of Qinbai compound compatibility. The minister drug can promote the absorption of baicalin in vivo. PMID:25282909

  17. Abnormal clinical pharmacokinetics of the developmental radiosensitizers pimonidazole (Ro 03-8799) and etanidazole (SR 2508)

    SciTech Connect

    Maughan, T.S.; Newman, H.F.; Bleehen, N.M.; Ward, R.; Workman, P. )

    1990-05-01

    The hypoxic cell radiosensitizers Ro 03-8799 (pimonidazole) and SR 2508 (etanidazole) are under evaluation as single agents (Phase III) and in combination (Phase I). Ro 03-8799 produces an acute, transient central nervous system syndrome, whereas SR 2508 causes cumulative, peripheral neurotoxicity; both effects are dose-limiting. Pharmacokinetic studies have shown the importance of area under the plasma drug concentration versus time curve (AUC) in predicting the risk of peripheral neuropathy. Most patients have very similar pharmacokinetic parameters. This study reports 2/25 patients receiving 0.75 g/m2 Ro 03-8799 plus 2.0 g/m2 SR 2508 who showed significant discrepancies in drug handling. One patient exhibited a markedly elevated AUC and prolonged t1/2 beta for SR 2508 and this was associated with an unusually rapid onset of peripheral neuropathy. A second patient showed normal handling of SR 2508 but prolonged values for both t1/2 alpha and t1/2 beta for Ro 03-8799 and unusually low levels of its N-oxide metabolite. In addition a low peak Ro 03-8799 concentration combined with a very high volume of distribution was found in this patient, leading to a normal AUC value and toxicity profile. Both patients exhibited a relatively low creatinine clearance. The mechanisms which may underlie these findings are discussed, and the importance of pharmacokinetic monitoring in the use of these agents is emphasized.

  18. Effects of Chungsinoryungsan, a polyherbal complex, on the pharmacokinetic profiles of perindopril in rats

    PubMed Central

    KANG, SEOK-BONG; SHON, HO-SANG; PARK, SOO-JIN; SONG, CHANG-HYUN; KU, SAE-KWANG

    2014-01-01

    For sufficient antihypertension with less adverse effects, numerous clinical trials have recommended combination therapy using two or more hypertensive drugs. Chungsinoryungsan (CSORS) is a polyherbal complex based on oriental medicine, which has shown therapeutic potentials for antihypertension and additional renal improvement. Therefore, the affect of CSORS on the pharmacokinetic profiles of perindopril, an antihypertensive drug, was analyzed as a novel combination of hypertensive drugs. Rats received perindopril with CSORS as the combination or distilled water as the control. The co-administration of perindopril with CSORS or distilled water was performed by single dosing or repeated dosing for a week at a 2-h interval. The analyzed pharmacokinetic parameters included peak concentration (Cmax), time to reach the Cmax (Tmax), area under the plasma concentration-time curve, terminal half-life (t1/2) and mean residence time to infinity (MRTinf). In the single oral co-administration within 5 min, the pharmacokinetics of perindopril demonstrated an increased Tmax and MRTinf but reduced t1/2 in the combination compared to the control treatment, indicating drug-drug interactions between perindopril and CSORS. However, in the repeated co-administration for a week at a 2-h interval, which was more than perindopril MRTinf in the control treatment (1.5±0.1 h), the initial co-administration showed no differences in the pharmacokinetics between the combination and control treatments. Furthermore, the repeated co-administration also showed no differences between the combination and control treatment. The results indicate that CSORS can be co-administered at a 2-h interval that was more than perindopril MRTinf and further clinical studies may provide detailed information for developing a drug regimen that generates enhanced combination effects of CSORS with hypertensive drugs. PMID:25279159

  19. Pharmacokinetics of tilidine and naloxone in patients with severe hepatic impairment.

    PubMed

    Brennscheidt, Ulrich; Brunnmüller, Ulrike; Proppe, Dietfried; Thomann, Peter; Seiler, Klaus-Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of tilidine (CAS 20380-58-9), naloxone (CAS 465-65-6) and tilidine metabolites after administration of a single oral dose of a solution containing 100 mg tilidine hydrochloride and 8 mg naloxone hydrochloride (equivalent to 1.44 ml Valoron N solution) to patients with severe hepatic impairment. The investigation was carried out as an open single-dose study in 8 patients suffering from liver cirrhosis. Patients qualified for study enrollment if they had a Child-Pugh score of > or = 7 and a mono-ethyl-glycine-xylidide (MEGX) 15-min test value < 50 ng/ ml. Blood samples were taken over a period of 28 h and analyzed for the prodrug tilidine, its active metabolite nortilidine, bisnortilidine, and naloxone (total and non-glucuronidated fraction). Pharmacokinetic parameters were compared with data from a previous study performed in healthy volunteers. Tilidine, nortilidine and unconjugated naloxone pharmacokinetic parameters showed a high variability between patients. Compared to previous results obtained in healthy volunteers, maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of nortilidine was reduced by 44%, whereas elimination half-life (t1/2) was prolonged by factor 2. The area under the curve (AUC) showed a slight reduction of approximately 20%. For total naloxone, no relevant change was observed. However, in contrast to the results obtained in healthy subjects, unconjugated naloxone could be measured in plasma from patients with cirrhosis, possibly due to a reduced glucuronidation capacity of the liver in these patients. In conclusion, severe hepatic impairment has a relatively minor influence on the exposure (AUC) to the active metabolite of tilidine (i.e., nortilidine). However, a straightforward interpretation of the results was confounded by pronounced variability in nortilidine pharmacokinetics. In individual patients with severely affected liver function, satisfactory analgesia with tilidine

  20. Bioactive Markers Based Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of Extracts of a Traditional Medicinal Plant, Piper sarmentosum

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Khalid; Ismail, Zhari; Sadikun, Amirin; Ibrahim, Pazillah

    2011-01-01

    In vitro assays are economical and easy to perform but to establish relevance of their results to real clinical outcome in animals or human, pharmacokinetics is prerequisite. Despite various in vitro pharmacological activities of extracts of Piper sarmentosum, there is no report of pharmacokinetics. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate ethanol extract of fruit of the plant in dose of 500 mg kg−1 orally for pharmacokinetics. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into groups 1, 2, and 3 (each n = 6) to study absorption, distribution and excretion, respectively. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet detection was applied to quantify pellitorine, sarmentine and sarmentosine in plasma, tissues, feces and urine to calculate pharmacokinetic parameters. Pellitorine exhibited maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) 34.77 ng mL−1 ± 1.040, time to achieve Cmax (Tmax) 8 h, mean resident time (MRT) 26.00 ± 0.149 h and half life (t1/2) 18.64 ± 1.65 h. Sarmentine showed Cmax 191.50 ± 12.69 ng mL−1, Tmax 6 h, MRT 11.12 ± 0.44 h and t1/2 10.30 ± 1.98 h. Sarmentosine exhibited zero oral bioavailability because it was neither detected in plasma nor in tissues, and in urine. Pellitorine was found to be distributed in intestinal wall, liver, lungs, kidney, and heart, whereas sarmentine was found only in intestinal wall and heart. The cumulative excretion of pellitorine, sarmentine and sarmentosine in feces in 72 h was 0.0773, 0.976, and 0.438 μg, respectively. This study shows that pellitorine and sarmentine have good oral bioavailability while sarmentosine is not absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:19770264

  1. Effects of Chungsinoryungsan, a polyherbal complex, on the pharmacokinetic profiles of perindopril in rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok-Bong; Shon, Ho-Sang; Park, Soo-Jin; Song, Chang-Hyun; Ku, Sae-Kwang

    2014-11-01

    For sufficient antihypertension with less adverse effects, numerous clinical trials have recommended combination therapy using two or more hypertensive drugs. Chungsinoryungsan (CSORS) is a polyherbal complex based on oriental medicine, which has shown therapeutic potentials for antihypertension and additional renal improvement. Therefore, the affect of CSORS on the pharmacokinetic profiles of perindopril, an antihypertensive drug, was analyzed as a novel combination of hypertensive drugs. Rats received perindopril with CSORS as the combination or distilled water as the control. The co-administration of perindopril with CSORS or distilled water was performed by single dosing or repeated dosing for a week at a 2-h interval. The analyzed pharmacokinetic parameters included peak concentration (Cmax), time to reach the Cmax (Tmax), area under the plasma concentration-time curve, terminal half-life (t1/2) and mean residence time to infinity (MRTinf). In the single oral co-administration within 5 min, the pharmacokinetics of perindopril demonstrated an increased Tmax and MRTinf but reduced t1/2 in the combination compared to the control treatment, indicating drug-drug interactions between perindopril and CSORS. However, in the repeated co-administration for a week at a 2-h interval, which was more than perindopril MRTinf in the control treatment (1.5±0.1 h), the initial co-administration showed no differences in the pharmacokinetics between the combination and control treatments. Furthermore, the repeated co-administration also showed no differences between the combination and control treatment. The results indicate that CSORS can be co-administered at a 2-h interval that was more than perindopril MRTinf and further clinical studies may provide detailed information for developing a drug regimen that generates enhanced combination effects of CSORS with hypertensive drugs. PMID:25279159

  2. Cyclosporine pharmacokinetics in pancreas transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Munda, R; Schroeder, T J; Pedersen, S A; Clardy, C W; Wadhwa, N K; Myre, S A; Stephens, G W; Pesce, A J; Alexander, J W; First, M R

    1988-04-01

    Ten CsA pharmacokinetic studies were performed on five pancreas transplant recipients to determine proper doses and dosing intervals. These cadaver pancreas transplants were performed with exocrine ductal drainage into the urinary tract through a bladder anastomosis in four cases and into the bowel in one case. Four CsA pharmacokinetic studies were performed on diabetic renal transplant recipients and an additional six studies were performed while with pancreas transplant patients taking metoclopramide in an effort to enhance absorption of CsA. Mean CsA dose was 3.7 mg/kg/dose (range 2.1 to 7.5 mg/kg/dose). All patients but one were on twice daily dosing intervals yielding an average daily dose of 7.4 mg/kg/d. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were used. The adequacy of a 1-, 2-, or 3-exponential model was determined by breakpoint analysis of the log concentration v time curve using the F statistic. The terminal rate constant was calculated by nonlinear regression analysis. The AUC and AUMC were calculated by the trapezoidal method with exponential extrapolation and these were used to calculate the MRT and Vdss. The unknown fractional absorption, F, was used to correct the oral data. The average CsA concentration maximum (Cmax) was 528 ng/mL with an average time to maximum concentration (Tmax) of 4.7 hours, a mean residence time of 7.75 hours, with a Vdss/%F of 9.61 L/kg in the pancreas transplant recipients. Additional studies of six patients receiving metoclopramide with CsA revealed an average Cmax of 723 ng/mL, an average Tmax of 2.3 hours, an average MRT of 6.08 hours, and an average Vdss/%F of 5.7% L/kg. These results indicate that coexistent gastroparesis in diabetic recipients of either pancreatic or renal transplants may result in reduced bioavailability of CsA. PMID:3284095

  3. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions with oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Back, D J; Orme, M L

    1990-06-01

    Oral contraceptive steroids are used by an estimated 60 to 70 million women world-wide. Over the past 20 years there have been both case reports and clinical studies on the topic of drug interactions with these agents. Some of the interactions are of definite therapeutic relevance, whereas others can be discounted as being of no clinical significance. Pharmacological interactions between oral contraceptive steroids and other compounds may be of 2 kinds: (a) drugs may impair the efficacy of oral contraceptive steroids, leading to breakthrough bleeding and pregnancy (in a few cases, the activity of the contraceptive is enhanced); (b) oral contraceptive steroids may interfere with the metabolism of other drugs. A number of anticonvulsants (phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine) are enzyme-inducing agents and thereby increase the clearance of the oral contraceptive steroids. Valproic acid has no enzyme-inducing properties, and thus women on this anticonvulsant can rely on their low dose oral contraceptive steroids for contraceptive protection. Researchers are now beginning to unravel the molecular basis of this interaction, with evidence of specific forms of cytochrome P450 (P450IIC and IIIA gene families) being induced by phenobarbital. Rifampicin, the antituberculous drug, also induces a cytochrome P450 which is a product of the P450IIIA gene subfamily. This isozyme is one of the major forms involved in 2-hydroxylation of ethinylestradiol. Broad spectrum antibiotics have been implicated in causing pill failure; case reports document the interaction, and general practitioners are convinced that it is real. The problem remains that there is still no firm clinical pharmacokinetic evidence which indicates that blood concentrations of oral contraceptive steroids are altered by antibiotics. However, perhaps this should not be a surprise, given that the incidence of the interaction may be very low. It is suggested that an individual at risk will have a low bioavailability

  4. Covariates of intravenous paracetamol pharmacokinetics in adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pharmacokinetic estimates for intravenous paracetamol in individual adult cohorts are different to a certain extent, and understanding the covariates of these differences may guide dose individualization. In order to assess covariate effects of intravenous paracetamol disposition in adults, pharmacokinetic data on discrete studies were pooled. Methods This pooled analysis was based on 7 studies, resulting in 2755 time-concentration observations in 189 adults (mean age 46 SD 23 years; weight 73 SD 13 kg) given intravenous paracetamol. The effects of size, age, pregnancy and other clinical settings (intensive care, high dependency, orthopaedic or abdominal surgery) on clearance and volume of distribution were explored using non-linear mixed effects models. Results Paracetamol disposition was best described using normal fat mass (NFM) with allometric scaling as a size descriptor. A three-compartment linear disposition model revealed that the population parameter estimates (between subject variability,%) were central volume (V1) 24.6 (55.5%) L/70 kg with peripheral volumes of distribution V2 23.1 (49.6%) L/70 kg and V3 30.6 (78.9%) L/70 kg. Clearance (CL) was 16.7 (24.6%) L/h/70 kg and inter-compartment clearances were Q2 67.3 (25.7%) L/h/70 kg and Q3 2.04 (71.3%) L/h/70 kg. Clearance and V2 decreased only slightly with age. Sex differences in clearance were minor and of no significance. Clearance, relative to median values, was increased during pregnancy (FPREG = 1.14) and decreased during abdominal surgery (FABDCL = 0.715). Patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery had a reduced V2 (FORTHOV = 0.649), while those in intensive care had increased V2 (FICV = 1.51). Conclusions Size and age are important covariates for paracetamol pharmacokinetics explaining approximately 40% of clearance and V2 variability. Dose individualization in adult subpopulations would achieve little benefit in the scenarios explored. PMID:25342929

  5. Clinical Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Profile of Idelalisib.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Srinivasan; Jin, Feng; Sharma, Shringi; Kearney, Brian P

    2016-01-01

    Idelalisib is a potent and selective phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-δ inhibitor, which is a first-in-class agent to be approved for the treatment of relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, follicular B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and small lymphocytic lymphoma. In dose-ranging studies, idelalisib exposure increased in a less than dose-proportional manner, likely because of solubility-limited absorption. The approved starting dose of 150 mg twice daily was supported by extensive exposure-response evaluations, with dose reduction to 100 mg twice daily being allowed for specific toxicities. Idelalisib may be administered without regard to food on the basis of the absence of clinically relevant food effects, and was accordingly dosed in primary efficacy/safety studies. Idelalisib is metabolized primarily via aldehyde oxidase (AO) and, to a lesser extent, via cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A. Coadministration with the strong CYP3A inhibitor ketoconazole 400 mg once daily resulted in a ~79 % increase in the idelalisib area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC). Administration with the potent inducer rifampin resulted in a 75 % decrease in idelalisib exposure (AUC) and, as such, coadministration with strong inducers should be avoided. GS-563117 is an inactive primary circulating metabolite of idelalisib formed mainly via AO. Unlike idelalisib, GS-563117 is a mechanism-based inhibitor of CYP3A. Accordingly, idelalisib 150 mg twice-daily dosing increases the midazolam AUC 5.4-fold. Clinically, idelalisib is not an inhibitor of the transporters P-glycoprotein, breast cancer resistance protein, organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1 or OAPT1B3. In a population pharmacokinetic model, no meaningful impact on idelalisib pharmacokinetics was noted for any of the covariates tested. Idelalisib exposure was ~60 % higher with moderate/severe hepatic impairment; no relevant changes were observed with severe renal impairment. This article reviews a comprehensive

  6. Pharmacokinetics and interactions of headache medications, part I: introduction, pharmacokinetics, metabolism and acute treatments.

    PubMed

    Sternieri, Emilio; Coccia, Ciro Pio Rosario; Pinetti, Diego; Ferrari, Anna

    2006-12-01

    Recent progress in the treatment of primary headaches has made available specific, effective and safe medications for these disorders, which are widely spread among the general population. One of the negative consequences of this undoubtedly positive progress is the risk of drug-drug interactions. This review is the first in a two-part series on pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of headache medications. Part I addresses acute treatments. Part II focuses on prophylactic treatments. The overall aim of this series is to increase the awareness of physicians, either primary care providers or specialists, regarding this topic. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of major severity involving acute medications are a minority among those reported in literature. The main drug combinations to avoid are: i) NSAIDs plus drugs with a narrow therapeutic range (i.e., digoxin, methotrexate, etc.); ii) sumatriptan, rizatriptan or zolmitriptan plus monoamine oxidase inhibitors; iii) substrates and inhibitors of CYP2D6 (i.e., chlorpromazine, metoclopramide, etc.) and -3A4 (i.e., ergot derivatives, eletriptan, etc.), as well as other substrates or inhibitors of the same CYP isoenzymes. The risk of having clinically significant pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions seems to be limited in patients with low frequency headaches, but could be higher in chronic headache sufferers with medication overuse. PMID:17125411

  7. Interspecies allometric analysis of the comparative pharmacokinetics of 44 drugs across veterinary and laboratory animal species.

