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Sample records for radiosensitizes malignant human

  1. Akt signaling pathway: a target for radiosensitizing human malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Chautard, Emmanuel; Loubeau, Galle; Tchirkov, Andre; Chassagne, Jacques; Vermot-Desroches, Claudine; Morel, Laurent; Verrelle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Radiation therapy plays a central role in the treatment of glioblastoma, but it is not curative due to the high tumor radioresistance. Phosphatidyl-inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (Akt) and Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathways serve to block the apoptosis process, keeping cells alive in very toxic environments such as chemotherapy or ionizing radiation. In the present study, from a panel of 8 human malignant glioma cell lines, investigations on the relationship between intrinsic radioresistance and Akt or STAT3 basal activation were done. Secondly, the impact of down-modulation of Akt or STAT3 signaling on in vitro intrinsic radiosensitivity was evaluated. Using a clonogenic cell survival assay, our results revealed a significant correlation between the basal Akt activation and the surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2). In contrast, no correlation was found between STAT3 activation and SF2. According to this, down-modulation of Akt with a specific chemical inhibitor (Akt inhibitor IV) demonstrated a significant enhancement of radiation sensitivity on glioma cells in a clonogenic survival assay. On the contrary, down-modulation of STAT3 signaling with a specific chemical inhibitor (JSI-124) or a neutralizing gp130 antibody failed to radiosensitize glioma cells. These data indicate that the Akt intercept node could be a more relevant therapeutic target than STAT3 for radiosensitizing human malignant glioma. PMID:20406894

  2. Radiosensitization effect of zidovudine on human malignant glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Fuxiang; Liao Zhengkai; Dai Jing; Xiong Jie; Xie CongHua; Luo Zhiguo; Liu Shiquan; Zhou Yunfeng . E-mail: yfzhouwhu@163.com

    2007-03-09

    Telomeres are shortened with each cell division and play an important role in maintaining chromosomal integrity and function. Telomerase, responsible for telomere synthesis, is activated in 90% of human tumor cells but seldom in normal somatic cells. Zidovudine (AZT) is a reverse transcriptase inhibitor. In this study, we have investigated the effects of {gamma}-radiation in combination with AZT on telomerase activity (TA), telomere length, DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs), DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), and the changes in radiosensitivity of human malignant glioma cell line U251. The results showed that the TA was suppressed by AZT but enhanced by irradiation, resulting in a deceleration of restored rate of shortened telomere, decreased repair rate of DNA strand breaks, and increased radiosensitivity of U251 cells. Our results suggested that telomerase activity and telomere length may serve as markers for estimating the efficacy of cancer radiotherapy and reverse transcriptase inhibitors, such as AZT, may be used clinically as a new radiosensitizer in cancer radiotherapy.

  3. In vitro cellular radiosensitivity of human malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, P.J.; Courtenay, V.D.

    1982-07-01

    The agar diffusion chamber assay was used to construct in vitro radiation cell survival curves for two human malignant melanoma xenografts. Both tumors had survival curves of shoulder-exponential shape with large shoulders (Dq 2.38, 2.92 Gy). Comparison with previous studies of 4 human tumor xenografts in the same system suggests that large shoulders are more common in melanomas than other tumor types. This supports the case for large fraction irradiation in the clinical therapy of melanoma.

  4. Radiosensitization by fullerene-C60 dissolved in squalene on human malignant melanoma through lipid peroxidation and enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shinya; Kimura, Masatsugu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2014-04-01

    We examined fullerene-C60 dissolved in squalene (C60/Sqe) for the ability to potentiate the radiosensitization under X-ray irradiation on human malignant melanoma HMV-II cells, which were treated with C60/Sqe and thereafter irradiated with X-ray. The cell proliferation for C60/Sqe was inhibited more markedly than for Sqe alone. Meanwhile, cell proliferation was almost unaltered for C60/squalane (Sqa) or Sqa, a hydrogenated form of Sqe, as compared to no-additive control. Thus radiosensitization of C60/Sqe is attributed to peroxidation of unsaturated bonds of squalene by X-ray-excited C60 in contrast to squalane. The fluorescence images of HMV-II cells stained with Rhodamine123, an indicator for mitochondrial membrane potential, were monitored for 6 h after X-ray irradiation. C60/Sqe obviously exhibited more augmented fluorescence intensity on perinuclear region of HMV-II cells than Sqe alone. TBARS assay showed that the lipid peroxidation level as malondialdehyde-equivalent increased by combination of C60/Sqe and X-ray dose-dependently on X-ray doses. C60/Sqe exhibited lipid peroxidation more markedly by 1.2-fold than Sqe alone. Thus the level of lipid peroxidation of squalene was sufficiently higher in C60/Sqe than in Sqe in the absence of C60 under X-ray irradiation, suggesting the combination of C60/Sqe and X-ray irradiation induced radiosensitization on HMV-II cells by peroxidation of absorbed Sqe in mitochondrial membrane via oxidative stress mediated by fullerene-C60.

  5. Book Review: Human Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.

    2013-11-01

    This well written report reviews the evidence for variation in human sensitivity to ionizing radiation from epidemiological, clinical, animal, and experimental studies. The report also considers the mechanism(s) of radiation sensitivity and the ethical implications of current and potential knowledge that might be gained in the future. The report is concisely written, considers a large number of historical as well as recent studies, and features a ‘ bullet like ’ summary at the end of each chapter that captures the salient points.

  6. Intra-arterial bromodeoxyuridine radiosensitization of malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Hegarty, T.J.; Thornton, A.F.; Diaz, R.F.; Chandler, W.F.; Ensminger, W.D.; Junck, L.; Page, M.A.; Gebarski, S.S.; Hood, T.W.; Stetson, P.L. )

    1990-08-01

    In the 1950's it was first observed that mammalian cells exposed to the halogenated deoxyuridines were more sensitive to ultraviolet light and radiation than untreated cells. This prompted early clinical trials with bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) which showed mixed results. More recently, several Phase I studies, while establishing the feasibility of continuous intravenous (IV) infusion of BUdR, have reported significant dose limiting skin and bone marrow toxicities and have questioned the optimal method of BUdR delivery. To exploit the high mitotic activity of malignant gliomas relative to surrounding normal brain tissue, we have developed a permanently implantable infusion pump system for safe, continuous intraarterial (IA) internal carotid BUdR delivery. Since July 1985, 23 patients with malignant brain tumors (18 grade 4, 5 grade 3) have been treated in a Phase I clinical trial using IA BUdR (400-600 mg/m2/day X 8 1/2 weeks) and focal external beam radiotherapy (59.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy/day in 6 1/2 weeks). Following initial biopsy/surgery the infusion pump system was implanted; BUdR infusion began 2 weeks prior to and continued throughout the 6 1/2 week course of radiotherapy. There have been no vascular complications. Side-effects in all patients have included varying degrees of anorexia, fatigue, ipsilateral forehead dermatitis, blepharitis, and conjunctivitis. Myelosuppression requiring dose reduction occurred in one patient. An overall Kaplan-Meier estimated median survival of 20 months has been achieved. As in larger controlled series, histologic grade and age are prognostically significant. We have shown in a Phase I study that IA BUdR radiosensitization is safe, tolerable, may lead to improved survival, and appears to be an efficacious primary treatment of malignant gliomas.

  7. Radiosensitization of malignant gliomas following intracranial delivery of paclitaxel biodegradable polymer microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Gabikian, Patrik; Tyler, Betty M.; Zhang, Irma; Li, Khan W.; Brem, Henry; Walter, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Object The aim of this study was to demonstrate that paclitaxel could function as a radiosensitizer for malignant glioma in vitro and in vivo. Methods The radiosensitizing effect of paclitaxel was tested in vitro using the human U373MG and rat 9L glioma cell lines. Cell cycle arrest in response to paclitaxel exposure was quantified by flow cytometry. Cells were subsequently irradiated, and toxicity was measured using the clonogenic assay. In vivo studies were performed in Fischer 344 rats implanted with intracranial 9L gliosarcoma. Rats were treated with control polymer implants, paclitaxel controlled-release polymers, radiotherapy, or a combination of the 2 treatments. The study end point was survival. Results Flow cytometry demonstrated G2-M arrest in both U373MG and 9L cells following 6–12 hours of paclitaxel exposure. The order in which the combination treatment was administered was significant. Exposure to radiation treatment (XRT) during the 6–12 hours after paclitaxel treatment resulted in a synergistic reduction in colony formation. This effect was greater than the effect from either treatment alone and was also greater than the effect of radiation exposure followed by paclitaxel. Rats bearing 9L gliosarcoma tumors treated with paclitaxel polymer administration followed by single-fraction radiotherapy demonstrated a synergistic improvement in survival compared with any other treatment, including radiotherapy followed by paclitaxel treatment. Median survival for control animals was 13 days; for those treated with paclitaxel alone, 21 days; for those treated with XRT alone, 21 days; for those treated with XRT followed by paclitaxel, 45 days; and for those treated with paclitaxel followed by XRT, more than 150 days (p < 0.0001). Conclusions These results indicate that paclitaxel is an effective radiosensitizer for malignant gliomas because it renders glioma cells more sensitive to ionizing radiation by causing G2-M arrest, and induces a synergistic response to chemoradiotherapy. PMID:24605841

  8. SU11657 Enhances Radiosensitivity of Human Meningioma Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Milker-Zabel, Stefanie Bois, Angelika Zabel-du; Ranai, Gholamreza; Trinh, Thuy; Unterberg, Andreas; Debus, Juergen; Lipson, Kenneth E.; Abdollahi, Amir; Huber, Peter E.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of the multireceptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor SU11657 (primarily vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor) in combination with irradiation in freshly isolated primary human meningioma cells. Methods and Materials: Tumor specimens were obtained from meningioma patients undergoing surgery at the Department of Neurosurgery, University of Heidelberg, Germany. For the present study only cells up to passage 6 were used. Benign and atypical meningioma cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were treated with SU11657 alone and in combination with 6-MV photons (0-10 Gy). Clonogenic survival and cell proliferation were determined alone and in coculture assays to determine direct and paracrine effects. Results: Radiation and SU11657 alone reduced cell proliferation in atypical and benign meningioma cells as well as in HUVEC in a dose-dependent manner. SU11657 alone also reduced clonogenic survival of benign and atypical meningioma cells. SU11657 increased radiosensitivity of human meningioma cells in clonogenic survival and cell number/proliferation assays. The anticlonogenic and antiproliferative effects alone and the radiosensitization effects of SU11657 were more pronounced in atypical meningioma cells compared with benign meningioma cells. Conclusion: Small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors like SU11657 are capable of amplifying the growth inhibitory effects of irradiation in meningioma cells. These data provide a rationale for further clinical evaluation of this combination concept, especially in atypical and malignant meningioma patients.

  9. Suppression of autophagy augments the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition on human glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Xiaopeng; Du, Jie; Hua, Song; Zhang, Haowen; Gu, Cheng; Wang, Jie; Yang, Lei; Huang, Jianfeng; Yu, Jiahua Liu, Fenju

    2015-01-15

    Radiotherapy is an essential component of the standard therapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma. To increase the radiosensitivity of glioma cells is a feasible solution to improve the therapeutic effects. It has been suggested that inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) can radiosensitize glioma cells, probably via the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. In this study, human malignant glioma cells, U251 and A172, were treated with an STAT3 inhibitor, WP1066, or a short hairpin RNA plasmid targeting STAT3 to suppress the activation of STAT3 signaling. The radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition were confirmed in glioma cells. Intriguingly, combination of ionizing radiation exposure and STAT3 inhibition triggered a pronounced increase of autophagy flux. To explore the role of autophagy, glioma cells were treated with 3-methyladenine or siRNA for autophagy-related gene 5, and it was demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy further strengthened the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition. Accordingly, more apoptotic cells were induced by the dual inhibition of autophagy and STAT3 signaling. In conclusion, our data revealed a protective role of autophagy in the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition, and inhibition of both autophagy and STAT3 might be a potential therapeutic strategy to increase the radiosensitivity of glioma cells. - Highlights: • Inactivation of STAT3 signaling radiosensitizes malignant glioma cells. • STAT3 inhibition triggers a significant increase of autophagy flux induced by ionizing radiation in glioma cells. • Suppression of autophagy further strengthens the radiosensitizing effects of STAT3 inhibition in glioma cells. • Dual inhibition of autophagy and STAT3 induce massive apoptotic cells upon exposure to ionizing radiation.

  10. Hyaluronan in human malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Sironen, R.K.; Department of Pathology, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, FI-70211 Kuopio ; Tammi, M.; Tammi, R.; Auvinen, P.K.; Anttila, M.; Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1777, FI-70211 Kuopio ; Kosma, V-M.

    2011-02-15

    Hyaluronan, a major macropolysaccharide in the extracellular matrix of connective tissues, is intimately involved in the biology of cancer. Hyaluronan accumulates into the stroma of various human tumors and modulates intracellular signaling pathways, cell proliferation, motility and invasive properties of malignant cells. Experimental and clinicopathological evidence highlights the importance of hyaluronan in tumor growth and metastasis. A high stromal hyaluronan content is associated with poorly differentiated tumors and aggressive clinical behavior in human adenocarcinomas. Instead, the squamous cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas tend to have a reduced hyaluronan content. In addition to the stroma-cancer cell interaction, hyaluronan can influence stromal cell recruitment, tumor angiogenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Hyaluronan receptors, hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronan degrading enzymes, hyaluronidases, are involved in the modulation of cancer progression, depending on the tumor type. Furthermore, intracellular signaling and angiogenesis are affected by the degradation products of hyaluronan. Hyaluronan has also therapeutic implications since it is involved in multidrug resistance.

  11. In vitro radiosensitivity of human leukemia cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Greenberger, J.S.; Schmidt, A.; Karpas, A.; Moloney, W.C.; Little, J.B.

    1981-05-01

    The in vitro radiobiologic survival values (anti n, D/sub 0/) of four tumor lines derived from human hematopoietic tumors were studied. These cell lines were HL60 promyelocytic leukemia; K562 erythroleukemia; 45 acute lymphocytic leukemia; and 176 acute monomyelogenous leukemia. More cell lines must be examined before the exact relationship between in vitro radiosensitivity and clinical radiocurability is firmly established.

  12. Enhanced G2 chromatid radiosensitivity, an early stage in the neoplastic transformation of human epidermal keratinocytes in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Gantt, R.; Sanford, K.K.; Parshad, R.; Price, F.M.; Peterson, W.D. Jr.; Rhim, J.S.

    1987-03-01

    A deficiency in DNA repair, manifest as enhanced chromatid radiosensitivity during the G2 phase of the cell cycle, together with a proliferative stimulus such as that provided by active oncogenes may be necessary and sufficient for the malignant neoplastic transformation of human keratinocytes in culture. Normal epidermal keratinocytes established as continuous cell lines by transfection with pSV3-neo or infection with adeno 12-SV40 hybrid virus developed enhanced G2 chromatid radiosensitivity after 18 passages in culture. In contrast to cells from primary or secondary culture, these cells could be transformed to malignant neoplastic cells by infection with Kirsten murine sarcoma virus containing the Ki-ras oncogene or in one line by the chemical carcinogen, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine; both of these agents produced a marked proliferative response. Cytological heterogeneity and karyotypic instability characterized the cells during their progression to neoplasia. These results are interpreted in terms of a mechanism for neoplastic transformation.

  13. The HSP90 Inhibitor Ganetespib Radiosensitizes Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Casal, Roberto; Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Epperly, Michael W.; Basse, Per H.; Wang, Hong; Wang, Xinhui; Proia, David A.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Socinski, Mark A.; Levina, Vera

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone HSP90 is involved in stabilization and function of multiple client proteins, many of which represent important oncogenic drivers in NSCLC. Utilization of HSP90 inhibitors as radiosensitizing agents is a promising approach. The antitumor activity of ganetespib, HSP90 inhibitor, was evaluated in human lung adenocarcinoma (AC) cells for its ability to potentiate the effects of IR treatment in both in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxic effects of ganetespib included; G2/M cell cycle arrest, inhibition of DNA repair, apoptosis induction, and promotion of senescence. All of these antitumor effects were both concentration- and time-dependent. Both pretreatment and post-radiation treatment with ganetespib at low nanomolar concentrations induced radiosensitization in lung AC cells in vitro. Ganetespib may impart radiosensitization through multiple mechanisms: such as down regulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway; diminished DNA repair capacity and promotion of cellular senescence. In vivo, ganetespib reduced growth of T2821 tumor xenografts in mice and sensitized tumors to IR. Tumor irradiation led to dramatic upregulation of β-catenin expression in tumor tissues, an effect that was mitigated in T2821 xenografts when ganetespib was combined with IR treatments. These data highlight the promise of combining ganetespib with IR therapies in the treatment of AC lung tumors. PMID:26010604

  14. In vitro radiosensitivity of human leukemia cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Greenberger, J.S.; Schmidt, A.; Karpas, A.; Moloney, W.C.; Little, J.B.

    1981-05-01

    The in vitro radiobiologic survival values (n, D0) of four tumor lines derived from human hematopoietic tumors were studied. These cell lines were HL50 (n . 1.3, D0 . 117 rad(1.17 Gy)), promyelocytic leukemia; K562 (n . 1.4, D0 . 165 rad(1.65 Gy)), erythroleukemia; 45 (n . 1.1, D0 . 147 rad(1.47 Gy)), acute lymphocyte leukemia; and 176 (n . 4.0, D0 . 76 rad(0.76 Gy)), acute monomyelogenous leukemia. More cell lines must be examined before the exact relationship between in vitro radiosensitivity and clinical radiocurability is firmly established.

  15. Fulvestrant radiosensitizes human estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University Medical College, Shandong Province ; Yang, Qifeng; Haffty, Bruce G.; Li, Xiaoyan; Moran, Meena S.

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Fulvestrant radiosensitizes MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant increases G1 arrest and decreases S phase in MCF-7 cells. ► Fulvestrant down-regulates DNA-PKcs and RAD51 in MCF-7 cells. -- Abstract: The optimal sequencing for hormonal therapy and radiation are yet to be determined. We utilized fulvestrant, which is showing promise as an alternative to other agents in the clinical setting of hormonal therapy, to assess the cellular effects of concomitant anti-estrogen therapy (fulvestrant) with radiation (F + RT). This study was conducted to assess the effects of fulvestrant alone vs. F + RT on hormone-receptor positive breast cancer to determine if any positive or negative combined effects exist. The effects of F + RT on human breast cancer cells were assessed using MCF-7 clonogenic and tetrazolium salt colorimetric (MTT) assays. The assays were irradiated with a dose of 0, 2, 4, 6 Gy ± fulvestrant. The effects of F + RT vs. single adjuvant treatment alone on cell-cycle distribution were assessed using flow cytometry; relative expression of repair proteins (Ku70, Ku80, DNA-PKcs, Rad51) was assessed using Western Blot analysis. Cell growth for radiation alone vs. F + RT was 0.885 ± 0.013 vs. 0.622 ± 0.029 @2 Gy, 0.599 ± 0.045 vs. 0.475 ± 0.054 @4 Gy, and 0.472 ± 0.021 vs. 0.380 ± 0.018 @6 Gy RT (p = 0.003). While irradiation alone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, the combination of F + RT induced cell redistribution in the G1 phase and produced a significant decrease in the proportion of cells in G2 phase arrest and in the S phase in breast cancer cells (p < 0.01). Furthermore, levels of repair proteins DNA-PKcs and Rad51 were significantly decreased in the cells treated with F + RT compared with irradiation alone. F + RT leads to a decrease in the surviving fraction, increased cell cycle arrest, down regulating of nonhomologous repair protein DNA-PKcs and homologous recombination repair protein RAD51. Thus, our findings suggest that F + RT increases breast cancer cell radiosensitivity compared with radiation alone. These findings have salient implications for designing clinical trials using fulvestrant and radiation therapy.

  16. Association between cellular radiosensitivity and G1/G2 checkpoint proficiencies in human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hematulin, Arunee; Sagan, Daniel; Sawanyawisuth, Kanlayanee; Seubwai, Wunchana; Wongkham, Sopit

    2014-09-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a destructive malignancy with a poor prognosis and lack of effective medical treatment. Radiotherapy is an alternative treatment for patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma. However, there are limited data on the radiation responsiveness of individual cholangiocarcinoma cells, which is a key factor that influences radiation treatment outcome. In this study, we found that cholangiocarcinoma cell lines differ remarkably in their radiosensitivity. The variation of radiosensitivity of cholangiocarcinoma cells correlates with their p53 status and existing G1 and/or G2 checkpoint defects. We also demonstrated the potential of checkpoint kinase Chk1/2 inhibition on the enhancement of the radiosensitivity of cholangiocarcinoma cells. Thus, this study provides useful information for predicting radiation response and provides evidence for the enchantment of radiotherapeutic efficiency by targeting checkpoint kinase Chk1/2 in some subpopulations of cholangiocarcinoma patients. PMID:24969815

  17. Andrographolide radiosensitizes human ovarian cancer SKOV3 xenografts due to an enhanced apoptosis and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Qiu, Xingsheng

    2015-11-01

    Andrographolide (AND), a diterpenoid lactone isolated from Andrographis paniculata, has been shown to have radiosensitivity in several types of cancer. Whether AND can radiosensitize ovarian cancer remains unknown. The present study investigated the radiosensitizing effects of AND in human ovarian SKOV3 xenografts and examined the molecular mechanisms of AND-mediated radiosensitization. Nude mice bearing human ovarian SKOV3 were treated with AND to investigate the effects of drug administration on tumor growth, radiosensitivity, apoptosis, and autophagy. Subsequent Western blot analysis and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining (autophagy analysis) were used to determine the role of AND. Finally, the pathway of apoptosis was characterized by caspase-3 activity assay as well as TUNEL analysis. AND potently sensitized SKOV3 xenografts to radiation. Moreover, apoptosis and autophagy in radiation combined with drug-treated xenografts increased significantly compared with the simple drug or single radiation treatment. This result was associated with an increase in the Bax/Bcl-2 protein ratio and p-p53 expression after exposure to combination treatment. Meanwhile, the level of Beclin 1 and Atg5 and the conversion from LC3-I to LC3-II, three important proteins involved in autophagy, were increased. AND acts as a strong radiosensitizer in human ovarian SKOV3 xenografts in vivo by increasing the Bax/Bcl-2 protein ratio and promoting the activation of caspase-3, leading to enhanced apoptosis as well as autophagy. PMID:26014516

  18. Enhancement of P53-Mutant Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Radiosensitivity by Flavonoid Fisetin

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wenshu; Lee Yijang; Yu Yichu; Hsaio Chinghui

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether fisetin is a potential radiosensitizer for human colorectal cancer cells, which are relatively resistant to radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was examined by clonogenic survival assay, and DNA fragmentation was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The effects of treatments on cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was performed to ascertain the protein levels of {gamma}-H2AX, phospho-Chk2, active caspase-3, PARP cleavage, phospho-p38, phospho-AKT, and phospho-ERK1/2. Results: Fisetin pretreatment enhanced the radiosensitivity of p53-mutant HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells but not human keratocyte HaCaT cells; it also prolonged radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest, enhanced radiation-induced cell growth arrest in HT-29 cells, and suppressed radiation-induced phospho-H2AX (Ser-139) and phospho-Chk2 (Thr-68) in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Pretreatment with fisetin enhanced radiation-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Fisetin pretreatment augmented radiation-induced phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, which is involved in caspase-mediated apoptosis, and SB202190 significantly reduced apoptosis and radiosensitivity in fisetin-pretreated HT-29 cells. By contrast, both phospho-AKT and phospho-ERK1/2, which are involved in cell proliferation and antiapoptotic pathways, were suppressed after irradiation combined with fisetin pretreatment. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this study is the first to provide evidence that fisetin exerts a radiosensitizing effect in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Fisetin could potentially be developed as a novel radiosensitizer against radioresistant human cancer cells.

  19. Cancer stem cells and human malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Schatton, Tobias; Frank, Markus H

    2010-01-01

    Summary Cancer stem cells (CSC) have been identified in hematological malignancies and several solid cancers. Similar to physiological stem cells, CSC are capable of self-renewal and differentiation and have the potential for indefinite proliferation, a function through which they may cause tumor growth. Although conventional anti-cancer treatments might eradicate most malignant cells in a tumor, they are potentially ineffective against chemoresistant CSC, which may ultimately be responsible for recurrence and progression. Human malignant melanoma is a highly aggressive and drug-resistant cancer. Detection of tumor heterogeneity, undifferentiated molecular signatures, and increased tumorigenicity of melanoma subsets with embryonic-like differentiation plasticity strongly suggest the presence and involvement of malignant melanoma stem cells (MMSC) in the initiation and propagation of this malignancy. Here, we review these findings in the context of functional properties ascribed to melanocyte stem cells and CSC in other cancers. We discuss the association of deregulated signaling pathways, genomic instability, and vasculogenic mimicry phenomena observed in melanoma subpopulations in light of the CSC concept. We propose that a subset of MMSC may be responsible for melanoma therapy-resistance, tumor invasiveness, and neoplastic progression and that targeted abrogation of a MMSC compartment could therefore ultimately lead to stable remissions and perhaps cures of metastatic melanoma. PMID:18353142

  20. Cancer stem cells and human malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Schatton, Tobias; Frank, Markus H

    2008-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) have been identified in hematological malignancies and several solid cancers. Similar to physiological stem cells, CSC are capable of self-renewal and differentiation and have the potential for indefinite proliferation, a function through which they may cause tumor growth. Although conventional anti-cancer treatments might eradicate most malignant cells in a tumor, they are potentially ineffective against chemoresistant CSC, which may ultimately be responsible for recurrence and progression. Human malignant melanoma is a highly aggressive and drug-resistant cancer. Detection of tumor heterogeneity, undifferentiated molecular signatures, and increased tumorigenicity of melanoma subsets with embryonic-like differentiation plasticity strongly suggest the presence and involvement of malignant melanoma stem cells (MMSC) in the initiation and propagation of this malignancy. Here, we review these findings in the context of functional properties ascribed to melanocyte stem cells and CSC in other cancers. We discuss the association of deregulated signaling pathways, genomic instability, and vasculogenic mimicry phenomena observed in melanoma subpopulations in light of the CSC concept. We propose that a subset of MMSC may be responsible for melanoma therapy-resistance, tumor invasiveness, and neoplastic progression and that targeted abrogation of a MMSC compartment could therefore ultimately lead to stable remissions and perhaps cures of metastatic melanoma. PMID:18353142

  1. The radiosensitizing effect of doranidazole on human colorectal cancer cells exposed to high doses of irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Gong, Aimin; Ji, Jun; Wu, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Lv, Suqing; Lv, Hongzhu; Sun, Xizhuo

    2007-01-01

    Background This paper investigates the effects of a new radiosensitizer, doranidazole, and enhancing irradiation on colorectal cancer cells. Methods The radiosensitizing effect of doranidazole was determined using colony formation and propidium iodide (PI) assays to measure cell growth inhibition and the cell killing effect of human colorectal cancer cell lines exposed to high doses of γ-ray irradiation under hypoxic conditions in vitro. Fluorescence staining and cell migration assays were also used to assess the radiosensitizing effect. Results Cell proliferation evaluated by clonogenic survival curves was significantly inhibited by 5 mmol/L doranidazole, particularly at doses ranging from 10 to 30 Gy of irradiation. The radiosensitizing effect of doranidazole on colorectal cancer cells occurs in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Doranidazole also inhibited the mobility of cell invasion and migration. Conclusion Doranidazole can enhance the killing effect and the cell growth inhibition of colorectal cancer after high-dose irradiation in a time and dose-dependent manner. PMID:17919337

  2. Chromosomal radiosensitivity of human immunodeficiency virus positive/negative cervical cancer patients in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    HERD, OLIVIA; FRANCIES, FLAVIA; KOTZEN, JEFFREY; SMITH, TRUDY; NXUMALO, ZWIDE; MULLER, XANTHENE; SLABBERT, JACOBUS; VRAL, ANNE; BAEYENS, ANS

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer amongst South African women and is the leading cause of cancer-associated mortality in this region. Several international studies on radiation-induced DNA damage in lymphocytes of cervical cancer patients have remained inconclusive. Despite the high incidence of cervical cancer in South Africa, and the extensive use of radiotherapy to treat it, the chromosomal radiosensitivity of South African cervical cancer patients has not been studied to date. Since a high number of these patients are human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive, the effect of HIV infection on chromosomal radiosensitivity was also investigated. Blood samples from 35 cervical cancer patients (20 HIV-negative and 15 HIV-positive) and 20 healthy controls were exposed to X-rays at doses of 6 MV of 2 and 4 Gy in vitro. Chromosomal radiosensitivity was assessed using the micronucleus (MN) assay. MN scores were obtained using the Metafer 4 platform, an automated microscopic system. Three scoring methods of the MNScore module of Metafer were applied and compared. Cervical cancer patients had higher MN values than healthy controls, with HIV-positive patients having the highest MN values. Differences between groups were significant when using a scoring method that corrects for false positive and false negative MN. The present study suggested increased chromosomal radiosensitivity in HIV-positive South African cervical cancer patients. PMID:26549042

  3. Prostate-targeted radiosensitization via aptamer-shRNA chimeras in human tumor xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xiaohua; Zhang, Yonggang; Ribas, Judit; Chowdhury, Wasim H.; Castanares, Mark; Zhang, Zhewei; Laiho, Marikki; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Lupold, Shawn E.

    2011-01-01

    Dose-escalated radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer (PCa) has a clear therapeutic benefit; however, escalated doses may also increase injury to noncancerous tissues. Radiosensitizing agents can improve ionizing radiation (IR) potency, but without targeted delivery, these agents will also sensitize surrounding normal tissues. Here we describe the development of prostate-targeted RNAi agents that selectively sensitized prostate-specific membrane antigen–positive (PSMA-positive) cells to IR. siRNA library screens identified DNA-activated protein kinase, catalytic polypeptide (DNAPK) as an ideal radiosensitization target. DNAPK shRNAs, delivered by PSMA-targeting RNA aptamers, selectively reduced DNAPK in PCa cells, xenografts, and human prostate tissues. Aptamer-targeted DNAPK shRNAs, combined with IR, dramatically and specifically enhanced PSMA-positive tumor response to IR. These findings support aptamer-shRNA chimeras as selective sensitizing agents for the improved treatment of high-risk localized PCa. PMID:21555850

  4. Lin28-let7 Modulates Radiosensitivity of Human Cancer Cells With Activation of K-Ras

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jee-Sun.; Kim, Jae-Jin; Byun, Ju-Yeon; Kim, In-Ah

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of targeting Lin28-let7 microRNA regulatory network for overcoming the radioresistance of cancer cells having activated K-Ras signaling. Methods and Materials: A549 lung carcinoma cells and ASPC1 pancreatic cancer cells possessing K-RAS mutation were transfected with pre-let7a microRNA or Lin28 siRNA, respectively. Clonogenic assay, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western analysis were performed. The effects of Lin28 on SQ20B cells having wild-type K-RAS, and a normal fibroblast were also assessed. Results: The overexpression of let-7a decreased expression of K-Ras and radiosensitized A549 cells. Inhibition of Lin28, a repressor of let-7, attenuated K-Ras expression and radiosensitized A549 and ASPC1 cells. Neither SQ20B cells expressing wild-type K-RAS nor HDF, the normal human fibroblasts, were radiosensitized by this approach. Conclusions: The Lin28-let7 regulatory network may be a potentially useful therapeutic target for overcoming the radioresistance of human cancers having activated K-Ras signaling.

  5. Effect of downregulation of survivin expression on radiosensitivity of human epidermoid carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sah, Nand K.; Munshi, Anupama; Hobbs, Marvette B.A.; Carter, Bing Z.; Andreeff, Michael; Meyn, Raymond E. . E-mail: rmeyn@mdanderson.org

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The expression of survivin, a member of the inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein family, is elevated in many types of human cancer. High survivin expression has been associated with poor patient prognosis and tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to compare the radiosensitizing effects of five agents that target survivin on their relative ability to downregulate survivin expression. Methods and Materials: The human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431 was treated with adenoviral-mediated wild-type p53, antisense to survivin, the mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor PD98059, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Purvalanol A, or the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A. The radiosensitizing effects of these treatments were determined by clonogenic survival curve analysis and their abilities to suppress survivin expression by Western blot analysis. Results: All the strategies were shown to radiosensitize A431 cells. This effect correlated with their abilities to downregulate survivin. Conclusion: Expression of survivin appears to confer a radioresistant phenotype that can be overcome using several clinically achievable strategies that target survivin either specifically or nonspecifically.

  6. Rosiglitazone enhances the radiosensitivity of p53-mutant HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Shu-Jun; Institute of Radiation Sciences, Tzu Chi Technology College, Hualien, Taiwan ; Hsaio, Ching-Hui; Tseng, Ho-Hsing; Su, Yu-Han; Shih, Wen-Ling; Lee, Jeng-Woei; Chuah, Jennifer Qiu-Yu

    2010-04-09

    Combined-modality treatment has improved the outcome in cases of various solid tumors, and radiosensitizers are used to enhance the radiotherapeutic efficiency. Rosiglitazone, a synthetic ligand of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors {gamma} used in the treatment of type-2 diabetes, has been shown to reduce tumor growth and metastasis in human cancer cells, and may have the potential to be used as a radiosensitizer in radiotherapy for human colorectal cancer cells. In this study, rosiglitazone treatment significantly reduced the cell viability of p53-wild type HCT116 cells but not p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Interestingly, rosiglitazone pretreatment enhanced radiosensitivity in p53-mutant HT-29 cells but not HCT116 cells, and prolonged radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest and enhanced radiation-induced cell growth inhibition in HT-29 cells. Pretreatment with rosiglitazone also suppressed radiation-induced H2AX phosphorylation in response to DNA damage and AKT activation for cell survival; on the contrary, rosiglitazone pretreatment enhanced radiation-induced caspase-8, -9, and -3 activation and PARP cleavage in HT-29 cells. In addition, pretreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor, zVAD-fmk, attenuated the levels of caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage in radiation-exposed cancer cells in combination with rosiglitazone pretreatment. Our results provide proof for the first time that rosiglitazone suppresses radiation-induced survival signals and DNA damage response, and enhances the radiation-induced apoptosis signaling cascade. These findings can assist in the development of rosiglitazone as a novel radiosensitizer.

  7. Radiosensitization of human pancreatic cancer cells by MLN4924, an investigational NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Dongping; Li, Hua; Yu, Jie; Sebolt, Jonathan T.; Zhao, Lili; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Smith, Peter G.; Morgan, Meredith A.; Sun, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy is used in locally advanced pancreatic cancers where it can improve survival in combination with gemcitabine. However, prognosis is still poor in this setting where more effective therapies remain needed. MLN4924 is an investigational small molecule currently in Phase I clinical trials. MLN4924 inhibits NAE (NEDD8 Activating Enzyme), a pivotal regulator of the E3 ubiquitin ligase SCF (SKP1, Cullins, and F-box protein), that has been implicated recently in DNA repair. In this study, we provide evidence that MLN4924 can be used as an effective radiosensitizer in pancreatic cancer. Specifically, MLN4924 (20100 nM) effectively inhibited cullin neddylation and sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to ionizing radiation in vitro with a sensitivity enhancement ratio (SER) of ~1.5. Mechanistically, MLN4924 treatment stimulated an accumulation of several SCF substrates, including CDT1, WEE1 and NOXA, in parallel with an enhancement of radiation-induced DNA damage, aneuploidy, G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. RNAi-mediated knockdown of CDT1 and WEE1 partially abrogated MLN4924-induced aneuploidy, G2/M arrest, and radiosensization, indicating a causal effect. Further, MLN4924 was an effective radiosensitizer in mouse xenograft models of human pancreatic cancer. Our findings offer proof of concept for use of MLN4924 as a novel class of radiosensitizer for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22072567

  8. STAT3 Serine 727 Phosphorylation: A Relevant Target to Radiosensitize Human Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ouédraogo, Zangbéwendé Guy; Müller-Barthélémy, Mélanie; Kemeny, Jean-Louis; Dedieu, Véronique; Biau, Julian; Khalil, Toufic; Raoelfils, Lala Ines; Granzotto, Adeline; Pereira, Bruno; Beaudoin, Claude; Guissou, Innocent Pierre; Berger, Marc; Morel, Laurent; Chautard, Emmanuel; Verrelle, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an essential component of glioma standard treatment. Glioblastomas (GBM), however, display an important radioresistance leading to tumor recurrence. To improve patient prognosis, there is a need to radiosensitize GBM cells and to circumvent the mechanisms of resistance caused by interactions between tumor cells and their microenvironment. STAT3 has been identified as a therapeutic target in glioma because of its involvement in mechanisms sustaining tumor escape to both standard treatment and immune control. Here, we studied the role of STAT3 activation on tyrosine 705 (Y705) and serine 727 (S727) in glioma radioresistance. This study explored STAT3 phosphorylation on Y705 (pSTAT3-Y705) and S727 (pSTAT3-S727) in glioma cell lines and in clinical samples. Radiosensitizing effect of STAT3 activation down-modulation by Gö6976 was explored. In a panel of 15 human glioma cell lines, we found that the level of pSTAT3-S727 was correlated to intrinsic radioresistance. Moreover, treating GBM cells with Gö6976 resulted in a highly significant radiosensitization associated to a concomitant pSTAT3-S727 down-modulation only in GBM cell lines that exhibited no or weak pSTAT3-Y705. We report the constitutive activation of STAT3-S727 in all GBM clinical samples. Targeting pSTAT3-S727 mainly in pSTAT3-Y705-negative GBM could be a relevant approach to improve radiation therapy. PMID:25736961

  9. Study of the morphologic character and in vivo radiosensitizing effect of 5-thio-. cap alpha. -D-glucose toward a malignant melanoma of golden Syrian hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Berner, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Low LET radiation was evaluated alone and in combination with 5-thio-..cap alpha..-D-glucopyranose (5TDG) for reducing the in vivo growth of amelanotic malignant melanoma. Nine groups of tumor-bearing animals received radiation and/or 5TDG treatments and a tenth group served as non-treatment controls. The radiation protocols, equivalent in terms of Time-Dose-Fractionation value, were 2.25, 5.20, or 8.00 gray per treatment. The 5TDG as mother liquor was administered orally for 22 days at 0.75 or 1.5 g/kg-day. The 1.5 g/kg-day dose level was omitted from a second study. In the first radiosensitization study, animals treated with radiation or radiation and 5TDG, exhibited a reduction in tumor growth compared to the control group. The group receiving 5.20 gray and 0.75 g/kg-day displayed a significant reduction in tumor growth for Days 8-22 of the study compared to the control group. Treatment with 5TDG alone did not reduce tumor growth. In the second study, treatment with radiation alone reduced tumor growth. Radiation and drug treatment protocols did not reproduce the findings from the first radiosensitization study.

  10. Human malignant melanoma heterotransplanted to nude mice.

    PubMed

    Tropé, C; Johnsson, J E; Alm, P; Landberg, T; Olsson, H; Wennerberg, J

    1981-01-01

    Five different human malignant melanoma were heterotransplanted subcutaneously to nude mice. When small tissue pieces were used 3 out of 5 tumors grew. Subcutaneous injections of suspended tumor cells were also made, but all failed to take. Metastatic or infiltrative growth was never seen in the mice observed for up to 2.5 months. The successful grafts largely retained the original morphologicaL features. The three successfully transplanted tumors could all be serially transferred with 100% tumor take. In one case passage time was reduced from 40 days to 15 days. As measured with 3H-thymidine incorporation the proliferation rate increased during the passages. These changes might be due to a selection of more rapidly growing tumor cells in the nudes. PMID:7312076

  11. Immunoprevention of human papillomavirus-associated malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Wang1, Joshua W.; Hung, Chein-fu; Huh, Warner K.; Trimble, Cornelia L.; Roden, Richard B.S.

    2014-01-01

    Persistent infection by one of fifteen high risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) types is a necessary but not sufficient cause of 5% of all human cancers. This provides a remarkable opportunity for cancer prevention via immunization. Since Harald zur Hausen’s pioneering identification of hrHPV types 16 and 18, found in ~50% and ~20% of cervical cancers respectively, two prophylactic HPV vaccines containing virus-like particles (VLP) of each genotype have been widely licensed. These vaccines are beginning to impact infection and HPV-associated neoplasia rates after immunization campaigns in adolescents. Here we review recent progress and opportunities to better prevent HPV-associated cancers, including: broadening immune-protection to cover all hrHPV types, reducing the cost of HPV vaccines especially for developing countries that have the highest rates of cervical cancer, and immune-based treatment of established HPV infections. Screening based upon George Papanicolaou’s cervical cytology testing, and more recently detection of hrHPV DNA/RNA, followed by ablative treatment of high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2/3) have substantially reduced cervical cancer rates, and we examine their interplay with immune-based modalities for the prevention and eventual elimination of cervical cancer and other HPV-related malignancies. PMID:25488410

  12. The radiosensitization effects of Endostar on human lung squamous cancer cells H-520

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The present study mainly aimed to investigate the direct effects of Endostar (ES) on the proliferation and radiosensitivity of human lung squamous cancer cell line H-520. Results ES significantly inhibited H-520 cell proliferation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. According to the colony-forming assays, ES could increase the H-520 cell radiosensitivity. ES induced cell apoptosis, the apoptosis rate increased with the raise of ES concentration. Irradiation induced significantly higher apoptosis rate in ES-treated H-520 cells than non-treated H-520 cells. ES induced cell cycle distribution and G0/G1 arrest in H-520 cells, whereas irradiation induced G2/M arrest. The phospho-p38-MAPK and p-Akt protein levels were decreased in H-520 cells after ES treatment. Furthermore, activated caspase protein level increased and Bcl-2 protein levels decreased after treatment with ES and irradiation. Conclusion ES significantly enhanced the sensitivity of H-520 cells to irradiation by inhibition of cellular proliferation, promotion of cell apoptosis and redistribution of cell cycle, possibly via deactivation of Akt pathway. The present study supports the possibility to use the combination of ES and ionizing irradiation to treat patients with lung squamous cell cancer in clinics. PMID:20492730

  13. Guggulsterone-Mediated Enhancement of Radiosensitivity in Human Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Choudhuri, Rajani; DeGraff, William; Gamson, Janet; Mitchell, James B.; Cook, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To observe the effect of guggulsterone (GS) on the radiation response in human cancer cell lines. Materials and methods: The radiation response of cancer cells treated with GS was observed by cell survival studies, cell growth assay, NF-κB activity assay, western blotting of some key growth promoting receptors, the DNA repair protein γH2AX, and flow cytometry for DNA analyses. Results: GS inhibited radiation induced NF-κB activation and enhanced radiosensitivity in the pancreatic cell line, PC-Sw. It reduced both cell cycle movement and cell growth. GS reduced ERα protein in MCF7 cells and IGF1-Rβ protein in colon cancer cells and pancreatic cancer cells and inhibited DNA double strand break (DSB) repair following radiation. Conclusion: GS induced radiation sensitization may be due to several different mechanisms including the inhibition of NF-κB activation and reductions in IGF1-Rβ. In addition, GS induced γH2AX formation, primarily in the S-phase, indicates that DNA DSB's in the S-phase may be another reason for GS induced radiosensitivity. ERα down-regulation in response to GS suggests that it can be of potential use in the treatment of estrogen positive tumors that are resistant to tamoxifen. PMID:22649756

  14. MiR-124 Radiosensitizes Human Colorectal Cancer Cells by Targeting PRRX1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Gao, Fei; Lin, Xiaoshan; He, Lian; Li, Dan; Li, Zhijun; Ding, Yi; Chen, Longhua

    2014-01-01

    One of the challenges in the treatment of colorectal cancer patients is that these tumors show resistance to radiation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in essential biological activities, including chemoresistance and radioresistance. Several research studies have indicated that miRNA played an important role in sensitizing cellular response to ionizing radiation (IR). In this study, we found that miR-124 was significantly down-regulated both in CRC-derived cell lines and clinical CRC samples compared with adjacent non-tumor colorectal tissues, MiR-124 could sensitize human colorectal cancer cells to IR in vitro and in vivo. We identified PRRX1, a new EMT inducer and stemness regulator as a novel direct target of miR-124 by using target prediction algorithms and luciferase assay. PRRX1 knockdown could sensitize CRC cells to IR similar to the effects caused by miR-124. Overexpression of PRRX1 in stably overexpressed-miR-124 cell lines could rescue the effects of radiosensitivity enhancement brought by miR-124. Taking these observations into consideration, we illustrated that miR-124 could increase the radiosensitivity of CRC cells by blocking the expression of PRRX1, which indicated miR-124 could act as a great therapeutic target for CRC patients. PMID:24705396

  15. PTEN: Multiple Functions in Human Malignant Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Milella, Michele; Falcone, Italia; Conciatori, Fabiana; Cesta Incani, Ursula; Del Curatolo, Anais; Inzerilli, Nicola; Nuzzo, Carmen M. A.; Vaccaro, Vanja; Vari, Sabrina; Cognetti, Francesco; Ciuffreda, Ludovica

    2015-01-01

    PTEN is the most important negative regulator of the PI3K signaling pathway. In addition to its canonical, PI3K inhibition-dependent functions, PTEN can also function as a tumor suppressor in a PI3K-independent manner. Indeed, the PTEN network regulates a broad spectrum of biological functions, modulating the flow of information from membrane-bound growth factor receptors to nuclear transcription factors, occurring in concert with other tumor suppressors and oncogenic signaling pathways. PTEN acts through its lipid and protein phosphatase activity and other non-enzymatic mechanisms. Studies conducted over the past 10?years have expanded our understanding of the biological role of PTEN, showing that in addition to its ability to regulate proliferation and cell survival, it also plays an intriguing role in regulating genomic stability, cell migration, stem cell self-renewal, and tumor microenvironment. Changes in PTEN protein levels, location, and enzymatic activity through various molecular mechanisms can generate a continuum of functional PTEN levels in inherited syndromes, sporadic cancers, and other diseases. PTEN activity can indeed, be modulated by mutations, epigenetic silencing, transcriptional repression, aberrant protein localization, and post-translational modifications. This review will discuss our current understanding of the biological role of PTEN, how PTEN expression and activity are regulated, and the consequences of PTEN dysregulation in human malignant tumors. PMID:25763354

  16. Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Human Nonmalignant and Malignant Cells and Tissues.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassman, Wenling Sha

    This thesis explores steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy from human malignant and non -malignant cells and tissues. The focus of these studies are the analysis of the excitation spectra, emission spectra, and decay time based on the contribution from several key intrinsic fluorophors: NAD(P)H, flavins, tryptophan, elastin and collagen that exist in different amounts in the human tissues and cells. The comparison between the spectra from malignant and non-malignant cells and tissues gives information on the changes that occur from non-malignancy to malignancy in the cells and tissues. The spectra of tissues and cells are also compared to help in understanding what fluorophors are responsible for fluorescence spectral differences between the malignant and non-malignant tissues and cells. The results in this thesis show that the spectral differences between the normal and cancerous tissues and cells exist in various wavelength ranges. The experimental data from GYN tissues have shown with over 95% of the sensitivity and specificity to separate malignant from non-malignant tissues using 300nm excitation. The 340nm band, which is mostly in response to intrinsic fluorophor (amino acid tryptophan), from malignant tissues were relatively higher then that from the non-malignant tissues. This might have been caused by the higher concentration of free tryptophan in the malignant tumor when compared to that of the normal tissue. This has been found in medical clinical study. The experimental data in this thesis also show that the fluorescence intensities around 450nm-460nm, which are mostly due to the intrinsic fluorophor coenzyme NADH, from both malignant cells in vitro and tissues in vitro are relatively higher than from non-malignant cells in vitro and tissues in vitro. These findings are reinforced by the faster decay time of the NADH fluorescence from normal cells in vitro than from neoplasm cells in vitro. Thus, the NADH in the mitochondria might be bound less tight in the malignant cells then that in the non-malignant cells because of metabolism changes from non-malignance to malignance. This thesis contributes to the new field of "mediphotonics" in life science.

  17. Replication-Dependent Radiosensitization of Human Glioma Cells by Inhibition of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Dungey, Fiona A.; Loeser, Dana A.; Chalmers, Anthony J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: Current treatments for glioblastoma multiforme are inadequate and limited by the radiation sensitivity of normal brain. Because glioblastoma multiforme are rapidly proliferating tumors within nondividing normal tissue, the therapeutic ratio might be enhanced by combining radiotherapy with a replication-specific radiosensitizer. KU-0059436 (AZD2281) is a potent and nontoxic inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) undergoing a Phase II clinical trial as a single agent. Methods and Materials: Based on previous observations that the radiosensitizing effects of PARP inhibition are more pronounced in dividing cells, we investigated the mechanisms underlying radiosensitization of human glioma cells by KU-0059436, evaluating the replication dependence of this effect and its therapeutic potential. Results: KU-0059436 increased the radiosensitivity of four human glioma cell lines (T98G, U373-MG, UVW, and U87-MG). Radiosensitization was enhanced in populations synchronized in S phase and abrogated by concomitant exposure to aphidicolin. Sensitization was further enhanced when the inhibitor was combined with a fractionated radiation schedule. KU-0059436 delayed repair of radiation-induced DNA breaks and was associated with a replication-dependent increase in {gamma}H2AX and Rad51 foci. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that KU-0059436 increases radiosensitivity in a replication-dependent manner that is enhanced by fractionation. A mechanism is proposed whereby PARP inhibition increases the incidence of collapsed replication forks after ionizing radiation, generating persistent DNA double-strand breaks. These observations indicate that KU-0059436 is likely to enhance the therapeutic ratio achieved by radiotherapy in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. A Phase I clinical trial is in development.

  18. Downregulation of high mobility group box 1 modulates telomere homeostasis and increases the radiosensitivity of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Shaobo; Zhou, Fuxiang; Yang, Hui; Wei, Yuehua; Gong, Jun; Mei, Zijie; Wu, Lin; Yu, Haijun; Zhou, Yunfeng

    2015-03-01

    The functions of the high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in tumor cells include replenishing telomeric DNA and maintaining cell immortality. There is a negative correlation between human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and radiosensitivity in tumor cells. Our aim was to elucidate the relationship among HMGB1, telomere homeostasis and radiosensitivity in MCF-7 cells. In this study, we established stably transfected control (MCF-7-NC) and HMGB1 knockdown (MCF-7-shHMGB1) cell lines. The expression of HMGB1 mRNA and the relative telomere length were examined by real-time PCR. Radiosensitivity was detected by clonogenic assay. The protein expressions were determined by western blot analysis. The telomerase activity was detected by PCR-ELISA. Proliferation ability was examined by CCK-8 assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry. DNA damage foci were detected by immunofluorescence. ShRNA-mediated downregulation of HMGB1 expression increased the radiosensitivity of MCF-7 cells, and reduced the accumulation of hTERT and cyclin D1. Moreover, knockdown of HMGB1 in MCF-7 cells inhibited telomerase activity and cell proliferation, while increasing the extent of apoptosis. Downregulation of HMGB1 modulated telomere homeostasis by changing the level of telomere-binding proteins, such as TPP1 (PTOP), TRF1 and TRF2. This downregulation also inhibited the ATM and ATR signaling pathways. The current data demonstrate that knockdown of HMGB1 breaks telomere homeostasis, enhances radiosensitivity, and suppresses the repair of DNA damage in human breast cancer cells. These results suggested that HMGB1 might be a potential radiotherapy target in human breast cancer. PMID:25501936

  19. Radiosensitization of Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells by Human Papillomavirus 16 Oncoprotein E6*I

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Ervinna; Delic, Naomi C.; Hong, Angela; Zhang Mei; Rose, Barbara R.; Lyons, J. Guy

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) whose disease is associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection have a significantly better outcome than those with HPV-negative disease, but the reasons for the better outcome are not known. We postulated that they might relate to an ability of HPV proteins to confer a better response to radiotherapy, a commonly used treatment for OSCC. Methods and Materials: We stably expressed the specific splicing-derived isoforms, E6*I and E6*II, or the entire E6 open reading frame (E6total), which gives rise to both full length and E6*I isoforms, in OSCC cell lines. Radiation resistance was measured in clonogenicity assays, p53 activity was measured using transfected reporter genes, and flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle and apoptosis. Results: E6*I and E6total sensitized the OSCC cells to irradiation, E6*I giving the greatest degree of radiosensitization (approximately eightfold lower surviving cell fraction at 10 Gy), whereas E6*II had no effect. In contrast to radiosensitivity, E6*I was a weaker inhibitor than E6total of tumor suppressor p53 transactivator activity in the same cells. Flow cytometric analyses showed that irradiated E6*I expressing cells had a much higher G2M:G1 ratio than control cells, indicating that, after G2, cells were diverted from the cell cycle to programmed cell death. Conclusion: This study supports a role for E6*I in the enhanced responsiveness of HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas to p53-independent radiation-induced death.

  20. Radiosensitization of Human Leukemic HL-60 Cells by ATR Kinase Inhibitor (VE-821): Phosphoproteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Šalovská, Barbora; Fabrik, Ivo; Ďurišová, Kamila; Link, Marek; Vávrová, Jiřina; Řezáčová, Martina; Tichý, Aleš

    2014-01-01

    DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation or chemotherapy are frequently used in oncology. DNA damage response (DDR)—triggered by radiation-induced double strand breaks—is orchestrated mainly by three Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinases (PIKKs): Ataxia teleangiectasia mutated (ATM), DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and ATM and Rad3-related kinase (ATR). Their activation promotes cell-cycle arrest and facilitates DNA damage repair, resulting in radioresistance. Recently developed specific ATR inhibitor, VE-821 (3-amino-6-(4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl)-N-phenylpyrazine-2-carboxamide), has been reported to have a significant radio- and chemo-sensitizing effect delimited to cancer cells (largely p53-deficient) without affecting normal cells. In this study, we employed SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics to describe the mechanism of the radiosensitizing effect of VE-821 in human promyelocytic leukemic cells HL-60 (p53-negative). Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC)-prefractionation with TiO2-enrichment and nano-liquid chromatography—tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis revealed 9834 phosphorylation sites. Proteins with differentially up-/down-regulated phosphorylation were mostly localized in the nucleus and were involved in cellular processes such as DDR, all phases of the cell cycle, and cell division. Moreover, sequence motif analysis revealed significant changes in the activities of kinases involved in these processes. Taken together, our data indicates that ATR kinase has multiple roles in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle and that its inhibitor VE-821 is a potent radiosensitizing agent for p53-negative HL-60 cells. PMID:25003641

  1. HPV16-E7 Expression Causes Fluorodeoxyuridine-mediated Radiosensitization in SW620 Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Axelson, Michael D; Davis, Mary A; Ethier, Stephen P; Lawrence, Theodore S

    1999-01-01

    Abstract We have reported that HT29 colon cancer cells, which are radiosensitized by fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd), exhibit a greater increase in cyclin E-dependent kinase activity and progress further into S phase in the presence of FdUrd than do SW620 colon cancer cells, which are only minimally sensitized by this drug (Cancer Res 56: 3203, 1996). Although these findings suggested that the ability to progress into S phase in the presence of FdUrd permits cells to be radiosensitized, we wished to test this hypothesis by attempting to drive SW620 human colon cells into S phase by transducing them with the HPV16-E7 gene. Two-parameter flow cytometry showed that E7-transduced cells progressed through S phase after radiation and FdUrd treatment more rapidly than SW620 parental cells. We found that E7-transduced SW620 cells were significantly radiosensitized by FdUrd (100 nmol/L, 14 hours) with an enhancement ratio for 2 clones of 1.47±0.03 and 1.51±0.14, compared with 1.24±0.04 in SW620 parental cells. These data strongly support the hypothesis that dysregulation of S-phase progression is an important factor in FdUrd-mediated radiosensitization. PMID:10933053

  2. c-MYC is a radiosensitive locus in human breast cells

    PubMed Central

    Wade, M A; Sunter, N J; Fordham, S E; Long, A; Masic, D; Russell, L J; Harrison, C J; Rand, V; Elstob, C; Bown, N; Rowe, D; Lowe, C; Cuthbert, G; Bennett, S; Crosier, S; Bacon, C M; Onel, K; Scott, K; Scott, D; Travis, L B; May, F E B; Allan, J M

    2015-01-01

    Ionising radiation is a potent human carcinogen. Epidemiological studies have shown that adolescent and young women are at increased risk of developing breast cancer following exposure to ionising radiation compared with older women, and that risk is dose-dependent. Although it is well understood which individuals are at risk of radiation-induced breast carcinogenesis, the molecular genetic mechanisms that underlie cell transformation are less clear. To identify genetic alterations potentially responsible for driving radiogenic breast transformation, we exposed the human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A to fractionated doses of X-rays and examined the copy number and cytogenetic alterations. We identified numerous alterations of c-MYC that included high-level focal amplification associated with increased protein expression. c-MYC amplification was also observed in primary human mammary epithelial cells following exposure to radiation. We also demonstrate that the frequency and magnitude of c-MYC amplification and c-MYC protein expression is significantly higher in breast cancer with antecedent radiation exposure compared with breast cancer without a radiation aetiology. Our data also demonstrate extensive intratumor heterogeneity with respect to c-MYC copy number in radiogenic breast cancer, suggesting continuous evolution at this locus during disease development and progression. Taken together, these data identify c-MYC as a radiosensitive locus, implicating this oncogenic transcription factor in the aetiology of radiogenic breast cancer. PMID:25531321

  3. Hypoxia-targeted triple suicide gene therapy radiosensitizes human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Hung Tsung; Xing, Ligang; Deng, Xuelong; Sun, Xiaorong; Ling, C Clifton; Li, Gloria C

    2014-08-01

    The hypoxic microenvironment, an important feature of human solid tumors but absent in normal tissue, may provide an opportunity for cancer-specific gene therapy. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether hypoxia-driven triple suicide gene TK/CD/UPRT expression enhances cytotoxicity to ganciclovir (GCV) and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), and sensitizes human colorectal cancer to radiation in vitro and in vivo. Stable transfectant of human colorectal HCT8 cells was established which expressed hypoxia-inducible vectors (HRE-TK/eGFP and HRE-CD/UPRT/mDsRed). Hypoxia-induced expression/function of TK, CD and UPRT was verified by western blot analysis, flow cytometry, fluorescent microscopy and cytotoxicity assay of GCV and 5-FC. Significant radiosensitization effects were detected after 5-FC and GCV treatments under hypoxic conditions. In the tumor xenografts, the distribution of TK/eGFP and CD/UPRT/mDsRed expression visualized with fluorescence microscopy was co-localized with the hypoxia marker pimonidazole positive staining cells. Furthermore, administration of 5-FC and GCV in mice in combination with local irradiation resulted in tumor regression, as compared with prodrug or radiation treatments alone. Our data suggest that the hypoxia-inducible TK/GCV+CDUPRT/5-FC triple suicide gene therapy may have the ability to specifically target hypoxic cancer cells and significantly improve the tumor control in combination with radiotherapy. PMID:24912473

  4. Late ROS-accumulation and Radiosensitivity in CuZnSOD Overexpressing Human Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhen; Sarsour, Ehab H.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Li, Ling; Kumar, Maneesh G.; Goswami, Prabhat C.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the hypothesis that CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) overexpression confers radioresistance to human glioma cells by regulating the late accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and G2/M checkpoint pathway. U118-9 human glioma cells (wild type, neo vector control, and stably overexpressing SOD1) were irradiated (0-10 Gy) and assayed for cell survival, cellular ROS levels, cell cycle phase distributions, and cyclin B1 expression. SOD1 overexpressing cells were radioresistant compared to wild type (wt) and neo vector control (neo) cells. Irradiated wt and neo cells showed a significant increase (~2-fold) in DHE-fluorescence beginning at 2 d post-irradiation, which remained elevated at 8 d post-irradiation. Interestingly, the late accumulation of ROS was suppressed in irradiated SOD1-overexpressing cells. The increase in ROS levels was followed by a decrease in cell growth and viability, and an increase in the percentage of cells with sub G1 DNA content. SOD1 overexpression enhanced radiation-induced G2-accumulation within 24 h post-irradiation, which was accompanied with a decrease in cyclin B1 mRNA and protein levels. These results support the hypothesis that long after the radiation exposure a “metabolic redox-response” regulates radiosensitivity of human glioma cells. PMID:18790046

  5. Infrared absorption spectra of human malignant tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skornyakov, I. V.; Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Butra, V. A.

    2008-05-01

    We used infrared spectroscopy methods to study the molecular structure of tissues from human organs removed during surgery. The IR spectra of the surgical material from breast, thyroid, and lung are compared with data from histological examination. We show that in malignant neoplasms, a change occurs in the hydrogen bonds of protein macromolecules found in the tissue of the studied organs. We identify the spectral signs of malignant pathology.

  6. The gangliosides as a possible molecular coupling factor between the proportion of radiosensitive cells in vitro and the metastatic potential in vivo within a human melanoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, C. P.; Buronfosse, A.; Portoukalian, J.; Fertil, B.

    1997-01-01

    With an experimental model of spontaneous lung metastases in immunosuppressed newborn rats, seven clones and variants with different metastatic potential and gangliosides expression were derived from a single parental human melanoma cell line M4Be. The cellular radiosensitivity of M4Be and its seven sublines was estimated using an in vitro colony assay. The total amount of gangliosides in M4Be and its seven sublines was determined by cell extraction and thin-layer chromatography, while the expression of GD3 gangliosides was estimated by flow cytometry with a monoclonal antibody. The radiation-cell survival curves of most clones and variants derived from M4Be showed a zero dose extrapolation clearly lower than 100%, suggesting that two populations of cells of very different radiosensitivity coexist within each of these clones and variants. Although the proportion of radiosensitive cells could be estimated from the shape of the survival curve, its radiosensitivity is too high to be properly evaluated by the colony assay. The eight survival curves differ essentially in the proportion of radiosensitive cells--which varied from 0% to 40% among M4Be and its seven sublines--whereas the cellular radiosensitivity of the radioresistant population was similar among them. The metastatic potential in vivo of M4Be and its seven sublines was not significantly related to the cellular radiosensitivity of their corresponding radioresistant population, but significantly increased with the fraction of radiosensitive cells. This relationship is valid only when the highly metastatic cells are cultured for no more than five passages in vitro as the fraction of radiosensitive cells is rapidly lost during subcultures. The relationship remains valid in vivo as metastatic melanoma-bearing newborn rats whole body irradiated with 20 cGy show no lung metastasis compared with controls. The radiosensitive cell fraction is inversely correlated with both the total ganglioside content (r = 0.84, P < 0.02) and the number of cells positively labelled with the monoclonal antibody directed to GD3 (r = 0.92, P < 0.001). The incubation of a radiosensitive clone with the exogenous bovine brain ganglioside GM1 significantly increases the proportion of radioresistant cells and suppresses its metastatic potential, while the inhibition of the endogenous gangliosides synthesis in the radioresistant cell line M4Be increases the proportion of radiosensitive cells. This study provides a possible explanation for the correlation between the metastatic potential and the proportion of radiosensitive cells within the seven sublines derived from a single parental human melanoma cell line. PMID:9043018

  7. Betulinyl Sulfamates as Anticancer Agents and Radiosensitizers in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bache, Matthias; Münch, Christin; Güttler, Antje; Wichmann, Henri; Theuerkorn, Katharina; Emmerich, Daniel; Paschke, Reinhard; Vordermark, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Betulinic acid (BA), a natural compound of birch bark, is cytotoxic for many tumors. Recently, a betulinyl sulfamate was described that inhibits carbonic anhydrases (CA), such as CAIX, an attractive target for tumor-selective therapy strategies in hypoxic cancer cells. Data on combined CAIX inhibition with radiotherapy are rare. In the human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB231 and MCF7, the effects of BA and betulinyl sulfamates on cellular and radiobiological behavior under normoxia and hypoxia were evaluated. The two most effective betulinyl sulfamates CAI 1 and CAI 3 demonstrated a 1.8–2.8-fold higher cytotoxicity than BA under normoxia in breast cancer cells, with IC50 values between 11.1 and 18.1 µM. BA exhibits its strongest cytotoxicity with IC50 values of 8.2 and 16.4 µM under hypoxia. All three substances show a dose-dependent increase in apoptosis, inhibition of migration, and inhibition of hypoxia-induced gene expression. In combination with irradiation, betulinyl sulfamates act as radiosensitizers, with DMF10 values of 1.47 (CAI 1) and 1.75 (CAI 3) under hypoxia in MDA-MB231 cells. BA showed additive effects in combination with irradiation. Taken together; our results suggest that BA and betulinyl sulfamates seem to be attractive substances to combine with radiotherapy; particularly for hypoxic breast cancer. PMID:26540049

  8. Photosensitizing and radiosensitizing effects of mitoxantrone: combined chemo-, photo-, and radiotherapy of DFW human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sazgarnia, Ameneh; Montazerabadi, Ali Reza; Bahreyni-Toosi, Mohammad Hossein; Ahmadi, Amirhossein

    2013-11-01

    This study evaluated the effects of mitoxantrone (MX), an antitumor agent, as a sensitizer to both photodynamic and radiation therapy in DFW human melanoma cells. Cells were incubated with MX at different concentrations for 90 min and then exposed to non-coherent light at different fluence rates and/or X-ray ionizing radiation at different dose rates. Combinatorial effects of this chemo-, photo-, and radiotherapy were also evaluated. MX had no significant effects on viability at moderate doses but had a strong cytotoxic effect on cancer cells when used as a photosensitizer. MX also acted as a potent radiosensitizer. We observed a dose-dependent effect on cell viability in cells exposed to MX in combination with phototherapy and radiotherapy. Strong synergistic effects were observed for combinations of two or more treatment methods, which, in some cases, induced complete cell death. Thus, a combination of ionizing radiation with MX-mediated photodynamic therapy could serve as a new method for cancer therapy with fewer adverse side effects. PMID:23371053

  9. Radiosensitivity of human natural killer cells: Binding and cytotoxic activities of natural killer cell subsets

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, R.; Vitale, M.; Mazzotti, G.; Manzoli, L.; Papa, S. )

    1990-10-01

    The sensitivity of human natural killer (NK) cell activities (both binding and killing) after exposure of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to different doses of gamma radiation was studied. A panel of monoclonal antibodies was used to identify the NK and T-lymphocyte subsets and to evaluate their radiosensitivity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were irradiated with low (2-6 Gy) and high (10-30 Gy) doses and NK cell binding and cytotoxic activity against K562 target cells were studied after 3 h and 48 h in culture. The primary damage to NK cell activity was identified at the postbinding level and affected mainly the lytic machinery. After 48 h culture postirradiation, an overall depression of cytotoxic activity was observed, but ionizing radiation produced either a selection of the more cytotoxic NK cell subsets, which therefore might be considered more resistant to radiation damage than the less cytotoxic NK cells, or a long-term stimulation of cytotoxic activity in surviving cells.

  10. Cytogenetic characterization of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity in Cobalt-60 irradiated human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Gnanada S; Joiner, Michael C; Tucker, James D

    2014-12-01

    The dose-effect relationships of cells exposed to ionizing radiation are frequently described by linear quadratic (LQ) models over an extended dose range. However, many mammalian cell lines, when acutely irradiated in G2 at doses ≤0.3Gy, show hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) as measured by reduced clonogenic cell survival, thereby indicating greater cell lethality than is predicted by extrapolation from high-dose responses. We therefore hypothesized that the cytogenetic response in G2 cells to low doses would also be steeper than predicted by LQ extrapolation from high doses. We tested our hypothesis by exposing four normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines to 0-400cGy of Cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The cytokinesis block micronucleus assay was used to determine the frequencies of micronuclei and nucleoplasmic bridges. To characterize the dependence of the cytogenetic damage on dose, univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to compare the responses in the low- (HRS) and high-dose response regions. Our data indicate that the slope of the response for all four cell lines at ≤20cGy during G2 is greater than predicted by an LQ extrapolation from the high-dose responses for both micronuclei and bridges. These results suggest that the biological consequences of low-dose exposures could be underestimated and may not provide accurate risk assessments following such exposures. PMID:25771872

  11. Betulinyl Sulfamates as Anticancer Agents and Radiosensitizers in Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Bache, Matthias; Münch, Christin; Güttler, Antje; Wichmann, Henri; Theuerkorn, Katharina; Emmerich, Daniel; Paschke, Reinhard; Vordermark, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Betulinic acid (BA), a natural compound of birch bark, is cytotoxic for many tumors. Recently, a betulinyl sulfamate was described that inhibits carbonic anhydrases (CA), such as CAIX, an attractive target for tumor-selective therapy strategies in hypoxic cancer cells. Data on combined CAIX inhibition with radiotherapy are rare. In the human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB231 and MCF7, the effects of BA and betulinyl sulfamates on cellular and radiobiological behavior under normoxia and hypoxia were evaluated. The two most effective betulinyl sulfamates CAI 1 and CAI 3 demonstrated a 1.8-2.8-fold higher cytotoxicity than BA under normoxia in breast cancer cells, with IC50 values between 11.1 and 18.1 µM. BA exhibits its strongest cytotoxicity with IC50 values of 8.2 and 16.4 µM under hypoxia. All three substances show a dose-dependent increase in apoptosis, inhibition of migration, and inhibition of hypoxia-induced gene expression. In combination with irradiation, betulinyl sulfamates act as radiosensitizers, with DMF10 values of 1.47 (CAI 1) and 1.75 (CAI 3) under hypoxia in MDA-MB231 cells. BA showed additive effects in combination with irradiation. Taken together; our results suggest that BA and betulinyl sulfamates seem to be attractive substances to combine with radiotherapy; particularly for hypoxic breast cancer. PMID:26540049

  12. Evidence for variation in human radiosensitivity and its potential impact on radiological protection.

    PubMed

    Bouffler, S D

    2016-06-01

    Radiological protection standards generally assume that all members of the population are equally sensitive to the adverse health effects associated with radiation exposure, recognising the age- and sex-related differences in sensitivity to radiation-induced cancer. It has become very clear over recent years that genetic and lifestyle factors can play important roles in the susceptibility of individuals to a range of diseases; as such, the same may apply to radiation-associated diseases. Evidence is accumulating from studies at many levels of biological organisation - cells, experimental organisms, and humans - that a range of radiosensitivity exists between individuals in the population. Consideration of improvements in radiological protection practices to take account of such differences will require the availability of robust and accurate ways to assess the sensitivity of an individual or population subgroup. In addition, there will need to be careful consideration of the ethical aspects relating to use of individual sensitivity information. These ethical considerations are very likely to be exposure context dependent, and require careful risk-benefit balance consideration before practical application. PMID:26956676

  13. Circulating Antibodies in Human Connective Tissue Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Moore, M.; Hughes, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    In a comparative study, sera from patients with connective tissue tumours, various carcinomata and from individuals without malignancy were evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence (IF) for antibodies reactive with apparently specific antigens shared by sarcoma derived tissue culture cell lines; for antibodies by IF to 2 tissue autoantigens (nuclear antigen and smooth muscle antigen) on rat liver substrate; and for HL-A antibodies by microcytotoxicity against a panel of 22 lymphocytes. Antibodies reactive with 11/16 cell lines originating from sarcomata were detected in 36% of all sarcoma sera tested, 12% carcinoma sera and 9% sera from controls. The incidence of antisarcoma antibody (ASA) was higher in the sera of sarcoma patients whose disease was in the primary phase (53%) compared with those in whom disease was advanced. A lower incidence (8%) of antibodies to nuclear antigen was detected in the sera of sarcoma patients compared with carcinoma patients (22%) and controls (23%), but the incidence of smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) was higher (45%) compared with carcinomata and controls (36% and 35% respectively). HL-A antibodies were present in 13% sarcoma sera, 36% carcinoma sera and 33% control sera. Evidence is presented to show that the various antibodies are distinct and that those reacting with sarcoma derived cell lines may be tumour associated antibodies possibly related to a virus specified antigen. ImagesFig. 1aFig. 1bFig. 1cFig. 1d PMID:4613373

  14. Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results: IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK {alpha} subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21{sup waf/cip} as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21{sup waf/cip} and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21{sup waf/cip} pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.

  15. Radiosensitization of human glioma cells by tamoxifen is associated with the inhibition of PKC-ι activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    YANG, LEI; YUAN, XIAOPENG; WANG, JIE; GU, CHENG; ZHANG, HAOWEN; YU, JIAHUA; LIU, FENJU

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the radiosensitizing effects of tamoxifen (TAM), a non-steroidal anti-estrogen drug, in human glioma A172 and U251 cells in vitro. A colony-forming assay revealed that TAM enhances radiosensitivity in A172 and U251 cells. Treatment with TAM also increased the percentage of apoptotic cells subsequent to ionizing radiation, and increased the expression of apoptotic markers, including cleaved caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Ionizing radiation induced G2/M phase arrest, which was alleviated within 24 h when the radiation-induced DNA damage was repaired. However, flow cytometry analysis revealed that TAM treatment delayed the recovery of cell cycle progression. Additional examination demonstrated that TAM-mediated protein kinase C-ι (PKC-ι) inhibition may lead to the activation of pro-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2-associated death promoter, and the dephosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 7, resulting in increased cell apoptosis and sustained G2/M phase arrest following exposure to radiation. The present data indicate that the radiosensitizing effects of TAM on glioma cells are partly due to the inhibition of PKC-ι activity in vitro. PMID:26171054

  16. Highly efficient radiosensitization of human glioblastoma and lung cancer cells by a G-quadruplex DNA binding compound.

    PubMed

    Merle, Patrick; Gueugneau, Marine; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Müller-Barthélémy, Mélanie; Amiard, Simon; Chautard, Emmanuel; Guetta, Corinne; Dedieu, Véronique; Communal, Yves; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Gallego, Maria; White, Charles; Verrelle, Pierre; Tchirkov, Andreï

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures at the end of chromosomes which stabilize and protect them from nucleotidic degradation and end-to-end fusions. The G-rich telomeric single-stranded DNA overhang can adopt a four-stranded G-quadruplex DNA structure (G4). Stabilization of the G4 structure by binding of small molecule ligands enhances radiosensitivity of tumor cells, and this combined treatment represents a novel anticancer approach. We studied the effect of the platinum-derived G4-ligand, Pt-ctpy, in association with radiation on human glioblastoma (SF763 and SF767) and non-small cell lung cancer (A549 and H1299) cells in vitro and in vivo. Treatments with submicromolar concentrations of Pt-ctpy inhibited tumor proliferation in vitro with cell cycle alterations and induction of apoptosis. Non-toxic concentrations of the ligand were then combined with ionizing radiation. Pt-ctpy radiosensitized all cell lines with dose-enhancement factors between 1.32 and 1.77. The combined treatment led to increased DNA breaks. Furthermore, a significant radiosensitizing effect of Pt-ctpy in mice xenografted with glioblastoma SF763 cells was shown by delayed tumor growth and improved survival. Pt-ctpy can act in synergy with radiation for efficient killing of cancer cells at concentrations at which it has no obvious toxicity per se, opening perspectives for future therapeutic applications. PMID:26542881

  17. Highly efficient radiosensitization of human glioblastoma and lung cancer cells by a G-quadruplex DNA binding compound

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Patrick; Gueugneau, Marine; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Müller-Barthélémy, Mélanie; Amiard, Simon; Chautard, Emmanuel; Guetta, Corinne; Dedieu, Véronique; Communal, Yves; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Gallego, Maria; White, Charles; Verrelle, Pierre; Tchirkov, Andreï

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein structures at the end of chromosomes which stabilize and protect them from nucleotidic degradation and end-to-end fusions. The G-rich telomeric single-stranded DNA overhang can adopt a four-stranded G-quadruplex DNA structure (G4). Stabilization of the G4 structure by binding of small molecule ligands enhances radiosensitivity of tumor cells, and this combined treatment represents a novel anticancer approach. We studied the effect of the platinum-derived G4-ligand, Pt-ctpy, in association with radiation on human glioblastoma (SF763 and SF767) and non-small cell lung cancer (A549 and H1299) cells in vitro and in vivo. Treatments with submicromolar concentrations of Pt-ctpy inhibited tumor proliferation in vitro with cell cycle alterations and induction of apoptosis. Non-toxic concentrations of the ligand were then combined with ionizing radiation. Pt-ctpy radiosensitized all cell lines with dose-enhancement factors between 1.32 and 1.77. The combined treatment led to increased DNA breaks. Furthermore, a significant radiosensitizing effect of Pt-ctpy in mice xenografted with glioblastoma SF763 cells was shown by delayed tumor growth and improved survival. Pt-ctpy can act in synergy with radiation for efficient killing of cancer cells at concentrations at which it has no obvious toxicity per se, opening perspectives for future therapeutic applications. PMID:26542881

  18. Radiosensitivity of CD4 or CD8 positive human T-lymphocytes by an in vitro colony formation assay

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, N.; Kusunoki, Y.; Akiyama, M. )

    1990-08-01

    The recent development of an in vitro lymphocyte colony assay makes it possible to examine variations in the radiosensitivity of humans using peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) instead of the skin fibroblast assay. Our recent study showed that most of the colonies consisted of lymphocytes bearing CD4 or CD8 antigens. Since the fraction of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in PBL differs among individuals, we suspected that individual radiosensitivity might be biased by the different subset frequencies if the dose-survival curves of the CD4+ and CD8+ cells were different from each other. In the present study, CD4+ (helper/inducer T) and CD8+ (suppressor/cytotoxic T) lymphocytes were isolated from PBL and their dose-survival curves were determined. The results showed that the D10 (dose required to reduce the surviving fraction to 10%) was similar for these two types of cells (3.13 +/- 0.10 Gy (mean +/- SD) for CD4+, 3.34 +/- 0.50 Gy for CD8+ and 3.14 +/- 0.17 Gy for the unsorted cells), supporting the use of the whole PBL population for the screening of individuals with altered radiosensitivity.

  19. Effect of restoration of retinoblastoma gene function on the radiosensitivity of cells of human tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, N.M.; Little, J.B.

    1994-11-01

    To assess the role of expression of the retinoblastoma (RB) gene on the sensitivity of cells to the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, we transfected a normal RB gene into cells of RB{sup +} and RB{sup {minus}} osteosarcoma cell lines and an RB{sup {minus}} prostate carcinoma line and studied the radiosensitivity of the cells before and after transfection. Four transfected clones were isolated from the two RB{sup {minus}} tumor cell lines that expressed the product of the transfected normal RB gene and contained no mutations in the pocket and C-terminal regions by sequencing. A small increase in radiosensitivity was observed in cell lines transfected with the pDOL plasmid vector alone, containing the neo gene and a long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter. However, no significant change in radiosensitivity occurred in transfected cells expressing the normal RB gene compared to controls transfected with an RB{sup {minus}} plasmid. Based on this and other information, we conclude that RB gene function is not involved in the response of these human tumor cells to the cytotoxic effects of radiation. 38 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Targeting FAK Radiosensitizes 3-Dimensional Grown Human HNSCC Cells Through Reduced Akt1 and MEK1/2 Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hehlgans, Stephanie; Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main; Institute of Radiopharmacy, Helmholtz Center Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden ; Eke, Iris; Cordes, Nils; Institute of Radiopharmacy, Helmholtz Center Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden; Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital and Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a main regulator of integrin signaling and cell migration, is frequently overexpressed and hyperphosphorylated in human head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We have previously shown that pharmacologic FAK inhibition leads to radiosensitization of 3-dimensionally grown HNSCC cell lines. To further evaluate the role of FAK in radioresistance and as a potential cancer target, we examined FAK and FAK downstream signaling in HNSCC cell lines grown in more physiologic extracellular matrix-based 3-dimensional cell cultures. Methods and Materials: Seven HNSCC cell lines were grown in 3-dimensional extracellular matrix and the clonogenic radiation survival, expression, and phosphorylation of FAK, paxillin, Akt1, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, and MEK1/2 were analyzed after siRNA-mediated knockdown of FAK, Akt1, MEK1, FAK+Akt1, or FAK+MEK1 compared with controls or stable overexpression of FAK. The role of MEK1/2 for clonogenic survival and signaling was investigated using the MEK inhibitor U0126 with or without irradiation. Results: FAK knockdown moderately or significantly enhanced the cellular radiosensitivity of 3-dimensionally grown HNSCC cells. The FAK downstream targets paxillin, Akt1, and ERK1/2 were substantially dephosphorylated under FAK depletion. FAK overexpression, in contrast, increased radiation survival and paxillin, Akt1, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. The degree of radiosensitization upon Akt1, ERK1/2, or MEK1 depletion or U0126 was superimposable to FAK knockdown. Combination knockdown conditions (ie, Akt1/FAK, MEK1/FAK, or U0126/FAK) failed to provide additional radiosensitization. Conclusions: Our data provide further evidence for FAK as important determinant of radiation survival, which acts in the same signaling axis as Akt1 and ERK1/2. These data strongly support our hypothesis that FAK is a relevant molecular target for HNSCC radiotherapy.