    PubMed

    Riviere, J E; Martin-Jimenez, T; Sundlof, S F; Craigmill, A L

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply the method of allometric analysis to a study of the comparative disposition of veterinary drugs using the Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank (FARAD) as a source of the comparative pharmacokinetic data. An initial filtration of the FARAD data was performed in order to exclude drugs for which no pharmacokinetic data were available, in at least four species the route of administration was other than intravenous, and the matrix was different from blood, plasma or serum. This process restricted the study to a total of 44 candidate drugs. The primary pharmacokinetic parameter selected for study was half-life (t1/2). As this parameter is a composite of clearance (Cl) and volume of distribution (Vd), it was considered to be the most robust for interspecies scaling. Volume of distribution at steady state (Vdss) and clearance showed weak allometric correlations with weight across species. The relationships between body weight and elimination half-life (51/2 beta) were determined for this selected group of drugs by using the empirically determined function Y = a Wb. The function Y represents the parameter of concern (half-life), a is a coefficient typical of every drug (intercept), W is the species average body weight, and b is the scaling exponent. A total of 11 drugs (tetracycline, oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, erythromycin, diazepam, prednisolone, cephapirin, ampicillin, gentamicin, apramycin and carbenicillin) showed statistically significant correlations and consequently are excellent candidates for interspecies extrapolation of pharmacokinetic parameters (half-life) in species of relevance to veterinary medicine. The remaining 33 drugs were divided into two groups which showed various degrees of lack of correlation. Many of the drugs that showed no allometric correlation were low hepatic extraction drugs. However, some other drugs demonstrated equivocal results which could either be due to a true lack of allometric

  8. A Treatment Planning Method for Sequentially Combining Radiopharmaceutical Therapy and External Radiation Therapy;External beam therapy; Radiopharmaceutical therapy; Three-dimensional dosimetry; Treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, Robert F.; McNutt, Todd; Baechler, Sebastien; He Bin; Esaias, Caroline E.; Frey, Eric C.; Loeb, David M.; Wahl, Richard L.; Shokek, Ori; Sgouros, George

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Effective cancer treatment generally requires combination therapy. The combination of external beam therapy (XRT) with radiopharmaceutical therapy (RPT) requires accurate three-dimensional dose calculations to avoid toxicity and evaluate efficacy. We have developed and tested a treatment planning method, using the patient-specific three-dimensional dosimetry package 3D-RD, for sequentially combined RPT/XRT therapy designed to limit toxicity to organs at risk. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose (BED) was used to translate voxelized RPT absorbed dose (D{sub RPT}) values into a normalized total dose (or equivalent 2-Gy-fraction XRT absorbed dose), NTD{sub RPT} map. The BED was calculated numerically using an algorithmic approach, which enabled a more accurate calculation of BED and NTD{sub RPT}. A treatment plan from the combined Samarium-153 and external beam was designed that would deliver a tumoricidal dose while delivering no more than 50 Gy of NTD{sub sum} to the spinal cord of a patient with a paraspinal tumor. Results: The average voxel NTD{sub RPT} to tumor from RPT was 22.6 Gy (range, 1-85 Gy); the maximum spinal cord voxel NTD{sub RPT} from RPT was 6.8 Gy. The combined therapy NTD{sub sum} to tumor was 71.5 Gy (range, 40-135 Gy) for a maximum voxel spinal cord NTD{sub sum} equal to the maximum tolerated dose of 50 Gy. Conclusions: A method that enables real-time treatment planning of combined RPT-XRT has been developed. By implementing a more generalized conversion between the dose values from the two modalities and an activity-based treatment of partial volume effects, the reliability of combination therapy treatment planning has been expanded.

  9. The pharmacokinetics of cefadroxil associated with probenecid.

    PubMed

    Mariño, E L; Dominguez-Gil, A

    1981-11-01

    The effects of probenecid on the pharmacokinetic parameters of cefadroxil administered in a single dose of 500 mg are studied. The serum and urine levels of the antibiotic were determined by a microbiologic plate diffusion method. The antibiotic follows a single-compartment model. The half-life of cefadroxil in serum has an average value of 1.13 h, rising to 1.63 h when the antibiotic is associated with probenecid. The apparent distribution volume remains unmodified with a value close to 23 liters. The lag time is 0.25 h in the absence of probenecid, rising to 1.029 h in the presence of the uricosuric agent. PMID:6795136

  10. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic-Driven Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, James M.

    2010-01-01

    The drug discovery and development enterprise, traditionally an industrial juggernaut, has spanned into the academic arena that is partially motivated by the National Institutes of Health Roadmap highlighting translational science and medicine. Since drug discovery and development represents a pipeline of basic to clinical investigations it meshes well with the prime “bench to the bedside” directive of translational medicine. The renewed interest in drug discovery and develpoment in academia provides an opportunity to rethink the hiearchary of studies with the hope to improve the staid approaches that have been critizied for lacking innovation. One area that has received limited attention concerns the use of pharmacokinetic [PK] and pharmacodynamic [PD] studies in the drug development process. Using anticancer drug development as a focus, this review will address past and current deficencies in how PK/PD studies are conducted and offer new strategies that might bridge the gap between preclinical and clinical trials. PMID:20687184

  11. Pharmacokinetics of oral dichloroacetate in dogs.

    PubMed

    Maisenbacher, Herbert W; Shroads, Albert L; Zhong, Guo; Daigle, Adam D; Abdelmalak, Monica M; Samper, Ivan Sosa; Mincey, Brandy D; James, Margaret O; Stacpoole, Peter W

    2013-12-01

    We characterized the pharmacokinetics and dynamics of dichloroacetate (DCA), an investigational drug for mitochondrial diseases, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and cancer. Adult Beagle dogs were orally administered 6.25 mg/kg q12h DCA for 4 weeks. Plasma kinetics was determined after 1, 14, and 28 days. The activity and expression of glutathione transferase zeta 1 (GSTZ1), which biotransforms DCA to glyoxylate, were determined from liver biopsies at baseline and after 27 days. Dogs demonstrate much slower clearance and greater inhibition of DCA metabolism and GSTZ1 activity and expression than rodents and most humans. Indeed, the plasma kinetics of DCA in dogs is similar to humans with GSTZ1 polymorphisms that confer exceptionally slow plasma clearance. Dogs may be a useful model to further investigate the toxicokinetics and therapeutic potential of DCA. PMID:24038869

  12. [Pharmacokinetic interactions of telaprevir with other drugs].

    PubMed

    Berenguer Berenguer, Juan; González-García, Juan

    2013-07-01

    Telaprevir is a new direct-acting antiviral drug for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and is both a substrate and an inhibitor of cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isoenzymes. With the introduction of this new drug, assessment of drug-drug interactions has become a key factor in the evaluation of patients under treatment for HCV infection. During the treatment of this infection, many patients require other drugs to mitigate the adverse effects of anti-HCV drugs and to control other comorbidities. Moreover, most patients coinfected with HIV and HCV require antiretroviral therapy during treatment for HCV. Physicians should therefore be familiar with the pharmacokinetic properties of direct-acting antivirals for HCV treatment and their potential drug-drug interactions. The present article reviews the available information to date on the interactions of telaprevir with other drugs and provides recommendations for daily clinical practice. PMID:24063902

  13. [Mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics of rilpivirine].

    PubMed

    Portilla, Joaquín; Estrada, Vicente

    2013-06-01

    Rilpivirine is a potent nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) with high efficacy in the treatment of HIV infection in treatment-naïve patients. This drug is active against both wild-type HIV-1 and a wide variety of first-generation NNRTI. Rilpivirine has a highly favorable pharmacokinetics profile, but, because its absorption depends on gastric pH, it should be administered with food to ensure correct absorption. Rilpivirine is metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A and consequently potential interactions should be considered when it is administered with P450 (CYP) 3A inducers or inhibitors. Although higher doses can behave as enzyme inducers, at a dose of 25mg/day, rilpivirine is unlikely to alter the concentrations of other drugs metabolized through this pathway. Because of its prolonged half-life, rilpivirine can be administered orally once daily. PMID:24252527

  14. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of brotizolam in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bechtel, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    1 Pharmacokinetic studies were performed in healthy young volunteers and in elderly patients after oral administration of single doses (0.5 mg), increasing doses (0.5-1.5 mg), and multiple doses (1.0 mg) of brotizolam. 2 Brotizolam was absorbed quickly from the gastro-intestinal tract. Elimination half-lives were in the range of 3.6-7.9 h. 3 In healthy young volunteers as well as in elderly patients, there was neither a tendency for brotizolam to accumulate nor was there any indication of enzyme induction. 4 Brotizolam was metabolized almost completely into hydroxylated compounds which were conjugated prior to renal excretion. 5 After oral administration of [14C]-brotizolam, two-thirds of excretion of radioactivity was renal and was completed within 4 days. PMID:6661373

  15. Radiosynthesis and pharmacokinetics of high specific activity /sup 75,77/Br-bromperidol, a potent butyrophenone neuroleptic

    SciTech Connect

    Moerlein, S.M.; Stocklin, G.

    1984-01-01

    Bromperidol, 4-(4-(4-bromophenyl)-4-hydroxypiperidino)-4'- fluorobutyrophenone, is a potent neuroleptic which has found clinical use in the treatment of schizophrenia. Of the major dopaminergic receptor-binding ligands, bromperidol has the greatest specificity for binding to cerebral dopamine receptors (K/sub i/ = 3.7 nM) relative to competitive cerebral serotonin (K/sub i/ = 26 nM), ..cap alpha..-adrenergic (K/sub i/ = 100 nM) or histamine (K/sub i/ = 700 nM) receptors. The authors have therefore prepared bromperidol labelled with no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) /sup 75/Br (t/sub 1/2/ = 1.6 hr ..beta../sup +/) or /sup 77/Br (t/sub 1/2/ = 52 hr EC) for evaluation as a radiopharmaceutical for mapping cerebral dopamine receptor areas with PECT technology, as well as for non-invasive pharmacodynamic studies in man with conventional nuclear medicine equipment. 4-(4-(4-trimethylstannylphenyl)-4-hydroxypiperidino)-4'- fluorobutyrophenone, TMSn-P, was synthesized in 40% chemical yield by reaction of trimethylstannyl sodium with bromperidol. TMSn-P was purified by preparative HPLC and characterized by /sup 1/H-NMR and GC-MS. TMSn-P was radiobrominated in methanol using n.c.a. /sup 75/Br/sup -/ or /sup 77/Br/sup -/ and dichloramine-T as oxidizing agent. Product /sup 75,77/Br-bromperidol was separated from impurities, including chlorinated side-product halo-peridol, using HPLC (RP-18; MeOH/H/sub 2/O/Et/sub 3/N = 70/30/0.3). For a reaction time of 5 minutes, and an overall radiopharmaceutical production time of 30 minutes, /sup 75,77/Br-bromperidol was obtained in physiological saline solution with 40% radiochemical yield and a specific activity > 10,000 Ci/mmole. The pharmacokinetics in rodents and PECT studies in primates using /sup 75,77/Br-bromperidol are compared with that of previously-reported /sup 75,77/Br-brombenperidol.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of cysteamine bitartrate following gastrointestinal infusion

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, Meredith C; Barshop, Bruce A; Gangoiti, Jon A; Deutsch, Reena; Martin, Michael; Schneider, Jerry A; Dohil, Ranjan

    2007-01-01

    Aims Although cysteamine was first used in the treatment of cystinosis in 1976 and approved by the FDA as cysteamine bitartrate (Cystagon™) in 1994, surprisingly little pharmacological data are available for this compound. Cysteamine and its related drugs are currently being evaluated for the treatment of Huntington’s and Parkinson’s disease. The aim of te study was to understand the pharmacokinetics of cysteamine bitartrate following gastrointestinal infusion. Method Cysteamine bitartrate was delivered through a naso-enteric catheter into the stomach (n = 8), small intestine (n = 8) and caecum (n = 4) of normal subjects. Plasma cysteamine concentrations were determined using LC-MS/MS. Results The rate and extent of drug absorption were assessed by comparing AUC(0, ∞), Cmax and tmax, among the gastrointestinal infusion sites. Total cysteamine exposure, expressed as area under the curve (AUC(0, ∞)) was greatest when the drug was infused into the small intestine (4331.3 ± 1907.6 min × µm) followed by stomach (3901.9 ± 1591.9 min × µm) and caecum (3141.4 ± 1627.6 min × µm). Cysteamine infusion into the small intestine resulted in the most rapid rise to maximal plasma concentrations (tmax = 21 ± 0.56 min); tmax was delayed to 50 ± 26 min and 64 ± 26 min after gastric and caecal infusion, respectively. The maximum cysteamine plasma concentration (Cmax) was reached after infusion of the drug into the small intestine (51 ± 21 µm), which was higher than plasma Cmax concentrations after gastric (39 ± 16 µm) and caecal infusion (23 ± 15 µm). Conclusions The pharmacokinetic data generated help extend our understanding of cysteamine. PMID:17229040

  17. Clinical Population Pharmacokinetics and Toxicodynamics of Linezolid

    PubMed Central

    Boak, Lauren M.; Rayner, Craig R.; Grayson, M. Lindsay; Paterson, David L.; Spelman, Denis; Khumra, Sharmila; Capitano, Blair; Forrest, Alan; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common side effect of linezolid, an oxazolidinone antibiotic often used to treat multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial infections. Various risk factors have been suggested, including linezolid dose and duration of therapy, baseline platelet counts, and renal dysfunction; still, the mechanisms behind this potentially treatment-limiting toxicity are largely unknown. A clinical study was conducted to investigate the relationship between linezolid pharmacokinetics and toxicodynamics and inform strategies to prevent and manage linezolid-associated toxicity. Forty-one patients received 42 separate treatment courses of linezolid (600 mg every 12 h). A new mechanism-based, population pharmacokinetic/toxicodynamic model was developed to describe the time course of plasma linezolid concentrations and platelets. A linezolid concentration of 8.06 mg/liter (101% between-patient variability) inhibited the synthesis of platelet precursor cells by 50%. Simulations predicted treatment durations of 5 and 7 days to carry a substantially lower risk than 10- to 28-day therapy for platelet nadirs of <100 ×109/liter. The risk for toxicity did not differ noticeably between 14 and 28 days of therapy and was significantly higher for patients with lower baseline platelet counts. Due to the increased risk of toxicity after longer durations of linezolid therapy and large between-patient variability, close monitoring of patients for development of toxicity is important. Dose individualization based on plasma linezolid concentration profiles and platelet counts should be considered to minimize linezolid-associated thrombocytopenia. Overall, oxazolidinone therapy over 5 to 7 days even at relatively high doses was predicted to be as safe as 10-day therapy of 600 mg linezolid every 12 h. PMID:24514086

  18. PREDICTIVE PHARMACOKINETICS OF TRAMADOL HYDROCHLORIDE FLOATING TABLETS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianming; Zhang, Yanzhen; Guo, Zhiling; Tao, Qingwen; Wang, Yongjun; Zhou, Wei; Ma, Xiao; Li, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to propose the effectiveness of convolution approach to predict pharmacokinetics of tramadol hydrochloride floating tablets, prepared by using various ratios of carbopol, HPMC K100M, and Hibiscus rosa Sinensis as excipient. The in vitro dissolution test was conducted using paddle method in 900 mL of HCl buffer with pH 1.2 to simulate the gastric condition. The stirring speed of paddles was set at 70 rpm. Temperature of dissolution medium was adjusted at 37 ± 5 °C. At predetermined time points, 5 mL of dissolution samples were taken with a replacement of same volume using fresh medium. The obtained samples were analyzed at 271 nm using UV visible spectrophotometer. The values of predicted pharmacokinetic parameters like Cmax (maximum blood drug level), Tmax (time required to attain maximum blood drug level), and AUC (area under blood drug concentration curve) ranged between 80.8 ± 3.2-119.6 ± 4.7 ng/mL, 11.4 ± 0.2-12.2 ± 0.2 h, and 1430.5 ± 209.5-1970.6 ± 287.4 ng.h/mL, respectively. This certainly is a desired feature required at the formulation development step, where the formulator requires the development of a formulation using desired in vivo features on the basis of only accessible in vitro data. It can be concluded from the results that convolution method is a practical method for the prediction of drug concentration in blood and for quality control. PMID:27476294

  19. Reporting guidelines for population pharmacokinetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, Kevin; Mehrotra, Nitin; Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Kastrissios, Helen; Patel, Bela; Al-Huniti, Nidal; Jadhav, Pravin; Wang, Yaning; Byon, Wonkyung

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a consolidated set of guiding principles for the reporting of population pharmacokinetic (PK) analyses based on input from a survey of practitioners as well as discussions between industry, consulting, and regulatory scientists. The survey found that identification of population covariate effects on drug exposure and support for dose selection (in which population PK frequently serves as preparatory analysis for exposure-response modeling) are the main areas of influence for population PK analysis. The proposed guidelines consider 2 main purposes of population PK reports: (1) to present key analysis findings and their impact on drug development decisions, and (2) as documentation of the analysis methods for the dual purpose of enabling review of the analysis and facilitating future use of the models. This work also identified 2 main audiences for the reports: (1) a technically competent group responsible for in-depth review of the data, methodology, and results; and (2) a scientifically literate but not technically adept group, whose main interest is in the implications of the analysis for the broader drug development program. We recommend a generalized question-based approach with 6 questions that need to be addressed throughout the report. We recommend 8 sections (Synopsis, Introduction, Data, Methods, Results, Discussion, Conclusions, Appendix) with suggestions for the target audience and level of detail for each section. A section providing general expectations regarding population PK reporting from a regulatory perspective is also included. We consider this an important step toward industrialization of the field of pharmacometrics such that a nontechnical audience also understands the role of pharmacometric analyses in decision making. Population PK reports were chosen as representative reports to derive these recommendations; however, the guiding principles presented here are applicable for all pharmacometric reports

  20. Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal Scopolamine Gel Formulation (Inscop)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Jason L.; Du, Brian; Daniels, Vernie; Simmons, Rita; Buckey, Jay; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Space Motion Sickness (SMS) is commonly experienced by astronauts and often requires treatment with medications during early flight days of space missions. Orally administered scopolamine is commonly used by astronauts to prevent SMS. Bioavailability of oral (PO) SMS medications is often low and highly variable. Intranasal (IN) administration of medications achieves higher and more reliable bioavailability than from an equivalent PO dose. Methods: To test the safety and reliability of INSCOP, two clinical studies were performed, a dose escalation study and a comparison study administering INSCOP during normal ambulation and head down tilt bedrest. Efficacy was evaluated by testing INSCOP with two, different motion sickness inducing paradigms. Results: Preliminary results indicate that INSCOP demonstrates linear pharmacokinetics and a low side effect profile. In head down tilt bedrest, relative bioavailability of INSCOP was increased for females at both doses (0.2 and 0.4 mg) and for males at the higher dose (0.4 mg) but is reduced at the lower dose (0.2 mg) compared to normal ambulation. INSCOP displays gender specific differences during ABR. One of the treatment efficacy trials conducted at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center demonstrated that INSCOP is efficacious at both doses (0.2 and 0.4 mg) in suppressing motion sickness symptoms as indicated by longer chair ride times with INSCOP administration than with placebo, and efficacy increases with dose. Similar results were seen using another motion sickness simulator, the motion simulator dome, at the Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory, with significantly increased time in the dome in motion-susceptible subjects when using INSCOP compared to untreated controls. Conclusion: Higher bioavailability, linear pharmacokinetics, a low incidence of side effects, and a favorable efficacy profile make INSCOP a desirable formulation for prophylactic and rescue treatment of astronauts in space and military personnel on

  1. Pharmacokinetics of metoprolol during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Rachel J; Eyal, Sara; Easterling, Thomas R; Caritis, Steve N; Venkataraman, Raman; Hankins, Gary; Rytting, Erik; Thummel, Kenneth; Kelly, Edward J; Risler, Linda; Phillips, Brian; Honaker, Matthew T; Shen, Danny D; Hebert, Mary F

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the steady-state pharmacokinetics of metoprolol during pregnancy and lactation. Serial plasma, urine, and breast milk concentrations of metoprolol and its metabolite, α-hydroxymetoprolol, were measured over 1 dosing interval in women treated with metoprolol (25-750 mg/day) during early pregnancy (n = 4), mid-pregnancy (n = 14), and late pregnancy (n = 15), as well as postpartum (n = 9) with (n = 4) and without (n = 5) lactation. Subjects were genotyped for CYP2D6 loss-of-function allelic variants. Using paired analysis, mean metoprolol apparent oral clearance was significantly higher in mid-pregnancy (361 ± 223 L/h, n = 5, P < .05) and late pregnancy (568 ± 273 L/h, n = 8, P < .05) compared with ≥3 months postpartum (200 ± 131 and 192 ± 98 L/h, respectively). When the comparison was limited to extensive metabolizers (EMs), metoprolol apparent oral clearance was significantly higher during both mid- and late pregnancy (P < .05). Relative infant exposure to metoprolol through breast milk was <1.0% of maternal weight-adjusted dose (n = 3). Because of the large, pregnancy-induced changes in metoprolol pharmacokinetics, if inadequate clinical responses are encountered, clinicians who prescribe metoprolol during pregnancy should be prepared to make aggressive changes in dosage (dose and frequency) or consider using an alternate beta-blocker. PMID:26461463

  2. A simple pharmacokinetics subroutine for modeling double peak phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Mirfazaelian, Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Massoud

    2006-04-01

    Double peak absorption has been described with several orally administered drugs. Numerous reasons have been implicated in causing the double peak. DRUG-KNT--a pharmacokinetic software developed previously for fitting one and two compartment kinetics using the iterative curve stripping method--was modified and a revised subroutine was incorporated to solve double-peak models. This subroutine considers the double peak as two hypothetical doses administered with a time gap. The fitting capability of the presented model was verified using four sets of data showing double peak profiles extracted from the literature (piroxicam, ranitidine, phenazopyridine and talinolol). Visual inspection and statistical diagnostics showed that the present algorithm provided adequate curve fit disregarding the mechanism involved in the emergence of the secondary peaks. Statistical diagnostic parameters (RSS, AIC and R2) generally showed good fitness in the plasma profile prediction by this model. It was concluded that the algorithm presented herein provides adequate predicted curves in cases of the double peak phenomenon. PMID:16400712

  3. Applications of a Pharmacokinetic Simulation Program in Pharmacy Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Presents a multicompartment model which illustrates aspects of drug absorption, distribution, and elimination in the human body for a course in pharmacokinetics. The course work consists of the interpretation of computer generated simulated data. (Author/CMV)

  4. Relationship of quantitative structure and pharmacokinetics in fluoroquinolone antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Die; Xu, Wei-Ren; Liu, Chang-Xiao

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the relationship between quantitative structure and pharmacokinetics (QSPkR) of fluoroquinolone antibacterials. METHODS: The pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of oral fluoroquinolones were collected from the litera-ture. These pharmacokinetic data were averaged, 19 compounds were used as the training set, and 3 served as the test set. Genetic function approximation (GFA) module of Cerius2 software was used in QSPkR analysis. RESULTS: A small volume and large polarizability and surface area of substituents at C-7 contribute to a large area under the curve (AUC) for fluoroquinolones. Large polarizability and small volume of substituents at N-1 contribute to a long half life elimination. CONCLUSION: QSPkR models can contribute to some fluoroquinolones antibacterials with excellent pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:17552035

  5. Enhancing the Modeling of PFOA Pharmacokinetics with Bayesian Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The detail sufficient to describe the pharmacokinetics (PK) for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and the methods necessary to combine information from multiple data sets are both subjects of ongoing investigation. Bayesian analysis provides tools to accommodate these goals. We exa...

  6. Explicit Pharmacokinetic Modeling: Tools for Documentation, Verification, and Portability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative estimates of tissue dosimetry of environmental chemicals due to multiple exposure pathways require the use of complex mathematical models, such as physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. The process of translating the abstract mathematics of a PBPK mode...

  7. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a novel Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor, DMNG-3.

    PubMed

    Xin-Guo, Zhang; Kou, Fei; Guo-Di, Ma; Tang, Peng; Zhong-Duo, Yang

    2016-01-01

    DMNG-3(3β-Methyl-[2-(4-nitrophenoxy)ethyl]-amino]con-5-enine), is a new and the potentially most potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor recently obtained from conessine by N-demethylation and nucleophilic substitution reaction. In the present study, a step-down passive avoidance test was used to investigate whether DMNG-3 could modulate impairment of learning and memory induced by scopolamine, and a high performance liquid chromatography(HPLC) method for the determination of DMNG-3 in biological samples was applied to study its pharmacokinetics and tissues distribution. Separation was achieved on C18 column using a mobile phase consisting methanol-water (70:30, v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0ml/min. The intra- and inter-day precisions were good and the RSD was all lower than 1.30%. The mean absolute recovery of DMNG-3 in plasma ranged from 88.55 to 96.45 %. Our results showed oral administration of DMNG-3(10,25,50 mg/kg/day) can significantly improve the latency and number of errors and had a positive effect of improvement of learning and memory in mice in passive avoidance tests. The elimination half-life (T1/2) was 14.07±1.29, 15.87±1.03h, and the total clearance (CL) values were 0.70±0.11, 0.78±0.13 L/h/kg, respectively. The pharmacokinetic studies showed that DMNG-3 has a slowly clearance and large distribution volume in experimental animals, and its disposition is linear over the range of doses tested. The liver, small intestine, stomach, and large intestine were the major distribution tissues of DMNG-3 in mice. It was found that DMNG-3 could be detected in brain, suggesting that DMNG-3 can cross the blood-brain barrier. The present study shows that DMNG-3 can be possible developed as a new drug for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease in the future. PMID:27373949

  8. Development of a Pediatric Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Sirolimus: Applying Principles of Growth and Maturation in Neonates and Infants

    PubMed Central

    Emoto, C; Fukuda, T; Johnson, TN; Adams, DM; Vinks, AA

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the maturation of sirolimus clearance in a cohort of very young pediatric patients with vascular anomalies. The relationship between allometrically scaled in vivo clearance and age was described by the Emax model in patients aged 1 month to 2 years. Consistent with the observed increase, in vitro intrinsic clearance of sirolimus using pediatric liver microsomes showed a similar age-dependent increase. In children older than 2 years, allometrically scaled sirolimus clearance did not show further maturation. Simulated clearance estimates with a sirolimus physiologically based pharmacokinetic model that included CYP3A4/5/7 and CYP2C8 maturation profiles were in close agreement with observed in vivo clearance values. In addition, physiologically based pharmacokinetic model-simulated sirolimus pharmacokinetic profiles predicted the actual observations well. These results demonstrate the utility of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling approach for the prediction of the developmental trajectory of sirolimus metabolic activity and its effects on total body clearance in neonates and infants. PMID:26225230

  9. Application of a Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Study Theophylline Metabolism and Its Interactions With Ciprofloxacin and Caffeine.

    PubMed

    Navid, A; Ng, D M; Wong, S E; Lightstone, F C

    2016-02-01

    Theophylline is a commonly used bronchodilator. However, due to its narrow therapeutic range, moderate elevation of serum concentration can result in adverse drug reactions (ADRs). ADRs occur because of interhuman pharmacokinetic variability and interactions with coprescribed medicines. We developed a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of theophylline, caffeine, and ciprofloxacin metabolisms to: examine theophylline pharmacokinetic variability, and predict population-level outcomes of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). A simulation-based equation for personalized dosing of theophylline was derived. Simulations of DDI show that calculated personalized doses are safe even after cotreatment with large doses of strong inhibitors. Simulations of adult populations indicate that the elderly are most susceptible to ADRs stemming from theophylline-ciprofloxacin and theophylline-caffeine interactions. Females, especially Asians, due to their smaller average size, are more susceptible to DDI-induced ADRs following typical dosing practices. Our simulations also show that the higher adipose and lower muscle fractions in females significantly alter the pharmacokinetics of theophylline or ciprofloxacin. PMID:26933518

  10. Pharmacokinetic Profile of µSMIN Plus™, a new Micronized Diosmin Formulation, after Oral Administration in Rats.

    PubMed

    Russo, Rosario; Mancinelli, Angelo; Ciccone, Michele; Terruzzi, Fabio; Pisano, Claudio; Severino, Lorella

    2015-09-01

    Diosmin is a naturally occurring flavonoid present in citrus fruits and other plants belonging to the Rutaceae family. It is used for the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) for its pheblotonic and vaso-active properties, safety and tolerability as well. The aim of the current in vivo study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic profile of a branded micronized diosmin (µSMIN Plus™) compared with plain micronized diosmin in male Sprague-Dawley rats. After oral administration by gastric gavage, blood samples were collected via jugular vein catheters at regular time intervals from baseline up to 24 hours. Plasma concentrations were assessed by LC/MS. For each animal, the following pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using a non-compartmental analysis: maximum plasma drug concentration (Cmax), time to reach Cmax (Tmax), area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-last), elimination half-life (t½), and relative oral bioavailability (%F). The results of the current study clearly showed an improvement in the pharmacokinetic parameters in animals treated with µSMIN Plus™ compared with animals treated with micronized diosmin. In particular, µSMIN Plus™ showed a 4-fold increased bioavailability compared with micronized diosmin. In conclusion, the results from the current study provided a preliminary pharmacokinetic profile for µSMIN Plus™, which may represent a new tool for CVI management. PMID:26594761

  11. Development of a Pediatric Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Sirolimus: Applying Principles of Growth and Maturation in Neonates and Infants.

    PubMed

    Emoto, C; Fukuda, T; Johnson, T N; Adams, D M; Vinks, A A

    2015-02-01

    This study describes the maturation of sirolimus clearance in a cohort of very young pediatric patients with vascular anomalies. The relationship between allometrically scaled in vivo clearance and age was described by the Emax model in patients aged 1 month to 2 years. Consistent with the observed increase, in vitro intrinsic clearance of sirolimus using pediatric liver microsomes showed a similar age-dependent increase. In children older than 2 years, allometrically scaled sirolimus clearance did not show further maturation. Simulated clearance estimates with a sirolimus physiologically based pharmacokinetic model that included CYP3A4/5/7 and CYP2C8 maturation profiles were in close agreement with observed in vivo clearance values. In addition, physiologically based pharmacokinetic model-simulated sirolimus pharmacokinetic profiles predicted the actual observations well. These results demonstrate the utility of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling approach for the prediction of the developmental trajectory of sirolimus metabolic activity and its effects on total body clearance in neonates and infants. PMID:26225230

  12. Plasma pharmacokinetics of high-dose oral busulfan in children and adults undergoing bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Bruce; Enockson, Karen; Johnson, Amy; Bruns, Alyssa; Blazar, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    We have analyzed the plasma pharmacokinetics of busulfan in 272 patients receiving high-dose oral busulfan and intravenous cyclophosphamide in conjunction with allogeneic or autologous bone marrow transplantation. The patients ranged in age from 2 months to 59 yr (mean 10, median 12 yr) and had the following diagnoses: thalassemia or sickle cell anemia (n = 74); leukemia or myelodysplasia (n = 112); inborn errors of metabolism (n = 41) or immunodeficiency (n = 45). Plasma specimens were collected following the first dose for each patient which ranged from 1 to 4 mg/kg (mean +/- SD, 1.21 +/- 0.41, median 1.15). Busulfan was quantitated using ultraviolet absorbance detection after derivatization and HPLC separation. Pharmacokinetic parameters were derived by modeling the raw data to fit first-order single compartment kinetics. The kinetic parameters showed wide interpatient variability independent of age and diagnosis. There was a statistically significant correlation of age with the following parameters: area under the curve (AUC); maximal concentration; minimum concentration; clearance; volume of distribution and absorption half-time. The coefficients of determination (i.e. correlation coefficient squared) were low ranging from 0.04 to 0.12 implying only a small part (i.e. 4-12%) of the variance was explained by age. Although busulfan pharmacokinetics are age-related most of the variability is not explained by age or diagnosis. PMID:12603688

  13. Pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin in Japanese quails and common pheasants.

    PubMed

    Lashev, L D; Dimitrova, D J; Milanova, A; Moutafchieva, R G

    2015-04-01

    The pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin and marbofloxacin was studied in Japanese quails and common pheasants. Healthy mature birds from both species and both genders were treated intravenously and orally with enrofloxacin (10 mg/kg) and marbofloxacin (5 mg/kg). After intravenous administration enrofloxacin was extensively metabolised to ciprofloxacin. Metabolites of marbofloxacin were not detected. Values of volume of distribution were respectively 4.63 l/kg and 3.67 l/kg for enrofloxacin and 1.56 l/kg and 1.43 l/kg for marbofloxacin. In quails, total body clearance values were higher than those in pheasants and other avian species. After oral application enrofloxacin was rapidly absorbed in quails, more rapidly than marbofloxacin. Pheasants absorbed both antimicrobials at a lower rate. Higher bioavailability was observed for marbofloxacin (118%). Relatively low bioavailability was established in quails for enrofloxacin (26.4%), accompanied by extensive conversion to ciprofloxacin. Generally, quails absorbed and eliminated both fluoroquinolones more rapidly than pheasants; the latter showed pharmacokinetics similar to poultry. Because of favourable pharmacokinetic properties, marbofloxacin should be preferred for oral administration in Japanese quails and pheasants for treatment of infections caused by equally susceptible pathogens. PMID:25567298

  14. Pharmacokinetics of a multicomponent herbal preparation in healthy Chinese and African volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Alolga, Raphael N.; Fan, Yong; Zhang, Gang; Li, Jin; Zhao, Yi-Jing; Lelu Kakila, Jimmy; Chen, Yan; Li, Ping; Qi, Lian-Wen

    2015-01-01

    K-601 is an herbal formulation for influenza consisting of Lonicera japonica, Isatis indigotica, Rheum palmatum, Phellodendron chinense, and Scutellaria baicalensis. In this work, we characterized the chemical constituents in K-601, identified the absorbed compounds and determined their pharmacokinetics in 6 Chinese and African volunteers by liquid chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Similarity evaluation for chromatographic fingerprint of nine different batches showed values above 0.983. Totally, 50 components were identified in K-601. Then, 15 major prototype compounds and 17 metabolites were identified in human plasma. Major metabolic pathways included glucuronidation, sulfation, methylation, demethylation, and reduction. The pharmacokinetics of the most abundant prototype compounds, berberine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine and magnoflorine were determined. Significant pharmacokinetic differences were observed between the African and Chinese subjects. The AUCs of the African is about 4–10 fold higher than that of the Chinese for the three benzylisoquinoline alkaloids. Magnoflorine, an aporphine alkaloid, was absorbed better in the Chinese than in the African. The biotransformation of K-601 by human intestinal microflora was also investigated. The major reactions included hydroxylation, methylation, demethylation, acetylation and reduction. Glucuronidation and sulfation were not observed with fecal flora. These results may be important and useful in linking data from pharmacological assays and clinical effects. PMID:26268432

  15. PKSolver: An add-in program for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data analysis in Microsoft Excel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Huo, Meirong; Zhou, Jianping; Xie, Shaofei