  1. Simultaneous Inhibition of EGFR and PI3K Enhances Radiosensitivity in Human Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li Ping; Zhang Qing; Torossian, Artour; Li Zhaobin; Xu Wencai; Lu Bo; Fu Shen

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling transduction pathway are common in cancer. This pathway is imperative to the radiosensitivity of cancer cells. We aimed to investigate the radiosensitizing effects of the simultaneous inhibition of EGFR and PI3K in breast cancer cells. Methods and Materials: MCF-7 cell lines with low expression of EGFR and wild-type PTEN and MDA-MB-468 cell lines with high expression of EGFR and mutant PTEN were used. The radiosensitizing effects by the inhibition of EGFR with AG1478 and/or PI3K with Ly294002 were determined by colony formation assay, Western blot was used to investigate the effects on downstream signaling. Flow cytometry was used for apoptosis and cell cycle analysis. Mice-bearing xenografts of MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells were also used to observe the radiosensitizing effect. Results: Simultaneous inhibition of EGFR and PI3K greatly enhanced radiosensitizing effect in MDA-MB-468 in terms of apoptosis and mitotic death, either inhibition of EGFR or PI3K alone could enhance radiosensitivity with a dose-modifying factor (DMF{sub SF2}) of 1.311 and 1.437, radiosensitizing effect was further enhanced by simultaneous inhibition of EGFR and PI3K with a DMF{sub SF2} at 2.698. DNA flow cytometric analysis indicated that dual inhibition combined with irradiation significantly induced G0/G1 phase arrest in MDA-MB-468 cells. The expression of phosphor-Akt and phosphor-Erk1/2 (induced by irradiation and PI3K inhibitor) were fully attenuated by simultaneous treatment with both inhibitors in combination with irradiation. In addition, dual inhibition combined with irradiation induced dramatic tumor growth delay in MDA-MB-468 xenografts. Conclusions: Our study indicated that simultaneous inhibition of EGFR and PI3K could further sensitize the cancer cells to irradiation compared to the single inhibitor with irradiation in vitro and in vivo. The approach may have important therapeutic implication in the treatment of a subset of breast cancer patients with high expression of EGFR and deficient function of PTEN.

  2. Celecoxib Enhances the Radiosensitizing Effect of 7-Hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01) in Human Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Mee; Jeong, In-Hye; Pyo, Hongryull

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: 7-Hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01), a Chk1-specific inhibitor, showed promising in vitro and in vivo chemo- or radiosensitizing activity. However, there have been concerns about its limited therapeutic efficacy and risk of side effects. A method of enhancing the treatment efficacy of UCN-01 while not increasing its side effects on normal tissue may therefore be required to apply this drug in clinical settings. Celecoxib is a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-specific inhibitor that downregulates ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related (ATR) protein, an upstream kinase of Chk1. In this study, we investigated whether the addition of celecoxib can potentiate the radiosensitizing effect of UCN-01. Methods and Materials: The cooperative radiosensitizing effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms of UCN-01 plus celecoxib were determined by clonogenic assay, tumor growth delay assay, flow cytometry, and Western blotting. Synergism of the three agents combined (UCN-01 plus celecoxib plus radiation) were evaluated using median drug effect analysis and drug-independent action model analysis. Results: The combination of UCN-01 and celecoxib could induce synergistic cytotoxicity and radiosensitizing effects in in vitro and in vivo systems. The combination of both drugs also cooperatively inhibited IR-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest, and increased the G{sub 2} to mitotic transition. Conclusions: Combined treatment with UCN-01 and celecoxib can exert synergistically enhanced radiosensitizing effects via cooperative inhibition of the ionizing radiation-activated G{sub 2} checkpoint. We propose that this combination strategy may be useful in clinical applications of UCN-01 for radiotherapy of cancer patients.

  3. Halogenated pyrimidine sensitization of low dose rate irradiation in human malignant glioma

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, P.W.; Mancini, W.R.; Stetson, P.L.; Greenberg, H.S.; Nguyen, N.; Seabury, H.; Heidorn, D.B.; Lawrence, T.S. )

    1993-07-15

    The purpose was to determine the potential advantage of combining halogenated pyrimidine radiosensitization and continuous low dose rate irradiation in human malignant glioma. An established glioma line (U-251) was incubated with 5-bromo-2-doxyuridine (BrdUrd) at clinically achievable concentrations at three dose rates of interest - 100 cGy/min (typical of external beam therapy), 43 cGy/hr (typical of temporary afterloaded implants), and 12 cGy/hr (typical of permanent implants). After exposure to 1 [mu]M BrdUrd, the greatest enhancement ratio was seen at the 12 cGy/hr dose rate, implying a BrdUrd induced inverse dose rate effect independent of a G[sub 2]M block. Under these conditions, the mean inactivation dose after 1 [mu]M BrdUrd exposure was equivalent for 100 cGy/min and 12 cGy/hr. These results support the use of halopyrimidines as sensitizers of temporary afterloaded and permanent implants. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Radiosensitivity of hepatoma cell lines and human normal liver cell lines exposed to 12C6+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, X.; Yang, J.; Li, W.; Guo, C.; Dang, B.; Wang, J.; Zhou, L.; Wei, W.; Gao, Q.

    AIM To investigate the radiosensitivity of hepatoma cell lines and human normal liver cell lines METHODS Accelerated carbon ions by heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou HIRFL have high LET We employed it to study the radiosensitivity of hepatoma cell lines SMMC-7721 and human normal liver cell lines L02 using premature chromosome condensation technique PCC Cell survive was documented by a colony assay Chromatid breaks were measured by counting the number of chromatid breaks and isochromatid breaks immediately after prematurely chromosome condensed by Calyculin-A RESULTS The survival curve of the two cell lines presented a good linear relationship and the survival fraction of L02 is higher than that of SMMC-7721 Additionally the two types of G 2 phase chromosome breaks chromatid breaks and isochromatid breaks of L02 are lower than that of SMMC-7721 CONCLUSION Human normal liver cell line have high radioresistance than that of hepatoma cell line It imply that it is less damage to normal organs when radiotherapy to hepatoma

  5. Radiosensitivity of human ovarian carcinoma and melanoma cells to γ-rays and protons

    PubMed Central

    Keta, Otilija; Todorović, Danijela; Popović, Nataša; Korićanac, Lela; Cuttone, Giacomo; Petrović, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Proton radiation offers physical advantages over conventional radiation. Radiosensitivity of human 59M ovarian cancer and HTB140 melanoma cells was investigated after exposure to γ-rays and protons. Material and methods Irradiations were performed in the middle of a 62 MeV therapeutic proton spread out Bragg peak with doses ranging from 2 to 16 Gy. The mean energy of protons was 34.88 ±2.15 MeV, corresponding to the linear energy transfer of 4.7 ±0.2 keV/µm. Irradiations with γ-rays were performed using the same doses. Viability, proliferation and survival were assessed 7 days after both types of irradiation while analyses of cell cycle and apoptosis were performed 48 h after irradiation. Results Results showed that γ-rays and protons reduced the number of viable cells for both cell lines, with stronger inactivation achieved after irradiation with protons. Surviving fractions for 59M were 0.91 ±0.01 for γ-rays and 0.81 ±0.01 for protons, while those for HTB140 cells were 0.93 ±0.01 for γ-rays and 0.86 ±0.01 for protons. Relative biological effectiveness of protons, being 2.47 ±0.22 for 59M and 2.08 ±0.36 for HTB140, indicated that protons provoked better cell elimination than γ-rays. After proton irradiation proliferation capacity of the two cell lines was slightly higher as compared to γ-rays. Proliferation was higher for 59M than for HTB140 cells after both types of irradiation. Induction of apoptosis and G2 arrest detected after proton irradiation were more prominent in 59M cells. Conclusions The obtained results suggest that protons exert better antitumour effects on ovarian carcinoma and melanoma cells than γ-rays. The dissimilar response of these cells to radiation is related to their different features. PMID:25097591

  6. Eliminating malignant contamination from therapeutic human spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dovey, Serena L; Valli, Hanna; Hermann, Brian P; Sukhwani, Meena; Donohue, Julia; Castro, Carlos A; Chu, Tianjiao; Sanfilippo, Joseph S; Orwig, Kyle E

    2013-04-01

    Spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) transplantation has been shown to restore fertility in several species and may have application for treating some cases of male infertility (e.g., secondary to gonadotoxic therapy for cancer). To ensure safety of this fertility preservation strategy, methods are needed to isolate and enrich SSCs from human testis cell suspensions and also remove malignant contamination. We used flow cytometry to characterize cell surface antigen expression on human testicular cells and leukemic cells (MOLT-4 and TF-1a). We demonstrated via FACS that EpCAM is expressed by human spermatogonia but not MOLT-4 cells. In contrast, HLA-ABC and CD49e marked >95% of MOLT-4 cells but were not expressed on human spermatogonia. A multiparameter sort of MOLT-4-contaminated human testicular cell suspensions was performed to isolate EpCAM+/HLA-ABC-/CD49e- (putative spermatogonia) and EpCAM-/HLA-ABC+/CD49e+ (putative MOLT-4) cell fractions. The EpCAM+/HLA-ABC-/CD49e- fraction was enriched for spermatogonial colonizing activity and did not form tumors following human-to-nude mouse xenotransplantation. The EpCAM-/HLA-ABC+/CD49e+ fraction produced tumors following xenotransplantation. This approach could be generalized with slight modification to also remove contaminating TF-1a leukemia cells. Thus, FACS provides a method to isolate and enrich human spermatogonia and remove malignant contamination by exploiting differences in cell surface antigen expression. PMID:23549087

  7. Poor Prognosis Associated With Human Papillomavirus α7 Genotypes in Cervical Carcinoma Cannot Be Explained by Intrinsic Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, John S.; Iype, Rohan; Armenoult, Lucile S.C.; Taylor, Janet; Applied Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester ; Miller, Crispin J.; Davidson, Susan; Sanjose, Silvia de; Bosch, Xavier; Stern, Peter L.; West, Catharine M.L.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype and outcome after radiation therapy and intrinsic radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: HPV genotyping was performed on cervix biopsies by polymerase chain reaction using SPF-10 broad-spectrum primers, followed by deoxyribonucleic acid enzyme immunoassay and genotyping by reverse hybridization line probe assay (LiPA{sub 25}) (version 1) (n=202). PapilloCheck and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to genotype cervix cancer cell lines (n=16). Local progression-free survival after radiation therapy alone was assessed using log-rank and Cox proportionate hazard analyses. Intrinsic radiosensitivity was measured as surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) using clonogenic assays. Results: Of the 202 tumors, 107 (53.0%) were positive for HPV16, 29 (14.4%) for HPV18, 9 (4.5%) for HPV45, 23 (11.4%) for other HPV genotypes, and 22 (10.9%) were negative; 11 (5.5%) contained multiple genotypes, and 1 tumor was HPV X (0.5%). In 148 patients with outcome data, those with HPVα9-positive tumors had better local progression-free survival compared with α7 patients in univariate (P<.004) and multivariate (hazard ratio 1.54, 95% confidence interval 1.11-1.76, P=.021) analyses. There was no difference in the median SF2 of α9 and α7 cervical tumors (n=63). In the cell lines, 9 were α7 and 4 α9 positive and 3 negative. There was no difference in SF2 between α9 and α7 cell lines (n=14). Conclusion: The reduced radioresponsiveness of α7 cervical tumors is not related to intrinsic radiosensitivity.

  8. Hyper-radiosensitivity and induced radioresistance and bystander effects in rodent and human cells as a function of radiation quality.

    PubMed

    Cherubini, R; De Nadal, V; Gerardi, S

    2015-09-01

    In the past two decades, a body of experimental evidences in vitro has shown the presence of a plethora of phenomena occurring after low-dose irradiation [including hypersensitivity and induced radioresistance (IRR), adaptive response, bystander effect (BE) and genomic instability], which might imply a non-linear behaviour of cancer risk curves in the low-dose region and question the validity of the linear no-threshold model for cancer risk assessment in such a dose region. In this framework, a systematic investigation have been undertaken on non-linear effects at low doses as a function of different radiation quality and cellular radiosensitivity and in terms of different biological end points. The present article reports the recent results on hyper-radiosensitivity and IRR and BE phenomena, in terms of clonogenic survival in V79 Chinese hamster cells and T98G human glioblastoma cells irradiated with protons and carbon ions with different energy, as a function of dose (and fluence). PMID:25953796

  9. Ectopically hTERT expressing adult human mesenchymal stem cells are less radiosensitive than their telomerase negative counterpart

    SciTech Connect

    Serakinci, Nedime . E-mail: nserakinci@health.sdu.dk; Christensen, Rikke; Graakjaer, Jesper; Cairney, Claire J.; Keith, W. Nicol; Alsner, Jan; Saretzki, Gabriele; Kolvraa, Steen

    2007-03-10

    During the past several years increasing evidence indicating that the proliferation capacity of mammalian cells is highly radiosensitive, regardless of the species and the tissue of origin of the cells, has accumulated. It has also been shown that normal bone marrow cells of mice have a similar radiosensitivity to other mammalian cells so far tested. In this study, we investigated the genetic effects of ionizing radiation (2.5-15 Gy) on normal human mesenchymal stem cells and their telomerised counterpart hMSC-telo1. We evaluated overall genomic integrity, DNA damage/repair by applying a fluorescence-detected alkaline DNA unwinding assay together with Western blot analyses for phosphorylated H2AX and Q-FISH was applied for investigation of telomeric damage. Our results indicate that hMSC and TERT-immortalized hMSCs can cope with relatively high doses of {gamma}-rays and that overall DNA repair is similar in the two cell lines. The telomeres were extensively destroyed after irradiation in both cell types suggesting that telomere caps are especially sensitive to radiation. The TERT-immortalized hMSCs showed higher stability at telomeric regions than primary hMSCs indicating that cells with long telomeres and high telomerase activity have the advantage of re-establishing the telomeric caps.

  10. The status of microRNA-21 expression and its clinical significance in human cutaneous malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Lv, Xiaoxing; Li, Jing; Li, Jinqing; Li, Xueyong; Li, Wangzhou; Li, Yuejun

    2012-10-01

    Dysregulation of microRNA-21 plays critical roles in tumor initiation and progression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the status of microRNA-21 expression in human cutaneous malignant melanoma and determine its clinical significance. TaqMan(®) real-time RT-PCR assay was performed to examine the expression of microRNA-21 in 10 cases of dysplastic nevi, 86 cases of primary cutaneous melanomas, 10 cases of melanoma metastases. The correlation of microRNA-21 expression with clinicopathological factors or prognosis of patients with cutaneous melanoma was statistically analyzed. Additionally, the effects of microRNA-21 expression on growth, apoptosis and chemo- or radiosensitivity of melanoma cells were also investigated by transfection of microRNA-21 inhibitor. We firstly showed that increased levels of microRNA-21 expression were shown from dysplastic nevi to primary cutaneous melanomas to melanoma metastases. Moreover, high miR-21 expression was found to be correlated with Breslow thickness and advanced clinical stage. Patients with high microRNA-21 expression showed shorter 5-year disease-free or overall survival than those with low microRNA-21 expression. Furthermore, multivariate regression analysis showed that the status of microRNA-21 expression was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival of patients. Antisense-mediated microRNA-21 inhibition could significantly suppress growth, increase apoptosis and enhance chemo- or radiosensitivity of human cutaneous melanoma cells by inducing the increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Thus, the status of microRNA-21 might be an independent prognostic factor for patients with cutaneous melanoma, and microRNA-21 has the potential of being a novel molecular target for the treatment of human cutaneous melanoma. PMID:22130252

  11. Inhibition of human positive cofactor 4 radiosensitizes human esophageal squmaous cell carcinoma cells by suppressing XLF-mediated nonhomologous end joining

    PubMed Central

    Qian, D; Zhang, B; Zeng, X-L; Le Blanc, J M; Guo, Y-H; Xue, C; Jiang, C; Wang, H-H; Zhao, T-S; Meng, M-B; Zhao, L-J; Hao, J-H; Wang, P; Xie, D; Lu, B; Yuan, Z-Y

    2014-01-01

    Radiotherapy has the widest application to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients. Factors associated with DNA damage repair have been shown to function in cell radiosensitivity. Human positive cofactor 4 (PC4) has a role in nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and is involved in DNA damage repair. However, the clinical significance and biological role of PC4 in cancer progression and cancer cellular responses to chemoradiotherapy (CRT) remain largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential roles of PC4 in the radiosensitivity of ESCC. In this study, we showed that knockdown of PC4 substantially increased ESCC cell sensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR) both in vitro and in vivo and enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe (MC). Importantly, we demonstrated that silencing of PC4 suppressed NHEJ by downregulating the expression of XLF in ESCC cells, whereas reconstituting the expression of XLF protein in the PC4-knockdown ESCC cells restored NHEJ activity and radioresistance. Moreover, high expression of PC4 positively correlated with ESCC resistance to CRT and was an independent predictor for short disease-specific survival of ESCC patients in both of our cohorts. These findings suggest that PC4 protects ESCC cells from IR-induced death by enhancing the NHEJ-promoting activity of XLF and could be used as a novel radiosensitivity predictor and a promising therapeutic target for ESCCs. PMID:25321468

  12. Inhibition of UBE2D3 Expression Attenuates Radiosensitivity of MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells by Increasing hTERT Expression and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liu; Li, Fen; Ren, Li; Yu, Haijun; Liu, Yu; Xia, Ling; Lei, Han; Liao, Zhengkai; Zhou, Fuxiang; Xie, Conghua; Zhou, Yunfeng

    2013-01-01

    The known functions of telomerase in tumor cells include replenishing telomeric DNA and maintaining cell immortality. We have previously shown the existence of a negative correlation between human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and radiosensitivity in tumor cells. Here we set out to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation by telomerase of radiosensitivity in MCF-7 cells. Toward this aim, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening of a human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma radioresistant (Hep2R) cDNA library was first performed to search for potential hTERT interacting proteins. We identified ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2D3 (UBE2D3) as a principle hTERT-interacting protein and validated this association biochemically. ShRNA-mediated inhibition of UBE2D3 expression attenuated MCF-7 radiosensitivity, and induced the accumulation of hTERT and cyclin D1 in these cells. Moreover, down-regulation of UBE2D3 increased hTERT activity and cell proliferation, accelerating G1 to S phase transition in MCF-7 cells. Collectively these findings suggest that UBE2D3 participates in the process of hTERT-mediated radiosensitivity in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells by regulating hTERT and cyclin D1. PMID:23741361

  13. Radiosensitization and downregulation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) upon inhibition of mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) in malignant melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Stefan; Lamkowski, Andreas; Priller, Markus; Port, Matthias; Steinestel, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Background Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is an important cofactor in the p53-mediated DNA damage response pathway upon ionizing radiation (IR) and exerts anti-apoptotic effects also independent of p53 pathway activation. Furthermore, hnRNP K is overexpressed in various neoplasms including malignant melanoma (MM). Here, we investigate the role of hnRNP K in the radioresistance of MM cells. Methods and results Our results show cytoplasmic expression of hnRNP K in human MM surgical specimens, but not in benign nevi, and a quick dose- and time-dependent upregulation in response to IR accompanied by cytoplasmic redistribution of the protein in the IPC-298 cellular tumor model carrying an activating NRAS mutation (p.Q61L). SiRNA-based knockdown of hnRNP K induced a delayed decline in γH2AX/53BP1-positive DNA repair foci upon IR. Pharmacological interference with MAPK signaling abrogated ERK phosphorylation, diminished cellular hnRNP K levels, impaired γH2AX/53BP1-foci repair and proliferative capability and increased apoptosis comparable to the observed hnRNP K knockdown phenotype in IPC-298 cells. Conclusion Our results indicate that pharmacological interference with MAPK signaling increases vulnerability of NRAS-mutant malignant melanoma cells to ionizing radiation along with downregulation of endogenous hnRNP K and point towards a possible use for combined MEK inhibition and localized radiation therapy of MM in the NRAS-mutant setting where BRAF inhibitors offer no clinical benefit. PMID:26136337

  14. 5-Iodo-2-Pyrimidinone-2'-Deoxyribose-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Radiosensitization in U87 Human Glioblastoma Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, Timothy J. Kinsella, Michael T.; Seo, Yuji; Berk, Gregory

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: 5-Iodo-2-pyrimidinone-2'-deoxyribose (IPdR) is a novel orally administered (p.o.) prodrug of 5-iododeoxyuridine. Because p.o. IPdR is being considered for clinical testing as a radiosensitizer in patients with high-grade gliomas, we performed this in vivo study of IPdR-mediated cytotoxicity and radiosensitization in a human glioblastoma xenograft model, U87. Methods and Materials: Groups of 8 or 9 athymic male nude mice (6-8 weeks old) were implanted with s.c. U87 xenograft tumors (4 x 10{sup 6} cells) and then randomized to 10 treatment groups receiving increasing doses of p.o. IPdR (0, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg/d) administered once daily (q.d.) x 14 days with or without radiotherapy (RT) (0 or 2 Gy/d x 4 days) on days 11-14 of IPdR treatment. Systemic toxicity was determined by body weight measurements during and after IPdR treatment. Tumor response was assessed by changes in tumor volumes. Results: IPdR alone at doses of {>=}500 mg/kg/d resulted in moderate inhibition of tumor growth. The combination of IPdR plus RT resulted in a significant IPdR dose-dependent tumor growth delay, with the maximum radiosensitization using {>=}500 mg/kg/d. IPdR doses of 500 and 1000 mg/kg/d resulted in transient 5-15% body weight loss during treatment. Conclusions: In U87 human glioblastoma s.c. xenografts, p.o. IPdR given q.d. x 14 days and RT given 2 Gy/d x 4 days (days 11-14 of IPdR treatment) results in a significant tumor growth delay in an IPdR dose-dependent pattern. The use of p.o. IPdR plus RT holds promise for Phase I/II testing in patients with high-grade gliomas.

  15. Anticancer activity of glucomoringin isothiocyanate in human malignant astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Thangavelu Soundara; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Iori, Renato; Rollin, Patrick; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2016-04-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) released from their glucosinolate precursors have been shown to inhibit tumorigenesis and they have received significant attention as potential chemotherapeutic agents against cancer. Astrocytoma grade IV is the most frequent and most malignant primary brain tumor in adults without any curative treatment. New therapeutic drugs are therefore urgently required. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antitumor activity of the glycosylated isothiocyanate moringin [4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)benzyl isothiocyanate] produced from quantitative myrosinase-induced hydrolysis of glucomoringin (GMG) under neutral pH value. We have evaluated the potency of moringin on apoptosis induction and cell death in human astrocytoma grade IV CCF-STTG1 cells. Moringin showed to be effective in inducing apoptosis through p53 and Bax activation and Bcl-2 inhibition. In addition, oxidative stress related Nrf2 transcription factor and its upstream regulator CK2 alpha expressions were modulated at higher doses, which indicated the involvement of oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis induced by moringin. Moreover, significant reduction in 5S rRNA was noticed with moringin treatment. Our in vitro results demonstrated the antitumor efficacy of moringin derived from myrosinase-hydrolysis of GMG in human malignant astrocytoma cells. PMID:26882972

  16. Enhancement of radiosensitivity in human glioblastoma cells by the DNA N-mustard alkylating agent BO-1051 through augmented and sustained DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background 1-{4-[Bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]phenyl}-3-[2-methyl-5-(4-methylacridin-9-ylamino)phenyl]urea (BO-1051) is an N-mustard DNA alkylating agent reported to exhibit antitumor activity. Here we further investigate the effects of this compound on radiation responses of human gliomas, which are notorious for the high resistance to radiotherapy. Methods The clonogenic assay was used to determine the IC50 and radiosensitivity of human glioma cell lines (U87MG, U251MG and GBM-3) following BO-1051. DNA histogram and propidium iodide-Annexin V staining were used to determine the cell cycle distribution and the apoptosis, respectively. DNA damage and repair state were determined by γ-H2AX foci, and mitotic catastrophe was measure using nuclear fragmentation. Xenograft tumors were measured with a caliper, and the survival rate was determined using Kaplan-Meier method. Results BO-1051 inhibited growth of human gliomas in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Using the dosage at IC50, BO-1051 significantly enhanced radiosensitivity to different extents [The sensitizer enhancement ratio was between 1.24 and 1.50 at 10% of survival fraction]. The radiosensitive G2/M population was raised by BO-1051, whereas apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe were not affected. γ-H2AX foci was greatly increased and sustained by combined BO-1051 and γ-rays, suggested that DNA damage or repair capacity was impaired during treatment. In vivo studies further demonstrated that BO-1051 enhanced the radiotherapeutic effects on GBM-3-beared xenograft tumors, by which the sensitizer enhancement ratio was 1.97. The survival rate of treated mice was also increased accordingly. Conclusions These results indicate that BO-1051 can effectively enhance glioma cell radiosensitivity in vitro and in vivo. It suggests that BO-1051 is a potent radiosensitizer for treating human glioma cells. PMID:21244709

  17. Radiosensitivity of human prostate cancer cells can be modulated by inhibition of 12-lipoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lvey, J; Nie, D; Tvri, J; Kenessey, I; Tmr, J; Kandouz, M; Honn, K V

    2013-07-28

    Nearly 30% of prostate cancer (PCa) patients treated with potentially curative doses relapse at the sites of irradiation. How some tumor cells acquire radioresistance is poorly understood. The platelet-type 12-lipoxygenases (12-LOX)-mediated arachidonic acid metabolism is important in PCa progression. Here we show that 12-LOX confers radioresistance upon PCa cells. Treatment with 12-LOX inhibitors baicalein or BMD122 sensitizes PCa cells to radiation, without radiosensitizing normal cells. 12-LOX inhibitors and radiation, when combined, have super additive or synergistic inhibitory effects on the colony formation of both androgen-dependent LNCaP and androgen-independent PC-3 PCa cells. In vivo, the combination therapy significantly reduced tumor growth. PMID:23523613

  18. ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy of human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Meidanchi, Alireza; Akhavan, Omid; Khoei, Samideh; Shokri, Ali A; Hajikarimi, Zahra; Khansari, Nakisa

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles of high-Z elements exhibit stronger photoelectric effects than soft tissues under gamma irradiation. Hence, they can be used as effective radiosensitizers for increasing the efficiency of current radiotherapy. In this work, superparamagnetic zinc ferrite spinel (ZnFe2O4) nanoparticles were synthesized by a hydrothermal reaction method and used as radiosensitizers in cancer therapy. The magnetic nanoparticles showed fast separation from solutions (e.g., ~1 min for 2 mg mL(-1) of the nanoparticles in ethanol) by applying an external magnetic field (~1T). The ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles were applied in an in vitro radiotherapy of lymph node carcinoma of prostate cells (as high radioresistant cells) under gamma irradiation of (60)Co source. The nanoparticles exhibited no significant effects on the cancer cells up to the high concentration of 100 μg mL(-1), in the absence of gamma irradiation. The gamma irradiation alone (2Gy dose) also showed no significant effects on the cells. However, gamma irradiation in the presence of 100 μg mL(-1) ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles resulted in ~53% inactivation of the cells (~17 times higher than the inactivation that occurred under gamma irradiation alone) after 24h. The higher cell inactivation was assigned to interaction of gamma radiation with nanoparticles (photoelectric effect), resulting in a high level electron release in the media of the radioresistant cells. Our results indicated that ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles not only can be applied in increasing the efficiency of radiotherapy, but also can be easily separated from the cell environment by using an external magnetic field after the radiotherapy. PMID:25492003

  19. Radiosensitivity of human clonogenic myeloma cells and normal bone marrow precursors: Effect of different dose rates and fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Glueck, S.; Van Dyk, J.; Messner, H.A. )

    1994-03-01

    Evaluation of radiation dose rate and fractionation effects on clonogenic myeloma cells was carried out. The radiosensitivity of clonogenic myeloma cells was evaluated for seven human myeloma cell lines. The lines were maintained in liquid suspension culture. Following radiation, cells were plated in semisolid medium using methylcellulose as viscous support. Radiation doses up to 12 Gy were delivered at dose rates of 0.05 and 0.5 Gy/min by a [sup 60]Co source. Each total dose was administered either as a single dose or in multiple fractions of 2 Gy. The data were analyzed according to the linear quadratic and multi target model of irradiation. Clonogenic progenitors of the seven myeloma cell lines differed in their radiosensitivity as measured by multiple parameters. The differences were mainly observed at low dose. The most effective cytoreduction was seen when radiation was administered in a single fraction at high dose rate. The cytoreductive effect on clonogenic myeloma cells was compared for clinically practiced total body irradiation (TBI) schedules delivered either in a single or in multiple fractions without causing significant pulmonary toxicity. The administration of 12 Gy delivered in six fractions of 2 Gy resulted in a superior reduction of clonogenic cells compared to a single fraction of 5 Gy. The preparation of bone marrow transplant recipients with multiple myeloma using fractionated radiation with a total dose of 12 Gy appears to afford better ablation than a single dose of 5 Gy while maintaining a low incidence of pulmonary toxicity. 20 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Radio-sensitization of human leukaemic MOLT-4 cells by DNA-dependent protein kinase inhibitor, NU7441.

    PubMed

    Tichy, Ales; Durisova, Kamila; Salovska, Barbora; Pejchal, Jaroslav; Zarybnicka, Lenka; Vavrova, Jirina; Dye, Natalie A; Sinkorova, Zuzana

    2014-03-01

    We studied the effect of pre-incubation with NU7441, a specific inhibitor of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), on molecular mechanisms triggered by ionizing radiation (IR). The experimental design involved four groups of human T-lymphocyte leukaemic MOLT-4 cells: control, NU7441-treated (1 μM), IR-treated (1 Gy), and combination of NU7441 and IR. We used flow cytometry for apoptosis assessment, Western blotting and ELISA for detection of proteins involved in DNA repair signalling and epifluorescence microscopy for detection of IR-induced phosphorylation of histone H2A.X. We did not observe any major changes in the amount of DNA-PK subunits Ku70/80 caused by the combination of NU7441 and radiation. Their combination led to an increased phosphorylation of H2A.X, a hallmark of DNA damage. However, it did not prevent up-regulation of neither p53 (and its phosphorylation at Ser 15 and 392) nor p21. We observed a decrease in the levels of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1, cdc25A phosphatase, cleavage of PARP and a significant increase in apoptosis in the group treated with combination. In conclusion, the combination of NU7441 with IR caused increased phosphorylation of H2A.X early after irradiation and subsequent induction of apoptosis. It was efficient in MOLT-4 cells in 10× lower concentration than the inhibitor NU7026. NU7441 proved as a potent radio-sensitizing agent, and it might provide a platform for development of new radio-sensitizers in radiotherapy. PMID:24100951

  1. Management of human papillomavirus-related gynecological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola A; Kind, André B; Jacob, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections affect women in every age group and in various benign, premalignant as well as malignant gynecological conditions. As a benign condition, condylomata acuminata of the whole female genital tract can be observed, transmitted by low risk HPV types 6 and 11, whilst dysplastic changes of the vulva appear as vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia, of the vagina as vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia and of the cervix as cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, and are caused by high risk HPV types most notably 16 and 18. These dysplastic changes give rise to precursor lesions of vulvar and cervical cancer, both driven via immune regression and potentially hormonal changes by promoting the malignant transformation profile of HPV subtypes. Attributes which can support this process are smoking, immunodeficiency, vitamin deficiency, stress, vaginal infections and hormonal influence. The causal relationship between persistent infection with high-risk HPV genotypes and vulvar and cervical cancer has been clearly demonstrated and is stronger than the relationship observed between smoking and lung cancer. New global cancer prevention can be envisaged by implementing vaccination against HPV in young women, with 2 vaccines currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration: the quadrivalent Gardasil (HPV-6, -11, -16, -18) and the bivalent Cervarix (HPV-16, -18). PMID:24643189

  2. Raman spectroscopic identification of normal and malignant human stomach cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jipeng; Guo, Jianyu; Wu, Liangping; Sun, Zhenrong; Cai, Weiying; Wang, Zugeng

    2005-12-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is employed to identify the normal and malignant human stomach cells. For the cancer cell, the reduced intensity of the Raman peak at 1250 cm^(-1) indicates that the protein secondary structure transforms from ?-sheet or disordered structures to ?-helical, while the increased intensity of the symmetric PO2 stretching vibration mode at 1094 cm^(-1) shows the increased DNA content. The ratio of the intensity at 1315 cm^(-1) to that at 1340 cm^(-1) reduces from 1.8 for the normal cell to 1.1 for the cancer cell in the course of canceration, and the ratio of the intensity at 1655 cm^(-1) to that at 1450 cm^(-1) increases from 1.00 for the cancer cell to 1.26 for the normal cell which indicates that the canceration of stomach cell may induce saturation of the lipid chain.

  3. The role of human papilloma virus in urological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Isabel; Borena, Wegene; Pichler, Renate

    2015-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with cancer of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx. However, the role of HPV infection in urological tumors is not yet clarified. HPV appears not to play a major causative role in renal and testicular carcinogenesis. However, HPV infection should be kept in mind regarding cases of prostate cancer, as well as in a sub-group of patients with bladder cancer with squamous differentiation. Concerning the role of HPV in penile cancer incidence, it is a recognized risk factor proven in a large number of studies. This short review provides an update regarding recent literature on HPV in urological malignancies, thereby, also discussing possible limitations on HPV detection in urological cancer. PMID:25964524

  4. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha

    2013-07-18

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET - 290keV/{mu}m) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows {approx} 28% reduction of {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells.

  5. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha

    2013-07-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET - 290keV/μm) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows ˜ 28% reduction of 12C6+ ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells.

  6. Radiosensitizing effect of ferulic acid on human cervical carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Subburayan; Kanimozhi, Govindhasamy; Prasad, Nagarajan Rajendra; Mahalakshmi, Rajendran

    2011-10-01

    Radiotherapy may be effectively combined with plant derived radiosensitizers. Ferulic acid, a naturally occurring phenolic acid, has been reported to have free radical producing properties. In the present study, the radiosensitisation potential of ferulic acid has been tested in two cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa and ME-180) in vitro. Percentage of growth inhibition (MTT assay), colony survival, levels of lipid peroxidation (TBARS, CD and LHP), antioxidant status (SOD, CAT, GPx and GSH), oxidative DNA damage (% tail DNA, tail length, tail moment and Olive tail moment), apoptotic morphological changes (AO/EtBr staining) and intracellular ROS levels (DCFH-DA) were estimated. The present results show that ferulic acid (FA) enhances radiation effects by increasing lipid peroxidative markers in HeLa and ME-180 cells. We observed significant enhancement of ROS levels during ferulic acid plus radiation treatment. FA treatment alone increased intracellular ROS levels indicate its prooxidant nature. Similarly, we observed enhanced oxidative DNA damage and apoptotic morphological changes in FA plus radiation treated cells. The present data suggest radiation sensitizing property of FA in cervical cancer cells. Further investigations warrants to substantiate the present findings. PMID:21600977

  7. Greatwall promotes cell transformation by hyperactivating AKT in human malignancies.

    PubMed

    Vera, Jorge; Lartigue, Lydia; Vigneron, Suzanne; Gadea, Gilles; Gire, Veronique; Del Rio, Maguy; Soubeyran, Isabelle; Chibon, Frederic; Lorca, Thierry; Castro, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The PP2A phosphatase is often inactivated in cancer and is considered as a tumour suppressor. A new pathway controlling PP2A activity in mitosis has been recently described. This pathway includes the Greatwall (GWL) kinase and its substrates endosulfines. At mitotic entry, GWL is activated and phosphorylates endosulfines that then bind and inhibit PP2A. We analysed whether GWL overexpression could participate in cancer development. We show that GWL overexpression promotes cell transformation and increases invasive capacities of cells through hyperphosphorylation of the oncogenic kinase AKT. Interestingly, AKT hyperphosphorylation induced by GWL is independent of endosulfines. Rather, GWL induces GSK3 kinase dephosphorylation in its inhibitory sites and subsequent SCF-dependent degradation of the PHLPP phosphatase responsible for AKT dephosphorylation. In line with its oncogenic activity, we find that GWL is often overexpressed in human colorectal tumoral tissues. Thus, GWL is a human oncoprotein that promotes the hyperactivation of AKT via the degradation of its phosphatase, PHLPP, in human malignancies. PMID:26613407

  8. Embryonic stem cell (ESC)-mediated transgene delivery induces growth suppression, apoptosis and radiosensitization, and overcomes temozolomide resistance in malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Germano, I M; Emdad, L; Qadeer, Z A; Binello, E; Uzzaman, M

    2010-09-01

    High-grade gliomas are among the most lethal of all cancers. Despite considerable advances in multimodality treatment, including surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the overall prognosis for patients with this disease remains dismal. Currently available treatments necessitate the development of more effective tumor-selective therapies. The use of gene therapy for malignant gliomas is promising, as it allows in situ delivery and selectively targets brain tumor cells while sparing the adjacent normal brain tissue. Viral vectors that deliver proapoptotic genes to malignant glioma cells have been investigated. Although tangible results on patients' survival remain to be further documented, significant advances in therapeutic gene transfer strategies have been made. Recently, cell-based gene delivery has been sought as an alternative method. In this paper, we report the proapoptotic effects of embryonic stem cell (ESC)-mediated mda-7/IL-24 delivery to malignant glioma cell lines. Our data show that these are similar to those observed using a viral vector. In addition, acknowledging the heterogeneity of malignant glioma cells and their signaling pathways, we assessed the effects of conventional treatment for high-grade gliomas, ionizing radiation and temozolomide, when combined with ESC-mediated transgene delivery. This combination resulted in synergistic effects on tumor cell death. The mechanisms involved in this beneficial effect included activation of both apoptosis and autophagy. Our in vitro data support the concept that ESC-mediated gene delivery might offer therapeutic advantages over standard approaches to malignant gliomas. Our results corroborate the theory that combined treatments exploiting different signaling pathways are needed to succeed in the treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:20523363

  9. Cathepsin L suppression increases the radiosensitivity of human glioma U251 cells via G2/M cell cycle arrest and DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-qing; Wang, Wen-juan; Li, Jun; Yang, Neng; Chen, Gang; Wang, Zhong; Liang, Zhong-qin

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Cathepsin L is a lysosomal cysteine protease that plays important roles in cancer tumorigenesis, proliferation and chemotherapy resistance. The aim of this study was to determine how cathepsin L regulated the radiosensitivity of human glioma cells in vitro. Methods: Human glioma U251 cells (harboring the mutant type p53 gene) and U87 cells (harboring the wide type p53 gene) were irradiated with X-rays. The expression of cathepsin L was analyzed using Western blot and immunofluorescence assays. Cell survival and DNA damage were evaluated using clonogenic and comet assays, respectively. Flow cytometry was used to detect the cell cycle distribution. Apoptotic cells were observed using Hoechst 33258 staining and fluorescence microscopy. Results: Irradiation significantly increased the cytoplasmic and nuclear levels of cathepsin L in U251 cells but not in U87 cells. Treatment with the specific cathepsin L inhibitor Z-FY-CHO (10 μmol/L) or transfection with cathepsin L shRNA significantly increased the radiosensitivity of U251 cells. Both suppression and knockdown of cathepsin L in U251 cells increased irradiation-induced DNA damage and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. Both suppression and knockdown of cathepsin L in U251 cells also increased irradiation-induced apoptosis, as shown by the increased levels of Bax and decreased levels of Bcl-2. Conclusion: Cathepsin L is involved in modulation of radiosensitivity in human glioma U251 cells (harboring the mutant type p53 gene) in vitro. PMID:26095040

  10. Malignant transformation of diploid human fibroblasts by transfection of oncogenes

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    This document consist of brief reports prepared by postdoctoral students supported by the project, each describing his accomplishments under the grant. Topics include (1) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1. 1 Cells by Gamma Radiation, (2) Correlation between Levels of ras Expression and Presence of Transformed Phenotypes Including Tumorigenicity, Using a Modulatable Promoter, (3) Relation between Specific rad Oncogene Expression, (4) Correlation of Genetic Changes in Fibroblastic Tumors with Malignancies, (5)Transformation of MSU-1.1 Cells by sis Oncogene, (6) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1.0 Cells, (7) Correlation of Urokinase Plasminogen Activation (mu-PA) with Malignant Phenotype, (8)Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Studies of the Proteins of the Major Cell Strains of the MSU-1 Family of Cells, and (9) Correlation between Proteinase Activity Levels and Malignancy.

  11. Comprehensive Profiling of Radiosensitive Human Cell Lines with DNA Damage Response Assays Identifies the Neutral Comet Assay as a Potential Surrogate for Clonogenic Survival

    PubMed Central

    Nahas, Shareef A.; Davies, Robert; Fike, Francesca; Nakamura, Kotoka; Du, Liutao; Kayali, Refik; Martin, Nathan T.; Concannon, Patrick; Gatti, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to explore the possible causes of human radiosensitivity and identify more rapid assays for cellular radiosensitivity, we interrogated a set of assays that evaluate cellular functions involved in recognition and repair of DNA double-strand breaks: (1) neutral comet assay, (2) radiation-induced γ-H2AX focus formation, (3) the temporal kinetics of structural maintenance of chromosomes 1 phosphorylation, (4) intra-S-phase checkpoint integrity, and (5) mitochondrial respiration. We characterized a unique panel of 19 “radiosensitive” human lymphoblastoid cell lines from individuals with undiagnosed diseases suggestive of a DNA repair disorder. Radiosensitivity was defined by reduced cellular survival using a clonogenic survival assay. Each assay identified cell lines with defects in DNA damage response functions. The highest concordance rate observed, 89% (17/19), was between an abnormal neutral comet assay and reduced survival by the colony survival assay. Our data also suggested that the neutral comet assay would be a more rapid surrogate for analyzing DNA repair/processing disorders. PMID:21962002

  12. Treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin in children with malignancies.

    PubMed

    Bolonaki, I; Stiakaki, E; Lydaki, E; Dimitriou, H; Kambourakis, A; Kalmantis, T; Kalmanti, M

    1996-01-01

    The effect of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) on the anemia of cancer was examined in 15 children with hematologic malignancies (group I) and solid tumors (group II), whose hemoglobin (Hb) was under the third percentile for sex and age. The response to rHuEPO was defined as an increase of Hb to above the 10th percentile following 8 weeks of therapy. The rHuEPO caused an increase in the Hb and hematocrit (Hct) in 46% of children of both groups at a dose of 150 IU/L, in 28.5% of children at a dose of 250 IU/L and in 25.5% of children at a dose of 400 IU/L. Leukocyte and platelet counts were not influenced by the rHuEPO treatment. The red cell transfusion requirement decreased to 66% in both groups after rHuEPO treatment. Erythropoietin (EPO) levels were measured prior to the treatment and then every 4 weeks during rHuEPO treatment. Children who responded to EPO had an initial EPO level of < 100 IU/L, while those who did not respond had an initial EPO level of > 100 IU/L. Erythropoietin was well tolerated in all children, with no side effects. PMID:8721025

  13. Quantitative immunoassay of human deoxycytidine kinase in malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, H; Carrera, C J; Carson, D A

    1992-11-15

    Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) is necessary for the activity of several nucleosides used for the chemotherapy of cancer and AIDS. However, the measurement of dCK catalytic activity in crude cell extracts may be imprecise, due to the presence of phosphatases and nucleotidases that degrade the enzyme products. We describe a simple immunoassay for dCK that can measure accurately as little as 5 ng enzyme protein in crude tissue extracts. The assay enabled us to show (i) that mutant cells deficient in dCK activity lack immunoreactive dCK protein, (ii) that dCK catalytic activity and immunoreactivity correlate closely in human tumors, and (iii) that immunoreactive dCK is particularly high in lymphocytes and lymphoid malignancies, although certain solid tumors may also contain the enzyme. The immunoassay of dCK could prove useful in the selection and monitoring of patients who are being treated with nucleosides that are activated by this enzyme. PMID:1489095

  14. Depletion of Securin Induces Senescence After Irradiation and Enhances Radiosensitivity in Human Cancer Cells Regardless of Functional p53 Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wenshu; Yu Yichu; Lee Yijang; Chen, J.-H.; Hsu, H.-Y.; Chiu, S.-J.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is one of the best choices for cancer treatment. However, various tumor cells exhibit resistance to irradiation-induced apoptosis. The development of new strategies to trigger cancer cell death besides apoptosis is necessary. This study investigated the role of securin in radiation-induced apoptosis and senescence in human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was determined using clonogenic assays. Western blot analysis was used to analyze levels of securin, caspase-3, PARP, p53, p21, Rb, gamma-H2AX, and phospho-Chk2. Senescent cells were analyzed using a beta-galactosidase staining assay. A securin-expressed vector (pcDNA-securin) was stably transfected into securin-null HCT116 cells. Securin gene knockdown was performed by small interfering RNA and small hairpin RNA in HCT116 and MDA-MB-231 cells, respectively. Results: Radiation was found to induce apoptosis in securin wild type HCT116 cells but induced senescence in securin-null cells. Restoration of securin reduced senescence and increased cell survival in securin-null HCT116 cells after irradiation. Radiation-induced gamma-H2AX and Chk2 phosphorylation were induced transiently in securin-wild-type cells but exhibited sustained activation in securin-null cells. Securin gene knockdown switches irradiation-induced apoptosis to senescence in both HCT116 p53-null and MDA-MB-231 cells. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that the level of securin expression plays a determining role in the radiosensitivity and fate of cells. Depletion of securin impairs DNA repair after irradiation, increasing DNA damage and promoting senescence in the residual surviving cells regardless of functional p53 expression. The knockdown of securin may contribute to a novel radiotherapy protocol for the treatment of human cancer cells that are resistant to irradiation.

  15. Modification of the radiosensitivity of human testicular cancer cells by simian virus 40 sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, M.; Dritschilo, A.

    1994-11-01

    CRL7800 cells are of human testicular cancer origin and are sensitive to killing by ionizing radiation. After transfection with a plasmid expressing the T-antigen (pSC), cells show enhanced growth and an increased resistance to ionizing radiation. Cell cycle analysis reveals perturbation of a cell cycle checkpoint which, after irradiation, results in an increase in G{sub 2}-phase arrest in CRL7800VA cells. These experiments demonstrate the modulation of radiation sensitivity and cell cycle arrest of human tumor cells by the introduction of viral genes. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Chromosomal radiosensitivity during the G2 cell-cycle period of skin fibroblasts from individuals with familial cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Parshad, R; Sanford, K K; Jones, G M

    1985-01-01

    We reported previously that human cells after neoplastic transformation in culture had acquired an increased susceptibility to chromatid damage induced by x-irradiation during the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Evidence suggested that this results from deficient DNA repair during G2 phase. Cells derived from human tumors also showed enhanced G2-phase chromosomal radiosensitivity. Furthermore, skin fibroblasts from individuals with genetic diseases predisposing to a high risk of cancer, including ataxia-telangiectasia, Bloom syndrome, Fanconi anemia, and xeroderma pigmentosum exhibited enhanced G2-phase chromosomal radiosensitivity. The present study shows that apparently normal skin fibroblasts from individuals with familial cancer--i.e., from families with a history of neoplastic disease--also exhibit enhanced G2-phase chromosomal radiosensitivity. This radiosensitivity appears, therefore, to be associated with both a genetic predisposition to cancer and a malignant neoplastic state. Furthermore, enhanced G2-phase chromosomal radiosensitivity may provide the basis for an assay to detect genetic susceptibility to cancer. PMID:3860870

  17. Chromosomal radiosensitivity during the G2 cell-cycle period of skin fibroblasts from individuals with familial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Parshad, R.; Sanford, K.K.; Jones, G.M.

    1985-08-01

    The authors reported previously that human cells after neoplastic transformation in culture had acquired an increased susceptibility to chromatid damage induced by x-irradiation during the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Evidence suggested that this results from deficient DNA repair during G2 phase. Cells derived from human tumors also showed enhanced G2-phase chromosomal radiosensitivity. Furthermore, skin fibroblasts from individuals with genetic diseases predisposing to a high risk of cancer, including ataxia-telangiectasia, Bloom syndrome, Fanconi anemia, and xeroderma pigmentosum exhibited enhanced G2-phase chromosomal radiosensitivity. The present study shows that apparently normal skin fibroblasts from individuals with familial cancer--i.e., from families with a history of neoplastic disease--also exhibit enhanced G2-phase chromosomal radiosensitivity. This radiosensitivity appears, therefore, to be associated with both a genetic predisposition to cancer and a malignant neoplastic state. Furthermore, enhanced G2-phase chromosomal radiosensitivity may provide the basis for an assay to detect genetic susceptibility to cancer.

  18. Radiosensitivity of nall human melanoma transplanted into nude mice: repair, reoxygenation and dose fractionation. [Gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Guichard, M.; Malaise, E.P.

    1982-06-01

    Split dose and fractionated ..gamma..-rays experiments have been performed on a human melanoma transplanted into nude mice using an in vitro colony assay. Repair of potentially lethal damage observed after a single dose of 20 Gy was found to no longer occur when 7 daily doses of 2.5 Gy were administered. In split-dose experiments, the increase in survival level probably can not be explained by repair of sublethal damage. When a single high dose of radiation is administered a certain reoxygenation is observed; however, there is no reoxygenation when low radiation doses are delivered daily.

  19. Normal human colon cells suppress malignancy when fused with colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.L.; Moyer, M.P. )

    1990-11-01

    Normal human colon mucosa cells and cells obtained from histologically normal tissues near that cancer were fused with human colon cancer cells. Resultant hybrid populations of normal and malignant cell fusions behaved as nonmalignant cells in culture, were unable to grow in soft agar, did not express tumor-associated antigens, and were nontumorigenic in nude mice. Autofusion of the cancer cell population led to a phenotype intermediate between normal and malignant cells. That is, the cultures had a much lower plating efficiency in soft agar, and the tumors had a longer latency and slower growth rate in nude mice. This is the first cell culture system to demonstrate that normal epithelial cells can suppress malignancy of their autologous cancer cells, and is a prelude to more extensive studies of genetic events involved in malignant conversion of human colonic epithelium.

  20. Differential effects of phorbol ester on the in vitro invasiveness of malignant and non-malignant human fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Fridman, R; Lacal, J C; Reich, R; Bonfil, D R; Ahn, C H

    1990-01-01

    The effect of the phorbol ester tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) on cell invasion was studied using an in vitro assay for cell invasion through a reconstituted basement membrane matrix (Matrigel). TPA inhibited the invasiveness of malignant human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. In contrast, WI-38 lung fibroblasts, which show a very low invasive capacity, were stimulated (3-fold) to invade Matrigel after exposure to TPA for 48 hours. The inhibitory or stimulatory effects of TPA on cell invasion were correlated with a decrease or an increase in cell motility and collagenase IV activity, respectively. Synthetic diacylglycerols partially mimicked the inhibitory action of TPA on HT1080 cells but failed to stimulate WI-38 cell invasion. Immunoblots demonstrated that in both cell lines the alpha and beta isoforms of protein kinase C were equally down-regulated after a 5 hour exposure to TPA despite the basal low level of protein kinase C polypeptide in the malignant cells. Thus, whereas in WI-38 cells induction of an invasive behavior could be observed in the absence of protein kinase C, in the malignant cells disappearance of the kinase was associated with a non-invasive phenotype. PMID:2153689

  1. Phenotypic characterization of telomerase-immortalized primary non-malignant and malignant tumor-derived human prostate epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Yongpeng; Li Hongzhen; Miki, Jun; Kim, Kee-Hong; Furusato, Bungo; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Chu, Wei-Sing; McLeod, David G.; Srivastava, Shiv; Ewing, Charles M.; Isaacs, William B.; Rhim, Johng S. . E-mail: jrhim@cpdr.org

    2006-04-01

    In vitro human prostate cell culture models are critical for clarifying the mechanism of prostate cancer progression and for testing preventive and therapeutic agents. Cell lines ideal for the study of human primary prostate tumors would be those derived from spontaneously immortalized tumor cells; unfortunately, explanted primary prostate cells survive only short-term in culture, and rarely immortalize spontaneously. Therefore, we recently have generated five immortal human prostate epithelial cell cultures derived from both the benign and malignant tissues of prostate cancer patients with telomerase, a gene that prevents cellular senescence. Examination of these cell lines for their morphologies and proliferative capacities, their abilities to grow in low serum, to respond to androgen stimulation, to grow above the agar layer, to form tumors in SCID mice, suggests that they may serve as valid, useful tools for the elucidation of early events in prostate tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the chromosome alterations observed in these immortalized cell lines expressing aspects of the malignant phenotypes imply that these cell lines accurately recapitulate the genetic composition of primary tumors. These novel in vitro models may offer unique models for the study of prostate carcinogenesis and also provide the means for testing both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents.

  2. Pleiotropic roles of Notch signaling in normal, malignant, and developmental hematopoiesis in the human

    PubMed Central

    Kushwah, Rahul; Guezguez, Borhane; Lee, Jung Bok; Hopkins, Claudia I; Bhatia, Mickie

    2014-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is evolutionarily conserved across species and plays an important role in regulating cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. It has been implicated in several different hematopoietic processes including early hematopoietic development as well as adult hematological malignancies in humans. This review focuses on recent developments in understanding the role of Notch signaling in the human hematopoietic system with an emphasis on hematopoietic initiation from human pluripotent stem cells and regulation within the bone marrow. Based on recent insights, we summarize potential strategies for treatment of human hematological malignancies toward the concept of targeting Notch signaling for fate regulation. PMID:25252682

  3. The effect of recombinant human stem cell factor and basic fibroblast growth factor on the in vitro radiosensitivity of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors from human umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Kreja, L; Thoma, S; Selig, C; Lamping, C; Ziegler, B L; Nothdurft, W

    1993-10-01

    Human umbilical cord blood (CB) cells selected by immunomagnetic beads for expression of the CD34 antigen were irradiated with increasing doses of x-rays (72 cGy/min). Clonogenic survival of the hematopoietic progenitors, including mixed colony-forming cells (Mix-CFC), erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells (GM-CFC), was determined in methylcellulose cultures containing placenta conditioned medium (PCM) and erythropoietin (Epo). Exponential survival curves were fitted to the data of all the colonies, resulting in D0 = 95 cGy for Mix-CFC, 136 cGy for BFU-E, and 136 cGy for GM-CFC. Additionally, the radiosensitivity of CD34+ cells was studied employing cultures containing either recombinant human stem cell factor (rhSCF) or basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF) in combination with PCM and Epo. It was found that the colony-forming efficiency (CFE) of non-irradiated CD34+ cells of 5.5% (range 1.4 to 14.4%) did not increase after the addition of SCF or b-FGF to the culture. The radiation response characteristics showed, however, that in the presence of SCF, the D0 value and the extrapolation number n increased significantly. This suggests the stimulation of what operationally is termed "recovery from potentially lethal damage." In contrast, no response modifying effect could be seen for b-FGF. PMID:7691633

  4. Alterations in replication timing of cancer-related genes in malignant human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Andrew; Sinha, Seema; Marella, Narasimharao; Berezney, Ronald

    2013-05-01

    The replication timing of nine genes commonly involved in cancer was investigated in the MCF10 cell lines for human breast cancer progression. Six of these nine genes are part of a constellation of tumor suppressor genes that play a major role in familial human breast cancer (TP53, ATM, PTEN, CHK2, BRCA1, and BRCA2). Three other genes are involved in a large number of human cancers including breast as either tumor suppressors (RB1 and RAD51) or as an oncogene (cMYC). Five of these nine genes (TP53, RAD51, ATM, PTEN, and cMYC) show significant differences (P < 0.05) in replication timing between MCF10A normal human breast cells and the corresponding malignant MCF10CA1a cells. These differences are specific to the malignant state of the MCF10CA1a cells since there were no significant differences in the replication timing of these genes between normal MCF10A cells and the non-malignant cancer MCF10AT1 cells. Microarray analysis further demonstrated that three of these five genes (TP53, RAD51, and cMYC) showed significant changes in gene expression (≥2-fold) between normal and malignant cells. Our findings demonstrate an alteration in the replication timing of a small subset of cancer-related genes in malignant breast cancer cells. These alterations partially correlate with the major transcriptional changes characteristic of the malignant state in these cells. PMID:23161755

  5. In vitro measurements of ultraweak luminescence of human malignant tumors and healthy tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwirot, B. W.; Chwirot, S.; Jedrzejczyk, W.; Pozniak, V.; Dziczek, D.; Michniewicz, Z.; Jackowski, M.; Raczynska, A. M.; Winczakiewicz, J.

    2001-07-01

    In vitro measurements of levels of ultraweak luminescence were carried out using healthy and malignant tissues obtained from 63 patients undergoing surgical operations for cancers of colon, stomach and breast. The results obtained support recent reports that there is a difference in mean intensities of the ultraweak luminescence emitted from healthy and malignant tissues. This work demonstrates, however, that because of a large scatter among the intensities detected for samples obtained from different patients the differences found for the mean intensities cannot serve as a parameter for differentiating between the malignant and normal human tissues.

  6. Malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients in India: Initial experience in the HAART era

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Surendra K.; Soneja, Manish; Ranjan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Limited data are available on malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients from India. We undertook this study to assess the frequency and spectrum of malignancies in HIV-infected adult patients during the first eight years of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) rollout under the National ART Programme at a tertiary care centre in New Delhi, India. Methods: Retrospective analysis of records of patients registered at the ART clinic between May 2005 and December 2013 was done. Results: The study included 2598 HIV-infected adult patients with 8315 person-years of follow up. Malignancies were diagnosed in 26 patients with a rate of 3.1 (IQR 2.1-4.5) cases per 1000 person-years. The median age for those diagnosed with malignancy was 45 (IQR 36-54) yr, which was significantly (P<0.01) higher compared with those not developing malignancies 35 (IQR 30-40) yr. The median baseline CD4+ T-cell count in patients with malignancy was 135 (IQR 68-269) cells/µl compared to 164 (IQR 86-243) cells/µl in those without malignancies. AIDS-defining cancers (ADCs) were seen in 19 (73%) patients, while non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADCs) were observed in seven (27%) patients. Malignancies diagnosed included non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (16), carcinoma cervix (3), Hodgkin's lymphoma (2), carcinoma lung (2), hepatocellular carcinoma (1), and urinary bladder carcinoma (1). One patient had primary central nervous system lymphoma. There was no case of Kaposi's sarcoma. Interpretation & conclusions: Malignancies in HIV-infected adult patients were infrequent in patients attending the clinic. Majority of the patients presented with advanced immunosuppression and the ADCs, NHL in particular, were the commonest malignancies. PMID:26658591

  7. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yingbin; School of Life Science, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 ; Cai, Shaoxi; Yang, Li; College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 ; Yu, Shuhui; Library of Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 ; Jiang, Jiahuan; Yan, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Haoxing; Liu, Lan; Liu, Qun; Du, Jun; Cai, Shaohui; Sung, K.L. Paul; Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Bioengineering, University of California, SD 0412

    2010-12-10

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  8. The role of SV40 in malignant mesothelioma and other human malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pershouse, Mark A; Heivly, Shane; Girtsman, Teri

    2006-11-01

    SV40 is a DNA tumor virus thrust upon human populations primarily as a contaminant in various vaccine preparations. Some estimates suggest that millions of people are currently infected with the virus. The virus causes primary brain tumors, bone tumors, lymphomas, and mesotheliomas when injected into some rodent models. It has also been detected in a similar spectrum of human tumors. However, epidemiological studies have failed to conclusively demonstrate a higher incidence of disease in affected populations. To date, over 60 reports from 49 different laboratories have shown SV40 sequences in tissues from human cancer patients. Six studies, however, have failed to detect evidence of virus in similar tissues. Some have suggested that SV40 may act as a cocarcinogen with asbestos to cause mesothelioma formation, or that it may be responsible for the 10-20% of mesotheliomas with no reported history of asbestos exposure. This report briefly covers the historical evidence for SV40 carcinogenesis and then covers experiments now underway to better understand the role of SV40 in human mesotheliomas. PMID:16920674

  9. Spontaneous and experimental malignancies in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Lapin, Boris A; Yakovleva, Lelita A

    2014-04-01

    Contrary to earlier established opinion that tumors in monkeys are found rarely, now the large material confirms that monkey tumors are frequent phenomenon. Tumor incidence clearly increases with age. Frequencies of benign and malignant tumors of various locations and histogenesis are slightly different. Tumors of hematopoietic system are the most frequent. Sporadic cases and enzootic outbreaks of lymphomas are described for different kinds of monkeys, including apes, and probably are caused by viruses. Two viruses were isolated by us from sick monkeys - the retrovirus C-type STLV-1 and the herpes virus papio HVP. Inoculation of virus cultures into monkeys and rabbits induces neoplasms. Monkey neoplasms can be induced by exposure to various chemical agents, and by oncogenic and non-oncogenic viruses. There is no strict species specificity of tumor viruses. The role of polyoma viruses in neoplasms etiology is discussed. PMID:24392944

  10. Radiosensitizing effects of misonidazole and SR 2508 on a human melanoma tranplanted in nude mice: influence on repair of potentially lethal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Guichard, M.; Malaise, E.P.

    1982-03-01

    The radiosensitizing effects of misonidazole and SR 2508 (1 mg/g) were compared on a human melanoma (Na11) containing 85% hypoxic cells transplanted into nude mice. For both drugs, the enhancement ratios (ER) were 1.7 after immediate plating and 2.1 after delayed plating. This difference in ERs is related to a lack of PLD repair in tumors in the presence of the sensitizer. The effect of misonidazole was also investigated in another human melanoma (Be11) containing 40% hypoxic cells. After immediate plating, the Er was similar to that observed with the Na11 tumor (1.7)m but PLD repair was not reduced. A comparative analysis of the influence of misonidazole on the response (survival curve - PLD repair) of Na11 melanoma to different ionizing radiations was attempted.

  11. Downregulation of miR-210 expression inhibits proliferation, induces apoptosis and enhances radiosensitivity in hypoxic human hepatoma cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wei; Sun, Ting; Cao, Jianping; Liu, Fenju; Tian, Ye; Zhu, Wei

    2012-05-01

    Hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and an important contributor to tumor radioresistance. miR-210 is the most consistently and robustly induced microRNA under hypoxia in different types of tumor cells and normal cells. In the present study, to explore the feasibility of miR-210 as an effective therapeutic target, lentiviral-mediated anti-sense miR-210 gene transfer technique was employed to downregulate miR-210 expression in hypoxic human hepatoma SMMC-7721, HepG2 and HuH7 cells, and phenotypic changes of which were analyzed. Hypoxia led to an increased hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) and miR-210 expression and cell arrest in the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase in all cell lines. miR-210 downregulation significantly suppressed cell viability, induced cell arrest in the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase, increased apoptotic rate and enhanced radiosensitivity in hypoxic human hepatoma cells. Moreover, apoptosis-inducing factor, mitochondrion-associated, 3 (AIFM3) was identified as a direct target gene of miR-210. AIFM3 downregulation by siRNA attenuated radiation induced apoptosis in miR-210 downregulated hypoxic human hepatoma cells. Taken together, these data suggest that miR-210 might be a potential therapeutic target and specific inhibition of miR-210 expression in combination with radiotherapy might be expected to exert strong anti-tumor effect on hypoxic human hepatoma cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-210 downregulation radiosensitized hypoxic hepatoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AIFM3 was identified as a direct target gene of miR-210. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-210 might be a therapeutic target to hypoxic hepatoma.

  12. Deleted in liver cancer protein family in human malignancies (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Lukasik, D.; Wilczek, E.; Wasiutynski, A.; Gornicka, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Deleted in Liver Cancer (DLC) protein family comprises proteins that exert their function mainly by the Rho GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain and by regulation of the small GTPases. Since Rho GTPases are key factors in cell proliferation, polarity, cytoskeletal remodeling and migration, the aberrant function of their regulators may lead to cell transformation. One subgroup of these proteins is the DLC family. It was found that the first identified gene from this family, DLC1, is often lost in hepatocellular carcinoma and may be involved as a tumor suppressor in the liver. Subsequent studies evaluated the hypothesis that the DLC1 gene acts as a tumor suppressor, not only in liver cancer, but also in other types of cancer. Following DLC1, two other members of the DLC protein family, DLC2 and DLC3, were identified. However, limited published data are available concerning the role of these proteins in malignant transformation. This review focuses on the structure and the role of DLC1 and its relatives in physiological conditions and summarizes data published thus far regarding DLC function in the neoplastic process. PMID:22866123

  13. Radiosensitization by Inhibiting STAT1 in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Zhouguang; Tretiakova, Maria; Zhang Zhongfa; Li Yan; Wang Xiaozhen; Zhu, Julie Xiaohong; Gao Yuanhong; Mai Weiyuan; Furge, Kyle; Qian Chaonan; Amato, Robert; Butler, E. Brian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been historically regarded as a radioresistant malignancy, but the molecular mechanism underlying its radioresistance is not understood. This study investigated the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), a transcription factor downstream of the interferon-signaling pathway, in radioresistant RCC. Methods and Materials: The expressions of STAT1 and STAT3 in 164 human clear cell RCC samples, 47 papillary RCC samples, and 15 normal kidney tissue samples were examined by microarray expression profiling and immunohistochemistry. Western blotting was performed to evaluate the total and phosphorylated STAT1 expression in CRL-1932 (786-O) (human clear cell RCC), SKRC-39 (human papillary RCC), CCL-116 (human fibroblast), and CRL-1441 (G-401) (human Wilms tumor). STAT1 was reduced or inhibited by fludarabine and siRNA, respectively, and the effects on radiation-induced cell death were investigated using clonogenic assays. Results: STAT1 expression, but not STAT3 expression, was significantly greater in human RCC samples (p = 1.5 x 10{sup -8} for clear cell; and p = 3.6 x 10{sup -4} for papillary). Similarly, the expression of STAT1 was relatively greater in the two RCC cell lines. STAT1 expression was reduced by both fludarabine and siRNA, significantly increasing the radiosensitivity in both RCC cell lines. Conclusion: This is the first study reporting the overexpression of STAT1 in human clear cell and papillary RCC tissues. Radiosensitization in RCC cell lines was observed by a reduction or inhibition of STAT1 signaling, using fludarabine or siRNA. Our data suggest that STAT1 may play a key role in RCC radioresistance and manipulation of this pathway may enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy.

  14. Myosin VI contributes to malignant proliferation of human glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rong; Fang, Xu-hao

    2016-01-01

    Previously characterized as a backward motor, myosin VI (MYO6), which belongs to myosin family, moves toward the minus end of the actin track, a direction opposite to all other known myosin members. Recent researches have illuminated the role of MYO6 in human cancers, particularly in prostate cancer. However, the role of MYO6 in glioma has not yet been determined. In this study, to explore the role of MYO6 in human glioma, lentivirus-delivered short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting MYO6 was designed to stably down-regulate its endogenous expression in glioblastoma cells U251. Knockdown of MYO6 signifi cantly inhibited viability and proliferation of U251 cells in vitro. Moreover, the cell cycle of U251 cells was arrested at G0/G1 phase with the absence of MYO6, which could contribute to the suppression of cell proliferation. In conclusion, we firstly identified the crucial involvement of MYO6 in human glioma. The inhibition of MYO6 by shRNA might be a potential therapeutic method in human glioma. PMID:26937209

  15. Malignant Transformation of Hymenolepis nana in a Human Host.

    PubMed

    Muehlenbachs, Atis; Bhatnagar, Julu; Agudelo, Carlos A; Hidron, Alicia; Eberhard, Mark L; Mathison, Blaine A; Frace, Michael A; Ito, Akira; Metcalfe, Maureen G; Rollin, Dominique C; Visvesvara, Govinda S; Pham, Cau D; Jones, Tara L; Greer, Patricia W; Vélez Hoyos, Alejandro; Olson, Peter D; Diazgranados, Lucy R; Zaki, Sherif R

    2015-11-01

    Neoplasms occur naturally in invertebrates but are not known to develop in tapeworms. We observed nests of monomorphic, undifferentiated cells in samples from lymph-node and lung biopsies in a man infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The morphologic features and invasive behavior of the cells were characteristic of cancer, but their small size suggested a nonhuman origin. A polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) assay targeting eukaryotes identified Hymenolepis nana DNA. Although the cells were unrecognizable as tapeworm tissue, immunohistochemical staining and probe hybridization labeled the cells in situ. Comparative deep sequencing identified H. nana structural genomic variants that are compatible with mutations described in cancer. Invasion of human tissue by abnormal, proliferating, genetically altered tapeworm cells is a novel disease mechanism that links infection and cancer. PMID:26535513

  16. Diverse mechanisms of AKT pathway activation in human malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Mitchell; Testa, Joseph R.

    2013-01-01

    AKT/PKB (Protein Kinase B) are central proteins mediating signals from receptor tyrosine kinases and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. AKT kinases are involved in a number of important cellular processes including cell proliferation and survival, cell size in response to nutrient availability, tumor invasion/metastasis, and angiogenesis. Various components of the AKT signaling pathway are encoded by tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes whose loss or activation, respectively, plays an important role in tumorigenesis. The growing body of evidence connecting deregulated AKT signaling with sporadic human cancers and inherited cancer predisposition syndromes is discussed. We also highlight new findings regarding the involvement of activating mutations of AKT1, AKT2, and AKT3 in somatic overgrowth disorders: Proteus syndrome, hypoglycemia with hypertrophy, and hemimegalencephaly, respectively. In addition, we review recent literature documenting the various ways the AKT signaling pathway is activated in human cancers and consequences for molecularly targeted therapies. PMID:23297823

  17. Zebrafish as a Model for the Study of Human Myeloid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jeng-Wei; Hsieh, Meng-Shan; Liao, Heng-An; Yang, Yi-Ju; Ho, Yi-Jung; Lin, Liang-In

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid malignancies are heterogeneous disorders characterized by uncontrolled proliferation or/and blockage of differentiation of myeloid progenitor cells. Although a substantial number of gene alterations have been identified, the mechanism by which these abnormalities interact has yet to be elucidated. Over the past decades, zebrafish have become an important model organism, especially in biomedical research. Several zebrafish models have been developed to recapitulate the characteristics of specific myeloid malignancies that provide novel insight into the pathogenesis of these diseases and allow the evaluation of novel small molecule drugs. This report will focus on illustrative examples of applications of zebrafish models, including transgenesis, zebrafish xenograft models, and cell transplantation approaches, to the study of human myeloid malignancies. PMID:26064935

  18. Zebrafish as a Model for the Study of Human Myeloid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jeng-Wei; Hsieh, Meng-Shan; Liao, Heng-An; Yang, Yi-Ju; Ho, Yi-Jung; Lin, Liang-In

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid malignancies are heterogeneous disorders characterized by uncontrolled proliferation or/and blockage of differentiation of myeloid progenitor cells. Although a substantial number of gene alterations have been identified, the mechanism by which these abnormalities interact has yet to be elucidated. Over the past decades, zebrafish have become an important model organism, especially in biomedical research. Several zebrafish models have been developed to recapitulate the characteristics of specific myeloid malignancies that provide novel insight into the pathogenesis of these diseases and allow the evaluation of novel small molecule drugs. This report will focus on illustrative examples of applications of zebrafish models, including transgenesis, zebrafish xenograft models, and cell transplantation approaches, to the study of human myeloid malignancies. PMID:26064935

  19. HSF1 drives a transcriptional program distinct from heat shock to support highly malignant human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mendillo, Marc L.; Santagata, Sandro; Koeva, Martina; Bell, George W.; Hu, Rong; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Fraenkel, Ernest; Ince, Tan A.; Whitesell, Luke; Lindquist, Susan

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Heat-Shock Factor 1 (HSF1), master regulator of the heat-shock response, facilitates malignant transformation, cancer cell survival and proliferation in model systems. The common assumption is that these effects are mediated through regulation of heat-shock protein (HSP) expression. However, the transcriptional network that HSF1 coordinates directly in malignancy and its relationship to the heat-shock response have never been defined. By comparing cells with high and low malignant potential alongside their non-transformed counterparts, we identify an HSF1-regulated transcriptional program specific to highly malignant cells and distinct from heat shock. Cancer-specific genes in this program support oncogenic processes: cell-cycle regulation, signaling, metabolism, adhesion and translation. HSP genes are integral to this program, however, many are uniquely regulated in malignancy. This HSF1 cancer program is active in breast, colon and lung tumors isolated directly from human patients and is strongly associated with metastasis and death. Thus, HSF1 rewires the transcriptome in tumorigenesis, with prognostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:22863008

  20. On the radiosensitivity of man in space.

    PubMed

    Esposito, R D; Durante, M; Gialanella, G; Grossi, G; Pugliese, M; Scampoli, P; Jones, T D

    2001-01-01

    Astronauts' radiation exposure limits are based on experimental and epidemiological data obtained on Earth. It is assumed that radiation sensitivity remains the same in the extraterrestrial space. However, human radiosensitivity is dependent upon the response of the hematopoietic tissue to the radiation insult. It is well known that the immune system is affected by microgravity. We have developed a mathematical model of radiation-induced myelopoiesis which includes the effect of microgravity on bone marrow kinetics. It is assumed that cellular radiosensitivity is not modified by the space environment, but repopulation rates of stem and stromal cells are reduced as a function of time in weightlessness. A realistic model of the space radiation environment, including the HZE component, is used to simulate the radiation damage. A dedicated computer code was written and applied to solar particle events and to the mission to Mars. The results suggest that altered myelopoiesis and lymphopoiesis in microgravity might increase human radiosensitivity in space. PMID:11642296

  1. From The Cover: Reconstruction of functionally normal and malignant human breast tissues in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Chavarria, Tony; Wu, Min; Magrane, Greg; Gray, Joe W.; Carey, Loucinda; Richardson, Andrea; Weinberg, Robert A.

    2004-04-01

    The study of normal breast epithelial morphogenesis and carcinogenesis in vivo has largely used rodent models. Efforts at studying mammary morphogenesis and cancer with xenotransplanted human epithelial cells have failed to recapitulate the full extent of development seen in the human breast. We have developed an orthotopic xenograft model in which both the stromal and epithelial components of the reconstructed mammary gland are of human origin. Genetic modification of human stromal cells before the implantation of ostensibly normal human mammary epithelial cells resulted in the outgrowth of benign and malignant lesions. This experimental model allows for studies of human epithelial morphogenesis and differentiation in vivo and underscores the critical role of heterotypic interactions in human breast development and carcinogenesis.

  2. FOURIER COMPONENT IMAGING OF WATER RESONANCE IN HUMAN BREAST PROVIDES MARKERS FOR MALIGNANCY

    PubMed Central

    Medved, Milica; Newstead, Gillian M.; Fan, Xiaobing; Du, Yiping P.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Shimauchi, Akiko; Zamora, Marta A.; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate that voxels with inhomogeneously broadened water resonances, as revealed by high spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) MRI, correlate with underlying tumor pathology findings, and thus carry diagnostically useful information. Materials and Methods Thirty four women with mammographically suspicious breast lesions were imaged at 1.5 T, using high resolution echo-planar spectroscopic imaging. Fourier component images (FCIs) of off-peak spectral signal were generated, and clusters of voxels with significant inhomogeneous broadening (broadened clusters) were identified and correlated to biopsy results. Results Inhomogeneously broadened clusters were found significantly more frequently in malignant than in benign lesions. A larger percentage of broadened cluster voxels were found inside the malignant vs. benign lesions. The high statistical significance for separation of benign and malignant lesions was robust over a large range of postprocessing parameters, with a maximum ROC area under curve of 0.83. Conclusion In human breast, an inhomogeneously broadened water resonance can serve as a correlate marker for malignancy, and is likely to reflect underlying anatomy or physiology. PMID:19741276

  3. The mechanisms responsible for the radiosensitizing effects of sorafenib on colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ho; Kim, Mi-Sook; Jung, Won-Gyun

    2014-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common malignancies in the world, and is generally treated more effectively by chemoradiotherapy rather than radiotherapy or chemotherapy alone. Targeted radiosensitizers are often used in order to enhance the radiosensitivity of tumor cells. The aim of the present study was to identify the mechanism of radiosensitization by sorafenib in colorectal cancer. Three human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines (HCT116, HT29 and SW480) were treated with sorafenib alone or radiation followed by sorafenib. In vitro tests were performed using colony forming assays, FACS analysis, immunohistochemistry, tumor cell motility assays, invasion assays and endothelial tube formation assays. Sorafenib enhanced the anti-proliferative effects of radiation, reducing colony formation, increasing G2/M arrest and enhancing radiation-induced apoptosis by reactive oxygen species. Sorafenib also inhibited the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage by blocking the activation of DNA-dependent protein kinase. Combination treatment significantly inhibited tumor cell migration, tumor cell invasion and vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated angiogenesis in vitro. Taken together, our results provide a scientific rationale for the use of sorafenib with radiotherapy in colon cancer and suggest a clinical utility for this approach. PMID:25242034

  4. Histone deacetylation as a target for radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Cerna, David; Camphausen, Kevin; Tofilon, Philip J

    2006-01-01

    Due to an increase in the understanding of molecular radiobiology, strategies for enhancing tumor radiosensitivity have begun to focus on targeting the molecules and processes that regulate cellular radioresponse. Toward this end, histone acetylation has begun to receive considerable attention as a potential target for radiosensitization. Histone acetylation, which is determined by the competing actions of histone acetylases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs), plays a role in regulating chromatin structure and gene expression--two parameters that have long been considered determinants of radioresponse. As a means of modifying histone acetylation status, considerable effort has been put into the development of inhibitors of HDAC activity, which is often aberrant in tumor cells. This has led to the generation of a relatively large number of structurally diverse compounds that inhibit HDAC activity and result in histone hyperacetylation, and importantly, are applicable to patient treatment. Whereas a number of these HDAC inhibitors have antitumor activity in preclinical cancer models when delivered as single agents, recent studies have indicated that these compounds also significantly enhance tumor cell radiosensitivity. A structurally diverse set of HDAC inhibitors have been shown to enhance the in vitro radiosensitivity of human tumor cell lines generated from a spectrum of solid tumors. Moreover, HDAC inhibitors increased the radiosensitivity of human tumor xenografts. Although the mechanism responsible for this radiosensitization has not been definitely elucidated, data suggest that inhibiting the repair of radiation-induced DNA damage may be involved. Whereas HDAC inhibitors are currently in clinical trials as single modalities and in combination with chemotherapeutic agents, recent results suggest that these compounds may also enhance the antitumor effectiveness of radiotherapy. PMID:16782459

  5. Classification of normal and malignant human gastric mucosa tissue with confocal Raman microspectroscopy and wavelet analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yaogai; Shen, Aiguo; Jiang, Tao; Ai, Yong; Hu, Jiming

    2008-02-01

    Thirty-two samples from the human gastric mucosa tissue, including 13 normal and 19 malignant tissue samples were measured by confocal Raman microspectroscopy. The low signal-to-background ratio spectra from human gastric mucosa tissues were obtained by this technique without any sample preparation. Raman spectral interferences include a broad featureless sloping background due to fluorescence and noise. They mask most Raman spectral feature and lead to problems with precision and quantitation of the original spectral information. A preprocessed algorithm based on wavelet analysis was used to reduce noise and eliminate background/baseline of Raman spectra. Comparing preprocessed spectra of malignant gastric mucosa tissues with those of counterpart normal ones, there were obvious spectral changes, including intensity increase at ˜1156 cm -1 and intensity decrease at ˜1587 cm -1. The quantitative criterion based upon the intensity ratio of the ˜1156 and ˜1587 cm -1 was extracted for classification of the normal and malignant gastric mucosa tissue samples. This could result in a new diagnostic method, which would assist the early diagnosis of gastric cancer.