    2010-09-01

    This study presents PKSolver, a freely available menu-driven add-in program for Microsoft Excel written in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), for solving basic problems in pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) data analysis. The program provides a range of modules for PK and PD analysis including noncompartmental analysis (NCA), compartmental analysis (CA), and pharmacodynamic modeling. Two special built-in modules, multiple absorption sites (MAS) and enterohepatic circulation (EHC), were developed for fitting the double-peak concentration-time profile based on the classical one-compartment model. In addition, twenty frequently used pharmacokinetic functions were encoded as a macro and can be directly accessed in an Excel spreadsheet. To evaluate the program, a detailed comparison of modeling PK data using PKSolver and professional PK/PD software package WinNonlin and Scientist was performed. The results showed that the parameters estimated with PKSolver were satisfactory. In conclusion, the PKSolver simplified the PK and PD data analysis process and its output could be generated in Microsoft Word in the form of an integrated report. The program provides pharmacokinetic researchers with a fast and easy-to-use tool for routine and basic PK and PD data analysis with a more user-friendly interface. PMID:20176408

  16. Pharmacokinetic strategies to improve drug penetration and entrapment within solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Al-Abd, Ahmed M; Aljehani, Zekra K; Gazzaz, Rana W; Fakhri, Sarah H; Jabbad, Aisha H; Alahdal, Abdulrahman M; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2015-12-10

    Despite the discovery of a large number of anticancer agents, cancer still remains among the leading causes of death since the middle of the twentieth century. Solid tumors possess a high degree of genetic instability and emergence of treatment resistance. Tumor resistance has emerged for almost all approved anticancer drugs and will most probably emerge for newly discovered anticancer agents as well. The use of pharmacokinetic approaches to increase anticancer drug concentrations within the solid tumor compartment and prolong its entrapment might diminish the possibility of resistance emergence at the molecular pharmacodynamic level and might even reverse tumor resistance. Several novel treatment modalities such as metronomic therapy, angiogenesis inhibitors, vascular disrupting agents and tumor priming have been introduced to improve solid tumor treatment outcomes. In the current review we will discuss the pharmacokinetic aspect of these treatment modalities in addition to other older treatment modalities, such as extracellular matrix dissolving agents, extracellular matrix synthesis inhibitors, chemoembolization and cellular efflux pump inhibition. Many of these strategies showed variable degrees of success/failure; however, reallocating these modalities based on their influence on the intratumoral pharmacokinetics might improve their understanding and treatment outcomes. PMID:26342660

  17. Sirolimus formulation with improved pharmacokinetic properties produced by a continuous flow method.

    PubMed

    Solymosi, Tamás; Angi, Réka; Basa-Dénes, Orsolya; Ránky, Soma; Ötvös, Zsolt; Glavinas, Hristos; Filipcsei, Genovéva; Heltovics, Gábor

    2015-08-01

    The oral bioavailability of Sirolimus is limited by poor dissolution of the compound in the gastrointestinal tract resulting in a low bioavailability and large inter-individual differences in blood levels. Several different formulation approaches were applied to overcome these disadvantageous pharmacokinetic properties including the marketed oral solution and a tablet form containing wet milled nanocrystals. These approaches deliver improved pharmacokinetics, yet, they share the characteristics of complex production method and composition. We have developed a nanostructured Sirolimus formulation prepared by the controlled continuous flow precipitation of the compound from its solution in the presence of stabilizers. We have shown that contrary to the batch production the process could be easily intensified and scaled up; apparently the uniformity of the precipitation is heavily dependent on the production parameters, most likely the mixing of the solvent and antisolvent. We compared the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of the nanostructured formula with the marketed nanoformula. We found that our method produces particles in the size range of less than 100nm. The solid form redispersed instantaneously in water and in biorelevant media. Both the solid form and the redispersed colloid solution showed excellent stability even in accelerated test conditions. The oral administration of the nanostructured formula resulted in faster absorption, higher exposure and higher trough concentrations when compared to the marked form. These advantageous properties could allow the development of solid oral Sirolimus formulae with lower strength and gel based topical delivery systems. PMID:26003815

  18. Pharmacokinetics, Tissue Distribution, and Anti-Lipogenic/Adipogenic Effects of Allyl-Isothiocyanate Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jiyun; Chung, Woo-Jae; Jang, Young Jin; Seong, Ki-Seung; Moon, Jae-Hak; Ha, Tae Youl; Jung, Chang Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Allyl-isothiocyanate (AITC) is an organosulfur phytochemical found in abundance in common cruciferous vegetables such as mustard, wasabi, and cabbage. Although AITC is metabolized primarily through the mercapturic acid pathway, its exact pharmacokinetics remains undefined and the biological function of AITC metabolites is still largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of AITC metabolites on lipid accumulation in vitro and elucidated the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of AITC metabolites in rats. We found that AITC metabolites generally conjugate with glutathione (GSH) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and are distributed in most organs and tissues. Pharmacokinetic analysis showed a rapid uptake and complete metabolism of AITC following oral administration to rats. Although AITC has been reported to exhibit anti-tumor activity in bladder cancer, the potential bioactivity of its metabolites has not been explored. We found that GSH-AITC and NAC-AITC effectively inhibit adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and suppress expression of PPAR-γ, C/EBPα, and FAS, which are up-regulated during adipogenesis. GSH-AITC and NAC-AITC also suppressed oleic acid-induced lipid accumulation and lipogenesis in hepatocytes. Our findings suggest that AITC is almost completely metabolized in the liver and rapidly excreted in urine through the mercapturic acid pathway following administration in rats. AITC metabolites may exert anti-obesity effects through suppression of adipogenesis or lipogenesis. PMID:26317351

  19. Pharmacokinetic Study and Optimal Formulation of New Anti-Parkinson Natural Compound Schisantherin A

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Fei; Guo, Bao Jian; Li, Sai; Zhang, Zai Jun; Chan, Hok Man; Zheng, Ying; Lee, Simon Ming Yuen

    2015-01-01

    Our recent studies showed that schisantherin A (StA) is a promising candidate for PD treatment, but the pharmacokinetic profile of StA is largely unknown. The effects of different formulations on the pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of StA were investigated by HPLC equipped with a vacuum degasser, a quaternary pump, a manual sampler, and an ultraviolet detector. The absolute bioavailability of StA in nanoemulsion formulation was significantly increased from 4.3% to 47.3%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of absolute bioavailability for StA in rats and successful increase of bioavailability of StA by nanoemulsion formulation. The pharmacokinetic profiles of StA could be significantly improved by a safe nanoemulsion formulation. This study provides a successful example of advanced delivery system for improving the bioavailability of potential central nervous system (CNS) drug candidate with poor solubility. This novel approach could be an effective alternative solution to overcome the shortcomings of conventional poor drug delivery of CNS drugs. The results of present study not only indicate that StA has potential to be developed as a promising oral therapeutic agent for the management of PD but also shed light on novel way to improve bioavailability of PD drugs. PMID:26075137

  20. Phase I and pharmacokinetic evaluation of floxuridine/leucovorin given on the Roswell Park weekly regimen.

    PubMed

    Creaven, P J; Rustum, Y M; Petrelli, N J; Meropol, N J; Raghavan, D; Rodriguez-Bigas, M; Levine, E G; Frank, C; Udvary-Nagy, S; Proefrock, A

    1994-01-01

    A phase I and pharmacokinetics study was carried out of floxuridine (FdUrd) modulated by leucovorin (LV) given on the Roswell Park regimen (LV given at 500 mg/m2 by 2-h infusion and FdUrd given by i.v. push at 1 h after the start of LV infusion, treatment being given weekly x 6). The dose-limiting toxicity was diarrhea; the MTD and recommended dose for phase II studies was 1,650 mg/m2 per week of FdUrd. The dose-response curve was steep, with 3/3 patients treated at a dose of 1,750 mg/m2 developing grade IV diarrhea. With this schedule there was no significant mucositis. Pharmacokinetic parameters showed very wide interpatient variability. Plasma decay was biphasic with a t1/2 beta of approximately 2 h. Plasma clearance was high (> 200 1 h-1). No correlation between pharmacokinetic parameters and toxicity could be identified. PMID:8004761

  1. Pharmacokinetics of a multicomponent herbal preparation in healthy Chinese and African volunteers.

    PubMed

    Alolga, Raphael N; Fan, Yong; Zhang, Gang; Li, Jin; Zhao, Yi-Jing; Lelu Kakila, Jimmy; Chen, Yan; Li, Ping; Qi, Lian-Wen

    2015-01-01

    K-601 is an herbal formulation for influenza consisting of Lonicera japonica, Isatis indigotica, Rheum palmatum, Phellodendron chinense, and Scutellaria baicalensis. In this work, we characterized the chemical constituents in K-601, identified the absorbed compounds and determined their pharmacokinetics in 6 Chinese and African volunteers by liquid chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Similarity evaluation for chromatographic fingerprint of nine different batches showed values above 0.983. Totally, 50 components were identified in K-601. Then, 15 major prototype compounds and 17 metabolites were identified in human plasma. Major metabolic pathways included glucuronidation, sulfation, methylation, demethylation, and reduction. The pharmacokinetics of the most abundant prototype compounds, berberine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine and magnoflorine were determined. Significant pharmacokinetic differences were observed between the African and Chinese subjects. The AUCs of the African is about 4-10 fold higher than that of the Chinese for the three benzylisoquinoline alkaloids. Magnoflorine, an aporphine alkaloid, was absorbed better in the Chinese than in the African. The biotransformation of K-601 by human intestinal microflora was also investigated. The major reactions included hydroxylation, methylation, demethylation, acetylation and reduction. Glucuronidation and sulfation were not observed with fecal flora. These results may be important and useful in linking data from pharmacological assays and clinical effects. PMID:26268432

  2. Comparative Pharmacokinetic Properties and Antitumor Activity of the Marine HDACi Largazole and Largazole Peptide Isostere

    PubMed Central

    Pilon, John L.; Clausen, Dane J.; Hansen, Ryan J.; Lunghofer, Paul J.; Charles, Brad; Rose, Barbara J.; Thamm, Douglas H.; Gustafson, Daniel L.; Bradner, James E.; Williams, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Largazole is a potent class I selective HDACi natural product isolated from the marine cyanobacteria Symploca sp. The purpose of this study was to test synthetic analogs of Largazole to identify potential scaffold structural modifications that would improve the drug-like properties of this clinically relevant natural product. Methods The impact of Largazole scaffold replacements on in vitro growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis, pharmacokinetic properties, and in vivo activity using a xenograft model were investigated. Results In vitro studies in colon, lung, and pancreatic cancer cell lines showed that pyridyl substituted Largazole analogs had low nanomolar/high-picomolar activity on cell proliferation, and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at concentrations equivalent to or lower than the parent compound Largazole. Using IV bolus delivery at 5mg/kg, two compartmental pharmacokinetic modeling on the peptide isostere analog of Largazole indicated improved pharmacokinetics including AUC, CL, and Vss. In the A549 non-small cell lung carcinoma xenograft model using a dosage of 5 mg/kg administered intraperitoneally every other day, Largazole, Largazole thiol, and Largazole peptide isostere demonstrated tumor growth inhibition (TGI%) of 32, 44, and 66 percent respectively. Moreover, the decreased tumor growth rate for Largazole peptide isostere was statistically significant compared to control (p=0.002) and superior to Largazole (p=0.006). Surprisingly tumor growth inhibition in this system and treatment regimen was not observed with the potent pyridyl-based analogs. Conclusions Our results establish that replacing the depsipepitde linkage in Largazole with an amide may impart pharmacokinetic advantage and that alternative prodrug forms of largazole are feasible. PMID:25616967

  3. Vatalanib population pharmacokinetics in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: CALGB 10105 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Owzar, Kouros; Gupta, Pankaj; Larson, Richard A; Mulkey, Flora; Miller, Antonius A; Lewis, Lionel D; Hurd, David; Vij, Ravi; Ratain, Mark J; Murry, Daryl J

    2014-01-01

    Aims Vatalanib is an oral anti-angiogenesis agent that inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases, which in patients showed auto induction of metabolism and variability in pharmacokinetic (PK) disposition. The objective was to characterize the population PK and time-dependent change in vatalanib clearance and assess exposure–toxicity relationship in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Methods This was an open-label phase II study of vatalanib in MDS patients receiving 750–1250 mg once daily in 28-day cycles. Serial blood samples were obtained and plasma vatalanib concentrations measured by HPLC. Population PK analysis was performed using nonmem 7.2 with FO estimation since FOCE failed. The final model was evaluated using goodness-of-fit plots, bootstrap analysis, and visual predictive check. Results Pharmacokinetic data were complete for 137 patients (86 M, 51 F), of median age 70 years (range 20–91). A one-compartment model with lagged first-order absorption and time-dependent change in oral clearance was fitted to the vatalanib plasma concentration versus time data. The population means for pre-induction and post-induction oral clearance were 24.1 l h–1 (range: 9.6–45.5) and 54.9 l h–1 (range: 39.8–75.6), respectively. The apparent oral clearance increased 2.3-fold, (range: 1.7–4.1-fold) from first dose to steady state. Our data did not identify a significant relationship of the predefined covariates with vatalanib pharmacokinetics, although power to detect such a relationship was limited. Conclusions Vatalanib pharmacokinetics were highly variable and the extent of auto induction was not determined to correlate with any of the pre-defined covariates. PMID:24838014

  4. Population Pharmacokinetic Assessment of the Effect of Food on Piperaquine Bioavailability in Patients with Uncomplicated Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Lindegardh, Niklas; Lwin, Khin Maung; Annerberg, Anna; Kiricharoen, Lily; Ashley, Elizabeth; White, Nicholas J.; Nosten, François; Day, Nicholas P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Previously published literature reports various impacts of food on the oral bioavailability of piperaquine. The aim of this study was to use a population modeling approach to investigate the impact of concomitant intake of a small amount of food on piperaquine pharmacokinetics. This was an open, randomized comparison of piperaquine pharmacokinetics when administered as a fixed oral formulation once daily for 3 days with (n = 15) and without (n = 15) concomitant food to patients with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Thailand. Nonlinear mixed-effects modeling was used to characterize the pharmacokinetics of piperaquine and the influence of concomitant food intake. A modified Monte Carlo mapped power approach was applied to evaluate the relationship between statistical power and various degrees of covariate effect sizes of the given study design. Piperaquine population pharmacokinetics were described well in fasting and fed patients by a three-compartment distribution model with flexible absorption. The final model showed a 25% increase in relative bioavailability per dose occasion during recovery from malaria but demonstrated no clinical impact of concomitant intake of a low-fat meal. Body weight and age were both significant covariates in the final model. The novel power approach concluded that the study was adequately powered to detect a food effect of at least 35%. This modified Monte Carlo mapped power approach may be a useful tool for evaluating the power to detect true covariate effects in mixed-effects modeling and a given study design. A small amount of food does not affect piperaquine absorption significantly in acute malaria. PMID:24449770

  5. Pharmacokinetics of a new 10% intravenous immunoglobulin in patients receiving replacement therapy for primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Richard L; Church, Joseph A; Peter, Hans H; Sleasman, John W; Melamed, Isaac; Stein, Mark R; Bichler, Johann

    2009-06-28

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is used in treating immunodeficiencies and autoimmune or inflammatory disorders. As manufacturing processes and storage can alter IgG molecules, pharmacokinetic assessments are important for new preparations. Thus, we studied pharmacokinetics of IgPro10, a new 10% liquid IVIg product stabilised with l-proline, in patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) and X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA). Patients received IgPro10 for >or=4 months (median dose of 444mg/kg, at 3- or 4-week intervals). Median total IgG serum concentrations increased from 10.2g/l pre-infusion to 23.2g/l at infusion end. Serum IgG concentrations decreased in a biphasic manner; median terminal half-life was 36.6 days. Median half-lives were 33.2 for IgG(1), 36.3 for IgG(2), 25.9 for IgG(3) and 36.4 days for IgG(4). Specific antibody concentrations (anti-CMV, anti-Hemophilus influenzae type B, anti-tetanus toxoid and anti-Streptococcus pneumoniae) decreased with median half-lives of 22.3-30.5 days. IgPro10 pharmacokinetics were similar in patients with CVID and XLA, although patients with CVID showed higher levels of anti-tetanus and anti-S. pneumoniae antibodies than patients with XLA, suggesting residual specific antibody production. IgPro10 pharmacokinetics fulfilled expectations for and were similar to intact IgG products. Administration of IgPro10 at 3- or 4-week intervals achieved sufficient plasma concentrations of total IgG, IgG subclasses and antibodies specific to important pathogens. PMID:19491015

  6. Pharmacokinetic profile that reduces nephrotoxicity of gentamicin in a perfused kidney-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sejoong; LesherPerez, Sasha Cai; Kim, Byoung Choul C; Yamanishi, Cameron; Labuz, Joseph M; Leung, Brendan; Takayama, Shuichi

    2016-03-01

    Nephrotoxicity is often underestimated because renal clearance in animals is higher compared to in humans. This paper aims to illustrate the potential to fill in such pharmacokinetic gaps between animals and humans using a microfluidic kidney model. As an initial demonstration, we compare nephrotoxicity of a drug, administered at the same total dosage, but using different pharmacokinetic regimens. Kidney epithelial cell, cultured under physiological shear stress conditions, are exposed to gentamicin using regimens that mimic the pharmacokinetics of bolus injection or continuous infusion in humans. The perfusion culture utilized is important both for controlling drug exposure and for providing cells with physiological shear stress (1.0 dyn cm(-2)). Compared to static cultures, perfusion culture improves epithelial barrier function. We tested two drug treatment regimens that give the same gentamycin dose over a 24 h period. In one regimen, we mimicked drug clearance profiles for human bolus injection by starting cell exposure at 19.2 mM of gentamicin and reducing the dosage level by half every 2 h over a 24 h period. In the other regimen, we continuously infused gentamicin (3 mM for 24 h). Although junctional protein immunoreactivity was decreased with both regimens, ZO-1 and occludin fluorescence decreased less with the bolus injection mimicking regimen. The bolus injection mimicking regimen also led to less cytotoxicity and allowed the epithelium to maintain low permeability, while continuous infusion led to an increase in cytotoxicity and permeability. These data show that gentamicin disrupts cell-cell junctions, increases membrane permeability, and decreases cell viability particularly with prolonged low-level exposure. Importantly a bolus injection mimicking regimen alleviates much of the nephrotoxicity compared to the continuous infused regimen. In addition to potential relevance to clinical gentamicin administration regimens, the results are important in

  7. [Mecanisms of pharmacokinetic interactions involving oral anticancer agents].