  6. Drug Metabolism and Homologous Recombination Repair in Radiosensitization with Gemcitabine

    PubMed Central

    Im, Michael M.; Flanagan, Sheryl A.; Ackroyd, Jeffrey J.; Shewach, Donna S.

    2015-01-01

    Gemcitabine (difluorodeoxycytidine; dFdCyd) is a potent radiosensitizer, noted for its ability to enhance cytotoxicity with radiation at noncytotoxic concentrations in vitro and subchemotherapeutic doses in patients. Radiosensitization in human tumor cells requires dFdCyd-mediated accumulation of cells in S phase with inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase, resulting in ≥80% deoxyadenosine triphosphate (dATP) depletion and errors of replication in DNA. Less is known of the role of specific DNA replication and repair pathways in the radiosensitization mechanism. Here the role of homologous recombination (HR) in relationship to the metabolic and cell cycle effects of dFdCyd was investigated using a matched pair of CHO cell lines that are either proficient (AA8 cells) or deficient (irs1SF cells) in HR based on expression of the HR protein XRCC3. The results demonstrated that the characteristics of radiosensitization in the rodent AA8 cells differed significantly from those in human tumor cells. In the AA8 cells, radiosensitization was achieved only under short (≤4 h) cytotoxic incubations, and S-phase accumulation did not appear to be required for radiosensitization. In contrast, human tumor cell lines were radiosensitized using noncytotoxic concentrations of dFdCyd and required early S-phase accumulation. Studies of the metabolic effects of dFdCyd demonstrated low dFdCyd concentrations did not deplete dATP by ≥80% in AA8 and irs1SF cells. However, at higher concentrations of dFdCyd, failure to radiosensitize the HR-deficient irs1SF cells could not be explained by a lack of dATP depletion or lack of S-phase accumulation. Thus, these parameters did not correspond to dFdCyd radiosensitization in the CHO cells. To evaluate directly the role of HR in radiosensitization, XRCC3 expression was suppressed in the AA8 cells with a lentiviral-delivered shRNA. Partial XRCC3 suppression significantly decreased radiosensitization [radiation enhancement ratio (RER) = 1.6 ± 0.15], compared to nontransduced (RER = 2.7 ± 0.27; P = 0.012), and a substantial decrease compared to nonspecific shRNA-transduced (RER =2.5 ± 0.42; P =0.056) AA8 cells. Although the results support a role for HR in radiosensitization with dFdCyd in CHO cells, the differences in the underlying metabolic and cell cycle characteristics suggest that dFdCyd radiosensitization in the nontumor-derived CHO cells is mechanistically distinct from that in human tumor cells. PMID:25564718

  7. Role of Phosphodiesterase 2 in Growth and Invasion of Human Malignant Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hiramoto, Kenichi; Murata, Taku; Shimizu, Kasumi; Morita, Hiroshi; Inui, Madoka; Manganiello, Vincent C.; Tagawa, Toshiro; Arai, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) regulate the intracellular concentrations and effects of adenosine 3’,5’-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and guanosine 3’,5’-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). The role of PDEs in malignant tumor cells is still uncertain. The role of PDEs, especially PDE2, in human malignant melanoma PMP cell line was examined in this study. In PMP cells, 8-bromo-cAMP, a cAMP analog, inhibited cell growth and invasion. However, 8-bromo-cGMP, a cGMP analog, had little or no effect. PDE2 and PDE4, but not PDE3, were expressed in PMP cells. Growth and invasion of PMP cells were inhibited by erythro-9-(2-Hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (EHNA), a specific PDE2 inhibitor, but not by rolipram, a specific PDE4 inhibitor. Moreover, cell growth and invasion were inhibited by transfection of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) specific for PDE2A and a catalytically-dead mutant of PDE2A. After treating cells with EHNA or rolipram, intracellular cAMP concentrations were increased. Growth and invasion were stimulated by PKA14-22, a PKA inhibitor, and inhibited by N6-benzoyl-c AMP, a PKA specific cAMP analogue, whereas 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2’-O-methyl-cAMP, an Epac specific cAMP analogue, did not. Invasion, but not growth, was stimulated by A-kinase anchor protein (AKAP) St-Ht31 inhibitory peptide. Based on these results, PDE2 appears to play an important role in growth and invasion of the human malignant melanoma PMP cell line. Selectively suppressing PDE2 might possibly inhibit growth and invasion of other malignant tumor cell lines. PMID:24705027

  8. Role of phosphodiesterase 2 in growth and invasion of human malignant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Kenichi; Murata, Taku; Shimizu, Kasumi; Morita, Hiroshi; Inui, Madoka; Manganiello, Vincent C; Tagawa, Toshiro; Arai, Naoya

    2014-09-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) regulate the intracellular concentrations and effects of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). The role of PDEs in malignant tumor cells is still uncertain. The role of PDEs, especially PDE2, in human malignant melanoma PMP cell line was examined in this study. In PMP cells, 8-bromo-cAMP, a cAMP analog, inhibited cell growth and invasion. However, 8-bromo-cGMP, a cGMP analog, had little or no effect. PDE2 and PDE4, but not PDE3, were expressed in PMP cells. Growth and invasion of PMP cells were inhibited by erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl) adenine (EHNA), a specific PDE2 inhibitor, but not by rolipram, a specific PDE4 inhibitor. Moreover, cell growth and invasion were inhibited by transfection of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) specific for PDE2A and a catalytically-dead mutant of PDE2A. After treating cells with EHNA or rolipram, intracellular cAMP concentrations were increased. Growth and invasion were stimulated by PKA14-22, a PKA inhibitor, and inhibited by N(6)-benzoyl-c AMP, a PKA specific cAMP analog, whereas 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyl-cAMP, an Epac specific cAMP analog, did not. Invasion, but not growth, was stimulated by A-kinase anchor protein (AKAP) St-Ht31 inhibitory peptide. Based on these results, PDE2 appears to play an important role in growth and invasion of the human malignant melanoma PMP cell line. Selectively suppressing PDE2 might possibly inhibit growth and invasion of other malignant tumor cell lines. PMID:24705027

  9. Silencing NFBD1/MDC1 enhances the radiosensitivity of human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE1 cells and results in tumor growth inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Zeng, Q; Chen, T; Liao, K; Bu, Y; Hong, S; Hu, G

    2015-01-01

    NFBD1 functions in cell cycle checkpoint activation and DNA repair following ionizing radiation (IR). In this study, we defined the NFBD1 as a tractable molecular target to radiosensitize nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells. Silencing NFBD1 using lentivirus-mediated shRNA-sensitized NPC cells to radiation in a dose-dependent manner, increasing apoptotic cell death, decreasing clonogenic survival and delaying DNA damage repair. Furthermore, downregulation of NFBD1 inhibited the amplification of the IR-induced DNA damage signal, and failed to accumulate and retain DNA damage-response proteins at the DNA damage sites, which leaded to defective checkpoint activation following DNA damage. We also implicated the involvement of NFBD1 in IR-induced Rad51 and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit foci formation. Xenografts models in nude mice showed that silencing NFBD1 significantly enhanced the antitumor activity of IR, leading to tumor growth inhibition of the combination therapy. Our studies suggested that a combination of gene therapy and radiation therapy may be an effective strategy for human NPC treatment. PMID:26247734

  10. Melatonin enhancement of the radiosensitivity of human breast cancer cells is associated with the modulation of proteins involved in estrogen biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Alonso-González, Carolina; González, Alicia; Martínez-Campa, Carlos; Menéndez-Menéndez, Javier; Gómez-Arozamena, José; García-Vidal, Angela; Cos, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Enhancing the radiosensitivity of cancer cells is one of the most important tasks in clinical radiobiology. Endocrine therapy and radiotherapy are two cancer treatment modalities which are often given together in patients with locally-advanced breast cancer and positive hormone-receptor status. Oncostatic actions of melatonin are relevant on estrogen-dependent mammary tumors. In the present study, we wanted to evaluate the effects of the combination of ionizing radiation and melatonin on proteins involved in estrogen biosynthesis in breast cancer cells. We demonstrated a role of melatonin in mediating the sensitization of human breast cancer cells to the ionizing radiation by decreasing around 50% the activity and expression of proteins involved in the synthesis of estrogens in these cells. Thus, melatonin pretreatment before radiation reduces the amount of active estrogens at cancer cell level. Melatonin 1 nM induced a 2-fold change in p53 expression as compared to radiation alone. The regulatory action of melatonin on p53 could be a link between melatonin and its modulatory action on the sensitivity of breast cancer cells to ionizing radiation. These findings may have implications for designing clinical trials using melatonin and radiotherapy. PMID:26497762

  11. SV40 association with human malignancies and mechanisms of tumor immunity by large tumor antigen.

    PubMed

    Lowe, D B; Shearer, M H; Jumper, C A; Kennedy, R C

    2007-04-01

    SV40 was discovered as a contaminate of poliovirus vaccine lots distributed to millions of individuals in the United States between 1955 and 1963 while contaminated vaccine batches were later circulated worldwide. After SV40 was observed to cause in vitro animal and human cell transformations and in vivo tumor formations in animals, the search for a connection between the virus and human malignancies has continued to the present day. Different molecular methods have been used to detect SV40 gene products in a variety of human cancers, though SV40 causality in these tumor types has yet to be established. These data, however, are not without controversial issues related to inconclusive SV40 serological and epidemiological evidence alongside tools and methodologies that may contribute to false-positive results in human specimens. This review will also explore how vaccination against SV40 protein products may be used to help prevent and treat individuals with SV40-expressing cancers. PMID:17260087

  12. Differential Expression of Decorin by Human Malignant and Benign Vascular Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Salomäki, Henriikka H.; Sainio, Annele O.; Söderström, Mirva; Pakkanen, Sari; Laine, Jukka; Järveläinen, Hannu T.

    2008-01-01

    An increasing amount of evidence indicates that a small extracellular chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan, decorin, is indirectly involved in angiogenesis. Given that angiogenesis is a sine qua non for tumor growth and progression, we attempted to examine whether human malignant vascular tumors differ from human benign vascular tumors in terms of their decorin expression and synthesis. CD31 immunostaining demonstrated that the human malignant vascular tumors Kaposi's sarcoma and angiosarcoma were filled with capillary-like structures, whereas in benign cavernous and capillary hemangiomas, blood vessels were not as abundantly present. By utilizing in situ hybridization and immunocytochemical assays for decorin, we showed that there was no detectable decorin mRNA expression or immunoreactivity within the tumor mass in the Kaposi's sarcoma or angiosarcoma group. Instead, decorin was expressed in the connective tissue stroma lining the sarcoma tissue. In contrast to sarcomas, in hemangiomas, decorin mRNA expression and immunoreactivity were observed also within the tumor mass, particularly in the connective tissue stroma surrounding the clusters of intratumoral blood vessels. Finally, distribution of type I collagen was found to be similar to that of decorin in these tumor tissues. Our findings can be explained with different states of angiogenesis in dissimilar growths. In sarcomas, angiogenesis is extremely powerful, whereas in hemangiomas, angiogenesis has ceased. Thus, decorin is likely to possess a suppressive effect on human tumor angiogenesis in vivo, as previously described by studies using different experimental models. Decorin certainly provides a usable biomarker for distinguishing between benign and malignant vascular tumors in patients. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:639–646, 2008) PMID:18413650

  13. Effects of gemcitabine on radiosensitization, apoptosis, and Bcl-2 and Bax protein expression in human pancreatic cancer xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Z T; Wu, X H; Wang, L; Li, B; Zhu, X X

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiosensitizing effects of gemcitabine towards human pancreatic cancer xenografts. A human pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established in nude mice, 36 of which were randomly divided into 6 treatment groups. Tumors were measured every 2 days, and the tumor volumes, growth delays, and inhibition rates were compared to evaluate the gemcitabine enhancement factor. The apoptotic index was determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling assay, and apoptosis inhibitory protein Bcl-2 and apoptosis-related protein Bax expression were detected by immunohistochemistry. Compared with the control group, xenograft growth was significantly inhibited in the 25 (G25) and 50 mg/kg gemcitabine (G50) groups (P < 0.05). In the 25 (G25R) and 50 (G50R) mg/kg gemcitabine + radiotherapy groups, local tumor growth was significantly inhibited, with inhibition rates of 88.22 and 91.23%, respectively, significantly higher than those of the simple radiotherapy (SR), G25, and G50 groups (44.11, 72.88, and 77.53%, respectively; P < 0.05). The tumor growth delay in the G25R and G50R groups were 9 and 15 days, respectively, higher than the SR, G25, and G50 groups (each 4 days, P < 0.05). The apoptosis of tumor cells in the intervention groups significantly increased, and the apoptotic index among the intervention groups exhibited significant differences (P < 0.05). The immunohistochemical results indicated that Bcl-2 was downregulated to different degrees in the intervention groups, whereas Bax was upregulated (P < 0.05). Therefore, gemcitabine appears to enhance the radiotherapeutic sensitivity of human pancreatic cancer xenografts significantly. PMID:26634526

  14. Radiosensitivity of Human Fibroblasts is Associated With Amino Acid Substitution Variants in Susceptible Genes And Correlates With The Number of Risk Alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Alsbeih, Ghazi . E-mail: galsbeih@kfshrc.edu.sa; El-Sebaie, Medhat; Al-Harbi, Najla; Al-Buhairi, Muneera; Al-Hadyan, Khaled; Al-Rajhi, Nasser

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: Genetic predictive markers of radiosensitivity are being sought for stratifying radiotherapy for cancer patients and risk assessment of radiation exposure. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms in susceptible genes are associated with, and the number of risk alleles has incremental effect on, individual radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: Six amino acid substitution variants (ATM 1853 Asp/Asn G>A, p53 72 Arg/Pro G>C, p21 31 Ser/Arg C>A, XRCC1 399 Arg/Gln G>A, XRCC3 241 Thr/Met C>T, and TGF{beta}1 10 Leu/Pro T>C) were genotyped by direct sequencing in 54 fibroblast strains of different radiosensitivity. Results: The clonogenic survival fraction at 2 Gy range was 0.15-0.50 (mean, 0.34, standard deviation, 0.08). The mean survival fraction at 2 Gy divided the cell strains into radiosensitive (26 cases) and normal (28 controls). A significant association was observed between the survival fraction at 2 Gy and ATM 1853 Asn, XRCC3 241 Met, and TGF{beta}1 10 Leu alleles (p = 0.05, p = 0.02, and p = 0.02, respectively). The p53 72 Arg allele showed a borderline association (p = 0.07). The number of risk alleles increased with increasing radiosensitivity, and the group comparison showed a statistically significant difference between the radiosensitive and control groups (p {<=}0.001). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms in susceptible genes influence cellular radiation response and that the number of risk alleles has a combined effect on radiosensitivity. Individuals with multiple risk alleles could be more susceptible to radiation effects than those with fewer risk alleles. These results may have implications in predicting normal tissue reactions to radiotherapy and risk assessment of radiation exposure.

  15. The human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor ritonavir is potentially active against urological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor ritonavir has recently been shown to have antineoplastic activity, and its use in urological malignancies is under investigation with an eye toward drug repositioning. Ritonavir is thought to exert its antineoplastic activity by inhibiting multiple signaling pathways, including the Akt and nuclear factor-kappaB pathways. It can increase the amount of unfolded proteins in the cell by inhibiting both the proteasome and heat shock protein 90. Combinations of ritonavir with agents that increase the amount of unfolded proteins, such as proteasome inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors, or heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, therefore, induce endoplasmic reticulum stress cooperatively and thereby kill cancer cells effectively. Ritonavir is also a potent cytochrome P450 3A4 and P-glycoprotein inhibitor, increasing the intracellular concentration of combined drugs by inhibiting their degradation and efflux from cancer cells and thereby enhancing their antineoplastic activity. Furthermore, riotnavir’s antineoplastic activity includes modulation of immune system activity. Therapies using ritonavir are thus an attractive new approach to cancer treatment and, due to their novel mechanisms of action, are expected to be effective against malignancies that are refractory to current treatment strategies. Further investigations using ritonavir are expected to find new uses for clinically available drugs in the treatment of urological malignancies as well as many other types of cancer. PMID:25914545

  16. Ocrelizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against CD20 for inflammatory disorders and B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hutas, Gabor

    2008-11-01

    Biogen Idec Inc, Genentech Inc, Roche Holding AG and Chugai Pharmaceutical Co Ltd are developing ocrelizumab, a humanized mAb against CD20, for the potential treatment of inflammatory disorders and B-cell malignancies. Ocrelizumab is undergoing phase III clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis and lupus nephritis, and phase II trials for multiple sclerosis and hematological cancer. Previously, ocrelizumab was also being developed for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and neuromyelitis optica; however, development for SLE has been discontinued. No development has been reported for neuromyelitis optica and as of January 2007, this indication had been removed from the company pipeline. PMID:18951300

  17. Human malignant mesothelioma is recapitulated in immunocompetent BALB/c mice injected with murine AB cells.

    PubMed

    Mezzapelle, Rosanna; Rrapaj, Eltjona; Gatti, Elena; Ceriotti, Chiara; Marchis, Francesco De; Preti, Alessandro; Spinelli, Antonello E; Perani, Laura; Venturini, Massimo; Valtorta, Silvia; Moresco, Rosa Maria; Pecciarini, Lorenza; Doglioni, Claudio; Frenquelli, Michela; Crippa, Luca; Recordati, Camilla; Scanziani, Eugenio; de Vries, Hilda; Berns, Anton; Frapolli, Roberta; Boldorini, Renzo; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Bianchi, Marco E; Crippa, Massimo P

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Mesothelioma is a highly aggressive cancer, which is difficult to diagnose and treat. Here we describe the molecular, cellular and morphological characterization of a syngeneic system consisting of murine AB1, AB12 and AB22 mesothelioma cells injected in immunocompetent BALB/c mice, which allows the study of the interplay of tumor cells with the immune system. Murine mesothelioma cells, like human ones, respond to exogenous High Mobility Group Box 1 protein, a Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern that acts as a chemoattractant for leukocytes and as a proinflammatory mediator. The tumors derived from AB cells are morphologically and histologically similar to human MM tumors, and respond to treatments used for MM patients. Our system largely recapitulates human mesothelioma, and we advocate its use for the study of MM development and treatment. PMID:26961782

  18. Human malignant mesothelioma is recapitulated in immunocompetent BALB/c mice injected with murine AB cells

    PubMed Central

    Mezzapelle, Rosanna; Rrapaj, Eltjona; Gatti, Elena; Ceriotti, Chiara; Marchis, Francesco De; Preti, Alessandro; Spinelli, Antonello E.; Perani, Laura; Venturini, Massimo; Valtorta, Silvia; Moresco, Rosa Maria; Pecciarini, Lorenza; Doglioni, Claudio; Frenquelli, Michela; Crippa, Luca; Recordati, Camilla; Scanziani, Eugenio; de Vries, Hilda; Berns, Anton; Frapolli, Roberta; Boldorini, Renzo; D’Incalci, Maurizio; Bianchi, Marco E.; Crippa, Massimo P.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Mesothelioma is a highly aggressive cancer, which is difficult to diagnose and treat. Here we describe the molecular, cellular and morphological characterization of a syngeneic system consisting of murine AB1, AB12 and AB22 mesothelioma cells injected in immunocompetent BALB/c mice, which allows the study of the interplay of tumor cells with the immune system. Murine mesothelioma cells, like human ones, respond to exogenous High Mobility Group Box 1 protein, a Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern that acts as a chemoattractant for leukocytes and as a proinflammatory mediator. The tumors derived from AB cells are morphologically and histologically similar to human MM tumors, and respond to treatments used for MM patients. Our system largely recapitulates human mesothelioma, and we advocate its use for the study of MM development and treatment. PMID:26961782

  19. Widespread p53 overexpression in human malignant tumors. An immunohistochemical study using methacarn-fixed, embedded tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, P. L.; Gown, A. M.; Kramp, S. G.; Coltrera, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    p53 is a nuclear protein believed to play an important role, through mutation and overexpression, in the progression of human malignant tumors. The authors employed a monoclonal antibody, 1801, and investigated overexpression of p53 in a series of 255 malignant and benign tumors, using deparaffinized sections of methacarn-fixed tissue. Overall, immunohistochemically detected p53 overexpression was found in 39% of malignant tumors, with considerable variation within individual tumor types (34% of breast carcinomas, 92% of ovarian carcinomas, 33% of soft tissue sarcomas). Homogenous, heterogenous, and focal immunostaining patterns were noted. With rare exceptions, no immunostaining of any benign tumors was noted. No immunostaining was found in adjacent, benign tissues, or in a series of fetal tissues. This is the first demonstration of widespread p53 overexpression in alcohol-fixed, embedded tissue and confirms the major role played by p53 in human malignancies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:1731521

  20. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Type 1 Receptor Inhibitor NVP-AEW541 Enhances Radiosensitivity of PTEN Wild-Type but Not PTEN-Deficient Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Isebaert, Sofie F.; Swinnen, Johannes V.; McBride, William H.; Haustermans, Karin M.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: During the past decade, many clinical trials with both monoclonal antibodies and small molecules that target the insulin-like growth factor-type 1 receptor (IGF-1R) have been launched. Despite the important role of IGF-1R signaling in radioresistance, studies of such agents in combination with radiotherapy are lagging behind. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the small molecule IGF-1R kinase inhibitor NVP-AEW541 on the intrinsic radioresistance of prostate cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effect of NVP-AEW541 on cell proliferation, cell viability, IGF-1R signaling, radiosensitivity, cell cycle distribution, and double strand break repair was determined in three human prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, DU145, 22Rv1). Moreover, the importance of the PTEN pathway status was explored by means of transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Results: NVP-AEW541 inhibited cell proliferation and decreased cell viability in a time-and dose-dependent manner in all three cell lines. Radiosensitization was observed in the PTEN wild-type cell lines DU145 and 22Rv1 but not in the PTEN-deficient PC3 cell line. NVP-AEW541-induced radiosensitization coincided with downregulation of phospho-Akt levels and high levels of residual double strand breaks. The importance of PTEN status in the radiosensitization effect was confirmed by transfection experiments with constitutively active Akt or inactive kinase-dead Akt. Conclusions: NVP-AEW541 enhances the effect of ionizing radiation in PTEN wild-type, but not in PTEN-deficient, prostate cancer cells. Proper patient selection based on the PTEN status of the tumor will be critical to the achievement of optimal results in clinical trials in which the combination of radiotherapy and this IGF-1R inhibitor is being explored.

  1. Selective growth inhibition of human malignant melanoma cells by syringic acid-derived proteasome inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been shown that proteasome inhibition leads to growth arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and/or induction of apoptosis. However, it was found that some of these inhibitors do not induce apoptosis in several human normal cell lines. This selective activity makes proteasome inhibition a promising target for new generation of anticancer drugs. Clinical validation of the proteasome, as a therapeutic target in oncology, has been provided by the dipeptide boronic acid derivative; bortezomib. Bortezomib has proven to be effective as a single agent in multiple myeloma and some forms of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Syringic acid (4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzoic acid, 1), a known phenolic acid, was isolated from the methanol extract of Tamarix aucheriana and was shown to possess proteasome inhibitory activity. Methods Using Surflex-Dock program interfaced with SYBYL, the docking affinities of syringic acid and its proposed derivatives to 20S proteasome were studied. Several derivatives were virtually proposed, however, five derivatives: benzyl 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzoate (2), benzyl 4-(benzyloxy)-3,5-dimethoxybenzoate (3), 3'-methoxybenzyl 3,5-dimethoxy-4-(3'-methoxybenzyloxy)benzoate (4), 3'-methoxybenzyl 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzoate (5) and 3',5'-dimethoxybenzyl 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzoate (6), were selected based on high docking scores, synthesized, and tested for their anti-mitogenic activity against human colorectal, breast and malignant melanoma cells as well as normal human fibroblast cells. Results Derivatives 2, 5, and 6 showed selective dose-dependent anti-mitogenic effect against human malignant melanoma cell lines HTB66 and HTB68 with minimal cytotoxicity on colorectal and breast cancer cells as well as normal human fibroblast cells. Derivatives 2, 5 and 6 significantly (p ≤ 0.0001) inhibited the various proteasomal chymotrypsin, PGPH, and trypsin like activities. They growth arrested the growth of HTB66 cells at G1 and G2-phases. They also arrested the growth of HTB68 cells at S- and G2-phase, respectively. Moreover, derivatives 2, 5, and 6 markedly induced apoptosis (≥ 90%) in both HTB66 and HTB68. Conclusions Computer-derived syringic acid derivatives possess selective anti-mitogenic activity on human malignant melanoma cells that may be attributed to perturbation of cell cycle, induction of apoptosis and inhibition of various 26S proteasomal activities. PMID:23958424

  2. MicroRNAs Induce Epigenetic Reprogramming and Suppress Malignant Phenotypes of Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Hisataka; Wu, Xin; Kawamoto, Koichi; Nishida, Naohiro; Konno, Masamitsu; Koseki, Jun; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Noguchi, Kozou; Gotoh, Noriko; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Miyata, Kanjiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Nagano, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Obika, Satoshi; Kataoka, Kazunori; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Hideshi

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer is a genetic disease, epigenetic alterations are involved in its initiation and progression. Previous studies have shown that reprogramming of colon cancer cells using Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc reduces cancer malignancy. Therefore, cancer reprogramming may be a useful treatment for chemo- or radiotherapy-resistant cancer cells. It was also reported that the introduction of endogenous small-sized, non-coding ribonucleotides such as microRNA (miR) 302s and miR-369-3p or -5p resulted in the induction of cellular reprogramming. miRs are smaller than the genes of transcription factors, making them possibly suitable for use in clinical strategies. Therefore, we reprogrammed colon cancer cells using miR-302s and miR-369-3p or -5p. This resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation and invasion and the stimulation of the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition phenotype in colon cancer cells. Importantly, the introduction of the ribonucleotides resulted in epigenetic reprogramming of DNA demethylation and histone modification events. Furthermore, in vivo administration of the ribonucleotides in mice elicited the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, which involves the mitochondrial Bcl2 protein family. The present study shows that the introduction of miR-302s and miR-369s could induce cellular reprogramming and modulate malignant phenotypes of human colorectal cancer, suggesting that the appropriate delivery of functional small-sized ribonucleotides may open a new avenue for therapy against human malignant tumors. PMID:25970424

  3. MicroRNAs Induce Epigenetic Reprogramming and Suppress Malignant Phenotypes of Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hisataka; Wu, Xin; Kawamoto, Koichi; Nishida, Naohiro; Konno, Masamitsu; Koseki, Jun; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Noguchi, Kozou; Gotoh, Noriko; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Miyata, Kanjiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Nagano, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Obika, Satoshi; Kataoka, Kazunori; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ishii, Hideshi

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer is a genetic disease, epigenetic alterations are involved in its initiation and progression. Previous studies have shown that reprogramming of colon cancer cells using Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc reduces cancer malignancy. Therefore, cancer reprogramming may be a useful treatment for chemo- or radiotherapy-resistant cancer cells. It was also reported that the introduction of endogenous small-sized, non-coding ribonucleotides such as microRNA (miR) 302s and miR-369-3p or -5p resulted in the induction of cellular reprogramming. miRs are smaller than the genes of transcription factors, making them possibly suitable for use in clinical strategies. Therefore, we reprogrammed colon cancer cells using miR-302s and miR-369-3p or -5p. This resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation and invasion and the stimulation of the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition phenotype in colon cancer cells. Importantly, the introduction of the ribonucleotides resulted in epigenetic reprogramming of DNA demethylation and histone modification events. Furthermore, in vivo administration of the ribonucleotides in mice elicited the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, which involves the mitochondrial Bcl2 protein family. The present study shows that the introduction of miR-302s and miR-369s could induce cellular reprogramming and modulate malignant phenotypes of human colorectal cancer, suggesting that the appropriate delivery of functional small-sized ribonucleotides may open a new avenue for therapy against human malignant tumors. PMID:25970424

  4. Withania somnifera Root Extract Has Potent Cytotoxic Effect against Human Malignant Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Babli; Singh, Shruti; Thakur, Suman S.

    2015-01-01

    In Ayurveda, Withania somnifera is commonly known as Ashwagandha, its roots are specifically used in medicinal and clinical applications. It possesses numerous therapeutic actions which include anti-inflammatory, sedative, hypnotic and narcotic. Extracts from this plant have been reported for its anticancer properties. In this study we evaluated for the first time, the cytotoxic effect of Withania root extract on human malignant melanoma A375 cells. The crude extract of Withania was tested for cytotoxicity against A375 cells by MTT assay. Cell morphology of treated A375 cells was visualized through phase contrast as well as fluorescence microscopy. Agarose gel electrophoresis was used to check DNA fragmentation of the crude extract treated cells. Crude extract of Withania root has the potency to reduce viable cell count in dose as well as time dependent manner. Morphological change of the A375 cells was also observed in treated groups in comparison to untreated or vehicle treated control. Apoptotic body and nuclear blebbing were observed in DAPI stained treated cells under fluorescence microscope. A ladder of fragmented DNA was noticed in treated cells. Thus it might be said that the crude water extract of Withania somnifera has potent cytotoxic effect on human malignant melanoma A375 cells. PMID:26334881

  5. Epigenetic Regulation of Inflammatory Cytokines and Associated Genes in Human Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Yasmin, Rehana; Hassan, Amjad; Khan, Abdul Rehman; Abbasi, Rashda; Ahmad, Nafees

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a multifaceted defense response of immune system against infection. Chronic inflammation has been implicated as an imminent threat for major human malignancies and is directly linked to various steps involved in tumorigenesis. Inflammatory cytokines, interleukins, interferons, transforming growth factors, chemokines, and adhesion molecules have been associated with chronic inflammation. Numerous cytokines are reported to be aberrantly regulated by different epigenetic mechanisms like DNA methylation and histone modifications in tumor tissues, contributing to pathogenesis of tumor in multiple ways. Some of these cytokines also work as epigenetic regulators of other crucial genes in tumor biology, either directly or indirectly. Such regulations are reported in lung, breast, cervical, gastric, colorectal, pancreatic, prostate, and head and neck cancers. Epigenetics of inflammatory mediators in cancer is currently subject of extensive research. These investigations may help in understanding cancer biology and to develop effective therapeutic strategies. The purpose of this paper is to have a brief view of the aberrant regulation of inflammatory cytokines in human malignancies. PMID:25814785

  6. Clinical significance of the integrin α6β4 in human malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Rachel L.; O’Connor, Kathleen L.

    2015-01-01

    Integrin α6β4 is a cellular adhesion molecule that binds to laminins in the extracellular matrix and nucleates the formation of hemidesmosomes. During carcinoma progression, integrin α6β4 is released from hemidesmosomes, where it can then signal to facilitate multiple aspects of tumor progression including sustaining proliferative signaling, tumor invasion and metastasis, evasion of apoptosis, and stimulation of angiogenesis. The integrin achieves these ends by cooperating with growth factor receptors including EGFR, ErbB-2, and c-Met to amplify downstream pathways such as PI3K, AKT, MAPK and the Rho family small GTPases. Furthermore, it dramatically alters the transcriptome toward a more invasive phenotype by controlling promoter DNA demethylation of invasion and metastasis-associated proteins, such as S100A4 and autotaxin, and upregulates and activates key tumor promoting transcription factors such as the NFATs and NFkB. Expression of integrin α6β4 has been studied in many human malignancies where its overexpression is associated with aggressive behavior and a poor prognosis. This review provides an assessment of integrin α6β4 expression patterns and their prognostic significance in human malignancies, and describes key signaling functions of integrin α6β4 that contribute to tumor progression. PMID:26121317

  7. PKCα activation down-regulates ATM and radio-sensitizes androgen-sensitive human prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Jean-Philip; Rotenberg, Susan A.; Kang, Ji-Hye; Lerman, Gabriel; Fuks, Zvi; Kolesnick, Richard; Marquez, Victor E.; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that treatment of human androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and CWR22-Rv1 with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), a known protein kinase C (PKC) activator, decreases ATM protein levels, thus de-repressing the enzyme ceramide synthase (CS) and promoting apoptosis as well as radio-sensitizing these cells.1 Here we show that PKCα mediates the TPA effect on ATM expression, since ATM suppression and apoptosis induced by either TPA or diacylglycerol-lactone (DAG-lactone), both inducing PKCα activation,2 are abrogated in LNCaP cells following transfection of a kinase-dead PKCα mutant (KD-PKCα). Similarly, KD-PKCα blocks the apoptotic response elicited by combination of TPA and radiation, whereas expression of constitutively active PKCα is sufficient to sensitize cells to radiation alone, without a need to pre-treat the cells with TPA. These findings identify CS activation as a downstream event of PKCα activity in LNCaP cells. Similar results were obtained in CWR22-Rv1 cells with DAG-lactone treatment. Using the LNCaP orthotopic prostate model it is shown that treatment with TPA or DAG-lactone induces significant reduction in tumor ATM levels coupled with tumor growth delay. Furthermore, while fractionated radiation alone produces significant tumor growth delay, pretreatment with TPA or DAG-lactone significantly potentiates tumor cure. These findings support a model in which activation of PKCα downregulates ATM, thus relieving CS repression by ATM and enhancing apoptosis via ceramide generation. This model may provide a basis for the design of new therapies in prostate cancer. PMID:19029835

  8. Inhibition of the Rac1-WAVE2-Arp2/3 signaling pathway promotes radiosensitivity via downregulation of cofilin-1 in U251 human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Wang, Chen-Han; Yan, Hua; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Jin-Bing; Qian, Chun-Fa; Xiao, Hong; Liu, Hong-Yi

    2016-05-01

    The Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1)-WASP-family verprolin-homologous protein-2 (WAVE2)-actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) signaling pathway has been identified to be involved in cell migration and invasion in various types of cancer cell. Cofilin‑1 (CFL‑1), which is regulated by the Rac1‑WAVE2‑Arp2/3 signaling pathway, may promote radioresistance in glioma. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the potential role of the Rac1‑WAVE2‑Arp2/3 signaling pathway in radioresistance in U251 human glioma cells and elucidate its affect on CFL‑1 expression. Western blot analysis was performed to evaluate the protein expression of CFL‑1. In the present study, Rac1 was inhibited by NSC 23766, WAVE2 was inhibited by transfection with short hairpin (sh)RNA‑WAVE2 using Lipofectamine™ 2000 and Arp2/3 was inhibited by CK‑666. Cell viability was measured using the 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)-2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, the cell migration ability was examined by a wound‑healing assay, and the cell invasion ability was assessed using a Transwell culture chamber system. The results showed that inhibition of the Rac1‑WAVE2‑Arp2/3 signaling pathway using NSC 23766, shRNA‑WAVE2 or CK‑666 reduced the cell viability, migration and invasion abilities in U251 human glioma cells, concordant with a reduced expression of CFL‑1. Furthermore, the expression of CFL‑1 was significantly increased in radioresistant U251 glioma cells when compared with normal U251 human glioma cells. These findings indicate that inhibition of the Rac1‑WAVE2‑Arp2/3 signaling pathway may promote radiosensitivity, which may partially result from the downregulation of CFL‑1 in U251 human glioma cells. PMID:27052944

  9. Recent developments in radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Linam, Justin; Yang, Li-Xi

    2015-05-01

    Radiation therapy is essential for local tumor control for many types of cancer histologies. Technological advancements in recent years have allowed for precise irradiation of target tissues while minimizing the dose to non-target tissues. To enhance radiation damage to cancer cells and further limit the radiation effects on normal tissue, researchers have explored compounds that specifically target cancer cells and make them more sensitive to ionizing radiation. Recent radiosensitization research has focused on promising compounds that alter hypoxia, inhibit topoisomerases, interfere with microtubules, and activate caspases, among other mechanisms. Many such compounds have shown impressive results in pre-clinical trials against a variety of cell types, but their safety, efficacy and practicability in clinical trials remains to be demonstrated. This review seeks to provide an overview of recent research in radiosensitization, detailing some of the more successful compounds, and illustrating avenues for future research. PMID:25964520

  10. Inhibition of hedgehog signaling reduces the side population in human malignant mesothelioma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H-A; Kim, M-C; Kim, N-Y; Kim, Y

    2015-01-01

    Deregulation of crucial embryonic pathways, including hedgehog signaling, has been frequently implicated in a variety of human cancers and is emerging as an important target for anticancer therapy. This study evaluated the potential anticancer effects of cyclopamine, a chemical inhibitor of hedgehog signaling, in human malignant mesothelioma (HMM) cell lines. Cyclopamine treatment significantly decreased the proliferation of HMM cells by promoting apoptosis and shifting the cell cycle toward dormant phase. The clonogenicity and mobility of HMM cells were significantly decreased by cyclopamine treatment. Treatment of HMM cells with cyclopamine significantly reduced the abundance of side population cells, which were measured using an assay composed of Hoechst 33342 dye staining and subsequent flow cytometry. Furthermore, the expression levels of stemness-related genes were significantly affected by cyclopamine treatment. Taken together, the present study showed that targeting hedgehog signaling could reduce a more aggressive subpopulation of the cancer cells, suggesting an alternative approach for HMM therapy. PMID:26206198

  11. Two canine malignant vascular tumours with features of human retiform haemangioendothelioma.

    PubMed

    Lombardini, E D; Summers, B A

    2013-02-01

    Within the human medical literature, retiform haemangioendothelioma (RHE) is an established and well-recognized histopathological variant of endothelial tumours, but to date RHE has not been reported in animals. These tumours are characterized by the presence of elongate, arborizing vascular channels lined by neoplastic endothelium with prominent, often bulging ('hobnail') nuclei supported by a dense collagenous matrix and accompanied by abundant lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells typically express endothelial markers such as von Willebrand factor and CD31. Human RHEs are categorized as low-grade malignancies. This report describes two canine vascular tumours with features consistent with RHE. In both cases there was suspected or known widespread tumour metastasis. PMID:22817764

  12. Characterization of phosphodiesterase 2A in human malignant melanoma PMP cells

    PubMed Central

    MORITA, HIROSHI; MURATA, TAKU; SHIMIZU, KASUMI; OKUMURA, KENYA; INUI, MADOKA; TAGAWA, TOSHIRO

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis for malignant melanoma is poor; therefore, new diagnostic methods and treatment strategies are urgently needed. Phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2) is one of 21 phosphodiesterases, which are divided into 11 families (PDE1-PDE11). PDE2 hydrolyzes cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP), and its binding to cGMP enhances the hydrolysis of cAMP. We previously reported the expression of PDE1, PDE3 and PDE5 in human malignant melanoma cells. However, the expression of PDE2 in these cells has not been investigated. Herein, we examined the expression of PDE2A and its role in human oral malignant melanoma PMP cells. Sequencing of RT-PCR products revealed that PDE2A2 was the only variant expressed in PMP cells. Four point mutations were detected; one missense mutation at nucleotide position 734 (from C to T) resulted in the substitution of threonine with isoleucine at amino acid position 214. The other three were silent mutations. An in vitro migration assay and a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay revealed that suppressing PDE2 activity with its specific inhibitor, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA), had no impact on cell motility or apoptosis. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of EHNA, assessed using a trypan blue exclusion assay, was negligible. On the other hand, assessment of cell proliferation by BrdU incorporation and cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry revealed that EHNA treatment inhibited DNA synthesis and increased the percentage of G2/M-arrested cells. Furthermore, cyclin A mRNA expression was downregulated, while cyclin E mRNA expression was upregulated in EHNA-treated cells. Our results demonstrated that the PDE2A2 variant carrying point mutations is expressed in PMP cells and may affect cell cycle progression by modulating cyclin A expression. Thus, PDE2A2 is a possible new molecular target for the treatment of malignant melanoma. PMID:23381931

  13. Circadian rhythmometry of mammalian radiosensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, E.; Halberg, F.; Loken, M. K.; Kim, Y. S.

    1974-01-01

    In the case of human bone marrow, the largest number of mitoses is seen in the evening in diurnally active men, mitotic activity being at a minimum in the morning. The opposite pattern is observed for nocturnal animals such as rats and mice on a regimen of light during the daytime alternating with darkness during the night hours. The entirety of these rhythms plays an important role in the organism's responses to environmental stimuli, including its resistance to potentially harmful agents. Conditions under which circadian rhythms can be observed and validated by inferential statistical means are discussed while emphasizing how artifacts of the laboratory environment can be shown to obscure circadian periodic variations in radiosensitivity.

  14. In vivo study of breast carcinoma radiosensitization by targeting eIF4E

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hua; Li, Li-Wen; Department of Bioscience, College of Life Sciences, Northwest University, No. 229 North Taibai Road, Xi'an 710069 ; Shi, Mei; Wang, Jian-Hua; Xiao, Feng; Zhou, Bin; Diao, Li-Qiong; Long, Xiao-Li; Liu, Xiao-Li; Xu, Lin

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer eIF4E is associated with the formation and progression for breast cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer pSecX-t4EBP1 can downregulated the expression of eIF4E in direct binding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We transfected pSecX-t4EBP1 into a mouse xenograft model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It can significantly inhibit tumor growth and enhance the radiosensitivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The possible mechanism is downregulation of HIF-1{alpha} expression. -- Abstract: Background: Eukaryotic initiation factor eIF4E, an important regulator of translation, plays a crucial role in the malignant transformation, progression and radioresistance of many human solid tumors. The overexpression of this gene has been associated with tumor formation in a wide range of human malignancies, including breast cancer. In the present study, we attempted to explore the use of eIF4E as a therapeutic target to enhance radiosensitivity for breast carcinomas in a xenograft BALB/C mice model. Materials and methods: Ninety female BALB/C mice transfected with EMT-6 cells were randomly divided into six groups: control, irradiation (IR), pSecX-t4EBP1, pSecX-t4EBP1 + irradiation, pSecX and pSecX + irradiation. At the end of the experiments, all mice were sacrificed, the xenografts were harvested to measure the tumor volume and mass, and the tumor inhibition rates were calculated. Apoptosis was detected with a flow cytometric assay. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of HIF-1{alpha}. Results: The xenografts in pSecX-t4EBP1 mice showed a significantly delayed growth and smaller tumor volume, with a higher tumor inhibition rate compared with the control and pSecX groups. A similar result was obtained in the pSecX-t4EBP1 + IR group compared with IR alone and pSecX + irradiation. The expression of HIF-1{alpha} in the tumor cells was significantly decreased, while the apoptosis index was much higher. Conclusions: pSecX-t4EBP1 can significantly inhibit tumor growth and enhance the radiosensitivity of breast carcinoma xenografts in BALB/C mice. This is possibly associated with the downregulation of HIF-1{alpha} expression, which suggests that pSecX-t4EBP1 may serve as an ideal molecular target for the radiosensitization of breast carcinoma.

  15. Role of Mitochondrial Network Stabilisation by a Human Small Heat Shock Protein in Tumour Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Turi, Zsuzsanna; Hocsak, Eniko; Racz, Boglarka; Szabo, Aliz; Balogh, Andras; Sumegi, Balazs; Gallyas, Ferenc

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we found that the unconventional small human heat-shock protein HSPB11 inhibits cell death by HSP90 mediated cholesterol-rich membrane microdomain dependent activation of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/protein kinase B pathway and by stabilising the mitochondrial membrane systems. Also, progressive cytoplasmic expression of HSPB11 correlated with brain tumor malignancy. In the present study we investigated how cytoplasmic abundance of HSPB11 augments tumor malignancy. We up- and downregulated the cytoplasmic level of HSPB11 before paclitaxel exposure in NIH3T3 and HeLa cells, which normally express low and high levels, respectively, of the HSPB11 protein. We examined the paclitaxel-mediated induction of cell death, mitochondrial fission, HSPB11 mitochondrial translocation and inhibitory phosphorylation of dynamin-like protein-1 (DLP1). We found that increasing cytoplasmic abundance of HSPB11 in NIH3T3 cells protected against paclitaxel-induced apoptosis, while suppressing HSPB11 in HeLa cells sensitised the cells toward paclitaxel. Also, paclitaxel enhanced mitochondrial translocation of HSPB11 in wild type HeLa but not in NIH3T3 cells. More importantly, increased cytoplasmic level of HSPB11 in NIH3T3 cells enhanced the inhibitory phosphorylation of DLP1 and attenuated paclitaxel-induced mitochondrial fission. All these results suggest that increased cytoplasmic abundance of HSPB11 augments inhibitory phosphorylation of DLP1 thereby reduces mitochondrial fission that eventually leads to decreased apoptosis. This novel mechanism may explain the resistance to apoptosis and increased malignancy of HSPB11-overexpressing tumours. The clinical significance of this mechanism has already been highlighted by the finding that the kinase inhibitor tyrphostin A9 induces cancer cell death by DLP1-mediated mitochondrial fragmentation. PMID:25874011

  16. Radiosensitizing effect of schinifoline from Zanthoxylum schinifolium Sieb et Zucc on human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells: a preliminary in vitro investigation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Fang; Fan, Li; Tian, Mei; Qi, Xue-Song; Liu, Jian-Xiang; Feng, Jiang-Bin; Du, Shu-Shan; Su, Xu; Wang, Yong-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Schinifoline (SF), a 4-quinolinone derivative, was found in Zanthoxylum schinifolium for the first time. 4-Quinolinone moieties are thought to have cytotoxic activity and are often used as a tubulin polymerization inhibitors, heterogeneous enzyme inhibitors and antiplatelet agents. However, very little information respect to radiosensitization has focused on SF. This work aimed to investigate the radiosensitizing effect of SF on A549 cells. The cell viability results indicated cytotoxicity of SF on A549 cells, with IC50 values of 33.7 ± 2.4, 21.9 ± 1.9 and 16.8 ± 2.2 μg/mL, respectively, after 6, 12, 24 h treatment with different concentrations, and the 10% or 20% IC50 concentration during 12 h was applied in later experiments. The results of cell proliferative inhibition and clonogenic assay showed that SF enhanced the radiosensitivity of A549 cells when applied before 60Co γ-irradiation and this effect was mainly time and concentration dependent. The flow cytometric data indicated that SF treatment before the irradiation increased the G2/M phase, thus improving the radiosensitivity of A549, leading to cell apoptosis. This paper is the first study that describes the in vitro radiosensitising, cell cycle and apoptotic-inducing effects of schinifoline. PMID:25470278

  17. Regulated Expression of Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 in Human Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Jonjic, Nives; Martìn-Padura, Inés; Pollicino, Teresa; Bernasconi, Sergio; Jílek, Petr; Bigotti, Aldo; Mortarini, Roberta; Anichini, Andrea; Parmiani, Giorgio; Colotta, Francesco; Dejana, Elisabetta; Mantovani, Alberto; Natali, Pier Giorgio

    1992-01-01

    Expression of the endothelial adhesion molecule VCAM-1 was studied in human malignant melanoma lines by flow cytometry. Clones 2/4 and 2/14(derived from the same lesion) had appreciable levels of VCAM-1 expression, whereas clone 2/21 and thelines A2058, Mel24, and A375 were negative. Clone 2/14 was selected for further analysis. Exposure to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) markedly augmented VCAM-1 on melanoma cells. Surface VCAM-1 was associated with expression of specific transcripts that were augmented by TNF. Analysis by reverse transcriptase and polymerase chain reaction using appropriate primers revealed that TNF-stimulated melanoma cells expressed both 7 and 6 immunoglobulin domain transcripts with predominance of the longer species. Tumor necrosis factor-stimulated melanoma cells bound more VLA-4-expressing cells (melanoma and monocytes) than resting tumor cells and anti-VCAM-1 monoclonal antibodies significantly inhibited binding, thus suggesting that surface VCAM-1 on melanoma is functional. Analysis of melanoma tissue sections demonstrated that VCAM-1 is not a marker of transformation of melanocytes because it can be detected in benign nevi. Although, unlike ICAM-1, VCAM-1 is not correlated with tumor progression, its expression in a fraction of primary melanomas indicates that it may play a role in regulating host immune response and homotypic interactions in some malignant melanomas ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 5 PMID:1281617

  18. P16INK4a MEDIATED SUPPRESSION OF TELOMERASE IN NORMAL AND MALIGNANT HUMAN BREAST CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Bazarov, Alexey V.; van Sluis, Marjolein; Hines, Curtis; Bassett, Ekaterina; Beliveau, Alain; Campeau, Eric; Mukhopadhyay, Rituparna; Lee, Won Jae; Melodyev, Sonya; Zaslavsky, Yuri; Lee, Leonard; Rodier, Francis; Chicas, Agustin; Lowe, Scott W.; Benhattar, Jean; Ren, Bing; Campisi, Judith; Yaswen, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Summary The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16INK4a (CDKN2A) is an important tumor-suppressor gene frequently inactivated in human tumors. p16 suppresses the development of cancer by triggering an irreversible arrest of cell proliferation termed cellular senescence. Here, we describe another anti-oncogenic function of p16 in addition to its ability to halt cell cycle progression. We show that transient expression of p16 stably represses the hTERT gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of telomerase, in both normal and malignant breast epithelial cells. Short-term p16 expression increases the amount of histone H3 trimethylated on lysine 27 (H3K27) bound to the hTERT promoter, resulting in transcriptional silencing, likely mediated by polycomb complexes. Our results indicate that transient p16 exposure may prevent malignant progression in dividing cells by irreversible repression of genes, such as hTERT, whose activity is necessary for extensive self-renewal. PMID:20569236

  19. p16(INK4a) -mediated suppression of telomerase in normal and malignant human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Bazarov, Alexey V; Van Sluis, Marjolein; Hines, William C; Bassett, Ekaterina; Beliveau, Alain; Campeau, Eric; Mukhopadhyay, Rituparna; Lee, Won Jae; Melodyev, Sonya; Zaslavsky, Yuri; Lee, Leonard; Rodier, Francis; Chicas, Agustin; Lowe, Scott W; Benhattar, Jean; Ren, Bing; Campisi, Judith; Yaswen, Paul

    2010-10-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16(INK4a) (CDKN2A) is an important tumor suppressor gene frequently inactivated in human tumors. p16 suppresses the development of cancer by triggering an irreversible arrest of cell proliferation termed cellular senescence. Here, we describe another anti-oncogenic function of p16 in addition to its ability to halt cell cycle progression. We show that transient expression of p16 stably represses the hTERT gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of telomerase, in both normal and malignant breast epithelial cells. Short-term p16 expression increases the amount of histone H3 trimethylated on lysine 27 (H3K27) bound to the hTERT promoter, resulting in transcriptional silencing, likely mediated by polycomb complexes. Our results indicate that transient p16 exposure may prevent malignant progression in dividing cells by irreversible repression of genes, such as hTERT, whose activity is necessary for extensive self-renewal. PMID:20569236

  20. Genetic modification of human T lymphocytes for the treatment of hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hoyos, Valentina; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro

    2012-01-01

    Modern chemotherapy regimens and supportive care have produced remarkable improvements in the overall survival of patients with hematologic malignancies. However, the development of targeted small molecules, monoclonal antibodies, and biological therapies that demonstrate greater efficacy and lower toxicity remains highly desirable in hematology, and oncology in general. In the context of biological therapies, T-lymphocyte based treatments have enormous potential. Donor lymphocyte infusion in patients relapsed after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant pioneered the concept that T lymphocytes can effectively control tumor growth, and this was then followed by the development of cell culture strategies to generate T lymphocytes with selective activity against tumor cells. Over the past decade, it has become clear that the adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes promotes sustained antitumor effects in patients with virus-associated lymphomas, such as Epstein-Barr virus related post-transplant lymphomas and Hodgkin's lymphomas. Because of this compelling clinical evidence and the concomitant development of methodologies for robust gene transfer to human T lymphocytes, the field has rapidly evolved, offering new opportunities to extend T-cell based therapies. This review summarizes the most recent biological and clinical developments using genetically manipulated T cells for the treatment of hematologic malignancies. PMID:22929977

  1. The p21-Dependent Radiosensitization of Human Breast Cancer Cells by MLN4924, an Investigational Inhibitor of NEDD8 Activating Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gongxian; Sun, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a treatment choice for local control of breast cancer. However, intrinsic radioresistance of cancer cells limits therapeutic efficacy. We have recently validated that SCF (SKP1, Cullins, and F-box protein) E3 ubiquitin ligase is an attractive radiosensitizing target. Here we tested our hypothesis that MLN4924, a newly discovered investigational small molecule inhibitor of NAE (NEDD8 Activating Enzyme) that inactivates SCF E3 ligase, could act as a novel radiosensitizing agent in breast cancer cells. Indeed, we found that MLN4924 effectively inhibited cullin neddylation, and sensitized breast cancer cells to radiation with a sensitivity enhancement ratio (SER) of 1.75 for SK-BR-3 cells and 1.32 for MCF7 cells, respectively. Mechanistically, MLN4924 significantly enhanced radiation-induced G2/M arrest in SK-BR-3 cells, but not in MCF7 cells at early time point, and enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis in both lines at later time point. However, blockage of apoptosis by Z-VAD failed to abrogate MLN4924 radiosensitization, suggesting that apoptosis was not causally related. We further showed that MLN4924 failed to enhance radiation-induced DNA damage response, but did cause minor delay in DNA damage repair. Among a number of tested SCF E3 substrates known to regulate growth arrest, apoptosis and DNA damage response, p21 was the only one showing an enhanced accumulation in MLN4924-radiation combination group, as compared to the single treatment groups. Importantly, p21 knockdown via siRNA partialy inhibited MLN4924-induced G2/M arrest and radiosensitization, indicating a causal role played by p21. Our study suggested that MLN4924 could be further developed as a novel class of radiosensitizer for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:22457814

  2. Frequency analysis of multispectral photoacoustic images for differentiating malignant region from normal region in excised human prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Saugata; Rao, Navalgund A.; Valluru, Keerthi S.; Chinni, Bhargava K.; Dogra, Vikram S.; Helguera, Maria

    2014-03-01

    Frequency domain analysis of the photoacoustic (PA) radio frequency signals can potentially be used as a tool for characterizing microstructure of absorbers in tissue. This study investigates the feasibility of analyzing the spectrum of multiwavelength PA signals generated by excised human prostate tissue samples to differentiate between malignant and normal prostate regions. Photoacoustic imaging at five different wavelengths, corresponding to peak absorption coefficients of deoxyhemoglobin, whole blood, oxyhemoglobin, water and lipid in the near infrared (NIR) (700 nm - 1000 nm) region, was performed on freshly excised prostate specimens taken from patients undergoing prostatectomy for biopsy confirmed prostate cancer. The PA images were co-registered with the histopathology images of the prostate specimens to determine the region of interest (ROI) corresponding to malignant and normal tissue. The calibrated power spectrum of each PA signal from a selected ROI was fit to a linear model to extract the corresponding slope, midband fit and intercept parameters. The mean value of each parameter corresponding to malignant and adjacent normal prostate ROI was calculated for each of the five wavelengths. The results obtained for 9 different human prostate specimens, show that the mean values of midband fit and intercept are significantly different between malignant and normal regions. In addition, the average midband fit and intercept values show a decreasing trend with increasing wavelength. These preliminary results suggest that frequency analysis of multispectral PA signals can be used to differentiate malignant region from the adjacent normal region in human prostate tissue.

  3. Accelerated malignant conversion of human HBL-100 cells by the v-Ki-ras oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Saint-Ruf, C.; Nardeux, P.; Estrade, S.; Brouty-Boye, D.; Lavialle, C.; Cassingena, R. ); Rhim, J.S. )

    1988-05-01

    The human epithelial HBL-100 cell line harbors SV{sub 40} genetic information and has an unlimited growth potential. Despite displaying properties characteristic of transformation since its early in vitro passages, it is capable of producing progressively growing tumors in nude mice only after long-term culture. This a reproducible phenomenon and apparently not the consequence of a selection of preexisting malignant cells. Superinfection of early passage nontumorigenic HBL-100 cells with Kirsten murine sarcoma virus, which contains a Ki-ras oncogene having undergone multiple activating events, induces morphologic alterations and rapidly converts the cells to neoplastic cells, further supporting the hypothesis of multistep carcinogenesis. The HBL-100 cell line might be useful in defining the oncogenes representative of different families, which are able to complement SV{sub 40} in this system.

  4. Radioprotection of Human Cell Nuclear DNA by Polyamines: Radiosensitivity of Chromatin is Influenced by Tightly Bound Spermine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warters, Raymond L.; Newton, Gerald L.; Olive, Peggy L.; Fahey, Robert C.

    1999-01-01

    The polyamines putrescine (PUT) and spermine (SPM) were examined for their ability to protect human cell Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) against the formation of radiation-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs). As observed previously, under conditions where polyamines were shown to be almost completely absent, association with nuclear matrix protein into a nucleoid, and organization into chromatin structure, protected DNA from induction of DSBs by factors of 4.5 and 95, respectively. At concentrations below 1 mM, PUT or SPM provided equivalent levels of protection to deproteinized nuclear DNA, consistent with their capacity to scavenge radiation-induced radicals. At constant ionic strength, 5 mM SPM protected deproteinized DNA and nucleoid DNA and DNA in nuclear chromatin by factors of 100 and 26, respectively. At 5 mM, SPM provided 15 times greater protection of deproteinized DNA than did PUT. Under physiologically relevant conditions, 5 mM SPM protected DNA in the intact nucleus from the induction of DSBs by a factor of 2 relative to DNA in the absence of SPM. Studies of SPM binding during cellular fractionation revealed that a significant fraction of the cellular SPM is tightly bound in the nucleus but can be removed by extended washing. Thus the association of SPM with nuclear chromatin appears to be a significant contributor to the resistance of the cell's DNA to the induction of DSBs.

  5. Surface charge characteristics of cells from malignant cell lines and normal cell lines of the human hematopoietic system.

    PubMed

    Marikovsky, Y; Ben-Bassat, H; Leibovich, S J; Cividalli, L; Fischler, H; Danon, D

    1979-02-01

    Cells from malignant and normal lines of human hematopoietic origin were studied for their surface charge characteristics with the use of the following criteria: 1) the electron microscopic appearance of cell membranes after labeling with cationized ferritin (CF) either before or after glutaraldehyde fixation, 2) electrophoretic mobility, 3) total sialic acid content, and 4) agglutinability with poly-L-lysine (PLL). CF induced a time-dependent redistribution of surface receptors in unfixed malignant cells but not in unfixed normal cells. After 10 seconds of labeling with CF, both normal and malignant unfixed cells showed a uniform and even labeling pattern. After 5 minutes of labeling, malignant cells exhibited a highly pronounced pattern of clusters and patches, as distinct from a random and even pattern exhibited by normal cells. Both normal and malignant cells after fixation exhibited an equivalent random and even labeling pattern with CF, independent of the duration of labeling. The malignant cells studied possessed less sialic acid, had a lower electric mobility, and were agglutinated more readily with PLL than were the normal cells. PMID:310907

  6. Detection of human polyomaviruses MCPyV, HPyV6, and HPyV7 in malignant and non-malignant tonsillar tissues.

    PubMed

    Saláková, Martina; Košlabová, Eva; Vojtěchová, Zuzana; Tachezy, Ruth; Šroller, Vojtěch

    2016-04-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is associated with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a rare skin malignancy. Human polyomavirus six and seven (HPyV6 and HPyV7) were identified on a skin but have not been associated with any pathology. The serology data suggest that infection with polyomaviruses occurs in childhood and they are widespread in population. However, the site of persistent infection has not been identified. Altogether, 103 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens and five fresh frozen tissues (FF) of non-malignant tonsils and 97 FFPE and 15 FF samples of tonsillar carcinomas were analyzed by qPCR for the presence of MCPyV, HPyV6, and HPyV7 DNA. All MCPyV DNA positive FF tissues were screened for the expression of early viral transcripts. Overall prevalence of MCPyV, HPyV6, and HPyV7 in non-malignant tonsillar tissues was 10.2%, 4.6%, and, 0.9%, respectively. The prevalence of MCPyV DNA in non-malignant tonsils increased with age (P < 0.05). While the prevalence of MCPyV DNA was significantly higher in the tumors than non-malignant tissues (35.7% vs. 10.2%) (P < 0.001), the prevalence of HPyV6 DNA (5.4% vs. 4.6%) and HPyV7 DNA (1.8% vs. 0.9%) were comparable. In all MCPyV DNA positive FF tissues early transcripts were detected. MCPyV, HPyV6, and HPyV7 DNAs were found in tonsils, suggesting that the tonsils may be a site of viral latency. The viral load was low indicating that only a fraction of cells are infected. The higher prevalence of MCPyV DNA was detected in tonsillar tumors but there was no difference in the viral load between tumor and healthy tissues. J. Med. Virol. 88:695-702, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26381295

  7. Optical delineation of human malignant melanoma using second harmonic imaging of collagen

    PubMed Central

    Thrasivoulou, C.; Virich, G.; Krenacs, T.; Korom, I.; Becker, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    Skin cancer incidence has increased exponentially over the last three decades. In 2008 skin cancer caused 2280 deaths in the UK, with 2067 due to malignant melanoma. Early diagnosis can prevent mortality, however, conventional treatment requires multiple procedures and increasing treatment times. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging could offer diagnosis and demarcation of melanoma borders non-invasively at presentation thereby short-cutting the excision biopsy stage. To test the efficacy and accuracy of SHG imaging of collagen in skin and to delineate the borders of skin cancers, unstained human melanoma biopsy sections were imaged using SHG microscopy. Comparisons with sister sections, stained with H&E or Melan-A were made for correlation of invasion borders. Fresh ex vivo normal human and rat skin was imaged through its whole thickness using SHG to demonstrate this technique is transferable to in vivo tissues. SHG imaging demonstrated detailed collagen distribution in normal skin, with total absence of SHG signal (fibrillar collagen) within the melanoma-invaded tissue. The presence or absence of signal changes dramatically at the borders of the melanoma, accurately demarcating the edges that strongly correlated with H&E and Melan-A defined borders (p<0.002). SHG imaging of ex vivo human and rat skin demonstrated collagen architecture could be imaged through the full thickness of the skin. We propose that SHG imaging could be used for diagnosis and accurate demarcation of melanoma borders on presentation and therefore potentially reduce mortality rates. PMID:21559140

  8. Micro-RNAs as diagnostic or prognostic markers in human epithelial malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRs) are important regulators of mRNA and protein expression; the ability of miR expression profilings to distinguish different cancer types and classify their sub-types has been well-described. They also represent a novel biological entity with potential value as tumour biomarkers, which can improve diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of treatment response for human cancers. This endeavour has been greatly facilitated by the stability of miRs in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, and their detection in circulation. This review will summarize some of the key dysregulated miRs described to date in human epithelial malignancies, and their potential value as molecular bio-markers in FFPE tissues and blood samples. There remain many challenges in this domain, however, with the evolution of different platforms, the complexities of normalizing miR profiling data, and the importance of evaluating sufficiently-powered training and validation cohorts. Nonetheless, well-conducted miR profiling studies should contribute important insights into the molecular aberrations driving human cancer development and progression. PMID:22128797

  9. Influence of zinc deficiency on AKT-MDM2-P53 signaling axes in normal and malignant human prostate cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With prostate being the highest zinc-accumulating tissue before the onset of cancer, the effects of physiologic levels of zinc on Akt-Mdm2-p53 and Akt-p21 signaling axes in human normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) and malignant prostate LNCaP cells were examined. Cells were cultured for 6 d in...

  10. Benzamide and nicotinamide radiosensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.W.; Brown, J.M.; Grange, E.W.; Martinez, A.P.

    1993-06-01

    A method to destroy hypoxic tumor cells in a warmblooded animal is described, which method comprises: (a) administering to said warmblooded animal a compound of the formula: wherein X is O or S; Z is H, OR, SR or NHR in which R is H, hydrocarbyl (1-6C) including cyclic and unsaturated hydrocarbyl, optionally substituted with 1 or 2 substituents selected from the group consisting of halo, hydroxy, epoxy, alkoxy, alkylthio, amino including morpholino, acyloxy and acylamido and their thio analogs, alkylsulfonyl or alkylphosphonyl, carboxy or alkoxycarbonyl, or carbamyl or alkylcarbamyl, and in which R can optionally be interrupted by a single ether (-O-) linkage; or Z os O(CO)R, NH(CO)R, O(SO)R, or O(POR)R in which R is as above defined, in an amount effective to radiosensitize said hypoxic tumor cells, (b) followed by, after a time period to provide maximum radiosensitization, irradiating said tumor cells with a dose of radiation effective to destroy said cells.

  11. Isolation and characterization of human malignant glioma cells from histologically normal brain.

    PubMed

    Silbergeld, D L; Chicoine, M R

    1997-03-01

    Brain invasion prevents complete surgical extirpation of malignant gliomas; however, invasive cells from distant, histologically normal brain previously have not been isolated, cultured, and characterized. To evaluate invasive human malignant glioma cells, the authors established cultures from gross tumor and histologically normal brain. Three men and one woman, with a mean age of 67 years, underwent two frontal and two temporal lobectomies for tumors, which yielded specimens of both gross tumor and histologically normal brain. Each specimen was acquired a minimum of 4 cm from the gross tumor. The specimens were split: a portion was sent for neuropathological evaluation (three glioblastomas multiforme and one oligodendroglioma) and a portion was used to establish cell lines. Morphologically, the specimens of gross tumor and histologically normal brain were identical in three of the four cell culture pairs. Histochemical staining characteristics were consistent both within each pair and when compared with the specimens sent for neuropathological evaluation. Cultures demonstrated anchorage-independent growth in soft agarose and neoplastic karyotypes. Growth rates in culture were greater for histologically normal brain than for gross tumor in three of the four culture pairs. Although the observed increases in growth rates of histologically normal brain cultures do not correlate with in vivo behavior, these findings corroborate the previously reported stem cell potential of invasive glioma cells. Using the radial dish assay, no significant differences in motility between cultures of gross tumor and histologically normal brain were found. In summary, tumor cells were cultured from histologically normal brain acquired from a distance greater than 4 cm from the gross tumor, indicating the relative insensitivity of standard histopathological identification of invasive glioma cells (and hence the inadequacy of frozen-section evaluation of resection margins). Cell lines derived from gross tumor and histologically normal brain were usually histologically identical and demonstrated equivalent motility, but had different growth rates. PMID:9046311

  12. Preclinical studies identify novel targeted pharmacological strategies for treatment of human malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Favoni, Roberto E; Daga, Antonio; Malatesta, Paolo; Florio, Tullio

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of human malignant pleural mesothelioma (hMPM) is still increasing worldwide. hMPM prognosis is poor even if the median survival time has been slightly improved after the introduction of the up-to-date chemotherapy. Nevertheless, large phase II/III trials support the combination of platinum derivatives and pemetrexed or raltitrexed, as preferred first-line schedule. Better understanding of the molecular machinery of hMPM will lead to the design and synthesis of novel compounds targeted against pathways identified as crucial for hMPM cell proliferation and spreading. Among them, several receptors tyrosine kinase show altered activity in subsets of hMPM. This observation suggests that these kinases might represent novel therapeutic targets in this chemotherapy-resistant disease. Over these foundations, several promising studies are ongoing at preclinical level and novel molecules are currently under evaluation as well. Yet, established tumour cell lines, used for decades to investigate the efficacy of anticancer agents, although still the main source of drug efficacy studies, after long-term cultures tend to biologically diverge from the original tumour, limiting the predictive potential of in vivo efficacy. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of malignant cells capable of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, are believed to play an essential role in cancer initiation, growth, metastasization and relapse, being responsible of chemo- and radiotherapy refractoriness. According to the current carcinogenesis theory, CSCs represent the tumour-initiating cell (TIC) fraction, the only clonogenic subpopulation able to originate a tumour mass. Consequently, the recently described isolation of TICs from hMPM, the proposed main pharmacological target for novel antitumoural drugs, may contribute to better dissect the biology and multidrug resistance pathways controlling hMPM growth. PMID:22289125

  13. Human papillomavirus infection and the malignant transformation of sinonasal inverted papilloma: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ren-Wu; Guo, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Ru-Xin

    2016-06-01

    A growing number of molecular epidemiological studies have been conducted to evaluate the association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and the malignancy of sinonasal inverted papilloma (SNIP). However, the results remain inconclusive. Here, a meta-analysis was conducted to quantitatively assess this association. Case-control studies investigating SNIP tissues for presence of HPV DNA were identified. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by the Mantel-Haenszel method. An assessment of publication bias and sensitivity analysis were also performed. We calculated a pooled OR of 2.16 (95% CI=1.46-3.21, P<0.001) without statistically significant heterogeneity or publication bias. Stratification by HPV type showed a stronger association for patients with high-risk HPV (hrHPV) types, HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-16/18 infection (OR=8.8 [95% CI: 4.73-16.38], 8.04 [95% CI: 3.34-19.39], 18.57 [95% CI: 4.56-75.70], and 26.24 [4.35-158.47], respectively). When only using PCR studies, pooled ORs for patients with hrHPV, HPV-16, and HPV18 infection still reached statistical significance. However, Egger's test reflected significant publication bias in the HPV-16 sub-analysis (P=0.06), and the adjusted OR was no longer statistically significant (OR=1.65, 95%CI: 0.58-4.63). These results suggest that HPV infection, especially hrHPV (HPV-18), is significantly associated with malignant SNIP. PMID:27085508

  14. The claudin family of proteins in human malignancy: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lei; Lu, Zhe; Lu, Qun; Chen, Yan-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Tight junctions, or zonula occludens, are the most apical component of the junctional complex and provide one form of cell–cell adhesion in epithelial and endothelial cells. Nearly 90% of malignant tumors are derived from the epithelium. Loss of cell–cell adhesion is one of the steps in the progression of cancer to metastasis. At least three main tight junction family proteins have been discovered: occludin, claudin, and junctional adhesion molecule (JAM). Claudins are the most important structural and functional components of tight junction integral membrane proteins, with at least 24 members in mammals. They are crucial for the paracellular flux of ions and small molecules. Overexpression or downregulation of claudins is frequently observed in epithelial-derived cancers. However, molecular mechanisms by which claudins affect tumorigenesis remain largely unknown. As the pivotal proteins in epithelial cells, altered expression and distribution of different claudins have been reported in a wide variety of human malignancies, including pancreatic, colonic, lung, ovarian, thyroid, prostate, esophageal, and breast cancers. In this review, we will give the readers an overall picture of the changes in claudin expression observed in various cancers and their mechanisms of regulation. Downregulation of claudins contributes to epithelial transformation by increasing the paracellular permeability of nutrients and growth factors to cancerous cells. In the cases of upregulation of claudin expression, the barrier function of the cancerous epithelia changes, as they often display a disorganized arrangement of tight junction strands with increased permeability to paracellular markers. Finally, we will summarize the literature suggesting that claudins may become useful biomarkers for cancer detection and diagnosis as well as possible therapeutic targets for cancer treatment. PMID:24232410

  15. Preclinical studies identify novel targeted pharmacological strategies for treatment of human malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Favoni, Roberto E; Daga, Antonio; Malatesta, Paolo; Florio, Tullio

    2012-05-01

    The incidence of human malignant pleural mesothelioma (hMPM) is still increasing worldwide. hMPM prognosis is poor even if the median survival time has been slightly improved after the introduction of the up-to-date chemotherapy. Nevertheless, large phase II/III trials support the combination of platinum derivatives and pemetrexed or raltitrexed, as preferred first-line schedule. Better understanding of the molecular machinery of hMPM will lead to the design and synthesis of novel compounds targeted against pathways identified as crucial for hMPM cell proliferation and spreading. Among them, several receptors tyrosine kinase show altered activity in subsets of hMPM. This observation suggests that these kinases might represent novel therapeutic targets in this chemotherapy-resistant disease. Over these foundations, several promising studies are ongoing at preclinical level and novel molecules are currently under evaluation as well. Yet, established tumour cell lines, used for decades to investigate the efficacy of anticancer agents, although still the main source of drug efficacy studies, after long-term cultures tend to biologically diverge from the original tumour, limiting the predictive potential of in vivo efficacy. Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of malignant cells capable of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, are believed to play an essential role in cancer initiation, growth, metastasization and relapse, being responsible of chemo- and radiotherapy refractoriness. According to the current carcinogenesis theory, CSCs represent the tumour-initiating cell (TIC) fraction, the only clonogenic subpopulation able to originate a tumour mass. Consequently, the recently described isolation of TICs from hMPM, the proposed main pharmacological target for novel antitumoural drugs, may contribute to better dissect the biology and multidrug resistance pathways controlling hMPM growth. PMID:22289125

  16. Frequent detection of high human papillomavirus DNA loads in oral potentially malignant disorders.

    PubMed

    Pierangeli, A; Cannella, F; Scagnolari, C; Gentile, M; Sciandra, I; Antonelli, G; Ciolfi, C; Russo, C; Palaia, G; Romeo, U; Polimeni, A

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is estimated to be the cause of 40--80% of the squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx but only of a small fraction of the oral cavity cancers. The prevalence of oral HPV infection has significantly increased in the last decade, raising concerns about the role of HPV in progression of oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) toward squamous cell carcinomas. We sought to study HPV infection in patients with oral lesions, and in control individuals, using non-invasive and site-specific oral brushing and sensitive molecular methods. HPV DNA positivity and viral loads were evaluated in relation to patient data and clinical diagnosis. We enrolled 116 individuals attending Dental Clinics: 62 patients with benign oral lesions (e.g. fibromas, papillomatosis, ulcers) or OPMD (e.g. lichen, leukoplakia) and 54 controls. Oral cells were collected with Cytobrush and HPV-DNA was detected with quantitative real-time PCR for the more common high-risk (HR) and low-risk (LR) genotypes. HPV detection rate, percentage of HR HPVs and HPV-DNA loads (namely HPV16 and in particular, HPV18) were significantly higher in patients than in controls. Lichen planus cases had the highest HPV-positive rate (75.0%), hairy leukoplakia the lowest (33.3%). This study detected unexpectedly high rates of HPV infection in cells of the oral mucosa. The elevated HR HPV loads found in OPMD suggest the effectiveness of quantitative PCR in testing oral lesions. Prospective studies are needed to establish whether elevated viral loads represent a clinically useful marker of the risk of malignant progression. PMID:26408278

  17. The role of cell cycle redistribution in radiosensitization: Implications regarding the mechanism of fluorodeoxyuridine radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    McGinn, C.J.; Kunugi, fK.A.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1994-11-15

    Radiosensitization has previously been demonstrated in a human colon cancer cell line (HT-29) following a 2 h exposure to low, clinically relevant concentrations (0.05-0.5 {mu}M) of fluorodeoxyuridine (FdUrd) (15). The sensitizer enhancement ratio value (measured at 10% survival) plateaued at {approx} 1.7 between 16 and 32 h following removal of drug. Parallel studies investigating the effect of FdUrd on the distribution of cells throughout the cell cycle found that the percentage of cells in early S-phase increased to {approx} 70% during the same period that maximal radiosensitization was noted. As a follow-up to these findings, experiments have been designed to investigate the contribution of this early S-phase delay to radiosensitization. Synchronized populations of Ht-29 cells have been obtained with three separate techniques. Two involve the induction of a reversible metaphase arrest J(with high pressure N{sub 2}O or colcemid) followed by a shakeoff of mitotic cells. The third uses a plant amino acid, mimosine, to induce a reversible block at the G{sub 1}/S boundary. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the degree of synchrony based on bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) uptake and propidium iodide (PI) staining. Radiation survival curves were obtained on these synchronized populations to investigate changes in radiosensitivity through the cell cycle. Additionally, levels of thymidylate synthase (TS), the primary target of FdUrd cytotoxicity, were measured in each phase of the cell cycle using the TS 106 monoclonal antibody against human TS. Synchronization with mitotic shakeoff produced relatively pure populations of cells in G{sub 1}; however, the degree of synchrony in early S-phase was limited both by cells remaining in G;{sub 1} and by cells progressing into late S-phase. These techniques failed to reveal increased radiosensitivity in early S-phase at 10% survival. 36 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Horizontal Transmission and Retention of Malignancy, as well as Functional Human Genes, After Spontaneous Fusion of Human Glioblastoma and Hamster Host Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, David M.; Zagzag, David; Heselmeyer-Haddad, Kerstin M.; Berroa Garcia, Lissa Y; Ried, Thomas; Loo, Meiyu; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Gold, David V.

    2011-01-01

    Cell fusion in vitro has been used to study cancer, gene mapping and regulation, and the production of antibodies via hybridomas. However, in-vivo heterosynkaryon formation by cell-cell fusion has received less attention. This investigation describes the spontaneous fusion of a human glioblastoma with normal hamster cells after xenogeneic transplantation, resulting in malignant cells that express both human and hamster genes and gene products, and retention of glioblastoma traits with an enhanced ability to metastasize. Three of 7 human genes found showed translation of their proteins during serial propagation in vivo or in vitro for years; namely, CD74, CXCR4, and PLAGL2, each implicated with malignancy or glioblastoma. This supports the thesis that genetic hybridization of cancer and normal cells can transmit malignancy and also, as first described herein, regulatory genes involved in the tumor’s organotypic morphology. Evidence also is increasing that even cell-free human cancer DNA can induce malignancy and transfer genetic information to normal cells. Hence, we posit that the transfer of genetic information between tumor and stromal cells, whether by cell-cell fusion or other mechanisms, is implicated in the progression of malignancy, and may further define the crosstalk between cancer cells and their stromal neighbors. PMID:21796629

  19. Loss of Canonical Smad4 Signaling Promotes KRAS Driven Malignant Transformation of Human Pancreatic Duct Epithelial Cells and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Lisa; Radulovich, Nikolina; Zhu, Chang-Qi; Wang, Dennis; To, Christine; Ibrahimov, Emin; Tsao, Ming-Sound

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in North America. Activating KRAS mutations and Smad4 loss occur in approximately 90% and 55% of PDAC, respectively. While their roles in the early stages of PDAC development have been confirmed in genetically modified mouse models, their roles in the multistep malignant transformation of human pancreatic duct cells have not been directly demonstrated. Here, we report that Smad4 represents a barrier in KRAS-mediated malignant transformation of the near normal immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cell line model. Marked Smad4 downregulation by shRNA in KRASG12V expressing HPDE cells failed to cause tumorigenic transformation. However, KRAS-mediated malignant transformation occurred in a new HPDE-TGF-? resistant (T?R) cell line that completely lacks Smad4 protein expression and is resistant to the mito-inhibitory activity of TGF-?. This transformation resulted in tumor formation and development of metastatic phenotype when the cells were implanted orthotopically into the mouse pancreas. Smad4 restoration re-established TGF-? sensitivity, markedly increased tumor latency by promoting apoptosis, and decreased metastatic potential. These results directly establish the critical combination of the KRAS oncogene and complete Smad4 inactivation in the multi-stage malignant transformation and metastatic progression of normal human HPDE cells. PMID:24386371

  20. Alterations in the activity and isozymic profile of human phosphofructokinase during malignant transformation in vivo and in vitro: transformation- and progression-linked discriminants of malignancy.

    PubMed

    Vora, S; Halper, J P; Knowles, D M

    1985-07-01

    6-Phosphofructokinase (PFK) plays a central role in the regulation of glycolysis in both normal and neoplastic cells. Since PFK also mediates the Pasteur effect, it coordinates the two modes of energy production in most cell systems, i.e., glycolysis and respiration. The energy production in the cancer cell is characterized by a predominance of aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) and a diminution or lack of the Pasteur effect. Previous studies from this laboratory have demonstrated that PFK in humans and in the rat exists in multiple tetrameric isozymic forms consisting of three unique subunits under separate genetic controls, M, L, and P types. These isozymes are distinguishable from one another by ion-exchange chromatography and subunit-specific antibodies. Various organs exhibit unique isozyme distribution patterns which essentially reflect the preferred mode of carbohydrate metabolism utilized, i.e., glycolysis or gluconeogenesis or both. In order to investigate whether the high aerobic glycolysis of the cancer cell can be explained on the basis of a lack of the regulatory function of PFK due to an altered isozyme distribution pattern, we compared the activity and isozymic profile of the enzyme from malignant cells of human leukemias, lymphomas, virus-transformed cell lines, and established malignant cell lines of lymphoid, myeloid, erythroid, and fibroblastic origin and their normal counterparts. The myeloid and erythroid cell lines were also investigated after in vitro differentiation induced by dimethyl sulfoxide, sodium butyrate, hemin, etc. Our results show that, as is the case with hexokinase and pyruvate kinase, the other two rate-limiting enzymes of glycolysis, PFK shows both quantitative increases and isozymic alterations secondary to altered gene expression during neoplastic transformation, both in vivo and in vitro. In contradistinction to the isozymic alteration in hexokinase and pyruvate kinase, where highly regulated liver-type isozymes decrease or disappear and are replaced by the nonregulated ones, in the case of PFK, the highly regulated liver-type isozyme not only persists but actually increases, followed by an increase in the platelet-type isozyme. These isozymic alterations closely parallel the quantitative increases in total PFK activity, which in turn is closely related to the rate of replication of cancer cells and hence an increase in metabolism. Thus, human PFK is both a transformation- and a progression-linked discriminant of malignancy (For definitions of these terms, see Weber et al., N. Engl. J. Med., 296: 486-493, 1977.).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:3159473

  1. Increased Wild-Type N-Ras Activation by Neurofibromin Down-Regulation Increases Human Neuroblastoma Stem Cell Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dan; Spengler, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    Cellular heterogeneity is a well-known feature of human neuroblastoma tumors and cell lines. Of the 3 phenotypes (N-, I-, and S-type) isolated and characterized, the I-type cancer stem cell of neuroblastoma is the most malignant. Here, we report that, although wild-type N-Ras protein is expressed at the same level in all 3 neuroblastoma cell phenotypes, activated N-Ras–GTP level is significantly higher in I-type cancer stem cells. When activated N-Ras levels were decreased by transfection of a dominant-negative N-Ras construct, the malignant potential of I-type cancer stem cells decreased significantly. Conversely, when weakly malignant N-type cells were transfected with a constitutively active N-Ras construct, activated N-Ras levels, and malignant potential, were significantly increased. Thus, high levels of N-Ras–GTP are required for the increased malignancy of I-type neuroblastoma cancer stem cells. Moreover, increased activation of N-Ras results from significant down-regulation of neurofibromin (NF1), an important RasGAP. This specific down-regulation is mediated by an ubiquitin-proteasome–dependent pathway. Thus, decreased expression of NF1 in I-type neuroblastoma cancer stem cells causes a high level of activated N-Ras that is, at least in part, responsible for their higher tumorigenic potential. PMID:22737269

  2. Expression of peroxiredoxin 1 and 4 promotes human lung cancer malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Wu, Lisha; Mishra, Murli; Chawsheen, Hedy A; Wei, Qiou

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Peroxiredoxin (Prx) family are major cellular antioxidants that scavenge hydrogen peroxide and play essential roles in oxidative stress and cell signaling. 2-Cys Prxs, including Prx1, 2, 3 and 4, have been indicated in multiple oncogenic signaling pathways and thus may contribute to various processes of cancer development. The significance of 2-Cys Prxs in lung cancer development and their biological function in signal transduction have not been fully investigated. In this study we analyzed the expression of 2-Cys Prxs in lung cancer, and examined their levels of expression in a variety of cell lines established from human lung normal or cancer tissues. We found that 2-Cys Prxs, in particular, Prx1 and Prx4, were preferentially expressed in cell lines derived from human lung cancer. Through isoform specific knockdown of individual Prx, we demonstrated that Prx1 and Prx4 (but not Prx3) were required for human lung cancer A549 cells to form soft agar colony and to invade through matrigel in culture. Knockdown of Prx1 or Prx4 significantly reduced the activation of c-Jun and repressed the AP-1 mediated promoter activity. In mouse xenograft models, knockdown of Prx4 in A549 cells reduced subcutaneous tumor growth and blocked metastasis formation initiated through tail vein injection. Moreover, overexpression of Prx1 or Prx4 further enhanced the malignancy of A549 cells both in culture and in mouse xenografts in vivo. These data provide an in-depth understanding of the contribution of Prx1 and Prx4 to lung cancer development and are of importance for future development of therapeutic methods that targeting 2-Cys Prxs. PMID:25232487

  3. Adenovirus-mediated suppression of HMGI(Y) protein synthesis as potential therapy of human malignant neoplasias

    PubMed Central

    Scala, Stefania; Portella, Giuseppe; Fedele, Monica; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Fusco, Alfredo

    2000-01-01

    High mobility group I (HMGI) proteins are overexpressed in several human malignant tumors. We previously demonstrated that inhibition of HMGI synthesis prevents thyroid cell transformation. Here, we report that an adenovirus carrying the HMGI(Y) gene in an antisense orientation (Ad-Yas) induced programmed cell death of two human thyroid anaplastic carcinoma cell lines (ARO and FB-1), but not normal thyroid cells. The Ad-Yas virus led to death of lung, colon, and breast carcinoma cells. A control adenovirus carrying the lacZ gene did not inhibit the growth of either normal or neoplastic cells. Ad-Yas treatment of tumors induced in athymic mice by ARO cells caused a drastic reduction in tumor size. Therefore, suppression of HMGI(Y) protein synthesis by an HMGI(Y) antisense adenoviral vector may be a useful treatment strategy in a variety of human malignant neoplasias, in which HMGI(Y) gene overexpression is a general event. PMID:10759549

  4. Detection of tolerance against human chorionic gonadotropin at malignant and benign tumors of female reproduction system.

    PubMed

    Akhvlediani, L; Nagervadze, M; Dumbadze, G

    2009-06-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of hCG synthesis during malignant gynecological tumors and establish the level of tolerance against hCG in malignant and benign tumors. We have examined peripheral blood of 86 patients with malignant and benign tumors of reproductive system and healthy donors, aged 42-65 for detection of anti-hCG auto-antibodies and possibility of hCG synthesis. Investigation have shown that in case of malignant tumors as auto-antibody concentration is low and hCG level is high, hCG plays a role of autocrine growth factor for tumor cells and maintains the malignancy and tumor growth. The existence of auto-antibody indicates that immune system is not completely tolerant to hCG. During studies on the effectiveness of anti-tumor vaccine, this fact should be taken into consideration. PMID:19578206

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Malignant Transformation by Low Dose Cadmium in Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kluz, Thomas; Cohen, Lisa; Shen, Steven S.; Costa, Max

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium is a carcinogenic metal, the mechanisms of which are not fully understood. In this study, human bronchial epithelial cells were transformed with sub-toxic doses of cadmium (0.01, 0.05, and 0.1 μM) and transformed clones were characterized for gene expression changes using RNA-seq, as well as other molecular measurements. 440 genes were upregulated and 47 genes were downregulated in cadmium clones relative to control clones over 1.25-fold. Upregulated genes were associated mostly with gene ontology terms related to embryonic development, immune response, and cell movement, while downregulated genes were associated with RNA metabolism and regulation of transcription. Several embryonic genes were upregulated, including the transcription regulator SATB2. SATB2 is critical for normal skeletal development and has roles in gene expression regulation and chromatin remodeling. Small hairpin RNA knockdown of SATB2 significantly inhibited growth in soft agar, indicating its potential as a driver of metal-induced carcinogenesis. An increase in oxidative stress and autophagy was observed in cadmium clones. In addition, the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase was depleted by transformation with cadmium. MGMT loss caused significant decrease in cell viability after treatment with the alkylating agent temozolomide, demonstrating diminished capacity to repair such damage. Results reveal various mechanisms of cadmium-induced malignant transformation in BEAS-2B cells including upregulation of SATB2, downregulation of MGMT, and increased oxidative stress. PMID:27186882

  6. Fine structure of three major grades of malignancy of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kern, H F; Röher, H D; von Bülow, M; Klöppel, G

    1987-01-01

    Fine structural analysis of a series of 51 adenocarcinoma in the human pancreas revealed their composition of one major cell type, a mucoprotein secreting cell which has a number of structural features resembling the cells of the larger interlobular ducts in the normal pancreas. In addition to mucus secretion, the tumor cells released large quantities of membrane material, both as vesicles pinched off from microvilli and as blebs sequestered from the plasma membrane. At the ultrastructural level the subdivision of tumors into three major grades of malignancy was manifested by a progressive loss in cell polarity and a reduction in the association of tumor cells with elements of the extracellular matrix (basal lamina). The highest grade of differentiation grew as tubular structures with a common luminal space, while with progressive dedifferentiation and loss of cell polarity secretion occurred into both luminal and interstitial spaces. This release pattern of tumor cell products, which constitute a complex mixture of exportable and constitutive proteins, will lead to their appearance in both pancreatic juice and blood circulation. Tumor cell spreading occurred along perineural sheaths and was combined with nerve fiber destruction. Primary tumors and lymph node or liver metastases did not differ significantly in their respective grading. PMID:3575312

  7. β-lapachone suppresses the proliferation of human malignant melanoma cells by targeting specificity protein 1.

    PubMed

    Bang, Woong; Jeon, Young-Joo; Cho, Jin Hyoung; Lee, Ra Ham; Park, Seon-Min; Shin, Jae-Cheon; Choi, Nag-Jin; Choi, Yung Hyun; Cho, Jung-Jae; Seo, Jae-Min; Lee, Seung-Yeop; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Chae, Jung-Il

    2016-02-01

    β-lapachone (β-lap), a novel natural quinone derived from the bark of the Pink trumpet tree (Tabebuia avellanedae) has been demonstrated to have anticancer activity. In this study, we investigated whether β-lap exhibits anti-proliferative effects on two human malignant melanoma (HMM) cell lines, G361 and SK-MEL-28. The effects of β-lap on the HMM cell lines were investigated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)‑5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)‑2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, Annexin V and Dead cell assay, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) assay and western blot analysis. We demonstrated that β-lap significantly induced apoptosis and suppressed cell viability in the HMM cells. Intriguingly, the transcription factor specificity protein 1 (Sp1) was significantly downregulated by β-lap in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, β-lap modulated the protein expression level of the Sp1 regulatory genes including cell cycle regulatory proteins and apoptosis-associated proteins. Taken together, our findings indicated that β-lap modulates Sp1 transactivation and induces apoptotic cell death through the regulation of cell cycle- and apoptosis-associated proteins. Thus, β-lap may be used as a promising anticancer drug for cancer prevention and may improve the clinical outcome of patients with cancer. PMID:26718788

  8. Immunohistochemical detection of the multidrug transport protein P170 in human normal tissues and malignant lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Pileri, S A; Sabattini, E; Falini, B; Tazzari, P L; Gherlinzoni, F; Michieli, M G; Damiani, D; Zucchini, L; Gobbi, M; Tsuruo, T

    1991-08-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies, MRK16 and C219, both directed at the 170 kDa P-glycoprotein multidrug resistance agent, were applied to frozen sections or cytospin preparations from normal human tissues and 60 non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphomas. Adrenal gland, kidney, liver and pancreas were always stained by the reagents, albeit with slightly different patterns. Brain capillaries as well as macrophages and some elements of the bone marrow, peripheral blood, ovarian stroma and colonic, gastric and jejunal mucosa were positive in all examined preparations. There were differences in the staining patterns with the two antibodies. Among the 60 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, 25 contained a number of positive cells, which ranged from 2% to 100%. No correlation was seen between the expression of P170 and histological type, stage, clinical symptoms or growth fraction. A close relationship was shown between the presence of P170 positive elements and the clinical course of the disease (P less than 0.001). PMID:1684559

  9. Telomerase activity and human papillomavirus in malignant, premalignant and benign cervical lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Mutirangura, A.; Sriuranpong, V.; Termrunggraunglert, W.; Tresukosol, D.; Lertsaguansinchai, P.; Voravud, N.; Niruthisard, S.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define a correlation between telomerase activity and human papillomavirus (HPV) in normal control tissue and in benign, premalignant and malignant cervical lesions. Telomerase activity was detectable in 33 out of 34 cases of squamous-cell carcinoma, five out of six cases of microinvasive carcinoma, 8 out of 20 cases and two out of six cases of high- and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs) respectively. The higher frequency of positive telomerase in invasive carcinoma compared with SILs was observed in both HPV-associated and non-associated groups. Whereas 92.6% of HPV-positive and 100% of HPV-negative invasive lesions expressed telomerase, only 50% of HPV-positive and 25% of HPV-negative SILs did. Interestingly, telomerase activity was also detectable in 13 out of 28 cases of benign lesions regardless of the presence of HPV. In conclusion, there may be two roles of telomerase in the cervix. The first one would present in benign lesions; the second is associated with cancer development and activated during the late stage of multistep carcinogenesis in both HPV-positive and -negative groups. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9764586

  10. Specific Expression of Human Intelectin-1 in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma and Gastrointestinal Goblet Cells

    PubMed Central

    Washimi, Kota; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Yamashita, Makiko; Kageyama, Taihei; Suzuki, Katsuo; Yoshihara, Mitsuyo; Miyagi, Yohei; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Tsuji, Shoutaro

    2012-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a fatal tumor. It is often hard to discriminate MPM from metastatic tumors of other types because currently, there are no reliable immunopathological markers for MPM. MPM is differentially diagnosed by some immunohistochemical tests on pathology specimens. In the present study, we investigated the expression of intelectin-1, a new mesothelioma marker, in normal tissues in the whole body and in many cancers, including MPM, by immunohistochemical analysis. We found that in normal tissues, human intelectin-1 was mainly secreted from gastrointestinal goblet cells along with mucus into the intestinal lumen, and it was also expressed, to a lesser extent, in mesothelial cells and urinary epithelial cells. Eighty-eight percent of epithelioid-type MPMs expressed intelectin-1, whereas sarcomatoid-type MPMs, biphasic MPMs, and poorly differentiated MPMs were rarely positive for intelectin-1. Intelectin-1 was not expressed in other cancers, except in mucus-producing adenocarcinoma. These results suggest that intelectin-1 is a better marker for epithelioid-type MPM than other mesothelioma markers because of its specificity and the simplicity of pathological assessment. Pleural intelectin-1 could be a useful diagnostic marker for MPM with applications in histopathological identification of MPM. PMID:22768319

  11. RHBDL2 Is a Critical Membrane Protease for Anoikis Resistance in Human Malignant Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chao-Han; Jiang, Shinn-Jong; Hung, Jui-Hsiang; Chang, Bi-Ing; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Anoikis resistance allows metastatic tumor cells to survive in a homeless environment. Activation of epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is one of the key mechanisms for metastatic tumor cells to resist anoikis, yet the regulation mechanisms of homeless-triggered EGFR activation in metastatic tumor cells remain unclear. Rhomboid-like-2 (RHBDL2), an evolutionally conserved intramembrane serine protease, can cleave the EGF ligand and thus trigger EGFR activation. Herein, we demonstrated that RHBDL2 overexpression in human epithelial cells resulted in promotion of cell proliferation, reduction of cell adhesion, and suppression of anoikis. During long-term suspension cultures, increased RHBDL2 was only detected in aggressive tumor cell lines. Treatment with the rhomboid protease inhibitor or RHBDL2 shRNA increased cleaved caspase 3, a marker of apoptosis. Finally, inhibition of EGFR activation increased the cleaved caspase 3 and attenuated the detachment-induced focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation. Taken together, these findings provide evidence for the first time that RHBDL2 is a critical molecule in anoikis resistance of malignant epithelial cells, possibly through the EGFR-mediated signaling. Our study demonstrates RHBDL2 as a new therapeutic target for cancer metastasis. PMID:24977233

  12. p53 mutations in human lymphoid malignancies: association with Burkitt lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Gaidano, G; Ballerini, P; Gong, J Z; Inghirami, G; Neri, A; Newcomb, E W; Magrath, I T; Knowles, D M; Dalla-Favera, R

    1991-01-01

    We have investigated the frequency of p53 mutations in B- and T-cell human lymphoid malignancies, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the major subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. p53 exons 5-9 were studied by using genomic DNA from 197 primary tumors and 27 cell lines by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and by direct sequencing of PCR-amplified fragments. Mutations were found associated with (i) Burkitt lymphoma (9/27 biopsies; 17/27 cell lines) and its leukemic counterpart L3-type B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (5/9), both of which also carry activated c-myc oncogenes, and (ii) B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (6/40) and, in particular, its stage of progression known as Richter's transformation (3/7). Mutations were not found at any significant frequency in other types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma or acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In many cases, only the mutated allele was detectable, implying loss of the normal allele. These results suggest that (i) significant differences in the frequency of p53 mutations are present among subtypes of neoplasms derived from the same tissue; (ii) p53 may play a role in tumor progression in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia; (iii) the presence of both p53 loss/inactivation and c-myc oncogene activation may be important in the pathogenesis of Burkitt lymphoma and its leukemic form L3-type B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Images PMID:2052620

  13. ZAP-70 is expressed by normal and malignant human B-cell subsets of different maturational stage.

    PubMed

    Scielzo, C; Camporeale, A; Geuna, M; Alessio, M; Poggi, A; Zocchi, M R; Chilosi, M; Caligaris-Cappio, F; Ghia, P

    2006-04-01

    ZAP-70 tyrosine kinase is involved in signalling pathways following T-cell receptor stimulation and was originally described only in T cells and natural killer cells. ZAP-70 expression has been reported in normal mouse B lineage cells and in human malignant B lymphocytes, mainly in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) where it correlates with clinical outcome. We analyzed several B-cell lines and ex vivo malignant B cells, ranging from acute lymphoblastic leukemia to multiple myeloma and reflecting different stages of B-cell differentiation, and they showed ZAP-70 expression regardless their maturation stage. We then analyzed by Western blot and flow cytometry different human normal B-lymphocyte subpopulations: naïve, germinal center and memory B cells from tonsils, CD19+ CD5+ cells from cord blood and CD19+ lymphocytes from peripheral blood. All expressed ZAP-70 protein, though at different levels depending on their differentiation, activation and tissue localization. In addition, ZAP-70 expression levels could be modulated following stimulation via the B-cell receptor. These findings implicate a potential role of ZAP-70 in the signalling pathway of B lymphocytes at different maturational stages, indicate that ZAP-70 expression is not a CLL-specific feature among B-cell malignancies and suggest that the absence of ZAP-70 rather than its presence should be considered abnormal for malignant B lymphocytes. PMID:16482211

  14. Extract of Cordyceps militaris inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth of human malignant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ruma, I Made Winarsa; Putranto, Endy Widya; Kondo, Eisaku; Watanabe, Risayo; Saito, Ken; Inoue, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Ken-Ichi; Nakata, Susumu; Kaihata, Masaji; Murata, Hitoshi; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo

    2014-07-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor development and metastasis. Among several angiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF) is important for tumor-derived angiogenesis and commonly overexpressed in solid tumors. Thus, many antitumor strategies targeting VEGF have been developed to inhibit cancer angiogenesis, offering insights into the successful treatment of solid cancers. However, there are a number of issues such as harmful effects on normal vascularity in clinical trials. Taking this into consideration, we employed Cordyceps militaris as an antitumor approach due to its biological safety in vivo. The herbal medicinal mushroom Cordyceps militaris has been reported to show potential anticancer properties including anti-angiogenic capacity; however, its concrete properties have yet to be fully demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the biological role of Cordyceps militaris extract in tumor cells, especially in regulating angiogenesis and tumor growth of a human malignant melanoma cell line. We demonstrated that Cordyceps militaris extract remarkably suppressed tumor growth via induction of apoptotic cell death in culture that links to the abrogation of VEGF production in melanoma cells. This was followed by mitigation of Akt1 and GSK-3β activation, while p38α phosphorylation levels were increased. Extract treatment in mouse model xenografted with human melanoma cells resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect with down-regulation of VEGF expression. The results suggest that suppression of tumor growth by Cordyceps militaris extract is, at least, mediated by its anti-angiogenicity and apoptosis induction capacities. Cordyceps militaris extract may be a potent antitumor herbal drug for solid tumors. PMID:24789042

  15. A Three-dimensional Tissue Culture Model to Study Primary Human Bone Marrow and its Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Mukti R.; Belch, Andrew R.; Pilarski, Linda M; Kirshner, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Tissue culture has been an invaluable tool to study many aspects of cell function, from normal development to disease. Conventional cell culture methods rely on the ability of cells either to attach to a solid substratum of a tissue culture dish or to grow in suspension in liquid medium. Multiple immortal cell lines have been created and grown using such approaches, however, these methods frequently fail when primary cells need to be grown ex vivo. Such failure has been attributed to the absence of the appropriate extracellular matrix components of the tissue microenvironment from the standard systems where tissue culture plastic is used as a surface for cell growth. Extracellular matrix is an integral component of the tissue microenvironment and its presence is crucial for the maintenance of physiological functions such as cell polarization, survival, and proliferation. Here we present a 3-dimensional tissue culture method where primary bone marrow cells are grown in extracellular matrix formulated to recapitulate the microenvironment of the human bone (rBM system). Embedded in the extracellular matrix, cells are supplied with nutrients through the medium supplemented with human plasma, thus providing a comprehensive system where cell survival and proliferation can be sustained for up to 30 days while maintaining the cellular composition of the primary tissue. Using the rBM system we have successfully grown primary bone marrow cells from normal donors and patients with amyloidosis, and various hematological malignancies. The rBM system allows for direct, in-matrix real time visualization of the cell behavior and evaluation of preclinical efficacy of novel therapeutics. Moreover, cells can be isolated from the rBM and subsequently used for in vivo transplantation, cell sorting, flow cytometry, and nucleic acid and protein analysis. Taken together, the rBM method provides a reliable system for the growth of primary bone marrow cells under physiological conditions. PMID:24637629

  16. Comprehensive Glycomics of a Multistep Human Brain Tumor Model Reveals Specific Glycosylation Patterns Related to Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kazue; Kimura, Taichi; Piao, Jinhua; Tanaka, Shinya; Shinohara, Yasuro

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells frequently express glycans at different levels and/or with fundamentally different structures from those expressed by normal cells, and therefore elucidation and manipulation of these glycosylations may provide a beneficial approach to cancer therapy. However, the relationship between altered glycosylation and causal genetic alteration(s) is only partially understood. Here, we employed a unique approach that applies comprehensive glycomic analysis to a previously described multistep tumorigenesis model. Normal human astrocytes were transformed via the serial introduction of hTERT, SV40ER, H-RasV12, and myrAKT, thereby mimicking human brain tumor grades I-IV. More than 160 glycans derived from three major classes of cell surface glycoconjugates (N- and O-glycans on glycoproteins, and glycosphingolipids) were quantitatively explored, and specific glycosylation patterns related to malignancy were systematically identified. The sequential introduction of hTERT, SV40ER, H-RasV12, and myrAKT led to (i) temporal expression of pauci-mannose/mono-antennary type N-glycans and GD3 (hTERT); (ii) switching from ganglio- to globo-series glycosphingolipids and the appearance of Neu5Gc (hTERT and SV40ER); (iii) temporal expression of bisecting GlcNAc residues, α2,6-sialylation, and stage-specific embryonic antigen-4, accompanied by suppression of core 2 O-glycan biosynthesis (hTERT, SV40ER and Ras); and (iv) increased expression of (neo)lacto-series glycosphingolipids and fucosylated N-glycans (hTERT, SV40ER, Ras and AKT). These sequential and transient glycomic alterations may be useful for tumor grade diagnosis and tumor prognosis, and also for the prediction of treatment response. PMID:26132161

  17. Clinical Significance of Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Expression in Human Malignant and Benign Thyroid Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lakiotaki, Eleftheria; Giaginis, Constantinos; Tolia, Maria; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Giannopoulou, Ioanna; Kyrgias, George; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is comprised of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and proteins responsible for their metabolism participate in many different functions indispensable to homeostatic regulation in several tissues, exerting also antitumorigenic effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of CB1 and CB2 expression in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions. CB1 and CB2 proteins' expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 87 patients with benign (n = 43) and malignant (n = 44) lesions and was statistically analyzed with clinicopathological parameters, follicular cells' proliferative capacity, and risk of recurrence rate estimated according to the American Thyroid Association (ATA) staging system. Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was significantly more frequently observed in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0005, resp.). Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was also significantly more frequently observed in papillary carcinomas compared to hyperplastic nodules (p = 0.0097 and p = 0.0110, resp.). In malignant thyroid lesions, elevated CB2 expression was significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases (p = 0.0301). Enhanced CB2 expression was also more frequently observed in malignant thyroid cases with presence of capsular (p = 0.1165), lymphatic (p = 0.1989), and vascular invasion (p = 0.0555), as well as in those with increased risk of recurrence rate (p = 0.1165), at a nonsignificant level though, whereas CB1 expression was not associated with any of the clinicopathological parameters examined. Our data suggest that CB receptors may be involved in malignant thyroid transformation and especially CB2 receptor could serve as useful biomarker and potential therapeutic target in thyroid neoplasia. PMID:26539529

  18. Malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Moore, Alastair J; Parker, Robert J; Wiggins, John

    2008-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a fatal asbestos-associated malignancy originating from the lining cells (mesothelium) of the pleural and peritoneal cavities, as well as the pericardium and the tunica vaginalis. The exact prevalence is unknown but it is estimated that mesotheliomas represent less than 1% of all cancers. Its incidence is increasing, with an expected peak in the next 10-20 years. Pleural malignant mesothelioma is the most common form of mesothelioma. Typical presenting features are those of chest pain and dyspnoea. Breathlessness due to a pleural effusion without chest pain is reported in about 30% of patients. A chest wall mass, weight loss, sweating, abdominal pain and ascites (due to peritoneal involvement) are less common presentations. Mesothelioma is directly attributable to occupational asbestos exposure with a history of exposure in over 90% of cases. There is also evidence that mesothelioma may result from both para-occupational exposure and non-occupational "environmental" exposure. Idiopathic or spontaneous mesothelioma can also occur in the absence of any exposure to asbestos, with a spontaneous rate in humans of around one per million. A combination of accurate exposure history, along with examination radiology and pathology are essential to make the diagnosis. Distinguishing malignant from benign pleural disease can be challenging. The most helpful CT findings suggesting malignant pleural disease are 1) a circumferential pleural rind, 2) nodular pleural thickening, 3) pleural thickening of > 1 cm and 4) mediastinal pleural involvement. Involvement of a multidisciplinary team is recommended to ensure prompt and appropriate management, using a framework of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, surgery and symptom palliation with end of life care. Compensation issues must also be considered. Life expectancy in malignant mesothelioma is poor, with a median survival of about one year following diagnosis. PMID:19099560

  19. Radioimmunoassay for human pancreatic ribonuclease and measurement of serum immunoreactive pancreatic ribonuclease in patients with malignant tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kurihara, M.; Ogawa, M.; Ohta, T.; Kurokawa, E.; Kitahara, T.; Murata, A.; Matsuda, K.; Kosaki, G.; Watanabe, T.; Wada, H.

    1984-05-01

    A method for radioimmunoassay of human pancreatic RNase was developed. The method is sensitive, reproducible, and specific. Almost no cross-reactivity exists between human pancreatic and liver RNases. A good correlation was observed between the serum concentration of pancreatic RNase as measured by radioimmunoassay and its enzymatic activity using polycytidylic acid as substrate. The concentration of serum pancreatic RNase correlates well with age, blood urea nitrogen, and albumin contents but does not correlate with serum amylase activity. Using the data of 52 patients with malignant tumors except pancreatic cancer, serum RNase level could be expressed by a multiple regression equation: Immunoreactive RNase content in pancreatic cancer was elevated in patients with complications from renal failure. Serum pancreatic RNase contents in patients with pancreatic cancer measured by radioimmunoassay agreed well with the values calculated using the equation derived from the data of patients with other malignant tumors.

  20. Analysis of individual differences in radiosensitivity using genome editing.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, S; Royba, E; Akutsu, S N; Yanagihara, H; Ochiai, H; Kudo, Y; Tashiro, S; Miyamoto, T

    2016-06-01

    Current standards for radiological protection of the public have been uniformly established. However, individual differences in radiosensitivity are suggested to exist in human populations, which could be caused by nucleotide variants of DNA repair genes. In order to verify if such genetic variants are responsible for individual differences in radiosensitivity, they could be introduced into cultured human cells for evaluation. This strategy would make it possible to analyse the effect of candidate nucleotide variants on individual radiosensitivity, independent of the diverse genetic background. However, efficient gene targeting in cultured human cells is difficult due to the low frequency of homologous recombination (HR) repair. The development of artificial nucleases has enabled efficient HR-mediated genome editing to be performed in cultured human cells. A novel genome editing strategy, 'transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated two-step single base pair editing', has been developed, and this was used to introduce a nucleotide variant associated with a chromosomal instability syndrome bi-allelically into cultured human cells to demonstrate that it is the causative mutation. It is proposed that this editing technique will be useful to investigate individual radiosensitivity. PMID:27012844

  1. The Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor SWAP-70 Modulates the Migration and Invasiveness of Human Malignant Glioma Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Seol, Ho Jun; Smith, Christian A; Salhia, Bodour; Rutka, James T

    2009-01-01

    The malignant glioma is the most common primary human brain tumor. Its tendency to invade away from the primary tumor mass is considered a leading cause of tumor recurrence and treatment failure. Accordingly, the molecular pathogenesis of glioma invasion is currently under investigation. Previously, we examined a gene expression array database comparing human gliomas to nonneoplastic controls and identified several Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors with differential expression. Here, we report that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor SWAP-70 has increased expression in malignant gliomas and strongly correlates with lowered patient survival. SWAP-70 is a multifunctional signaling protein involved in membrane ruffling that works cooperatively with activated Rac. Using a glioma tissue microarray, we validated that SWAP-70 demonstrates higher expression in malignant gliomas compared with low-grade gliomas or nonneoplastic brain tissue. Through immunofluorescence, SWAP-70 localizes to membrane ruffles in response to the growth factor, epidermal growth factor. To assess the role of SWAP-70 in glioma migration and invasion, we inhibited its expression withsmall interfering RNAs and observed decreased glioma cell migration and invasion. SWAP-70 overexpression led to increased levels of active Rac even in low-serum conditions. In addition, when SWAP-70 was overexpressed in glioma cells, we observed enhanced membrane ruffle formation followed by increased cellmigration and invasiveness. Taken together, our findings suggest that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor SWAP-70 plays an important role in the migration and invasion of human gliomas into the surrounding tissue. PMID:19956392

  2. The Methanol Extract of Angelica sinensis Induces Cell Apoptosis and Suppresses Tumor Growth in Human Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wen-Lin; Harn, Horng-jyh; Hung, Pei-Hsiu; Hsieh, Ming-Chang; Chang, Kai-Fu; Huang, Xiao-Fan; Liao, Kuang-Wen; Lee, Ming-Shih; Tsai, Nu-Man

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly vascularized and invasive neoplasm. The methanol extract of Angelica sinensis (AS-M) is commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat several diseases, such as gastric mucosal damage, hepatic injury, menopausal symptoms, and chronic glomerulonephritis. AS-M also displays potency in suppressing the growth of malignant brain tumor cells. The growth suppression of malignant brain tumor cells by AS-M results from cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. AS-M upregulates expression of cyclin kinase inhibitors, including p16, to decrease the phosphorylation of Rb proteins, resulting in arrest at the G0-G1 phase. The expression of the p53 protein is increased by AS-M and correlates with activation of apoptosis-associated proteins. Therefore, the apoptosis of cancer cells induced by AS-M may be triggered through the p53 pathway. In in vivo studies, AS-M not only suppresses the growth of human malignant brain tumors but also significantly prolongs patient survival. In addition, AS-M has potent anticancer effects involving cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and antiangiogenesis. The in vitro and in vivo anticancer effects of AS-M indicate that this extract warrants further investigation and potential development as a new antibrain tumor agent, providing new hope for the chemotherapy of malignant brain cancer. PMID:24319475

  3. Altered expression of G/sub 1/-specific genes in human malignant myeloid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Calabretta, B.; Venturelli, D.; Kaczmarek, L.; Narni, F.; Talpaz, M.; Anderson, B.; Beran, M.; Baserga, R.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have studied the expression of cell-cycle genes specific to the G/sub 1/ (2A9, 2F1, 4F1, c-myc) and S (histone H3) phases of the cell cycle in normal and malignant human myeloid cycling cells. The levels of expression were determined by measuring the amounts of specific RNA in blot hybridization assays. Levels of expression of the G/sub 1/ genes were compared to the level of expression of the S-phase-specific H3 gene. In a normal asynchronous system provided by the bone marrow cells of three normal donors, the expressions of the four G/sub 1/-specific genes 2A9, 2F1, 4F1, and c-myc, and of the S-phase-specific gene H3 were in ratios that differed little from one individual to another. In the total RNA of eight patients in the chronic phase of chronic myelogenous leukemia, a high level of expression of G/sub 1/ cell-cycle genes was paralleled by a high level of expression of the S-phase H3 gene, simply reflecting and increase in the fraction of proliferating cells. In patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), the RNA levels of 2F1 and 4F1 paralleled the expression of H3. However, in 9 of 10 patients with AML they found that the expression of c-myc was elevated with respect to H3 expression. Two important conclusions can be drawn from these findings: (i) increased levels of a G/sub 1/-specific RNA in a tumor may not indicate overexpression of that gene but may instead simply reflect the fraction of proliferating cells; and (ii) in some patients with AML, however, the expression of certain G/sub 1/ genes is truly deregulated and might contribute to the impairment of proliferative control that is associated with this phenotype.

  4. p53 mutations in human lymphoid malignancies: Association with Burkitt lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gaidano, G.; Ballerini, P.; Gong, J.Z.; Inghirami, G.; Knowles, D.M.; Dalla-Favera, R. ); Neri, A, Centro Malattie del Sangue G. Marcora, Milan ); Newcomb, E.W. ); Magrath, I.T. )

    1991-06-15

    The authors have investigated the frequency of p53 mutations in B- and T-cell human lymphoid malignancies, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the major subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. p53 exons 5-9 were studied by using genomic DNA from 197 primary tumors and 27 cell lines by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and by direst sequencing of PCR-amplified fragments. Mutations were found associated with (i) Burkitt lymphoma (9/27 biopsoes; 17/27 cell lines) and its leukemic counterpart L{sub 3}-type B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (5/9), both of which also carry activated c-myc oncogenes, and (ii) B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (6/40) and, in particular, its stage of progression known as Richter's transformation (3/7). Mutations were not found at any significant frequency in other types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma or acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In many cases, only the mutated allele was detectable, implying loss of the normal allele. These results suggest that (1) significant differences in the frequency of p53 mutations are present among subtypes of neoplasms derived from the same tissue; (2) p53 may play a role in tumor progression in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia; (3) the presence of both p53 loss/inactivation and c-myc oncogene activation may be important in the pathogenesis of Burkitt lymphoma and its leukemia form L{sub 3}-type B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  5. Virus-like particles for the prevention of human papillomavirus-associated malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joshua W.; Roden, Richard B.S.

    2013-01-01

    As compared to peptide/protein-based vaccines, naked DNA vectors and even traditional attenuated or inactived virus vaccines, virus-like particles (VLPs) are an attractive vaccine platform because they offer a combination of safety, ease of production, and both high density B cell epitope display and intracellular presentation of T cell epitopes that induce potent humoral and cellular immune responses respectively. Indeed, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines based on VLP production by recombinant expression of major capsid antigen L1 in yeast (Gardasil®, Merck & Co.) or insect cells (Cervarix®, GlaxoSmithKline) have been licensed for the prevention of cervical and anogenital infection and disease associated with the genotypes targeted by each vaccine. These HPV vaccines however have not been demonstrated as effective to treat existing infections, and efforts to develop a therapeutic HPV vaccine continue. Furthermore, current HPV L1-VLP vaccines provide type-restricted protection, requiring highly multivalent formulations to broaden coverage to the dozen or more oncogenic HPV genotypes. This raises the complexity and cost of vaccine production. The lack of access to screening and high disease burden in developing countries has spurred efforts to develop second generation HPV vaccines that are more affordable, induce wider protective coverage and offer therapeutic coverage against HPV-associated malignancies. Given the previous success with L1 VLP-based vaccines against HPV, VLPs have been also adopted as platforms for many second generation HPV and non-HPV vaccine candidates with both prophylactic and therapeutic intent. Here we examine the progress and challenges of these efforts, with a focus on how they inform VLP vaccine design. PMID:23414405

  6. Combined inhibition of Wee1 and PARP1/2 for radiosensitization in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karnak, David; Engelke, Carl G.; Parsels, Leslie A.; Kausar, Tasneem; Wei, Dongping; Robertson, Jordan R.; Marsh, Katherine B.; Davis, Mary A.; Zhao, Lili; Maybaum, Jonathan; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Morgan, Meredith A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose While the addition of radiation to chemotherapy improves survival in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer, more effective therapies are urgently needed. Thus, we investigated the radiosensitizing efficacy of the novel drug combination of Wee1 and PARP1/2 [poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1/2] inhibitors (AZD1775 and olaparib, respectively) in pancreatic cancer. Experimental Design Radiosensitization of AsPC-1 or MiaPaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells was assessed by clonogenic survival and tumor growth assays. Mechanistically, the effects of AZD1775, olaparib, and radiation on cell cycle, DNA damage (γH2AX) and HRR (homologous recombination repair) were determined. Results Treatment of AsPC-1 and MiaPaCa-2 cells with either AZD1775 or olaparib caused modest radiosensitization while treatment with the combination significantly increased radiosensitization. Radiosensitization by the combination of AZD1775 and olaparib was associated with G2 checkpoint abrogation and persistent DNA damage. In addition, AZD1775 inhibited HRR activity and prevented radiation-induced Rad51 focus formation. Finally, in vivo, in MiaPaCa-2-derived xenografts, olaparib did not radiosensitize, while AZD1775 produced moderate, yet significant, radiosensitization (P<0.05). Importantly, the combination of AZD1775 and olaparib produced highly significant radiosensitization (P<0.0001) evidenced by a 13-day delay in tumor volume doubling (vs radiation alone) and complete eradication of 20% of tumors. Conclusions Taken together, these results demonstrate the efficacy of combined inhibition of Wee1 and PARP inhibitors for radiosensitizing pancreatic cancers and support the model that Wee1 inhibition sensitizes cells to PARP inhibitor-mediated radiosensitization through inhibition of HRR and abrogation of the G2 checkpoint, ultimately resulting in unrepaired, lethal DNA damage and radiosensitization. PMID:25117293

  7. Radiosensitive severe combined immunodeficiency disease.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Christopher C; Cowan, Morton J

    2010-02-01

    Inherited defects in components of the nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair mechanism produce a T-B-NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) characterized by heightened sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Patients with the radiosensitive form of SCID may also have increased short- and long-term sensitivity to the alkylator-based chemotherapy regimens that are traditionally used for conditioning before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Known causes of radiosensitive SCID include deficiencies of Artemis, DNA ligase IV, DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit, and Cernunnos-XLF, all of which have been treated with HCT. Because of these patients' sensitivity to certain forms of chemotherapy, the approach to donor selection and the type of conditioning regimen used for a patient with radiosensitive SCID requires careful consideration. Significantly more research needs to be done to determine the long-term outcomes of patients with radiosensitive SCID after HCT and to discover novel nontoxic approaches to HCT that might benefit those patients with intrinsic radiosensitivity and chemosensitivity as well as potentially all patients undergoing an HCT. PMID:20113890

  8. Nogo-A inhibits the migration and invasion of human malignant glioma U87MG cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shu-Guang; Ryu, Hyang-Hwa; Li, Song-Yuan; Li, Chun-Hao; Lim, Sa-Hoe; Jang, Woo-Youl; Jung, Shin

    2016-06-01

    Nogo or reticulon-4 (RTN4), also known as neurite outgrowth inhibitor, is a member of the reticulon family of genes. Nogo-A, one of the three isoforms, is enriched in the central nervous system (CNS). The extracellular domain of Nogo-A, Nogo-66, has neurite growth inhibitory activity that is specific for neurons and is mediated by the Nogo receptor. However, most of its functions are not known yet. We investigated whether Nogo-A modulates the migration and invasion of a glioblastoma cell line, as well as the factors that have an effect on Nogo-A. The expression of Nogo-A was evaluated using western blotting and immunohistochemistry in human brain tumor specimens. U87MG cells were transfected with a sense-Nogo-A cDNA construct (U87-Nogo-A cells expressing Nogo-A) and an empty vector (U87MG-E cells not expressing Nogo-A). The migration and invasion abilities of these cells were investigated using simple scratch and Matrigel invasion assays. Morphologic and cytoskeletal changes were documented by confocal microscopy. The proliferation rate was estimated using doubling time assay. The effects of Nogo-A on Rho activity and phosphorylated cofilin were determined by a Rho activity assay and western blotting. Among primary brain tumors, Nogo-A expression was found in a higher percentage of oligodendrogliomas (90.0%) compared with the percentage in the glioblastomas (68.4%). In addition, the percentage in mixed gliomas was 42.9%, while it was not expressed in pituitary adenomas or schwannomas. The migration and invasion abilities of the U87-Nogo-A cells were decreased compared with the control. In the U87-Nogo-A cell line, Rho activity and phosphorylated cofilin expression were also decreased and morphology became more flat in comparison with the U87MG-E cell line. Nogo-A may inhibit the migration and invasion of human malignant glioma cells via the downregulation of RhoA-cofilin signaling. PMID:27109183

  9. Frequent expression of the variant CD30 in human malignant myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Horie, R; Gattei, V; Ito, K; Imajo-Ohmi, S; Tange, T; Miyauchi, J; Pinto, A; Degan, M; De Iuliis, A; Tassan Mazzocco, F; Rossi, F M; Higashihara, M; Watanabe, T

    1999-12-01

    We earlier identified a variant of CD30 (CD30v) that retains only the cytoplasmic region of the authentic CD30. This variant is expressed in alveolar macrophages. CD30v can activate the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) as CD30, and its overexpression in HL-60 induced a differentiated phenotype. To better understand the physiological and pathological functions of CD30v, expression of this variant was examined using a multiple approach to examine 238 samples of human malignant myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms. Screening by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed expression of CD30v transcripts in 52 of 72, 7 of 11, 63 of 90, and 7 of 30 samples of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myeloid blast crisis of myeloproliferative disorders (MBC), and lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs) of B- and T-cell origin, respectively. CD30v expression was high in monocyte-oriented AMLs (FAB M4 and M5), B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL), and multiple myeloma (MM). Using the specific antibody HCD30C2, prepared using a peptide corresponding to the nine amino acids of the amino-terminal CD30v, expression of CD30v protein was detected in 10 of 25 and 2 of 10 AML and ALL samples, respectively. In AMLs, immunocytochemical detection of CD30v revealed the presence of loose clusters of CD30v-expressing cells dispersed amid a population of CD30v-negative blasts. Finally, the parallel expression of CD30v mRNA and protein, as evidenced by Northern and Western blotting, was confirmed in selected cases of AMLs and LPDs. A significant correlation was found between expressions of CD30v and CD30 ligand transcripts in AML and LPD (P = 0.02, odds ratio = 3.2). The association of CD30v with signal-transducing proteins, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF) 2, and TRAF5 was demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation analysis, as was demonstrated for authentic CD30 protein. Expression of transcripts for TRAF1, TRAF2, TRAF3, and TRAF5, as demonstrated by RT-PCR, was noted in leukemic blasts that express CD30v. Collectively, frequent expression of CD30v along with TRAF proteins in human neoplastic cells of myeloid and lymphoid origin provide supportive evidence for biological and possible pathological functions of this protein in the growth and differentiation of a variety of myeloid and lymphoid cells. PMID:10595933

  10. Association of epigenetic alterations in the human C7orf24 gene with the aberrant gene expression in malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yuji; Hattori, Akira; Yoshiki, Tatsuhiro; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2013-10-01

    Human chromosome 7 open reading frame 24 (C7orf24)/γ-glutamyl cyclotransferase has been suggested to be a potential diagnostic marker for several cancers, including carcinomas in the bladder urothelium, breast and endometrial epithelium. We here investigated the epigenetic regulation of the human C7orf24 promoter in normal diploid ARPE-19 and IMR-90 cells and in the MCF-7 and HeLa cancer cell lines to understand the transcriptional basis for the malignant-associated high expression of C7orf24. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that histone modifications associated with active chromatin were enriched in the proximal region but not in the distal region of the C7orf24 promoter in HeLa and MCF-7 cells. In contrast, elevated levels of histone modifications leading to transcriptional repression and accumulation of heterochromatin proteins in the C7orf24 promoter were observed in the ARPE-19 and IMR-90 cells, compared to the levels in HeLa and MCF-7 cancer cells. In parallel, the CpG island of the C7orf24 promoter was methylated to a greater extent in the normal cells than in the cancer cells. These results suggest that the transcriptional silencing of the C7orf24 gene in the non-malignant cells is elicited through heterochromatin formation in its promoter region; aberrant expression of C7orf24 associated with malignant alterations results from changes in chromatin dynamics. PMID:23853312

  11. The activation of human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) is implicated in melanoma cell malignant transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Serafino, A. Balestrieri, E.; Pierimarchi, P.; Matteucci, C.; Moroni, G.; Oricchio, E.; Rasi, G.; Mastino, A.; Spadafora, C.; Garaci, E.; Vallebona, P. Sinibaldi

    2009-03-10

    Melanoma development is a multi-step process arising from a series of genetic and epigenetic events. Although the sequential stages involved in progression from melanocytes to malignant melanoma are clearly defined, our current understanding of the mechanisms leading to melanoma onset is still incomplete. Growing evidence show that the activation of endogenous retroviral sequences might be involved in transformation of melanocytes as well as in the increased ability of melanoma cells to escape immune surveillance. Here we show that human melanoma cells in vitro undergo a transition from adherent to a more malignant, non-adherent phenotype when exposed to stress conditions. Melanoma-derived non-adherent cells are characterized by an increased proliferative potential and a decreased expression of both HLA class I molecules and Melan-A/MART-1 antigen, similarly to highly malignant cells. These phenotypic and functional modifications are accompanied by the activation of human endogenous retrovirus K expression (HERV-K) and massive production of viral-like particles. Down-regulation of HERV-K expression by RNA interference prevents the transition from the adherent to the non-adherent growth phenotype in low serum. These results implicate HERV-K in at least some critical steps of melanoma progression.

  12. Toll-like receptors in the pathogenesis of human B cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important players in B-cell activation, maturation and memory and may be involved in the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphomas. Accumulating studies show differential expression in this heterogeneous group of cancers. Stimulation with TLR specific ligands, or agonists of their ligands, leads to aberrant responses in the malignant B-cells. According to current data, TLRs can be implicated in malignant transformation, tumor progression and immune evasion processes. Most of the studies focused on multiple myeloma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but in the last decade the putative role of TLRs in other types of B-cell lymphomas has gained much interest. The aim of this review is to discuss recent findings on the role of TLRs in normal B cell functioning and their role in the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies. PMID:25112836

  13. Non-malignant disease mortality in meat workers: a model for studying the role of zoonotic transmissible agents in non-malignant chronic diseases in humans

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E S; Zhou, Y; Sall, M; Faramawi, M El; Shah, N; Christopher, A; Lewis, N

    2007-01-01

    Background Current research efforts have mainly concentrated on evaluating the role of substances present in animal food in the aetiology of chronic diseases in humans, with relatively little attention given to evaluating the role of transmissible agents that are also present. Meat workers are exposed to a variety of transmissible agents present in food animals and their products. This study investigates mortality from non-malignant diseases in workers with these exposures. Methods A cohort mortality study was conducted between 1949 and 1989, of 8520 meat workers in a union in Baltimore, Maryland, who worked in manufacturing plants where animals were killed or processed, and who had high exposures to transmissible agents. Mortality in meat workers was compared with that in a control group of 6081 workers in the same union, and also with the US general population. Risk was estimated by proportional mortality and standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) and relative SMR. Results A clear excess of mortality from septicaemia, subarachnoid haemorrhage, chronic nephritis, acute and subacute endocarditis, functional diseases of the heart, and decreased risk of mortality from pre-cerebral, cerebral artery stenosis were observed in meat workers when compared to the control group or to the US general population. Conclusions The authors hypothesise that zoonotic transmissible agents present in food animals and their products may be responsible for the occurrence of some cases of circulatory, neurological and other diseases in meat workers, and possibly in the general population exposed to these agents. PMID:17604337

  14. Shape-dependent regulation of proliferation in normal and malignant human cells and its alteration by interferon

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesh, D.A.; Greene, J.J.

    1986-06-01

    The relationship between cell morphology, proliferation, and contact inhibition was studied in normal and malignant human cells which varied in their sensitivity to contact inhibition. Their ability to proliferate was examined under conditions where the cells were constrained into different shapes by plating onto plastic surfaces coated with poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate). Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) can precisely vary the shape of cells without toxicity. Cell proliferation was quantitated by cell counts and labeling indices were determined by autoradiography. The normal JHU-1 foreskin fibroblasts and IMR-90 lung fibroblasts exhibited contact-inhibited growth with a saturation density of 2.9 X 10(5) and 2.0 X 10(5) cells/cm2, respectively. These cells also exhibited stringent dependency on cell shape with a mitotic index of less than 3% at poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) concentrations at which the cells were rounded versus a labeling index of 75-90% when the cells were flat. The malignant bladder carcinoma line RT-4 exhibited partial contact-inhibited growth. Its dependency on cell shape was less stringent than that of normal cells with a mitotic index of 37-40% when rounded and 79% when flat. The malignant fibrosarcoma line, HT1080, was not contact inhibited and was entirely shape independent with a mitotic index of 70-90% regardless of cell shape. Treatment of HT1080 cells with low concentration of human fibroblast interferon (less than 40 units/ml) restored shape-dependent proliferation while having little effect on normal cells. Subantiproliferative doses of interferon were also shown to restore contact-inhibited proliferation control to malignant cells previously lacking it.

  15. Enhanced radiosensitization by the cationic liposome-encapsulated thymidine analogue BrdU through the increased intracellular BrdU-uptake on human melanoma as compared to anionic or nonionic liposomal or free BrdU.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shinya; Kimura, Masatsugu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2014-11-01

    The synthetic thymidine analogue, 5-bromo-2'-deoxy-uridine (BrdU) was encapsulated in cationic liposome composed of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and stearylamine (molar ratio = 1/1/0.2; diameter = 120 nm), and the radiosensitization of cationic liposomal BrdU was assessed on human melanoma cells HMV-II, with comparing to anionic or nonionic liposomal BrdU and free-BrdU. HMV-II cells were pretreated by cationic liposomal BrdU or free-BrdU and then exposed to X-ray, followed by WST-8 assay to examine cell proliferation. The radiation-induced change of nuclei was defined with Hoechst33342 staining. The rates of thymidine replacement by BrdU and DNA double-strand breaks on HMV-II cells were determined with an anti-BrdU antibody and anti-53BP1 antibody, respectively. On 7th day after X-ray irradiation at 3 Gy, cell proliferation was suppressed more markedly in the administration of cationic liposomal BrdU than free-BrdU at equivalent BrdU doses. Giant polykaryocytes were observed in cationic liposomal BrdU-treated HMV-II cells. Radiosensitization was enhanced dose-dependently along with BrdU doses of 0.1-0.8 μM in the order: cationic liposomal BrdU > anionic liposomal BrdU > nonionic liposomal BrdU (see symbol) free-BrdU. Similarly, the cationic liposomal BrdU augmented the rate of thymidine-moiety replacement by BrdU and DNA double-strand breaks more appreciably than free-BrdU. Therefore, the cationic liposome-encapsulation of BrdU would be one of favorable drug deliveries for facilitating the X-ray therapy against cancer. PMID:26000387

  16. Intracellular pH regulation in a nonmalignant and a derived malignant human breast cell line.

    PubMed

    Wahl, M L; Pooler, P M; Briand, P; Leeper, D B; Owen, C S

    2000-06-01

    Tumor cells in vivo often exist in an ischemic microenvironment that would compromise the growth of normal cells. To minimize intracellular acidification under these conditions, these cells are thought to upregulate H(+) transport mechanisms and/or slow the rate at which metabolic processes generate intracellular protons. Proton extrusion has been compared under identical conditions in two closely related human breast cell lines: nonmalignant but immortalized HMT-3522/S1 and malignant HMT-3522/T4-2 cells derived from them. Only the latter were capable of tumor formation in host animals or long-term growth in a low-pH medium designed to mimic conditions in many solid tumors. However, detailed study of the dynamics of proton extrusion in the two cell lines revealed no significant differences. Thus, even though the ability to upregulate proton extrusion in a low pH environment (pH(e)) may be important for cell survival in a tumor, this ability is not acquired along with the capacity to form solid tumors and is not unique to the transformed cell. This conclusion was based on fluorescence measurements of intracellular pH (pH(i)) on cells that were plated on extracellular matrix, allowing them to remain adherent to proteins to which they had become attached 24 to 48 h earlier. Proton translocation under conditions of low pH(e) was observed by monitoring pH(i) after exposing cells to an acute acidification of the surrounding medium. Proton translocation at normal pH(e) was measured by monitoring the recovery after introduction of an intracellular proton load by treatment with ammonium chloride. Even in the presence of inhibitors of the three major mechanisms of proton translocation (sodium-proton antiport, bicarbonate transport, and proton-lactate symport) together with acidification of their medium, cells showed only about 0.4 units of reduction in pH(i). This was attributed to a slowing of metabolic proton generation because the inhibitors were shown to be effective when the same cells were given an intracellular acidification. PMID:10797312

  17. PTHrP promotes malignancy of human oral cancer cell downstream of the EGFR signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Tamaki; Tsuda, Masumi; Ohba, Yusuke Kawaguchi, Hideaki; Totsuka, Yasunori; Shindoh, Masanobu

    2008-04-11

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is detected in many aggressive tumors and involved in malignant conversion; however, the underlying mechanism remains obscure. Here, we identified PTHrP as a mediator of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling to promote the malignancies of oral cancers. PTHrP mRNA was abundantly expressed in most of the quiescent oral cancer cells, and was significantly upregulated by EGF stimulation via ERK and p38 MAPK. PTHrP silencing by RNA interference, as well as EGFR inhibitor AG1478 treatment, significantly suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasiveness. Furthermore, combined treatment of AG1478 and PTHrP knockdown achieved synergistic inhibition of malignant phenotypes. Recombinant PTHrP substantially promoted cell motility, and rescued the inhibition by PTHrP knockdown, suggesting the paracrine/autocrine function of PTHrP. These data indicate that PTHrP contributes to the malignancy of oral cancers downstream of EGFR signaling, and may thus provide a therapeutic target for oral cancer.

  18. Synergistic mitosis-arresting effects of arsenic trioxide and paclitaxel on human malignant lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xu-Fang; Wu, Ying-Li; Xu, Han-Zhang; Zhao, Meng; Zhuang, Han-Yi; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Hua; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2010-01-01

    The treatment outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has improved steadily over the last 50 years. However, the cure rates are unlikely to be raised further with current therapies. Since increasing the dosage of chemotherapeutic agents could also elevate toxicity, a solution to how one could achieve maximum therapeutic effect with the minimum dosage possible is imminent. One possibility is the employment of combination drug therapies. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is a widely used drug for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Its combination with other drugs presented therapeutic activities in malignant cancers other than APL. Considering the fact that ATO induces mitotic arrest prior to apoptosis induction, we attempted to investigate the potential anti-cancer effects of ATO in combination with the microtubule-stabilizing agent, paclitaxel (PTX), using malignant lymphocytes as in vitro models. Three malignant lymphocytic cell lines and primary cells were treated with ATO and/or PTX. Using the Chou-Talalay analysis for evaluation of combined effect of ATO and PTX, we found a synergistic effect of the two drugs in the inhibition of cell growth. We also found that the combination of ATO and PTX at low concentrations synergistically induced mitotic arrest followed by apoptosis in malignant lymphocytes, which increased phosphorylated cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) on Thr(161) and promoted the dysregulated activation of Cdk1. The ATO/PTX combination also significantly enhanced the activation of spindle checkpoint by inducing the formation of the inhibitory checkpoint complex BubR1/Cdc20. Our study provided the first in vitro demonstration that low concentrations of ATO and PTX synergistically induce mitotic arrest in malignant lymphocytes. PMID:19781537

  19. Malignant hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arteriolar nephrosclerosis; Nephrosclerosis - arteriolar; Hypertension - malignant; High blood pressure - malignant ... a small number of people with high blood pressure, including children and adults. It is more common ...

  20. The casein kinase 2 inhibitor, CX-4945, as an anti-cancer drug in treatment of human hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Chon, Hae J.; Bae, Kyoung J.; Lee, Yura; Kim, Jiyeon

    2015-01-01

    The casein kinase 2 (CK2) protein kinase is a pro-survival kinase and therapeutic target in treatment of various human cancers. CK2 overexpression has been demonstrated in hematological malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and multiple myeloma. CX-4945, also known as Silmitasertib, is an orally administered, highly specific, ATP-competitive inhibitor of CK2. CX-4945 induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis and is currently being evaluated in clinical trials for treatment of many cancer types. In the past 2 years, the focus on the therapeutic potential of CX-4945 has shifted from solid tumors to hematological malignancies. CX-4945 exerts anti-proliferative effects in hematological tumors by downregulating CK2 expression and suppressing activation of CK2-mediated PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways. Furthermore, combination of CX-4945 with other inhibitors yielded synergistic effects in cell death induction. These new findings demonstrate that CK2 overexpression contributes to blood cancer cell survival and resistance to chemotherapy. Combinatorial use of CX-4945 is a promising therapeutic tool for treatment of hematological malignancies. PMID:25873900

  1. Targeted radiosensitization of cells expressing truncated DNA polymerase {beta}.

    PubMed

    Neijenhuis, Sari; Verwijs-Janssen, Manon; van den Broek, Lenie J; Begg, Adrian C; Vens, Conchita

    2010-11-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is an effective anticancer treatment, although failures still occur. To improve radiotherapy, tumor-targeted strategies are needed to increase radiosensitivity of tumor cells, without influencing normal tissue radiosensitivity. Base excision repair (BER) and single-strand break repair (SSBR) contribute to the determination of sensitivity to IR. A crucial protein in BER/SSBR is DNA polymerase β (polβ). Aberrant polβ expression is commonly found in human tumors and leads to inhibition of BER. Here, we show that truncated polβ variant (polβ-Δ)-expressing cells depend on homologous recombination (HR) for survival after IR, indicating that a considerable fraction of polβ-Δ-induced lesions are subject to repair by HR. Increased sensitization was found not to result from involvement in DNA-dependent protein kinase-dependent nonhomologous end joining, the other major double-strand break repair pathway. Caffeine and the ATM inhibitor Ku55933 cause polβ-Δ-dependent radiosensitization. Consistent with the observed HR dependence and the known HR-modulating activity of ATM, polβ-Δ-expressing cells showed increased radiosensitization after BRCA2 knockdown that is absent under ATM-inhibited conditions. Our data suggest that treatment with HR modulators is a promising therapeutic strategy for exploiting defects in the BER/SSBR pathway in human tumors. PMID:20978197

  2. Dependence of Gold Nanoparticle Radiosensitization on Functionalizing Layer Thickness.

    PubMed

    Spaas, Cedric; Dok, Rüveyda; Deschaume, Olivier; De Roo, Bert; Vervaele, Mattias; Seo, Jin Won; Bartic, Carmen; Hoet, Peter; Van den Heuvel, Frank; Nuyts, Sandra; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles functionalized with polyethylene glycol of different chain lengths are used to determine the influence of the capping layer thickness on the radiosensitizing effect of the particles. The size variations in organic coating, built up with polyethylene glycol polymers of molecular weight 1-20 kDa, allow an evaluation of the decrease in dose enhancement percentages caused by the gold nanoparticles at different radial distances from their surface. With localized eradication of malignant cells as a primary focus, radiosensitization is most effective after internalization in the nucleus. For this reason, we performed controlled radiation experiments, with doses up to 20 Gy and particle diameters in a range of 5-30 nm, and studied the relaxation pattern of supercoiled DNA. Subsequent gel electrophoresis of the suspensions was performed to evaluate the molecular damage and consecutively quantify the gold nanoparticle sensitization. In conclusion, on average up to 58.4% of the radiosensitizing efficiency was lost when the radial dimensions of the functionalizing layer were increased from 4.1 to 15.3 nm. These results serve as an experimental supplement for biophysical simulations and demonstrate the influence of an important parameter in the development of nanomaterials for targeted therapies in cancer radiotherapy. PMID:26950059

  3. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Oxygen-Dependent Radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Lin, Qun; Yun, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Molecular oxygen has long been recognized as a powerful radiosensitizer that enhances the cell-killing efficiency of ionizing radiation. Radiosensitization by oxygen occurs at very low concentrations with the half-maximum radiosensitization at approximately 3 mmHg. However, robust hypoxia-induced signal transduction can be induced at <15 mmHg and can elicit a wide range of cellular responses that will affect therapy response as well as malignant progression. Great strides have been made, especially since the 1990s, toward identification and characterization of the oxygen-regulated molecular pathways that affect tumor response to ionizing radiation. In this review, we will discuss the current advances in our understanding of oxygen-dependent molecular modification and cellular signal transduction and their impact on tumor response to therapy. We will specifically address mechanistic distinctions between radiobiological hypoxia (0–3 mmHg) and pathological hypoxia (3–15 mmHg). We also propose a paradigm that hypoxia increases radioresistance by maintaining the cancer stem cell phenotype. PMID:25938770

  4. PME-1 protects ERK pathway activity from protein phosphatase 2A-mediated inactivation in human malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Puustinen, Pietri; Junttila, Melissa R.; Vanhatupa, Sari; Sablina, Anna A.; Hector, Melissa E.; Teittinen, Kaisa; Raheem, Olayinka; Ketola, Kirsi; Lin, Shujun; Kast, Juergen; Haapasalo, Hannu; Hahn, William C.; Westermarck, Jukka

    2010-01-01

    ERK/MAPK pathway activity is regulated by the antagonist function of activating kinases and inactivating protein phosphatases. Sustained ERK pathway activity is commonly observed in human malignancies, however the mechanisms by which the pathway is protected from phosphatase-mediated inactivation in the tumor tissue remain obscure. Here we show that methylesterase PME-1-mediated inhibition of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) promotes basal ERK pathway activity, and is required for efficient growth factor response. Mechanistically PME-1 is shown to support ERK pathway signaling upstream of Raf, but downstream of growth factor receptors and PKC. In malignant glioblastoma, PME-1 expression levels correlate with both ERK activity and cell proliferation in vivo. Moreover, PME-1 expression significantly correlates with disease progression in human astrocytic gliomas (N=222). Together, these observations identify PME-1 expression as one mechanism by which ERK pathway activity is maintained in cancer cells, and suggest important functional role for PME-1 in the disease progression of human astrocytic gliomas. PMID:19293187

  5. [Malignant lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Kato, Harumi; Kinoshita, Tomohiro

    2016-03-01

    Malignant lymphomas encompass various types of lymphoid neoplasms, possibly originating from cells in various stages of differentiation. The development of high throughput technologies based on knowledge of the human genome identifies novel mutations, epigenetic alterations, and signaling pathways characteristics of each of the lymphoma subtypes. The mutational landscape of tumors may have a clinical impact in terms of identifying rational approaches for molecular target therapy and predictive biomarkers for new therapies. This review will focus on our current understanding of underlying molecular mechanisms, new molecular target drugs, and their activity in lymphomas. PMID:27076235

  6. Cell-surface glycoproteins of human sarcomas: differential expression in normal and malignant tissues and cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rettig, W.F.; Garin-Chesa, P.; Beresford, H.R.; Oettgen, H.F.; Melamed, M.R.; Old, L.J.

    1988-05-01

    Normal differentiation and malignant transformation of human cells are characterized by specific changes in surface antigen phenotype. In the present study, the authors have defined six cell-surface antigens of human sarcomas and normal mesenchymal cells, by using mixed hemadsorption assays and immunochemical methods for the analysis of cultured cells and immunohistochemical staining for the analysis of normal tissues and > 200 tumor specimens. Differential patterns of F19, F24, G171, G253, S5, and Thy-1 antigen expression were found to characterize (i) subsets of cultured sarcoma cell lines, (ii) cultured fibroblasts derived from various organs, (iii) normal resting and activated mesenchymal tissues, and (iv) sarcoma and nonmesenchymal tumor tissues. These results provide a basic surface antigenic map for cultured mesenchymal cells and mesenchymal tissues and permit the classification of human sarcomas according to their antigenic phenotypes.

  7. FT-IR Spectroscopic Analysis of Normal and Malignant Human Oral Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnakumar, N.; Madhavan, R. Nirmal; Sumesh, P.; Palaniappan, Pl. Rm.; Venkatachalam, P.; Ramachandran, C. R.

    2008-11-01

    FT-IR spectroscopy has been used to explore the changes in the vibrational bands of normal and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissues in the region 4000-400 cm-1. Significant changes in the spectral features were observed. The spectral changes were the results of characteristics structural alterations at the molecular level in the malignant tissues. These alterations include structural changes of proteins and possible increase of its content, an increase in the nucleic-to-cytoplasm ratio, an increase in the relative amount of DNA, an increase in the rate of phosphorylation process induced by carcinogenesis, a loss of hydrogen bonding of the C-OH groups in the amino acid residues of proteins, a decrease in the relative amount of lipids compared to normal epithelial oral tissues. The results of the present study demonstrate that the FT-IR technique has the feasibility of discriminating malignant from normal tissues and other pathological states in a short period of time and may detect malignant transformation earlier than the standard histological examination stage.

  8. Interaction with basement membrane serves to rapidly distinguish growth and differentiation pattern of normal and malignant human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, O W; Rnnov-Jessen, L; Howlett, A R; Bissell, M J

    1992-01-01

    Normal human breast epithelial cells show a high degree of phenotypic plasticity in monolayer culture and express many traits that otherwise characterize tumor cells in vivo. Paradoxically, primary human breast carcinoma cells are difficult to establish in culture: most outgrowths arise from the normal tissue surrounding the tumor. These characteristics have posed major obstacles to the establishment of simple reliable criteria for mammary epithelial transformation in culture. In the present study, we show that a reconstituted basement membrane (BM) can be used to culture all normal human breast epithelial cells and a subset of human breast carcinoma cells. The two cell types can be readily distinguished by virtue of the ability of normal cells to reexpress a structurally and functionally differentiated phenotype within BM. Twelve specimens of normal breast tissue and 2 normal breast epithelial cell lines (total 14 samples) embedded in BM as single cells were able to form multicellular spherical colonies with a final size close to that of true acini in situ. Sections of mature spheres revealed a central lumen surrounded by polarized luminal epithelial cells expressing keratins 18 and 19 and sialomucin at the apical membrane. Significantly, two-thirds of normal spheres deposited a visible endogenous type IV collagen-containing BM even though they were in contact with exogenously provided BM. Growth was arrested completely within the same time period. In contrast, none of 6 carcinoma cell lines or 2 cultures of carcinoma from fresh samples (total 8 samples) responded to BM by growth regulation, lumen formation, correct polarity, or deposition of endogenous BM. These findings may provide the basis of a rapid assay for discriminating normal human breast epithelial cells from their malignant counterparts. Furthermore, we propose that the ability to sense BM appropriately and to form three-dimensional organotypic structures may be the function of a class of "suppressor" genes that are lost as cells become malignant. Images PMID:1384042

  9. Inhibition of CXCR4 by LY2624587, a Fully Humanized Anti-CXCR4 Antibody Induces Apoptosis of Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Sheng-Bin; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Paul, Donald; Kays, Lisa M.; Ye, Ming; Vaillancourt, Peter; Dowless, Michele; Stancato, Louis F.; Stewart, Julie; Uhlik, Mark T.; Long, Haiyan; Chu, Shaoyou; Obungu, Victor H.

    2016-01-01

    SDF-1 and CXCR4 are a chemokine and chemokine receptor pair playing critical roles in tumorigenesis. Overexpression of CXCR4 is a hallmark of many hematological malignancies including acute myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and generally correlates with a poor prognosis. In this study, we developed a humanized anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibody, LY2624587 as a potent CXCR4 antagonist that was advanced into clinical study for cancer. LY2624587 blocked SDF-1 binding to CXCR4 with an IC50 of 0.26 nM, and inhibited SDF-1-induced GTP binding with a Kb of 0.66 nM. In human lymphoma U937 and leukemia CCRF-CEM cells expressing endogenous CXCR4, LY2624587 inhibited SDF-1-induced cell migration with IC50 values of 3.7 and 0.26 nM, respectively. This antibody also inhibited CXCR4 and SDF-1 mediated cell signaling including activation of MAPK and AKT in tumor cells expressing CXCR4. Bifocal microscopic and flow cytometry analyses revealed that LY2624587 mediated receptor internalization and caused CXCR4 down-regulation on the cell surface. In human hematologic cancer cells, LY2624587 caused dose dependent apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. In mouse xenograft models developed with human leukemia and lymphoma cells expressing high levels of CXCR4, LY2624587 exhibited dose-dependent tumor growth inhibition and provided significant survival benefit in a disseminated lymphoma model. Collectively, we have demonstrated that CXCR4 inhibition by LY2624587 has the potential for the treatment of human hematological malignancies. PMID:26954567

  10. Protective Role of Hsp27 Protein Against Gamma Radiation-Induced Apoptosis and Radiosensitization Effects of Hsp27 Gene Silencing in Different Human Tumor Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Aloy, Marie-Therese Hadchity, Elie; Bionda, Clara; Diaz-Latoud, Chantal; Claude, Line; Rousson, Robert; Arrigo, Andre-Patrick; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: The ability of heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) to protect cells from stressful stimuli and its increased levels in tumors resistant to anticancer therapeutics suggest that it may represent a target for sensitization to radiotherapy. In this study, we investigate the protective role of Hsp27 against radiation-induced apoptosis and the effect of its attenuation in highly expressing radioresistant cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: We examined clonogenic death and the kinetics of apoptotic events in different tumor cell lines overexpressing or underexpressing Hsp27 protein irradiated with photons. The radiosensitive Jurkat cell line, which does not express Hsp27 constitutively or in response to {gamma}-rays, was stably transfected with Hsp27 complementary DNA. Attenuation of Hsp27 expression was accomplished by antisense or RNAi (interfering RNA) strategies in SQ20B head-and-neck squamous carcinoma, PC3 prostate cancer, and U87 glioblastoma radioresistant cells. Results: We measured concentration-dependent protection against the cytotoxic effects of radiation in Jurkat-Hsp27 cells, which led to a 50% decrease in apoptotic cells at 48 hours in the highest expressing cells. Underlying mechanisms leading to radiation resistance involved a significant increase in glutathione levels associated with detoxification of reactive oxygen species, a delay in mitochondrial collapse, and caspase activation. Conversely, attenuation of Hsp27 in SQ20B cells, characterized by their resistance to apoptosis, sensitizes cells to irradiation. This was emphasized by increased apoptosis, decreased glutathione basal level, and clonogenic cell death. Sensitization to irradiation was confirmed in PC3 and U87 radioresistant cells. Conclusion: Hsp27 gene therapy offers a potential adjuvant to radiation-based therapy of resistant tumors.

  11. Garlic compounds induced calpain and intrinsic caspase cascade for apoptosis in human malignant neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Surajit; Banik, Naren L; Patel, Sunil J; Ray, Swapan K

    2007-04-01

    Malignant (N-type) neuroblastoma continues to defy current chemotherapeutic regimens. We tested the garlic compounds diallyl sulfide (DAS) and diallyl disulfide (DADS) for induction of apoptosis in human malignant neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Viability of human primary neurons was unaffected after 24 h treatment with 50 and 100 microM DAS and 50 microM DADS but slightly affected with 100 microM DADS. Treatment with 50 and 100 microM DAS or DADS significantly decreased viability in SH-SY5Y cells. Wright staining showed morphological features of apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells treated with 50 and 100 microM DAS or DADS for 24 h. ApopTag assay demonstrated DNA fragmentation in apoptotic cells. Apoptosis was associated with an increase in [Ca(2+)](i), increase in Bax:Bcl-2 ratio, mitochondrial release of cytochrome c, increase in cytosolic Smac/Diablo, and down regulation of inhibitor-of-apoptosis proteins and nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB). Activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 indicated involvement of intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Calpain and caspase-3 activities produced 145 kD spectrin break down product (SBDP) and 120 kD SBDP, respectively. Also, caspase-3 activity cleaved inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (ICAD). Results strongly suggested that the garlic compounds DAS and DADS suppressed anti-apoptotic factors and activated calpain and intrinsic caspase cascade for apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. PMID:17219050

  12. The evaluation of human papillomavirus and p53 gene mutation in benign and malignant conjunctiva and eyelid lesions.

    PubMed

    Joanna, Reszec; Renata, Zalewska; Witold, Pepi?ski; Ma?gorzata, Skawronska; Bernaczyk, Piotr; Chyczewski, Lech

    2010-12-01

    Papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas are the most common conjunctival and eyelid lesions. The etiology is still unclear and recently human papillomavirus infection and p53 gene mutation have been taken into consideration. The aim of our study was the evaluation of HPV DNApresence and p53 gene mutation in 45 benign and 38 malignant squamous lesions of the conjunctiva and eyelid. For HPV detection PCR-RFLP and immunohistochemical reaction were used; for p53 gene mutation PCR-SSCP was used. Only 8.8% papillomas, 9.1% squamous cell cancers and 3.7% basal cell cancers (using PCR-RFLP method) and 26.6% papillomas, 7.4% squamous cell cancers and 9.1% basal cell cancers (using immunohisto-chemical reaction) were HPV positive. p53 gene mutation was evaluated in 24.4% papillomas, 54.5% squamous cell cancers and 22.2% basal cell cancers; most commonly in 6 and 7 exon. Human papillomavirus infection, opposite to p53 gene mutation, is not a significant etiological factor of the benign and malignant conjunctival and eyelid lesions development. PMID:21478094

  13. An Antibody-based Multifaceted Approach Targeting the Human Transferrin Receptor for the Treatment of B-cell Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Tracy R.; Ortiz-Sánchez, Elizabeth; Luria-Pérez, Rosendo; Quintero, Rafaela; Helguera, Gustavo; Bonavida, Benjamin; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Penichet, Manuel L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary We previously developed an antibody-avidin fusion protein (ch128.1Av) targeting the human transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1, also known as CD71), which demonstrates direct in vitro cytotoxicity against malignant hematopoietic cells. This cytotoxicity is attributed to its ability to decrease the level of TfR1 leading to lethal iron deprivation. We now report that ch128.1Av shows the ability to bind the Fc γ receptors and the complement component C1q, suggesting that it is capable of eliciting Fcmediated effector functions such as antibody-dependent cellmediated cytotoxicity and complement-mediated cytotoxicity. In addition, in 2 disseminated multiple myeloma xenograft mouse models, we show that a single dose of ch128.1Av results in significant antitumor activity, including long-term survival. It is interesting to note that the parental antibody without avidin (ch128.1) also shows remarkable in vivo anticancer activity despite its limited in vitro cytotoxicity. Finally, we demonstrate that ch128.1Av is not toxic to pluripotent hematopoietic progenitor cells using the long-term cell-initiating culture assay suggesting that these important progenitors would be preserved in different therapeutic approaches, including the in vitro purging of cancer cells for autologous transplantation and in vivo passive immunotherapy. Our results suggest that ch128.1Av and ch128.1 may be effective in the therapy of human multiple myeloma and potentially other hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:21654517

  14. Overexpression of Yin Yang 1 in the pathogenesis of human hematopoietic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Bonavida, B; Huerta-Yepez, S; Baritaki, S; Vega, M; Liu, H; Chen, H; Berenson, J

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor Yin Yang (YY) 1 has been reported to be overexpressed in several tumor types and plays a role in both the progression of the disease as well as the maintenance of tumor cell resistance to cell death by cytotoxic drugs. YY1 also has been reported to be a prognostic factor for several cancers and was proposed to be a therapeutic target. The expression, function, and role of YY1 in the pathogenesis of hematologic malignancies are summarized briefly herein. Data are represented for B non-Hodgkin lymphoma, AIDS-related lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and children's acute lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:22248059

  15. Capsaicin-Induced Death of Human Haematological Malignant Cell Lines Is Independent of TRPV1 Activation.

    PubMed

    Omari, Sofia A; Adams, Murray J; Kunde, Dale A; Geraghty, Dominic P

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the plant-derived vanilloid, capsaicin (CAP), on the metabolic activity of THP-1, U266B1 and U937 hematological malignancy cells was determined. CAP reduced metabolic activity in a concentration-dependent manner in the three cell lines. A biphasic effect was observed on THP-1 cells (EC50: IC50 (95% CI) 32.9 (19.9-54.3)/219 (144-246) µmol/l). U266B1 cells were more resistant to CAP than THP-1 and U937. Metabolic activity was significantly inhibited by CAP in U937 compared to U266B1 cells (IC50: 197 versus 431 µmol/l, respectively, p < 0.008). Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) and CB1 antagonists (SB452533 and AM251, respectively) suppressed the CAP-induced increase in THP-1 cell metabolic activity (p < 0.001). AM251 and SB452533 appeared to act as partial agonists and displayed a synergistic effect with CAP in U937 cells. CAP inhibits the metabolic activity of malignant hematological cells through non-TRPV1-dependent mechanisms. PMID:27160991

  16. The malignant progression effects of regorafenib in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tomida, Chisato; Aibara, Kana; Yamagishi, Naoko; Yano, Chiaki; Nagano, Hikaru; Abe, Tomoki; Ohno, Ayako; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Nikawa, Takeshi; Teshima-Kondo, Shigetada

    2015-01-01

    A number of anti-angiogenic drugs targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGF-R) have developed and enabled significant advances in cancer therapy including colorectal cancer. However, acquired resistance to the drugs occurs, leading to disease progression, such as invasion and metastasis. How tumors become the resistance and promote their malignancy remains fully uncertain. One of possible mechanisms for the resistance and the progression may be the direct effect of VEGF-R inhibitors on tumor cells expressing VEGF-R. We investigated here the direct effect of a VEGF-R-targeting agent, regorafenib, which is the first small molecule inhibitor of VEGF-Rs for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, on phenotype changes in colon cancer HCT116 cells. Treatment of cells with regorafenib for only 2 days activated cell migration and invasion, while vehicle-treated control cells showed less activity. Intriguingly, chronic exposure to regorafenib for 90 days dramatically increased migration and invasion activities and induced a resistance to hypoxia-induced apoptosis. These results suggest that loss of VEGF signaling in cancer cells may induce the acquired resistance to VEGF/VEGF-R targeting therapy by gaining two major malignant phenotypes, apoptosis resistance and activation of migration/invasion. PMID:26399347

  17. Repair of chromosome damage induced by X-irradiation during G2 phase in a line of normal human fibroblasts and its malignant derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Parshad, R.; Gantt, R.; Sanford, K.K.; Jones, G.M.; Tarone, R.E.