    PubMed

    Levêque, Dominique; Duval, Céline; Poulat, Charlotte; Palas, Benjamin; El Aatmani, Anne; Dory, Anne; Becker, Guillaume; Gourieux, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    Oral anticancer agents and particularly kinase inhibitors are subject to pharmacokinetic drug interactions in relation to absorption and elimination phases. Interacting factors are food, fruit juices, cigarette smoke, acid-reducing agents and inducers/inhibitors. Some anticancer agents are inducers and/or inhibitors and can also perpetrate drug interactions. This review emphasizes the mechanisms of pharmacokinetic drug interactions involving oral anticancer agents. PMID:25609481

  8. Abuse-Deterrent Opioid Formulations: Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Considerations.

    PubMed

    Walter, Carmen; Knothe, Claudia; Lötsch, Jörn

    2016-07-01

    Abuse-deterrent formulations (ADFs) are technologically sophisticated pharmaceutical formulations that impede manipulation and extraction of opioids and/or provoke unpleasant effects when they are taken in excessive quantity. This is implemented by creating physical barriers, inseparably combining the opioid with an opioid antagonist or adding aversive agents to the formulation. These pharmaceutical changes may potentially alter the pharmacokinetics and consequently the pharmacodynamics of the opioid. In this review, comparative evidence on pharmacokinetic differences between abuse-deterrent and classical formulations of the same opioids is summarized; furthermore, pharmacodynamic differences, with a focus on analgesia and abuse-related symptoms, are addressed. Most of the 12 studies comparing opioid pharmacokinetics have judged the physically intact ADF as being bioequivalent to the corresponding classical formulation. Pharmacokinetic differences have, however, been reported with physically manipulated ADFs and have ranged from moderate deviations from bioequivalence to complete changes in the pharmacokinetic profile (e.g. from a sustained-release formulation to a fast-release formulation). Pharmacodynamic effects were assessed in 14 comparative studies, which reported that intact ADFs usually provided clinically equivalent analgesia and clear advantages with respect to their addiction potential. However, withdrawal symptoms could be induced by the ADFs, although rarely and, in particular, when the ADFs had been physically altered. This evidence suggests that opioid ADFs are a working concept resulting in mostly minor pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences in comparison with classical formulations; however, they may deviate from this equivalence when physically altered. PMID:26719075

  9. A new approach to the analysis of radiopharmaceuticals. Final technical report, January 15, 1987--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.G.; Davison, A.; Costello, C.E.

    1998-03-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate analytical techniques that could be used in the study of both the basic chemistry and the radiopharmaceutical chemistry of {sup 99m}Tc. First funded in 1981, the work focused initially upon the use of high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and various forms of mass spectrometry for the identification of technetium species. This funding allowed the authors to combine HPLC and mass spectrometry to identify radiopharmaceuticals which, although in clinical use, had not previously been characterized. Other techniques that have been examined include resonance Raman spectroscopy and, more significantly, {sup 99}Tc nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), with the latter not only being used in purely chemical experiments but also in biologic studies. In 1985 a grant to the Department of Chemistry at MIT from DOE allowed the purchase of an X-ray diffractometer and access to this instrument has enabled them to broaden the analytical base with routine structural determinations.

  10. VIEW SHOWING WEST ELEVATION, EAST SIDE OF MEYER AVENUE. SHOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW SHOWING WEST ELEVATION, EAST SIDE OF MEYER AVENUE. SHOWS 499-501, MUNOZ HOUSE (AZ-73-37) ON FAR RIGHT - Antonio Bustamente House, 485-489 South Meyer Avenue & 186 West Kennedy Street, Tucson, Pima County, AZ

  11. Preparation of Cefquinome Sulfate Proliposome and its Pharmacokinetics in Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    FU, Qiang; FU, Hua-Lin; Huan, LUO; ZHANG, Wei; SHU, Guang; LIU, Meng-Jiao; DENG, Feng-Ying; HU, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Cefquinome Sulfate (CS) is a fourth-generation cephalosporin, which has been developed solely for veterinary use. It shows potent antibacterial activity against a broad spectrum of bacterial species. However, Cefquinome is susceptible to hydrolysis, which limiting its clinical employment efficacies to some extent. So, in this study, to increase Cefquinome Sulfate biological half-life, a novel Cefquinome Sulfate proliposome was prepared by solid dispersion and effervescent techniques and characterized for morphology, particle size, entrapment efficiency and in vitro release. A Reversed Phase-High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP–HPLC) method was first chosen and established to determine the drug concentration in plasma after intra muscular (IM) administrating Cefquinome Sulfate solution and liposome at a single dosage of 18 mg/kg in rabbit. Then their pharmacokinetics in vivo was compared. Results showed that the received liposome was milky white suspension, spherical or ellipsoidal in shape. The mean particle size was 203±5 nm and the entrapment efficiency was 53.5±0.16%. The cefaquinom sulfate solution and liposome both followed a two compartment model, in vivo. The pharmacokinetic parameters for the solution and liposomal formulations were measured as follows: t1/2α were (1.214 ± 0.135) h and (1.395 ± 0.113) h, t1/2β were (8.752 ± 0.846) h and (16.503 ± 1.275) h, AUC(0-24) were (49.582 ± 9.173) (mg·h)/L and (138.727 ± 11.034) (mg·h)/L, CL/F were (0.357 ± 0.015) L/(h·kg) and (0.127 ± 0.012) L/(h·kg), MRT(0-24) were (2.68 ± 0.229) h and (5.945 ± 0.479) h, respectively. It could be clearly seen that t1/2β of liposome prolonged (p < 0.05), AUC and MRT both increased remarkably (p < 0.01), CL/F decreased. Results indicated that this preparation has more residence time and exhibits some sustained–release tendency. PMID:24523741

  12. Population Pharmacokinetics of Benznidazole in Adult Patients with Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aldasoro, E.; Guerrero, L.; Posada, E.; Serret, N.; Mejía, T.; Urbina, J. A.; Gascón, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to build a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model to characterize benznidazole (BNZ) pharmacokinetics in adults with chronic Chagas disease. This study was a prospective, open-label, single-center clinical trial approved by the local ethics committee. Patients received BNZ at 2.5 mg/kg of body weight/12 h (Abarax, Elea Laboratory, Argentina) for 60 days. Plasma BNZ samples were taken several times during the study and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-visible detection (HPLC-UV). The popPK analysis was done with NONMEMv.7.3. Demographic and biological data were tested as covariates. Intraindividual, interoccasion, and residual variabilities were modeled. Internal and external validations were completed to assess the robustness of the model. Later on, simulations were performed to generate BNZ concentration-time course profiles for different dosage regimens. A total of 358 plasma BNZ concentrations from 39 patients were included in the analysis. A one-compartment PK model characterized by clearance (CL/F) and the apparent volume of distribution (V/F), with first-order absorption (Ka) and elimination, adequately described the data (CL/F, 1.73 liters/h; V/F, 89.6 liters; and Ka, 1.15 h−1). No covariates were found to be significant for CL/F and V/F. Internal and external validations of the final model showed adequate results. Data from simulations revealed that a dose of 2.5 mg/kg/12 h might lead to overexposure in most patients. A lower dose (2.5 mg/kg/24 h) was able to achieve trough BNZ plasma concentrations within the accepted therapeutic range of 3 to 6 mg/liter. In summary, we developed a population PK model for BNZ in adults with chronic Chagas disease. Dosing simulations showed that a BNZ dose of 2.5 mg/kg/24 h will adequately keep BNZ trough plasma concentrations within the recommended target range for the majority of patients. (This study has been registered at EudraCT under number 2011

  13. 15. Detail showing lower chord pinconnected to vertical member, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail showing lower chord pin-connected to vertical member, showing floor beam riveted to extension of vertical member below pin-connection, and showing brackets supporting cantilevered sidewalk. View to southwest. - Selby Avenue Bridge, Spanning Short Line Railways track at Selby Avenue between Hamline & Snelling Avenues, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  14. Application of a novel liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method for the determination of antazoline in human plasma: Result of ELEPHANT-I [ELEctrophysiological, pharmacokinetic and hemodynamic effects of PHenazolinum (ANTazoline mesylate)] human pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Giebułtowicz, Joanna; Piotrowski, Roman; Baran, Jakub; Kułakowski, Piotr; Wroczyński, Piotr

    2016-05-10

    Antazoline is a first-generation antihistaminic agent with antiarrhythmic quinidine-like properties. In some countries, it is widely used for termination of cardiac arrhythmias, especially atrial fibrillation (AF). However, no human pharmacokinetic studies have been conducted with intravenous antazoline. The aim of our study was to develop and validate a novel liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the determination of antazoline in human plasma: the ELEPHANT-I [ELEctrophysiological, pharmacokinetic and hemodynamic effects of PHenazolinum (ANTazoline mesylate)] human pharmacokinetic study. Antazoline was extracted from plasma using liquid-liquid extraction. The concentration of the analyte was measured by LC-MS/MS with xylometazoline as an internal standard. The method was validated for linearity, precision, accuracy, stability (freeze/thaw stability, stability in autosampler, short and long term stability), dilution integrity and matrix effect. The analyzed validation criteria were fulfilled. The method was applied to a pharmacokinetic study involving 10 healthy volunteers. Following a single intravenous dose of antazoline mesylate (100 mg), the plasma concentration profile showed a relative fast elimination with a terminal elimination half-life of 2.29 h. A relatively high volume of distribution was observed (Vss=315 L). The values of mean residence time (MRT∞), area under the curve (AUC∞) and clearance were 3.45 h, 0.91 mg h L(-1) and 80.5 L h(-1), respectively. One volunteer showed significant differences in pharmacokinetic parameters. In conclusion, the proposed new LC-MS/MS method was successfully used for the first time for the determination of antazoline in human plasma. PMID:26895496

  15. Production and Clinical Applications of Radiopharmaceuticals and Medical Radioisotopes in Iran.

    PubMed

    Jalilian, Amir Reza; Beiki, Davood; Hassanzadeh-Rad, Arman; Eftekhari, Arash; Geramifar, Parham; Eftekhari, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    During past 3 decades, nuclear medicine has flourished as vibrant and independent medical specialty in Iran. Since that time, more than 200 nuclear physicians have been trained and now practicing in nearly 158 centers throughout the country. In the same period, Tc-99m generators and variety of cold kits for conventional nuclear medicine were locally produced for the first time. Local production has continued to mature in robust manner while fulfilling international standards. To meet the ever-growing demand at the national level and with international achievements in mind, work for production of other Tc-99m-based peptides such as ubiquicidin, bombesin, octreotide, and more recently a kit formulation for Tc-99m TRODAT-1 for clinical use was introduced. Other than the Tehran Research Reactor, the oldest facility active in production of medical radioisotopes, there is one commercial and three hospital-based cyclotrons currently operational in the country. I-131 has been one of the oldest radioisotope produced in Iran and traditionally used for treatment of thyrotoxicosis and differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Since 2009, (131)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine has been locally available for diagnostic applications. Gallium-67 citrate, thallium-201 thallous chloride, and Indium-111 in the form of DTPA and Oxine are among the early cyclotron-produced tracers available in Iran for about 2 decades. Rb-81/Kr-81m generator has been available for pulmonary ventilation studies since 1996. Experimental production of PET radiopharmaceuticals began in 1998. This work has culminated with development and optimization of the high-scale production line of (18)F-FDG shortly after installation of PET/CT scanner in 2012. In the field of therapy, other than the use of old timers such as I-131 and different forms of P-32, there has been quite a significant advancement in production and application of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals in recent years. Application of (131)I

  16. Cardiac blood-pool scintigraphy in rats and hamsters: comparison of five radiopharmaceuticals and three pinhole collimator apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Pieri, P.; Fischman, A.J.; Ahmad, M.; Moore, R.H.; Callahan, R.J.; Strauss, H.W. )

    1991-05-01

    Preclinical evaluation of cardiac drugs may require evaluation of cardiac function in intact animals. To optimize the quality of radionuclide measurements of ventricular function in small animals, a comparison was made of gated blood-pool scans recorded with five blood-pool radiopharmaceuticals ({sup 99}mTc-labeled human polyclonal IgG, {sup 99}mTc-human serum albumin labeled by two methods, and red blood cells radiolabeled with {sup 99}mTc via in vivo and in vitro methods) in rats and three pinhole apertures in hamsters. The quality of the radiopharmaceuticals was evaluated by comparing count density ratios (LV/BACKGROUND and LV/LIVER) and ejection fractions recorded with each agent. The edge definition of the left ventricle and count rate performance of the 1-, 2-, and 3-mm apertures was evaluated in hamsters. In general, the images obtained with the radiolabeled cells were superior to those obtained with the labeled proteins and no significant differences between the protein preparations were detected. Left ventricular ejection fractions calculated with all five radiopharmaceuticals were not significantly different. The best quality images were obtained with the 1-mm pinhole collimator. Ejection fraction and acquisition time were inversely related to aperture size. A good compromise between resolution and sensitivity was obtained with the 2-mm pinhole collimator.

  17. Development of more efficacious [Tc]-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, W.R.

    1993-05-03

    This research program is detailed at development of more efficacious technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals for use as imaging agents in diagnostic nuclear medicine. We seek to isolate and develop distinct site imaging agents to provide diagnostic information concerning a given pathological condition. Analytical techniques are being developed to enable complete analysis of radiopharmaceutical preparations so that individual complexes can be characterized with respect to imaging efficacy and to enable a radiopharmaceutical to be monitored after injection into a test animal to determine the species that actually accumulates in an organ to provide the image. Administration of the isolated, single most effective imaging complex, rather than a mixture of technetium-containing complexes, wi-11 minimize radiation exposure to the patient and maximize diagnostic information available to the clinician. This report specifically describes the development of capillary electrophoresis (CE) for characterizating diphosphonate skeletal imaging agents. Advances in the development of electrochemical and fiber optic sensors for Tc and Re imaging agents are described. These sensors will ultimately be capable of monitoring a specific chemical state of an imaging agent in vivo after injection into a test animal by implantation in the organ of interest.

  18. Prediction of pharmacokinetic parameters using a genetic algorithm combined with an artificial neural network for a series of alkaloid drugs.

    PubMed

    Zandkarimi, Majid; Shafiei, Mohammad; Hadizadeh, Farzin; Darbandi, Mohammad Ali; Tabrizian, Kaveh

    2014-03-01

    An important goal for drug development within the pharmaceutical industry is the application of simple methods to determine human pharmacokinetic parameters. Effective computing tools are able to increase scientists' ability to make precise selections of chemical compounds in accordance with desired pharmacokinetic and safety profiles. This work presents a method for making predictions of the clearance, plasma protein binding, and volume of distribution for alkaloid drugs. The tools used in this method were genetic algorithms (GAs) combined with artificial neural networks (ANNs) and these were applied to select the most relevant molecular descriptors and to develop quantitative structure-pharmacokinetic relationship (QSPkR) models. Results showed that three-dimensional structural descriptors had more influence on QSPkR models. The models developed in this study were able to predict systemic clearance, volume of distribution, and plasma protein binding with normalized root mean square error (NRMSE) values of 0.151, 0.263, and 0.423, respectively. These results demonstrate an acceptable level of efficiency of the developed models for the prediction of pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:24634842

  19. Population pharmacokinetics of imatinib mesylate in patients with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukaemia: results of a phase III study

    PubMed Central

    Schmidli, H; Peng, B; Riviere, G-J; Capdeville, R; Hensley, M; Gathmann, I; Bolton, A E; Racine-Poon, A

    2005-01-01

    Aims This study was designed to investigate the biochemical and physiological covariates or comedications that affect the pharmacokinetics of imatinib mesylate in patients with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukaemia (CP CML). Methods Pharmacokinetic data were analyzed in 371 patients receiving 400 mg imatinib once daily during a phase III trial of imatinib vs interferon-alfa plus cytarabine for the treatment of newly diagnosed CP CML. Covariates included age, weight, sex, ethnicity, haemoglobin (Hb) concentration, white blood cell (WBC) count, liver function, and creatinine concentration. Blood samples for imatinib analysis were taken on treatment days 1 and 29. Nonlinear mixed effects modelling was used for the population pharmacokinetic analysis. Results Population mean estimates (95% confidence interval) at day 1 for apparent clearance (CL) and apparent volume of distribution (V) of imatinib were 14 (13–15) l h−1 and 252 (237–267) l, respectively. Modelling suggested that CL decreased by 4 (3-5) l h−1 from day 1 to day 29, whereas V remained unchanged. Interindividual variability in CL and V was 32% and 31%, respectively. Weight, Hb, and WBC count demonstrated small effects on CL and V. Doubling body weight or Hb or halving the WBC count was associated with a 12%, 86% and 8% increase in CL, respectively, and a 32%, 60% and 5% increase in V, respectively. Comedications showed no clear effects on imatinib CL. Conclusions Population covariates and coadministered drugs minimally affected imatinib pharmacokinetics in newly diagnosed CP CML patients. PMID:15963092

  20. Gallium-68 DOTATATE Production with Automated PET Radiopharmaceutical Synthesis System: A Three Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Alireza; Snowdon, Graeme M; Bailey, Dale L; Schembri, Geoffrey P; Bailey, Elizabeth A; Roach, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Gallium-68 (Ga-68) is an ideal research and hospital-based PET radioisotope. Currently, the main form of Ga-68 radiopharmaceutical that is being synthesised in-house is Ga-68 conjugated with DOTA based derivatives. The development of automated synthesis systems has increased the reliability, reproducibility and safety of radiopharmaceutical productions. Here we report on our three year, 500 syntheses experience with an automated system for Ga-68 DOTATATE. Methods: The automated synthesis system we use is divided into three parts of a) servomotor modules, b) single use sterile synthesis cassettes and, c) a computerised system that runs the modules. An audit trail is produced by the system as a requirement for GMP production. The required reagents and chemicals are made in-. The Germanium breakthrough is determined on a weekly basis. Production yields for each synthesis are calculated to monitor the performance and efficiency of the synthesis. The quality of the final product is assessed after each synthesis by ITLC-SG and HPLC methods. Results: A total of 500 Ga-68 DOTATATE syntheses (>800 patient doses) were performed between March 2011 and February 2014. The average generator yield was 81.3±0.2% for 2011, 76.7±0.4% for 2012 and 75.0±0.3% for 2013. Ga-68 DOTATATE yields for 2011, 2012, and 2013 were 81.8±0.4%, 82.2±0.4% and 87.9±0.4%, respectively. These exceed the manufacturer's expected value of approximately 70%. Germanium breakthrough averaged 8.6×10-6% of total activity which is well below the recommended level of 0.001%. The average ITLC-measured radiochemical purity was above 98.5% and the average HPLC-measured radiochemical purity was above 99.5%. Although there were some system failures during synthesis, there were only eight occasions where the patient scans needed to be rescheduled. Conclusion: In our experience the automated synthesis system performs reliably with a relatively low incident of failures. Our system had a consistent

  1. Study of potential utility of new radiopharmaceuticals based on technetium-99m labeled derivative of glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeltchan, R.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Chernov, V.; Stasyuk, E.; Rogov, A.; Il'ina, E.; Larionova, L.; Skuridin, V.

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: to study the potential utility of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc for cancer imaging in laboratory animals. Materials and method: the study was carried out in cell cultures of normal CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cells CHO) and malignant tissues MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7). To evaluate the uptake of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in normal and tumor tissue cells, 25 MBq of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc was added to the vials with 3 million cells and incubated for 30 min at room temperature. After centrifugation of the vials with cells, the supernatant was removed. The radioactivity in vials with normal and tumor cells was then measured. In addition, the study included 40 mice of C57B1/6j lines with tumor lesion of the right femur. For neoplastic lesions, Lewis lung carcinoma model was used. Following anesthesia, mice were injected intravenously with 25 MBq of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose. Planar scintigraphy was performed 15 minutes later in a matrix of 512x512 pixels for 5 min. Results: when measuring the radioactivity of normal and malignant cells after incubation with 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose, it was found that the radioactivity of malignant cells was higher than that of normal cells. The mean values of radioactivity levels in normal and malignant cells were 0.3 ± 0.15 MBq and 1.07 ± 0.6 MBq, respectively. All examined animals had increased accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose at the tumor site. The accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the tumor was on average twice as high as compared to the symmetric region. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose is a prospective radiopharmaceutical for cancer visualization. In addition, high accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the culture of cancer cells and in tumor tissue of animals demonstrates tumor tropism of the radiopharmaceutical.

  2. Experimental study of radiopharmaceuticals based on technetium-99m labeled derivative of glucose for tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeltchan, R.; Medvedeva, A.; Sinilkin, I.; Bragina, O.; Chernov, V.; Stasyuk, E.; Rogov, A.; Il'ina, E.; Larionova, L.; Skuridin, V.; Dergilev, A.

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: to study the potential utility of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc for cancer imaging in laboratory animals. Materials and method: the study was carried out in cell cultures of normal CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cells CHO) and malignant tissues MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7). To evaluate the uptake of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in normal and tumor tissue cells, 25 MBq of 1-thio-D-glucose labeled with 99mTc was added to the vials with 3 million cells and incubated for 30 minutes at room temperature. After centrifugation of the vials with cells, the supernatant was removed. Radioactivity in vials with normal and tumor cells was then measured. In addition, the study included 40 mice of C57B 1/6j lines with tumor lesion of the right femur. For neoplastic lesions, Lewis lung carcinoma model was used. Following anesthesia, mice were injected intravenously with 25MBq of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose. Planar scintigraphy was performed 15 minutes later in a matrix of 512x512 pixels for 5 minutes. Results: when measuring the radioactivity of normal and malignant cells after incubation with 99mTc-1-thio-D- glucose, it was found that the radioactivity of malignant cells was higher than that of normal cells. The mean values of radioactivity levels in normal and malignant cells were 0.3±0.15MBq and 1.07±0.6MBq, respectively. All examined animals had increased accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio- D-glucose at the tumor site. The accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the tumor was on average twice as high as compared to the symmetric region. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose is a prospective radiopharmaceutical for cancer visualization. In addition, high accumulation of 99mTc-1-thio-D-glucose in the culture of cancer cells and in tumor tissue of animals demonstrates tumor tropism of the radiopharmaceutical.

  3. Population pharmacokinetic analysis of voriconazole from a pharmacokinetic study with immunocompromised Japanese pediatric subjects.

    PubMed

    Muto, Chieko; Shoji, Satoshi; Tomono, Yoshiro; Liu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    A population pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis was conducted to characterize the voriconazole pharmacokinetic profiles in immunocompromised Japanese pediatric subjects and to compare them to those in immunocompromised non-Japanese pediatric subjects. A previously developed two-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first-order absorption and mixed linear and nonlinear elimination adequately described the voriconazole intravenous and oral data from Japanese pediatric subjects with few modifications. Bayesian priors were applied to this analysis by using the NONMEM routine NWPRI, which allowed priors for the fixed-effect parameter vector and variance matrix of the random-effect parameters to be a normal distribution and an inverse Wishart distribution, respectively. Large intersubject variabilities in oral bioavailability and voriconazole exposure were observed in these pediatric subjects. The mean oral bioavailability estimated in Japanese pediatric subjects was 73% (range, 17% to 99%), which is consistent with the reported estimates of 64% in the previous model and less than what was originally estimated for healthy adults-96%. Voriconazole exposures in Japanese pediatric subjects were generally comparable to those in non-Japanese pediatric subjects receiving the same dosing regimens, given the large intersubject variability. Consistent with the previous findings, the CYP2C19 genotyping status did not have a clinically relevant effect on voriconazole exposure in Japanese pediatric subjects, although it was identified as a covariate in the model to help explain the intersubject variability in voriconazole exposure. The CYP2C19 genotyping status alone does not warrant dose adjustment of voriconazole. No other factors besides age and weight were identified to explain the PK variability of voriconazole. PMID:25801557

  4. The pharmacokinetics of levosalbutamol: what are the clinical implications?

    PubMed

    Boulton, D W; Fawcett, J P

    2001-01-01

    enantiomers at beta-adrenoceptors. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationships for levosalbutamol show relatively large interindividual variations. Functionally significant genetic polymorphisms have been identified for beta2-adrenoceptors, SULT1A3 and organic action transporters, all of which affect the disposition or action of levosalbutamol. Animal, in vitro and some clinical studies have reported deleterious effects of (S)-salbutamol on smooth muscle contractility or lung function. However, well-designed clinical studies in patients with asthma have failed to find evidence of significant toxicity associated with (S)-salbutamol. The clinical consequences of relatively higher plasma concentrations of (S)-salbutamol following administration of racemate remain unclear, but in the absence of clear evidence of toxicity the clinical superiority of levosalbutamol over racemic salbutamol appears to be small. PMID:11236808

  5. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the nitroimidazole antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Lamp, K C; Freeman, C D; Klutman, N E; Lacy, M K

    1999-05-01

    Metronidazole, the prototype nitroimidazole antimicrobial, was originally introduced to treat Trichomonas vaginalis, but is now used for the treatment of anaerobic and protozoal infections. The nitroimidazoles are bactericidal through toxic metabolites which cause DNA strand breakage. Resistance, both clinical and microbiological, has been described only rarely. Metronidazole given orally is absorbed almost completely, with bioavailability > 90% for tablets; absorption is unaffected by infection. Rectal and intravaginal absorption are 67 to 82%, and 20 to 56%, of the dose, respectively. Metronidazole is distributed widely and has low protein binding (< 20%). The volume of distribution at steady state in adults is 0.51 to 1.1 L/kg. Metronidazole reaches 60 to 100% of plasma concentrations in most tissues studied, including the central nervous system, but does not reach high concentrations in placental tissue. Metronidazole is extensively metabolised by the liver to 5 metabolites. The hydroxy metabolite has biological activity of 30 to 65% and a longer elimination half-life than the parent compound. The majority of metronidazole and its metabolites are excreted in urine and faeces, with less than 12% excreted unchanged in urine. The pharmacokinetics of metronidazole are unaffected by acute or chronic renal failure, haemodialysis, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, age, pregnancy or enteric disease. Renal dysfunction reduces the elimination of metronidazole metabolites; however, no toxicity has been documented and dosage alterations are unnecessary. Liver disease leads to a decreased clearance of metronidazole and dosage reduction is recommended. Recent pharmacodynamic studies of metronidazole have demonstrated activity for 12 to 24 hours after administration of metronidazole 1 g. The post-antibiotic effect of metronidazole extends beyond 3 hours after the concentration falls below the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The concentration

  6. 28. MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF ARVFS FACILITY AS BUILT. SHOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF ARVFS FACILITY AS BUILT. SHOWS LINCOLN BOULEVARD, BIG LOST RIVER, AND NAVAL REACTORS FACILITY. F.C. TORKELSON DRAWING NUMBER 842-ARVFS-101-2. DATED OCTOBER 12, 1965. INEL INDEX CODE NUMBER: 075 0101 851 151969. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. 8. Detail showing concrete abutment, showing substructure of bridge, specifically ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail showing concrete abutment, showing substructure of bridge, specifically west side of arch and substructure. - Presumpscot Falls Bridge, Spanning Presumptscot River at Allen Avenue extension, 0.75 mile west of U.S. Interstate 95, Falmouth, Cumberland County, ME

  8. Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamic effects of naloxegol at peripheral and central nervous system receptors in healthy male subjects: A single ascending-dose study.

    PubMed

    Eldon, Michael A; Kugler, Alan R; Medve, Robert A; Bui, Khanh; Butler, Kathleen; Sostek, Mark

    2015-11-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, ascending-dose, crossover study evaluated single oral doses of naloxegol (NKTR-118; 8, 15, 30, 60, 125, 250, 500, and 1000 mg), a PEGylated derivative of naloxone, for safety and tolerability, antagonism of peripheral and central nervous system (CNS) effects of intravenous morphine, and pharmacokinetics. Healthy men were randomized 1:1 to naloxegol or naloxegol-matching placebo administered with morphine and lactulose in a 2-period crossover design. Periods were separated by a 5- to 7-day washout. Assessments included safety, tolerability, orocecal transit time (OCTT), pupillary miosis, and pharmacokinetics. The study was completed by 46 subjects. The most common adverse events were somnolence, dizziness, headache, and nausea. Greater reversal of morphine-induced delay in OCTT occurred with increasing naloxegol dose, demonstrating dose-ordered antagonism of morphine's peripheral gastrointestinal effects. Forty-four subjects showed no reversal of pupillary miosis; 2 showed potential partial reversal at 250 and 1000 mg, indicating negligible antagonism of morphine's CNS effects at doses ≤ 125 mg. Rapid absorption, linear pharmacokinetics up to 1000 mg, and low to moderate between-subject pharmacokinetic variability was observed. The pharmacokinetics of morphine or its glucuronide metabolites were unaltered by concurrent naloxegol administration. Naloxegol was generally safe and well tolerated at single doses up to 1000 mg. PMID:27137715

  9. H2CHXdedpa and H4CHXoctapa-chiral acyclic chelating ligands for (67/68)Ga and (111)In radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Ramogida, Caterina F; Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Boros, Eszter; Ferreira, Cara L; Patrick, Brian O; Adam, Michael J; Orvig, Chris

    2015-02-16

    The chiral acyclic ligands H2CHXdedpa (N4O2), H2CHXdedpa-bb (N4O2), and H4CHXoctapa (N4O4) (CHX = cyclohexyl/cyclohexane, H2dedpa = 1,2-[[6-carboxy-pyridin-2-yl]-methylamino]ethane, bb = N,N'-dibenzylated, H4octapa = N,N'-bis(6-carboxy-2-pyridylmethyl)-ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid) were synthesized, complexed with Ga(III) and/or In(III), and evaluated for their potential as chelating agents in radiopharmaceutical applications. The ligands were compared to the previously studied hexadentate H2dedpa and octadentate H4octapa ligands to determine the effect adding a chiral 1R,2R-trans-cyclohexane to replace the ethylenediamine backbone would have on metal complex stability and radiolabeling kinetics. It was found that [Ga(CHXdedpa)](+) showed very similar properties to those of [Ga(dedpa)](+), with only one isomer in solution observed by NMR spectroscopy, and minimal structural changes in the solid-state X-ray structure. Like [Ga(dedpa)](+), [Ga(CHXdedpa)](+) exhibited exceptionally high thermodynamic stability constants (log KML = 28.11(8)), and the chelate retained the ability to label (67)Ga quantitatively in 10 min at room temperature at ligand concentrations of 1 × 10(-5) M. In vitro kinetic inertness assays demonstrated the [(67)Ga(CHXdedpa)](+) complex to be more stable than [(67)Ga(dedpa)](+) in a human serum competition, with 90.5% and 77.8% of (67)Ga remaining chelate-bound after 2 h, respectively. Preliminary coordination studies of H4CHXoctapa with In(III) demonstrated [In(CHXoctapa)](-) to have an equivalently high thermodynamically stable constant as [In(octapa)](-), with log KML values of 27.16(9) and 26.76(14), respectively. The [(111)In(CHXoctapa)](-) complex showed exceptionally high in vitro kinetic inertness over 120 h in human serum, comparing well with previously reported [(111)In(octapa)](-) values, and an improved stability compared to the current industry "gold standards" 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA

  10. Toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and photodynamic properties of chlorin e6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostenich, Gennady; Zhuravkin, Ivan N.; Gurinovich, G. P.; Zhavrid, Edvard A.

    1993-03-01

    Toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and the tumor damage effect of chlorin e6 after light irradiation were studied. The results show that chlorin e6 LD50 value in C57Bl mice was 189 +/- 10 mg/kg, in non-inbred white rats it was 99 +/- 14 mg/kg 14 days after the agent iv injection. The concentration of chlorin e6 in blood, liver, kidney, spleen, and tumors (sarcoma M-1 and sarcoma 45) of the rats was determined by the fluorescence method 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 48, and 72 hours after the agent iv injection at the dose of 10 mg/kg. For this purpose chlorin e6 was extracted from tissues by detergent triton X-100. The depth of necrosis spreading in tumor tissue was evaluated after chlorin e6 injection at the doses of 1 - 10 mg/kg and subsequent irradiation by a krypton laser with light energy density of 90 J/cm2, using the method of vital staining with Evans blue. It was found that depending on the agent dose and time interval between chlorin e6 injection and photoradiation, the depth of tumor necrosis varied from 4.0 to 16.6 mm in sarcoma M-1 and from 5.0 to 15.0 in sarcoma 45.

  11. [Pharmacokinetics of naltrexone hydrochloride and naltrexone glucuronide in the dog].