    1982-08-01

    A line of normal human skin fibroblasts (KD) differed from its malignant derivative (HUT-14) in the extent of cytogenetic damage induced by X-irradiation during G2 phase. Malignant cells had significantly more chromatid breaks and gaps after exposure to 25, 50, or 100 rad. The gaps may represent single-strand breaks. Results from alkaline elution of cellular DNA immediately after irradiation showed that the normal and malignant cells in asynchronous population were equally sensitive to DNA single-strand breakage by X-irradiation. Caffeine or beta-cytosine arabinoside (ara-C), inhibitors of DNA repair, when added directly following G2 phase exposure, significantly increased the incidence of radiation-induced chromatid damage in the normal cells. In contrast, similar treatment of the malignant cells had little influence. Ara-C differed from caffeine in its effects; whereas both agents increased the frequency of chromatid breaks and gaps, only ara-C increased the frequency of gaps to the level observed in the irradiated malignant cells. Addition of catalase, a scavenger of the derivative free hydroxyl radical (.OH), to the cultures of malignant cells before, during, and following irradiation significantly reduced the chromatid damage; and catalase prevented formation of chromatid gaps. The DNA damage induced by X-ray during G2 phase in the normal KD cells was apparently repaired by a caffeine- and ara-C-sensitive mechanism(s) that was deficient or absent in their malignant derivatives.

  18. A Dimeric Mutant of Human Pancreatic Ribonuclease with Selective Cytotoxicity toward Malignant Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccoli, Renata; di Gaetano, Sonia; de Lorenzo, Claudia; Grauso, Michela; Monaco, Carmen; Spalletti-Cernia, Daniela; Laccetti, Paolo; Cinatl, Jaroslav; Matousek, Josef; D'Alessio, Giuseppe

    1999-07-01

    Monomeric human pancreatic RNase, devoid of any biological activity other than its RNA degrading ability, was engineered into a dimeric protein with a cytotoxic action on mouse and human tumor cells, but lacking any appreciable toxicity on mouse and human normal cells. This dimeric variant of human pancreas RNase selectively sensitizes to apoptotic death cells derived from a human thyroid tumor. Because of its selectivity for tumor cells, and because of its human origin, this protein represents a potentially very attractive, novel tool for anticancer therapy.

  19. The K(m) for Radiosensitization of Human Tumor Cells by Oxygen is Much Greater than 3 mmHg and is Further Increased by Elevated Levels of Cysteine.

    PubMed

    Horan, A D; Koch, C J

    2001-10-01

    We studied the role of cysteine as an intracellular radiation protector under conditions in which both oxygen and thiols were monitored at 37 degrees C. In HCT-116 human colon cancer cells, the intracellular cysteine content affects the radiation survival dramatically at intermediate oxygen levels, but not at zero or high oxygen levels. Using a spin-through-oil method with a dual radioactive label detection system, we measured intracellular cysteine and glutathione (GSH) levels for cells in suspension culture. A comparison of the cysteine levels of monolayer cells lysed in situ and of trypsinized monolayer cells in suspension (Horan et al., Cytometry 29, 76-82, 1997) revealed that, upon trypsinization from monolayer culture and transfer to a spinner apparatus at 37 degrees C, HCT-116 cells lose most of their intracellular cysteine. Over the 60-min time course of control experiments, these cells do not recover intracellular cysteine despite the availability of cystine (the disulfide of cysteine) in the medium. When cells in spinner culture are provided with exogenous cysteine, they initially concentrate it to 10-fold the extracellular concentration, with the concentration factor decreasing to about 5-fold over the course of an hour. The intracellular GSH concentration changes little throughout this period, regardless of the changes in cysteine levels. The same apparatus was used to assess the survival of HCT-116 cells irradiated at 37 degrees C under conditions of constant pO(2) monitoring. For cells without added cysteine, the oxygen concentration for half-maximal radiation sensitivity was about 7.5 mmHg (intermediate hypoxia), more than twice the commonly accepted value (3 mmHg). At 7.5 mmHg, cells with added cysteine (intracellular concentration 3.5 mM) were almost as radioresistant as severely hypoxic cells (approximately 0.005% oxygen). Cells in parallel experiments in which the cells were grown in monolayers on glass Petri dishes had intermediate cysteine values and also intermediate radiosensitivity. We conclude that the radiation response of cells at intermediate oxygen levels is controlled predominantly by intracellular cysteine levels and that the cysteine levels commonly found in tumors may increase the K(m) for radiosensitivity to values much higher than suggested previously. PMID:11554850

  20. A novel bispecific immunotoxin delivered by human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to target blood vessels and vasculogenic mimicry of malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yonghong; Sun, Xinlin; Huang, Min; Ke, Yiquan; Wang, Jihui; Liu, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Background In previous years, immunotoxins have been shown to be a greatly promising therapeutic tool for brain malignancies, such as gliomas. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) exhibit tropism to tumor tissue. However, the effect of bispecific immunotoxins in malignant gliomas is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of bispecific immunotoxins in human malignant gliomas. Materials and methods In the present study, the bispecific immunotoxin VEGF165-ephrin A1-PE38KDEL was established using deoxyribonucleic acid shuffling and cloning techniques. The VEGF165-ephrin A1-PE38KDEL was delivered by hMSCs to mouse malignant gliomas. The effects of the bispecific immunotoxins on glioma-derived blood vessels and vasculogenic mimicry to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumorigenic effects of immunotoxins were examined in vivo. Results In vitro, transfected hMSCs significantly inhibited the cell viability of gliomas cell lines U87 and U251 in a dose-dependent manner compared with untransfected hMSCs (P<0.01). In vivo, the intratumoral injection of engineered hMSCs was effective at inhibiting tumor growth in a malignant glioma tumor model. Conclusion The bispecific immunotoxin secreted from hMSCs acts as a novel strategy for improving treatment options for malignant gliomas in the clinic. PMID:26089644

  1. Rigosertib is a more effective radiosensitizer than cisplatin in concurrent chemo-radiation treatment of cervical carcinoma, in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Agoni, Lorenzo; Basu, Indranil; Gupta, Seema; Alfieri, Alan; Gambino, Angela; Goldberg, Gary L.; Reddy, E. Premkumar; Guha, Chandan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Rigosertib is a novel anti-mitotic agent that induces selective G2/M arrest in cancer cells. Our study shows that rigosertib, when administered concurrently with radiotherapy, acts as a radiosensitizer with greater efficacy than cisplatin, the standard drug in concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for cervical malignancies. Rigosertib, combined with radiotherapy, appears to be a potential therapeutic agent for the clinical management of cervical carcinoma. Rigosertib as a radiosensitizer for cervical carcinoma PMID:24529717

  2. WE-G-BRE-08: Radiosensitization by Olaparib Eluting Nanospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Tangutoori, S; Kumar, R; Sridhar, S; Korideck, H; Makrigiorgos, G; Cormack, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Permanent prostate brachytherapy often uses inert bio-absorbable spacers to achieve the desired geometric distribution of sources within the prostate. Transforming these spacers into implantable nanoplatforms for chemo-radiation therapy (INCeRT) provides a means of providing sustained in-situ release of radiosensitizers in the prostate to enhance the therapeutic ratio of the procedure. Olaparib, a PARP inhibitor, suppresses DNA repair processes present during low dose rate continuous irradiation. This work investigates the radiosensitizing/DNA damage repair inhibition by NanoOlaparib eluting nanospheres. Methods: Human cell line PC3 (from ATCC), was maintained in F12-k medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum. Clonogenic assay kit (from Fischer Scientific) was used to fix and stain the cells to determine the long term effects of irradiation. Nanoparticle size and zeta potential of nanospheres were determined using a Zeta particle size analyzer. The incorporation of Olaparib in nanospheres was evaluated by HPLC. Irradiation was performed in a small animal irradiator operating at 220 KeV.The long term effects of radio-sensitization with olaparib and nanoolaparib was determined using the clonogenic assay at 2 Gy and 4 Gy doses. The cells were allowed to grow for around 10 doubling cycles, The colonies were fixed and stained using clonogenic assay kit. The excess stain was washed off using DI water and the images were taken using a digital camera. Results: Radiosensitization studies were carried out in prostate cancer cell line, PC3 radiation at 0, 2 and 4Gy doses. Strongest dose response was observed with nanoolaparib treated cells compared to untreated cells. Conclusion: A two stage drug release of drug eluting nanospheres from a biodegradable spacer has been suggested for sustained in-situ release of Olaparib to suppress DNA repair processes during prostate brachytherapy. The Olaparib eluting nanospheres had the same in-vitro radiosensitizing effect as free olaparib. DOD 1R21CA16977501, A. David Mazzone Awards Program 2012PD164.

  3. The Role of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Cell Proliferation and Cell Death in Human Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Sobolewski, Cyril; Cerella, Claudia; Dicato, Mario; Ghibelli, Lina; Diederich, Marc

    2010-01-01

    It is well admitted that the link between chronic inflammation and cancer involves cytokines and mediators of inflammatory pathways, which act during the different steps of tumorigenesis. The cyclooxygenases (COXs) are a family of enzymes, which catalyze the rate-limiting step of prostaglandin biosynthesis. This family contains three members: ubiquitously expressed COX-1, which is involved in homeostasis; the inducible COX-2 isoform, which is upregulated during both inflammation and cancer; and COX-3, expressed in brain and spinal cord, whose functions remain to be elucidated. COX-2 was described to modulate cell proliferation and apoptosis mainly in solid tumors, that is, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers, and, more recently, in hematological malignancies. These findings prompt us to analyze here the effects of a combination of COX-2 inhibitors together with different clinically used therapeutic strategies in order to further improve the efficiency of future anticancer treatments. COX-2 modulation is a promising field investigated by many research groups. PMID:20339581

  4. The Human Papillomavirus E6 PDZ Binding Motif: From Life Cycle to Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Ganti, Ketaki; Broniarczyk, Justyna; Manoubi, Wiem; Massimi, Paola; Mittal, Suruchi; Pim, David; Szalmas, Anita; Thatte, Jayashree; Thomas, Miranda; Tomaić, Vjekoslav; Banks, Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Cancer-causing HPV E6 oncoproteins are characterized by the presence of a PDZ binding motif (PBM) at their extreme carboxy terminus. It was long thought that this region of E6 had a sole function to confer interaction with a defined set of cellular substrates. However, more recent studies have shown that the E6 PBM has a complex pattern of regulation, whereby phosphorylation within the PBM can regulate interaction with two classes of cellular proteins: those containing PDZ domains and the members of the 14-3-3 family of proteins. In this review, we explore the roles that the PBM and its ligands play in the virus life cycle, and subsequently how these can inadvertently contribute towards the development of malignancy. We also explore how subtle alterations in cellular signal transduction pathways might result in aberrant E6 phosphorylation, which in turn might contribute towards disease progression. PMID:26147797

  5. The Human Papillomavirus E6 PDZ Binding Motif: From Life Cycle to Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Ganti, Ketaki; Broniarczyk, Justyna; Manoubi, Wiem; Massimi, Paola; Mittal, Suruchi; Pim, David; Szalmas, Anita; Thatte, Jayashree; Thomas, Miranda; Tomaić, Vjekoslav; Banks, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-causing HPV E6 oncoproteins are characterized by the presence of a PDZ binding motif (PBM) at their extreme carboxy terminus. It was long thought that this region of E6 had a sole function to confer interaction with a defined set of cellular substrates. However, more recent studies have shown that the E6 PBM has a complex pattern of regulation, whereby phosphorylation within the PBM can regulate interaction with two classes of cellular proteins: those containing PDZ domains and the members of the 14-3-3 family of proteins. In this review, we explore the roles that the PBM and its ligands play in the virus life cycle, and subsequently how these can inadvertently contribute towards the development of malignancy. We also explore how subtle alterations in cellular signal transduction pathways might result in aberrant E6 phosphorylation, which in turn might contribute towards disease progression. PMID:26147797

  6. Preclinical targeting of human T-cell malignancies using CD4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Pinz, K; Liu, H; Golightly, M; Jares, A; Lan, F; Zieve, G W; Hagag, N; Schuster, M; Firor, A E; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive lymphomas with no effective upfront standard treatment and ineffective options in relapsed disease, resulting in poorer clinical outcomes as compared with B-cell lymphomas. The adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach for treatment of hematological malignancies. However, preclinical reports of targeting T-cell lymphoma with CARs are almost non-existent. Here we have designed a CAR, CD4CAR, which redirects the antigen specificity of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to CD4-expressing cells. CD4CAR T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cord blood effectively redirected T-cell specificity against CD4+ cells in vitro. CD4CAR T cells efficiently eliminated a CD4+ leukemic cell line and primary CD4+ PTCL patient samples in co-culture assays. Notably, CD4CAR T cells maintained a central memory stem cell-like phenotype (CD8+CD45RO+CD62L+) under standard culture conditions. Furthermore, in aggressive orthotropic T-cell lymphoma models, CD4CAR T cells efficiently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells while also significantly prolonging mouse survival. Combined, these studies demonstrate that CD4CAR-expressing CD8+ T cells are efficacious in ablating malignant CD4+ populations, with potential use as a bridge to transplant or stand-alone therapy for the treatment of PTCLs. PMID:26526988

  7. Identification of cancer stem cell markers in human malignant mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ghani, Farhana Ishrat; Yamazaki, Hiroto; Iwata, Satoshi; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Aoe, Keisuke; Okabe, Kazunori; Mimura, Yusuke; Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Kishimoto, Takumi; Yamada, Taketo; Xu, C. Wilson; Morimoto, Chikao; Drug Development Program, Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} We performed serial transplantation of surgical samples and established new cell lines of malignant mesothelioma. {yields} SP cell and expressions of CD9/CD24/CD26 were often observed in mesothelioma cell lines. {yields} SP and CD24{sup +} cells proliferated by asymmetric cell division-like manner. CD9{sup +} and CD24{sup +} cells have higher potential to generate spheroid colony. {yields} The marker-positive cells have clear tendency to generate larger tumors in mice. -- Abstract: Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive and therapy-resistant neoplasm arising from the pleural mesothelial cells and usually associated with long-term asbestos exposure. Recent studies suggest that tumors contain cancer stem cells (CSCs) and their stem cell characteristics are thought to confer therapy-resistance. However, whether MM cell has any stem cell characteristics is not known. To understand the molecular basis of MM, we first performed serial transplantation of surgical samples into NOD/SCID mice and established new cell lines. Next, we performed marker analysis of the MM cell lines and found that many of them contain SP cells and expressed several putative CSC markers such as CD9, CD24, and CD26. Interestingly, expression of CD26 closely correlated with that of CD24 in some cases. Sorting and culture assay revealed that SP and CD24{sup +} cells proliferated by asymmetric cell division-like manner. In addition, CD9{sup +} and CD24{sup +} cells have higher potential to generate spheroid colony than negative cells in the stem cell medium. Moreover, these marker-positive cells have clear tendency to generate larger tumors in mouse transplantation assay. Taken together, our data suggest that SP, CD9, CD24, and CD26 are CSC markers of MM and could be used as novel therapeutic targets.

  8. Photodynamic therapy of human malignant tumors: a comparative study between photohem and tetrasulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranadko, Eugeny P.; Skobelkin, Oleg K.; Litvin, Grigory D.; Astrakhankina, Tamara A.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis of the results of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for treating malignant neoplasms of the skin, mammary glands, tongue, oral mucous, lower lip, larynx, lungs, urinary bladder, rectum and other locations has been made. During 1992-1995 543 tumoral foci in 146 patients have been treated with PDT. All patients were previously treated with conventional techniques without effect or they were not treated due to contraindications either because of severe accompanying diseases or because of old age. A part of the patients had PDT because of recurrences or intradermal metastases in 1-2 years after surgical, radial or combined treatment. Two home-made preparations were used as photosensitizers: Photohem (hematoporphyrine derivative) and Photosense (aluminum sulfonated phthalocyanine). Light sources were: the argon pumped dye laser ('Innova-200,' 'Coherent') and home-made laser devices: copper-vapor laser-pumped dye laser ('Yakhroma-2,' Frjazino), gas-discharge unit 'Xenon' (wavelength 630 nm), gold-vapor laser (wavelength 627.8 nm) for Photohem; while for Photosense sessions we used solid-state laser on ittrium aluminate 'Poljus-1' (wavelength 670 mn). Up to now we have follow-up control data within 2 months and 3 years. Positive effect of PDT was seen in 92.4% of patients including complete regression of tumors in 62.3% and partial -- in 30.1%. Currently, this new perspective technique of treating malignant neoplasms is successfully being used in Russia; new photosensitizers and light sources for PDT and fluorescent tumour diagnostics are being developed as well.

  9. MicroRNA-3151 inactivates TP53 in BRAF-mutated human malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lankenau, Malori A; Patel, Ravi; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Maharry, Sophia E; Hoag, Kevin W; Duggan, Megan; Walker, Christopher J; Markowitz, Joseph; Carson, William E; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2015-12-01

    The B-Raf proto-oncogene serine/threonine kinase (BRAF) gene is the most frequently mutated gene in malignant melanoma (MM) and papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and is causally involved in malignant cell transformation. Mutated BRAF is associated with an aggressive disease phenotype, thus making it a top candidate for targeted treatment strategies in MM and PTC. We show that BRAF mutations in both MM and PTC drive increased expression of oncomiR-3151, which is coactivated by the SP1/NF-κB complex. Knockdown of microRNA-3151 (miR-3151) with short hairpin RNAs reduces cell proliferation and increases apoptosis of MM and PTC cells. Using a targeted RNA sequencing approach, we mechanistically determined that miR-3151 directly targets TP53 and other members of the TP53 pathway. Reducing miR-3151's abundance increases TP53's mRNA and protein expression and favors its nuclear localization. Consequently, knockdown of miR-3151 also leads to caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Simultaneous inhibition of aberrantly activated BRAF and knockdown of miR-3151 potentiates the effects of sole BRAF inhibition with the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib and may provide a novel targeted therapeutic approach in BRAF-mutated MM and PTC patients. In conclusion, we identify miR-3151 as a previously unidentified player in MM and PTC pathogenesis, which is driven by BRAF-dependent and BRAF-independent mechanisms. Characterization of TP53 as a downstream effector of miR-3151 provides evidence for a causal link between BRAF mutations and TP53 inactivation. PMID:26582795

  10. Activation of endogenous human stem cell-associated retroviruses (SCARs) and therapy-resistant phenotypes of malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2016-07-01

    Recent reports revealed consistent activation of specific endogenous retroviral elements in human preimplantation embryos and embryonic stem cells. Activity of stem cell associated retroviruses (SCARs) has been implicated in seeding thousands of human-specific regulatory sequences in the hESC genome. Activation of specific SCARs has been demonstrated in patients diagnosed with multiple types of cancer, autoimmune diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders, and appears associated with clinically lethal therapy resistant death-from-cancer phenotypes in a sub-set of cancer patients diagnosed with different types of malignant tumors. A hallmark feature of human-specific SCAR integration sites is deletions of ancestral DNA. Analysis of human-specific genetic loci of SCARs' stemness networks in tumor samples of TCGA cohorts representing 29 cancer types suggests that this approach may facilitate identification of pan-cancer genomic signatures of clinically-lethal disease defined by the presence of somatic non-silent mutations, gene-level copy number changes, and transcripts and proteins' expression of SCAR-regulated host genes. Present analyses indicate that multiple lines of strong circumstantial evidence support the hypothesis that activation of SCARs' networks may play an important role in cancer progression and metastasis, perhaps contributing to the emergence of clinically-lethal therapy-resistant death-from-cancer phenotypes. PMID:27084523

  11. Antiproliferative Activity of Double Point Modified Analogs of 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D2 Against Human Malignant Melanoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska, Anna; Wierzbicka, Justyna; Nadkarni, Sharmin; Brown, Geoffrey; Kutner, Andrzej; Żmijewski, Michał A.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is a lipid soluble steroid hormone with pleiotropic biological properties, including regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. As to these desirable anticancer actions, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamins D and analogs have been reported to inhibit the proliferation and to induce differentiation of a wide variety of cancer cell types, including human malignant melanoma. However, there is a need for novel and more efficacious vitamin D analogs, and how best to design such is still an open issue. A series of double point modified (DPM) analogs of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2 (1,25(OH)2D2) induced differentiation of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) positive A375 and VDR negative SK-MEL 188b human malignant melanoma cell lines. Surprisingly, the dose of 1,25(OH)2D2 required to inhibit the proliferation of the A375 melanoma cell line by was several fold lower than that required in the case of 1,25(OH)2D3. To evaluate the impact of the modification in the side chain (additional 22-hydroxyl) and in the A-ring (5,6-trans modification), the regular side-chain of vitamin D2 or D3 was retained in the structure of our analogs. As expected, 5,6-trans modification was advantageous to enhancing the anti-proliferative activity of analogs, but not as a single point modification (SPM). Very unexpectedly, the additional 22-hydroxyl in the side-chain reduced significantly the anti-proliferative activity of both the natural and 5,6-trans series analogs. Finally, an induction of pigmentation in melanoma SK-MEL 188b cells was observed to sensitized cells to the effect of vitamin D analogs. PMID:26760999

  12. Down-regulation of malignant potential by alpha linolenic acid in human and mouse colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chamberland, John P; Moon, Hyun-Seuk

    2015-03-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (also called ω-3 fatty acis or n-3 fatty acid) are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with a double bond (C=C) at the third carbon atom from the end of the carbon chain. Numerous test tube and animal studies have shown that omega-3 fatty acids may prevent or inhibit the growth of cancers, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids are important in cancer physiology. Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is one of an essential omega-3 fatty acid and organic compound found in seeds (chia and flaxseed), nuts (notably walnuts), and many common vegetable oils. ALA has also been shown to down-regulate cell proliferation of prostate, breast, and bladder cancer cells. However, direct evidence that ALA suppresses to the development of colon cancer has not been studied. Also, no previous studies have evaluated whether ALA may regulate malignant potential (adhesion, invasion and colony formation) in colon cancer cells. In order to address the questions above, we conducted in vitro studies and evaluated whether ALA may down-regulate malignant potential in human (HT29 and HCT116) and mouse (MCA38) colon cancer cell lines. We observed that treatment with 1-5 mM of ALA inhibits cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion in both human and mouse colon cancer cell lines. Interestingly, we observed that ALA did not decrease total colony numbers when compared to control. By contrast, we found that size of colony was significantly changed by ALA treatment when compared to control in all colon cancer cell lines. We suggest that our data enhance our current knowledge of ALA's mechanism and provide crucial information to further the development of new therapies for the management or chemoprevention of colon cancer. PMID:25336096

  13. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) expression in human malignant gliomas contributes to immune escape and tumour progression.

    PubMed

    Mittelbronn, Michel; Platten, Michael; Zeiner, Pia; Dombrowski, Yvonne; Frank, Brigitte; Zachskorn, Cornelia; Harter, Patrick N; Weller, Michael; Wischhusen, Jörg

    2011-09-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), which inhibits apoptosis and promotes angiogenesis, is expressed in cancers suppressing immune surveillance. Its biological role in human glioblastoma is, however, only poorly understood. We examined in-vivo expression of MIF in 166 gliomas and 23 normal control brains by immunohistochemistry. MIF immunoreactivity was enhanced in neoplastic astrocytes in WHO grade II glioma and increased significantly in higher tumour grades (III-IV). MIF expression was further assessed in 12 glioma cell lines in vitro. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that MIF mRNA expression was elevated up to 800-fold in malignant glioma cells compared with normal brain. This translated into high protein levels as assessed by immunoblotting of total cell lysates and by ELISA-based measurement of secreted MIF. Wild-type p53-retaining glioma cell lines expressed higher levels of MIF, which may be connected with the previously described role of MIF as a negative regulator of wild-type p53 signalling in tumour cells. Stable knockdown of MIF by shRNA in glioma cells significantly increased tumour cell susceptibility towards NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Furthermore, supernatant from mock-transfected cells, but not from MIF knockdown cells, induced downregulation of the activating immune receptor NKG2D on NK and CD8+ T cells. We thus propose that human glioma cell-derived MIF contributes to the immune escape of malignant gliomas by counteracting NK and cytotoxic T-cell-mediated tumour immune surveillance. Considering its further cell-intrinsic and extrinsic tumour-promoting effects and the availability of small molecule inhibitors, MIF seems to be a promising candidate for future glioma therapy. PMID:21773885

  14. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiman, Norman Jay

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9, influence cataract development and thus radiosensitivity. These observations have direct applicability to various human populations including accidentally exposed individuals, interventional medical workers, astronauts and nuclear plant workers.

  15. Radiotherapy of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.S.

    1985-04-01

    The role of radiotherapy in the treatment of malignant melanoma is limited, and surgery generally forms the mainstay of medical practice. However, there are some circumstances in which radiotherapy should be considered the treatment of choice. Symptomatic metastatic lesions in bone or brain can effectively be palliated in a substantial proportion of instances. At the current stage of our knowledge, conventionally fractionated treatment of such lesions forms the standard against which other treatments should be measured. In contrast, metastatic lesions to skin or lymph nodes that do not overlie critical normal structures probably are better treated by high-dose-per-fraction techniques. Radiotherapy may play a definitive role in the treatment of lentigo maligna. The precise optimal energy of the beam to be used remains to be defined. Slightly more penetrating radiation appears to be required for lentigo maligna melanomas. Here, too, the optimal energy remains to be defined. The treatment of nonlentigenous melanomas primarily by radiotherapy is unproved in my opinion. Certainly, the data from the Princess Margaret Hospital is exciting, but I believe it must be corroborated by a well-designed trial before it can be accepted without question. Future directions in treatment of malignant melanoma are likely to include further trials of unconventional fractionation and the use of radiosensitizing agents in conjunction with radiotherapy. The time for dermatologists and radiation therapists to cooperate in such studies is at hand.

  16. Primary malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Mısır, A. Ferhat; Durmuşlar, Mustafa C.; Zerener, Tamer; Gün, Banu D.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanomas (MM) of the oral cavity are extremely rare, accounting for 0.2% to 8.0% of all malignant melanomas. Malignant melanomas is more frequently seen at the level of the hard palate and gingiva. Early diagnosis and treatment are important for reducing morbidity. Malignant melanoma cells stain positively with antibodies to human melanoma black 45, S-100 protein, and vimentin; therefore, immunohistochemistry can play an important role in evaluating the depth of invasion and the location of metastases. A 76-year-old man developed an oral malignant melanoma, which was originally diagnosed as a bluish reactive denture hyperplasia caused by an ill-fitting lower denture. The tumor was removed surgically, and histopathological examination revealed a nodular-type MM. There was no evidence of recurrence over a 4-year follow-up period. PMID:27052289

  17. Primary malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Mısır, A Ferhat; Durmuşlar, Mustafa C; Zerener, Tamer; Gün, Banu D

    2016-04-01

    Malignant melanomas (MM) of the oral cavity are extremely rare, accounting for 0.2% to 8.0% of all malignant melanomas. Malignant melanomas is more frequently seen at the level of the hard palate and gingiva. Early diagnosis and treatment are important for reducing morbidity. Malignant melanoma cells stain positively with antibodies to human melanoma black 45, S-100 protein, and vimentin; therefore, immunohistochemistry can play an important role in evaluating the depth of invasion and the location of metastases. A 76-year-old man developed an oral malignant melanoma, which was originally diagnosed as a bluish reactive denture hyperplasia caused by an ill-fitting lower denture. The tumor was removed surgically, and histopathological examination revealed a nodular-type MM. There was no evidence of recurrence over a 4-year follow-up period. PMID:27052289

  18. Comparative analysis of the expression patterns of metalloproteinases and their inhibitors in breast neoplasia, sporadic colorectal neoplasia, pulmonary carcinomas and malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Kossakowska, A. E.; Huchcroft, S. A.; Urbanski, S. J.; Edwards, D. R.

    1996-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases, TIMPs) play essential roles in the remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Results of in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that the balance between MMPs and TIMPs is altered in neoplasia, contributing to the invasive and metastatic properties of malignant tumours. In this study we have analysed the expression of five MMP genes and TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 in 37 benign and malignant lesions of human breast using Northern blot analysis. MMP-9 (92 kDa gelatinase) and MMP-11 (stromelysin 3) were most consistently expressed by carcinomas. Based on detection of either MMP-9 or MMP-11 mRNAs, we were able to distinguish between malignant and benign disease with a predictive accuracy of 90% with 94% sensitivity and 85% specificity. Subsequently, these results were compared with results for carcinomas of colon and lung and malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL). Elevated MMP-9 and TIMP-1 expression was observed in all four systems. MMP-11 characterised all carcinomas as well as carcinomas in situ but was not detectable in NHL. Our data therefore argue that there are remarkably similar patterns of specific functions involved in ECM remodelling that correlate with malignancy in different human tumours of different histogenesis. However, MMP-11 expression is a characteristic of tumours of epithelial origin that is not found in lymphoid neoplasia. Thus it suggests that MMP-11 may play a regulatory role in the invasion and metastasis of carcinomas. Images Figure 1 PMID:8645587

  19. Photoacoustic Tomography of Human Hepatic Malignancies Using Intraoperative Indocyanine Green Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Akinori; Ishizawa, Takeaki; Kamiya, Mako; Shimizu, Atsushi; Kaneko, Junichi; Ijichi, Hideaki; Shibahara, Junji; Fukayama, Masashi; Midorikawa, Yutaka; Urano, Yasuteru; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    Recently, fluorescence imaging following the preoperative intravenous injection of indocyanine green has been used in clinical settings to identify hepatic malignancies during surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of photoacoustic tomography using indocyanine green as a contrast agent to produce representative fluorescence images of hepatic tumors by visualizing the spatial distribution of indocyanine green on ultrasonographic images. Indocyanine green (0.5 mg/kg, intravenous) was preoperatively administered to 9 patients undergoing hepatectomy. Intraoperatively, photoacoustic tomography was performed on the surface of the resected hepatic specimens (n = 10) under excitation with an 800 nm pulse laser. In 4 hepatocellular carcinoma nodules, photoacoustic imaging identified indocyanine green accumulation in the cancerous tissue. In contrast, in one hepatocellular carcinoma nodule and five adenocarcinoma foci (one intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and 4 colorectal liver metastases), photoacoustic imaging delineated indocyanine green accumulation not in the cancerous tissue but rather in the peri-cancerous hepatic parenchyma. Although photoacoustic tomography enabled to visualize spatial distribution of ICG on ultrasonographic images, which was consistent with fluorescence images on cut surfaces of the resected specimens, photoacoustic signals of ICG-containing tissues decreased approximately by 40% even at 4 mm depth from liver surfaces. Photoacoustic tomography using indocyanine green also failed to identify any hepatocellular carcinoma nodules from the body surface of model mice with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In conclusion, photoacoustic tomography has a potential to enhance cancer detectability and differential diagnosis by ultrasonographic examinations and intraoperative fluorescence imaging through visualization of stasis of bile-excreting imaging agents in and/or around hepatic tumors. However, further technical advances are needed to improve the visibility of photoacoustic signals emitted from deeply-located lesions. PMID:25379674

  20. Histone H2B monoubiquitination: roles to play in human malignancy.

    PubMed

    Cole, Alexander J; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick; Marsh, Deborah J

    2015-02-01

    Ubiquitination has traditionally been viewed in the context of polyubiquitination that is essential for marking proteins for degradation via the proteasome. Recent discoveries have shed light on key cellular roles for monoubiquitination, including as a post-translational modification (PTM) of histones such as histone H2B. Monoubiquitination plays a significant role as one of the largest histone PTMs, alongside smaller, better-studied modifications such as methylation, acetylation and phosphorylation. Monoubiquitination of histone H2B at lysine 120 (H2Bub1) has been shown to have key roles in transcription, the DNA damage response and stem cell differentiation. The H2Bub1 enzymatic cascade involves E3 RING finger ubiquitin ligases, with the main E3 generally accepted to be the RNF20-RNF40 complex, and deubiquitinases including ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7), USP22 and USP44. H2Bub1 has been shown to physically disrupt chromatin strands, fostering a more open chromatin structure accessible to transcription factors and DNA repair proteins. It also acts as a recruiting signal, actively attracting proteins with roles in transcription and DNA damage. H2Bub1 also appears to play central roles in histone cross-talk, influencing methylation events on histone H3, including H3K4 and H3K79. Most significantly, global levels of H2Bub1 are low to absent in advanced cancers including breast, colorectal, lung and parathyroid, marking H2Bub1 and the enzymes that regulate it as key molecules of interest as possible new therapeutic targets for the treatment of cancer. This review offers an overview of current knowledge regarding H2Bub1 and highlights links between dysregulation of H2Bub1-associated enzymes, stem cells and malignancy. PMID:24891457

  1. Cystathionine β-synthase-derived hydrogen sulfide is involved in human malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Vellecco, Valentina; Mancini, Antonio; Ianaro, Angela; Calderone, Vincenzo; Attanasio, Chiara; Cantalupo, Anna; Andria, Barbara; Savoia, Gennaro; Panza, Elisabetta; Di Martino, Antonietta; Cirino, Giuseppe; Bucci, Mariarosaria

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is an endogenous gasotransmitter and its mechanism of action involves activation of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels and phosphodiesterase inhibition. As both mechanisms are potentially involved in malignant hyperthermia (MH), in the present study we addressed the involvement of the L-cysteine/hydrogen sulfide pathway in MH. Skeletal muscle biopsies obtained from 25 MH-susceptible (MHS) and 56 MH-negative (MHN) individuals have been used to perform the in vitro contracture test (IVCT). Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and Western blotting studies have also been performed. Hydrogen sulfide levels are measured in both tissue samples and plasma. In MHS biopsies an increase in cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) occurs, as both mRNA and protein expression compared with MHN biopsies. Hydrogen sulfide biosynthesis is increased in MHS biopsies (0.128±0.12 compared with 0.943±0.13 nmol/mg of protein per min for MHN and MHS biopsies, respectively; P<0.01). Addition of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) to MHS samples evokes a response similar, in the IVCT, to that elicited by either caffeine or halothane. Incubation of MHN biopsies with NaHS, before caffeine or halothane challenge, switches an MHN to an MHS response. In conclusion we demonstrate the involvement of the L-cysteine/hydrogen sulfide pathway in MH, giving new insight into MH molecular mechanisms. This finding has potential implications for clinical care and could help to define less invasive diagnostic procedures. PMID:26460077

  2. Human exposure to polyhalogenated hydrocarbons and incidence of selected malignancies -central European experience.

    PubMed

    Bencko, V; Rames, J; Ondrusova, M; Plesko, I; Jurickova, L; Trnovec, T

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes results of two ecological studies design to analyze the incidence of selected malignancies in two populations exposed to polychlorinated hydrocarbons, mostly PCBs and TCDDs/Fs by comparing data available in the National Cancer Registry of the Slovak Republic and National Oncological Registry of the Czech Republic databases for the Slovak Republic (approximately 5M inhabitants) and the Czech Republic (10,3 M inhabitants) to the data relevant for the population of Michalovce District, the Slovak Republic (approximately 112,000 inhabitants) and Uherske Hradiste, the Czech Republic (146,000 inhabitants). Those districts are recognized as PCB-contaminated areas due to production and industrial use of PCBs. Data were analyzed for the 10-year period 1987-1996. The age adjusted world standard ratio (WSR) incidence of thyroid, pancreatic, breast, ovarian, bladder, and brain tumors in females and thyroid, pancreatic, breast, bladder, brain, prostate and testicular tumors in males were compared. Neither PCBs nor TCDDs/Fs appear to contribute to the observed significantly lower incidence of breast and prostate cancer in the Michalovce District and lower bladder cancer incidence in Uherske Hradiste District. However, anti-estrogenic and anti-androgenic properties have been described for hydroxylated and methylsulfonyl PCB metabolites. These properties could contribute to a mechanism through which these metabolites might modulate the development of breast, prostate and bladder cancer. The results of our analysis points to substantial potential problems of risk assessment for cancer incidence in populations exposed to xenobiotics, or more generally, as it relates to a wide spectrum of confoundings of cancer risk factors. PMID:19469657

  3. Inhibition of cell growth by EGR-1 in human primary cultures from malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Calogero, Antonella; Lombari, Vincenza; De Gregorio, Giorgia; Porcellini, Antonio; Ucci, Severine; Arcella, Antonietta; Caruso, Riccardo; Gagliardi, Franco Maria; Gulino, Alberto; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Frati, Luigi; Mercola, Dan; Ragona, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Background The aim of this work was to investigate in vitro the putative role of EGR-1 in the growth of glioma cells. EGR-1 expression was examined during the early passages in vitro of 17 primary cell lines grown from 3 grade III and from 14 grade IV malignant astrocytoma explants. The explanted tumors were genetically characterized at the p53, MDM2 and INK4a/ARF loci, and fibronectin expression and growth characteristics were examined. A recombinant adenovirus overexpressing EGR-1 was tested in the primary cell lines. Results Low levels of EGR-1 protein were found in all primary cultures examined, with lower values present in grade IV tumors and in cultures carrying wild-type copies of p53 gene. The levels of EGR-1 protein were significantly correlated to the amount of intracellular fibronectin, but only in tumors carrying wild-type copies of the p53 gene (R = 0,78, p = 0.0082). Duplication time, plating efficiency, colony formation in agarose, and contact inhibition were also altered in the p53 mutated tumor cultures compared to those carrying wild-type p53. Growth arrest was achieved in both types of tumor within 1–2 weeks following infection with a recombinant adenovirus overexpressing EGR-1 but not with the control adenovirus. Conclusions Suppression of EGR-1 is a common event in gliomas and in most cases this is achieved through down-regulation of gene expression. Expression of EGR-1 by recombinant adenovirus infection almost completely abolishes the growth of tumor cells in vitro, regardless of the mutational status of the p53 gene. PMID:14711380

  4. Role of androgen and vitamin D receptors in endothelial cells from benign and malignant human prostate

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ivy; Montecinos, Viviana P.; Buttyan, Ralph; Johnson, Candace S.; Smith, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    Forty years ago, Judah Folkman (Folkman. N Engl J Med 285: 1182–1186, 1971) proposed that tumor growth might be controlled by limiting formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) needed to supply a growing tumor with oxygen and nutrients. To this end, numerous “antiangiogenic” agents have been developed and tested for therapeutic efficacy in cancer patients, including prostate cancer (CaP) patients, with limited success. Despite the lack of clinical efficacy of lead anti-angiogenic therapeutics in CaP patients, recent published evidence continues to support the idea that prostate tumor vasculature provides a reasonable target for development of new therapeutics. Particularly relevant to antiangiogenic therapies targeted to the prostate is the observation that specific hormones can affect the survival and vascular function of prostate endothelial cells within normal and malignant prostate tissues. Here, we review the evidence demonstrating that both androgen(s) and vitamin D significantly impact the growth and survival of endothelial cells residing within prostate cancer and that systemic changes in circulating androgen or vitamin D drastically affect blood flow and vascularity of prostate tissue. Furthermore, recent evidence will be discussed about the expression of the receptors for both androgen and vitamin D in prostate endothelial cells that argues for direct effects of these hormone-activated receptors on the biology of endothelial cells. Based on this literature, we propose that prostate tumor vasculature represents an unexplored target for modulation of tumor growth. A better understanding of androgen and vitamin D effects on prostate endothelial cells will support development of more effective angiogenesis-targeting therapeutics for CaP patients. PMID:23548616

  5. The specific role of pRb in p16INK4A-mediated arrest of normal and malignant human breast cells

    PubMed Central

    Bazarov, Alexey V; Lee, Won Jae; Bazarov, Irina; Bosire, Moses; Hines, William C; Stankovich, Basha; Chicas, Agustin; Lowe, Scott W

    2012-01-01

    RB family proteins pRb, p107 and p130 have similar structures and overlapping functions, enabling cell cycle arrest and cellular senescence. pRb, but not p107 or p130, is frequently mutated in human malignancies. In human fibroblasts acutely exposed to oncogenic ras, pRb has a specific role in suppressing DNA replication, and p107 or p130 cannot compensate for the loss of this function; however, a second p53/p21-dependent checkpoint prevents escape from growth arrest. This model of oncogene-induced senescence requires the additional loss of p53/p21 to explain selection for preferential loss of pRb function in human malignancies. We asked whether similar rules apply to the role of pRb in growth arrest of human epithelial cells, the source of most cancers. In two malignant human breast cancer cell lines, we found that individual RB family proteins were sufficient for the establishment of p16-initiated senescence, and that growth arrest in G1 was not dependent on the presence of functional pRb or p53. However, senescence induction by endogenous p16 was delayed in primary normal human mammary epithelial cells with reduced pRb but not with reduced p107 or p130. Thus, under these circumstances, despite the presence of functional p53, p107 and p130 were unable to completely compensate for pRb in mediating senescence induction. We propose that early inactivation of pRb in pre-malignant breast cells can, by itself, extend proliferative lifespan, allowing acquisition of additional changes necessary for malignant transformation. PMID:22333593

  6. The specific role of pRb in p16 (INK4A) -mediated arrest of normal and malignant human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Bazarov, Alexey V; Lee, Won Jae; Bazarov, Irina; Bosire, Moses; Hines, William C; Stankovich, Basha; Chicas, Agustin; Lowe, Scott W; Yaswen, Paul

    2012-03-01

    RB family proteins pRb, p107 and p130 have similar structures and overlapping functions, enabling cell cycle arrest and cellular senescence. pRb, but not p107 or p130, is frequently mutated in human malignancies. In human fibroblasts acutely exposed to oncogenic ras, pRb has a specific role in suppressing DNA replication, and p107 or p130 cannot compensate for the loss of this function; however, a second p53/p21-dependent checkpoint prevents escape from growth arrest. This model of oncogene-induced senescence requires the additional loss of p53/p21 to explain selection for preferential loss of pRb function in human malignancies. We asked whether similar rules apply to the role of pRb in growth arrest of human epithelial cells, the source of most cancers. In two malignant human breast cancer cell lines, we found that individual RB family proteins were sufficient for the establishment of p16-initiated senescence, and that growth arrest in G 1 was not dependent on the presence of functional pRb or p53. However, senescence induction by endogenous p16 was delayed in primary normal human mammary epithelial cells with reduced pRb but not with reduced p107 or p130. Thus, under these circumstances, despite the presence of functional p53, p107 and p130 were unable to completely compensate for pRb in mediating senescence induction. We propose that early inactivation of pRb in pre-malignant breast cells can, by itself, extend proliferative lifespan, allowing acquisition of additional changes necessary for malignant transformation. PMID:22333593

  7. Preferential cytotoxicity of bortezomib toward highly malignant human liposarcoma cells via suppression of MDR1 expression and function

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yamei; Wang, Lingxian; Wang, Lu; Wu, Xuefeng; Wu, Xudong; Gu, Yanhong; Shu, Yongqian; Sun, Yang; Shen, Yan; Xu, Qiang

    2015-02-15

    Liposarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma with a high risk of relapse. Few therapeutic options are available for the aggressive local or metastatic disease. Here, we report that the clinically used proteasome inhibitor bortezomib exhibits significantly stronger cytotoxicity toward highly malignant human liposarcoma SW872-S cells compared with its parental SW872 cells, which is accompanied by enhanced activation of apoptotic signaling both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of cells with Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP60015 or the translation inhibitor cycloheximide ameliorated this enhanced apoptosis. Bortezomib inhibited MDR1 expression and function more effectively in SW872-S cells than in SW872 cells, indicating that the increased cytotoxicity relies on the degree of proteasome inhibition. Furthermore, the pharmacological or genetic inhibition of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase (SERCA) 2, which is highly expressed in SW872-S cells, resulted in partial reversal of cell growth inhibition and increase of MDR1 expression in bortezomib-treated SW872-S cells. These results show that bortezomib exhibits preferential cytotoxicity toward SW872-S cells possibly via highly expressed SERCA2-associated MDR1 suppression and suggest that bortezomib may serve as a potent agent for treating advanced liposarcoma. - Highlights: • We compare the cytotoxicity of different drugs between SW872-S and SW872 cells. • Highly malignant liposarcoma cells SW872-S show hypersensitivity to bortezomib. • Apoptotic signaling is robustly enhanced in bortezomib-treated SW872-S cells. • Bortezomib has strong suppression on MDR1 expression and function in SW872-S cells. • Inhibition of SERCA2 protects SW872-S cells from bortezomib.

  8. Expression of vimentin filaments in canine malignant mammary gland tumors: A simulation of clinicopathological features of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rismanchi, Sanaz; Yadegar, Orly; Muhammadnejad, Samad; Amanpour, Saeid; Taghizadeh-Jahed, Masoud; Muhammadnejad, Ahad

    2014-09-01

    Canine malignant mammary gland tumors (CMMGTs) are the most common malignancies observed in females. Several biological similarities have been reported between CMMGTs and human breast cancer (HBC). The present study aimed to assess the correlation of vimentin filaments overexpression, as part of the process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the clinicopathological characteristics in CMMGTs. The clinicopathological characteristics of 42 CMMGTs were collected. Paraffin-embedded blocks underwent immunohistochemistry staining, which was performed using vimentin (to assess the evolution of the EMT process), Ki-67 (for evaluation of tumor proliferation) and cluster of differentiation 34 (CD34) (for evaluation of angiogenesis) antibodies. The tumor stage, grade, vascular invasion, margin status, rate of expression of the vimentin filaments, microvessel density-CD34 and proliferation rate data were obtained. Finally, the association between the expression of the vimentin filaments and those parameters was resolved statistically. A significant association was shown between the overexpression of the vimentin filaments and tumor size (r=0.71, P=0.03), tumor grade (r=0.80, P=0.021), angiogenesis (r=0.57, P=0.043), proliferation coefficient (r=0.06, P=0.001) and vascular invasion (r=0.76, P=0.043). Vimentin overexpression did not statistically correlate with the tumor stage or the margin status. Similar to the findings of the present study, certain recent studies have indicated that vimentin filament expression in HBC and CMMGTs is associated with the severity of cancer. Thus, spontaneous canine mammary tumor models appear to be an appropriate animal model for breast cancer research, and the results of the present study could aid to reinforce the association. PMID:25054018

  9. Ionizing radiation predisposes non-malignant human mammaryepithelial cells to undergo TGF beta-induced epithelial to mesenchymaltransition

    SciTech Connect

    Andarawewa, Kumari L.; Erickson, Anna C.; Chou, William S.; Costes, Sylvain; Gascard, Philippe; Mott, Joni D.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2007-04-06

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}) is a tumor suppressor during the initial stage of tumorigenesis, but it can switch to a tumor promoter during neoplastic progression. Ionizing radiation (IR), both a carcinogen and a therapeutic agent, induces TGF{beta}, activation in vivo. We now show that IR sensitizes human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to undergo TGF{beta}-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Non-malignant HMEC (MCF10A, HMT3522 S1 and 184v) were irradiated with 2 Gy shortly after attachment in monolayer culture, or treated with a low concentration of TGF{beta} (0.4 ng/ml), or double-treated. All double-treated (IR+TGF{beta}) HMEC underwent a morphological shift from cuboidal to spindle-shaped. This phenotype was accompanied by decreased expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin, {beta}-catenin and ZO-1, remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, and increased expression of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, fibronectin and vimentin. Furthermore, double-treatment increased cell motility, promoted invasion and disrupted acinar morphogenesis of cells subsequently plated in Matrigel{trademark}. Neither radiation nor TGF{beta} alone elicited EMT, even though IR increased chronic TGF{beta} signaling and activity. Gene expression profiling revealed that double treated cells exhibit a specific 10-gene signature associated with Erk/MAPK signaling. We hypothesized that IR-induced MAPK activation primes non-malignant HMEC to undergo TGF{beta}-mediated EMT. Consistent with this, Erk phosphorylation were transiently induced by irradiation, persisted in irradiated cells treated with TGF{beta}, and treatment with U0126, a Mek inhibitor, blocked the EMT phenotype. Together, these data demonstrate that the interactions between radiation-induced signaling pathways elicit heritable phenotypes that could contribute to neoplastic progression.

  10. Pharmacological Ascorbate Radiosensitizes Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Cieslak, John A; Welsh, Jessemae L; Sibenaller, Zita A; Allen, Bryan G; Wagner, Brett A; Kalen, Amanda L; Doskey, Claire M; Strother, Robert K; Button, Anna M; Mott, Sarah L; Smith, Brian; Tsai, Susan; Mezhir, James; Goswami, Prabhat C; Spitz, Douglas R; Buettner, Garry R; Cullen, Joseph J

    2015-08-15

    The toxicity of pharmacologic ascorbate is mediated by the generation of H2O2 via the oxidation of ascorbate. Because pancreatic cancer cells are sensitive to H2O2 generated by ascorbate, they would also be expected to become sensitized to agents that increase oxidative damage such as ionizing radiation. The current study demonstrates that pharmacologic ascorbate enhances the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation as seen by decreased cell viability and clonogenic survival in all pancreatic cancer cell lines examined, but not in nontumorigenic pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Ascorbate radiosensitization was associated with an increase in oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, which was reversed by catalase. In mice with established heterotopic and orthotopic pancreatic tumor xenografts, pharmacologic ascorbate combined with ionizing radiation decreased tumor growth and increased survival, without damaging the gastrointestinal tract or increasing systemic changes in parameters indicative of oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of pharmacologic ascorbate as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26081808

  11. The distribution of cells expressing a natural killer cell marker (HNK-1) in normal human lymphoid organs and malignant lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Mori, S; Mohri, N; Morita, H; Yamaguchi, K; Shimamine, T

    1983-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody, HNK-1, is known to react with some human leukocytes including all natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood. The distribution of cells reacting with this antibody (HNK-1+ cell) was studied in human peripheral lymphoid organs, consisting of five lymph nodes, two specimens of gastric mucosa with lymphoid tissue, two tonsils, one appendix, and two thymuses. Fourteen cases of malignant lymphoma (ML) were also examined. For the demonstration of HNK-1+ cells, the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) bridge method was applied to cryostat sections of these specimens. It was found that in normal lymphoid organs most HNK-1+ cells were located in lymph follicles, especially in germinal centers, and some were found in 'mixed' regions which indicate outsides of both the follicles and T-zones. Amongst the ML, large clusters of HNK-1+ cells were observed only in two cases of follicular lymphoma, although a few scattered HNK-1+ cells were noted in other ML, including five diffuse B-cell lymphomas, six T-cell lymphomas and one null cell lymphoma. The possible significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:6137899

  12. von Willebrand factor fibers promote cancer-associated platelet aggregation in malignant melanoma of mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Alexander T.; Suckau, Jan; Frank, Kathrin; Desch, Anna; Goertz, Lukas; Wagner, Andreas H.; Hecker, Markus; Goerge, Tobias; Umansky, Ludmila; Beckhove, Philipp; Utikal, Jochen; Gorzelanny, Christian; Diaz-Valdes, Nancy; Umansky, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-mediated procoagulatory activity leads to venous thromboembolism and supports metastasis in cancer patients. A prerequisite for metastasis formation is the interaction of cancer cells with endothelial cells (ECs) followed by their extravasation. Although it is known that activation of ECs and the release of the procoagulatory protein von Willebrand factor (VWF) is essential for malignancy, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that VWF fibers in tumor vessels promote tumor-associated thromboembolism and metastasis. Using in vitro settings, mouse models, and human tumor samples, we showed that melanoma cells activate ECs followed by the luminal release of VWF fibers and platelet aggregation in tumor microvessels. Analysis of human blood samples and tumor tissue revealed that a promoted VWF release combined with a local inhibition of proteolytic activity and protein expression of ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin-like and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type I repeats 13) accounts for this procoagulatory milieu. Blocking endothelial cell activation by the low-molecular-weight heparin tinzaparin was accompanied by a lack of VWF networks and inhibited tumor progression in a transgenic mouse model. Our findings implicate a mechanism wherein tumor-derived vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) promotes tumor progression and angiogenesis. Thus, targeting EC activation envisions new therapeutic strategies attenuating tumor-related angiogenesis and coagulation. PMID:25977583

  13. T24 human bladder carcinoma cells with activated Ha-ras protooncogene: Nontumorigenic cells susceptible to malignant transformation with carcinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Senger, D.R.; Perruzzi, C.A.; Ali, I.U. )

    1988-07-01

    A comparative analysis of T24 human bladder carcinoma cells and N-methyl-N{prime}-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MeNNG)-transformed derivatives (MeNNG-T24) revealed the following: (i) The presence of an activated c-Ha-ras gene (in the absence of the normal allele) is sufficient to confer upon T24 cells a tumor-associated phenotype. (ii) MeNNG-transformed T24 cells not only acquire tumor-associated (in vitro) traits (growth in soft agar and rhodamine retention) but, are highly tumorigenic in nude mice. (iii) It is possible to render T24 cells tumorigenic by chemical transformation; therefore, the reason that T24 cells lack tumorigenicity is not because of possible incompatibilities between these cells and nude mice but, in fact, because T24 cells are not malignant. (iv) The loss of expression of a transformation-related M{sub r} 67,000 phosphoprotein by MeNNG-T24 cells after explanation of these cells from nude mouse tumors to in vitro culture indicates that culture conditions can be responsible for rapid phenotypic conversion of human tumor cell lines.

  14. Epidermal growth factor stimulates vascular endothelial growth factor production by human malignant glioma cells: a model of glioblastoma multiforme pathophysiology.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, C K; Kim, J; Wong, W L; King, V; Brock, T; Gillespie, G Y

    1993-01-01

    Hypervascularity, focal necrosis, persistent cerebral edema, and rapid cellular proliferation are key histopathologic features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and malignant of human brain tumors. By immunoperoxidase and immunofluorescence, we definitively have demonstrated the presence of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) in five out of five human glioma cell lines (U-251MG, U-105MG, D-65MG, D-54MG, and CH-235MG) and in eight human GBM tumor surgical specimens. In vitro experiments with glioma cell lines revealed a consistent and reliable relation between EGFr activation and VEGF production; namely, EGF (1-20 ng/ml) stimulation of glioma cells resulted in a 25-125% increase in secretion of bioactive VEGF. Conditioned media (CM) prepared from EGF-stimulated glioma cell lines produced significant increases in cytosolic free intracellular concentrations of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Neither EGF alone or CM from glioma cultures prepared in the absence of EGF induced [Ca2+]i increases in HUVECs. Preincubation of glioma CM with A4.6.1, a monoclonal antibody to VEGF, completely abolished VEGF-mediated [Ca2+]i transients in HUVECs. Likewise, induction by glioma-derived CM of von Willebrand factor release from HUVECs was completely blocked by A4.6.1 pretreatment. These observations provide a key link in understanding the basic cellular pathophysiology of GBM tumor angiogenesis, increased vascular permeability, and cellular proliferation. Specifically, EGF activation of EGFr expressed on glioma cells leads to enhanced secretion of VEGF by glioma cells. VEGF released by glioma cells in situ most likely accounts for pathognomonic histopathologic and clinical features of GBM tumors in patients, including striking tumor angiogenesis, increased cerebral edema and hypercoagulability manifesting as focal tumor necrosis, deep vein thrombosis, or pulmonary embolism. Images PMID:7680247

  15. Telomerase-immortalized non-malignant human prostate epithelial cells retain the properties of multipotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongzhen; Zhou Jianjun; Miki, Jun; Furusato, Bungo; Gu Yongpeng; Srivastava, Shiv; McLeod, David G.; Vogel, Jonathan C.; Rhim, Johng S.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding prostate stem cells may provide insight into the origin of prostate cancer. Primary cells have been cultured from human prostate tissue but they usually survive only 15-20 population doublings before undergoing senescence. We report here that RC-170N/h/clone 7 cells, a clonal cell line from hTERT-immortalized primary non-malignant tissue-derived human prostate epithelial cell line (RC170N/h), retain multipotent stem cell properties. The RC-170N/h/clone 7 cells expressed a human embryonic stem cell marker, Oct-4, and potential prostate epithelial stem cell markers, CD133, integrin {alpha}2{beta}1{sup hi} and CD44. The RC-170N/h/clone 7 cells proliferated in KGM and Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium with 10% fetal bovine serum and 5 {mu}g/ml insulin (DMEM + 10% FBS + Ins.) medium, and differentiated into epithelial stem cells that expressed epithelial cell markers, including CK5/14, CD44, p63 and cytokeratin 18 (CK18); as well as the mesenchymal cell markers, vimentin, desmin; the neuron and neuroendocrine cell marker, chromogranin A. Furthermore the RC170 N/h/clone 7 cells differentiated into multi tissues when transplanted into the sub-renal capsule and subcutaneously of NOD-SCID mice. The results indicate that RC170N/h/clone 7 cells retain the properties of multipotent stem cells and will be useful as a novel cell model for studying the mechanisms of human prostate stem cell differentiation and transformation.

  16. Basic and clinical aspects of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nathanson, L. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the following 10 chapters: The role of oncogenes in the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma; Laminin and fibronectin modulate the metastatic activity of melanoma cells; Structure, function and biosynthesis of ganglioside antigens associated with human tumors derived from the neuroectoderm; Epidemiology of ocular melanoma; Malignant melanoma: Prognostic factors; Endocrine influences on the natural history of human malignant melanoma; Psychosocial factors associated with prognostic indicators, progression, psychophysiology, and tumor-host response in cutaneous malignant melanoma; Central nervous system metastases in malignant melanoma; Interferon trials in the management of malignant melanoma and other neoplasms: an overview; and The treatment of malignant melanoma by fast neutrons.

  17. Bipolar cellular morphology of malignant melanoma in unstained human melanoma skin tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Wenkai; Yang, Chia-Yi; Yang, Haw

    2009-03-01

    Microstructures of unstained human melanoma skin tissues have been examined by multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy. The polarized shape of the individual melanoma cell can be readily recognized-a phenotype that has been identified in laboratory cultures as characteristic of proliferating melanocytes but has not been demonstrated in clinical instances. The results thus provide snapshots of invading melanoma cells in their native environment and suggest a practical means of connecting in vitro laboratory studies to in vivo processes.

  18. Repair of chromosome damage induced by X-irradiation during G/sub 2/ phase in a line of normal human fibroblasts and its malignant derivative

    SciTech Connect

    Parshad, R.; Gantt, R.; Sanford, K.K.; Jones, G.M.; Tarone, R.E.

    1982-08-01

    A line of normal human skin fibroblasts (KD) differed from its malignant derivative (HUT-14) in the extent of cytogenetic damage induced by X-irradiation during G/sub 2/ phase. Malignant cells had significantly more chromatid breaks and gaps after exposure to 25, 50, or 100 rad. Results from alkaline elution of cellular DNA immediately after irradiation showed that the normal and malignant cells in asynchronous population were equally sensitive to DNA single-strand breakage by X-irradiation. Caffeine or ..beta..-cytosine arabinoside (ara-C), inhibitors of DNA repair, when added directly following G/sub 2/ phase exposure, significantly increased the incidence of radiation-induced chromatid damage in the normal cells. In contrast, similar treatment of the malignant cells had little influence. Ara-C differed from caffeine in its effects; whereas both agents increased the frequency of chromatid breaks and gaps, only ara-C increased the frequency of gaps to the level observed in the irradiated malignant cells. Addition of catalase, which destroys H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, or mannitol, a scavenger of the derivative free hydroxyl radical (.OH), to the cultures of malignant cells before, during, and following irradiation significantly reduced the chromatid damage; and catalase prevented formation of chromatid gaps. The DNA damage induced by X-ray during G/sub 2/ phase in the normal KD cells was apparently repaired by a caffeine- and ara-C-sensitive mechanism(s) that was deficient or absent in their malignant derivatives.

  19. Human BK Polyomavirus—The Potential for Head and Neck Malignancy and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Burger-Calderon, Raquel; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Members of the human Polyomaviridae family are ubiquitous and pathogenic among immune-compromised individuals. While only Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) has conclusively been linked to human cancer, all members of the polyomavirus (PyV) family encode the oncoprotein T antigen and may be potentially carcinogenic. Studies focusing on PyV pathogenesis in humans have become more abundant as the number of PyV family members and the list of associated diseases has expanded. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) in particular has emerged as a new opportunistic pathogen among HIV positive individuals, carrying harmful implications. Increasing evidence links BKPyV to HIV-associated salivary gland disease (HIVSGD). HIVSGD is associated with elevated risk of lymphoma formation and its prevalence has increased among HIV/AIDS patients. Determining the relationship between BKPyV, disease and tumorigenesis among immunosuppressed individuals is necessary and will allow for expanding effective anti-viral treatment and prevention options in the future. PMID:26184314

  20. AZD2014 Radiosensitizes Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma by Inhibiting AKT/mTOR Axis and Inducing G1/G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chih-Chia; Huang, Hsien-bin; Hung, Shih-Kai; Liao, Hui-Fen; Lee, Ching-Chih; Lin, Hon-Yi; Li, Szu-Chin; Ho, Hsu-Chueh; Hung, Chung-Lin; Su, Yu-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common malignant neoplasms in Taiwan. Activation of the mTOR signaling pathway has been linked to decreased radiation responsiveness in human oral cancer, thus it limits efficacy of radiotherapy. To address this question, we investigated the effect of AZD2014, a novel small molecular ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2 kinase, as a radiosensitizer in primary OSCC and OSCC-derived cell line models. Methods We isolated primary tumor cells from OSCC tissues and cell lines. AZD2014 was administered with and without ionizing radiation. The radiosensitizing effect of AZD2014 were then assessed using cell viability assays, clonogenic survival assays, and cell cycle analyses. Western blotting was used to detect protein expression. Results Combination treatment with AZD2014 and irradiation resulted in significant reduction in OSCC cell line and primary OSCC cell colony formation due to the enhanced inhibition of AKT and both mTORC1 and mTORC2 activity. Pre-treatment with AZD2014 in irradiated oral cancer cells induced tumor cell cycle arrest at the G1 and G2/M phases, which led to disruption of cyclin D1-CDK4 and cyclin B1-CDC2 complexes. Moreover, AZD2014 synergized with radiation to promote both apoptosis and autophagy by increasing caspase-3 and LC3 in primary OSCC cells. Conclusions These findings suggest that in irradiated OSCC cells, co-treatment with AZD2014, which targets mTORC1 and mTORC2 blockade, is an effective radiosensitizing strategy for oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27031247

  1. Role of Natural Radiosensitizers and Cancer Cell Radioresistance: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Misbah; Qazi, Aamer; Qazi, Mahmood Husain; Parveen, Gulshan; Waquar, Sulayman; Ashraf, Abdul Basit; Rasool, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Cancer originates from genetic mutations accumulation. Cancer stem cells have been depicted as tumorigenic cells that can differentiate and self-renew. Cancer stem cells are thought to be resistant to conventional therapy like chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy damage carcinomic DNA cells. Because of the ability of cancer stem cells to self-renew and reproduce malignant tumors, they are the subject of intensive research. In this review, CSCs radioresistant mechanisms which include DNA damage response and natural radiosensitizers have been summed up. Reactive oxygen species play an important role in different physiological processes. ROS scavenging is responsible for regulation of reactive oxygen species generation. A researcher has proved that microRNAs regulate tumor radiation resistance. Ionizing radiation does not kill the cancer cells; rather, IR just slows down the signs and symptoms. Ionizing radiation damages DNA directly/indirectly. IR is given mostly in combination with other chemo/radiotherapies. We briefly described here the behavior of cancer stem cells and radioresistance therapies in cancer treatment. To overcome radioresistance in treatment of cancer, strategies like fractionation modification, treatment in combination, inflammation modification, and overcoming hypoxic tumor have been practiced. Natural radiosensitizers, for example, curcumin, genistein, and quercetin, are more beneficial than synthetic compounds. PMID:26998418

  2. The human Bosniak model applied to a cat with renal cystadenoma. A classification to differentiate benign and malignant cystic renal masses via computed tomography and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Baloi, P; Del Chicca, F; Ruetten, M; Gerber, B

    2015-01-01

    A 13-year-old domestic shorthair cat was presented with weight loss and azotemia. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a large cystic space- occupying lesion with multiple septae in the left kidney. A core needle biopsy yielded a renal cystadenoma originating from the epithelial cells. This report describes the clinical, ultrasonographic and computed tomographic features and the growth progression of a renal cystadenoma. We describe the first attempt to apply the human Bosniak classification to a cat with renal cystic neoplasia to differentiate between benign and malignant lesions. Cystadenoma should be a differential diagnosis in cases of renal cystic space-occupying lesions. Other differentials, imaging features to differentiate benign and malignant lesions and the risk of malignant transformation will be discussed. PMID:25599531

  3. Up-regulation of microRNA-15b correlates with unfavorable prognosis and malignant progression of human glioma

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Chao; Guan, Yanlei; Zhao, Kai; Chen, Ling; Bao, Yijun; Cui, Run; Li, Guangyu; Wang, Yunjie

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that microRNA-15b (miR-15b) regulates cell cycle progression, proliferationnd apoptosis in glioma cells by targeting Cyclins. However, the clinical significance of miR-15b in human glioma remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the significance of miR-15b expression in diagnosis, prognosis and malignant progression of glioma. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptive-PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to examine miR-15b expression levels in 76 glioma tissues (13 grade II, 13 grade III and 50 grade IV gliomas) and seven glioma cell lines, as well as 10 non-neoplastic brain tissues and human astrocyte as control. MiR-15b showed significant increased expression in high-grade gliomas (P ≤ 0.001) and glioma cells (fold change 2.8-7.6) relative to non-neoplastic brains and astrocyte, respectively. Additionally, high miR-15b expression was significantly associated with advanced WHO grade (P ≤ 0.001), advanced patient age (P ≤ 0.001) and low Karnofsky performance score (KPS, P ≤ 0.001). Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox regression analysis showed that patients with high miR-15b expression had significantly poor overall survival rate (P ≤ 0.001) and miR-15b expression was an independent prognosis-predicting factor for glioma patients (P ≤ 0.001; risk ratio = 5.6), respectively. Moreover, miR-15b expression was examined in seven independent patients with primary grade II or III gliomas that spontaneously progressed to grade III or IV gliomas. Statistically significant higher expression (P = 0.01) in the recurrent tumor compared with the corresponding primary tumor was observed in all of the seven patients. Our results suggest that miR-15b may be a prognostic predictor and be involved in malignant progression of glioma. PMID:26191187

  4. Optimization and comprehensive characterization of a faithful tissue culture model of the benign and malignant human prostate

    PubMed Central

    Maund, Sophia L.; Nolley, Rosalie; Peehl, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    Few preclinical models accurately depict normal human prostate tissue or primary prostate cancer (PCa). In vitro systems typically lack complex cellular interactions among structured prostatic epithelia and a stromal microenvironment, and genetic and molecular fidelity are concerns in both in vitro and in vivo models. “Tissue slice cultures” (TSC) provide realistic preclinical models of diverse tissues and organs, but have not been fully developed or widely utilized for prostate studies. Problems encountered include degeneration of differentiated secretory cells, basal cell hyperplasia, and poor survival of PCa. Here, we optimized, characterized, and applied a TSC model of primary human PCa and benign prostate tissue that overcomes many deficiencies of current in vitro models. Tissue cores from fresh prostatectomy specimens were precision-cut at 300-µm and incubated in a rotary culture apparatus. The ability of varied culture conditions to faithfully maintain benign and cancer cell and tissue structure and function over time was evaluated by immunohistological and biochemical assays. After optimization of the culture system, molecular and cellular responses to androgen ablation and to piperlongumine, purported to specifically reduce androgen signaling in PCa, were investigated. Optimized culture conditions successfully maintained the structural and functional fidelity of both benign and PCa TSCs for 5 days. TSCs exhibited androgen-dependence, appropriately undergoing ductal degeneration, reduced proliferation, and decreased prostate-specific antigen expression upon androgen ablation. Furthermore, TSCs revealed cancer-specific reduction of androgen receptor and increased apoptosis upon treatment with piperlongumine, validating data from cell lines. We demonstrate a TSC model that authentically recapitulates the structural, cellular, and genetic characteristics of the benign and malignant human prostate, androgen-dependence of the native tissue, and cancer-specific response to a potential new therapeutic for PCa. The work described herein provides a basis for advancing the experimental utility of the TSC model. PMID:24296879

  5. Malignant human cell transformation of Marcellus Shale gas drilling flow back water.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yixin; Chen, Tingting; Shen, Steven S; Niu, Yingmei; DesMarais, Thomas L; Linn, Reka; Saunders, Eric; Fan, Zhihua; Lioy, Paul; Kluz, Thomas; Chen, Lung-Chi; Wu, Zhuangchun; Costa, Max

    2015-10-01

    The rapid development of high-volume horizontal hydraulic fracturing for mining natural gas from shale has posed potential impacts on human health and biodiversity. The produced flow back waters after hydraulic stimulation are known to carry high levels of saline and total dissolved solids. To understand the toxicity and potential carcinogenic effects of these wastewaters, flow back waters from five Marcellus hydraulic fracturing oil and gas wells were analyzed. The physicochemical nature of these samples was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. A cytotoxicity study using colony formation as the endpoint was carried out to define the LC50 values of test samples using human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B). The BEAS-2B cell transformation assay was employed to assess the carcinogenic potential of the samples. Barium and strontium were among the most abundant metals in these samples and the same metals were found to be elevated in BEAS-2B cells after long-term treatment. BEAS-2B cells treated for 6weeks with flow back waters produced colony formation in soft agar that was concentration dependent. In addition, flow back water-transformed BEAS-2B cells show better migration capability when compared to control cells. This study provides information needed to assess the potential health impact of post-hydraulic fracturing flow back waters from Marcellus Shale natural gas mining. PMID:26210350

  6. Monitoring the Bystander Killing Effect of Human Multipotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Leten, Cindy; Trekker, Jesse; Struys, Tom; Roobrouck, Valerie D.; Dresselaers, Tom; Vande Velde, Greetje; Lambrichts, Ivo; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Himmelreich, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Tumor infiltrating stem cells have been suggested as a vehicle for the delivery of a suicide gene towards otherwise difficult to treat tumors like glioma. We have used herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase expressing human multipotent adult progenitor cells in two brain tumor models (hU87 and Hs683) in immune-compromised mice. In order to determine the best time point for the administration of the codrug ganciclovir, the stem cell distribution and viability were monitored in vivo using bioluminescence (BLI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Treatment was assessed by in vivo BLI and MRI of the tumors. We were able to show that suicide gene therapy using HSV-tk expressing stem cells can be followed in vivo by MRI and BLI. This has the advantage that (1) outliers can be detected earlier, (2) GCV treatment can be initiated based on stem cell distribution rather than on empirical time points, and (3) a more thorough follow-up can be provided prior to and after treatment of these animals. In contrast to rodent stem cell and tumor models, treatment success was limited in our model using human cell lines. This was most likely due to the lack of immune components in the immune-compromised rodents. PMID:26880961

  7. Radiosensitization Effect of STI-571 on Pancreatic Cancer Cells In Vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hye Won; Wen, Jing; Lim, Jong-Baeck; Bang, Seung Min; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To examine STI-571-induced radiosensitivity in human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Methods and Materials: Three human pancreatic cancer cell lines (Bxpc-3, Capan-1, and MiaPaCa-2) exhibiting different expression levels of c-Kit and platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRbeta) and showing different K-ras mutation types were used. For evaluation of the antitumor activity of STI-571 in combination with radiation, clonogenic survival assays, Western blot analysis, and the annexin V/propidium iodide assay with microscopic evaluation by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole were conducted. Results: Dramatic phosphorylated (p)-c-Kit and p-PDGFRbeta attenuation, a modest dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition, and significant radiosensitization were observed after STI-571 treatment in view of apoptosis, although the levels of growth inhibition and increased radiosensitization were different according to cell lines. The grades of radiosensitivity corresponded to the attenuation levels of p-c-Kit and p-PDGFRbeta by STI-571, particularly to those of p-c-Kit, and the radiosensitivity was partially affected by K-ras mutation in pancreatic cancer cells. Among downstream pathways associated with c-Kit or PDGFRbeta, p-PLCgamma was more closely related to radiosensitivity compared with p-Akt1 or p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1. Conclusion: STI-571 enhances radiation response in pancreatic cancer cells. This effect is affected by the attenuation levels of p-c-Kit or p-PDGFRbeta, and K-ras mutation status. Among them, p-c-Kit plays more important roles in the radiosensitivity in pancreatic cancer compared with p-PDGFRbeta or K-ras mutation status.

  8. Malignant transformation of diploid human fibroblasts by transfection of oncogenes. Part 2, Progress report, July 1989--June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, J.J.

    1992-12-31

    This document consist of brief reports prepared by postdoctoral students supported by the project, each describing his accomplishments under the grant. Topics include (1) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1. 1 Cells by Gamma Radiation, (2) Correlation between Levels of ras Expression and Presence of Transformed Phenotypes Including Tumorigenicity, Using a Modulatable Promoter, (3) Relation between Specific rad Oncogene Expression, (4) Correlation of Genetic Changes in Fibroblastic Tumors with Malignancies, (5)Transformation of MSU-1.1 Cells by sis Oncogene, (6) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1.0 Cells, (7) Correlation of Urokinase Plasminogen Activation (mu-PA) with Malignant Phenotype, (8)Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Studies of the Proteins of the Major Cell Strains of the MSU-1 Family of Cells, and (9) Correlation between Proteinase Activity Levels and Malignancy.

  9. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA-induced malignant transformation of NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yasumoto, S.; Burkhardt, A.L.; Doniger, J.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    A biological function for human papillomavirus 16 (HPV 16) DNA was demonstrated by transformation of NIH 3T3 cells. HPV 16 DNA has been found frequently in genital cancer and has been classified as a papillomavirus on the basis of DNA homology. A recombinant HPV 16 DNA (pSHPV16d), which contains a head-to-tail dimer of the full-length HPV 16 genome, induced morphologic transformation; the transformed cells were tumorigenic in nude mice. Expression of transforming activity was unique because of the long latency period (more than 4 weeks) required for induction of morphologic transformation and because the transfected DNA existed primarily in a multimeric form with some rearrangement. Furthermore, virus-specific RNAs were expressed in the transformants. The transformation of NIH 3T3 cells provides a model for analyzing the functions of HPV 16, which is associated with cervical carcinomas.

  10. Characterization of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase isoenzyme expression in benign and malignant human prostate.

    PubMed

    Elo, J P; Akinola, L A; Poutanen, M; Vihko, P; Kyllönen, A P; Lukkarinen, O; Vihko, R

    1996-03-28

    In the present study, expressions of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17HSD) types 1, 2, and 3, 5alpha-reductase type 2 and human androgen receptor mRNAs were determined in 12 benign prostatic hyperplasia and 17 prostatic carcinoma specimens. 17HSD type 2 was found to be the principle isoenzyme expressed in the prostate. Significantly higher expressions of 17HSD type 2 and 5alpha-reductase type 2 were detected in benign prostatic hyperplasia compared with the carcinoma specimens. Expression of the androgen receptor in the 2 groups was not significantly different. 17HSD type 3 mRNA was not detected in any of the specimens investigated. Only low constructive expression of the 2.3 kb mRNA of 17HSD type 1 was seen. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that this did not lead to significant enzyme expression, only faint staining for the enzyme protein being detected, mainly in uroepithelial cells. No significant correlation was found between any of the mRNAs analysed, but the data on 5alpha-reductase type 2 mRNA support the presence of an increased proportion of 5alpha-dihydrotesterone in the hyperplastic prostate. In cultured PC-3 prostatic cancer cells and in the transiently transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells, 17HSD type 2 was found exclusively to convert 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone and testosterone into the less potent 17-keto compounds 5alpha-androstanedione and 4-androstenedione, respectively. We suggest that the 17HSD type 2 isoenzyme plays a part in the metabolic pathway, resulting in the inactivation of testosterone and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone locally in the prostate. The enzyme expressed in the prostate could, therefore, protect cells from excessive androgen action. PMID:8608963

  11. The Zfx gene is expressed in human gliomas and is important in the proliferation and apoptosis of the human malignant glioma cell line U251

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Zfx is a zinc finger protein of the Zfy family, whose members are highly conserved in vertebrates. Zfx is a shared transcriptional regulator of both embryonic stem cells (ESC) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), which suggests a common genetic basis of self-renewal in embryonic and adult stem cells. The level of Zfx expression correlates with aggressiveness and severity in many cancer types, including prostate cancer, breast cancer, and leukemia. However, the importance of Zfx in human glioma is largely unknown. In the present study, we examined the role of Zfx in human glioma. Methods We detected expression levels of Zfx mRNA in U251 cells, U87 cells, U373 cells, and A172 cells by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. To analyze the expression of Zfx mRNA in glioma tissues, we performed real-time quantitative PCR on 35 pathologically confirmed glioma samples (Grade I-4cases, Grade II-13cases, Grade III-11cases, and Grade IV-7cases) and on 5 noncancerous brain tissue samples. We used lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to knock down Zfx expression in the human malignant glioma cell line U251. Changes in Zfx target gene expression were determined by real-time RT-PCR. Cell proliferation was examined by a High Content Screening assay. DNA synthesis in proliferating cells was determined by BrdU incorporation. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were detected by flowcytometric analysis. Results We discovered that Zfx mRNA was expressed in U251 cells, U87 cells, U373 cells, and A172 cells. The expression level of Zfx is significantly higher in gliomas compared to noncancerous brain tissue. Using a lentivirus-based RNAi approach, Zfx expression was significantly inhibited in human glioblastoma U251 cells. The effects of Zfx knockdown on cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis were assessed. Inhibition of Zfx expression in U251 cells by RNAi significantly impaired cell proliferation, increased apoptosis, and arrested cells in S phase. Conclusions The results of our study demonstrate that the Zfx gene is highly expressed in glioma tissue and in glioma cell lines. Furthermore, Zfx may play a critical role in cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution, and apoptosis of human malignant glioma cells. PMID:22185393

  12. Identification of human in vitro cell lines with greater intrinsic cellular radiosensitivity to 62. 5 MeV (p [yields] Be[sup +]) neutrons than 4 MeV photons

    SciTech Connect

    Warenius, H.M.; Browning, P.G.; Morton, I.E. ); Britten, R.A. ); Peacock, J.H. )

    1994-03-01

    The purpose was to identify human in vitro cell lines with a high relative cellular sensitivity to fast neutrons as compared to photons and to examine their relationship to intrinsic photon radiosensitivity and cellular proliferation kinetics. The clonogenic cell survival following exposure to low LET, 4 MeV photons or, high LET, 62.5 MeV (p [yields] Be[sup +]) fast neutrons and the cell survival following exposure to low LET, 4 MeV photons or, high LET, 62.5 MeV (p [yields] Be[sup +]) fast neutrons and the cell kinetic parameters of 30 human in vitro cell lines, covering a wide range of histologies, were analyzed alone and with previously published data of Fertil and Malaise. The relative survival at 1.6 Gy of neutrons (SF[sub 1.6]) compared to 2 Gy of photons (SF[sub 2]) and the cell kinetic parameters of the 30 cell lines were also compared. The relative lethality of 62.5 MeV fast neutrons was assessed by comparing the ratio [alpha] neutrons/[alpha] photons or SF[sub 1.6] neutrons/SF[sub 2] photons to SF[sub 2] photons. Cellular proliferation kinetics were measured by flow cytometry following BrdU incorporation and the relationship of cellular proliferation to relative neutron lethality was measured by comparing the [alpha] neutron/[alpha] photon ratio to the labelling index (LI), potential doubling (T[sub pot]) and ploidy. The majority of cell survival curves obtained following exposure to 62.5 MeV fast neutrons were curvilinear with beta values of similar order to those obtained with low LET 4 MeV photons. Comparison of alpha values for neutrons and photons revealed a relatively neutron sensitive subset of 9 out of 30 in vitro cell lines. This subset was not, however, distinguishable when 1.6 Gy of neutrons was compared to 2 Gy of photons. There was no correlation between cell survival with neutrons or photons and the cell kinetic parameters T[sub pot] or LI or with DNA ploidy. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. The effects of self-assembling peptide RADA16 hydrogel on malignant phenotype of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hong; Han, Yun-Zhu; Cai, Guo-Hui; Tang, Fu-Shan; Yang, Ze-Hong; Ao, Di-Shu; Zhou, An

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study will provide a self-assembling peptide (RADA16-I) -derived hydrogel as a tool for investigation the malignant phenotype of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell. Characteristic analysis indicated that the peptide consists of a well-defined secondary structure and self-assembly property. Our results showed that these cells cultured in RADA16-I hydrogels showed a spindle-shaped phenotype with irregular and radial nuclei. Immunohistochemical results showed that the expression of fibronectin in hepatocellular carcinoma cells is positive cultured in RADA16-I hydrogels, and the expression levels of laminin are weakly positive. DNA contents cultured in RADA16-I hydrogel gradually increased up to Day 9. The expression levels of VEGFA, EGF and FGF2 in three hydrogels showed no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05), and the expression levels of IGF-1 in RADA16-I and collagen-I were significantly lower than those of in the Matrigel hydrogel (P ≤ 0.05). These findings suggested that the RADA16-I will help to provide a better physiological substrate for hepatocellular carcinoma cell culture, may serve as an ideal model for cancer biology research of tumorigenesis, growth, local invasion, and metastasis. PMID:26628972

  14. Effect of single-dose x irradiation on the growth curves of a human malignant melanoma transplanted into nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Spang-Thomsen, M.; Visfeldt, J.; Nielsen, A.