    PubMed

    Li, H; Zhao, S F; Wang, N; Ge, Z H

    1996-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics of naltrexone hydrochloride (NTX) and naltrexone glucuronide was studied in the dog using HPLC-electrochemical detection with naloxone as internal standard. After iv 5 mg or po 10 mg NTX, the plasma concentration-time curves of NTX were found to fit to a two-compartment model and a single compartment with first-order absorption. The elimination half-lives of NTX were 78 +/- 6 min and 74 +/- 6 min, respectively. Although NTX could be absorbed rapidly in the dog after po administration, the plasma concentration of the parent drug was very low and its absolute bioavailability was 15.8%. The experiments showed that the major metabolite of NTX in dog plasma was beta-glucuronidase-hydrolyzable conjugate. Dosing NTX intravenously and orally, the plasma levels of the conjugate were 1.3 and 23 times as high as that of the parent drug, the elimination half-lives of the glucuronide from plasma were 3.4 h and 12.6 h, respectively. The results indicate that NTX is subjected to a marked first-pass effect in the dog after oral administration. PMID:9208648

  12. Pharmacokinetics of mirtazapine and lithium in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Sitsen, J M; Voortman, G; Timmer, C J

    2000-06-01

    A substantial proportion of patients diagnosed with depression and treated with antidepressants show no or insufficient response. In such patients, lithium is often added to the antidepressant for augmentation. The present study investigated the possible drug-drug interaction between mirtazapine and lithium in 12 healthy male subjects in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled two-period cross-over design. Subjects meeting the inclusion and exclusion criteria were randomly assigned to one of two groups. After an overnight fast, they received either a single oral dose of 600 mg lithium carbonate (16 meq Li+) for 10 days at 08.00 h and a single oral dose of 30 mg mirtazapine at 21.00 h on day 9 or the same number (n = 4) of placebo capsules and and a single oral dose of 30 mg mirtazapine at 21.00 h on day 9. At pre-defined times, blood samples were drawn for the measurement of mirtazapine plasma concentrations and lithium serum concentrations. In addition, psychometric tests were performed and the safety and tolerability of the drugs were assessed. The results indicate that mirtazapine does not alter the pharmacokinetics of lithium and vice versa. In addition, the combination of mirtazapine and lithium appeared to be safe and well-tolerated. Extensive psychometric testing after the administration of mirtazapine did not reveal any differences on any tests in subjects on lithium and placebo, respectively. PMID:10890312

  13. Pharmacokinetics of Methylprednisolone after Intravenous and Intramuscular Administration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Anasuya; Pyszczynski, Nancy; DuBois, Debra C.; Almon, Richard R.; Jusko, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Methylprednisolone (MPL) pharmacokinetics was examined in adrenalectomized (ADX) and normal rats to assess the feasibility of intramuscular (i.m.) dosing for use in pharmacodynamic studies. Several study phases were pursued. Parallel group studies were performed in normal and ADX rats given 50 mg/kg MPL (i.v. or i.m.) and blood samples were collected up to 6 h. Data from studies where normal rats were dosed with 50 mg/kg MPL i.m. and killed over either 6 or 96 h were combined to determine muscle site and plasma MPL concentrations. Lastly, ADX rats were dosed with 50 mg/kg MPL i.m. and killed over 18 h to assess hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) dynamics. MPL exhibited bi-exponential kinetics after i.v. dosing with a terminal slope of 2.1 h−1. The i.m. drug was absorbed slowly with two first-order absorption rate constants, 1.26 and 0.219 h−1 indicating flip-flop kinetics with overall 50% bioavailability. The kinetics of MPL at the injection site exhibited slow, dual absorption rates. Although i.m. MPL showed lower bioavailability compared with other corticosteroids in rats, TAT dynamics revealed similar i.m. and i.v. response profiles. The more convenient intramuscular dosing can replace the i.v. route without causing marked differences in pharmacodynamics. PMID:17569107

  14. Pharmacokinetics of cefroxadine after infusion to healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Cadórniga, R; Molina, I T; Pastoriza, P; Negro, S; Evora, C M; Gutierrez, J A

    1990-10-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cefroxadine in healthy human volunteers was studied in plasma and urine, after an infusion administration of 1 g of this drug for 0.5 h. Blood and urine samples were microbiologically quantified by diffusion on solid gelose using Bacillus Subtilis ATCC 6633 as the test organism. Plasma and urine profiles were fitted to a reduced two-compartment model not having inactivating biotransformation as a route of elimination. The parameters of distribution for this model show a rapid disposition (t1/2 alpha = 0.28 h) and an average volume of the central compartment of 0.15 +/- 0.04 l/kg (range 0.20-0.09). The dominant terminal half-life (beta-phase) was 1.17 +/- 0.26 h (range 0.90-1.67). The total body volume 0.41 +/- 0.09 l/kg (range 0.30-0.52) indicates that there is no diffusion of the antibiotic into intracellular fluids of poorly perfused tissues due to its high elimination rate. PMID:2258253

  15. Lifetime pharmacokinetic model for hydrophobic contaminants in marine mammals

    SciTech Connect

    Hickie, B.E.; Mackay, D.; Koning, J. de

    1999-11-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model is developed that describes the uptake and release of a hydrophobic organic chemical by a marine mammal over its entire lifetime, i.e., from birth to death. This model is applied to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas). The processes treated are growth; uptake from food, milk, and air; disposition of the chemical among arterial and venous blood, liver, muscle, blubber, and rapidly perfused tissues; and losses by metabolism, release in exhaled air; and by egestion. A separate model is developed for females, which includes pregnancy, birth, and lactation. Food consumption is deduced from size, growth, and from activity-dependent bioenergetic data. The results obtained by simulating continuous PCB exposure over a 30-year period are in accordance with reported concentrations and show the importance of milk transfer to both mother and progeny and the tendency for continued accumulation over the animal's lifetime. Implications of the results are discussed, especially the need for improved data on diets, gut absorption characteristics, and various physiological parameters used in the model.

  16. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antiretrovirals in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Andrea; Di Perri, Giovanni; Bonora, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    HIV-positive patients may be effectively treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy and such a strategy is associated with striking immune recovery and viral load reduction to very low levels. Despite undeniable results, the central nervous system (CNS) is commonly affected during the course of HIV infection, with neurocognitive disorders being as prevalent as 20-50 % of treated subjects. This review discusses the pathophysiology of CNS infection by HIV and the barriers to efficacious control of such a mechanism, including the available data on compartmental drug penetration and on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships. In the reviewed articles, a high variability in drug transfer to the CNS is highlighted with several mechanisms as well as methodological issues potentially influencing the observed results. Nevirapine and zidovudine showed the highest cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to plasma ratios, although target concentrations are currently unknown for the CNS. The use of the composite CSF concentration effectiveness score has been associated with better virological outcomes (lower HIV RNA) but has been inconsistently associated with neurocognitive outcomes. These findings support the CNS effectiveness of commonly used highly antiretroviral therapies. The use of antiretroviral drugs with increased CSF penetration and/or effectiveness in treating or preventing neurocognitive disorders however needs to be assessed in well-designed prospective studies. PMID:25200312

  17. Production of 64Cu and 67Cu radiopharmaceuticals using zinc target irradiated with accelerator neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Masako; Hashimoto, Kazuyuki; Saeki, Hideya; Sato, Nozomi; Motoishi, Shoji; Nagai, Yasuki

    2014-09-01

    Copper radioisotopes have gained a lot of attention in radiopharmaceuticals owing to their unique decay characteristics. The longest half-life β emitter, 67Cu, is thought to be suitable for targeted radio-immunotherapy. Adequate production of 67Cu to meet the demands of clinical studies has not been fully established. Another attractive copper isotope, 64Cu has possible applications as a diagnostic imaging tracer combined with a therapeutic effect. This work proposes a production method using accelerator neutrons in which two copper radioisotopes can be produced: 1) 68Zn(n,x)67Cu and 2) 64Zn(n,p)64Cu using ~14 MeV neutrons generated by natC(d, n) reaction, both from natural or enriched zinc oxides. The generated 64,67Cu were separated from the target zinc oxide using a chelating and an anion exchange columns and were labelled with two widely studied chelators where the labelling efficiency was found to be acceptably good. The major advantage of this method is that a significant amount of 64,67Cu with a very few impurity radionuclides are produced which also makes the separation procedure simple. Provided an accelerator supplying an Ed = ~ 40 MeV, a wide application of 64,67Cu based drugs in nuclear medicine is feasible in the near future. We will present the characteristics of this production method using accelerator neutrons including the chemical separation processes.

  18. Laser stimulation of the acupoint 'Zusanli' (ST.36) on the radiopharmaceutical biodistribution in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Frederico, Éric H F F; Santos, Ailton A; Sá-Caputo, Danubia C C; Neves, Rosane F; Guimarães, Carlos A S; Chang, Shyang; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2016-03-01

    Laser used to stimulate acupoints is called laser acupuncture (LA). It is generally believed that similar clinical responses to manual acupuncture can be achieved. Here we analysed the effects of the laser (904 nm) at the 'Zusanli' acupoint (ST.36) of the stomach meridian on the biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical Na(99m)TcO4. Wistar rats were divided into control (CG) and experimental groups (EG). The EG were exposed daily to the laser (904 nm) at ST.36 with 1 joule/min (40 mW/cm(2)) for 1 min. The animals of the CG were not exposed to laser at all. On the 8th day after LA, the animals were sedated and Na(99m)TcO4 was administered. After 10 min, the animals were all sacrificed and the organs removed. The radioactivity was counted in each organ to calculate the percentage of radioactivity of the injected dose per gram (%ATI/ g). Comparison of the %ATI/g in EG and CG was performed by Mann-Whitney test. The %ATI/g was significantly increased in the thyroid due to the stimulation of the ST.36 by laser. It is possible to conclude that the stimulation of ST.36 does lead to biological phenomena that interfere with the metabolism of the thyroid. PMID:26949088

  19. Development of radiodetection systems towards miniaturised quality control of PET and SPECT radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Taggart, Matthew P; Tarn, Mark D; Esfahani, Mohammad M N; Schofield, Daniel M; Brown, Nathaniel J; Archibald, Stephen J; Deakin, Tom; Pamme, Nicole; Thompson, Lee F

    2016-04-26

    The ability to detect radiation in microfluidic devices is important for the on-chip analysis of radiopharmaceuticals, but previously reported systems have largely suffered from various limitations including cost, complexity of fabrication, and insufficient sensitivity and/or speed. Here, we present the use of sensitive, low cost, small-sized, commercially available silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) for the detection of radioactivity inside microfluidic channels fabricated from a range of conventional microfluidic chip substrates. We demonstrate the effects of chip material and thickness on the detection of the positron-emitting isotope, [(18)F]fluoride, and find that, while the SiPMs are light sensors, they are able to detect radiation even through opaque chip materials via direct positron and gamma (γ) ray interaction. Finally, we employed the SiPM platform for analysis of the PET (positron emission tomography) radiotracers 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ([(18)F]FDG) and [(68)Ga]gallium-citrate, and highlight the ability to detect the γ ray emitting SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) radiotracer, [(99m)Tc]pertechnetate. PMID:27044712

  20. PET radiopharmaceuticals for imaging of tumor hypoxia: a review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lopci, Egesta; Grassi, Ilaria; Chiti, Arturo; Nanni, Cristina; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Toschi, Luca; Fonti, Cristina; Lodi, Filippo; Mattioli, Sandro; Fanti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a pathological condition arising in living tissues when oxygen supply does not adequately cover the cellular metabolic demand. Detection of this phenomenon in tumors is of the utmost clinical relevance because tumor aggressiveness, metastatic spread, failure to achieve tumor control, increased rate of recurrence, and ultimate poor outcome are all associated with hypoxia. Consequently, in recent decades there has been increasing interest in developing methods for measurement of oxygen levels in tumors. Among the image-based modalities for hypoxia assessment, positron emission tomography (PET) is one of the most extensively investigated based on the various advantages it offers, i.e., broad range of radiopharmaceuticals, good intrinsic resolution, three-dimensional tumor representation, possibility of semiquantification/quantification of the amount of hypoxic tumor burden, overall patient friendliness, and ease of repetition. Compared with the other non-invasive techniques, the biggest advantage of PET imaging is that it offers the highest specificity for detection of hypoxic tissue. Starting with the 2-nitroimidazole family of compounds in the early 1980s, a great number of PET tracers have been developed for the identification of hypoxia in living tissue and solid tumors. This paper provides an overview of the principal PET tracers applied in cancer imaging of hypoxia and discusses in detail their advantages and pitfalls. PMID:24982822

  1. Multi-scale hybrid models for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry with Geant4.

    PubMed

    Marcatili, S; Villoing, D; Garcia, M P; Bardiès, M

    2014-12-21

    The accuracy of radiopharmaceutical absorbed dose distributions computed through Monte Carlo (MC) simulations is mostly limited by the low spatial resolution of 3D imaging techniques used to define the simulation geometry. This issue also persists with the implementation of realistic hybrid models built using polygonal mesh and/or NURBS as they require to be simulated in their voxel form in order to reduce computation times. The existing trade-off between voxel size and simulation speed leads on one side, in an overestimation of the size of small radiosensitive structures such as the skin or hollow organs walls and, on the other, to unnecessarily detailed voxelization of large, homogeneous structures.We developed a set of computational tools based on VTK and Geant4 in order to build multi-resolution organ models. Our aim is to use different voxel sizes to represent anatomical regions of different clinical relevance: the MC implementation of these models is expected to improve spatial resolution in specific anatomical structures without significantly affecting simulation speed. Here we present the tools developed through a proof of principle example. Our approach is validated against the standard Geant4 technique for the simulation of voxel geometries. PMID:25415621

  2. Kinetic sensitivity of a receptor-binding radiopharmaceutical: Technetium-99m galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin

    SciTech Connect

    Vera, D.R.; Woodle, E.S.; Stadalnik, R.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Kinetic sensitivity is the ability of a physiochemical parameter to alter the time-activity curve of a radiotracer. The kinetic sensitivity of liver and blood time-activity data resulting from a single bolus injection of ({sup 99m}Tc)galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (( Tc)NGA) into healthy pigs was examined. Three parameters, hepatic plasma flow scaled as flow per plasma volume, ligand-receptor affinity, and total receptor concentration, were tested using (Tc)NGA injections of various molar doses and affinities. Simultaneous measurements of plasma volume (iodine-125 human serum albumin dilution), and hepatic plasma flow (indocyanine green extraction) were performed during 12 (Tc)NGA studies. Paired data sets demonstrated differences (P(chi v2) less than 0.01) in liver and blood time-activity curves in response to changes in each of the tested parameters. We conclude that the (Tc)NGA radiopharmacokinetic system is therefore sensitive to hepatic plasma flow, ligand-receptor affinity, and receptor concentration. In vivo demonstration of kinetic sensitivity permits delineation of the physiologic parameters that determine the biodistribution of a radiopharmaceutical. This delineation is a prerequisite to a valid analytic assessment of receptor biochemistry via kinetic modeling.

  3. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of biokinetic models for radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, W B; Hoeschen, C

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical models for kinetics of radiopharmaceuticals in humans were developed and are used to estimate the radiation absorbed dose for patients in nuclear medicine by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee. However, due to the fact that the residence times used were derived from different subjects, partially even with different ethnic backgrounds, a large variation in the model parameters propagates to a high uncertainty of the dose estimation. In this work, a method was developed for analysing the uncertainty and sensitivity of biokinetic models that are used to calculate the residence times. The biokinetic model of (18)F-FDG (FDG) developed by the MIRD Committee was analysed by this developed method. The sources of uncertainty of all model parameters were evaluated based on the experiments. The Latin hypercube sampling technique was used to sample the parameters for model input. Kinetic modelling of FDG in humans was performed. Sensitivity of model parameters was indicated by combining the model input and output, using regression and partial correlation analysis. The transfer rate parameter of plasma to other tissue fast is the parameter with the greatest influence on the residence time of plasma. Optimisation of biokinetic data acquisition in the clinical practice by exploitation of the sensitivity of model parameters obtained in this study is discussed. PMID:20185457

  4. Development of dopamine receptor radiopharmaceuticals for the study of neurological and psychiatric disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Jogeshwar Mukherjee

    2009-01-02

    Our goals in this grant application are directed towards the development of radiotracers that may allow the study of the high-affinity state (functional state) of the dopamine receptors. There have been numerous reports on the presence of two inter-convertible states of these (G-protein coupled) receptors in vitro. However, there is no report that establishes the presence of these separate affinity states in vivo. We have made efforts in this direction in order to provide such direct in vivo evidence about the presence of the high affinity state. This understanding of the functional state of the receptors is of critical significance in our overall diagnosis and treatment of diseases that implicate the G-protein coupled receptors. Four specific aims have been listed in the grant application: (1). Design and syntheses of agonists (2). Radiosyntheses of agonists (3). In vitro pharmacology of agonists (4). In vivo distribution and pharmacology of labeled derivatives. We have accomplished the syntheses and radiosyntheses of three agonist radiotracers labeled with carbon-11. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological experiments have been accomplished in rats and preliminary PET studies in non-human primates have been carried out. Various accomplishments during the funded years, briefly outlined in this document, have been disseminated by several publications in various journals and presentations in national and international meetings (Society of Nuclear Medicine, Society for Neuroscience and International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry).

  5. Multi-scale hybrid models for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry with Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcatili, S.; Villoing, D.; Garcia, M. P.; Bardiès, M.

    2014-12-01

    The accuracy of radiopharmaceutical absorbed dose distributions computed through Monte Carlo (MC) simulations is mostly limited by the low spatial resolution of 3D imaging techniques used to define the simulation geometry. This issue also persists with the implementation of realistic hybrid models built using polygonal mesh and/or NURBS as they require to be simulated in their voxel form in order to reduce computation times. The existing trade-off between voxel size and simulation speed leads on one side, in an overestimation of the size of small radiosensitive structures such as the skin or hollow organs walls and, on the other, to unnecessarily detailed voxelization of large, homogeneous structures. We developed a set of computational tools based on VTK and Geant4 in order to build multi-resolution organ models. Our aim is to use different voxel sizes to represent anatomical regions of different clinical relevance: the MC implementation of these models is expected to improve spatial resolution in specific anatomical structures without significantly affecting simulation speed. Here we present the tools developed through a proof of principle example. Our approach is validated against the standard Geant4 technique for the simulation of voxel geometries.