    1981-01-01

    A human malignant melanoma transplanted into nude mice was exposed to single-dose x irradiation. Experimental growth data described mathematically according to a transformed Gompertz function were used to determine the effect of irradiation on growth delay, growth rate, and tumor shrinkage. The radiation-induced changes in the histology of the tumors were also described. The results showed that irradiation induced a dose-dependent growth delay; this parameter was therefore found suitable for the assessment of relative therapeutic effect. The treatment also induced a dose-dependent reduction in growth rate during regrowth. As a result of this effect on growth rate, extrapolation of tumor shrinkage to the time of treatment became directly misleading as a measure of the effect of the treatment. From this it can be deduced that in therapeutic studies where treatment induces nonparallel posttherapeutic growth curves, growth delay for various tumors and therapies cannot be compared directly. The transformed Gompertz function proved to be extremely well suited for evaluating these conditions.

  15. Comparative Genomic Hybridization of Human Malignant Gliomas Reveals Multiple Amplification Sites and Nonrandom Chromosomal Gains and Losses

    PubMed Central

    Schròck, Evelin; Thiel, Gundula; Lozanova, Tanka; du Manoir, Stanislas; Meffert, Marie-Christine; Jauch, Anna; Speicher, Michael R.; Nürnberg, Peter; Vogel, Siegfried; Janisch, Werner; Donis-Keller, Helen; Ried, Thomas; Witkowski, Regine; Cremer, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    Nine human malignant gliomas (2 astrocytomas grade III and 7 glioblastomas) were analyzed using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). In addition to the amplification of the EGFR gene at 7p12 in 4 of 9 cases, six new amplification sites were mapped to 1q32, 4q12, 7q21.1, 7q21.2-3, 12p, and 22q12. Nonrandom chromosomal gains and losses were identified with overrepresentation of chromosome 7 and underrepresentation of chromosome 10 as the most frequent events (1 of 2 astrocytomas, 7 of 7 glioblastomas). Gain of a part or the whole chromosome 19 and losses of chromosome bands 9pter-23 and 22q13 were detected each in five cases. Loss of chromosome band 17p13 and gain of chromosome 20 were revealed each in three cases. The validity of the CGH data was confirmed using interphase cytogenetics with YAC clones, chromosome painting in tumor metaphase spreads, and DNA fingerprinting. A comparison of CGH data with the results of chromosome banding analyses indicates that metaphase spreads accessible in primary tumor cell cultures may not represent the clones predominant in the tumor tissue ImagesFigure 1Figure 4Figure 6 PMID:8203461

  16. LncRNA HOTAIR promotes human liver cancer stem cell malignant growth through downregulation of SETD2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haiyan; An, Jiahui; Wu, Mengying; Zheng, Qidi; Gui, Xin; Li, Tianming; Pu, Hu; Lu, Dongdong

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR predicts negative tumor prognosis and exhibits oncogenic activity. Herein, we demonstrate HOTAIR promotes human liver cancer stem cell malignant growth through downregulation of SETD2. Mechanistically, HOTAIR reduces the recuritment of the CREB, P300, RNA polII onto the SETD2 promoter region that inhibits SETD2 expression and its phosphorylation. Thereby, the SETD2 binding capacity to substrate histone H3 is weakened, triggering a reduction of trimethylation on histone H3 thirty-sixth lysine, and thereby the H3K36me3–hMSH2-hMSH6-SKP2 complex is also decreased. Strikingly, the complex occupancy on chromosome is depressed, preventing from mismatch DNA repair. While reducing the degradation capacity of Skp2 for aging histone H3 bound to damaged DNA, the aging histone repair is impaired. Furthermore, that the damaged DNA escaped to repair can causes microsatellite instability(MSI) and abnormal expression of cell cycle related genes that may trigger the hepatocarcinogenesis. This study provides evidence for HOTAIR to promote tumorigenesis via downregulating SETD2 in liver cancer stem cells. PMID:26172293

  17. Estimation of the epidemiological burden of human papillomavirus-related cancers and non-malignant diseases in men in Europe: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in malignant and non-malignant genital diseases in women is well known and the corresponding epidemiological burden has been widely described. However, less is known about the role of HPV in anal, penile and head and neck cancer, and the burden of malignant and non-malignant HPV-related diseases in men. The objective of this review is to estimate the epidemiological burden of HPV-related cancers and non-malignant diseases in men in Europe. Methods The annual number of new HPV-related cancers in men in Europe was estimated using Eurostat population data and applying cancer incidence rates published by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The number of cancer cases attributable to HPV, and specifically to HPV16/18, was calculated based on the most relevant prevalence estimates. The annual number of new cases of genital warts was calculated from the most robust European studies; and latest HPV6/11 prevalence estimates were then applied. A literature review was also performed to retrieve exhaustive data on HPV infection at all anatomical sites under study, as well as incidence and prevalence of external genital warts, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis and HPV-related cancer trends in men in Europe. Results A total of 72, 694 new cancer cases at HPV-related anatomical sites were estimated to occur each year in men in Europe. 17,403 of these cancer cases could be attributable to HPV, with 15,497 of them specifically attributable to HPV16/18. In addition, between 286,682 and 325,722 new cases of genital warts attributable to HPV6/11were estimated to occur annually in men in Europe. Conclusions The overall estimated epidemiological burden of HPV-related cancers and non-malignant diseases is high in men in Europe. Approximately 30% of all new cancer cases attributable to HPV16/18 that occur yearly in Europe were estimated to occur in men. As in women, the vast majority of HPV-positive cancer in men is related to HPV16/18, while almost all HPV-related non-malignant diseases are due to HPV6/11. A substantial number of these malignant and non-malignant diseases may potentially be prevented by quadrivalent HPV vaccination. PMID:22260541

  18. Health Disparities in the Immunoprevention of Human Papillomavirus Infection and Associated Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Bakir, Amira H.; Skarzynski, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes roughly 1.6% of the plus 1.6 million cases of cancer that are diagnosed in the United States each year. Despite the proven safety and efficacy of available vaccines, HPV remains the most common sexually transmitted infection. Underlying the high prevalence of HPV infection is the poor adherence to the Centers for Disease Control recommendation to vaccinate all 11- to 12-year-old males and females. In fact, only about 38 and 14% of eligible females and males, respectively, receive the complete, three-dose immunization. The many factors associated with missed HPV vaccination opportunities – including race, age, family income, and patient education – contribute to widespread disparities in vaccine completion and related health outcomes. Beyond patient circumstance, however, research indicates that the rigor and consistency of recommendation by primary care providers also plays a significant role in uptake of HPV immunization. Health disparities data are of vital importance to HPV vaccination campaigns because they can provide insight into how to address current problems and allocate limited resources where they are most needed. Furthermore, even modest gains in populations with low vaccination rates may yield great benefits because HPV immunization has been shown to provide herd immunity, indirect protection for non-immunized individuals achieved by limiting the spread of an infectious agent through a population. However, the impact of current HPV vaccination campaigns is hindered by stagnant immunization rates, which remain far below target levels despite a slow overall increase. Furthermore, gains in immunization are not equally distributed across gender, age, demographic, and socioeconomic divisions within the recommended group of vaccine recipients. To achieve the greatest impact, public health campaigns should focus on improving immunization coverage where it is weakest. They should also explore more subtle but potentially significant determinants of HPV vaccine initiation and completion, such as the attitudes of parents and healthcare providers and factors that exacerbate HPV-related health outcomes, including smoking and human immunodeficiency virus-mediated immunosuppression. Optimizing the efficacy of vaccination campaigns will require a health disparities approach that both identifies and remedies the underlying causes of population differences in HPV vaccination. PMID:26734596

  19. Expression of hemidesmosomal and extracellular matrix proteins by normal and malignant human prostate tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, R. B.; Hao, J.; Knox, J. D.; Dalkin, B. L.; Clark, V.; Cress, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    The progression of prostate carcinoma may be influenced by the biochemical nature of the basal lamina surrounding the primary carcinoma cells. As a first step toward understanding this process, the composition and structure of the basal lamina in normal prostate, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and human carcinoma were determined. In addition, a comparison was made between the attachments of the normal basal cell to its underlying basal lamina and those made by primary prostate carcinoma. The normal basal cells form both focal adhesions and hemidesmosomal-like structures as observed by transmission electron microscopy. The normal basal cells exhibited a polarized distribution of hemidesmosomal associated proteins including BP180, BP230, HD1, plectin, laminin-gamma 2(B2t), collagen VII, and the corresponding integrin laminin receptors alpha 6 beta 1 and alpha 6 beta 4. The expression and distribution pattern of these proteins were retained in the prostate intraepithelial neoplasia lesions. In contrast, the carcinoma cells uniformly lacked hemidesmosomal structures, the integrin alpha 6 beta 4, BP180, laminin-gamma 2 (B2t), and collagen VII but did express BP230 (30%), plectin, HD1 (15%), and the integrin laminin receptors alpha 3 beta 1 and alpha 6 beta 1. These results suggest that, although a detectable basal lamina structure is present in carcinoma, its composition and cellular attachments are abnormal. The loss of critical cellular attachments may play a role in influencing the progression potential of prostate carcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7778688

  20. Radiosensitizing Effects of Ectopic miR-101 on Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells Depend on the Endogenous miR-101 Level

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Susie; Wang Hongyan; Ng, Wooi Loon; Curran, Walter J.; Wang Ya

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Previously, we showed that ectopic miR-101 could sensitize human tumor cells to radiation by targeting ATM and DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to inhibit DNA repair, as the endogenous miR-101 levels are low in tumors in general. However, the heterogeneity of human cancers may result in an exception. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a few tumor cell lines with a high level of endogenous miR-101 would prove less response to ectopic miR-101. Methods and Materials: Fourteeen non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and one immortalized non-malignant lung epithelial cell line (NL20) were used for comparing endogenous miR-101 levels by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Based on the different miR-101 levels, four cell lines with different miR-101 levels were chosen for transfection with a green fluorescent protein-lentiviral plasmid encoding miR-101. The target protein levels were measured by using Western blotting. The radiosensitizing effects of ectopic miR-101 on these NSCLC cell lines were determined by a clonogenic assay and xenograft mouse model. Results: The endogenous miR-101 level was similar or lower in 13 NSCLC cell lines but was 11-fold higher in one cell line (H157) than in NL20 cells. Although ectopic miR-101 efficiently decreased the ATM and DNA-PKcs levels and increased the radiosensitization level in H1299, H1975, and A549 cells, it did not change the levels of the miR-101 targets or radiosensitivity in H157 cells. Similar results were observed in xenograft mice. Conclusions: A small number of NSCLC cell lines could have a high level of endogenous miR-101. The ectopic miR-101 was able to radiosensitize most NSCLC cells, except for the NSCLC cell lines that had a much higher endogenous miR-101 level. These results suggest that when we choose one miRNA as a therapeutic tool, the endogenous level of the miRNA in each tumor should be considered.

  1. Isolation and genome-wide expression and methylation characterization of CD31+ cells from normal and malignant human prostate tissue

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Deeb, Kristin K.; Ma, Yingyu; Morrison, Carl D.; Liu, Song; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an important component involved in the angiogenesis. Little is known about the global gene expression and epigenetic regulation in tumor endothelial cells. The identification of gene expression and epigenetic difference between human prostate tumor-derived endothelial cells (TdECs) and those in normal tissues may uncover unique biological features of TdEC and facilitate the discovery of new anti-angiogenic targets. We established a method for isolation of CD31+ endothelial cells from malignant and normal prostate tissues obtained at prostatectomy. TdECs and normal-derived ECs (NdECs) showed >90% enrichment in primary culture and demonstrated microvascular endothelial cell characteristics such as cobblestone morphology in monolayer culture, diI-acetyl-LDL uptake and capillary-tube like formation in Matrigel®. In vitro primary cultures of ECs maintained expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. We then conducted a pilot study of transcriptome and methylome analysis of TdECs and matched NdECs from patients with prostate cancer. We observed a wide spectrum of differences in gene expression and methylation patterns in endothelial cells, between malignant and normal prostate tissues. Array-based expression and methylation data were validated by qRT-PCR and bisulfite DNA pyrosequencing. Further analysis of transcriptome and methylome data revealed a number of differentially expressed genes with loci whose methylation change is accompanied by an inverse change in gene expression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of isolation of ECs from histologically normal prostate and prostate cancer via CD31+ selection. The data, although preliminary, indicates that there exist widespread differences in methylation and transcription between TdECs and NdECs. Interestingly, only a small proportion of perturbed genes were overlapped between American (AA) and Caucasian American (CA) patients with prostate cancer. Our study indicates that identifying gene expression and/or epigenetic differences between TdECs and NdECs may provide us with new anti-angiogenic targets. Future studies will be required to further characterize the isolated ECs and determine the biological features that can be exploited in the prognosis and therapy of prostate cancer. PMID:23978847

  2. The gamma 2 chain of kalinin/laminin 5 is preferentially expressed in invading malignant cells in human cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Pyke, C.; Rømer, J.; Kallunki, P.; Lund, L. R.; Ralfkiaer, E.; Danø, K.; Tryggvason, K.

    1994-01-01

    All known laminin isoforms are cross-shaped heterotrimeric molecules, consisting of one heavy alpha chain and two light beta and gamma chains. Recently, a cDNA encoding a new gamma chain from laminin 5 (also known as kalinin) was sequenced. This chain, named gamma 2, showed extended homology to the classical gamma 1 chain but differed from this by lacking the terminal globular domain. Recent data, indicating an important role of the gamma 2 chain gene in establishing adhesion contacts between epithelial cells and basement membranes, prompted us to investigate whether the gamma 2 chain gene is aberrantly expressed in cancer tissue, and if so whether its localization could provide clues to its possible role in cancer dissemination. Routinely processed tissue specimens from 36 cases of human cancer were investigated, including 16 cases of colon adenocarcinoma, 7 ductal mammary carcinomas, 4 squamous cell carcinomas, 3 malignant melanomas and 6 sarcomas. In situ hybridization for the detection of mRNAs for the gamma 2 chain and for the classical laminin chains alpha 1, beta 1, and gamma 1 was performed using S-35 labeled antisense RNA probes. As positive control of the specificity of the gamma 2 chain mRNA detection, two different anti-sense probes derived from two nonoverlapping cDNA clones were used. Malignant cells were found to express the gamma 2 chain in 29 of the 30 carcinomas studied and the expression was particularly high in cancer cells located at the invasion front. In contrast, mesenchymally derived cancer cells in three different types of sarcomas did not express the gamma 2 chain. In colon cancer there was a clear histological correlation between the expression of gamma 2 chain by cancer cells and their engagement in tumor budding processes. Laminin chains alpha 1, beta 1, and gamma 1 were weakly expressed throughout cancerous areas with no apparent correlation to sites of invasion. The aberrant expression of the gamma 2 chain gene seen in invasively growing cancer cells point to a role of this molecule in establishing focal adhesions of cancer cells to the extracellular matrix during their migration through surrounding normal tissue. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7943170

  3. Isolation and genome-wide expression and methylation characterization of CD31+ cells from normal and malignant human prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Deeb, Kristin K; Ma, Yingyu; Morrison, Carl D; Liu, Song; Johnson, Candace S; Trump, Donald L

    2013-09-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an important component involved in the angiogenesis. Little is known about the global gene expression and epigenetic regulation in tumor endothelial cells. The identification of gene expression and epigenetic difference between human prostate tumor-derived endothelial cells (TdECs) and those in normal tissues may uncover unique biological features of TdEC and facilitate the discovery of new anti-angiogenic targets. We established a method for isolation of CD31+ endothelial cells from malignant and normal prostate tissue obtained at prostatectomy. TdECs and normal-derived ECs (NdECs) showed >90% enrichment in primary culture and demonstrated microvascular endothelial cell characteristics such as cobblestone morphology in monolayer culture, diI-acetyl-LDL uptake and capillary-tube like formation in Matrigel®. In vitro primary cultures of ECs maintained expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. We then conducted a pilot study of transcriptome and methylome analysis of TdECs and matched NdECs from patients with prostate cancer. We observed a wide spectrum of differences in gene expression and methylation patterns in endothelial cells, between malignant and normal prostate tissues. Array-based expression and methylation data were validated by qRT-PCR and bisulfite DNA pyrosequencing. Further analysis of transcriptome and methylome data revealed a number of differentially expressed genes with loci whose methylation change is accompanied by an inverse change in gene expression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of isolation of ECs from histologically normal prostate and prostate cancer via CD31+ selection. The data, although preliminary, indicates that there exist widespread differences in methylation and transcription between TdECs and NdECs. Interestingly, only a small proportion of perturbed gene was overlapped between American (AA) and Caucasian American (CA) patients with prostate cancer. Our study indicates that identifying gene expression and/or epigenetic differences between TdECs and NdECs may provide us with new anti-angiogenic targets. Future studies will be required to further characterize the isolated ECs and determine the biological features that can be exploited in the prognosis and therapy of prostate cancer. PMID:23978847

  4. Connexin 30 expression inhibits growth of human malignant gliomas but protects them against radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Artesi, Maria; Kroonen, Jerome; Bredel, Markus; Nguyen-Khac, Minh; Deprez, Manuel; Schoysman, Laurent; Poulet, Christophe; Chakravarti, Arnab; Kim, Hyunsoo; Scholtens, Denise; Seute, Tatjana; Rogister, Bernard; Bours, Vincent; Robe, Pierre A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Glioblastomas remain ominous tumors that almost invariably escape treatment. Connexins are a family of transmembrane, gap junction-forming proteins, some members of which were reported to act as tumor suppressors and to modulate cellular metabolism in response to cytotoxic stress. Methods We analyzed the copy number and expression of the connexin (Cx)30 gene gap junction beta-6 (GJB6), as well as of its protein immunoreactivity in several public and proprietary repositories of glioblastomas, and their influence on patient survival. We evaluated the effect of the expression of this gap junction protein on the growth, DNA repair and energy metabolism, and treatment resistance of these tumors. Results The GJB6 gene was deleted in 25.8% of 751 analyzed tumors and mutated in 15.8% of 158 tumors. Cx30 immunoreactivity was absent in 28.9% of 145 tumors. Restoration of Cx30 expression in human glioblastoma cells reduced their growth in vitro and as xenografts in the striatum of immunodeficient mice. Cx30 immunoreactivity was, however, found to adversely affect survival in 2 independent retrospective cohorts of glioblastoma patients. Cx30 was found in clonogenic assays to protect glioblastoma cells against radiation-induced mortality and to decrease radiation-induced DNA damage. This radioprotection correlated with a heat shock protein 90–dependent mitochondrial translocation of Cx30 following radiation and an improved ATP production following this genotoxic stress. Conclusion These results underline the complex relationship between potential tumor suppressors and treatment resistance in glioblastomas and single out GJB6/Cx30 as a potential biomarker and target for therapeutic intervention in these tumors. PMID:25155356

  5. Local interstitial delivery of z-butylidenephthalide by polymer wafers against malignant human gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Harn, Horng-Jyh; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Lin, Po-Cheng; Liu, Cyong-Yue; Liu, Po-Yen; Chang, Li-Fu; Yen, Ssu-Yin; Hsieh, Dean-Kuo; Liu, Fu-Chen; Tai, Dar-Fu; Chiou, Tzyy-Wen

    2011-01-01

    We have shown that the natural compound z-butylidenephthalide (Bdph), isolated from the chloroform extract of Angelica sinensis, has antitumor effects. Because of the limitation of the blood-brain barrier, the Bdph dosage required for treatment of glioma is relatively high. To solve this problem, we developed a local-release system with Bdph incorporated into a biodegradable polyanhydride material, p(CPP-SA; Bdph-Wafer), and investigated its antitumor effects. On the basis of in vitro release kinetics, we demonstrated that the Bdph-Wafer released 50% of the available Bdph by the sixth day, and the release reached a plateau phase (90% of Bdph) by the 30th day. To investigate the in situ antitumor effects of the Bdph-Wafer on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we used 2 xenograft animal models—F344 rats (for rat GBM) and nude mice (for human GBM)—which were injected with RG2 and DBTRG-05MG cells, respectively, for tumor formation and subsequently treated subcutaneously with Bdph-Wafers. We observed a significant inhibitory effect on tumor growth, with no significant adverse effects on the rodents. Moreover, we demonstrated that the antitumor effect of Bdph on RG2 cells was via the PKC pathway, which upregulated Nurr77 and promoted its translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Finally, to study the effect of the interstitial administration of Bdph in cranial brain tumor, Bdph-Wafers were surgically placed in FGF-SV40 transgenic mice. Our Bdph-Wafer significantly reduced tumor size in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, our study showed that p(CPP-SA) containing Bdph delivered a sufficient concentration of Bdph to the tumor site and effectively inhibited the tumor growth in the glioma. PMID:21565841

  6. Uncovering the role of p53 splice variants in human malignancy: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Surget, Sylvanie; Khoury, Marie P; Bourdon, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Thirty-five years of research on p53 gave rise to more than 68,000 articles and reviews, but did not allow the uncovering of all the mysteries that this major tumor suppressor holds. How p53 handles the different signals to decide the appropriate cell fate in response to a stress and its implication in tumorigenesis and cancer progression remains unclear. Nevertheless, the uncovering of p53 isoforms has opened new perspectives in the cancer research field. Indeed, the human TP53 gene encodes not only one but at least twelve p53 protein isoforms, which are produced in normal tissues through alternative initiation of translation, usage of alternative promoters, and alternative splicing. In recent years, it became obvious that the different p53 isoforms play an important role in regulating cell fate in response to different stresses in normal cells by differentially regulating gene expression. In cancer cells, abnormal expression of p53 isoforms contributes actively to cancer formation and progression, regardless of TP53 mutation status. They can also be associated with response to treatment, depending on the cell context. The determination of p53 isoform expression and p53 mutation status helps to define different subtypes within a particular cancer type, which would have different responses to treatment. Thus, the understanding of the regulation of p53 isoform expression and their biological activities in relation to the cellular context would constitute an important step toward the improvement of the diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive values of p53 in cancer treatment. This review aims to summarize the involvement of p53 isoforms in cancer and to highlight novel potential therapeutic targets. PMID:24379683

  7. Radiosensitivity of hepatoma cell lines and human normal liver cell lines exposed in vitro to carbon ions and argon ions at the HIRFL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xigang; Li, Wenjian; Wang, Zhuanzi; Wei, Wei; Guo, Chuanling; Lu, Dong; Yang, Jianshe

    2009-05-01

    Human hepatoma (SMMC-7721) and normal liver (L02) cells were irradiated with γ-rays, 12C 6+ and 36Ar 18+ ion beams at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). By using the Calyculin-A induced premature chromosome condensation technique, chromatid-type breaks and isochromatid-type breaks were scored separately. Tumor cells irradiated with heavy ions produced a majority of isochromatid break, while chromatid breaks were dominant when cells were exposed to γ-rays. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for irradiation-induced chromatid breaks were 3.6 for L02 and 3.5 for SMMC-7721 cell lines at the LET peak of 96 keVμm -112C 6+ ions, and 2.9 for both of the two cell lines of 512 keVμm -136Ar 18+ ions. It suggested that the RBE of isochromatid-type breaks was pretty high when high-LET radiations were induced. Thus we concluded that the high production of isochromatid-type breaks, induced by the densely ionizing track structure, could be regarded as a signature of high-LET radiation exposure.

  8. Epigenetic control of group V phospholipase A2 expression in human malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Menschikowski, Mario; Hagelgans, Albert; Nacke, Brit; Jandeck, Carsten; Mareninova, Olga A; Asatryan, Liana; Siegert, Gabriele

    2016-06-01

    Secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) are suggested to play an important role in inflammation and tumorigenesis. Different mechanisms of epigenetic regulation are involved in the control of group IIA, III and X sPLA2s expression in cancer cells, but group V sPLA2 (GV-PLA2) in this respect has not been studied. Here, we demonstrate the role of epigenetic mechanisms in regulation of GV-PLA2 expression in different cell lines originating from leukaemia and solid cancers. In blood leukocytes from leukaemic patients, levels of GV-PLA2 transcripts were significantly lower in comparison to those from healthy individuals. Similarly, in DU-145 and PC-3 prostate and CAL-51 and MCF-7 mammary cancer cell lines, levels of GV-PLA2 transcripts were significantly lower in relation to those found in normal epithelial cells of prostate or mammary. By sequencing and methylation-specific high-resolution melting (MS-HRM) analyses of bisulphite-modified DNA, distinct CpG sites in the GV-PLA2 promoter region were identified that were differentially methylated in cancer cells in comparison to normal epithelial and endothelial cells. Spearman rank order analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between the methylation degree and the cellular expression of GV-PLA2 (r = -0.697; p = 0.01). The effects of demethylating agent (5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine) and histone deacetylase inhibitor (trichostatin A) on GV-PLA2 transcription in the analysed cells confirmed the importance of DNA methylation and histone modification in the regulation of the GV-PLA2 gene expression in leukaemic, prostate and mammary cancer cell lines. The exposure of tumour cells to human recombinant GV-PLA2 resulted in a reduced colony forming activity of MCF-7, HepG2 and PC-3 cells, but not of DU-145 cells suggesting a cell-type-dependent effect of GV-PLA2 on cell growth. In conclusion, our results suggest that epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone modification play an important role in downregulation of GV-PLA2 expression in cancer cells. PMID:26715269

  9. Wnt interaction and extracellular release of prominin-1/CD133 in human malignant melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rappa, Germana; Mercapide, Javier; Anzanello, Fabio; Le, Thuc T.; Johlfs, Mary G.; Fiscus, Ronald R.; Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela; Corbeil, Denis; Lorico, Aurelio

    2013-04-01

    Prominin-1 (CD133) is the first identified gene of a novel class of pentaspan membrane glycoproteins. It is expressed by various epithelial and non-epithelial cells, and notably by stem and cancer stem cells. In non-cancerous cells such as neuro-epithelial and hematopoietic stem cells, prominin-1 is selectively concentrated in plasma membrane protrusions, and released into the extracellular milieu in association with small vesicles. Previously, we demonstrated that prominin-1 contributes to melanoma cells pro-metastatic properties and suggested that it may constitute a molecular target to prevent prominin-1-expressing melanomas from colonizing and growing in lymph nodes and distant organs. Here, we report that three distinct pools of prominin-1 co-exist in cultures of human FEMX-I metastatic melanoma. Morphologically, in addition to the plasma membrane localization, prominin-1 is found within the intracellular compartments, (e.g., Golgi apparatus) and in association with extracellular membrane vesicles. The latter prominin-1–positive structures appeared in three sizes (small, ≤40 nm; intermediates ∼40–80 nm, and large, >80 nm). Functionally, the down-regulation of prominin-1 in FEMX-I cells resulted in a significant reduction of number of lipid droplets as observed by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering image analysis and Oil red O staining, and surprisingly in a decrease in the nuclear localization of beta-catenin, a surrogate marker of Wnt activation. Moreover, the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) promoter activity was 2 to 4 times higher in parental than in prominin-1-knockdown cells. Collectively, our results point to Wnt signaling and/or release of prominin-1–containing membrane vesicles as mediators of the pro-metastatic activity of prominin-1 in FEMX-I melanoma. - Highlights: ► First report of release of prominin-1–containing microvesicles from cancer cells. ► Pro-metastatic role of prominin-1–containing microvesicles in FEMX-I melanoma. ► Down-regulation of prominin-1 results in decreased nuclear localization of β-catenin. ► Wnt signaling as mediator of the pro-metastatic activity of prominin-1.

  10. Regulation of ATM in DNA double strand break repair accounts for the radiosensitivity in human cells exposed to high linear energy transfer ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lian; Yu, Dong; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Tong, Jian; Cao, Jianping; Fan, Saijun

    2009-11-01

    High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation shows different biological effects from low-LET radiation. The complex nature of high LET radiation-induced damage, especially the clustered DNA damage, brings about slow repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), which finally lead to higher lethality and chromosome aberration. Ionizing radiation (IR) induced DNA DSBs are repaired by both non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathways in mammalian cells. The novel function of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) protein is its involvement in the DSB repair of slow kinetics for "dirty" breaks rejoining by NHEJ, this suggests that ATM may play a more important role in high LET radiation-induced DNA damage. We show here that KU55933, an ATM inhibitor could distinctly lower the clonogenic survival in normal human skin fibroblast cells exposed to carbon ion radiation and dramatically impair the normal process for DSB repair. We also implicated the involvement of ATM in the two pathways of DNA DSB repair, with DNA-PKcs and Rad51 as the representative proteins. The phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at Thr-2609 with both immunoblotting and immunofluorescent staining indicated an ATM-dependent change, while for Rad51, KU55933 pretreatment could postpone the formation of nuclear Rad51 foci. Interestingly, we also found that pretreatment with chloroquine, an ATM stimulator could protect cells from carbon ion radiation only at lower doses. For doses over 1Gy, protection was no longer observed. There was a dose-dependent increase for ATM kinase activity, with saturation at about 1Gy. Chloroquine pretreatment prior to 1Gy of carbon ion radiation did not enhance the autophosphorylation of ATM at serine 1981. The function of ATM in G2/M checkpoint arrest facilitated DSB repair in high-LET irradiation. Our results provide a possible mechanism for the direct involvement of ATM in DSB repair by high-LET irradiation. PMID:19583974

  11. Transcription analysis in the MeLiM swine model identifies RACK1 as a potential marker of malignancy for human melanocytic proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Egidy, Giorgia; Jul, Sophia; Boss, Philippe; Bernex, Florence; Geffrotin, Claudine; Vincent-Naulleau, Silvia; Horak, Vratislav; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Panthier, Jean-Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Background Metastatic melanoma is a severe disease. Few experimental animal models of metastatic melanoma exist. MeLiM minipigs exhibit spontaneous melanoma. Cutaneous and metastatic lesions are histologically similar to human's. However, most of them eventually spontaneously regress. Our purpose was to investigate whether the MeLiM model could reveal markers of malignancy in human melanocytic proliferations. Results We compared the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) between normal pig skin melanocytes and melanoma cells from an early pulmonary metastasis of MeLiM minipigs. Tag identification revealed 55 regulated genes, including GNB2L1 which was found upregulated in the melanoma library. In situ hybridisation confirmed GNB2L1 overexpression in MeLiM melanocytic lesions. GNB2L1 encodes the adaptor protein RACK1, recently shown to influence melanoma cell lines tumorigenicity. We studied the expression of RACK1 by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy in tissues specimens of normal skin, in cutaneous and metastatic melanoma developped in MeLiM minipigs and in human patients. In pig and human samples, the results were similar. RACK1 protein was not detected in normal epidermal melanocytes. By contrast, RACK1 signal was highly increased in the cytoplasm of all melanocytic cells of superficial spreading melanoma, recurrent dermal lesions and metastatic melanoma. RACK1 partially colocalised with activated PKC??. In pig metastases, additional nuclear RACK1 did not associate to BDNF expression. In human nevi, the RACK1 signal was low. Conclusion RACK1 overexpression detected in situ in human melanoma specimens characterized cutaneous and metastatic melanoma raising the possibility that RACK1 can be a potential marker of malignancy in human melanoma. The MeLiM strain provides a relevant model for exploring mechanisms of melanocytic malignant transformation in humans. This study may contribute to a better understanding of melanoma pathophysiology and to progress in diagnosis. PMID:18442364

  12. Malignant hyperthermia

    MedlinePlus

    Repeated or untreated episodes can cause kidney failure. Untreated episodes can be fatal. ... such as cocaine, amphetamine (speed), and ecstasy. These drugs may cause problems similar to malignant hyperthermia in people who ...

  13. Survivin knockdown increased anti-cancer effects of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate in human malignant neuroblastoma SK-N-BE2 and SH-SY5Y cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Md. Motarab; Banik, Naren L.; Ray, Swapan K.

    2012-08-01

    Neuroblastoma is a solid tumor that mostly occurs in children. Malignant neuroblastomas have poor prognosis because conventional chemotherapeutic agents are hardly effective. Survivin, which is highly expressed in some malignant neuroblastomas, plays a significant role in inhibiting differentiation and apoptosis and promoting cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. We examined consequences of survivin knockdown by survivin short hairpin RNA (shRNA) plasmid and then treatment with (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a green tea flavonoid, in malignant neuroblastoma cells. Our Western blotting and laser scanning confocal immunofluorescence microscopy showed that survivin was highly expressed in malignant neuroblastoma SK-N-BE2 and SH-SY5Y cell lines and slightly in SK-N-DZ cell line. Expression of survivin was very faint in malignant neuroblastoma IMR32 cell line. We transfected SK-N-BE2 and SH-SY-5Y cells with survivin shRNA, treated with EGCG, and confirmed knockdown of survivin at mRNA and protein levels. Survivin knockdown induced morphological features of neuronal differentiation, as we observed following in situ methylene blue staining. Combination of survivin shRNA and EGCG promoted neuronal differentiation biochemically by increases in the expression of NFP, NSE, and e-cadherin and also decreases in the expression of Notch-1, ID2, hTERT, and PCNA. Our in situ Wright staining and Annexin V-FITC/PI staining showed that combination therapy was highly effective in inducing, respectively, morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis. Apoptosis occurred with activation of caspase-8 and cleavage of Bid to tBid, increase in Bax:Bcl-2 ratio, mitochondrial release of cytochrome c, and increases in the expression and activity of calpain and caspase-3. Combination therapy decreased migration of cells through matrigel and inhibited proliferative (p-Akt and NF-{kappa}B), invasive (MMP-2 and MMP-9), and angiogenic (VEGF and b-FGF) factors. Also, in vitro network formation ability of cells was significantly inhibited by survivin silencing and completely by combination of survivin silencing and EGCG treatment. Collectively, survivin silencing potentiated anti-cancer effects of EGCG in human malignant neuroblastoma cells having survivin overexpression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin shRNA + EGCG controlled growth of human malignant neuroblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin knockdown induced neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin shRNA + EGCG induced morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination therapy inhibited invasion, proliferation, and angiogenesis as well. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer So, combination therapy showed multiple anti-cancer mechanisms in neuroblastoma.

  14. Deep sequencing of the small RNA transcriptome of normal and malignant human B cells identifies hundreds of novel microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Jima, Dereje D.; Zhang, Jenny; Jacobs, Cassandra; Richards, Kristy L.; Dunphy, Cherie H.; Choi, William W. L.; Yan Au, Wing; Srivastava, Gopesh; Czader, Magdalena B.; Rizzieri, David A.; Lagoo, Anand S.; Lugar, Patricia L.; Mann, Karen P.; Flowers, Christopher R.; Bernal-Mizrachi, Leon; Naresh, Kikkeri N.; Evens, Andrew M.; Gordon, Leo I.; Luftig, Micah; Friedman, Daphne R.; Weinberg, J. Brice; Thompson, Michael A.; Gill, Javed I.; Liu, Qingquan; How, Tam; Grubor, Vladimir; Gao, Yuan; Patel, Amee; Wu, Han; Zhu, Jun; Blobe, Gerard C.; Lipsky, Peter E.; Chadburn, Amy

    2010-01-01

    A role for microRNA (miRNA) has been recognized in nearly every biologic system examined thus far. A complete delineation of their role must be preceded by the identification of all miRNAs present in any system. We elucidated the complete small RNA transcriptome of normal and malignant B cells through deep sequencing of 31 normal and malignant human B-cell samples that comprise the spectrum of B-cell differentiation and common malignant phenotypes. We identified the expression of 333 known miRNAs, which is more than twice the number previously recognized in any tissue type. We further identified the expression of 286 candidate novel miRNAs in normal and malignant B cells. These miRNAs were validated at a high rate (92%) using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and we demonstrated their application in the distinction of clinically relevant subgroups of lymphoma. We further demonstrated that a novel miRNA cluster, previously annotated as a hypothetical gene LOC100130622, contains 6 novel miRNAs that regulate the transforming growth factor-β pathway. Thus, our work suggests that more than a third of the miRNAs present in most cellular types are currently unknown and that these miRNAs may regulate important cellular functions. PMID:20733160

  15. Fine scale quantification of HCG beta gene transcription in human trophoblastic and non-malignant non-trophoblastic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rull, K; Hallast, P; Uuskla, L; Jackson, J; Punab, M; Salumets, A; Campbell, RK; Laan, M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: HCG is produced by syncytiotrophoblast of placenta. It delays the apoptosis of corpus luteum and functions in implantation. Its possible role in male reproduction has been raised. HCG beta subunit is encoded by CGB, CGB5, CGB7 and CGB8 genes located at 19q13.3 in a common genome cluster with beta subunit non-coding CGB1 and CGB2. We conducted a sensitive quantification and comparison of CGB gene expression in human trophoblastic (blastocysts, n=6; normal/failed pregnancy, n=51) and non-malignant non-trophoblastic tissues (15 different tissue types, samples n=241). METHODS: Real-time RT-PCR. RESULTS: We showed a wide transcriptional window of CGB genes in normal pregnancy, a significant reduction in recurrent miscarriages, and a high expression (especially CGB1/CGB2) in ectopic and molar pregnancies. Expression was several orders of magnitude lower in the non-placental tissues, with the highest CGB levels being seen in testis, prostate, thymus, skeletal muscle and lung samples. The contribution of CGB1/CGB2 to the summarized expression of six CGB genes was not proportional to their gene dosage: 1/1000 to 1/10000. An interesting exception was the testis exhibiting a much higher CGB1/CGB2 to total CGB mRNA ratio of ?1/3, corresponding to gene dosage. CONCLUSIONS: The expressional profile of CGB genes, activated already in blastocyst stage, is associated with the status of pregnancy. The presence of CGB transcripts in testes, and in particular CGB1/CGB2 transcripts, may indicate a role in male reproductive tract. PMID:18048458

  16. Quinalizarin enhances radiosensitivity of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells partially by suppressing SHP-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaofen; Meng, Rui; Yu, Zhonghua; Mou, Jingjing; Liu, Sha; Sun, Ziyi; Zou, Zhenwei; Wu, Gang; Peng, Gang

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of quinalizarin on the radiosensitivity of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells and the relevant underlying mechanisms. Human NPC cell lines CNE-1, CNE-2 and 5-8F were treated with quinalizarin and then irradiated with different X-rays doses. Cell viability, survival, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), apoptosis, cell cycle distribution, expression of SHP-1 and other related proteins were detected with MTT assay, colony formation assay, immunofluorescent assay, flow cytometry and western blot analysis, respectively. We also examined how the effects of quinalizarin were affected by SHP-1-overexpression by lentivirus transfection. Quinalizarin at 25 µM enhanced radiosensitivity of NPC cells. This increased radiosensitivity was due to inhibition of cell viability, which delayed DSB repair as seen by significantly increased γ-H2AX foci, promoting apoptosis by 34% in CNE-1 and 9% in CNE-2 cells compared to controls and changing cell cycle distribution in CNE-1, but not CNE-2 cells. Quinalizarin treatment obviously decreased SHP-1 protein expression. Overexpressing SHP-1 partially reversed the radiosensitive effect of quinalizarin. Quinalizarin inhibited binding of p65 and the promoter of SHP-1, and decreased the activities of SHP-1 promoter and SHP-1. Quinalizarin enhanced radiosensitivity of NPC cells partially by suppressing SHP-1 expression. PMID:26781335

  17. Prostate-Specific Natural Health Products (Dietary Supplements) Radiosensitize Normal Prostate Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Yasmin; Schoenherr, Diane; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific health products (dietary supplements) are taken by cancer patients to alleviate the symptoms linked with poor prostate health. However, the effect of these agents on evidence-based radiotherapy practice is poorly understood. The present study aimed to determine whether dietary supplements radiosensitized normal prostate or prostate cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: Three well-known prostate-specific dietary supplements were purchased from commercial sources available to patients (Trinovin, Provelex, and Prostate Rx). The cells used in the study included normal prostate lines (RWPE-1 and PWR-1E), prostate tumor lines (PC3, DU145, and LNCaP), and a normal nonprostate line (HaCaT). Supplement toxicity was assessed using cell proliferation assays [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] and cellular radiosensitivity using conventional clonogenic assays (0.5-4Gy). Cell cycle kinetics were assessed using the bromodeoxyuridine/propidium iodide pulse-labeling technique, apoptosis by scoring caspase-3 activation, and DNA repair by assessing gammaH2AX. Results: The cell growth and radiosensitivity of the malignant PC3, DU145, and LNcaP cells were not affected by any of the dietary prostate supplements (Provelex [2mug/mL], Trinovin [10mug/mL], and Prostate Rx [50 mug/mL]). However, both Trinovin (10mug/mL) and Prostate Rx (6mug/mL) inhibited the growth rate of the normal prostate cell lines. Prostate Rx increased cellular radiosensitivity of RWPE-1 cells through the inhibition of DNA repair. Conclusion: The use of prostate-specific dietary supplements should be discouraged during radiotherapy owing to the preferential radiosensitization of normal prostate cells.

  18. Management of Inoperable Malignant Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kiess, Ana P; Quon, Harry

    2016-01-01

    For patients with inoperable salivary gland malignancy, radiation therapy has significant limitations but has been the mainstay of treatment. With standard photon radiation (X-rays), the 10-year loco-regional control (LRC) and overall survival rates are only ∼25%. Neutron radiation has potential biological advantages over photon radiation because it causes increased DNA damage, and studies of patients with inoperable salivary gland malignancy have shown improved 6-year LRC and overall survival of ∼60%. However, neutron radiation may also increase the risk of late toxicities, especially central nervous system toxicities after treatment of tumors involving the base of the skull. Proton radiation has potential physical advantages due to minimal exit dose through normal tissues, and a recent study has demonstrated 90% 5-year LRC after combined proton/photon radiation for adenoid cystic carcinoma involving the base of the skull. Stereotactic radiosurgery has also been used in combination with neutrons or standard photons as a technique to boost the skull base. The use of concurrent chemotherapy as a radiosensitizer has been considered based on extrapolation of data on squamous cell carcinomas, but further data are needed on inoperable salivary gland malignancies. Newer targeted therapies are also under investigation, and clinical trial enrollment is encouraged. PMID:27093559

  19. Probing human malignant T cells with lectins: a comparison with their surface antigen patterns defined by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Richard, Y; Boumsell, L; Lemerle, J; Valensi, F; Bernard, A

    1982-01-01

    Tumor cells from 40 children and 13 adults with T cell malignancies were assessed for staining with fluorescinated peanut agglutinin (PNA) and soybean agglutinin (SBA). These cell populations had also been characterized for surface surface antigens using a series of monoclonal antibodies (Mo. Ab.) that permit an assignment of malignant cells to discrete stages of normal T cell differentiation. We had previously shown a clear correspondence between lectin- and Mo. Ab-defined cell compartments within thymuses from normal children and T cells in peripheral blood. We report here that the pattern of reactivity of malignant T cells populations with lectins correlates closely the degree of maturation, as assessed by Mo. Ab. Thus, utilization of lectins together with Mo. Ab., can be clinically useful to characterize T cell malignancies. This observation shows that, in spite of a high degree of heterogeneity of malignant T cell populations from one patient to the other, in their pattern of surface antigens, these populations seem essentially to conform to the scheme of normal T cell differentiation. PMID:6981736

  20. Long-term low-dose α-particle enhanced the potential of malignant transformation in human bronchial epithelial cells through MAPK/Akt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Weili; Xiao, Linlin; Dong, Chen; He, Mingyuan; Pan, Yan; Xie, Yuexia; Tu, Wenzhi; Fu, Jiamei; Shao, Chunlin

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Multi-exposures of 25 mGy α-ray enhanced cell proliferation, adhesion, and invasion. • MAPK/Akt but not JNK/P66 was positively correlated with cell invasive phenotypes. • LDR of α-irradiation triggers cell malignant transformation through MAPK/Akt. - Abstract: Since the wide usage of ionizing radiation, the cancer risk of low dose radiation (LDR) (<0.1 Gy) has become attractive for a long time. However, most results are derived from epidemiologic studies on atomic-bomb survivors and nuclear accidents surrounding population, and the molecular mechanism of this risk is elusive. To explore the potential of a long-term LDR-induced malignant transformation, human bronchial epithelial cells Beas-2B were fractionally irradiated with 0.025 Gy α-particles for 8 times in total and then further cultured for 1–2 months. It was found that the cell proliferation, the abilities of adhesion and invasion, and the protein expressions of p-ERK, p-Akt, especially p-P38 were not only increased in the multiply-irradiated cells but also in their offspring 1–2 months after the final exposure, indicating high potentiality of cell malignant transformation. On opposite, the expressions of p-JNK and p-P66 were diminished in the subcultures of irradiated cells and thus may play a role of negative regulation in canceration. When the cells were transferred with p38 siRNA, the LDR-induced enhancements of cell adhesion and invasion were significantly reduced. These findings suggest that long-term LDR of α-particles could enhance the potential of malignant transformation incidence in human bronchial epithelial cells through MAPK/Akt pathway.

  1. Novel ZnO:Ag nanocomposites induce significant oxidative stress in human fibroblast malignant melanoma (Ht144) cells.

    PubMed

    Arooj, Syeda; Nazir, Samina; Nadhman, Akhtar; Ahmad, Nafees; Muhammad, Bakhtiar; Ahmad, Ishaq; Mazhar, Kehkashan; Abbasi, Rashda

    2015-01-01

    The use of photoactive nanoparticles (NPs) such as zinc oxide (ZnO) and its nanocomposites has become a promising anticancer strategy. However, ZnO has a low photocatalytic decomposition rate and the incorporation of metal ions such as silver (Ag) improves their activity. Here different formulations of ZnO:Ag (1, 3, 5, 10, 20 and 30% Ag) were synthesized by a simple co-precipitation method and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Rutherford back scattering and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for their structure, morphology, composition and optical band gap. The NPs were investigated with regard to their different photocatalytic cytotoxic effects in human malignant melanoma (HT144) and normal (HCEC) cells. The ZnO:Ag nanocomposites killed cancer cells more efficiently than normal cells under daylight exposure. Nanocomposites having higher Ag content (10, 20 and 30%) were more toxic compared to low Ag content (1, 3 and 5%). For HT144, under daylight exposure, the IC50 values were ZnO:Ag (10%): 23.37 μg/mL, ZnO:Ag (20%): 19.95 μg/mL, and ZnO:Ag (30%): 15.78 μg/mL. ZnO:Ag (30%) was toxic to HT144 (IC50: 23.34 μg/mL) in dark as well. The three nanocomposites were further analyzed with regard to their ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induce lipid peroxidation. The particles led to an increase in levels of ROS at cytotoxic concentrations, but only HT144 showed strongly induced MDA level. Finally, NPs were investigated for the ROS species they generated in vitro. A highly significant increase of (1)O2 in the samples exposed to daylight was observed. Hydroxyl radical species, HO(•), were also generated to a lesser extent. Thus, the incorporation of Ag into ZnO NPs significantly improves their photo-oxidation capabilities. ZnO:Ag nanocomposites could provide a new therapeutic option to selectively target cancer cells. PMID:25821698

  2. An integrated approach for comparative proteomic analysis of human bile reveals overexpressed cancer-associated proteins in malignant biliary stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lukic, Natalija; Visentin, Rmy; Delhaye, Myriam; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Lescuyer, Pierre; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Farina, Annarita

    2014-05-01

    Proteomics is a key tool in the identification of new bile biomarkers for differentiating malignant and nonmalignant biliary stenoses. Unfortunately, the complexity of bile and the presence of molecules interfering with protein analysis represent an obstacle for quantitative proteomic studies in bile samples. The simultaneous need to introduce purification steps and minimize the use of pre-fractionation methods inevitably leads to protein loss and limited quantifications. This dramatically reduces the chance of identifying new potential biomarkers. In the present study, we included differential centrifugation as a preliminary step in a quantitative proteomic workflow involving iTRAQ labeling, peptide fractionation by OFFGEL electrophoresis and LC-MS/MS, to compare protein expression in bile samples collected from patients with malignant or nonmalignant biliary stenoses. A total of 1267 proteins were identified, including a set of 322 newly described bile proteins, mainly belonging to high-density cellular fractions. The subsequent comparative analysis led to a 5-fold increase in the number of quantified proteins over previously published studies and highlighted 104 proteins overexpressed in malignant samples. Finally, immunoblot verifications performed on a cohort of 8 malignant (pancreatic adenocarcinoma, n=4; cholangiocarcinoma, n=4) and 5 nonmalignant samples (chronic pancreatitis, n=3; biliary stones, n=2) confirmed the results of proteomic analysis for three proteins: olfactomedin-4, syntenin-2 and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge. PMID:23872482

  3. STAT3 mutations identified in human hematologic neoplasms induce myeloid malignancies in a mouse bone marrow transplantation model

    PubMed Central

    Couronné, Lucile; Scourzic, Laurianne; Pilati, Camilla; Valle, Véronique Della; Duffourd, Yannis; Solary, Eric; Vainchenker, William; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Damm, Frederik; Stern, Marc-Henri; Gaulard, Philippe; Lamant, Laurence; Delabesse, Eric; Merle-Beral, Hélène; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Fontenay, Michaëla; Tilly, Hervé; Bastard, Christian; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Bernard, Olivier A.; Mercher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    STAT3 protein phosphorylation is a frequent event in various hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. Acquired STAT3 mutations have been recently identified in 40% of patients with T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia, a rare T-cell disorder. In this study, we investigated the mutational status of STAT3 in a large series of patients with lymphoid and myeloid diseases. STAT3 mutations were identified in 1.6% (4 of 258) of patients with T-cell neoplasms, in 2.5% (2 of 79) of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma but in no other B-cell lymphoma patients (0 of 104) or patients with myeloid malignancies (0 of 96). Functional in vitro assays indicated that the STAT3Y640F mutation leads to a constitutive phosphorylation of the protein. STA21, a STAT3 small molecule inhibitor, inhibited the proliferation of two distinct STAT3 mutated cell lines. Using a mouse bone marrow transplantation assay, we observed that STAT3Y640F expression leads to the development of myeloproliferative neoplasms with expansion of either myeloid cells or megakaryocytes. Together, these data indicate that the STAT3Y640F mutation leads to constitutive activation of STAT3, induces malignant hematopoiesis in vivo, and may represent a novel therapeutic target in some lymphoid malignancies. PMID:23872306

  4. Malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed Central

    Ben Abraham, R.; Adnet, P.; Glauber, V.; Perel, A.

    1998-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia is a rare autosomal dominant trait that predisposes affected individuals to great danger when exposed to certain anaesthetic triggering agents (such as potent volatile anaesthetics and succinylcholine). A sudden hypermetabolic reaction in skeletal muscle leading to hyperthermia and massive rhabdomyolysis can occur. The ultimate treatment is dantrolene sodium a nonspecific muscle relaxant. Certain precautions should be taken before anaesthesia of patients known to be susceptible to malignant hyperthermia. These include the prohibition of the use of triggering agents, monitoring of central body temperature and expired CO2, and immediate availability of dantrolene. In addition, careful cleansing of the anaesthesia machine of vapours of halogenated agents is recommended. If these measures are taken, the chances of an MH episode are greatly reduced. When malignant hyperthermia-does occur in the operating room, prompt recognition and treatment usually prevent a potentially fatal outcome. The most reliable test to establish susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia is currently the in vitro caffeine-halothane contracture test. It is hoped that in the future a genetic test will be available. PMID:9538480

  5. Hematologic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogstraten, B.

    1986-01-01

    The principle aim of this book is to give practical guidelines to the modern treatment of the six important hematologic malignancies. Topics considered include the treatment of the chronic leukemias; acute leukemia in adults; the myeloproliferative disorders: polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and idiopathic myelofibrosis/agnogenic myeloid metaplasia; Hodgkin's Disease; non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; and Multiple Myeloma.

  6. Aberrant regulation of the LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop in human malignant tumors and its effects on the hallmarks of cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianzhen; Wang, Guangyu; Hao, Dapeng; Liu, Xi; Wang, Dong; Ning, Ning; Li, Xiaobo

    2015-01-01

    RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are two of the most important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, and their aberrant expression contributes to the development of human malignancies. Let-7, one of the most well-known tumor suppressors, is frequently down-regulated in a variety of human cancers. The RBP LIN28A/LIN28B, a direct target of the let-7 family of miRNAs, is an inhibitor of let-7 biogenesis and is frequently up-regulated in cancers. Aberrant regulation of the LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop in human malignant tumors is reportedly involved in cancer development, contributing to cellular proliferation, cell death resistance, angiogenesis, metastasis, metabolism reprogramming, tumor-associated inflammation, genome instability, acquiring immortality and evading immune destruction. In this review, we summarized the mechanisms of LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop aberrant regulation in human cancer and discussed the roles and potential mechanisms of the LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop in regulating the hallmarks of cancer. The crosstalk between LIN28A/LIN28B and let-7 loop and certain oncogenes (such as MYC, RAS, PI3K/AKT, NF-κB and β-catenin) in regulating hallmarks of cancer has also been discussed. PMID:26123544

  7. Radiosensitivity of CD45RO{sup +} memory and CD45RO{sup {minus}} naive T cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Uzawa, Akiko; Suzuki, Gen; Nakata, Yukiko; Akashi, Makoto; Ohyama, Harumi; Akanuma, Atsuo

    1994-01-01

    Radiosensitivities of various human T-cell subsets were investigated by a proliferation assay and by a single-cell gel electrophoresis assay. Each T-cell subset was purified using a cell sorter and was induced to proliferate by ionomycin and interleukin 2. Unsorted T cells showed biphasic dose-survival curves, indicating the heterogeneity of T cells in terms of radiosensitivity. Purified CD4{sup +} helper and CD8{sup +} killer T cells showed similar biphasic dose-survival curves. Hence both T-cell subsets were composed of cells of different radiosensitivity. The T-cell subsets belonging to different activation stages such as CD45RO{sup +} memory and CD45RO{sup {minus}} naive T cells had different dose-survival curves. The former was more radiosensitive than the latter. The high radiosensitivity of CD45RO{sup +} cells was also demonstrated by single-cell gel electrophoresis after irradiation. This is the first demonstration that a particular cell surface marker on T cells is correlated with greater radiosensitivity. 27 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Tumor radiosensitization by monomethyl auristatin E: mechanism of action and targeted delivery.

    PubMed

    Buckel, Lisa; Savariar, Elamprakash N; Crisp, Jessica L; Jones, Karra A; Hicks, Angel M; Scanderbeg, Daniel J; Nguyen, Quyen T; Sicklick, Jason K; Lowy, Andrew M; Tsien, Roger Y; Advani, Sunil J

    2015-04-01

    Intrinsic tumor resistance to radiotherapy limits the efficacy of ionizing radiation (IR). Sensitizing cancer cells specifically to IR would improve tumor control and decrease normal tissue toxicity. The development of tumor-targeting technologies allows for developing potent radiosensitizing drugs. We hypothesized that the anti-tubulin agent monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE), a component of a clinically approved antibody-directed conjugate, could function as a potent radiosensitizer and be selectively delivered to tumors using an activatable cell-penetrating peptide targeting matrix metalloproteinases and RGD-binding integrins (ACPP-cRGD-MMAE). We evaluated the ability of MMAE to radiosensitize both established cancer cells and a low-passage cultured human pancreatic tumor cell line using clonogenic and DNA damage assays. MMAE sensitized colorectal and pancreatic cancer cells to IR in a schedule- and dose-dependent manner, correlating with mitotic arrest. Radiosensitization was evidenced by decreased clonogenic survival and increased DNA double-strand breaks in irradiated cells treated with MMAE. MMAE in combination with IR resulted in increased DNA damage signaling and activation of CHK1. To test a therapeutic strategy of MMAE and IR, PANC-1 or HCT-116 murine tumor xenografts were treated with nontargeted free MMAE or tumor-targeted MMAE (ACPP-cRGD-MMAE). While free MMAE in combination with IR resulted in tumor growth delay, tumor-targeted ACPP-cRGD-MMAE with IR produced a more robust and significantly prolonged tumor regression in xenograft models. Our studies identify MMAE as a potent radiosensitizer. Importantly, MMAE radiosensitization can be localized to tumors by targeted activatable cell-penetrating peptides. PMID:25681274

  9. Ocular penetration, toxicity, and radiosensitization effects of two hypoxic cell radiosensitizers on retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Rootman, J.; Gallie, B.; Kumi, C.; Bussanich, N.; Rogers, B.; Palcic, B.

    1986-11-01

    Two new radiosensitizing drugs, SR-2508 and SR-2555, were studied for their in vivo toxicity and absorption properties. For both drugs, 100 mg dissolved in 0.5 mL of normal saline resulted in the maximum acceptable level of toxicity when injected subconjunctivally in rabbit eyes as determined by ocular and histopathologic changes. SR-2508 showed higher ocular and systemic absorption than SR-2555. The radiosensitizing ability of these drugs was studied using Chinese hamster ovary cells and the retinoblastoma cell line, V79c6. Results of the in vitro radiation experiments indicate that both drugs are comparable with misonidazole in their radiosensitizing ability, with SR-2508 being slightly more effective than SR-2555. Because of their relative high ocular absorption and low toxicity in comparison with misonidazole, these two drugs, particularly SR-2508, may be of clinical value and could be considered for adjunctive use as radiosensitizers of hypoxic tumors such as retinoblastoma.

  10. The mitogenic effect of KGF and the expression of its cell surface receptor on cultured normal and malignant human oral keratinocytes and on contiguous fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Drugan, C S; Stone, A; Game, S M; Prime, S S

    1997-08-01

    This study examined the mitogenic response to keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) of normal and tumour-derived human oral keratinocytes in which the degree of cellular differentiation was known and in contiguous fibroblast cultures derived from the malignant epithelial cultures. Keratinocytes, but not fibroblasts, were stimulated by KGF, thereby demonstrating epithelial target cell specificity of the ligand. KGF-induced stimulation of the tumour-derived keratinocytes cultured in the absence of the 3T3 fibroblast support broadly correlated with the degree of cellular differentiation; well-differentiated keratinocytes were stimulated more by KGF than their less differentiated counterparts. Malignant oral keratinocytes expressed KGF cell surface receptors (KD 451-709 pM; receptors/cell 2306-13645), but KGF receptor mRNA did not correlate with either KGF-induced mitogenesis or the degree of epithelial cell differentiation. When the tumour-derived keratinocytes were cultured in the presence of 3T3 fibroblasts, the mitogenic response to KGF was comparable to normal epithelial cells. The results suggest that KGF-mediated growth stimulation may not be significant in providing a selective advantage for the growth of malignant keratinocytes. PMID:9250933

  11. Azidothymidine Enhances Fluorodeoxyuridine-Mediated Radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.-M.; Johnson, Monika; Smith, Brian J.; Dornfeld, Ken

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To examine the role of DNA repair and altered thymidine analogues in altering the response to radiation during thymidine deprivation. Methods and Materials: Mismatch repair-deficient and -proficient cell lines HEC59 and HC-2.4 were treated with fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR), azidothymidine (AZT), and irradiation either alone or in combination, and outcomes of clonogenic survival and cell-cycle distributions were determined. Results: Survival outcomes for all treatments were similar for both cell lines, suggesting that hMSH2 does not significantly influence thymidine deprivation toxicity or radiosensitization. The chain-terminating thymidine analogue AZT increased the toxicity of FUdR and increased DNA fragmentation. The combination of FUdR and AZT afforded greater radiosensitization than either drug alone. Drug enhancement ratios, the degree of excess radiation-induced cell death in drug-treated cultures compared with radiation alone for HEC59, were 1.2, 1.4, and 1.8 for AZT, FUdR, and the combination, respectively. Enhancement ratios for HC-2.4 were 1.3, 1.5, and 1.8 for AZT, FUdR, and the combination, respectively. Conclusion: Azidothymidine, a chain-terminating thymidine analogue, can enhance the radiosensitizing affects of thymidine deprivation. Deoxyribonucleic acid strand breaks may play an important role in the mechanism of thymidine deprivation-induced radiosensitization.

  12. Epigenetic alteration by DNA-demethylating treatment restores apoptotic response to glucocorticoids in dexamethasone-resistant human malignant lymphoid cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoids (GCs) are often included in the therapy of lymphoid malignancies because they kill several types of malignant lymphoid cells. GCs activate the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), to regulate a complex genetic network, culminating in apoptosis. Normal lymphoblasts and many lymphoid malignancies are sensitive to GC-driven apoptosis. Resistance to GCs can be a significant clinical problem, however, and correlates with resistance to several other major chemotherapeutic agents. Methods We analyzed the effect of treatment with the cytosine analogue 5 aza-2’ deoxycytidine (AZA) on GC resistance in two acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T or pre-T ALL) cell lines- CEM and Molt-4- and a (B-cell) myeloma cell line, RPMI 8226. Methods employed included tissue culture, flow cytometry, and assays for clonogenicity, cytosine extension, immunochemical identification of proteins, and gene transactivation. High throughput DNA sequencing was used to confirm DNA methylation status. Conclusions Treatment of these cells with AZA resulted in altered DNA methylation and restored GC-evoked apoptosis in all 3 cell lines. In CEM cells the altered epigenetic state resulted in site-specific phosphorylation of the GR, increased GR potency, and GC-driven induction of the GR from promoters that lie in CpG islands. In RPMI 8226 cells, expression of relevant coregulators of GR function was altered. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which is central to a feed-forward mechanism of site-specific GR phosphorylation and ultimately, apoptosis, occurred in all 3 cell lines. These data show that in certain malignant hematologic B- and T-cell types, epigenetically controlled GC resistance can be reversed by cell exposure to a compound that causes DNA demethylation. The results encourage studies of application to in vivo systems, looking towards eventual clinical applications. PMID:24795534

  13. ROS-dependent prostate apoptosis response-4 (Par-4) up-regulation and ceramide generation are the prime signaling events associated with curcumin-induced autophagic cell death in human malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Thayyullathil, Faisal; Rahman, Anees; Pallichankandy, Siraj; Patel, Mahendra; Galadari, Sehamuddin

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are extremely resistant to therapies that induce apoptosis, but are less resistant to therapies that induce autophagy. Therefore, drugs targeting autophagy are promising in the management of malignant gliomas. In this study, we investigated the anti-glioma potential of curcumin in vitro, and further examined the molecular mechanisms of curcumin-induced cell death in human malignant glioma. Here, we provide evidence that curcumin is cytotoxic against human malignant glioma cell lines, and the mechanism of cell death caused by curcumin is associated with features of autophagy. Curcumin suppresses the growth of human malignant glioma cells via ROS-dependent prostate apoptosis response-4 (Par-4) induction and ceramide generation. Extracellular supplementation of antioxidants such as glutathione and N-acetylcysteine to glioma cells abrogated the Par-4 induction, ceramide generation, and in turn, prevented curcumin-induced autophagic cell death. Moreover, tumor cells transfected with Par-4 gene sensitized the curcumin-induced autophagic cell death. Overall, this study describes a novel signaling pathway by which curcumin induces ROS-dependent Par-4 activation and ceramide generation, leading to autophagic cell death in human malignant glioma cells. PMID:25349781

  14. The Effect of Chemoradiotherapy with SRC Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor, PP2 and Temozolomide on Malignant Glioma Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Keun-Yong; Cho, Bong Jun; Choi, Eun Jung; Kim, Jin-Ho; Chie, Eui Kyu; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Kim, Il Han; Paek, Sun Ha; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, In Ah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the effect of chemoradiotherapy with PP2 and temozolomide (TMZ) on malignant glioma cells using clonogenic assays and in vivo brain tumor model. Materials and Methods The effect of PP2 on radiosensitivity of U251 and T98G cells was investigated using clonogenic assays. The expression of E-cadherin, matrix metalloproteinases 2 (MMP2), Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was measured by Western blotting and an accumulation of γH2AX foci 6 hours after radiotherapy was measured after PP2 treatment. The effect of PP2 on migration, invasion, and vasculogenic mimicry formation (VMF) of U251 cells was evaluated. In an orthotopical brain tumor model with U251 cells, PP2 was injected intraperitoneally with or without oral TMZ before, during and after whole brain radiotherapy. Bioluminescence images were taken to visualize in vivo tumors and immunohistochemical staining of VEGF, CD31, EphA2, and hypoxia-inducible factor 1a was performed. Results PP2 increased radiosensitivity of U251 and T98G cells without decreasing survival of normal human astrocytes. Chemoradiotherapy with PP2 and TMZ resulted in increased accumulation of γH2AX foci. PP2 induced overexpression of E-cadherin and suppression of MMP2, VEGF, and EphA2. PP2 also compromised invasion, migration, and VMF of U251 cells. In brain tumors, chemoradiotherapy with PP2 and TMZ decreased tumor volume best, but not statistically significantly compared with chemoradiotherapy with TMZ. The expression of VEGF and CD31 was suppressed in PP2-treated tumors. Conclusion PP2 enhances radiosensitivity of malignant glioma cells and suppresses invasion and migration of U251 cells. Chemoradiotherapy with PP2 and TMZ resulted in non-significant tumor volume decrease. PMID:26044161

  15. Underexpression of LKB1 tumor suppressor is associated with enhanced Wnt signaling and malignant characteristics of human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinghan; Zhang, Keqiang; Wang, Jinhui; Wu, Xiwei; Liu, Xiyong; Li, Bin; Zhu, Yan; Yu, Yong; Cheng, Qingbao; Hu, Zhenli; Guo, Chao; Hu, Shuya; Mu, Bing; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Li, Jie; Smith, Lynne; Yang, Lu; Liu, Qi; Chu, Peiguo; Chang, Vincent; Zhang, Baihe; Wu, Mengchao; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Yen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is a rare and highly aggressive malignancy. In this study, we identified the presence of gene deletion and missense mutation leading to inactivation or underexpression of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor and excluded the involvement of LKB1 gene hypermethylation in ICC tissues. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that LKB1 was underexpressed in a portion of 326 ICC tissues compared to their adjacent normal tissues. By statistical analysis underexpression of LKB1 in ICC tissues significantly correlated with poor survival and malignant disease characteristics in ICC patients. Moreover, we showed that knockdown of LKB1 significantly enhanced growth, migration, and invasion of three LKB1-competent ICC cell lines. Global transcriptional profiling analysis identified multiple malignancy-promoting genes, such as HIF-1α, CD24, Talin1, Vinculin, Wnt5, and signaling pathways including Hedgehog, Wnt/β-catenin, and cell adhesion as novel targets of LKB1 underexpression in ICC cells. Furthermore, knockdown of LKB1 gene expression dramatically enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling in ICC cells, while an inverse correlation between LKB1 and nuclear β-catenin was observed in ICC tissues. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism for ICC carcinogenesis in which LKB1 underexpression enhances multiple signaling pathways including Wnt/β-catenin to promote disease progression. PMID:26056085

  16. Expression of tumour associated antigens in normal, benign and malignant human mammary epithelial tissue: a comparative immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Croce, M V; Colussi, A G; Price, M R; Segal-Eiras, A

    1997-01-01

    Breast carcinoma cells may express a variety of clinically relevant epitopes, some of which are associated with aberrant glycosylation of MUC1 mucin molecules, as well as determinants which are commonly expressed on their normal molecular counterparts. The present investigation is primarily an immunochemical analysis of MUC1 epitopes and other tumour associated antigenic determinants, as defined by their reaction with monoclonal antibodies and expressed in normal, benign and malignant epithelia. It was determined that malignant tissues of the breast expressed MUC1 mucin, as well as the Le(y) hapten and CEA, at different intensities, cellular distribution and patterns and percentages of positively stained cells. Conversely, benign tissues expressed a low intensity of MUC1 which was restricted to apical cell surface membranes and lumen debris; a similar pattern was found in some normal breast sections. It was concluded that MUC1 mucin exhibits heterogeneous antigenicity (as defined by its reactivity with a panel of related anti-MUC1 monoclonal antibodies) which is predominantly related to the progression of malignant disease. Le(y) is a marker of breast neoplasia, while CEA was found on only a small proportion of tumours. These immunohistochemical findings are considered in the context of improving breast cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:9494522

  17. Knockdown of Cathepsin L promotes radiosensitivity of glioma stem cells both in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjuan; Long, Linmei; Wang, Long; Tan, Caihong; Fei, Xifeng; Chen, Leisong; Huang, Qiang; Liang, Zhongqin

    2016-02-28

    The presence of glioma stem cells (GSCs) in tumor is relevant for glioma treatment resistance. This study assessed whether knockdown of Cathepsin L can influence GSC growth, tumor radiosensitivity, and clinical outcome. Protein levels of Cathepsin L and stem cell markers (CD133 and Nestin) were analyzed in samples from 90 gliomas of different WHO grades and 6 normal brain tissues by immunohistochemistry. Two glioma stem cell lines with overexpressed Cathepsin L were stably transfected with Cathepsin L short hairpin RNA expression vectors. The effects of Cathepsin L inhibition on radiosensitivity, self-renewal, stemness, DNA damage, and apoptosis were evaluated. In addition, an intracranial animal model and subcutaneous tumor xenografts in nude mice were used to assess tumor response to Cathepsin L inhibition in vivo. Our results proved that expressions of Cathepsin L and CD133, but not of Nestin, correlated with malignant grades of glioma tissues. GSCs with high Cathepsin L and CD133 co-expression were extraordinarily radioresistant. Cathepsin L inhibition with radiotherapy significantly reduced GSC growth, promoted apoptosis, and improved radiosensitivity. Knockdown of Cathepsin L resulted in a dramatic reduction of CD133 expression, as well as the decreased phosphorylation of DNA repair checkpoint proteins (ATM and DNA-PKcs). Furthermore, combination of Cathepsin L inhibition and radiotherapy potently blocked tumor growth and decreased blood vessel formation in vivo. Taken together, these findings suggest Cathepsin L as a promising therapeutic target for clinical therapy in GBM patients. PMID:26706414

  18. The radiosensitivity index predicts for overall survival in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Chinnaiyan, Prakash; Fulp, William J.; Eschrich, Steven; Torres-Roca, Javier F.; Caudell, Jimmy J.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously developed a multigene expression model of tumor radiosensitivity (RSI) with clinical validation in multiple cohorts and disease sites. We hypothesized RSI would identify glioblastoma patients who would respond to radiation and predict treatment outcomes. Clinical and array based gene expression (Affymetrix HT Human Genome U133 Array Plate Set) level 2 data was downloaded from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). A total of 270 patients were identified for the analysis: 214 who underwent radiotherapy and temozolomide and 56 who did not undergo radiotherapy. Median follow-up for the entire cohort was 9.1 months (range: 0.04–92.2 months). Patients who did not receive radiotherapy were more likely to be older (p < 0.001) and of poorer performance status (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, RSI is an independent predictor of OS (HR = 1.64, 95% CI 1.08–2.5; p = 0.02). Furthermore, on subset analysis, radiosensitive patients had significantly improved OS in the patients with high MGMT expression (unmethylated MGMT), 1 year OS 84.1% vs. 53.7% (p = 0.005). This observation held on MVA (HR = 1.94, 95% CI 1.19–3.31; p = 0.008), suggesting that RT has a larger therapeutic impact in these patients. In conclusion, RSI predicts for OS in glioblastoma. These data further confirm the value of RSI as a disease-site independent biomarker. PMID:26451615

  19. The radiosensitivity index predicts for overall survival in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Kamran A; Chinnaiyan, Prakash; Fulp, William J; Eschrich, Steven; Torres-Roca, Javier F; Caudell, Jimmy J

    2015-10-27

    We have previously developed a multigene expression model of tumor radiosensitivity (RSI) with clinical validation in multiple cohorts and disease sites. We hypothesized RSI would identify glioblastoma patients who would respond to radiation and predict treatment outcomes. Clinical and array based gene expression (Affymetrix HT Human Genome U133 Array Plate Set) level 2 data was downloaded from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). A total of 270 patients were identified for the analysis: 214 who underwent radiotherapy and temozolomide and 56 who did not undergo radiotherapy. Median follow-up for the entire cohort was 9.1 months (range: 0.04-92.2 months). Patients who did not receive radiotherapy were more likely to be older (p < 0.001) and of poorer performance status (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, RSI is an independent predictor of OS (HR = 1.64, 95% CI 1.08-2.5; p = 0.02). Furthermore, on subset analysis, radiosensitive patients had significantly improved OS in the patients with high MGMT expression (unmethylated MGMT), 1 year OS 84.1% vs. 53.7% (p = 0.005). This observation held on MVA (HR = 1.94, 95% CI 1.19-3.31; p = 0.008), suggesting that RT has a larger therapeutic impact in these patients. In conclusion, RSI predicts for OS in glioblastoma. These data further confirm the value of RSI as a disease-site independent biomarker. PMID:26451615

  20. Laser-induced photodynamic therapy with aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate as the photosensitizer: Differential phototoxicity in normal and malignant human cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Glassberg, E.; Lewandowski, L.; Lask, G.; Uitto, J. )

    1990-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the use of laser or noncoherent light energy with photosensitizing dyes to induce a cytotoxic reaction in the target cells, resulting in cell injury and/or death. In this study, we have examined laser-induced phototoxicity in normal human skin fibroblasts and HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells incubated with aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (AlPcS) in vitro. The culture, laser, and photosensitizer parameters were varied in attempts to establish the conditions for differential cytotoxicity between normal and malignant human fibroblasts. Biochemical assays, as a measure of cytotoxicity, included (3H)thymidine incorporation (an index of DNA replication), (35S)methionine incorporation (a measure of protein synthetic activity), and the MTT assay (an indirect index of mitochondrial activity). In the absence of laser irradiation, AlPcS was non-toxic to both cell lines in concentrations up to 25 micrograms/ml. Laser light alone at 675 nm (the absorption maximum of AlPcS) had no effect on the cells at energy densities up to 16 J/cm2. In the presence of 3 or 10 micrograms/ml of AlPcS, both cell lines demonstrated marked energy-dependent toxicity. If an 8-h or a 24-h efflux period in AlPcS-free medium was allowed to take place prior to laser irradiation, normal fibroblasts were much less sensitive to PDT, whereas fibrosarcoma cells still exhibited a marked degree of toxicity. The results indicate that, under appropriate treatment conditions, AlPcS is capable of preferentially sensitizing a malignant mesenchymal cell line, while sparing its non-malignant normal cell counterpart.

  1. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase in Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, Rodney E.; Mayhall, Kim; Maxwell, Nicole M.; Kandil, Emad

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthesis. Both intracellular and extracellular Nampt (iNampt and eNampt) levels are increased in several human malignancies and some studies demonstrate increased iNampt in more aggressive/invasive tumors and in tumor metastases. Several different molecular targets have been identified that promote carcinogenesis following iNampt overexpression, including SirT1, CtBP, and PARP-1. Additionally, eNampt is elevated in several human cancers and is often associated with a higher tumor stage and worse prognoses. Here we review the roles of Nampt in malignancy, some of the known mechanisms by which it promotes carcinogenesis, and discuss the possibility of employing Nampt inhibitors in cancer treatment. PMID:24386506

  2. Microbiome and Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Plottel, Claudia S.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    Current knowledge is insufficient to explain why only a proportion of individuals exposed to environmental carcinogens or carrying a genetic predisposition to cancer develop disease. Clearly, other factors must be important and one such element that has recently received attention is the human microbiome, the residential microbes including Bacteria, Archaea, Eukaryotes, and viruses that colonize humans. Here, we review principles and paradigms of microbiome-related malignancy, as illustrated by three specific microbial-host interactions. We review the effects of the microbiota on local and adjacent-neoplasia, present the estrobolome model of distant effects, and discuss the complex interactions with a latent virus leading to malignancy. These are separate facets of a complex biology interfacing all the microbial species we harbor from birth onward toward early reproductive success and eventual senescence. PMID:22018233

  3. Up-regulation of human cervical cancer proto-oncogene contributes to hepatitis B virus-induced malignant transformation of hepatocyte by down-regulating E-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junfeng; Dai, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Hongfei; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Shihui; Gao, Tongtong; Kou, Zhihua; Yu, Hong; Guo, Yan; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Zhang, Jianying; Zhou, Yusen

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most fatal human malignancies, Human cervical cancer proto-oncogene (HCCR) aberrantly expressed in a number of malignant tumors, including HCC. HCC is associated with Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in a large percentage of cases. To explore the regulation and function of HCCR expression in the development of HCC, we detected HCCR expression in HBV expressing hepatocytes. Results showed that the expression of HCCR was higher in HBV-expressing hepatocytes than that in control cells. Examining different components of HBV revealed that the HBx promotes HCCR expression in hepatocytes via the T-cell factor (TCF)/?-catenin pathway. HCCR expression in HBx transgenic mice increased with as the mice aged and developed tumors. We also found that overexpression of HCCR in hepatocytes promoted cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and reduced cell adhesion. Suppressing HCCR expression abolished the effect of HBx-induced hepatocyte growth. In addition, HCCR represses the expression of E-cadherin by inhibition its promoter activity, which might correlate with the effects of HCCR in hepatocytes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that HBx-HCCR-E-cadherin regulation pathway might play an important role in HBV-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. They also imply that HCCR is a potential risk marker for HCC and/or a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26470691

  4. Malignant transformation of human gastric epithelium cells via reactive oxygen species production and Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation following 40-week exposure to ochratoxin A.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xin; Cui, Jinfeng; Meng, Xinxing; Xing, Lingxiao; Shen, Haitao; Wang, Juan; Liu, Jing; Wang, Yuan; Lian, Weiguang; Zhang, Xianghong

    2016-03-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), one of the most abundant food-contaminating mycotoxins, is a possible carcinogenic to humans. We previously demonstrated that OTA treatment induced oxidative damage in human gastric epithelium cells (GES-1) in vitro. In this study, we found that long-term OTA treatment could result in increased proliferation, migration, and invasion abilities of GES-1 cells and induce anchorage-independent growth of cells in soft agar. Inoculation of OTA-treated GES-1 cells resulted in the formation of tumor xenografts in Balb/c nude mice in vivo, confirming that long-term OTA treatment can induce the malignant transformation of GES-1 cells. In addition, we found that long-term OTA treatment induced oxidative stress and activated the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, including the nuclear transition of β-catenin and the upregulation of the downstream molecules of the pathway. Finally, pretreatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) inhibited ROS formation and activation of the Wnt pathway in OTA-transformed GES-1 cells, which decreased the tumor formation abilities of these cells after inoculation in nude mice. These findings suggest that long-term OTA exposure induces the malignant transformation of GES-1 cells via intracellular ROS production and activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:26721203

  5. The toxic effects, GSH depletion and radiosensitivity by BSO on retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Xianjin Yi; Li Ding; Yizun Jin; Chuo Ni; Wenji Wang )

    1994-05-15

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular malignant tumor in children. Previous investigations have reported that buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) can deplete intracellular glutathione (GSH) by specific inhibition and increase cellular radiosensitivity. The toxic effects, GSH depletion and radiosensitivity effects of BSO on retinoblastoma cells are reported in this paper. GSH content of retinoblastoma cell lines Y-79, So-Rb50 and retinoblastoma xenograft is 2.7 [+-] 1.3 X 1.0[sup [minus]12] mmol/cell, 1.4 [+-] 0.2 X 1.0[sup [minus]12] mmol/cell, and 2.8 [+-] 1.2 [mu]mol/g, respectively. The ID[sub 50] of BSO on Y-79 and So-Rb50 in air for 3 h exposure is 2.5 mM and 0.2 mM, respectively. GSH depletion by 0.1 mM BSO for 24 h on Y-79 cells and 0.01 mM BSO for 24 h on So-Rb50 cells is 16.35%, and 4.7% of control. GSH depletion in tumor and other organ tissues in retinoblastoma-bearing nude mice after BSO administration is differential. GSH depletion after BSO exposure in Y-79 cells in vitro decreases the Do value of retinoblastoma cells. The SER of 0.01 mM and 0.05 mM BSO for 24 h under hypoxic conditions is 1.21 and 1.36, respectively. Based on these observations, the authors conclude that BSO toxicity on retinoblastoma cells depends on the characteristics of the cell line and that BSO can increase hypoxic retinoblastoma cells' radiosensitivity in vitro. Further study of BSO radiosensitization on retinoblastoma in vivo using nude mouse xenografts is needed. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Sialylation and glycosylation modulate cell adhesion and invasion to extracellular matrix in human malignant lymphoma: Dependency on integrin and the Rho GTPase family

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, OSAMU; ABE, MASAFUMI; HASHIMOTO, YUKO

    2015-01-01

    To determine the biological roles of cell surface glycosylation, we modified the surface glycosylation of human malignant lymphoma cell lines using glycosylation inhibitors. The O-glycosylation inhibitor, benzyl-α-GalNAc (BZ) enhanced the fibronectin adhesion of HBL-8 cells, a human Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, and of H-ALCL cells, a human anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line, both of which were established in our laboratory. The N-glycosylation inhibitor, tunicamycin (TM) inhibited the surface expression of Phaseolus vulgaris leukoagglutinating (L-PHA) lectin- and Canavalia ensiformis (ConA) lectin-reactive oligosaccharides in the HBL-8 cell line. Assay of the adhesion of HBL-8 cells to fibronectin showed that fibronectin adhesion is mediated by the integrin very late antigen (VLA)-4 and that not only BZ but also TM treatment enhanced HBL-8 cell adhesion to fibronectin. Furthermore, although BZ treatment also enhanced H-ALCL cell adhesion to fibronectin, this effect was not mediated by VLA-5 or the RGD sequence of fibronectin. We also showed that H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-3 was enhanced by pre-treatment with neuraminidase, which cleaves cell surface sialic acid. Additionally, H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-3 was inhibited by pre-treatment with the RGD peptide suggesting that cell adhesion to galectin-3 is mediated by integrin (VLA-5). Furthermore, H-ALCL cell invasion of galectin-1 and galectin-3 was inhibited by pre-treatment with the RGD peptide. Therefore, cell adhesion to and invasion of galectin-1 and galectin-3 are integrin-dependent. In addition to these findings, cell adhesion to galectin-3 was markedly inhibited by treatment with β-lactose compared to treatment with sucrose. Therefore, interactions between integrins and galectin-3 may be mediated through β-galactose that is linked to glycans of integrins. AZA1, an inhibitor of Ras homolog oncoprotein (Rho) GTPase family proteins, RAS-related C3 botulinus toxin substrate 1 (Rac 1) and Cell division control protein 42 homolog (Cdc42) markedly inhibited cell invasion of galectin-1 and galectin-3 suggesting that Rac 1 and Cdc42 may be involved in the regulation of H-ALCL cell invasion of galectins. In conclusion, artificial modification of cell surface glycosylation revealed the biological roles of glycosylation in the adhesion to and invasion of the extracellular matrix (ECM) by human malignant lymphoma cell lines. These findings will provide new insight into the glycobiology of human malignant lymphoma. PMID:26497328

  7. Sialylation and glycosylation modulate cell adhesion and invasion to extracellular matrix in human malignant lymphoma: Dependency on integrin and the Rho GTPase family.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi; Hashimoto, Yuko

    2015-12-01

    To determine the biological roles of cell surface glycosylation, we modified the surface glycosylation of human malignant lymphoma cell lines using glycosylation inhibitors. The O-glycosylation inhibitor, benzyl-α-GalNAc (BZ) enhanced the fibronectin adhesion of HBL-8 cells, a human Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, and of H-ALCL cells, a human anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line, both of which were established in our laboratory. The N-glycosylation inhibitor, tunicamycin (TM) inhibited the surface expression of Phaseolus vulgaris leukoagglutinating (L-PHA) lectin- and Canavalia ensiformis (ConA) lectin-reactive oligosaccharides in the HBL-8 cell line. Assay of the adhesion of HBL-8 cells to fibronectin showed that fibronectin adhesion is mediated by the integrin very late antigen (VLA)-4 and that not only BZ but also TM treatment enhanced HBL-8 cell adhesion to fibronectin. Furthermore, although BZ treatment also enhanced H-ALCL cell adhesion to fibronectin, this effect was not mediated by VLA-5 or the RGD sequence of fibronectin. We also showed that H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-3 was enhanced by pre-treatment with neuraminidase, which cleaves cell surface sialic acid. Additionally, H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-3 was inhibited by pre‑treatment with the RGD peptide suggesting that cell adhesion to galectin-3 is mediated by integrin (VLA-5). Furthermore, H-ALCL cell invasion of galectin-1 and galectin-3 was inhibited by pre-treatment with the RGD peptide. Therefore, cell adhesion to and invasion of galectin-1 and galectin-3 are integrin-dependent. In addition to these findings, cell adhesion to galectin-3 was markedly inhibited by treatment with β-lactose compared to treatment with sucrose. Therefore, interactions between integrins and galectin-3 may be mediated through β-galactose that is linked to glycans of integrins. AZA1, an inhibitor of Ras homolog oncoprotein (Rho) GTPase family proteins, RAS-related C3 botulinus toxin substrate 1 (Rac 1) and Cell division control protein 42 homolog (Cdc42) markedly inhibited cell invasion of galectin-1 and galectin-3 suggesting that Rac 1 and Cdc42 may be involved in the regulation of H-ALCL cell invasion of galectins. In conclusion, artificial modification of cell surface glycosylation revealed the biological roles of glycosylation in the adhesion to and invasion of the extracellular matrix (ECM) by human malignant lymphoma cell lines. These findings will provide new insight into the glycobiology of human malignant lymphoma. PMID:26497328

  8. Evaluation of discoidin domain receptor-2 (DDR2) expression level in normal, benign, and malignant human prostate tissues

    PubMed Central

    Azemikhah, Mitra; Ashtiani, Hamidreza Ahmadi; Aghaei, Mahmoud; Rastegar, Hosein

    2015-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor (DDR) is a new member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family. There are two isoforms of discoidin domain receptor (DDR), DDR1 and DDR2. These receptors play a major role in the adhesion, motility and cell proliferation. Due to the important role of DDR2 in the development of tumor extension, this receptor is pivotal in the field of carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the mRNA and protein expression of DDR2, in the malignant, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and normal tissues of patients with prostate cancer. In this study the gene and protein expression of DDR2 in adjacent normal (n=40), BPH (n=40), and malignant (n=40) prostate tissue were measured using real-time PCR and Western blotting. Then, the correlation of DDR2 gene and protein expression with prognostic factors such as age, tumor grade, tumor stage, lymph node involvement, and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration were evaluated. The relative mRNA and protein expression level of DDR2 in malignant and benign prostate tissue was significantly higher than those of adjacent normal tissues (P<0.01). This expression was found to increase approximately 3.5 and 2.1 fold for mRNA and protein levels, respectively. Spearman test indicated a significant correlation between DDR2 mRNA and protein expression with prognostic factors such as tumor grade, stage, lymph node involvement, and serum PSA concentration. However, significant correlation with age was not observed. These findings suggest that DDR2 is a cancer-related gene associated with the aggressive progression of prostate cancer patients. PMID:26600862

  9. Evaluation of discoidin domain receptor-2 (DDR2) expression level in normal, benign, and malignant human prostate tissues.

    PubMed

    Azemikhah, Mitra; Ashtiani, Hamidreza Ahmadi; Aghaei, Mahmoud; Rastegar, Hosein

    2015-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor (DDR) is a new member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family. There are two isoforms of discoidin domain receptor (DDR), DDR1 and DDR2. These receptors play a major role in the adhesion, motility and cell proliferation. Due to the important role of DDR2 in the development of tumor extension, this receptor is pivotal in the field of carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the mRNA and protein expression of DDR2, in the malignant, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and normal tissues of patients with prostate cancer. In this study the gene and protein expression of DDR2 in adjacent normal (n=40), BPH (n=40), and malignant (n=40) prostate tissue were measured using real-time PCR and Western blotting. Then, the correlation of DDR2 gene and protein expression with prognostic factors such as age, tumor grade, tumor stage, lymph node involvement, and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration were evaluated. The relative mRNA and protein expression level of DDR2 in malignant and benign prostate tissue was significantly higher than those of adjacent normal tissues (P<0.01). This expression was found to increase approximately 3.5 and 2.1 fold for mRNA and protein levels, respectively. Spearman test indicated a significant correlation between DDR2 mRNA and protein expression with prognostic factors such as tumor grade, stage, lymph node involvement, and serum PSA concentration. However, significant correlation with age was not observed. These findings suggest that DDR2 is a cancer-related gene associated with the aggressive progression of prostate cancer patients. PMID:26600862

  10. Oroxylin A induces autophagy in human malignant glioma cells via the mTOR-STAT3-Notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zou, Meijuan; Hu, Chen; You, Qidong; Zhang, Aixia; Wang, Xuerong; Guo, Qinglong

    2015-11-01

    Autophagy is a tightly-regulated catabolic pathway involving degradation of cellular proteins, cytoplasm and organelles. Recent evidence suggests that autophagy plays a potential role in cell death as a tumor suppressor and that its induction especially in combination with apoptosis could be beneficial. It remains unclear if all cancer cells behave the same mechanism when autophagy is induced. Although mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is well known as a negative regulator of autophagy, the relationship between signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and autophagy has not yet been investigated. Oroxylin A, a natural mono-flavonoid extracted from Scutellariae radix, is a promising therapeutic agent for treating multiple cancers. Here we investigated the mechanism underlying the effect of oroxylin A on malignant glioma cells. We showed that oroxylin A inhibited the proliferation of malignant glioma cells by inducing autophagy in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Oroxylin A treatment inhibits the AKT and ERK activation and the downstream phosphorylation level of mTOR and STAT3. In addition, oroxylin A treatment decreases the expression of Notch-1 and myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) but upregulates Beclin 1, the key autophagy-related protein. 3-MA (autophagy inhibitor) or knockdown of Beclin 1 partially can rescue cells from oroxylin A-induced autophagic cell death. In contrast, knockdown of STAT3 aggravates oroxylin A-induced autophagic cell death. Our data reveal an important role of autophagy in enhancing cell death induced by oroxylin A and conclude that oroxylin A exerts anti-malignant glioma proficiency by inducing autophagy via the ERK/AKT-mTOR-STAT3-Notch signaling cascade. PMID:25213258

  11. The status of the art of human malignant glioma management: the promising role of targeting tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Florio, Tullio; Barbieri, Federica

    2012-10-01

    Glioblastoma is the most prevalent and malignant form of brain cancer, but the current available multimodality treatments yield poor survival improvement. Thus, innovative therapeutic strategies represent the challenging topic for glioblastoma management. Multidisciplinary advances, supporting current standard of care therapies and investigational trials that reveal potential drug targets for glioblastoma are reviewed. A radical change in glioblastoma therapeutic approaches could arise from the identification of cancer stem cells, putative tumor-initiating cells involved in tumor initiation, progression and resistance, as innovative drug target. Still controversial identification of markers and molecular regulators in glioma tumor-initiating cells and novel approaches targeting these cells are discussed. PMID:22704957

  12. [Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma].

    PubMed

    Scripcariu, V; Dajbog, Elena; Lefter, L; Ferariu, D; Pricop, Adriana; Grigoraş, M; Dragomir, Cr

    2006-01-01

    Mesothelioma is a neoplasm originating from the mesothelial surface lining cells of the serous human cavities. It may involve the pleura, less frequently the peritoneum rarely, the pericardium, the tunica vaginalis testis and ovarian epithelium. Asbestos has been widely used in industry. A causal relationship between asbestos exposure and pleural, peritoneal and pericardial malign mesothelioma was suggested, the risk of cancer being correlated to cumulate exposure. Studies from National Cancer Institute, USA, show that the malignant mesothelioma is a rare and aggressive asbestos related malignancy. The symptomatology is insidious and poses difficult problems in diagnosis and treatment. This paper presents the case of a 59 year old patient with malignant peritoneal mesothelioma who worked almost 40 years as an electrician, exposed to asbestos fibers. He was hospitalized for important weight loss, abdominal pain and tiredness being diagnosed after imaging tests with a giant tumor, localized at the abdominal upper level, which seems to originate from the spleen's superior pole. During surgery we discovered a tumor with cystic parts, intense vascularized, which turn to be adherent in the upper side to the lower face of the left midriff cupola, to the spleen superior pole and 1/3 middle level of the great gastric curve. It was performed surgical ablation of the tumor, splenectomy with favorable postoperative evolution, the patient being now under chemotherapy treatment. PMID:17283842

  13. Inhibition of malignant phenotypes of human osteosarcoma cells by a gene silencer, a pyrrole-imidazole polyamide, which targets an E-box motif.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masashi; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Nakai, Yuji; Ozaki, Toshinori; Koshikawa, Nobuko; Toshio, Kojima; Kataba, Motoaki; Oguni, Asako; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Yukihiro; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Fukuda, Noboru; Ueno, Takahiro; Soma, Masayoshi; Nagase, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Gene amplification and/or overexpression of the transcription factor c-MYC, which binds to the E-box sequence (5'-CACGTG-3'), has been observed in many human tumors. In this study, we have designed 5 pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamides recognizing E-box, and found that, among them, Myc-6 significantly suppresses malignant phenotypes of human osteosarcoma MG63 cells both in vitro and in vivo. Intriguingly, knockdown of the putative Myc-6 target MALAT1 encoding long noncoding RNA remarkably impaired cell growth of MG63 cells. Collectively, our present findings strongly suggest that Myc-6 exerts its tumor-suppressive ability at least in part through the specific down-regulation of MALAT1. PMID:24918046

  14. Homozygous mutation of MTPAP causes cellular radiosensitivity and persistent DNA double-strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Martin, N T; Nakamura, K; Paila, U; Woo, J; Brown, C; Wright, J A; Teraoka, S N; Haghayegh, S; McCurdy, D; Schneider, M; Hu, H; Quinlan, A R; Gatti, R A; Concannon, P

    2014-01-01

    The study of rare human syndromes characterized by radiosensitivity has been instrumental in identifying novel proteins and pathways involved in DNA damage responses to ionizing radiation. In the present study, a mutation in mitochondrial poly-A-polymerase (MTPAP), not previously recognized for its role in the DNA damage response, was identified by exome sequencing and subsequently associated with cellular radiosensitivity. Cell lines derived from two patients with the homozygous MTPAP missense mutation were radiosensitive, and this radiosensitivity could be abrogated by transfection of wild-type mtPAP cDNA into mtPAP-deficient cell lines. Further analysis of the cellular phenotype revealed delayed DNA repair, increased levels of DNA double-strand breaks, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), and increased cell death after irradiation (IR). Pre-IR treatment of cells with the potent anti-oxidants, α-lipoic acid and n-acetylcysteine, was sufficient to abrogate the DNA repair and clonogenic survival defects. Our results firmly establish that mutation of the MTPAP gene results in a cellular phenotype of increased DNA damage, reduced repair kinetics, increased cell death by apoptosis, and reduced clonogenic survival after exposure to ionizing radiation, suggesting a pathogenesis that involves the disruption of ROS homeostasis. PMID:24651433

  15. Genetics and biology of human ovarian teratomas. III. Cytogenetics and origins of malignant ovarian germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Hoffner, L; Shen-Schwarz, S; Deka, R; Chakravarti, A; Surti, U

    1992-08-01

    This report presents cytogenetic data on three cases of malignant ovarian germ cell tumors. All were diagnosed as malignant teratoma; case 1 with yolk sac elements; case 2 with elements of endodermal sinus tumor, embryonal carcinoma, and choriocarcinoma; and case 3 with yolk sac elements and embryonal carcinoma. Metaphase cells from each tumor, and normal tissue from the host, were karyotyped and scored for centromeric heteromorphisms in an attempt to determine the mechanism of origin. The karyotypes were 79,XXX,+1,+3,-6,+8,+12,+14,-15,+17, +20,+21,+22;49,XX,+8,+12,+22; and 48,XX,+3,+14, respectively. The analysis of centromeric heteromorphisms and DNA fingerprints of host and teratoma using the M13 probe revealed that one case originated from a germ cell before the first meiotic division. Normal host tissue was not available in case 2, but several centromeric markers were heterozygous in the tumor, indicating either meiosis I error or complete failure of germ cell meiosis. In the third case the centromeric heteromorphisms that were heterozygous in the host appeared to be homozygous for certain chromosomes and heterozygous for others in the tumor. These results suggest that germ cell teratomas could arise by the fusion of two ova. PMID:1521236

  16. Malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Chan

    2012-11-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is an uncommon, life-threatening pharmacogenetic disorder of the skeletal muscle. It presents as a hypermetabolic response in susceptible individuals to potent volatile anesthetics with/without depolarizing muscle relaxants; in rare cases, to stress from exertion or heat stress. Susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia (MHS) is inherited as an autosomally dominant trait with variable expression and incomplete penetrance. It is known that the pathophysiology of MH is related to an uncontrolled rise of myoplasmic calcium, which activates biochemical processes resulting in hypermetabolism of the skeletal muscle. In most cases, defects in the ryanodine receptor are responsible for the functional changes of calcium regulation in MH, and more than 300 mutations have been identified in the RYR1 gene, located on chromosome 19q13.1. The classic signs of MH include increase of end-tidal carbon dioxide, tachycardia, skeletal muscle rigidity, tachycardia, hyperthermia and acidosis. Up to now, muscle contracture test is regarded as the gold standard for the diagnosis of MHS though molecular genetic test is used, on a limited basis so far to diagnose MHS. The mortality of MH is dramatically decreased from 70-80% to less than 5%, due to an introduction of dantrolene sodium for treatment of MH, early detection of MH episode using capnography, and the introduction of diagnostic testing for MHS. This review summarizes the clinically essential and important knowledge of MH, and presents new developments in the field. PMID:23198031

  17. Targeting the AKT pathway: Repositioning HIV protease inhibitors as radiosensitizers

    PubMed Central

    Goda, Jayant S.; Pachpor, Tejaswini; Basu, Trinanjan; Chopra, Supriya; Gota, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Cellular resistance in tumour cells to different therapeutic approaches has been a limiting factor in the curative treatment of cancer. Resistance to therapeutic radiation is a common phenomenon which significantly reduces treatment options and impacts survival. One of the mechanisms of acquiring resistance to ionizing radiation is the overexpression or activation of various oncogenes like the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), RAS (rat sarcoma) oncogene or loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue) which in turn activates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3-K)/AKT pathway responsible for radiation resistance in various tumours. Blocking the pathway enhances the radiation response both in vitro and in vivo. Due to the differential activation of this pathway (constitutively activated in tumour cells and not in the normal host cells), it is an excellent candidate target for molecular targeted therapy to enhance radiation sensitivity. In this regard, HIV protease inhibitors (HPIs) known to interfere with PI3-K/AKT signaling in tumour cells, have been shown to sensitize various tumour cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo. As a result, HPIs are now being investigated as possible radiosensitizers along with various chemotherapeutic drugs. This review describes the mechanisms by which PI3-K/AKT pathway causes radioresistance and the role of HIV protease inhibitors especially nelfinavir as a potential candidate drug to target the AKT pathway for overcoming radioresistance and its use in various clinical trials for different malignancies. PMID:27121513

  18. RRx-001, A novel dinitroazetidine radiosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Ning, Shoucheng; Peehl, Donna; Oronsky, Arnold; Cabrales, Pedro; Bednarski, Mark; Knox, Susan

    2016-06-01

    The 'holy grail' in radiation oncology is to improve the outcome of radiation therapy (RT) with a radiosensitizer-a systemic chemical/biochemical agent that additively or synergistically sensitizes tumor cells to radiation in the absence of significant toxicity. Similar to the oxygen effect, in which DNA bases modified by reactive oxygen species prevent repair of the cellular radiation damage, these compounds in general magnify free radical formation, leading to the permanent "fixation" of the resultant chemical change in the DNA structure. The purpose of this review is to present the origin story of the radiosensitizer, RRx-001, which emerged from the aerospace industry. The activity of RRx-001 as a chemosensitizer in multiple tumor types and disease states including malaria, hemorrhagic shock and sickle cell anemia, are the subject of future reviews. PMID:26841903

  19. Identification of a cDNA encoding a parathyroid hormone-like peptide from a human tumor associated with humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Mangin, M.; Webb, A.C.; Dreyer, B.E.; Posillico, J.T.; Ikeda, K.; Weir, E.C.; Stewart, A.F.; Bander, N.H.; Milstone, L.; Barton, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy is a common paraneoplastic syndrome that appears to be mediated in many instances by a parathyroid hormone-like peptide. Poly(A)/sup +/ RNA from a human renal carcinoma associated with this syndrome was enriched by preparative electrophoresis and used to construct an enriched cDNA library in phage lambdagt10. The library was screened with a codon-preference oligonucleotide synthesized on the basis of a partial N-terminal amino acid sequence from a human tumor-derived peptide, and a 2.0 kilo-base cDNA was identified. The cDNA encodes a 177 amino acid protein consisting of a 36 amino acid leader sequence and a 141 amino acid mature peptide. The first 13 amino acids of the deduced sequence of the mature peptide display strong homology to human PTH, with complete divergence thereafter. RNA blot-hybridization analysis revealed multiple transcripts in mRNA from tumors associated with the humor syndrome and also in mRNA from normal human keratinocytes. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA from humans and rodents revealed a simple pattern compatible with a single-copy gene. The gene has been mapped to chromosome 12.

  20. Daily rhythms of radiosensitivity of animals and several determining causes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druzhinin, Y. P.; Malyutina, T. S.; Seraya, V. M.; Rodina, G. P.; Vatsek, A.; Rakova, A.

    1974-01-01

    Daily rhythms of radiosensitivity in rats and mice were determined by survival rates after acute total radiation at the same dosage at different times of the day. Radiosensitivity differed in animals of different species and varieties. Inbred mice exhibited one or two increases in radiosensitivity during the dark, active period of the day. These effects were attributed to periodic changes in the state of stem hematopoietic cells.

  1. Involvement of p53 mutation and mismatch repair proteins dysregulation in NNK-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying; Zhang, Shuilian; Huang, Xiaobin; Chen, Kailin; Shen, Jing; Wang, Zhengyang

    2014-01-01

    Genome integrity is essential for normal cellular functions and cell survival. Its instability can cause genetic aberrations and is considered as a hallmark of most cancers. To investigate the carcinogenesis process induced by tobacco-specific carcinogen NNK, we studied the dynamic changes of two important protectors of genome integrity, p53 and MMR system, in malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells after NNK exposure. Our results showed that the expression of MLH1, one of the important MMR proteins, was decreased early and maintained the downregulation during the transformation in a histone modification involved and DNA methylation-independent manner. Another MMR protein PMS2 also displayed a declined expression while being in a later stage of transformation. Moreover, we conducted p53 mutation analysis and revealed a mutation at codon 273 which led to the replacement of arginine by histidine. With the mutation, DNA damage-induced activation of p53 was significantly impaired. We further reintroduced the wild-type p53 into the transformed cells, and the malignant proliferation can be abrogated by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These findings indicate that p53 and MMR system play an important role in the initiation and progression of NNK-induced transformation, and p53 could be a potential therapeutic target for tobacco-related cancers. PMID:25215298

  2. Non-AIDS definings malignancies among human immunodeficiency virus-positive subjects: Epidemiology and outcome after two decades of HAART era.

    PubMed

    Brugnaro, Pierluigi; Morelli, Erika; Cattelan, Francesca; Petrucci, Andrea; Panese, Sandro; Eseme, Franklyn; Cavinato, Francesca; Barelli, Andrea; Raise, Enzo

    2015-08-12

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been widely available in industrialized countries since 1996; its widespread use determined a dramatic decline in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related mortality, and consequently, a significant decrease of AIDS-defining cancers. However the increased mean age of HIV-infected patients, prolonged exposure to environmental and lifestyle cancer risk factors, and coinfection with oncogenic viruses contributed to the emergence of other malignancies that are considered non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADCs) as a relevant fraction of morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected people twenty years after HAART introduction. The role of immunosuppression in the pathogenesis of NADCs is not well defined, and future researches should investigate the etiology of NADCs. In the last years there is a growing evidence that intensive chemotherapy regimens and radiotherapy could be safely administrated to HIV-positive patients while continuing HAART. This requires a multidisciplinary approach and a close co-operation of oncologists and HIV-physicians in order to best manage compliance of patients to treatment and to face drug-related side effects. Here we review the main epidemiological features, risk factors and clinical behavior of the more common NADCs, such as lung cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal cancer and anal cancer, Hodgkin's lymphoma and some cutaneous malignancies, focusing also on the current therapeutic approaches and preventive screening strategies. PMID:26279983

  3. Artemether Combined with shRNA Interference of Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Significantly Inhibited the Malignant Biological Behavior of Human Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Xue, Yi-Xue; Yao, Yi-Long; Yu, Bo; Liu, Yun-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Artemether is the derivative extracted from Chinese traditional herb and originally used for malaria. Artemether also has potential therapeutic effects against tumors. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) is an important cell surface adhesion molecule associated with malignancy of gliomas. In this work, we investigated the role and mechanism of artemether combined with shRNA interference of VCAM-1 (shRNA-VCAM-1) on the migration, invasion and apoptosis of glioma cells. U87 human glioma cells were treated with artemether at various concentrations and shRNA interfering technology was employed to silence the expression of VCAM-1. Cell viability, migration, invasiveness and apoptosis were assessed with MTT, wound healing, Transwell and Annexin V-FITC/PI staining. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) was checked by Western blot assay. Results showed that artemether and shRNA-VCAM-1 not only significantly inhibited the migration, invasiveness and expression of MMP-2/9 and p-Akt, but also promoted the apoptosis of U87 cells. Combined treatment of both displayed the maximum inhibitory effects on the malignant biological behavior of glioma cells. Our work revealed the potential therapeutic effects of artemether and antiVCAM-1 in the treatments of gliomas. PMID:23593320

  4. Alterations in vitamin D signaling pathway in gastric cancer progression: a study of vitamin D receptor expression in human normal, premalignant, and malignant gastric tissue

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yanghui; Da, Mingxu; Zhang, Yongbin; Peng, Lingzhi; Yao, Jibin; Duan, Yaoxing

    2015-01-01

    Amount of studies in cells and animal models have proved vitamin D has multifarious antitumor effects. However, epidemiological studies showed inconsistent result on gastric cancer. The antitumor role is mainly mediated by the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Our hypothesis is that VDR may be abnormally (poorly) expressed in gastric cancer tissue. Present study is aimed at discovering and analyzing VDR expression in a series of human gastric tissues, including normal, premalignant, and malignant gastric tissue, and correlated VDR to the clinicopathological parameters of gastric cancer patients. VDR expression was detected by immunohistochemistry. The χ2 test was used to analyze the VDR expression as well as the relationship between VDR and the clinicopathological factors of gastric cancer patients. Compared with normal (82.61%) and premalignant tissues (73.64%), VDR was lower expressed in cancer tissues (57.61%), with a statistically significant difference (P = 0.001). Among cancer tissues, VDR was higher expressed in well and moderate differentiated tissues contrasted with tissues with poor differentiation, and higher expressed in small tumors (< 5 cm) compared with large tumors (≥ 5 cm), with a statistically significant difference respectively (P = 0.016, P = 0.009). A decline linear trend appeared when analyzing the statistical difference of VDR expression among normal, premalignant, and malignant gastric tissues. VDR expression has been on the decline from the premalignant stage, finally low expressed in gastric cancer tissues, especial in poorly differentiated tissues. VDR could be a potential prognostic factor for patients with gastric cancer. PMID:26722516

  5. Non-AIDS definings malignancies among human immunodeficiency virus-positive subjects: Epidemiology and outcome after two decades of HAART era

    PubMed Central

    Brugnaro, Pierluigi; Morelli, Erika; Cattelan, Francesca; Petrucci, Andrea; Panese, Sandro; Eseme, Franklyn; Cavinato, Francesca; Barelli, Andrea; Raise, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been widely available in industrialized countries since 1996; its widespread use determined a dramatic decline in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related mortality, and consequently, a significant decrease of AIDS-defining cancers. However the increased mean age of HIV-infected patients, prolonged exposure to environmental and lifestyle cancer risk factors, and coinfection with oncogenic viruses contributed to the emergence of other malignancies that are considered non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADCs) as a relevant fraction of morbidity and mortality among HIV-infected people twenty years after HAART introduction. The role of immunosuppression in the pathogenesis of NADCs is not well defined, and future researches should investigate the etiology of NADCs. In the last years there is a growing evidence that intensive chemotherapy regimens and radiotherapy could be safely administrated to HIV-positive patients while continuing HAART. This requires a multidisciplinary approach and a close co-operation of oncologists and HIV-physicians in order to best manage compliance of patients to treatment and to face drug-related side effects. Here we review the main epidemiological features, risk factors and clinical behavior of the more common NADCs, such as lung cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal cancer and anal cancer, Hodgkin’s lymphoma and some cutaneous malignancies, focusing also on the current therapeutic approaches and preventive screening strategies. PMID:26279983

  6. Malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Bandschapp, Oliver; Girard, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a subclinical myopathy, usually triggered by volatile anaesthetics and depolarising muscle relaxants. Clinical symptoms are variable, and the condition is sometimes difficult to identify. Nevertheless, rapid recognition and specific as well as symptomatic treatment are crucial to avoid a lethal outcome. Molecular genetic investigations have confirmed the skeletal muscle type ryanodine receptor to be the major MH locus with more than 70% of MH families carrying a mutation in this gene. There is no screening method to test for MH, as current tests are invasive (open muscle biopsy) or restricted to MH families with known MH-associated mutations (molecular genetic testing). The prevalence of the MH trait is unknown, because the clinical penetrance after contact with triggering agents is very variable. More recently, MH mutations have been associated with rhabdomyolysis following statin therapy or with non-pharmacological triggering, such as exertional heat stroke. PMID:22851008

  7. Characterization of cancer stem cell properties of CD24 and CD26-positive human malignant mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Hiroto; Naito, Motohiko; Ghani, Farhana Ishrat; Dang, Nam H.; Morimoto, Chikao

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We focused on CD24 and CD26 for further analysis of CSC properties in MM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Their expressions were correlated with chemoresistance, cell growth, and invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Their expressions were also correlated with several cancer related genes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression of each marker was correlated with different CSC property in Meso1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation of ERK by EGF was regulated by expression of CD26, but not CD24. -- Abstract: Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an asbestos-related malignancy characterized by rapid growth and poor prognosis. In our previous study, we have demonstrated that several cancer stem cell (CSC) markers correlated with CSC properties in MM cells. Among these markers, we focused on two: CD24, the common CSC marker, and CD26, the additional CSC marker. We further analyzed the CSC properties of CD24 and CD26-positve MM cells. We established RNAi-knockdown cells and found that these markers were significantly correlated with chemoresistance, proliferation, and invasion potentials in vitro. Interestingly, while Meso-1 cells expressed both CD24 and CD26, the presence of each of these two markers was correlated with different CSC property. In addition, downstream signaling of these markers was explored by microarray analysis, which revealed that their expressions were correlated with several cancer-related genes. Furthermore, phosphorylation of ERK by EGF stimulation was significantly affected by the expression of CD26, but not CD24. These results suggest that CD24 and CD26 differentially regulate the CSC potentials of MM and could be promising targets for CSC-oriented therapy.

  8. Genotype analysis of the human endostatin variant p.D104N in benign and malignant adrenocortical tumors

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Mariani, Beatriz Marinho; Trarbach, Ericka Barbosa; Ribeiro, Tamaya Castro; Pereira, Maria Adelaide Albergaria; Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho; Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson Villares

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Endostatin is a potent endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis. It is derived from the proteolytic cleavage of collagen XVIII, which is encoded by the COL18A1 gene. A polymorphic COL18A1 allele encoding the functional polymorphism p.D104N impairs the activity of endostatin, resulting in a decreased ability to inhibit angiogenesis. This polymorphism has been previously analyzed in many types of cancer and has been considered a phenotype modulator in some benign and malignant tumors. However, these data are controversial, and different results have been reported for the same tumor types, such as prostate and breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to genotype the p.D104N variant in a cohort of pediatric and adult patients with adrenocortical tumors and to determine its possible association with the biological behavior of adrenocortical tumors. METHODS: DNA samples were obtained from 38 pediatric and 56 adult patients (0.675 yrs) with adrenocortical tumors. The DNA samples were obtained from peripheral blood, frozen tissue or paraffin-embedded tumor blocks when blood samples or fresh frozen tissue samples were unavailable. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to genotype the patients and 150 controls. The potential associations of the p.D104N polymorphism with clinical and histopathological features and oncologic outcome (age of onset, tumor size, malignant tumor behavior, and clinical syndrome) were analyzed. RESULTS: Both the patient group and the control group were in HardyWeinberg equilibrium. The frequencies of the p.D104N polymorphism in the patient group were 81.9% (DD), 15.9% (DN) and 2.2% (NN). In the controls, these frequencies were 80.6%, 17.3% and 2.0%, respectively. We did not observe any association of this variant with clinical or histopathological features or oncologic outcome in our cohort of pediatric and adult patients with adrenocortical tumors. PMID:22358232

  9. Malignant mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Ahmed Tipu, Salman; Ishtiaq, Sundas

    2013-01-01

    Malignant Mesothelioma (MM) is a rare but rapidly fatal and aggressive tumor of the pleura and peritoneum with limited knowledge of its natural history. The incidence has increased in the past two decades but still it is a rare tumor. Etiology of all forms of mesothelioma is strongly associated with industrial pollutants, of which asbestos is the principal carcinogen. Mesothelioma is an insidious neoplasm arising from mesothelial surfaces i.e., pleura (65%-70%), peritoneum (30%), tunica vaginalis testis, and pericardium (1%-2%). The diagnosis of peritoneal and Pleural mesothelioma is often delayed, due to a long latent period between onset and symptoms and the common and nonspecific clinical presentation. The definite diagnosis can only be established by diagnostic laparoscopy or open surgery along with biopsy to obtain histological examination and immunocytochemical analysis. Different treatment options are available but Surgery can achieve a complete or incomplete resection and Radical resection is the preferred treatment. Chemotherapy has an important role in palliative treatment. Photodynamic therapy is also an option under trial. Patients who successfully underwent surgical resection had a considerably longer median survival as well as a significantly higher 5-year survival. Source of Data/Study Selection: The data were collected from case reports, cross-sectional studies, Open-label studies and phase –II trials between 1973-2012. Data Extraction: Web sites and other online resources of American college of surgeons, Medline, NCBI and Medscape resource centers were used to extract data. Conclusion: Malignant Mesothelioma (MM) is a rare but rapidly fatal and aggressive tumor with limited knowledge of its natural history. The diagnosis of peritoneal and Pleural mesothelioma is often delayed, so level of index of suspicion must be kept high. PMID:24550969

  10. Malignant thymoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, L S; Huang, M H; Lin, T S; Huang, B S; Chien, K Y

    1992-07-15

    Sixty-one patients underwent operations for malignant thymomas between 1961 and 1989. Twenty-three patients had associated myasthenia gravis (MG), an incidence of 37.7%. Upon being admitted to the hospital, the patients' most common symptoms included chest pain, MG, cough, and dyspnea. Only 7 of 61 (11.5%) patients had no symptom. Tumor staging of 58 patients with invasive thymomas was performed according to Masaoka classification. The patients were classified as follows: Stage II disease, 5; Stage III, 41; Stage IVa, 8; and Stage IVb, 4. In addition, thymic carcinoma was present in three patients. The series had a resection rate of 55.7%. The incidence of operative complications was 16.3%. Only one patient died of myocardial infarction; the incidence of operative mortality was 1.6%. The patients with MG had a higher rate of resection (69.6%) and a higher incidence of complete thymectomy (14 of 23 patients; 60.9%). Mixed lymphoepithelial tumors and epithelial cell predominant tumors were the most frequent histologic patterns (45.9% and 34.4%, respectively). Fifty-two patients had postoperative radiation therapy, and 10 patients had chemotherapy. The overall cumulative survival rates in the series were 59% and 34% at 5 and 10 years, respectively. The results demonstrated that the factors affecting the prognosis may include resectability, postoperative irradiation or chemotherapy, MG, and tumor staging. The influence of histologic variation on survival rates could not be clearly defined in the series. Surgical resection, particularly complete thymectomy, followed by irradiation is the primary option of therapeutic management for malignant thymoma. PMID:1617594

  11. The Origin of Malignant Malaria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasmodium falciparum is the causative agent of malignant malaria, which is among the most severe human infectious diseases. Despite its overwhelming significance to human health, the parasite’s origins remain unclear. The favored origin hypothesis holds that P. falciparum and its closest known rel...

  12. [Aggressive behavior and radiosensitivity in rats'].

    PubMed

    Nadareishvili, K Sh; Todua, F T; Nikolaishvili, M M; Iordanishvili, G S; Ormotsadze, G L; Melitauri, N N; Nadareishvili, D K; Kazakhshvili, M R

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to present the study of rats' individual radiosensitivity dependence on their individual aggressiveness. On total irradiation in sublethal doses (1.0, 1.5 and 3.5 Gy) and in doses close to LD50/30 (6, 7 and 8 Gy) there was investigated comparative radiosensitivity of non-aggressive and aggressive rats of Wistar line, as well as that of non-aggressive individuals during provoked aggressiveness by means of blocking serotonin synthesis with intraperitoneal (i/p) injection of 400 mg/kg of parachlorphenylalanine (pCPA). Muricidity served as a criterion for aggressiveness and as a criterion of radiosensitivity--cumulative function of survival, the changes of behavior in "Open feald", serotonine and catecholamine content in various brain structures and the dose dependence on the radiation modification of muricidity. It has been found that after 1 Gy total X-irradiation the rats do not lose aggressiveness. Nevertheless the ethalogical parameters change in considerable degree. In the doses of 1.5 and 3.5 Gy muricidity is eluminated in 15-18 and 5-9 days, correspondingly. I/p injection of pCPA after the elimination of aggressiveness provokes transient muricidity in the same terms and duration as it is in case of non-aggressive rats. The elimination of muricidity is associated with changes in content and distribution of biogenic amines in various structures of brain, as well as with reduction of locomotor and reference-research activity, on the one hand and with an increase of emotionality and stereotype activity, on the other hand. After X-irradiation in 6, 7 and 8 Gy the regression coefficients of the dependence of functions type of survival on irradiation dose in aggressive rats is significantly reliable both in comparison with non-aggressive rats and animals with provoked aggressiveness. The change of mortality-rate per unit of changing irradiation dose not depend on blocking of serotonin synthesis, which deficit is one of the distinct determinant of aggressiveness, on the one hand, and higher radiosensitivity, on the other hand. The obtained data allow to suppose that elimination of muricidity after the irradiation of rats in the sublethal doses is conditioned not only by the consequenses of radiation damage of neurobiological structures responsible for the organization of aggressive behavior but the activation of serotonergic system in the process of restitution after radiation trauma. On the other hand, higher radiosensitivity of aggressive rats compared with non-aggressive ones is connected with low serotonin content, thiols and some other biologically active substances which are endogenous radioprotectors determining individual radioresistance. PMID:17953436

  13. Targeting Mcl-1 for Radiosensitization of Pancreatic Cancers12

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Dongping; Zhang, Qiang; Schreiber, Jason S.; Parsels, Leslie A.; Abulwerdi, Fardokht A.; Kausar, Tasneem; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Sun, Yi; Nikolovska-Coleska, Zaneta; Morgan, Meredith A.

    2015-01-01

    In order to identify targets whose inhibition may enhance the efficacy of chemoradiation in pancreatic cancer, we previously conducted an RNAi library screen of 8,800 genes. We identified Mcl-1 (myeloid cell leukemia-1), an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, as a target for sensitizing pancreatic cancer cells to chemoradiation. In the present study we investigated Mcl-1 inhibition by either genetic or pharmacological approaches as a radiosensitizing strategy in pancreatic cancer cells. Mcl-1 depletion by siRNA produced significant radiosensitization in BxPC-3 and Panc-1 cells in association with Caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage, but only minimal radiosensitization in MiaPaCa-2 cells. We next tested the ability of the recently identified, selective, small molecule inhibitor of Mcl-1, UMI77, to radiosensitize in pancreatic cancer cells. UMI77 caused dissociation of Mcl-1 from the pro-apoptotic protein Bak and produced significant radiosensitization in BxPC-3 and Panc-1 cells, but minimal radiosensitization in MiaPaCa-2 cells. Radiosensitization by UMI77 was associated with Caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage. Importantly, UMI77 did not radiosensitize normal small intestinal cells. In contrast, ABT-737, an established inhibitor of Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bcl-w, failed to radiosensitize pancreatic cancer cells suggesting the unique importance of Mcl-1 relative to other Bcl-2 family members to radiation survival in pancreatic cancer cells. Taken together, these results validate Mcl-1 as a target for radiosensitization of pancreatic cancer cells and demonstrate the ability of small molecules which bind the canonical BH3 groove of Mcl-1, causing displacement of Mcl-1 from Bak, to selectively radiosensitize pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:25749177

  14. Luteolin inhibits Cr(VI)-induced malignant cell transformation of human lung epithelial cells by targeting ROS mediated multiple cell signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; Roy, Ram Vinod; Hitron, John Andrew; Wang, Lei; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Asha, Padmaja; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Yitao; Shi, Xianglin

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a well-known human carcinogen associated with the incidence of lung cancer. Inhibition of metal induced carcinogenesis by a dietary antioxidant is a novel approach. Luteolin, a natural dietary flavonoid found in fruits and vegetables, possesses potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. We found that short term exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to Cr(VI) (5 μM) showed a drastic increase in ROS generation, NADPH oxidase (NOX) activation, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione depletion, which were significantly inhibited by the treatment with luteolin in a dose dependent manner. Treatment with luteolin decreased AP-1, HIF-1α, COX-2, and iNOS promoter activity induced by Cr(VI) in BEAS-2B cells. In addition, luteolin protected BEAS-2B cells from malignant transformation induced by chronic Cr(VI) exposure. Moreover, luteolin also inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α) and VEGF in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Western blot analysis showed that luteolin inhibited multiple gene products linked to survival (Akt, Fak, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL), inflammation (MAPK, NF-κB, COX-2, STAT-3, iNOS, TNF-α) and angiogenesis (HIF-1α, VEGF, MMP-9) in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Nude mice injected with BEAS-2B cells chronically exposed to Cr(VI) in the presence of luteolin showed reduced tumor incidence compared to Cr(VI) alone treated group. Overexpression of catalase (CAT) or SOD2, eliminated Cr(VI)-induced malignant transformation. Overall, our results indicate that luteolin protects BEAS-2B cells from Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis by scavenging ROS and modulating multiple cell signaling mechanisms that are linked to ROS. Luteolin, therefore, serves as a potential chemopreventive agent against Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:25448439

  15. Exposure to the polyester PET precursor—terephthalic acid induces and perpetuates DNA damage-harboring non-malignant human breast cells

    PubMed Central

    Luciani-Torres, Maria Gloria; Moore, Dan H.; Dairkee, Shanaz H.

    2015-01-01

    Identification of early perturbations induced in cells from non-cancerous breast tissue is critical for understanding possible breast cancer risk from chemical exposure. We have demonstrated previously that exposure to the ubiquitous xenoestrogens, bisphenol A (BPA) and methyl paraben, promotes the hallmarks of cancer in non-malignant human high-risk donor breast epithelial cells (HRBECs) isolated from several donors. Here we show that terephthalic acid (TPA), a major chemical precursor of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) containers used for the storage of food and beverages, increased the ERα: ERβ ratio in multiple HRBEC samples, suggesting an estrogenic effect. Although, like BPA and methyl paraben, TPA also promoted resistance to tamoxifen-induced apoptosis, unlike these chemicals instead of inducing an increased S-phase fraction, TPA treatment arrested cell proliferation. DNA-PK, ATM and members of the MRN complex, known to be involved in DNA damage sensor and effector proteins, were elevated indicating induction of DNA strand breaks. Early DNA damage checkpoint response, mediated through p53/p21, led to G1 arrest in TPA-exposed cells. Removal of TPA from the growth medium resulted in the rapid induction of BCL2, increasing the ratio of anti-: pro-apoptotic proteins, together with overexpression of Cyclin A/CDK2 proteins. Consequently, despite elevated p53pSer15 and H2AXpSer139, indicating sustained DNA damage, TPA exposed cells resumed robust growth rates seen prior to TPA exposure. The propensity for the perpetuation of DNA aberrations that activate DNA damage pathways in non-malignant breast cells justifies careful consideration of human exposure to TPA, particularly at vulnerable life stages. PMID:25411358

  16. Exposure to the polyester PET precursor--terephthalic acid induces and perpetuates DNA damage-harboring non-malignant human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Luciani-Torres, Maria Gloria; Moore, Dan H; Goodson, William H; Dairkee, Shanaz H

    2015-01-01

    Identification of early perturbations induced in cells from non-cancerous breast tissue is critical for understanding possible breast cancer risk from chemical exposure. We have demonstrated previously that exposure to the ubiquitous xenoestrogens, bisphenol A (BPA) and methyl paraben, promotes the hallmarks of cancer in non-malignant human high-risk donor breast epithelial cells (HRBECs) isolated from several donors. Here we show that terephthalic acid (TPA), a major chemical precursor of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) containers used for the storage of food and beverages, increased the ERα: ERβ ratio in multiple HRBEC samples, suggesting an estrogenic effect. Although, like BPA and methyl paraben, TPA also promoted resistance to tamoxifen-induced apoptosis, unlike these chemicals instead of inducing an increased S-phase fraction, TPA treatment arrested cell proliferation. DNA-PK, ATM and members of the MRN complex, known to be involved in DNA damage sensor and effector proteins, were elevated indicating induction of DNA strand breaks. Early DNA damage checkpoint response, mediated through p53/p21, led to G1 arrest in TPA-exposed cells. Removal of TPA from the growth medium resulted in the rapid induction of BCL2, increasing the ratio of anti-: pro-apoptotic proteins, together with overexpression of Cyclin A/CDK2 proteins. Consequently, despite elevated p53(pSer15) and H2AX(pSer139), indicating sustained DNA damage, TPA exposed cells resumed robust growth rates seen prior to TPA exposure. The propensity for the perpetuation of DNA aberrations that activate DNA damage pathways in non-malignant breast cells justifies careful consideration of human exposure to TPA, particularly at vulnerable life stages. PMID:25411358

  17. Molecular events contributing to cell death in malignant human hematopoietic cells elicited by an IgG3-avidin fusion protein targeting the transferrin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Patrick P.; Helguera, Gustavo; Daniels, Tracy R.; Lomas, Simon Z.; Rodriguez, Jose A.; Schiller, Gary; Bonavida, Benjamin; Morrison, Sherie L.; Penichet, Manuel L.

    2006-01-01

    We have previously reported that an anti-human transferrin receptor IgG3-avidin fusion protein (anti-hTfR IgG3-Av) inhibits the proliferation of an erythroleukemia-cell line. We have now found that anti-hTfR IgG3-Av also inhibits the proliferation of additional human malignant B and plasma cells. Anti-hTfR IgG3-Av induces internalization and rapid degradation of the TfR. These events can be reproduced in cells treated with anti-hTfR IgG3 cross-linked with a secondary Ab, suggesting that they result from increased TfR cross-linking. Confocal microscopy of cells treated with anti-hTfR IgG3-Av shows that the TfR is directed to an intracellular compartment expressing the lysosomal marker LAMP-1. The degradation of TfR is partially blocked by cysteine protease inhibitors. Furthermore, cells treated with anti-hTfR IgG3-Av exhibit mitochondrial depolarization and activation of caspases 9, 8, and 3. The mitochondrial damage and cell death can be prevented by iron supplementation, but cannot be fully blocked by a pan-caspase inhibitor. These results suggest that anti-hTfR IgG3-Av induces lethal iron deprivation, but the resulting cell death does not solely depend on caspase activation. This report provides insights into the mechanism of cell death induced by anti-TfR Abs such as anti-hTfR IgG3-Av, a molecule that may be useful in the treatment of B-cell malignancies such as multiple myeloma. PMID:16804109

  18. Luteolin inhibits Cr(VI)-induced malignant cell transformation of human lung epithelial cells by targeting ROS mediated multiple cell signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; Roy, Ram Vinod; Hitron, John Andrew; Wang, Lei; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Asha, Padmaja; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Yitao; Shi, Xianglin

    2014-12-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a well-known human carcinogen associated with the incidence of lung cancer. Inhibition of metal induced carcinogenesis by a dietary antioxidant is a novel approach. Luteolin, a natural dietary flavonoid found in fruits and vegetables, possesses potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. We found that short term exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to Cr(VI) (5μM) showed a drastic increase in ROS generation, NADPH oxidase (NOX) activation, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione depletion, which were significantly inhibited by the treatment with luteolin in a dose dependent manner. Treatment with luteolin decreased AP-1, HIF-1α, COX-2, and iNOS promoter activity induced by Cr(VI) in BEAS-2B cells. In addition, luteolin protected BEAS-2B cells from malignant transformation induced by chronic Cr(VI) exposure. Moreover, luteolin also inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α) and VEGF in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Western blot analysis showed that luteolin inhibited multiple gene products linked to survival (Akt, Fak, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL), inflammation (MAPK, NF-κB, COX-2, STAT-3, iNOS, TNF-α) and angiogenesis (HIF-1α, VEGF, MMP-9) in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Nude mice injected with BEAS-2B cells chronically exposed to Cr(VI) in the presence of luteolin showed reduced tumor incidence compared to Cr(VI) alone treated group. Overexpression of catalase (CAT) or SOD2, eliminated Cr(VI)-induced malignant transformation. Overall, our results indicate that luteolin protects BEAS-2B cells from Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis by scavenging ROS and modulating multiple cell signaling mechanisms that are linked to ROS. Luteolin, therefore, serves as a potential chemopreventive agent against Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:25448439

  19. Luteolin inhibits Cr(VI)-induced malignant cell transformation of human lung epithelial cells by targeting ROS mediated multiple cell signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Young-Ok; Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; Roy, Ram Vinod; Hitron, John Andrew; Wang, Lei; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Asha, Padmaja; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Yitao; Shi, Xianglin

    2014-12-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a well-known human carcinogen associated with the incidence of lung cancer. Inhibition of metal induced carcinogenesis by a dietary antioxidant is a novel approach. Luteolin, a natural dietary flavonoid found in fruits and vegetables, possesses potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. We found that short term exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) to Cr(VI) (5 μM) showed a drastic increase in ROS generation, NADPH oxidase (NOX) activation, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione depletion, which were significantly inhibited by the treatment with luteolin in a dose dependent manner. Treatment with luteolin decreased AP-1, HIF-1α, COX-2, and iNOS promoter activity induced by Cr(VI) in BEAS-2B cells. In addition, luteolin protected BEAS-2B cells from malignant transformation induced by chronic Cr(VI) exposure. Moreover, luteolin also inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α) and VEGF in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Western blot analysis showed that luteolin inhibited multiple gene products linked to survival (Akt, Fak, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL), inflammation (MAPK, NF-κB, COX-2, STAT-3, iNOS, TNF-α) and angiogenesis (HIF-1α, VEGF, MMP-9) in chronic Cr(VI) exposed BEAS-2B cells. Nude mice injected with BEAS-2B cells chronically exposed to Cr(VI) in the presence of luteolin showed reduced tumor incidence compared to Cr(VI) alone treated group. Overexpression of catalase (CAT) or SOD2, eliminated Cr(VI)-induced malignant transformation. Overall, our results indicate that luteolin protects BEAS-2B cells from Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis by scavenging ROS and modulating multiple cell signaling mechanisms that are linked to ROS. Luteolin, therefore, serves as a potential chemopreventive agent against Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Luteolin inhibited Cr(VI)-induced oxidative stress. • Luteolin inhibited chronic Cr(VI)-induced malignant transformation. • Luteolin inhibited chronic Cr(VI)-induced inflammation. • Luteolin inhibited chronic Cr(VI)-induced angiogenesis.

  20. Dinaciclib, a Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of Mcl-1 and Enhances ABT-737-Mediated Cell Death in Malignant Human Glioma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Jane, Esther P; Premkumar, Daniel R; Cavaleri, Jonathon M; Sutera, Philip A; Rajasekar, Thatchana; Pollack, Ian F

    2016-02-01

    The prognosis for malignant glioma, the most common brain tumor, is still poor, underscoring the need to develop novel treatment strategies. Because glioma cells commonly exhibit genomic alterations involving genes that regulate cell-cycle control, there is a strong rationale for examining the potential efficacy of strategies to counteract this process. In this study, we examined the antiproliferative effects of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor dinaciclib in malignant human glioma cell lines, with intact, deleted, or mutated p53 or phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10; intact or deleted or p14ARF or wild-type or amplified epidermal growth factor receptor. Dinaciclib inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell-cycle arrest at the G2/M checkpoint, independent of p53 mutational status. In a standard 72-hour 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol- 2yl]-5-[3-carboxymethoxyphenyl]-2-[4-sulfophenyl]-2H, tetrazolium (MTS) assay, at clinically relevant concentrations, dose-dependent antiproliferative effects were observed, but cell death was not induced. Moreover, the combination of conventional chemotherapeutic agents and various growth-signaling inhibitors with dinaciclib did not yield synergistic cytotoxicity. In contrast, combination of the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitors ABT-263 (4-[4-[[2-(4-chlorophenyl)-5,5-dimethylcyclohexen-1-yl]methyl]piperazin-1-yl]-N-[4-[[(2R)-4-morpholin-4-yl-1-phenylsulfanylbutan-2-yl]amino]-3-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)phenyl]sulfonylbenzamide) or ABT-737 (4-[4-[[2-(4-chlorophenyl)phenyl]methyl]piperazin-1-yl]-N-[4-[[(2R)-4-(dimethylamino)-1-phenylsulfanylbutan-2-yl]amino]-3-nitrophenyl]sulfonylbenzamide) with dinaciclib potentiated the apoptotic response induced by each single drug. The synergistic killing by ABT-737 with dinaciclib led to cell death accompanied by the hallmarks of apoptosis, including an early loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential; the release of cytochrome c, smac/DIABLO, and apoptosis-inducing factor; phosphatidylserine exposure on the plasma membrane surface and activation of caspases and poly ADP-ribose polymerase. Mechanistic studies revealed that dinaciclib promoted proteasomal degradation of Mcl-1. These observations may have important clinical implications for the design of experimental treatment protocols for malignant human glioma. PMID:26585571

  1. Enhanced cellular radiosensitivity induced by cofilin-1 over-expression is associated with reduced DNA repair capacity

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Jyh-Der; Chiu, Yu-Wen; Lo, Chia-Chien; Chiang, Pei-Hsun; Chiu, Su-Jun; Tsai, Cheng-Han; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Chen, Ran-Chou; Gorbunova, Vera; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A previous report has indicated that over-expression of cofilin-1 (CFL-1), a member of the actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family, enhances cellular radiosensitivity. This study explores, the involvement of various DNA damage responses and repair systems in the enhanced cellular radiosensitivity as well as assessing the role of CFL-1 phosphorylation in radiosensitivity. Materials and Methods Human non-small lung cancer H1299 cells harboring a tet-on gene expression system were used to induce exogenous expression of wild-type CFL-1. Colony formation assays were used to determine cell survival after γ-ray exposure. DNA damage levels were determined by comet assay. DNA repair capacity was assessed by fluorescence-based DNA repair analysis and antibody detection of various repair proteins. The effects of CFL-1 phosphorylation on radiation responses were explored using two mutant CFL-1 proteins, S3D and S3A. Finally, endogenous CFL-1 phosphorylation levels were investigated using latrunculin A (LA), cytochalasin B (CB) and Y27632. Results When phosphorylatable CFL-1 was expressed, radiosensitivity was enhanced after exposure to γ-rays and this was accompanied by DNA damage. Phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) and p53-binding protein-1 (53BP1) foci, as well as Chk1/2 phosphorylation, were apparently suppressed, although ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase activation was apparently unaffected. In addition, two radiation induced double strand break (DSB) repair, systems, namely homologous recombination repair (HRR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), were suppressed. Moreover, over-expression of CFL-1 S3D and CFL-1 S3A both enhanced radiosensitivity. However, enhanced radiosensitivity and reduced γ-H2AX expression were only detected in cells treated with LA which increased endogenous phospho-CFL-1, and not in cells treated with Y27632, which dephosphorylates CFL-1. Conclusion CFL-1 over-expression enhances radiosensitivity and this is associated with reduced DNA repair capacity. Although phosphorylated CFL-1 seems to be involved in radiosensitivity, further studies are required to address the importance of CFL-1 activity to the regulation of radiosensitivity. PMID:23362981

  2. Differential β2-adrenergic receptor expression defines the phenotype of non-tumorigenic and malignant human breast cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Rivero, Ezequiel M.; Galés, Céline; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Lüthy, Isabel A.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignancy in women. Several reports demonstrated that adrenergic receptors (ARs) are involved in breast cancer. Here we observed that epinephrine (Epi), an endogenous AR agonist, caused opposite effects in non-tumorigenic (MCF-10A and HBL-100) and tumor cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). Thus, Epi, in non-tumor breast cells, as well as isoproterenol (β-agonist), in all cell lines, maintained a benign phenotype, decreasing cell proliferation and migration, and stimulating cell adhesion. β-AR expression and cAMP levels were higher in MCF-10A than in MCF-7 cells. β2-AR knock-down caused a significant increase of cell proliferation and migration, and a decrease of cell adhesion both in basal and in Iso-stimulated conditions. Coincidently, β2-AR over-expression induced a significant decrease of cell proliferation and migration, and an increase of cell adhesion. Therefore, β2-AR is implied in cell phenotype and its agonists or antagonists could eventually complement cancer therapy. PMID:25375203

  3. Identification of a seven glycopeptide signature for malignant pleural mesothelioma in human serum by selected reaction monitoring

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Serum biomarkers can improve diagnosis and treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). However, the evaluation of potential new serum biomarker candidates is hampered by a lack of assay technologies for their clinical evaluation. Here we followed a hypothesis-driven targeted proteomics strategy for the identification and clinical evaluation of MPM candidate biomarkers in serum of patient cohorts. Results Based on the hypothesis that cell surface exposed glycoproteins are prone to be released from tumor-cells to the circulatory system, we screened the surfaceome of model cell lines for potential MPM candidate biomarkers. Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM) assay technology allowed for the direct evaluation of the newly identified candidates in serum. Our evaluation of 51 candidate biomarkers in the context of a training and an independent validation set revealed a reproducible glycopeptide signature of MPM in serum which complemented the MPM biomarker mesothelin. Conclusions Our study shows that SRM assay technology enables the direct clinical evaluation of protein-derived candidate biomarker panels for which clinically reliable ELISA’s currently do not exist. PMID:24207061

  4. [Malignant melanoma].

    PubMed

    Champeau, F; Verola, O

    1998-08-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most serious skin tumor and its incidence is doubling every ten years. Ultraviolet rays represent the main environmental cause of melanoma. Among the constitutional factors identified, two clinicopathological forms of naevus are considered to be important epidemiological precursors: acquired dysplastic naevi and congenital giant naevi. Four clinical and histological types are distinguished: SSM (Superficial Spreading Melanoma), NM (Nodular Melanoma), LMM (Lentigo Maligna Melanoma), arising from Dubreuilh melanosis, ALM (Acral Lentiginous Melanoma). Thickness constitutes the essential prognostic factor. Clinical examination is the only recommended standard assessment. Chest x-ray is useful, and acts as a reference for subsequent follow-up. Other complementary investigations are requested as a function of clinical signs. Treatment is exclusively surgical. The lateral resection margins are 0.5 cm for melanoma in situ, 1 cm for melanomas less than 1 mm thick, 2 cm for melanomas between 1 and 4 mm thick, and 3 cm for melanomas thicker than 4 mm. Chemotherapy is mainly used in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. There is no indication for radiotherapy apart from palliative treatment of nonsurgical metastases. New therapies such as immunotherapy and gene therapy are under investigation. PMID:9926473

  5. Estramustine: A novel radiation enhancer in human carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, S.; Gabel, M.; Khil, M.S.

    1994-08-30

    Estramustine (EM), an antimicrotubule agent, binds microtubule-associated proteins, causes spindle disassembly, and arrests cells at the late G{sub 2}/M phase of the cell cycle. Since cells in the G{sub 2}/M phase are the most radiosensitive and some human cancer cells contain high level of EM-binding protein, experiments were carried out to determine whether radiation sensitization could be obtained in human carcinoma cells. Cells containing a high level of EM-binding protein such as prostate carcinoma (DU-145), breast carcinoma (MCF-7), and malignant glioma (U-251) were used to demonstrate radiosensitization. Cervical carcinoma (HeLa-S{sub 3}) and colon carcinoma (HT-29) cells which are not known to contain EM-binding protein were also employed. Cell survival was assayed by the colony forming ability of single plated cells in culture to obtain dose-survival curves. Pretreatment of DU-145, MCF-7, and U-251 cells to a nontoxic concentration (5 {mu}M) of EM for more than one cell cycle time, substantially enhanced the radiation-induced cytotoxicity. The sensitizer enhancement ratio of these cells ranged from 1.35-1.52. The magnitude of the enhancement was dependent on the drug concentration and exposure time. The rate of cell accumulation in G{sub 2}/M phase, as determined by flow cytometry, increased with longer treatment time in the cell lines which showed radiosensitization. Other antimicrotubule agents such as taxol and vinblastine caused minimal or no radiosensitization at nontoxic concentrations. The data provide a radiobiological basis for using EM as a novel radiation enhancer, with the property of tissue selectivity. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. C-Kit Expression, Angiogenesis, and Grading in Canine Mast Cell Tumour: A Unique Model to Study C-Kit Driven Human Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Patruno, Rosa; Marech, Ilaria; Zizzo, Nicola; Nardulli, Patrizia; Introna, Marcello; Capriuolo, Gennaro; Rubini, Rosa Angela; Ribatti, Domenico; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano

    2014-01-01

    Canine cutaneous mast cell tumour (CMCT) is a c-Kit driven tumour sharing similar c-Kit aberrations found in human gastrointestinal stromal tumour. CMCT is classified into three forms: well- (G1), intermediately (G2) (more benign diseases), and poorly (G3) differentiated (malignant) forms. We assess a correlation between c-Kit status, grading, and angiogenesis in CMCTs to explore their potential significance in humans. C-Kit receptor (c-KitR) expression, microvascular density (MVD), and mast cell granulated and degranulated status density (MCGD and MCDD, resp.) were analyzed in 97 CMCTs, by means of histochemistry, immunohistochemistry double staining, and image analysis system. Data showed that predominantly diffuse cytoplasmic- and predominantly focal paranuclear- (Golgi-like) c-Kit protein (PDC-c-Kit and PFP-c-Kit, resp.) expression correlate with high MVD, G3 histopathological grade, and MCDD. Moreover, predominant cell membrane-c-KitR (PCM-c-KitR) expression status correlates with low MVD, G1-G2 histopathological grade, and MCGD. These findings underline the key role of c-Kit in the biopathology of canine MCTs, indicating a link between aberrant c-Kit expression, increased angiogenesis, and higher histopathological grade. CMCT seems to be a model to study contributions of c-Kit activated MCs in tumour angiogenesis and to evaluate the inhibition of MCs activation by means of c-Kit tyrosine kinase inhibitors, currently translated in humans. PMID:24900982

  7. c-Kit expression, angiogenesis, and grading in canine mast cell tumour: a unique model to study c-Kit driven human malignancies.

    PubMed

    Patruno, Rosa; Marech, Ilaria; Zizzo, Nicola; Ammendola, Michele; Nardulli, Patrizia; Gadaleta, Claudia; Introna, Marcello; Capriuolo, Gennaro; Rubini, Rosa Angela; Ribatti, Domenico; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2014-01-01

    Canine cutaneous mast cell tumour (CMCT) is a c-Kit driven tumour sharing similar c-Kit aberrations found in human gastrointestinal stromal tumour. CMCT is classified into three forms: well- (G1), intermediately (G2) (more benign diseases), and poorly (G3) differentiated (malignant) forms. We assess a correlation between c-Kit status, grading, and angiogenesis in CMCTs to explore their potential significance in humans. C-Kit receptor (c-KitR) expression, microvascular density (MVD), and mast cell granulated and degranulated status density (MCGD and MCDD, resp.) were analyzed in 97 CMCTs, by means of histochemistry, immunohistochemistry double staining, and image analysis system. Data showed that predominantly diffuse cytoplasmic- and predominantly focal paranuclear- (Golgi-like) c-Kit protein (PDC-c-Kit and PFP-c-Kit, resp.) expression correlate with high MVD, G3 histopathological grade, and MCDD. Moreover, predominant cell membrane-c-KitR (PCM-c-KitR) expression status correlates with low MVD, G1-G2 histopathological grade, and MCGD. These findings underline the key role of c-Kit in the biopathology of canine MCTs, indicating a link between aberrant c-Kit expression, increased angiogenesis, and higher histopathological grade. CMCT seems to be a model to study contributions of c-Kit activated MCs in tumour angiogenesis and to evaluate the inhibition of MCs activation by means of c-Kit tyrosine kinase inhibitors, currently translated in humans. PMID:24900982

  8. Asbestos-related malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Talcott, J.A.; Antman, K.H.

    1988-05-01

    Asbestos-associated malignancies have received significant attention in the lay and medical literature because of the increasing frequency of two asbestos-associated tumors, lung carcinoma and mesothelioma; the wide distribution of asbestos; its status as a prototype environmental carcinogen; and the many recent legal compensation proceedings, for which medical testimony has been required. The understanding of asbestos-associated carcinogenesis has increased through study of animal models, human epidemiology, and, recently, the application of modern molecular biological techniques. However, the detailed mechanisms of carcinogenesis remain unknown. A wide variety of malignancies have been associated with asbestos, although the strongest evidence for a causal association is confined to lung cancer and mesothelioma. Epidemiological studies have provided evidence that both the type of asbestos fiber and the industry in which the exposure occurs may affect the rates of asbestos-associated cancers. It has been shown that asbestos exerts a carcinogenic effect independent of exposure to cigarette smoking that, for lung cancers, is synergistically enhanced by smoking. Other questions remain controversial, such as whether pulmonary fibrosis necessarily precedes asbestos-associated lung cancer and whether some threshold level of exposure to asbestos (including low-dose exposures that may occur in asbestos-associated public buildings) may be safe. Mesothelioma, the most closely asbestos-associated malignancy, has a dismal natural history and has been highly resistant to therapy. However, investigational multi-modality therapy may offer benefit to some patients. 179 references.

  9. Expression of hPNAS-4 Radiosensitizes Lewis Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Hui; Yuan Zhu; Zhu Hong; Li Lei; Shi Huashan; Wang Zi; Fan Yu; Deng Qian; Zeng Jianshuang; He Yinbo; Xiao Jianghong; Li Zhiping

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to transfer the hPNAS-4 gene, a novel apoptosis-related human gene, into Lewis lung cancer (LL2) and observe its radiosensitive effect on radiation therapy in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: The hPNAS-4 gene was transfected into LL2 cells, and its expression was detected via western blot. Colony formation assay and flow cytometry were used to detect the growth and apoptosis of cells treated with irradiation/PNAS-4 in vitro. The hPNAS-4 gene was transferred into LL2-bearing mice through tail vein injection of the liposome/gene complex. The tumor volumes were recorded after radiation therapy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay were performed to detect the tumor cell growth and apoptosis in vivo. Results: The hPNAS-4 gene was successfully transferred into LL2 cells and tumor tissue, and its overexpressions were confirmed via western blot analysis. Compared with the control, empty plasmid, hPNAS-4, radiation, and empty plasmid plus radiation groups, the hPNAS-4 plus radiation group more significantly inhibited growth and enhanced apoptosis of LL2 cells in vitro and in vivo (P<.05). Conclusions: The hPNAS-4 gene was successfully transferred into LL2 cells and tumor tissue and was expressed in both LL2 cell and tumor tissue. The hPNAS-4 gene therapy significantly enhanced growth inhibition and apoptosis of LL2 tumor cells by radiation therapy in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, it may be a potential radiosensitive treatment of radiation therapy for lung cancer.

  10. P2X7 receptor as predictor gene for glioma radiosensitivity and median survival.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Marina P; Kipper, Franciele; Nicoletti, Natália F; Sperotto, Nathalia D; Zanin, Rafael; Tamajusuku, Alessandra S K; Flores, Debora G; Meurer, Luise; Roesler, Rafael; Filho, Aroldo B; Lenz, Guido; Campos, Maria M; Morrone, Fernanda B

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is considered the most lethal intracranial tumor and the median survival time is approximately 14 months. Although some glioma cells present radioresistance, radiotherapy has been the mainstay of therapy for patients with malignant glioma. The activation of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is responsible for ATP-induced death in various cell types. In this study, we analyzed the importance of ATP-P2X7R pathway in the radiotherapy response P2X7R silenced cell lines, in vivo and human tumor samples. Both glioma cell lines used in this study present a functional P2X7R and the P2X7R silencing reduced P2X7R pore activity by ethidium bromide uptake. Gamma radiation (2Gy) treatment reduced cell number in a P2X7R-dependent way, since both P2X7R antagonist and P2X7R silencing blocked the cell cytotoxicity caused by irradiation after 24h. The activation of P2X7R is time-dependent, as EtBr uptake significantly increased after 24h of irradiation. The radiotherapy plus ATP incubation significantly increased annexin V incorporation, compared with radiotherapy alone, suggesting that ATP acts synergistically with radiotherapy. Of note, GL261 P2X7R silenced-bearing mice failed in respond to radiotherapy (8Gy) and GL261 WT-bearing mice, that constitutively express P2X7R, presented a significant reduction in tumor volume after radiotherapy, showing in vivo that functional P2X7R expression is essential for an efficient radiotherapy response in gliomas. We also showed that a high P2X7R expression is a good prognostic factor for glioma radiosensitivity and survival probability in humans. Our data revealed the relevance of P2X7R expression in glioma cells to a successful radiotherapy response, and shed new light on this receptor as a useful predictor of the sensitivity of cancer patients to radiotherapy and median survival. PMID:26358881

  11. On the mechanism of salivary gland radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Konings, Antonius W.T. . E-mail: a.w.t.konings@med.rug.nl; Coppes, Rob P.; Vissink, Arjan

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To contribute to the understanding of the enigmatic radiosensitivity of the salivary glands by analysis of appropriate literature, especially with respect to mechanisms of action of early radiation damage, and to supply information on the possibilities of amelioration of radiation damage to the salivary glands after radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Selected published data on the mechanism of salivary gland radiosensitivity and radioprotection were studied and analyzed. Results: From a classical point of view, the salivary glands should not respond as rapidly to radiation as they appear to do. Next to the suggestion of massive apoptosis, the leakage of granules and subsequent lysis of acinar cells was suggested to be responsible for the acute radiation-induced function loss of the salivary glands. The main problem with these hypotheses is that recently performed assays show no cell loss during the first days after irradiation, while saliva flow is dramatically diminished. The water secretion is selectively hampered during the first days after single-dose irradiation. Literature is discussed that shows that the compromised cells suffer selective radiation damage to the plasma membrane, disturbing signal transduction primarily affecting watery secretion. Although the cellular composition of the submandibular gland and the parotid gland are different, the damage response is very alike. The acute radiation-induced function loss in both salivary glands can be ameliorated by prophylactic treatment with specific receptor agonists. Conclusions: The most probable mechanism of action, explaining the enigmatic high radiosensitivity for early effects, is selective radiation damage to the plasma membrane of the secretory cells, disturbing muscarinic receptor stimulated watery secretion. Later damage is mainly due to classical mitotic cell death of progenitor cells, leading to a hampered replacement capacity of the gland for secretory cells, but is also caused by damage to the extracellular environment, preventing proper cell functioning.

  12. Taxonomic and developmental aspects of radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, F.L.; Anderson, S.L.

    1996-11-01

    Considerable information is available on the effects of radioactivity on adult and early life stages of organisms. The preponderance of data is on mortality after a single irradiation with relatively high doses. Unfortunately, because experiments were carried out under different conditions and for different time periods, the validity of comparing the results from different laxonomic groups is questionable. In general, the conclusions are that there is a relationship (1) between radioresistance to high doses of acute radiation and taxonomy of the organism, primitive forms being more radioresistant than complex vertebrates and (2) between radiosensitivity and developmental stage, early life stages being more sensitive than later stages. The first conclusion may be related to the capability of the organism to repopulate cells and to differentiate and redifferentiate them; the second to the rate of cellular division and to the degree of differentiation. In question, however, is the relevance of the responses from high levels of acute radiation to that of the responses to long-term exposure to low levels of radiation, which are ecologically of more interest. Data from studies of the effects of acute and chronic exposure on development of gametes and zygotes indicate that, for some fishes and invertebrates, responses at the cellular and molecular levels show effect levels comparable to those observed in some mammals. Acute doses between 0,05 and 0.5Cy and dose rates between 0.02 to 0.2mCy/h appear to define critical ranges in which detrimental effects on fertility are first observed in a variety of radiosensitive organisms. To better understand inherent radiosensitivity, we need more information on the ability of cells to repopulate and differentiate and to prevent or repair damage to biological critical molecules, such as DNA, because these factors may alter significantly organisms` responses to radiation.

  13. MicroRNA dependent regulation of DNMT-1 and tumor suppressor gene expression by Interleukin-6 in human malignant cholangiocytes

    PubMed Central

    Braconi, Chiara; Huang, Nianyuan; Patel, Tushar

    2014-01-01

    Although the inflammation-associated cytokine Interleukin-6 (IL-6) has been implicated in cholangiocarcinoma growth, the relationship between IL-6 and oncogenic changes is unknown. IL-6 can increase expression of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT-1) and epigenetically regulate the expression of several genes, including microRNAs (miRNAs). DNMT-1 up-regulation occurs in hepatobiliary cancers and is associated with a poor prognosis. To understand the potential regulation of DNMT-1 by IL-6 dependent miRNAs, we examined the expression of a group of miRNAs which have sequence complementarity to the 3′-UTR of DNMT-1, namely miR-148a, miR-152 and miR-301. The expression of these miRNAs was decreased in cholangiocarcinoma cells. Moreover, the expression of all three miRNAs was decreased in IL-6 over-expressing malignant cholangiocytes in vitro and in tumor cell xenografts. There was a concomitant decrease in expression of the methylation-sensitive tumor suppressor genes Rassf1a, and p16INK4a. Using luciferase reporter constructs, DNMT-1 was verified as a target for miR-148a and miR-152. Precursors to miR-148a and miR-152 decreased DNMT-1 protein expression, increased Rassf1a and p16INK4a expression and reduced cell proliferation. Conclusion These data indicate that IL-6 can regulate the activity of DNMT-1 and expression of methylation-dependent tumor suppressor genes by modulation of miR-148a and miR-152, and provide a link between this inflammation-associated cytokines and oncogenesis in cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:20146264

  14. Chemical radiosensitizers for use in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wardman, P

    2007-08-01

    Radiosensitizers are intended to enhance tumour cell killing while having much less effect on normal tissues. Some drugs target different physiological characteristics of the tumour, particularly hypoxia associated with radioresistance. Oxygen is the definitive hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, the large differential radiosensitivity of oxic vs hypoxic cells being an attractive factor. The combination of nicotinamide to reduce acute hypoxia with normobaric carbogen breathing is showing clinical promise. 'Electron-affinic' chemicals that react with DNA free radicals have the potential for universal activity to combat hypoxia-associated radioresistance; a nitroimidazole, nimorazole, is clinically effective at tolerable doses. Hypoxia-specific cytotoxins, such as tirapazamine, are valuable adjuncts to radiotherapy. Nitric oxide is a potent hypoxic cell radiosensitizer; variations in endogenous levels might have prognostic significance, and routes to deliver nitric oxide specifically to tumours are being developed. In principle, many drugs can be delivered selectively to hypoxic tumours using either reductase enzymes or radiation-produced free radicals to activate drug release from electron-affinic prodrugs. A redox-active agent based on a gadolinium chelate is being evaluated clinically. Pyrimidines substituted with bromine or iodine are incorporated into DNA and enhance free radical damage; fluoropyrimidines act by different mechanisms. A wide variety of drugs that influence the nature or repair of DNA damage are being evaluated in conjunction with radiation; it is often difficult to define the mechanisms underlying chemoradiation regimens. Drugs being evaluated include topoisomerase inhibitors (e.g. camptothecin, topotecan), and the hypoxia-activated anthraquinone AQ4N; alkylating agents include temozolomide. Drugs involved in DNA repair pathways being investigated include the potent poly(ADP ribose)polymerase inhibitor, AG14,361. Proteins involved in cell signalling, such as the Ras family, are attractive targets linked to radioresistance, as are epidermal growth factor receptors and linked kinases (drugs including vandetanib [ZD6,474], cetuximab and gefitinib), and cyclooxygenase-2 (celecoxib). The suppression of radioprotective thiols seems to offer more potential with alkylating agents than with radiotherapy, although it remains a strategy worthy of exploration. PMID:17478086

  15. Intraoral malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Babburi, Suresh; Subramanyam, R V; Aparna, V; Sowjanya, P

    2013-07-01

    Primary oral mucosal melanoma is a rare aggressive neoplasm and accounts for only 0.2-8% of all reported melanomas. It is a malignant neoplasm of melanocytes that may arise from a benign melanocytic lesion or de novo from melanocytes within normal skin or mucosa. It is considered to be the most deadly and biologically unpredictable of all human neoplasms, having the worst prognosis. In this article, we report a case of oral melanoma in a 52-year-old female patient with a chief complaint of black discolouration of the maxillary gingiva and palate. PMID:24249959

  16. Intraoral malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Babburi, Suresh; Subramanyam, R. V.; Aparna, V.; Sowjanya, P.