  6. Complexation study on no-carrier-added astatine with insulin: a candidate radiopharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Susanta; Roy, Kamalika; Sen, Souvik

    2008-12-01

    No-carrier-added astatine radionuclides produced in the (7)Li-irradiated lead matrix were separated from bulk lead nitrate target by complexing At with insulin, followed by dialysis. The method offers simultaneous separation of At from lead as well as its complexation with insulin. The At-insulin complex might be a potential radiopharmaceutical in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. The stability of At-insulin complex was checked by dialysis against deionized water and Ringer lactate (RL) solution. It has been found that the half-life of At-insulin complex is about approximately 12h, when dialyzed against deionized water and is only 6h, when dialyzed against RL solution having the same composition as blood serum. The 6h half-life of this Insulin-At complex is perfect for killing cancer cells from external cell surfaces as the half-life of internalization of insulin molecule inside the cell is 7-12h. PMID:18674921

  7. A Concise Radiosynthesis of the Tau Radiopharmaceutical, [18F]T807

    PubMed Central

    Shoup, Timothy M.; Yokell, Daniel L.; Rice, Peter A.; Jackson, Raul N.; Livni, Eli; Johnson, Keith A.; Brady, Thomas J.; Vasdev, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine-18 labelled 7-(6-fluoropyridin-3-yl)-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole ([18F]T807) is a potent and selective agent for imaging paired helical filaments of tau (PHF-tau) and is among the most promising PET radiopharmaceuticals for this target in early clinical trials. The present study reports a simplified one-step method for the synthesis of [18F]T807 that is broadly applicable for routine clinical production using a GE Tracerlab™ FXFN radiosynthesis module. Key facets of our optimized radiosynthesis include development and use of a more soluble protected precursor, tert-butyl 7-(6-nitropyridin-3-yl)-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole-5-carboxylate, as well as new HPLC separation conditions that enable a facile one-step synthesis. During the nucleophilic fluorinating reaction with potassium cryptand [18F]fluoride (K[18F]/K222) in DMSO at 130 °C over 10 min, the precursor is concurrently deprotected. Formulated [18F]T807 was prepared in an uncorrected radiochemical yield of 14 ± 3%, with a specific activity of 216 ± 60 GBq/μmol (5837 ± 1621 mCi/μmol) at the end of synthesis (60 min; n = 3) and validated for human use. This methodology offers the advantage of faster synthesis in fewer steps, with simpler automation which we anticipate will facilitate widespread clinical use of [18F]T807. PMID:24339014

  8. Correction Factors Applied to Finger Dosimetry: A Theoretical Assessment of Appropriate Values for Use in Handling Radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Sherbini, Sami; Ilas, Dan; Eckerman, Keith F; DeCicco, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) regulations limit the dose to the skin to 500 mSv per year. This is also the dose limit recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The operational quantity recommended by ICRP for quantifying dose to the skin is the personal dose equivalent, Hp(0.07) and is identical to NRC s shallow dose equivalent, Hs, also measured at a skin depth of 7 mg cm 2. However, whereas ICRP recommends averaging the dose to the skin over an area of 1 cm2 regardless of the size of the exposed area of skin, USNRC requires the shallow dose equivalent to be averaged over 10 cm2. To monitor dose to the skin of the hands of workers handling radioactive materials and particularly in radiopharmaceutical manufacturing facilities, which is the focus of this work, workers are frequently required to wear finger ring dosimeters. The dosimeters monitor the dose at the location of the sensitive element, but this is not the dose required to show compliance (i.e., the dose averaged over the highest exposed contiguous 10 cm2 of skin). Therefore, it may be necessary to apply a correction factor that enables estimation of the required skin dose from the dosimeter reading. This work explored the effects of finger ring placement and of the geometry of the radioactive materials being handled by the worker on the relationship between the dosimeter reading and the desired average dose. A mathematical model of the hand was developed for this purpose that is capable of positioning the fingers in any desired grasping configuration, thereby realistically modeling manipulation of any object. The model was then used with the radiation transport code MCNP to calculate the dose distribution on the skin of the hand when handling a variety of radioactive vials and syringes, as well as the dose to the dosimeter element. Correction factors were calculated using the results of these calculations and examined for any patterns that may be

  9. Pharmacokinetics of bacmecillinam and pivmecillinam in volunteers.

    PubMed

    Josefsson, K; Bergan, T; Magni, L; Pring, B G; Westerlund, D

    1982-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of bacmecillinam and pivmecillinam were studied in healthy fasting volunteers given tablets in a cross-over, randomized order. The mean (+/- SD) peak levels of plasma mecillinam were 1.43 +/- 0.34, 2.73 +/- 0.43, and 4.62 +/- 1.41 mg/l after bacmecillinam 100, 200, and 400 mg and 2.38 +/- 0.65 mg/l after pivmecillinam 400 mg. The corresponding areas under plasma Vs time curves (AUC) were 2.21 +/- 0.19, 3.99 +/- 0.63, and 7.74 +/- 1.38 mg . h. l-1 for bacmecillinam and 5.35 +/- 0.93 mg . h. l-1 for pivmecillinam. The elimination half-lives were 0.8-1.1 h for bacmecillinam and 0.7 h for pivmecillinam. The 12 h urinary recovery of unchanged mecillinam after the 400 mg doses was 41% for bacmecillinam and 30% for pivmecillinam. The 400 mg dose of bacmecillinam gave a significantly higher plasma peak (p less than 0.001), AUC (p less than 0.001) and urinary recovery (p less than 0.001) than did pivmecillinam 400 mg. The plasma peaks appeared earlier and the rate of absorption was higher after bacmecillinam than after pivmecillinam (p less than 0.05). In conclusion, bacmecillinam had a better bioavailability than pivmecillinam in the tablet formulations studied. The AUC increased linearly with increasing doses of bacmecillinam. PMID:6293834

  10. Persistent pharmacokinetic challenges to pediatric drug development

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Daniel P.; Kulczar, Christopher; Roth, Wyatt; Liu, Wanqing; Knipp, Gregory T.

    2014-01-01

    The development of new therapeutic agents for the mitigation of pediatric disorders is largely hindered by the inability for investigators to assess pediatric pharmacokinetics (PK) in healthy patients due to substantial safety concerns. Pediatric patients are a clinical moving target for drug delivery due to changes in absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) and the potential for PK related toxicological (T) events to occur throughout development. These changes in ADMET can have profound effects on drug delivery, and may lead to toxic or sub-therapeutic outcomes. Ethical, economical, logistical, and technical barriers have resulted in insufficient investigation of these changes by industrial, regulatory, and academic bodies, leading to the classification of pediatric patients as therapeutic orphans. In response to these concerns, regulatory agencies have incentivized investigation into these ontogenic changes and their effects on drug delivery in pediatric populations. The intent of this review is to briefly present a synopsis of the development changes that occur in pediatric patients, discuss the effects of these changes on ADME and drug delivery strategies, highlight the hurdles that are still being faced, and present some opportunities to overcome these challenges. PMID:25221567

  11. Pharmacokinetic interaction of intravenous fentanyl with ketoconazole.

    PubMed

    Ziesenitz, Victoria C; König, Sonja K; Mahlke, Nina S; Skopp, Gisela; Haefeli, Walter E; Mikus, Gerd

    2015-06-01

    Fentanyl is primarily metabolized by CYP3A, but has also been suggested to act as a weak inhibitor of CYP3A. We investigated the influence of CYP3A inhibition by ketoconazole on the pharmacokinetics of intravenously administered fentanyl and the effect of fentanyl on CYP3A activity. A prospective, open-label, randomized, monocentre, crossover study was conducted in 16 healthy volunteers. They received fentanyl alone (5 microgram per kilogram) or fentanyl plus ketoconazole (200 milligram orally B.I.D. over 2 days). Naloxone (2 × 0.2 milligram i.v.) was given simultaneously with fentanyl to mitigate any opioid effect. Midazolam was administered as a CYP3A probe drug. Fentanyl and its metabolites were quantified by LC/MS/MS in blood and urine samples obtained over 24 hour. Exposure of fentanyl (AUC0- ∞ ) was significantly increased to 133% and systemic clearance was reduced to 78% by ketoconazole, norfentanyl formation was significantly delayed and partial metabolic clearance decreased to 18%. Fentanyl had no influence on midazolam exposure and CYP3A activity whereas ketoconazole decreased CYP3A activity to 13%. Although fentanyl N-dealkylation is substantially inhibited by ketoconazole, exposure of fentanyl itself increased by one third only. Clinically fentanyl dosage adjustments may become necessary when ketoconazole or other strong CYP3A inhibitors are given simultaneously. Fentanyl itself does not influence CYP3A activity. PMID:25651378

  12. Pharmacokinetics and drug interactions of eslicarbazepine acetate.

    PubMed

    Bialer, Meir; Soares-da-Silva, Patricio

    2012-06-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a novel once-daily antiepileptic drug (AED) approved in Europe since 2009 that was found to be efficacious and well tolerated in a phase III clinical program in adult patients with partial onset seizures previously not controlled with treatment with one to three AEDs, including carbamazepine (CBZ). ESL shares with CBZ and oxcarbazepine (OXC) the dibenzazepine nucleus bearing the 5-carboxamide substitute, but is structurally different at the 10,11 position. This molecular variation results in differences in metabolism, preventing the formation of toxic epoxide metabolites such as carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide. Unlike OXC, which is metabolized to both eslicarbazepine and (R)-licarbazepine, ESL is extensively converted to eslicarbazepine. The systemic exposure to eslicarbazepine after ESL oral administration is approximately 94% of the parent dose, with minimal exposure to (R)-licarbazepine and OXC. After ESL oral administration, the effective half-life (t(1/2,eff) ) of eslicarbazepine was 20-24 h, which is approximately two times longer than its terminal half-life (t(1/2)). At clinically relevant doses (400-1,600 mg/day) ESL has linear pharmacokinetics (PK) with no effects of gender or moderate liver impairment. However, because eslicarbazepine is eliminated primarily (66%) by renal excretion, dose adjustment is recommended for patients with renal impairment. Eslicarbazepine clearance is induced by phenobarbital, phenytoin, and CBZ and it dose-dependently decreases plasma exposure of oral contraceptive and simvastatin. PMID:22612290

  13. Pattern Recognition in Pharmacokinetic Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Johan; Meibohm, Bernd; Weiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition is a key element in pharmacokinetic data analyses when first selecting a model to be regressed to data. We call this process going from data to insight and it is an important aspect of exploratory data analysis (EDA). But there are very few formal ways or strategies that scientists typically use when the experiment has been done and data collected. This report deals with identifying the properties of a kinetic model by dissecting the pattern that concentration-time data reveal. Pattern recognition is a pivotal activity when modeling kinetic data, because a rigorous strategy is essential for dissecting the determinants behind concentration-time courses. First, we extend a commonly used relationship for calculation of the number of potential model parameters by simultaneously utilizing all concentration-time courses. Then, a set of points to consider are proposed that specifically addresses exploratory data analyses, number of phases in the concentration-time course, baseline behavior, time delays, peak shifts with increasing doses, flip-flop phenomena, saturation, and other potential nonlinearities that an experienced eye catches in the data. Finally, we set up a series of equations related to the patterns. In other words, we look at what causes the shapes that make up the concentration-time course and propose a strategy to construct a model. By practicing pattern recognition, one can significantly improve the quality and timeliness of data analysis and model building. A consequence of this is a better understanding of the complete concentration-time profile. PMID:26338231

  14. Pharmacokinetics of azithromycin in rats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Shepard, R M; Falkner, F C

    1990-01-01

    After intravenous or oral administration to rats and dogs, azithromycin was rapidly distributed into the tissues, where concentrations frequently exceeded those in serum by 100-fold or more within 24 h of a single dose. Tissue concentrations were proportional to the dose following single administrations of 10 to 40 mg/kg in rats and dogs. Tissue concentrations were higher after multiple dosing and became greater as the dose was increased from 10 to 40 mg/kg. Elimination half-lives were similar in most tissues and were about 40 h in rats after seven doses of 20 mg/kg and about 90 h in dogs after five doses of 30 mg/kg. Serum concentrations declined in a multi-exponential manner, reflecting initial rapid distribution into tissues and then slow return to serum from tissues. Azithromycin had good oral bioavailability in rats and dogs (46% and 97%, respectively). Rapid uptake of azithromycin by tissues from serum and slow redistribution from tissues to serum are apparently factors governing the pharmacokinetics of azithromycin in rats and dogs. Serum concentrations do not reflect the availability of azithromycin in tissues. PMID:2154438

  15. Pharmacokinetics of gentamicin in birds of prey.

    PubMed

    Bird, J E; Miller, K W; Larson, A A; Duke, G E

    1983-07-01

    The pharmacokinetics of gentamicin, including half-life, apparent volume of distribution, total body clearance, and fraction of drug absorbed from IM injection sites, were determined in 3 species of birds of prey (red-tailed hawks, great horned owls, and golden eagles). Significant differences (P less than 0.05) between species were found for the half-life and total body clearance values for this broad-spectrum antibiotic. The values for apparent volume of distribution and fraction absorbed did not differ among species and were similar to those reported in mammals. Rapid and relatively complete absorption from IM injection sites resulted in high bioavailability. After IV administration of 10 mg of gentamicin/kg of body weight, serum concentrations greater than 12 micrograms/ml were present for at least 2 hours and greater than 2 micrograms/ml for 4 to 6 hours. On the basis of the various determinations, an IM dose of 2.5 mg of gentamicin/kg given every 8 hours should provide therapeutic serum concentrations of gentamicin in the 3 species. PMID:6881663

  16. Pharmacokinetics and biotransformation of tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jinping; Kong, Xiangyi; Kong, Aiying; Han, Mei

    2014-01-01

    Tea is an infusion of the leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant and is the most widely consumed beverage in the world after water. The main chemical components in teas are phenolic compounds (tea polyphenols, mainly tea catechins). A large number of in vitro and in vivo scientific studies have supported that the tea polyphenols can provide a number of health benefits such as, reducing the incidence of coronary heart disease, diabetes and cancer. Recently, tea polyphenols have proven highly attractive as lead compounds for drug discovery programs. A clear understanding of chemistry, stability, pharmacokinetics and metabolic fate of tea will be significant to elucidate many medicinal effects by biochemical theory and pharmaceutical development. This article reviews the current literature on the pharmacoknetics and biotransformation of tea catechins. The half-lives of tea polyphenols are 2-4h and their absorption and elimination are rapid in humans. The peak times (tmax) are 1 and 3 h after oral administration and the peak plasma concentrations are low μM range. It has been reported that catechins are easily metabolized by enzyme and microbe, and the main metabolic pathways are methylation, glucuronidation, sulfation, ring-fission metabolism, and so on. The information is important to discuss some of the challenges and benefits of pursuing this family of compounds for drug discovery. PMID:24527703

  17. Methylprednisolone pharmacokinetics after intravenous and oral administration.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Habet, S M; Rogers, H J

    1989-01-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics of methylprednisolone (MP) were studied in five normal subjects following intravenous doses of 20, 40 and 80 mg methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) and an oral dose of 20 mg methylprednisolone as 4 x 5 mg tablets. Plasma concentrations of MP and MPSS were measured by both high performance thin layer (h.p.t.l.c.) and high pressure liquid chromatography (h.p.l.c.). 2. The mean values (+/- s.d.) of half-life, mean residence time (MRT), systemic clearance (CL) and volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) of MP following intravenous administration were 1.93 +/- 0.35 h, 3.50 +/- 1.01 h, 0.45 +/- 0.12 lh-1 kg-1 and 1.5 +/- 0.63 1 kg-1, respectively. There was no evidence of dose-related changes in these values. The plasma MP concentration-time curves were superimposable when normalized for dose. 3. The bioavailability of methylprednisolone from the 20 mg tablet was 0.82 +/- 0.11 (s.d.). 4. In vivo hydrolysis of MPSS was rapid with a half-life of 4.14 +/- 1.62 (s.d.) min, and was independent of dose. In contrast, in vitro hydrolysis in plasma, whole blood and red blood cells was slow; the process continuing for more than 7 days. Sodium fluoride did not prevent the hydrolysis of MPSS. PMID:2655680

  18. Cephalexin pharmacokinetics in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nahata, M C; Lubin, A H; Visconti, J A

    1984-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics of cephalexin were studied in 7 pediatric and 4 adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and 4 normal adult volunteers. Cephalexin, 250-500 mg, was given as a single dose in suspension. The area under the cephalexin serum concentration-time curve normalized for dose per kilogram averaged 0.185, 0.242, and 0.272 ml/min/kg-1 in pediatric CF patients, adult CF patients, and normal adults, respectively (p greater than 0.05). A threefold interindividual variation was observed in cephalexin renal clearance in CF patients. Renal clearance of cephalexin averaged 5.85 ml/min/kg in pediatric and 4.61 ml/min/kg in adult CF patients (p greater than 0.05). Elimination half-life of cephalexin averaged 0.74, 0.76, and 1.04 h in pediatric patients, adult patients, and normal adults (p greater than 0.05). Cephalexin was well absorbed based on a mean 24-hour urinary recovery of 89 and 93% in pediatric and adult patients. A trend for higher renal clearance of cephalexin was observed among pediatric compared to adult patients. These results indicate that clearance of cephalexin may not increase in patients with CF of minimal severity characterized by an excellent Shwachman score. PMID:6468223

  19. Population pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin in Korean patients.

    PubMed

    Kiem, Sungmin; Ryu, Sung-Mun; Lee, Yun-Mi; Schentag, Jerome J; Kim, Yang-Wook; Kim, Hyeon-Kuk; Jang, Hang-Jae; Joo, Yong-Don; Jin, Kyubok; Shin, Jae-Gook; Ghim, Jong-Lyul

    2016-08-01

    Levofloxacin (LVFX) has different effects depending on the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)/minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ratio. While AUC can be expressed as dose/clearance (CL), we measured serial concentrations of LVFX in Koreans and tried to set a Korean-specific equation, estimating the CL of the antibiotic. In total, 38 patients, aged 18-87 years, received once daily intravenous LVFX doses of 500 mg or 250 mg, depending on their renal function. Four plasma samples were obtained according to a D optimal sampling design. The population pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of LVFX were estimated using non-linear mixed-effect modeling (NONMEM, ver. 7.2). The CL of LVFX was dependent on creatinine clearance (CLCR) as a covariate. The mean population PK parameters of LVFX in Koreans were as follows: CL (l/hour) = 6.19 ×  (CLCR/75)(1.32). The CL of LVFX in Koreans is expected to be lower than that in Western people. PMID:25976699

  20. Pharmacokinetics and biodegradation of chitosan in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Jiang, Zhiwen; Han, Baoqin; Niu, Shuyi; Dong, Wen; Liu, Wanshun

    2015-10-01

    Chitosan, an excellent biomedical material, has received a widespread in vivo application. In contrast, its metabolism and distribution once being implanted were less documented. In this study, the pharmacokinetics and biodegradation of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled and muscle implantation administrated chitosan in rats were investigated with fluorescence spectrophotometry, histological assay and gel chromatography. After implantation, chitosan was degraded gradually during its distribution to diverse organs. Among the tested organs, liver and kidney were found to be the first two highest in chitosan content, which was followed by heart, brain and spleen. Urinary excretion was believed to be the major pathway of chitosan elimination, yet 80% of chitosan administered to rats was not trackable in their urine. This indicated that the majority of chitosan was degraded in tissues. In average, the molecular weight of the degradation products of chitosan in diverse organs and urine was found to be <65 kDa. This further confirmed the in vivo degradation of chitosan. Our findings provided new evidences for the intensive and safe application of chitosan as a biomedical material.