    2013-01-01

    Primary oral mucosal melanoma is a rare aggressive neoplasm and accounts for only 0.2-8% of all reported melanomas. It is a malignant neoplasm of melanocytes that may arise from a benign melanocytic lesion or de novo from melanocytes within normal skin or mucosa. It is considered to be the most deadly and biologically unpredictable of all human neoplasms, having the worst prognosis. In this article, we report a case of oral melanoma in a 52-year-old female patient with a chief complaint of black discolouration of the maxillary gingiva and palate. PMID:24249959

  17. Differential expression and biochemical activity of the immune receptor Tim-3 in healthy and malignant human myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Isabel Gonçalves; Gibbs, Bernhard F.; Bardelli, Marco; Varani, Luca; Sumbayev, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    The T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (Tim-3) is a plasma membrane-associated receptor which is involved in a variety of biological responses in human immune cells. It is highly expressed in most acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells and therefore may serve as a possible target for AML therapy. However, its biochemical activities in primary human AML cells remain unclear. We therefore analysed the total expression and surface presence of the Tim-3 receptor in primary human AML blasts and healthy primary human leukocytes isolated from human blood. We found that Tim-3 expression was significantly higher in primary AML cells compared to primary healthy leukocytes. Tim-3 receptor molecules were distributed largely on the surface of primary AML cells, whereas in healthy leukocytes Tim-3 protein was mainly expressed intracellularly. In primary human AML blasts, both Tim-3 agonistic antibody and galectin-9 (a Tim-3 natural ligand) significantly upregulated mTOR pathway activity. This was in line with increased accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) and secretion of VEGF and TNF-α. Similar results were obtained in primary human healthy leukocytes. Importantly, in both types of primary cells, Tim-3-mediated effects were compared with those induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and stem cell factor (SCF). Tim-3 induced comparatively moderate responses in both AML cells and healthy leukocytes. However, Tim-3, like LPS, mediated the release of both TNF-α and VEGF, while SCF induced mostly VEGF secretion and did not upregulate TNF-α release. PMID:26413815

  18. Differential expression of CD66a (BGP), a cell adhesion molecule of the carcinoembryonic antigen family, in benign, premalignant, and malignant lesions of the human mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Riethdorf, L; Lisboa, B W; Henkel, U; Naumann, M; Wagener, C; Löning, T

    1997-07-01

    CD66a, also known as biliary glycoprotein (BGP), is a member of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) family and the human homologue of the rat cell-CAM. There is evidence that aberrant expression or loss of CD66a in tumor tissue is of biological significance. No data about its expression in breast carcinoma cells and only sparse information about the expression of CD66a in normal breast are available thus far. In this study we used monoclonal antibodies to analyze the expression of CD66a and CEA in normal tissue, benign lesions, and in noninvasive and invasive carcinomas of the mammary gland. In normal tissue and benign lesions, CD66a was consistently expressed at the apical sites of epithelial cells and in myoepithelia, whereas CEA was absent or was restricted only to some apical membranes within the ductal tree. The specific staining of myoepithelia was most evident in pseudoinfiltrative radial scars and sclerosing adenosis. However, the apical expression of CD66a disappeared with the development of the malignant phenotype in noninvasive and invasive carcinomas, and changed gradually from low- to high-grade noninvasive carcinomas into a predominant uniform membrane staining all around the atypical cells. CEA expression was irregular in intensity and distribution. The native apical CD66a staining was partially preserved in some highly differentiated invasive carcinomas with a better prognosis, such as tubular and papillary carcinomas. These findings indicate that loss of CD66a expression rather than a change in staining patterns coincides with the development of the malignant phenotype. PMID:9212821

  19. A new treatment for human malignant melanoma targeting L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1): A pilot study in a canine model

    SciTech Connect

    Fukumoto, Shinya; Hanazono, Kiwamu; Fu, Dah-Renn; Endo, Yoshifumi; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi; Iwano, Hidetomo; Uchide, Tsuyoshi

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •LAT1 is highly expressed in tumors but at low levels in normal tissues. •We examine LAT1 expression and function in malignant melanoma (MM). •LAT1 expression in MM tissues and cell lines is higher than those in normal tissues. •LAT1 selective inhibitors inhibit amino acid uptake and cell growth in MM cells. •New chemotherapeutic protocols including LAT1 inhibitors are effective for treatment. -- Abstract: L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), an isoform of amino acid transport system L, transports branched or aromatic amino acids essential for fundamental cellular activities such as cellular growth, proliferation and maintenance. This amino acid transporter recently has received attention because of its preferential and up-regulated expression in a variety of human tumors in contrast to its limited distribution and low-level expression in normal tissues. In this study, we explored the feasibility of using LAT1 inhibitor as a new therapeutic agent for human malignant melanomas (MM) using canine spontaneous MM as a model for human MM. A comparative study of LAT expression was performed in 48 normal tissues, 25 MM tissues and five cell lines established from MM. The study observed LAT1 mRNA levels from MM tissues and cell lines that were significantly (P < 0.01) higher than in normal tissues. Additionally, MM with distant metastasis showed a higher expression than those without distant metastasis. Functional analysis of LAT1 was performed on one of the five cell lines, CMeC-1. [{sup 3}H]L-Leucine uptake and cellular growth activities in CMeC-1 were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by selective LAT1 inhibitors (2-amino-2-norbornane-carboxylic acid, BCH and melphalan, LPM). Inhibitory growth activities of various conventional anti-cancer drugs, including carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, dacarbazine, doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, nimustine, vinblastine and vincristine, were significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced by combination use with BCH or LPM. These findings suggest that LAT1 could be a new therapeutic target for MM.

  20. Wogonin Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Human Malignant Neuroblastoma Cells Via IRE1α-Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ge, Wenliang; Yin, Qiyou; Xian, Hua

    2015-07-01

    Wogonin, a flavonoid isolated from Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, has been reported to exhibit a variety of biological effects including anti-cancer effects. It has a pro-apoptotic role in many cancer types. However, the molecular mechanisms of wogonin in treating neuroblastoma remain elusive. In the present study, two malignant neuroblastoma cell lines (SK-N-BE2 and IMR-32 cells) were treated with different doses of wogonin (0-150 μM). Wogonin showed significant cytotoxic effects in SK-N-BE2 and IMR-32 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Treatment of SK-N-BE2 and IMR-32 cells with 75 μΜ wogonin for 48 h significantly promoted apoptosis, the release of cytochrome c, altered the expression of certain members of Bcl-2 family (Bcl-2, Bax and Bid), and increased the activation of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, and PARP-1, which demonstrated that the cytotoxic effect of wogonin in SK-N-BE2 and IMR-32 cells is mediated by mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, wogonin induced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related proteins (GRP78/Bip and GRP94/gp96) and activation of caspase-12 and caspase-4 in SK-N-BE2 and IMR-32 cells. In addition, wogonin increase the expression of IRE1α and TRAF2, and phosphorylation of ASK1 and JNK in SK-N-BE2 and IMR-32 cells. Knockdown of IRE1α by siRNA not only markedly inhibited wogonin-induced up-regulation of IRE1α and TRAF2, and phosphorylation of ASK1 and JNK but also reduced wogonin-induced cytotoxic effects and mitochondrial dysfunction in SK-N-BE2 and IMR-32 cells. These results indicated that wogonin could induce apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, and ER stress in SK-N-BE2 and IMR-32 cells by modulating IRE1α-dependent pathway. PMID:25740014

  1. Radiosensitization of TPGS-emulsified docetaxel-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles in CNE-1 and A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Yuan, Yin; Chu, Min; Zhao, Shuang; Song, Qingle; Mu, Xiaoqian; Xu, Shuangbing; Zhang, Zhiping; Yang, Kunyu

    2016-03-01

    Docetaxel is among the most effective radiosensitizers. It is widely used as radiosensitizer in many tumors, including head and neck carcinoma. Nevertheless, poor solubility and severe hypersensitivity limit its clinical use and its therapeutic effect remains to be improved. In this study, docetaxel-loaded polymeric nanoparticles were prepared by nanoprecipitation method to be new radiosensitizer with lower side effects and higher efficacy. The physiochemical characteristics of the nanoparticles were studied. Two human tumor cell lines which are resistant to radiotherapy were used in this research. We have compared the radioenhancement efficacy of docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles with docetaxel in A549 and CNE-1 cells. Compared with docetaxel, radiosensitization of docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles was improved significantly (sensitization enhancement ratio in A549 increased 1.24-fold to 1.68-fold when the radiation was applied 2 h after the drug, p < 0.01, sensitization enhancement ratio in CNE-1 increased 1.32-fold to 1.61-fold, p < 0.05). We explored the mechanisms for the radiosensitization efficiency and the difference between docetaxel and docetaxel-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. The improved radiosensitization efficacy was associated with enhanced G2/M arrest, promoted apoptosis and the role of D-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate which will enhance the cell uptake and inhibit the multiple drug resistance. Moreover, the radiosensitization efficacy of docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles was more prominent than docetaxel. In conclusion, tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-emulsified docetaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles were more efficacious and fewer adverse effects were observed than with the commercial docetaxel formulation. Thus, PLGA nanoparticles hold promise as a radiosensitizing agent. PMID:26608458

  2. Formation of spherical cancer stem-like cell colonies with resistance to chemotherapy drugs in the human malignant fibrous histiocytoma NMFH-1 cell line

    PubMed Central

    DENG, LIANG; LI, DEJIAN; GU, WENGUANG; LIU, AIGUO; CHENG, XIANGYANG

    2015-01-01

    Various human cancers have been revealed to contain cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and the spherical colonies that possess stem-like properties and cancer-initiating abilities. Malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) is a common soft-tissue sarcoma, and is considered to be a myxoma due to the observed high-grade lesions. In the present study, the spherical colonies were isolated from a human MFH cell line NMFH-1 using the sphere culture system. These colonies demonstrated stem-like properties, with the ability of self-renewal and strong drug-resistance to doxorubicin and cisplatin. In addition, verapamil, an adenosine triphosphate binding cassette protein transporter protein (ABCG2) inhibitor, enhanced the efficacy of the aforementioned chemotherapy agents. These colonies also demonstrated an increased expression of embryonic stem genes, including Oct3/4, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, sex determining region Y-box 10 and ABCG2, and stem cell-associated surface markers, such as cluster of differentiation (CD)44 and CD133. These results indicated that NMFH-1 lesions contain cancer stem-like cell populations that demonstrate strong drug resistance, and verapamil enhanced the efficacy of the chemotherapy agents. PMID:26722334

  3. Autophagy Induction by Endothelial-Monocyte Activating Polypeptide II Contributes to the Inhibition of Malignant Biological Behaviors by the Combination of EMAP II with Rapamycin in Human Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Meng, Fanjie; Li, Shuai; Liu, Libo; Zhao, Lini; Liu, Yunhui; Hu, Yi; Li, Zhen; Yao, Yilong; Xi, Zhuo; Teng, Hao; Xue, Yixue

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of endothelial-monocyte activating polypeptide II (EMAP II) on human glioblastoma (GBM) cells and glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) as well as its possible mechanisms. In this study, EMAP II inhibited the cell viability and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in human GBM cells and GSCs, and autophagy inhibitor 3-methyl adenine (3-MA) blocked these effects. Autophagic vacuoles were formed in these cells after EMAP II treatment and this phenomenon was blocked by 3-MA. In addition, the up-regulation of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3 (LC3)-II and the down-regulation of autophagic degraded substrate p62/SQSTM1 caused by EMAP II were observed. Cells treated with EMAP-II inhibited the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway, and PI3K/Akt agonist insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) blocked the effect of EMAP II on the expression of LC3-II and p62/SQSTM1. Cells exposed to EMAP-II experienced mitophagy and ER stress. Furthermore, the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion of GBM cells and GSCs were more remarkable by the combination of EMAP II and rapamycin than either agent alone in vitro and in vivo. The current study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of EMAP II in human GBM cells and GSCs was induced by autophagy, accompanied by the inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway, mitophagy and ER stress. The combination of EMAP II with rapamycin demonstrated the inhibitory effect on the malignant biological behaviors of human GBM cells and GSCs in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26648842

  4. Radiosensitization in prostate cancer: mechanisms and targets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in American men over the age of 45 years and is the third most common cause of cancer related deaths in American men. In 2012 it is estimated that 241,740 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 28,170 men will succumb to prostate cancer. Currently, radiation therapy is one of the most common definitive treatment options for localized prostate cancer. However, significant number of patients undergoing radiation therapy will develop locally persistent/recurrent tumours. The varying response rates to radiation may be due to 1) tumor microenvironment, 2) tumor stage/grade, 3) modality used to deliver radiation, and 4) dose of radiation. Higher doses of radiation has not always proved to be effective and have been associated with increased morbidity. Compounds designed to enhance the killing effects of radiation, radiosensitizers, have been extensively investigated over the past decade. The development of radiosensitizing agents could improve survival, improve quality of life and reduce costs, thus benefiting both patients and healthcare systems. Herin, we shall review the role and mechanisms of various agents that can sensitize tumours, specifically prostate cancer. PMID:23351141

  5. Evaluation of nitrobenzimidazoles as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.; Frank, L.R.; Bush, D.; Harrison, G.H.

    1983-07-01

    Radiobiological and pharmacokinetic assays were performed to determine the potential of 2-nitrobenzimidazole (NBI) as a hypoxic cell radiosensitizing agent. As judged by comparing survival curve slopes of Serratia marcescens irradiated under aerated and hypoxic conditions, the NBI enhancement ratio (ER) at 2 mM concentration was 2.4 +- 0.2, compared with an oxygen enhancement ratio of 3.3 +- 0.3. 2,5-Dinitrobenzimidazole (DNBI) was investigated in vitro; its ER was 3.0 +- 0.3 at 4 mM concentration. Very poor tissue penetration of DNBI precluded further testing in vivo. Acute toxic signs appeared in C3H/HeJ mice following ip injection of NBI at 100 mg/kg. These would be partly attributable to the stress caused by the high pH of the injection vehicle. The LD/sub 50/ was estimated to be 125 to 150 mg/kg. Mammary adenocarcinoma tumors grown in the flanks of these mice exhibited maximum NBI levels at 5 min postinjection (ip). Peak tumor radiosensitization occurred in the interval between 5 and 10 min postinjection. The ER for tumor regrowth delay was 2.1 +- 0.3 following 50 mg/kg injected into mice 5 min before irradiation. Functional evaluation up to 40 days after treatment revealed no evidence of neurological deficit.

  6. Evaluation of nitrobenzimidazoles as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.; Frank, L.R.; Bush, D.; Harrison, G.H.

    1983-07-01

    Radiobiological and pharmacokinetic assays were performed to determine the potential of 2-nitrobenzimidazole (NBI) as a hypoxic cell radiosensitizing agent. As judged by comparing survival curve slopes of Serratia marcescens irradiated under aerated and hypoxic conditions, the NBI enhancement ratio (ER) at 2 mM concentration was 2.4 +/- 0.2, compared with an oxygen enhancement ratio of 3.3 +/- 0.3. 2,5-Dinitrobenzimidazole (DNBI) was investigated in vitro; its ER was 3.0 +/- 0.3 at 4 mM concentration. Very poor tissue penetration of DNBI precluded further testing in vivo. Acute toxic signs appeared in C3H/HeJ mice following ip injection of NBI at 100 mg/kg. These would be partly attributable to the stress caused by the high pH of the injection vehicle. The LD50 was estimated to be 125-150 mg/kg. Mammary adenocarcinoma tumors grown in the flanks of these mice exhibited maximum NBI levels at 5 min postinjection (ip). Peak tumor radiosensitization occurred in the interval between 5 and 10 min postinjection. The ER for tumor regrowth delay was 2.1 +/- 0.3 following 50 mg/kg injected into mice 5 min before irradiation. Functional evaluation up to 40 days after treatment revealed no evidence of neurological deficit.

  7. Enhancement of radiosensitivity by dual inhibition of the HER family with ZD1839 ('Iressa') and trastuzumab ('Herceptin')

    SciTech Connect

    Fukutome, Mika . E-mail: fukutome@rad.twmu.ac.jp; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Nasu, Sachiko; Seki, Kaori; Mitsuhashi, Norio

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were twofold: (1) to examine the effects of dual inhibition of 2 members of the HER family, the epidermoid growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER2/neu, by gefitinib (ZD1839) and trastuzumab on radiosensitivity; and (2) to explore the molecular mechanism of radiosensitization especially focusing on the survival signal transduction pathways by using A431 human vulvar squamous carcinoma cells expressing EGFR and HER2/neu. Methods and Materials: The effects of inhibitors on Radiation-induced activation of EGFR and/or HER2/neu, and the intracellular proteins that are involved in their downstream signaling, were quantified by the Western blot. Radiosensitizing effects by the blockage of EGFR and/or HER2/neu were determined by a clonogenic assay. Results: Radiation-induced activation of the EGFR and HER2/neu was inhibited with ZD1839 and/or trastuzumab. ZD1839 also inhibited Radiation-induced phosphorylation of HER2/neu. Radiation in combination with the HER family inhibitors inhibited the activation of Akt and MEK1/2, the downstream survival signaling of the HER family. ZD1839 enhanced radiosensitivity with a dose-modifying factor (DMF) (SF3) of 1.45 and trastuzumab did so with a DMF (SF3) of 1.11. Simultaneous blockade of EGFR and HER2/neu induced a synergistic radiosensitizing effect with a DMF (SF3) of 2.29. Conclusions: The present data suggest that a dual EGFR and HER2/neu targeting may have potential for radiosensitization in tumors in which both of these pathways are active.

  8. Malignant transformation of human colon epithelial cells by benzo[c]phenanthrene dihydrodiolepoxides as well as 2-hydroxyamino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, Uta; Fuchs, Judith Iris; Teubner, Wera; Steinberg, Pablo . E-mail: steinber@rz.uni-potsdam.de

    2006-04-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heterocyclic aromatic amines (HCAs) ingested with food have repeatedly been suggested to be involved in the malignant transformation of colon epithelial cells. In order to test this hypothesis, HCEC cells (SV40 large T antigen-immortalized human colon epithelial cells) were incubated with a racemic mixture of benzo[c]phenanthrene dihydrodiol epoxides (B[c]PhDE), extremely potent carcinogenic PAH metabolites in vivo, or with 2-hydroxyamino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (N-OH-PhIP), the N-hydroxylated metabolite of the most abundant HCA in cooked meat. First, it was shown that HCEC cells express sulfotransferase 1A1, which is needed to metabolize N-OH-PhIP to the corresponding N-sulfonyloxy derivative, the direct precursor molecule of genotoxic nitrenium ions. Thereafter, exponentially growing HCEC cells were exposed five times to 0.1 {mu}g (0.37 nmol) B[c]PhDE/ml for 30 min or 0.72 {mu}g (3 nmol) N-OH-PhIP/ml for 24 h. Chemically treated HCEC cells showed an enhanced saturation density and grew faster than the corresponding solvent-treated cell cultures. After five treatment cycles, HCEC{sup B[c]PhDE} as well as HCEC {sup N-OH-PhIP} cells lost cell-cell contact inhibition and started piling up and forming foci in the culture flasks. Furthermore, HCEC{sup B[c]PhDE} and HCEC {sup N-OH-PhIP} cells were injected i.m. into SCID mice. Within 6 weeks after injection, eight animals out of eight injected with HCEC{sup B[c]PhDE} or HCEC {sup N-OH-PhIP} cells developed tumors at the site of injection, thus demonstrating the high tumorigenic potential of the HCEC{sup B[c]PhDE} and HCEC {sup N-OH-PhIP} cell cultures. Taken together, we show for the first time that the abovementioned active PAH metabolites as well as N-OH-PhIP are indeed able to malignantly transform human colon epithelial cells in vitro.

  9. Increased expression of annexin A1 predicts poor prognosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma and enhances cell malignant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ya; Lin, Guoqing; Fang, Wenzheng; Zhu, Hongwei; Chu, Kedan

    2014-12-01

    Annexin A1 (ANXA1) belongs to the annexin superfamily of proteins, which contribute to the pathological consequence and sequelae of most serious human diseases. Recent studies have reported diverse roles of ANXA1 in various human cancers; however, its involvement in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) still remains controversial. To investigate the expression pattern of ANXA1 in HCC tissues and evaluate its associations with tumor progression and patients' prognosis, immunohistochemistry was performed using 160 pairs of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded cancerous and adjacent non-cancerous tissues from patients with HCC. Then, the associations between ANXA1 expression, clinicopathological characteristics, and prognosis of HCC patients were statistically evaluated. In vitro migration and invasion assays of siRNA-targeted ANXA1-transfected cells were further performed. As a result, the expression levels of ANXA1 protein in HCC tissues were significantly higher than those in adjacent non-cancerous tissues (P < 0.001). High ANXA1 expression was closely correlated with advanced TNM stage (P = 0.001) and high Edmondson grade (P = 0.02). Then, univariate and multivariate analyses showed that the status of ANXA1 expression was an independent predictor for overall survival of HCC patients. Furthermore, knockdown of ANXA1 by transfection of siRNA-ANXA1 could suppress the migration and invasion abilities of HCC cells in vitro. Collectively, these findings offer the convincing evidence that ANXA1 may play an important role in HCC progression and can be used as a molecular marker to predict prognosis and a potential target for therapeutic intervention of HCC. PMID:25412936

  10. Evolutionary conservation of zebrafish linkage group 14 with frequently deleted regions of human chromosome 5 in myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting Xi; Zhou, Yi; Kanki, John P.; Deng, Min; Rhodes, Jennifer; Yang, Hong Wei; Sheng, Xiao Ming; Zon, Leonard I.; Look, A. Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Recurring interstitial loss of all or part of the long arm of chromosome 5, del(5q), is a hallmark of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia. Although the genes affected by these changes have not been identified, two critically deleted regions (CDRs) are well established. We have identified 76 zebrafish cDNAs orthologous to genes located in these 5q CDRs. Radiation hybrid mapping revealed that 33 of the 76 zebrafish orthologs are clustered in a genomic region on linkage group 14 (LG14). Fifteen others are located on LG21, and two on LG10. Although there are large blocks of conserved syntenies, the gene order between human and zebrafish is extensively inverted and transposed. Thus, intrachromosomal rearrangements and inversions appear to have occurred more frequently than translocations during evolution from a common chordate ancestor. Interestingly, of the 33 orthologs located on LG14, three have duplicates on LG21, suggesting that the duplication event occurred early in the evolution of teleosts. Murine orthologs of human 5q CDR genes are distributed among three chromosomes, 18, 11, and 13. The order of genes within the three syntenic mouse chromosomes appears to be more colinear with the human order, suggesting that translocations occurred more frequently than inversions during mammalian evolution. Our comparative map should enhance understanding of the evolution of the del(5q) chromosomal region. Mutant fish harboring deletions affecting the 5q CDR syntenic region may provide useful animal models for investigating the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:11983906

  11. Exposure to modeled microgravity induces metabolic idleness in malignant human MCF-7 and normal murine VSMC cells.

    PubMed

    Coinu, Rita; Chiaviello, Angela; Galleri, Grazia; Franconi, Flavia; Crescenzi, Elvira; Palumbo, Giuseppe

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the effect of modeled microgravity (MMG) on normal vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and neoplastic human breast cancer cells (MCF-7). In both cell types, MMG induced partial arrest in G2M and increased p14-3-3, HSP70, HSP60 and p21 expression. Cells synchronized by 24h starvation reentered the normal cycle within 24h if released in complete medium and exposed to normal gravity, but not if exposed to MMG. Similarly, MMG prevented VSMC and MCF-7 cells from overcoming growth arrest and re-synthesizing DNA. This study shows that cells adjust their metabolic rate in response to MMG. PMID:16638572

  12. Let-7b overexpression leads to increased radiosensitivity of uveal melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yixiong; Zhang, Leilei; Fan, Jiayan; Jia, Renbin; Song, Xin; Xu, Xiaofang; Dai, Liyan; Zhuang, Ai; Ge, Shengfang; Fan, Xianqun

    2015-04-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is an intraocular malignant tumor in adults that is characterized by rapid progression and recurrence. Irradiation has become the primary therapy for UM patients who are not candidates for surgery. However, after large-dose fraction irradiation treatment, some patients undergo subsequent enucleation because of radiotherapy-related complications. This situation has raised concerns on how to optimize the effectiveness of radiation treatment. Recent investigations of microRNAs are changing our understanding of UM tumor biology and are helping to identify novel targets for radiotherapy. The radioresistant UM cell lines OM431 and OCM1 were selected and exposed to irradiation, and let-7b was found to be downregulated after exposure. We then confirmed that let-7b mimics could inhibit UM growth both in vitro and in vivo. More specifically, transfection with let-7b mimics markedly resensitized OCM1 and OM431 cells to irradiation by reducing the population of S-phase cells. Cyclin D1 plays a vital role in cell cycle arrest, which is induced by let-7b overexpression. Cyclin D1 is also a target of let-7b and its expression is suppressed by upregulation of let-7b. Collectively, our results indicate that let-7b overexpression can in turn downregulate cyclin D1 expression and enhance the radiosensitivity of UM through cell cycle arrest. Let-7b could serve as a marker for radiosensitivity and could enhance the therapeutic benefit of UM cell irradiation. PMID:25588203

  13. A new treatment for human malignant melanoma targeting L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1): a pilot study in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Shinya; Hanazono, Kiwamu; Fu, Dah-Renn; Endo, Yoshifumi; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi; Iwano, Hidetomo; Uchide, Tsuyoshi

    2013-09-13

    L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), an isoform of amino acid transport system L, transports branched or aromatic amino acids essential for fundamental cellular activities such as cellular growth, proliferation and maintenance. This amino acid transporter recently has received attention because of its preferential and up-regulated expression in a variety of human tumors in contrast to its limited distribution and low-level expression in normal tissues. In this study, we explored the feasibility of using LAT1 inhibitor as a new therapeutic agent for human malignant melanomas (MM) using canine spontaneous MM as a model for human MM. A comparative study of LAT expression was performed in 48 normal tissues, 25MM tissues and five cell lines established from MM. The study observed LAT1 mRNA levels from MM tissues and cell lines that were significantly (P<0.01) higher than in normal tissues. Additionally, MM with distant metastasis showed a higher expression than those without distant metastasis. Functional analysis of LAT1 was performed on one of the five cell lines, CMeC-1. [(3)H]l-Leucine uptake and cellular growth activities in CMeC-1 were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by selective LAT1 inhibitors (2-amino-2-norbornane-carboxylic acid, BCH and melphalan, LPM). Inhibitory growth activities of various conventional anti-cancer drugs, including carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, dacarbazine, doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, nimustine, vinblastine and vincristine, were significantly (P<0.05) enhanced by combination use with BCH or LPM. These findings suggest that LAT1 could be a new therapeutic target for MM. PMID:23954667

  14. Advances in radiation biology: Relative radiation sensitivities of human organ systems. Volume 12

    SciTech Connect

    Lett, J.T.; Altman, K.I.; Ehmann, U.K.; Cox, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is a thematically focused issue of Advances in Radiation Biology. The topic surveyed is relative radiosensitivity of human organ systems. Topics considered include relative radiosensitivities of the thymus, spleen, and lymphohemopoietic systems; relative radiosensitivities of the small and large intestine; relative rediosensitivities of the oral cavity, larynx, pharynx, and esophagus; relative radiation sensitivity of the integumentary system; dose response of the epidermal; microvascular, and dermal populations; relative radiosensitivity of the human lung; relative radiosensitivity of fetal tissues; and tolerance of the central and peripheral nervous system to therapeutic irradiation.

  15. Clinical relevance of normal and tumour cell radiosensitivity in BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers: a review.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Jacques; Poortmans, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Women harbouring BRCA1/2 mutations are known to be at higher lifetime risk of developing breast cancer than non-carriers. Compared to mastectomy, conservative surgery is also associated, in this patient population, with a higher probability to developing recurrent ipsilateral breast cancer following primary treatment. To reduce these risks, the management of BRCA1/2 - associated cancers has therefore focused on optimal prophylactic and therapeutic interventions at the time of diagnosis. In a recent past, comparative analyses of radiosensitivity levels have been carried out in murine embryos harbouring BRCA1/2 gene mutation and in non-carriers. The fact that a number of these experimental data are in favour of higher radiosensitivity levels in carriers of germline mutations leads to concern regarding the potential consequences of exposure to radiation, especially in terms of excessive toxicity in normal tissues and radiation-induced malignancies. The objective of this review is to determine whether or not the potentially higher radiosensitivity of normal and tumour cells has a clinical relevance in BRCA1/2 mutations carriers in terms of disease control, acute and late adverse events, and tumourigenesis. PMID:25557581

  16. Dynamics of MBD2 deposition across methylated DNA regions during malignant transformation of human mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Devailly, Guillaume; Grandin, Mélodie; Perriaud, Laury; Mathot, Pauline; Delcros, Jean-Guy; Bidet, Yannick; Morel, Anne-Pierre; Bignon, Jean-Yves; Puisieux, Alain; Mehlen, Patrick; Dante, Robert

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is thought to induce transcriptional silencing through the combination of two mechanisms: the repulsion of transcriptional activators unable to bind their target sites when methylated, and the recruitment of transcriptional repressors with specific affinity for methylated DNA. The Methyl CpG Binding Domain proteins MeCP2, MBD1 and MBD2 belong to the latter category. Here, we present MBD2 ChIPseq data obtained from the endogenous MBD2 in an isogenic cellular model of oncogenic transformation of human mammary cells. In immortalized (HMEC-hTERT) or transformed (HMLER) cells, MBD2 was found in a large proportion of methylated regions and associated with transcriptional silencing. A redistribution of MBD2 on methylated DNA occurred during oncogenic transformation, frequently independently of local DNA methylation changes. Genes downregulated during HMEC-hTERT transformation preferentially gained MBD2 on their promoter. Furthermore, depletion of MBD2 induced an upregulation of MBD2-bound genes methylated at their promoter regions, in HMLER cells. Among the 3,160 genes downregulated in transformed cells, 380 genes were methylated at their promoter regions in both cell lines, specifically associated by MBD2 in HMLER cells, and upregulated upon MBD2 depletion in HMLER. The transcriptional MBD2-dependent downregulation occurring during oncogenic transformation was also observed in two additional models of mammary cell transformation. Thus, the dynamics of MBD2 deposition across methylated DNA regions was associated with the oncogenic transformation of human mammary cells. PMID:26007656

  17. Change in radiosensitivity of rats during hypokinetic stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, I. P.

    1980-01-01

    The laws governing stress modification of radiation sickness in relation to hypokinetic stress were investigated. It was found that gamma irradiation (800 rad) of rats on the third day of exposure to hypokinesia increased the radiosensitivity of the animals which was determined by the survival rate and the dynamics of body weight and the weight of some internal organs. The same radiation dose was given on the 20th day of hypokinesia and on the third day of recovery from the 20 day hypokinesia decreased the radiosensitivity of rats. It is concluded that the variations in the radiosensitivity observed may be due to a stress effect of hypokinesia.

  18. Radiosensitizing effect of zinc oxide and silica nanocomposites on cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Generalov, Roman; Kuan, Woo Boon; Chen, Wei; Kristensen, Solveig; Juzenas, Petras

    2015-05-01

    Nanoparticulates responsive to X-rays offer increased efficacy of radiation therapy. However, successful demonstrations of such nanoparticle use are limited so far due to lack of significant radiosensitizing effects or poor nanoparticle stability in a biological system. Zinc oxide (ZnO) is the most promising biocompatible material for medicinal applications. In this paper, we report preparation and characterization of scintillating ZnO/SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles. The ZnO/SiO2 nanoparticles absorb ultraviolet (UV) radiation (below 360nm) and emit green fluorescence (400-750nm, maximum 550nm). Under X-ray irradiation (200kVp), the nanoparticles scintillate emitting luminescence in the region 350-700nm (maximum 420nm). The synthesized ZnO/SiO2 nanoparticles are stable in a biologically relevant environment (water and cell growth medium). The potential of the ZnO/SiO2 nanoparticles for radiosensitization is demonstrated in human prostate adenocarcinoma cell lines (LNCaP and Du145). The nanoparticles enhance radiation-induced reduction in cell survival about 2-fold for LNCaP and 1.5-fold for Du145 cells. Radiosensitizing effect can be attributed to X-ray-induced radiocatalysis by the nanoparticles. PMID:25829130

  19. Raman spectrosopic characterization of human malignant tissues: implications for a percutaneous optical biopsy technique for in-situ tissue diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redd, Douglas C. B.; Frank, Christopher J.; Feng, Zhe Chuan; Gansler, Ted S.; McCreery, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advancements in the technique of Raman spectroscopy now make it possible to achieve rapid, minimally invasive and non-destructive characterization of tissues. In order to evaluate the efficacy of this technique for diagnosis, the Raman spectra of normal and neoplastic human tissues (e.g., breast, kidney, liver and colon) were obtained utilizing visible and near-IR excitation. Normal breast tissue and colon adenocarcinoma showed major Raman features due to the presence of carotenoids and lipids. In breast carcinoma, the features due to lipids were attenuated and as fibrosis (desmoplasia) increased, new spectral features attributable to collagen were observed. Samples of normal and neoplastic liver and kidney show unique spectral differences sufficient to permit tissue differentiation.

  20. Inhibition of Hsp27 Radiosensitizes Head-and-Neck Cancer by Modulating Deoxyribonucleic Acid Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Guttmann, David M.; Hart, Lori; Du, Kevin; Seletsky, Andrew; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To present a novel method of tumor radiosensitization through Hsp27 knockdown using locked nucleic acid (LNA) and to investigate the role of Hsp27 in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival assays, immunoblotting, the proximity ligation assay, and γH2AX foci analysis were conducted in SQ20B and FaDu human head-and-neck cancer cell lines treated with Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Additionally, nude mice with FaDu flank tumors were treated with fractionated radiation therapy after pretreatment with Hsp27 LNA and monitored for tumor growth. Results: Hsp27 LNA and Hsp27 shRNA radiosensitized head-and-neck cancer cell lines in an Hsp27-dependent manner. Ataxia-Telangectasia Mutated-mediated DNA repair signaling was impaired in irradiated cells with Hsp27 knockdown. ATM kinase inhibition abrogated the radiosensitizing effect of Hsp27. Furthermore, Hsp27 LNA and shRNA both attenuated DNA repair kinetics after radiation, and Hsp27 was found to colocalize with ATM in both untreated and irradiated cells. Last, combined radiation and Hsp27 LNA treatment in tumor xenografts in nude mice suppressed tumor growth compared with either treatment alone. Conclusions: These results support a radiosensitizing property of Hsp27 LNA in vitro and in vivo, implicate Hsp27 in double strand break repair, and suggest that Hsp27 LNA might eventually serve as an effective clinical agent in the radiotherapy of head-and-neck cancer.

  1. Comparison of microwave and magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia radiosensitization in murine breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustini, Andrew J.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Hoopes, Paul J.

    2011-03-01

    Hyperthermia has been shown to be an effective radiosensitizer. Its utility as a clinical modality has been limited by a minimally selective tumor sensitivity and the inability to be delivered in a tumor-specific manner. Recent in vivo studies (rodent and human) have shown that cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity can be effectively and safely delivered via iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (mNP) and an appropriately matched noninvasive alternating magnetic field (AMF). To explore the tumor radiosensitization potential of mNP hyperthermia we used a syngeneic mouse breast cancer model, dextran-coated 110 nm hydrodynamic diameter mNP and a 169 kHz / 450 Oe (35.8 kA/m) AMF. Intradermally implanted (flank) tumors (150 +/- 40 mm3) were treated by injection of 0.04 ml mNP (7.5 mg Fe) / cm3 into the tumor and an AMF (35.8 kA/m and 169 kHz) exposure necessary to achieve a CEM (cumulative equivalent minute) thermal dose of 60 (CEM 60). Tumors were treated with mNP hyperthermia (CEM 60), radiation alone (15 Gy, single dose) and in combination. Compared to the radiation and heat alone treatments, the combined treatment resulted in a greater than two-fold increase in tumor regrowth tripling time (tumor treatment efficacy). None of the treatments resulted in significant normal tissue toxicity or morbidity. Studies were also conducted to compare the radiosensitization effect of mNP hyperthermia with that of microwave-induced hyperthermia. The effects of incubation of nanoparticles within tumors (to allow nanoparticles to be endocytosed) before application of AMF and radiation were determined. This preliminary information suggests cancer cell specific hyperthermia (i.e. antibody-directed or anatomically-directed mNP) is capable of providing significantly greater radiosensitization / therapeutic ratio enhancement than other forms of hyperthermia delivery.

  2. Cell surface response of chemically transformed, malignant mouse embryonal fibroblasts and human colon cancer cells to the maturation-promoting agent, N,N-dimethylformamide

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    The lactoperoxidase//sup 125/I radioiodination procedure was used to probe the cell surface of normal, nontransformed AKR-2B mouse embryo fibroblasts and malignant, permanently methylcholanthrene-transformed AKR-2B (AKR-MCA) cells to establish the relationship between cell surface changes and transformation/differentiation in this cell system. AKR-MCA cells displayed surface alterations secondary to N,N-dimethylformamide (DFM)-promoted differentiation. Growth of AKR-MCA cells in DMF virtually eliminated the 85,000 and 63,000 molecular weight surface proteins susceptible to radioiodination and increased surface material of approx.200,000 molecular weight. Thus, surface profiles of DFM-treated AKR-MCA cells were essentially identical to those of nontransformed AKR-2B cells. Experimentation was extended to a cultured human colon cancer cell line (HCT MOSER). HCT MOSER cells exposed to DMF manifested marked, reversible morphological and surface changes which occurred as a function of time of growth in DMF and DMF concentration. Interestingly, material reactive with anti-fibronectin was found on the surfaces and in the culture medium of DFM-treated HCT MOSER cells.

  3. Blockade of p53 by HIF-2α, but not HIF-1α, is involved in arsenite-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Li, Yuan; Pang, Ying; Ling, Min; Shen, Lu; Jiang, Rongrong; Zhao, Yue; Zhou, Jianwei; Wang, Xinru; Liu, Qizhan

    2012-06-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), which consist of α and β subunits, are transcription factors involved in regulation of a variety of cellular functions. By blocking the function of the tumor suppressor p53, over-expressions of HIFs are linked to carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Inorganic arsenic, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, is associated with an increased risk of cancer. Although there are several hypotheses regarding arsenic-induced carcinogenesis, the mechanism of action remains obscure. We have shown that long-term exposure of human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells to a low level of arsenite increases their proliferation rate and anchorage-independent growth. When introduced into nude mice, the transformed cells are tumorigenic. The present report demonstrates that, with increased time of exposure to arsenite, there is more increased expression of HIF-2α, but not HIF-1α. These factors are known to have different functions, and, in some cases, opposite effects. Arsenite induces accumulation of HIF-2α by inhibiting its degradation through the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome pathway. HIF-2α knockdown, but not HIF-1α knockdown, increases the activation of p53. Finally, inhibition of HIF-2α blocks arsenite-induced proliferation and malignant transformation. Thus, our studies show that blockade of p53 function by inhibiting the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation of HIF-2α, but not that of HIF-1α, is involved in arsenite-induced proliferation and neoplastic transformation of HBE cells. PMID:22447124

  4. T-lymphocyte subgroups and the activity of human natural killer (HNK) cells in low-grade and high-grade malignant cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Burger, T; Schmelczer, M; Molnr, L; Fbin, G; Szab, A; Tvri, E

    1990-01-01

    T-lymphocyte subgroups and the percentage and activity of Human Natural Killer (HNK) cells were investigated in 24 patients suffering from low-grade and 24 patients with high-grade malignancies of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The ratio of CD3, CD4, Leu-7, and HNK cells as well as the release by HNK cells of the 51Cr bound to target cells were found decreased, depending on the pathological stage. The tests were performed with OKT-monoclonal sera. A significant change was observed in the reactivity of bone marrow cells to monoclonal sera; the change was identical in character with that observed when lymphocytes isolated from the peripheral blood were used in the same tests. No significant changes could be observed in the quantitative relations of immunoglobulins. Such changes could by no means be expected, on the basis of the unchanged number of T-suppressor lymphocytes (CDB). As to the supposed immunological relation in detail, the role of a plasma factor that reduces T-lymphocyte formation is assumed to have primary importance in this phenomenon. PMID:1704121

  5. Genetic Alteration of a bispecific ligand directed toxin targeting human CD19 and CD22 receptors resulting in improved efficacy against systemic B cell malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Vallera, Daniel A.; Chen, Hua; Sicheneder, Andrew R.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Taras, Elizabeth P.

    2009-01-01

    A bispecific ligand-directed toxin (BLT) called DT2219ARL consisting of two sFv ligands recognizing CD19 and CD22 and catalytic DT390 was genetically enhanced for superior in vivo anti-leukemia activity. Genetic alterations included reverse orienting VH-VL domains and adding aggregation reducing/stabilizing linkers. In vivo, these improvements resulted in previously unseen long-term tumor-free survivors measured in a bioluminescent xenograft imaging model in which the progression of human Raji Burkitt’s lymphoma could be tracked in real time and in a Daudi model as well. Studies showed DT2219ARL was potent (IC50s 0.06–0.2 nM range) and selectively blockable. Imaging studies indicated the highly invasive nature of this B cell malignancy model and showed it likely induced preterminal hind limb paralysis because of metastasis to spinal regions prevented by DT2219ARL. DT2219ARL represents a new class of bispecific biological that can be continually improved by genetic mutation. PMID:19327829

  6. Phosphorylated human lectin galectin-3: analysis of ligand binding by histochemical monitoring of normal/malignant squamous epithelia and by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Szabo, P; Dam, T K; Smetana, K; Dvoránková, B; Kübler, D; Brewer, C F; Gabius, H-J

    2009-02-01

    The human lectin galectin-3 is a multifunctional effector with special functions in regulation of adhesion and apoptosis. Its unique trimodular organization includes the 12-residue N-terminal sequence, a substrate for protein kinase CK1-dependent phosphorylation. As a step towards elucidating its significance, we prepared phosphorylated galectin-3, labelled it and used it as a tool in histochemistry. We monitored normal and malignant squamous epithelia. Binding was suprabasal with obvious positive correlation to the degree of differentiation and negative correlation to proliferation. The staining pattern resembled that obtained with the unmodified lectin. Basal cell carcinomas were invariably negative. The epidermal positivity profile was akin to distribution of the desmosomal protein desmoglein, as also seen with keratinocytes in vitro. In all cases, binding was inhibitable by the presence of lactose, prompting further investigation of the activity of the lectin site by a sensitive biochemical method, i.e. isothermal titration calorimetry. The overall affinity and the individual enthalpic and entropic contributions were determined. No effect of phosphorylation was revealed. This strategic combination of histo- and biochemical techniques applied to an endogenous effector after its processing by a protein kinase thus enabled a detailed monitoring of the binding properties of the post-translationally modified lectin. It underscores the value of using endogenous lectins as a histochemical tool. The documented approach has merit for applications beyond lectinology. PMID:18983621

  7. Enhanced induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via the mitochondrial membrane potential disruption in human U87 malignant glioma cells by aloe emodin.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Samhani; Haris, Khalilah; Abdul Ghani, Abdul Rahman Izaini; Abdullah, Jafri Malin; Johan, Muhammad Farid; Mohamed Yusoff, Abdul Aziz

    2013-09-01

    Aloe emodin, one of the active compounds found in Aloe vera leaves, plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and death. It has been reported to promote the anti-cancer effects in various cancer cells by inducing apoptosis. However, the mechanism of inducing apoptosis by this agent is poorly understood in glioma cells. This research is to investigate the apoptosis and cell cycle arrest inducing by aloe emodin on U87 human malignant glioma cells. Aloe emodin showed a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of U87 cells proliferation and decreased the percentage of viable U87 cells via the induction of apoptosis. Characteristic morphological changes, such as the formation of apoptotic bodies, were observed with confocal microscope by Annexin V-FITC/PI staining, supporting our viability study and flow cytometry analysis results. Our data also demonstrated that aloe emodin arrested the cell cycle in the S phase and promoted the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in U87 cells that indicated the early event of the mitochondria-induced apoptotic pathway. PMID:23869465

  8. Radiosensitivity of cultured insect cells: II. Diptera

    SciTech Connect

    Koval, T.M.

    1983-10-01

    The radiosensitivity of five dipteran cell lines representing three mosquito genera and one fruit fly genus were examined. These lines are: (1) ATC-10, Aedes aegypti; (2) RU-TAE-14, Toxorhynchites amboinensis; (3) RU-ASE-2A, Anopheles stephensi; (4) WR69-DM-1, Drosophila melanogaster; and (5) WR69-DM-2, Drosophila melanogaster. Population doubling times for these lines range from approximately 16 to 48 hr. Diploid chromosome numbers are six for the mosquito cells and eight for the fruit fly cells D/sub 0/ values are 5.1 and 6.5 Gy for the Drosophila cell lines and 3.6, 6.2, and 10.2 Gy for the mosquito cell lines. The results of this study demonstrate that dipteran insect cells are a few times more resistant to radiation than mammalian cells, but not nearly as radioresistant as lepidopteran cells.

  9. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland ; Hales, Russell K.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  10. Ganetespib radiosensitization for liver cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Chettiar, Sivarajan T; Malek, Reem; Annadanam, Anvesh; Nugent, Katriana M; Kato, Yoshinori; Wang, Hailun; Cades, Jessica A; Taparra, Kekoa; Belcaid, Zineb; Ballew, Matthew; Manmiller, Sarah; Proia, David; Lim, Michael; Anders, Robert A; Herman, Joseph M; Tran, Phuoc T

    2016-04-01

    Therapies for liver cancer particularly those including radiation are still inadequate. Inhibiting the stress response machinery is an appealing anti-cancer and radiosensitizing therapeutic strategy. Heat-shock-protein-90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone that is a prominent effector of the stress response machinery and is overexpressed in liver cancer cells. HSP90 client proteins include critical components of pathways implicated in liver cancer cell survival and radioresistance. The effects of a novel non-geldanamycin HSP90 inhibitor, ganetespib, combined with radiation were examined on 3 liver cancer cell lines, Hep3b, HepG2 and HUH7, using in vitro assays for clonogenic survival, apoptosis, cell cycle distribution, γH2AX foci kinetics and client protein expression in pathways important for liver cancer survival and radioresistance. We then evaluated tumor growth delay and effects of the combined ganetespib-radiation treatment on tumor cell proliferation in a HepG2 hind-flank tumor graft model. Nanomolar levels of ganetespib alone exhibited liver cancer cell anti-cancer activity in vitro as shown by decreased clonogenic survival that was associated with increased apoptotic cell death, prominent G2-M arrest and marked changes in PI3K/AKT/mTOR and RAS/MAPK client protein activity. Ganetespib caused a supra-additive radiosensitization in all liver cancer cell lines at low nanomolar doses with enhancement ratios between 1.33-1.78. These results were confirmed in vivo, where the ganetespib-radiation combination therapy produced supra-additive tumor growth delay compared with either therapy by itself in HepG2 tumor grafts. Our data suggest that combined ganetespib-radiation therapy exhibits promising activity against liver cancer cells, which should be investigated in clinical studies. PMID:26980196

  11. Can Drugs Enhance Hypofractionated Radiotherapy? A Novel Method of Modeling Radiosensitization Using In Vitro Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ohri, Nitin; Dicker, Adam P.; Lawrence, Yaacov Richard

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy (hRT) is being explored for a number of malignancies. The potential benefit of giving concurrent chemotherapy with hRT is not known. We sought to predict the effects of combined modality treatments by using mathematical models derived from laboratory data. Methods and Materials: Data from 26 published clonogenic survival assays for cancer cell lines with and without the use of radiosensitizing chemotherapy were collected. The first three data points of the RT arm of each assay were used to derive parameters for the linear quadratic (LQ) model, the multitarget (MT) model, and the generalized linear quadratic (gLQ) model. For each assay and model, the difference between the predicted and observed surviving fractions at the highest tested RT dose was calculated. The gLQ model was fitted to all the data from each RT cell survival assay, and the biologically equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions (EQD2s) of clinically relevant hRT regimens were calculated. The increase in cell kill conferred by the addition of chemotherapy was used to estimate the EQD2 of hRT along with a radiosensitizing agent. For comparison, this was repeated using conventionally fractionated RT regimens. Results: At a mean RT dose of 8.0 Gy, the average errors for the LQ, MT, and gLQ models were 1.63, 0.83, and 0.56 log units, respectively, favoring the gLQ model (p < 0.05). Radiosensitizing chemotherapy increased the EQD2 of hRT schedules by an average of 28% to 82%, depending on disease site. This increase was similar to the gains predicted for the addition of chemotherapy to conventionally fractionated RT. Conclusions: Based on published in vitro assays, the gLQ equation is superior to the LQ and MT models in predicting cell kill at high doses of RT. Modeling exercises demonstrate that significant increases in biologically equivalent dose may be achieved with the addition of radiosensitizing agents to hRT. Clinical study of this approach is warranted.

  12. Human epidemiology: A review of fiber type and characteristics in the development of malignant and nonmalignant disease

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, J.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Consideration of the human epidemiology of diseases arising from exposure to naturally occurring and man-made mineral fibers encompasses the several forms of asbestos, other naturally occurring silicates, and man-made mineral fibers. The diseases arising from exposures to some of these fibers include pleural thickening, pulmonary fibrosis, lung cancers, mesothelioma of the pleura and peritoneum, and other cancers. Risk factors important in assessing these diseases include assessment of latency, duration of exposure, cumulative exposure, fiber origin and characteristics, other possible confounding occupational or environmental exposures, and smoking. Methodological issues commonly presenting problems in evaluation of these data include assessment of the adequacy of environmental exposures, particularly in regard to fiber identification, distribution, and concentration over the duration of exposure, and the adequacy of study design to detect health effects. Research priorities include further assessment and standardization of pleural thickening relative to fiber exposure, uniform mesothelioma surveillance, further epidemiological assessment of certain silicate and man-made mineral fiber cohorts with emphasis given to assessment of tremolite and small diameter glass and ceramic fibers. Further assessment of possible health risks of the general public should await improved definition of relevant fiber exposure in ambient air.

  13. YThe BigH3 Tumor Suppressor Gene in Radiation-Induced Malignant Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Shao, G.; Piao, C.; Hei, T.

    Carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process with sequences of genetic events governing the phenotypic expression of a series of transformation steps leading to the development of metastatic cancer Previous studies from this laboratory have identified a 7 fold down- regulation of the novel tumor suppressor Big-h3 among radiation induced tumorigenic BEP2D cells Furthermore ectopic re-expression of this gene suppresses tumorigenic phenotype and promotes the sensitivity of these tumor cells to etoposide-induced apoptosis To extend these studies using a genomically more stable bronchial cell line we ectopically expresses the catalytic subunit of telomerase hTERT in primary human small airway epithelial SAE cells and generated several clonal cell lines that have been continuously in culture for more than 250 population doublings and are considered immortal Comparably-treated control SAE cells infected with only the viral vector senesced after less than 10 population doublings The immortalized clones demonstrated anchorage dependent growth and are non-tumorigenic in nude mice These cells show no alteration in the p53 gene but a decrease in p16 expression Exponentially growing SAEh cells were exposed to graded doses of 1 GeV nucleon of 56 Fe ions accelerated at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Irradiated cells underwent gradual phenotypic alterations after extensive in vitro cultivation Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming anchorage independent in semisolid medium These findings indicate

  14. TALENs-directed knockout of the full-length transcription factor Nrf1α that represses malignant behaviour of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yonggang; Qiu, Lu; Lü, Fenglin; Ru, Xufang; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Yu, Siwang; Zhang, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    The full-length Nrf1α is processed into distinct isoforms, which together regulate genes essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and organ integrity, and liver-specific loss of Nrf1 in mice results in spontaneous hepatoma. Herein, we report that the human constitutive Nrf1α, rather than smaller Nrf1β/γ, expression is attenuated or abolished in the case of low-differentiated high-metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas. Therefore, Nrf1α is of importance in the physio-pathological origin and development, but its specific pathobiological function(s) remains elusive. To address this, TALENs-directed knockout of Nrf1α, but not Nrf1β/γ, is created in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The resulting Nrf1α−/− cells are elongated, with slender spindle-shapes and enlarged gaps between cells observed under scanning electron microscope. When compared with wild-type controls, the invasive and migratory abilities of Nrf1α−/− cells are increased significantly, along with the cell-cycle G2-M arrest and S-phase reduction, as accompanied by suppressed apoptosis. Despite a modest increase in the soft-agar colony formation of Nrf1α−/− cells, its loss-of-function markedly promotes malgrowth of the subcutaneous carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with hepatic metastasis. Together with molecular expression results, we thus suppose requirement of Nrf1α (and major derivates) for gene regulatory mechanisms repressing cancer cell process (e.g. EMT) and malignant behaviour (e.g. migration). PMID:27065079

  15. TALENs-directed knockout of the full-length transcription factor Nrf1α that represses malignant behaviour of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yonggang; Qiu, Lu; Lü, Fenglin; Ru, Xufang; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Yu, Siwang; Zhang, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    The full-length Nrf1α is processed into distinct isoforms, which together regulate genes essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and organ integrity, and liver-specific loss of Nrf1 in mice results in spontaneous hepatoma. Herein, we report that the human constitutive Nrf1α, rather than smaller Nrf1β/γ, expression is attenuated or abolished in the case of low-differentiated high-metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas. Therefore, Nrf1α is of importance in the physio-pathological origin and development, but its specific pathobiological function(s) remains elusive. To address this, TALENs-directed knockout of Nrf1α, but not Nrf1β/γ, is created in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The resulting Nrf1α(-/-) cells are elongated, with slender spindle-shapes and enlarged gaps between cells observed under scanning electron microscope. When compared with wild-type controls, the invasive and migratory abilities of Nrf1α(-/-) cells are increased significantly, along with the cell-cycle G2-M arrest and S-phase reduction, as accompanied by suppressed apoptosis. Despite a modest increase in the soft-agar colony formation of Nrf1α(-/-) cells, its loss-of-function markedly promotes malgrowth of the subcutaneous carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with hepatic metastasis. Together with molecular expression results, we thus suppose requirement of Nrf1α (and major derivates) for gene regulatory mechanisms repressing cancer cell process (e.g. EMT) and malignant behaviour (e.g. migration). PMID:27065079

  16. Physical basis and biological mechanisms of gold nanoparticle radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Karl T; McMahon, Stephen J; Currell, Fred J; Prise, Kevin M

    2012-08-21

    The unique properties of nanomaterials, in particular gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have applications for a wide range of biomedical applications. GNPs have been proposed as novel radiosensitizing agents due to their strong photoelectric absorption coefficient. Experimental evidence supporting the application of GNPs as radiosensitizing agents has been provided from extensive in vitro investigation and a relatively limited number of in vivo studies. Whilst these studies provide experimental evidence for the use of GNPs in combination with ionising radiation, there is an apparent disparity between the observed experimental findings and the level of radiosensitization predicted by mass energy absorption and GNP concentration. This review summarises experimental findings and attempts to highlight potential underlying biological mechanisms of response in GNP radiosensitization. PMID:22767423

  17. Fenretinide Perturbs Focal Adhesion Kinase in Premalignant and Malignant Human Oral Keratinocytes. Fenretinide's Chemopreventive Mechanisms Include ECM Interactions.

    PubMed

    Han, Byungdo B; Li, Suyang; Tong, Meng; Holpuch, Andrew S; Spinney, Richard; Wang, Daren; Border, Michael B; Liu, Zhongfa; Sarode, Sachin; Pei, Ping; Schwendeman, Steven P; Mallery, Susan R

    2015-05-01

    The membrane-associated protein, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), modulates cell-extracellular matrix interactions and also conveys prosurvival and proliferative signals. Notably, increased intraepithelial FAK levels accompany transformation of premalignant oral intraepithelial neoplasia (OIN) to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). OIN chemoprevention is a patient-centric, optimal strategy to prevent OSCC's comorbidities and mortality. The cancer chemopreventive and synthetic vitamin A derivative, fenretinide, has demonstrated protein-binding capacities, for example, mTOR- and retinol-binding protein interactions. These studies used a continuum of human oral keratinocytes (normal-HPV E6/E7-transduced-OSCC) to assess potential fenretinide-FAK drug protein interactions and functional consequences on cellular growth regulation and motility. Molecular modeling studies demonstrated that fenretinide has approximately 200-fold greater binding affinity relative to the natural ligand (ATP) at FAK's kinase domain. Fenretinide also shows intermediate binding at FAK's FERM domain and interacts at the ATP-binding site of the closest FAK analogue, PYK2. Fenretinide significantly suppressed proliferation via induction of apoptosis and G2-M cell-cycle blockade. Fenretinide-treated cells also demonstrated F-actin disruption, significant inhibition of both directed migration and invasion of a synthetic basement membrane, and decreased phosphorylation of growth-promoting kinases. A commercially available FAK inhibitor did not suppress cell invasion. Notably, although FAK's FERM domain directs cell invasion, FAK inhibitors target the kinase domain. In addition, FAK-specific siRNA-treated cells showed an intermediate cell migration capacity; data which suggest cocontribution of the established migrating-enhancing PYK2. Our data imply that fenretinide is uniquely capable of disrupting FAK's and PYK2's prosurvival and mobility-enhancing effects and further extend fenretinide's chemopreventive contributions beyond induction of apoptosis and differentiation. PMID:25712051

  18. Increased Notch Signaling Enhances Radioresistance of Malignant Stromal Cells Induced by Glioma Stem/ Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinshi; Chen, Yanming; Wang, Mengyao; Ma, Jiawei; Hong, Lei; Liu, Ning; Fan, Qiuhong; Lu, Xueguan; Tian, Ye; Wang, Aidong; Dong, Jun; Lan, Qing; Huang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Background Host malignant stromal cells induced by glioma stem/progenitor cells were revealed to be more radiation-resistant than the glioma stem/progenitor cells themselves after malignant transformation in nude mice. However, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unclear. Methods Malignant stromal cells induced by glioma stem/progenitor cell 2 (GSC-induced host brain tumor cells, ihBTC2) were isolated and identified from the double color-coded orthotopic glioma nude mouse model. The survival fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) was used to evaluate the radiation resistance of ihBTC2, the human glioma stem/progenitor cell line SU3 and its radiation-resistant sub-strain SU3-5R and the rat C6 glioma cell line. The mRNA of Notch 1 and Hes1 from ihBTC2 cells were detected using qPCR before and after 4 Gy radiation. The expression of the Notch 1, pAkt and Bcl-2 proteins were investigated by Western blot. To confirm the role of the Notch pathway in the radiation resistance of ihBTC2, Notch signaling blocker gamma secretase inhibitors (GSIs) were used. Results The ihBTC2 cells had malignant phenotypes, such as infinite proliferation, hyperpentaploid karyotype, tumorigenesis in nude mice and expression of protein markers of oligodendroglia cells. The SF2 of ihBTC2 cells was significantly higher than that of any other cell line (P<0.05, n = 3). The expression of Notch 1 and Hes1 mRNAs from ihBTC2 cells was significantly increased after radiation. Moreover, the Notch 1, pAkt and Bcl-2 proteins were significantly increased after radiation (P<0.05, n = 3). Inhibition of Notch signaling markedly enhanced the radiosensitivity of ihBTC2 cells. Conclusions In an orthotopic glioma model, the malignant transformation of host stromal cells was induced by glioma stem/progenitor cells. IhBTC2 cells are more radiation-resistant than the glioma stem/progenitor cells, which may be mediated by activation of the Notch signaling pathway. PMID:26599017

  19. Metalloporphyrins and their uses as radiosensitizers for radiation therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    2004-07-06

    The present invention covers radiosensitizers containing as an active ingredient halogenated derivatives of boronated porphyrins containing multiple carborane cages having the structure ##STR1## which selectively accumulate in neoplastic tissue within the irradiation volume and thus can be used in cancer therapies including, but not limited to, boron neutron--capture therapy and photodynamic therapy. The present invention also covers methods for using these radiosensitizers in tumor imaging and cancer treatment.

  20. Impaired lymphocyte development and antibody class switching and increased malignancy in a murine model of DNA ligase IV syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nijnik, Anastasia; Dawson, Sara; Crockford, Tanya L.; Woodbine, Lisa; Visetnoi, Supawan; Bennett, Sophia; Jones, Margaret; Turner, Gareth D.; Jeggo, Penelope A.; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Cornall, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations in DNA ligase IV (LIG4) cause a human syndrome of immunodeficiency, radiosensitivity, and growth retardation due to defective DNA repair by the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. Lig4-null mice are embryonic lethal, and better mouse models are needed to study human LigIV syndrome. We recently identified a viable mouse strain with a Y288C hypomorphic mutation in the Lig4 gene. Lig4Y288C mice exhibit a greater than 10-fold reduction of LigIV activity in vivo and recapitulate the immunodeficiency and growth retardation seen in human patients. Here, we have demonstrated that the Lig4Y288C mutation leads to multiple defects in lymphocyte development and function, including impaired V(D)J recombination, peripheral lymphocyte survival and proliferation, and B cell class switch recombination. We also highlight a high incidence of thymic tumors in the Lig4Y288C mice, suggesting that wild-type LigIV protects against malignant transformation. These findings provide explanations for the complex lymphoid phenotype of human LigIV syndrome. PMID:19451691

  1. Pediatric Salivary Gland Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ord, Robert A; Carlson, Eric R

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric malignant salivary gland tumors are extremely rare. The percentage of malignant tumors is higher than that seen in adults, although the outcomes in terms of survival are better in pediatric patients. The mainstay of treatment is surgical excision with negative margins. This article reviews current concepts in demographics, etiology, management, and outcomes of malignant salivary tumors in children. PMID:26614703

  2. Cytoplasmic RNA from normal and malignant human cells shows homology to the DNAs of Epstein-Barr virus and human adenoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Arrand, J R; Walsh-Arrand, J E; Rymo, L

    1983-01-01

    Cytoplasmic RNA prepared from several human cell lines and tissues was hybridised to DNA from Epstein-Barr virus, human adenovirus types 2, 3 and 12 and human papovaviruses BK and JC. RNA from all the cells, regardless of whether or not they were virally infected, hybridised to specific regions of the Epstein-Barr virus or adenovirus genomes but not to papovavirus DNA. The cellular cross-hybridising species appear to be repetitive sequences which are conserved in higher eukaryotes. Mismatch estimations indicate a high degree of homology between the viral and host sequences. Detailed analysis of selected regions of viral DNA failed to reveal any primary-structural peculiarities. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 8. PMID:6196189

  3. Celecoxib Induced Tumor Cell Radiosensitization by Inhibiting Radiation Induced Nuclear EGFR Transport and DNA-Repair: A COX-2 Independent Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmann, Klaus H. Mayer, Claus; Ohneseit, Petra A.; Raju, Uma; Andratschke, Nickolaus H.; Milas, Luka; Rodemann, H. Peter

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms mediating radiosensitization of human tumor cells by the selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor celecoxib. Methods and Materials: Experiments were performed using bronchial carcinoma cells A549, transformed fibroblasts HH4dd, the FaDu head-and-neck tumor cells, the colon carcinoma cells HCT116, and normal fibroblasts HSF7. Effects of celecoxib treatment were assessed by clonogenic cell survival, Western analysis, and quantification of residual DNA damage by {gamma}H{sub 2}AX foci assay. Results: Celecoxib treatment resulted in a pronounced radiosensitization of A549, HCT116, and HSF7 cells, whereas FaDu and HH4dd cells were not radiosensitized. The observed radiosensitization could neither be correlated with basal COX-2 expression pattern nor with basal production of prostaglandin E2, but was depended on the ability of celecoxib to inhibit basal and radiation-induced nuclear transport of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The nuclear EGFR transport was strongly inhibited in A549-, HSF7-, and COX-2-deficient HCT116 cells, which were radiosensitized, but not in FaDu and HH4dd cells, which resisted celecoxib-induced radiosensitization. Celecoxib inhibited radiation-induced DNA-PK activation in A549, HSF7, and HCT116 cells, but not in FaDu and HH4dd cells. Consequentially, celecoxib increased residual {gamma}H2AX foci after irradiation, demonstrating that inhibition of DNA repair has occurred in responsive A549, HCT116, and HSF7 cells only. Conclusions: Celecoxib enhanced radiosensitivity by inhibition of EGFR-mediated mechanisms of radioresistance, a signaling that was independent of COX-2 activity. This novel observation may have therapeutic implications such that COX-2 inhibitors may improve therapeutic efficacy of radiation even in patients whose tumor radioresistance is not dependent on COX-2.

  4. Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylated at both linker and COOH-terminal regions transmit malignant TGF-beta signal in later stages of human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Koichi; Kitano, Chiaki; Murata, Miki; Sekimoto, Go; Yoshida, Katsunori; Uemura, Yoshiko; Seki, Toshihito; Taketani, Shigeru; Fujisawa, Jun-ichi; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2009-07-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta initially inhibits growth of mature epithelial cells. Later, however, autocrine TGF-beta signaling acts in concert with the Ras pathway to induce a proliferative and invasive phenotype. TGF-beta activates not only TGF-beta type I receptor (TbetaRI) but also Ras-associated kinases, which differentially phosphorylate the mediators Smad2 and Smad3 to create distinct phosphorylated forms: COOH-terminally phosphorylated Smad2/3 (pSmad2C and pSmad3C) and both linker and COOH-terminally phosphorylated Smad2/3 (pSmad2L/C and pSmad3L/C). In this study, we investigated actions of pSmad2L/C and pSmad3L/C in cancer progression. TGF-beta inhibited cell growth by down-regulating c-Myc oncoprotein through the pSmad2C and pSmad3C pathway; TGF-beta signaling, in turn, enhanced cell growth by up-regulating c-Myc through the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4-dependent pSmad2L/C and pSmad3L/C pathways in cell nuclei. Alternatively, TbetaRI and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) together created cytoplasmic pSmad2L/C, which entered the nucleus and stimulated cell invasion, partly by up-regulating matrix metalloproteinase-9. In 20 clinical samples, pSmad2L/C and pSmad3L/C showed nuclear localization at invasion fronts of all TGF-beta-producing human metastatic colorectal cancers. In vitro kinase assay confirmed that nuclear CDK4 and cytoplasmic JNK obtained from the tumor tissue could phosphorylate Smad2 or Smad3 at their linker regions. We suggest that CDK4, together with JNK, alters tumor-suppressive TGF-beta signaling to malignant characteristics in later stages of human colorectal cancer. The linker phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 may represent a target for intervention in human metastatic cancer. PMID:19531654

  5. Targeted Radiosensitization by the Chk1 Inhibitor SAR-020106

    SciTech Connect

    Borst, Gerben R.; McLaughlin, Martin; Kyula, Joan N.; Neijenhuis, Sari; Khan, Aadil; Good, James; Zaidi, Shane; Powell, Ned G.; Meier, Pascal; Collins, Ian; Garrett, Michelle D.; Verheij, Marcel; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To explore the activity of a potent Chk1 inhibitor (SAR-020106) in combination with radiation. Methods and Materials: Colony and mechanistic in vitro assays and a xenograft in vivo model. Results: SAR-020106 suppressed-radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M arrest and reduced clonogenic survival only in p53-deficient tumor cells. SAR-020106 promoted mitotic entry following irradiation in all cell lines, but p53-deficient cells were likely to undergo apoptosis or become aneuploid, while p53 wild-type cells underwent a postmitotic G{sub 1} arrest followed by subsequent normal cell cycle re-entry. Following combined treatment with SAR-020106 and radiation, homologous-recombination-mediated DNA damage repair was inhibited in all cell lines. A significant increase in the number of pan-γH2AX-staining apoptotic cells was observed only in p53-deficient cell lines. Efficacy was confirmed in vivo in a clinically relevant human head-and-neck cell carcinoma xenograft model. Conclusion: The Chk1 inhibitor SAR-020106 is a potent radiosensitizer in tumor cell lines defective in p53 signaling.

  6. Serial PET studies of human cerebral malignancy with (1-/sup 11/C)putrescine and (1-/sup 11/C)2-deoxy-D-glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Hiesiger, E.; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.; Logan, J.; Brodie, J.D.; McPherson, D.; MacGregor, R.R.; Christman, D.R.; Volkow, N.D.; Flamm, E.

    1987-08-01

    Serial PET measurements of (1-/sup 11/C)putrescine ((/sup 11/C)PUT) uptake and glucose metabolic rate (GMR) using (1-/sup 11/C)2-deoxy-D-glucose ((/sup 11/C)2DG) were made on eight human subjects with a radiological and, in most cases, pathological diagnosis of primary or metastatic brain tumor. Blood-to-brain influx constants (Ki) were calculated for (/sup 11/C)PUT. Tumor uptake of /sup 11/C after (/sup 11/C)PUT injection was unidirectional peaking at 15 min. The mean +/- s.d. Kis for (/sup 11/C)PUT for tumor and normal brain tissue were 0.78 +/- 0.045 and 0.024 +/- 0.007 ml cc-1 min-1, respectively (average of ratio, 3.11 whereas the ratio of GMR for tumor and normal brain tissue was 1.2 +/- 0.5. The mean Ki for four active, high grade astrocytomas was 0.098 +/- 0.030 in contrast to 0.027 +/- 0.008 ml cc-1 min-1 for two patients with low grade astrocytoma. Active high grade astrocytomas also showed marked CT contrast enhancement and regional glucose hypermetabolism. In one subject with brain metastases, both (/sup 11/C)PUT and GMR correlated with a declining clinical picture in repeated studies over a 4-mo period. PET studies with (/sup 11/C)PUT provide a better signal:noise ratio than GMR measurements, are useful for locating small glycolytically hypometabolic tumors and, when used in longitudinal studies in a single subject, appear to provide an index of degree of malignancy.

  7. [Intraoperative radiotherapy in malignant bone tumors].

    PubMed

    Yamamuro, T; Kotoura, Y

    1993-06-01

    When a bone tumor is confirmed to be malignant by biopsy and has not expanded into the soft tissue, intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) is indicated for most parts of the four extremities. The irradiation area is exposed through an extensive skin incision, and the soft tissues are opened and retracted away from the irradiation area, leaving a layer of normal tissue directly covering the tumor. The irradiation is performed with 12-26 MeV electron beams from a betatron at a dose of 50-100 Gy, depending on the radiosensitivity of each tumor. The multifocal bilateral irradiation method is the best for minimizing complications of the soft tissues. Since 1978, we have performed IORT in combination with chemotherapy in 41 cases of malignant bone tumors and experienced only five cases of tumor recurrence one in the irradiated area and four in the non-irradiated area. Joint function in the irradiated limb was excellent. However, due to the high incidence of pathological fracture after IORT in osteolytic tumors, the limb eventually had to be replaced by a prosthesis. After 1984 when cisplatinum was introduced to our chemotherapy protocol, the cumulative 5 year survival rate increased to 81%, with the irradiated lesion preserved in situ in osteoblastic tumors and replaced with a prosthesis in osteolytic tumors. PMID:8341560

  8. Autocrine growth factors and solid tumor malignancy.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, J. H.; Karnes, W. E.; Cuttitta, F.; Walker, A.

    1991-01-01

    The ability of malignant cells to escape the constraint that normally regulate cell growth and differentiation has been a primary focus of attention for investigators of cancer cell biology. An outcome of this attention has been the discovery that the protein products of oncogenes play a role in the activation of growth signal pathways. A second outcome, possibly related to abnormal oncogene expression, has been the discovery that malignant cells frequently show an ability to regulate their own growth by the release of autocrine growth modulatory substances. Most important, the growth of certain malignant cell types has been shown to depend on autocrine growth circuits. A malignant tumor whose continued growth depends on the release of an autocrine growth factor may be vulnerable to treatment with specific receptor antagonists or immunoneutralizing antibodies designed to break the autocrine circuit. Information is rapidly emerging concerning autocrine growth factors in selected human solid tissue malignancy. Images PMID:1926844

  9. From Melanocyte to Metastatic Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Bandarchi, Bizhan; Ma, Linglei; Navab, Roya; Seth, Arun; Rasty, Golnar

    2010-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive malignancies in human and is responsible for almost 60% of lethal skin tumors. Its incidence has been increasing in white population in the past two decades. There is a complex interaction of environmental (exogenous) and endogenous, including genetic, risk factors in developing malignant melanoma. 8–12% of familial melanomas occur in a familial setting related to mutation of the CDKN2A gene that encodes p16. The aim of this is to briefly review the microanatomy and physiology of the melanocytes, epidemiology, risk factors, clinical presentation, historical classification and histopathology and, more in details, the most recent discoveries in biology and genetics of malignant melanoma. At the end, the final version of 2009 AJCC malignant melanoma staging and classification is presented. PMID:20936153

  10. MicroRNA-18a enhances the radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cells by promoting radiation-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Pan, Xiaofen; Yang, Qin; Wen, Lu; Jiang, Yao; Zhao, Yingchao; Li, Guiling

    2015-06-01

    Evidence has demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs) are important in the regulation of cellular radiosensitivity of various types of human cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the role of miR-18a in regulating the radiosensitivity of cervical cancer, in order to understand the underlying mechanism and to assess the potential of miR-18a as a biomarker for predicting radiosensitivity. The expression of miR-18a was investigated in 48 cervical cancer patients. The results revealed that miR-18a expression was significantly higher in radiosensitive patients than in radioresistant patients by RT-qPCR (P<0.05). Transient transfection experiments showed that miR-18a was upregulated by the miR-18a mimic and downregulated by the miR-18a inhibitor in the SiHa and HeLa cells. Without irradiation treatment, a similar growth was observed in the cells with or without transfection of miR-18a. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and Hoechst staining assays showed that miR-18a had no effect on the proliferation and apoptosis of cervical cancer cells after transfection. However, the upregulation of miR-18a suppressed the level of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and attenuated DNA double-strand break repair after irradiation, which re-sensitized the cervical cancer cells to radiotherapy by promoting apoptosis. Taken together, these results demonstrated that miR-18a is a potential molecule predictor of radiosensitivity in cervical cancer patients and played an important role in the response to radiotherapy. PMID:25963391

  11. Incidence of malignant thyroid tumors in humans after exposure to diagnostic doses of /sup 131/I. II. Estimation of thyroid gland size, thyroid radiation dose, and predicted versus observed number of malignant thyroid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, L.E.; Eklund, G.; Lundell, G.

    1980-12-01

    The size of the thyroid glands was analyzed for 10% of the patients in a selected group that had been exposed to diagnostic doses of /sup 131/I. The mean thyroid gland weight +- SD was 50 +- 33 g for patients 20 or more years of age and 10 +- 5 g for patients less than 20 years of age. With the present follow-up, diagnostic doses of /sup 131/I appeared not to be associated with an increased risk for later development of malignant thyroid tumors. Possible reasons for the difference between the observed number of such tumors and the number expected (47 to 124) on the basis of risk estimates of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation are discussed.

  12. Dose-rate dependence of heat radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Gerner, E.W.; Oval, J.H.; Manning, M.R.; Sim, D.A.; Bowden, G.T.; Hevezi, J.M.

    1983-09-01

    The dose rate dependence of heat radiosensitization was studied using rat astrocytoma cells in culture and a cliniclly relevant protocol of heat dose and heat radiation sequence. Cells were treated with a minimally toxic heat dose of 43/sup 0/C for 30 minutes, after which they were irradiated with varying doses of radiation at dose rates ranging from 0.567 to 300 cGy/min. This heat dose substantially reduced the extrapolation number (n), but had little effect on D/sub 0/ of the radiation survival curve at dose rates of 50 cGy/min or greater. At dose rates less than 10 cGy/min, 43/sup 0/C for 30 min had little effect on n and only for the lowest dose rate studied (0.567 cGy/min) was there a significant reduction in D/sub 0/ (60%). The thermal enhancement ratio did not vary inversely with radiation dose rate over the dose rate range studied but, instead, was maximal at the two dose rate extremes (0.567 and 300 cGy/min). These data demonstrate that a clinically relevant heat dose enhances very low dose rate, as well as high dose rate, ionizing radiation, but suggest that little benefit is to be gained from using dose rates intermediate between conventional radiotherapeutic high dose rates or dose rates representative of interstitial implants.

  13. Neutron irradiation of human melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.; Mountford, M.H.; Allen, B.J.; Mishima, Y.; Ichihashi, M.; Parsons, P.

    1989-07-01

    The biological characteristics and in vitro radiosensitivity of melanoma cells to thermal neutrons were investigated as a guide to the effectiveness of boron neutron capture therapy. Plateau phase cultures of three human malignant melanoma-established cell lines were examined for cell density at confluence, doubling time, cell cycle parameters, chromosome constitution, and melanin content. Cell survival dose-response curves, for cells preincubated in the presence or absence of p-boronophenylalanine. HCl (10B1-BPA), were measured over the dose range 0.6-8.0 Gy (N + gamma). The neutron fluence rate was 2.6 x 10(9) n/cm2/s and the total dose rate 3.7 Gy/h (31% gamma). Considerable differences were observed in the morphology and cellular properties of the cell lines. Two cell lines (96E and 96L) were amelanotic, and one was melanotic (418). An enhanced killing for neutron irradiation was found only for the melanotic cells after 20 h preincubation with 10 micrograms/ml 10B1-BPA. In view of the doubling times of the cell lines of about 23 h (96E and 96L) or of 36 h (418), it seems likely that an increased boron uptake, and hence increased radiosensitivity, might result if the preincubation period with 10B1-BPA is extended to several hours longer than the respective cell cycle times.

  14. Arsenite evokes IL-6 secretion, autocrine regulation of STAT3 signaling, and miR-21 expression, processes involved in the EMT and malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Fei; Xu, Yuan; Ling, Min; Zhao, Yue; Xu, Wenchao; Liang, Xiao; Jiang, Rongrong; Wang, Bairu; Bian, Qian; Liu, Qizhan

    2013-11-15

    Arsenite is an established human carcinogen, and arsenite-induced inflammation contributes to malignant transformation of cells, but the molecular mechanisms by which cancers are produced remain to be established. The present results showed that, evoked by arsenite, secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, led to the activation of STAT3, a transcription activator, and to increased levels of a microRNA, miR-21. Blocking IL-6 with anti-IL-6 antibody and inhibiting STAT3 activation reduced miR-21 expression. For human bronchial epithelial cells, cultured in the presence of anti-IL-6 antibody for 3 days, the arsenite-induced EMT and malignant transformation were reversed. Thus, IL-6, acting on STAT3 signaling, which up-regulates miR-21in an autocrine manner, contributes to the EMT induced by arsenite. These data define a link from inflammation to EMT in the arsenite-induced malignant transformation of HBE cells. This link, mediated through miRNAs, establishes a mechanism for arsenite-induced lung carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Arsenite evokes IL-6 secretion. • IL-6 autocrine mediates STAT3 signaling and up-regulates miR-21expression. • Inflammation is involved in arsenite-induced EMT.

  15. A comprehensive analysis of radiosensitization targets; functional inhibition of DNA methyltransferase 3B